Science.gov

Sample records for adverse soil conditions

  1. HEPA Filter Performance under Adverse Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Michael; Hogancamp, Kristina; Alderman, Steven; Waggoner, Charles

    2007-07-01

    This study involved challenging nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under a variety of conditions that can arise in Department of Energy (DOE) applications such as: low or high RH, controlled and uncontrolled challenge, and filters with physically damaged media or seals (i.e., leaks). Reported findings correlate filter function as measured by traditional differential pressure techniques in comparison with simultaneous instrumental determination of up and down stream PM concentrations. Additionally, emission rates and failure signatures will be discussed for filters that have either failed or exceeded their usable lifetime. Significant findings from this effort include the use of thermocouples up and down stream of the filter housing to detect the presence of moisture. Also demonstrated in the moisture challenge series of tests is the effect of repeated wetting of the filter. This produces a phenomenon referred to as transient failure before the tensile strength of the media weakens to the point of physical failure. An evaluation of the effect of particle size distribution of the challenge aerosol on loading capacity of filters is also included. Results for soot and two size distributions of KCl are reported. Loading capacities for filters ranged from approximately 70 g of soot to nearly 900 g for the larger particle size distribution of KCl. (authors)

  2. Management of Cattle Exposed to Adverse Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mader, Terry L; Griffin, Dee

    2015-07-01

    During periods of adverse weather, optimum conditions for animal comfort and performance are compromised. Use of alternative supplementation programs need to be considered for livestock challenged by adverse environmental conditions. Use of additional water for consumption and cooling, shade, and/or alternative management strategies need to be considered to help livestock cope with heat stress. For animals reared outside during winter, strategies that increase animal space and environmental buffers need to be used to minimize effects of mud, wet conditions, and windchill. There are ample opportunities for livestock producers to enhance animal welfare and minimize the impact of environmental stress. PMID:26139190

  3. Soil Conditioning Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soils are a critical natural resource for the future development and sustainability of humankind. Natural resource assessment tools are often used to evaluate the effects of management on soil properties and processes to ensure the sustainable use of our limited soils resources. The Soil Conditioni...

  4. Word Learning under Adverse Listening Conditions: Context-Specific Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creel, Sarah C.; Aslin, Richard N.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of word learning have presented the items to listeners under ideal conditions. Here we ask how listeners learn new vocabulary items under adverse listening conditions. Would listeners form acoustically-specific representations that incorporated the noise, base their representations on noise-free language knowledge, or both? To…

  5. Quality of whey powders stored under adverse conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey protein concentrate powder (WPC) is exported by the U.S. and is included in emergency aid foods, but the bags sent overseas are usually stored without refrigeration and under elevated temperature and relative humidity (RH). The shelf life of WPC under adverse conditions must be known to preven...

  6. Do shrubs reduce the adverse effects of grazing on soil properties?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eldridge, David J.; Beecham, Genevieve; Grace, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Increases in the density of woody plants are a global phenomenon in drylands, and large aggregations of shrubs, in particular, are regarded as being indicative of dysfunctional ecosystems. There is increasing evidence that overgrazing by livestock reduces ecosystem functions in shrublands, but that shrubs may buffer the negative effects of increasing grazing. We examined changes in water infiltration and nutrient concentrations in soils under shrubs and in their interspaces in shrublands in eastern Australia that varied in the intensity of livestock grazing. We used structural equation modelling to test whether shrubs might reduce the negative effects of overgrazing on infiltration and soil carbon and nitrogen (henceforth ‘soil nutrients’). Soils under shrubs and subject to low levels of grazing were more stable and had greater levels of soil nutrients. Shrubs had a direct positive effect on soil nutrients; but, grazing negatively affected nutrients by increasing soil bulk density. Structural equation modelling showed that shrubs had a direct positive effect on water flow under ponded conditions but also enhanced water flow, indirectly, through increased litter cover. Any positive effects of shrubs on water flow under low levels of grazing waned at high levels of grazing. Our results indicate that shrubs may reduce the adverse effects of grazing on soil properties. Specifically, shrubs could restrict access to livestock and therefore protect soils and plants beneath their canopies. Low levels of grazing are likely to ensure the retention of soil water and soil carbon and nitrogen in shrubland soils.

  7. Uncertainty Comparison of Visual Sensing in Adverse Weather Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shi-Wei; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Chen, Lun-Chi; Tseng, Chien-Hao; Lin, Fang-Pang; Hsu, Ching-Han

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on flood-region detection using monitoring images. However, adverse weather affects the outcome of image segmentation methods. In this paper, we present an experimental comparison of an outdoor visual sensing system using region-growing methods with two different growing rules-namely, GrowCut and RegGro. For each growing rule, several tests on adverse weather and lens-stained scenes were performed, taking into account and analyzing different weather conditions with the outdoor visual sensing system. The influence of several weather conditions was analyzed, highlighting their effect on the outdoor visual sensing system with different growing rules. Furthermore, experimental errors and uncertainties obtained with the growing rules were compared. The segmentation accuracy of flood regions yielded by the GrowCut, RegGro, and hybrid methods was 75%, 85%, and 87.7%, respectively. PMID:27447642

  8. Hierarchically nanotextured surfaces maintaining superhydrophobicity under severely adverse conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Tanmoy; Antonini, Carlo; Auf der Mauer, Matthias; Stamatopoulos, Christos; Tiwari, Manish K.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2014-07-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are highly desirable for a broad range of technologies and products affecting everyday life. Despite significant progress in recent years in understanding the principles of hydrophobicity, mostly inspired by surface designs found in nature, many man-made surfaces employ readily processable materials, ideal to demonstrate principles, but with little chance of survivability outside a very limited range of well-controlled environments. Here we focus on the rational development of robust, hierarchically nanostructured, environmentally friendly, metal-based (aluminum) superhydrophobic surfaces, which maintain their performance under severely adverse conditions. Based on their functionality, we superpose selected hydrophobic layers (i.e. self-assembled monolayers, thin films, or nanofibrous coatings) on hierarchically textured aluminum surfaces, collectively imparting high level robustness of superhydrophobicity under adverse conditions. These surfaces simultaneously exhibit chemical stability, mechanical durability and droplet impalement resistance. They impressively maintained their superhydrophobicity after exposure to severely adverse chemical environments like strong alkaline (pH ~ 9-10), acidic (pH ~ 2-3), and ionic solutions (3.5 weight% of sodium chloride), and could simultaneously resist water droplet impalement up to an impact velocity of 3.2 m s-1 as well as withstand standard mechanical durability tests.Superhydrophobic surfaces are highly desirable for a broad range of technologies and products affecting everyday life. Despite significant progress in recent years in understanding the principles of hydrophobicity, mostly inspired by surface designs found in nature, many man-made surfaces employ readily processable materials, ideal to demonstrate principles, but with little chance of survivability outside a very limited range of well-controlled environments. Here we focus on the rational development of robust, hierarchically

  9. Perceptual Learning of Speech under Optimal and Adverse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xujin; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have a remarkable ability to understand spoken language despite the large amount of variability in speech. Previous research has shown that listeners can use lexical information to guide their interpretation of atypical sounds in speech (Norris, McQueen, & Cutler, 2003). This kind of lexically induced perceptual learning enables people to adjust to the variations in utterances due to talker-specific characteristics, such as individual identity and dialect. The current study investigated perceptual learning in two optimal conditions: conversational speech (Experiment 1) vs. clear speech (Experiment 2), and three adverse conditions: noise (Experiment 3a) vs. two cognitive loads (Experiments 4a & 4b). Perceptual learning occurred in the two optimal conditions and in the two cognitive load conditions, but not in the noise condition. Furthermore, perceptual learning occurred only in the first of two sessions for each participant, and only for atypical /s/ sounds and not for atypical /f/ sounds. This pattern of learning and non-learning reflects a balance between flexibility and stability that the speech system must have to deal with speech variability in the diverse conditions that speech is encountered. PMID:23815478

  10. Speech perception with tactile support in adverse listening conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drullman, Rob; Bronkhorst, Adelbert W.

    2002-05-01

    Since long, different methods of vibrotactile stimulation have been used as an aid for speech perception by some people with severe hearing impairment. The fact that experiments have shown (limited) benefits proves that tactile information can indeed give some support. In our research program on multimodal interfaces, we wondered if normal hearing listeners could benefit from tactile information when speech was presented in adverse listening conditions. Therefore, we set up a pilot experiment with a male speaker against a background of one, two, four or eight competing male speakers or speech noise. Sound was presented diotically to the subjects and the speech-reception threshold (SRT) for short sentences was measured. The temporal envelope (0-30 Hz) of the speech signal was computed in real time and led to the tactile transducer (MiniVib), which was fixed to the index finger. First results show a significant drop in SRT of about 3 dB when using tactile stimulation in the condition of one competing speaker. In the other conditions no significant effects were found, but there is a trend of a decrease of the SRT when tactile information is given. We will discuss the results of further experiments.

  11. Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Kelley J.; Schneiderman, Jason S.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Whitmire, Alexandra M.; Picano, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA commitment to human space flight includes continuing to fly astronauts on the ISS until it is decommissioned as well as possibly returning astronauts to the moon or having astronauts venture to an asteroid or Mars. As missions leave low Earth orbit and explore deeper space, BHP supports and conducts research to enable a risk posture that considers the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders “acceptable given mitigations,” for pre-, in, and post-flight.The Human System Risk Board (HSRB) determines the risk of various mission scenarios using a likelihood (per person per year) by consequences matrix examining those risks across two categories—long term health and operational (within mission). Colors from a stoplight signal are used by HSRB and quickly provide a means of assessing overall perceived risk for a particular mission scenario. Risk associated with the current six month missions on the ISS are classified as “accepted with monitoring” while planetary missions, such as a mission to Mars, are recognized to be a “red” risk that requires mitigation to ensure mission success.Currently, the HSRB deems that the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric outcomes requires mitigation for planetary missions owing to long duration isolation and radiation exposure (see Table 1). While limited research evidence exists from spaceflight, it is well known anecdotally that the shift from the two week shuttle missions to the six month ISS missions renders the psychological stressors of space as more salient over longer duration missions. Shuttle astronauts were expected just to tolerate any stressors that arose during their mission and were successful at doing so (Whitmire et al, 2013). While it is possible to deal with stressors such as social isolation and to live with incompatible crewmembers for two weeks on shuttle, “ignoring it” is much less likely to be a successful coping mechanism

  12. Transport Across Chloroplast Membranes: Optimizing Photosynthesis for Adverse Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    Chloroplasts are central to solar light harvesting and photosynthesis. Optimal chloroplast functioning is vitally dependent on a very intensive traffic of metabolites and ions between the cytosol and stroma, and should be attuned for adverse environmental conditions. This is achieved by an orchestrated regulation of a variety of transport systems located at chloroplast membranes such as porines, solute channels, ion-specific cation and anion channels, and various primary and secondary active transport systems. In this review we describe the molecular nature and functional properties of the inner and outer envelope and thylakoid membrane channels and transporters. We then discuss how their orchestrated regulation affects thylakoid structure, electron transport and excitation energy transfer, proton-motive force partition, ion homeostasis, stromal pH regulation, and volume regulation. We link the activity of key cation and anion transport systems with stress-specific signaling processes in chloroplasts, and discuss how these signals interact with the signals generated in other organelles to optimize the cell performance, with a special emphasis on Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species signaling. PMID:26597501

  13. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Soil conditions. 3285.201 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.201 Soil conditions. To help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or...

  14. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Soil conditions. 3285.201 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.201 Soil conditions. To help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or...

  15. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Soil conditions. 3285.201 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.201 Soil conditions. To help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or...

  16. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Soil conditions. 3285.201 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.201 Soil conditions. To help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or...

  17. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Soil conditions. 3285.201 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.201 Soil conditions. To help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or...

  18. 75 FR 8353 - Waiver of Filing Deadline Due to Adverse Weather Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... COMMISSION Waiver of Filing Deadline Due to Adverse Weather Conditions February 16, 2010. AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Due to adverse weather conditions, the Federal Communications..., February 11, 2010. In recognition of the numerous closings and disruptions caused by the weather in...

  19. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss... for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program § 760.203 Eligible losses, adverse weather, and... weather or eligible loss condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, (including, but not...

  20. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss... for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program § 760.203 Eligible losses, adverse weather, and... weather or eligible loss condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, (including, but not...

  1. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss... for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program § 760.203 Eligible losses, adverse weather, and... weather or eligible loss condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, (including, but not...

  2. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss... for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program § 760.203 Eligible losses, adverse weather, and... weather or eligible loss condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, (including, but not...

  3. Fluorescence parameters of leaves of trees and shrubs during period of adverse weather conditions in Krasnoyarsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavorueva, E. N.; Zavoruev, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of adverse weather conditions (AWC) on the fluorescence parameters of leaves Prinsepia sinensis, Amelanchier florida, Crataegus chlorocarca is obtained. However, significant changes in the fluorescence of the leaves of Acer negundo, Betula pendula under AWC were not observed.

  4. Soil carbon sequestration estimated with the soil conditioning index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid and reliable assessments of the potential of different agricultural management systems to sequester soil organic carbon are needed to promote conservation and help mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. The soil conditioning index (SCI) is a relatively simple model to parameterize and is currentl...

  5. America's Soil and Water: Condition and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1981

    A review of conditions and trends regarding soil and water resources of rural nonfederal lands of the United States is presented in this publication. Maps, charts, and graphs illustrate the data collected on various aspects of soil and water use and practice. Topic areas considered include: (1) land use patterns; (2) classes of land; (3)…

  6. Measuring Soil Nitrogen Mineralization under Field Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land application of animal manure is known to alter rates of nitrogen (N) mineralization in soils, but quantitative information concerning intensity and duration of these effects has been difficult to obtain under field conditions. We estimated net effects of manure on N mineralization in soils unde...

  7. Micrometeorological conditions under different soil frost depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemoto, M.; Hirota, T.; Iwata, Y.; Suzuki, S.; Hasegawa, S.

    2007-12-01

    Eastern Hokkaido, where is one of the largest agricultural production regions in Japan, is characterized by low air temperature and relatively thin snow covers resulting in soil frost over the winter. However, the soil frost depth has been significantly decreasing since late 1980's due to an insulation from the cold air by a thick snow cover developing in early winter. In the current study, soil water movement, soil temperature, and surface heat balance under different soil frost conditions were monitored to obtain a knowledge of changes in micrometeorological condition of the agricultural production systems in the Eastern Hokkaido associated with the decreasing soil frost depth in the region. A paired soil plot experiment was conducted from Nov. 2005 to May 2006, where the frost depth was artificially enhanced by removing snow for 24 days in the retreatment plot and the natural condition was maintained in the control plot. The soil in the experimental field was classified as Andisol with much porosity and high drainability. In each plot, water content and soil temperature were measured by TDR and thermocouple, respectively. The maximum soil-frost depth in the treatment and control plots resulted in 43.8 and 13.6ċm, respectively. Changes in snow water equivalent volume SWE) and snow depth were manually recorded. The difference of SWE just before melting snow was same. The day of snow disappearing was 18th April 2006 for both plots. The control plot with a thin frozen layer allowed infiltration of snow melt water, and water content at the lower subsoil increased accordance in snowmelting, whereas a thick frozen layer in the treatment plot impeded the infiltration resulting in waterlogging being observed on the soil surface. These differences in profile of water content and in developing soil frost depth results in more delay in increasing soil temperature at the deeper depth. At the surface, however, the difference in soil temperature was quickly disappeared, and

  8. ACCEPT: Introduction of the Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Rodney A.; Santanu, Das; Janakiraman, Vijay Manikandan; Hosein, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of anomalies or adverse events is a challenging task, and there are a variety of methods which can be used to address the problem. In this paper, we introduce a generic framework developed in MATLAB (sup registered mark) called ACCEPT (Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox). ACCEPT is an architectural framework designed to compare and contrast the performance of a variety of machine learning and early warning algorithms, and tests the capability of these algorithms to robustly predict the onset of adverse events in any time-series data generating systems or processes.

  9. Health Monitoring and Management for Manufacturing Workers in Adverse Working Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoya; Zhong, Miao; Wan, Jiafu; Yi, Minglun; Gao, Tiancheng

    2016-10-01

    In adverse working conditions, environmental parameters such as metallic dust, noise, and environmental temperature, directly affect the health condition of manufacturing workers. It is therefore important to implement health monitoring and management based on important physiological parameters (e.g., heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature). In recent years, new technologies, such as body area networks, cloud computing, and smart clothing, have allowed the improvement of the quality of services. In this article, we first give five-layer architecture for health monitoring and management of manufacturing workers. Then, we analyze the system implementation process, including environmental data processing, physical condition monitoring and system services and management, and present the corresponding algorithms. Finally, we carry out an evaluation and analysis from the perspective of insurance and compensation for manufacturing workers in adverse working conditions. The proposed scheme will contribute to the improvement of workplace conditions, realize health monitoring and management, and protect the interests of manufacturing workers. PMID:27624491

  10. Comprehension of Familiar and Unfamiliar Native Accents under Adverse Listening Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adank, Patti; Evans, Bronwen G.; Stuart-Smith, Jane; Scott, Sophie K.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the relative processing cost associated with comprehension of an unfamiliar native accent under adverse listening conditions. Two sentence verification experiments were conducted in which listeners heard sentences at various signal-to-noise ratios. In Experiment 1, these sentences were spoken in a familiar or an…

  11. Can hydromorphic conditions accelerate soil development?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringer, Marianna; Kiss, Klaudia; Horváth-Szabó, Kata; Réka Balázs, Brigitta; Németh, Tibor; Sipos, Péter; Szabó, Máté; Jakab, Gergely; Madarász, Balázs; Szalai, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    The formation and development of waterlogged (hydromorphic) soils are primarily determined by long-term water saturation. The presence of water in the profile can result increasing speed of soil forming processes including the accumulation of organic matter or other components and mineralogical transformations. Original papers refer more than hundreds of years for this kinds of mineral transformations. We suppose that this process could be more rapid. This study focuses on the mineralogical investigation of a sandy meadow soil (calcic, gleyic Phaeozem ferric, arenic) located in a swampy area in Central Hungary. The starting time of the soil formation is a well documented fact: the parent material deposited during an extremely heavy flood event in the 1960s. Therefore, the studied soil profile is the result of the last half century. Our aim was to explore the degree of mineral phase alteration via soil formation during a half-century under hydromorphic conditions. Routine laboratory measurements (selective dissolution methods for the determination of amorphous and crystalline Fe, and Mn content, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy measurements for elemental composition determination, X-ray powder diffraction for mineralogical composition, and particle sizing by laser diffraction) were implemented. Morphological and chemical study of carbonate and iron nodules was carried out by electron microprobe. Simple chemical tests (eg. Fe2+ indication by dipiridil test) and morphological observations were performed on the field. Redox potential (Eh) and pH were measured in 20 cm and 40 cm depths by field monitoring station during the vegetation period. Results show that well developed horizons have emerged during fifty years in the studied soil profile. The most intense mineralogical transformations developed in the zone of the heaviest redox oscillation. Soil formation under hydromorphic conditions proceeds at higher speeds contrariwise to the century time scale reported in

  12. Adverse Pregnancy Conditions, Infertility, and Future Cardiovascular Risk: Implications for Mother and Child

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki; Wei, Janet; Minissian, Margo; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2016-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy conditions in women are common and have been associated with adverse cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes such as myocardial infarction and stroke. As risk stratification in women is often suboptimal, recognition of non-traditional risk factors such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and premature delivery has become increasingly important. Additionally, such conditions may also increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in the children of afflicted women. In this review, we aim to highlight these conditions, along with infertility, and the association between such conditions and various cardiovascular outcomes and related maternal risk along with potential translation of risk to offspring. We will also discuss proposed mechanisms driving these associations as well as potential opportunities for screening and risk modification. PMID:26037616

  13. Causal Factors and Adverse Conditions of Aviation Accidents and Incidents Related to Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Sandifer, Carl E.; Jones, Sharon Monica

    2010-01-01

    The causal factors of accidents from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) database and incidents from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) database associated with loss of control (LOC) were examined for four types of operations (i.e., Federal Aviation Regulation Part 121, Part 135 Scheduled, Part 135 Nonscheduled, and Part 91) for the years 1988 to 2004. In-flight LOC is a serious aviation problem. Well over half of the LOC accidents included at least one fatality (80 percent in Part 121), and roughly half of all aviation fatalities in the studied time period occurred in conjunction with LOC. An adverse events table was updated to provide focus to the technology validation strategy of the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) Project. The table contains three types of adverse conditions: failure, damage, and upset. Thirteen different adverse condition subtypes were gleaned from the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS), the FAA Accident and Incident database, and the NTSB database. The severity and frequency of the damage conditions, initial test conditions, and milestones references are also provided.

  14. The Impact of Organic Amendments on Soil Properties Under Mediterranean Climatic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso Gonzalez, Paloma; Francisco Martinez Murillo, Juan; Damian Ruiz Sinoga, Jose

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion and unsustainable land uses produce adverse effect on SOC content. Soil management techniques and corrections can be applied for soil recovery, especially, with afforestation purposes. This study presents the short term effects of the application of different treatments and amendments on soil properties for soils included in several sets of closed plots located in the experimental area of Pinarillo (Nerja, Spain). The analysed soil properties were: pH, EC, Organic Carbon, total Nitrogen and total Carbon. In order to verify possible differences, we applied the test of Mann-Whitney U in corroboration with the previous homogeneity test of variance. The result of each strategy set compared to the initial condition shows at least one significant modification in the analysed soil properties. Electrical conductivity was the most changeable soil property respect to the initial condition. Similarly, organic carbon content and total organic carbon remained quite similar. However, when all of the strategy sets are compared among them, total carbon was the most significantly changeable property. Mulching, polymers and urban residue seem to highly modify the soil initial conditions. Although soil physic-chemical parameters generally used to evaluate soil quality change very slowly. The analysed soil properties shows significant differences between dry and wet season. This fact, could be indicating the effect of certain seasonality as it is usual in Mediterranean condition.

  15. Assessment of the State of the Art of Flight Control Technologies as Applicable to Adverse Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary s.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Leone, Karen M.; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Withrow, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    Literature from academia, industry, and other Government agencies was surveyed to assess the state of the art in current Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) aircraft technologies. Over 100 papers from 25 conferences from the time period 2004 to 2009 were reviewed. An assessment of the general state of the art in adaptive flight control is summarized first, followed by an assessment of the state of the art as applicable to 13 identified adverse conditions. Specific areas addressed in the general assessment include flight control when compensating for damage or reduced performance, retrofit software upgrades to flight controllers, flight control through engine response, and finally test and validation of new adaptive controllers. The state-of-the-art assessment applicable to the adverse conditions include technologies not specifically related to flight control, but may serve as inputs to a future flight control algorithm. This study illustrates existing gaps and opportunities for additional research by the NASA IRAC Project

  16. Algorithms for contours depicting static electric fields during adverse weather conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.

    1991-01-01

    A flexible and functional analytical tool is developed for the study of electric fields during adverse weather conditions. This tool is designed for use by members of the Atmospheric Science Group as part of their overall effort to appraise environmental conditions during these situations. It is also used to illustrate approaches open to those interested in the study of the physics of ambient electric field phenomena. Computer resources of KSC are coordinated with original software to produce contour interpretations of electric field data available from a grid of field mills spanning the region. Three model algorithms are presented and examples are given illustrating the system design, flexibility, and utility.

  17. Evaluation of adaptive dynamic range optimization in adverse listening conditions for cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Hussnain; Hazrati, Oldooz; Tobey, Emily A.; Hansen, John H. L

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Adaptive Dynamic Range Optimization (ADRO) on speech identification for cochlear implant (CI) users in adverse listening conditions. In this study, anechoic quiet, noisy, reverberant, noisy reverberant, and reverberant noisy conditions are evaluated. Two scenarios are considered when modeling the combined effects of reverberation and noise: (a) noise is added to the reverberant speech, and (b) noisy speech is reverberated. CI users were tested in different listening environments using IEEE sentences presented at 65 dB sound pressure level. No significant effect of ADRO processing on speech intelligibility was observed. PMID:25190428

  18. Evaluation of adaptive dynamic range optimization in adverse listening conditions for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hussnain; Hazrati, Oldooz; Tobey, Emily A; Hansen, John H L

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of Adaptive Dynamic Range Optimization (ADRO) on speech identification for cochlear implant (CI) users in adverse listening conditions. In this study, anechoic quiet, noisy, reverberant, noisy reverberant, and reverberant noisy conditions are evaluated. Two scenarios are considered when modeling the combined effects of reverberation and noise: (a) noise is added to the reverberant speech, and (b) noisy speech is reverberated. CI users were tested in different listening environments using IEEE sentences presented at 65 dB sound pressure level. No significant effect of ADRO processing on speech intelligibility was observed. PMID:25190428

  19. Some effects of adverse weather conditions on performance of airplane antiskid braking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.; Mccarty, J. L.; Tanner, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The performance of current antiskid braking systems operating under adverse weather conditions was analyzed in an effort to both identify the causes of locked-wheel skids which sometimes occur when the runway is slippery and to find possible solutions to this operational problem. This analysis was made possible by the quantitative test data provided by recently completed landing research programs using fully instrumented flight test airplanes and was further supported by tests performed at the Langley aircraft landing loads and traction facility. The antiskid system logic for brake control and for both touchdown and locked-wheel protection is described and its response behavior in adverse weather is discussed in detail with the aid of available data. The analysis indicates that the operational performance of the antiskid logic circuits is highly dependent upon wheel spin-up acceleration and can be adversely affected by certain pilot braking inputs when accelerations are low. Normal antiskid performance is assured if the tire-to-runway traction is sufficient to provide high wheel spin-up accelerations or if the system is provided a continuous, accurate ground speed reference. The design of antiskid systems is complicated by the necessity for tradeoffs between tire braking and cornering capabilities, both of which are necessary to provide safe operations in the presence of cross winds, particularly under slippery runway conditions.

  20. Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders: Evidence Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Kelley J.; Williams, Thomas J.; Schneiderman, Jason S.; Whitmire, Alexandra M.; Picano, James J.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Schmidt, Lacey L.; Shea, Camille

    2016-01-01

    In April 2010, President Obama declared a space pioneering goal for the United States in general and NASA in particular. "Fifty years after the creation of NASA, our goal is no longer just a destination to reach. Our goal is the capacity for people to work and learn and operate and live safely beyond the Earth for extended periods of time, ultimately in ways that are more sustainable and even indefinite." Thus NASA's Strategic Objective 1.1 emerged as "expand human presence into the solar system and to the surface of Mars to advance exploration, science, innovation, benefits to humanity, and international collaboration" (NASA 2015b). Any space flight, be it of long or short duration, occurs in an extreme environment that has unique stressors. Even with excellent selection methods, the potential for behavioral problems among space flight crews remain a threat to mission success. Assessment of factors that are related to behavioral health can help minimize the chances of distress and, thus, reduce the likelihood of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders arising within a crew. Similarly, countermeasures that focus on prevention and treatment can mitigate the cognitive or behavioral conditions that, should they arise, would impact mission success. Given the general consensus that longer duration, isolation, and confined missions have a greater risk for behavioral health ensuring crew behavioral health over the long term is essential. Risk, which within the context of this report is assessed with respect to behavioral health and performance, is addressed to deter development of cognitive and behavioral degradations or psychiatric conditions in space flight and analog populations, and to monitor, detect, and treat early risk factors, predictors and other contributing factors. Based on space flight and analog evidence, the average incidence rate of an adverse behavioral health event occurring during a space mission is relatively low for the

  1. Adverse psychosocial working conditions and minor psychiatric disorders among bank workers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In most countries, the financial service sector has undergone great organizational changes in the past decades, with potential negative impact on bank workers' mental health. The aim of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of minor psychiatric disorders (MPD) among Brazilian bank workers and to investigate whether they are associated with an adverse psychosocial working environment. Methods A cross-sectional study of a random sample of 2,500 workers in a Brazilian state bank in 2008. The presence of MPD was determined by the General Health Questionnaire.(GHQ). Psychosocial work conditions were assessed by means of the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) and Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). The presence and magnitude of the independent associations between MPD and adverse psychosocial working conditions were determined by Prevalence Ratios, obtained by Poisson regression. Results From 2,337 eligible workers, 88% participated. The prevalence of MPD was greater among women (45% vs. 41%; p > 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, the prevalence of MPD was twice as high among bank workers exposed to high psychological demand and low control at work and under high effort and low reward working conditions. The lack of social support at work and the presence of over-commitment were also associated with higher prevalence of MPD. A negative interaction effect was found between over-commitment and effort-reward imbalance. Conclusion The prevalence of MPD is high among bank workers. The results reinforce the association between MPD and adverse psychosocial working conditions, assessed by the JCQ and ERI models. The direction of the interaction observed between over-commitment and ERI was contrary to what was expected. PMID:21062496

  2. Climate Change and Crop Exposure to Adverse Weather: Changes to Frost Risk and Grapevine Flowering Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mosedale, Jonathan R.; Wilson, Robert J.; Maclean, Ilya M. D.

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of grapevines in the UK and many other cool climate regions is expected to benefit from the higher growing season temperatures predicted under future climate scenarios. Yet the effects of climate change on the risk of adverse weather conditions or events at key stages of crop development are not always captured by aggregated measures of seasonal or yearly climates, or by downscaling techniques that assume climate variability will remain unchanged under future scenarios. Using fine resolution projections of future climate scenarios for south-west England and grapevine phenology models we explore how risks to cool-climate vineyard harvests vary under future climate conditions. Results indicate that the risk of adverse conditions during flowering declines under all future climate scenarios. In contrast, the risk of late spring frosts increases under many future climate projections due to advancement in the timing of budbreak. Estimates of frost risk, however, were highly sensitive to the choice of phenology model, and future frost exposure declined when budbreak was calculated using models that included a winter chill requirement for dormancy break. The lack of robust phenological models is a major source of uncertainty concerning the impacts of future climate change on the development of cool-climate viticulture in historically marginal climatic regions. PMID:26496127

  3. LEARNING TO BE BAD: ADVERSE SOCIAL CONDITIONS, SOCIAL SCHEMAS, AND CRIME

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Ronald L.; Burt, Callie Harbin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we develop and test a new approach to explain the link between social factors and individual offending. We argue that seemingly disparate family, peer, and community conditions lead to crime because the lessons communicated by these events are similar and promote social schemas involving a hostile view of people and relationships, a preference for immediate rewards, and a cynical view of conventional norms. Further, we posit that these three schemas are interconnected and combine to form a criminogenic knowledge structure that gives rise to situational interpretations legitimating criminal behavior. Structural equation modeling with a sample of roughly 700 hundred African American teens provided strong support for the model. The findings indicated that persistent exposure to adverse conditions such as community crime, discrimination, harsh parenting, deviant peers and low neighborhood collective efficacy increased commitment to the three social schemas. The three schemas were highly intercorrelated and combined to form a latent construct that strongly predicted increases in crime. Further, in large measure the effect of the various adverse conditions on increases in crime was indirect through their impact on this latent construct. We discuss the extent to which the social schematic model presented in the paper might be used to integrate concepts and findings from several of the major theories of criminal behavior. PMID:21760641

  4. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber: Adverse operating conditions test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Test hardware, facilities, and procedures are described along with results of electrically heated tube and channel tests conducted to determine adverse operating condition limits for convectively cooled chambers typical of Space Shuttle Orbit Manuevering Engine designs. Hot-start tests were conducted with corrosion resistant steel and nickel tubes with both monomethylhydrazine and 50-50 coolants. Helium ingestion, in both bubble and froth form, was studied in tubular test sections. Helium bubble ingestion and burn-out limits in rectangular channels were also investigated.

  5. Speech perception under adverse conditions: insights from behavioral, computational, and neuroscience research

    PubMed Central

    Guediche, Sara; Blumstein, Sheila E.; Fiez, Julie A.; Holt, Lori L.

    2014-01-01

    Adult speech perception reflects the long-term regularities of the native language, but it is also flexible such that it accommodates and adapts to adverse listening conditions and short-term deviations from native-language norms. The purpose of this article is to examine how the broader neuroscience literature can inform and advance research efforts in understanding the neural basis of flexibility and adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Specifically, we highlight the potential role of learning algorithms that rely on prediction error signals and discuss specific neural structures that are likely to contribute to such learning. To this end, we review behavioral studies, computational accounts, and neuroimaging findings related to adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Already, a few studies have alluded to a potential role of these mechanisms in adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Furthermore, we consider research topics in neuroscience that offer insight into how perception can be adaptively tuned to short-term deviations while balancing the need to maintain stability in the perception of learned long-term regularities. Consideration of the application and limitations of these algorithms in characterizing flexible speech perception under adverse conditions promises to inform theoretical models of speech. PMID:24427119

  6. The dissipation of hexazinone in tropical soils under semi-controlled field conditions in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Lalah, Joseph O; Muendo, Bonface M; Getenga, Zachary M

    2009-09-01

    The dissipation of hexazinone (Velpar) in two tropical soil types in Kenya was studied under field and semi-controlled conditions for a period of 84 days. The dissipation was found to be very rapid and this could be attributed to adverse weather conditions including high initial rainfall as well as to low soil-organic-matter content, volatilization, surface run-off and biodegradation. The DT(50) values of dissipation obtained by first order kinetics were 20 days and 21.3 days in clay and loam soil types, respectively. The influence of bargasse compost (1000 microg/g dry soil) was also studied and was found to enhance dissipation to some extent, giving DT(50) values of 18 days and 18.3 days in clay and loam soil types, respectively. PMID:20183079

  7. Respiratory Response of Roots to Heterogeneous Soil Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individual plant roots are frequently exposed to wide ranges of soil conditions. For example, in summer, soil temperatures near the soil surface may vary from 10-20 C at night to over 40 C during the day, while soil moisture may vary from saturation following a heavy rain to almost completely dry i...

  8. Bill E. Kunkle Interdisciplinary Beef Symposium: Animal welfare concerns for cattle exposed to adverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Mader, T L

    2014-12-01

    Increasing awareness of animal welfare has become a priority in food production systems involving animals. Under normal working environments, production practices are constantly evaluated to maintain optimum levels of animal well-being. However, during periods of adverse weather, optimum conditions for animal comfort, as well as animal performance, are often compromised. In the Midwest and Great Plains states, the heat waves of 1995, 1999, 2006, 2009, 2010, and 2013 were particularly difficult on animals reared in confinement, with documented cattle losses approaching 5,000 head each year. Additionally, during the summer of 2011, nearly 15,000 head of cattle across 5 states were lost as a result of heat stress. During prolonged periods of heat stress, lower conceptions rates are observed in livestock. In addition, animals reared in confinement buildings are often compromised because of limitations in ventilation systems. Under the opposite environmental spectrum, the winters of 1992 to 1993, 1996 to 1997, 1997 to 1998, 2006 to 2007, and 2008 to 2009 caused hardship for livestock producers, particularly for those rearing animals in an outdoor environment. During the winters of 1996 to 1997 and 2008 to 2009 up to 50% of the newborn calves were lost in many areas, with over 75,000 head of cattle lost in the northern plains states. Late fall and early winter snowstorms in 1992, 1997, 2006, and 2013 resulted in the loss of over 25,000 head of cattle each year in the Great Plains region of the United States. Economic losses from reduced performance of cattle experiencing severe environmental stress likely exceed losses associated with livestock death by 5- to 10-fold. Use of alternative supplementation programs may need to be considered for livestock challenged by adverse environmental conditions. Use of additional water for consumption and cooling, shade, and/or alternative management strategies need to be considered to help livestock cope with heat stress. For animals

  9. Research on long-range laser active imaging system applied in adverse weather conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Zhi-gang; Liu, Meng-de; Yang, Li; Kabanov, V. V.; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Jie; Chu, Shi-bo; Yang, Jun-xian; Zhou, Yang

    2013-09-01

    A low-light level night vision device or thermal infrared imager belonging to passive imaging system is generally used in daily target detection and identification. But in adverse weather conditions of dark of night, poor atmospheric transmission characteristics or strong backscattering (fog, dust, rain, snow, etc.), even the most sensitive low-light level night vision could not provide enough image resolution for detecting and identifying targets, and the thermal infrared imager is also limited by low temperature contrast. A long-range laser active imaging system, in combination with high-power semiconductor pulsed lasers with collimation technology, receiving objective lens of large diameter, long focal length and narrow viewing angle, high-gain image intensifier CCD (ICCD) camera and range-gated synchronization control technology, is developed for long distance target detection and high resolution imaging in adverse weather conditions. The system composition and operating principle are introduced. The extremely powerful and efficient illuminators with collimation technology are able to deliver uniform beams, which are essential for illuminating targets at a distance and generating high-quality images. The particular receiving objective lens, ICCD camera and range-gated synchronization control technology could reduce strong backscattering signal and improve imaging signal-to-noise ratio. The laboratory and outfield experiments have been done to validate imaging effect and imaging quality. The results show that the minimum resolution is about 3-5cm, 10cm, and greater than 20 cm for target far from 1100m, 4700m, and 6700m respectively in dark of night. Furthermore, the minimum resolution could reach to 10cm and 20cm for target far from 2500m and 4800m respectively and the image is too blurred to accurately identify the target when observing the target far from 7200m in rainy condition.

  10. A Ground-Based Array to Observe Geospace Electrodynamics During Adverse Space Weather Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2004-05-01

    Geomagnetic Storms occur with surprising frequency and create adverse space weather conditions. During these periods, our knowledge and ability to specify or forecast in adequate detail for user needs is negligible. Neither experimental observations nor theoretical developments have made a significant new impact on the problem for over two decades. Although we can now map Total Electron Content (TEC) in the ionosphere over a continent with sufficient resolution to see coherent long-lived structures, these do not provide constraints on the geospace electrodynamics that is at the heart of our lack of understanding. We present arguments for the need of a continental deployment of ground-based sensors to stepwise advance our understanding of the geospace electrodynamics when it is most adverse from a space weather perspective and also most frustrating from an understanding of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere coupling. That a continental-scale deployment is more productive at addressing the problem than a realizable global distribution is shown. Each measurement is discussed from the point-of-view of either providing new knowledge or becoming a key for future real-time specification and forecasting for user applications. An example of a storm database from one mid-latitude station for the 31 March 2002 is used as a conceptual point in a ground-based array. The presentation focuses on scientific questions that have eluded a quantitative solution for over three decades and view a ground-based array as an "IGY" type of catalyst for answering these questions.

  11. Determination and representation of electric charge distributions associated with adverse weather conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Algorithms are presented for determining the size and location of electric charges which model storm systems and lightning strikes. The analysis utilizes readings from a grid of ground level field mills and geometric constraints on parameters to arrive at a representative set of charges. This set is used to generate three dimensional graphical depictions of the set as well as contour maps of the ground level electrical environment over the grid. The composite, analytic and graphic package is demonstrated and evaluated using controlled input data and archived data from a storm system. The results demonstrate the packages utility as: an operational tool in appraising adverse weather conditions; a research tool in studies of topics such as storm structure, storm dynamics, and lightning; and a tool in designing and evaluating grid systems.

  12. Functions of Nitric Oxide (NO) in Roots during Development and under Adverse Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2015-01-01

    The free radical molecule, nitric oxide (NO), is present in the principal organs of plants, where it plays an important role in a wide range of physiological functions. Root growth and development are highly regulated by both internal and external factors such as nutrient availability, hormones, pattern formation, cell polarity and cell cycle control. The presence of NO in roots has opened up new areas of research on the role of NO, including root architecture, nutrient acquisition, microorganism interactions and the response mechanisms to adverse environmental conditions, among others. Additionally, the exogenous application of NO throughout the roots has the potential to counteract specific damages caused by certain stresses. This review aims to provide an up-to-date perspective on NO functions in the roots of higher plants. PMID:27135326

  13. Chosen risk level during car-following in adverse weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Hjelkrem, Odd André; Ryeng, Eirin Olaussen

    2016-10-01

    This study examines how precipitation, light conditions and surface conditions affect the drivers' risk perception. An indicator CRI (Chosen Risk Index) is defined, which describes the chosen risk level for drivers in a car-following situation. The dataset contains about 70 000 observations of driver behaviour and weather status on a rural road. Based on the theory of risk homeostasis and an assumption that driving behaviour in situations with daylight, dry road and no precipitation reflects drivers' target level of risk, generalised linear models (GLM) were estimated for cars and trucks separately to reveal the effect of adverse weather conditions on risk perception. The analyses show that both car and truck drivers perceive the highest risk when driving on snow covered roads. For car drivers, a snow covered road in combination with moderate rain or light snow are the factors which lowers the CRI the most. For trucks, snow cover and partially covered roads significantly lowers the CRI, while precipitation did not seem to impose any higher risk. Interaction effects were found for car drivers only. PMID:27454867

  14. Effect of exposure to adverse climatic conditions on production in Manchega dairy sheep.

    PubMed

    Ramón, M; Díaz, C; Pérez-Guzman, M D; Carabaño, M J

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to examine the effects of exposure to adverse weather conditions on milk production to assess the thermotolerance capability of the Manchega breed, a dairy sheep reared in the Mediterranean area, and the extent of decline in production outside the thermal comfort zone. To achieve this purpose, we merged data from the official milk recording of the breed with weather information and used to describe the cold and heat stress response for production traits. Production data consisted of 1,094,804 test-day records from the first 3 lactations of 177,605 ewes gathered between years 2000 to 2010. For each production trait and climate variable, the thermal load production response was characterized by the estimation of cold and heat stress thresholds that define a thermoneutral zone and the slopes of production decay outside this thermoneutral zone. Overall, we observed a comfort region between 10 and 22°C for daily average temperature, 18 and 30°C for daily maximum temperature, and from 9 to 18 units for a temperature-humidity index (THI) for all traits. Decline in production due to cold stress effects was of a greater magnitude than heat stress effects, especially for milk yield. Production losses ranged between 7 and 16 and from 0.2 to 0.6g/d per °C (or THI unit) for milk and for fat and protein yields, respectively. For heat stress, the observed decline in production was of 1 to 5 and 0.1 to 0.3g/d per °C (or THI unit) above the threshold for milk yield and for fat and protein yields, respectively. Highly productive animals showed a narrower comfort zone and higher slopes of decay. The study of lagged effects of thermal load showed how consequences of cold and heat stress are already visible in the first hours after exposure. Thus, production losses were due mainly to climate conditions on the day of control and the day before, with conditions on the previous days having a smaller effect. Annual economic losses due to thermal (cold and heat

  15. Overcoming adverse weather conditions with a common optical path, multiple sensors, and intelligent image fusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Joseph; Piacentino, Michael; Caldwell, Brian

    2008-04-01

    Mission success is highly dependent on the ability to accomplish Surveillance, Situation Awareness, Target Detection and Classification, but is challenging under adverse weather conditions. This paper introduces an engineering prototype to address the image collection challenges using a Common Optical Path, Multiple Sensors and an Intelligent Image Fusion System, and provides illustrations and sample fusion images. Panavision's advanced wide spectrum optical design has permitted a suite of imagers to perform observations through a common optical path with a common field of view, thereby aligning images and facilitating optimized downstream image processing. The adaptable design also supports continuous zoom or Galilean lenses for multiple field of views. The Multiple Sensors include: (1) High-definition imaging sensors that are small, have low power consumption and a wide dynamic range; (2) EMCCD sensors that transition from daylight to starlight, even under poor weather conditions, with sensitivity down to 0.00025 Lux; and (3) SWIR sensors that, with the advancement in InGaAs, are able to generate ultra-high sensitivity images from 1-1.7μm reflective light and can achieve imaging through haze and some types of camouflage. The intelligent fusion of multiple sensors provides high-resolution color information with previously impossible sensitivity and contrast. With the integration of Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) and Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), real-time Image Processing and Fusion Algorithms can facilitate mission success in a small, low power package.

  16. Short-Term Reducing Conditions Decreases Soil Aggregation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Upland soils in Midwestern US are often ponded during the spring for days or weeks and may undergo reducing state. Short-term reducing conditions change the chemistry of the soil and that may affect soil aggregation. The objective of this paper was to determine how changes in the redox status of the...

  17. Assessment of nitrogen ceilings for Dutch agricultural soils to avoid adverse environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    de Vries, W; Kros, H; Oenema, O; Erisman, J W

    2001-11-01

    In the Netherlands, high traffic density and intensive animal husbandry have led to high emissions of reactive nitrogen (N) into the environment. This leads to a series of environmental impacts, including: (1) nitrate (NO3) contamination of drinking water, (2) eutrophication of freshwater lakes, (3) acidification and biodiversity impacts on terrestrial ecosystems, (4) ozone and particle formation affecting human health, and (5) global climate change induced by emissions of N2O. Measures to control reactive N emissions were, up to now, directed towards those different environmental themes. Here we summarize the results of a study to analyse the agricultural N problem in the Netherlands in an integrated way, which means that all relevant aspects are taken into account simultaneously. A simple N balance model was developed, representing all crucial processes in the N chain, to calculate acceptable N inputs to the farm (so-called N ceiling) and to the soil surface (application in the field) by feed concentrates, organic manure, fertiliser, deposition, and N fixation. The N ceilings were calculated on the basis of critical limits for NO 3 concentrations in groundwater, N concentrations in surface water, and ammonia (NH3) emission targets related to the protection of biodiversity of natural areas. Results show that in most parts of the Netherlands, except the western and the northern part, the N ceilings are limited by NH 3 emissions, which are derived from critical N loads for nature areas, rather than limits for both ground- and surface water. On the national scale, the N ceiling ranges between 372 and 858 kton year(-1) depending on the choice of critical limits. The current N import is 848 kton year(-1). A decrease of nearly 60% is needed to reach the ceilings that are necessary to protect the environment against all adverse impacts of N pollution from agriculture. PMID:12805837

  18. Influence of soil conditioning on ground deformation during longitudinal tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mingjing; Yin, Zhen-Yu

    2014-03-01

    Soil conditioning is often adopted to facilitate EPB shield tunneling. However, the resulting improvement of soil fluidity and the reduction of friction forces will also raise the ground deformation problem. This paper aims to investigate the influence of soil conditioning on the ground deformation during longitudinal tunneling. DEM is employed for this study due to its advantages in analyzing large deformations and discontinuous processes. Soil conditioning is modeled by reducing the interparticle friction of soils in a specific zone around the cutterhead of the tunnel. The tunnel advance with different soil-conditioning treatments is thus modeled. Comparisons are carried out on the ground deformation, i.e. ground surface settlement, vertical and horizontal displacements. The influence of soil conditioning on the ground deformation is clarified, and is associated with the fluidity from poor to favorite, and the mechanical properties from dilative to contractive are associated with the increase of soil conditioning. The results are helpful to determine the conditioned soils and control ground deformation for real constructions.

  19. Phosphorus Release to Floodwater from Calcareous Surface Soils and Their Corresponding Subsurface Soils under Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jayarathne, P D K D; Kumaragamage, D; Indraratne, S; Flaten, D; Goltz, D

    2016-07-01

    Enhanced phosphorus (P) release from soils to overlying water under flooded, anaerobic conditions has been well documented for noncalcareous and surface soils, but little information is available for calcareous and subsurface soils. We compared the magnitude of P released from 12 calcareous surface soils and corresponding subsurface soils to overlying water under flooded, anaerobic conditions and examined the reasons for the differences. Surface (0-15 cm) and subsurface (15-30 cm) soils were packed into vessels and flooded for 8 wk. Soil redox potential and concentrations of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) and total dissolved Ca, Mg, Fe, and Mn in floodwater and pore water were measured weekly. Soil test P was significantly smaller in subsurface soils than in corresponding surface soils; thus, the P release to floodwater from subsurface soils was significantly less than from corresponding surface soils. Under anaerobic conditions, floodwater DRP concentration significantly increased in >80% of calcareous surface soils and in about 40% of subsurface soils. The increase in floodwater DRP concentration was 2- to 17-fold in surface soils but only 4- to 7-fold in subsurface soils. With time of flooding, molar ratios of Ca/P and Mg/P in floodwater increased, whereas Fe/P and Mn/P decreased, suggesting that resorption and/or reprecipitation of P took place involving Fe and Mn. Results indicate that P release to floodwater under anaerobic conditions was enhanced in most calcareous soils. Surface and subsurface calcareous soils in general behaved similarly in releasing P under flooded, anaerobic conditions, with concentrations released mainly governed by initial soil P concentrations. PMID:27380087

  20. Pathways from childhood abuse and other adversities to adult health risks: The role of adult socioeconomic conditions.

    PubMed

    Font, Sarah A; Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), including child abuse, have been linked with poor health outcomes in adulthood. The mechanisms that explain these relations are less understood. This study assesses whether associations of ACEs and health risks are mediated by adult socioeconomic conditions, and whether these pathways are different for maltreatment than for other types of adversities. Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2012 survey (N=29,229), we employ structural equation modeling to (1) estimate associations of the number and type of ACEs with five health risks-depression, obesity, tobacco use, binge drinking, and self-reported sub-optimal health; and (2) assess whether adult socioeconomic conditions-marriage, divorce and separation, educational attainment, income and insurance status-mediate those associations. Findings suggest both direct and indirect associations between ACEs and health risks. At high numbers of ACEs, 15-20% of the association between number of ACEs and adult health risks was attributable to socioeconomic conditions. Associations of three ACEs (exposure to domestic violence, parental divorce, and residing with a person who was incarcerated) with health risks were nearly entirely explained by socioeconomic conditions in adulthood. However, child physical, emotional, and sexual abuse were significantly associated with several adult health risks, beyond the effects of other adversities, and socioeconomic conditions explained only a small portion of these associations. These findings suggest that the pathways to poor adult health differ by types of ACEs, and that childhood abuse is more likely than other adversities to have a direct impact. PMID:26059537

  1. No Adverse Effect of Genetically Modified Antifungal Wheat on Decomposition Dynamics and the Soil Fauna Community – A Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Duc, Caroline; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Lindfeld, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) plants has raised several environmental concerns. One of these concerns regards non-target soil fauna organisms, which play an important role in the decomposition of organic matter and hence are largely exposed to GM plant residues. Soil fauna may be directly affected by transgene products or indirectly by pleiotropic effects such as a modified plant metabolism. Thus, ecosystem services and functioning might be affected negatively. In a litterbag experiment in the field we analysed the decomposition process and the soil fauna community involved. Therefore, we used four experimental GM wheat varieties, two with a race-specific antifungal resistance against powdery mildew (Pm3b) and two with an unspecific antifungal resistance based on the expression of chitinase and glucanase. We compared them with two non-GM isolines and six conventional cereal varieties. To elucidate the mechanisms that cause differences in plant decomposition, structural plant components (i.e. C∶N ratio, lignin, cellulose, hemicellulose) were examined and soil properties, temperature and precipitation were monitored. The most frequent taxa extracted from decaying plant material were mites (Cryptostigmata, Gamasina and Uropodina), springtails (Isotomidae), annelids (Enchytraeidae) and Diptera (Cecidomyiidae larvae). Despite a single significant transgenic/month interaction for Cecidomyiidae larvae, which is probably random, we detected no impact of the GM wheat on the soil fauna community. However, soil fauna differences among conventional cereal varieties were more pronounced than between GM and non-GM wheat. While leaf residue decomposition in GM and non-GM wheat was similar, differences among conventional cereals were evident. Furthermore, sampling date and location were found to greatly influence soil fauna community and decomposition processes. The results give no indication of ecologically relevant adverse effects of antifungal GM wheat on the

  2. Restricted streptomycin use in apple orchards did not adversely alter the soil bacteria communities.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Fiona; Smith, Daniel P; Owens, Sarah M; Duffy, Brion; Frey, Jürg E

    2013-01-01

    Streptomycin has been authorized for restricted use in the prevention of the fire blight disease of pome fruit orchards in the EU and Switzerland. This study addresses the important topic of the influence of the use of streptomycin in agriculture on the total bacteria community within the soil ecosystem. Soil samples were taken from soils under apple trees, prior to streptomycin application and 2 weeks post streptomycin application or water application (untreated control). High throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was used to generate datasets from the soils under apple trees in apple orchards from three different locations in Switzerland. We hypothesized that the use of streptomycin would reduce the bacterial diversity within the soil samples and enhance a reduction in the variety of taxa present. Bacterial species such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, and Stenotrophomonas are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics and as such it is of interest to investigate if the use of streptomycin provided a selective advantage for these bacteria in the soil ecosystem. The application of streptomycin did not influence the abundance and diversities of major bacteria taxa of the soils or the Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, and Stenotrophomonas species. We also discovered that apple orchards under the same management practices, did not harbor the same bacterial communities. The restricted application of streptomycin in the protection of apple orchards from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora under the guidelines in Switzerland did not alter either the bacterial diversity or abundance within these soil ecosystems. PMID:24550889

  3. Nutritional characteristics of the leaves of native plants growing in adverse soils of humid tropical lowlands.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Mitsuru; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Ishizawa, Tetsuya; Nilnond, Chairatna; Nuyim, Tanit; Shinano, Takuro; Urayama, Masaru; Tuah, Sehat Jaya

    2003-01-01

    Acid sulfate, peat, sandy podzolic, and saline soils are widely distributed in the lowlands of Thailand and Malaysia. The nutrient concentrations in the leaves of plants grown in these type of soils were studied with the aim of developing a nutritional strategy for adapting to such problem soils. In sago and oil palms that were well-adapted to peat soil, the N, P, and K concentrations were the same in the mature leaves, while the Ca, Mg, Na, and Fe concentrations were higher in the mature leaves of the oil palm than of the sago palm. Melastoma malabathricum and Melaleuca cajuputi plants that were well-adapted to low pH soils, peat. and acid sulfate soils were also studied. It was observed that a high amount of Al accumulated in the M. marabathricum leaves, while Al did not accumulate in M. cajuputi leaves. M. cajuputi plants accumulated large amounts of Na in their leaves or stems regardless of the exchangeable Na concentration in the soil, while M. malabathricum that was growing in saline-affected soils excluded Na. Positive relationships between macronutrients were recognized between P and N, between K and N, and between P and K. Al showed antagonistic relationships with P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu, and Na. Na also showed antagonistic relationships with P, K, Zn, Mn, Cu, and Al. Fe showed weak antagonistic relationships with Zn, Mn, Cu, and Al. PMID:12906350

  4. Urban cultivation in allotments maintains soil qualities adversely affected by conventional agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Jill L; Davies, Zoe G; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    Modern agriculture, in seeking to maximize yields to meet growing global food demand, has caused loss of soil organic carbon (SOC) and compaction, impairing critical regulating and supporting ecosystem services upon which humans also depend. Own-growing makes an important contribution to food security in urban areas globally, but its effects on soil qualities that underpin ecosystem service provision are currently unknown. We compared the main indicators of soil quality; SOC storage, total nitrogen (TN), C : N ratio and bulk density (BD) in urban allotments to soils from the surrounding agricultural region, and between the allotments and other urban greenspaces in a typical UK city. A questionnaire was used to investigate allotment management practices that influence soil properties. Allotment soils had 32% higher SOC concentrations and 36% higher C : N ratios than pastures and arable fields and 25% higher TN and 10% lower BD than arable soils. There was no significant difference between SOC concentration in allotments and urban non-domestic greenspaces, but it was higher in domestic gardens beneath woody vegetation. Allotment soil C : N ratio exceeded that in non-domestic greenspaces, but was lower than that in garden soil. Three-quarters of surveyed allotment plot holders added manure, 95% composted biomass on-site, and many added organic-based fertilizers and commercial composts. This may explain the maintenance of SOC, C : N ratios, TN and low BD, which are positively associated with soil functioning. Synthesis and applications. Maintenance and protection of the quality of our soil resource is essential for sustainable food production and for regulating and supporting ecosystem services upon which we depend. Our study establishes, for the first time, that small-scale urban food production can occur without the penalty of soil degradation seen in conventional agriculture, and maintains the high soil quality seen in urban greenspaces. Given the

  5. Effect of Water Logging Conditions on Solubility of Soil Nutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wide use of herbicides, fungicides, fertilizers, and soil amendments affect the rhizosphere biochemistry and ecology. Soils in the Midwest of the US tend to be saturated in the early spring when snow and ice melt, and frequent rain occurs. Saturated conditions also occur after heavy rainfall eve...

  6. Nitroglycerin degradation mediated by soil organic carbon under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Martel, Richard; Bamba, Abraham N'Valoua; Blais, Jean-François; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2014-10-01

    The presence of nitroglycerin (NG) has been reported in shallow soils and pore water of several military training ranges. In this context, NG concentrations can be reduced through various natural attenuation processes, but these have not been thoroughly documented. This study aimed at investigating the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in the natural attenuation of NG, under aerobic conditions typical of shallow soils. The role of SOM in NG degradation has already been documented under anoxic conditions, and was attributed to SOM-mediated electron transfer involving different reducing agents. However, unsaturated soils are usually well-oxygenated, and it was not clear whether SOM could participate in NG degradation under these conditions. Our results from batch- and column-type experiments clearly demonstrate that in presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) leached from a natural soil, partial NG degradation can be achieved. In presence of particulate organic matter (POM) from the same soil, complete NG degradation was achieved. Furthermore, POM caused rapid sorption of NG, which should result in NG retention in the organic matter-rich shallow horizons of the soil profile, thus promoting degradation. Based on degradation products, the reaction pathway appears to be reductive, in spite of the aerobic conditions. The relatively rapid reaction rates suggest that this process could significantly participate in the natural attenuation of NG, both on military training ranges and in contaminated soil at production facilities. PMID:25086776

  7. Development of a Hydraulic-driven Soil Penetrometer for Measuring Soil Compaction in Field Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekin, Yucel; Okursoy, Rasim

    Soil compaction is an important physical limiting factor for root emergence and the growth of plants. Therefore it is essential to control soil compaction, which is normally caused by heavy traffic in fields during the growing season. Soil compaction in fields is usually measured by using standard soil cone penetrometers, which can be of several different types according to their design. Most of the time, especially in heavy soil conditions, measuring soil compaction with a standard hand penetrometer produces measurement errors if the cone of the penetrometer cannot be pushed into the soil at a standard rate. Obtaining data with hand penetrometers is also difficult and takes a long time and effort. For this reason, a three-point hitch-mounted and hydraulic-driven soil cone penetrometer has been designed in order to reduce time and effort and to reduce possible measurement errors in the sampling of soil compaction data for research purposes. The hydraulic penetrometer is mounted on the three-point hitch and a hydraulic piston pushes the standard penetrometer cone into the soil at a constant speed. Forces acting on the cone base are recorded with a computer-based 16-bit data acquisition system composed of a load cell, a portable computer, signal amplification and necessary control software for the sampling. As a conclusion, the designed and constructed three-point hitch-mounted hydraulic-driven standard soil cone penetrometer provides with quick and very accurate measurements about soil compaction in clay soil in heavy conditions.

  8. The impact of soil preparation on the soil erosion rates under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaledi Darvishan, A.; Homayounfar, V.; Sadeghi, S. H. R.

    2015-03-01

    The use of laboratory methods in soil erosion studies causes soil disturbance, preparation and placement in experimental plots and has been recently considered more and more because of many advantages. However, different stages of soil removal, transfer, preparation and placement in laboratory plots cause significant changes in soil structure and subsequently, the results of runoff, sediment concentration and soil loss. Knowing the rate of changes in sediment concentration and soil loss variables with respect to the soil preparation for laboratory studies is therefore inevitable to generalize the laboratory results to field conditions. However, there has been less attention to evaluate the effects of soil preparation on sediment variables. The present study was therefore conducted to compare sediment concentration and soil loss in natural and prepared soil. To achieve the study purposes, 18 field 1 m × 1 m-plots were adopted in an 18% gradient slope with sandy-clay-loam soil in the Kojour watershed, Northern Iran. Three rainfall intensities of 40, 60 and 80 mm h-1 were simulated on both prepared and natural soil treatments with three replications. The sediment concentration and soil loss at five three-minute intervals after time-to-runoff were then measured. The results showed the significant (p ≤ 0.01) increasing effects of soil preparation on the average sediment concentration and soil loss. The increasing rates of runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss due to the study soil preparation method for laboratory soil erosion plots, were 179, 183 and 1050% (2.79, 2.83 and 11.50 times), respectively.

  9. Adverse Birth Outcomes and Maternal Exposure to Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene through Soil Vapor Intrusion in New York State

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Michl, Elizabeth L.; Gomez, Marta I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Industrial spills of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Endicott, New York (USA), have led to contamination of groundwater, soil, and soil gas. Previous studies have reported an increase in adverse birth outcomes among women exposed to VOCs in drinking water. Objective: We investigated the prevalence of adverse birth outcomes among mothers exposed to trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene [or perchloroethylene (PCE)] in indoor air contaminated through soil vapor intrusion. Methods: We examined low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, and birth defects among births to women in Endicott who were exposed to VOCs, compared with births statewide. We used Poisson regression to analyze births and malformations to estimate the association between maternal exposure to VOCs adjusting for sex, mother’s age, race, education, parity, and prenatal care. Two exposure areas were identified based on environmental sampling data: one area was primarily contaminated with TCE, and the other with PCE. Results: In the TCE-contaminated area, adjusted rate ratios (RRs) were significantly elevated for LBW [RR = 1.36; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 1.73; n = 76], small for gestational age (RR = 1.23; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.48; n = 117), term LBW (RR = 1.68; 95% CI: 1.20, 2.34; n = 37), cardiac defects (RR = 2.15; 95% CI: 1.27, 3.62; n = 15), and conotruncal defects (RR = 4.91; 95% CI: 1.58, 15.24; n = 3). In the PCE-contaminated area, RRs for cardiac defects (five births) were elevated but not significantly. Residual socioeconomic confounding may have contributed to elevations of LBW outcomes. Conclusions: Maternal residence in both areas was associated with cardiac defects. Residence in the TCE area, but not the PCE area, was associated with LBW and fetal growth restriction. PMID:22142966

  10. Extension of laboratory-measured soil spectra to field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.; Weismiller, R. A.; Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    Spectral responses of two glaciated soils, Chalmers silty clay loam and Fincastle silt loam, formed under prairie grass and forest vegetation, respectively, were measured in the laboratory under controlled moisture equilibria using an Exotech Model 20C spectroradiometer to obtain spectral data in the laboratory under artificial illumination. The same spectroradiometer was used outdoors under solar illumination to obtain spectral response from dry and moistened field plots with and without corn residue cover, representing the two different soils. Results indicate that laboratory-measured spectra of moist soil are directly proportional to the spectral response of that same field-measured moist bare soil over the 0.52 micrometer to 1.75 micrometer wavelength range. The magnitudes of difference in spectral response between identically treated Chalmers and Fincastle soils are greatest in the 0.6 micrometers to 0.8 micrometer transition region between the visible and near infrared, regardless of field condition or laboratory preparation studied.

  11. Microbial destruction of chitin in soils under different moisture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroslavtsev, A. M.; Manucharova, N. A.; Stepanov, A. L.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Sudnitsyn, I. I.

    2009-07-01

    The most favorable moisture conditions for the microbial destruction of chitin in soils are close to the total water capacity. The water content has the most pronounced effect on chitin destruction in soils in comparison with other studied substrates. It was found using gas-chromatographic and luminescent-microscopic methods that the maximum specific activity of the respiration of the chitinolytic community was at a rather low redox potential with the soil moisture close to the total water capacity. The range of moisture values under which the most intense microbial transformation of chitin occurred was wider in clayey and clay loamy soils as compared with sandy ones. The increase was observed due to the contribution of mycelial bacteria and actinomycetes in the chitinolytic complex as the soil moisture increased.

  12. Bioremediation of coal contaminated soil under sulfate-reducing condition.

    PubMed

    Kuwano, Y; Shimizu, Y

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biodegradation of coal-derived hydrocarbons, especially high molecular weight (HMW) components, under anaerobic conditions. For this purpose biodegradation experiments were performed, using specifically designed soil column bioreactors. For the experiment, coal-contaminated soil was prepared, which contains high molecular weight hydrocarbons at high concentration (approx. 55.5 mgC g-drysoil(-1)). The experiment was carried out in two different conditions: sulfate reducing (SR) condition (SO4(2-) = 10 mmol l(-1) in the liquid medium) and control condition (SO4(2-)<0.5 mmol l(-1)). Although no degradation was observed under the control condition, the resin fraction decreased to half (from 6,541 to 3,386 mgC g-soil(-1)) under SR condition, with the concomitant increase of two PAHs (phenanthrene and fluoranthene, 9 and 2.5 times, respectively). From these results, we could conclude that high molecular hydrocarbons were biodegradable and transformed to low molecular weight PAHs under the sulfate-reducing condition. Since these PAHs are known to be biologically degraded under aerobic condition, a serial combination of anaerobic (sulfate reducing) and then aerobic bioremediations could be effective and useful for the soil pollution by petroleum and/or coal derived hydrocarbons. PMID:16457179

  13. Evaluating soil organic C sequestration in the Cotton Belt with the soil conditioning index (SCI)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation models that are sensitive to management, edaphic factors, and climate could provide insightful probes of how land owners and producers might be able to sequester soil organic C and engage in emerging carbon markets. We used the soil conditioning index (SCI) embedded in the RUSLE2 model t...

  14. Calibration of the soil conditioning index (SCI) to soil organic carbon in the southeastern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prediction of soil organic C sequestration with adoption of various conservation agricultural management approaches is needed to meet the emerging market for environmental services provided by agricultural land stewardship. The soil conditioning index (SCI) is a relatively simple model used by the ...

  15. Soil conditioning index (SCI) and soil organic carbon in the Midwest and southeastern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calibration of the soil conditioning index (SCI) to a diversity of field studies with known changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) would improve the usefulness of the SCI by the USDA–Natural Resources Conservation Service to assess the environmental services provided by agricultural land stewardship. ...

  16. 30 CFR 285.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 285.816 Section 285.816 Mineral Resources..., pipeline, or facility? If environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or...

  17. Effect of vegetation of transgenic Bt rice lines and their straw amendment on soil enzymes, respiration, functional diversity and community structure of soil microorganisms under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hua; Dong, Bin; Yan, Hu; Tang, Feifan; Wang, Baichuan; Yu, Yunlong

    2012-01-01

    With the development of transgenic crops, there is an increasing concern about the possible adverse effects of their vegetation and residues on soil environmental quality. This study was carried out to evaluate the possible effects of the vegetation of transgenic Bt rice lines Huachi B6 (HC) and TT51 (TT) followed by the return of their straw to the soil on soil enzymes (catalase, urease, neutral phosphatase and invertase), anaerobic respiration activity, microbial utilization of carbon substrates and community structure, under field conditions. The results indicated that the vegetation of the two transgenic rice lines (HC and TT) and return of their straw had few adverse effects on soil enzymes and anaerobic respiration activity compared to their parent and distant parent, although some transient differences were observed. The vegetation and subsequent straw amendment of Bt rice HC and TT did not appear to have a harmful effect on the richness, evenness and community structure of soil microorganisms. No different pattern of impact due to plant species was found between HC and TT. It could be concluded that the vegetation of transgenic Bt rice lines and the return of their straw as organic fertilizer may not alter soil microbe-mediated functions. PMID:23513447

  18. Water content and matric potential of soil under different soil frost conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Iwata, Y.; Hiirota, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Arima, J.

