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Sample records for adverse soil conditions

  1. Modelling speech intelligibility in adverse conditions.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Jørgensen and Dau (J Acoust Soc Am 130:1475-1487, 2011) proposed the speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM) in an attempt to overcome the limitations of the classical speech transmission index (STI) and speech intelligibility index (SII) in conditions with nonlinearly processed speech. Instead of considering the reduction of the temporal modulation energy as the intelligibility metric, as assumed in the STI, the sEPSM applies the signal-to-noise ratio in the envelope domain (SNRenv). This metric was shown to be the key for predicting the intelligibility of reverberant speech as well as noisy speech processed by spectral subtraction. The key role of the SNRenv metric is further supported here by the ability of a short-term version of the sEPSM to predict speech masking release for different speech materials and modulated interferers. However, the sEPSM cannot account for speech subjected to phase jitter, a condition in which the spectral structure of the intelligibility of speech signal is strongly affected, while the broadband temporal envelope is kept largely intact. In contrast, the effects of this distortion can be predicted -successfully by the spectro-temporal modulation index (STMI) (Elhilali et al., Speech Commun 41:331-348, 2003), which assumes an explicit analysis of the spectral "ripple" structure of the speech signal. However, since the STMI applies the same decision metric as the STI, it fails to account for spectral subtraction. The results from this study suggest that the SNRenv might reflect a powerful decision metric, while some explicit across-frequency analysis seems crucial in some conditions. How such across-frequency analysis is "realized" in the auditory system remains unresolved.

  2. HEPA Filter Performance under Adverse Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Michael; Hogancamp, Kristina; Alderman, Steven; Waggoner, Charles

    2007-07-01

    This study involved challenging nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under a variety of conditions that can arise in Department of Energy (DOE) applications such as: low or high RH, controlled and uncontrolled challenge, and filters with physically damaged media or seals (i.e., leaks). Reported findings correlate filter function as measured by traditional differential pressure techniques in comparison with simultaneous instrumental determination of up and down stream PM concentrations. Additionally, emission rates and failure signatures will be discussed for filters that have either failed or exceeded their usable lifetime. Significant findings from this effort include the use of thermocouples up and down stream of the filter housing to detect the presence of moisture. Also demonstrated in the moisture challenge series of tests is the effect of repeated wetting of the filter. This produces a phenomenon referred to as transient failure before the tensile strength of the media weakens to the point of physical failure. An evaluation of the effect of particle size distribution of the challenge aerosol on loading capacity of filters is also included. Results for soot and two size distributions of KCl are reported. Loading capacities for filters ranged from approximately 70 g of soot to nearly 900 g for the larger particle size distribution of KCl. (authors)

  3. Flight data recovery under adverse conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbauer, E. J.

    1981-11-01

    Methods for overcoming data loss, including bit dump, bit shift, forward and reverse readout, time displacement compensation (TDC), wideband TDC, and supersynchronization are discussed. Supersynchronization systems recognize acquisition of any one sync word as an in-sync condition and process accordingly. They open a window prior to the end of the subframe which enables the circuit to look for the next sync work up to 8 bits early. A feedback loop enables one shot timing methods to track the average bit rate automatically. A time duration equal to 70.7% of the average bit period is recommended. A digital bit averaging technique, in which the bit decision time is determined by the average of the two previous bits, gives excellent results. With forward and reverse processing, data are processed in the usual way through the engineering conversion process. Valid data, prior to the out of sync area, look normal. The computer then goes to the end of the subframe and processes data from this point backwards toward the sync loss area.

  4. Management of Cattle Exposed to Adverse Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mader, Terry L; Griffin, Dee

    2015-07-01

    During periods of adverse weather, optimum conditions for animal comfort and performance are compromised. Use of alternative supplementation programs need to be considered for livestock challenged by adverse environmental conditions. Use of additional water for consumption and cooling, shade, and/or alternative management strategies need to be considered to help livestock cope with heat stress. For animals reared outside during winter, strategies that increase animal space and environmental buffers need to be used to minimize effects of mud, wet conditions, and windchill. There are ample opportunities for livestock producers to enhance animal welfare and minimize the impact of environmental stress.

  5. Word Learning under Adverse Listening Conditions: Context-Specific Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creel, Sarah C.; Aslin, Richard N.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of word learning have presented the items to listeners under ideal conditions. Here we ask how listeners learn new vocabulary items under adverse listening conditions. Would listeners form acoustically-specific representations that incorporated the noise, base their representations on noise-free language knowledge, or both? To…

  6. Do shrubs reduce the adverse effects of grazing on soil properties?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eldridge, David J.; Beecham, Genevieve; Grace, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Increases in the density of woody plants are a global phenomenon in drylands, and large aggregations of shrubs, in particular, are regarded as being indicative of dysfunctional ecosystems. There is increasing evidence that overgrazing by livestock reduces ecosystem functions in shrublands, but that shrubs may buffer the negative effects of increasing grazing. We examined changes in water infiltration and nutrient concentrations in soils under shrubs and in their interspaces in shrublands in eastern Australia that varied in the intensity of livestock grazing. We used structural equation modelling to test whether shrubs might reduce the negative effects of overgrazing on infiltration and soil carbon and nitrogen (henceforth ‘soil nutrients’). Soils under shrubs and subject to low levels of grazing were more stable and had greater levels of soil nutrients. Shrubs had a direct positive effect on soil nutrients; but, grazing negatively affected nutrients by increasing soil bulk density. Structural equation modelling showed that shrubs had a direct positive effect on water flow under ponded conditions but also enhanced water flow, indirectly, through increased litter cover. Any positive effects of shrubs on water flow under low levels of grazing waned at high levels of grazing. Our results indicate that shrubs may reduce the adverse effects of grazing on soil properties. Specifically, shrubs could restrict access to livestock and therefore protect soils and plants beneath their canopies. Low levels of grazing are likely to ensure the retention of soil water and soil carbon and nitrogen in shrubland soils.

  7. Quality of whey powders stored under adverse conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey protein concentrate powder (WPC) is exported by the U.S. and is included in emergency aid foods, but the bags sent overseas are usually stored without refrigeration and under elevated temperature and relative humidity (RH). The shelf life of WPC under adverse conditions must be known to preven...

  8. Extinction of CO2 Laser Radiation Under Adverse Weather Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    81-1280 B0 91,a 4 TITLE (and Subtitle) S TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED EXTINCTION OF CO2 LASER RADIATION UNDER FINAL Oct 78 Oct 81 ADVERSE WEATHER...CONDITIONS 6 PERFORMING O0G r_ r NUMBER 7. AUTHOR( s ) 8 CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER( s ) Dr. Vincent Chimelis ŝ PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10...number) Laser Propagation Rain Laser Extinction CO2 Lasers Adverse Weather Aerosol s - 20 RACT (Continue on reverse side If necessary and Identify by

  9. Adverse health effects of high-effort/low-reward conditions.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, J

    1996-01-01

    In addition to the person-environment fit model (J. R. French, R. D. Caplan, & R. V. Harrison, 1982) and the demand-control model (R. A. Karasek & T. Theorell, 1990), a third theoretical concept is proposed to assess adverse health effects of stressful experience at work: the effort-reward imbalance model. The focus of this model is on reciprocity of exchange in occupational life where high-cost/low-gain conditions are considered particularly stressful. Variables measuring low reward in terms of low status control (e.g., lack of promotion prospects, job insecurity) in association with high extrinsic (e.g., work pressure) or intrinsic (personal coping pattern, e.g., high need for control) effort independently predict new cardiovascular events in a prospective study on blue-collar men. Furthermore, these variables partly explain prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, atherogenic lipids) in 2 independent studies. Studying adverse health effects of high-effort/low-reward conditions seems well justified, especially in view of recent developments of the labor market.

  10. Perceptual Learning of Speech under Optimal and Adverse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xujin; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have a remarkable ability to understand spoken language despite the large amount of variability in speech. Previous research has shown that listeners can use lexical information to guide their interpretation of atypical sounds in speech (Norris, McQueen, & Cutler, 2003). This kind of lexically induced perceptual learning enables people to adjust to the variations in utterances due to talker-specific characteristics, such as individual identity and dialect. The current study investigated perceptual learning in two optimal conditions: conversational speech (Experiment 1) vs. clear speech (Experiment 2), and three adverse conditions: noise (Experiment 3a) vs. two cognitive loads (Experiments 4a & 4b). Perceptual learning occurred in the two optimal conditions and in the two cognitive load conditions, but not in the noise condition. Furthermore, perceptual learning occurred only in the first of two sessions for each participant, and only for atypical /s/ sounds and not for atypical /f/ sounds. This pattern of learning and non-learning reflects a balance between flexibility and stability that the speech system must have to deal with speech variability in the diverse conditions that speech is encountered. PMID:23815478

  11. Assurance of Fault Management: Risk-Significant Adverse Condition Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitz, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Fault Management (FM) systems are ranked high in risk-based assessment of criticality within flight software, emphasizing the importance of establishing highly competent domain expertise to provide assurance for NASA projects, especially as spaceflight systems continue to increase in complexity. Insight into specific characteristics of FM architectures seen embedded within safety- and mission-critical software systems analyzed by the NASA Independent Verification Validation (IVV) Program has been enhanced with an FM Technical Reference (TR) suite. Benefits are aimed beyond the IVV community to those that seek ways to efficiently and effectively provide software assurance to reduce the FM risk posture of NASA and other space missions. The identification of particular FM architectures, visibility, and associated IVV techniques provides a TR suite that enables greater assurance that critical software systems will adequately protect against faults and respond to adverse conditions. The role FM has with regard to overall asset protection of flight software systems is being addressed with the development of an adverse condition (AC) database encompassing flight software vulnerabilities.Identification of potential off-nominal conditions and analysis to determine how a system responds to these conditions are important aspects of hazard analysis and fault management. Understanding what ACs the mission may face, and ensuring they are prevented or addressed is the responsibility of the assurance team, which necessarily should have insight into ACs beyond those defined by the project itself. Research efforts sponsored by NASAs Office of Safety and Mission Assurance defined terminology, categorized data fields, and designed a baseline repository that centralizes and compiles a comprehensive listing of ACs and correlated data relevant across many NASA missions. This prototype tool helps projects improve analysis by tracking ACs, and allowing queries based on project, mission

  12. Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Kelley J.; Schneiderman, Jason S.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Whitmire, Alexandra M.; Picano, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA commitment to human space flight includes continuing to fly astronauts on the ISS until it is decommissioned as well as possibly returning astronauts to the moon or having astronauts venture to an asteroid or Mars. As missions leave low Earth orbit and explore deeper space, BHP supports and conducts research to enable a risk posture that considers the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders “acceptable given mitigations,” for pre-, in, and post-flight.The Human System Risk Board (HSRB) determines the risk of various mission scenarios using a likelihood (per person per year) by consequences matrix examining those risks across two categories—long term health and operational (within mission). Colors from a stoplight signal are used by HSRB and quickly provide a means of assessing overall perceived risk for a particular mission scenario. Risk associated with the current six month missions on the ISS are classified as “accepted with monitoring” while planetary missions, such as a mission to Mars, are recognized to be a “red” risk that requires mitigation to ensure mission success.Currently, the HSRB deems that the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric outcomes requires mitigation for planetary missions owing to long duration isolation and radiation exposure (see Table 1). While limited research evidence exists from spaceflight, it is well known anecdotally that the shift from the two week shuttle missions to the six month ISS missions renders the psychological stressors of space as more salient over longer duration missions. Shuttle astronauts were expected just to tolerate any stressors that arose during their mission and were successful at doing so (Whitmire et al, 2013). While it is possible to deal with stressors such as social isolation and to live with incompatible crewmembers for two weeks on shuttle, “ignoring it” is much less likely to be a successful coping mechanism

  13. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Soil conditions. 3285.201 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.201 Soil conditions. To help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or...

  14. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Soil conditions. 3285.201 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.201 Soil conditions. To help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or...

  15. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Soil conditions. 3285.201 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.201 Soil conditions. To help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or...

  16. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Soil conditions. 3285.201 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.201 Soil conditions. To help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or...

  17. 24 CFR 3285.201 - Soil conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Soil conditions. 3285.201 Section... DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Site Preparation § 3285.201 Soil conditions. To help prevent settling or sagging, the foundation must be constructed on firm, undisturbed soil or...

  18. 75 FR 8353 - Waiver of Filing Deadline Due to Adverse Weather Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... COMMISSION Waiver of Filing Deadline Due to Adverse Weather Conditions February 16, 2010. AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Due to adverse weather conditions, the Federal Communications..., February 11, 2010. In recognition of the numerous closings and disruptions caused by the weather in...

  19. Soil carbon sequestration estimated with the soil conditioning index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid and reliable assessments of the potential of different agricultural management systems to sequester soil organic carbon are needed to promote conservation and help mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. The soil conditioning index (SCI) is a relatively simple model to parameterize and is currentl...

  20. America's Soil and Water: Condition and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1981

    A review of conditions and trends regarding soil and water resources of rural nonfederal lands of the United States is presented in this publication. Maps, charts, and graphs illustrate the data collected on various aspects of soil and water use and practice. Topic areas considered include: (1) land use patterns; (2) classes of land; (3)…

  1. Fluorescence parameters of leaves of trees and shrubs during period of adverse weather conditions in Krasnoyarsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavorueva, E. N.; Zavoruev, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of adverse weather conditions (AWC) on the fluorescence parameters of leaves Prinsepia sinensis, Amelanchier florida, Crataegus chlorocarca is obtained. However, significant changes in the fluorescence of the leaves of Acer negundo, Betula pendula under AWC were not observed.

  2. ACCEPT: Introduction of the Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Rodney A.; Santanu, Das; Janakiraman, Vijay Manikandan; Hosein, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of anomalies or adverse events is a challenging task, and there are a variety of methods which can be used to address the problem. In this paper, we introduce a generic framework developed in MATLAB (sup registered mark) called ACCEPT (Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox). ACCEPT is an architectural framework designed to compare and contrast the performance of a variety of machine learning and early warning algorithms, and tests the capability of these algorithms to robustly predict the onset of adverse events in any time-series data generating systems or processes.

  3. Health Monitoring and Management for Manufacturing Workers in Adverse Working Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoya; Zhong, Miao; Wan, Jiafu; Yi, Minglun; Gao, Tiancheng

    2016-10-01

    In adverse working conditions, environmental parameters such as metallic dust, noise, and environmental temperature, directly affect the health condition of manufacturing workers. It is therefore important to implement health monitoring and management based on important physiological parameters (e.g., heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature). In recent years, new technologies, such as body area networks, cloud computing, and smart clothing, have allowed the improvement of the quality of services. In this article, we first give five-layer architecture for health monitoring and management of manufacturing workers. Then, we analyze the system implementation process, including environmental data processing, physical condition monitoring and system services and management, and present the corresponding algorithms. Finally, we carry out an evaluation and analysis from the perspective of insurance and compensation for manufacturing workers in adverse working conditions. The proposed scheme will contribute to the improvement of workplace conditions, realize health monitoring and management, and protect the interests of manufacturing workers.

  4. The Impact of Organic Amendments on Soil Properties Under Mediterranean Climatic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso Gonzalez, Paloma; Francisco Martinez Murillo, Juan; Damian Ruiz Sinoga, Jose

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion and unsustainable land uses produce adverse effect on SOC content. Soil management techniques and corrections can be applied for soil recovery, especially, with afforestation purposes. This study presents the short term effects of the application of different treatments and amendments on soil properties for soils included in several sets of closed plots located in the experimental area of Pinarillo (Nerja, Spain). The analysed soil properties were: pH, EC, Organic Carbon, total Nitrogen and total Carbon. In order to verify possible differences, we applied the test of Mann-Whitney U in corroboration with the previous homogeneity test of variance. The result of each strategy set compared to the initial condition shows at least one significant modification in the analysed soil properties. Electrical conductivity was the most changeable soil property respect to the initial condition. Similarly, organic carbon content and total organic carbon remained quite similar. However, when all of the strategy sets are compared among them, total carbon was the most significantly changeable property. Mulching, polymers and urban residue seem to highly modify the soil initial conditions. Although soil physic-chemical parameters generally used to evaluate soil quality change very slowly. The analysed soil properties shows significant differences between dry and wet season. This fact, could be indicating the effect of certain seasonality as it is usual in Mediterranean condition.

  5. Adverse Pregnancy Conditions, Infertility, and Future Cardiovascular Risk: Implications for Mother and Child

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki; Wei, Janet; Minissian, Margo; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2016-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy conditions in women are common and have been associated with adverse cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes such as myocardial infarction and stroke. As risk stratification in women is often suboptimal, recognition of non-traditional risk factors such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and premature delivery has become increasingly important. Additionally, such conditions may also increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in the children of afflicted women. In this review, we aim to highlight these conditions, along with infertility, and the association between such conditions and various cardiovascular outcomes and related maternal risk along with potential translation of risk to offspring. We will also discuss proposed mechanisms driving these associations as well as potential opportunities for screening and risk modification. PMID:26037616

  6. Causal Factors and Adverse Conditions of Aviation Accidents and Incidents Related to Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Sandifer, Carl E.; Jones, Sharon Monica

    2010-01-01

    The causal factors of accidents from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) database and incidents from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) database associated with loss of control (LOC) were examined for four types of operations (i.e., Federal Aviation Regulation Part 121, Part 135 Scheduled, Part 135 Nonscheduled, and Part 91) for the years 1988 to 2004. In-flight LOC is a serious aviation problem. Well over half of the LOC accidents included at least one fatality (80 percent in Part 121), and roughly half of all aviation fatalities in the studied time period occurred in conjunction with LOC. An adverse events table was updated to provide focus to the technology validation strategy of the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) Project. The table contains three types of adverse conditions: failure, damage, and upset. Thirteen different adverse condition subtypes were gleaned from the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS), the FAA Accident and Incident database, and the NTSB database. The severity and frequency of the damage conditions, initial test conditions, and milestones references are also provided.

  7. Assessment of the State of the Art of Flight Control Technologies as Applicable to Adverse Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary s.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Leone, Karen M.; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Withrow, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    Literature from academia, industry, and other Government agencies was surveyed to assess the state of the art in current Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) aircraft technologies. Over 100 papers from 25 conferences from the time period 2004 to 2009 were reviewed. An assessment of the general state of the art in adaptive flight control is summarized first, followed by an assessment of the state of the art as applicable to 13 identified adverse conditions. Specific areas addressed in the general assessment include flight control when compensating for damage or reduced performance, retrofit software upgrades to flight controllers, flight control through engine response, and finally test and validation of new adaptive controllers. The state-of-the-art assessment applicable to the adverse conditions include technologies not specifically related to flight control, but may serve as inputs to a future flight control algorithm. This study illustrates existing gaps and opportunities for additional research by the NASA IRAC Project

  8. Algorithms for contours depicting static electric fields during adverse weather conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.

    1991-01-01

    A flexible and functional analytical tool is developed for the study of electric fields during adverse weather conditions. This tool is designed for use by members of the Atmospheric Science Group as part of their overall effort to appraise environmental conditions during these situations. It is also used to illustrate approaches open to those interested in the study of the physics of ambient electric field phenomena. Computer resources of KSC are coordinated with original software to produce contour interpretations of electric field data available from a grid of field mills spanning the region. Three model algorithms are presented and examples are given illustrating the system design, flexibility, and utility.

  9. Some effects of adverse weather conditions on performance of airplane antiskid braking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.; Mccarty, J. L.; Tanner, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The performance of current antiskid braking systems operating under adverse weather conditions was analyzed in an effort to both identify the causes of locked-wheel skids which sometimes occur when the runway is slippery and to find possible solutions to this operational problem. This analysis was made possible by the quantitative test data provided by recently completed landing research programs using fully instrumented flight test airplanes and was further supported by tests performed at the Langley aircraft landing loads and traction facility. The antiskid system logic for brake control and for both touchdown and locked-wheel protection is described and its response behavior in adverse weather is discussed in detail with the aid of available data. The analysis indicates that the operational performance of the antiskid logic circuits is highly dependent upon wheel spin-up acceleration and can be adversely affected by certain pilot braking inputs when accelerations are low. Normal antiskid performance is assured if the tire-to-runway traction is sufficient to provide high wheel spin-up accelerations or if the system is provided a continuous, accurate ground speed reference. The design of antiskid systems is complicated by the necessity for tradeoffs between tire braking and cornering capabilities, both of which are necessary to provide safe operations in the presence of cross winds, particularly under slippery runway conditions.

  10. Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders: Evidence Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Kelley J.; Williams, Thomas J.; Schneiderman, Jason S.; Whitmire, Alexandra M.; Picano, James J.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Schmidt, Lacey L.; Shea, Camille

    2016-01-01

    In April 2010, President Obama declared a space pioneering goal for the United States in general and NASA in particular. "Fifty years after the creation of NASA, our goal is no longer just a destination to reach. Our goal is the capacity for people to work and learn and operate and live safely beyond the Earth for extended periods of time, ultimately in ways that are more sustainable and even indefinite." Thus NASA's Strategic Objective 1.1 emerged as "expand human presence into the solar system and to the surface of Mars to advance exploration, science, innovation, benefits to humanity, and international collaboration" (NASA 2015b). Any space flight, be it of long or short duration, occurs in an extreme environment that has unique stressors. Even with excellent selection methods, the potential for behavioral problems among space flight crews remain a threat to mission success. Assessment of factors that are related to behavioral health can help minimize the chances of distress and, thus, reduce the likelihood of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders arising within a crew. Similarly, countermeasures that focus on prevention and treatment can mitigate the cognitive or behavioral conditions that, should they arise, would impact mission success. Given the general consensus that longer duration, isolation, and confined missions have a greater risk for behavioral health ensuring crew behavioral health over the long term is essential. Risk, which within the context of this report is assessed with respect to behavioral health and performance, is addressed to deter development of cognitive and behavioral degradations or psychiatric conditions in space flight and analog populations, and to monitor, detect, and treat early risk factors, predictors and other contributing factors. Based on space flight and analog evidence, the average incidence rate of an adverse behavioral health event occurring during a space mission is relatively low for the

  11. The dissipation of hexazinone in tropical soils under semi-controlled field conditions in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Lalah, Joseph O; Muendo, Bonface M; Getenga, Zachary M

    2009-09-01

    The dissipation of hexazinone (Velpar) in two tropical soil types in Kenya was studied under field and semi-controlled conditions for a period of 84 days. The dissipation was found to be very rapid and this could be attributed to adverse weather conditions including high initial rainfall as well as to low soil-organic-matter content, volatilization, surface run-off and biodegradation. The DT(50) values of dissipation obtained by first order kinetics were 20 days and 21.3 days in clay and loam soil types, respectively. The influence of bargasse compost (1000 microg/g dry soil) was also studied and was found to enhance dissipation to some extent, giving DT(50) values of 18 days and 18.3 days in clay and loam soil types, respectively.

  12. Significance of frailty for predicting adverse clinical outcomes in different patient groups with specific medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Ritt, Martin; Gaßmann, Karl-Günter; Sieber, Cornel Christian

    2016-10-01

    Frailty is a major health burden in an aging society. It constitutes a clinical state of reduced physiological reserves that is associated with a diminished ability to withstand internal and external stressors. Frail patients have an increased risk for adverse clinical outcomes, such as mortality, readmission to hospital, institutionalization and falls. Of further clinical interest, frailty might be at least in part reversible in some patients and subject to preventive strategies. In daily clinical practice older patients with a complex health status, who are mostly frail or at least at risk of developing frailty, are frequently cared for by geriatricians. Recently, clinicians and scientists from other medical disciplines, such as cardiology, pulmonology, gastroenterology, nephrology, endocrinology, rheumatology, surgery and critical care medicine also discovered frailty to be an interesting instrument for risk stratification of patients, including younger patients. In this review we highlight the results of recent studies that demonstrated the significance of frailty to predict adverse clinical outcomes in patients with specific medical conditions, such as cardiac, lung, liver and kidney diseases as well as diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, trauma patients, patients undergoing surgery and critically ill patients. Multiple studies in patients with the aforementioned specific medical conditions could be identified demonstrating a predictive role of frailty for several adverse clinical outcomes. The association between frailty and adverse clinical outcomes reported in these studies was in part independent of several major potential confounder factors, such as age, sex, race, comorbidities and disabilities and were also detected in younger patients.

  13. Adverse psychosocial working conditions and minor psychiatric disorders among bank workers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In most countries, the financial service sector has undergone great organizational changes in the past decades, with potential negative impact on bank workers' mental health. The aim of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of minor psychiatric disorders (MPD) among Brazilian bank workers and to investigate whether they are associated with an adverse psychosocial working environment. Methods A cross-sectional study of a random sample of 2,500 workers in a Brazilian state bank in 2008. The presence of MPD was determined by the General Health Questionnaire.(GHQ). Psychosocial work conditions were assessed by means of the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) and Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). The presence and magnitude of the independent associations between MPD and adverse psychosocial working conditions were determined by Prevalence Ratios, obtained by Poisson regression. Results From 2,337 eligible workers, 88% participated. The prevalence of MPD was greater among women (45% vs. 41%; p > 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, the prevalence of MPD was twice as high among bank workers exposed to high psychological demand and low control at work and under high effort and low reward working conditions. The lack of social support at work and the presence of over-commitment were also associated with higher prevalence of MPD. A negative interaction effect was found between over-commitment and effort-reward imbalance. Conclusion The prevalence of MPD is high among bank workers. The results reinforce the association between MPD and adverse psychosocial working conditions, assessed by the JCQ and ERI models. The direction of the interaction observed between over-commitment and ERI was contrary to what was expected. PMID:21062496

  14. Galena weathering under simulated calcareous soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Lara, René H; Briones, Roberto; Monroy, Marcos G; Mullet, Martine; Humbert, Bernard; Dossot, Manuel; Naja, Ghinwa M; Cruz, Roel

    2011-09-01

    Exploitation of polymetallic deposits from calcareous mining sites exposes galena and others sulfides to weathering factors. Galena weathering leads to the formation of lead phases (e.g., PbSO(4), PbCO(3)) with a higher bioaccessibility than galena, thus increasing the mobility and toxicity of lead. Despite the environmental impacts of these lead phases, the mechanisms of galena oxidation and the transformation of lead secondary phases, under neutral-alkaline carbonated conditions, have rarely been studied. In this work, an experimental approach, combining electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques, was developed to examine the interfacial processes involved in the galena weathering under simulated calcareous conditions. The results showed an initial oxidation stage with the formation of an anglesite-like phase leading to the partial mineral passivation. Under neutral-alkaline carbonated conditions, the stability of this phase was limited as it transformed into a cerussite-like one. Based on the surface characterization and the formation of secondary species, the weathering mechanisms of galena in calcareous soil and its environmental implications were suggested.

  15. LEARNING TO BE BAD: ADVERSE SOCIAL CONDITIONS, SOCIAL SCHEMAS, AND CRIME

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Ronald L.; Burt, Callie Harbin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we develop and test a new approach to explain the link between social factors and individual offending. We argue that seemingly disparate family, peer, and community conditions lead to crime because the lessons communicated by these events are similar and promote social schemas involving a hostile view of people and relationships, a preference for immediate rewards, and a cynical view of conventional norms. Further, we posit that these three schemas are interconnected and combine to form a criminogenic knowledge structure that gives rise to situational interpretations legitimating criminal behavior. Structural equation modeling with a sample of roughly 700 hundred African American teens provided strong support for the model. The findings indicated that persistent exposure to adverse conditions such as community crime, discrimination, harsh parenting, deviant peers and low neighborhood collective efficacy increased commitment to the three social schemas. The three schemas were highly intercorrelated and combined to form a latent construct that strongly predicted increases in crime. Further, in large measure the effect of the various adverse conditions on increases in crime was indirect through their impact on this latent construct. We discuss the extent to which the social schematic model presented in the paper might be used to integrate concepts and findings from several of the major theories of criminal behavior. PMID:21760641

  16. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber: Adverse operating conditions test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Test hardware, facilities, and procedures are described along with results of electrically heated tube and channel tests conducted to determine adverse operating condition limits for convectively cooled chambers typical of Space Shuttle Orbit Manuevering Engine designs. Hot-start tests were conducted with corrosion resistant steel and nickel tubes with both monomethylhydrazine and 50-50 coolants. Helium ingestion, in both bubble and froth form, was studied in tubular test sections. Helium bubble ingestion and burn-out limits in rectangular channels were also investigated.

  17. Speech perception under adverse conditions: insights from behavioral, computational, and neuroscience research

    PubMed Central

    Guediche, Sara; Blumstein, Sheila E.; Fiez, Julie A.; Holt, Lori L.