    2006-12-01

    Eastern Hokkaido, where is one of the largest agricultural production regions in Japan, is characterized by low air temperature and relatively thin snow covers resulting in soil frost over the winter. However, the soil frost depth has been significantly decreasing since late 1980's due to an insulation from the cold air by a thick snow cover developing in early winter. In the current study, soil water movement under different soil frost conditions were monitored to obtain a knowledge of changes in hydraulic-regime of the agricultural production systems in the Eastern Hokkaido associated with the decreasing soil frost depth in the region. A paired soil plot experiment was conducted from Nov. 2005 to May 2006, where the frost depth was artificially enhanced by removing snow in the treatment plot and the natural condition was maintained in the control plot. The soil in the experimental field was classified as Andisol with much porosity and high drainability. In each plot, water content and matric potential were measured by TDR and thermally-insulated tensiometer, respectively. Changes in snow water equivalent volume (SWE) and soil-frost depth were manually recorded. The maximum soil-frost depth in the treatment and control plots resulted in 47 and 19 cm, respectively. In both plots, soil water content and matric potential in underlying unfrozen soil decreased with the progress of freezing front, and the direction of soil water flow between 90 and 100 cm changed from downward to upward after the onset of the soil freezing. It is of note that the matric potential at 90 cm in the treatment plot decreased down to -480 cm, while the matric potential at the same depth in the control plot was -200 cm at minimum. When the underlying unfrozen soil was most driest the soil water volume stored in a depth interval from 50 to 100 cm for the treatment and control plots was 189 and 212 mm, respectively. Further, the magnitude of upward hydraulic gradient between 90 and 100 cm in the

  19. Formation of aerobic granular sludge under adverse conditions: low DO and high ammonia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Hu; Lv, Lu; Wang, Qing; Jiang, Qipei

    2013-04-01

    In this study, two adverse environments: low dissolved oxygen (DO) and high ammonia concentration, were employed to investigate the morphology, interspecies quorum sensing, extracellular polymers (EPS) characterization and microbial communities in the formation of aerobic granular sludge. Results showed that low DO could promote filamentous bacterial outgrowth. Under high ammonia concentration aerobic granular sludge (AGS) could still be cultivated, although it was looser and lighter than the control group. During the early stage of the AGS cultivation process, Al-2 activity reached a peak value in all three reactors, and ultrasonic pre-treatment was not beneficial to the release of Al-2. During AGS formation, the production of polysaccharide exhibited increases from 12.2% to 40.3%, 49.6%, and 29.3%. And PS in R2 was the highest as the result of sludge bulking. PS/PN was 1.5 to approximately 8 in the three reactors. Three-dimensional EEM fuorescence spectroscopy variation indicated the change of protein in EPS, and the highest intensity of Peak T1 was obtained. The location shift of Peak T1 was not obvious, and Peaks A, C, and T2 shifted toward longer wavelengths (red shift) of 5 to approximately 60 nm, or shorter wavelengths (blue shift) of 10 to approximately 25 nm on the emission scale and/or excitation scale in all three reactors. This provided spectral information on the chemical structure changes. Bacteria in R3 had the highest species diversity, and all bacteria in beta-Proteobacteria were identified as genus Thauera, which suggested that simultaneous nitrification and denitrification occurred in R3. The filamentous bacteria in seed sludge and R2 were species-richer. There was a low abundance of filamentous bacteria in R1 and R3, which contributed to the granule structure stability. PMID:24620612

  20. Adverse foraging conditions may impact body mass and survival of a high Arctic seabird

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harding, A.M.A.; Welcker, J.; Steen, H.; Hamer, K.C.; Kitaysky, A.S.; Fort, J.; Talbot, S.L.; Cornick, L.A.; Karnovsky, N.J.; Gabrielsen, G.W.; Gremillet, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tradeoffs between current reproduction and future survival are widely recognized, but may only occur when food is limited: when foraging conditions are favorable, parents may be able to reproduce without compromising their own survival. We investigated these tradeoffs in the little auk (Alle alle), a small seabird with a single-egg clutch. During 2005-2007, we examined the relationship between body mass and survival of birds breeding under contrasting foraging conditions at two Arctic colonies. We used corticosterone levels of breeding adults as a physiological indicator of the foraging conditions they encountered during each reproductive season. We found that when foraging conditions were relatively poor (as reflected in elevated levels of corticosterone), parents ended the reproductive season with low body mass and suffered increased post-breeding mortality. A positive relationship between body mass and post-breeding survival was found in one study year; light birds incurred higher survival costs than heavy birds. The results of this study suggest that reproducing under poor foraging conditions may affect the post-breeding survival of long-lived little auks. They also have important demographic implications because even a small change in adult survival may have a large effect on populations of long-lived species. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Short rotation willow coppice in Wales: High production under adverse environmental conditions?

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, F.M.; Hodson, R.W.; Randerson, P.F.

    1995-11-01

    The production of short rotation willow coppice in central Wales was once regarded as a vain hope rather than a distinct possibility. Research at the University of Wales, Cardiff, Field Station at Llysdinam in mid-Wales over the last four years has proven that it is possible to produce a commercially viable crop on very poor upland soils and at an altitude of almost 300m provided that lime and inorganic fertilizers are added. Because of the national need to find new routes for the disposal of sewage sludge, its addition to short rotation coppice serves the dual purpose of disposal and nutrient addition. Over the first two years of the sludging experiment, it was found that the addition of 300 m{sup 3}ha{sup -1} of digested sewage sludge significantly increased crop weight, at least in the first year. Unfortunately, the crop yields did not reach those obtained using inorganic fertilizers at the same site but it is suggested that a repeated application regime might improve overall crop yield.

  2. Unification of soil feedback patterns under different evaporation conditions to improve soil differentiation over flat area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shanxin; Zhu, A.-Xing; Meng, Lingkui; Burt, James E.; Du, Fei; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Guiming

    2016-07-01

    Detailed and accurate information on the spatial variation of soil types and soil properties are critical components of environmental research and hydrological modeling. Early studies introduced a soil feedback pattern as a promising environmental covariate to predict spatial variation over low-relief areas. However, in practice, local evaporation can have a significant influence on these patterns, making them incomparable at different locations. This study aims to solve this problem by examining the concept of transforming the dynamic patterns of soil feedback from the original time-related space to a new evaporation-related space. A study area in northeastern Illinois with large low-relief farmland was selected to examine the effectiveness of this idea. Images from MODIS in Terra for every April-May period over 12 years (2000-2011) were used to extract the soil feedback patterns. Compared to the original time-related space, the results indicate that the patterns in the new evaporation-related space tend to be more stable and more easily captured from multiple rain events regardless of local evaporation conditions. Random samples selected for soil subgroups from the SSURGO soil map show that patterns in the new space reveal a difference between different soil types. And these differences in patterns are closely related to the difference in the soil structure of the surface layer.

  3. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-10-17

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. PMID:25218504

  4. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-01-01

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR. PMID:25218504

  5. Changes in Soil Minerology Reduce Phosphorus Mobility During Anoxic Soil Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, S. K.; Geohring, L. D.; Richards, B. K.; Walter, M.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2008-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) transfer from the landscape to receiving waters is an important environmental concern because these diffuse losses may cause widespread water quality impairments which can accelerate freshwater eutrophication. Phosphorus (P) mobilization from soil to surface and subsurface flow paths is controlled by numerous factors, and thus it can vary greatly with time and landscape scale. To determine whether P mobilization during soil saturation in the landscape was caused or controlled by complexation, iron reduction or ligand exchange, experiments were carried out to better characterize the interrelationships of varying P sources with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and soil anoxic conditions. The soil incubation experiments consisted of treatments with distilled water, 5 mM acetic acid (HAc), 0.05% humic acid (HA) and glucose (40 mM) at 26 o C under anaerobic conditions to isolate effects of the various P exchange processes. The experimental results suggest that during soil saturation, the loosely bound P, which is primarily associated with iron oxyhydroxides, was mobilized by both reduction and complexation processes. Good correlations were observed between ferrous iron (Fe+2) and DOC, and between total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) and DOC, facilitating P desorption to the soil water. The anaerobic soil conditions with different P sources also indicated that mineralization facilitated P mobility, mainly due to chelation (humics and metabolites) and as a result of the bio-reduction of iron when fresh litter and grass were present. The organic P sources which are rich in carbohydrate and cellulose and that undergo fermentation due to the action of lactate forming organisms also caused a release of P. The easily metabolizable DOC sources lead to intensive bio-reduction of soil with the release of Fe, however this did not necessarily appear to cause more TDP in the soil solution. The varying P additions in soils with water, HAc and glucose (40mm) before and after

  6. RWEQ - Wind erosion predictions for variable soil roughness conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oro, Laura A.; Colazo, Juan C.; Buschiazzo, Daniel E.

    2016-03-01

    The soil surface roughness is a main factor in all wind erosion prediction models, including the Revised Wind Erosion Equation (RWEQ). The objective of this study was to test the erodibility of two typical soils of the semiarid Argentinean Pampas under three different tillage conditions (compared to a flat surface) at three wind velocities using a wind tunnel and to evaluate the performance of the RWEQ model. Results showed that all rough surfaces were less eroded by wind than a flat surface (FS) in both soils and all wind velocities. An exception was LB (lister-bedder) in the Haplustoll that showed similar erosion than FS. Wind erosion increased rapidly above 16.5 m s-1 wind velocity in all tillage conditions. The relative wind erosion (RE) calculated with the RWEQ (K‧ factor) fitted well with measured RE, except for K‧ < 0.1 (rougher surface) where the measured RE were much higher than the predicted. More than 70% of RE variability was explained by the oriented roughness (Kr) in both soils. The aforementioned indicates that Kr can be used instead of K‧ (a value that contains both, Kr and the random roughness - Crr factors) to predict wind erosion with RWEQ in the studied soils. Absolute wind erosion amounts predicted with RWEQ fitted well with measured data only for DT, mainly at low wind velocity. For the other tillage tools, the model did not apply well as it underestimated the erosion for the rougher soil surface condition (LB) and overestimated it for the less rough surface (DH).

  7. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... corrective action to BOEM within 30 days of the discovery of the adverse effect. (b) Take remedial action...

  8. 30 CFR 285.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 285.816 Section 285.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU...: (a) Submit a plan of corrective action to MMS within 30 days of the discovery of the adverse...

  9. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... corrective action to BOEM within 30 days of the discovery of the adverse effect. (b) Take remedial action...

  10. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... corrective action to BOEM within 30 days of the discovery of the adverse effect. (b) Take remedial action...

  11. Biodegradation of a Light NAPL under Varying Soil Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, B. K.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Kleingeld, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    To see the impact of different soil environmental conditions on LNAPL biodegradation, a series of batch, microcosm, column and 2-D tank experiments under controlled conditions have been planned. Microcosms along with batch experiments have been designed for five different moisture contents ranging from residual to saturated, and under varying temperature condition. The batches are being used for two saturated soils containing toluene. For the unsaturated cases, fifteen microcosms are designed to mimic natural conditions more closely. The microcosms consist of a transparent outer column and an air permeable, but watertight, inner tube comprised of toluene phobic material. The space between the outer column and the inner porous tube is filled with a soil having a particular moisture content with a known amount of toluene. The inner porous tube is filled with air at atmospheric pressure, providing sufficient oxygen for the degradation of considered light NAPL. A special sampling mechanism has been fabricated to enable airtight soil sampling. Four columns have been designed for studying the impact of water table fluctuation on the LNAPL fate and transport in variably-saturated soil. Water table in two columns will be static and remaining two will be subjected to a fluctuation. Finally a 2-D tank setup, made of a steel box and a glass cover, has been refurbished for bioremediation process of LNAPL from start to finish. The main body is constructed of one piece of 1.5 mm thick stainless steel formed into a box with inner dimensions of 200cm-long x 94cm-high x 4cm-deep. The front cover is made of glass wall having 19-mm thickness. The soil is going to be packed between the two walls. The groundwater will be flowing horizontally from left to right and the water table level in the tank will be controlled by two end chambers. The chambers are separated from the soil by a fine meshed stainless steel sheet. The spatial and the temporal distributions of the LNAPL and its

  12. A study of different indicators of Maillard reaction with whey proteins and different carbohydrates under adverse storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Graciela E; Naranjo, Gabriela B; Malec, Laura S

    2017-01-15

    This study examined different indicators of each stage of Maillard reaction under adverse storage conditions in a system with whey proteins and lactose or glucose. The analysis of lysine loss by the o-phthaldialdehyde method can be considered a good indicator of the early stage, showing considerable differences in reactivity when systems with mono and disaccharides were analyzed. Capillary electrophoresis proved to be a sensitive method for evaluating the extent of glycosylation of the native proteins, providing valuable information when the loss of lysine was not significant. The estimation of the Amadori compound from the determination of total 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde would have correlate well with reactive lysine content if the advanced stages of the reaction had not been reached. For assessing the occurrence of the intermediate and final stages, the measurement of free 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde and color, proved not to be suitable for storage conditions. PMID:27542493

  13. Emerging role of angiogenin in stress response and cell survival under adverse conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuping; Hu, Guo-Fu

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenin (ANG), also known as ribonuclease (RNASE) 5, is a member of the vertebrate-specific, secreted RNASE superfamily. ANG was originally identified as a tumor angiogenic factor, but its biological activity has been extended from inducing angiogenesis to stimulating cell proliferation and more recently, to promoting cell survival. Under growth conditions, ANG is translocated to nucleus where it accumulates in nucleolus and stimulates ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription, thus facilitating cell growth and proliferation. Under stress conditions, ANG is accumulated in cytoplasmic compartments and modulates the production of tiRNA, a novel class of small RNA that is derived from tRNA and is induced by stress. tiRNA suppress global protein translation by inhibiting both cap-dependent and -independent translation including that mediated by weak IRESes. However, strong IRES-mediated translation, a mechanism often used by genes involved in pro-survival and anti-apoptosis, is not affected. Thus, ANG-mediated tiRNA reprogram protein translation, save anabolic energy, and promote cell survival. This recently uncovered function of ANG presents a novel mechanism of action in regulating cell growth and survival. PMID:22021078

  14. Performance evaluation of laser scanners through the atmosphere with adverse condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hespel, L.; Riviere, N.; Huet, T.; Tanguy, B.; Ceolato, R.

    2011-11-01

    Using laser imaging systems to represent 3-D scene becomes a referent prospective technology in the areas of guidance and navigation. Measurements with high spatial resolution for significant range can be achieved, even in degraded visibility conditions such as the Brown-White Out, rain, fog, sandstorms... Moreover, this technology is well suited for assisted perception tasks (access to 3D information) and obstacle detection (telemetry of small objects). For airborne applications, it is very complementary to conventional enhanced vision systems such as Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) and millimeter wave radar to provide images of land in environments with limited visibility. It also offers a 3D mapping of land or a single location in relation to the environment, which means alone or coupled with others, can realign and secure real-time database of information used such in a synthetic vision system (SVS). The objective of the work is to assess the impact of degraded visibility conditions on the laser radiometric propagation of a 3D laser scanner as they directly influence the performance of the ladar system [1].

  15. Soil Properties, Nutrient Dynamics, and Soil Enzyme Activities Associated with Garlic Stalk Decomposition under Various Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xu; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen

    2012-01-01

    The garlic stalk is a byproduct of garlic production and normally abandoned or burned, both of which cause environmental pollution. It is therefore appropriate to determine the conditions of efficient decomposition, and equally appropriate to determine the impact of this decomposition on soil properties. In this study, the soil properties, enzyme activities and nutrient dynamics associated with the decomposition of garlic stalk at different temperatures, concentrations and durations were investigated. Stalk decomposition significantly increased the values of soil pH and electrical conductivity. In addition, total nitrogen and organic carbon concentration were significantly increased by decomposing stalks at 40°C, with a 5∶100 ratio and for 10 or 60 days. The highest activities of sucrase, urease and alkaline phosphatase in soil were detected when stalk decomposition was performed at the lowest temperature (10°C), highest concentration (5∶100), and shortest duration (10 or 20 days). The evidence presented here suggests that garlic stalk decomposition improves the quality of soil by altering the value of soil pH and electrical conductivity and by changing nutrient dynamics and soil enzyme activity, compared to the soil decomposition without garlic stalks. PMID:23226411

  16. Soil microbial respiration from various microhabitats in Arctic landscape: impact of soil type, environmental conditions and soil age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasi, Christina; Jokinen, Simo; Marushchak, Maija; Trubnikova, Tatiana; Hämäläinen, Kai; Oinonen, Markku; Martikainen, Pertti

    2014-05-01

    methods applied. It seems that the lower decomposability of peat is largely outweighed by higher C stocks at field conditions. Surprisingly, the bare surfaces (peat circles) with 3500 years old C at the surface exhibited about the largest soil microbial respiration rates among all sites as shown by both methods. This is likely due to the immature status of the peat which was during the bulk of its developmental time protected by permafrost, together with high C-densities. The observation is particularly relevant for decomposition of deeper peat at the permafrost-active layer interface in the large vegetated peat plateaus, where soil material similar to the bare surfaces can be found. The results suggest that the chemical nature and high age of the soil SOC in deep peat does not solely guarantee for resistance to decay. Thus, the study highlights risks for potential re-mobilization of C in deep peat soils following thawing. Soil microbial respiration rates need to be better known when predicting the overall carbon sink/source character of tundra ecosystems in a warming climate. Biasi C., Jokinen S., Marushchak M., Hämäläinen K., Trubnikova T., Oinonen M., Martikainen P. (2013). Microbial respiration in Arctic upland and peat soils as source of CO2. Ecosystems. DOI: 10.1007/s10021-013-9710-z.

  17. The brain dynamics of rapid perceptual adaptation to adverse listening conditions.

    PubMed

    Erb, Julia; Henry, Molly J; Eisner, Frank; Obleser, Jonas

    2013-06-26

    Listeners show a remarkable ability to quickly adjust to degraded speech input. Here, we aimed to identify the neural mechanisms of such short-term perceptual adaptation. In a sparse-sampling, cardiac-gated functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) acquisition, human listeners heard and repeated back 4-band-vocoded sentences (in which the temporal envelope of the acoustic signal is preserved, while spectral information is highly degraded). Clear-speech trials were included as baseline. An additional fMRI experiment on amplitude modulation rate discrimination quantified the convergence of neural mechanisms that subserve coping with challenging listening conditions for speech and non-speech. First, the degraded speech task revealed an "executive" network (comprising the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex), parts of which were also activated in the non-speech discrimination task. Second, trial-by-trial fluctuations in successful comprehension of degraded speech drove hemodynamic signal change in classic "language" areas (bilateral temporal cortices). Third, as listeners perceptually adapted to degraded speech, downregulation in a cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit was observable. The present data highlight differential upregulation and downregulation in auditory-language and executive networks, respectively, with important subcortical contributions when successfully adapting to a challenging listening situation. PMID:23804092

  18. Carbon black retention in saturated natural soils: Effects of flow conditions, soil surface roughness and soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Lohwacharin, J; Takizawa, S; Punyapalakul, P

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated factors affecting the transport, retention, and re-entrainment of carbon black nanoparticles (nCBs) in two saturated natural soils under different flow conditions and input concentrations using the two-site transport model and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Soil organic matter (SOM) was found to create unfavorable conditions for the retention. Despite an increased flow velocity, the relative stability of the estimated maximum retention capacity in soils may suggest that flow-induced shear stress forces were insufficient to detach nCB. The KPFM observation revealed that nCBs were retained at the grain boundary and on surface roughness, which brought about substantial discrepancy between theoretically-derived attachment efficiency factors and the ones obtained by the experiments using the two-site transport model. Thus, decreasing ionic strength and increasing solution pH caused re-entrainment of only a small fraction of retained nCB in the soil columns. PMID:26057475

  19. Soil moisture under contrasted atmospheric conditions in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorin-Molina, César; Cerdà, Artemi; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.

    2014-05-01

    , Intraannual changes, Atmospheric parameters, Eastern Spain Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and RECARE FP7 project 603498 supported this research. References: Azorin-Molina, C., Connell, B.H., Baena-Calatrava, R. 2009. Sea-breeze convergence zones from AVHRR over the Iberian Mediterranean Area and the Isle of Mallorca, Spain. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology 48 (10), 2069-2085. Azorin-Molina, C., Vicente-Serrano, S. M., Cerdà, A. 2013. Soil moisture changes in two experimental sites in Eastern Spain. Irrigation versus rainfed orchards under organic farming. EGU, Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU2013-13286. Bodí, M.B., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S.H. & Cerdà, A. 2011. The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma, 160, 599-607. 10.1016/j.geoderma.2010.11.009 Cerdà, A. 1995. Soil moisture regime under simulated rainfall in a three years abandoned field in Southeast Spain. Physics and Chemistry of The Earth, 20 (3-4), 271-279. Cerdà, A. 1999. Seasonal and spatial variations in infiltration rates in badland surfaces under Mediterranean climatic conditions. Water Resources Research, 35 (1) 319-328. Cerdà, A. 2002. The effect of season and parent material on water erosion on highly eroded soils in eastern Spain. Journal of Arid Environments, 52, 319-337. García-Fayos, P. García-Ventoso, B. Cerdà, A. 2000. Limitations to Plant establishment on eroded slopes in Southeastern Spain. Journal of Vegetation Science, 11- 77- 86. Ghafoor, A., Murtaza, G., Rehman, M. Z., Saifullah Sabir, M. 2012. Reclamation and salt leaching efficiency for tile drained saline-sodic soil using marginal quality water for irrigating rice and wheat crops. Land Degradation & Development, 23: 1 -9. DOI 10.1002/ldr.1033 Johnston, C. R., Vance, G. F., Ganjegunte, G. K. 2013. Soil properties changes following irrigation with coalbed natural

  20. Evaluation of antibiotic mobility in soil associated with swine-slurry soil amendment under cropping conditions.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, C; Flores, C; Caixach, J; Mita, L; Piña, B; Comas, J; Bayona, J M

    2014-11-01

    Interest in identifying pools of antibacterial-resistance genes has grown over the last decade, with veterinary antibiotics (VAs) receiving particular attention. In this paper, a mesoscale study aimed at evaluating the vertical transport of common VAs-namely, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and lincosamides in agricultural soil subjected to drip irrigation-was performed under greenhouse conditions. Accordingly, leachates of cropped and uncropped soil, amended with swine-slurry leading to 19-38 μg kg(-1) (dry mass) antibiotics in the soil, were analyzed over the course of the productive cycle of a lettuce (42 days) with three sampling campaigns (N = 24). High lincomycin (LCM) concentrations (30-39 μg L(-1)) were detected in the leachates collected from the swine-slurry-amended soil. The highest LCM mass recovered in the leachates (30.1 ± 1.63 %) was obtained from cropped experimental units. In addition, the LCM leaching constant and its leaching potential as obtained from the first-order model were higher in the leachates from the cropped experimental units. Lower concentrations of sulfadimethoxine were also detected in leachates and in soil. Enrofloxacin and oxytetracycline occurred only in soil, which is consistent with high soil interaction. PMID:24938815

  1. Experiments using new initial soil moisture conditions and soil map in the Eta model over La Plata Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Moira E.; Tomasella, Javier; Rodriguez, Daniel A.; Chou, Sin Chan

    2013-08-01

    An effort towards a more accurate representation of soil moisture and its impact on the modeling of weather systems is presented. Sensitivity tests of precipitation to soil type and soil moisture changes are carried out using the atmospheric Eta model for the numerical simulation of the development of a mesoscale convective system over northern Argentina. Modified initial soil moisture conditions were obtained from a hydrological balance model developed and running operationally at INPE. A new soil map was elaborated using the available soil profile information from Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Argentina and depicts 18 different soil types. Results indicate that more accurate initial soil moisture conditions and incorporating a new soil map with hydraulic parameters, more representative of South American soils, improve daily total precipitation forecasts both in quantitative and spatial representations.

  2. Soil moisture under contrasted atmospheric conditions in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorin-Molina, César; Cerdà, Artemi; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.

    2014-05-01

    , Intraannual changes, Atmospheric parameters, Eastern Spain Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and RECARE FP7 project 603498 supported this research. References: Azorin-Molina, C., Connell, B.H., Baena-Calatrava, R. 2009. Sea-breeze convergence zones from AVHRR over the Iberian Mediterranean Area and the Isle of Mallorca, Spain. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology 48 (10), 2069-2085. Azorin-Molina, C., Vicente-Serrano, S. M., Cerdà, A. 2013. Soil moisture changes in two experimental sites in Eastern Spain. Irrigation versus rainfed orchards under organic farming. EGU, Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU2013-13286. Bodí, M.B., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S.H. & Cerdà, A. 2011. The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma, 160, 599-607. 10.1016/j.geoderma.2010.11.009 Cerdà, A. 1995. Soil moisture regime under simulated rainfall in a three years abandoned field in Southeast Spain. Physics and Chemistry of The Earth, 20 (3-4), 271-279. Cerdà, A. 1999. Seasonal and spatial variations in infiltration rates in badland surfaces under Mediterranean climatic conditions. Water Resources Research, 35 (1) 319-328. Cerdà, A. 2002. The effect of season and parent material on water erosion on highly eroded soils in eastern Spain. Journal of Arid Environments, 52, 319-337. García-Fayos, P. García-Ventoso, B. Cerdà, A. 2000. Limitations to Plant establishment on eroded slopes in Southeastern Spain. Journal of Vegetation Science, 11- 77- 86. Ghafoor, A., Murtaza, G., Rehman, M. Z., Saifullah Sabir, M. 2012. Reclamation and salt leaching efficiency for tile drained saline-sodic soil using marginal quality water for irrigating rice and wheat crops. Land Degradation & Development, 23: 1 -9. DOI 10.1002/ldr.1033 Johnston, C. R., Vance, G. F., Ganjegunte, G. K. 2013. Soil properties changes following irrigation with coalbed natural

  3. Three Gorges Reservoir Area: soil erosion under natural condition vs. soil erosion under current land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönbrodt, Sarah; Behrens, Thorsten; Scholten, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Apparently, the current most prominent human-induced example for large scale environmental impact is the Three Gorges Dam in China. The flooding alongside the Yangtze River, and its tributaries results in a vast loss of settlement and farmland area with productive, fertile valley soils. Due to the associated high land use dynamic on uphill-sites, the soil resources are underlying high land use pressure. Within our study, the soil erosion under natural conditions is compared to the soil erosion under current land use after the impoundment. Both were modeled using the empirical Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) which is able to predict long-term annual soil loss with limited data. The database consists of digital terrain data (45 m resolution DEM, erosive slope length based on Monte-Carlo-Aggregation according to Behrens et al. (2008)), field investigations of recent erosion forms, and literature studies. The natural disposition to soil erosion was calculated considering the USLE factors R, S, and K. The soil erosion under current land use was calculated taking into account all USLE factors. The study area is the catchment of the Xiangxi River in the Three Gorges Reservoir area. Within the Xiangxi Catchment (3,200 km²) the highly dynamic backwater area (580 km²), and two micro-scale study sites (Xiangjiaba with 2.8 km², and Quyuan with 88 km²) are considered more detailed as they are directly affected by the river impoundment. Central features of the Xiangxi Catchment are the subtropical monsoon climate, an extremely steep sloping relief (mean slope angle 39°, SD 22.8°) artificially fractured by farmland terraces, and a high soil erodibility (mean K factor 0.37, SD 0.13). On the catchment scale the natural disposition to soil erosion makes up to mean 518.0 t ha-1 a-1. The maximum potential soil loss of 1,730.1 t ha-1 a-1 under natural conditions is reached in the Quyuan site (mean 635.8 t ha-1 a-1) within the backwater area (mean 582.9 t ha-1 a-1). In the

  4. Assessing Soil Organic C Sequestration with the Soil Conditioning Index in the Southeastern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil organic C sequestration can be a significant driver of how conservation management systems are adopted by producers and promoted by government agencies. Simulation of various tillage, crop rotation, and cover cropping conditions across the cotton growing region of the southeastern USA would al...

  5. Estimating soil organic carbon sequestration throughout the Cotton Belt with the soil conditioning index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil organic C sequestration can be a significant driver of how conservation management systems are adopted by producers and promoted by government agencies. Simulation of various tillage, crop rotation, and cover cropping conditions across the cotton growing region of the southeastern USA would al...

  6. Laboratory investigation of boundary condition impacts on nitrate anion exclusion in an unsaturated soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transient unsaturated horizontal column experiments were conducted with a loam soil, under variable boundary conditions, to obtain added insight on anion exclusion processes that impact nitrate transport in soil. The boundary conditions evaluated were column inlet soil water content, initial soil w...

  7. Reported respiratory symptoms and adverse home conditions after 9/11 among residents living near the World Trade Center.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shao; Jones, Rena; Reibman, Joan; Bowers, James; Fitzgerald, Edward F; Hwang, Syni-An

    2007-05-01

    This study investigated whether self-reported damage, dust, and odors in homes near the World Trade Center (WTC) after September 11, 2001, were related to increased rates of respiratory symptoms among residents and if multiple sources of exposure were associated with greater health risk. We mailed questionnaires to homes within 1.5 km of the WTC site (affected area) and in upper Manhattan (control area). Surveys asked about respiratory symptoms, unplanned medical visits, physician diagnoses, medication use, and conditions in the home after 9/11. Adverse home conditions were associated with new-onset (i.e., began after 9/11) and persistent (i.e., remained 1 year after 9/11) upper and lower respiratory symptoms in the affected area (Cumulative Incidence Ratios [CIRs] 1.20-1.71). Residents reporting longer duration of dust/odors or multiple sources of exposure had greater risk for symptoms compared to those reporting shorter duration and fewer sources. These data suggest that WTC-related contamination in the home after 9/11 was associated with new and persistent respiratory symptoms among residents living near the site. While we cannot eliminate potential biases related to self-reported data, we took strategies to minimize their impact, and the observed effects are biologically plausible. PMID:17530533

  8. Survival of a microbial soil community under Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. A.; Noernberg, P.; Merrison, J.; Lomstein, B. Aa.; Finster, K. W.

    2003-04-01

    Because of the similarities between Earth and Mars early history the hypothesis was forwarded that Mars is a site where extraterrestrial life might have and/or may still occur(red). Sample-return missions are planned by NASA and ESA to test this hypothesis. The enormous economic costs and the logistic challenges of these missions make earth-based model facilities inevitable. The Mars simulation system at University of Aarhus, Denmark allows microbiological experiments under Mars analogue conditions. Thus detailed studies on the effect of Mars environmental conditions on the survival and the activity of a natural microbial soil community were carried out. Changes in the soil community were determined with a suite of different approaches: 1) total microbial respiration activity was investigated with 14C-glucose, 2) the physiological profile was investigated by the EcoLog-system, 3) colony forming units were determined by plate counts and 4) the microbial diversity on the molecular level was accessed with Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis. The simulation experiments showed that a part of the bacterial community survived Martian conditions corresponding to 9 Sol. These and future simulation experiments will contribute to our understanding of the possibility for extraterrestrial and terrestrial life on Mars.

  9. Tools to support maintenance strategies under soft soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, J. W. M.; van Meerten, J. J.; Woning, M. P.; Eijbersen, M. J.; Huber, M.

    2015-11-01

    Costs for maintenance of infrastructure in municipalities with soft soil underground conditions, are estimated to be almost 40 % higher than in others. As a result, these municipalities meet financial problems that cause overdue maintenance. In some cases municipalities are even afraid to be unable to offer a minimum service level in future. In common, traditional practice, roads and sewerage systems have been constructed in trenches that consist of sandy material that replaces the upper meters of the soft soil. Under influence of its weight, this causes accelerated settlements of the construction. A number of alternative constructions have been developed, e.g. using light-weight materials to limit settlement velocity. In order to limit future maintenance costs, improvement of maintenance strategies is desired. Tools have been and will be developed to support municipalities in improving their maintenance strategies and save money by doing that. A model (BALANS) that weighs the attractiveness of alternative solutions under different soil, environmental and economic circumstances, will be presented.

  10. Characterization of Apollo Bulk Soil Samples Under Simulated Lunar Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Thomas, I.; Bowles, N. E.; Greenhagen, B. T.

    2013-12-01

    Remote observations provide key insights into the composition and evolution of planetary surfaces. A fundamentally important component to any remote compositional analysis of planetary surfaces is laboratory measurements of well-characterized samples measured under the appropriate environmental conditions. The vacuum environment of airless bodies like the Moon creates a steep thermal gradient in the upper hundreds of microns of regolith. Lab studies of particulate rocks and minerals as well as selected lunar soils under vacuum and lunar-like conditions have identified significant effects of this thermal gradient on thermal infrared (TIR) spectral measurements [e.g. Logan et al. 1973, Salisbury and Walter 1989, Thomas et al. 2012, Donaldson Hanna et al. 2012]. Such lab studies demonstrate the high sensitivity of TIR emissivity spectra to environmental conditions under which they are measured. To best understand the effects of the near surface-environment of the Moon, a consortium of four institutions with the capabilities of characterizing lunar samples was created. The goal of the Thermal Infrared Emission Studies of Lunar Surface Compositions Consortium (TIRES-LSCC) is to characterize Apollo bulk soil samples with a range of compositions and maturities in simulated lunar conditions to provide better context for the spectral effects due to varying compositions and soil maturity as well as for the interpretation of data obtained by the LRO Diviner Lunar Radiometer and future lunar and airless body thermal emission spectrometers. An initial set of thermal infrared emissivity measurements of the bulk lunar soil samples will be made in three of the laboratories included in the TIRES-LSCC: the Asteroid and Lunar Environment Chamber (ALEC) in RELAB at Brown University, the Simulated Lunar Environment chamber in the Planetary Spectroscopy Facility (PSF) at the University of Oxford, and the Simulated Airless Body Emission Laboratory (SABEL) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  11. Effect of local soil conditions on site amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.C.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Johnson, J.J.

    1983-02-18

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is developing a complete fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. The analysis procedure is based upon a state-of-the-art evaluation of the current seismic analysis and design process and explicitly accounts for uncertainties inherent in such a process. In Phase I, the seismic input, the soil-structure interaction, dynamic response of structures and subsystems, and fragility were developed and combined using a probabilistic computational procedure. Demonstration calculations were completed for the Zion nuclear power plant. In Phase II, presently ongoing, additional models, improvements to existing models, and improvements to the probabilistic computational assessment of Zion have been developed. Local site amplification has significant effect on structural response and is a major source of uncertainty. As part of the final Zion analysis in Phase II, an assessment of the local site effect at the Zion site was made using new time histories modified for the Zion soil conditions. In this paper, we briefly describe the approach used to correct the seismic hazard curve and time histories developed in Phase I for local site effects and discuss in some detail the results of our efforts to validate the approach. The principle step in the approach was the use of an equivalent linear iterative technique assuming vertically incident waves to correct a set of time histories appropriate for a rock outcrop for the local soil column. For the Zion soil column this led to large correction factors.

  12. Soil organic carbon of European forest soils: current stock and projections under climate change conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caddeo, Antonio; Marras, Serena; Spano, Donatella; Sirca, Costantino

    2016-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) represents the largest terrestrial carbon pool, and it is subjected to climate change impacts. In Europe, a limited number of studies makes a wide-scale comparison of SOC stock and changes under climate change conditions, and most of them are related to agricultural soils. In this work, the SOC stock of the forested areas of Europe (obtained from the CORINE 2006 Land Use Map) was assessed at 1 km resolution using the agro-ecosystem SOC model CENTURY. The results of the model were compared with independent observational datasets (i.e. LUCAS Topsoil Survey Database). In addition, climate simulations (RCPs 4.5 and 8.5) using the CMCC (Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Climate Change) and the CORDEX dataset were used to estimate the SOC changes of these areas under climate change conditions.

  13. Effects of soil oxygen conditions and soil pH on remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by laccase from white rot fungi.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuechun; Yi, Xiaoyun

    2010-04-01

    High residues of DDT in agricultural soils are of concern because they present serious threats to food security and human health. This article focuses on remediation of DDT-contaminated soil using laccase under different soil oxygen and soil pH conditions. The laboratory experiment results showed significant effects of soil oxygen conditions and soil pH on remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by laccase at the end of a 25-d incubation period. This study found the positive correlation between the concentration of oxygen in soil and the degradation of DDT by laccase. The residue of DDTs in soil under the atmosphere of oxygen decreased by 28.1% compared with the atmosphere of nitrogen at the end of the incubation with laccase. A similar pattern was observed in the remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by laccase under different flooding conditions, the higher the concentrations of oxygen in soil, the lower the residues of four DDT components and DDTs in soils. The residue of DDTs in the nonflooding soil declined by 16.7% compared to the flooded soil at the end of the incubation. The residues of DDTs in soils treated with laccase were lower in the pH range 2.5-4.5. PMID:20617049

  14. The effect of environmental conditions and soil physicochemistry on phosphate stabilisation of Pb in shooting range soils.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi

    2016-04-01

    The stabilisation of Pb in the soil by phosphate is influenced by environmental conditions and physicochemical properties of the soils to which it is applied. Stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined in four soils under different environmental conditions. The effect of soil moisture and temperature on stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined by measurement of water extractable and bioaccessible Pb, sequential fractionation and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The addition of humic acid, ammonium nitrate and chloride was also examined for inhibition or improvement of Pb stability with phosphate treatment. The effect of moisture level varied between soils. In soil MB and DA a soil moisture level of 50% water holding capacity was sufficient to maximise stabilisation of Pb, but in soil TV and PE reduction in bioaccessible Pb was inhibited at this moisture level. Providing moisture at twice the soil water holding capacity did not enhance the effect of phosphate on Pb stabilisation. The difference of Pb stability as a result of incubating phosphate treated soils at 18 °C and 37 °C was relatively small. However wet-dry cycles decreased the effectiveness of phosphate treatment. The reduction in bioaccessible Pb obtained was between 20 and 40% with the most optimal treatment conditions. The reduction in water extractable Pb by phosphate was substantial regardless of incubation conditions and the effect of different temperature and soil moisture regimes was not significant. Selective sequential extraction showed phosphate treatment converted Pb in fraction 1 (exchangeable, acid and water soluble) to fraction 2 (reducible). There were small difference in fraction 4 (residual) Pb and fraction 1 as a result of treatment conditions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of stabilised PE soil revealed small differences in Pb speciation under varying soil moisture and temperature treatments. The addition of humic acid and chloride produced the greatest effect on Pb speciation in

  15. Can the soil conditioning index predict soil organic carbon sequestration with conservation agricultural systems in the South?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil conditioning index (SCI) is a relatively simple model used by NRCS to predict changes in soil organic C. It is based on three important conditions: (1) organic material (OM), (2) field operations (FO), and (3) erosion (ER). Our objective was to develop quantitative relationships between (...

  16. Arsenopyrite weathering under conditions of simulated calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Lara, René H; Velázquez, Leticia J; Vazquez-Arenas, Jorge; Mallet, Martine; Dossot, Manuel; Labastida, Israel; Sosa-Rodríguez, Fabiola S; Espinosa-Cristóbal, León F; Escobedo-Bretado, Miguel A; Cruz, Roel

    2016-02-01

    Mining activities release arsenopyrite into calcareous soils where it undergoes weathering generating toxic compounds. The research evaluates the environmental impacts of these processes under semi-alkaline carbonated conditions. Electrochemical (cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, EIS), spectroscopic (Raman, XPS), and microscopic (SEM, AFM, TEM) techniques are combined along with chemical analyses of leachates collected from simulated arsenopyrite weathering to comprehensively examine the interfacial mechanisms. Early oxidation stages enhance mineral reactivity through the formation of surface sulfur phases (e.g., S n (2-)/S(0)) with semiconductor properties, leading to oscillatory mineral reactivity. Subsequent steps entail the generation of intermediate siderite (FeCO3)-like, followed by the formation of low-compact mass sub-micro ferric oxyhydroxides (α, γ-FeOOH) with adsorbed arsenic (mainly As(III), and lower amounts of As(V)). In addition, weathering reactions can be influenced by accessible arsenic resulting in the formation of a symplesite (Fe3(AsO4)3)-like compound which is dependent on the amount of accessible arsenic in the system. It is proposed that arsenic release occurs via diffusion across secondary α, γ-FeOOH structures during arsenopyrite weathering. We suggest weathering mechanisms of arsenopyrite in calcareous soil and environmental implications based on experimental data. PMID:26498805

  17. Influences of solution chemical conditions on mobilization of TNT from contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Dante, D.A.; Tiller, C.L.; Pennell, K.D.

    1996-12-31

    Residual explosives and their byproducts are common contaminants at several US military installations. One of the major explosive contaminants is 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) (a hydrophobic organic compound). Contamination from TNT has resulted from manufacturing and handling processes which occurred at military installations, especially Army Ammunition Plants (AAP), over many decades until environmental regulations were implemented. TNT causes adverse effects to the environment, including growth inhibition to plants, toxicity to aquatic life, and possible mutagenicity, and also is toxic to humans. As a result of the effects of TNT on the environment and current environmental regulations, substantial research effort has been focused on determining the fate of TNT in natural systems and the development of remediation processes. Many potential remediation processes, such as those involving plants or microorganisms, are in part limited by the transfer of TNT from solid phases (e.g., sorbed to soil or present as TNT granules) to the aqueous phase. The purpose of this research is to assess the release of TNT from a soil phase to a mobile aqueous phase under varying solution chemical conditions. In particular, influences of pH, aquatic natural organic matter, and surfactants are investigated.

  18. Amplifying Learning through Sites of Pedagogical Practice: A Possible Effect of Working with Disciplinary Technologies in Schools Operating under Adverse Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Debra

    2005-01-01

    Schools located within communities experiencing high levels of social dislocation, educational disadvantage and student disengagement from learning are working under "adverse conditions". These schools face particular challenges when it comes to stabilising and sustaining wholeschool change aimed at improving students' learning outcomes. In this…

  19. Effects of redox conditions on the adsorption of dissolved organic matter to soil minerals and differently aged paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerwein, Meike; Hanke, Alexander; Kaiser, Klaus; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2010-05-01

    Effects of redox conditions on the adsorption of dissolved organic matter to soil minerals and differently aged paddy soils Meike Sauerwein1, Alexander Hanke2, Klaus Kaiser3, Karsten Kalbitz2 1) Dept. of Soil Ecology, Bayreuth Centre of Ecology and Environmental Research (BayCEER), University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany, meike.sauerwein@gmail.com 2) Institute of ecosystem dynamics and biodiversity, University of Amsterdam, 1018 WV, Netherlands, a.hanke@uva.nl, k.kalbitz@uva.nl 3) Soil Sciences, Martin Luther University Halle, 06099 Halle, Germany, klaus.kaiser@landw.uni-halle.de Current knowledge on dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soils is based mainly on observations and experiments in aerobic environments. Adsorption to soil minerals is an important mechanism of DOM retention and stabilization against microbial decay under oxic conditions. Under anoxic conditions where hydrous iron oxides, the potential main adsorbents of DOM, possibly dissolve, the importance of adsorption seems questionable. Therefore, we studied the adsorption of DOM to selected soil minerals and to mineral soils under oxic and anoxic conditions. In detail, we tested the following hypotheses: 1. Minerals and soils adsorb less DOM under anoxic conditions than under oxic ones. 2. The reduced adsorption under anoxic conditions is result of the smaller adsorption to hydrous Fe oxides whereas adsorption to clay minerals and Al hydroxides is not sensitive to changes in redox conditions 3. DOM adsorption will increase with the number of redox cycles, thus time of soil formation, due to increasing contents of poorly crystalline Fe oxides. This will, however, cause a stronger sensitivity to redox changes as poor crystalline Fe oxides are more reactive. 4. Aromatic compounds, being preferentially adsorbed under oxic conditions, will be less strongly adsorbed under anoxic conditions. We chose paddy soils as models because their periodically and regular exposure to changing redox cycles, with

  20. SCREENING COTTON VARIETIES FOR TOLERANCE TO WATERLOGGED SOIL CONDITIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is adapted to an arid climate and well drained soils. Waterlogged soils are considered to be one of the major problems for cotton producers world wide. This problem is amplified on heavy clay soils, and furrow irrigation makes the potential for waterlogging even greater. To investigate the r...

  1. Wireless sensor network for monitoring soil moisture and weather conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wireless sensor network (WSN) was developed and deployed in three fields to monitor soil water status and collect weather data for irrigation scheduling. The WSN consists of soil-water sensors, weather sensors, wireless data loggers, and a wireless modem. Soil-water sensors were installed at three...

  2. Healthy soil as a necessary condition of human life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, M. S.; Dorodnykh, Yu. L.; Marchenko, A. I.

    2010-07-01

    The extent of soil degradation and soil pathology in Russia is discussed. The concept of a federal target program “National System of the Chemical and Biological Security of the Russian Federation (2009-2013)” is examined. A definition is given to healthy soil of agrocenoses and its main functional characteristic—ecological stability (including balanced biodiversity, self-cleaning capacity, and suppressive activity of the phytopedocenosis). Urgent applied scientific problems of regional soil sanitation are formulated. Criteria and modern methods of ecological monitoring and assessment of soil quality and health are considered. A systems approach to sanitation of soils infected by highly harmful phytopathogens—the causative agents of root rots of cereal crops—is demonstrated using the induction of soil suppressiveness as an example.

  3. Genotype and Neuropsychological Response Inhibition as Resilience Promoters for ADHD, ODD, and CD under Conditions of Psychosocial Adversity

    PubMed Central

    Nigg, Joel; Nikolas, Molly; Friderici, Karen; Park, Leeyoung; Zucker, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Whereas child personality, IQ, and family factors have been identified as enabling a resilient response to psychosocial adversity, more direct biological resilience factors have been less well delineated. This is particularly so for child ADHD, which has received less attention from a resilience perspective than have associated externalizing disorders. Children from two independent samples were classified as resilient if they avoided developing ADHD, ODD, or CD in the face of family adversity. Two protective factors were examined for their potential relevance to prefrontal brain development: neuropsychological response inhibition, as assessed by the Stop task, and a composite catecholamine genotype risk score. Resilient children were characterized in both samples by more effective response inhibition, although the effect in the second sample was very small. Genotype was measured in Sample 1, and a composite high risk genotype index was developed by summing presence of risk across markers on three genes expressed in prefrontal cortex: dopamine transporter, dopamine D4 receptor, and noradrenergic alpha 2 receptor. Genotype was a reliable resilience indicator against development of ADHD and CD, but not ODD, in the face of psychosocial adversity. Results illustrate potential neurobiological protective factors related to development of prefrontal cortex that may enable children to avoid developing ADHD and CD in the presence of psychosocial adversity. PMID:17705902

  4. Adversity-induced relapse of fear: neural mechanisms and implications for relapse prevention from a study on experimentally induced return-of-fear following fear conditioning and extinction.

    PubMed

    Scharfenort, R; Menz, M; Lonsdorf, T B

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of current treatments for anxiety disorders is limited by high relapse rates. Relapse of anxiety disorders and addiction can be triggered by exposure to life adversity, but the underlying mechanisms remain unexplored. Seventy-six healthy adults were a priori selected for the presence or absence of adverse experiences during childhood (CA) and recent past (RA; that is, past 12 months). Participants underwent fear conditioning (day 1) and fear extinction and experimental return-of-fear (ROF) induction through reinstatement (a model for adversity-induced relapse; day 2). Ratings, autonomic (skin conductance response) and neuronal activation measures (functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)) were acquired. Individuals exposed to RA showed a generalized (that is, not CS- specific) fear recall and ROF, whereas unexposed individuals showed differential (that is, CS+ specific) fear recall and ROF on an autonomic level despite no group differences during fear acquisition and extinction learning. These group differences in ROF were accompanied by corresponding activation differences in brain areas known to be involved in fear processing and differentiability/generalization of ROF (that is, hippocampus). In addition, dimensional measures of RA, CA and lifetime adversity were negatively correlated with differential skin conductance responses (SCRs) during ROF and hippocampal activation. As discriminating signals of danger and safety, as well as a tendency for overgeneralization, are core features in clinically anxious populations, these deficits may specifically contribute to relapse risk following exposure to adversity, in particular to recent adversity. Hence, our results may provide first and novel insights into the possible mechanisms mediating enhanced relapse risk following exposure to (recent) adversity, which may guide the development of effective pre- and intervention programs. PMID:27434492

  5. Effect of soil conditions on solar pond performance

    SciTech Connect

    Leboeuf, C.M.; Johnson, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    A recent effort to design a one-acre solar pond at the US Air Force Academy brought up several research issues pertaining to solar pond performance prediction. This report addresses those issues. Interactions of the pond with the soil below it have historically been estimated using very simplistic techniques that tend to ignore soil composition, moisture content, and the coupled heat and moisture transport phenomena. This study examines the models of soil thermal conductivity and heat and mass transport in soils under imposed temperature gradients to assess the potential applicability of these models to solar pond modeling. In addition, a computer simulation code is developed that incorporates the soil thermal conductivity model. Using the code, a parametric analysis was performed illustrating the impact of this property on pond behavior and the importance of experimental model verification for the range of soil temperatures experienced in solar ponds. Implications of the combined heat and moisture movement theory on solar pond performance are presented.

  6. Predicting soil organic carbon sequestration in crop production systems of the southeastern USA with EPIC and the soil conditioning index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Conditioning Index (SCI), administered by the USDA-Natural Resource Conservation Service, predicts a positive or negative trend in soil organic carbon (SOC) based on knowledge of field operations, erosion loss, and organic matter inputs, but has not been adequately calibrated against long-t...

  7. Investigation of Soil Conditioning Index Values for Southern High Plains Agroecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS) has proposed the Soil Conditioning Index (SCI) to predict the consequences of management actions on the state of soil organic carbon (SOC), a soil quality indicator. The SCI predicts qualitative changes i...

  8. Kinetic Distribution of 14C-Metsulfuron-methyl Residues in Paddy Soils under Different Moisture Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice paddy soils undergo several cycles of drying and wetting during a growing season. A laboratory study was conducted to determine the effect of soil moisture conditions on the distribution and kinetics of extractable and bound residues of 14C-metsulfuron-methyl in six Chinese paddy soils during 8...

  9. A colonizing species has high fitness on soils with an exotic species legacy when conditioning effects are mitigated

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant interaction with soil can create feedbacks that influence intraspecific and interspecific performance. These feedbacks can either be short term, within-season soil conditioning called priority effects or longer-term influences called soil legacies. Soil conditioning and soil legacies can preve...

  10. Black locust--successful invader of a wide range of soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Vítková, Michaela; Tonika, Jaroslav; Müllerová, Jana

    2015-02-01

    Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia, BL), a species native to North America, has successfully invaded many types of habitats over the world. This study provides an overall assessment of BL soil conditions to determine the range of physical-chemical soil properties it can tolerate. 511 BL stands (for the soil types) and 33 permanent plots (for the soil chemistry) were studied in the Czech Republic. Relationships among different environmental variables (physical-chemical soil properties, vegetation characteristics and habitat conditions) were investigated and variables with the highest effect on species composition were detected. The results were compared with data in the literature for other parts of the secondary and native distributions of this species. This assessment showed that BL is able to tolerate extremely diverse soil physical-chemical conditions, from extremely acid to strongly alkaline, and from medium to highly base saturated soils with a gradient of different subsurface stoniness. Soil nitrate, N mineralization and nitrification rates also varied considerably and the concentrations of exchangeable phosphorus and ammonium were consistently low. N mineralization rate, incubated inorganic nitrogen and nitrates were positively correlated with base saturation and cation exchange capacity. The most common soil types were young soils (Cambisols, Leptosols, Arenosols, and coarsely textured Fluvisols). BL seems to be limited by water supply and soil aeration and prefers well aerated and drained soils, and tolerates desiccation but avoids compact soils and areas where the soils are frequently waterlogged. On steep slopes, BL was less vigorous, stunted and less competitive. By contrast, the tallest BL trees were found on sandy soils in a flat landscape. Number and share of nitrophytes in the herb layer were positively related to basic bedrock, soil reaction and N-NO3/N ratio. Soil reaction was determined as the most important environmental characteristic

  11. Optimizing Soil Hydraulic Parameters in RZWQM2 Under Fallow Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective estimation of soil hydraulic parameters is essential for predicting soil water dynamics and related biochemical processes in agricultural systems. However, high uncertainties in estimated parameter values limit a model’s skill for prediction and application. In this study, a global search ...

  12. Greenhouse gas emissions from soil under changing environmental conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript is the Guest Editors’ Introduction to a special issue on greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture. The papers were assembled following presentation at EuroSoil 2012. Exchange of greenhouse gases between soils and the atmosphere is a natural consequence of several ecosystem process...

  13. Some adverse effects of soil amendment with organic Materials-The case of soils polluted by copper industry phytostabilized with red fescue.

    PubMed

    Cuske, Mateusz; Karczewska, Anna; Gałka, Bernard; Dradrach, Agnieszka

    2016-08-01

    The study was aimed to examine the effects of soil amendment with organic waste materials on the growth of red fescue and the uptake of Cu and Zn by this grass, in view of its potential usage for phytostabilization of Cu-polluted soils. Five soils, containing 301-5180 mg/kg Cu, were collected from the surroundings of copper smelter Legnica, and amended with lignite (LG) and limed sewage sludge (SS). Plant growth and the concentrations of Cu and Zn in the shoots and roots of grass were measured in a pot experiment and related to the results of Pytotoxkit and Microtox® tests performed on soil solution. The effects of soil amendment with LG and SS differed greatly, and depended on soil properties. In some cases, the application of alkaline SS resulted in dramatic increase of Cu phytotoxicity and its enhanced uptake by plants, while application of LG to slightly acidic soil caused increased accumulation of Zn in plants, particularly in their roots. The study confirmed good suitability of red fescue for phytostabilization of Cu-contaminated soils except for those extremely polluted. Organic amendments to be used for metal immobilization should be thoroughly examined prior to application. PMID:26853183

  14. [Morphology of soil iron oxides and its correlation with soil-forming process and forming conditions in a karst mountain].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Zhu, Zhang-Xiong; Fu, Wa-Li; Wen, Zhi-Lin

    2012-06-01

    The quantity and morphology of iron oxides are indicators of soil forming-process and forming conditions. In order to analyze the connection between soil iron oxides and soil forming conditions and degenerative process of karst ecosystem, we have chosen 14 soil profiles on the top and middle section of Jinfo Mountain, a typical karst slope in Chongqing, China. Morphology and contents of soil iron oxides were studied by using chemical selective extraction techniques. We draw conclusions: 1) total iron (Fe(t)) is mainly controlled by parent material and lithology. Significant difference of Fe(t) content exists between soils in Top Mountain (51.49 g x kg(-1), mean value from 5 profiles) and soils at the middle sector of North Slope (86.29 g x kg(-1), mean value of 9 profiles); 2) the results show low concentration of F(d) (29.16 g x kg(-1)) and low ratio of Fe(d) to Fe(t)(35.40%) in soil clay under conditions of high elevation and low temperature on Top Mountain. In contrast, the results indicate advanced weathering and soil-forming process at middle slope sites due to high temperature; this is supported by high mean values of Fe(d) (43.92 g x kg(-1)) and ratio of Fe(d)/Fe(t) in clay (60.41%); 3) long humid climatic setting and large numbers of soil organic matter on top of the mountain result in high activation degrees (F(o)/Fe(d)) and high complexation degrees (Fe(p)/Fe(d)); mean values of them are 73.51%, 17.21% respectively, which are higher than that of soils at middle slope sites (13.06%, 0.41%); 4) after degradation or deforestation of secondary forestland (pines massoniana among bushes) at middle section of the hillslope, soil free iron oxides (Fe(d)) and total iron oxides (Fe(t)) decrease as well as soil organic carbon and clay, because of progressively increasing of soil erosion. Average contents of Fe(t) and Fe(d) in clay from 2 shrub profiles are 98.25 g x kg(-1), 50.81 g x kg(-1) respectively. However, the four tillage soils we have studied reveal lower

  15. A standardized soil quality index for diverse field conditions.

    PubMed

    de Paul Obade, Vincent; Lal, Rattan

    2016-01-15

    Understanding the nexus between soil quality and productivity is constrained by data artifacts, compounded by limitations of the existing models. Here, we explore the potential of 4 regression methods (i.e., Reduced Regression (RR), SIMPLS, Principal Component Regression (PCR), and Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR)), to synthesize 10 soil physical and chemical properties acquired from 3 major management practices and different soil layers, into an unbiased soil quality index (SQI) capable of evaluating soil functions (e.g., biomass production). The data was acquired from privately owned fields within the state of Ohio, USA, at the following land use and management sites: natural vegetation (NV) or woodlands, conventional till (CT), and no-till (NT). The soils were sampled at similar landscape positions (i.e., summit) at depth intervals of 0-10, 10-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm, and analyzed for bulk density (ρb), carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio, soil organic C (SOC), total N (TN), available water capacity (AWC), pH and electrical conductivity (EC). Preliminary analyses revealed the PLSR method as the most robust. The PLSR Variable Importance of Projection (VIP) was calculated, transformed into the SQI score and compared with yield data. SOC, ρb, C/N and EC were identified as the major variables influencing soil quality status. The data shows that the quality of Pewamo silty clay loam (Pw) soil was higher than Crosby Celina loams (CtA), Kibbie fine sandy loam (kbA), Glynwood silt loam (GWA) and Crosby silt loam (CrA), respectively. In 2012, the mean SQI was 42.9%, with corn and soybean yields of 7 and 2Mg/ha. The R(2) of SQI versus yield was 0.74 for corn (Zea mays L.), and 0.89 for soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). Future studies will investigate techniques for mapping this SQI. PMID:26410717

  16. SUBSURFACE SOIL CONDITIONS BENEATH AND NEAR BUILDINGS AND THE POTENTIAL EFFECTS ON SOIL VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings is called vapor intrusion. Volatile organic chemicals in contaminated soils or groundwater can emit vapors that may migrate through subsurface soils and enter indoor air spaces of overlying buildings. T...

  17. Mobility of spiromesifen in packed soil columns under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Mate, Ch Jamkhokai; Mukherjee, Irani; Das, Shaon Kumar

    2014-11-01

    On percolating water equivalent to 1,156 mm of rainfall, spiromesifen formulation did not leach out of 25-cm long columns, and 62.7 % of this was recovered in 5-10-cm soil depth. In columns treated with the analytical grade, 52.40 % of the recovered spiromesifen was confined to 0-5-cm soil depth, with 0.04 % in leachate fraction, suggesting high adsorption in soil. Results revealed that percolating 400 mL of water, residues of enol metabolite of spiromesifen was detected up to 20-25-cm soil layer, with 23.50 % residues of spiromesifen in this layer and 1.73 % in the leachate fraction indicating that metabolite is more mobile as compared to the parent compound. Results suggested a significant reduction in leaching losses of enol metabolite in amended soil columns with 5 % nano clay, farmyard manure (FYM), and vermicompost. No enol spiromesifen was recovered in the leachate in columns amended with nano clay, vermicompost, and FYM; however, 85.30, 70.5, and 65.40 %, respectively, was recovered from 0-5 cm-soil depth of column after percolating water equivalent to 1,156 mm of rainfall. Spiromesifen formulation is less mobile in sandy loam soil than analytical grade spiromesifen. The metabolite, enol spiromesifen, is relatively more mobile than the parent compound and may leach into groundwater. The study suggested that amendments were very effective in reducing the downward mobility of enol metabolite in soil column. Further, it resulted in greater retention of enol metabolite in the amendment application zone. PMID:25060860

  18. Biotoxicity of Mars soils: 1. Dry deposition of analog soils on microbial colonies and survival under Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Doug W.

    2012-11-01

    Six Mars analog soils were created to simulate a range of potentially biotoxic geochemistries relevant to the survival of terrestrial microorganisms on Mars, and included basalt-only (non-toxic control), salt, acidic, alkaline, aeolian, and perchlorate rich geochemistries. Experiments were designed to simulate the dry-deposition of Mars soils onto spacecraft surfaces during an active descent landing scenario with propellant engines. Six eubacteria were initially tested for tolerance to desiccation, and the spore-former Bacillus subtilis HA101 and non-spore former Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 were identified to be strongly resistant (HA101) and moderately resistant (29212) to desiccation at 24 °C. Furthermore, tests with B. subtilis and E. faecalis demonstrated that at least 1 mm of Mars analog soil was required to fully attenuate the biocidal effects of a simulated Mars-normal equatorial UV flux. Biotoxicity experiments were conducted under simulated Martian conditions of 6.9 mbar, -10 °C, CO2-enriched anoxic atmosphere, and a simulated equatorial solar spectrum (200-1100 nm) with an optical depth of 0.1. For B. subtilis, the six analog soils were found, in general, to be of low biotoxicity with only the high salt and acidic soils exhibiting the capacity to inactivate a moderate number of spores (<1 log reductions) exposed 7 days to the soils under simulated Martian conditions. In contrast, the overall response of E. faecalis to the analog soils was more dramatic with between two and three orders of magnitude reductions in viable cells for most soils, and between six and seven orders of magnitude reductions observed for the high-salt soil. Results suggest that Mars soils are likely not to be overtly biotoxic to terrestrial microorganisms, and suggest that the soil geochemistries on Mars will not preclude the habitability of the Martian surface.

  19. Effects of agricultural practices of three crops on the soil communities under Mediterranean conditions: field evaluation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Sara; José Cerejeira, Maria; Abreu, Manuela; Sousa, José Paulo

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable agricultural production relies on soil communities as the main actors in key soil processes necessary to maintain sustainable soil functioning. Soil biodiversity influences soil physical and chemical characteristics and thus the sustainability of crop and agro-ecosystems functioning. Agricultural practices (e.g.: soil tillage, pesticides and fertilizer applications, irrigation) may affects negatively or positively soil biodiversity and abundances by modifying the relationships between organisms in the soil ecosystem. The present study aimed to study the influence of agricultural practices of three crops (potato, onion and maize) under Mediterranean climate conditions on soil macro- and mesofauna during their entire crop cycles. Effects on soil communities were assessed at a higher tier of environmental risk assessment comprising field testing of indigenous edaphic communities in a selected study-site located in a major agriculture region of Central Portugal, Ribatejo e Oeste, neighbouring protected wetlands. A reference site near the agricultural field site was selected as a Control site to compare the terrestrial communities' composition and variation along the crop cycle. The field soil and Control site soil are sandy loam soils. Crops irrigation was performed by center-pivot (automated sprinkler that rotates in a half a circle area) and by sprinklers. Soil macro- and mesofauna were collected at both sites (field and Control) using two methodologies through pitfall trapping and soil sampling. The community of soil macro- and mesofauna of the three crops field varied versus control site along the crops cycles. Main differences were due to arachnids, coleopterans, ants and adult Diptera presence and abundance. The feeding activity of soil fauna between control site and crop areas varied only for potato and onion crops vs. control site but not among crops. Concentration of pesticides residues in soil did not cause apparent negative effects on the soil

  20. Conditional dependence of evaporative fraction on surface and root-zone soil moisture and its application to soil moisture retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, D.; Akuraju, V.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) or evapotranspiration (ET) estimates from space have been gaining growing attention as an input to retrieve root-zone soil moisture. The rationale behind the approach is that i) there exists a strong causal link between the evapotranspiration and the vegetation canopy temperature and ii) under water-limited conditions soil water available for transpiration controls the evaporative fraction (EF) or the actual evapotranspiration (AET) to potential evapotranspiration (PET) ratio of vegetated surfaces. In this work, we examine the relationship between EF and surface to root-zone soil moisture content collected from two study sites (wheat and pasture fields) at the Dookie research farm site in Victoria, Australia. EF estimated from the eddy covariance system is compared with soil moisture content under various ranges of soil depths (5 depths from surface to 120 cm), net radiation, soil wetness and biomass. In both wheat and pasture fields, EF is highly correlated with surface (0-8 cm) soil moisture when the soil surface is bare-to-lightly vegetated, but the correlation decreases as vegetation grows or as the net radiation decreases. On the other hand, EF shows strong correlation with root-zone soil moisture during the growing seasons of the fields. Under similar ranges of soil moisture and net radiation, EF can have different ranges depending on the vegetation height and density. These results indicate the importance of biophysical parameters and processes in estimating surface and root-zone soil moisture contents using surface energy flux. We propose an exponential and a spherical model to fit EF versus soil moisture and show how their uncertainty changes with biophysical parameters.

  1. Modelling agricultural suitability along soil transects under current conditions and improved scenario of soil factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Elmabod, Sameh K.; Jordán, Antonio; Fleskens, Luuk; van der Ploeg, Martine; Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Anaya-Romero, María; van der Salm, Renée J.; De la Rosa, Diego

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural land suitability analysis and improvement of soils by addressing major limitations may be a strategy for climate change adaptation. This study aims to investigate the influence of topography and variability of soil factors on the suitability of 12 annual, semiannual and perennial Mediterranean crops in the province of Seville (southern Spain). In order to represent the variability in elevation, lithology and soil, two latitudinal and longitudinal (S-N and W-E) soil transects (TA and TB) were considered including 63 representative points at regular 4 km intervals. These points were represented by 41 soil profiles from the SDBm soil database -Seville. Almagra model, a component of the agro-ecological decision support system MicroLEIS, was used to assess soil suitability. Results were grouped into five soil suitability classes: S1-optimum, S2-high, S3-moderate, S4-marginal and S5-not suitable. Each class was divided in subclasses according to the main soil limiting factors: depth (p), texture (t), drainage (d), carbonate content (c), salinity (s), sodium saturation (a), and the degree of development of the soil profile (g). This research also aimed to maximize soil potential by improving limiting factors d, c, s and a after soil restoration. Therefore, management techniques were also considered as possible scenarios in this study. The results of the evaluation showed that soil suitability ranged between S1 and S5p - S5s along of the transects. In the northern extreme of transect TA, high content of gravels and coarse texture are limiting factors (soils are classified as S4t) In contrast, the limiting factor in the eastern extreme of transect TB is the shallow useful depth (S5p subclass). The absence of calcium carbonate becomes a limiting factor in some parts of TA. In contrast, the excessive content of calcium carbonate appeared to be a limiting factor for crops in some intermediate points of TB transect. For both transects, soil salinity is the main

  2. Release of Pharmaceuticals under Reducing Conditions in a Wastewater-Irrigated Mexican Soil.

    PubMed

    Dalkmann, Philipp; Dresemann, Tim-Fabian; Siebe, Christina; Mansfeldt, Tim; Amelung, Wulf; Siemens, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Wastewater irrigation is often performed by flood irrigation, leading to changes in redox potential (Eh) of irrigated soils. In addition to soil organic matter, Fe-(hydr)oxides are important sorbents for pollutants, and biotransformation of pollutants can be accelerated under reducing conditions. Here, the influence of reducing conditions on the release of sorbed pharmaceuticals from soil and their potential accelerated dissipation was investigated in a microcosm study. Samples of a soil from the Mezquital Valley (Mexico) irrigated for 85 yr with untreated wastewater were incubated under oxidizing (Eh of 500 ± 20 mV), weakly reducing (Eh of 100 ± 20 mV), and moderately reducing (Eh of -100 ± 20 mV) soil conditions for 30 to 31 d. The concentrations of nine pharmaceuticals (bezafibrate, carbamazepine, ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, enrofloxacin, clarithromycin, diclofenac, and naproxen) were extracted via solid-phase extraction from soil slurries and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Low Eh did not lead to a release of formerly sorbed pharmaceuticals from the wastewater irrigated soil. High pH values (>8) of the examined soil resulting from denitrification under reducing conditions prevented the dissolution of Fe-(hydr)oxides and, hence, the potential release of pharmaceuticals. A trend of decreasing concentrations of sulfamethoxazole and bezafibrate with time under moderately reducing conditions supports previous findings of a transformation of these compounds under anaerobic conditions. PMID:25602209

  3. Soil, water, and vegetation conditions in south Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.; Everitt, J. H.; Gerbermann, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Software development for a computer-aided crop and soil survey system is nearing completion. Computer-aided variety classification accuracies using LANDSAT-1 MSS data for a 600 hectare citrus farm were 83% for Redblush grapefruit and 91% for oranges. These accuracies indicate that there is good potential for computer-aided inventories of grapefruit and orange citrus orchards with LANDSAT-type MSS data. Mean digital values of clouds differed statistically from those for crop, soil, and water entities, and those for cloud shadows were enough lower than sunlit crop and soil to be distinguishable. The standard errors of estimate for the calibration of computer compatible tape coordinate system (pixel and record) to earth coordinate system (longitude and latitude) for 6 LANDSAT scenes ranged from 0.72 to 1.50 pixels and from 0.58 to 1.75 records.