    2014-01-01

    Adult speech perception reflects the long-term regularities of the native language, but it is also flexible such that it accommodates and adapts to adverse listening conditions and short-term deviations from native-language norms. The purpose of this article is to examine how the broader neuroscience literature can inform and advance research efforts in understanding the neural basis of flexibility and adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Specifically, we highlight the potential role of learning algorithms that rely on prediction error signals and discuss specific neural structures that are likely to contribute to such learning. To this end, we review behavioral studies, computational accounts, and neuroimaging findings related to adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Already, a few studies have alluded to a potential role of these mechanisms in adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Furthermore, we consider research topics in neuroscience that offer insight into how perception can be adaptively tuned to short-term deviations while balancing the need to maintain stability in the perception of learned long-term regularities. Consideration of the application and limitations of these algorithms in characterizing flexible speech perception under adverse conditions promises to inform theoretical models of speech. PMID:24427119

  18. Bill E. Kunkle Interdisciplinary Beef Symposium: Animal welfare concerns for cattle exposed to adverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Mader, T L

    2014-12-01

    Increasing awareness of animal welfare has become a priority in food production systems involving animals. Under normal working environments, production practices are constantly evaluated to maintain optimum levels of animal well-being. However, during periods of adverse weather, optimum conditions for animal comfort, as well as animal performance, are often compromised. In the Midwest and Great Plains states, the heat waves of 1995, 1999, 2006, 2009, 2010, and 2013 were particularly difficult on animals reared in confinement, with documented cattle losses approaching 5,000 head each year. Additionally, during the summer of 2011, nearly 15,000 head of cattle across 5 states were lost as a result of heat stress. During prolonged periods of heat stress, lower conceptions rates are observed in livestock. In addition, animals reared in confinement buildings are often compromised because of limitations in ventilation systems. Under the opposite environmental spectrum, the winters of 1992 to 1993, 1996 to 1997, 1997 to 1998, 2006 to 2007, and 2008 to 2009 caused hardship for livestock producers, particularly for those rearing animals in an outdoor environment. During the winters of 1996 to 1997 and 2008 to 2009 up to 50% of the newborn calves were lost in many areas, with over 75,000 head of cattle lost in the northern plains states. Late fall and early winter snowstorms in 1992, 1997, 2006, and 2013 resulted in the loss of over 25,000 head of cattle each year in the Great Plains region of the United States. Economic losses from reduced performance of cattle experiencing severe environmental stress likely exceed losses associated with livestock death by 5- to 10-fold. Use of alternative supplementation programs may need to be considered for livestock challenged by adverse environmental conditions. Use of additional water for consumption and cooling, shade, and/or alternative management strategies need to be considered to help livestock cope with heat stress. For animals

  19. Wear of novel ceramic-on-ceramic bearings under adverse and clinically relevant hip simulator conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Jennings, Louise M; Begand, Sabine; Oberbach, Thomas; Delfosse, Daniel; Fisher, John

    2013-11-01

    Further development of ceramic materials for total hip replacement aim to increase fracture toughness and further reduce the incidence of bearing fracture. Edge loading due to translational mal positioning (microseparation) has replicated stripe wear, wear rates, and bimodal wear debris observed on retrievals. This method has replicated the fracture of early zirconia ceramic-on-ceramic bearings. This has shown the necessity of introducing microseparation conditions to the gait cycle when assessing the tribological performance of new hip replacement bearings. Two novel ceramic matrix composite materials, zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA) and alumina-toughened zirconia (ATZ), were developed by Mathys Orthopädie GmbH. In this study, ATZ-on-ATZ and ZTA-on-ZTA bearing combinations were tested and compared with alumina-on-alumina (Al2O3-on-Al2O3) bearings under adverse microseparation and edge loading conditions using the Leeds II physiological anatomical hip joint simulator. The wear rate (±95% confidence limit) of ZTA-on-ZTA was 0.14 ± 0.10 mm(3)/million cycles and that of ATZ-on-ATZ was 0.06 ± 0.004 mm(3)/million cycles compared with a wear rate of 0.74 ± 1.73 mm(3)/million cycles for Al2O3-on-Al2O3 bearings. Stripe wear was evident on all bearing combinations; however, the stripe formed on the ATZ and ZTA femoral heads was thinner and shallower that that formed on the Al2O3 heads. Posttest phase composition measurements for both ATZ and ZTA materials showed no significant change in the monoclinic zirconia content. ATZ-on-ATZ and ZTA-on-ZTA showed superior wear resistance properties when compared with Al2O3-on-Al2O3 under adverse edge loading conditions.

  20. A Ground-Based Array to Observe Geospace Electrodynamics During Adverse Space Weather Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2004-05-01

    Geomagnetic Storms occur with surprising frequency and create adverse space weather conditions. During these periods, our knowledge and ability to specify or forecast in adequate detail for user needs is negligible. Neither experimental observations nor theoretical developments have made a significant new impact on the problem for over two decades. Although we can now map Total Electron Content (TEC) in the ionosphere over a continent with sufficient resolution to see coherent long-lived structures, these do not provide constraints on the geospace electrodynamics that is at the heart of our lack of understanding. We present arguments for the need of a continental deployment of ground-based sensors to stepwise advance our understanding of the geospace electrodynamics when it is most adverse from a space weather perspective and also most frustrating from an understanding of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere coupling. That a continental-scale deployment is more productive at addressing the problem than a realizable global distribution is shown. Each measurement is discussed from the point-of-view of either providing new knowledge or becoming a key for future real-time specification and forecasting for user applications. An example of a storm database from one mid-latitude station for the 31 March 2002 is used as a conceptual point in a ground-based array. The presentation focuses on scientific questions that have eluded a quantitative solution for over three decades and view a ground-based array as an "IGY" type of catalyst for answering these questions.

  1. Determination and representation of electric charge distributions associated with adverse weather conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Algorithms are presented for determining the size and location of electric charges which model storm systems and lightning strikes. The analysis utilizes readings from a grid of ground level field mills and geometric constraints on parameters to arrive at a representative set of charges. This set is used to generate three dimensional graphical depictions of the set as well as contour maps of the ground level electrical environment over the grid. The composite, analytic and graphic package is demonstrated and evaluated using controlled input data and archived data from a storm system. The results demonstrate the packages utility as: an operational tool in appraising adverse weather conditions; a research tool in studies of topics such as storm structure, storm dynamics, and lightning; and a tool in designing and evaluating grid systems.

  2. Probiotics production and alternative encapsulation methodologies to improve their viabilities under adverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Coghetto, Chaline Caren; Brinques, Graziela Brusch; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    2016-12-01

    Probiotic products are dietary supplements containing live microorganisms producing beneficial health effects on the host by improving intestinal balance and nutrient absorption. Among probiotic microorganisms, those classified as lactic acid bacteria are of major importance to the food and feed industries. Probiotic cells can be produced using alternative carbon and nitrogen sources, such as agroindustrial residues, at the same time contributing to reduce process costs. On the other hand, the survival of probiotic cells in formulated food products, as well as in the host gut, is an essential nutritional aspect concerning health benefits. Therefore, several cell microencapsulation techniques have been investigated as a way to improve cell viability and survival under adverse environmental conditions, such as the gastrointestinal milieu of hosts. In this review, different aspects of probiotic cells and technologies of their related products are discussed, including formulation of culture media, and aspects of cell microencapsulation techniques required to improve their survival in the host.

  3. Cost-sharing, physician utilization, and adverse selection among Medicare beneficiaries with chronic health conditions.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Geoffrey

    2015-02-01

    Pooled data from the 2007, 2009, and 2011/2012 California Health Interview Surveys were used to compare the number of self-reported annual physician visits among 36,808 Medicare beneficiaries ≥65 in insurance groups with differential cost-sharing. Adjusted for adverse selection and a set of health covariates, Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) only beneficiaries had similar physician utilization compared with HMO enrollees but fewer visits compared with those with supplemental (1.04, p = .001) and Medicaid (1.55, p = .003) coverage. FFS only beneficiaries in very good or excellent health had fewer visits compared with those of similar health status with supplemental (1.30, p = .001) or Medicaid coverage (2.15, p = .002). For subpopulations with several chronic conditions, FFS only beneficiaries also had fewer visits compared with beneficiaries with supplemental or Medicaid coverage. Observed differences in utilization may reflect efficient and necessary physician utilization among those with chronic health needs.

  4. Functions of Nitric Oxide (NO) in Roots during Development and under Adverse Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2015-01-01

    The free radical molecule, nitric oxide (NO), is present in the principal organs of plants, where it plays an important role in a wide range of physiological functions. Root growth and development are highly regulated by both internal and external factors such as nutrient availability, hormones, pattern formation, cell polarity and cell cycle control. The presence of NO in roots has opened up new areas of research on the role of NO, including root architecture, nutrient acquisition, microorganism interactions and the response mechanisms to adverse environmental conditions, among others. Additionally, the exogenous application of NO throughout the roots has the potential to counteract specific damages caused by certain stresses. This review aims to provide an up-to-date perspective on NO functions in the roots of higher plants. PMID:27135326

  5. Assessment of nitrogen ceilings for Dutch agricultural soils to avoid adverse environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    de Vries, W; Kros, H; Oenema, O; Erisman, J W

    2001-11-09

    In the Netherlands, high traffic density and intensive animal husbandry have led to high emissions of reactive nitrogen (N) into the environment. This leads to a series of environmental impacts, including: (1) nitrate (NO3) contamination of drinking water, (2) eutrophication of freshwater lakes, (3) acidification and biodiversity impacts on terrestrial ecosystems, (4) ozone and particle formation affecting human health, and (5) global climate change induced by emissions of N2O. Measures to control reactive N emissions were, up to now, directed towards those different environmental themes. Here we summarize the results of a study to analyse the agricultural N problem in the Netherlands in an integrated way, which means that all relevant aspects are taken into account simultaneously. A simple N balance model was developed, representing all crucial processes in the N chain, to calculate acceptable N inputs to the farm (so-called N ceiling) and to the soil surface (application in the field) by feed concentrates, organic manure, fertiliser, deposition, and N fixation. The N ceilings were calculated on the basis of critical limits for NO 3 concentrations in groundwater, N concentrations in surface water, and ammonia (NH3) emission targets related to the protection of biodiversity of natural areas. Results show that in most parts of the Netherlands, except the western and the northern part, the N ceilings are limited by NH 3 emissions, which are derived from critical N loads for nature areas, rather than limits for both ground- and surface water. On the national scale, the N ceiling ranges between 372 and 858 kton year(-1) depending on the choice of critical limits. The current N import is 848 kton year(-1). A decrease of nearly 60% is needed to reach the ceilings that are necessary to protect the environment against all adverse impacts of N pollution from agriculture.

  6. Global responses of Escherichia coli to adverse conditions determined by microarrays and FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moen, Birgitte; Janbu, Astrid Oust; Langsrud, Solveig; Langsrud, Oyvind; Hobman, Jon L; Constantinidou, Chrystala; Kohler, Achim; Rudi, Knut

    2009-06-01

    The global gene expression and biomolecular composition in an Escherichia coli model strain exposed to 10 adverse conditions (sodium chloride, ethanol, glycerol, hydrochloric and acetic acid, sodium hydroxide, heat (46 degrees C), and cold (15 degrees C), as well as ethidium bromide and the disinfectant benzalkonium chloride) were determined using DNA microarrays and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In total, approximately 40% of all investigated genes (1682/4279 genes) significantly changed expression, compared with a nonstressed control. There were, however, only 3 genes (ygaW (unknown function), rmf (encoding a ribosomal modification factor), and ghrA (encoding a glyoxylate/hydroxypyruvate reductase)) that significantly changed expression under all conditions (not including benzalkonium chloride). The FT-IR analysis showed an increase in unsaturated fatty acids during ethanol and cold exposure, and a decrease during acid and heat exposure. Cold conditions induced changes in the carbohydrate composition of the cell, possibly related to the upregulation of outer membrane genes (glgAP and rcsA). Although some covariance was observed between the 2 data sets, principle component analysis and regression analyses revealed that the gene expression and the biomolecular responses are not well correlated in stressed populations of E. coli, underlining the importance of multiple strategies to begin to understand the effect on the whole cell.

  7. Chosen risk level during car-following in adverse weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Hjelkrem, Odd André; Ryeng, Eirin Olaussen

    2016-10-01

    This study examines how precipitation, light conditions and surface conditions affect the drivers' risk perception. An indicator CRI (Chosen Risk Index) is defined, which describes the chosen risk level for drivers in a car-following situation. The dataset contains about 70 000 observations of driver behaviour and weather status on a rural road. Based on the theory of risk homeostasis and an assumption that driving behaviour in situations with daylight, dry road and no precipitation reflects drivers' target level of risk, generalised linear models (GLM) were estimated for cars and trucks separately to reveal the effect of adverse weather conditions on risk perception. The analyses show that both car and truck drivers perceive the highest risk when driving on snow covered roads. For car drivers, a snow covered road in combination with moderate rain or light snow are the factors which lowers the CRI the most. For trucks, snow cover and partially covered roads significantly lowers the CRI, while precipitation did not seem to impose any higher risk. Interaction effects were found for car drivers only.

  8. Adverse childhood experiences and mental health, chronic medical conditions, and development in young children

    PubMed Central

    Kerker, Bonnie D.; Zhang, Jinjin; Nadeem, Erum; Stein, Ruth E. K.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Heneghan, Amy; Landsverk, John; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the relationships between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and mental health, chronic medical conditions and social development among young children in the child welfare system. Methods This was a cross-sectional study, using a nationally representative sample of children investigated by child welfare (National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being II) from 2008–2009. Our analysis included caregiver interviews and caseworker reports about children age 18–71 months who were not in out-of-home care (N=912). We examined the associations between ACEs and mental health (measured by the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL)), reported chronic medical conditions, and social development (measured by the Vineland Socialization Scale), in bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results Nearly all children (98.1%) were reported to have had an ACE in their lifetime; the average number of ACEs was 3.6. For every additional reported ACE there was a 32% increased odds of having a problem score on the CBCL (Odds Ratio (OR)=1.32, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.14, 1.53), and a 21% increased odds of having a chronic medical condition (OR=1.21, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.40). Among children 36–71 months, for every additional reported ACE there was a 77% increased odds of a low Vineland Socialization score (OR=1.77, 95% CI: 1.12, 2.78). Conclusion and Relevance ACEs were associated with poor early childhood mental health and chronic medical conditions, and, among children age 3–5, social development. Efforts are needed to examine whether providing early intervention to families with multiple stressors mitigates the impact of ACEs on children’s outcomes. PMID:26183001

  9. Electrokinetic remediation of fluorine-contaminated soil: conditioning of anolyte.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hyung; Jeon, Chil-Sung; Baek, Kitae; Ko, Sung-Hwan; Yang, Jung-Seok

    2009-01-15

    The feasibility of anolyte conditioning on electrokinetic remediation of fluorine-contaminated soil was investigated with a field soil. The initial concentration of fluorine, pH and water content in the soil were 414mg/kg, 8.91 and 15%, respectively. Because the extraction of fluorine generally increased with the soil pH, the pH of the anode compartment was controlled by circulating strong alkaline solution to enhance the extraction of fluorine during electrokinetic remediation. The removal of fluorine increased with the concentration of the alkaline solution and applied current density and fluorine removed up to 75.6% within 14 days. Additionally, anolyte conditioning sharply increased the electro-osmotic flow, which enhanced the removal of fluorine in this study. In many respects, anolyte conditioning in electrokinetic remediation of fluorine-contaminated soil will be a promising technology.

  10. Nitroglycerin degradation mediated by soil organic carbon under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Geneviève; Martel, Richard; Bamba, Abraham N'Valoua; Blais, Jean-François; Ampleman, Guy; Thiboutot, Sonia

    2014-10-01

    The presence of nitroglycerin (NG) has been reported in shallow soils and pore water of several military training ranges. In this context, NG concentrations can be reduced through various natural attenuation processes, but these have not been thoroughly documented. This study aimed at investigating the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in the natural attenuation of NG, under aerobic conditions typical of shallow soils. The role of SOM in NG degradation has already been documented under anoxic conditions, and was attributed to SOM-mediated electron transfer involving different reducing agents. However, unsaturated soils are usually well-oxygenated, and it was not clear whether SOM could participate in NG degradation under these conditions. Our results from batch- and column-type experiments clearly demonstrate that in presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) leached from a natural soil, partial NG degradation can be achieved. In presence of particulate organic matter (POM) from the same soil, complete NG degradation was achieved. Furthermore, POM caused rapid sorption of NG, which should result in NG retention in the organic matter-rich shallow horizons of the soil profile, thus promoting degradation. Based on degradation products, the reaction pathway appears to be reductive, in spite of the aerobic conditions. The relatively rapid reaction rates suggest that this process could significantly participate in the natural attenuation of NG, both on military training ranges and in contaminated soil at production facilities.

  11. Effect of Water Logging Conditions on Solubility of Soil Nutrients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wide use of herbicides, fungicides, fertilizers, and soil amendments affect the rhizosphere biochemistry and ecology. Soils in the Midwest of the US tend to be saturated in the early spring when snow and ice melt, and frequent rain occurs. Saturated conditions also occur after heavy rainfall eve...

  12. No Adverse Effect of Genetically Modified Antifungal Wheat on Decomposition Dynamics and the Soil Fauna Community – A Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Duc, Caroline; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Lindfeld, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) plants has raised several environmental concerns. One of these concerns regards non-target soil fauna organisms, which play an important role in the decomposition of organic matter and hence are largely exposed to GM plant residues. Soil fauna may be directly affected by transgene products or indirectly by pleiotropic effects such as a modified plant metabolism. Thus, ecosystem services and functioning might be affected negatively. In a litterbag experiment in the field we analysed the decomposition process and the soil fauna community involved. Therefore, we used four experimental GM wheat varieties, two with a race-specific antifungal resistance against powdery mildew (Pm3b) and two with an unspecific antifungal resistance based on the expression of chitinase and glucanase. We compared them with two non-GM isolines and six conventional cereal varieties. To elucidate the mechanisms that cause differences in plant decomposition, structural plant components (i.e. C∶N ratio, lignin, cellulose, hemicellulose) were examined and soil properties, temperature and precipitation were monitored. The most frequent taxa extracted from decaying plant material were mites (Cryptostigmata, Gamasina and Uropodina), springtails (Isotomidae), annelids (Enchytraeidae) and Diptera (Cecidomyiidae larvae). Despite a single significant transgenic/month interaction for Cecidomyiidae larvae, which is probably random, we detected no impact of the GM wheat on the soil fauna community. However, soil fauna differences among conventional cereal varieties were more pronounced than between GM and non-GM wheat. While leaf residue decomposition in GM and non-GM wheat was similar, differences among conventional cereals were evident. Furthermore, sampling date and location were found to greatly influence soil fauna community and decomposition processes. The results give no indication of ecologically relevant adverse effects of antifungal GM wheat on the

  13. No adverse effect of genetically modified antifungal wheat on decomposition dynamics and the soil fauna community--a field study.

    PubMed

    Duc, Caroline; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Lindfeld, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) plants has raised several environmental concerns. One of these concerns regards non-target soil fauna organisms, which play an important role in the decomposition of organic matter and hence are largely exposed to GM plant residues. Soil fauna may be directly affected by transgene products or indirectly by pleiotropic effects such as a modified plant metabolism. Thus, ecosystem services and functioning might be affected negatively. In a litterbag experiment in the field we analysed the decomposition process and the soil fauna community involved. Therefore, we used four experimental GM wheat varieties, two with a race-specific antifungal resistance against powdery mildew (Pm3b) and two with an unspecific antifungal resistance based on the expression of chitinase and glucanase. We compared them with two non-GM isolines and six conventional cereal varieties. To elucidate the mechanisms that cause differences in plant decomposition, structural plant components (i.e. C∶N ratio, lignin, cellulose, hemicellulose) were examined and soil properties, temperature and precipitation were monitored. The most frequent taxa extracted from decaying plant material were mites (Cryptostigmata, Gamasina and Uropodina), springtails (Isotomidae), annelids (Enchytraeidae) and Diptera (Cecidomyiidae larvae). Despite a single significant transgenic/month interaction for Cecidomyiidae larvae, which is probably random, we detected no impact of the GM wheat on the soil fauna community. However, soil fauna differences among conventional cereal varieties were more pronounced than between GM and non-GM wheat. While leaf residue decomposition in GM and non-GM wheat was similar, differences among conventional cereals were evident. Furthermore, sampling date and location were found to greatly influence soil fauna community and decomposition processes. The results give no indication of ecologically relevant adverse effects of antifungal GM wheat on the

  14. Restricted streptomycin use in apple orchards did not adversely alter the soil bacteria communities.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Fiona; Smith, Daniel P; Owens, Sarah M; Duffy, Brion; Frey, Jürg E

    2013-01-01

    Streptomycin has been authorized for restricted use in the prevention of the fire blight disease of pome fruit orchards in the EU and Switzerland. This study addresses the important topic of the influence of the use of streptomycin in agriculture on the total bacteria community within the soil ecosystem. Soil samples were taken from soils under apple trees, prior to streptomycin application and 2 weeks post streptomycin application or water application (untreated control). High throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was used to generate datasets from the soils under apple trees in apple orchards from three different locations in Switzerland. We hypothesized that the use of streptomycin would reduce the bacterial diversity within the soil samples and enhance a reduction in the variety of taxa present. Bacterial species such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, and Stenotrophomonas are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics and as such it is of interest to investigate if the use of streptomycin provided a selective advantage for these bacteria in the soil ecosystem. The application of streptomycin did not influence the abundance and diversities of major bacteria taxa of the soils or the Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, and Stenotrophomonas species. We also discovered that apple orchards under the same management practices, did not harbor the same bacterial communities. The restricted application of streptomycin in the protection of apple orchards from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora under the guidelines in Switzerland did not alter either the bacterial diversity or abundance within these soil ecosystems.

  15. Urban cultivation in allotments maintains soil qualities adversely affected by conventional agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Jill L; Davies, Zoe G; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    Modern agriculture, in seeking to maximize yields to meet growing global food demand, has caused loss of soil organic carbon (SOC) and compaction, impairing critical regulating and supporting ecosystem services upon which humans also depend. Own-growing makes an important contribution to food security in urban areas globally, but its effects on soil qualities that underpin ecosystem service provision are currently unknown. We compared the main indicators of soil quality; SOC storage, total nitrogen (TN), C : N ratio and bulk density (BD) in urban allotments to soils from the surrounding agricultural region, and between the allotments and other urban greenspaces in a typical UK city. A questionnaire was used to investigate allotment management practices that influence soil properties. Allotment soils had 32% higher SOC concentrations and 36% higher C : N ratios than pastures and arable fields and 25% higher TN and 10% lower BD than arable soils. There was no significant difference between SOC concentration in allotments and urban non-domestic greenspaces, but it was higher in domestic gardens beneath woody vegetation. Allotment soil C : N ratio exceeded that in non-domestic greenspaces, but was lower than that in garden soil. Three-quarters of surveyed allotment plot holders added manure, 95% composted biomass on-site, and many added organic-based fertilizers and commercial composts. This may explain the maintenance of SOC, C : N ratios, TN and low BD, which are positively associated with soil functioning. Synthesis and applications. Maintenance and protection of the quality of our soil resource is essential for sustainable food production and for regulating and supporting ecosystem services upon which we depend. Our study establishes, for the first time, that small-scale urban food production can occur without the penalty of soil degradation seen in conventional agriculture, and maintains the high soil quality seen in urban greenspaces. Given the

  16. Urban cultivation in allotments maintains soil qualities adversely affected by conventional agriculture.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Jill L; Davies, Zoe G; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2014-08-01

    Modern agriculture, in seeking to maximize yields to meet growing global food demand, has caused loss of soil organic carbon (SOC) and compaction, impairing critical regulating and supporting ecosystem services upon which humans also depend. Own-growing makes an important contribution to food security in urban areas globally, but its effects on soil qualities that underpin ecosystem service provision are currently unknown. We compared the main indicators of soil quality; SOC storage, total nitrogen (TN), C : N ratio and bulk density (BD) in urban allotments to soils from the surrounding agricultural region, and between the allotments and other urban greenspaces in a typical UK city. A questionnaire was used to investigate allotment management practices that influence soil properties. Allotment soils had 32% higher SOC concentrations and 36% higher C : N ratios than pastures and arable fields and 25% higher TN and 10% lower BD than arable soils. There was no significant difference between SOC concentration in allotments and urban non-domestic greenspaces, but it was higher in domestic gardens beneath woody vegetation. Allotment soil C : N ratio exceeded that in non-domestic greenspaces, but was lower than that in garden soil. Three-quarters of surveyed allotment plot holders added manure, 95% composted biomass on-site, and many added organic-based fertilizers and commercial composts. This may explain the maintenance of SOC, C : N ratios, TN and low BD, which are positively associated with soil functioning. Synthesis and applications. Maintenance and protection of the quality of our soil resource is essential for sustainable food production and for regulating and supporting ecosystem services upon which we depend. Our study establishes, for the first time, that small-scale urban food production can occur without the penalty of soil degradation seen in conventional agriculture, and maintains the high soil quality seen in urban greenspaces. Given the

  17. Pathways from childhood abuse and other adversities to adult health risks: The role of adult socioeconomic conditions.

    PubMed

    Font, Sarah A; Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), including child abuse, have been linked with poor health outcomes in adulthood. The mechanisms that explain these relations are less understood. This study assesses whether associations of ACEs and health risks are mediated by adult socioeconomic conditions, and whether these pathways are different for maltreatment than for other types of adversities. Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2012 survey (N=29,229), we employ structural equation modeling to (1) estimate associations of the number and type of ACEs with five health risks-depression, obesity, tobacco use, binge drinking, and self-reported sub-optimal health; and (2) assess whether adult socioeconomic conditions-marriage, divorce and separation, educational attainment, income and insurance status-mediate those associations. Findings suggest both direct and indirect associations between ACEs and health risks. At high numbers of ACEs, 15-20% of the association between number of ACEs and adult health risks was attributable to socioeconomic conditions. Associations of three ACEs (exposure to domestic violence, parental divorce, and residing with a person who was incarcerated) with health risks were nearly entirely explained by socioeconomic conditions in adulthood. However, child physical, emotional, and sexual abuse were significantly associated with several adult health risks, beyond the effects of other adversities, and socioeconomic conditions explained only a small portion of these associations. These findings suggest that the pathways to poor adult health differ by types of ACEs, and that childhood abuse is more likely than other adversities to have a direct impact.

  18. [Soil Microbial Respiration Under Different Soil Temperature Conditions and Its Relationship to Soil Dissolved Organic Carbon and Invertase].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Shu-tao; Hu, Zheng-hua; Zhang, Xu

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the soil microbial respiration under different temperature conditions and its relationship to soil dissolved organic carbon ( DOC) and invertase, an indoor incubation experiment was performed. The soil samples used for the experiment were taken from Laoshan, Zijinshan, and Baohuashan. The responses of soil microbial respiration to the increasing temperature were studied. The soil DOC content and invertase activity were also measured at the end of incubation. Results showed that relationships between cumulative microbial respiration of different soils and soil temperature could be explained by exponential functions, which had P values lower than 0.001. The coefficient of temperature sensitivity (Q10 value) varied from 1.762 to 1.895. The Q10 value of cumulative microbial respiration decreased with the increase of soil temperature for all soils. The Q10 value of microbial respiration on 27 days after incubation was close to that of 1 day after incubation, indicating that the temperature sensitivity of recalcitrant organic carbon may be similar to that of labile organic carbon. For all soils, a highly significant ( P = 0.003 ) linear relationship between cumulative soil microbial respiration and soil DOC content could be observed. Soil DOC content could explain 31.6% variances of cumulative soil microbial respiration. For the individual soil and all soils, the relationship between cumulative soil microbial respiration and invertase activity could be explained by a highly significant (P < 0.01) linear regression function, which suggested that invertase was a good indicator of the magnitude of soil microbial respiration.

  19. Degradation behavior of sulfadiazine in soils under different conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Feng; Ying, Guang-Guo; Yang, Li-Hua; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Liu, Feng; Tao, Ran; Yu, Zhi-Qiang; Peng, Ping'an

    2009-03-01

    This study investigated the degradation of sulfadiazine in three soils and also determined its sorption and hydrolysis behaviors as well. At the spike concentration of 10 mg/kg, the half-lives for sulfadiazine in the aerobic nonsterile soils ranged from 12 days to 18 days. Sulfadiazine was more persistent in the anoxic soils with the half-lives ranging between 57 days and 237 days and soil microorganisms played little role in the dissipation process under anoxic conditions. The decline in sulfadiazine concentrations was also observed in the sterile soils under aerobic conditions. Hydrolysis could not explain this phenomena as hydrolysis of sulfadiazine was pH dependent. Sulfadiazine only hydrolyzed to a very limited degree at acidic pH. Increased sorption was observed for sulfadiazine in soil 1 (pH 4.3) when the contact time increased to 14 days, but no significant increase in sorption was found for soil 2 (pH 7.2) and soil 3 (pH 8.5).

  20. Pathways from Childhood Abuse and Other Adversities to Adult Health Risks: The Role of Adult Socioeconomic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), including child abuse, have been linked with poor health outcomes in adulthood. The mechanisms that explain these relations are less understood. This study assesses whether associations of ACEs and health risks are mediated by adult socioeconomic conditions, and whether these pathways are different for maltreatment than for other types of adversities. Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2012 survey (N=29,229), we employ structural equation modeling to (1) estimate associations of the number and type of ACEs with five health risks – depression, obesity, tobacco use, binge drinking, and self-reported sub-optimal health; and (2) assess whether adult socioeconomic conditions— marriage, divorce and separation, educational attainment, income and insurance status—mediate those associations. Findings suggest both direct and indirect associations between ACEs and health risks. At high numbers of ACEs, 15–20% of the association between number of ACEs and adult health risks was attributable to socioeconomic conditions. Associations of three ACEs (exposure to domestic violence, parental divorce, and residing with a person who was incarcerated) with health risks were nearly entirely explained by socioeconomic conditions in adulthood. However, child physical, emotional and sexual abuse were significantly associated with several adult health risks, beyond the effects of other adversities, and socioeconomic conditions explained only a small portion of these associations. These findings suggest that the pathways to poor adult health differ by types of ACEs, and that childhood abuse is more likely than other adversities to have a direct impact. PMID:26059537

  1. The Formation of Teacher Work Teams under Adverse Conditions: Towards a More Realistic Scenario for Schools in Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintrop, Rick; Charles, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Group formation studies are rare in the literature on teacher professional learning communities (PLCs). But they are needed to render realistic scenarios and design interventions for practitioners who work in schools where teachers encounter distress and social adversity. Under these conditions, we may need approaches to PLC development that are…

  2. Extension of laboratory-measured soil spectra to field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, E. R.; Baumgardner, M. F.; Weismiller, R. A.; Biehl, L. L.; Robinson, B. F.

    1982-01-01

    Spectral responses of two glaciated soils, Chalmers silty clay loam and Fincastle silt loam, formed under prairie grass and forest vegetation, respectively, were measured in the laboratory under controlled moisture equilibria using an Exotech Model 20C spectroradiometer to obtain spectral data in the laboratory under artificial illumination. The same spectroradiometer was used outdoors under solar illumination to obtain spectral response from dry and moistened field plots with and without corn residue cover, representing the two different soils. Results indicate that laboratory-measured spectra of moist soil are directly proportional to the spectral response of that same field-measured moist bare soil over the 0.52 micrometer to 1.75 micrometer wavelength range. The magnitudes of difference in spectral response between identically treated Chalmers and Fincastle soils are greatest in the 0.6 micrometers to 0.8 micrometer transition region between the visible and near infrared, regardless of field condition or laboratory preparation studied.

  3. Microbial destruction of chitin in soils under different moisture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroslavtsev, A. M.; Manucharova, N. A.; Stepanov, A. L.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Sudnitsyn, I. I.

    2009-07-01

    The most favorable moisture conditions for the microbial destruction of chitin in soils are close to the total water capacity. The water content has the most pronounced effect on chitin destruction in soils in comparison with other studied substrates. It was found using gas-chromatographic and luminescent-microscopic methods that the maximum specific activity of the respiration of the chitinolytic community was at a rather low redox potential with the soil moisture close to the total water capacity. The range of moisture values under which the most intense microbial transformation of chitin occurred was wider in clayey and clay loamy soils as compared with sandy ones. The increase was observed due to the contribution of mycelial bacteria and actinomycetes in the chitinolytic complex as the soil moisture increased.

  4. Effect of soil water content on soil thermal conductivity under field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vico, G.; Daly, E.; Manzoni, S.; Porporato, A.