  4. Organic phosphorus fractions in organically amended paddy soils in continuously and intermittently flooded conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changming; Yang, Linzhang; Jianhua, Lee

    2006-01-01

    Soil organic phosphorus (SOP) can greatly contribute to plant-available P and P nutrition. The study was conducted to determine the effects of organic amendments on organic P fractions and microbiological activities in paddy soils. Samples were collected at the Changshu Agro-ecological Experiment Station in Tahu Lake Basin, China, from an experiment that has been performed from 1999 to 2004, on a paddy soil (Gleysols). Treatments consisted of swine manure (SM), wheat straw (WS), swine manure plus wheat straw (SM + WS), and a control (chemical fertilization alone). Organic amendments markedly increased soil total organic phosphorus (TOP) and total organic carbon (TOC), especially in continuously flooded conditions. Based on the fractionation of SOP, organic amendments significantly increased soil labile organic phosphorus (LOP), moderately labile organic phosphorus (MLOP), and moderately stable organic phosphorus (MSOP) compared with the control. For SM and SM + WS treatments, LOP in continuously flooded soils decreased by 30.1 and 36.4%, respectively, compared to intermittently flooded soils. In organically amended soils, continuous flooding showed significantly lower microbial biomass phosphorus (MBP) and alkaline phosphatase activities (APA) than intermittent flooding. In intermittently flooded conditions, incorporating organic amendments into soil resulted in greater P uptake and biomass yield of rice than the control. In the intermittently flooded soils, APA (P < 0.05) and MBP (P < 0.01) were significantly and positively related to TOP, LOP, MLOP, and MSOP, whereas in continuously flooded soils, there was a significant (P < 0.05) negative relationship between MBP, TOP, and MSOP. Based on soil organic P fractions and soil enzymatic and microbiological activities, continuous flooding applied to paddy soils should be avoided, especially when swine manure is incorporated into paddy soil. PMID:16738400

  5. Soil, water, and vegetation conditions in south Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.; Everitt, J. H.; Gerbermann, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The best wavelengths in the 0.4 to 2.5 micron interval were determined for detecting lead toxicity and ozone damage, distinguishing succulent from woody species, and detecting silverleaf sunflower. A perpendicular vegetation index, a measure of the distance from the soil background line, in MSS 5 and MSS 7 data space, of pixels containing vegetation was developed and tested as an indicator of vegetation development and crop vigor. A table lookup procedure was devised that permits rapid identification of soil background and green biomass or phenological development in LANDSAT scenes without the need for training data.

  6. Soil water balance in an unsaturated pyroclastic slope for evaluation of soil hydraulic behaviour and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirone, Marianna; Papa, Raffaele; Nicotera, Marco Valerio; Urciuoli, Gianfranco

    2015-09-01

    Flowslides in granular soils pose a major threat to life and the environment. Their initiation in unsaturated soils is regulated by rainfall infiltration which reduces the matric suction and hence shear strength. Analysis of such phenomena is of strategic importance especially when it aims to mitigate landslide risk by means of early warning systems (EWSs). In this framework, physically-based models need to reproduce the hydro-mechanical behaviour of the slopes through numerical analyses, whose main uncertainty concerns the hydraulic conditions at the boundaries of the studied domain and hydraulic conductivity functions of unsaturated soils. Hence consummate knowledge of both these factors is absolutely necessary for efficient predictions. In this paper hydraulic boundary conditions and hydraulic conductivity functions are investigated at the scale of the slope through an application of soil water balance based on in-situ monitoring at the test site of Monteforte Irpino (southern Italy). Meteorological data, matric suction and soil water content measurements were collected over four years at the test site. The soil water balance was analysed on a seasonal time scale with regard to the whole pyroclastic cover resting on the steep limestone substratum. Infiltration and runoff are estimated, interaction between the soil cover and the substratum is investigated, and the hydraulic conductivity functions operative at the site scale are defined.

  7. [Dynamics of soil microbial biomass and dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen under flooded condition].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shaojun; Peng, Peiqin; Rong, Xiangmin; Liu, Qiang; Tang, Qi

    2006-11-01

    With reddish yellow soil (RYS) and alluvial purple soil (APS), the two typical paddy soils in the Dongting Lake floodplain of China as test soils, an incubation test was conducted at 25 degrees C to study the dynamic changes of soil microbial biomass and dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen under flooded condition. Three treatments were installed, i.e., control (CK), ammonium sulfate (N), and rice straw powder plus ammonium sulfate (S-N). The results showed that during incubation, soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC), soil microbial biomass nitrogen (SMBN), soil dissolved organic carbon (SDOC), and soil dissolved organic nitrogen (SDON) reached their maximum initially, decreased thereafter, and tended to be stable. After amending the substrates to the two soils, the averages of SMBC to soil total carbon, SMBN to soil total nitrogen, SDOC to soil total carbon, and SDON to soil total nitrogen were 2% - 3%, 2% - 3%, 1% or so, and 5% - 6%, respectively. In the two soils, the peak values of SMBC in treatment N and those of SMBN, SDOC and SDON in treatment S-N were the highest, while those of SMBC in treatments N and S-N had no significant difference. The peak values of SMBN, SDOC and SDON in RYS were significantly different between treatments N and S-N, while no significant difference was observed between the peak values of SMBN and SDOC in APS, because the fertility of RYS was lower than that of APS. In the first 7 days of incubation, SMBC/SMBN ratio was < 10, while after 14 days of incubation, this ratio was higher in treatment N than in treatment S-N at the same time in the same soil. The SDOC/SDON ratio in all treatments was the highest at the 3rd d, and the lowest at the 28th d of incubation. PMID:17269325

  8. Estimating steady-state evaporation rates from bare soils under conditions of high water table

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ripple, C.D.; Rubin, J.; Van Hylckama, T. E. A.

    1970-01-01

    A procedure that combines meteorological and soil equations of water transfer makes it possible to estimate approximately the steady-state evaporation from bare soils under conditions of high water table. Field data required include soil-water retention curves, water table depth and a record of air temperature, air humidity and wind velocity at one elevation. The procedure takes into account the relevant atmospheric factors and the soil's capability to conduct 'water in liquid and vapor forms. It neglects the effects of thermal transfer (except in the vapor case) and of salt accumulation. Homogeneous as well as layered soils can be treated. Results obtained with the method demonstrate how the soil evaporation rates·depend on potential evaporation, water table depth, vapor transfer and certain soil parameters.

  9. Improved Prediction of Quasi-Global Vegetation Conditions Using Remotely-Sensed Surface Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolten, John; Crow, Wade

    2012-01-01

    The added value of satellite-based surface soil moisture retrievals for agricultural drought monitoring is assessed by calculating the lagged rank correlation between remotely-sensed vegetation indices (VI) and soil moisture estimates obtained both before and after the assimilation of surface soil moisture retrievals derived from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) into a soil water balance model. Higher soil moisture/VI lag correlations imply an enhanced ability to predict future vegetation conditions using estimates of current soil moisture. Results demonstrate that the assimilation of AMSR-E surface soil moisture retrievals substantially improve the performance of a global drought monitoring system - particularly in sparsely-instrumented areas of the world where high-quality rainfall observations are unavailable.

  10. Soil structure, colloids, and chemical transport as affected by short-term reducing conditions: a laboratory study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Upland soils in the Midwestern US often undergo reducing conditions when soils are temporally flooded during the spring and remain water saturated for days or weeks. Short-term reducing conditions change the chemistry of the soil and may affect soil structure and solution chemical transport. The eff...

  11. Load dissipation by corn residue on tilled soil in laboratory and field-wheeling conditions.

    PubMed

    Reichert, José M; Brandt, André A; Rodrigues, Miriam F; Reinert, Dalvan J; Braida, João A

    2016-06-01

    Crop residues may partially dissipate applied loads and reduce soil compaction. We evaluated the effect of corn residue on energy-applied dissipation during wheeling. The experiment consisted of a preliminary laboratory test and a confirmatory field test on a Paleaudalf soil. In the laboratory, an adapted Proctor test was performed with three energy levels, with and without corn residue. Field treatments consisted of three 5.1 Mg tractor wheeling intensities (0, 2, and 6), with and without 12 Mg ha(-1) corn residue on the soil surface. Corn residue on the soil surface reduced soil bulk density in the adapted Proctor test. By applying energy of 52.6 kN m m(-3) , soil dissipated 2.98% of applied energy, whereas with 175.4 kN m m(-3) a dissipation of 8.60% was obtained. This result confirms the hypothesis that surface mulch absorbs part of the compaction effort. Residue effects on soil compaction observed in the adapted Proctor test was not replicated under subsoiled soil field conditions, because of differences in applied pressure and soil conditions (structure, moisture and volume confinement). Nevertheless, this negative result does not mean that straw has no effect in the field. Such effects should be measured via stress transmission and compared to soil load-bearing capacity, rather than on bulk deformations. Wheeling by heavy tractor on subsoiled soil increased compaction, independently of surface residue. Two wheelings produced a significantly increase, but six wheelings did not further increase compaction. Reduced traffic intensity on recently tilled soil is necessary to minimize soil compaction, since traffic intensity show a greater effect than surface mulch on soil protection from excessive compaction. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:26304050

  12. Soil transport parameters of potassium under a tropical saline soil condition using STANMOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzanye da Silva Santos, Rafaelly; Honorio de Miranda, Jarbas; Previatello da Silva, Livia

    2015-04-01

    Environmental responsibility and concerning about the final destination of solutes in soil, so more studies allow a better understanding about the solutes behaviour in soil. Potassium is a macronutrient that is required in high concentrations, been an extremely important nutrient for all agricultural crops. It plays essential roles in physiological processes vital for plant growth, from protein synthesis to maintenance of plant water balance, and is available to plants dissolved in soil water while exchangeable K is loosely held on the exchange sites on the surface of clay particles. K will tend to be adsorbed onto the surface of negatively charged soil particles. Potassium uptake is vital for plant growth but in saline soils sodium competes with potassium for uptake across the plasma membrane of plant cells. This can result in high Na+:K+ ratios that reduce plant growth and eventually become toxic. This study aimed to obtain soil transport parameters of potassium in saline soil, such as: pore water velocity in soil (v), retardation factor (R), dispersivity (λ) and dispersion coefficient (D), in a disturbed sandy soil with different concentrations of potassium chlorate solution (KCl), which is one of the most common form of potassium fertilizer. The experiment was carried out using soil samples collected in a depth of 0 to 20 cm, applying potassium chlorate solution containing 28.6, 100, 200 and 500 mg L-1 of K. To obtain transport parameters, the data were adjusted with the software STANMOD. At low concentrations, interaction between potassium and soil occur more efficiently. It was observed that only the breakthrough curve prepared with solution of 500 mg L-1 reached the applied concentration, and the solution of 28.6 mg L-1 overestimated the parameters values. The STANMOD proved to be efficient in obtaining potassium transport parameters; KCl solution to be applied should be greater than 500 mg L-1; solutions with low concentrations tend to overestimate

  13. Extreme Air Pollution Conditions Adversely Affect Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance: The Air Pollution and Cardiometabolic Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Brook, Robert D; Sun, Zhichao; Brook, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Rao, Xiaoquan; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Sun, Qinghua; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports that fine particulate matter adversely affects cardiometabolic diseases particularly in susceptible individuals; however, health effects induced by the extreme concentrations within megacities in Asia are not well described. We enrolled 65 nonsmoking adults with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the Beijing metropolitan area into a panel study of 4 repeated visits across 4 seasons since 2012. Daily ambient fine particulate matter and personal black carbon levels ranged from 9.0 to 552.5 µg/m(3) and 0.2 to 24.5 µg/m(3), respectively, with extreme levels observed during January 2013. Cumulative fine particulate matter exposure windows across the prior 1 to 7 days were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure elevations ranging from 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.7) to 2.7 (0.6-4.8) mm Hg per SD increase (67.2 µg/m(3)), whereas cumulative black carbon exposure during the previous 2 to 5 days were significantly associated with ranges in elevations in diastolic blood pressure from 1.3 (0.0-2.5) to 1.7 (0.3-3.2) mm Hg per SD increase (3.6 µg/m(3)). Both black carbon and fine particulate matter were significantly associated with worsening insulin resistance (0.18 [0.01-0.36] and 0.22 [0.04-0.39] unit increase per SD increase of personal-level black carbon and 0.18 [0.02-0.34] and 0.22 [0.08-0.36] unit increase per SD increase of ambient fine particulate matter on lag days 4 and 5). These results provide important global public health warnings that air pollution may pose a risk to cardiometabolic health even at the extremely high concentrations faced by billions of people in the developing world today. PMID:26573709

  14. Forest soil respiration rate and delta13C is regulated by recent above ground weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Ekblad, Alf; Boström, Björn; Holm, Anders; Comstedt, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Soil respiration, a key component of the global carbon cycle, is a major source of uncertainty when estimating terrestrial carbon budgets at ecosystem and higher levels. Rates of soil and root respiration are assumed to be dependent on soil temperature and soil moisture yet these factors often barely explain half the seasonal variation in soil respiration. We here found that soil moisture (range 16.5-27.6% of dry weight) and soil temperature (range 8-17.5 degrees C) together explained 55% of the variance (cross-validated explained variance; Q2) in soil respiration rate (range 1.0-3.4 micromol C m(-2) s(-1)) in a Norway spruce (Picea abies) forest. We hypothesised that this was due to that the two components of soil respiration, root respiration and decomposition, are governed by different factors. We therefore applied PLS (partial least squares regression) multivariate modelling in which we, together with below ground temperature and soil moisture, used the recent above ground air temperature and air humidity (vapour pressure deficit, VPD) conditions as x-variables. We found that air temperature and VPD data collected 1-4 days before respiration measurements explained 86% of the seasonal variation in the rate of soil respiration. The addition of soil moisture and soil temperature to the PLS-models increased the Q2 to 93%. delta13C analysis of soil respiration supported the hypotheses that there was a fast flux of photosynthates to root respiration and a dependence on recent above ground weather conditions. Taken together, our results suggest that shoot activities the preceding 1-6 days influence, to a large degree, the rate of root and soil respiration. We propose this above ground influence on soil respiration to be proportionally largest in the middle of the growing season and in situations when there is large day-to-day shifts in the above ground weather conditions. During such conditions soil temperature may not exert the major control on root respiration. PMID

  15. Examining the effect of altered redox conditions on deep soil organic matter stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, C.; Kellman, L. M.; Ziegler, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Since subsoil horizons contribute significantly to terrestrial carbon (C) budgets, understanding the influence of disturbances such as forest harvesting on subsoil C stability is critical. Clearcut harvesting leads to changes in the soil physico-chemical environment, including altering redox conditions arising from changes in soil hydrology that increase soil saturation, soil temperature, and pH. These physico-chemical changes have the potential to alter the adsorption of soil organic matter (SOM) to minerals, particularly at depth where SOM is primarily associated with mineral phases. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of differing redox states (aerobic vs. anaerobic) and temperature upon SOM stability of forested soils representative of the Acadian Forest Region of Eastern North America. Composite soil samples through depth (0-10, 10-20, 20-35, and 35-50 cm) from a mature red spruce forest (110 years) were incubated under optimum (aerobic) or saturated (anaerobic) conditions for 1 or 4 months at two temperatures (5 and 15 C). Following incubation, soil leachate was analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and UV-vis absorbance in order to determine soil C losses and its optical character. Specific UV-vis absorbance SUVA (254 nm) and spectral slope ratios were calculated in order to assess the composition of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). Preliminary results from the 1 month incubation indicate that under anaerobic conditions, all depths released DOC with a higher SUVA than under aerobic conditions, with the largest change observed in the 0-10 cm depth increment. Soil incubated at 5 C produced leachate with significantly less DOC and with a lower absorbance compared to 15 C under both redox conditions. These results suggest that both temperature and redox state are important in determining the aromaticity of DOC released from soils. Spectral slope ratios revealed that a greater proportion of CDOM of lower molecular weight

  16. Stress, deformation and micromorphological aspects of soil freezing under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetchick, Elizabeth

    In this thesis, frost heave is viewed as a process resulting from the interactions between thermodynamic conditions, soil environment controls such as texture, stress/deformation conditions and soil microstructure. A series of laboratory experiments was devised to investigate the links between these aspects. Because a limited number of studies exist on the development of internal stresses and strains in freezing soil, the work focussed on obtaining rheological data using conventional soil strain gauges and prototype stress transducers. A fine-grained unstructured silt was placed in a column (30 cm diameter by 100 cm length) and subjected to freezing and freeze-thaw cycles from the top down, lasting up to three months. Heat and water flows, as well as stresses and strains were monitored. The frozen soil was sectioned at the end of four of the experiments to examine the soil fabrics that had developed. From the experimental results, schematic stress and strain curves are proposed. For a single freeze cycle, compressive normal and tensile normal stresses were recorded simultaneously by the measuring devices within the freezing soil profile. Ice lens inception took place when the stress field changed, a condition which occurred either at the frost front level or at the base of the growing ice lens. Negative and positive strains reflected the different stress states that were sustained below and above the freezing front. Negative strains or soil consolidation took place as stresses increased before the passage of the frost line. Negligible soil strains were recorded as maximum soil consolidation was attained, before soil expansion. Distinct positive strain patterns indicating secondary and continuing heave, were recorded simultaneously throughout a thickness of soil, over a range of temperatures. Ice lens growth mostly took place as secondary frost heave, but continuing heave was measured, and the temperature conditions for both types of heave were determined. During

  17. Antagonistic Pleiotropy at the Human IL6 Promoter Confers Genetic Resilience to the Pro-Inflammatory Effects of Adverse Social Conditions in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Manu, Kavya; Telzer, Eva H.; Kiang, Lisa; Bower, Julienne E.; Irwin, Michael R.; Fuligni, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The authors tested the evolutionary genetic hypothesis that the functional form of an asymmetrically risky Gene × Environment interaction will differ as a function of age-related antagonistic pleiotropy (i.e., show opposite effects in young vs. old individuals). Previous studies have identified a polymorphism in the human IL6 promoter (rs1800795; IL6 –174 G/C) that interacts with adverse socioenvironmental conditions to promote chronic inflammation in older adults (elevated C-reactive protein). This study identifies a protective effect of the same polymorphism in 17- to 19-year-old adolescents confronting socioeconomic adversity. Over 60% of the environmental risk contribution to the IL6 × Socioeconomic Status interaction could be accounted for by interpersonal stress and adult role burden. Thus, the IL6 –174G allele does not represent an undifferentiated risk factor but instead sensitizes inflammatory biology to socioenvironmental conditions, conferring either genetic vulnerability or resilience depending on the developmental “somatic environment” that interacts with social conditions to influence gene expression. PMID:21639625

  18. Degradation of the Herbicide Metolachlor in Drummer Soil Under Different Redox Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the role of microorganisms and effect of soil environmental conditions on herbicide fate is critical for stewardship of herbicide use in cropping systems. As compared to the modernized perceptions of soil redox status, diminutive progress has been made in characterizing the impact of a...

  19. Antecedent conditions influence soil respiration differences in shrub and grass patches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying the response of soil respiration to past environmental conditions is critical for predicting how future climate and vegetation change will impact ecosystem carbon balance. Increased shrub dominance in semiarid grasslands has potentially large effects on soil carbon cycling. The goal of t...

  20. Leaf area index determination of wheat indicating heterogeneous soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, K.; Eitzinger, J.; Rischbeck, P.; Schneider, W.; Suppan, F.; Weihs, P.

    2006-09-01

    The objective of this study, which is part of the project "crop drought stress monitoring by remote sensing" (DROSMON), is to assess the potential of hyperspectral imagery to determine drought stress of crops due to heterogeneous soil composition by estimating the leaf area index (LAI). LAI, which characterizes the actual status of the crops and therefore the potential yield, may be seen as the most important parameter indicating medium term drought stress. As a result of former river meanders, the soils in the Marchfeld region are interrupted by bands of lighter soil. The higher content of sand in the bands leads to a lower water storage capacity and consequently to a decrease in plant growth. An airborne HyMap image was acquired in June 2005 during anthesis stage of wheat. Inversion of a radiative transfer model by means of a look-up-table (LUT) approach was performed to retrieve LAI and other canopy parameters from wheat canopy reflectance. Additionally, the LAI was estimated by establishing empirical relationships between LAI and spectral indices (MSAVI, TVI and MTVI2). Both ways of LAI estimation showed a reasonable correlation to final yield measurements obtained one month after the image data acquisition. However, there was a slightly better agreement of model inversion results. The results suggest the applicability of hyperspectral imagery to map potential drought risk of (wheat) fields.

  1. Uranium partitioning under acidic conditions in a sandy soil aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.H. |; Serkiz, S.M.; Johnson, L.M.

    1995-07-01

    The partitioning of uranium in an aquifer down gradient of two large mixed waste sites was examined with respect to the solution and soil chemistry (e.g., pH redox potential and contaminant concentration) and aqueous-phase chemical speciation. This involved generation of field-derived, batch sorption, and reactive mineral surface sorption data. Field-derived distribution coefficients for uranium at these waste sites were found to vary between 0.40 and 15,000. Based on thermodynamic speciation modeling and a comparison of field and laboratory data, gibbsite is a potential reactive mineral surface present in modified soils at the sites. Uranium partitioning data are presented from field samples and laboratory studies of background soil and the mineral surface gibbsite. Mechanistic and empirical sorption models fit to the field-derived uranium partitioning data show an improvement of over two orders of magnitude, as measured by the normalized sum of errors squared, when compared with the single K{sub d} model used in previous risk work. Models fit to batch sorption data provided a better fit of sorbed uranium than do models fit to the field-derived data.

  2. Breaking The Enzymatic Latch: Do Anaerobic Conditions Constrain Decomposition In Humid Tropical Forest Soil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    Anaerobic conditions have been proposed to impose a "latch" on soil organic matter decomposition by inhibiting the activity of extracellular enzymes that catalyze the transformation of organic polymers into monomers for microbial assimilation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that anaerobiosis inhibits soil hydrolytic enzyme activity in a humid tropical forest ecosystem in Puerto Rico. We sampled surface and sub-surface soil from each of 59 plots (n = 118) stratified across distinct topographical zones (ridges, slopes, and valleys) known to vary in soil oxygen (O2) concentrations, and measured the potential activity of five hydrolytic enzymes that decompose carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) substrates. We measured reduced iron (Fe (II)) concentrations in soil extractions to provide a spatially and temporally integrated index of anaerobic microbial activity, since iron oxides constitute the dominant anaerobic terminal electron acceptor in this ecosystem. Surprisingly, we observed positive relationships between Fe (II) concentrations and the activity of all enzymes that we assayed. Linear mixed effects models that included Fe (II) concentration, topographic position, and their interaction explained between 30 to 70 % of the variance of enzyme activity of β-1,4-glucosidase, β-cellobiohydrolase, β-xylosidase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, and acid phosphatase. Soils from ridges and slopes contained between 10 and 800 μg Fe (II) g-1 soil, and exhibited consistently positive relationships (p < 0.0001) between Fe (II) and enzyme activity. Valley soils did not display significant relationships between enzyme activity and Fe (II), although they displayed variation in soil Fe (II) concentrations similar to ridges and slopes. Overall, valleys exhibited lower enzyme activity and lower Fe (II) concentrations than ridges or slopes, possibly related to decreased root biomass and soil C. Our data provide no indication that anaerobiosis suppresses soil enzyme activity, but

  3. Influence of soil conditions on dissolved organic matter leached from forest and wetland soils: a controlled growth chamber study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Ah; Nguyen, Hang Vo-Minh; Oh, Hae Sung; Hur, Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of various soil conditions, including drying-rewetting, nitrogen deposition, and temperature rise, on the quantities and the composition of dissolved organic matter leached from forest and wetland soils. A set of forest and wetland soils with and without the nitrogen deposition were incubated in the growth chambers under three different temperatures. The moisture contents were kept constant, except for two-week drying intervals. Comparisons between the original and the treated samples revealed that drying-rewetting was a crucial environmental factor driving changes in the amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The DOC was also notably increased by the nitrogen deposition to the dry forest soil and was affected by the temperature of the dry wetland soil. A parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis identified three sub-fractions of the fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) from the fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), and their compositions depended on drying-rewetting. The data as a whole, including the DOC and PARAFAC components and other optical indices, were possibly explained by the two main variables, which were closely related with the PARAFAC components and DOC based on principal component analysis (PCA). Our results suggested that the DOC and PARAFAC component information could provide a comprehensive interpretation of the changes in the soil-leached DOM in response to the different environmental conditions. PMID:26561321

  4. An analysis of the dissipation of pharmaceuticals under thirteen different soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Kodešová, Radka; Kočárek, Martin; Klement, Aleš; Golovko, Oksana; Koba, Olga; Fér, Miroslav; Nikodem, Antonín; Vondráčková, Lenka; Jakšík, Ondřej; Grabic, Roman

    2016-02-15

    The presence of human and veterinary pharmaceuticals in the environment is recognized as a potential threat. Pharmaceuticals have the potential to contaminate soils and consequently surface and groundwater. Knowledge of contaminant behavior (e.g., sorption onto soil particles and degradation) is essential when assessing contaminant migration in the soil and groundwater environment. We evaluated the dissipation half-lives of 7 pharmaceuticals in 13 soils. The data were evaluated relative to the soil properties and the Freundlich sorption coefficients reported in our previous study. Of the tested pharmaceuticals, carbamazepine had the greatest persistence (which was mostly stable), followed by clarithromycin, trimethoprim, metoprolol, clindamycin, sulfamethoxazole and atenolol. Pharmaceutical persistence in soils was mostly dependent on the soil-type conditions. In general, lower average dissipation half-lives and variability (i.e., trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, clindamycin, metoprolol and atenolol) were found in soils of better quality (well-developed structure, high nutrition content etc.), and thus, probably better microbial conditions (i.e., Chernozems), than in lower quality soil (Cambisols). The impact of the compound sorption affinity onto soil particles on their dissipation rate was mostly negligible. Although there was a positive correlation between compound dissipation half-life and Freundlich sorption coefficient for clindamycin (R=0.604, p<0.05) and sulfamethoxazole (R=0.822, p<0.01), the half-life of sulfamethoxazole also decreased under better soil-type conditions. Based on the calculated dissipation and sorption data, carbamazepine would be expected to have the greatest potential to migrate in the soil water environment, followed by sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and metoprolol. The transport of clindamycin, clarithromycin and atenolol through the vadose zone seems less probable. PMID:26657382

  5. Changes in mineral soil biogeochemical cycling and environmental conditions following tree harvest in the Northeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vario, C.; Friedland, A.

    2012-12-01

    In the northeastern United States, reductions in carbon dioxide emissions have been attempted by using local wood as a renewable alternative to oil. Although woody biomass products are readily available, recent findings suggest that forest disturbance may cause release of carbon from the deeper mineral soil. Worldwide, deep soils sequester more than half of soil carbon, making it critical in the global carbon cycle; however, most studies on the effect of harvesting have focused on the organic soil horizon. Our research aimed to uncover changes in biogeochemistry and environmental conditions in deeper, mineral soil after clear cutting forests. We quantified post-harvest mineral soil carbon pools through a regional study. We utilized stands of different ages to measure the recovery of soil carbon over time since harvest. Stands included in this study were cut approximately 5, 12, 25, 50, or 120 ybp, in order to identify changes in soil carbon over time since harvest. We sampled harvested stands in six research or protected forests across New York, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Vermont. Soil samples were collected to a depth of 60 cm below the surface of the mineral soil using a gas-powered augur and 9.5 cm diameter drill bit. Soil samples were analyzed at Dartmouth College. In order to understand specific changes in mineral soil carbon dynamics following harvest, measurements of carbon fluxes, such as soil respiration and DOC transport were conducted at five different-aged stands at Bartlett Experimental Forest, NH. While parameters that may influence carbon storage—such as pH, clay content, tree cover and elevation— did not vary across the different-aged stands in each forest, carbon pools did vary over time. We found changes in carbon pools in at least three experimental forests across the northeast. At Bartlett Experimental Forest, we found a gradual decline in mineral soil carbon storage from between 85-87 Mg ha-1 in 120 year old and primary forest stands

  6. Soil, Water, and Vegetation Conditions in South Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Reflectance differences between the dead leaves of six crops (corn, cotton, sorghum, sugar cane, citrus, and avocado) and the respective bare soils where the dead leaves were lying on the ground were determined from laboratory spectrophotometric measurements over the 0.5- to 2.5 micron wavelength interval. The largest differences were in the near infrared waveband 0.75- to 1.35 microns. Leaf area index was predicted from plant height, percent ground cover, and plant population for irrigated and nonirrigated grain sorghum fields for the 1975 growing season.

  7. Sensitivity of Polygonum aviculare Seeds to Light as Affected by Soil Moisture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Batlla, Diego; Nicoletta, Marcelo; Benech-Arnold, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims It has been hypothesized that soil moisture conditions could affect the dormancy status of buried weed seeds, and, consequently, their sensitivity to light stimuli. In this study, an investigation is made of the effect of different soil moisture conditions during cold-induced dormancy loss on changes in the sensitivity of Polygonum aviculare seeds to light. Methods Seeds buried in pots were stored under different constant and fluctuating soil moisture environments at dormancy-releasing temperatures. Seeds were exhumed at regular intervals during storage and were exposed to different light treatments. Changes in the germination response of seeds to light treatments during storage under the different moisture environments were compared in order to determine the effect of soil moisture on the sensitivity to light of P. aviculare seeds. Key Results Seed acquisition of low-fluence responses during dormancy release was not affected by either soil moisture fluctuations or different constant soil moisture contents. On the contrary, different soil moisture environments affected seed acquisition of very low fluence responses and the capacity of seeds to germinate in the dark. Conclusions The results indicate that under field conditions, the sensitivity to light of buried weed seeds could be affected by the soil moisture environment experienced during the dormancy release season, and this could affect their emergence pattern. PMID:17430979

  8. Bioactivity of Several Herbicides on the Nanogram Level Under Different Soil Moisture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jung, S C; Kuk, Y I; Senseman, S A; Ahn, H G; Seong, C N; Lee, D J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a double-tube centrifuge method was employed to determine the effects of soil moisture on the bioactivity of cafenstrole, pretilachlor, benfuresate, oxyfluorfen and simetryn. In general, the available herbicide concentration in soil solution (ACSS) showed little change as soil moisture increased for herbicides. The total available herbicide in soil solution (TASS) typically increased as soil moisture increased for all herbicides. The relationship between TASS and % growth rate based on dry weight showed strong linear relationships for both cafenstrole and pretilachlor, with r2 values of 0.95 and 0.84, respectively. Increasing TASS values were consistent with increasing herbicide water solubility, with the exception of the ionizable herbicide simetryn. Plant absorption and % growth rate exhibited a strong linear relationship with TASS. According to the results suggested that TASS was a better predictor of herbicidal bioactivity than ACSS for all herbicides under unsaturated soil moisture conditions. PMID:26328425

  9. Penman-Monteith Evapotranspiration under Soil Moisture Limiting Conditions across California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, A. J.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions soil moisture often limits the flux of water to meet the atmospheric evapotranspiration (ET) demand. Potentially drier conditions and more variable precipitation and snow in California create a need to better understand how this reservoir limits ET across the state. The upcoming Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission's surface and root zone soil moisture data will provide additional information to force observation based ET models at spatial scales ranging from 3-36 km2. To support application of SMAP data to ET modeling we investigate the role of soil moisture within the Penman-Monteith representation at FLUXNET and agricultural sites across California. We present findings on actual ET under soil moisture limiting conditions that do not violate assumptions within this modeling framework.

  10. Reclaimed wastewater: impact on soil-plant system under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, B F F; He, Z L; Silva, M S; Herpin, U; Nogueira, S F; Montes, C R; Melfi, A J

    2011-08-15

    This study investigated the ionic speciation of reclaimed urban wastewater (RWW), and the impact of increasing RWW irrigation rates on soil properties and plant nutrition under field conditions. Most RWW elements (>66%) are readily available as NH(4)(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), K(+), SO(4)(2-), Cl(-), H(3)BO(3), Mn(2+) and Zn(2+), but in imbalanced proportion for plant nutrition. Lead, Cd, Cr and Al in RWW are mostly bounded with DOM or OH(-).(.)Irrigation with RWW decreased soil acidity, which is beneficial to the acidic tropical soil. Although RWW irrigation builds exchangeable Na(+) up, the excessive Na(+) was leached out of the soil profile after a rainy summer season (>400 mm). Benefits of the disposal of RWW to the soil under tropical conditions were discussed, however, the over irrigation with RWW (>100% of crop evapotranspiration) led to a nutritional imbalance, accumulating S and leading to a plant deficiency of P and K. PMID:21616587

  11. Soil layer condensation peak as a response to soil water properties under Sudanese climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, S.; Motelica-Heino, M.; Ozier-Lafontaine, H.

    2012-04-01

    The soil apparent density is strongly dependent on their physico-chemical properties. It can be negatively impacted by human activities such as soil work or animal pasture or natural salinity influenced by irrigation.. In contrast it can be improved for different depths by agricultural practices. A « condensation peak » defined as an increase in the apparent density was found for the heterogeneous soils of Niger for several profiles of 5 soil classes and for a very shallow depth (10 cm maximum) with a very variable extreme depth (from 35 to 150 cm) associated with extreme density values (from 1.45 to 2). The depth of this peak, for soils neither saline nor vertic, varies inversely with the proportion of soil fine elements (silts+clays). However it corresponds to an average value of useful water (AWC) of 100mm (CV=24.4%). In sodic and alkaline soils this peak can be observed at shallow depths (from 53 to 61cm with a CV from 15 to 40%), thus for much lower AWC values (from 74 to 87cm with a CV from 26 to 47%). It can be found either below or above an impermeable horizon of a maximal density of 2.. This peak is likely to be associated with a multi-annual alternance of humectation-dessication at this depth. Its occurrence is based on an interplay of intrinsic physical and hydric soil properties but also on extrisnic parameters sch as the pluviometry, the location at the scale of the watershed and the micromodelling.

  12. Effect of soil surface conditions on runoff velocity and sediment mean aggregate diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    César Ramos, Júlio; Bertol, Ildegardis; Paz González, Antonio; de Souza Werner, Romeu; Marioti, Juliana; Henrique Bandeira, Douglas; Andrighetti Leolatto, Lidiane

    2013-04-01

    Soil cover and soil management are the factors that most influence soil erosion by water, because they directly affect soil surface roughness and surface cover. The main effect of soil cover by crop residues consists in dissipation of kinetic energy of raindrops and also partly kinetic energy of runoff, so that the soil disaggregation is considerably reduced but, in addition, soil cover captures detached soil particles, retains water on its surface and decreases runoff volume and velocity. In turn, soil surface roughness, influences soil surface water storage and infiltration and also runoff volume and velocity, sediment retention and subsequently water and sediment losses. Based on the above rationale, we performed a field experiment to assess the influence of soil cover and soil surface roughness on decay of runoff velocity as well as on mean diameter of transported sediments (D50 index). The following treatments were evaluated: SRR) residues of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) on a smooth soil surfcace, SRV) residues of common vetch (Vicia sativa) on a smooth soil surface, SSR) scarification after cultivation of Italian ryegrass resulting in a rough surface, SSV) scarification after cultivation of common vetch resulting in a rough surface, and SBS) scarified bare soil with high roughness as a control. The field experiments was performed on an Inceptisol in South Brazil under simulated rainfall conditions during 2012. Experimental plots were 11 m long and 3.5 m wide with an area of 38.5 m2. Six successive simulated rainfall tests were applied using a rotating-boom rain simulator. During each test, rain intensity was 60 mmhr-1, whereas rain duration was 90 minutes. Runoff velocity showed no significant differences between cultivated treatments. However, when compared to bare soil treatment, SBS (0.178 m s-1) and irrespective of the presence of surface crop residues or scarification operations, cultivated soil treatments significantly reduced runoff velocity

  13. Foliar photochemical processes and carbon metabolism under favourable and adverse winter conditions in a Mediterranean mixed forest, Catalonia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, D.; Chang, C. T.; Peñuelas, J.; Gracia, C.; Sabaté, S.

    2014-06-01

    Evergreen trees in the Mediterranean region must cope with a wide range of environmental stresses from summer drought to winter cold. The mildness of Mediterranean winters can periodically lead to favourable environmental conditions above the threshold for a positive carbon balance, benefitting evergreen woody species more than deciduous ones. The comparatively lower solar energy input in winter decreases the foliar light saturation point. This leads to a higher susceptibility to photoinhibitory stress especially when chilly (< 12 °C) or freezing temperatures (< 0 °C) coincide with clear skies and relatively high solar irradiances. Nonetheless, the advantage of evergreen species that are able to photosynthesize all year round where a significant fraction can be attributed to winter months, compensates for the lower carbon uptake during spring and summer in comparison to deciduous species. We investigated the ecophysiological behaviour of three co-occurring mature evergreen tree species (Quercus ilex L., Pinus halepensis Mill., and Arbutus unedo L.) during a period of mild winter conditions and their responses to a sudden cold period. The state of the photosynthetic machinery in both periods was thus tested by estimating the foliar photosynthetic potential with CO2 response curves in parallel with chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. The studied evergreen tree species benefited strongly from mild winter conditions by exhibiting extraordinarily high photosynthetic potentials similar to those under spring conditions. A sudden period of frost, however, negatively affected the photosynthetic apparatus, leading to significant decreases in key physiological parameters such as the maximum carboxylation velocity (Vc, max), the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (Jmax), and the optimal fluorometric quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm). This change persisted for several weeks after the cold period despite the recovery of the temperature to the conditions

  14. Foliar photochemical processes and carbon metabolism under favourable and adverse winter conditions in a Mediterranean mixed forest, Catalonia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, D.; Chang, C. T.; Peñuelas, J.; Gracia, C.; Sabaté, S.

    2014-10-01

    Evergreen trees in the Mediterranean region must cope with a wide range of environmental stresses from summer drought to winter cold. The mildness of Mediterranean winters can periodically lead to favourable environmental conditions above the threshold for a positive carbon balance, benefitting evergreen woody species more than deciduous ones. The comparatively lower solar energy input in winter decreases the foliar light saturation point. This leads to a higher susceptibility to photoinhibitory stress especially when chilly (< 12 °C) or freezing temperatures (< 0 °C) coincide with clear skies and relatively high solar irradiances. Nonetheless, the advantage of evergreen species that are able to photosynthesize all year round where a significant fraction can be attributed to winter months, compensates for the lower carbon uptake during spring and summer in comparison to deciduous species. We investigated the ecophysiological behaviour of three co-occurring mature evergreen tree species (Quercus ilex L., Pinus halepensis Mill., and Arbutus unedo L.). Therefore, we collected twigs from the field during a period of mild winter conditions and after a sudden cold period. After both periods, the state of the photosynthetic machinery was tested in the laboratory by estimating the foliar photosynthetic potential with CO2 response curves in parallel with chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. The studied evergreen tree species benefited strongly from mild winter conditions by exhibiting extraordinarily high photosynthetic potentials. A sudden period of frost, however, negatively affected the photosynthetic apparatus, leading to significant decreases in key physiological parameters such as the maximum carboxylation velocity (Vc, max), the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (Jmax), and the optimal fluorometric quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm). The responses of Vc, max and Jmax were highly species specific, with Q. ilex exhibiting the highest and P

  15. Sensitivity of soil moisture initialization for decadal predictions under different regional climatic conditions in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodayar, S.; Sehlinger, A.; Feldmann, H.; Kottmeier, C.

    2015-12-01

    The impact of soil initialization is investigated through perturbation simulations with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM. The focus of the investigation is to assess the sensitivity of simulated extreme periods, dry and wet, to soil moisture initialization in different climatic regions over Europe and to establish the necessary spin up time within the framework of decadal predictions for these regions. Sensitivity experiments consisted of a reference simulation from 1968 to 1999 and 5 simulations from 1972 to 1983. The Effective Drought Index (EDI) is used to select and quantify drought status in the reference run to establish the simulation time period for the sensitivity experiments. Different soil initialization procedures are investigated. The sensitivity of the decadal predictions to soil moisture initial conditions is investigated through the analysis of water cycle components' (WCC) variability. In an episodic time scale the local effects of soil moisture on the boundary-layer and the propagated effects on the large-scale dynamics are analysed. The results show: (a) COSMO-CLM reproduces the observed features of the drought index. (b) Soil moisture initialization exerts a relevant impact on WCC, e.g., precipitation distribution and intensity. (c) Regional characteristics strongly impact the response of the WCC. Precipitation and evapotranspiration deviations are larger for humid regions. (d) The initial soil conditions (wet/dry), the regional characteristics (humid/dry) and the annual period (wet/dry) play a key role in the time that soil needs to restore quasi-equilibrium and the impact on the atmospheric conditions. Humid areas, and for all regions, a humid initialization, exhibit shorter spin up times, also soil reacts more sensitive when initialised during dry periods. (e) The initial soil perturbation may markedly modify atmospheric pressure field, wind circulation systems and atmospheric water vapour distribution affecting atmospheric stability

  16. The potential of Chromolaena odorata (L) to decontaminate used engine oil impacted soil under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Atagana, Harrison Ifeanyichukwu

    2011-08-01

    This study reports on the use of Chromolaena odorata (L) R.M. King and H. Robinson, an Asteraceae (compositae) and an invasive alien weed in Africa for the remediation of soil contaminated with used engine oil. Used engine oilfrom a motor service garage was used to artificially contaminate soil taken from a garden to give total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) of between 1 and 40 g kg(-1). Chromolaena odorata (L), propagated by stem cuttings were transplanted into the contaminated soil and watered just enough to keep the soil at about 70% water holding capacity for 90 day. A set of control experiments containing 40 g kg(-1) used engine oil but without plants was set up. All experiments were set up in triplicates. Although the plants in the experiments containing higher than 30 g kg(-1) used engine oil showed relatively slower growth (fewer branches and leaves, and shorter in height) compared to those containing lower concentrations, the plants in all the experiments continued to grow until the end of the 90 day period. Residual TPH after 90 days showed that between 21 and 100% of oil was lost from the planted soil while only 11.5% was lost in the control, which did not contain plants during the same period. Analysis of plant tissues showed that both shoot and root tissues contained detectable levels of TPH and selected PAHs were also detectable. Biomass accumulation by Chromolaena odorata was affected adversely by concentrations of oil higher than 20 g kg(-1). Results of germination rates and germination energy measurements showed that Chromolaena odorata was able to reduce the toxicity of the contaminated soil after 90 days as compared to soils containing freshly contaminated soiL PMID:21972491

  17. Modeling the effect of adverse environmental conditions and clothing on temperature rise in a human body exposed to radio frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Moore, Stephen M; McIntosh, Robert L; Iskra, Steve; Wood, Andrew W

    2015-02-01

    This study considers the computationally determined thermal profile of a fully clothed, finely discretized, heterogeneous human body model, subject to the maximum allowable reference level for a 1-GHz radio frequency electromagnetic field for a worker, and also subject to adverse environmental conditions, including high humidity and high ambient temperature. An initial observation is that while electromagnetic fields at the occupational safety limit will contribute an additional thermal load to the tissues, and subsequently, cause an elevated temperature, the magnitude of this effect is far outweighed by that due to the conditions including the ambient temperature, relative humidity, and the type of clothing worn. It is envisaged that the computational modeling approach outlined in this paper will be suitably modified in future studies to evaluate the thermal response of a body at elevated metabolic rates, and for different body shapes and sizes including children and pregnant women. PMID:25314694

  18. River basin soil-vegetation condition assessment applying mathematic simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Natalia; Trifonova, Tatiana; Shirkin, Leonid

    2013-04-01

    Meticulous attention paid nowadays to the problem of vegetation cover productivity changes is connected also to climate global transformation. At the same time ecosystems anthropogenic transformation, basically connected to the changes of land use structure and human impact on soil fertility, is developing to a great extent independently from climatic processes and can seriously influence vegetation cover productivity not only at the local and regional levels but also globally. Analysis results of land use structure and soil cover condition influence on river basin ecosystems productive potential is presented in the research. The analysis is carried out applying integrated characteristics of ecosystems functioning, space images processing results and mathematic simulation methods. The possibility of making permanent functional simulator defining connection between macroparameters of "phytocenosis-soil" system condition on the basis of basin approach is shown. Ecosystems of river catchment basins of various degrees located in European part of Russia were chosen as research objects. For the integrated assessment of ecosystems soil and vegetation conditions the following characteristics have been applied: 1. Soil-productional potential, characterizing the ability of natural and natural-anthropogenic ecosystem in certain soil-bioclimatic conditions for long term reproduction. This indicator allows for specific phytomass characteristics and ecosystem produce, humus content in soil and bioclimatic parameters. 2. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) has been applied as an efficient, remotely defined, monitoring indicator characterizing spatio-temporal unsteadiness of soil-productional potential. To design mathematic simulator functional simulation methods and principles on the basis of regression, correlation and factor analysis have been applied in the research. Coefficients values defining in the designed static model of phytoproductivity distribution has been

  19. Influences of solution chemical conditions on mobilization of TNT from contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Dante, D.A.; Tiller, C.L.; Pennell, K.D.

    1996-12-31

    2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its byproducts are common contaminants on US military installations. Many potential remediation processes are in part limited by the transfer of TNT from the contaminated soil into the aqueous phase. The purpose of this research is to assess the release of TNT from contaminated soil under varying solution chemical conditions. In particular, influences of pH, aquatic natural organic matter, and addition of two surfactants is investigated. Uncontaminated soil was collected from a near-surface site at the Alabama Army Ammunition Plant and was artificially contaminated with TNT prior to the mobilization experiments. Results for the pH experiments show that more TNT is mobilized at neutral pH conditions than at low pH conditions. The presence of dissolved organic matter enhances the release of TNT from soil, but not by a large amount. Surfactant addition has the most significant effect on TNT mobilization.

  20. Soil, water, and vegetation conditions in south Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.; Everitt, J. H.; Gerbermann, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Field spectral measurements and laboratory densitometric measurements showed that tree canopy reflectance differences among the Marrs, Redblush, and Valencia varieties in the visible spectral region were due to their different leaf chlorophyll concentrations. Field measurements of visible light reflectance were directly related to the tonal responses on infrared color photos of the varietal tree canopies. Consequently, densitometric measurements of the foliage on the infrared color transparency with red-filtered light successfully discriminated among the three varieties. Reflectance measurements with a field spectroradiometer on nine dates the growing season of two wheat varieties, Milam and Penjamo, documented their spectra over the 0.45 to 2.50 micron wavelength interval associated with plant cover and physiological development. An image analyzer system was used to optically planimeter the percentage of soil background, vegetation and shadow in the vertical photographs taken within the FOV of the spectroradiometer on each measurement date.

  1. Assessment of possibilities and conditions of irrigation in Hungary by digital soil map products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborczi, Annamária; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Takács, Katalin; Szatmári, Gábor; Szabó, József; Pásztor, László

    2016-04-01

    Sustaining proper soil moisture is essentially important in agricultural management. However, irrigation can be really worth only, if we lay sufficient emphasis on soil conservation. Nationwide planning of irrigation can be taken place, if we have spatially exhaustive maps and recommendations for the different areas. Soil moisture in the pores originate from 'above' (precipitation), or from 'beneath' (from groundwater by capillary lift). The level of groundwater depends on topography, climatic conditions and water regime of the nearby river. The thickness of capillary zone is basicly related to the physical and water management properties of the soil. Accordingly the capillary rise of sandy soils - with very high infiltration rate and very poor water retaining capacity - are far smaller than in the case of clay soils - with very poor infiltration rate and high water retaining capacity. Applying irrigation water can be considered as a reinforcement from 'above', and it affects the salinity and sodicity as well as the soil structure, nutrient supply and soil formation. We defined the possibilities of irrigation according to the average salt content of the soil profile. The nationwide mapping of soil salinity was based on legacy soil profile data, and it was carried out by regression kriging. This method allows that environmental factors with exhaustive spatial extension, such as climatic-, vegetation-, topographic-, soil- and geologic layers can be taken into consideration to the spatial extension of the reference data. According to soil salinity content categories, the areas were delineated as 1. to be irrigated, 2. to be irrigated conditionally, 3. not to be irrigated. The conditions of irrigation was determined by the comparison of the 'actual' and the 'critical' depth of the water table. Since, if the water rises above the critical level, undesirable processes, such as salinization and alkalinization can be developed. The critical depth of the water table was

  2. Emissions of 1,3-Dichloropropene and Chloropicrin after Soil Fumigation under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yates, Scott R; Ashworth, Daniel J; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Qiaoping; Knuteson, James; van Wessenbeeck, Ian J

    2015-06-10

    Soil fumigation is an important agronomic practice in the production of many high-value vegetable and fruit crops, but the use of chemical fumigants can lead to excessive atmospheric emissions. A large-scale (2.9 ha) field experiment was conducted to obtain volatilization and cumulative emission rates for two commonly used soil fumigants under typical agronomic practices: 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin. The aerodynamic method and the indirect back-calculation method using ISCST3 and CALPUFF dispersion models were used to estimate flux loss from the treated field. Over the course of the experiment, the daily peak volatilization rates ranged from 12 to 30 μg m(-2) s(-1) for 1,3-D and from 0.7 to 2.6 μg m(-2) s(-1) for chloropicrin. Depending on the method used for quantification, total emissions of 1,3-D and chloropicrin, respectively, ranged from 16 to 35% and from 0.3 to 1.3% of the applied fumigant. A soil incubation study showed that the low volatilization rates measured for chloropicrin were due to particularly high soil degradation rates observed at this field site. Understanding and quantifying fumigant emissions from agricultural soil will help in developing best management practices to reduce emission losses, reducing adverse impacts to human and ecosystem health, and providing inputs for conducting risk assessments. PMID:26001417

  3. Soil erosion and effluent particle size distribution under different initial conditions and rock fragment coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomaa, S.; Barry, D. A.; Brovelli, A.; Heng, B. C. P.; Sander, G. C.; Parlange, J.-Y.

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that the presence of rock fragments on the soil surface and the soil's initial characteristics (moisture content, surface roughness, bulk density, etc.) are key factors influencing soil erosion dynamics and sediment delivery. In addition, the interaction of these factors increases the complexity of soil erosion patterns and makes predictions more difficult. The aim of this study was (i) to investigate the effect of soil initial conditions and rock fragment coverage on soil erosion yields and effluent particle size distribution and (ii) to evaluate to what extent the rock fragment coverage controls this relationship. Three laboratory flume experiments with constant precipitation rate of 74 mm/h on a loamy soil parcel with a 2% slope were performed. Experiments with duration of 2 h were conducted using the 6-m × 2-m EPFL erosion flume. During each experiment two conditions were considered, a bare soil and a rock fragment-protected (with 40% coverage) soil. The initial soil surface state was varied between the three experiments, from a freshly re-ploughed and almost dry condition to a compacted soil with a well-developed shield layer and high moisture content. Experiments were designed so that rain splash was the primary driver of soil erosion. Results showed that the amount of eroded mass was highly controlled by the initial soil conditions and whether the steady-state equilibrium was un-, partially- or fully- developed during the previous event. Additionally, results revealed that sediment yields and particle size composition in the initial part of an erosion event are more sensitive to the erosion history than the long-time behaviour. This latter appears to be mainly controlled by rainfall intensity. If steady-state was achieved for a previous event, then the next event consistently produced concentrations for each size class that peaked rapidly, and then declined gradually to steady-state equilibrium. If steady state was not obtained, then

  4. Soil genotoxicity induced by successive applications of chlorothalonil under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiangxiang; Cui, Ning; Zhou, Wei; Khorram, Mahdi Safaei; Wang, Donghong; Yu, Yunlong

    2014-05-01

    Greenhouse production of vegetables has been developed rapidly in China. High temperature and humidity inside the greenhouse make this environment more suitable for fast reproduction of fungal diseases. Fungicides are among the chemicals used extensively in the greenhouse to prevent crops from invasive infections by phytopathogens; however, little is known about the accumulation of fungicides in soil and their effect on soil quality under greenhouse conditions. In the present study, the accumulation of the fungicide chlorothalonil (CT) and its toxic metabolite hydroxy-chlorothalonil (HCT) in soil as well as their related soil genotoxicity under greenhouse conditions was investigated. The results indicated that both CT and HCT accumulated in soil with repeated applications of CT, and the accumulation level was strongly correlated to application dosage and its frequency. In addition, soil genotoxicity, which was measured by Vicia faba, also increased with the accumulation of CT and HCT, and the main contributor to this phenomenon was CT rather than HCT. The data demonstrated that successive applications of fungicides may result in their accumulation in soil and thus a decline in soil quality. PMID:24478244

  5. Field dissipation of oxyfluorfen in onion and its dynamics in soil under Indian tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Janaki, P; Sathya Priya, R; Chinnusamy, C

    2013-01-01

    Oxyfluorfen, a diphenyl-ether herbicide is being used to control annual and perennial broad-leaved weeds and sedges in a variety of field crops including onion. The present study was aimed to investigate the dynamics and field persistence of oxyfluorfen in onion plant, bulb and soil under Indian tropical conditions. Application of four rates of oxyfluorfen viz., 200, 250, 300 and 400 g AI ha(-1) as pre-emergence gave good weed control in field experiment with onion. The oxyfluorfen residue dissipated faster in plant than in soil respectively, with a mean half-life of 6.1 and 11.2 days. Dissipation followed first-order kinetics. In laboratory column leaching experiments, 17 percent of the applied oxyfluorfen was recovered from the soil and indicates its solubility in water and mobility in sandy clay loam soil was low. A sorption study revealed that the adsorption of oxyfluorfen to the soil was highly influenced by the soil organic carbon with the Koc value of 5450. The study concludes that the dissipation of oxyfluorfen in soil and onion was dependent on the physico-chemical properties of the soil and environmental conditions. PMID:23998306

  6. Proliferation of diversified clostridial species during biological soil disinfestation incorporated with plant biomass under various conditions.

    PubMed

    Mowlick, Subrata; Takehara, Toshiaki; Kaku, Nobuo; Ueki, Katsuji; Ueki, Atsuko

    2013-09-01

    Biological soil disinfestation (BSD) involves the anaerobic decomposition of plant biomass by microbial communities leading to control of plant pathogens. We analyzed bacterial communities in soil of a model experiment of BSD, as affected by biomass incorporation under various conditions, to find out the major anaerobic bacterial groups which emerged after BSD treatments. The soil was treated with Brassica juncea plants, wheat bran, or Avena strigosa plants, irrigated at 20 or 30 % moisture content and incubated at 25-30 °C for 17 days. The population of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. spinaciae incorporated at the start of the experiment declined markedly for some BSD conditions and rather high concentrations of acetate and butyrate were detected from these BSD-treated soils. The polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis based on the V3 region of 16S rRNA gene sequences from the soil DNA revealed that bacterial profiles greatly changed according to the treatment conditions. Based on the clone library analysis, phylogenetically diverse clostridial species appeared exceedingly dominant in the bacterial community of BSD soil incorporated with Brassica plants or wheat bran, in which the pathogen was suppressed completely. Species in the class Clostridia such as Clostridium saccharobutylicum, Clostridium acetobutylicum, Clostridium xylanovorans, Oxobacter pfennigii, Clostridium pasteurianum, Clostridium sufflavum, Clostridium cylindrosporum, etc. were commonly recognized as closely related species of the dominant clone groups from these soil samples. PMID:23132344

  7. One-against-All Weighted Dynamic Time Warping for Language-Independent and Speaker-Dependent Speech Recognition in Adverse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianglilan; Sun, Jiping; Luo, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Considering personal privacy and difficulty of obtaining training material for many seldom used English words and (often non-English) names, language-independent (LI) with lightweight speaker-dependent (SD) automatic speech recognition (ASR) is a promising option to solve the problem. The dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm is the state-of-the-art algorithm for small foot-print SD ASR applications with limited storage space and small vocabulary, such as voice dialing on mobile devices, menu-driven recognition, and voice control on vehicles and robotics. Even though we have successfully developed two fast and accurate DTW variations for clean speech data, speech recognition for adverse conditions is still a big challenge. In order to improve recognition accuracy in noisy environment and bad recording conditions such as too high or low volume, we introduce a novel one-against-all weighted DTW (OAWDTW). This method defines a one-against-all index (OAI) for each time frame of training data and applies the OAIs to the core DTW process. Given two speech signals, OAWDTW tunes their final alignment score by using OAI in the DTW process. Our method achieves better accuracies than DTW and merge-weighted DTW (MWDTW), as 6.97% relative reduction of error rate (RRER) compared with DTW and 15.91% RRER compared with MWDTW are observed in our extensive experiments on one representative SD dataset of four speakers' recordings. To the best of our knowledge, OAWDTW approach is the first weighted DTW specially designed for speech data in adverse conditions. PMID:24520317

  8. One-against-all weighted dynamic time warping for language-independent and speaker-dependent speech recognition in adverse conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianglilan; Sun, Jiping; Luo, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Considering personal privacy and difficulty of obtaining training material for many seldom used English words and (often non-English) names, language-independent (LI) with lightweight speaker-dependent (SD) automatic speech recognition (ASR) is a promising option to solve the problem. The dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm is the state-of-the-art algorithm for small foot-print SD ASR applications with limited storage space and small vocabulary, such as voice dialing on mobile devices, menu-driven recognition, and voice control on vehicles and robotics. Even though we have successfully developed two fast and accurate DTW variations for clean speech data, speech recognition for adverse conditions is still a big challenge. In order to improve recognition accuracy in noisy environment and bad recording conditions such as too high or low volume, we introduce a novel one-against-all weighted DTW (OAWDTW). This method defines a one-against-all index (OAI) for each time frame of training data and applies the OAIs to the core DTW process. Given two speech signals, OAWDTW tunes their final alignment score by using OAI in the DTW process. Our method achieves better accuracies than DTW and merge-weighted DTW (MWDTW), as 6.97% relative reduction of error rate (RRER) compared with DTW and 15.91% RRER compared with MWDTW are observed in our extensive experiments on one representative SD dataset of four speakers' recordings. To the best of our knowledge, OAWDTW approach is the first weighted DTW specially designed for speech data in adverse conditions. PMID:24520317

  9. Bacterial diversity of soil aggregates of different sizes in various land use conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Ekaterina; Azida, Thakahova; Olga, Kutovaya

    2014-05-01

    The patterns of soil microbiome structure may be a universal and very sensitive indicator of soil quality (soil "health") used for optimization and biologization of agricultural systems. The understanding of how microbial diversity influenses, and is influenced by, the environment can only be attained by analyses at scales relevant to those at which processes influencing microbial diversity actually operate. The basic structural and functional unit of the soil is a soil aggregate, which is actually a microcosm of the associative co-existing groups of microorganisms that form characteristic ecological food chains. It is known that many important microbial processes occur in spatially segregated microenvironments in soil leading to a microscale biogeography. The Metagenomic library of typical chernozem in conditions of different land use systems was created. Total genomic DNA was extracted from 0.5 g of the frozen soil after mechanical destruction. Sample preparation and sequencing was performed on a GS Junior ("Roche»", Switzerland) according to manufacturer's recommendations, using the universal primers to the variable regions V4 gene 16S - rRNA - F515 (GTGCCAGCMGCCGCGGTAA) and R806 (GGACT-ACVSGGGTATCTAAT). It is shown that the system of land use is a stronger determinant of the taxonomic composition of the soil microbial community, rather than the size of the structural units. In soil samples from different land use systems the presence of accessory components was revealed. They may be used as indicators of processes of soil recovery, soil degradation or soil exhaustion processes occuring in the agroecosystems. The comparative analysis of microbial communities of chernozem aggregates investigated demonstrates the statistically valuable differences in the amount of bacterial phyla and Archean domain content as well as the species richness in aggregates of various size fractions. The occurrence of specific components in the taxonomic structure of micro-and macro

  10. Molybdenum isotope fractionation in soils: Influence of redox conditions, organic matter, and atmospheric inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, C.; Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Opfergelt, S.; Guicharnaud, R. A.; Halliday, A. N.; Burton, K. W.

    2015-08-01

    Molybdenum isotope fractionation accompanying soil development is studied across three pedogenic gradients encompassing a range of controlling factors. These factors include variable redox conditions, organic matter content, Fe and Mn oxy(hydr)oxide content, mineral composition, degree of weathering, pH, type and amount of atmospheric inputs, age, climate, and underlying rock type. Soil profiles from the island of Maui (Hawaii) along a precipitation gradient ranging from 850 to 5050 mm mean annual precipitation show a decrease in average soil δ98Mo from -0.04 ± 0.11‰ at the driest, most oxic site, which is indistinguishable from the basalt parent material (-0.09 ± 0.08‰), to -0.33 ± 0.10‰ at the wettest, most reducing site. A suite of 6 Icelandic soils display a broad trend with heavier δ98Mo values (up to +1.50 ± 0.09‰) in soil horizons that are more weathered and have higher organic matter content. Selective extractions of Mo from different soil components indicate that the association with organic matter and silicate or Ti-oxide residue dominates retention of Mo in these soils, with adsorption on Fe and Mn oxy(hydr)oxides playing a lesser role. Across all basaltic soils, δ98Mo values are lighter in soils that exhibit the most net Mo loss relative to the parent material, and δ98Mo values are heavier in soils that exhibit net Mo gains. A well-drained regolith profile in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico developed on quartz diorite shows heavier δ98Mo values than the parent material (up to +0.71 ± 0.10‰ with an integrated profile average of +0.28 ± 0.10‰) in soil and shallower saprolite, despite overall moderate loss of 28% of Mo relative to the bedrock. However, the deeper saprolite is unfractionated from bedrock (-0.01 ± 0.10‰, quartz diorite bedrock) indicating that rock weathering dissolution processes and secondary clay formation do not fractionate Mo isotopes. Our data suggest that the Mo mass balance and isotope composition of

  11. The effect of solvent-conditioning on soil organic matter sorption affinity for diuron and phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Ahangar, Ahmad Gholamalizadeh; Smernik, Ronald J; Kookana, Rai S; Chittleborough, David J

    2009-08-01

    The effect of solvent-conditioning on the sorption of diuron and phenanthrene was investigated. The organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficients (K(OC)) for diuron and phenanthrene (determined from single initial concentrations of 0.8mgL(-1) and 1.5mgL(-1), respectively) were consistently higher following solvent-conditioning of a whole soil with five organic solvents (acetonitrile, acetone, methanol, chloroform and dichloromethane). The relative increase in K(OC) was inversely related to the polarity of the conditioning solvent (i.e. greater increases in K(OC) were observed for the least polar solvents: chloroform and dichloromethane). The effect of solvent-conditioning on the sorption properties of the same soil that had been lipid-extracted using accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) was also investigated. Since lipid extraction involves treatment with a non-polar solvent (95:5 dichloromethane:methanol) one may have expected no further increase in K(OC) on solvent-conditioning. On the contrary, the lipid-extracted soil exhibited very similar increases in K(OC) as the whole soil. This demonstrated that lipid removal and solvent-conditioning, which both increased K(OC) for this soil, are quite separate phenomena. PMID:19435638

  12. Influence of green waste compost on azimsulfuron dissipation and soil functions under oxic and anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    García-Jaramillo, M; Cox, L; Hermosín, M C; Cerli, C; Kalbitz, K

    2016-04-15

    Concerns have been raised over the sustainability of intensive rice cultivation, where the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides has been associated with numerous environmental problems. The objective of this study was to test the effect of the herbicide azimsulfuron on important soil functions as affected by amendment with a byproduct of the olive oil industry. Soil was collected from a Mediterranean rice field. Part of it was amended with alperujo compost (AC). Amended and unamended soils were incubated for 43days in presence or not of azimsulfuron, under anoxic-flooded (AF) and oxic-unflooded (OU) conditions. We monitored the dissipation of the herbicide azimsulfuron, C mineralization, soil microbial biomass (SMB) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content and its nature. Under AF conditions, the application of compost produced an increase in the dissipation of the herbicide (up to 12.4%). It was related with the higher DOC content, 4 times higher than under OU conditions. Though increases in carbon turnover (under AF and OU conditions) and reduction of SMBC after herbicide application (only under AF conditions) were observed, the differences were not statistically significant. The application of this organic amendment is presented as an efficient management strategy to increase C turnover in agricultural soils and reduce some of the negative effects derived from the application of azimsulfuron under flooded conditions. PMID:26849340

  13. Modeling Soil Sodicity Problems under Dryland and Irrigated Conditions: Case Studies in Argentina and Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso

    2014-05-01

    Salt-affected soils, both saline and sodic, my develop both under dryland and irrigated conditions, affecting negatively the physical and chemical soil properties, the crop production and the animal and human health.Among the development processes of salt-affected soils, the processes of sodification have been generally received less attention and is less understood than the development of saline soils. Although in both of them, hydrological processes are involved in their development, in the case of sodic soils we have to consider some additional chemical and physicochemical reactions, making more difficult their modeling and prediction. In this contribution we present two case studies: one related to the development of sodic soils in the lowlands of the Argentina Pampas, under dryland conditions and sub-humid temperate climate, with pastures for cattle production; the other deals with the development of sodic soils in the Colombia Cauca Valley, under irrigated conditions and tropical sub-humid climate, in lands used for sugarcane cropping dedicated to sugar and ethanol production. In both cases the development of sodicity in the surface soil is mainly related to the effects of the composition and level of groundwater, affected in the case of Argentina Pampas by the off-site changes in dryland use and management in the upper zones and by the drainage conditions in the lowlands, and in the case of the Cauca Valley, by the on-site irrigation and drainage management in lands with sugarcane. There is shown how the model SALSODIMAR, developed by the main author, based on the balance of water and soluble componentes of both the irrigation water and groundwater under different water and land management conditions, may be adapted for the diagnosis and prediction of both problems, and for the selection of alternatives for their management and amelioration.

  14. Contributions of groundwater conditions to soil and water salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Ramsis B.; Otto, Claus J.; Fitzpatrick, Robert W.

    Salinization is the process whereby the concentration of dissolved salts in water and soil is increased due to natural or human-induced processes. Water is lost through one or any combination of four main mechanisms: evaporation, evapotranspiration, hydrolysis, and leakage between aquifers. Salinity increases from catchment divides to the valley floors and in the direction of groundwater flow. Salinization is explained by two main chemical models developed by the authors: weathering and deposition. These models are in agreement with the weathering and depositional geological processes that have formed soils and overburden in the catchments. Five soil-change processes in arid and semi-arid climates are associated with waterlogging and water. In all represented cases, groundwater is the main geological agent for transmitting, accumulating, and discharging salt. At a small catchment scale in South and Western Australia, water is lost through evapotranspiration and hydrolysis. Saline groundwater flows along the beds of the streams and is accumulated in paleochannels, which act as a salt repository, and finally discharges in lakes, where most of the saline groundwater is concentrated. In the hummocky terrains of the Northern Great Plains Region, Canada and USA, the localized recharge and discharge scenarios cause salinization to occur mainly in depressions, in conjunction with the formation of saline soils and seepages. On a regional scale within closed basins, this process can create playas or saline lakes. In the continental aquifers of the rift basins of Sudan, salinity increases along the groundwater flow path and forms a saline zone at the distal end. The saline zone in each rift forms a closed ridge, which coincides with the closed trough of the groundwater-level map. The saline body or bodies were formed by evaporation coupled with alkaline-earth carbonate precipitation and dissolution of capillary salts. Résumé La salinisation est le processus par lequel la

  15. Storage of milk powders under adverse conditions. 2. Influence on the content of water-soluble vitamins.

    PubMed

    Ford, J E; Hurrell, R F; Finot, P A

    1983-05-01

    Storage of milk powder under unfavourable conditions accelerates the normally slow deterioration in nutritional quality. The effects of such storage on the water-soluble vitamin composition were examined. (a) Spray-dried whole milk containing 25 g water/kg was stored at 60 degrees and 70 degrees and sampled weekly to 9 weeks. (b) Spray-dried whole milk and skimmed milk were adjusted to contain 40 and 100 g water/kg and stored at 37 degrees in nitrogen and in oxygen. Samples were taken for analysis at intervals during storage. The samples were analysed for eight B-complex vitamins and ascorbic acid, and also for total lysine, 'reactive lysine' and 'lysine as lactulosyl-lysine'. Storage at 60 degrees caused rapid destruction of folic acid (53% loss at 4 weeks) and slower loss of thiamin, vitamin B6 and pantothenic acid (18% at 8 weeks). There was no change in the content of riboflavin, biotin, nicotinic acid and vitamin B12. At 70 degrees the rate of destruction of the four labile vitamins was much increased; 18% or less survived at 4 weeks. At 37 degrees and 40 g water/kg there was little change in total and 'reactive' lysine during storage for 57 d. Lactulosyl-lysine was demonstrably present but at low concentration. There was considerable loss of folate (72%) and ascorbate (91%) during storage for 30 d in O2, but no significant loss in N2. Thiamin fell by approximately 12% in 57 d, equally in O2 and N2. The content of the remaining vitamins was unchanged. At 100 g water/kg there were progressive Maillard changes. During 27 d in N2 the colour changed from cream to pale brown, but in O2 there was no perceptible colour change. Total lysine fell by 20% in 27 d, and 'reactive lysine' by 30%. Folate was stable during 16 d in N2, but largely (94%) destroyed in O2. Ascorbic acid was also destroyed in N2 as in O2. Thiamin fell by 41% in 27 d, equally in O2 and N2. Vitamin B6 was more labile, especially in N2, falling by 71% in 16 d. With skimmed-milk powder containing 100

  16. Effectiveness of the soil conditioning index to predict soil organic carbon sequestration in the southeastern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid and reliable assessment of the potential of various agricultural management systems to sequester soil organic C is needed to promote conservation and help mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. A growing database is emerging from detailed field experiments on how conservation agricultural systems...

  17. Soil microbial communties and enzyme activities in soils during historically extreme drought conditions in the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Southern High Plains region of Texas experienced a significant reduction in 2011 crop production due a record drought as it experienced the hottest summer since 1911 (> 48 days of temperatures above 37.7oC and only 37.8 mm precipitation). Soil microbial communities and their associated enzymatic...

  18. Lignin decomposition and microbial community in paddy soils: effects of alternating redox conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerli, Chiara; Liu, Qin; Hanke, Alexander; Kaiser, Klaus; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    Paddy soils are characterised by interchanging cycles of anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Such fluctuations cause continuous changes in soil solution chemistry as well as in the composition and physiological responses of the microbial community. Temporary deficiency in oxygen creates conditions favourable to facultative or obligates anaerobic bacteria, while aerobic communities can thrive in the period of water absence. These alterations can strongly affect soil processes, in particular organic matter (OM) accumulation and mineralization. In submerged soils, lignin generally constitutes a major portion of the total OM because of hampered degradation under anoxic conditions. The alternating redox cycles resulting from paddy soil management might promote both degradation and preservation of lignin, affecting the overall composition and reactivity of total and dissolved OM. We sampled soils subjected to cycles of anoxic (rice growing period) and oxic (harvest and growth of other crops) conditions since 700 and 2000 years. We incubated suspended Ap material, sampled from the two paddy plus two corresponding non-paddy control soils under oxic and anoxic condition, for 3 months, interrupted by a short period of three weeks (from day 21 to day 43) with reversed redox conditions. At each sampling time (day 2, 21, 42, 63, 84), we determined lignin-derived phenols (by CuO oxidation) as well as phospholipids fatty acids contents and composition. We aimed to highlight changes in lignin decomposition as related to the potential rapid changes in microbial community composition. Since the studied paddy soils had a long history of wet rice cultivation, the microbial community should be well adapted to interchanging oxic and anoxic cycles, therefore fully expressing its activity at both conditions. In non-paddy soil changes in redox conditions caused modification of quantity and composition of the microbial community. On the contrary, in well-established paddy soils the microbial

  19. Sensing technologies to measure metabolic activities in soil and assess its health conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cesare, Fabrizio; Macagnano, Antonella

    2013-04-01

    Soil is a complex ecosystem comprised of several and mutually interacting components, both abiotic (organo-mineral associations) and biotic (microbial and pedofaunal populations and plants), where a single parameter depends on other factors and affects the same and other factors, so that a network of influences among organisms coexists with the reciprocal actions between organisms and their environment. Therefore, it is difficult to undoubtedly determine what is the cause and what the effect within relationships between factors and processes. Soil is commonly studied through the evaluation and measurement of single parameters (e.g. the content of soil organic matter (SOM), microbial biomass, enzyme activities, pH, etc.), events (e.g. soil erosion, compaction, etc.) and processes (e.g. soil respiration, carbon fluxes, nitrification/denitrification, etc.), often carried out in laboratory conditions in order to limit the number of factors acting within the ecosystem under study, but missing the information about the global soil environment that way. In the last decade, several scientists have proposed and suggested the need for a holistic approach to soil ecosystems in different contexts. Recently, we have applied a sensing system developed in the last decades and capable of analysing complex mixtures of gases and volatiles (odours or aromas) in atmospheres, namely called electronic nose (EN). Typically, ENs are devices consisting of an array of differentially and partially specific, despite selective, sensors upon diverse coatings of sensitive films, i.e. interacting with single analytes of the same chemical class, despite not highly specific for a single substance, only, but showing also lower extent of cross-selectivity towards compounds of other chemical classes. ENs can be used in the classifications of odours by processing the collected responses of all sensors in the array through pattern recognition analyses, in order to obtain a chemical fingerprint

  20. No-tillage lessens soil CO2 emissions the most under arid and sandy soil conditions: results from a meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Khatab; Chivenge, Pauline; Ciais, Philippe; Chaplot, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    The management of agroecosystems plays a crucial role in the global carbon cycle with soil tillage leading to known organic carbon redistributions within soils and changes in soil CO2 emissions. Yet, discrepancies exist on the impact of tillage on soil CO2 emissions and on the main soil and environmental controls. A meta-analysis was conducted using 46 peer-reviewed publications totaling 174 paired observations comparing CO2 emissions over entire seasons or years from tilled and untilled soils across different climates, crop types and soil conditions with the objective of quantifying tillage impact on CO2 emissions and assessing the main controls. On average, tilled soils emitted 21 % more CO2 than untilled soils, which corresponded to a significant difference at P<0.05. The difference increased to 29 % in sandy soils from arid climates with low soil organic carbon content (SOCC < 1 %) and low soil moisture, but tillage had no impact on CO2 fluxes in clayey soils with high background SOCC (> 3 %). Finally, nitrogen fertilization and crop residue management had little effect on the CO2 responses of soils to no-tillage. These results suggest no-tillage is an effective mitigation measure of carbon dioxide losses from dry land soils. They emphasize the importance of including information on soil factors such as texture, aggregate stability and organic carbon content in global models of the carbon cycle.

  1. Rates of Root and Organism Growth, Soil Conditions, and Temporal and Spatial Development of the Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    WATT, MICHELLE; SILK, WENDY K.; PASSIOURA, JOHN B.

    2006-01-01

    • Background Roots growing in soil encounter physical, chemical and biological environments that influence their rhizospheres and affect plant growth. Exudates from roots can stimulate or inhibit soil organisms that may release nutrients, infect the root, or modify plant growth via signals. These rhizosphere processes are poorly understood in field conditions. • Scope and Aims We characterize roots and their rhizospheres and rates of growth in units of distance and time so that interactions with soil organisms can be better understood in field conditions. We review: (1) distances between components of the soil, including dead roots remnant from previous plants, and the distances between new roots, their rhizospheres and soil components; (2) characteristic times (distance2/diffusivity) for solutes to travel distances between roots and responsive soil organisms; (3) rates of movement and growth of soil organisms; (4) rates of extension of roots, and how these relate to the rates of anatomical and biochemical ageing of root tissues and the development of the rhizosphere within the soil profile; and (5) numbers of micro-organisms in the rhizosphere and the dependence on the site of attachment to the growing tip. We consider temporal and spatial variation within the rhizosphere to understand the distribution of bacteria and fungi on roots in hard, unploughed soil, and the activities of organisms in the overlapping rhizospheres of living and dead roots clustered in gaps in most field soils. • Conclusions Rhizosphere distances, characteristic times for solute diffusion, and rates of root and organism growth must be considered to understand rhizosphere development. Many values used in our analysis were estimates. The paucity of reliable data underlines the rudimentary state of our knowledge of root–organism interactions in the field. PMID:16551700

  2. IT-based soil quality evaluation for agroecologically smart land-use planning in RF conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Activated in the first decades of XXI century global climate, economy and farming changes sharply actualized novel IT-based approaches in soil quality evaluation to address modern agricultural issues with agroecologically smart land-use planning. Despite global projected climate changes will affect a general decline of crop yields (IPCC 2014), RF boreal and subboreal regions will benefit from predicted and already particularly verified temperature warming and increased precipitation (Valentini, Vasenev, 2015) due to essential increasing of growing season length and mild climate conditions favorable for most prospective crops and best available agrotechnologies. However, the essential spatial heterogeneity is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central European region of Russia which is one of the biggest «food baskets» in RF. In these conditions potentially favorable climate circumstances will increase not only soil fertility and workability features but also their dynamics and spatial variability that determine crucial issues of IT-based soil quality evaluation systems development and agroecologically smart farming planning. Developed and verified within the LAMP project (RF Governmental projects #11.G34.31.0079 and #14.120.14.4266) regionally adapted DSS (ACORD-R - RF #2012612944) gives effective informational and methodological support for smart farming agroecological optimization in global climate and farming changes challenges. Information basis for agroecologically smart land-use planning consists of crops and agrotechnologies requirements, regional and local systems of agroecological zoning, local landscape and soil cover patterns, land quality and degradation risk assessments, current and previous farming practices results, agroclimatic predictions and production agroecological models, environmental limitations and planned profitability, fertilizing efficiency DSS ACORD-R. Smart land-use practice refers to sustainable balance

  3. The mathematical simulation of the temperature fields of building envelopes under permanent frozen soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, M. V.; Babuta, M. N.; Kuznetsova, U. N.; Safonova, E. V.; Minaeva, O. M.

    2016-04-01

    The physical-mathematical model of the thermal state of the aired technical underground taking into account the air exchange and design features of construction under permanent frozen soil conditions has been suggested. The computational scheme of the temperature fields prediction of building envelopes of projected buildings and soil under and nearby buildings has been developed. The numerical simulation of the temperature fields of building envelopes changes was conducted during a year. The results of the numerical simulation showed that the heat coming from the technical undergrounds and through the walls does not influence the temperature field of the soil neither under a building nor at a distance from it.

  4. Biodegradation of explosives mixture in soil under different water-content conditions.

    PubMed

    Sagi-Ben Moshe, S; Dahan, O; Weisbrod, N; Bernstein, A; Adar, E; Ronen, Z

    2012-02-15

    Soil redox potential plays a key role in the rates and pathways of explosives degradation, and is highly influenced by water content and microbial activity. Soil redox potential can vary significantly both temporally and spatially in micro-sites. In this study, when soil water content increased, the redox potential decreased, and there was significant enhancement in the biodegradation of a mixture of three explosives. Whereas TNT degradation occurred under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, RDX and HMX degradation occurred only when water content conditions resulted in a prolonged period of negative redox potential. Moreover, under unsaturated conditions, which are more representative of real environmental conditions, the low redox potential, even when measured for temporary periods, was sufficient to facilitate anaerobic degradation. Our results clearly indicate a negative influence of TNT on the biodegradation of RDX and HMX, but this effect was less pronounced than that found in previous slurry batch experiments: this can be explained by a masking effect of the soil in the canisters. Fully or partially saturated soils can promote the existence of micro-niches that differ considerably in their explosives concentration, microbial community and redox conditions. PMID:22226717

  5. Activity and stability of a complex bacterial soil community under simulated Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Merrison, Jonathan; Nørnberg, Per; Aagaard Lomstein, Bente; Finster, Kai

    2005-04-01

    A simulation experiment with a complex bacterial soil community in a Mars simulation chamber was performed to determine the effect of Martian conditions on community activity, stability and survival. At three different depths in the soil core short-term effects of Martian conditions with and without ultraviolet (UV) exposure corresponding to 8 Martian Sol were compared. Community metabolic activities and functional diversity, measured as glucose respiration and versatility in substrate utilization, respectively, decreased after UV exposure, whereas they remained unaffected by Martian conditions without UV exposure. In contrast, the numbers of culturable bacteria and the genetic diversity were unaffected by the simulated Martian conditions both with and without UV exposure. The genetic diversity of the soil community and of the colonies grown on agar plates were evaluated by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) on DNA extracts. Desiccation of the soil prior to experimentation affected the functional diversity by decreasing the versatility in substrate utilization. The natural dominance of endospores and Gram-positive bacteria in the investigated Mars-analogue soil may explain the limited effect of the Mars incubations on the survival and community structure. Our results suggest that UV radiation and desiccation are major selecting factors on bacterial functional diversity in terrestrial bacterial communities incubated under simulated Martian conditions. Furthermore, these results suggest that forward contamination of Mars is a matter of great concern in future space missions.

  6. [Optimizing remediation conditions of non-thermal plasma for DDTs heavily contaminated soil].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-Hong; Luo, Yong-Ming; Teng, Ying; Liu, Wu-Xing; Pan, Cheng; Li, Zhen-Gao; Huang, Yu-Juan

    2013-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out in a non-thermal reactor to remove DDTs in heavily contaminated soil by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The study aims to investigate the effects of soil properties (including soil particle size and soil water content) and equipment working parameters (e. g. the plasma power, the processing time and discharge atmosphere) on the removal of DDTs from soil. The results showed that DDTs in soil were significantly degraded by the non-thermal plasma produced by dielectric barrier discharge. Removal rate of DDTs increased with increasing processing time. The removal efficiency of DDTs ranged from 95.3% to 99.9% in 20 minutes. The optimum conditions were as follows: 1 kW of the plasma power, 20 minutes of processing time in air discharge atmosphere, 0-0.9 mm soil particle size and 4.5% -10.5% of soil moisture content. The results also showed that o,p'-DDE might be the intermediate dechlorination and dehydrogenation product of the o,p'-DDT after the oxidization. PMID:23487955

  7. Agricultural machineries wheeling and soil qualities mapping in climatic changes conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergonzoli, S.; Servadio, P.

    2012-04-01

    and on control areas, a software GIS was used. Results shown the highest level of soil compaction caused by the traffic of WTN in term of CI and SS. In fact, increment ratio respect to the control measured after the tractors pass were: CI = 0.65 and 0.14 for WTN and for WTEL respectively; SS = 0.65 and 0.46 for WTN and WTEL respectively. Comparing the two different tires, significant differences were found particularly in the surface layers (0-0.20 m depth): mean values of CI and SS were higher for WTN (0.47 and 1.60 respectively) respect to WTEL. Track area covered by the two treatments respect to the whole field (16.32 ha) were: 0.025 for treatment WTN (0.27 m tires width) having an operative work width of 24 m ; 0.075 for treatment WTEL (0.85 m tires width) having an operative work width of 14 m. Results of this study highlighted that, in these field conditions (clay soil, water content over field capacity), tractor pass with very narrow tires caused a soil compaction level too high up to be impossible to traffic into the field. To operate at these soil water content conditions a tractors fitted with low aspect ratio and low inflation pressure tires is necessary. With lower soil water content, narrow tires allow carrying out fertilization into the inter-row avoiding crop trampling and compacting less percentage of field area respect to the a tractor equipped with large tires. Key words: Tractor, Soil trafficability, Soil compaction, Tires, GPS, GIS. Acknowledgements This work was carried out under the auspices of the special project "Sceneries of adaptation of the Italian agriculture to the climatic changes" (AGROSCENARI) of the Agricultural Research Council, and Italian Ministry of the Agricultural and Forestry Politics.

  8. Seedling mycorrhizal type and soil chemistry are related to canopy condition of Eucalyptus gomphocephala.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Lily; Barber, Paul A; Hardy, Giles E St J; Calver, Michael; Dell, Bernard

    2013-07-01

    The health of Eucalyptus gomphocephala is declining within its natural range in south-western Australia. In a pilot study to assess whether changes in mycorrhizal fungi and soil chemistry might be associated with E. gomphocephala decline, we set up a containerized bioassay experiment with E. gomphocephala as the trap plant using intact soil cores collected from 12 sites with E. gomphocephala canopy condition ranging from healthy to declining. Adjacent soil samples were collected for chemical analysis. The type of mycorrhiza (arbuscular or ectomycorrhizal) formed in containerized seedlings predicted the canopy condition of E. gomphocephala at the sites where the cores were taken. Ectomycorrhizal fungi colonization was higher in seedling roots in soil taken from sites with healthy canopies, whereas colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi dominated in roots in soil taken from sites with declining canopies. Furthermore, several soil chemical properties predicted canopy condition and the type of mycorrhizal fungi colonizing roots. These preliminary findings suggest that large-scale studies should be undertaken in the field to quantify those ectomycorrhiza (ECM) fungi sensitive to E. gomphocephala canopy decline and whether particular ECM fungi are bioindicators of ecosystem health. PMID:23314749

  9. Natural infection of the soil-borne fungus Rosellinia necatrix with novel mycoviruses under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Yaegashi, Hajime; Kanematsu, Satoko

    2016-07-01

    Fungi are an important component of the soil ecosystem. Mycoviruses have numerous potential impacts on soil fungi, including phytopathogenic fungal species. However, the diversity and ecology of mycoviruses in soil fungi is largely unexplored. Our previous work has shown that the soil-borne phytopathogenic fungus Rosellinia necatrix was infected with several novel mycoviruses after growing for 2-3 years in an apple orchard. In this study, we investigated whether natural infection of R. necatrix with mycoviruses occurs under limited conditions. Virus-free R. necatrix isolates were grown in a small bucket containing soil samples for a short time (1.5-4.5 months) under greenhouse conditions. Screening of dsRNA mycoviruses among 365 retrieved isolates showed that four, including 6-31, 6-33, 6-35, and 7-11, harbored virus-like dsRNAs. Molecular characterization of the dsRNAs revealed that three retrieved isolates, 6-31, 6-33, and 6-35 were infected with a novel endornavirus and isolate 7-11 is infected with a novel partitivirus belonging to the genus Alphapartitivirus. These novel mycoviruses had no overt biological impact on R. necatrix. Overall, this study indicates that natural infections of R. necatrix with new mycoviruses can occur under experimental soil conditions. PMID:26555164

  10. Experimental Investigation of Soil and Atmospheric Conditions on the Momentum, Mass, and Thermal Boundary Layers Above the Land Atmosphere Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, A.; Smits, K. M.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Schulte, P.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impacts of soil conditions (i.e. soil type, saturation) and atmospheric forcings (i.e. velocity, temperature, relative humidity) on the momentum, mass, and temperature boundary layers. The atmospheric conditions tested represent those typically found in semi-arid and arid climates and the soil conditions simulate the three stages of evaporation. The data generated will help identify the importance of different soil conditions and atmospheric forcings with respect to land-atmospheric interactions which will have direct implications on future numerical studies investigating the effects of turbulent air flow on evaporation. The experimental datasets generated for this study were performed using a unique climate controlled closed-circuit wind tunnel/porous media facility located at the Center for Experimental Study of Subsurface Environmental Processes (CESEP) at the Colorado School of Mines. The test apparatus consisting of a 7.3 m long porous media tank and wind tunnel, were outfitted with a sensor network to carefully measure wind velocity, air and soil temperature, relative humidity, soil moisture, and soil air pressure. Boundary layer measurements were made between the heights of 2 and 500 mm above the soil tank under constant conditions (i.e. wind velocity, temperature, relative humidity). The soil conditions (e.g. soil type, soil moisture) were varied between datasets to analyze their impact on the boundary layers. Experimental results show that the momentum boundary layer is very sensitive to the applied atmospheric conditions and soil conditions to a much less extent. Increases in velocity above porous media leads to momentum boundary layer thinning and closely reflect classical flat plate theory. The mass and thermal boundary layers are directly dependent on both atmospheric and soil conditions. Air pressure within the soil is independent of atmospheric temperature and relative humidity - wind velocity and soil

  11. IT-based soil quality evaluation for agroecologically smart land-use planning in RF conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Activated in the first decades of XXI century global climate, economy and farming changes sharply actualized novel IT-based approaches in soil quality evaluation to address modern agricultural issues with agroecologically smart land-use planning. Despite global projected climate changes will affect a general decline of crop yields (IPCC 2014), RF boreal and subboreal regions will benefit from predicted and already particularly verified temperature warming and increased precipitation (Valentini, Vasenev, 2015) due to essential increasing of growing season length and mild climate conditions favorable for most prospective crops and best available agrotechnologies. However, the essential spatial heterogeneity is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central European region of Russia which is one of the biggest «food baskets» in RF. In these conditions potentially favorable climate circumstances will increase not only soil fertility and workability features but also their dynamics and spatial variability that determine crucial issues of IT-based soil quality evaluation systems development and agroecologically smart farming planning. Developed and verified within the LAMP project (RF Governmental projects #11.G34.31.0079 and #14.120.14.4266) regionally adapted DSS (ACORD-R - RF #2012612944) gives effective informational and methodological support for smart farming agroecological optimization in global climate and farming changes challenges. Information basis for agroecologically smart land-use planning consists of crops and agrotechnologies requirements, regional and local systems of agroecological zoning, local landscape and soil cover patterns, land quality and degradation risk assessments, current and previous farming practices results, agroclimatic predictions and production agroecological models, environmental limitations and planned profitability, fertilizing efficiency DSS ACORD-R. Smart land-use practice refers to sustainable balance

  12. How do soil physical conditions for crop growth vary over time under established contrasting tillage regimes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallett, Paul; Stobart, Ron; Valentine, Tracy; George, Timothy; Morris, Nathan; Newton, Adrian; McKenzie, Blair

    2014-05-01

    When plant breeders develop modern cereal varieties for the sustainable intensification of agriculture, insufficient thought is given to the impact of tillage on soil physical conditions for crop production. In earlier work, we demonstrated that barley varieties that perform best in ploughed soil (the approach traditionally used for breeding trials) were not the same as those performing best under shallow non-inversion or zero-tillage. We also found that the Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) associated with improved phosphorus uptake, and hence useful for marker assisted breeding, were not robust between different tillage regimes. The impact of the soil environment had greater impact than the genetics in GxE interactions. It is obvious that soil tillage should be considered when breeding the next generation of crops. Tillage may also have important impacts on carbon storage, but we found that despite greater soil carbon at shallow depths under non-inversion tillage, the carbon stored throughout the soil profile was not affected by tillage. Studies on soil tillage impacts to crop productivity and soil quality are often performed in one season, on single sites that have had insufficient time to develop. Our current research explores multiple sites, on different soils, with temporal measurements of soil physical conditions under contrasting tillage regimes. We use the oldest established contemporary tillage experiments in the United Kingdom, with all sites sharing ploughed and shallow (7cm) non-inversion tillage treatments. In eastern Scotland (Mid Pilmore), the site also has zero tillage and deep ploughing (40 cm) treatments, and was established 11 years ago. In east England there are two sites, both also having a deep non-inversion tillage treatment, and they were established 6 (New Farm Systems) and 8 (STAR) years ago. We measure a range of crop and soil properties at sowing, one month after sowing and post-harvest, including rapid lab based assays that allow high

  13. [Leaching Remediation of Copper and Lead Contaminated Lou Soil by Saponin Under Different Conditions].

    PubMed

    Deng, Hong-xia; Yang, Ya-li; Li, Zhen; Xu, Yan; Li, Rong-hua; Meng, Zhao-fu; Yang, Ya-ti

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the leaching remediation effect of the eco-friendly biosurfactant saponin for Cu and Pb in contaminated Lou soil, batch tests method was used to study the leaching effect of saponin solution on single Cu, Pb contaminated Lou soil and mixed Cu and Pb contaminated Lou soil under different conditions such as reaction time, mass concentration of saponin, pH, concentration of background electrolyte and leaching times. The results showed that the maximum leaching removal effect of Cu and Pb in contaminated Lou soil was achieved by complexation of the heavy metals with saponin micelle, when the mass concentration of saponin solution was 50 g x L(-1), pH was 5.0, the reaction time was 240 min, and there was no background electrolyte. In single and mixed contaminated Lou soil, the leaching percentages of Cu were 29.02% and 25.09% after a single leaching with 50 g x L(-1) saponin under optimal condition, while the single leaching percentages of Pb were 31.56% and 28.03%, respectively. The result indicated the removal efficiency of Pb was more significant than that of Cu. After 4 times of leaching, the cumulative leaching percentages of Cu reached 58.92% and 53.11%, while the cumulative leaching percentages of Pb reached 77.69% and 65.32% for single and mixed contaminated Lou soil, respectively. The fractionation results of heavy metals in soil before and after a single leaching showed that the contents of adsorbed and exchangeable Cu and Pb increased in the contaminated soil, while the carbonate-bound, organic bound and sulfide residual Cu and Pb in the contaminated Lou soil could be effectively removed by saponin. PMID:26164925

  14. Effects of climatic conditions and soil properties on Cabernet Sauvignon berry growth and anthocyanin profiles.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guo; He, Yan-Nan; Yue, Tai-Xin; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Zhen-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Climatic conditions and soil type have significant influence on grape ripening and wine quality. The reported study was conducted in two "Cabernet Sauvignon (Vitis vinifera L.V)" vineyards located in Xinjiang, a semiarid wine-producing region of China during two vintages (2011 and 2012). The results indicate that soil and climate affected berry growth and anthocyanin profiles. These two localities were within a distance of 5 km from each other and had soils of different physical and chemical composition. For each vineyard, the differences of anthocyanin concentrations, and parameters concerning berry growth and composition between the two years could be explained by different climatic conditions. Soil effect was studied by investigation of differences in berry composition and anthocyanin profiles between the two vineyards in the same year, which could be explained mainly by the different soil properties, vine water and nitrogen status. Specifically, the soils with less water and organic matter produced looser clusters, heavier berry skins and higher TSS, which contributed to the excellent performance of grapes. Compared with 2011, the increases in anthocyanin concentrations for each vineyard in 2012 could be attributed to smaller number of extreme temperature (>35 °C) days and rainfall, lower vine water status and N level. The explanation for higher anthocyanin concentrations in grape skins from the soils with less water and organic matter could be the vine status differences, lighter berry weight and heavier skin weight at harvest. In particular, grapes from the soils with less water and organic matter had higher levels of 3'5'-substituded, O-methylated and acylated anthocyanins, which represented a positive characteristic conferring more stable pigmentation to the corresponding wine in the future. The present work clarifies the effects of climate and soil on berry growth and anthocyanin profiles, thus providing guidance for production of high-quality wine grapes

  15. Selenium and sulfur relationships in alfalfa and soil under field conditions, San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Severson, R.C.; Gough, L.P.

    1992-01-01

    Relationships between total Se and S or soluble SeO4 and SO4 in soils and tissue concentrations in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), under field conditions in the San Joaquin Valley of California, suggest that the rate of accumulation of Se in alfalfa may be reduced in areas where high Se and S concentrations in soils were measured. These data suggest that the balance between carbonate and sulfate minerals in soil may have a greater influence on uptake of Se by alfalfa than does the balance of SeO4 and SO4 in soil solution. Soil and alfalfa were sampled from areas representing a wide range in soil Se and S concentrations. Specific sampling locations were selected based on a previous study of Se, S, and other elements where 721 soil samples were collected to map landscape variability and distribution of elements. Six multiple-linear regression equations were developed between total and/or soluble soil chemical constituents and tissue concentrations of Se in alfalfa. We chose a regression model that accounted for 72% of the variability in alfalfa Se concentrations based on an association of elements in soil (total C, S, Se, and Sr) determined by factor analysis. To prepare a map showing the spatial distribution of estimated alfalfa Se concentrations, the model was applied to the data from the previously collected 721 soil samples. Estimated alfalfa Se concentrations in most of the study area were within a range that is predicted to produce alfalfa with neither Se deficiency nor toxicity when consumed by livestock. A few small areas are predicted to produce alfalfa that potentially would not meet minimum dietary needs of livestock.

  16. Evaporation from soils subjected to natural boundary conditions at the land-atmospheric interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, K.; Illngasekare, T.; Ngo, V.; Cihan, A.

    2012-04-01

    Bare soil evaporation is a key process for water exchange between the land and the atmosphere and an important component of the water balance in semiarid and arid regions. However, there is no agreement on the best methodology to determine evaporation under different boundary conditions at the land surface. This becomes critical in developing models that couples land to the atmosphere. Because it is difficult to measure evaporation from soil, with the exception of using lysimeters, numerous formulations have been proposed to establish a relationship between the rate of evaporation and soil moisture and/or soil temperature and thermal properties. Different formulations vary in how they partition available energy. A need exists to systematically compare existing methods to experimental data under highly controlled conditions not achievable in the field. The goal of this work is to perform controlled experiments under transient conditions of soil moisture, temperature and wind at the land/atmospheric interface to test different conceptual and mathematical formulations for the soil surface boundary conditions to develop appropriate numerical models to be used in simulations. In this study, to better understand the coupled water-vapor-heat flow processes in the shallow subsurface near the land surface, we modified a previously developed theory by Smits et al. [2011] that allows non-equilibrium liquid/gas phase change with gas phase vapor diffusion to better account for dry soil conditions. The model did not implement fitting parameters such as a vapor enhancement factor that is commonly introduced into the vapor diffusion coefficient as an arbitrary multiplication factor. In order to experimentally test the numerical formulations/code, we performed a two-dimensional physical model experiment under varying boundary conditions using test sand for which the hydraulic and thermal properties were well characterized. Precision data under well-controlled transient heat and

  17. Fate of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) in Saturated Soil Under Various Redox Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, I.; Menahem, A.; Berkowitz, B.

    2014-12-01

    The growing use of PPCPs results in their increasing release to the aquatic environment. Consequently, understanding the fate of PPCPs under environmentally relevant conditions that account for dynamic flow and varying redox states is critical. In this study, the transport of two organometallic PPCPs, Gd-DTPA and Roxarsone (As complex) and their metal salts (Gd(NO3)3, AsNaO2), is investigated. The former is used widely as a contrasting agent for MRI, while the latter is applied extensively as a food additive in the broiler poultry industry. Both of these compounds are excreted from the body, almost unchanged chemically. Gadolinium complexes are not fully eliminated in wastewater treatment and can reach groundwater via irrigation with treated wastewater; Roxarsone can enter groundwater via leaching from manure used as fertilizer. Studies have shown that the transport of PPCPs in groundwater is affected by environmental conditions such as redox states, pH, and soil type. For this study, column experiments using sand or Mediterranean red sandy clay soil were performed under several redox conditions: aerobic, nitrate-reducing, iron-reducing, sulfate-reducing, methanogenic, and very strongly chemical reducing. Batch experiments to determine adsorption isotherms were also performed for the complexes and metal salts. We found that Gd-DTPA transport was affected by the soil type and was not affected by the redox conditions. In contrast, Roxarsone transport was affected mainly by the different redox conditions, showing delayed breakthrough curves as the conditions became more biologically reduced (strong chemical reducing conditions did not affect the transport). We also observed that the metal salts show essentially no transport while the organic complexes display much faster breakthrough. The results suggest that transport of these PPCPs through soil and groundwater is determined by the redox conditions, as well as by soil type and the form of the applied metal (as salt

  18. Prediction of soil and ground water contamination with fungicides of different classes according to soil and climate conditions in Ukrain and other European countries.

    PubMed

    Vavrinevych, O; Antonenko, A; Omelchuk, S; Korshun, M; Bardov, V

    2015-05-01

    It was established that most of tested pesticides are moderately and low persistent in soil and climatic conditions of Ukraine, but more stable in Western and Northern Europe countries due to peculiarities of their climate type and soil characteristics. In addition, it was determined that all studied fungicides pertain to non- and low mobile compound (except moderately mobile pyrimethanil). Recommendations on application of studied fungicides in soil and climatic conditions of Ukraine and other European countries were given. PMID:26042452

  19. Microhabitat Effects on N2O Emissions from Floodplain Soils under Controlled Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Martin; Lehmann, Moritz; Niklaus, Pascal; Frey, Beat; Kuhn, Thomas; Luster, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Semi-terrestrial soils such as floodplain soils are considered to be potential hotspots of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The quantitative assessment of N2O release from these hot spots under field conditions, and of the microbial pathways that underlie net N2O production (ammonium oxidation, nitrifier-denitrification, and denitrification) is challenging in the environment because of the high spatial and temporal variability. The production and consumption of N2O appears to be linked to the presence or absence of micro-niches, providing specific conditions that may be favorable to either of the microbial pathways that produce or consume N2O. The availability of oxygen, reactive organic carbon, and dissolved nitrogen substrates likely play key roles with regards to the net production of N2O. Previous field studies demonstrated, for example, that flooding can trigger "hot moments" of enhanced N2O emission through a close coupling of niches with high and low oxygen availabilities. Such microhabitat effects likely depend on soil aggregate formation, plant soil interactions in the rhizosphere and the degradation of organic matter accumulations. In order to assess how these factors can modulate N2O production and consumption under simulated flooding/drying conditions, we have set up a mesocosm experiment with model soils comprising various mixtures of N-rich floodplain soil aggregates (4000 - 250 µm representing large aggregates, or <250 µm representing small aggregates) and inert matrix material (glass beads of 150 - 250 µm size, or quartz sand of 2000 - 3200 µm size, respectively). Soils containing the different aggregate size groups were either planted with willow (Salix viminalis L.), mixed with leaf litter or left untreated. At several time points before, during and after a simulated flood event, we measure the net efflux rate of N2O. In addition, soil water content, redox potential as well as carbon and nitrogen substrate availability are monitored. In order to

  20. Soil texture and climatc conditions for biocrust growth limitation: a meta analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Thomas; Subbotina, Mariia

    2015-04-01

    Along with afforestation, attempts have been made to combat desertification by managing soil crusts, and is has been reported that recovery rates of biocrusts are dependent on many factors, including the type, severity, and extent of disturbance; structure of the vascular plant community; conditions of adjoining substrates; availability of inoculation material; and climate during and after disturbance (Belnap & Eldridge 2001). Because biological soil crusts are known to be more stable on and to prefer fine substrates (Belnap 2001), the question arises as to how successful crust management practices can be applied to coarser soil. In previous studies we observed similar crust biomasses on finer soils under arid and on coarser soils under temperate conditions. We hypothesized that the higher water holding capacity of finer substrates would favor crust development, and that the amount of silt and clay in the substrate that is required for enhanced crust development would vary with changes in climatic conditions. In a global meta study, climatic and soil texture threshold values promoting BSC growth were derived. While examining literature sources, it became evident that the amount of studies to be incorporated into this meta analysis was reversely related to the amount of common environmental parameters they share. We selected annual mean precipitaion, mean temperature and the amount of silt and clay as driving variables for crust growth. Response variable was the "relative crust biomass", which was computed per literature source as the ratio between each individual crust biomass value of the given study to the study maximum value reported. We distinguished lichen, green algal, cyanobacterial and moss crusts. To quantify threshold conditions at which crust biomass responded to differences in texture and climate, we (I) determined correlations between bioclimatic variables, (II) calculated linear models to determine the effect of typical climatic variables with soil

  1. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Cations in an Unsaturated Fractured Soil Under Transient Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Joseph

    2015-01-31

    Rainfall experiments were conducted using intact soil cores and an instrumented soil pedon to examine the effect of physical heterogeneity and rainfall characteristics on the mobilization of colloids, organic matter, cesium, and strontium in a fractured soil. To measure the spatial variability of infiltration of colloids and contaminants, samples were collected through a 19-port grid placed below the soil core in laboratory study and in 27 samplers at multiple depths in the soil pedon in the field study. Cesium and strontium were applied to the soil cores and the soil pedon prior to mobilization experiments. Rainwater solutions of multiple ionic strengths and organic matter concentrations were applied to the soil cores and soil pedon to mobilize in situ colloids, cesium, and strontium. The mobilization of colloids and metal cations occurred through preferential flow paths in the soil cores. Compared to steady rainfall, greater amounts of colloids were mobilized during rainfall interrupted by pauses, which indicates that the supply of colloids to be mobilized was replenished during the pauses. A maximum in the amount of mobilized colloids were mobilized during a rainfall following a pause of 2.5 d. Pauses of shorter or longer duration resulted in less colloid mobilization. Freeze-thaw cycles, a transient condition in winter, enhanced colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of cesium and strontium in the soil cores. The exchange of solutes between the soil matrix and macropores caused a hysteretic mobilization of colloids, cesium, and strontium during changes in ionic strength. Colloid-facilitated mobilization of cesium and strontium was important at low ionic strength in fractures where slow flow allowed greater exchange of flow between the fractures and the surrounding matrix. The release of cesium and strontium by cation exchange occurred at high ionic strength in fractures where there is a little exchange of pore water with the surrounding matrix

  2. Land agroecological quality assessment in conditions of high spatial soil cover variability at the Pereslavskoye Opolye.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morev, Dmitriy; Vasenev, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The essential spatial variability is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central region of European territory of Russia. The original spatial heterogeneity of forest soils has been further complicated by a specific land-use history and human impacts. For demand-driven land-use planning and decision making the quantitative analysis and agroecological interpretation of representative soil cover spatial variability is an important and challenging task that receives increasing attention from private companies, governmental and environmental bodies. Pereslavskoye Opolye is traditionally actively used in agriculture due to dominated high-quality cultivated soddy-podzoluvisols which are relatively reached in organic matter (especially for conditions of the North part at the European territory of Russia). However, the soil cover patterns are often very complicated even within the field that significantly influences on crop yield variability and have to be considered in farming system development and land agroecological quality evaluation. The detailed investigations of soil regimes and mapping of the winter rye yield have been carried in conditions of two representative fields with slopes sharply contrasted both in aspects and degrees. Rye biological productivity and weed infestation have been measured in elementary plots of 0.25 m2 with the following analysis the quality of the yield. In the same plot soil temperature and moisture have been measured by portable devices. Soil sampling was provided from three upper layers by drilling. The results of ray yield detailed mapping shown high differences both in average values and within-field variability on different slopes. In case of low-gradient slope (field 1) there is variability of ray yield from 39.4 to 44.8 dt/ha. In case of expressed slope (field 2) the same species of winter rye grown with the same technology has essentially lower yield and within-field variability from 20 to 29.6 dt/ha. The

  3. Chromium Release from a COPR-Contaminated Soil at Varying Water Content and Redox Conditions.

    PubMed

    Matern, Katrin; Mansfeldt, Tim

    2016-07-01

    Many soils in the region of Kanpur, North India, are heavily affected by the leather industry and its upstream supplier sector, as indicated by elevated chromium (Cr) contents. Under reducing conditions-for instance, at water saturation after monsoon rain or flood irrigation-the dynamic and species distribution of Cr may be affected due to changes in redox potential (E). In this study, the influence of E on the speciation and release of Cr from a contaminated agricultural soil was investigated. A soil sample that was affected by hyperalkaline leachate from chromite ore processing residue, was taken and packed in soil columns, and subjected to a saturation-drainage-saturation cycle. After initial water saturation, the E dropped slowly to minimum values of around ‒100 mV (calculated to pH 7), while E was controlled by CrO/CrO(s), or CrO/(Fe,Cr)OOH redox couples. Soil drainage resulted in a quick return to oxidizing conditions; i.e., E > 300 mV. The Cr species distribution and release showed a clear trend with E. At the beginning of the experiment, under oxidizing and weakly reducing conditions (E range from >100 to 300 mV), Cr(VI) was released in particular. However, under moderately reducing conditions (E range from 100 to -100 mV), Cr was gradually immobilized and irreversible sequestered via reductive precipitation. The results presented in this study provide an improved understanding of the mobility of Cr(VI) in contaminated soils at varying water contents, which is essential for the evaluation of environmental risks in this region. PMID:27380074

  4. Assessing the evolution of soil moisture and vegetation conditions during the 2012 United States flash drought

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examines the evolution of several model-based and satellite-derived drought metrics sensitive to soil moisture and vegetation conditions during the extreme flash drought event that impacted major agricultural areas across the central U.S. during 2012. Standardized anomalies from the remo...

  5. Transport and fate of microorganisms in soils with preferential flow under different solution chemistry conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    [1] Laboratory and numerical studies were conducted to investigate the transport and fate of Escherichia coli D21g and coliphage f174 in saturated soils with preferential flow under different solution ionic strength (IS'='1, 5, 20, and 100 mM) conditions. Preferential flow systems were created by em...

  6. Bacillus spp. from rainforest soil promote plant growth under limited nitrogen conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of PGPR (Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria) isolated from rainforest on different plants under limited nitrogen conditions. Methods and Results: Bacterial isolates from a Peruvian rainforest soil were screened for plant growth promoting effects...

  7. NATIONAL RESULTS FROM THE 2011 NATIONAL WETLAND CONDITION ASSESSMENT (NWCA) SOILS ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2011, US Environmental Protection Agency conducted the first National Wetland Condition Assessment (NWCA). Field crews conducted one-day surveys of over 1000 wetlands across the contiguous United States. For every wetland sampled, soils were collected by layer (i.e., horizon)...

  8. Exploring transport dynamics of "new" and "old" tracers under varying hydrologic conditions in structured soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Joshua; Callaghan, Michael; Mikulic, Danijela; Cey, Edwin

    2016-04-01

    Fine-grained, structured soils are prone to preferential flow along macropores that can enhance vertical migration of surface applied contaminants ("new" solutes) due to water bypassing the soil matrix. This same bypass phenomenon can also inhibit the flushing of in situ salt or other contaminants ("old" solutes), thereby hampering reclamation of previously impacted soils. In all cases, mass exchange between the soil matrix and macropores is a significant control on water and solute movement in the soil profile. The dynamics of these mass exchange processes and the associated transport of both new and old tracers were studied in field- and core-scale experiments on low permeability, macroporous soils. A multi-year investigation of new (DFBA) and old (Cl) tracer transport was completed on two 20 x 20 m test plots within a tile-drained field. Irrigation water was applied to one test plot, while the second plot served as an unirrigated control. Detailed monitoring, including wells, lysimeters, tensiometers, soil cores, tile drains, and electrical resistivity tomography, revealed a comprehensive picture of the hydraulic system response and distribution of chemical tracers over multiple field seasons. A large difference in solute transport within and between seasons was attributed to temporally varying hydrologic (water table and soil moisture) conditions, despite similar total volumes of water application. Time-varying soil hydraulic properties and soil macropore saturation were believed to play a major role, and were explored in more detail with large, intact soil monolith experiments. Two paired-core infiltration experiments were completed using the same volumes of irrigation water, but different irrigation rates and durations. The migration of new (Br, I, and dye) and old (Cl) tracers was monitored throughout the experiments, and the final tracer distribution was characterized by destructive sampling at the conclusion of irrigation. The spatial and temporal

  9. Growth of Methanogens on a Mars Soil Simulant Under Simulated Martian Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kral, Timothy A.; Bekkum, Curtis R.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2004-06-01

    Due to the hostile conditions at the surface, any life forms existing on Mars today would most likely inhabit a subsurface environment where conditions are potentially wetter and warmer, but organic compounds may be lacking and light energy for photosynthesis would be absent. Methanogens, members of the domain Archaea, are microorganisms from planet Earth that can grow under these relatively extreme conditions. We have demonstrated that certain methanogenic species can indeed grow on a Mars soil simulant, JSC Mars-1, with limited amounts of water, under conditions approaching a possible subsurface environment on Mars.

  10. Electrokinetic remediation of a Cu-Zn contaminated red soil by controlling the voltage and conditioning catholyte pH.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong-Mei; Deng, Chang-Fen; Cang, Long; Alshawabkeh, Akram N

    2005-10-01

    Electrokinetics is an innovative technique for treating heavy metals contaminated soil, especially low pH soils such as the Chinese red soil (Udic Ferrisols). In this paper, a Cu-Zn contaminated red soil is treated by electrokinetics. When the Cu-Zn contaminated red soil was treated without control of catholyte pH during the electrokinetic treatment, the soil pH in the soil sections near cathode after the experiment was high above 6, which resulted in accumulation of large amounts of Cu and Zn in the soil sections with such high pH values. Compared to soil Cu, soil Zn was more efficiently removed from the soil by a controlled electrokinetic method. Application of lactic acid as catholyte pH conditioning solution caused an efficient removal of Cu and Zn from the soil. Increasing the electrolyte strength (salt concentration) of the conditioning solution further increased Cu removal, but did not cause a significant improvement for soil Zn. Soil Cu and Zn fractions after the electrokinetic treatments were analyzed using sequential extraction method, which indicated that Cu and Zn precipitation in the soil section closest to the cathode in the treatments without catholyte pH control limited their removal from the soil column. When the catholyte pH was controlled by lactic acid and CaCl(2), the soil Cu and Zn removal percentage after 554 h running reached 63% and 65%, respectively. Moreover, both the residual soil Cu and Zn concentrations were lower than 100 mg kg(-1), which is adequate and meets the requirement of the Chinese soil environmental quality standards. PMID:16202805

  11. Global Evaporation Estimates from SMAP Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrievals Using Conditional Sampling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreugdenhil, M.; Entekhabi, D.; Konings, A. G.; Salvucci, G.; Hogan, P.

    2015-12-01

    Evaporation links the water, energy and carbon cycles over land yet even its climatology on global scale is not observed. Tower-based flux measurements are sparse and do not cover diverse biomes and climates. In the last decades, many strategies to derive evaporation based on remote sensing measurements have been developed. However, these methods are dependent on a variety of assumptions and auxiliary data, making them more prone to error propagation. A more data-driven method was developed by Salvucci (2001), who found that under statistical stationary conditions the expected change in soil moisture storage is zero when conditioned to a certain storage for a certain time interval. Consequently, using the water balance, precipitation conditionally averaged to the soil moisture storage is equal to the total loss: evaporation and drainage. Using only soil moisture and precipitation data as model inputs reduces the sources of uncertainty. In this presentation we provide the first estimates of global evaporation from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive mission by applying the conditional sampling method to passive microwave soil moisture time series and in situ precipitation data. The obtained evaporation estimates show a good correspondence to measured evaporation from eddy correlation towers over selected field sites. Subsequently, a simple approach is developed to directly estimate evaporation from SMAP soil moisture data. This approach enables the investigation of dynamics in evaporation during the dry-down after storms. The timing of the transition between the different stages of evaporation is assessed for different climates especially the transition from stage 1 to stage 2 evaporation; atmosphere limited evaporation to soil limited evaporation respectively. Investigations into the dynamics of unstressed evaporation and transpiration and the transition from stage 1 to stage 2 evaporation increases our understanding of water stress and soil desiccation. It also

  12. Observing soil water dynamics under two field conditions by a novel sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, W.; Sun, Y.; Schulze Lammers, P.; Schumann, H.; Berg, A.; Shi, C.; Wang, C.

    2011-10-01

    SummarySufficiently available soil water is a basic requirement in agricultural production. Monitoring soil water dynamics (SWD) in the root zone is an optimal approach for managing a crop's growth. This study presents a novel sensor system that simultaneously measures volumetric soil water content (VSWC), apparent electrical conductivity (EC a) and soil temperature at two different soil depths (shallow: 16 cm; deep: 36 cm). For testing its feasibility in the field, two prototypes were installed, one in bare soil and the other in a sugar beet ( Beta vulgaris L.) field in the summer of 2010. Following a sequence of rainfall events randomly distributed over the experimental period, we observed distinct responses from the sensors at each monitored depth in both field conditions. In addition to the multi-parameter measurements, the novel sensor design includes a series of technical advantages such as solar-powered operation, wireless communication, and being relatively easy to install/remove. Thus, the developed wireless sensor system is promising for networked applications in precision farming.

  13. Persistence of cyfluthrin in three Malaysian agricultural soils under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee-Yin, Choo; Ismaill, B S; Salmijah, S; Halimah, M

    2013-09-01

    The influence of temperature, moisture and organic matter on the persistence of cyfluthrin was determined using three types of Malaysian soils, namely clay, clay loam and sandy clay loam obtained from a tomato farm in Cameron Highlands, Pahang. The persistence of cyfluthrin was observed in the laboratory at two temperature levels of 25 and 35 degreeC and field water capacity of 30 and 80%. Treated soil samples were incubated in a growth chamber for 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21 and 28 days. The results from the incubation studies showed that temperature and organic matter content significantly reduced the half-life (t1/2) values of cyfluthrin in the three soil types, but moisture content had very little effect. It was observed that cyfluthrin persisted longer at lower temperature and moisture content and higher organic matter content in all the three soil types. The present study demonstrated that under the tropical conditions of Malaysia, cyfluthrin dissipated rapidly in soils compared to its dissipation in soils of temperate regions, evidently due to high temperature. PMID:24558812

  14. Daytime and nighttime groundwater contributions to soils with different surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xuguang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Shi, Wenjuan

    2015-12-01

    Contributions of groundwater to the soil-water balance play an important role in areas with shallow water tables. The characteristics of daytime and nighttime water flux using non-weighing lysimeters were studied from June to September 2012 and 2013 in the extremely arid Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in northwestern China. The study consisted of nine treatments: three surface conditions, bare soil and cotton plants, each with water tables at depths of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 m; and plastic mulch with a water table at 1.5 m but with three percentages of open areas (POAs) in the plastic. The groundwater supply coefficient (SC) and the groundwater contribution (GC) generally varied with surface conditions. Both SC and GC decreased in the bare-soil and cotton treatments with increasing depth of the groundwater. Both SC and GC increased in the plastic-mulch treatment with increasing POA. Average nighttime GCs in the bare-soil treatments in July and August (the midsummer months) were 50.8-60.8 and 53.2-65.3 %, respectively, of the total daily contributions. Average nighttime GCs in the cotton treatments in July and August were 51.4-60.2 and 51.5-58.1 %, respectively, of the total daily contributions. The average GCs in June and September, however, were lower at night than during the daytime. Soil temperature may thus play a more important role than air temperature in the upflow of groundwater.

  15. Synoptic conditions related to soil moisture-atmosphere interactions and unorganized convection in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Trent W.; Quiring, Steven M.; Frauenfeld, Oliver W.; Rapp, Anita D.

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric modification by anomalously dry or wet soils can both enhance and suppress convective activity. However, the local-scale and mesoscale feedback governing soil moisture-precipitation coupling are embedded within the larger synoptic-scale environment. Despite their importance, synoptic-scale atmospheric conditions are rarely considered in studies examining soil moisture-atmosphere interactions. We combine self-organizing maps of 500 hPa geopotential height, spatial synoptic classification, and Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model air mass trajectories to determine if the synoptic-scale environment affects the ability of the land surface to force unorganized convection in Oklahoma. We identify several synoptic patterns that significantly impact the frequency of unorganized convection. Synoptic patterns characterized by midlevel troughs over the Southern Great Plains are less frequently associated with unorganized convective events. These patterns exhibit cool air advection in the midlevel and lower level of the atmosphere and are linked to suppression of convective activity. The synoptic patterns characterized by 500 hPa ridging over the study region are more frequently associated with unorganized convective events. These patterns likely result in increased net radiation, vapor pressure deficit, and more homogenously dry soils. Unorganized convective events that occur during these synoptic conditions initiate preferentially over dry soils. We present evidence that the synoptic-scale environment can influence whether and how the land surface has an impact on convection.

  16. Microbial inoculants and organic amendment improves plant establishment and soil rehabilitation under semiarid conditions.

    PubMed

    Mengual, Carmen; Schoebitz, Mauricio; Azcón, Rosario; Roldán, Antonio

    2014-02-15

    The re-establishment of autochthonous shrub species is an essential strategy for recovering degraded soils under semiarid Mediterranean conditions. A field assay was carried out to determine the combined effects of the inoculation with native rhizobacteria (Bacillus megaterium, Enterobacter sp, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus sp) and the addition of composted sugar beet (SB) residue on physicochemical soil properties and Lavandula dentata L. establishment. One year after planting, Bacillus sp. and B. megaterium + SB were the most effective treatments for increasing shoot dry biomass (by 5-fold with respect to control) and Enterobacter sp + SB was the most effective treatments for increasing dry root biomass. All the treatments evaluated significantly increased the foliar nutrient content (NPK) compared to control values (except B. thuringiensis + SB). The organic amendment had significantly increased available phosphorus content in rhizosphere soil by 29% respect to the control. Enterobacter sp combined with sugar beet residue improved total N content in soil (by 46% respect to the control) as well as microbiological and biochemical properties. The selection of the most efficient rhizobacteria strains and their combined effect with organic residue seems to be a critical point that drives the effectiveness of using these biotechnological tools for the revegetation and rehabilitation of degraded soils under semiarid conditions. PMID:24463051

  17. Antimony retention and release from drained and waterlogged shooting range soil under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Hockmann, Kerstin; Tandy, Susan; Lenz, Markus; Reiser, René; Conesa, Héctor M; Keller, Martin; Studer, Björn; Schulin, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    Many soils polluted by antimony (Sb) are subject to fluctuating waterlogging conditions; yet, little is known about how these affect the mobility of this toxic element under field conditions. Here, we compared Sb leaching from a calcareous shooting range soil under drained and waterlogged conditions using four large outdoor lysimeters. After monitoring the leachate samples taken at bi-weekly intervals for >1.5 years under drained conditions, two of the lysimeters were subjected to waterlogging with a water table fluctuating according to natural rainfall water infiltration. Antimony leachate concentrations under drained conditions showed a strong seasonal fluctuation between 110 μg L(-1) in summer and <40 μg L(-1) in winter, which closely correlated with fluctuations in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations. With the development of anaerobic conditions upon waterlogging, Sb in leachate decreased to 2-5 μg L(-1) Sb and remained stable at this level. Antimony speciation measurements in soil solution indicated that this decrease in Sb(V) concentrations was attributable to the reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) and the stronger sorption affinity of the latter to iron (Fe) (hydr)oxide phases. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering seasonal and waterlogging effects in the assessment of the risks from Sb-contaminated sites. PMID:25592464

  18. Leaching of Glyphosate and Aminomethylphosphonic Acid through Silty Clay Soil Columns under Outdoor Conditions.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Marco; Cecchi, Stefano; Zanchi, Camillo A; Orlandini, Simone

    2015-09-01

    Glyphosate [-(phosphono-methyl)-glycine] is the main herbicide used in the Chianti vineyards. Considering the pollution risk of the water table and that the vineyard tile drain may deliver this pollutant into nearby streams, the objective of the present study was to estimate the leaching losses of glyphosate under natural rainfall conditions in a silty clay soil in the Chianti area. The leaching of glyphosate and its metabolite (aminomethylphosphonic acid [AMPA]) through soils was studied in 1-m-deep soil columns under outdoor conditions over a 3-yr period. Glyphosate was detected in the leachates for up to 26 d after treatments at concentrations ranging between 0.5 and 13.5 μg L. The final peak (0.28 μg L) appeared in the leachates approximately 319 d after the first annual treatment. Aminomethylphosphonic acid first appeared (21.3 μg L) in the soil leachate 6.8 d after the first annual treatment. Aminomethylphosphonic acid detection frequency and measured concentration in the leachates were more than that observed for the glyphosate. Aminomethylphosphonic acid was detected in 20% of the soil leachates at concentrations ranging from 1 to 24.9 μg L. No extractable glyphosate was detected in the soil profile. However, the AMPA content in the lowest layer ranged from 13.4 to 21.1 mg kg, and on the surface layer, it ranged from 86.7 to 94 mg kg. Overall, these results indicate that both glyphosate and AMPA leaching through a 1-m soil column may be potential groundwater contaminants. PMID:26436283

  19. Plasmid load adversely affects growth and gluconic acid secretion ability of mineral phosphate-solubilizing rhizospheric bacterium Enterobacter asburiae PSI3 under P limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Archana, G; Naresh Kumar, G

    2011-01-20

    Effect of the metabolic load caused by the presence of plasmids on mineral phosphate-solubilizing (MPS) Enterobacter asburiae PSI3, was monitored with four plasmid cloning vectors and one native plasmid, varying in size, nature of the replicon, copy number and antibiotic resistance genes. Except for one plasmid, the presence of all other plasmids in E. asburiae PSI3 resulted in the loss of the MPS phenotype as reflected by the failure to bring about a drop in pH and release soluble P when grown in media containing rock phosphate (RP) as the sole P source. When 100 μM soluble P was supplemented along with RP, the adverse effects of plasmids on MPS phenotype and on growth parameters was reduced for some plasmid bearing derivatives, as monitored in terms of specific growth rates, glucose consumed, gluconic acids yields and P released. When 10 mM of soluble P as the only P source, was added to the medium all transformants showed growth and pH drop comparable with native strain. It may be concluded that different plasmids impose, to varying extents, a metabolic load in the phosphate-solubilizing bacterium E. asburiae PSI3 and results in diminishing its growth and P-solubilizing ability in P deficient conditions. PMID:20171856

  20. Associations between childhood adversity, adult stressful life events, and past-year drug use disorders in the National Epidemiological Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Bronwyn; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Wang, Shuai; Blanco, Carlos; Stein, Dan J.

    2014-01-01

    Stress sensitization, whereby CA lowers tolerance to later stressors, has been proposed as a potential mechanism explaining the association between exposure to childhood adversities (CA) and drug use disorders in adulthood. However this mechanism remains untested. This paper begins to address this gap through exploring associations between CA exposure and stressful events in adulthood for predicting drug use disorders. We used data drawn from Wave 2 of the U.S. National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (n=34,653) to explore whether the association between past-year stressful life events and the 12-month prevalence of disordered cannabis, stimulant and opiate use varied by the number of types of CA that an individual was exposed to. Past-year stressful life events were associated with an increased risk of cannabis, stimulant and opiate use disorders among men and women. Exposure to CA was associated with increased risk for disordered cannabis use among men and women and opiate use among men only. Finally, we found significant associations between exposure to CA and past year stressful life events in predicting disordered drug use, but only for women in relation to disordered stimulant and opiate use. Findings are suggestive of possible stress sensitization effects in predicting disordered stimulant and opiate use among women. Implications of these findings for the prevention and treatment of drug use disorders and for future research are discussed. PMID:25134042

  1. The effect of cultivation practices on soil - atmosphere carbon cycle under arid climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifschitz, David; Sternberg, Marcelo; Bonfil, David; Ben-Dor, Eyal; Eshel, Gil

    2010-05-01

    The soil - atmosphere carbon cycle was studied under arid climate conditions, in relation to crop management. Management included different tillage (Conventional vs. No Tillage, CT vs. NT respectively) and fertilization (nitrogen and phosphorus application vs. unfertilized) practices, in a continuous (winter) wheat field, for two growing seasons (2007-08 and 2008-09). The NT practice was characterized by higher CO2 effluxes than the CT during the growing season. In turn, the CT practice had higher pCO2 throughout the soil profile to a depth of 2m. This could be explained partially by a physical crust formation due to raindrop impact, emerging on the bare soil, mostly in the CT practice. The crust serves as a barrier for gas exchange (soil aeration) and in addition, also reduces rainfall infiltration, and all together harms the growing potential (the NT practice yielded higher plant biomass). Fertilization application had no apparent effect on the CO2 effluxes or the pCO2, but had a significant effect on the yield of the plant biomass. The NT practice had also higher amounts of soil organic Carbon, (SOC) mainly in the surface layer, and soil inorganic Carbon (SIC) to a depth of 2m. This is attributed to straw mulch application for the former and better gas and water conductivity (that initiates carbonate dissolution - precipitation cycles) for the latter, which is a much more dominant factor in arid area soils. The stable carbon isotope analysis (δ13C) values for the total Carbon (TC), SOC and SIC results show that the NT practice generates higher amounts of pedogenic carbonates also, and in general is clearly superior over CT in almost every aspect in the soil - atmosphere C cycle.

  2. Scale effect on runoff and soil loss control using rice straw mulch under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. H. R.; Gholami, L.; Sharifi, E.; Khaledi Darvishan, A.; Homaee, M.

    2015-01-01

    Amendments can control the runoff and soil loss by protecting the soil surface. However, scale effects on runoff and soil loss control have not been considered yet. The present study has been formulated to determine the efficiency of two plot sizes of 6 and 0.25 m2 covered by 0.5 kg m-2 of straw mulch with regard to changing the time to runoff, runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss under laboratory conditions. The study used a sandy-loam soil taken from summer rangeland, Alborz Mountains, northern Iran, and was conducted under simulated rainfall intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 and in three replicates. The results of the study showed that the straw mulch had a more significant effect on reducing the runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss on a 0.25 m2 plot scale. The maximum effectiveness in time to runoff for both the scales was observed at a rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1. The maximum increasing and decreasing rates in time to runoff and runoff coefficient were observed at a rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1, with 367.92 and 96.71% for the 0.25 m2 plot and 110.10 and 15.08% for the 6 m2 plot. The maximum reduction in the runoff coefficient was in the 0.25 m2 plot for the two rainfall intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1, with rates of -89.34 and -96.71%. The maximum change in soil loss at the intensities of both 50 and 90 mm h-1 occurred in the 0.25 m2 plot, with 100%, whereas in the 6 m2 plot, decreasing rates of soil loss for the intensities of both 50 and 90 mm h-1 were 46.74 and 63.24%, respectively.

  3. Scale effect on runoff and soil loss control using rice straw mulch under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. H. R.; Gholami, L.; Sharifi Moghadam, E.; Khaledi Darvishan, A.

    2014-10-01

    Amendments can control the runoff and soil loss by protecting soil surface. However, scale effects on runoff and soil loss control has not been considered yet. The present study has been formulated to determine the efficiency of two plot sizes of 6 and 0.25 m2 covered by straw mulch with rate of 0.5 kg m-2 in changing the time to runoff, runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss under laboratory conditions. The study has been conducted for a sandy-loam soil taken from summer rangeland, Alborz Mountains, Northern Iran under simulated rainfall intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 and in 3 replicates. The results of the study showed that the straw mulch had more significant effect in in reducing runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss at 0.25 m2 plot scale. The maximum effectiveness in time to runoff for both the scales, observed in rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1. The maximum increasing and decreasing rates in time to runoff and runoff coefficient observed in the rainfall intensity of 90 mm h-1 with the amounts of 367.92 and 96.71% for 0.25 m2 plot and the amounts of 110.10 and 15.08% for 6 m2 plot respectively. The maximum change of soil loss in both the intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 occurred at 0.25 m2 plot with the amount of 100% whereas at 6 m2 plot, decreasing rates of soil loss for in both the intensities of 50 and 90 mm h-1 were 46.74 and 63.24%, respectively.

  4. Compartmental modeling of PAH transport in soil column experiments under variably-saturated flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, F.; Sericano, J. L.; Wade, T. L.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge about the mobilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from PAH-laden soils or sediments is important to understand their bioavailability, and ultimately assess the environmental risk of PAH transport from surface soils into the groundwater. The transport and kinetics of three PAH from a spiked soil layer (2-3 cm soil depth), Phenanthrene-d10 (1900 ng/g), Naphthalene-d8 (1500 ng/g), and Pyrene-d10 (1800 ng/g), were investigated by performing a series of 8 rainfall events during 25 days in two large, replicate soil columns (length: 35 cm; diameter: 14.5 cm; 1 Pore Volume [PV]=2.29 L) under variably-saturated flow conditions. The water-methanol displacing solutions were at volumetric fractions of 0.3 and 0.6 during day 1 (E1) through E8 and E12-E22, respectively. Soil matric potential (h) was monitored at 5-cm and 20-cm depth and volumetric water content (θ) at 12.5-cm and 27.5-cm depth. Soil solution was sampled at 5 cm- (n=46) and 27.5-cm depth (n=46), and the effluent at the bottom of the column (n=163). HYDRUS-1D was used for inverse modeling of h and θ data and to predict θ at specific times and soil depth increments. First-order kinetics, compartmental models describing the transfer of PAH from the soil compartment to the soil solution compartment (desorption) and vice versa (sorption), were used to estimate mass transfer rates (φs, sorption; φd, desorption; φe, elimination), PAH mass in each compartment, and partition coefficients (Kd). Phenanthrene breakthrough curve could be interpreted through a two-parameter, two-compartment model corresponding to the common two-site sorption model, whose parameter estimates (and 95% confidence intervals) were φd=2.72 (2.31, 3.19) PV-1 and φe=4.67 (3.82, 5.7 ) PV-1. Naphthalene breakthrough curve followed a simple one-compartment elimination model, φe=2.0 (1.9, 2.1) PV-1, and that of Pyrene a three-parameter, two-compartment model, φs=0.0454 (0.00853, 0.0603) PV-1, φd=0.165 (0.0319, 0.855) PV

  5. Measurements of heat fluxes and soil moisture patterns in the field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanda, M.; Snehota, M.; Haase, T.; Wild, J.

    2011-12-01

    New combined thermal and soil moisture unit coded TMS2 is presented. It is a prototype designed on good experience with TMS1. The device combines three thermometers for use approximately at -10, 0 and +15 cm relative to soil surface when installed vertically. Soil moisture measurement is performed based on time domain transmission (TDT) principle for the full range of soil moisture. Presented new version incorporates lifetime power supply for approximately 5 year operation and life time permanent data storage (0.5 mil logs) if values are acquired every 10 minutes. Lifetime operation log accompanies lifetime data storage with lockable data blocks. Data are retrieved by contact portable pocket collector. Both vertical/surface or buriable/subsurface installation is possible thanks to additional communication interface on demand. Original model TMS1, proved durability in harsh outdoor environment with good functioning in wet conditions withstanding mechanical destruction. Extended testing in the sandstone area of the National Park Bohemian Switzerland, Czech Republic is performed since 2009 by the Institute of Botany of the ASCR. Results of long-term measurement at hundreds of localities are successfully used for i) evaluation of species-specific environmental requirements (for different species of plants, bryophytes and fungi) and ii) extrapolation of microclimatic conditions over large areas of rugged sandstone relief with assistance of accurate, LiDAR based, digital terrain model. TMS1 units are also applied for continuous measurement of temperature and moisture of coarse woody debris, which serves as an important substrate for establishment and growth of seedlings and is thus crucial for natural regeneration of many forest ecosystems. The TMS1 sensors have been tested and calibrated in soil laboratories of Czech Technical University in Prague for three soil materials: arenic cambisol, podzol and quartz sand, showing good linearity and minor influence of the

  6. Pathways towards risk: syndemic conditions mediate the effect of adversity on HIV risk behaviors among young men who have sex with men (YMSM).