    2008-12-01

    Knowledge of the thermal properties of soils is required in many areas of engineering, meteorology, agronomy, and ecosystem and soil science. Soil thermal conductivity varies in time and space, since it is influenced by soil properties as well as soil temperature and moisture conditions. We use the one dimensional heat conduction equation in conjunction with two-year data measured in a grass-covered field in North Carolina Piedmont to estimate soil thermal conductivity and to investigate how it is impacted by water content. In agreement with laboratory experiments reported in the literature, our results suggest that under dry conditions soil thermal conductivity increases across a relatively narrow range of soil water contents, above which a further increase in water content does not significantly change thermal conductivity. However, when soil approaches saturation, heat transfer is further improved, a fact not previously noted. This nonlinear behavior is consistent with the formation at high water contents of a continuous film of liquid water in soil aggregates of mineral and organic matter.

  5. Bioremediation of coal contaminated soil under sulfate-reducing condition.

    PubMed

    Kuwano, Y; Shimizu, Y

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biodegradation of coal-derived hydrocarbons, especially high molecular weight (HMW) components, under anaerobic conditions. For this purpose biodegradation experiments were performed, using specifically designed soil column bioreactors. For the experiment, coal-contaminated soil was prepared, which contains high molecular weight hydrocarbons at high concentration (approx. 55.5 mgC g-drysoil(-1)). The experiment was carried out in two different conditions: sulfate reducing (SR) condition (SO4(2-) = 10 mmol l(-1) in the liquid medium) and control condition (SO4(2-)<0.5 mmol l(-1)). Although no degradation was observed under the control condition, the resin fraction decreased to half (from 6,541 to 3,386 mgC g-soil(-1)) under SR condition, with the concomitant increase of two PAHs (phenanthrene and fluoranthene, 9 and 2.5 times, respectively). From these results, we could conclude that high molecular hydrocarbons were biodegradable and transformed to low molecular weight PAHs under the sulfate-reducing condition. Since these PAHs are known to be biologically degraded under aerobic condition, a serial combination of anaerobic (sulfate reducing) and then aerobic bioremediations could be effective and useful for the soil pollution by petroleum and/or coal derived hydrocarbons.

  6. Potential Climate Change Health Risks from Increases in Heat Waves: Abnormal Birth Outcomes and Adverse Maternal Health Conditions.

    PubMed

    Cil, Gulcan; Cameron, Trudy Ann

    2017-02-23

    We investigate the risks presented by heat waves for adverse health conditions for babies and expectant mothers when these mothers have been exposed to heat waves during gestation or during the period just prior to conception. Rather than just birth weight and gestational age, we focus on less common metrics such as abnormal conditions in the newborn (fetal distress, reliance on a ventilator, and meconium aspiration) and adverse health conditions in the mother (pregnancy-related hypertension, uterine bleeding during pregnancy, eclampsia, and incompetent cervix). We use monthly panel data for over 3,000 U.S. counties, constructed from the confidential version of the U.S. Natality Files for 1989-2008. Our models control for sociodemographic factors and include county, month, and state-by-year fixed effects to control for unobserved spatial and timewise heterogeneity in the data. Even within the United States, where there is widespread access to air conditioning, heat waves increase the fraction of babies with abnormal conditions related to maternal stress, as well as the fraction of mothers who experience pregnancy-related adverse health conditions. The scope for these risks in developing countries is likely to be even greater.

  7. Evaluating soil organic C sequestration in the Cotton Belt with the soil conditioning index (SCI)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation models that are sensitive to management, edaphic factors, and climate could provide insightful probes of how land owners and producers might be able to sequester soil organic C and engage in emerging carbon markets. We used the soil conditioning index (SCI) embedded in the RUSLE2 model t...

  8. Boundary condition and soil attribute impacts on anionic surfactant mobility in unsaturated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, B.; Brown, G.O.

    1996-11-01

    Surfactant mobility in unsaturated soil will impact the effectiveness and efficiency of using these compounds for in situ environmental remediation above the water table. For this reason, transient unsaturated column tests were used to study the influence of boundary conditions and soil attributes on anionic surfactant transport. In these tests, aqueous surfactant solutions were injected into the inlet of horizontally mounted soil columns. Two commercial anionic surfactants were used, an alkyl ether sulfate (AES) and a linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS). The overall study was divided into two parts. First, boundary condition effects including injected surfactant solution concentration, initial moisture content, and surfactant application rate were investigated. Increasing the injection solution concentration increased anionic surfactant mobility in the column while changes in the initial soil moisture content and surfactant application rate had no significant impact. Second, the impacts of soil attributes such as texture, dominant exchangeable cation, and resident organic matter were measured. With respect to texture, mobility was found to be greater in a sandy soil as compared with two loamy soils. Both surfactants, especially LAS, were found to be more mobile in a Na{sup +} dominated soil rather than one dominated by Ca{sup +2}. The absence of soil organic matter increased LAS mobility.

  9. Adverse Birth Outcomes and Maternal Exposure to Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene through Soil Vapor Intrusion in New York State

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Michl, Elizabeth L.; Gomez, Marta I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Industrial spills of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Endicott, New York (USA), have led to contamination of groundwater, soil, and soil gas. Previous studies have reported an increase in adverse birth outcomes among women exposed to VOCs in drinking water. Objective: We investigated the prevalence of adverse birth outcomes among mothers exposed to trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene [or perchloroethylene (PCE)] in indoor air contaminated through soil vapor intrusion. Methods: We examined low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, and birth defects among births to women in Endicott who were exposed to VOCs, compared with births statewide. We used Poisson regression to analyze births and malformations to estimate the association between maternal exposure to VOCs adjusting for sex, mother’s age, race, education, parity, and prenatal care. Two exposure areas were identified based on environmental sampling data: one area was primarily contaminated with TCE, and the other with PCE. Results: In the TCE-contaminated area, adjusted rate ratios (RRs) were significantly elevated for LBW [RR = 1.36; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 1.73; n = 76], small for gestational age (RR = 1.23; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.48; n = 117), term LBW (RR = 1.68; 95% CI: 1.20, 2.34; n = 37), cardiac defects (RR = 2.15; 95% CI: 1.27, 3.62; n = 15), and conotruncal defects (RR = 4.91; 95% CI: 1.58, 15.24; n = 3). In the PCE-contaminated area, RRs for cardiac defects (five births) were elevated but not significantly. Residual socioeconomic confounding may have contributed to elevations of LBW outcomes. Conclusions: Maternal residence in both areas was associated with cardiac defects. Residence in the TCE area, but not the PCE area, was associated with LBW and fetal growth restriction. PMID:22142966

  10. Solute Transport in Soils Under Conditions of Variable Flow Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liwang; Selim, H. M.

    1996-11-01

    Temporal and spatial variabilities of flow distribution significantly influence solute transport in soils. This laboratory study was designed to investigate the effects of temporal variation in flow velocity on pesticide transport in soils. Two pesticides, metribuzin (weakly adsorbed) and atrazine (moderately adsorbed), were chosen along with the following two soils: Cecil (<2 mm) and Sharkey (2-4 mm). Several tritium pulses were introduced into packed soil columns (15 or 30 cm in length) under different flow velocities to obtain velocity-dependent dispersion coefficients (D). Subsequently, several atrazine and metribuzin pulses were introduced under conditions of constant and variable velocities. For each experiment, changes in flow velocity were stepwise using a piston flow pump and were carried out during pulse application and leaching. For constant and variable flow velocity experiments, approximately similar pulse volumes and average flow velocities were maintained. Values of D versus pore water velocity (ν) from tritium breakthrough curves (BTCs) were well described using a linear equation for both soils. Identical BTCs for metribuzin were observed under conditions of constant or variable flow velocities in the Cecil soil column. However, metribuzin transport in the Sharkey soil was significantly influenced by velocity variations. Atrazine transport in the Sharkey soil was also significantly affected by variations in flow velocity. We further examined the error when an average rather than actual velocity distribution was used in BTC representation. The resulting experimental BTCs (concentration versus velocity-averaged pore volume) exhibited early arrival and the appearance of multiple peaks. Moreover, predictions of such BTCs based on the convective-dispersive equation were not successful. We concluded that actual water velocity distributions should be used in BTC representation, and, whenever possible, the use of an average velocity should be avoided.

  11. Effect of vegetation of transgenic Bt rice lines and their straw amendment on soil enzymes, respiration, functional diversity and community structure of soil microorganisms under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hua; Dong, Bin; Yan, Hu; Tang, Feifan; Wang, Baichuan; Yu, Yunlong

    2012-01-01

    With the development of transgenic crops, there is an increasing concern about the possible adverse effects of their vegetation and residues on soil environmental quality. This study was carried out to evaluate the possible effects of the vegetation of transgenic Bt rice lines Huachi B6 (HC) and TT51 (TT) followed by the return of their straw to the soil on soil enzymes (catalase, urease, neutral phosphatase and invertase), anaerobic respiration activity, microbial utilization of carbon substrates and community structure, under field conditions. The results indicated that the vegetation of the two transgenic rice lines (HC and TT) and return of their straw had few adverse effects on soil enzymes and anaerobic respiration activity compared to their parent and distant parent, although some transient differences were observed. The vegetation and subsequent straw amendment of Bt rice HC and TT did not appear to have a harmful effect on the richness, evenness and community structure of soil microorganisms. No different pattern of impact due to plant species was found between HC and TT. It could be concluded that the vegetation of transgenic Bt rice lines and the return of their straw as organic fertilizer may not alter soil microbe-mediated functions.

  12. Unification of soil feedback patterns under different evaporation conditions to improve soil differentiation over flat area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shanxin; Zhu, A.-Xing; Meng, Lingkui; Burt, James E.; Du, Fei; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Guiming

    2016-07-01

    Detailed and accurate information on the spatial variation of soil types and soil properties are critical components of environmental research and hydrological modeling. Early studies introduced a soil feedback pattern as a promising environmental covariate to predict spatial variation over low-relief areas. However, in practice, local evaporation can have a significant influence on these patterns, making them incomparable at different locations. This study aims to solve this problem by examining the concept of transforming the dynamic patterns of soil feedback from the original time-related space to a new evaporation-related space. A study area in northeastern Illinois with large low-relief farmland was selected to examine the effectiveness of this idea. Images from MODIS in Terra for every April-May period over 12 years (2000-2011) were used to extract the soil feedback patterns. Compared to the original time-related space, the results indicate that the patterns in the new evaporation-related space tend to be more stable and more easily captured from multiple rain events regardless of local evaporation conditions. Random samples selected for soil subgroups from the SSURGO soil map show that patterns in the new space reveal a difference between different soil types. And these differences in patterns are closely related to the difference in the soil structure of the surface layer.

  13. Changes in Soil Minerology Reduce Phosphorus Mobility During Anoxic Soil Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, S. K.; Geohring, L. D.; Richards, B. K.; Walter, M.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2008-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) transfer from the landscape to receiving waters is an important environmental concern because these diffuse losses may cause widespread water quality impairments which can accelerate freshwater eutrophication. Phosphorus (P) mobilization from soil to surface and subsurface flow paths is controlled by numerous factors, and thus it can vary greatly with time and landscape scale. To determine whether P mobilization during soil saturation in the landscape was caused or controlled by complexation, iron reduction or ligand exchange, experiments were carried out to better characterize the interrelationships of varying P sources with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and soil anoxic conditions. The soil incubation experiments consisted of treatments with distilled water, 5 mM acetic acid (HAc), 0.05% humic acid (HA) and glucose (40 mM) at 26 o C under anaerobic conditions to isolate effects of the various P exchange processes. The experimental results suggest that during soil saturation, the loosely bound P, which is primarily associated with iron oxyhydroxides, was mobilized by both reduction and complexation processes. Good correlations were observed between ferrous iron (Fe+2) and DOC, and between total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) and DOC, facilitating P desorption to the soil water. The anaerobic soil conditions with different P sources also indicated that mineralization facilitated P mobility, mainly due to chelation (humics and metabolites) and as a result of the bio-reduction of iron when fresh litter and grass were present. The organic P sources which are rich in carbohydrate and cellulose and that undergo fermentation due to the action of lactate forming organisms also caused a release of P. The easily metabolizable DOC sources lead to intensive bio-reduction of soil with the release of Fe, however this did not necessarily appear to cause more TDP in the soil solution. The varying P additions in soils with water, HAc and glucose (40mm) before and after

  14. Adverse Events of Massage Therapy in Pain-Related Conditions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ping; Gao, Ningyang; Wu, Junyi; Xu, Shifen

    2014-01-01

    Pain-related massage, important in traditional Eastern medicine, is increasingly used in the Western world. So the widening acceptance demands continual safety assessment. This review is an evaluation of the frequency and severity of adverse events (AEs) reported mainly for pain-related massage between 2003 and 2013. Relevant all-languages reports in 6 databases were identified and assessed by two coauthors. During the 11-year period, 40 reports of 138 AEs were associated with massage. Author, year of publication, country of occurrence, participant related (age, sex) or number of patients affected, the details of manual therapy, and clinician type were extracted. Disc herniation, soft tissue trauma, neurologic compromise, spinal cord injury, dissection of the vertebral arteries, and others were the main complications of massage. Spinal manipulation in massage has repeatedly been associated with serious AEs especially. Clearly, massage therapies are not totally devoid of risks. But the incidence of such events is low. PMID:25197310

  15. Seal formation in arid soil under natural and laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarah, Pariente; Sachs, Eyal

    2013-04-01

    Runoff is of considerable importance in the functioning of a desert ecosystem. The hydrological characteristics of runoff developing on arid soil under natural field conditions and those of runoff occurring in laboratory-controlled rain simulation experiments using the same type of soil were investigated. Runoff and erosion measurements were carried out in small plots (0.2-0.8 m2) on a south-facing hillslope in the northern Negev, Israel (90 mm ave. annual rainfall). Soil from the area near to the runoff plots was collected for the rain simulation experiments conducted in the laboratory. The soil was collected from 0-1 cm and 1-5 cm depths, and then placed within boxes (1.16 m long and 0.55 m wide) in the laboratory in the same order as they had been in the field. Representative surface stones were collected in the field and scattered randomly on the soil surface in the laboratory boxes. In some of the laboratory experiments soil, 5 cm in depth, was placed on a geotechnical sheet on a metal screen, while in other experiments, soil of 5 cm depth was placed on a Terzaghi filter. Rain simulator used had a rotating disk with a tilted nozzle to simulate raindrop size dispersion and kinetic energy of natural rain. The sprinkling intensity was set at a rate of 18 mm/hour. Soil crusts in the field were more stable than those created in the lab for two standard tests: Emerson - immersion test, and the 'single water drop' test. Whereas weak activity of microphytes was found in the field there was no such activity in the lab. The rain depth until runoff in the field was less than under laboratory conditions, while the sediment yield was greater in the field than in the laboratory (8.64 g/m2 versus 0.58 g/m2). The rain simulator experiments that had included a Terzaghi filter showed significantly higher final infiltration rate (7.5 mm/h versus 4.2 mm/h), shorter accumulated watering depth until stabilization of soil seal formation (100-200 mm versus 50 mm), and smaller

  16. Biodegradation of a Light NAPL under Varying Soil Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, B. K.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Kleingeld, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    To see the impact of different soil environmental conditions on LNAPL biodegradation, a series of batch, microcosm, column and 2-D tank experiments under controlled conditions have been planned. Microcosms along with batch experiments have been designed for five different moisture contents ranging from residual to saturated, and under varying temperature condition. The batches are being used for two saturated soils containing toluene. For the unsaturated cases, fifteen microcosms are designed to mimic natural conditions more closely. The microcosms consist of a transparent outer column and an air permeable, but watertight, inner tube comprised of toluene phobic material. The space between the outer column and the inner porous tube is filled with a soil having a particular moisture content with a known amount of toluene. The inner porous tube is filled with air at atmospheric pressure, providing sufficient oxygen for the degradation of considered light NAPL. A special sampling mechanism has been fabricated to enable airtight soil sampling. Four columns have been designed for studying the impact of water table fluctuation on the LNAPL fate and transport in variably-saturated soil. Water table in two columns will be static and remaining two will be subjected to a fluctuation. Finally a 2-D tank setup, made of a steel box and a glass cover, has been refurbished for bioremediation process of LNAPL from start to finish. The main body is constructed of one piece of 1.5 mm thick stainless steel formed into a box with inner dimensions of 200cm-long x 94cm-high x 4cm-deep. The front cover is made of glass wall having 19-mm thickness. The soil is going to be packed between the two walls. The groundwater will be flowing horizontally from left to right and the water table level in the tank will be controlled by two end chambers. The chambers are separated from the soil by a fine meshed stainless steel sheet. The spatial and the temporal distributions of the LNAPL and its

  17. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? If environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility so as to endanger the safety or the environment, you must: (a) Submit a plan...