    PubMed

    Herrick, Amy; Stall, Ron; Egan, James; Schrager, Sheree; Kipke, Michele

    2014-10-01

    Research shows that young men who have sex with men (YMSM) engage in higher rates of health risk behaviors and experience higher rates of negative health outcomes than their peers. The purpose of this study is to determine if the effects of adversity on HIV risk are mediated by syndemics (co-occurring health problems). Participants were 470 ethnically diverse YMSM ages 18 to 24 recruited between 2005 and 2006 and surveyed every 6 months for 24 months. Regression analyses examined the impact of adversity on syndemics (emotional distress, substance use, and problematic alcohol use) and the effects of both adversity and syndemics on HIV risk behaviors over time. Gay-related discrimination and victimization-among other adversity variables-were significantly associated with syndemics and condomless sex (CS). Syndemics mediated the effects of adversity on CS in all models. Adverse events impact HIV risk taking among YMSM through syndemics. These findings suggest that prevention programs aimed at reducing adversity may reduce both the synergistic effect of multiple psychosocial health problems and HIV risk taking. PMID:25146488

  7. Volatilization modeling of two herbicides from soil in a wind tunnel experiment under varying humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Martina; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2012-11-20

    Volatilization of pesticides from the bare soil surface is drastically reduced when the soil is under dry conditions (i.e., water content lower than the permanent wilting point). This effect is caused by the hydrated mineral surfaces that become available as additional sorption sites under dry conditions. However, established volatilization models do not explicitly consider the hydrated mineral surfaces as an independent sorption compartment and cannot correctly cover the moisture effect on volatilization. Here we integrated the existing mechanistic understanding of sorption of organic compounds to mineral surfaces and its dependence on the hydration status into a simple volatilization model. The resulting model was tested with reported experimental data for two herbicides from a wind tunnel experiment under various well-defined humidity conditions. The required equilibrium sorption coefficients of triallate and trifluralin to the mineral surfaces, K(min/air), at 60% relative humidity were fitted to experimental data and extrapolated to other humidity conditions. The model captures the general trend of the volatilization in different humidity scenarios. The results reveal that it is essential to have high quality input data for K(min/air), the available specific surface area (SSA), the penetration depth of the applied pesticide solution, and the humidity conditions in the soil. The model approach presented here in combination with an improved description of the humidity conditions under dry conditions can be integrated into existing volatilization models that already work well for humid conditions but still lack the mechanistically based description of the volatilization process under dry conditions. PMID:23130847

  8. Microhabitat Effects on N2O Emissions from Floodplain Soils under Controlled Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Martin; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Niklaus, Pascal A.; Kuhn, Thomas; Luster, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Semi-terrestrial soils such as floodplain soils are considered to be potential hotspots of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The quantitative assessment of N2O release from these hotspots under field conditions, and of the microbial pathways that underlie net N2O production (ammonium oxidation, nitrifier-denitrification, and denitrification) is challenging because of their high spatial and temporal variability. The production and consumption of N2O appears to be linked to the presence or absence of micro-niches, providing specific conditions that may be favorable to either of the relevant microbial pathways. Flood events have been shown to trigger moments of enhanced N2O emission through a close coupling of niches with high and low oxygen availabilities. This coupling might be modulated by microhabitat effects related to soil aggregate formation, root soil interactions and the degradation of organic matter accumulations. In order to assess how these factors can modulate N2O production and consumption under simulated flooding/drying conditions, we have set up a mesocosm experiment with N-rich floodplain soils comprising different combinations of soil aggregate size classes and inert matrix material. These model soils were either planted with basket willow (Salix viminalis L.), mixed with leaf litter, or left untreated. Throughout a simulated flood event, we repeatedly measured the net N2O production rate. In addition, soil water content, redox potential, as well as C and N substrate availability were monitored. In order to gain insight into the sources of, and biogeochemical controls on N2O production, we also measured the bulk δ15N signature of the produced N2O, as well as its intramolecular 15N site preference (SP). In this presentation we focus on a period of enhanced N2O emission during the drying phase after 48 hrs of flooding. We will discuss the observed emission patterns in the context of possible treatment effects. Soils with large aggregates showed a

  9. Testing of Icy-Soil Sample Delivery in Simulated Martian Conditions (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    This movie clip shows testing under simulated Mars conditions on Earth in preparation for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander using its robotic arm for delivering a sample to the doors of a laboratory oven.

    The icy soil used in the testing flowed easily from the scoop during all tests at Martian temperatures. On Mars, icy soil has stuck to the scoop, a surprise that may be related to composition of the soil at the landing site.

    This testing was done at Honeybee Robotics Spacecraft Mechanisms Corp., New York, which supplied the Phoenix scoop.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASAaE(TM)s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Interactions with soils conditioned by different vegetation: a potential explanation of bromus tectorum L. invasion into salt-deserts?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasion by Bromus tectorum L. may condition the soil and increase nutrient availability. We hypothesized that nutrient poor soils of the arid Honey Lake Valley of northeastern California U.S.A., similar in physical and chemical properties, but conditioned by either B. tectorum, Krascheninniko...

  11. Interactions with soils conditioned by different vegetation: A potential explanation of Bromus tectorum L. invasion into salt-deserts?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasion by Bromus tectorum L. may condition the soil and increase nutrient availability. We hypothesized that nutrient poor soils of the arid Honey Lake Valley of northeastern California U.S.A., similar in physical and chemical properties, but conditioned by either B. tectorum, Krascheninniko...

  12. Atrazine degradation by fungal co-culture enzyme extracts under different soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Chan-Cupul, Wilberth; Heredia-Abarca, Gabriela; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Refugio

    2016-05-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the atrazine degradation by fungal enzyme extracts (FEEs) in a clay-loam soil microcosm contaminated at field application rate (5 μg g(-1)) and to study the influence of different soil microcosm conditions, including the effect of soil sterilization, water holding capacity, soil pH and type of FEEs used in atrazine degradation through a 2(4) factorial experimental design. The Trametes maxima-Paecilomyces carneus co-culture extract contained more laccase activity and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content (laccase = 18956.0 U mg protein(-1), H2O2 = 6.2 mg L(-1)) than the T. maxima monoculture extract (laccase = 12866.7 U mg protein(-1), H2O2 = 4.0 mg L(-1)). Both extracts were able to degrade atrazine at 100%; however, the T. maxima monoculture extract (0.32 h) achieved a lower half-degradation time than its co-culture with P. carneus (1.2 h). The FEE type (p = 0.03) and soil pH (p = 0.01) significantly affected atrazine degradation. The best degradation rate was achieved by the T. maxima monoculture extract in an acid soil (pH = 4.86). This study demonstrated that both the monoculture extracts of the native strain T. maxima and its co-culture with P. carneus can efficiently and quickly degrade atrazine in clay-loam soils. PMID:26830051

  13. [Influences of humic acids on the dissimilatory iron reduction of red soil in anaerobic condition].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-na; Li, Zhong-pei; Che, Yu-ping

    2009-01-01

    Iron oxide is abundant in red soil. Reduction and oxidation of iron oxide are important biogeochemical processes. In this paper, we reported the effects of humic acid on dissimilatory iron reduction (DISSIR) in red soil by adding glucose or humic acid (HA), under an anaerobic condition. Results indicated that DISSIR is weak for the red soil with a low content of organic matter, Glucose that act as electron donators promoted the process of DISSIR in red soil. HA added to soil solely didn't accelerate the DISSIR since it couldn't provide electron donators to microbe. However, adding of both glucose and HA promoted the DISSIR at the beginning of the incubation but then inhibited the process, which maybe caused by the effects of precipitation and adsorption of red soil. Concentrations of HA strongly affected the DISSIR, HA at low concentrations(0.20 and 0.02 g/kg) had weak effects, while HA at a high concentration (2.00 g/kg) promoted the process at the beginning and then inhibited it. HA extracted from different materials had distinct effects on the DISSIR. HA from Weathering coal of Datong in Shanxi Province (HAs), lignite of Gongxian in Henan Province (HAh) and Dianchi Lake sediment in Kunming of Yunnan Province (HAk) all promoted the DISSIR at the beginning of the incubation. However, at the end of incubation, HAk with a low aromaticity still promoted the process, while HAs and HAh with a higher aromaticity weakened the DISSIR. This may be due to the increase in adsorption of soil with the aromaticity of HA. PMID:19353884

  14. Benefits and limitations of pig slurry to reclaim bare mine soils under Mediterranean semiarid conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Acosta, Jose A.; Kabas, Sebla; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Ángeles Muñoz, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effects of pig slurry application on reclamation of mine soils from Cartagena-La Unión Mining District (SE Spain) were investigated in a field experiment. Exchangeable metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn), total organic carbon, total nitrogen, soluble carbon, microbial biomass and three enzyme activities were periodically monitored during 67 days. In addition, one year after the application of the pig slurry, soil and developed vegetation was sampled. Results showed that only exchangeable Cd and Zn significantly decreased in the amended plots, mainly for Cd, with decreases of 98%. The rest of metals and chemical properties did not change with time after application of amendments, showing values not significantly different than those present before pig slurry application. Soluble carbon, microbial biomass carbon and the enzyme activities increased after the application of pig slurry. However, after various days these parameters started a decreasing trend until reaching values similar to the control from approximately day 25. Thus, mainly precipitation as phosphate from the waste was very effective for Cd immobilization. No increments were observed in soil organic carbon because the organic carbon applied with the slurry was too low to be significantly detected. Nonetheless, pig slurry is a good fertilizer owing to the high quantity of nutrients provided, needed to promote the development of vegetation. One year after application, a native vegetation cover (25-30%) was reached by spontaneous colonization. Triggered plant growth by the effect of amendment improved soil conditions, particularly by the help of the medium created by their rhizosphere systems. Increments in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen, and decreases in the exchangeable metals fraction concentration were observed in rhizospheric soils when compared to the bare soils. This improvement in soil quality mediated by vegetation was more efficient than the direct effect of the amendment. In

  15. Water dynamics and groundwater contributions in a young mountain soil under different meteorological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negm, Amro; Falocchi, Marco; Barontini, Stefano; Ranzi, Roberto; Bacchi, Baldassare

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater contribution to the soil-water content and to the evapotranspiration is a major uncertainty to assess the water balance. Particularly in mountain environments, where the soil and the depth of the water table are shallow, both percolation and water rise from the water table can happen. Aiming at better understanding these processes at the local scale, a micrometeorological station, equipped with both traditional sensors, an eddy covariance (EC) apparatus with a 20Hz sonic anemometer and infrared CO2 and H2O gas analyser, and four multiplexed TDR probes, was installed at Cividate Camuno (Oglio river basin, Central Italian Alps, Italy, 274ma.s.l.), in a mountain environment with complex topography and Alpine sublitoranean climate. The young, anthropised, soil upper layers are about 40cm deep and mainly covered by alfalfa (Medicago sativa), wild carrot (Daucus carota) and yarrow (Achillea millefolium). Field and laboratory tests were performed to characterise the soil hydraulic properties. Particularly the soil-water retention relationships were measured by means of a low- and a high-pressure Richards' apparatus, and the hydraulic conductivity at saturation of each soil layer was estimated by 2-dimensional, axis-symmetrical, inverse modelling of field infiltration tests from single ring infiltrometer. The measurements were performed during Summer 2012 and Summer 2013. The groundwater exchange was numerically estimated both in wet (Summer 2012) and in dry meteorlogical conditions (Summer 2013). Evapotranspiration was assessed by means of Penman-Monteith method, which was found to be in the range between EC-estimated fluxes and an indirect estimate based on the Bowen ratio correction for Summer 2012. The two seasons are meteorologically very different and it results also in the soil-water regime. During Summer 2012, the weather was relatively wet, the soil did not reach very small water contents, so that precipitation was able to percolate towards the

  16. Methanogenic archaea are globally ubiquitous in aerated soils and become active under wet anoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Roey; Claus, Peter; Conrad, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The prototypical representatives of the Euryarchaeota—the methanogens—are oxygen sensitive and are thought to occur only in highly reduced, anoxic environments. However, we found methanogens of the genera Methanosarcina and Methanocella to be present in many types of upland soils (including dryland soils) sampled globally. These methanogens could be readily activated by incubating the soils as slurry under anoxic conditions, as seen by rapid methane production within a few weeks, without any additional carbon source. Analysis of the archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA gene community profile in the incubated samples through terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and quantification through quantitative PCR indicated dominance of Methanosarcina, whose gene copy numbers also correlated with methane production rates. Analysis of the δ13C of the methane further supported this, as the dominant methanogenic pathway was in most cases aceticlastic, which Methanocella cannot perform. Sequences of the key methanogenic enzyme methyl coenzyme M reductase retrieved from the soil samples before incubation confirmed that Methanosarcina and Methanocella are the dominant methanogens, though some sequences of Methanobrevibacter and Methanobacterium were also detected. The global occurrence of only two active methanogenic archaea supports the hypothesis that these are autochthonous members of the upland soil biome and are well adapted to their environment. PMID:22071343

  17. Testing of the hydromechanical prediction model of soil erosion under the conditions of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogichaishvili, G. P.; Kirvalidze, D. R.; Gorjomeladze, O. L.

    2014-09-01

    A hydromechanical model for predicting water (rain-induced) soil erosion was tested on the experimental plots of the Research Institute of Tea and Subtropical Crops in Zendidi village (the Ajara Autonomous Republic) and the Sabashvili Institute of Soil Science, Agrochemistry, and Melioration in Khevi and Kitskhi villages (Upper Imeretia, Western Georgia). A comparison of factual and predicted values of rain-induced erosion for the plots with permanent black fallow showed that the model overestimated the average annual soil loss for the yellow-brown strongly eroded soil in Zendidi village by 23.22 t/ha (133%). This value ranged in different years from 18 to 1052%. For the plots with corn, the predicted value of annual erosion was by 16.94 t/ha higher than the factual value (overestimation of 488%). A comparison of factual and predicted values of rainfall erosion for the plots under sprinkling irrigation also showed that the predicted soil loss was higher than the factual one by 4.14-30.40 t/ha for corn, 6.76-11.14 t/ha for winter wheat, and 15.75-24.12 t/ha for the plots with stubble of winter wheat and barley. Thus, the hydromechanical model for predicting water erosion inadequately describes it under the conditions of Western Georgia and has to be refined.

  18. Biotite weathering in podzolic soil under conditions of a model field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, T. A.; Tolpeshta, I. I.; Topunova, I. V.

    2010-10-01

    The biotite changes in the 1-5 μm fraction after its occurrence in the F, H, AE, and E horizons of a pale-podzolic soil for five years under conditions of a model field experiment were assessed by X-ray diffraction analysis. It was found that the main changes of the biotite in all the horizons included the degradational transformation of its crystal lattice to interstratified mica-vermiculite structures and vermiculite. The intensity of this process gradually decreased from the F horizon down the profile in parallel with the decrease in the amount of roots and the abundance and activity of microbiota. Chloritized structures were present among the products of the biotite weathering in the H, AE, and E horizons; the degree of chloritization gradually increased from the H horizon to the E horizon. The main identified products of the biotite weathering in the AE and E horizons formed during the 5 years of the model experiment were identified in the clay and fine-silt fractions from these horizons of the native pale-podzolic soils. Therefore, the vermiculite, soil chlorite, and mixed-layer illite-vermiculite minerals in the soils studied could be considered as products of the recent soil functioning. The obtained results and literature data showed that the weathering of biotite resulted in the formation of K- and Al-buffer systems.

  19. Transport of gadolinium- and arsenic-based pharmaceuticals in saturated soil under various redox conditions.

    PubMed

    Menahem, Adi; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2016-02-01

    The release of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) to the soil-water environment necessitates understanding of PPCP transport behavior under conditions that account for dynamic flow and varying redox states. This study investigates the transport of two organometallic PPCPs, Gd-DTPA and roxarsone (arsenic compound) and their metal salts (Gd(NO3)3, AsNaO2); Gd-DTPA is used widely as a contrasting agent for MRI, while roxarsone is applied extensively as a food additive in the broiler poultry industry. Here, we present column experiments using sand and Mediterranean red sandy clay soil, performed under several redox conditions. The metal salts were almost completely immobile. In contrast, transport of Gd-DTPA and roxarsone was affected by the soil type. Roxarsone was also affected by the different redox conditions, showing delayed breakthrough curves as the redox potential became more negative due to biological activity (chemically-strong reducing conditions did not affect the transport). Mechanisms that include adsorptive retardation for aerobic and nitrate-reducing conditions, and non-adsorptive retardation for iron-reducing, sulfate-reducing and biologically-strong reducing conditions, are suggested to explain the roxarsone behavior. Gd-DTPA is found to be a stable complex, with potential for high mobility in groundwater systems, whereas roxarsone transport through groundwater systems is affected by redox environments, demonstrating high mobility under aerobic and nitrate-reducing conditions and delayed transport under iron-reducing, sulfate-reducing and biologically-strong reducing conditions. PMID:26408978

  20. Specific microbial populations thrive under fluctuating redox conditions in tropical soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deangelis, K. M.; Silver, W. L.; Thompson, A.; Firestone, M. K.

    2008-12-01

    The highly weathered soils of upland humid tropical forests are characterized by rapidly fluctuating redox conditions, dominated by Fe-oxide mineralogy, and have relatively low sulfate availability. To assess how fluctuating redox conditions and accompanying biogeochemistry impact microbial community structure and function, we collected soil cores from the Luquillo LTER forest in Puerto Rico and incubated them for 32 days under one of three redox regimes: static oxic, static anoxic, and 4-day fluctuating redox. Over this time course we measured CO2, CH4, and N2O production, amorphous iron and Fe(II), and microbial community structure by high density microarray (PhyloChip) analysis. Static oxic, anoxic, and fluctuating redox soils all had statistically indistinguishable respiration rates over the course of the experiment. Fluctuating redox conditions permitted simultaneous methanogenesis, N2O production, and iron reduction, all accompanied by steady CO2 production. We analyzed the standing and active microbial community using the 16S ribosomal DNA and RNA biomarkers, identifying 2489 taxa in these soils. Ordination analysis showed significant separation between the active (RNA-based) and standing (DNA-based) communities, with much more variation in the active community compared to the standing community. Fluctuating redox conditions maintained a microbial community structure similar to that of the pre-incubation samples, while static anaerobic conditions had the most profound effect on the communities. Finally, there was considerable overlap between the taxa that were the most highly correlated with production of CH4 and Fe(II). Association of groups of taxa with specific biogeochemical processes begins to identify organisms potentially responsible for field biogeochemical processing.

  1. Soil application of Beauveria bassiana to control Ceratitis capitata in semi field conditions.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ali; Sermann, Helga; Lerche, Sandra; Büttner, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    The Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) is a highly polyphagous pest of economic importance cultures in Syria, as in many other parts of the world. The potential of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiona BALS (VUIL.) strain 412 against adults of Mediterranean fruit fly C. capitata was evaluated in semi field conditions during the summer. Soil (5-7 cm high) was filled into plastic container (27 cm x 32 cm). In one container 75 pupae, two days before emergency, were spread uniformly on the soil. Then the pupae were covered with soil (4-5 cm layer). After that, 30 ml suspension of fungal spores (4 x 10(8) spores/ml) was applied to the soil surface using a dash bottle. This corresponded to a spore density of 1.3 x 10(7) spores/cm2 on soil. Water and food (1:4 yeast, sucrose) were placed in the cages for the emerged flies. The semi-field evaluation of B. bassiana revealed a fly mortality of about 46% compared to 16% in the control. In addition 72% of dead flies were moulded in the treatment. These results indicated that the entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana was pathogen against the adults of C. capitata not only in the laboratory condition but also under field condition. That means B. bassiana could decrease the offspring of C. capitata. Therefore B. bassiana could be an effective factor to control C. capitata in combination with other control methods, used in IPM program in the field. PMID:20222591

  2. Impact of soil moisture initial conditions on multi model summer predictions over mid-latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardilouze, Constantin; Prodhomme, Chloé; Batté, Lauriane; Déqué, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Land surface initial conditions have been recognized as a potential source of predictability at seasonal time scales. As an example, results from GLACE-2 (phase 2 of the Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment) highlighted the impact of spring soil moisture in summer near-surface air temperature prediction over Europe and Northern America with global long-range forecast systems (Koster et al., 2011, van den Hurk et al.,2012). Yet, few studies have explored such an influence over a sufficient hindcast period to produce a robust quantitative assessment. In the framework of the FP7-SPECS project, dedicated experiments have been carried out with June-August hindcasts from 5 distinct Atmosphere Ocean Global Climate Models initialized either by realistic or climatological soil moisture conditions on May 1st. Realistic initialization leads to an improved 2-meter temperature prediction skill over parts of Europe in the multi model, particularly the Balkans peninsula which had been identified as a hot spot of soil moisture-atmosphere coupling (Seneviratne et al. 2006) However no improvement was found over North-American Great Plains in spite of the high potential of this region. Further analyses suggest that this lack of skill stems from a common shortcoming of the models. All of them tend to overestimate the positive feedback between soil moisture, temperature and precipitation with respect to the observations. Hence, tackling model systematic biases over the US Southern Great Plains appears as a necessary prerequisite for summer predictability enhancement.

  3. Formation of diphenylthioarsinic acid from diphenylarsinic acid under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Shihoko; Guan, Ling; Nakajima, Mami; Fujii, Kunihiko; Nonaka, Masanori; Harada, Naoki

    2013-11-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is a toxic phenylarsenical compound often found around sites contaminated with phenylarsenic chemical warfare agents, diphenylcyanoarsine or diphenylchloroarsine, which were buried in soil after the World Wars. This research concerns the elucidation of the chemical structure of an arsenic metabolite transformed from DPAA under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions. In LC/ICP-MS analysis, the retention time of the metabolite was identical to that of a major phenylarsenical compound synthesized by chemical reaction of DPAA and hydrogen sulfide. Moreover the mass spectra for the two compounds measured using LC/TOF-MS were similar. Subsequent high resolution mass spectral analysis indicated that two major ions at m/z 261 and 279, observed on both mass spectra, were attributable to C12H10AsS and C12H12AsSO, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that the latter ion is the molecular-related ion ([M+H](+)) of diphenylthioarsinic acid (DPTA; (C6H5)2AsS(OH)) and the former ion is its dehydrated fragment. Thus, our results reveal that DPAA can be transformed to DPTA, as a major metabolite, under sulfate-reducing soil conditions. Moreover, formation of diphenyldithioarsinic acid and subsequent dimerization were predicted by the chemical reaction analysis of DPAA with hydrogen sulfide. This is the first report to elucidate the occurrence of DPAA-thionation in an anaerobic soil. PMID:24007995

  4. Effects of cattle grazing during the dormant season on soil surface hydrology and physical quality in a moist-temperate region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock grazing in paddocks of temperate regions during the dormant season adversely affects soil quality. The adverse effects stem from trampling action under wet soil conditions. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of livestock grazing on soil quality, with sp...

  5. Monitoring of the CO2 emission and the contents of microbial biomass in agroecosystems on gray forest soils of the Cisbaikal region under conditions of fluoride pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomazkina, L. V.

    2015-08-01

    The influence of the technogenic pollution of gray forest soils in the forest-steppe zone of the Cisbaikal region with fluorides emitted by aluminum smelters on the functioning and state of local agroecosystems was studied within the framework of a long-term agroecological monitoring program. Hydrothermic conditions of the growing season during the monitoring period (1997-2012) were compared with the climatic norm (1961-1990). It was found that the adverse effect of the technogenic pollution on the agroecosystem becomes more pronounced during the years with abnormal weather conditions. An increase in the CO2 emission into the atmosphere as a response of the microbial complex to the rise in the air temperatures was characterized by the linear dependence irrespectively of the degree of soil contamination. The methods of systems analysis were applied to generalize the results. The considered agroecosystem was studied as the system of particular components (soil-microorganisms-plants-atmosphere) integrated by the carbon fluxes. The regimes of the agroecosystem functioning and the ecological loads on it were estimated on the basis of data on the fluxes of net mineralized and (re)immobilized carbon. The environmental factors affecting the state and functioning of the agroecosystem were identified.

  6. Effect of wetting-drying cycles and fire conditions on runoff and soil loss of a Mediterranean Pale Rendzina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lado, Marcos; Inbar, Assaf; Tenaw, Haim; Stenberg, Marcelo; Ben-Hur, Meni

    2013-04-01

    Wetting and drying cycles have been reported to have a positive effect on soil aggregation and improve the recovery of soil structure after a disturbance. Therefore, after wildfires, it is expected that drying periods between consecutive storms could modify runoff and soil loss patterns. At the same time, different fire conditions may coexist in a location during a wildfire, creating a mosaic of soils affected to different degrees. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of wetting-drying cycles and various fire conditions on infiltration rate, runoff and soil loss of a Mediterranean soil. Samples from a Pale Rendzina from Birya forest in Northern Israel were subjected to treatments representing some of the soil disturbances that may coexist after a wildfire: unburnt (UB-soil, i.e. not affected by fire); low-moderate severity direct fire (direct fire-DF soil) and; prolonged heating under moderate temperature without direct contact with the flames (oven heated-HT soil). Each soil was placed under a rainfall simulator and exposed to three 80-mm storms separated by drying periods of 72h. Significant differences were found between fire conditions in infiltration rate, runoff and soil loss. Runoff and soil loss were in the following order :HTsoil loss of the HT soil were a result of its higher structural stability, likely emerging from the thermal fusion of clay particles in the aggregates, and from changes in the soil solution that reduced clay dispersion. This was confirmed by data obtained from slaking and dispersion tests. Wetting and drying cycles did not have a positive effect on runoff or soil loss. Total runoff and soil loss from the UB soil remained relatively constant in the three rainstorms, while those of DF and HT soils increased significantly from one rainstorm to the next. Therefore, the differences between fire conditions became smaller as the number of

  7. About climate variabilitiy leading the hydric condition of the soil in the rainfed region of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pántano, V. C.; Penalba, O. C.

    2013-05-01

    Extreme events of temperature and rainfall have a socio-economic impact in the rainfed agriculture production region in Argentina. The magnitude of the impact can be analyzed through the water balance which integrates the characteristics of the soil and climate conditions. Changes observed in climate variables during the last decades affected the components of the water balance. As a result, a displacement of the agriculture border towards the west was produced, improving the agricultural production of the region. The objective of this work is to analyze how the variability of rainfall and temperature leads the hydric condition of the soil, with special focus on extreme events. The hydric conditions of the soil (HC= Excess- Deficit) were estimated from the monthly water balance (Thornthwaite and Mather method, 1957), using monthly potential evapotranspiration (PET) and monthly accumulated rainfall (R) for 33 stations (period 1970-2006). Information of temperature and rainfall was provided by National Weather Service and the effective capacity of soil water was considered from Forte Lay and Spescha (2001). An agricultural extreme condition occurs when soil moisture and rainfall are inadequate or excessive for the development of the crops. In this study, we define an extreme event when the variable is less (greater) than its 20% and 10% (80% and 90%) percentile. In order to evaluate how sensitive is the HC to water and heat stress in the region, different conditional probabilities were evaluated. There is a weaker response of HC to extreme low PET while extreme low R leads high values of HC. However, this behavior is not always observed, especially in the western region where extreme high and low PET show a stronger influence over the HC. Finally, to analyze the temporal variability of extreme PET and R, leading hydric condition of the soil, the number of stations presenting extreme conditions was computed for each month. As an example, interesting results were

  8. Using NASA UAVSAR Datasets to Link Soil Moisture to Crop Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davitt, A. W. D.; McDonald, K. C.; Azarderakhsh, M.; Winter, J.

    2015-12-01

    California and The Central Valley are experiencing one of that region's worst, persistent droughts, which represents the continuation of a prolonged drought that started in the early 2000's. Due to the continued drought, many agricultural regions in The Central Valley have been experiencing water shortages, negatively impacting agricultural production and the socio-economics of the region. Due to these impacts, there has been an increased incentive to find new ways to conserve water for use in irrigation. Recent advances in remote sensing techniques provide the ability for end users to better understand field conditions so they may make more informed decisions on irrigation timing and amounts. However, a good understanding of soil moisture and its role in crop health and yield is lacking to support informed water management decisions. Though known to be important, a robust understanding of the role of the spatio-temporal patterns in soil moisture linked to crop health is lacking. Remote sensing platforms such as NASA's Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) provide the capacity to obtain within-field measurements to estimate within-field and field-to-field variability in soil moisture. UAVSAR radar images acquired from 2010 to 2014 for Yolo County, California are being examined to determine the suitability of high resolution (field scale) multi-temporal L-band radar backscatter imagery for soil moisture assessment and crop conditions through the growing season. By using such data and linking to in-situ meteorology measurements, modeling (MIMICS), and other remote sensing derived datasets (Sentinel, Landsat, MODIS, and TOPS-SIMS), an integrated monitoring system can potentially support the assessment of agricultural field conditions. This allows growers to optimize the use of limited water supplies through informed water management practices, potentially improving crop conditions and yield in a water stressed region.

  9. Adaptation of soil solarization to the integrated management of soilborne pests of tomato under humid conditions.

    PubMed

    Chellemi, D O; Olson, S M; Mitchell, D J; Secker, I; McSorley, R

    1997-03-01

    ABSTRACT Soil solarization was shown to be cost effective, compatible with other pest management tactics, readily integrated into standard production systems, and a valid alternative to preplant fumigation with methyl bromide under the tested conditions. Solarization using clear, photoselective, or gas-impermeable plastic was evaluated in combination with metham sodium, 1,3-dichloropropene + chloropicrin, methyl bromide + chloropicrin, pebulate, or cabbage residue. Strip solarization, applied to 20-cm-high, 0.9-m-wide beds, was conducted to achieve compatibility with standard production practices and resulted in soil temperatures 2 to 4 degrees C above those temperatures resulting when using conventional flatbed solarization. Soil temperatures were 1 to 2 degrees C higher at the edges of the raised beds, eliminating any border effects associated with solarization. Following a 40- to 55-day solarization period, the plastic was painted white and used as a production mulch for a subsequent tomato crop. The incidence of Southern blight and the density of Paratrichodorus minor and Criconemella spp. were lower (P < 0.05) in solarized plots. No differences (P < 0.05) in the incidence of Fusarium wilt and the density of nutsedge and Helicotylenchus spp. were observed between plots receiving solarization and plots fumigated with a mixture of methyl bromide + chloropicrin. The severity of root galling was lower (P < 0.05) when soil solarization was combined with 1,3-dichloropropene + chloropicrin (16.2 + 3.4 g/m(2)) and a gas-impermeable film. The incidence of bacterial wilt was not affected by soil treatments. Marketable yields in plots using various combinations of soil solarization and other tactics were similar (P < 0.05) to yields obtained in plots fumigated with methyl bromide + chloropicrin. The results were validated in several large scale field experiments conducted by commercial growers. PMID:18945167

  10. Effects of Temperature on Solute Transport Parameters in Differently-Textured Soils at Saturated Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, S.; Arihara, M.; Kawamoto, K.; Nishimura, T.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface warming driven by global warming, urban heat islands, and increasing use of shallow geothermal heating and cooling systems such as the ground source heat pump, potentially causes changes in subsurface mass transport. Therefore, understanding temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics is essential to accurately assess environmental risks due to increased subsurface temperature. In this study, one-dimensional solute transport experiments were conducted in soil columns under temperature control to investigate effects of temperature on solute transport parameters, such as solute dispersion and diffusion coefficients, hydraulic conductivity, and retardation factor. Toyoura sand, Kaolin clay, and intact loamy soils were used in the experiments. Intact loamy soils were taken during a deep well boring at the Arakawa Lowland in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. In the transport experiments, the core sample with 5-cm diameter and 4-cm height was first isotropically consolidated, whereafter 0.01M KCl solution was injected to the sample from the bottom. The concentrations of K+ and Cl- in the effluents were analyzed by an ion chromatograph to obtain solute breakthrough curves. The solute transport parameters were calculated from the breakthrough curves. The experiments were conducted under different temperature conditions (15, 25, and 40 oC). The retardation factor for the intact loamy soils decreased with increasing temperature, while water permeability increased due to reduced viscosity of water at higher temperature. Opposite, the effect of temperature on solute dispersivity for the intact loamy soils was insignificant. The effects of soil texture on the temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics will be further investigated from comparison of results from differently-textured samples.

  11. Effects of long-term continuous cropping on soil nematode community and soil condition associated with replant problem in strawberry habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingyue; Lewis, Edwin E.; Liu, Qizhi; Li, Heqin; Bai, Chunqi; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-08-01

    Continuous cropping changes soil physiochemical parameters, enzymes and microorganism communities, causing “replant problem” in strawberry cultivation. We hypothesized that soil nematode community would reflect the changes in soil conditions caused by long-term continuous cropping, in ways that are consistent and predictable. To test this hypothesis, we studied the soil nematode communities and several soil parameters, including the concentration of soil phenolic acids, organic matter and nitrogen levels, in strawberry greenhouse under continuous-cropping for five different durations. Soil pH significantly decreased, and four phenolic acids, i.e., p-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, cinnamic acid and p-coumaric acid, accumulated with time under continuous cropping. The four phenolic acids were highly toxic to Acrobeloides spp., the eudominant genus in non-continuous cropping, causing it to reduce to a resident genus after seven-years of continuous cropping. Decreased nematode diversity indicated loss of ecosystem stability and sustainability because of continuous-cropping practice. Moreover, the dominant decomposition pathway was altered from bacterial to fungal under continuous cropping. Our results suggest that along with the continuous-cropping time in strawberry habitat, the soil food web is disturbed, and the available plant nutrition as well as the general health of the soil deteriorates; these changes can be indicated by soil nematode community.

  12. Effects of long-term continuous cropping on soil nematode community and soil condition associated with replant problem in strawberry habitat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingyue; Lewis, Edwin E.; Liu, Qizhi; Li, Heqin; Bai, Chunqi; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-01-01

    Continuous cropping changes soil physiochemical parameters, enzymes and microorganism communities, causing “replant problem” in strawberry cultivation. We hypothesized that soil nematode community would reflect the changes in soil conditions caused by long-term continuous cropping, in ways that are consistent and predictable. To test this hypothesis, we studied the soil nematode communities and several soil parameters, including the concentration of soil phenolic acids, organic matter and nitrogen levels, in strawberry greenhouse under continuous-cropping for five different durations. Soil pH significantly decreased, and four phenolic acids, i.e., p-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, cinnamic acid and p-coumaric acid, accumulated with time under continuous cropping. The four phenolic acids were highly toxic to Acrobeloides spp., the eudominant genus in non-continuous cropping, causing it to reduce to a resident genus after seven-years of continuous cropping. Decreased nematode diversity indicated loss of ecosystem stability and sustainability because of continuous-cropping practice. Moreover, the dominant decomposition pathway was altered from bacterial to fungal under continuous cropping. Our results suggest that along with the continuous-cropping time in strawberry habitat, the soil food web is disturbed, and the available plant nutrition as well as the general health of the soil deteriorates; these changes can be indicated by soil nematode community. PMID:27506379

  13. Effects of long-term continuous cropping on soil nematode community and soil condition associated with replant problem in strawberry habitat.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingyue; Lewis, Edwin E; Liu, Qizhi; Li, Heqin; Bai, Chunqi; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-01-01

    Continuous cropping changes soil physiochemical parameters, enzymes and microorganism communities, causing "replant problem" in strawberry cultivation. We hypothesized that soil nematode community would reflect the changes in soil conditions caused by long-term continuous cropping, in ways that are consistent and predictable. To test this hypothesis, we studied the soil nematode communities and several soil parameters, including the concentration of soil phenolic acids, organic matter and nitrogen levels, in strawberry greenhouse under continuous-cropping for five different durations. Soil pH significantly decreased, and four phenolic acids, i.e., p-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, cinnamic acid and p-coumaric acid, accumulated with time under continuous cropping. The four phenolic acids were highly toxic to Acrobeloides spp., the eudominant genus in non-continuous cropping, causing it to reduce to a resident genus after seven-years of continuous cropping. Decreased nematode diversity indicated loss of ecosystem stability and sustainability because of continuous-cropping practice. Moreover, the dominant decomposition pathway was altered from bacterial to fungal under continuous cropping. Our results suggest that along with the continuous-cropping time in strawberry habitat, the soil food web is disturbed, and the available plant nutrition as well as the general health of the soil deteriorates; these changes can be indicated by soil nematode community. PMID:27506379

  14. Carbon and Nitrogen dynamics in forest soils depending on light conditions and tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselinovic, Bojana; Hager, Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Climate change mitigation actions under the Kyoto Protocol apply among other decreases of CO2-emissions and/or increases of carbon (C) stocks. As soils represent the second biggest C-reservoir on Earth, an exact estimation of the stocks and reliable knowledge on C-dynamics in forest soils is of high importance. Anyhow, here, the accurate GHG-accounting, emission reductions and increase in C stocks is hampered due to lack of reliable data and solid statistical methods for the factors which influence C-sequestration in and its release from these systems. In spite of good progress in the scientific research, these factors are numerous and diverse in their interactions. This work focuses on influence of the economically relevant tree species - Picea abies, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus spp. - and light conditions on forest floor and mineral soil C and N dynamics in forest soils. Spruce monocultures have been widely used management practices in central European forests during the past century. Such stands are in lower altitudes and on heavy and water logged soils unstable and prone to disturbances, especially to windthrows. We hypothesize that windthrow areas loose C & N and that the establishment of the previous nutrient stocks is, if at all, only possible to be reached over the longer periods of time. We research also how the increased OM depletion affects the change of C & N stocks in forest floor vs. mineral soil. Conversion of such secondary spruce monocultures to site adequate beech and oak forests may enable higher stocks allocated predominantly as stable organic carbon and as plant available nitrogen. For this purpose sites at 300-700 m altitude with planosols were chosen in the region of the Northern Alpine Foothills. A false chronosequence approach was used in order to evaluate the impacts of the tree species and change in light conditions on dynamic of C & N in the forest floor and mineral soil, over the period 0-100 (for oak 120 y.) years. The C- and N

  15. Mobilization and Release of colloidal Carbon from a Soil Column Under Redox Oscillation Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsar, M. Z.; Jin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM), the most mobile form of carbon (C), strongly influences the cycling, distribution and behavior of C in soil. In wetlands, the reductive dissolution of iron and manganese oxy-hydroxides releases large quantities of DOM into the soil solution. The objective of this study is to quantify the changes in aqueous organic carbon concentration in different sized fractions induced by reduction of iron and increase in pH. Twenty four cm long soil columns were prepared. Columns were run under oxic (as control) and anoxic conditions. Two platinum redox probes were inserted at 10 and 17 cm depths from the soil surface to monitor the redox status of the column. Anoxic and oxic conditions were maintained by flushing with either nitrogen or oxygen gas through the soil. No additional organic sources were added. After 35 days of anoxic environment, column leachate samples were separated by differential centrifugation into five colloidal sized fractions (<450 nm, <220 nm, <100 nm, <50 nm and <2.3 nm). Immediately after the 1st reduction half cycle, the leachate samples were collected inside the glove box and the soil columns were flushed with oxygen to prepare for 2nd reduction half cycle. After 1st reduction half cycle, the pH, ionic strength and aqueous (Fe2+) concentration of the column extracts were increased whereas the Eh value was decreased. The range of pH, Eh, ionic strength and concentration of Fe2+ was 6.38 to 6.91, -219 to -275 mV, 13.74 to 18.84 mM and 1.8 to 3.41 mg L-1, respectively. Following the anoxic incubation, the total desorbed C was increased up to 139 mg L-1. The distribution of C across the five particle size fractions was 3.68-11.73% (> 450 nm), 0.59-5.12% (450-220 nm), 0.45-4.91% (220-100 nm), 0.18-2.91% (100-50 nm), 15.48-35.23% (50 nm - 2.3 nm) and 49.15-63.94% (<2.3 nm). The preliminary results confirmed the release of more nanoparticulate (50-2.3 nm) and truly dissolved (<2.3 nm) organic matter from the anoxic soil column

  16. Comparison of four soil moisture sensor types under field conditions in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelbach, Heidi; Lehner, Irene; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2012-04-01

    SummaryMany environmental and hydrological applications require knowledge about soil moisture. Its measurement accuracy is known to depend on the sensor technique, which is sensitive to soil characteristics such as texture, temperature, bulk density and salinity. However, the calibration functions provided by instrument manufacturers are generally developed under laboratory conditions, and their accuracy for field applications is rarely investigated, in particular over long time periods and in comparison with other sensors types. In this paper, four side-by-side profile soil moisture measurements down to 110 cm using three low-cost sensors and one high-accuracy and high-cost time domain reflectometry (TDR) sensor are compared over a 2-year period at a clay loam site in Switzerland. The low-cost instruments include the (1) 10HS (Decagon Devices, United States), (2) CS616 (Campbell Scientific, United States), and (3) SISOMOP (SMG University of Karlsruhe, Germany) sensors, which are evaluated against the (4) TDR-based TRIME-IT/-EZ (IMKO GmbH, Germany) sensors. For the comparison, the calibration functions provided by the manufacturers are applied for each sensor type. The sensors are evaluated based on daily data regarding their representation of the volumetric water content (VWC) and its anomalies, as well as the respective temperature dependency of the measurements. Furthermore, for each sensor type the actual evapotranspiration is estimated using the soil water balance approach and compared with measurements from a weighing lysimeter. It is shown that the root mean square difference (RMSD) of VWC for the low-cost sensors compared to the TDR measurements are up to 0.3 m3/m3, with highest values in near-surface layers. However, the RMSD for the VWC anomalies are lower compared to those for absolute values. We conclude that under the studied conditions none of the evaluated low-cost sensors has a level of performance consistent with the respective manufacturer

  17. Nitrous oxide emissions in southern Poland from agricultural soils under various tillage conditions and from urban soils under strong anthropopression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkowski, M.; Bartyzel, J.; Zięba, D.; Ciaciek, K.; Nęcki, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of field measurements performed at: (i) the agricultural sites managed by Institute of Plant Acclimatization and Husbandry (ZDHAR) in Grodkowice (Malopolska, Poland), and (ii) the urban sites located in Kraków, Poland. For agricultural measurements, several sites have been selected for measurements of N2O emissions during two campaigns - in spring and autumn 2014. The investigated crops were chosen to represent the regional agriculture and included wheat, canola and maize under various tillage conditions, as well as an uncultivated grassland as a control site. For urban environment, measurement campaigns have been performed at the university's campus lawn and at a large urban meadow, both located in the centre of Kraków agglomeration. The sites were chosen to be representative of the urban green areas typical of Central Europe. The static chamber method was chosen to quantify soil-atmosphere N2O fluxes. Chamber enclosures have been performed every 3-5 days, depending on the conditions prevailing at the sites during the intermediate periods. From each enclosure, five 50-ml air samples have been collected for subsequent analysis of nitrous oxide concentrations. Well-established gas chromatography methods, with a precision of a single N2O measurement better than 0.5 ppb were employed. The measured concentrations were then used in a linear emission model to calculate N2O fluxes. Results of agricultural campaigns show large variability of N2O emissions, with maximum fluxes in the order of 120 ng N-N2O m-2 s-1, driven mainly by availability of nitrogen in soil and water. For fertilized sites, largest emissions values were observed several days after the rainfall events. Notable differences between sites under alternative tillage techniques have been observed. Observations at the urban sites revealed significant fluxes of N2O, with average daily values in some cases exceeding those observed at agricultural fields.

  18. Chemical equilibria model of strontium-90 adsorption and transport in soil in response to dynamic alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Spalding, B P; Spalding, I R

    2001-01-15

    Strontium-90 is a major hazardous contaminant of radioactive wastewater and its processing sludges at many Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. In the past, such contaminated wastewater and sludge have been disposed in soil seepage pits, lagoons, or cribs often under highly perturbed alkaline conditions (pH > 12) where 90Sr solubility is low and its adsorption to surrounding soil is high. As natural weathering returns these soils to near-neutral or slightly acidic conditions, the adsorbed and precipitated calcium and magnesium phases, in which 90Sr is carried, change significantly in both nature and amounts. No comprehensive computational method has been formulated previously to quantitatively simulate the dynamics of 90Sr in the soil-groundwater environment under such dynamic and wide-ranging conditions. A computational code, the Hydrologic Utility Model for Demonstrating Integrated Nuclear Geochemical Environmental Responses (HUMDINGER), was composed to describe the changing equilibria of 90Sr in soil based on its causative chemical reactions including soil buffering, pH-dependent cation-exchange capacity, cation selectivity, and the precipitation/dissolution of calcium carbonate, calcium hydroxide, and magnesium hydroxide in response to leaching groundwater characteristics including pH, acid-neutralizing capacity, dissolved cations, and inorganic carbonate species. The code includes a simulation of one-dimensional transport of 90Sr through a soil column as a series of soil mixing cells where the equilibrium soluble output from one cell is applied to the next cell. Unamended soil leaching and highly alkaline soil treatments, including potassium hydroxide, sodium silicate, and sodium aluminate, were simulated and compared with experimental findings using large (10 kg) soil columns that were leached with 90Sr-contaminated groundwater after treatment. HUMDINGER's simulations were in good agreement with dynamic experimental observations of soil exchange capacity

  19. Roles of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Soil Abiotic Conditions in the Establishment of a Dry Grassland Community

    PubMed Central

    Knappová, Jana; Pánková, Hana; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of soil biota in the composition of mature plant communities is commonly acknowledged. In contrast, the role of soil biota in the early establishment of new plant communities and their relative importance for soil abiotic conditions are still poorly understood. Aims and Methods The aim of this study was to understand the effects of soil origin and soil fungal communities on the composition of a newly established dry grassland plant community. We used soil from two different origins (dry grassland and abandoned field) with different pH and nutrient and mineral content. Grassland microcosms were established by sowing seeds of 54 species of dry grassland plants into the studied soils. To suppress soil fungi, half of the pots were regularly treated with fungicide. In this way, we studied the independent and combined effects of soil origin and soil community on the establishment of dry grassland communities. Key Results The effect of suppressing the soil fungal community on the richness and composition of the plant communities was much stronger than the effect of soil origin. Contrary to our expectations, the effects of these two factors were largely additive, indicating the same degree of importance of soil fungal communities in the establishment of species-rich plant communities in the soils from both origins. The negative effect of suppressing soil fungi on species richness, however, occurred later in the soil from the abandoned field than in the soil from the grassland. This result likely occurred because the negative effects of the suppression of fungi in the field soil were caused mainly by changes in plant community composition and increased competition. In contrast, in the grassland soil, the absence of soil fungi was limiting for plants already at the early stages of their establishment, i.e., in the phases of germination and early recruitment. While fungicide affects not only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi but also other biota, our data

  20. Arsenic mobility in soils contaminated with metallurgical wastes as a function of variable chemical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Payne, D. G.; Villalobos, M.; Ceniceros, A.; Lopez, J. L.; Gutierrez, M.

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic is a pervasive contaminant of natural aqueous systems, such as groundwater and soils, its sources being both natural and anthropogenic. The present investigation was performed on soils contaminated with residues from ore processing activities and revealed the presence of arsenate [As(V)] species with a very low mobility, through natural attenuation processes. The stability of this attenuation was investigated by varying two specific equilibrium chemical conditions: pH and presence of bicarbonate ions. One-unit changes in equilibrium pH generally caused small increases in As mobility, whereas the presence of bicarbonate ions considerably increased this mobility. The results were compared to thermodinamic simulations of equilibrium conditions using the total elemental composition of each individual soil, but excluding sorption reactions. Close matches between experimental data and simulations revealed the predominance of solubility-controlled As mobility via heavy-metal arsenate solid formation. Bicarbonate ions were found to be highly unsuitable for extraction of sorbed arsenate fractions due to indirect As release from solid arsenates, via heavy-metal carbonate precipitation processes.

  1. Successional stage of biological soil crusts: an accurate indicator of ecohydrological condition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Wilcox, Bradford P.; Van Scoyoc, Matthew V.; Phillips, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are a key component of many dryland ecosystems. Following disturbance, biological soil crusts will recover in stages. Recently, a simple classification of these stages has been developed, largely on the basis of external features of the crusts, which reflects their level of development (LOD). The classification system has six LOD classes, from low (1) to high (6). To determine whether the LOD of a crust is related to its ecohydrological function, we used rainfall simulation to evaluate differences in infiltration, runoff, and erosion among crusts in the various LODs, across a range of soil depths and with different wetting pre-treatments. We found large differences between the lowest and highest LODs, with runoff and erosion being greatest from the lowest LOD. Under dry antecedent conditions, about 50% of the water applied ran off the lowest LOD plots, whereas less than 10% ran off the plots of the two highest LODs. Similarly, sediment loss was 400 g m-2 from the lowest LOD and almost zero from the higher LODs. We scaled up the results from these simulations using the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model. Modelling results indicate that erosion increases dramatically as slope length and gradient increase, especially beyond the threshold values of 10 m for slope length and 10% for slope gradient. Our findings confirm that the LOD classification is a quick, easy, nondestructive, and accurate index of hydrological condition and should be incorporated in field and modelling assessments of ecosystem health.

  2. Plant nutrients do not covary with soil nutrients under changing climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wentao; Elser, James J.; Lü, Xiao-Tao; Wang, Zhengwen; Bai, Edith; Yan, Caifeng; Wang, Chao; Li, Mai-He; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Han, Xingguo; Xu, Zhuwen; Li, Hui; Wu, Yunna; Jiang, Yong

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) play vital roles in plant growth and development. Yet how climate regimes and soil fertility influence plant N and P stoichiometry is not well understood, especially in the belowground plant parts. Here we investigated plant aboveground and belowground N and P concentrations ([N] and [P]) and their stoichiometry in three dominant genera along a 2200 km long climatic gradient in northern China. Results showed that temperature explained more variation of [N] and [P] in C4 plants, whereas precipitation exerted a stronger influence on [N] and [P] in C3 plants. Both plant aboveground and belowground [N] and [P] increased with decreasing precipitation, and increasing temperatures yet were negatively correlated with soil [N] and [P]. Plant N:P ratios were unrelated with all climate and soil variables. Plant aboveground and belowground [N] followed an allometric scaling relationship, but the allocation of [P] was isometric. These results imply that internal processes stabilize plant N:P ratios and hence tissue N:P ratios may not be an effective parameter for predicting plant nutrient limitation. Our results also imply that past positive relationships between plant and nutrient stocks may be challenged under changing climatic conditions. While any modeling would need to be able to replicate currently observed relationships, it is conceivable that some relationships, such as those between temperature or rainfall and carbon:nutrient ratios, should be different under changing climatic conditions.

  3. Transport of bromide measured by soil coring, suction plates, and lysimeters under transient flow conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasteel, R.; Pütz, Th.; Vereecken, H.

    2003-04-01

    Lysimeter studies are one step within the registration procedure of pesticides. Flow and transport in these free-draining lysimeters do not reflect the field situation mainly because of the occurence of a zone of local saturation at the lower boundary (seepage face). The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of flow and transport behaviour of bromide detected with different measuring devices (lysimeters, suction plates, and soil coring) by comparing experimental results with numerical simulations in heterogeneous flow domains. We applied bromide as a small pulse to the bare soil surface (Orthic Luvisol) of the three devices and the displacement of bromide was regurlarly sampled for three years under natural wheather conditions. Based on the mean breakthrough curves we observe experimentally that lysimeters have a lower effective pore-water velocity and exhibit more solute spreading resulting in a larger dispersivity than the suction plates. This can be ascribed to the artefact of the lower boundary. We performed numerical transport simulations in 2-D heterogeneous flow fields (scaling approach) choosing appropriate boundary conditions for the various devices. The simulations allow to follow the temporal evolution of flow and transport processes in the various devices and to gain additional process understanding. We conclude that the model is essentially capable to reproduce the main experimental findings only if we account for the spatial correlation structure of the hydraulic properties, i.e. soil heterogeneity.

  4. Effect of anoxic vs. oxic conditions in soils on composition of mobile OM as revealed from comprehensive fluorescence analysis of soil effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Andreas; Ritschel, Thomas; Totsche, Kai

    2014-05-01

    The fractionation of OM due to sorption of DOM on mineral surfaces has drawn much attention in soil science. This is mainly motivated by the implied stabilization of OM and the disposition of less affine organic molecules as mobile compounds within porous media, both processes significantly affecting the carbon cycling and that of OM-associated elements. In this study, we provide a time-resolved assessment of mobile OM in soil effluents on the basis of fluorescence excitation-emission-matrices (EEM). Our comprehensive fluorescence EEM analysis was based on a supervised parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) that permits the fixing of selected components. We estimated the protein content in soil effluent OM with a reference for microbially produced proteins from Bacillus subtilis. The soil effluent was obtained from soil columns filled with topsoil either from a floodplain site or a maize field. Except for the 1 mM NaCl influent, nothing was added to the soil columns. Under water-saturated conditions, the activity of autochthonous microbial communities induced anoxic conditions within the soil columns resulting in the microbial reduction of pedogenic Fe(III) oxides and subsequent discharge of mobile Fe2+ during percolation. Upon re-aeration of the soil effluent, Fe2+ re-oxidized and precipitated as organo-mineral ferrihydrite in the soil effluent. EEM from consecutively sampled effluent fractions pointed to a mainly invariant soil effluent OM composition, where fulvic acid-like components were predominant. However, the OM, which was associated with the effluent ferrihydrite, was enriched in proteins, which was confirmed by corresponding FTIR spectra. This suggests the preferential association of proteins with in situ-precipitated ferrihydrite, rendering proteins less mobile in soils, where precipitation and immobilization of ferrihydrite occurs. Consequently, one would assume lower protein concentrations in the soil effluent if ferrihydrite precipitation occurs within

  5. Biochar carbon sequestration and downward translocation in contrasting soils under field conditions in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal Singh, Bhupinder; Fang, Yunying; Boersma, Mark; Matta, Pushpinder; Van Zwieten, Lukas; Macdonald, Lynne

    2014-05-01

    Carbon (C) sequestration potential of biochar depends on its stability and stabilisation of native or added organic C in soil. However, the processes of biochar degradation, fate in soil organic matter pools, and downward translocation in the soil profile, and the influence of biochar on emissions or stabilisation of native organic C sources are poorly understood under field conditions. An Eucalyptus saligna green-waste biochar (δ13C -36.6o; total C 66.8%) produced by slow pyrolysis at 450° C was applied at 29.2 t ha-1 to 10-cm depth in circular (0.66-m diameter) micro-plots, encompassing three soils [Tenosol, Dermosol and Ferrosol (Australian Soil Classification); Arenosol, Planosol, Ferralsol (approximate WRB Classification] under contrasting pasture systems across New South Wales and Tasmania (Australia). The aims of this study were to (i) monitor the fate of biochar C in respired CO2 and quantify biochar stability and stabilisation under field conditions, (ii) determine the influence of biochar on native soil C emissions, and (iii) track downward migration of the surface (0-10 cm) applied biochar over a 1-year period. We also periodically monitored the impact of biochar on microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and aboveground biomass production. The soils were separated into light and heavy C fractions and the C recovery of applied biochar C was calculated at 0-8, 8-12, 12-20 and 20-30 cm depths. Biochar C mineralisation rates were generally higher, albeit fluctuated widely, in the first 3 to 4 months. Over the first 7 months, the proportion of added biochar C mineralised in soils ranged between 1.4 and 5.5% and followed the sequence: Tenosol < Dermosol < Ferrosol. The mean residence time (MRT) of biochar ranged from 29 and 70 years. These values of MRT should be treated as highly conservative values, as they mainly reflect the MRT of relatively labile C components in biochar. The cumulative CO2-C emission over the 7-month period from native soil and plant sources

  6. Sensitivity analyses of a colloid-facilitated contaminant transport model for unsaturated heterogeneous soil conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Périard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean

    2013-04-01

    effects and the one-at-a-time approach (O.A.T); and (ii), we applied Sobol's global sensitivity analysis method which is based on variance decompositions. Results illustrate that ψm (maximum sorption rate of mobile colloids), kdmc (solute desorption rate from mobile colloids), and Ks (saturated hydraulic conductivity) are the most sensitive parameters with respect to the contaminant travel time. The analyses indicate that this new module is able to simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. However, validations under laboratory conditions are needed to confirm the occurrence of the colloid transport phenomenon and to understand model prediction under non-saturated soil conditions. Future work will involve monitoring of the colloidal transport phenomenon through soil column experiments. The anticipated outcome will provide valuable information on the understanding of the dominant mechanisms responsible for colloidal transports, colloid-facilitated contaminant transport and, also, the colloid detachment/deposition processes impacts on soil hydraulic properties. References: Šimůnek, J., C. He, L. Pang, & S. A. Bradford, Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably Saturated Porous Media: Numerical Model and Experimental Verification, Vadose Zone Journal, 2006, 5, 1035-1047 Šimůnek, J., M. Šejna, & M. Th. van Genuchten, The C-Ride Module for HYDRUS (2D/3D) Simulating Two-Dimensional Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably-Saturated Porous Media, Version 1.0, PC Progress, Prague, Czech Republic, 45 pp., 2012.

  7. Comparing the ensemble and extended Kalman filters for in situ soil moisture assimilation with contrasting conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbairn, D.; Barbu, A. L.; Mahfouf, J.-F.; Calvet, J.-C.; Gelati, E.

    2015-12-01

    Two data assimilation (DA) methods are compared for their ability to produce an accurate soil moisture analysis using the Météo-France land surface model: (i) SEKF, a simplified extended Kalman filter, which uses a climatological background-error covariance, and (ii) EnSRF, the ensemble square root filter, which uses an ensemble background-error covariance and approximates random rainfall errors stochastically. In situ soil moisture observations at 5 cm depth are assimilated into the surface layer and 30 cm deep observations are used to evaluate the root-zone analysis on 12 sites in south-western France (SMOSMANIA network). These sites differ in terms of climate and soil texture. The two methods perform similarly and improve on the open loop. Both methods suffer from incorrect linear assumptions which are particularly degrading to the analysis during water-stressed conditions: the EnSRF by a dry bias and the SEKF by an over-sensitivity of the model Jacobian between the surface and the root-zone layers. These problems are less severe for the sites with wetter climates. A simple bias correction technique is tested on the EnSRF. Although this reduces the bias, it modifies the soil moisture fluxes and suppresses the ensemble spread, which degrades the analysis performance. However, the EnSRF flow-dependent background-error covariance evidently captures seasonal variability in the soil moisture errors and should exploit planned improvements in the model physics. Synthetic twin experiments demonstrate that when there is only a random component in the precipitation forcing errors, the correct stochastic representation of these errors enables the EnSRF to perform better than the SEKF. It might therefore be possible for the EnSRF to perform better than the SEKF with real data, if the rainfall uncertainty was accurately captured. However, the simple rainfall error model is not advantageous in our real experiments. More realistic rainfall error models are suggested.

  8. Seasonality of soil erosion under mediterranean conditions at the Alqueva Dam watershed.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Vera; Panagopoulos, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Alqueva reservoir created the largest artificial lake of Western Europe in 2010. Since then, the region has faced challenges due to land-use changes that may increase the risk of erosion and shorten the lifetime of the reservoir, increasing the need to promote land management sustainability. This paper investigates the aspect of seasonality of soil erosion using a comprehensive methodology that integrates the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) approach, geographic information systems, geostatistics, and remote-sensing. An experimental agro-silvo pastoral area (typical land-use) was used for the RUSLE factors update. The study confirmed the effect of seasonality on soil erosion rates under Mediterranean conditions. The highest rainfall erosivity values occurred during the autumn season (433.6 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1)), when vegetation cover is reduced after the long dry season. As a result, the autumn season showed the highest predicted erosion (9.9 t ha(-1)), contributing 65 % of the total annual erosion. The predicted soil erosion for winter was low (1.1 t ha(-1)) despite the high rainfall erosivity during that season (196.6 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1)). The predicted annual soil loss was 15.1 t ha(-1), and the sediment amount delivery was 4,314 × 10(3) kg. Knowledge of seasonal variation would be essential to outline sustainable land management practices. This model will be integrated with World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies methods to support decision-making in that watershed, and it will involve collaboration with both local people and governmental institutions. PMID:24794193

  9. Seasonality of Soil Erosion Under Mediterranean Conditions at the Alqueva Dam Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Vera; Panagopoulos, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Alqueva reservoir created the largest artificial lake of Western Europe in 2010. Since then, the region has faced challenges due to land-use changes that may increase the risk of erosion and shorten the lifetime of the reservoir, increasing the need to promote land management sustainability. This paper investigates the aspect of seasonality of soil erosion using a comprehensive methodology that integrates the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) approach, geographic information systems, geostatistics, and remote-sensing. An experimental agro-silvo pastoral area (typical land-use) was used for the RUSLE factors update. The study confirmed the effect of seasonality on soil erosion rates under Mediterranean conditions. The highest rainfall erosivity values occurred during the autumn season (433.6 MJ mm ha-1 h-1), when vegetation cover is reduced after the long dry season. As a result, the autumn season showed the highest predicted erosion (9.9 t ha-1), contributing 65 % of the total annual erosion. The predicted soil erosion for winter was low (1.1 t ha-1) despite the high rainfall erosivity during that season (196.6 MJ mm ha-1 h-1). The predicted annual soil loss was 15.1 t ha-1, and the sediment amount delivery was 4,314 × 103 kg. Knowledge of seasonal variation would be essential to outline sustainable land management practices. This model will be integrated with World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies methods to support decision-making in that watershed, and it will involve collaboration with both local people and governmental institutions.

  10. The impact of oscillating redox conditions: arsenic immobilisation in contaminated calcareous floodplain soils.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Christopher T; Couture, Raoul-Marie; Omoregie, Enoma O; Bardelli, Fabrizio; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Roman-Ross, Gabriela; Charlet, Laurent

    2013-07-01

    Arsenic contamination of floodplain soils is extensive and additional fresh arsenic inputs to the pedosphere from human activities are ongoing. We investigate the cumulative effects of repetitive soil redox cycles, which occur naturally during flooding and draining, on a calcareous fluvisol, the native microbial community and arsenic mobility following a simulated contamination event. We show through bioreactor experiments, spectroscopic techniques and modelling that repetitive redox cycling can decrease arsenic mobility during reducing conditions by up to 45%. Phylogenetic and functional analyses of the microbial community indicate that iron cycling is a key driver of observed changes to solution chemistry. We discuss probable mechanisms responsible for the arsenic immobilisation observed in-situ. The proposed mechanisms include, decreased heterotrophic iron reduction due to the depletion of labile particulate organic matter (POM), increases to the proportion of co-precipitated vs. aqueous or sorbed arsenic with α-FeOOH/Fe(OH)3 and potential precipitation of amorphous ferric arsenate. PMID:23587855

  11. Soil moisture variations in remotely sensed and reanalysis datasets during weak monsoon conditions over central India and central Myanmar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Sourabh; Kar, Sarat C.; Sharma, Anu Rani

    2016-03-01

    Variation of soil moisture during active and weak phases of summer monsoon JJAS (June, July, August, and September) is very important for sustenance of the crop and subsequent crop yield. As in situ observations of soil moisture are few or not available, researchers use data derived from remote sensing satellites or global reanalysis. This study documents the intercomparison of soil moisture from remotely sensed and reanalyses during dry spells within monsoon seasons in central India and central Myanmar. Soil moisture data from the European Space Agency (ESA)—Climate Change Initiative (CCI) has been treated as observed data and was compared against soil moisture data from the ECMWF reanalysis-Interim (ERA-I) and the climate forecast system reanalysis (CFSR) for the period of 2002-2011. The ESA soil moisture correlates rather well with observed gridded rainfall. The ESA data indicates that soil moisture increases over India from west to east and from north to south during monsoon season. The ERA-I overestimates the soil moisture over India, while the CFSR soil moisture agrees well with the remotely sensed observation (ESA). Over Myanmar, both the reanalysis overestimate soil moisture values and the ERA-I soil moisture does not show much variability from year to year. Day-to-day variations of soil moisture in central India and central Myanmar during weak monsoon conditions indicate that, because of the rainfall deficiency, the observed (ESA) and the CFSR soil moisture values are reduced up to 0.1 m3/m3 compared to climatological values of more than 0.35 m3/m3. This reduction is not seen in the ERA-I data. Therefore, soil moisture from the CFSR is closer to the ESA observed soil moisture than that from the ERA-I during weak phases of monsoon in the study region.

  12. Mathematic simulation of soil-vegetation condition and land use structure applying basin approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Natalia; Shirkin, Leonid; Krasnoshchekov, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystems anthropogenic transformation is basically connected to the changes of land use structure and human impact on soil fertility. The Research objective is to simulate the stationary state of river basins ecosystems. Materials and Methods. Basin approach has been applied in the research. Small rivers basins of the Klyazma river have been chosen as our research objects. They are situated in the central part of the Russian plain. The analysis is carried out applying integrated characteristics of ecosystems functioning and mathematic simulation methods. To design mathematic simulator functional simulation methods and principles on the basis of regression, correlation and factor analysis have been applied in the research. Results. Mathematic simulation resulted in defining possible permanent conditions of "phytocenosis-soil" system in coordinates of phytomass, phytoproductivity, humus percentage in soil. Ecosystem productivity is determined not only by vegetation photosynthesis activity but also by the area ratio of forest and meadow phytocenosis. Local maximums attached to certain phytomass areas and humus content in soil have been defined on the basin phytoproductivity distribution diagram. We explain the local maximum by synergetic effect. It appears with the definite ratio of forest and meadow phytocenosis. In this case, utmost values of phytomass for the whole area are higher than just a sum of utmost values of phytomass for the forest and meadow phytocenosis. Efficient correlation of natural forest and meadow phytocenosis has been defined for the Klyazma river. Conclusion. Mathematic simulation methods assist in forecasting the ecosystem conditions under various changes of land use structure. Nowadays overgrowing of the abandoned agricultural lands is very actual for the Russian Federation. Simulation results demonstrate that natural ratio of forest and meadow phytocenosis for the area will restore during agricultural overgrowing.

  13. Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Conditions from Oven-Dry to Full Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.