  18. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? If environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility so as to endanger the safety or the environment, you must: (a) Submit a plan...

  19. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? If environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility so as to endanger the safety or the environment, you must: (a) Submit a plan...

  20. [Clonal plasticity of Iris japonica under different soil and canopy conditions in subtropocal evergreen broad-leaved forest].

    PubMed

    He, Yue-Jun; Han, Wen-Ping; Zhong, Zhang-Cheng

    2011-02-01

    An investigation was made on the growth indices of Iris japonica growing on the yellow soil and Karst soil within a subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest and in the forest gaps, aimed to approach the clonal plasticity of I. japonica in heterogeneous habitats. The results showed that the ramet height and diameter and the rhizome diameter of I. japonica were significantly higher in yellow soil habitat than in Karst soil habitat, while the individual density was in adverse. Light had significant effects on rhizome diameter, but soil condition had lesser effects under the same light environment. Within the forest of Karst soil habitat, the bud number and flower number of I. japonica were zero, possibly due to the double pressure from soil quality and light environment for the balance between resources uptake and energy assignment and for the sustaining of growth. In a certain extent, I. japonica in yellow soil habitat tended to K strategy via decreasing the individual number for improving competition to adapt environment, while I. japonica in Karst soil habitat tended to r strategy via increasing individual number for sustaining competition capability.

  1. Carbon black retention in saturated natural soils: Effects of flow conditions, soil surface roughness and soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Lohwacharin, J; Takizawa, S; Punyapalakul, P

    2015-10-01

    We evaluated factors affecting the transport, retention, and re-entrainment of carbon black nanoparticles (nCBs) in two saturated natural soils under different flow conditions and input concentrations using the two-site transport model and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Soil organic matter (SOM) was found to create unfavorable conditions for the retention. Despite an increased flow velocity, the relative stability of the estimated maximum retention capacity in soils may suggest that flow-induced shear stress forces were insufficient to detach nCB. The KPFM observation revealed that nCBs were retained at the grain boundary and on surface roughness, which brought about substantial discrepancy between theoretically-derived attachment efficiency factors and the ones obtained by the experiments using the two-site transport model. Thus, decreasing ionic strength and increasing solution pH caused re-entrainment of only a small fraction of retained nCB in the soil columns.

  2. Estimation of Soil Moisture Content Using Air-Launched GPR Techniques in Variable Soil Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardel, B.; Kelly, B.

    2008-12-01

    Air-launched Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques have most frequently been used for infrastructure characterization, but these techniques show promise for soil moisture estimation in the near subsurface. Air- launched GPR data can be acquired very quickly, and data processing can be easily automated, so these techniques have potential for efficient estimation of water content in the shallow subsurface over large areas. In this experiment, we investigate the efficacy of air-launched GPR techniques for estimating soil water content under saturated and dry conditions in both sandy and organic-rich soils. Data were also acquired to investigate the depth of penetration of air-launched data in these soils using multiple GPR frequencies. The experiment was performed in a large tank under controlled climatic conditions. Initially, the tank was filled with wet sand to a depth of 24-cm, and GPR data were acquired over the sand using 250-, 500-, and 1000-MHz antennas. Then, a thin plastic tarp was placed on the wet sand, a 3-cm layer of dry sand was placed on the tarp, and data collection was repeated. Additional 3-cm layers of dry sand were placed in the tank, with data acquisition after each layer, until the dry sand layer was 15-cm thick. The tank was then excavated, and a basal layer of dry sand was added. Data were again acquired over the dry sand, and the incremental filling of the tank and data acquisition were repeated using 3-cm layers of wet sand. Finally, the entire process was repeated using a basal layer of wet organic soil overlain by dry organic soil and using a basal layer of dry organic soil overlain by wet organic soil. For all air-launch data, the dielectric constant was determined using the amplitudes of the reflection from the soil surface, and Topp's equation was used to convert the dielectric constant to water content. Data analysis is ongoing, but preliminary results indicate that water content can be estimated with reasonable accuracy in both

  3. Soil moisture under contrasted atmospheric conditions in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorin-Molina, César; Cerdà, Artemi; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.

    2014-05-01

    , Intraannual changes, Atmospheric parameters, Eastern Spain Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and RECARE FP7 project 603498 supported this research. References: Azorin-Molina, C., Connell, B.H., Baena-Calatrava, R. 2009. Sea-breeze convergence zones from AVHRR over the Iberian Mediterranean Area and the Isle of Mallorca, Spain. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology 48 (10), 2069-2085. Azorin-Molina, C., Vicente-Serrano, S. M., Cerdà, A. 2013. Soil moisture changes in two experimental sites in Eastern Spain. Irrigation versus rainfed orchards under organic farming. EGU, Geophysical Research Abstracts, EGU2013-13286. Bodí, M.B., Mataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S.H. & Cerdà, A. 2011. The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma, 160, 599-607. 10.1016/j.geoderma.2010.11.009 Cerdà, A. 1995. Soil moisture regime under simulated rainfall in a three years abandoned field in Southeast Spain. Physics and Chemistry of The Earth, 20 (3-4), 271-279. Cerdà, A. 1999. Seasonal and spatial variations in infiltration rates in badland surfaces under Mediterranean climatic conditions. Water Resources Research, 35 (1) 319-328. Cerdà, A. 2002. The effect of season and parent material on water erosion on highly eroded soils in eastern Spain. Journal of Arid Environments, 52, 319-337. García-Fayos, P. García-Ventoso, B. Cerdà, A. 2000. Limitations to Plant establishment on eroded slopes in Southeastern Spain. Journal of Vegetation Science, 11- 77- 86. Ghafoor, A., Murtaza, G., Rehman, M. Z., Saifullah Sabir, M. 2012. Reclamation and salt leaching efficiency for tile drained saline-sodic soil using marginal quality water for irrigating rice and wheat crops. Land Degradation & Development, 23: 1 -9. DOI 10.1002/ldr.1033 Johnston, C. R., Vance, G. F., Ganjegunte, G. K. 2013. Soil properties changes following irrigation with coalbed natural

  4. Evaluation of antibiotic mobility in soil associated with swine-slurry soil amendment under cropping conditions.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, C; Flores, C; Caixach, J; Mita, L; Piña, B; Comas, J; Bayona, J M

    2014-11-01

    Interest in identifying pools of antibacterial-resistance genes has grown over the last decade, with veterinary antibiotics (VAs) receiving particular attention. In this paper, a mesoscale study aimed at evaluating the vertical transport of common VAs-namely, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and lincosamides in agricultural soil subjected to drip irrigation-was performed under greenhouse conditions. Accordingly, leachates of cropped and uncropped soil, amended with swine-slurry leading to 19-38 μg kg(-1) (dry mass) antibiotics in the soil, were analyzed over the course of the productive cycle of a lettuce (42 days) with three sampling campaigns (N = 24). High lincomycin (LCM) concentrations (30-39 μg L(-1)) were detected in the leachates collected from the swine-slurry-amended soil. The highest LCM mass recovered in the leachates (30.1 ± 1.63 %) was obtained from cropped experimental units. In addition, the LCM leaching constant and its leaching potential as obtained from the first-order model were higher in the leachates from the cropped experimental units. Lower concentrations of sulfadimethoxine were also detected in leachates and in soil. Enrofloxacin and oxytetracycline occurred only in soil, which is consistent with high soil interaction.

  5. Physiological and genetic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana anthocyanin biosynthesis mutants under chronic adverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Misyura, Maksym; Colasanti, Joseph; Rothstein, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Anthocyanin production is a characteristic response of flowering plants to unfavourable environmental conditions. The potential roles of flavonoids and anthocyanins in plant growth were investigated by growing Arabidopsis thaliana anthocyanin production mutants (transparent testa) under limiting nitrogen and high light conditions. Inability to produce kaempferol or subsequent intermediate compounds by some transparent testa lines was correlated with less biomass accumulation in mature plants compared with wild-type control plants under all growth conditions tested. However, under both limiting nitrogen and high light chronic stress conditions, mutant lines defective in later steps of the anthocyanin production pathway produced the same or more biomass than wild-type plants. No difference in senescence between transparent testa and wild-type plants was found using chlorophyll catabolism and SAG12 expression measurements, and no mutants were impaired in the ability to remobilize nutrients from the vegetative to reproductive tissues. Moreover, the absence of anthocyanin and/or upstream flavonoids does not affect the ability of plants to respond to limiting nitrogen by reducing photosynthetic capacity. These results support a role for kaempferol and quercetin accumulation in normal plant growth and development. Further, the absence of anthocyanins has no effect on plant growth under the chronic stress conditions tested.

  6. Physiological and genetic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana anthocyanin biosynthesis mutants under chronic adverse environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Anthocyanin production is a characteristic response of flowering plants to unfavourable environmental conditions. The potential roles of flavonoids and anthocyanins in plant growth were investigated by growing Arabidopsis thaliana anthocyanin production mutants (transparent testa) under limiting nitrogen and high light conditions. Inability to produce kaempferol or subsequent intermediate compounds by some transparent testa lines was correlated with less biomass accumulation in mature plants compared with wild-type control plants under all growth conditions tested. However, under both limiting nitrogen and high light chronic stress conditions, mutant lines defective in later steps of the anthocyanin production pathway produced the same or more biomass than wild-type plants. No difference in senescence between transparent testa and wild-type plants was found using chlorophyll catabolism and SAG12 expression measurements, and no mutants were impaired in the ability to remobilize nutrients from the vegetative to reproductive tissues. Moreover, the absence of anthocyanin and/or upstream flavonoids does not affect the ability of plants to respond to limiting nitrogen by reducing photosynthetic capacity. These results support a role for kaempferol and quercetin accumulation in normal plant growth and development. Further, the absence of anthocyanins has no effect on plant growth under the chronic stress conditions tested. PMID:23162120

  7. Adverse foraging conditions may impact body mass and survival of a high Arctic seabird

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harding, A.M.A.; Welcker, J.; Steen, H.; Hamer, K.C.; Kitaysky, A.S.; Fort, J.; Talbot, S.L.; Cornick, L.A.; Karnovsky, N.J.; Gabrielsen, G.W.; Gremillet, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tradeoffs between current reproduction and future survival are widely recognized, but may only occur when food is limited: when foraging conditions are favorable, parents may be able to reproduce without compromising their own survival. We investigated these tradeoffs in the little auk (Alle alle), a small seabird with a single-egg clutch. During 2005-2007, we examined the relationship between body mass and survival of birds breeding under contrasting foraging conditions at two Arctic colonies. We used corticosterone levels of breeding adults as a physiological indicator of the foraging conditions they encountered during each reproductive season. We found that when foraging conditions were relatively poor (as reflected in elevated levels of corticosterone), parents ended the reproductive season with low body mass and suffered increased post-breeding mortality. A positive relationship between body mass and post-breeding survival was found in one study year; light birds incurred higher survival costs than heavy birds. The results of this study suggest that reproducing under poor foraging conditions may affect the post-breeding survival of long-lived little auks. They also have important demographic implications because even a small change in adult survival may have a large effect on populations of long-lived species. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Use of a driving simulator to assess performance under adverse weather conditions in adults with albinism.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Gwen M; Summers, C Gail; Ward, Nicholas; Bhargava, Esha; Rakauskas, Michael E; Holleschau, Ann M

    2012-04-01

    Participants with albinism have reduced vision and nystagmus with reduced foveation times. This prospective study evaluated driving in 12 participants with albinism and 12 matched controls. Participants drove a vehicle simulator through a virtual rural course in sunny and foggy conditions. Under sunny conditions, participants with albinism showed a narrower preferred minimum safety boundary during car-following tasks than did controls, but there was no difference under foggy conditions. Their driving did not differ significantly from that of controls when approaching a stop sign or when choosing gap size between oncoming vehicles when crossing an intersection. However, when compared to control drivers, participants with albinism had a decreased minimum safety boundary for car-following that should be included in counseling regarding driving safety.

  9. Short rotation willow coppice in Wales: High production under adverse environmental conditions?

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, F.M.; Hodson, R.W.; Randerson, P.F.

    1995-11-01

    The production of short rotation willow coppice in central Wales was once regarded as a vain hope rather than a distinct possibility. Research at the University of Wales, Cardiff, Field Station at Llysdinam in mid-Wales over the last four years has proven that it is possible to produce a commercially viable crop on very poor upland soils and at an altitude of almost 300m provided that lime and inorganic fertilizers are added. Because of the national need to find new routes for the disposal of sewage sludge, its addition to short rotation coppice serves the dual purpose of disposal and nutrient addition. Over the first two years of the sludging experiment, it was found that the addition of 300 m{sup 3}ha{sup -1} of digested sewage sludge significantly increased crop weight, at least in the first year. Unfortunately, the crop yields did not reach those obtained using inorganic fertilizers at the same site but it is suggested that a repeated application regime might improve overall crop yield.

  10. Experiments using new initial soil moisture conditions and soil map in the Eta model over La Plata Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Moira E.; Tomasella, Javier; Rodriguez, Daniel A.; Chou, Sin Chan

    2013-08-01

    An effort towards a more accurate representation of soil moisture and its impact on the modeling of weather systems is presented. Sensitivity tests of precipitation to soil type and soil moisture changes are carried out using the atmospheric Eta model for the numerical simulation of the development of a mesoscale convective system over northern Argentina. Modified initial soil moisture conditions were obtained from a hydrological balance model developed and running operationally at INPE. A new soil map was elaborated using the available soil profile information from Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Argentina and depicts 18 different soil types. Results indicate that more accurate initial soil moisture conditions and incorporating a new soil map with hydraulic parameters, more representative of South American soils, improve daily total precipitation forecasts both in quantitative and spatial representations.

  11. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-10-17

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR.

  12. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, including, but not limited to, earthquake, excessive..., earthquake, excessive wind, flood, hurricane, tornado, volcanic eruption, and wildfire. To be eligible for a... limited to, an earthquake, flood, hurricane, tidal surge, tornado, and volcanic eruption....

  13. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... limited to, earthquake, excessive wind, flood, hurricane, tidal surge, tornado, volcanic eruption, and... limited to, earthquake, excessive wind, flood, hurricane, tornado, volcanic eruption, and wildfire. To be... loss condition as determined by the Deputy Administrator including, but not limited to, an...

  14. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, including, but not limited to, earthquake, excessive..., earthquake, excessive wind, flood, hurricane, tornado, volcanic eruption, and wildfire. To be eligible for a... determined by the Deputy Administrator including, but not limited to, an earthquake, flood, hurricane,...

  15. Three Gorges Reservoir Area: soil erosion under natural condition vs. soil erosion under current land use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönbrodt, Sarah; Behrens, Thorsten; Scholten, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Apparently, the current most prominent human-induced example for large scale environmental impact is the Three Gorges Dam in China. The flooding alongside the Yangtze River, and its tributaries results in a vast loss of settlement and farmland area with productive, fertile valley soils. Due to the associated high land use dynamic on uphill-sites, the soil resources are underlying high land use pressure. Within our study, the soil erosion under natural conditions is compared to the soil erosion under current land use after the impoundment. Both were modeled using the empirical Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) which is able to predict long-term annual soil loss with limited data. The database consists of digital terrain data (45 m resolution DEM, erosive slope length based on Monte-Carlo-Aggregation according to Behrens et al. (2008)), field investigations of recent erosion forms, and literature studies. The natural disposition to soil erosion was calculated considering the USLE factors R, S, and K. The soil erosion under current land use was calculated taking into account all USLE factors. The study area is the catchment of the Xiangxi River in the Three Gorges Reservoir area. Within the Xiangxi Catchment (3,200 km²) the highly dynamic backwater area (580 km²), and two micro-scale study sites (Xiangjiaba with 2.8 km², and Quyuan with 88 km²) are considered more detailed as they are directly affected by the river impoundment. Central features of the Xiangxi Catchment are the subtropical monsoon climate, an extremely steep sloping relief (mean slope angle 39°, SD 22.8°) artificially fractured by farmland terraces, and a high soil erodibility (mean K factor 0.37, SD 0.13). On the catchment scale the natural disposition to soil erosion makes up to mean 518.0 t ha-1 a-1. The maximum potential soil loss of 1,730.1 t ha-1 a-1 under natural conditions is reached in the Quyuan site (mean 635.8 t ha-1 a-1) within the backwater area (mean 582.9 t ha-1 a-1). In the

  16. Comparison of Infrared and Millimeter-Wave Imager Performance in Adverse Weather Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    area, which were used as inputs to Acquire, are different than the Johnson criteria default value of 0.75 and the target area used by Wikner † in his MMW...target is 3 × 3 m. 5 2.3 Weather Analysis Method for MMW Systems The results of this section are taken from Wikner [3]. His assumptions are in table...Science and Technology Division, Arlington, VA (1979). 3. D. Wikner , Prediction of 94 GHz Radiometer Performance in Various Environ- mental Condition

  17. Bioremediation of carbofuran contaminated soil under saturated condition: soil column study.

    PubMed

    Plangklang, Pensri; Reungsang, Alissara; Suphannafai, Wisarut

    2012-06-01

    Disturbed soil columns, 5.8 cm in diameter and 25 cm in length, were used as a basic model to simulate the movement of carbofuran in rice field soil under saturated conditions. Bioaugmentation using a specific carbofuran degrader, Burkholderia sp. PCL3, in free and immobilized cell forms and biostimulation using rice straw as organic amendment were applied with the aim of enhancing the degradation of carbofuran in soil and to prevent the movement of carbofuran along with the flow through. In the abiotic control and the treatment with only indigenous microorganisms, the mass recovery percentage of carbofuran in the effluent was 52.1 and 22.5%, respectively. The application of bioaugmentation or biostimulation significantly enhanced carbofuran degradation in soil and reduced the movement of carbofuran as indicated by a low mass recovery percentage of carbofuran in the effluent of 14.6-15.5%. A low efficiency of carbofuran removal was obtained from the soil column with bioaugmentation together with biostimulation treatments in which the mass recovery percentage of carbofuran in the effluent was in the range of 22.1-22.6%. Sorption of carbofuran to soil, rice straw and corncob, formation of carbofuran metabolite and colony forming unit (CFU) and pH variation with the time were also investigated during column operation.

  18. A study of different indicators of Maillard reaction with whey proteins and different carbohydrates under adverse storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Graciela E; Naranjo, Gabriela B; Malec, Laura S

    2017-01-15

    This study examined different indicators of each stage of Maillard reaction under adverse storage conditions in a system with whey proteins and lactose or glucose. The analysis of lysine loss by the o-phthaldialdehyde method can be considered a good indicator of the early stage, showing considerable differences in reactivity when systems with mono and disaccharides were analyzed. Capillary electrophoresis proved to be a sensitive method for evaluating the extent of glycosylation of the native proteins, providing valuable information when the loss of lysine was not significant. The estimation of the Amadori compound from the determination of total 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde would have correlate well with reactive lysine content if the advanced stages of the reaction had not been reached. For assessing the occurrence of the intermediate and final stages, the measurement of free 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde and color, proved not to be suitable for storage conditions.

  19. Active imaging systems to see through adverse conditions: Light-scattering based models and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere, Nicolas; Ceolato, Romain; Hespel, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    Onera, the French aerospace lab, develops and models active imaging systems to understand the relevant physical phenomena affecting these systems performance. As a consequence, efforts have been done on the propagation of a pulse through the atmosphere and on target geometries and surface properties. These imaging systems must operate at night in all ambient illumination and weather conditions in order to perform strategic surveillance for various worldwide operations. We have implemented codes for 2D and 3D laser imaging systems. As we aim to image a scene in the presence of rain, snow, fog or haze, we introduce such light-scattering effects in our numerical models and compare simulated images with measurements provided by commercial laser scanners.

  20. Soil aquifer treatment of artificial wastewater under saturated conditions.

    PubMed

    Essandoh, H M K; Tizaoui, C; Mohamed, M H A; Amy, G; Brdjanovic, D

    2011-08-01

    A 2000 mm long saturated laboratory soil column was used to simulate soil aquifer treatment under saturated conditions to assess the removal of chemical and biochemical oxygen demand (COD and BOD), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrogen and phosphate, using high strength artificial wastewater. The removal rates were determined under a combination of constant hydraulic loading rates (HLR) and variable COD concentrations as well as variable HLR under a constant COD. Within the range of COD concentrations considered (42 mg L⁻¹-135 mg L⁻¹) it was found that at fixed hydraulic loading rate, a decrease in the influent concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), total nitrogen and phosphate improved their removal efficiencies. At the high COD concentrations applied residence times influenced the redox conditions in the soil column. Long residence times were detrimental to the removal process for COD, BOD and DOC as anoxic processes and sulphate reduction played an important role as electron acceptors. It was found that total COD mass loading within the range of 911 mg d⁻¹-1780 mg d⁻¹ applied as low COD wastewater infiltrated coupled with short residence times would provide better effluent quality than the same mass applied as a COD with higher concentration at long residence times. The opposite was true for organic nitrogen where relatively high concentrations coupled with long residence time gave better removal efficiency.

  1. Blind spots and adverse conditions of care: screening migrants for tuberculosis in France and Germany.

    PubMed

    Kehr, Janina

    2012-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that declined significantly throughout the 20(th) century. Large-scale TB screening of entire populations in France and Germany has thus been replaced by active screening of risk-groups, particularly migrants. The article engages with its problems and practices on three levels: by looking at the way information on migrants as an at-risk group is produced through disease surveillance data; by analysing how such at-risk group data influence local screening practices; and by showing which political and medical problems arise in the field. I overturn the discussion about screening and surveillance of migrants as a risk-group by showing that it is not the stigmatisation of migrants through disease risk that is most at stake, but the invisibility of the most vulnerable among them in disease surveillance data and the way restrictive national immigration policies interfere with and subvert local screening and treatment practices targeting them. The aim of my article is to promote a pragmatic sociology of screening, while paying attention to the practical complexities, political conditions and medical ambivalences of screening and follow-up care, especially when the migrant groups concerned are socially, politically and medically vulnerable.

  2. Tools to support maintenance strategies under soft soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, J. W. M.; van Meerten, J. J.; Woning, M. P.; Eijbersen, M. J.; Huber, M.

    2015-11-01

    Costs for maintenance of infrastructure in municipalities with soft soil underground conditions, are estimated to be almost 40 % higher than in others. As a result, these municipalities meet financial problems that cause overdue maintenance. In some cases municipalities are even afraid to be unable to offer a minimum service level in future. In common, traditional practice, roads and sewerage systems have been constructed in trenches that consist of sandy material that replaces the upper meters of the soft soil. Under influence of its weight, this causes accelerated settlements of the construction. A number of alternative constructions have been developed, e.g. using light-weight materials to limit settlement velocity. In order to limit future maintenance costs, improvement of maintenance strategies is desired. Tools have been and will be developed to support municipalities in improving their maintenance strategies and save money by doing that. A model (BALANS) that weighs the attractiveness of alternative solutions under different soil, environmental and economic circumstances, will be presented.

  3. Characterization of Apollo Bulk Soil Samples Under Simulated Lunar Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Thomas, I.; Bowles, N. E.; Greenhagen, B. T.

    2013-12-01

    Remote observations provide key insights into the composition and evolution of planetary surfaces. A fundamentally important component to any remote compositional analysis of planetary surfaces is laboratory measurements of well-characterized samples measured under the appropriate environmental conditions. The vacuum environment of airless bodies like the Moon creates a steep thermal gradient in the upper hundreds of microns of regolith. Lab studies of particulate rocks and minerals as well as selected lunar soils under vacuum and lunar-like conditions have identified significant effects of this thermal gradient on thermal infrared (TIR) spectral measurements [e.g. Logan et al. 1973, Salisbury and Walter 1989, Thomas et al. 2012, Donaldson Hanna et al. 2012]. Such lab studies demonstrate the high sensitivity of TIR emissivity spectra to environmental conditions under which they are measured. To best understand the effects of the near surface-environment of the Moon, a consortium of four institutions with the capabilities of characterizing lunar samples was created. The goal of the Thermal Infrared Emission Studies of Lunar Surface Compositions Consortium (TIRES-LSCC) is to characterize Apollo bulk soil samples with a range of compositions and maturities in simulated lunar conditions to provide better context for the spectral effects due to varying compositions and soil maturity as well as for the interpretation of data obtained by the LRO Diviner Lunar Radiometer and future lunar and airless body thermal emission spectrometers. An initial set of thermal infrared emissivity measurements of the bulk lunar soil samples will be made in three of the laboratories included in the TIRES-LSCC: the Asteroid and Lunar Environment Chamber (ALEC) in RELAB at Brown University, the Simulated Lunar Environment chamber in the Planetary Spectroscopy Facility (PSF) at the University of Oxford, and the Simulated Airless Body Emission Laboratory (SABEL) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory

  4. Structural Brain Network Reorganization and Social Cognition Related to Adverse Perinatal Condition from Infancy to Early Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Fischi-Gomez, Elda; Batalle, Dafnis; Borradori-Tolsa, Cristina; Eixarch, Elisenda; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Gratacós, Eduard; Hüppi, Petra S.

    2016-01-01

    Adverse conditions during fetal life have been associated to both structural and functional changes in neurodevelopment from the neonatal period to adolescence. In this study, connectomics was used to assess the evolution of brain networks from infancy to early adolescence. Brain network reorganization over time in subjects who had suffered adverse perinatal conditions is characterized and related to neurodevelopment and cognition. Three cohorts of prematurely born infants and children (between 28 and 35 weeks of gestational age), including individuals with a birth weight appropriated for gestational age and with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), were evaluated at 1, 6, and 10 years of age, respectively. A common developmental trajectory of brain networks was identified in both control and IUGR groups: network efficiencies of the fractional anisotropy (FA)-weighted and normalized connectomes increase with age, which can be related to maturation and myelination of fiber connections while the number of connections decreases, which can be associated to an axonal pruning process and reorganization. Comparing subjects with or without IUGR, a similar pattern of network differences between groups was observed in the three developmental stages, mainly characterized by IUGR group having reduced brain network efficiencies in binary and FA-weighted connectomes and increased efficiencies in the connectome normalized by its total connection strength (FA). Associations between brain networks and neurobehavioral impairments were also evaluated showing a relationship between different network metrics and specific social cognition-related scores, as well as a higher risk of inattention/hyperactivity and/or executive functional disorders in IUGR children. PMID:28008304

  5. Effects of Soil Oxygen Conditions and Soil pH on Remediation of DDT-contaminated Soil by Laccase from White Rot Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuechun; Yi, Xiaoyun

    2010-01-01

    High residues of DDT in agricultural soils are of concern because they present serious threats to food security and human health. This article focuses on remediation of DDT-contaminated soil using laccase under different soil oxygen and soil pH conditions. The laboratory experiment results showed significant effects of soil oxygen conditions and soil pH on remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by laccase at the end of a 25-d incubation period. This study found the positive correlation between the concentration of oxygen in soil and the degradation of DDT by laccase. The residue of DDTs in soil under the atmosphere of oxygen decreased by 28.1% compared with the atmosphere of nitrogen at the end of the incubation with laccase. A similar pattern was observed in the remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by laccase under different flooding conditions, the higher the concentrations of oxygen in soil, the lower the residues of four DDT components and DDTs in soils. The residue of DDTs in the nonflooding soil declined by 16.7% compared to the flooded soil at the end of the incubation. The residues of DDTs in soils treated with laccase were lower in the pH range 2.5–4.5. PMID:20617049

  6. Mercury critical concentrations to Enchytraeus crypticus (Annelida: Oligochaeta) under normal and extreme conditions of moisture in tropical soils - Reproduction and survival.

    PubMed

    Buch, Andressa Cristhy; Schmelz, Rüdiger M; Niva, Cintia Carla; Correia, Maria Elizabeth Fernandes; Silva-Filho, Emmanoel Vieira

    2017-03-05

    Soil provides many ecosystem services that are essential to maintain its quality and healthy development of the flora, fauna and human well-being. Environmental mercury levels may harm the survival and diversity of the soil fauna. In this respect, efforts have been made to establish limit values of mercury (Hg) in soils to terrestrial fauna. Soil organisms such as earthworms and enchytraeids have intimate contact with trace metals in soil by their oral and dermal routes, reflecting the potentially adverse effects of this contaminant. The main goal of this study was to obtain Hg critical concentrations under normal and extreme conditions of moisture in tropical soils to Enchytraeus crypticus to order to assess if climate change may potentiate their acute and chronic toxicity effects. Tropical soils were sampled from of two Forest Conservation Units of the Rio de Janeiro State - Brazil, which has been contaminated by Hg atmospheric depositions. Worms were exposed to three moisture conditions, at 20%, 50% and 80% of water holding capacity, respectively, and in combination with different Hg (HgCl2) concentrations spiked in three types of tropical soil (two natural soils and one artificial soil). The tested concentrations ranged from 0 to 512mg Hg kg(-1) dry weight. Results indicate that the Hg toxicity is higher under increased conditions of moisture, significantly affecting survival and reproduction rate.