    2011-11-04

    Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to the capillary force only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which the water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified measurements. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but underestimate the conductivity. The extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

  14. Energy crop (Sida hermaphrodita) fertilization using digestate under marginal soil conditions: A dose-response experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Moritz; Bueno Piaz Barbosa, Daniela; Horsch, David; Jablonowski, Nicolai David

    2014-05-01

    The global demand for energy security and the mitigation of climate change are the main drivers pushing energy-plant production in Germany. However, the cultivation of these plants can cause land use conflicts since agricultural soil is mostly used for plant production. A sustainable alternative to the conventional cultivation of food-based energy-crops is the cultivation of special adopted energy-plants on marginal lands. To further increase the sustainability of energy-plant cultivation systems the dependency on synthetic fertilizers needs to be reduced via closed nutrient loops. In the presented study the energy-plant Sida hermaphrodita (Malvaceae) will be used to evaluate the potential to grow this high potential energy-crop on a marginal sandy soil in combination with fertilization via digestate from biogas production. With this dose-response experiment we will further identify an optimum dose, which will be compared to equivalent doses of NPK-fertilizer. Further, lethal doses and deficiency doses will be observed. Two weeks old Sida seedlings were transplanted to 1L pots and fertilized with six doses of digestate (equivalent to a field application of 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, 160t/ha) and three equivalent doses of NPK-fertilizer. Control plants were left untreated. Sida plants will grow for 45 days under greenhouse conditions. We hypothesize that the nutrient status of the marginal soil can be increased and maintained by defined digestate applications, compared to control plants suffering of nutrient deficiency due to the low nutrient status in the marginal substrate. The dose of 40t/ha is expected to give a maximum biomass yield without causing toxicity symptoms. Results shall be used as basis for further experiments on the field scale in a field trial that was set up to investigate sustainable production systems for energy crop production under marginal soil conditions.

  15. CANOPY CONDUCTANCE OF PINUS TAEDA, LIQUIDAMBAR STYRACIFLUA AND QUERCUS PHELLOS UNDER VARYING ATMOSPHERIC AND SOIL WATER CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sap flow, and atmospheric and soil water data were collected in closed-top chambers under conditions of high soil water potential for saplings of Liquidambar styraciflua L., Quercus phellos L., and Pinus taeda L., three co-occurring species in the southeastern USA. Responses of c...

  16. Growing Opuntia (cactus) and Brassica species for the long-term remediation of selenium-contaminated soil under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identifying alternative crops for planting in Se-containing agricultural soils of western central California will depend upon the plants’ ability to tolerate high salt and boron (B) conditions. Multi-year field studies were conducted on Se-laden soils with different cactus clones (Opuntia-ficus indi...

  17. Effect of boundary conditions on measured water retention behavior within soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-torres, S.; Scheuermann, A.; Pedroso, D.; Li, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Soil Water Characteristic Curve (SWCC) is a practical representation of the behavior of soil water by relating the suction (difference between the air and water pressures to the moisture content (water saturation). The SWCC is characterized by a hysteresis loop, which is thought to be unique in that any drainage-imbibition cycle lies within a main hysteresis loop limited by two different curves for drainage and imbibition. This 'uniqueness' is the main argument for considering the SWCC as a material-intrinsic feature that characterizes the pore structure and its interaction with fluids. Models have been developed with the SWCC as input data to describe the evolution of the water saturation and the suction within soils. One example of these models is the widely used Richard's equation [1]. In this work we present a series of numerical simulations to evaluate the 'unique' nature of the SWCC. The simulations involves the use of the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) [2] within a regular soil, modelling the flow behavior of two immiscible fluids: wetting and non-wetting. The soil is packed within a cubic domain to resemble the experimental setups that are commonly used for measuring the SWCC[3]. The boundary conditions ensure that the non-wetting phase enters through one cubic face and the wetting phase enters trough the opposite phase, with no flow boundary conditions in the remaining 4 cubic faces. The SWCC known features are inspected including the presence of the common limit curves for different cycles involving varying limits for the suction. For this stage of simulations, the SWCC is indeed unique. Later, different boundary conditions are applied with the two fluids each injected from 3 opposing faces into the porous medium. The effect of this boundary condition change is a net flow direction, which is different from that in the previous case. A striking result is observed when both SWCC are compared and found to be noticeable different. Further analysis is

  18. The Land-use influence on soil GHG emission in condition of Moscow megalopolis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizirskaya, Maria; Epikhina, Anna; Vasenev, Ivan; Valentini, Riccardo

    2013-04-01

    he modern Global climate change problems are closely connected to greenhouses gases (GHG) balance in dominated landscapes. This problem is especially actual in case of sharply man-changed urban landscapes. Up to now not so many studies have deal with urbanization (functional zoning, land-use type, soil contamination etc.) effect on soils GHG emission spatial-temporal variability at the local and regional scale, although the global scale land-use changes and human impacts are reported to be the main factors behind soil CO2 emission. Moscow megalopolis (with population 12-16 million) is the biggest one not only for European territory of Russia but for Europe too. Our study has been done in representative urban landscapes with different land-use practices typical for Moscow: urban forest (widespread in the North of Moscow) and green lawns with different functional zoning (11 sites in total). Forest sites have been studied during 7 years and differ in mesorelief (small hill summit and two slopes). Green lawns vary in the functional use (residential, recreational and industrial) and level of human impact (normal and high). In each plot soil respiration was measured in field conditions using Li-6400-XT system. We separate autotrophic (root-derived) and heterotrophic (microbial-derived) soil respiration in the field using micro (1mm) and macro (1 cm) pore meshes. The measurements have been done weekly since June till October 2012 in 3 replicas per each plot. Additionally we analyze CH4 emission using the exposition chamber measurements method. The conducted research have shown high temporal and spatial variability of CO2 and CH4 fluxes due to functional zoning, slope, vegetation type, land-use practice, soil microclimate characteristics. The highest CO2 emission is typical for green lawns where the CO2 fluxes reached 3.3 µmol CO2m-2s-1, which is 2.5-3 times more than the one of the urban forest. Comparative analysis of the roots and microorganisms contribution in total

  19. Effects of changing redox conditions on the dynamics of dissolved organic matter and CO2 in paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Alexander; Cao, Zhi Hong; Liu, Qin; Muhr, Jan; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2010-05-01

    The current knowledge about dissolved organic matter (DOM) dynamics in soils and its dependence on different C pools based mainly on observations and experiments in aerobic environments. We have only a limited understanding about the effects of changing redox conditions on production and composition of DOM although this fraction of soil organic matter is important for greenhouse gas emission and carbon storage in soils. In many ecosystems temporal and spatial changes of oxic and anoxic conditions are evident and might even increase in future. It is assumed that changing redox conditions are the key drivers of DOM dynamics in such ecosystems. More detailed we tested the following hypotheses: Anoxic conditions result in relative DOM accumulation due to less mineralization of already produced DOM Close relationship between DOM production and CO2 emission 14C signature of CO2 enables the identification of different C pools degraded at oxic and anoxic conditions We chose paddy soils as a model ecosystem because these soils are anoxic during the rice growing period and oxic during harvest and growth of other crops. Furthermore, paddy soils have oxic and anoxic horizons. Soils of a unique chronosequence of paddy soil evolution (50 to 2000 years, China) were studied in direct comparison to non-paddy soils of the same age. In these soils, exposed to different redox conditions over defined periods of times, the dynamics of DOM, CO2, 14C of the CO2 and other redox sensitive elements were followed in laboratory experiments. In the latter redox conditions were changed every 3 weeks from oxic to anoxic and vice versa. Besides analysis of the composition of the soil solution and the gas phase we determined differences in C pools being respired at oxic and anoxic conditions by 14C AMS of the CO2. The measured redox potentials of -50 mV to 250mV at anoxic conditions and 350 mV to 550 mV at oxic conditions were in the expected range and proofed the appropriate setting of the chosen

  20. Adverse Socioeconomic Conditions and Oocyst-Related Factors Are Associated with Congenital Toxoplasmosis in a Population-Based Study in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Carellos, Ericka Viana Machado; de Andrade, Gláucia Manzan Queiroz; Vasconcelos-Santos, Daniel Vitor; Januário, José Nélio; Romanelli, Roberta Maia Castro; Abreu, Mery Natali Silva; da Silva, Fabiana Maria; Loures, Ivy Rosa Coelho; de Andrade, Juliana Queiroz; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    Objective Congenital toxoplasmosis is a public health problem in Brazil. This study aimed to determine risk factors associated with congenital toxoplasmosis in Minas Gerais which is the second largest Brazilian State based on number of inhabitants, and its territorial extension is larger than that of France. Methods: Population-based case-control study to assess the association between congenital toxoplasmosis and maternal exposure to infection risk factors. The study included mothers/children participating in the Minas Gerais Newborn Screening Program. The cases consisted of 175 mothers of infected children, and the controls consisted of 278 mothers of children without suspected infection. The associations were assessed through binomial logistic regression with p≤0.05. Results The variables associated with lower probability of toxoplasmosis were: older mother age (OR = 0.89; CI95% = 0.85–0.93), higher level of education (OR = 0.85; CI95% = 0.78–0.92), access to potable water (OR = 0.21; CI95% = 0.08–0.51), and home with flush toilet (OR = 0.18; CI95% = 0.04–078). The variables associated with higher probability of infection were: cats in the neighborhood (OR = 2.27; CI95% = 1.27–4.06), owning or visiting homes with domestic cats (OR = 1.90; CI95% = 1.09–3.31), handling the soil (OR = 2.29; CI95% = 1.32–3.96), and eating fresh meat not previously frozen (OR = 3.97; CI95% = 2.17–7.25). After stratification according region of residence (rural or urban/peri-urban), home with flush toilet and consumption of treated water were protective against the disease only in the rural stratum. Conclusions In Minas Gerais, congenital toxoplasmosis has been associated with poor socioeconomic conditions. Considering maternal exposure to sources of Toxoplasma gondii, the predominating risk factors were those related to the ingestion of oocysts. It is expected that these results will contribute to

  1. Copper binding to soil fulvic and humic acids: NICA-Donnan modeling and conditional affinity spectra.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinling; Tan, Wenfeng; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Mingxia; Fang, Linchuan; Koopal, Luuk K

    2016-07-01

    Binding of Cu(II) to soil fulvic acid (JGFA), soil humic acids (JGHA, JLHA), and lignite-based humic acid (PAHA) was investigated through NICA-Donnan modeling and conditional affinity spectrum (CAS). It is to extend the knowledge of copper binding by soil humic substances (HS) both in respect of enlarging the database of metal ion binding to HS and obtaining a good insight into Cu binding to the functional groups of FA and HA by using the NICA-Donnan model to unravel the intrinsic and conditional affinity spectra. Results showed that Cu binding to HS increased with increasing pH and decreasing ionic strength. The amount of Cu bound to the HAs was larger than the amount bound to JGFA. Milne's generic parameters did not provide satisfactory predictions for the present soil HS samples, while material-specific NICA-Donnan model parameters described and predicted Cu binding to the HS well. Both the 'low' and 'high' concentration fitting procedures indicated a substantial bidentate structure of the Cu complexes with HS. By means of CAS underlying NICA isotherm, which was scarcely used, the nature of the binding at different solution conditions for a given sample and the differences in binding mode were illustrated. It was indicated that carboxylic group played an indispensable role in Cu binding to HS in that the carboxylic CAS had stronger conditional affinity than the phenolic distribution due to its large degree of proton dissociation. The fact was especially true for JGFA and JLHA which contain much larger amount of carboxylic groups, and the occupation of phenolic sites by Cu was negligible. Comparable amounts of carboxylic and phenolic groups on PAHA and JGHA, increased the occupation of phenolic type sites by Cu. The binding strength of PAHA-Cu and JGHA-Cu was stronger than that of JGFA-Cu and JLHA-Cu. The presence of phenolic groups increased the chance of forming more stable complexes, such as the salicylate-Cu or catechol-Cu type structures. PMID:27061366

  2. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions. [south Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Emissive and reflective data for 10 days, and IR data for 6 nights in south Texas scenes were analyzed after procedures were developed for removing cloud-affected data. HCMM radiometric temperatures were: within 2 C of dewpoint temperatures on nights when air temperature approached dewpoint temperatures; significantly correlated with variables important in evapotranspiration; and, related to freeze severity and planting depth soil temperatures. Vegetation greenness indexes calculated from visible and reflective IR bands of NOAA-6 to -9 meteorological satellites will be useful in the AgRISTARS program for seasonal crop development, crop condition, and drought applications.

  3. Measurements of Soil Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Two Maize Agroecosystems at Harvest under Different Tillage Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Giacomo, Gerosa; Angelo, Finco; Fabio, Boschetti; Stefano, Brenna; Riccardo, Marzuoli

    2014-01-01

    In this study a comparison of the soil CO2 fluxes emitted from two maize (Zea mays L.) fields with the same soil type was performed. Each field was treated with a different tillage technique: conventional tillage (30 cm depth ploughing) and no-tillage. Measurements were performed in the Po Valley (Italy) from September to October 2012, covering both pre- and postharvesting conditions, by means of two identical systems based on automatic static soil chambers. Main results show that no-tillage technique caused higher CO2 emissions than conventional tillage (on average 2.78 and 0.79 μmol CO2 m−2 s−1, resp.). This result is likely due to decomposition of the organic litter left on the ground of the no-tillage site and thus to an increased microbial and invertebrate respiration. On the other hand, fuel consumption of conventional tillage technique is greater than no-tillage consumptions. For these reasons this result cannot be taken as general. More investigations are needed to take into account all the emissions related to the field management cycle. PMID:25530990

  4. Nitrogen partitioning in oak leaves depends on species, provenance, climate conditions and soil type.

    PubMed

    Hu, B; Simon, J; Kuster, T M; Arend, M; Siegwolf, R; Rennenberg, H

    2013-01-01

    Climate-tolerant tree species and/or provenances have to be selected to ensure the high productivity of managed forests in Central Europe under the prognosticated climate changes. For this purpose, we studied the responses of saplings from three oak species (i.e. Quercus robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens) and provenances of different climatic origin (i.e. low or high rainfall, low or high temperature habitats) with regard to leaf nitrogen (N) composition as a measure of N nutrition. Saplings were grown in model ecosystems on either calcareous or acidic soil and subjected to one of four treatments (control, drought, air warming or a combination of drought and air warming). Across species, oak N metabolism responded to the influence of drought and/or air warming with an increase in leaf amino acid N concentration at the expense of structural N. Moreover, provenances or species from drier habitats were more tolerant to the climate conditions applied, as indicated by an increase in amino acid N (comparing species) or soluble protein N (comparing provenances within a species). Furthermore, amino acid N concentrations of oak leaves were significantly higher on calcareous compared to acidic soil. From these results, it can be concluded that seeds from provenances or species originating from drier habitats and - if available - from calcareous soil types may provide a superior seed source for future forest establishment. PMID:22934888

  5. Arsenic distribution and speciation near rice roots influenced by iron plaques and redox conditions of the soil matrix.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Noriko; Ohkura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Yoshio; Maejima, Yuji; Arao, Tomohito

    2014-01-01

    Elevated arsenic (As) concentrations in rice and the soil solution result from changes in soil redox conditions, influenced by the water management practices during rice cultivation. Microscale changes in redox conditions from rhizosphere to soil matrix affect the As speciation and Fe plaque deposition. In order to focus on the rhizosphere environment, we observed microscale distribution and speciation of As around the rhizosphere of paddy rice with X-ray fluorescence mapping and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. When the soil matrix was anaerobic during rice growth, Fe-plaque did not cover the entire root, and As(III) was the dominant arsenic species in the soil matrix and rhizosphere. Draining before harvest led the conditions to shift to aerobic. Oxidation of As(III) to As(V) occurred faster in the Fe-plaque than the soil matrix. Arsenic was scavenged by iron mottles originating from Fe-plaque around the roots. The ratio of As(V) to As(III) decreased toward the outer-rim of the subsurface Fe mottles where the soil matrix was not completely aerated. These results provide direct evidence that speciation of As near rice roots depends on spatial and temporal redox variations in the soil matrix. PMID:24384039

  6. Electrokinetic remediation of a Cu contaminated red soil by conditioning catholyte pH with different enhancing chemical reagents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong-Mei; Deng, Chang-Fen; Cang, Long

    2004-07-01

    The effect of enhancement reagents on the efficiency of electrokinetic remediation of Cu contaminated red soil is evaluated. The enhancement agents were a mix of organic acids, including lactic acid+NaOH, HAc-NaAc and HAc-NaAc+EDTA. The soil was prepared to an initial Cu concentration of 438 mgkg(-1) by incubating the soil with CuSO4 solution in a flooded condition for 1 month. Sequential extraction showed that Cu was partitioned in the soil as follows: 195 mgkg(-1) as water soluble and exchangeable, 71 mgkg(-1) as carbonate bound and 105 mgkg(-1) as Fe and Mn oxides. The results indicate that neutralizing the catholyte pH maintains a lower soil pH compared to that without electrokinetic treatment. The electric currents varied depending upon the conditioning solutions and increased with an increasing applied voltage potential. The electroosmotic flow rate changed significantly when different conditioning enhancing reagents were used. It was observed that lactic acid+NaOH treatments resulted in higher soil electric conductivities than HAc-NaAc and HAc-NaAc+EDTA treatments. Ultimately, enhancement by lactic acid+NaOH resulted in highest removal efficiency (81% Cu removal) from the red soil. The presence of EDTA did not enhance Cu removal efficiencies from the red soil, because EDTA complexed with Cu to form negatively charge complexes, which slowly migrated toward the anode chamber retarding Cu2+ transport towards the cathode. PMID:15172599

  7. Processes affecting the dissipation of the herbicide isoxaflutole and its diketonitrile metabolite in agricultural soils under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Papiernik, Sharon K; Yates, Scott R; Koskinen, William C; Barber, Brian

    2007-10-17

    Two-year field dissipation studies were conducted in three soil types in Minnesota to examine the processes affecting the dissipation of the herbicide isoxaflutole and its phytotoxic diketonitrile metabolite (DKN) under relatively cool, wet soil conditions. Plots of cuphea were treated with isoxaflutole and potassium bromide, a nonsorbed, nondegraded tracer. Replicate soil cores were collected six times during the growing season to a depth of 1 m, and the bromide or herbicide concentration was measured in each of five depth increments. The dissipation half-life (DT50) of isoxaflutole + DKN was 8-18 days in each soil. Bromide and herbicide concentrations were low at depths >40 cm throughout the study, and herbicide concentrations in soil 100 days after application were usually undetectable. Simulation modeling using Hydrus-1D for the loam soil suggested that plant uptake was an important mechanism of dissipation. PMID:17880161

  8. [Ammonia volatilization of slow release compound fertilizer in different soils water conditions].

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-feng; Wang, Zheng-yin; You, Yuan; Li, Jing-chao

    2010-08-01

    By using venting method incubation experiment, we studied the ammonia volatilization and kinetics characteristics of uncoated slowed release compound fertilizer (SRF) under different soil water conditions and the growth and nitrogen utilization efficiency of rice in pot experiment. Results indicated that the ammonia volatilization of SRF under waterflooding reached the peak ahead of 3-4 days compared to the moist treatment. The peak and accumulation of ammonia volatilization in the waterflooding treatments were higher than those under the moist condition. SRF could significantly reduce total ammonia volatilization compared to the common compound fertilizer (CCF), reduced by 50.6% and 22.8% in the moist treatment and reduced by 24.2% and 10.4% in the waterflooding treatment,but the loss of ammonia volatilization of SRF was higher significantly than that of the coated fertilizer (CRF). Ammonia volatilization increased with the increasing of fertilizer application. The dynamics of ammonia volatilization of SRF could be quantitatively described with three equations: the first order kinetics equation, Elovich equation and parabola equation. Compared to moist condition, the biomass of rice plant in SRF, CCF and SRF treatments increased by 67.86%, 78.25% and 48.75%, and nitrogen utilization efficiency increased by 57.73%, 80.70% and 12.06% under waterflooding condition, respectively. Comparing with CCF, nitrogen utilization efficiency in SRF treatment improved by 59.10% and 10.40% under two soil moisture conditions. SRF could reduce ammonia volatilization and improve biomass and nitrogen utilization efficiency. PMID:21090317

  9. Gas-geochemical condition and ecological functions of urban soils in areas with gas generating grounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozharova, Nadezhda; Lebed-Sharlevich, Iana; Kulachkova, Svetlana

    2014-05-01

    Rapid urbanization and expansion of city borders lead to development of new areas, often following with relief changes, covering of gully-ravine systems and river beds with technogenic grounds containing construction and municipal waste. Decomposition of organic matter in these grounds is a source of methane and carbon dioxide. Intensive generation and accumulation of CO2 and CH4 into grounds may cause a fire and explosion risk for constructed objects. Gases emission to the atmosphere changes the global balance of GHGs and negatively influences on human health. The aim of this investigation is to study gas-geochemical condition and ecological functions of urban soils in areas with gas generating grounds. Studied areas are the gully-ravine systems or river beds, covered with technogenic grounds during land development. Stratigraphic columns of these grounds are 5-17 meters of man-made loamy material with inclusion of construction waste. Gas generating layer with increased content of organic matter, reductive conditions and high methanogenic activity (up to 1.0 ng*g-1*h-1) is situated at the certain depth. Maximum CH4 and CO2 concentrations in this layer reach dangerous values (2-10% and 11%, respectively) in the current standards. In case of disturbance of ground layer (e.g. well-drilling) methane is rapidly transferred by convective flux to atmosphere. The rate of CH4 emission reaches 100 mg*m-2*h-1 resulting in its atmospheric concentration growth by an order of magnitude compared with background. In normal occurrence of grounds methane gradually diffuses into the upper layers by pore space, consuming on different processes (e.g. formation of organic matter, nitrogen compounds or specific particles of magnetite), and emits to atmosphere. CH4 emission rate varies from 1 to 40 mg*m-2*h-1 increasing with depth of grounds. Carbon dioxide emission is about 100 mg*m-2*h-1. During soil formation on gas generating grounds bacterial oxidation of methane, one of the most

  10. Influence of Soil Moisture Conditions On The Flood Frequency Distribution: A Case Study With 10000 Years Synthetic Rainfall Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martina, M.; Todini, E.

    Soil moisture conditions within the catchment have a primary importance for the anal- ysis of flood risk but insufficiency of data or unavailability of measurements make them useless for operative purposes. Therefore classical simulation techniques to es- timate design flood can not consider the effects of the catchment initial soil moisture conditions. The aim of this work is to assess the influence of the soil conditions on water flow during flood event and especially on the flood frequency distribution. The proposed technique makes use of a stochastic point process, Neyman-Scott Rectan- gular Pulse, for generating a 10000 years rainfall series combined with a physically based rainfall-runoff model, TOPKAPI, for transforming rainfall into discharge and mean soil moisture conditions within the catchment. Finally the annual maximum floods have been extracted from the discharge series and their frequency distribution has been analyzed. The results have been compared with those from a traditional sim- ulation approach which uses a rainfall intensity-duration (IDF) relationship combined with the same rainfall-runoff TOPKAPI model but initialized by arbitrary soil mois- ture conditions. As it was expected the comparison shows that the influence of the soil conditions on flood frequency distribution is not negligible and gives reasonability to the methodology applied . The chosen study area is a North-Italian catchment where several years of hourly rainfall data series were available.

  11. Field lysimeters for the study of fate and transport of explosive chemicals in soils under variable environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Gloria M.; Padilla, Ingrid; Pando, Miguel; Pérez, Diego D.

    2006-05-01

    Landmines and other buried explosive devices pose in an immense threat in many places of the world, requiring large efforts on detection and neutralization of these objects. Many of the available detection techniques require the presence of chemicals near the soil-atmospheric surface. The presence of explosive related chemicals (ERCs) near this surface and their relation to the location of landmines, however, depends on the source characteristics and on fate and transport processes that affect their movement in soils. Fate and transport processes of ERC is soils may be interrelated with each other and are influenced by chemical characteristics and interrelated soil and environmental factors. Accurate detection of ERCs near the soil surface must, therefore, take into the variability of ERC concentration distributions near the soil surface as affected by fate and transport processes controlled interrelated environmental factors. To effectively predict the concentration distributions of ERCs in soils and near soil surfaces, it is necessary to have good understanding of parameters values that control these processes. To address this need, field lysimeters have been designed and developed at the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez .This paper presents the design of two field lysimeter used to study the fate and transport behavior of ERC in the field subjected to varying uncontrolled subtropical environmental conditions in two different soils. Both lysimeters incorporate pressure and concentration sampling ports, thermocouples, and a drainage system. Hydrus-2D was used to simulate soil moisture and drainage in the lysimeter for average environmental conditions in the study for the two soils used. The field lysimeters allow collection and monitoring of spatial and temporal ERC concentrations under variable, uncontrolled environmental conditions.

  12. Transport of simazine in unsaturated sandy soil and predictions of its leaching under hypothetical field conditions.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Francisco; Bachmann, Jaime; Muñoz, José F; Ortiz, Cristian; Tyler, Scott W; Alister, Claudio; Kogan, Marcelo

    2007-12-01

    The potential contamination of groundwater by herbicides is often controlled by processes in the vadose zone, through which herbicides travel before entering groundwater. In the vadose zone, both physical and chemical processes affect the fate and transport of herbicides, therefore it is important to represent these processes by mathematical models to predict contaminant movement. To simulate the movement of simazine, a herbicide commonly used in Chilean vineyards, batch and miscible displacement column experiments were performed on a disturbed sandy soil to quantify the primary parameters and processes of simazine transport. Chloride (Cl(-)) was used as a non-reactive tracer, and simazine as the reactive tracer. The Hydrus-1D model was used to estimate the parameters by inversion from the breakthrough curves of the columns and to evaluate the potential groundwater contamination in a sandy soil from the Casablanca Valley, Chile. The two-site, chemical non-equilibrium model was observed to best represent the experimental results of the miscible displacement experiments in laboratory soil columns. Predictions of transport under hypothetical field conditions using the same soil from the column experiments were made for 40 years by applying herbicide during the first 20 years, and then halting the application and considering different rates of groundwater recharge. For recharge rates smaller than 84 mm year(-1), the predicted concentration of simazine at a depth of 1 m is below the U.S. EPA's maximum contaminant levels (4 microg L(-1)). After eight years of application at a groundwater recharge rate of 180 mm year(-1) (approximately 50% of the annual rainfall), simazine was found to reach the groundwater (located at 1 m depth) at a higher concentration (more than 40 microg L(-1)) than the existing guidelines in the USA and Europe. PMID:17604874

  13. Analysis of soil water repellency under different eco-geomorphological conditions in Mediterranean environments (South of Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Donaire, Virginia; Gabarron-Galeote, Miguel A.; Martinez-Murillo, Juan F.; Ruiz-Sinoga, Jose D.

    2013-04-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) is a soil property that reduces its water affinity. Although it has been frequently related to wildfires, different studies in recent decades have shown that repellent soils are not rare, and they are widely spread around the world under various climatic, soil and vegetation conditions, on burned and unburned soils. The research described here was carried out in two Mediterranean rangelands containing similar Mediterranean tree and shrub species but differing in soil conditions. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of vegetal species, pH, soil organic matter (SOM), soil water content (SWC) and prescribed fire over SWR. In June 2011, two samples from the first 5 cm of soil, one up and one downslope from plants, were collected under the dominant species of the two study areas (Nerja -NE- and Almogía -AL-), in a north-facing hillslope . In NE the selected species were Pinus halepensis (Ph), Cistus clusii (Cc), Rosmarinus officinalis (Ro), Thymus vulgaris (Tv) and Stipa tenacissima (St). In addition samples were collected in bare soil (Bs, at least 1.5m far away from the nearest shrub), under burned shrubs (Bsc) and in burned bare soil (Bbs). A controlled fire was conducted in April 2011. In AL the selected species were Quercus suber (Qs), Cistus monspeliensis (Cm) and Cistus albidus (Ca). The results indicate: i) SWR is a common phenomenon in Mediterranean environments, in acid as well as in alkaline soils, but with a great variability in every study area depending on the vegetal species (Ro and Qs) were those more repellent to water; ii) OM seems to be a more influential factor over soil water repellency than acidity, which only was found a controlling factor for alkaline soils; iii climate and vegetation type, influencing SOM leading to hydrophobic conditions, are more key factors controlling SWR than bedrock characteristics; iv) SWC threshold for water repellency to be disappeared were not clearly stated independently of

  14. [Spatial variability of surface soil moisture content in depression area of karst region under moist and arid conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiguang; Chen, Hongsong; Su, Yirong; Wu, Jinshui; Zhang, Wei

    2006-12-01

    By the methods of geostatistics, this paper studied the spatial structure and distribution pattern of surface soil (0 - 5 and 5 - 10 cm) moisture content in the depression area of karst region in northwest Guangxi under moist and arid conditions in the forepart of dry season. The results showed that in test area, surface soil moisture content had obvious spatial heterogeneity and anisotropy, presenting a significantly different plaque distribution pattern. Under moist condition, surface soil moisture content had a medium or stronger spatial relativity, with a range of about 33.15 and 15.75 m, respectively, and an obvious trend effect in 0 - 5 cm soil layer. Under arid condition, the spatial relativity was strong, and the spatial scale of resembling plaque had somewhat decrease, with the smallest range being 8.22 m. The moisture content under arid condition had a higher spatial variability, and thus, the sampling strategy should be based on the mean soil moisture content. The significant difference in the spatial variability and distribution pattern of surface soil moisture in test area was mainly due to the effects of physiognomy, soil mean moisture (precipitation), and topography. PMID:17330464

  15. Controls of soil hydraulic characteristics on modeling groundwater recharge under different climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tiejun; Franz, Trenton E.; Zlotnik, Vitaly A.

    2015-02-01

    To meet the challenge of estimating spatially varying groundwater recharge (GR), increasing attention has been given to the use of vadose zone models (VZMs). However, the application of this approach is usually constrained by the lack of field soil hydraulic characteristics (SHCs) required by VZMs. To tackle this issue, SHCs based on the van Genuchten or Brooks-Corey model are generally estimated by pedotransfer functions or taken from texture based class averages. With the increasing use of this method, it is important to elucidate the controls of SHCs on computing GR mostly due to the high nonlinearity of the models. In this study, it is hypothesized that the nonlinear controls of SHCs on computing GR would vary with climatic conditions. To test this hypothesis, a widely used VZM along with two SHCs datasets for sand and loamy sand is used to compute GR at four sites in the continental Unites States with a significant gradient of precipitation (P). The simulation results show that the distribution patterns of mean annual GR ratios (GR ‾ / P ‾ , where GR ‾ and P ‾ are mean annual GR and P, respectively) vary considerably across the sites, largely depending on soil texture and climatic conditions at each site. It is found that GR ‾ / P ‾ is mainly controlled by the shape factor n in the van Genuchten model and the nonlinear effect of n on GR ‾ / P ‾ varies with climatic conditions. Specifically, for both soil textures, the variability in GR ‾ / P ‾ is smallest at the Andrews Forest with the highest P ‾ (191.3 cm/year) and GR ‾ / P ‾ is least sensitive to n; whereas, the variability in GR ‾ / P ‾ at the Konza Prairie (P ‾ = 84.2 cm/year) is the largest and GR ‾ / P ‾ is most sensitive to n. With further decreasing P ‾ , the nonlinear effect of n weakens at the Barta Brothers (P ‾ = 57.3 cm/year) and Sevilleta (P ‾ = 20.3 cm/year), leading to smaller GR ‾ / P ‾ variability at those two sites than at the Konza Prairie. The

  16. Protective effect of Klebsiella bacteria on lawn grasses under conditions of soil salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emtsev, V. T.; Sokolova, A. Ya.; Selitskaya, O. V.

    2010-07-01

    The protective effect of the inoculation of lawn grasses grown under conditions of soil salinization with bacteria of the Klebsiella genus ( K. planticola and K. pneumoniae) was demonstrated. It was found that K. pneumoniae improves the plant growth under conditions of a high concentration of sodium chloride. It was also shown that the inoculation of lawn grasses with these bacteria optimizes the morphophysiological parameters of the plants and increases the number of mitoses in the apical parts of the roots, which leads to a less significant decrease in the mitotic index under the impact of salinization. The capacity of K. planticola to penetrate into the plants may favor the activation of protective mechanisms improving the immunological status of the plants and, hence, their tolerance to salinization.

  17. Evaluation of Noah-LSM for soil hydrology parameters in the Indian summer monsoon conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, M. N.; Kumar, Manoj; Waghmare, R. T.; Dharmaraj, T.; Mahanty, N. C.

    2014-10-01

    The micrometeorological observations, collected over a station in Ranchi (23°45'N, 85°30'E) which is under the monsoon trough region of India, were used in the Noah-LSM (NCEP, OSU, Air Force and Office of Hydrology Land Surface Model) to investigate the model performance in wet (2009 and 2011) and dry (2010) conditions during the south-west summer monsoon season. With this analysis, it is seen that the Noah-LSM has simulated the diurnal cycle of heat fluxes (sensible and ground) reasonably. The simulated heat fluxes were compared with its direct measurements by sonic anemometer and soil heat flux plate. The net radiation and sensible heat flux are simulated well by the model, but the simulation of ground heat flux was found to be poor in both dry as well as wet conditions. The soil temperature simulations were also found to be poor in 0-5- and 5-10-cm layers compared to other deeper layers. The observations were also correlated with the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data. The correlation between the observations and ground heat flux was better in MERRA dataset than that of the Noah-LSM simulation.

  18. Analyzing Shallow Landslides and Rainfall Conditions in Taiwan: An Application of the Soil Water Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. W.; Saito, H.; Oguchi, T.

    2014-12-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides are significant natural hazards in Taiwan. This study analyzes 282 shallow landslides in Taiwan during 2006-2013 to identify the rainfall conditions responsible for landslides. We used the soil water index (SWI) which can represent the conceptual soil water contents as influenced by present and antecedent rainfall. SWI is used by the Japan Meteorological Agency to assess landslide hazards in Japan. Previous studies show that SWI can successfully predict the occurrence of landslides but only for Japan. Therefore, this study examines whether SWI can be also applied to Taiwan. We used the landslide data in 2006-2012 for analyses and those in 2013 for verification. The values of SWI before the rainfall events which triggered landslides were used as the indicator of the antecedent rainfall condition. We found that under different values of SWI before rainfall events, the rainfall conditions needed for triggering landslides, such as the rainfall intensity and duration, are different. Then we classified rainfall condition for triggering landslides into two types, short duration-high intensity (SH) and long duration-low intensity (LL), based on SWI and the principal component analysis. The SH type is associated with a rapid increase of SWI with short duration, and the LL type is with a gradual rise and subsequent constancy of SWI. Based on this result, we modeled the general trend of changes in SWI for the two types. We then verified the model by analyzing 19 landslides that occurred in 2013 with 14 SH types and five LL types. We also checked hourly changes in SWI for these 19 events and found that they all followed the general trend of the inferred SH and LL curves. Based on these results, it would be possible to predict a landslide of the SH or LL type, at an early stage of a rainfall event. Our results indicate that SWI is applicable to Taiwan in assessing regional landslide hazards.

  19. Effect of land abandonment on soil organic carbon fractions along a precipitation gradient in Mediterranean conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabarron-Galeote, Miguel A.; Trigalet, Sylvain; van Wesemael, Bas

    2015-04-01

    Land abandonment has been the main land use change in rural European Mediterranean areas over the last decades. The secondary succession process following land abandonment is strongly affected by precipitation, which in consequence determines the parallel change of soil organic carbon (SOC) and other soil properties. SOC is usually assumed to increase due to the intensification of plant residues inputs to soil, above as well below ground. However, SOC is composed of different fractions with contrasting resistance to decomposition that can have different responses to land abandonment. The objectives of this study are: i) to determine the net effect of land abandonment on the different soil organic carbon fractions; ii) to assess the relation between vegetation evolution and SOC fractions; iii) to establish the conditions with the greater potential to store stable SOC along a precipitation gradient. Three field sites with contrasting annual precipitation (GAU: 1080.5 mm yr-1- ALM: 650 mm yr-1- GER: 350 mm yr-1) were selected. On each site Fields abandoned in different periods, as verified on aerial photographs taken in 1956, 1977, 1984, 1998, 2001, 2004 and 2009, were selected using a chronosequence approach. The fractionation protocol implemented was based on the separation of different soil particle sizes, which are associated to SOC pools with different degree of stability. Samples of the first 10 cm of soil were added to a sodium-hexametaphosphate (HMP) solution (40 g L-1) and shaken horizontally for 1h (150 r.p.m.). The soil solution was then sieved consecutively through two meshes of 250 µm and 50 µm, obtaining the following fractions: i) >250 µm (coarse fraction), it contains coarse particles (coarse sand) and plant residues (particulate organic matter, POM), easily decomposable, that constitute the more labile SOC pool; ii) 50 - 250 µm (mid fraction), it contains fine sand, fine POM easily decomposable and stable microaggregates, that contains SOC

  20. [Effect of sulfur on the species of Fe and As under redox condition in paddy soil].

    PubMed

    Tang, Bing-Pei; Yang, Shi-Jie; Wang, Dai-Zhang; Rao, Wei; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Wang, Dan; Zhu, Yun-Ji

    2014-10-01

    Redox conditions of the polluted paddy soil with exogenous As were simulated by redox reaction apparatus after flowing N2 and O2 applied with different forms of inorganic sulfur(CK-S0, elemental sulfur-S1 and sulfate-S2). Results showed that redox potential (Eh) was about -100 - -200 mV and the pH 7.0-8.0 and the pe + pH 4-7 in soil solution when flowed N2, and Eh about 200 mV and the pH 6.5-7.5 and pe + pH 9-12 when continuously flowed O2. Concentrations of the dissolved Fe in soil solution were in 1.2-1.6 mg x L(-1) either flowed N2 or O2, and the order of Fe concentrations was AsS0 treatment > AsS1 treatment > AsS2 treatment. Amounts of soil Fe oxide by HCl extraction from different treatments were 5 g · kg(-1) lower than the original soil [(21.4 ± 0.3) g · kg(-1)] when flowed N2, and it was in favor of the transformation of crystal Fe into amorphous iron and Fe2+. Activity of Fe oxides from different treatments increased comparing to that of the original soil (46. 8%), and the order of activity of Fe oxides was AsS2 treatment (49.4%) < AsS1 treatment (60%). Fe2+ in solution and FeS were oxidized into Fe3+, and hydrolysis of Fe3+ was produced into Fe(OH)3 precipitation when flowed O2. It increased the contents of acid-soluble and crystal Fe oxide, and the order of activity of Fe oxides was AsS1 (41.2%) treatment > AsS2 (36.1%) treatment. Concentrations of As in soil solution were in the order of AsS0 [(1.13 ± 0.04) mg · L(-1)] > AsS1 [(0.89 ± 0.01) mg L(- 1)] > AsS2 [ (0.77 ± 0.04 )mg · L(-1)] when flowed N2 and was AsS1 [(0.77 ± 0.01) mg · L(-1)] > AsS0 [(0.20 ± 0.09 ) mg · L(-1)] > AsS2 [(0.09 ± 0.01) mg · L(-1)] when flowed O2. The proportions of arsenic fractions followed the order of the residual phases (34.9%-41.4%) ≈ specifically-sorbed (37.4%-39.5%) > well-crystallized hydrous oxides of Fe/Mn (23.3%-25.6%) > non-specifically sorbed (2.4%-3.3%) > amorphous hydrous oxides of Fe/Mn (0.5%-0.8%) when flowed N2, and was the residual phases (30

  1. SIMULATING SOIL ORGANIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN COTTON PRODUCTION SYSTEMS WITH EPIC AND THE SOIL CONDITIONING INDEX IN THE SOUTHEASTERN USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sequestration of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the southeastern USA is perceived as occurring at a relatively low rate, because of the inherent low SOC content of most agricultural soils. However, recent field estimates of SOC sequestration in conservation management systems suggest that the sequest...

  2. An evaluation of models of bare soil evaporation formulated with different land surface boundary conditions and assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, Kathleen M.; Ngo, Viet V.; Cihan, Abdullah; Sakaki, Toshihiro; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2012-12-01

    Bare soil evaporation is a key process for water exchange between the land and the atmosphere and an important component of the water balance. However, there is no agreement on the best modeling methodology to determine evaporation under different atmospheric boundary conditions. Also, there is a lack of directly measured soil evaporation data for model validation to compare these methods to establish the validity of their mathematical formulations. Thus, a need exists to systematically compare evaporation estimates using existing methods to experimental observations. The goal of this work is to test different conceptual and mathematical formulations that are used to estimate evaporation from bare soils to critically investigate various formulations and surface boundary conditions. Such a comparison required the development of a numerical model that has the ability to incorporate these boundary conditions. For this model, we modified a previously developed theory that allows nonequilibrium liquid/gas phase change with gas phase vapor diffusion to better account for dry soil conditions. Precision data under well-controlled transient heat and wind boundary conditions were generated, and results from numerical simulations were compared with experimental data. Results demonstrate that the approaches based on different boundary conditions varied in their ability to capture different stages of evaporation. All approaches have benefits and limitations, and no one approach can be deemed most appropriate for every scenario. Comparisons of different formulations of the surface boundary condition validate the need for further research on heat and vapor transport processes in soil for better modeling accuracy.

  3. Vegetative survival of some wall and soil blue-green algae under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Agrawal, S C

    2008-01-01

    Lyngbya major (a wall alga), survived throughout year, maximally to >80 % at atmospheric temperature (AT) of 17-36 degrees C and relative humidity (RH) 60-100 % in rainy and spring seasons, but the survival was 43-64 % in winter when AT decreased to 5 degrees C and RH was 65-98 %, and 15-23 % in summer when AT reached 48 degrees C and RH was 23-60 %. All soil algae (Lyngbya birgei, Aphanothece pallida, Gloeocapsa atrata, Oscillatoria subbrevis, O. animalis) survived >90 % in rainy season when soil moisture content (SMC) was 89-100 %. Lowering of SMC to a minimum of 55 % in spring and 39 % in winter led L. birgei, O. subbrevis and O. animalis to survive from 75, 66, and 65 %, respectively, in spring and 12, 14, and 20 % in winter, and A. pallida and G. atrata not at all in both seasons. All soil algae did not survive in summer when SMC was 12-30 %. Myxosarcina burmensis survived only in rainy and spring seasons when pond water temperature (PWT) was 19-25 degrees C and 18-26 degrees C, respectively, and not in winter and summer when PWT was 2-14 degrees C and 25-36 degrees C, respectively. L. major and A. pallida survived almost equally well under both submerged and air-exposed conditions for 15 d but less if submerged for more time than air-exposed on moist soil surface, while L. birgei, G. atrata, O. subbrevis, and O. animalis survived submergence in liquid medium better and longer than air-exposure on moist soil surface. Pond alga M. burmensis survived submergence better than air-exposure, true to its aquatic habitat. All algae survived less and died without forming any resistant cells when exposed to physical and physiological water stress (imposed by growing them on highly agarized media or in salinized liquid media), light stress (at 0, 2 and 10 micromol m(-2) s(-1) light intensity) or following UV shock (0.96-3.84 kJ/m(2)). A. pallida and G. atrata cells did not divide on 8 % agarized solid media, in > or =0.3 mol/L salinized liquid media, and in darkness. The

  4. Soil Water Content Sensor Response to Organic Matter Content under Laboratory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Fares, Ali; Awal, Ripendra; Bayabil, Haimanote K

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that the performance of soil water content monitoring (SWCM) sensors is affected by soil physical and chemical properties. However, the effect of organic matter on SWCM sensor responses remains less understood. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to (i) assess the effect of organic matter on the accuracy and precision of SWCM sensors using a commercially available soil water content monitoring sensor; and (ii) account for the organic matter effect on the sensor's accuracy. Sand columns with seven rates of oven-dried sawdust (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%, 12% and 18% v/v, used as an organic matter amendment), thoroughly mixed with quartz sand, and a control without sawdust were prepared by packing quartz sand in two-liter glass containers. Sand was purposely chosen because of the absence of any organic matter or salinity, and also because sand has a relatively low cation exchange capacity that will not interfere with the treatment effect of the current work. Sensor readings (raw counts) were monitored at seven water content levels (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.18, 0.24, and 0.30 cm³ cm(-3)) by uniformly adding the corresponding volumes of deionized water in addition to the oven-dry one. Sensor readings were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the organic matter level and water content. Sensor readings were strongly correlated with the organic matter level (R² = 0.92). In addition, the default calibration equation underestimated the water content readings at the lower water content range (<0.05 cm³ cm(-3)), while it overestimated the water content at the higher water content range (>0.05 cm³ cm(-3)). A new polynomial calibration equation that uses raw count and organic matter content as covariates improved the accuracy of the sensor (RMSE = 0.01 cm³ cm(-3)). Overall, findings of this study highlight the need to account for the effect of soil organic matter content to improve the accuracy and precision of the tested sensor under different soils and

  5. Use of the Priestley-Taylor evaporation equation for soil water limited conditions in a small forest clearcut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, A.L.; Childs, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Priestley-Taylor equation, a simplification of the Penman equation, was used to allow calculations of evapotranspiration under conditions where soil water supply limits evapotranspiration. The Priestley-Taylor coefficient, ??, was calculated to incorporate an exponential decrease in evapotranspiration as soil water content decreases. The method is appropriate for use when detailed meteorological measurements are not available. The data required to determine the parameter for the ?? coefficient are net radiation, soil heat flux, average air temperature, and soil water content. These values can be obtained from measurements or models. The dataset used in this report pertains to a partially vegetated clearcut forest site in southwest Oregon with soil depths ranging from 0.48 to 0.70 m and weathered bedrock below that. Evapotranspiration was estimated using the Bowen ratio method, and the calculated Priestley-Taylor coefficient was fitted to these estimates by nonlinear regression. The calculated Priestley-Taylor coefficient (?????) was found to be approximately 0.9 when the soil was near field capacity (0.225 cm3 cm-3). It was not until soil water content was less than 0.14 cm3 cm-3 that soil water supply limited evapotranspiration. The soil reached a final residual water content near 0.05 cm3 cm-3 at the end of the growing season. ?? 1991.

  6. Effects of irrigation with treated wastewater on the conditions in the root zone in orchards planted on clayey soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, S.

    2013-12-01

    With increasing water scarcity, treated wastewater (TW) appears as an attractive alternative source of water for irrigation, especially in arid and semi-arid regions where freshwater is naturally scarce. However, it seems that long-term use of TW for irrigation of orchards planted on heavy soils cause to yield reduction and crop damages. In terms of water quality, TW are characterized by higher concentrations of sodium and dissolved organic content that affect soil exchangeable sodium percentage on one hand and soil wettability, on the other hand. The working hypothesis of this study is that long-term use of TW for irrigation of clayey soils causes significant changes in the soil hydraulic properties, thus impacting on the conditions in the root zone. Experimental data show a significant effect of TW application on the main flow processes, infiltration and evaporation, on soil swelling intensity, and on spatial distribution of soil chemical attributes. All these reflect the impact of water quality on soil hydraulic properties. Continuous monitoring of oxygen concentration in the soil profile revealed that the air regime in the root zone is also significantly affected by irrigation water quality, with consequent implications on root respiration and microbial activity.

  7. Sensible heat balance estimates of transient soil ice contents for freezing and thawing conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil ice content is an important component for winter soil hydrology. The sensible heat balance (SHB) method using measurements from heat pulse probes (HPP) is a possible way to determine transient soil ice content. In a previous study, in situ soil ice contents estimates with the SHB method were in...

  8. Using a tank flow model with PEARL to measure the variation in pesticide persistence between anaerobic and aerobic soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, Joaquin; Seiterle-Winn, Natalie; Frances, Felix

    2013-04-01

    Pesticide leaching is very sensitive to the transformation rate (Boesten and Linden, 1991). The values of the transformation rates of the pesticides differ between aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions. The main objective is to determine if there is a significant variation in pesticide persistence between aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions. An auxiliary hydrological model is used with the PEARL model (Leistra et al, 2001). The auxiliary model determines the degree of saturation of the soil at each time step. The value of the degradation rate for a given pesticide in the PEARL model varies depending on the time periods with saturated or unsaturated soil conditions. The proposed auxiliary model has been conceptualized as a static tank flow model based on the actual evapotranspiration of the crop plants. It is based on the RIBAV model (Garcia-Arias et al. 2012) used for the modeling of riparian vegetation zonation. The tank represents a soil column which also includes the superficial root layer. The lower capacity limit of this tank is the permanent wilting moisture of the soil. The upper capacity limit represents the saturated condition of the soil. The tanks input flows are precipitation and irrigation. In contrast, output flows are the actual evapotranspiration and the discharge of the tank. The most relevant model parameters are the soil retention curves, the crop parameters (specially related to root depths and crop coefficients) and the daily meteorological data (such as precipitation and potential evapotranspiration). The main output of the auxiliary model is the relative soil moisture, which determines if the PEARL model should use the transformation rate value for aerobic or for anaerobic conditions. In order to prove the applicability of the model, it was tested with various pesticides, which cover a wide range of transformation rates. The results show that the auxiliary tank model is able to determine the partition of the pesticides degrading in both

  9. Effect of climatic conditions on the development of soil water repellency in soils treated with the wastewater of the olive oil production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaumann, Gabriele E.; Peikert, Benjamin; Tamimi, Nesreen; Steinmetz, Zacharias; Fischer, Jonas; Bibus, Daniel; Marei Sawalha, Amer; Dag, Arnon

    2014-05-01

    The disposal of untreated wastewater on soil can induce severe water repellency. The final degree of water repellency may strongly depend on the environmental conditions prevailing during and after disposal. Also unpolluted soil can develop severe water repellency upon exposure to extreme heat or draught events. The induced water repellency can be either persistent or of transient nature. However, the underlying mechanisms are not yet completely understood. The objective of this study was to investigate how climatic conditions determine the development and persistence of water repellency following wastewater disposal. Our hypothesis was that amphiphilic organic wastewater compounds physically sorb onto surfaces, which renders them hydrophobic. Depending on temperature and moisture, those compounds are degraded, chemically incorporated into SOM, or irreversibly sorbed to soil particles during the time after the first waste water-soil contact. According to our hypothesis, biological communities favor degradation and transformation of OM of waste water into SOM under moist soil conditions. This would reduce the initial hydrophobization. In contrast, drying irreversibly renders soil hydrophobic and phytotoxic due to immobilization of OMW OM in the soil. To test these hypotheses, we investigated effects of olive mil wastewater (OMW), the effluent originating from olive oil production, directly applied to soil. In Israel and Palastine, olive oil production generates large amounts of OMW within a short period of time between November and January. As sewage facilities do not accept OMW, it is often disposed onto soil, which leads to severe soil and groundwater pollution. If the above mentioned hypotheses match, pollution and hydrophobization might be minimized if the wastewater is discharged at the right time of the year. In order to test this, we conducted field (2-3 years) and laboratory (60 days) experiments in Israel (Gilat, arid climate) and in the West Bank (Bait

  10. Soil Conditions That Can Alter Natural Suppression of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Ohio Specialty Crop Soils

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michele L.; LeJeune, Jeffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Food-borne pathogen persistence in soil fundamentally affects the production of safe vegetables and small fruits. Interventions that reduce pathogen survival in soil would have positive impacts on food safety by minimizing preharvest contamination entering the food chain. Laboratory-controlled studies determined the effects of soil pH, moisture content, and soil organic matter (SOM) on the survivability of this pathogen through the creation of single-parameter gradients. Longitudinal field-based studies were conducted in Ohio to quantify the extent to which field soils suppressed Escherichia coli O157:H7 survival. In all experiments, heat-sensitive microorganisms were responsible for the suppression of E. coli O157 in soil regardless of the chemical composition of the soil. In laboratory-based studies, soil pH and moisture content were primary drivers of E. coli O157 survival, with increases in pH after 48 h (P = 0.02) and decreases in moisture content after 48 h (P = 0.007) significantly increasing the log reduction of E. coli O157 numbers. In field-based experiments, E. coli O157 counts from both heated and unheated samples were sensitive to both season (P = 0.004 for heated samples and P = 0.001 for unheated samples) and region (P = 0.002 for heated samples and P = 0.001 for unheated samples). SOM was observed to be a more significant driver of pathogen suppression than the other two factors after 48 h at both planting and harvest (P = 0.002 at planting and P = 0.058 at harvest). This research reinforces the need for both laboratory-controlled experiments and longitudinal field-based experiments to unravel the complex relationships controlling the survival of introduced organisms in soil. PMID:25934621

  11. [Optimal operating condition of ICP-aES for determination of soil nutrients extracted by Mehlich 3 through solution simulation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-li; Cui, Jian-yu; Tang, Ao-han; Han, Wen-xuan; Jiang, Rong-feng

    2010-09-01

    As a key process of fertilization with soil test, the determination of soil effective nutrients has received great attention in recent years. Based on a series of standard solution mixtures, which simulate the soil nutrients extracted by Mehlich 3 (M3) reagent, the optimal operating condition of ICP-AES was explored in a systematic way. The results show that the 20 key nutrient elements (P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Cd, Cr, Pb, Ni, Al, B, Mo, S, Si, Se, and As) in the solutions can be determined correctly and proficiently when ICP-AES is set at 0.80 L x min(-1) of carrier gas flux, with observation height 15 mm and power 1200 W. This study supplies a primary experimental foundation for establishing the determination technique of essential nutrient elements, extracted from soils in China with the general soil-nutrient extractant M3 reagent. PMID:21105440

  12. Long-term effects of conventional and reduced tillage systems on soil condition and yield of maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rátonyi, Tamás; Széles, Adrienn; Harsányi, Endre

    2015-04-01

    As a consequence of operations which neglect soil condition and consist of frequent soil disturbance, conventional tillage (primary tillage with autumn ploughing) results in the degradation and compaction of soil structure, as well as the reduction of organic matter. These unfavourable processes pose an increasing economic and environmental protection problem today. The unfavourable physical condition of soils on which conventional tillage was performed indicate the need for preserving methods and tools. The examinations were performed in the multifactorial long-term tillage experiment established at the Látókép experiment site of DE MÉK. The experiment site is located in the Hajdúság loess ridge (Hungary) and its soil is loess-based calcareous chernozem with deep humus layer. The physical soil type is mid-heavy adobe. The long-term experiment has a split-split plot design. The main plots are different tillage methods (autumn ploughing, spring shallow tillage) without replication. In this paper, the effect of conventional and reduced (shallow) tillage methods on soil conditions and maize yield was examined. A manual penetrometer was used to determine the physical condition and compactedness of the soil. The soil moisture content was determined with deep probe measurement (based on capacitive method). In addition to soil analyses, the yield per hectare of different plots was also observed. In reduced tillage, one compacted layer is shown in the soil resistance profile determined with a penetrometer, while there are two compacted layers in autumn ploughing. The highest resistance was measured in the case of primary tillage performed at the same depth for several years in the compacted (pan disk) layer developed under the developed layer in both treatments. The unfavourable impact of spring shallow primary tillage on physical soil conditions is shown by the fact that the compaction of the pan disk exceed the critical limit value of 3 MPa. Over the years, further

  13. AgRISTARS: Early warning and crop condition assessment. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator); Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Emissive (10.5 to 12.5 microns) and reflective (0.55 to 1.1 microns) data for ten day scenes and infrared data for six night scenes of southern Texas were analyzed for plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration. Heat capacity mapping mission radiometric temperatures were: within 2 C of dewpoint temperatures, significantly correlated with variables important in evapotranspiration, and related to freeze severity and planting depth soil temperatures.

  14. Sorption behavior of cesium on Ain Oussera soil under different physicochemical conditions.

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, A; Souahi, F; Hanini, S

    2010-12-15

    In the present study, the sorption behavior of cesium was investigated in Ain Oussera soil around the Es-Salam reactor facility. This study was conducted using batch method under different physicochemical conditions including contact time, ionic strength, pH, solid/liquid ratio and temperature. The results showed that sorption followed pseudo-second-order kinetics with a good regression coefficients (R(2)=0.999). The activation energies were 11.26 and 15.21 kJ mol(-1) which correspond to ion-exchange-type sorption mechanism. The adsorption was favored at low temperature and it was exothermic (ΔH(0)<0, with average value of -1.97 kJ mol(-1)) and spontaneous (ΔG(0)<0, with average value of -11.97 kJ mol(-1) at 23°C and -13.2 kJ mol(-1) at 60°C). The presence of competing cations such as K(+) and Ca(2+) ions in groundwater can significantly reduce the Cs adsorption onto soil. Desorption reaction was also investigated using three reagents with different ionic strengths (deionized water, groundwater and 0.1M KCl solution). The results showed that Cs ions were preferentially distributed onto high affinity sorption sites. PMID:20869168

  15. Physical conditioning to enhance bioremediation of excavated hydrocarbon contaminated soil at McClellan Air Force Base

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanoff, J.G.; Garcia, M.B. Jr.

    1995-05-01

    McClellan Air Force Base conducted an evaluation of an aerated-pile composting process and a slurry bioreactor process for biologically treating excavated hydrocarbon-contaminated soils while controlling emissions of volatile organic compounds. A large aspect of process evaluation was development of soil conditioning steps prior to biological treatment. The conditioning steps evaluated were: soil washing, using rod and hammer mills. Scrubbing was not effective at producing a consistently clean oversize fraction. Milling was effective at reducing the size of larger material and breaking agglomerates. Bioremediation results indicated both processes capable of greater than 90 percent reduction in hydrocarbon levels within 90 days. Aerated-pile composting was the preferred process because it required less operation and maintenance and more easily handled varying soil characteristics. A full-scale treatment process was developed and is described. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Mobility of Pb, Cu, and Zn in the phosphorus-amended contaminated soils under simulated landfill and rainfall conditions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinde; Liang, Yuan; Zhao, Ling; Le, Huangying

    2013-09-01

    Phosphorus-bearing materials have been widely applied in immobilization of heavy metals in contaminated soils. However, the study on the stability of the initially P-induced immobilized metals in the contaminated soils is far limited. This work was conducted to evaluate the mobility of Pb, Cu, and Zn in two contrasting contaminated soils amended with phosphate rock tailing (PR) and triple superphosphate fertilizer (TSP), and their combination (P + T) under simulated landfill and rainfall conditions. The main objective was to determine the stability of heavy metals in the P-treated contaminated soils in response to the changing environment conditions. The soils were amended with the P-bearing materials at a 2:1 molar ratio of P to metals. After equilibrated for 2 weeks, the soils were evaluated with the leaching procedures. The batch-based toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) was conducted to determine the leachability of heavy metals from both untreated and P-treated soils under simulated landfill condition. The column-based synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were undertaken to measure the downward migration of metals from untreated and P-treated soils under simulated rainfall condition. Leachability of Pb, Cu, and Zn in the TCLP extract followed the order of Zn > Cu > Pb in both soils, with the organic-C- and clay-poor soil showing higher metal leachability than the organic-C- and clay-rich soil. All three P treatments reduced leachability of Pb, Cu, and Zn by up to 89.2, 24.4, and 34.3 %, respectively, compared to the untreated soil, and TSP revealed more effectiveness followed by P + T and then PR. The column experiments showed that Zn had the highest downward migration upon 10 pore volumes of SPLP leaching, followed by Pb and then Cu in both soils. However, migration of Pb and Zn to subsoil and leachate were inhibited in the P-treated soil, while Cu in the leachate was enhanced by P treatment in the organic

  17. Conditions Leading to High CO2 (>5 kPa) in Waterlogged–Flooded Soils and Possible Effects on Root Growth and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    GREENWAY, HANK; ARMSTRONG, WILLIAM; COLMER, TIMOTHY D.

    2006-01-01

    • Aims Soil waterlogging impedes gas exchange with the atmosphere, resulting in low PO2 and often high PCO2. Conditions conducive to development of high PCO2 (5–70 kPa) during soil waterlogging and flooding are discussed. The scant information on responses of roots to high PCO2 in terms of growth and metabolism is reviewed. • Scope PCO2 at 15–70 kPa has been reported for flooded paddy-field soils; however, even 15 kPa PCO2 may not always be reached, e.g. when soil pH is above 7. Increases of PCO2 in soils following waterlogging will develop much more slowly than decreases in PO2; in soil from rice paddies in pots without plants, maxima in PCO2 were reached after 2–3 weeks. There are no reliable data on PCO2 in roots when in waterlogged or flooded soils. In rhizomes and internodes, PCO2 sometimes reached 10 kPa, inferring even higher partial pressures in the roots, as a CO2 diffusion gradient will exist from the roots to the rhizomes and shoots. Preliminary modelling predicts that when PCO2 is higher in a soil than in roots, PCO2 in the roots would remain well below the PCO2 in the soil, particularly when there is ventilation via a well-developed gas-space continuum from the roots to the atmosphere. The few available results on the effects of PCO2 at > 5 kPa on growth have nearly all involved sudden increases to 10–100 kPa PCO2; consequently, the results cannot be extrapolated with certainty to the much more gradual increases of PCO2 in waterlogged soils. Nevertheless, rice in an anaerobic nutrient solution was tolerant to 50 kPa CO2 being suddenly imposed. By contrast, PCO2 at 25 kPa retarded germination of some maize genotypes by 50 %. With regard to metabolism, assuming that the usual pH of the cytoplasm of 7·5 was maintained, every increase of 10 kPa CO2 would result in an increase of 75–90 mm HCO3− in the cytoplasm. pH maintenance would depend on the biochemical and biophysical pH stats (i.e. regulatory systems

  18. Fate of thiodicarb and its metabolite methomyl in sandy loam soil under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Sushma; Chauhan, Reena; Kumari, Beena; Singh, Rajvir

    2015-07-01

    Fate of thiodicarb and its major metabolite in sandy loam soil were studied by applying thiodicarb (Larvin 75 WP) at 500 and 1000 g a. i. ha(-1) under laboratory conditions. Samples drawn periodically were analysed on GC-FTD equipped with capillary column. The average initial deposits of total thiodicarb (thiodicarb and methomyl) were 0.025 and 0.035 mg kg(-1) at single and double dosages, respectively. Residues of thiodicarb reached below the determination level (BDL) of 0.005 mg kg(-1) after 15 days. Half-life periods for total thiodicarb were calculated to be 5.90 and 8.29 days at two doses, respectively, following first-order kinetics. PMID:26070994

  19. Using EPIC v. 3060 and the Soil Conditioning Index to predict soil organic carbon in cotton production systems of the southeastern USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Conditioning Index (SCI) administered by the USDA-NRCS predicts the consequences of tillage practices and cropping systems on trends in SOC but does not represent an actual quantity or accumulation rate of SOC. We calibrated the EPIC model for three major land resource areas in the southea...

  20. Influence of sugar cane vinasse on the sorption and degradation of herbicides in soil under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Lourencetti, Carolina; De Marchi, Mary R R; Ribeiro, Maria L

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the influence of sugar cane vinasse on the persistence, sorption and leaching potential of diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea), hexazinone (3-cyclohexyl-6-(dimethylamino)-1-methyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-dione) and tebuthiuron (1-(5-tert-butyl-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)-1,3-dimethylurea) in both a clay and sandy soil from a tropical area of Brazil. The experiments were conducted out under controlled laboratory conditions. The addition of sugarcane vinasse to soil influenced the persistence and sorption of the herbicides in both the studied clay and sandy soils, with a considerable decrease in the diuron DT₅₀ values in clay soil. The Ground Water Ubiquity Score (GUS) Index classifies the herbicides as leachers in both soils and treatments, with the exception of diuron, which is classified as a non-leacher in clay soil-vinasse and as a transient herbicide in sandy soil. These results suggest that special attention should be given to areas such as those where the sandy soil was collected in this study, which is a recharge area of the Guarani Aquifer and is likely to experience groundwater contamination due to the high leaching potential of the applied pesticides. PMID:22938579

  1. Effect of organic matter on the sorption activity of heavy loamy soils for volatile organic compounds under low moisture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breus, I. P.; Mishchenko, A. A.; Shinkarev, A. A.; Neklyudov, S. A.; Breus, V. A.

    2014-12-01

    The diverse effect of the organic matter content on the sorption of vapors of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons in soils under low moisture (<10.5%) has been revealed in sorption experiments using profile samples from two virgin heavy loamy dark gray forest soils characterized by relatively stable contents of finely dispersed mineral components. The decrease of the hydrocarbon sorption with increasing the content of organic matter under dry conditions (in the moisture range from 0 to 5-6%) indicates its lower sorption activity than that of the clay components and the blocking of the sorption sites on soil minerals by organic matter. At moisture contents above 5-6%, the effect of the soil composition on the sorption activity changes radically: it increases with increasing the content of organic matter. This is due to the inversion of the ratio between the activities of the soil components because of the hydrophilization of the surface of the mineral soil component. As a result, the sorption of water on the minerals reduces the mineral sorption activity to hydrocarbons to a lower level than the activity of organic matter. The maximum manifestation of the revealed blocking effect has been observed for the low-humus soils and this effect decreased with the accumulation of soil organic matter.

  2. Methane production and growth of microorganisms under different moisture conditions in soils with added chitin and without it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manucharova, N. A.; Yaroslavtsev, A. M.; Kornyushenko, E. G.; Stepanov, A. L.; Smagin, A. V.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Sudnitsyn, I. I.

    2007-08-01

    The limits of soil moisture providing the possibility of methane production and growth of microorganisms in soils with added chitin and without it were determined. Samples of gray forest, soddy-podzolic, gley taiga, chestnut, and chernozemic soils were studied. It was found that methane emission increases significantly under a high soil moisture content in the presence of chitin. The increase of the soil moisture up to the maximum water-holding capacity enhanced the emission of methane by two-six times. The dynamics of the methane emission from the soils in the course of microbial successions initiated by the addition of chitin or by the soil moistening to different levels were studied by the gas-chromatographic method. The population density and biomass of fungal, bacterial, and actinomycetic complexes under different moister levels were studied by the method of luminescent microscopy. It was determined that many microorganisms participate in the transformation of chitin in the soil under conditions of oxygen deficiency (upon the increased moisture content). Prokaryotes dominated by actinomycetes were the group that increased its biomass most actively (the biomass doubling took place).

  3. Structure and condition of soil-vegetation cover in the Klyazma river basin applying remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Natalia; Trifonova, Tatiana; Repkin, Roman

    2015-04-01

    Constant observation of vegetation and soil cover is one of the key issues of river basins ecologic monitoring. It is necessary to consider that observation objects have been continuously changing and these changes are comprehensive and depend on temporal and dimensional parameters. Remote sensing data, embracing vast areas and reflecting various interrelations, allow excluding accidental and short-term changes though concentrating on the transformation of the observed river basin ecosystem environmental condition. The research objective is to assess spatial-temporal peculiarities of soil-vegetation structure formation in the Klyazma basin as a whole and minor river basins within the area. Research objects are located in the centre of European Russia. Data used in our research include both statistic and published data, characterizing soil-vegetation cover of the area, space images Landsat. Research methods: Remote data analysis for assessing land utilization structure and soil-vegetation condition according to NDVI. Laying soil-geobotanic landscape profiles river valleys slopes. Phytomass reserve, phytoproductivity, soil fertility characteristics assessment. NDVI computation for each image pixel helped to map general condition of the Klyazma vegetation cover and to determine geographic ranges without vegetation or with depressed vegetation. For instance high vegetation index geographic range has been defined which corresponded to Vladimir Opolye characterized with the most fertile grey forest soil in the region. Comparative assessment of soil vegetation cover of minor river basins within the Klyazma basin, judging by the terrestrial data, revealed its better condition in the Koloksha basin which is also located in the area of grey forest soil. Besides here the maximum value of vegetation index for all phytocenosis was detected. In the research the most dynamically changing parts of the Klyazma basin have been determined according to NDVI dynamics analysis

  4. The significance of morphogenetic analysis in the assessment of soil-water conditions in Quaternary sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkowska, Ewa

    2015-10-01

    The landform pattern of the Polish Lowlands, which originated during and after the Warta Glaciation, is closely connected with areal deglaciation and directions of geomorphological landform evolution. Landscape-shaping processes were significant for the creation of sediment configuration and sediment characteristics of particular landforms and thus for properties of sediments. Determination of the relationships between the origin of a landform and its physical/geochemical properties can facilitate the evaluation of geological conditions carried out for land use planning that should take into account the sensitivity of the geological environment (soil, groundwater) to the migration of contaminants. The aim of this research was to find geomorphological means of identifying physicochemical and hydrogeological properties of Quaternary sediments that enable fast and precise assessment of long-term and recent soil-water conditions. The investigations were conducted in two areas of the Polish Lowlands that were formed during the Warta Glaciation. During geological mapping of distinguished landforms, 169 samples of sediments were collected for laboratory testing. The samples were analyzed for particle size, calcium carbonate, organic matter content, pH, permeability coefficient, CEC, and adsorption of Cd and Pb. The results show that these distinguished glacial landforms are characterized by the recurrence of superficial lithological profiles with typical physicochemical parameters. Thus, the morphogenesis of postglacial areas of central Poland formed during the Warta Glaciation has influenced the ability of surface deposits to retain contamination. A total of seven insulation classes of landforms in terms of differentiated insulating abilities of deposits, as well as the ranges of values for each insulating parameter, have been identified.

  5. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  6. Nitrous oxide emissions from soils in southern Poland under various tillage conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkowski, Michal; Zieba, Damian; Ciaciek, Klaudia; Necki, Jaroslaw; Rozanski, Kazimierz

    2015-04-01

    Due to close ties of nitrogen cycle with the production of food, appropriate mitigation policies need to be considered in order to reduce the impact of reactive N compounds on both human health and the environment. These policies strongly rely on quantitative information with respect to fluxes of reactive nitrogen compounds to the atmosphere and mechanisms controlling those fluxes on a various time and space scales. One of these compounds is nitrous oxide - currently the most important human-emitted ozone depleting substance and one of the most important greenhouse gases. In this study, which is a part of broader, regional (Southern Poland) analysis of nitrous oxide circulation, we present the results of field measurements performed at the Institute of Plant Acclimatization and Husbandry (ZDHAR) in Grodkowice (Malopolska). Several representative sites have been selected for measurements of N2O emissions during two campaigns - in spring (March) and autumn (October) 2014. The investigated crops were chosen to represent the regional agriculture and included wheat, canola and maize under various tillage conditions (with and without tilling), as well as an uncultivated grassland as a control site. The static chamber method was chosen to quantify soil-atmosphere N2O fluxes. Chamber enclosures have been performed every 3-5 days, depending on the conditions prevailing at the sites during the intermediate periods (e.g. rainfall or fertilization events). From each enclosure, five 50-ml air samples have been collected for subsequent analysis of nitrous oxide concentrations. Well-established gas chromatography methods, with a precision of a single N2O measurement better than 0.5 ppb were employed. The measured concentrations were then used in a linear emission model to calculate N2O fluxes. Other trace gases (CH4, CO2, SF6) were also measured in each sample for quality control purposes. Result for both campaigns show large variability of N2O emissions, with maximum fluxes in

  7. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  8. Efficacy of ivermectin and albendazole alone and in combination for treatment of soil-transmitted helminths in pregnancy and adverse events: a randomized open label controlled intervention trial in Masindi district, western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Ndyomugyenyi, Richard; Kabatereine, Narcis; Olsen, Annette; Magnussen, Pascal

    2008-12-01

    A randomized open-label trial, including 834 pregnant women, examined efficacy and recorded adverse events of ivermectin (ivc) and albendazole (alb) alone and combined (comb) on soil-transmitted helminth infections (STHs) in the second trimester of pregnancy. One abortion occurred in the alb group and 10 stillbirths (1, 5, 3, and 1) in the ivc, alb, comb, and the reference group (ref) with no STHs, respectively. Two babies were born with congenital abnormalities (1 [ivc] and 1 [ref]). The prevalence of anemia at first antenatal care (ANC) visit was 20.6% (23.7% [ivc], 21.1% [alb], 22.2% [comb], and 16.1% [ref]). Anemia was reduced to 8.5% at 36 weeks of gestation with 10.9% (ivc), 11.5% (alb), 7.7% (comb), and 6.9% (ref). Hookworm cure rates were 29.4% (ivc), 95.5% (alb), and 92.6% (comb). No severe adverse events were reported by the women after the administration of ivc, alb, or comb during the second trimester of pregnancy, but long-term pharmacovigillance is needed to assess safety of ivc, alb, or comb in pregnancy. PMID:19052293

  9. Migration, neighborhoods, and networks: approaches to understanding how urban environmental conditions affect syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Egan, James E; Frye, Victoria; Kurtz, Steven P; Latkin, Carl; Chen, Minxing; Tobin, Karin; Yang, Cui; Koblin, Beryl A

    2011-04-01

    Adopting socioecological, intersectionality, and lifecourse theoretical frameworks may enhance our understanding of the production of syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM). From this perspective, we present preliminary data from three related studies that suggest ways in which social contexts may influence the health of MSM. The first study, using cross-sectional data, looked at migration of MSM to the gay resort area of South Florida, and found that amount of time lived in the area was associated with risk behaviors and HIV infection. The second study, using qualitative interviews, observed complex interactions between neighborhood-level social environments and individual-level racial and sexual identity among MSM in New York City. The third study, using egocentric network analysis with a sample of African American MSM in Baltimore, found that sexual partners were more likely to be found through face-to-face means than the Internet. They also observed that those who co-resided with a sex partner had larger networks of people to depend on for social and financial support, but had the same size sexual networks as those who did not live with a partner. Overall, these findings suggest the need for further investigation into the role of macro-level social forces on the emotional, behavioral, and physical health of urban MSM. PMID:21369730

  10. Migration, Neighborhoods, and Networks: Approaches to Understanding How Urban Environmental Conditions Affect Syndemic Adverse Health Outcomes Among Gay, Bisexual and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Egan, James E.; Kurtz, Steven P.; Latkin, Carl; Chen, Minxing; Tobin, Karin; Yang, Cui; Koblin, Beryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Adopting socioecological, intersectionality, and lifecourse theoretical frameworks may enhance our understanding of the production of syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM). From this perspective, we present preliminary data from three related studies that suggest ways in which social contexts may influence the health of MSM. The first study, using cross-sectional data, looked at migration of MSM to the gay resort area of South Florida, and found that amount of time lived in the area was associated with risk behaviors and HIV infection. The second study, using qualitative interviews, observed complex interactions between neighborhood-level social environments and individual-level racial and sexual identity among MSM in New York City. The third study, using egocentric network analysis with a sample of African American MSM in Baltimore, found that sexual partners were more likely to be found through face-to-face means than the Internet. They also observed that those who co-resided with a sex partner had larger networks of people to depend on for social and financial support, but had the same size sexual networks as those who did not live with a partner. Overall, these findings suggest the need for further investigation into the role of macro-level social forces on the emotional, behavioral, and physical health of urban MSM. PMID:21369730

  11. Calibration procedures to test the feasibility of heated fiber optics for measuring soil water content in field conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez, Javier; Sayde, Chadi; Rodríguez Sinobas, Leonor; Sánchez, Raúl; Gil, María; Selker, John

    2013-04-01

    This research provides insights of the calibration procedures carried out at the agricultural field of La Nava de Arévalo (Spain). The suitability of the heat pulse theory applied to fiber optics for measuring soil water content, in field conditions, is here analyzed. In addition, it highlights the major findings obtained and the weakness to be addressed in future studies. Within a corn field, in a plot of 500 m2 of bare soil, 600 m of fiber optic cable (BruggSteal) were buried on a ziz-zag deployment at two depths, 30cm and 60cm. Various electrical heat pulses of 20W/m were applied to the stainless steel shield of the fiber optic cable during 2 minutes. The resulting thermal response was captured by means of Distributed Fiber Optic Temperature sensing (DFOT), within a spatial and temporal resolution up to 25 cm and 1 s, respectively. The soil thermal response was then correlated to the soil water content by using undisturbed soil samples and soil moisture sensors (Decagon ECHO 5TM). The process was also modeled by applying the numerical methods software Hydrus 2D. Also, the soil thermal properties were measured in situ by using a dual heat pulse probe (Decagon Kd2Pro). For an ongoing process, first results obtained show the suitability of heated fiber optics for measuring soil water content, in real field conditions. Also, they highlight the usefulness of Hydrus 2D as a complementary tool for calibration purposes and for reducing uncertainty in addressing soil spatial variability.

  12. Impact of water conditions on land surface subsidance and the decline of organic soils in Kuwasy peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, S.; Szajdak, L.

    2009-04-01

    Organic soils as result of drainage undergo consolidation, mineralization, and subsidence of surface layer, and decline of organic matter. The rate of the subsidence of surface layer depends on a number of factors, such as ground water level, kind of peat, density of thickness of peat layer, drainage depth, climate, land use and drainage duration. These processes are connected with the changes of physical properties and lead to the conversion of organic soils into mineral-organic and mineral. The phenomena are observed in Biebrza, Notec Valley, and Kurpiowska Basin and Wieprz-Krzna channel. During last 42 years, in Kuwasy peatland from 10-13 ton per year was declined and the area of peatland decreased from 53 to 57 cm. It was observed that, peat moorsh soil of the first stadium of moorshification located on a middle decomposed peat transformed into peat-moorh soil of the second stadium of moorshification located on a high decomposed peat. However shallow peat soils were converted into mineral-moorsh and moorsh. Kuwasy peatland was meliorated twice in XX century, first one in the middle of 30 and second one in 50. It led to the farther land surface subsidence and decline of organic matter. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the rate of land surface subsidence, decline of the area and the transformation of physic-water properties in peat-moorsh soil of different water conditions. The investigations were carried out in Kuwasy peatland, located in Biebrza Basin North-East Poland. In peat soil samples ash contents, porosity, pF curves and bulk density were determined. The analysis of these results allowed to evaluate long-term soil subsidence and to relate it to soil water conditions.

  13. SIMULATING HERBICIDE VOLATILIZATION FROM BARE SOIL AFFECTED BY ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS AND LIMITED SOLUBILITY IN WATER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A numerical model was developed to predict the behavior of triallate after application to a field soil. The model simulates pesticide fate and transport in soil, movement in the vapor phase and volatilization from the soil surface. The model has options to allow water and/or heat transport and can ...

  14. Emissions of 1,3-dichloropropene and chloropicrin after soil fumigation under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil fumigation is an important agronomic practice in the production of many high-value vegetable and fruit crops. The use of soil fumigant chemicals can lead to excessive atmospheric emissions and information is needed to develop best management practices so that use of soil fumigants does not har...

  15. Laboratory Assay of Soil Microbial Activities is Congruent with In Situ Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used microtiter plates loaded with an oxygen-sensitive fluorophore to assay respiration of organic substrates by soil microbial communities. The respiration of soil slurries was measured at low substrate concentrations (0.5 mg substrate per g soil) with no additional nutrients over a short seven...

  16. Improved prediction of quasi-global vegetation conditions using remotely-sensed surface soil moisture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The additive value of satellite-based surface soil moisture retrievals for agricultural drought monitoring is assessed by calculating the lagged rank correlation between remotely-sensed vegetation indices (VI) and model-based soil moisture obtained before and after the assimilation of surface soil m...

  17. A systems approach for enhancing soil quality and plant health under organic and conventional conditions: Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of compost and biological amendments, as well as a fall Brassica green manure crop, on soil fertility, soil microbial communities, soil-borne diseases, insect pests and potato yield quality and quantity were assessed at two farm sites in Northern Maine in 2007 and 2008. The two sites wer...

  18. Experimental study on evaporation from seasonally frozen soils under various water, solute and groundwater conditions in Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mousong; Huang, Jiesheng; Wu, Jingwei; Tan, Xiao; Jansson, Per-Erik

    2016-04-01

    Soil freezing and thawing significantly impact water balance in cold regions. To improve estimations of evaporation from seasonally frozen and saline soils, field experiments representing various water and solute conditions were conducted during a 5-month-period in Inner Mongolia, China. A mass balance method was used to estimate evaporation from frost tubes (5.5 × 300 cm) with treatments combining three solute contents (0.2%, 0.4%, and 0.6% g g-1 dry soil) with three initial groundwater table depth (GWTDs) (2.0, 1.5, and 1.0 m). The dynamics of water, heat and solute transport in the frost tubes and in field plots were also investigated. Seasonal changes in evaporation rates were observed during soil freezing/thawing periods. Low evaporation rates were maintained when the soil was deeply frozen (e.g., in P3), and relatively higher values occurred at the beginning and the end of the experiments (e.g., in P1 and P5). The cumulative evaporation amount increased with an increase in initial solute content and declined with a lowering of the initial GWTDs. Solute accumulation with water in the surface layer during freezing decreased the osmotic potential in soil, resulting in obvious freezing point depressions and higher liquid water contents in the uppermost layer of soil. During the soil thawing periods, no evidence of any control of water availability on evaporation was noticed, although the surface soil contained large amounts of water. This study has led to an improved understanding of the coupled effects of water, heat and solute on evaporation from seasonally frozen saline soils and also has important implications for water and energy balance studies in cold regions.

  19. Effect of operating conditions in soil aquifer treatment on the removals of pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    PubMed

    He, Kai; Echigo, Shinya; Itoh, Sadahiko

    2016-09-15

    Soil aquifer treatment (SAT) is an alternative advanced treatment for wastewater reclamation, and it has the potential to control micropollutants including pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). However, the relationship of operating conditions in SAT and removals of micropollutants was not clear. In this study, the effects of operating conditions on the removals of PPCPs were evaluated by using lab-scale columns and plant pilot-scale reactors under different operating conditions. Firstly, weathered granite soil (WGS), standard sand (SAND) and Toyoura standard sand (TS) have different soil characteristics such as total organic carbon (TOC) and cation exchange capacity (CEC). In the columns with these packing materials, the removals of carboxylic analgesics and antilipidemics were effective regardless packing materials. The removals of antibiotics were more effective in WGS than in TS and SAND, indicating high TOC and CEC enhance the sorption in SAT. Secondly, with the extension of hydraulic retention time (HRT), the removals of sulfamethoxazole, acetaminophen, crotamiton, and antipyrine were improved in WGS columns, and adaptable biodegradation for moderately removable PPCPs was formed. Thirdly, the removal efficiencies of sulfamethoxazole and crotamiton were higher in the WGS column under vadose condition than in the WGS column under saturated condition, because of aerobic condition in WGS column under vadose condition. Though long HRT and vadose condition had positive influence on the removals of several PPCPs such as sulfamethoxazole, WGS column with an HRT of 7days under saturated condition removed most PPCPs. PMID:27213846

  20. Accelerated Biodegradation of Agriculture Film Based on Aromatic-Aliphatic Copolyester in Soil under Mesophilic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Šerá, Jana; Stloukal, Petr; Jančová, Petra; Verney, Vincent; Pekařová, Silvie; Koutný, Marek

    2016-07-20

    A study was conducted on the biodegradation of aromatic-aliphatic copolyester-based agricultural film in soil at 25 °C. The polymer is known to be biodegradable under composting conditions although rather recalcitrant under mesophilic conditions. The material investigated comprised of the copolyester filled with approximately 25% of starch containing biodegradable plasticizers, and its behavior was compared to the corresponding material without the filler. Mineralization followed by CO2 production merely reached the point of about 6% after 100 days of incubation in the pure copolyester film, whereas the value of around 53% was recorded for the filled copolyester film, which exceeded the readily biodegradable starch filler content in the material by more than 20% and could be accounted for biodegradation of the copolyester. It was suggested that the accelerated copolyester biodegradation in the starch-filled material was most likely explained by the increase in the active surface area of the material available for the microbial attack after biodegradation of the filler. The results were supported by changes in molecular weight distributions of the copolyester and observations made by several microscopic techniques. These findings encourage further development of biodegradable agricultural films based on this material. PMID:27367168

  1. Acclimation of microorganisms to harsh soil crust conditions: Experimental and genomic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raanan, Hagai; Kaplan, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSC) are formed by the adhesion of sand particles to cyanobacterial exo- polysaccharides and play an important role in stabilizing sandy desert. Its destruction promotes desertification. These organisms cope with extreme temperatures, excess light and frequent hydration/dehydration cycles; the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. With the genome of newly sequenced Leptolyngbya, isolated from Nizzana BSC, we conduct comparative genomics of three desiccation tolerant cyanobacteria. This yield 46 unique genes, some of them similar to genes involve in sporulation of the gram positive bacteria Bacillus. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms taking place during desiccation we built an environmental chamber capable of simulating dynamic changes of environmental conditions in the crust. This chamber allows us to perform repetitive and accurate desiccation/rehydration experiments and follow cyanobacterial physiological and molecular response to such environmental changes. When we compared fast desiccation (less than 5 min) of isolated cyanobacteria to simulation of natural desiccation, we observed a 60% lower fluorescence recovery rate. The extent of damage from desiccation depended on the stress conditions during the dry period. These results suggest that cyanobacteria activated protection mechanisms in response to desiccation stress but which were not activated in 5 min desiccation tests. Gene expression patterns during desiccation are being analyzed in order to provide a better understanding of desiccation stress protection mechanisms.

  2. Simulated soil crust conditions in a chamber system provide new insights on cyanobacterial acclimation to desiccation.

    PubMed

    Raanan, Hagai; Oren, Nadav; Treves, Haim; Berkowicz, Simon M; Hagemann, Martin; Pade, Nadin; Keren, Nir; Kaplan, Aaron

    2016-02-01

    Environmental research often faces two major hurdles: (i) fluctuating spatial and temporal conditions and consequently large variability in the organisms' abundance and performance, and (ii) complex, costly logistics involved in field experiments. Measurements of physiological parameters or molecular analyses often represent single shot experiments. To study desiccation acclimation of filamentous cyanobacteria, the founders and main primary producers in desert biological soil crusts (BSC), we constructed an environmental chamber that can reproducibly and accurately simulate ambient conditions and measure microorganism performance. We show that recovery from desiccation of BSC cyanobacteria and Leptolyngbya ohadii isolated thereof are strongly affected by dehydration rate following morning dew. This effect is most pronounced in cells exposed to high light and temperature in the dry phase. Simultaneous measurements of water content, gas exchange and fluorescence were performed during dehydration. Photosynthetic performance measured by fluorescence begins declining when light intensity reaches values above 100 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), even in fully hydrated cells. In contrast, photosynthetic rates measured using O2 evolution and CO2 uptake increased during rising irradiance to the point where the water content declined below ∼ 50%. Thus, fluorescence cannot serve as a reliable measure of photosynthesis in desert cyanobacteria. The effects of drying on gas exchange are discussed. PMID:26234786

  3. Role of microorganisms in emission of nitrous oxide and methane in pulse cultivated soil under laboratory incubation condition.

    PubMed

    Jena, Jyotsnarani; Ray, Sanak; Srichandan, Haragobinda; Das, Anuradha; Das, Trupti

    2013-03-01

    Soil from a pulse cultivated farmers land of Odisha, India, have been subjected to incubation studies for 40 consecutive days, to establish the impact of various nitrogenous fertilizers and water filled pore space (WFPS) on green house gas emission (N2O & CH4). C2H2 inhibition technique was followed to have a comprehensive understanding about the individual contribution of nitrifiers and denitrifiers towards the emission of N2O. Nevertheless, low concentration of C2H2 (5 ml: flow rate 0.1 kg/cm(2)) is hypothesized to partially impede the metabolic pathways of denitrifying bacterial population, thus reducing the overall N2O emission rate. Different soil parameters of the experimental soil such as moisture, total organic carbon, ammonium content and nitrate-nitrogen contents were measured at regular intervals. Application of external N-sources under different WFPS conditions revealed the diverse role played by the indigenous soil microorganism towards green house gas emission. Isolation of heterotrophic microorganisms (Pseudomonas) from the soil samples, further supported the fact that denitrification might be prevailing during specific conditions thus contributing to N2O emission. Statistical analysis showed that WFPS was the most influential parameter affecting N2O formation in soil in absence of an inhibitor like C2H2. PMID:24426084

  4. Effectiveness of biological geotextiles in reducing runoff and soil loss under different environmental conditions using laboratory and field plot data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, T.

    2009-04-01

    Preliminary investigations suggest biological geotextiles could be an effective and inexpensive soil conservation method, with enormous global potential. Biological geotextiles are a possible temporary alternative for vegetation cover and can offer immediate soil protection. However, limited data are available on the erosion-reducing effects of biological geotextiles. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of selected types of biological geotextile in reducing runoff and soil loss under controlled laboratory conditions and under field conditions reflecting different environments (i.e. continental, temperate and tropical). In laboratory experiments, interrill runoff, interrill erosion and concentrated flow erosion were simulated using various rainfall intensities, flow shear stresses and slope gradients. Field plot data on the effects of biological geotextiles on sheet and rill erosion were collected in several countries under natural rainfall (U.K., Hungary, Lithuania, South Africa, Brazil, China and Thailand). The laboratory experiments indicate that all tested biological geotextiles were effective in reducing interrill runoff (on average 59% of the value for bare soil) and interrill erosion rates (on average 16% of the value for bare soil). Since simulated concentrated flow discharge sometimes flowed below the geotextiles, the effectiveness in reducing concentrated flow erosion was significantly less (on average 59% of the value for bare soil). On field plots, where both interrill and rill erosion occur, all tested geotextiles reduced runoff depth by a mean of 54% of the control value for bare soil and in some cases, runoff depth increased compared to bare soil surfaces, which can be attributed to the impermeable and hydrophobic characteristics of some biological geotextiles. In the field, soil loss rates due to interrill and rill erosion were reduced by a mean of 21% of the value of bare soil by biological geotextiles. This study

  5. A systems approach for enhancing soil quality and plant health under organic and conventional conditions: Effects on Soil Microbial Communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the second year of an integrated agricultural systems project, research plots established at both organic and conventional farm sites were sampled to assess soil microbial population dynamics in response to biocontrol and compost amendment, as well as with a rapeseed rotation. Compost amendment p...

  6. Adverse weather impacts on arable cropping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Damages due to extreme or adverse weather strongly depend on crop type, crop stage, soil conditions and management. The impact is largest during the sensitive periods of the farming calendar, and requires a modelling approach to capture the interactions between the crop, its environment and the occurrence of the meteorological event. The hypothesis is that extreme and adverse weather events can be quantified and subsequently incorporated in current crop models. Since crop development is driven by thermal time and photoperiod, a regional crop model was used to examine the likely frequency, magnitude and impacts of frost, drought, heat stress and waterlogging in relation to the cropping season and crop sensitive stages. Risk profiles and associated return levels were obtained by fitting generalized extreme value distributions to block maxima for air humidity, water balance and temperature variables. The risk profiles were subsequently confronted with yields and yield losses for the major arable crops in Belgium, notably winter wheat, winter barley, winter oilseed rape, sugar beet, potato and maize at the field (farm records) to regional scale (statistics). The average daily vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and reference evapotranspiration (ET0) during the growing season is significantly lower (p < 0.001) and has a higher variability before 1988 than after 1988. Distribution patterns of VPD and ET0 have relevant impacts on crop yields. The response to rising temperatures depends on the crop's capability to condition its microenvironment. Crops short of water close their stomata, lose their evaporative cooling potential and ultimately become susceptible to heat stress. Effects of heat stress therefore have to be combined with moisture availability such as the precipitation deficit or the soil water balance. Risks of combined heat and moisture deficit stress appear during the summer. These risks are subsequently related to crop damage. The methodology of defining

  7. Speciation and Release Kinetics of Cadmium in an Alkaline Paddy Soil Under Various Flooding Periods and Draining Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    S Khaokaew; R Chaney; G Landrot; M Ginder-Vogel; D Sparks

    2011-12-31

    This study determined Cd speciation and release kinetics in a Cd-Zn cocontaminated alkaline paddy soil, under various flooding periods and draining conditions, by employing synchrotron-based techniques, and a stirred-flow kinetic method. Results revealed that varying flooding periods and draining conditions affected Cd speciation and its release kinetics. Linear least-squares fitting (LLSF) of bulk X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra of the air-dried, and the 1 day-flooded soil samples, showed that at least 50% of Cd was bound to humic acid. Cadmium carbonates were found as the major species at most flooding periods, while a small amount of cadmium sulfide was found after the soils were flooded for longer periods. Under all flooding and draining conditions, at least 14 mg/kg Cd was desorbed from the soil after a 2-hour desorption experiment. The results obtained by micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF) spectroscopy showed that Cd was less associated with Zn than Ca, in most soil samples. Therefore, it is more likely that Cd and Ca will be present in the same mineral phases rather than Cd and Zn, although the source of these two latter elements may originate from the same surrounding Zn mines in the Mae Sot district.

  8. Mobilization and transport of metal-rich colloidal particles from mine tailings into soil under transient chemical and physical conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cong; Wu, Yaoguo; Hu, Sihai; Raza, Muhammad Ali; Fu, Yilin

    2016-04-01

    Exposed mine tailing wastes with considerable heavy metals can release hazardous colloidal particles into soil under transient chemical and physical conditions. Two-layered packed columns with tailings above and soils below were established to investigate mobilization and transport of colloidal particles from metal-rich mine tailings into soil under transient infiltration ionic strength (IS: 100, 20, 2 mM) and flow rate (FR: 20.7, 41, and 62.3 mm h(-1)), with Cu and Pb as representatives of the heavy metals. Results show that the tailing particles within the colloidal size (below 2 μm) were released from the columns. A step-decrease in infiltration IS and FR enhanced, whereas a step-increase in the IS and FR restrained the release of tailing particles from the column. The effects of step-changing FR were unexpected due to the small size of the released tailing particles (220-342 nm, being not sensitive to hydrodynamic shear force), the diffusion-controlled particle release process and the relatively compact pore structure. The tailing particles present in the solution with tested IS were found negatively charged and more stable than soil particles, which provides favorable conditions for tailing particles to be transported over a long distance in the soil. The mobilization and transport of Cu and Pb from the tailings into soil were mediated by the tailing particles. Therefore, the inherent toxic tailing particles could be considerably introduced into soil under certain conditions (IS reduction or FR decrease), which may result in serious environmental pollution. PMID:26780043

  9. Desorption of nitramine and nitroaromatic explosive residues from soils detonated under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Thomas A; Walsh, Marianne E; McGrath, Christian J; Weiss, Charles A; Jaramillo, Ashley Marie; Trainor, Thomas P

    2011-02-01

    Potentially toxic nitroaromatic and nitramine compounds are introduced onto soils during detonation of explosives. The present study was conducted to investigate the desorption and transformation of explosive compounds loaded onto three soils through controlled detonation. The soils were proximally detonated with Composition B, a commonly used military explosive containing 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), and octahydro 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX). Gas-exchangeable surface areas were measured from pristine and detonated soils. Aqueous batches of detonated soils were prepared by mixing each soil with ultrapure water. Samples were collected for 141 d and concentrations of Composition B compounds and TNT transformation products 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2ADNT), 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4ADNT), and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (1,3,5-TNB) were measured. The RDX, HMX, and TNT concentrations in detonated soil batches exhibited first-order physical desorption for the first, roughly, 10 d and then reached steady state apparent equilibrium within 40 d. An aqueous batch containing powdered Composition B in water was sampled over time to quantify TNT, RDX, and HMX dissolution from undetonated Composition B particles. The TNT, RDX, and HMX concentrations in aqueous batches of pure Composition B reached equilibrium within 6, 11, and 20 d, respectively. Detonated soils exhibited lower gas-exchangeable surface areas than their pristine counterparts. This is likely due to an explosive residue coating on detonated soil surfaces, shock-induced compaction, sintering, and/or partial fusion of soil particles under the intense heat associated with detonation. Our results suggest that explosive compounds loaded to soils through detonation take longer to reach equilibrium concentrations in aqueous batches than soils loaded with explosive residues through aqueous addition. This is likely due to the heterogeneous interactions between

  10. Modeling of salt-water migration through spod-podzolic soils under the field and laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronzhina, Tatiana

    2013-04-01

    The assessment of highly mineralized water influence on soils is an important issue in the contemporary world. Various regions with different conditions are exposed to salt-affected soils forming. Salinization of soils is a complex process of the chemical and physical properties changes. Therefore the chain of the laboratory and field experiments should be done in order to assess the main factors promoting highly mineralized water migration. In addition to it modelling is a good way to understand and evaluate main chemical and physical transformations in soils. The chain of experiments was done to assess salt water movement in spod-podzolic soils under field and laboratory conditions. The main goals were to evaluate the rate of salt water movement through soils and to estimate velocity of the desalinization process. Field experiment was conducted on spod-podzolic soils of Kaliningrad region. There were 4 sites measuring 20*25 cm watering with salt water in amount of 5 liters per each area. The mineralization of the solution was 100 g/l. In addition to the salt affected sites, 2 non polluted grounds were assessed too. Soils samples were collected in the period of 1 week, 1 month, 3 month and 1 year after the spill had been done. The samples were taken each 10 cm 110 cm deep and in double repeatability. Main chemical and physical parameters, such as volume water content, pH, conductivity, amount of calcium ion, magnesium, sodium, and chlorite in soils etc. were measured in each sample. The second experiment was conducted to evaluate the rate of soils solutions transformation under the laboratory conditions. Organic horizon was taken from the field and was stuffed in columns with 1.0 g/cm3 density. There were 16 columns with 4 cm diameter. 14 columns were showered with salt water with the same mineralization as in the field experiment. The amount of salt water injected in columns was 104 mm per one sample which is equal to the salt water volume spilled per one area in

  11. A dual-porous, biophysical void structure model of soil for the understanding of the conditions causing nitrous oxide emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, G. Peter; Maurizio Laudone, G.; Whalle, W. Richard; Bird, Nigel; Gregory, Andrew; Cardenas, Laura; Misselbrook, Tom

    2010-05-01

    periodic boundary conditions, and with a critical percolation path with the correct percolation characteristics and void volume of the macro-porosity of the soil. • A solid phase between the pores of the large unit cell, with the correct volume of the fraction of larger soil aggregates (larger 1 mm). • All the remaining pores of the large unit cell, which are not part of the critical percolation path, filled with smaller unit cells, which account for the micro-porosity of the soil sample. We describe the construction of a model that closely matches the following characteristics of a specific example of typical arable soil, taken from the Warren field of the Rothamsted experimental farm at Woburn, although the model can be used for a wide range of soils: (i) macroporosity and microporosity as measured by the water retention curve, (ii) the shape of the water retention characteristic under a wide range of tensions, (iii) the soil texture, and (iv) the extent of irreducible water content. Process model We will describe the insertion of Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Crank-Nicholson diffusion equations into the precisely scaled model, building on previous diffusion modelling (Laudone, G. M. et al, Chem.Eng.Sci., 2008). Comparison with experiment A comparison with experimental results sheds light on (i) the positional relationships of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria relative to the critical percolation path, (ii) the relationship between the critical percolation path and the preferential / critical flow path (Figure 4), (iii) the extent of ignorance about the reaction kinetics of some of the fundamental processes occurring, (iv) the soil conditions that cause nitrous oxide emission, and (v) the effect of soil compaction on the emission. Acknowledgement This presentation is a summary of the some of the work of the BBSRC funded U.K. soil research consortium "Soil Programme for Quality and Resilience" (BB/E001793/1 and others), of which Matthews is principal investigator.

  12. Wear of surface-engineered metal-on-metal bearings for hip prostheses under adverse conditions with the head loading on the rim of the cup.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Ian; Williams, Sophie; Isaac, Graham; Hatto, Peter; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2013-04-01

    Clinical studies have found high wear rates, elevated ion levels and high revision rates of large-diameter metal-on-metal surface replacement bearings in some patients, which have been associated with edge loading of the head on the rim of the cup. We have simulated increased wear and ion levels in metal-on-metal bearings in vitro by introducing variations in translational and rotational positioning of the components, which reproduces stripe wear on the femoral head, cup rim wear and clinically relevant large as well as small wear particles. There is interest in technologies such as surface engineering, which might reduce metal wear and the release of wear particles and ions. Reduced wear with surface-engineered surface replacements compared to metal-on-metal controls has been reported under standard walking conditions with correctly aligned and concentric components. In this in vitro study, the wear of chromium nitride surface-engineered metal-on-metal bearings under conditions of microseparation associated with translational and rotational malpositioning of the components was investigated and the results were compared with a previously reported study of metal-on-metal bearings under the same conditions. Simulations were conducted using our unique hip simulation microseparation methodologies, which reproduce accelerated wear in metal-on-metal bearings and have previously been clinically validated with ceramic-on-ceramic bearings. Four of the six surface-engineered bearings had evidence of head contact on the rim of the cup, which produced stripe wear on the femoral head. Four of the six surface-engineered bearings (two without stripe and two with stripe wear) had lower wear than the previously reported high wearing metal-on-metal bearings. At 2 million cycles, two of the surface-engineered bearings had substantially increased wear rates, four times higher than the high wear rates previously reported for metal-on-metal bearings under the same conditions. There was

  13. Adjustment of corn nitrogen in-season fertilization based on soil texture and weather conditions: a Meta-analysis of North American trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil properties and weather conditions are known to affect soil nitrogen (N) availability and plant N uptake. However, studies examining N response as affected by soil and weather sometimes give conflicting results. Meta-analysis is a statistical method for estimating treatment effects in a series o...

  14. ADVERSE CUTANEOUS DRUG REACTION

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR. PMID:19967009

  15. Soil temperature and intermittent frost modulate the rate of recovery of photosynthesis in Scots pine under simulated spring conditions.

    PubMed

    Ensminger, Ingo; Schmidt, Lilian; Lloyd, Jon

    2008-01-01

    An earlier onset of photosynthesis in spring for boreal forest trees is predicted as the climate warms, yet the importance of soil vs air temperatures for spring recovery remains to be determined. Effects of various soil- and air-temperature conditions on spring recovery of photosynthesis in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) seedlings were assessed under controlled environmental conditions. Using winter-acclimated seedlings, photosynthetic responses were followed after transfer to different simulated spring conditions. Recovery rates for photosynthetic electron transport and net CO(2) uptake were slower in plants from cold or frozen soil compared with controls. In addition, a greater fraction of light absorbed was not used photochemically, but was dissipated thermally via xanthophyll cycle pigments. Intermittent frost events decreased photosynthetic capacity and increased thermal energy dissipation. Within a few days after frost events, photosynthetic capacity recovered to prefrost levels. After 18 d under spring conditions, no difference in the optimum quantum yield of photosynthesis was observed between seedlings that had been exposed to intermittent frost and control plants. These results show that, if air temperatures remain favourable and spells of subfreezing air temperatures are only of short duration, intermittent frost events delay but do not severely inhibit photosynthetic recovery in evergreen conifers during spring. Cold and/or frozen soils exert much stronger inhibitory effects on the recovery process, but they do not totally inhibit it. PMID:18181961

  16. Elemental concentrations in the seed of mutants and natural variants of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under varying soil conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentrations of mineral nutrients in seeds are critical to both the life cycle of plants as well as human nutrition. These concentrations are strongly influenced by soil conditions, as shown here by quantifying the concentration of 14 elements in seeds from Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown un...

  17. Impact of Soil Moisture Conditions on Interannual Variability of the Water Balance over the North American Monsoon Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J.; Small, E.; Lakshmi, V.

    2001-12-01

    In this study, the effects of soil moisture conditions on interannual variability of the water balance over the North American monsoon (NAM) region was investigated using NCAR's MM5/OSU model. Observations and modeling studies suggest that a positive soil moisture-rainfall feedback may be important in magnifying and prolonging hydroclimatic anomalies in a variety of regions. Our preliminary modeling experiments show that the soil moisture-rainfall feedback is strong in the North American Monsoon System (NAMS) region and may contribute to variability of summertime precipitation in this area. However, this result is based on sensitivity experiments using extreme forcing - soil moisture was held at field capacity or wilting point throughout season long simulations. Here we use the MM5 model linked to the OSU land surface scheme to assess the strength of soil moisture-rainfall feedbacks in the NAMS region that result from realistic soil moisture forcing. Simulations are driven by NCEP reanalysis. The horizontal resolution of the finest grid is 30 km. Three member ensemble experiments begin on June 1 and end on October 1. First, we use the coupled MM5/OSU model to simulate NAMS climate and soil moisture in wet (1999) and dry (2000) monsoon seasons. Second, we repeat these two experiments but constrain the precipitation rate in July over the entire NAM region so that it approximates the mean state. This is accomplished by scaling the simulated precipitation at each point so that it is equal to mean observed precipitation at that location. Third, we repeat the 1999 and 2000 experiments but constrain the soil moisture field in July to the climatological mean value from the NCEP reanalysis. Both types of sensitivity experiments preserve the temporal variability of sea surface temperature (SST) in the surrounding oceans. We compare the atmosphere and land surface state in the control and sensitivity experiments. This isolates the effects of soil moisture anomalies on the

  18. Cyanide Degradation under Alkaline Conditions by a Strain of Fusarium solani Isolated from Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Dumestre, A.; Chone, T.; Portal, J.; Gerard, M.; Berthelin, J.

    1997-01-01

    Several cyanide-tolerant microorganisms have been selected from alkaline wastes and soils contaminated with cyanide. Among them, a fungus identified as Fusarium solani IHEM 8026 shows a good potential for cyanide biodegradation under alkaline conditions (pH 9.2 to 10.7). Results of K(sup14)CN biodegradation studies show that fungal metabolism seems to proceed by a two-step hydrolytic mechanism: (i) the first reaction involves the conversion of cyanide to formamide by a cyanide-hydrolyzing enzyme, cyanide hydratase (EC 4.2.1.66); and (ii) the second reaction consists of the conversion of formamide to formate, which is associated with fungal growth. No growth occurred during the first step of cyanide degradation, suggesting that cyanide is toxic to some degree even in cyanide-degrading microorganisms, such as F. solani. The presence of organic nutrients in the medium has a major influence on the occurrence of the second step. Addition of small amounts of yeast extract led to fungal growth, whereas no growth was observed in media containing cyanide as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. The simple hydrolytic detoxification pathway identified in the present study could be used for the treatment of many industrial alkaline effluents and wastes containing free cyanide without a prior acidification step, thus limiting the risk of cyanhydric acid volatilization; this should be of great interest from an environmental and health point of view. PMID:16535647

  19. Measuring Water Content and Desorption Isotherms in Soil Simulants Under Martian Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, T.; Aharonson, O.; Schorghofer, N.; Hecht, M. H.; Bridges, N.; Green, J. R.

    2003-12-01

    Theoretical predictions as well as recent spacecraft observations indicate that large quantities of ice is present in the high latitudes upper decimeters to meters of the Martian regolith. At shallower depths and warmer locations small amounts of H2O, either adsorbed or free, may be present transiently. We seek to simulate Mars surface conditions and to observe the effects of temperature cycling (diurnal and seasonal scale) on the water content profiles of several soil simulants. To model the upper Martian regolith, we begin by using crushed JSC Mars-1 palagonite with particles in the 50 micron to sub-micron size range. Spheres of pure silica in the 10 to 40 mm range may also be used to study the effects of grain surface morphology and composition. Simulants with various water contents are brought to Mars pressures and monitored. A line source heat-pulse probe is being prepared to monitor water content profiles in real-time and to be calibrated against water content samples measured with thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. Initial experiments will allow us to monitor water content; more refined investigations will permit the determination of desorption isotherms.

  20. The diel imprint of leaf metabolism on the δ13 C signal of soil respiration under control and drought conditions.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Matthias; Hammerle, Albin; Sturm, Patrick; Baur, Thomas; Gentsch, Lydia; Knohl, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Recent (13) CO(2) canopy pulse chase labeling studies revealed that photosynthesis influences the carbon isotopic composition of soil respired CO(2) (δ(13) C(SR)) even on a diel timescale. However, the driving mechanisms underlying these short-term responses remain unclear, in particular under drought conditions. The gas exchange of CO(2) isotopes of canopy and soil was monitored in drought/nondrought-stressed beech (Fagus sylvatica) saplings after (13) CO(2) canopy pulse labeling. A combined canopy/soil chamber system with gas-tight separated soil and canopy compartments was coupled to a laser spectrometer measuring mixing ratios and isotopic composition of CO(2) in air at high temporal resolution. The measured δ(13) C(SR) signal was then explained and substantiated by a mechanistic carbon allocation model. Leaf metabolism had a strong imprint on diel cycles in control plants, as a result of an alternating substrate supply switching between sugar and transient starch. By contrast, diel cycles in drought-stressed plants were determined by the relative contributions of autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration throughout the day. Drought reduced the speed of the link between photosynthesis and soil respiration by a factor of c. 2.5, depending on the photosynthetic rate. Drought slows the coupling between photosynthesis and soil respiration and alters the underlying mechanism causing diel variations of δ(13) C(SR). PMID:21851360

  1. Soil-ecological conditions of Korean pine growth in its natural area and upon introduction in the European part of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, M. M.

    2015-05-01

    Socioeconomic expediency and soil-ecological potential of introducing Korean pine ( Pinus koraiensis) in the forest zone of the European part of Russia are discussed. The specificity of soil-ecological conditions and technologies applied for growing Korean pine in some tree farms in the Far East region and in the European part of Russia are compared. The main soil-ecological factors and optimum soil parameters for the successful development of Korean pine in its natural and introduction areas are determined. It is shown that development of Korean pine seedlings on well-drained soils depends on the contents of potassium, humus, and physical clay in the soils. The seedlings gain maximum size upon their growing on soddypodzolic soils (Retisols). The analysis of mineral nutrition of pine seedlings of different ages, soil conditions, and seasonal growth phases shows that the contents of potassium and some microelements play the leading role in the successful growth of introduced Korean pine.

  2. Impact of rock materials and biofertilizations on P and K availability for maize (Zea Maize) under calcareous soil conditions

    PubMed Central

    Abou-el-Seoud, I.I.; Abdel-Megeed, A.

    2011-01-01

    The present work evaluated the synergistic effects of soil fertilization with rock P and K materials and co-inoculation with P and K-dissolving bacteria [PDB (Bacillus megaterium var. phosphaticum) and KDB (Bacillus mucilaginosus and B. subtilis)] on the improvement of P and K uptake, P and K availability and growth of maize plant grown under limited P and K soil conditions (calcareous soil). The experiment was establishment with eight treatments: without rock P and K materials or bacteria inoculation (control), rock P (RP), rock K (RK), RP + PDB, RK + KDB and R(P + K)+(P + K)DB. Under the same conditions of this study, co-inoculation of PDB and KDB in conjunction with direct application of rock P and K materials (R(P + K)) into the soil increased P and K availability and uptake, and the plant growth (shoot and root growth) of maize plants grown on P and K limited soils. PMID:23961162

  3. Bioremediation of polychlorinated-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans contaminated soil using simulated compost-amended landfill reactors under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Wu, Jer-Horng; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Chang, Juu-En

    2016-07-15

    Compost-amended landfill reactors were developed to reduce polychlorinated-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in contaminated soils. By periodically recirculating leachate and suppling oxygen, the online monitoring of the oxidation reduction potential confirmed that the reactors were maintained under hypoxic conditions, with redox levels constantly fluctuating between -400 and +80mV. The subsequent reactor operation demonstrated that PCDD/F degradation in soil could be facilitated by amending compost originating from the cow manure and waste sludge and that the degradation might be affected by the availability of easily degradable substrates in the soil and compost. The pyrosequencing analysis of V4/V5 regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes suggested that species richness of the soil microbial community was increased by a factor of 1.37-1.61. Although the bacterial community varied with the compost origin and changed markedly during reactor operation, it was dominated by Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. The aerotolerant anaerobic Sedimentibacter and Propionibacterium spp., and the uncultured Chloroflexi group could be temporarily induced to a high abundance by amending the cow manure compost; the bacterial growths were associated with the rapid degradation of PCDD/Fs. Overall, the novel bioremediation method for PCDD/F-contaminated soils using hypoxic conditions was effective, simple, energy saving, and thus easily practicable. PMID:27037469

  4. Impact of rock materials and biofertilizations on P and K availability for maize (Zea Maize) under calcareous soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Abou-El-Seoud, I I; Abdel-Megeed, A

    2012-01-01

    The present work evaluated the synergistic effects of soil fertilization with rock P and K materials and co-inoculation with P and K-dissolving bacteria [PDB (Bacillus megaterium var. phosphaticum) and KDB (Bacillus mucilaginosus and B. subtilis)] on the improvement of P and K uptake, P and K availability and growth of maize plant grown under limited P and K soil conditions (calcareous soil). The experiment was establishment with eight treatments: without rock P and K materials or bacteria inoculation (control), rock P (RP), rock K (RK), RP + PDB, RK + KDB and R(P + K)+(P + K)DB. Under the same conditions of this study, co-inoculation of PDB and KDB in conjunction with direct application of rock P and K materials (R(P + K)) into the soil increased P and K availability and uptake, and the plant growth (shoot and root growth) of maize plants grown on P and K limited soils. PMID:23961162

  5. A novel method for tracing the movement of multiple individual soil particles under rainfall conditions using florescent videography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Robert; Pates, Jackie; Quinton, John

    2016-04-01

    The importance of developing new techniques to study soil movement cannot be underestimated especially those that integrate new technology. Currently there are limited empirical data available about the movement of individual soil particles, particularly high quality time-resolved data. Here we present a new technique which allows multiple individual soil particles to be traced in real time under simulated rainfall conditions. The technique utilises fluorescent videography in combination with a fluorescent soil tracer, which is based on natural particles. The system has been successfully used on particles greater than ~130 micrometres diameter. The technique uses HD video shot at 50 frames per second, providing extremely high temporal (0.02 s) and spatial resolution (sub-millimetre) of a particle's location without the need to perturb the system. Once the tracer has been filmed then the images are processed and analysed using a particle analysis and visualisation toolkit written in python. The toolkit enables the creation of 2 and 3-D time-resolved graphs showing the location of 1 or more particles. Quantitative numerical analysis of a pathway (or collection of pathways) is also possible, allowing parameters such as particle speed and displacement to be assessed. Filming the particles removes the need to destructively sample material and has many side-benefits, reducing the time, money and effort expended in the collection, transport and laboratory analysis of soils, while delivering data in a digital form which is perfect for modern computer-driven analysis techniques. There are many potential applications for the technique. High resolution empirical data on how soil particles move could be used to create, parameterise and evaluate soil movement models, particularly those that use the movement of individual particles. As data can be collected while rainfall is occurring it may offer the ability to study systems under dynamic conditions(rather than rainfall of a

  6. Impact of groundwater capillary rises as lower boundary conditions for soil moisture in a land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergnes, Jean-Pierre; Decharme, Bertrand; Habets, Florence

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater is a key component of the global hydrological cycle. It sustains base flow in humid climate while it receives seepage in arid region. Moreover, groundwater influences soil moisture through water capillary rise into the soil and potentially affects the energy and water budget between the land surface and the atmosphere. Despite its importance, most global climate models do not account for groundwater and their possible interaction with both the surface hydrology and the overlying atmosphere. This study assesses the impact of capillary rise from shallow groundwater on the simulated water budget over France. The groundwater scheme implemented in the Total Runoff Integrated Pathways (TRIP) river routing model in a previous study is coupled with the Interaction between Soil Biosphere Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model. In this coupling, the simulated water table depth acts as the lower boundary condition for the soil moisture diffusivity equation. An original parameterization accounting for the subgrid elevation inside each grid cell is proposed in order to compute this fully-coupled soil lower boundary condition. Simulations are performed at high (1/12°) and low (0.5°) resolutions and evaluated over the 1989-2009 period. Compared to a free-drain experiment, upward capillary fluxes at the bottom of soil increase the mean annual evapotranspiration simulated over the aquifer domain by 3.12 % and 1.54 % at fine and low resolutions respectively. This process logically induces a decrease of the simulated recharge from ISBA to the aquifers and contributes to enhance the soil moisture memory. The simulated water table depths are then lowered, which induces a slight decrease of the simulated mean annual river discharges. However, the fully-coupled simulations compare well with river discharge and water table depth observations which confirms the relevance of the coupling formalism.

  7. Conditions in Home and Transplant Soils Have Differential Effects on the Performance of Diploid and Allotetraploid Anthericum Species

    PubMed Central

    Černá, Lucie; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Due to increased levels of heterozygosity, polyploids are expected to have a greater ability to adapt to different environments than their diploid ancestors. While this theoretical pattern has been suggested repeatedly, studies comparing adaptability to changing conditions in diploids and polyploids are rare. The aim of the study was to determine the importance of environmental conditions of origin as well as target conditions on performance of two Anthericum species, allotetraploid A. liliago and diploid A. ramosum and to explore whether the two species differ in the ability to adapt to these environmental conditions. Specifically, we performed a common garden experiment using soil from 6 localities within the species’ natural range, and we simulated the forest and open environments in which they might occur. We compared the performance of diploid A. ramosum and allotetraploid A. liliago originating from different locations in the different soils. The performance of the two species was not affected by simulated shading but differed strongly between the different target soils. Growth of the tetraploids was not affected by the origin of the plants. In contrast, diploids from the most nutrient poor soil performed best in the richest soil, indicating that diploids from deprived environments have an increased ability to acquire nutrients when available. They are thus able to profit from transfer to novel nutrient rich environments. Therefore, the results of the study did not support the general expectation that the polyploids should have a greater ability than the diploids to adapt to a wide range of conditions. In contrast, the results are in line with the observation that diploids occupy a wider range of environments than the allotetraploids in our system. PMID:25607545

  8. Pre-Emergency-Department Care-Seeking Patterns Are Associated with the Severity of Presenting Condition for Emergency Department Visit and Subsequent Adverse Events: A Timeframe Episode Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nan-Ping; Lai, K. Robert; Huang, Hsin-Tsung

    2015-01-01

    Background Many patients treated in Emergency Department (ED) visits can be treated at primary or urgent care sectors, despite the fact that a number of ED visitors seek other forms of care prior to an ED visit. However, little is known regarding how the pre-ED activity episodes affect ED visits. Objectives We investigated whether care-seeking patterns involve the use of health care services of various types prior to ED visits and examined the associations of these patterns with the severity of the presenting condition for the ED visit (EDVS) and subsequent events. Methods This retrospective observational study used administrative data on beneficiaries of the universal health care insurance program in Taiwan. The service type, treatment capacity, and relative diagnosis were used to classify pre-ED visits into 8 care types. Frequent pattern analysis was used to identify sequential care-seeking patterns and to classify 667,183 eligible pre-ED episodes into patterns. Generalized linear models were developed using generalized estimating equations to examine the associations of these patterns with EDVS and subsequent events. Results The results revealed 17 care-seeking patterns. The EDVS and likelihood of subsequent events significantly differed among patterns. The ED severity index of patterns differ from patterns seeking directly ED care (coefficients ranged from -0.05 to 0.13), and the odds-ratios for the likelihood of subsequent ED visits and hospitalization ranged from 1.18 to 1.86 and 1.16 to 2.84, respectively. Conclusions The pre-ED care-seeking patterns differ in severity of presenting condition and subsequent events that may represent different causes of ED visit. Future health policy maker may adopt different intervention strategies for targeted population to reduce unnecessary ED visit effectively. PMID:26030278

  9. Fast effects of biochar amendment on soil C and N dynamics, nutrient availability and fertility under controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Rosa, J. M.; Knicker, H.

    2012-04-01

    The shift towards a biobased economy will probably trigger the application of bioenergy by-products and charred residues to the soil as either amendments or fertilizers. However, limited research has been done to determine how this will influence C and N dynamics and soil functioning. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of 15N enriched pyrogenic organic matter (15N-PyOM) on C and N mineralisation, nutrient availability and fertility of amended soil. A typical Andalusian agricultural soil (calcareous Rhodoxeralf) was amended (0.1% w/w) with 15N enriched-biochar produced from Lolium perenne. The bioavailability and partitioning of the 15N from the biochars was tested by determining its content in the soil and the ray grass grown on this soil under controlled conditions for 72 days. After 30, 60 and 72 days of incubation, soil samples were analyzed for C, N, 15N, microbial biomass C. In addition, the chemical alteration of the 15N-containing organic structures during mobilization/immobilization was followed by solid-state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Soil amendment led to a general increase in the biomass production and N retention. After 72 days of incubation, 10 % of the 15N added in the soil with the PyOM had been degraded and available for grass growth. 15N and 13C NMR spectra confirmed that part of the pyrogenic heterocyclic N has been transformed into amide N, possibly by the use of microbiologically mobilized 15N from the char. Newer results indicate that PyOM can be microbially degraded, the efficiency of which depends on its chemical composition and properties. The chemical properties of the used material as well as the optimal conditions for microbial decay during the laboratory incubation experiments are likely to have augmented PyOM decomposition. In summary, our results indicate that: i) a re-evaluation of the potential of pyrogenic material as a sink of C and N is needed. ii) the characterization of the chemical composition of char material is

  10. Nitrite-driven nitrous oxide production under aerobic soil conditions: Kinetics and biochemical controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrite (NO2-) can accumulate during nitrification in soil following fertilizer application. While the role of NO2- as a substrate regulating nitrous oxide (N2O) production is recognized, kinetic data are not available that allow for estimating N2O production or soil-to-atmosphere fluxes as a functi...

  11. Simple surface foam application enhances bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil in cold conditions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Jongshin; Kim, Jaisoo

    2015-04-01

    Landfarming of oil-contaminated soil is ineffective at low temperatures, because the number and activity of micro-organisms declines. This study presents a simple and versatile technique for bioremediation of diesel-contaminated soil, which involves spraying foam on the soil surface without additional works such as tilling, or supply of water and air. Surfactant foam containing psychrophilic oil-degrading microbes and nutrients was sprayed twice daily over diesel-contaminated soil at 6 °C. Removal efficiencies in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) at 30 days were 46.3% for landfarming and 73.7% for foam-spraying. The first-order kinetic biodegradation rates for landfarming and foam-spraying were calculated as 0.019 d(-1) and 0.044 d(-1), respectively. Foam acted as an insulating medium, keeping the soil 2 °C warmer than ambient air. Sprayed foam was slowly converted to aqueous solution within 10-12h and infiltrated the soil, providing microbes, nutrients, water, and air for bioaugmentation. Furthermore, surfactant present in the aqueous solution accelerated the dissolution of oil from the soil, resulting in readily biodegradable aqueous form. Significant reductions in hydrocarbon concentration were simultaneously observed in both semi-volatile and non-volatile fractions. As the initial soil TPH concentration increased, the TPH removal rate of the foam-spraying method also increased. PMID:25577318

  12. Soil attributes, soybean mineral nutrition and yield in diverse crop rotations under no-till conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of sustainable agricultural systems depends on understanding complex relationships between soil attributes, crop rotations, and crop yield. Objectives were to measure how soil chemical and physical attributes as well as soybean (Glycine max Merr.) stover dry weight and mineral concentra...

  13. Effect of meteorology and soil condition on metolachlor and atrazine volatilization over a 10 year period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatilization of pesticides can detrimentally affect the environment by contaminating soil and surface waters far away from where the pesticides were applied. A 10-year study was conducted to focus on the impact of soil and climatic factors governing herbicide volatilization from an agricultural f...

  14. Nitrite-Driven Nitrous Oxide Production Under Aerobic Soil Conditions: Kinetics and Biochemical Controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrite (NO2-) can accumulate during nitrification in soil following fertilizer application. While the role of NO2- as a substrate regulating nitrous oxide (N2O) production is recognized, kinetic data are not available that allow for estimating N2O production or soil-to-atmosphere fluxes as a functi...

  15. Hyperspectral remote sensing estimation of crop residue cover: Soil mineralogy, surface conditions, and their effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation tillage practices can enhance soil organic carbon content (SOC), improve soil structure, and reduce erosion. However, direct assessment of tillage practice for monitoring SOC change over large regions is difficult. Remote sensing of crop residue cover (CRC) can help assess tillage pra...

  16. Updating Soil Surface Conditions During Wind Erosion Events Using the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During significant wind erosion events the soil surface is continually modified, however, erosion models rarely account for these changes. The objectives of this work are to provide an overview of the WEPS soil surface update methodology and demonstrate that by periodic surface updating during even...

  17. Updating soil surface conditions during wind erosion events using the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During significant wind erosion events the soil surface is continually modified. However, erosion models rarely account for these changes. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that physically-based field-scale models can improve their accuracy by periodically updating soil surface conditio...

  18. Aircraft based soil moisture retrievals under mixed vegetation and topographic conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An unresolved issue in global soil moisture retrieval using passive microwave sensors is the spatial integration of heterogeneous landscape features to the nominal 50 km footprint observed by most satellite systems. One of the objectives of the Soil Moisture Experiments 2004 (SMEX04) was to address ...

  19. Temporal patterns of infiltration into a water repellent soil under field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Phil; Roper, Margaret; Micin, Shayne; Jongepier, Ramona

    2014-05-01

    Water repellency causes substantial economic losses for farmers in southern Australia through impacts on crop growth and weed germination. However, recent research has demonstrated that laboratory measurements of water repellency may not be a reliable indicator of the severity of symptoms experienced in the field. In particular, crop residue retention and minimal soil disturbance led to increased water repellency, but was also associated with higher soil water contents measured at strategic times of the year. Little is known about the temporal patterns of soil water storage close to the soil surface in a water repellent sand. In this research we measured soil water content at a depth of 0.05 m at 15-minute intervals from June 2011 to October 2012, under various treatment combinations of residue retention and soil disturbance. Measurements were made in both 'crop row' and 'crop inter-row' positions. For a rainfall event (9.2 mm) in March 2012, prior to crop seeding, plots previously established with no-till absorbed significantly more water (increase in soil water content of 0.074 v/v) than plots conventionally cultivated (0.038 v/v). In June 2012 (12.6 mm), 4 weeks after crop seeding, tillage was again significant, and there was a significant interaction between tillage and 'row' or 'inter-row' position. These results demonstrate the importance of crop management in modifying the response of water repellent soils to rainfall in the field.

  20. DETERMINATION OF KINETICS OF PHOSPHORUS MINERALIZATION IN SOILS UNDER OXIDIZING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In search of a better approach to predict phosphorus movement in soils from applied wastewaters, reactions of added orthophosphates were studied in 9 different soils with widely varying physical and chemical properties. Information obtained on the nature and rate of P reaction wi...

  1. Mathematical simulation of soil microclimate conditions for predicting weed seed germination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microclimate-based models for weed seed emergence are in the initial phases of development. The major driving forces of weed seed germination in the soil environment are temperature and soil moisture content. In the past these quantities have been measured at a single point (e.g., 5 cm). However, th...

  2. Updating soil surface conditions during wind erosion events using the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During significant wind erosion events the soil surface is continually modified, however, erosion models rarely account for these changes. The objectives of this work are to provide an overview of the WEPS soil surface update methodology and demonstrate that by periodic surface updating during even...

  3. Simulated Corn Yield Responses to Limited-Water Irrigation Under Varying Soil and Climate Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water holding capacity of soils is a key factor in successful dryland and irrigated agriculture as it influences the fraction of precipitation and irrigation that is stored in the soil profile that can be subsequently used for crop production. There is a well-known dependence of water holding capaci...

  4. A new top boundary condition for modeling surface diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer: theoretical analysis and application to soil evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. Y.; Riley, W. J.

    2013-02-01

    We describe a new top boundary condition (TBC) for representing the air-soil diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer. This new TBC (1) accounts for the multi-phase flow of a generic tracer; (2) accounts for effects of soil temperature, pH, solubility, sorption, and desorption processes; (3) enables a smooth transition between wet and dry soil conditions; (4) is compatible with the conductance formulation for modeling air-water volatile tracer exchange; and (5) is applicable to site, regional, and global land models. Based on the new TBC, we developed new formulations for bare-soil resistance and corresponding soil evaporation efficiency. The new soil resistance is predicted as the reciprocal of the harmonic sum of two resistances: (1) gaseous and aqueous molecular diffusion and (2) liquid mass flow resulting from the hydraulic pressure gradient between the soil surface and center of the topsoil control volume. We compared the predicted soil evaporation efficiency with those from several field and laboratory soil evaporation measurements and found good agreement with the typically observed two-stage soil evaporation curves. Comparison with the soil evaporation efficiency equation of Lee and Pielke (1992; hereafter LP92) indicates that their equation can overestimate soil evaporation when the atmospheric resistance is low and underestimate soil evaporation when the soil is dry. Using a synthetic inversion experiment, we demonstrated that using inverted soil resistance data from field measurements to derive empirical soil resistance formulations resulted in large uncertainty because (1) the inverted soil resistance data are always severely impacted by measurement error and (2) the derived empirical equation is very sensitive to the number of data points and the assumed functional form of the resistance. We expect the application of our new TBC in land models will provide a consistent representation for the diffusive tracer exchange at the soil-air interface.

  5. A new top boundary condition for modeling surface diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer: theoretical analysis and application to soil evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. Y.; Riley, W. J.

    2012-10-01

    We describe a new top boundary condition (TBC) for representing the air-soil diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer. This new TBC (1) accounts for the multi-phase flow of a generic tracer; (2) accounts for effects of soil temperature, pH, solubility, sorption, and desorption processes; (3) enables a smooth transition between wet and dry soil conditions; (4) is compatible with the conductance formulation for modeling air-water volatile tracer exchange; and (5) is applicable to site, regional, and global land models. Based on the new TBC, we developed new formulations for bare-soil resistance and corresponding soil evaporation efficiency. The new soil resistance is predicted as the reciprocal of the harmonic sum of two resistances: (1) gaseous and aqueous molecular diffusion and (2) liquid mass flow resulting from the hydraulic pressure gradient between the soil surface and center of the topsoil control volume. The resulting soil evaporation efficiency reasonably explains the two-stage soil evaporation curves typically observed in field and laboratory soil evaporation measurements. Comparison with the soil evaporation efficiency equation of Lee and Pielke (1992; hereafter LP92) indicates that their equation can overestimate soil evaporation when the atmospheric resistance is low and underestimate soil evaporation when the soil is dry. Using a synthetic inversion experiment, we demonstrated that using inverted soil resistance data from field measurements to derive empirical soil resistance formulations resulted in large uncertainty because (1) the inverted soil resistance data is always severely impacted by measurement error and (2) the derived empirical equation is very sensitive to the number of data points and the assumed functional form of the resistance. We expect the application of our new TBC in land models will provide a consistent representation for the diffusive tracer exchange at the soil-air interface.

  6. Impact of conservation agriculture on catchment runoff and soil loss under changing climate conditions in May Zeg-zeg (Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanckriet, Sil; Araya, Tesfay; Cornelis, Wim; Verfaillie, Els; Poesen, Jean; Govaerts, Bram; Bauer, Hans; Deckers, Jozef; Haile, Mitiku; Nyssen, Jan

    2012-12-01

    SummaryThis study evaluates the practice of conservation agriculture (CA) in the May Zeg-zeg catchment (MZZ; 187 ha) in the North Ethiopian Highlands as a soil management technique for reducing soil loss and runoff, and assesses the consequences of future large-scale implementation on soil and hydrology at catchment-level. The study of such practice is important especially under conditions of climate change, since EdGCM (Educational Global Climate Model) simulation predicts by 2040 an increase in precipitation by more than 100 mm yr-1 in the study area. Firstly, field-saturated infiltration rates, together with soil texture and soil organic carbon contents, were measured. The relation with local topography allows to generate a pedotransfer function for field-saturated infiltration rate, and spatial interpolation with Linear Regression Mapping was used to map field-saturated infiltration rates optimally within the catchment. Secondly, on several farmlands, CA was checked against plain tillage (PT) for values of field-saturated infiltration rates, soil organic carbon, runoff and soil loss. Results show no significant differences for infiltration rates but significant differences for runoff and soil loss (as measured in the period 2005-2011). Runoff coefficients were 30.4% for PT and 18.8% for CA; soil losses were 35.4 t ha-1 yr-1 for PT and 14.4 t ha-1 yr-1 for CA. Thirdly, all collected information was used to predict future catchment hydrological response for full-implementation of CA under the predicted wetter climate (simulation with EdGCM). Curve Numbers for farmlands with CA were calculated. An area-weighted Curve Number allows the simulation of the 2011 rainy season runoff, predicting a total runoff depth of 23.5 mm under CA and 27.9 mm under PT. Furthermore, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation management factor P was calibrated for CA. Results also show the important influence of increased surface roughness on water ponding, modeled with a hydrologic

  7. Mapping soil water content under sparse vegetation and changeable sky conditions: comparison of two thermal inertia approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, Antonino; Capodici, Fulvio; Ciraolo, Giuseppe; La Loggia, Goffredo

    2013-01-01

    a sufficient condition to obtain accurate estimates of soil water content. A corrective coefficient taking into account actual sky cloudiness throughout the day allows better estimates of thermal inertia and, thus, of soil water content.

  8. Structural and physiological responses of two invasive weeds, Mikania micrantha and Chromolaena odorata, to contrasting light and soil water conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling-Ling; Wen, Da-Zhi

    2009-01-01

    To better understand the requirement of light and soil water conditions in the invasion sites of two invasive weeds, Mikania micrantha and Chromolaena odorata, we investigated their structural and physiological traits in response to nine combined treatments of light [full, medium and low irradiance (LI)] and soil water (full, medium and low field water content) conditions in three glasshouses. Under the same light conditions, most variables for both species did not vary significantly among different water treatments. Irrespective of water treatment, both species showed significant decreases in maximum light saturated photosynthetic rate (P (max)), photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency, and relative growth rate under LI relative to full irradiance; specific leaf area, however, increased significantly from full to LI though leaf area decreased significantly, indicating that limited light availability under extreme shade was the critical factor restricting the growth of both species. Our results also indicated that M. micrantha performed best under a high light and full soil water combination, while C. odorata was more efficient in growth under a high light and medium soil water combination. PMID:19030958

  9. Estimating Spatial Disturbution of Surface Soil Mositure Conditions Using a Downscale Technique with Thermal Inertia Retrieved from AMSR2 Soil Moisture Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, D.; Kimura, R.

    2014-12-01

    We examined that a method for estimating spatial distribution of surface soil moisture conditions with a fine grid scale. The AMSR2 soil moisture products which have been produced by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) with a coarse grid scale (50 km) were downscaled by a spatial distribution of thermal inertia (3 km), which was retrived from a two-source linear surface heat budget model using an optimization method in which the input variables such as MODIS surface temperature, insolation retrieved from a geostationary satellite, and surface meterological data were incorporated. The downscale technique employed a characteristic that thermal inertia is almost proportional to volumetric soil moisture content, which was found in results of some field experiments. This downscale technique was applied to the AMSR2 products of summer season of central Mongolia where typical and dry steppe were dominated. A preliminary result of the downscaling technique showed fairly good result that the values of downscaled soil moisture were varied in response to rainfall events at some grids where meteorological stations existed, while the values of AMSR2 were not significantly changed.

  10. No tillage effect on water retention characteristics of soil aggregates in rainfed semiarid conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Moure, Nuria; López, M. Victoria; Moret, David

    2010-05-01

    The evaluation of changes in soil moisture retention characteristics associated to alterations in soil structure is of great interest in tillage studies. Most of these studies have evaluated soil properties in samples of total soil but not in individual aggregates. However, soil behavior at a macroscale level depends on the aggregate properties. A better knowledge of aggregate characteristics, as the water retention properties, will help to explain, for example, the response of soil to tillage, compaction and crop growth, and hence, to plan adequate soil management practices. In this study we determine the water retention curve of soil aggregates of different sizes from a soil under two tillage systems (conventional and no tillage). The study was carried out in a silty clay loam soil of semiarid Aragon (NE Spain). Two tillage systems were compared: no tillage (NT) and conventional tillage with mouldboard plough (CT). Water retention curves (WRC) were determined for soil surface aggregates (0-5 cm) of three different sizes (8-4, 4-2 and 2-1 mm in diameter) by using the TDR-pressure cell (Moret et al. 2008. Soil Till. Res, 100, 114-119). The TDR-pressure cell is a non-destructive method which permits determining WRC with the only one and same soil sample. Thus, the pressure cell was filled with aggregates up to 4 cm height, weighted and wetted to saturation from the bottom. Pressure steps were sequentially applied at -0.5, -1.5, -3, -5, -10, -33, -100, -300 kPa, and water content of each aggregate sample was measured gravimetrically and by TDR 24 h after starting each pressure head step. The volume of the sample within the cell was also determined at this moment in order to obtain the bulk density and thus calculate the volumetric water content. A good relationship was obtained between the volumetric water content calculated from the gravimetric water content and the corresponding values measured by TDR (r2=0.907; p≤0.05). Within the same tillage treatment, no

  11. Multi-size saltation for different soil moisture conditions at a gobi site in the Taklimakan Desert, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, M.; Mikami, M.; Yamada, Y.; Zeng, F.; Gao, W.

    2005-12-01

    Sand Particle Counter (SPC) was newly developed to measure saltation process for particle size {d} from 38 to 667 um with 32 bins every seconds. We set this instrument at a gobi site in the southern part of the Taklimakan Desert, China in Spring in 2002 and 2003, as a part of ADEC experiment. Simultaneously, we measured soil water content using oven dry method and Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) sensors. From this result, it is found that The threshold wind speed u_t(θ) for wet conditions (θ = 0.009 m3m-3) was estimated to be 9.5 ms-1 at 3.8 m height and was 1.27 times larger than that for dry conditions (θ = 0.002 m3m-3), which consistent with Fecan et alOs (1999) theoretical consideration. The soil water content had marked effects on the threshold wind speed u_t and {q}. It was also demonstrated that (1) the saltation flux, q(d), for different particle size {d} for coarse sand particles of 69 to 203 um in diameter in wet condition were smaller than those in dry condition, whereas, the q(d) for fine sand particles of 39 to 54 um did not change and (2) the saltation particle size spectra changed from dry to wet conditions. These results suggest that the {q} depends on particle size and soil water content.

  12. Amendment of biochar reduces the release of toxic elements under dynamic redox conditions in a contaminated floodplain soil.

    PubMed

    Rinklebe, Jörg; Shaheen, Sabry M; Frohne, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Biochar (BC) can be used to remediate soils contaminated with potential toxic elements (PTEs). However, the efficiency of BC to immobilize PTEs in highly contaminated floodplain soils under dynamic redox conditions has not been studied up to date. Thus, we have (i) quantified the impact of pre-definite redox conditions on the release dynamics of dissolved aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) in a highly contaminated soil (CS) (non-treated) and in the same soil treated with 10 g kg(-1) biochar based material (CS+BC), and (ii) assessed the efficacy of the material to reduce the concentrations of PTEs in soil solution under dynamic redox conditions using an automated biogeochemical microcosm apparatus. The impact of redox potential (EH), pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and sulfate (SO4(2-)) on dynamics of PTEs was also determined. The EH was lowered to +68 mV and afterwards increased stepwise to +535 mV. Significant negative correlation between EH and pH in CS and CS+BC was detected. The systematic increase of EH along with decrease of pH favors the mobilization of PTEs in CS and CS+BC. The material addition seems to have little effect on redox processes because pattern of EH/pH and release dynamics of PTEs was basically similar in CS and CS+BC. However, concentrations of dissolved PTEs were considerably lower in CS+BC than in CS which demonstrates that BC is able to decrease concentrations of dissolved PTEs even under dynamic redox conditions. PMID:25900116

  13. Measuring, understanding and implementing (or at least trying) soil and water conservation in agricultural areas in Mediterranean conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Jose Alfonso; Burguet, María; Castillo, Carlos; de Luna, Elena; Guzmán, Gema; Lora, Ángel; Lorite, Ignacio; Mora, José; Pérez, Rafael; Soriano, María A.; Taguas, Encarnación V.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding soil erosion processes is the first step for designing and implementing effective soil conservation strategies. In agricultural areas, spatially in arid and semiarid conditions, water conservation is interlinked with soil conservation, and usually need to be addressed simultaneously to achieve success in their use by farmers. This is so for different reasons, but usually because some reduction in runoff is required to prevent soil erosion or to the need to design soil conservation systems that do maintain a favourable water balance for the crop to prevent yield reductions. The team presenting this communication works around both issues in Southern Spain, interconnecting several lines of research with the final objective of contribute to reverse some severe issues relating soil conservation in agricultural areas, mostly on tree crops (olives and vineyards). One of these lines is long-term experiments measuring, runoff and sediment losses at plot and small catchment scale. In these experiments we test the effect of different soil management alternatives on soil and water conservation. We also measured the evolution of soil properties and, in some cases, the evolution of soil moisture as well as nutrient and carbon losses with runoff and sediment. We also tests in these experiments new cover crops, from species better adapted to the rainfall regime of the region to mixes with several species to increase biodiversity. We complement these studies with surveys of soil properties in commercial farms. I some of these farms we follow the introduction by farmers of the cover crop strategies previously developed in our experimental fields. These data are invaluable to elaborate, calibrate and validate different runoff generation, water balance, and water erosion models and hillslope and small catchment scale. This allows us to elaborate regional analysis of the effect of different strategies to soil and water conservation in olive growing areas, and to refine

  14. Diversity of methanotrophs in Zoige wetland soils under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yun, Juanli; Ma, Anzhou; Li, Yaoming; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Wang, Yanfen; Zhang, Hongxun

    2010-01-01

    Zoige wetland is one of the most important methane emission centers in China. The oxidation of methane in the wetland affects global warming, soil ecology and atmospheric chemistry. Despite their global significance, microorganisms that consume methane in Zoige wetland remain poorly characterized. In this study, we investigated methanotrophs diversity in soil samples from both anaerobic site and aerobic site in Zoige wetland using pmoA gene as a molecular marker. The cloning library was constructed according to the pmoA sequences detected. Four clusters of methanotrophs were detected. The phylogenetic tree showed that all four clusters detected were affiliated to type I methanotrophs. Two novel clusters (cluster 1, cluster 2) were found to relate to none of the recognized genera of methanotrophs. These clusters have no cultured representatives and reveal an ecological adaptation of particular uncultured methanotrophs in Zoige wetland. Two clusters were belonging to Methylobacter and Methylococcus separately. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis gel bands pattern retrieved from these two samples revealed that the community compositions of anaerobic soil and aerobic soil were different from each other while anaerobic soil showed a higher metanotrophs diversity. Real-time PCR assays of the two samples demonstrated that aerobic soil sample in Zoige wetland was 1.5 times as much copy numbers as anaerobic soil. These data illustrated that methanotrophs are a group of microorganisms influence the methane consumption in Zoige wetland. PMID:21179963

  15. Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. Optimising post-mining soil conditions to maximise restoration success in a biodiverse semiarid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Erickson, Todd; Merritt, David; Dixon, Kingsley

    2014-05-01

    The original topsoil of mine degraded areas is frequently lost or damaged, which together with the absence of soil forming materials is a major constraint for seed germination and establishment in post-mining restoration. Thus, management of the available topsoil and the use of alternative growth media are critical to improve restoration areas disturbed through mining. Here we are developing laboratory and field trials to define the optimal range for physical and chemical properties of potentially suitable natural and 're-made' soil substrates and growth medium for 20 selected native plant species from the mining intensive Pilbara region of Western Australia. In this semiarid area, water is a limiting factor for seedling establishment, which is compounded by the lack of organic matter of post-disturbance soils. Therefore, particular attention is given to indicators of soil biological activity such as soil respiration, and hydrological soil properties such as water holding capacity, infiltration, hydraulic conductivity and soil water repellence. This research is part of a broader multi-study approach, the Restoration Seedbank Initiative project, a partnership between The University of Western Australia, BHP Billiton Iron Ore, and Kings Park and Botanic Garden to develop the science and underpinning knowledge to achieve biodiverse restoration in the Pilbara region, where land areas disturbed by mining exceed 40,000 ha. Achieving restoration success is critical as the Pilbara region is an ancient landscape with diverse geology and high levels of regional and local endemism in plants and animals.

  17. Hydrological Response of Soil Amendments Under the same Climatic Conditions (as Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso Gonzalez, Paloma; Francisco Martinez Murillo, Juan; Damian Ruiz Sinoga, Jose

    2014-05-01

    Soil loss due to water erosion is a serious problem in Mediterranean areas, that causes great concern. The resulting pattern of vegetation and bare soil is a key factor in runoff generation. According to this, different organic carbon extra-sources (sewage sludge, polymers, mulching, manure, etc) have been proved as an erosion control methods. Some studies indicate a positive influence on plant cover and sediment yield and reducing the high soil losses usually found in degraded areas, bare slopes and cultivate soils from Mediterranean. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role played by different soil amendments in the runoff generation and soil loss from closed and afforested plots. The experimental area is located in the Natural Park of Sierra Tejeda, Almijara and Alhama, in South of Spain. The study was carried out in seven 24 m2 (2 x 12 m) closed plots. Every pot had four repetitions. Rainfall was measured with a tipping-bucket raingauge (0.2 mm accuracy). In order to verify possible differences, we applied the test of Mann-Whitney U in corroboration with the previous homogeneity test of variance. Average total runoff collected from the 24 m2 plots was negligible for pinus branches mulching (5.52 l) and straw mulch (6.36 l), and high for hydroabsorbent polymers (22.49 l) and sheep manure (23.67 l). Mean soil losses for each of the land management indicated that hydroabsorbent polymers and sheep manure contributed with the greatest amounts, while straw mulch and pinus branches had negligible or no soil loss. The applications of straw mulch and pinus branches were very effective in reducing soil losses and produced an increase on the available water content respect to the control plots, although was lower than hydroabsorbent polymers.

  18. Soil-plant-atmosphere conditions regulating convective cloud formation above southeastern US pine plantations.

    PubMed

    Manoli, Gabriele; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Novick, Kimberly; Oishi, Andrew Christopher; Noormets, Asko; Marani, Marco; Katul, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.) occupy more than 20% of the forested area in the southern United States, represent more than 50% of the standing pine volume in this region, and remove from the atmosphere about 500 g C m-2 per year through net ecosystem exchange. Hence, their significance as a major regional carbon sink can hardly be disputed. What is disputed is whether the proliferation of young plantations replacing old forest in the southern United States will alter key aspects of the hydrologic cycle, including convective rainfall, which is the focus of the present work. Ecosystem fluxes of sensible (Hs) and latent heat (LE) and large-scale, slowly evolving free atmospheric temperature and water vapor content are known to be first-order controls on the formation of convective clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer. These controlling processes are here described by a zero-order analytical model aimed at assessing how plantations of different ages may regulate the persistence and transition of the atmospheric system between cloudy and cloudless conditions. Using the analytical model together with field observations, the roles of ecosystem Hs and LE on convective cloud formation are explored relative to the entrainment of heat and moisture from the free atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that cloudy-cloudless regimes at the land surface are regulated by a nonlinear relation between the Bowen ratio Bo=Hs/LE and root-zone soil water content, suggesting that young/mature pines ecosystems have the ability to recirculate available water (through rainfall predisposition mechanisms). Such nonlinearity was not detected in a much older pine stand, suggesting a higher tolerance to drought but a limited control on boundary layer dynamics. These results enable the generation of hypotheses about the impacts on convective cloud formation driven by afforestation/deforestation and groundwater depletion projected to increase following increased human population in the

  19. On the spatial distribution of the transpiration and soil moisture of a Mediterranean heterogeneous ecosystem in water-limited conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curreli, Matteo; Corona, Roberto; Montaldo, Nicola; Albertson, John D.; Oren, Ram

    2014-05-01

    Mediterranean ecosystems are characterized by a strong heterogeneity, and often by water-limited conditions. In these conditions contrasting plant functional types (PFT, e.g. grass and woody vegetation) compete for the water use. Both the vegetation cover spatial distribution and the soil properties impact the soil moisture (SM) spatial distribution. Indeed, vegetation cover density and type affects evapotranspiration (ET), which is the main lack of the soil water balance in these ecosystems. With the objective to carefully estimate SM and ET spatial distribution in a Mediterranean water-limited ecosystem and understanding SM and ET relationships, an extended field campaign is carried out. The study was performed in a heterogeneous ecosystem in Orroli, Sardinia (Italy). The experimental site is a typical Mediterranean ecosystem where the vegetation is distributed in patches of woody vegetation (wild olives mainly) and grass. Soil depth is low and spatially varies between 10 cm and 40 cm, without any correlation with the vegetation spatial distribution. ET, land-surface fluxes and CO2 fluxes are estimated by an eddy covariance technique based micrometeorological tower. But in heterogeneous ecosystems a key assumption of the eddy covariance theory, the homogeneity of the surface, is not preserved and the ET estimate may be not correct. Hence, we estimate ET of the woody vegetation using the thermal dissipation method (i.e. sap flow technique) for comparing the two methodologies. Due the high heterogeneity of the vegetation and soil properties of the field a total of 54 sap flux sensors were installed. 14 clumps of wild olives within the eddy covariance footprint were identified as the most representative source of flux and they were instrumented with the thermal dissipation probes. Measurements of diameter at the height of sensor installation (height of 0.4 m above ground) were recorded in all the clumps. Bark thickness and sapwood depth were measured on several

  20. Evaluation of Drainage from Passive Suction and Nonsuction Flux Meters in a Volcanic Clay Soil under Tropical Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    van der Velde, M; Green, S R.; Gee, Glendon W.; Vanclooster, M; Clothier, B E.

    2005-11-30

    Root zone drainage measurements are needed to improve fertilizer management in areas where agriculture may be impacting groundwater supplies. We present results of field tests where drainage was measured with two types of suction (resolution of 0.16 and 1.6 mm -1) and a nonsuction (resolution of 0.22 mm tip-1) water flux meter (WFM). The soil was a microstructured weathered volcanic ash located on a coral atoll subject to intense rainfall and located in the Kingdom of Tonga. Our objectives were to evaluate water flux measurements by comparing them with (i) simple water balance estimates of cumulative fluxes deduced from soil moisture content changes, and (iii) simulated fluxes using HYDRUS-1D. Soil hydraulic properties were obtained at five soil depths. During the 60-d evaluation period rainfall totaled 340 mm. The WFMs were installed in duplicate using disturbed soil. The consistency of the shape of the drainage curves measured with the WFMs, those derived from soil moisture changes, and those obtained with modeling led us to conclude that soil disturbance during WFM installation did not severely influence measurements. This was attributed to the strong microaggregation and disturbance introduced by plowing. Water balance and HYDRUS model estimates of drainage corresponded well with the measurement by nonsuction WFMs. Suction WFMs overestimated drainage, possibly due to flow convergence created by wick and divergence barrier lengths being not properly sized for the observed flow conditions. After the evaluation period some of the WFMs failed to respond. Nevertheless, flux meters are seen as promising tools to provide remote and continuous measurement of root zone drainage.

  1. Cloud resolving modelling of the life cycle of a MCS: Sensitivity to soil conditions over West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantner, L.; Kalthoff, N.

    2009-09-01

    In the African Sahelian (12°N-18°N) and Sudanian climate zone (9°N-11°N) convective systems contribute about 80-90% and about 50%, respectively, to the annual rainfall. Thus, they play a key role in the water cycle of West Africa. Their rainfall, however, is highly variable in space as well as in time. The initiation and modification of rain-producing convective systems in West Africa are still not well understood. In addition to mid- and upper-tropospheric forcing, the influence of surface and convective boundary layer (CBL) processes on the initiation of convection is often emphasised. Major factors are the spatial distribution and temporal development of water vapour in the CBL. Besides advective processes, water vapour is made available in the atmosphere locally through evapotranspiration from soil and vegetation; the latter is an important component of the earth's surface energy balance. Soil moisture affects the energy balance via the albedo and emissivity of the surface, the conduction of heat in the soil and the stomata resistance of vegetation. Research findings show that the soil moisture exerts greater influence on the CBL than vegetation. Cloud resolving real-case simulations initialized with ECMWF analysis data were performed to investigate the sensitivity of a mesoscale convective system (MCS) to soil properties. Several scenarios with different content of soil moisture and distribution of soil conditions were investigated. Initiation of convection was observed in all experiments. The initiation area was characterised by very low convective inhibition (CIN) and high convective available potential energy. The simulations showed some evidence that convection was initiated in the vicinity of orography and along soil moisture inhomogeneities. In a moist case precipitating cells were weak and disappeared when entering a region with higher CIN. In the other experiments MCSs developed. In the control run a weakening of the system was observed when

  2. Kinetics of selenate sorption in soil as influenced by biotic and abiotic conditions: a stirred flow-through reactor study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sanchez, L; Loffredo, N; Mounier, S; Martin-Garin, A; Coppin, F

    2014-12-01

    This study (i) quantified the kinetics of selenate sorption and (ii) measured the influence of biotic processes in soil selenate stabilisation. Stirred flow-through reactor experiments were conducted on samples of a silty clay soil (pH = 8, Eh = 240-300 mV) from Bure (France) in both non-sterile and sterile conditions. Parameters of the proposed two-site sorption model (EK), adapted from van Genuchten and Wagenet (1989), were estimated by nonlinear regression. Fast selenate sorption on type-1 sites was moderate, with an equilibrium constant of 25.5 and 39.1 L/kg for non-sterile and sterile conditions. Rate-limited sorption on type-2 sites increased with time, and was predominant for longer periods of time in non-sterile conditions. At equilibrium, it would represent over 96% of the sorbed inventory, with mean sorption times of 17 h and 191 h for non-sterile and sterile conditions. Our results showed for Bure soil that (i) selenate sorption in flowing and mildly-oxidising conditions was strongly kinetically controlled, especially in non-sterile conditions, (ii) selenate desorption was much slower than sorption, which suggests its pseudo-irreversible stabilisation, and (iii) microbial activity increased the contribution of rate-limited sorption on type-2 sites, for which it increased sorption rate by a factor 7 but also facilitated its reversibility. This work stresses the limits of the Kd approach to represent selenate sorption in flowing conditions and supports an alternative formulation like the EK model, but also points out that biotic conditions are significant sources of variability for sorption parameters. PMID:25151638

  3. Study of soil-plant transfer of 226Ra under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Soudek, Petr; Petrová, Sárka; Benesová, Dagmar; Kotyza, Jan; Vágner, Martin; Vanková, Radomíra; Vanek, Tomás

    2010-06-01

    A soil-plant transfer study was performed using soil from a former uranium ore processing factory in South Bohemia. We present the results from greenhouse experiments which include estimates of the time required for phytoremediation. The accumulation of (226)Ra by different plant species from a mixture of garden soil and contaminated substrate was extremely variable, ranging from 0.03 to 2.20 Bq (226)Ra/g DW. We found differences in accumulation of (226)Ra between plants from the same genus and between cultivars of the same plant species. The results of (226)Ra accumulation showed a linear relation between concentration of (226)Ra in plants and concentration of (226)Ra in soil mixtures. On the basis of these results we estimated the time required for phytoremediation, but this appears to be too long for practical purposes. PMID:18823682

  4. Quantifying soil surface photolysis under conditions simulating water movement in the field: a new laboratory test design.

    PubMed

    Hand, Laurence H; Nichols, Carol; Kuet, Sui F; Oliver, Robin G; Harbourt, Christopher M; El-Naggar, Essam M

    2015-10-01

    Soil surface photolysis can be a significant dissipation pathway for agrochemicals under field conditions, although it is assumed that such degradation ceases once the agrochemical is transported away from the surface following rainfall or irrigation and subsequent drainage of soil porewater. However, as both downward and upward water movements occur under field conditions, relatively mobile compounds may return to the surface, prolonging exposure to ultraviolet light and increasing the potential for degradation by photolysis. To test this hypothesis, a novel experimental system was used to quantify the contribution of photolysis to the overall dissipation of a new herbicide, bicyclopyrone, under conditions that mimicked field studies more closely than the standard laboratory test guidance. Soil cores were taken from 3 US field study sites, and the surfaces were treated with [(14) C]-bicyclopyrone. The radioactivity was redistributed throughout the cores using a simulated rainfall event, following which the cores were incubated under a xenon-arc lamp with continuous provision of moisture from below and a wind simulator to induce evaporation. After only 2 d, most of the test compound had returned to the soil surface. Significantly more degradation was observed in the irradiated samples than in a parallel dark control sample. Degradation rates were very similar to those observed in both the thin layer photolysis study and the field dissipation studies and significantly faster than in the soil metabolism studies conducted in the dark. Thus, for highly soluble, mobile agrochemicals, such as bicyclopyrone, photolysis is not terminated permanently by rainfall or irrigation but can resume following transport to the surface in evaporating water. PMID:26010776

  5. Influence of Variable Environmental Conditions on Presence and Concentration of Energetic Chemicals Near Soil Surface in the Vadoze Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anaya, A. A.; Padilla, I. Y.

    2008-12-01

    Many explosive-related compounds (ERCs) are found near the soil-atmospheric surface in sites containing buried explosive devices, such as landmines and unexploded ordnance, detonation-residual, and munitions residues from explosive manufacturing facilities. Accurate assessment of the fate and transport processes is essential for predicting their movement to the surface, groundwater, or any other important environmental compartment. The transport processes controlling the direction and magnitude of the movement, and chemical and physical processes controlling the fate of the chemicals vary with environmental conditions. This research addresses the effect of variable rainfall, evaporation, temperature, and solar radiation on fate and transport of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-Dinitrotoluene (DNT), and other related chemicals in partially saturated soil. Experiments have been conducted in a laboratory-scale 3D SoilBed placed inside an environmental chamber equipped with rainfall and solar radiation simulators, and temperature control settings. The SoilBed was packed with a sandy soil. Experiments have been conducted by burying a TNT/DNT source, simulating a landmine, and applying different rainfall and light radiation cycles while monitoring DNT, TNT, and other related ERCs solute concentrations temporally and spatially within the SoilBed. Experiments include different source characteristics, rainfall intensities, temperatures, and radiation cycles to evaluate their effect on the detection and movement of ERC in soils in both aqueous and vapor phases. Temporal and spatial data has been analyzed comparatively and quantitatively. Comparative analysis was developed using surfer®- and voxler®-generated images and 3D visualization models applying spatial interpolation and masking methods. Single and multi-variable statistical analysis has been employed to determine the most important factors affecting the fate, transport and detection of ERC near soil

  6. Application of nitrate to enhance biodegradation of gasoline components in soil by indigenous microorganisms under anoxic condition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Su-Cai; Song, Yun; Wang, Dong; Wei, Wen-Xia; Yang, Yan; Men, Bin; Li, Jia-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic/anoxic biodegradation of hydrocarbons offers an attractive approach to the removal of these compounds from polluted environments such as aquifers, aquatic sediments, submerged soils and subsurface soils. The application of nitrate was investigated to accelerate the degradation of gasoline components such as mono-aromatic hydrocarbons and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil by indigenous microorganisms under anoxic condition. The addition of nitrate had little effect on the degradation of mono-aromatic hydrocarbons m- & p-xylene, o-xylene, sec-butylbenzene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, but facilitated the degradation of TPH (C6-C12) and mono-aromatic hydrocarbons toluene and ethylbenzene markedly. Furthermore, the more nitrate added, the higher the percentage of toluene, ethylbenzene and TPH (C6-C12) degraded after 180 days of anoxic incubation. Microorganisms capable of degrading toluene, ethylbenzene and TPH (C6-C12) with nitrate as the electron acceptor under anaerobic/anoxic condition are composed predominantly of Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma- or Delta-proteobacteria. Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria were the main components of indigenous microorganisms, and accounted for 83-100% of the total amount of indigenous microorganisms in soil used in this study. Furthermore, the total amount of indigenous microorganisms increased with nitrate added. The addition of nitrate stimulated the growth of indigenous microorganisms, and therefore facilitated the degradation of toluene, ethylbenzene and TPH (C6-C12). PMID:26508265

  7. Bacteria Transport in a Soil-Based Wastewater Treatment System under Simulated Operational and Climate Change Conditions.

    PubMed

    Morales, Ivan; Amador, José A; Boving, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Bacteria removal efficiencies in a conventional soil-based wastewater treatment system (OWTS) have been modeled to elucidate the fate and transport of bacteria under environmental and operational conditions that might be expected under changing climatic conditions. The HYDRUS 2D/3D software was used to model the impact of changing precipitation patterns, bacteria concentrations, hydraulic loading rates (HLRs), and higher subsurface temperatures at different depths and soil textures. Modeled effects of bacteria concentration shows that greater depth of treatment was required in coarser soils than in fine-textured ones to remove . The initial removal percentage was higher when HLR was lower, but it was greater when HLR was higher. When a biomat layer was included in the transport model, the performance of the system improved by up to 12.0%. Lower bacteria removal (<5%) was observed at all depths under the influence of precipitation rates ranging from 5 to 35 cm, and 35-cm rainfall combined with a 70% increase in HLR. Increased subsurface temperature (23°C) increased bacteria removal relative to a lower temperature range (5-20°C). Our results show that the model is able to effectively simulate bacteria removal and the effect of precipitation and temperature in different soil textures. It appears that the performance of OWTS may be impacted by changing climate. PMID:26436263

  8. Reduction, methylation, and translocation of arsenic in Panax notoginseng grown under field conditions in arsenic-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Mi, Yanhua; Li, Qiwan; Chen, Lu; Du, Lijuan; He, Lizhong; Lei, Mei

    2016-04-15

    Variations in arsenic (As) species in Panax notoginseng grown under field conditions remain understudied compared with those under greenhouse conditions. In the present study, soil and plant samples were collected from Wenshan Zhuang and Miao Autonomous Prefecture, Yunnan Province, which is the main production area of P. notoginseng in China, to identify As species in the soil and plant tissues and further assess effect of As toxic stress on As transformation and translocation in P. notoginseng. The results showed that arsenate (As(V)) was almost exclusively identified in the soil, while arsenite (As(III)) and monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) were detected in high proportions in plant tissues, suggesting that As(V) could be reduced and subsequently methylated in the plant body, mainly in the root. The reduction and methylation of As in the root of P. notoginseng were promoted by low As toxic stress, but were impeded by high As toxic stress. Arsenic(III) and MMA could rapidly translocate upwards in P. notoginseng. In addition, the translocation of total As, As(III), and MMA from the root to the rhizome was a response to As toxic stress, and the translocation rate increased with the increasing As concentration in the taproot. This study provides new insights into the detoxification mechanism of P. notoginseng grown in As-contaminated soils and the control of As during cultivation. PMID:26851761

  9. Local climatic conditions constrain soil yeast diversity patterns in Mediterranean forests, woodlands and scrub biome.

    PubMed

    Yurkov, Andrey M; Röhl, Oliver; Pontes, Ana; Carvalho, Cláudia; Maldonado, Cristina; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2016-02-01

    Soil yeasts represent a poorly known fraction of the soil microbiome due to limited ecological surveys. Here, we provide the first comprehensive inventory of cultivable soil yeasts in a Mediterranean ecosystem, which is the leading biodiversity hotspot for vascular plants and vertebrates in Europe. We isolated and identified soil yeasts from forested sites of Serra da Arrábida Natural Park (Portugal), representing the Mediterranean forests, woodlands and scrub biome. Both cultivation experiments and the subsequent species richness estimations suggest the highest species richness values reported to date, resulting in a total of 57 and 80 yeast taxa, respectively. These values far exceed those reported for other forest soils in Europe. Furthermore, we assessed the response of yeast diversity to microclimatic environmental factors in biotopes composed of the same plant species but showing a gradual change from humid broadleaf forests to dry maquis. We observed that forest properties constrained by precipitation level had strong impact on yeast diversity and on community structure and lower precipitation resulted in an increased number of rare species and decreased evenness values. In conclusion, the structure of soil yeast communities mirrors the environmental factors that affect aboveground phytocenoses, aboveground biomass and plant projective cover. PMID:26568202

  10. Orthophosphate Leaching in St. Augustinegrass and Zoysiagrass Grown in Sandy Soil under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ronald F; Sartain, Jerry B; Kruse, Jason K; Obreza, Thomas A; O'Connor, George A; Harris, Willie G

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is required to maintain healthy, high-quality, warm-season turf. However, excessive P applications to soils with poor P retention capabilities may lead to leaching losses to groundwater. This field study was conducted to determine the maximum P fertilizer application rate to (Walt.) [Kuntze] 'Floratam' St. Augustinegrass (St. Augustinegrass) and 'Empire' zoysiagrass (zoysiagrass) below which P leaching is minimized. Five P levels ranging from 0 to 5.0 g P m yr were surface applied as triple superphosphate. Turf was established on an uncoated, low-P sand with negligible P retention capacity. Leaf and root growth, tissue P concentration, soil P concentration, soil P saturation, leachate volume, and orthophosphate (P) concentration in leachates were measured. Mehlich 1-extractable soil P (M1-P) and soil P saturation ratio (PSR) increased with time as the P rate increased. Lower M1-P and PSR values were measured with St. Augustinegrass, which absorbed more P than did zoysiagrass. The root system of St. Augustinegrass was larger and deeper compared with zoysiagrass, promoting greater P uptake and less P leaching. If tissue analysis indicates that P fertilization is required and the soil has the capacity to retain additional P, application of 0.8 g P m yr to zoysiagrass and 1.07 g P m yr to St. Augustinegrass is appropriate and does not result in increased P leaching. PMID:23673941

  11. Soil contamination evaluations: Earthworms as indicators of soil quality

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, G.; Wilbom, D.

    1995-12-31

    Earthworms have frequently been evaluated in the field and laboratory as representatives of the soil community that are indicative of their habitat`s quality. Within a landscape or at a contaminated site, soil quality, or soil health, has become increasingly critical to cleanup-related issues that revolve around questions of ``how clean is clean`` and the bioaccumulation of soil contaminants. Through an overview of numerous field and laboratory studies, the role that earthworms have played in evaluating soil contamination will be reviewed with a particular focus on evaluations of the bioaccumulation potential of chemicals in soil. Within ecological contexts, earthworms can provide information regarding immediately observable adverse affects related, for example, to acute toxicity. Additionally, earthworms can provide information directly related to the bioaccumulation potential of a chemical and trophic transfer of environmental chemicals, especially through the food-chain. Within the decision-making process, soil contamination evaluations must consider future land-use, as well as current and future expressions of adverse biological and ecological effects under field conditions, potentially following remediation. Through integrated field and laboratory studies using earthworms, the authors have been able to identify adversely affected soil communities and have been able to provide information for assessing adverse ecological effects potentially caused by contaminants. Field surveys and on-site or in situ biological testing with earthworms, however, can not alone identify causes of effects. As such, standardized biological tests have been routinely completed in the laboratory so linkages between expression of effects and contaminants could be more readily addressed in conjunction with appropriate chemical data from the field.

  12. H. pylori CagL-Y58/E59 Prime Higher Integrin α5β1 in Adverse pH Condition to Enhance Hypochlorhydria Vicious Cycle for Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Chang, Wei-Lun; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims H. pylori CagL amino acid polymorphisms such as Y58/E59 can increase integrin α5β1 expression and gastric cancer risk. Hypochlorhydria during chronic H. pylori infection promotes gastric carcinogenesis. The study test whether CagL-Y58/E59 isolates may regulate integrin α5β1 to translocate CagA via the type IV secretory system even under adverse pH conditions, and whether the integrin α5β1 expression primed by H. pylori is a pH-dependent process involving hypochlorhydria in a vicious cycle to promote gastric carcinogenesis. Methods The expressions of integrin α5 and β1, CagA phosphorylation, IL-8, FAK, EGFR, and AKT activation of AGS cells exposed to CagL-Y58/E59 H. pylori, isogenic mutants, and different H. pylori CagL amino acid replacement mutants under different pH values were determined. Differences in the pepsinogen I/II ratio (indirectly indicating gastric acidity) and gastric integrin α5β1 expression were compared among the 172 H. pylori-infected patients with different cancer risks. Results Even under adversely low pH condition, H. pylori CagL-Y58/E59 still keep active integrin β1 with stronger binding affinity, CagA translocation, IL-8, FAK, EGFR, and AKT activation than the other mutants (p<0.05). The in vitro assay revealed higher priming of integrin α5β1 by H. pylori under elevated pH as hypochlorhydria (p<0.05). In the H. pylori-infected patients, the gastric integrin α5β1 expressions were higher in those with pepsinogen I/II ratio <6 than in those without (p<0.05). Conclusions H. pylori CagL-Y58/E59 prime higher integrin under adverse pH and may involve to enhance hypochlorhydria vicious cycle for gastric carcinogenesis, and thus require an early eradication. PMID:24009701

  13. Quantitative inhibition of soil C and N cycling by ectomycorrhizal fungi under field condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averill, C.; Hawkes, C.

    2014-12-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) ecosystems store more carbon than non-ectomycorrhizal ecosystems at global scale. Recent theoretical and empirical work suggests the presence of ECM fungi allows plants to compete directly with decomposers for soil nitrogen (N) via exo-enzyme synthesis. Experimental ECM exclusion often results in a release from competition of saprotrophic decomposers, allowing for increased C-degrading enzyme production, increased microbial biomass, and eventually declines in soil C stocks. Our knowledge of this phenomenon is limited, however, to the presence or absence of ECM fungi. It remains unknown if competitive repression of saprotrophic microbes and soil C cycling by ECM fungi varies with ECM abundance. This is particularly relevant to global change experiments when manipulations alter plant C allocation to ECM symbionts. To test if variation in ECM abundance alters the competitive inhibition of saprotrophic soil microbes (quantitative inhibition) we established experimental ECM exclusion treatments along an ECM abundance gradient. We dug trenches to experimentally exclude ECM fungi, allowing us to test for competitive release of soil saprotrophs from competition. To control for disturbance we placed in-growth bags both inside and outside of trenches. Consistent with the quantitative inhibition hypothesis, sites with more ECM fungi had significantly less microbial biomass per unit soil C and lower rates of N mineralization. Consistent with a release from competition, C-degrading enzyme activities were higher and gross proteolytic rates were lower per unit microbial biomass inside compared to outside trenches. We interpret this to reflect increased microbial investment in C-acquisition and decreased investment in N-acquisition in the absence of ECM fungi. Furthermore, the increase in C-degrading enzymes per unit microbial biomass was significantly greater in sites with the most abundant ECM fungi. Based on these results, ECM-saprotroph competition does

  14. Ecophysiology of Trembling Aspen in Response to Root-Zone Conditions and Competition on Reclaimed Mine Soil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockstette, S.; Landhäusser, S.; Pinno, B.; Dyck, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Reclaimed soils are typically characterized by increased bulk densities, penetration resistances and poor soil structure as well as associated problems with hydrology and aeration. As a result, available rooting space for planted tree seedlings is often restricted to a shallow layer of topsoil, which is usually of higher quality and is cultivated prior to planting. This may hinder the development of healthy root systems, thus drastically increasing the risk for plant stress by limiting access to soil resources such as water, nutrients and oxygen. These problems are exacerbated when herbaceous plants compete for the same resources within this limited root-zone. To understand how limited rooting space affects the physiology of young trees, we experimentally manipulated soil conditions and levels of competition at a reclaimed mine site in central Alberta, Canada. The site was characterized by heavily compacted, fine textured subsoil (~2.0 Mg ha-1), capped with 15 cm of topsoil (~1.5 Mg ha-1). In a replicated study (n=6) half the plots were treated with a subsoil plow to a depth of about 60 cm to increase available rooting spece. Subsequently, trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and smooth brome (Bromus inermis L.) were planted to create four vegetation covers: aspen (a), brome (b), aspen + brome (ab) and control (c) (no vegetation). Various soil properties, including texture, bulk density, penetration resistance and water availability, in conjunction with plant parameters such as root and shoot growth, leaf area development, sap flow, and stomatal conductance have since been monitored, both in-situ and through destructive sampling. Our results indicate that the soil treatment was effective in lowering bulk densities and penetration resistance, while improving moisture retention characteristics. Tree seedling growth and leaf area development were significantly greater without competition, but did not differ between soil treatments. The soil treatment generally

  15. Impact of rainfall spatial distribution on rainfall-runoff modelling efficiency and initial soil moisture conditions estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramblay, Y.; Bouvier, C.; Ayral, P.-A.; Marchandise, A.

    2011-01-01

    A good knowledge of rainfall is essential for hydrological operational purposes such as flood forecasting. The objective of this paper was to analyze, on a relatively large sample of flood events, how rainfall-runoff modeling using an event-based model can be sensitive to the use of spatial rainfall compared to mean areal rainfall over the watershed. This comparison was based not only on the model's efficiency in reproducing the flood events but also through the estimation of the initial conditions by the model, using different rainfall inputs. The initial conditions of soil moisture are indeed a key factor for flood modeling in the Mediterranean region. In order to provide a soil moisture index that could be related to the initial condition of the model, the soil moisture output of the Safran-Isba-Modcou (SIM) model developed by Météo-France was used. This study was done in the Gardon catchment (545 km2) in South France, using uniform or spatial rainfall data derived from rain gauge and radar for 16 flood events. The event-based model considered combines the SCS runoff production model and the Lag and Route routing model. Results show that spatial rainfall increases the efficiency of the model. The advantage of using spatial rainfall is marked for some of the largest flood events. In addition, the relationship between the model's initial condition and the external predictor of soil moisture provided by the SIM model is better when using spatial rainfall, in particular when using spatial radar data with R2 values increasing from 0.61 to 0.72.

  16. Positive feedback of crop residue incorporation on dissolved organic carbon contents under anaerobic conditions in temperate rice paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said-Pullicino, Daniel; Sodano, Marcella; Bertora, Chiara; Lerda, Cristina; Sacco, Dario; Celi, Luisella

    2016-04-01

    Rice paddy soils are generally characterized by large concentrations and fluxes of DOC in comparison to other ecosystems. Our recent studies have shown that the combination of relatively high pore-water DOC concentrations under anoxic soil conditions (>10-20 mg C l‑1) and important percolation fluxes of water during field flooding may contribute significant organic C inputs into the subsoil (18-51 g C m‑2) over the cropping season. Crop residues incorporated into the soil after harvest represent the main input of organic C into paddy soils, returning about 200-300 g C m‑2 y‑1 in single-cropped rice paddies. The anaerobic decomposition of these residues may supply important amounts of DOC to soil pore waters. Moreover, the supply of electron donors with the input of residue-derived labile OM may further increase DOC contents by stimulating the microbially-catalyzed reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides under anoxic conditions, and release of DOC previously stabilized on the mineral matrix (i.e. positive feedback). This could have important implications on organic C inputs into the subsoil as well as substrate availability for methane production. We therefore hypothesized that crop residue management practices that influence the amount of labile organic matter present in the soil at the time of field flooding may strongly influence soil solution DOC concentrations as well as the positive feedback on the release of soil-derived DOC. We tested this hypothesis at field-scale by evaluating variations in the contents and quality of DOC above and beneath the plough pan over the cropping season as a function of crop residue management practices involving: tillage and crop residue incorporation in spring (SPR), tillage and crop residue incorporation in spring, dry seeding and 1 month delayed flooding (DRY), tillage and crop residue incorporation in autumn (AUT), and straw removal after harvest and tillage in spring (REM). Moreover, we linked changes in DOC

  17. Critical analysis of the thermal inertia approach to map soil water content under sparse vegetation and changeable sky conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, Antonino; Capodici, Fulvio; Corbari, Chiara; Ciraolo, Giuseppe; La Loggia, Goffredo; Sobrino, José Antonio

    2012-09-01

    sparse vegetation coverage. Results verify that the thermal inertia method can be applied on sparsely vegetated soil characterized by fractional cover up to ~0.25 (maximum value within this experiment); a lumped value of the phase difference allows a good estimate of the thermal inertia, whereas the comparison with the three-temperature approach did not give conclusive responses because ground radiometric temperatures were not acquired in optimal conditions. Results also show that clear sky only at the time of the remote sensing acquisitions is not a sufficient condition to apply the thermal inertia method. A corrective coefficient taking into account the actual sky cloudiness throughout the day allows accurate estimates of the spatial distribution of the thermal inertia (r2 ~ 0.9) and soil water content (r2 ~ 0.7).

  18. Global distribution of minerals in arid soils as lower boundary condition in dust models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickovic, Slobodan

    2010-05-01

    Mineral dust eroded from arid soils affects the radiation budget of the Earth system, modifies ocean bioproductivity and influences human health. Dust aerosol is a complex mixture of minerals. Dust mineral composition has several potentially important impacts to environment and society. Iron and phosphorus embedded in mineral aerosol are essential for the primary marine productivity when dust deposits over the open ocean. Dust also acts as efficient agent for heterogeneous ice nucleation and this process is dependent on mineralogical structure of dust. Recent findings in medical geology indicate possible role of minerals to human health. In this study, a new 1-km global database was developed for several minerals (Illite, Kaolinite, Smectite, Calcite, Quartz, Feldspar, Hematite and Gypsum) embedded in clay and silt populations of arid soils. For the database generation, high-resolution data sets on soil textures, soil types and land cover was used. Tin addition to the selected minerals, phosphorus was also added whose geographical distribution was specified from compiled literature and data on soil types. The developed global database was used to specify sources of mineral fractions in the DREAM dust model and to simulate atmospheric paths of minerals and their potential impacts on marine biochemistry and tropospheric ice nucleation.

  19. Influence of soil minerals on chromium(VI) reduction by sulfide under anoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yeqing; Deng, Baolin; Kim, Chulsung; Thornton, Edward C

    2007-01-01

    The effects of soil minerals on chromate (CrVIO42-, noted as Cr(VI)) reduction by sulfide were investigated in the pH range of 7.67 to 9.07 under the anoxic condition. The examined minerals included montmorillonite (Swy-2), illite (IMt-2), kaolinite (KGa-2), aluminum oxide (γ-Al2O3), titanium oxide (TiO2, P-25, primarily anatase), and silica (SiO2). Based on their effects on Cr(VI) reduction, these minerals were categorized into three groups: (i) minerals catalyzing Cr(VI) reduction – illite; (ii) minerals with no effect – Al2O3; and (iii) minerals inhibiting Cr(VI) reduction- kaolinite, montmorillonite, SiO2 and TiO2 . The catalysis of illite was attributed primarily to the low concentration of iron solubilized from the mineral, which could accelerate Cr(VI) reduction by shuttling electrons from sulfide to Cr(VI). Additionally, elemental sulfur produced as the primary product of sulfide oxidation could further catalyze Cr(VI) reduction in the heterogeneous system. Previous studies have shown that adsorption of sulfide onto elemental sulfur nanoparticles could greatly increase sulfide reactivity towards Cr(VI) reduction. Consequently, the observed rate constant, kobs, increased with increasing amounts of both iron solubilized from illite and elemental sulfur produced during the reaction. The catalysis of iron, however, was found to be blocked by phenanthroline, a strong complexing agent for ferrous iron. In this case, the overall reaction rate at the initial stage of reaction was pseudo first order with respect to Cr(VI), i.e., the reaction kinetics was similar to that in the homogeneous system, because elemental sulfur exerted no effect at the initial stage prior to accumulation of elemental sulfur nanoparticles. In the suspension of kaolinite, which belonged to group (iii), an inhibitive effect to Cr(VI) reduction was observed and subsequently examined in more details. The inhibition was due to the sorption of elemental sulfur onto kaolinite, which reduced

  20. Influence of forest stands on soil and ecosystem carbon stocks in the conditions of the European part of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganov, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Forest stands are one of the most important components of ecosystems, both in Russia and around the world and at the same time forest vegetation is able to provide environment-modifying effect on the occupied landscape and, in particular, on the soil cover. Currently, due to the large interest in the carbon cycle, there is a question about the influence of forest vegetation on carbon stocks in ecosystems and in particular in the soil cover. To perform the study we selected 9 objects located in the European part of Russia from the area of the southern taiga to the semi-desert zone: Novgorod region, Kostroma region, Moscow region (2 objects), Penza region, Voronezh region, Volgograd region (2 objects) and Astrakhan region. For studying the influence of forest vegetation on the soil`s carbon, we organized the following experiment scheme: in each of the objects two key sites were selected, so that they originally were in the same soil conditions and the difference between them was only in a course development of vegetation - forest or grass. One part of the experimental sites, presenting forest vegetation, were the restored forests on abandoned lands with the age of 70-200 years. The second part of the experimental sites were artificial forest plantations aged from 60 to 112 years planted on the originally treeless forest-steppe or steppe landscapes. Perennial hayfields, perennial abandoned agricultural landscapes and virgin steppe areas were used as reference sites with grass vegetation. For each forest site we estimated the major carbon pools: phytomass, mortmass (dead wood, dry grass), debris, litter and soil. All data were recalculated using the conversion factors in carbon stocks in t C ha-1. We collected soil samples every 10 cm until the depth of 50 cm, and then at 50-75 and 75-100 cm soil layers. Bulk density and total organic carbon were determined by CHN analyzer. As a result, the soil`s carbon was also calculated into t C ha-1. We found out that the total

  1. Degradation behavior of biocomposites based on cassava starch buried under indoor soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Maran, J Prakash; Sivakumar, V; Thirugnanasambandham, K; Sridhar, R

    2014-01-30

    Degradation of cassava (tapioca) starch based composite films during indoor soil burial experiments was analyzed using five factors, three levels Box-Behnken response surface design. From the results, it was observed that, increased water sorption promotes the entry of soil microorganism and it utilizes the starch films as a source of energy for their growth. The reduction in weight and mechanical property was associated with preferential loss of matrix components of the films. The microorganisms associated with the degradation of films were quantified and identified. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed the formation of patterns and cracks on the surface of the materials aged in the soils. From the results, second order polynomial models were developed for the responses. The results of the study demonstrated that, the tapioca starch based composites were showed a limited lifetime in biotic environment which make them suitable for being disposed in landfills after their use. PMID:24299744

  2. Fungal Diversity in Permafrost and Tallgrass Prairie Soils under Experimental Warming Conditions

    PubMed Central

    StLouis, Derek; Cole, James R.; Luo, Yiqi; Wu, Liyou; Schuur, E. A. G; Zhou, Jizhong; Tiedje, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Soil fungi play a major role in terrestrial ecosystem functioning through interactions with soil structure, plants, micro- and mesofauna, and nutrient cycling through predation, pathogenesis, mutualistic, and saprotrophic roles. The diversity of soil fungi was assessed by sequencing their 28S rRNA gene in Alaskan permafrost and Oklahoma tallgrass prairie soils at experimental sites where the effect of climate warming is under investigation. A total of 226,695 reads were classified into 1,063 genera, covering 62% of the reference data set. Using the Bayesian Classifier offered by the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) with 50% bootstrapping classification confidence, approximately 70% of sequences were returned as “unclassified” at the genus level, although the majority (∼65%) were classified at the class level, which provided insight into these lesser-known fungal lineages. Those unclassified at the genus level were subjected to BLAST analysis against the ARB-SILVA database, where ∼50% most closely matched nonfungal taxa. Compared to the more abundant sequences, a higher proportion of rare operational taxonomic units (OTU) were successfully classified to genera at 50% bootstrap confidence, indicating that the fungal rare biosphere in these sites is not composed of sequencing artifacts. There was no significant effect after 1 year of warming on the fungal community structure at both sites, except perhaps for a few minor members, but there was a significant effect of sample depth in the permafrost soils. Despite overall significant community structure differences driven by variations in OTU dominance, the prairie and permafrost soils shared 90% and 63% of all fungal sequences, respectively, indicating a fungal “seed bank” common between both sites. PMID:24014534

  3. Conditions for effective removal of pyrene from an artificially contaminated soil using Pseudomonas aeruginosa 57SJ rhamnolipids.

    PubMed

    Bordas, François; Lafrance, Pierre; Villemur, Richard

    2005-11-01

    The efficacy of a new rhamnolipid biosurfactants mixture to enhance the removal of pyrene from a soil artificially contaminated was investigated. The molar solubilization ratio (MSR) and the partition coefficient between the micelles and water (log K(m)) were found to be 7.5 x 10(-3) and 5.7, respectively. From soil column studies, the pyrene removal increased linearly with the concentration of the injected biosurfactants solution above the effective critical micellar concentration (0.4 g L(-1)). Flushing with a 5.0 g L(-1) biosurfactants solution increased the pyrene concentration in the effluent by 178 times. At high biosurfactants' concentrations (2.5 and 5.0 g L(-1)), the cumulative pyrene recovery reached 70%. This pyrene remobilization takes place independently of the soil organic carbon solubilization. This study provides a combination of batch and column experiments in order to find the conditions for effective soil remediation using a new rhamnolipids mixture. PMID:15905007

  4. Survival of Sporangia of New Clonal Lineages of Phytophthora infestans in Soil under Semiarid Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently there is no information on the viability of sporangia in soil of the new metalaxyl-resistant genotypes of P. infestans in the semiarid Columbia Basin of WA, and in potato growing regions throughout the world. Sporangia of metalaxyl-resistant US-8 and US-11 clonal lineages of P. infestans ...

  5. Fate of ( sup 14 C)monolinuron in potatoes and soil under outdoor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, D.; Scheunert, I. )

    1990-12-01

    (phenyl-{sup 14}C)Monolinuron was applied (2.5 and 1.9 kg/ha) to the soil surface of an outdoor lysimeter in two successive years: then, potatoes were grown. Total recovery of {sup 14}C in soil, plants, and leached water was about 55% (of {sup 14}C applied) after the first growing period and about 43% after the second growing period. Radioactivity in soil contained 77.1% (based on total {sup 14}C recovered in soil) bound residues, 15% monolinuron, and the following conversion products: N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-N'-methoxy-N'-methylurea, N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N'-methylurea. N-(4-chlorophenyl)methylcarbamate, N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-methylcarbamate, and 4-chloroformanilide. The leachate contained 0.8% (based on total {sup 14}C recovered in leachate) N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-N'-methoxy-N'-methylurea. Potato plants contained 0.106 mg/kg radioactive residues in peeled tubers after one growing period and 15.94 mg/kg in the tops; after two growing periods, peeled tubers contained 0.091 mg/kg and tops contained 18.87 mg/kg radioactive residues. These residues consisted of bound {sup 14}C (57.9% of total {sup 14}C recovered in plants), N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-N'-methoxy-N'-methylurea, N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N'-methylurea, N-(4-chlorophenyl)methylcarbamate, N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-methylcarbamate, and 4,4'-dichlorozobenzene.

  6. A Vineyard Agroecosystem: Disturbance and Precipitation Affect Soil Respiration under Mediterranean Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated impacts of agricultural management practices on soil respiration (Rs) in a Cabernet sauvignon (Vitis vinifera) vineyard (Oakville, CA; November 2003 – December 2005). We determined 1) Rs’s response to cover cropping, mowing and tillage, 2) environmental drivers of Rs and 3) total ann...

  7. Analytical Solution Describing Pesticide Volatilization from Soil Affected by a Change in Surface Condition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An analytical solution describing the fate and transport of pesticides applied to soils has been developed. Two pesticide application methods can be simulated: point-source applications such as a hot-gas injection method and a shank-source application method that includes a vertical pesticide distr...

  8. Influence of soil properties and test conditions on sorption and desorption of testosterone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, batch sorption and desorption experiments were conducted for testosterone using four agricultural soils and five clay minerals. Significant differences in sorption behavior were observed between abiotic and biotic systems. The Freundlich sorption coefficient Kf (µg per g)/(µg per mL) ...

  9. Effect of meteorology and soil condition on metolachlor and atrazine volatilization over a 10 year period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 10-year study was conducted to focus on the impact of soil and climatic factors governing herbicide volatilization from an agricultural field. For the first 5 years, metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl) acetamide] and atrazine [6-chloro-N-ethyl-N’-(1-methyl...

  10. Screening for tolerance to saturated soil conditions for cane grown for sugar and biofuels production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Louisiana cane (Saccharum spp.) is often produced on heavy-textured soils which often remain saturated for extended periods during the growing and harvest season. The objective of this research was to identify commercial sugar cane and energy cane varieties that exhibit tolerance to periodic satura...

  11. Long-term Tillage Influences on Soil Physical Properties under Dryland Conditions in Northeastern Montana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the effect of long-term (>20 yrs) tillage [no-till (NT), spring till (ST), and fall and spring till (FST)] under continuous spring wheat on soil penetration resistance (PR), bulk density ('b), water content ('m) and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) under dryland cropping systems. S...

  12. Methyl bromide emissions from a covered field: I. Experimental conditions and degradation in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.R.; Gan, J.; Ernst, F.F.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment is described to investigate the environmental fate and transport of methyl bromide in agricultural systems. The experiment was designed to determine the dynamics of methyl bromide movement through soil, degradation, and total emissions to the atmosphere. This is of particular interest because it will allow an assessment of the environmental impacts (i.e., stratospheric ozone depletion) resulting from the agricultural use of methyl bromide. Methyl bromide was applied at a rate of 843 kg in a 3.5-ha (i.e., 240 kg/ha) field at a depth of 0.25 m and covered with a sheet of 1-mil polyethylene plastic. The maximum methyl bromide concentration in the atmosphere occurred at night between 0200 and 0600 h. During the first 3 d of the experiment, the maximum daily concentrations at 0.2 m above the soil surface were 30, 5, and 1 mg/(m{sup 3} of air), respectively. The trend of reduced emissions with time continued until the plastic was removed, when a momentary increase in the methyl bromide emissions occurred. The maximum soil gas concentration 24 h after injection was 30 g/m{sup 3} located at a 0.25-m depth. When the plastic was removed from the field (at 5.6 d), the maximum soil gas concentration was approximately 2 g/m{sup 3} at a 0.5-m depth. A mass-difference method for estimating the total methyl bromide emissions from the soil, based on degradation of methyl bromide to Br{sup -}, indicates that approximately 39% or 325 kg ({+-} 164 kg) of the applied methyl bromide was converted to Br{sup -} and, therefore, 61% or 518 kg ({+-} 164 kg) was lost via volatilization. 16 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Influence of elevated ozone concentration on methanotrophic bacterial communities in soil under field condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. Z.; Zhong, M.

    2015-05-01

    The open top chamber (OTC) method was used in combination with real-time quantitative PCR and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) techniques in the wheat field to study the influence of different levels of O3 concentrations (ambient air filtered by activated carbons, 40 ppb, 80 ppb and 120 ppb) on the quantity and community structure of methanotrophic bacteria. O3 stress can influence the potential methane oxidation rate (PMOR) and potential methane production rate (PMPR) in the farmland soil. O3 treatment of 40 ppb improved significantly the 16S rRNA gene copy number in the total methanotrophic bacteria pmoA, and type I and type II methanotrophic bacteria in the soil depth of 0-20 cm. When the O3 concentration reached 120 ppb, the 16S rRNA gene copy number in the total methanotrophic bacteria pmoA and type I methanotrophic bacteria decreased significantly as compared to the control treatment in 10-20 cm layer. The 16s rRNA gene copy number of total methanotrophic bacteria pmoA and type I and type II methanotrophic bacteria were influenced by different O3 concentration and soil depth. The T-RFLP analysis indicated that O3 stress influenced significantly the community structure of the methanotrophic bacteria in soil, causing potential threat to the diversity of methanotrophic bacteria. It seems to imply that the rise of O3 concentration could produce an impact on the carbon cycling and the methane emission of the wheat field soil by changing the community structure and diversity of methanotrophic bacteria, which then influences the global climate change.

  14. Spatial distributions of forest stand condition, vegetation ground cover, and soil erosion for evaluating the linkages of sediment transport from hillslopes to streams in headwater catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomi, T.; Kumakura, A.; Mizugaki, S.; Takahisa, F.; Ishikawa, Y.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2011-12-01

    We investigated soil erosion and resultant fine sediment transport in headwater catchments with heterogeneous spatial patterns of forest stand condition and vegetation ground cover. The study was conducted in 7 and 5 ha headwater catchments (Watersheds No.3 and No.4, respectively) in Tanzawa mountains area, 60 km of southwest of Tokyo, Japan. We selected 53 points located within catchments including near stream channels to the ridge line. A 0.5 x 0.5 m plot (1m x 1m) were selected in each point for investigating vegetation biomass, litter cover, soil erosion (e.g., soil pedestal), overstory vegetation condition (type of forest and canopy openness), and soil physical properties (e.g., soil bulk density and particle size). We assumed that high of soil pedestal indicated short term soil erosions by soil splash and related down slope soil movement. Percentages of bare soil in No. 3 tend to greater than ones in No.4. In addition, bare soil slope tended to distributed lower part of hillslopes with > 45° in gradient, where the soil can be transported to streams. Because of the high soil erosion rate in No.3 catchment, suspended sediment and bedload transport in No.3 tended to be greater ones in No.4 catchment. Fingerprinting approach using activities of fallout radionuclides (caesium-137 and excess lead-210) confirmed that some of the fine sediment transport at associated with hillslope soil surface erosion. Findings of this study suggested that processes of catchment scale fine sediment depending on the linkages between hillslope and channels.

  15. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  16. The release of As, Cr and Cu from contaminated soil stabilized with APC residues under landfill conditions.

    PubMed

    Travar, I; Kihl, A; Kumpiene, J

    2015-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the stability of As, Cr and Cu in contaminated soil treated with air pollution control residues under landfill conditions. The influence of landfill gas and temperature on the release of trace elements from stabilized soil was simulated using a diffusion test. The air pollution control residues immobilized As through the precipitation of Ca-As minerals (calcium arsenate (Ca5H2(AsO4)3 × 5H2O), weilite (CaAsO4) and johnbaumite (Ca5(AsO4)3(OH)), incorporation of As into ettringite (Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12 × 26H2O) and adsorption by calcite (CaCO3). The air pollution control residues generally showed a high resistance to pH reduction, indicating high buffer capacity and stability of immobilized As in a landfill over time. Generation of heat in a landfill might increase the release of trace elements. The release of As from stabilized soil was diffusion-controlled at 60 °C, while surface wash-off, dissolution, and depletion prevailed at 20 °C. The air pollution control residues from the incineration of municipal solid waste immobilized Cr, indicating its stability in a landfill. The treatment of soil with air pollution control residues was not effective in immobilization of Cu. Contaminated soils treated with air pollution control residues will probably have a low impact on overall leachate quality from a landfill. PMID:25528268

  17. The Effect of Freeze-Thaw Conditions on Arctic Soil Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Niraj; Grogan, Paul; Chu, Haiyan; Christiansen, Casper T.; Walker, Virginia K.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is already altering the landscape at high latitudes. Permafrost is thawing, the growing season is starting earlier, and, as a result, certain regions in the Arctic may be subjected to an increased incidence of freeze-thaw events. The potential release of carbon and nutrients from soil microbial cells that have been lysed by freeze-thaw transitions could have significant impacts on the overall carbon balance of arctic ecosystems, and therefore on atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, the impact of repeated freezing and thawing with the consequent growth and recrystallization of ice on microbial communities is still not well understood. Soil samples from three distinct sites, representing Canadian geographical low arctic, mid-arctic and high arctic soils were collected from Daring Lake, Alexandra Fjord and Cambridge Bay sampling sites, respectively. Laboratory-based experiments subjected the soils to multiple freeze-thaw cycles for 14 days based on field observations (0 °C to −10 °C for 12 h and −10 °C to 0 °C for 12 h) and the impact on the communities was assessed by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) methyl ester analysis and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Both data sets indicated differences in composition and relative abundance between the three sites, as expected. However, there was also a strong variation within the two high latitude sites in the effects of the freeze-thaw treatment on individual PLFA and 16S-based phylotypes. These site-based heterogeneities suggest that the impact of climate change on soil microbial communities may not be predictable a priori; minor differential susceptibilities to freeze-thaw stress could lead to a “butterfly effect” as described by chaos theory, resulting in subsequent substantive differences in microbial assemblages. This perspectives article suggests that this is an unwelcome finding since it will make future predictions for the impact of on-going climate change on soil microbial communities

  18. Efficiency of some soil bacteria for chemical oxygen demand reduction of synthetic chlorsulfuron solutions under agiated culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Erguven, G O; Yildirim, N

    2016-01-01

    This study searches the efficiency of certain soil bacteria on chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of synthetic chlorsulfuron solutions under agitated culture conditions. It also aims to determine the turbidity of liquid culture medium with chlorsulfuron during bacterial incubation for 120 hours. As a result the highest and lowest COD removal efficiency of bacteria was determined for Bacillus simplex as 94% and for Micrococcus luteus as 70%, respectively at the end of the 96th hour. It was found that COD removal efficiency showed certain differences depend on the bacterial species. It was also observed that B. simplex had the highest COD removal efficiency and it was a suitable bacterium species for bioremediation of a chlorsulfuron contaminated soils. PMID:27262810

  19. Horizontal Heat Impact of Urban Structures on the Surface Soil Layer and Its Diurnal Patterns under Different Micrometeorological Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hongxuan; Hu, Dan; Wang, Xiaolin; Han, Fengsen; Li, Yuanzheng; Wu, Xiaogang; Ma, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    The temperature of the surface soil layer around different orientation walls was investigated horizontally along several construction-soil micro-gradients in Beijing, China. On a diurnal scale, similar fluctuating trends in T0 and T50 (temperature of surface soil layer, 0 and 0.5 m from the building baseline) adjacent to the external walls of buildings with the same orientation usually appeared under similar micrometeorological conditions. The difference between T0 and T50 (ΔT0-50) can be considered an indicator of the intensity of the horizontal heat effects: higher ΔT0-50 values correspond to greater intensities. The values of ΔT0-50 for south-, north-, east- and west-facing sides of buildings were highest on sunny days in summer and exhibited values of 6.61 K, 1.64 K, 5.93 K and 2.76 K, respectively. The scope of horizontal heat impacts (Sh) changed on a diurnal scale between zero and the maximum, which fluctuated with the micrometeorological conditions. The maximum values of Sh were 0.30, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.20 m for south-, north-, east-, and west-facing walls. The ΔT0-50 was related to solar radiation, horizontal heat flux, relative humidity, wind speed, soil moisture differences and air temperature; the relative importance of these factors was 36.22%, 31.80%, 19.19%, 2.67%, 3.68% and 6.44%, respectively.

  20. Horizontal Heat Impact of Urban Structures on the Surface Soil Layer and Its Diurnal Patterns under Different Micrometeorological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongxuan; Hu, Dan; Wang, Xiaolin; Han, Fengsen; Li, Yuanzheng; Wu, Xiaogang; Ma, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    The temperature of the surface soil layer around different orientation walls was investigated horizontally along several construction-soil micro-gradients in Beijing, China. On a diurnal scale, similar fluctuating trends in T0 and T50 (temperature of surface soil layer, 0 and 0.5 m from the building baseline) adjacent to the external walls of buildings with the same orientation usually appeared under similar micrometeorological conditions. The difference between T0 and T50 (ΔT 0-50) can be considered an indicator of the intensity of the horizontal heat effects: higher ΔT 0-50 values correspond to greater intensities. The values of ΔT 0-50 for south-, north-, east- and west-facing sides of buildings were highest on sunny days in summer and exhibited values of 6.61 K, 1.64 K, 5.93 K and 2.76 K, respectively. The scope of horizontal heat impacts (Sh) changed on a diurnal scale between zero and the maximum, which fluctuated with the micrometeorological conditions. The maximum values of Sh were 0.30, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.20 m for south-, north-, east-, and west-facing walls. The ΔT 0-50 was related to solar radiation, horizontal heat flux, relative humidity, wind speed, soil moisture differences and air temperature; the relative importance of these factors was 36.22%, 31.80%, 19.19%, 2.67%, 3.68% and 6.44%, respectively. PMID:26728627

  1. Horizontal Heat Impact of Urban Structures on the Surface Soil Layer and Its Diurnal Patterns under Different Micrometeorological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongxuan; Hu, Dan; Wang, Xiaolin; Han, Fengsen; Li, Yuanzheng; Wu, Xiaogang; Ma, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    The temperature of the surface soil layer around different orientation walls was investigated horizontally along several construction-soil micro-gradients in Beijing, China. On a diurnal scale, similar fluctuating trends in T0 and T50 (temperature of surface soil layer, 0 and 0.5 m from the building baseline) adjacent to the external walls of buildings with the same orientation usually appeared under similar micrometeorological conditions. The difference between T0 and T50 (ΔT0–50) can be considered an indicator of the intensity of the horizontal heat effects: higher ΔT0–50 values correspond to greater intensities. The values of ΔT0–50 for south-, north-, east- and west-facing sides of buildings were highest on sunny days in summer and exhibited values of 6.61 K, 1.64 K, 5.93 K and 2.76 K, respectively. The scope of horizontal heat impacts (Sh) changed on a diurnal scale between zero and the maximum, which fluctuated with the micrometeorological conditions. The maximum values of Sh were 0.30, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.20 m for south-, north-, east-, and west-facing walls. The ΔT0–50 was related to solar radiation, horizontal heat flux, relative humidity, wind speed, soil moisture differences and air temperature; the relative importance of these factors was 36.22%, 31.80%, 19.19%, 2.67%, 3.68% and 6.44%, respectively. PMID:26728627

  2. Adapting FAO-56 Spreadsheet Program to estimate olive orchard transpiration fluxes under soil water stress condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallo, G.; Provenzano, G.; Manzano-Juárez, J.

    2012-04-01

    In the Mediterranean environment, where the period of crops growth does not coincide with the rainy season, the crop is subject to water stress periods that may be amplified with improper irrigation management. Agro-hydrological models can be considered an economic and simple tool to optimize irrigation water use, mainly when water represents a limiting factor for crop production. In the last two decades, agro-hydrological physically based models have been developed to simulate mass and energy exchange processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere system (Feddes et al., 1978; Bastiaanssen et al., 2007). Unfortunately these models, although very reliable, as a consequence of the high number of required variables and the complex computational analysis, cannot often be used. Therefore, simplified agro-hydrological models may represent an useful and simple tool for practical irrigation scheduling. The main objective of the work is to assess, for an olive orchard, the suitability of FAO-56 spreadsheet agro-hydrological model to estimate a long time series of field transpiration, soil water content and crop water stress dynamic. A modification of the spreadsheet is suggested in order to adapt the simulations to a crop tolerant to water stress. In particular, by implementing a new crop water stress function, actual transpiration fluxes and an ecophysiological stress indicator, i. e. the relative transpiration, are computed in order to evaluate a plant-based irrigation scheduling parameter. Validation of the proposed amendment is carried out by means of measured sap fluxes, measured on different plants and up-scaled to plot level. Spatial and temporal variability of soil water contents in the plot was measured, at several depths, using the Diviner 2000 capacitance probe (Sentek Environmental Technologies, 2000) and TDR-100 (Campbell scientific, Inc.) system. The detailed measurements of soil water content, allowed to explore the high spatial variability of soil water content due

  3. Spectral detection of different types