  7. The effect of environmental conditions and soil physicochemistry on phosphate stabilisation of Pb in shooting range soils.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi

    2016-04-01

    The stabilisation of Pb in the soil by phosphate is influenced by environmental conditions and physicochemical properties of the soils to which it is applied. Stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined in four soils under different environmental conditions. The effect of soil moisture and temperature on stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined by measurement of water extractable and bioaccessible Pb, sequential fractionation and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The addition of humic acid, ammonium nitrate and chloride was also examined for inhibition or improvement of Pb stability with phosphate treatment. The effect of moisture level varied between soils. In soil MB and DA a soil moisture level of 50% water holding capacity was sufficient to maximise stabilisation of Pb, but in soil TV and PE reduction in bioaccessible Pb was inhibited at this moisture level. Providing moisture at twice the soil water holding capacity did not enhance the effect of phosphate on Pb stabilisation. The difference of Pb stability as a result of incubating phosphate treated soils at 18 °C and 37 °C was relatively small. However wet-dry cycles decreased the effectiveness of phosphate treatment. The reduction in bioaccessible Pb obtained was between 20 and 40% with the most optimal treatment conditions. The reduction in water extractable Pb by phosphate was substantial regardless of incubation conditions and the effect of different temperature and soil moisture regimes was not significant. Selective sequential extraction showed phosphate treatment converted Pb in fraction 1 (exchangeable, acid and water soluble) to fraction 2 (reducible). There were small difference in fraction 4 (residual) Pb and fraction 1 as a result of treatment conditions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of stabilised PE soil revealed small differences in Pb speciation under varying soil moisture and temperature treatments. The addition of humic acid and chloride produced the greatest effect on Pb speciation in

  8. The Cpx system of Escherichia coli, a strategic signaling pathway for confronting adverse conditions and for settling biofilm communities?

    PubMed

    Dorel, Corinne; Lejeune, Philippe; Rodrigue, Agnès

    2006-05-01

    Amongst the thirty or so two-component systems known in Escherichia coli, the Cpx system has been described as being a stress response system the main function of which is to respond to damage to the cell envelope via activation of proteases and folding catalysts. Nevertheless, the size of the Cpx regulon (several dozens of target genes) and the diversity of the physiological functions associated with it (resistance to hostile conditions, mobility, adherence factors, metabolism, etc.) indicate that the role of Cpx in cell physiology is undoubtedly more complex. The range of cellular functions affected by activation of the Cpx pathway corresponds quite closely to the description of the physiological state of cells grown in biofilms. We suggest that Cpx is a strategic signaling pathway for facing adverse conditions and for settling biofilm communities. Current knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of the CpxR response (transcriptional and post-transcriptional) and the interactions between CpxR and the other bacterial regulatory systems are presented.

  9. Reported respiratory symptoms and adverse home conditions after 9/11 among residents living near the World Trade Center.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shao; Jones, Rena; Reibman, Joan; Bowers, James; Fitzgerald, Edward F; Hwang, Syni-An

    2007-05-01

    This study investigated whether self-reported damage, dust, and odors in homes near the World Trade Center (WTC) after September 11, 2001, were related to increased rates of respiratory symptoms among residents and if multiple sources of exposure were associated with greater health risk. We mailed questionnaires to homes within 1.5 km of the WTC site (affected area) and in upper Manhattan (control area). Surveys asked about respiratory symptoms, unplanned medical visits, physician diagnoses, medication use, and conditions in the home after 9/11. Adverse home conditions were associated with new-onset (i.e., began after 9/11) and persistent (i.e., remained 1 year after 9/11) upper and lower respiratory symptoms in the affected area (Cumulative Incidence Ratios [CIRs] 1.20-1.71). Residents reporting longer duration of dust/odors or multiple sources of exposure had greater risk for symptoms compared to those reporting shorter duration and fewer sources. These data suggest that WTC-related contamination in the home after 9/11 was associated with new and persistent respiratory symptoms among residents living near the site. While we cannot eliminate potential biases related to self-reported data, we took strategies to minimize their impact, and the observed effects are biologically plausible.

  10. Arsenopyrite weathering under conditions of simulated calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Lara, René H; Velázquez, Leticia J; Vazquez-Arenas, Jorge; Mallet, Martine; Dossot, Manuel; Labastida, Israel; Sosa-Rodríguez, Fabiola S; Espinosa-Cristóbal, León F; Escobedo-Bretado, Miguel A; Cruz, Roel

    2016-02-01

    Mining activities release arsenopyrite into calcareous soils where it undergoes weathering generating toxic compounds. The research evaluates the environmental impacts of these processes under semi-alkaline carbonated conditions. Electrochemical (cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, EIS), spectroscopic (Raman, XPS), and microscopic (SEM, AFM, TEM) techniques are combined along with chemical analyses of leachates collected from simulated arsenopyrite weathering to comprehensively examine the interfacial mechanisms. Early oxidation stages enhance mineral reactivity through the formation of surface sulfur phases (e.g., S n (2-)/S(0)) with semiconductor properties, leading to oscillatory mineral reactivity. Subsequent steps entail the generation of intermediate siderite (FeCO3)-like, followed by the formation of low-compact mass sub-micro ferric oxyhydroxides (α, γ-FeOOH) with adsorbed arsenic (mainly As(III), and lower amounts of As(V)). In addition, weathering reactions can be influenced by accessible arsenic resulting in the formation of a symplesite (Fe3(AsO4)3)-like compound which is dependent on the amount of accessible arsenic in the system. It is proposed that arsenic release occurs via diffusion across secondary α, γ-FeOOH structures during arsenopyrite weathering. We suggest weathering mechanisms of arsenopyrite in calcareous soil and environmental implications based on experimental data.

  11. Clinical profiles of adverse drug reactions spontaneously reported at a single Korean hospital dedicated to children with complex chronic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bomi; Kim, Sunwha Zara; Lee, Jin; Jung, Ae Hee; Jung, Sun-Hoi; Hahn, Hyeon-Joo; Kang, Hye Ryun

    2017-01-01

    Children with complex chronic conditions (CCC) are presumed to be vulnerable to adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The clinical profiles of ADRs in CCC are not well known. Herein, we aim to describe the ADR profiles in CCC with regard to typical presentations and vulnerable groups. We accessed the ADR yearly reports at a tertiary children's hospital whose practice is mainly dedicated to CCC and descriptively analyzed their clinical profiles according to the presence of a complex chronic condition, ADR severity, and age groups. A total of 1841 cases were analyzed, among which 1258 (68.3%) were mild, 493 (26.8%) moderate, and 90 (4.9%) cases were severe. A total of 1581 (85.9%) cases of complex chronic condition were reported. The proportion of CCC in each severity group increased as the ADR becomes more severe. In CCC, ADRs were most frequently reported by nurses in the adolescent group and in cases where the symptoms involved the gastrointestinal system. The class of antineoplastic and immunomodulating drugs was the most commonly suspected of causing an ADR, followed by one of the antibiotics. When we focus on the trend across the age groups, the ratio of severe-to-total ADRs decreased with older age. Among severe cases, the ratio of off-label prescription-related cases was the highest in the infant/toddler group and decreased as the groups aged. In conclusion, ADRs of CCCs admitted to a tertiary children’s hospital have a unique profile. These groups are vulnerable to ADRs and thus they should be monitored closely, especially when they are infants or toddlers, so that severe ADRs can be identified and treated immediately. PMID:28199420

  12. Health surveillance under adverse ergonomics conditions--validity of a screening method adapted for the occupational health service.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Dirk; Gustafsson, Ewa; Rolander, Bo; Arvidsson, Inger; Nordander, Catarina

    2015-01-01

    A new health surveillance protocol for work-related upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders has been validated by comparing the results with a reference protocol. The studied protocol, Health Surveillance in Adverse Ergonomics Conditions (HECO), is a new version of the reference protocol modified for application in the Occupational Health Service (OHS). The HECO protocol contains both a screening part and a diagnosing part. Sixty-three employees were examined. The screening in HECO did not miss any diagnosis found when using the reference protocol, but in comparison to the reference protocol considerable time savings could be achieved. Fair to good agreement between the protocols was obtained for one or more diagnoses in neck/shoulders (86%, k = 0.62) and elbow/hands (84%, k = 0.49). Therefore, the results obtained using the HECO protocol can be compared with a reference material collected with the reference protocol, and thus provide information of the magnitude of disorders in an examined work group. Practitioner Summary: The HECO protocol is a relatively simple physical examination protocol for identification of musculoskeletal disorders in the neck and upper extremities. The protocol is a reliable and cost-effective tool for the OHS to use for occupational health surveillance in order to detect workplaces at high risk for developing musculoskeletal disorders.

  13. Wireless sensor network for monitoring soil moisture and weather conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A wireless sensor network (WSN) was developed and deployed in three fields to monitor soil water status and collect weather data for irrigation scheduling. The WSN consists of soil-water sensors, weather sensors, wireless data loggers, and a wireless modem. Soil-water sensors were installed at three...

  14. Does the Size of the Effect of Adverse Events at High Ages on Daily-Life Physical Functioning Depend on the Economic Conditions Around Birth?

    PubMed

    Scholte, Robert; van den Berg, Gerard J; Lindeboom, Maarten; Deeg, Dorly J H

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers determinants of physical functional limitations in daily-life activities at high ages. Specifically, we quantify the extent to which the impact of adverse life events on this outcome is larger in case of exposure to adverse economic conditions early in life. Adverse life events include bereavement, severe illness in the family, and the onset of chronic diseases. We use a longitudinal data set of individuals born in the first decades of the 20th century. The business cycle around birth is used as an indicator of economic conditions early in life. We find that the extent to which functional limitations suffer from the onset of chronic diseases is larger if the individual was born in a recession. The long-run effect of economic conditions early in life on functional limitations at high ages runs primarily via this life event. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Healthy soil as a necessary condition of human life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, M. S.; Dorodnykh, Yu. L.; Marchenko, A. I.

    2010-07-01

    The extent of soil degradation and soil pathology in Russia is discussed. The concept of a federal target program “National System of the Chemical and Biological Security of the Russian Federation (2009-2013)” is examined. A definition is given to healthy soil of agrocenoses and its main functional characteristic—ecological stability (including balanced biodiversity, self-cleaning capacity, and suppressive activity of the phytopedocenosis). Urgent applied scientific problems of regional soil sanitation are formulated. Criteria and modern methods of ecological monitoring and assessment of soil quality and health are considered. A systems approach to sanitation of soils infected by highly harmful phytopathogens—the causative agents of root rots of cereal crops—is demonstrated using the induction of soil suppressiveness as an example.

  16. Determination of arsenic species in soil solution under flooded conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Onken, B.M.; Hossner, L.R.

    1996-09-01

    Greenhouse experiments were conducted to evaluate the relationships between the species and concentrations of As in the soil solution of flooded soils with other parameters including soil pe, pH, Fe, Mn, and type and amount of As added. Two soils were treated with 0, 5, 15, 25, 35, and 45 mg As kg{sup -1} soil added as either Na-arsenate or Na-arsenite and planted with rice (Oryza sativa L.). Soil solution samples were collected during a period of 60 d and analyzed for As. Selective hydrides generation was employed to evaluate both type and quality of As present in the samples. Inorganic As in the form of arsenate and arsenite was found in the soil solution of both soils. The conversion of added arsenite to arsenate occurred within the first 10 d of the experiment when the pe/pH of the soil was not conducive to arsenite stability. Added arsenate was converted to arsenite during the source of the experiment as the pe/pH of the soil declined due to flooding. Arsenate reached a maximum in soil solution at 10 to 20 d after flooding while maximum arsenite concentrations occurred at 20 to 30 d after flooding. The total concentration of As in soil solution generally reached a maximum at 20 to 30 d after flooding, after which time precipitous losses of As from soil solution occurred in all but the highest As treatments. Soil solution As concentrations were not statistically different between planted and unplanted controls. 30 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Integration of iconic gestures and speech in left superior temporal areas boosts speech comprehension under adverse listening conditions.

    PubMed

    Holle, Henning; Obleser, Jonas; Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann; Gunter, Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    Iconic gestures are spontaneous hand movements that illustrate certain contents of speech and, as such, are an important part of face-to-face communication. This experiment targets the brain bases of how iconic gestures and speech are integrated during comprehension. Areas of integration were identified on the basis of two classic properties of multimodal integration, bimodal enhancement and inverse effectiveness (i.e., greater enhancement for unimodally least effective stimuli). Participants underwent fMRI while being presented with videos of gesture-supported sentences as well as their unimodal components, which allowed us to identify areas showing bimodal enhancement. Additionally, we manipulated the signal-to-noise ratio of speech (either moderate or good) to probe for integration areas exhibiting the inverse effectiveness property. Bimodal enhancement was found at the posterior end of the superior temporal sulcus and adjacent superior temporal gyrus (pSTS/STG) in both hemispheres, indicating that the integration of iconic gestures and speech takes place in these areas. Furthermore, we found that the left pSTS/STG specifically showed a pattern of inverse effectiveness, i.e., the neural enhancement for bimodal stimulation was greater under adverse listening conditions. This indicates that activity in this area is boosted when an iconic gesture accompanies an utterance that is otherwise difficult to comprehend. The neural response paralleled the behavioral data observed. The present data extends results from previous gesture-speech integration studies in showing that pSTS/STG plays a key role in the facilitation of speech comprehension through simultaneous gestural input.

  18. A colonizing species has high fitness on soils with an exotic species legacy when conditioning effects are mitigated

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant interaction with soil can create feedbacks that influence intraspecific and interspecific performance. These feedbacks can either be short term, within-season soil conditioning called priority effects or longer-term influences called soil legacies. Soil conditioning and soil legacies can preve...

  19. Greenhouse gas emissions from soil under changing environmental conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript is the Guest Editors’ Introduction to a special issue on greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture. The papers were assembled following presentation at EuroSoil 2012. Exchange of greenhouse gases between soils and the atmosphere is a natural consequence of several ecosystem process...

  20. Amplifying Learning through Sites of Pedagogical Practice: A Possible Effect of Working with Disciplinary Technologies in Schools Operating under Adverse Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Debra

    2005-01-01

    Schools located within communities experiencing high levels of social dislocation, educational disadvantage and student disengagement from learning are working under "adverse conditions". These schools face particular challenges when it comes to stabilising and sustaining wholeschool change aimed at improving students' learning outcomes.…

  1. Some adverse effects of soil amendment with organic Materials-The case of soils polluted by copper industry phytostabilized with red fescue.

    PubMed

    Cuske, Mateusz; Karczewska, Anna; Gałka, Bernard; Dradrach, Agnieszka

    2016-08-02

    The study was aimed to examine the effects of soil amendment with organic waste materials on the growth of red fescue and the uptake of Cu and Zn by this grass, in view of its potential usage for phytostabilization of Cu-polluted soils. Five soils, containing 301-5180 mg/kg Cu, were collected from the surroundings of copper smelter Legnica, and amended with lignite (LG) and limed sewage sludge (SS). Plant growth and the concentrations of Cu and Zn in the shoots and roots of grass were measured in a pot experiment and related to the results of Pytotoxkit and Microtox® tests performed on soil solution. The effects of soil amendment with LG and SS differed greatly, and depended on soil properties. In some cases, the application of alkaline SS resulted in dramatic increase of Cu phytotoxicity and its enhanced uptake by plants, while application of LG to slightly acidic soil caused increased accumulation of Zn in plants, particularly in their roots. The study confirmed good suitability of red fescue for phytostabilization of Cu-contaminated soils except for those extremely polluted. Organic amendments to be used for metal immobilization should be thoroughly examined prior to application.

  2. SUBSURFACE SOIL CONDITIONS BENEATH AND NEAR BUILDINGS AND THE POTENTIAL EFFECTS ON SOIL VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings is called vapor intrusion. Volatile organic chemicals in contaminated soils or groundwater can emit vapors that may migrate through subsurface soils and enter indoor air spaces of overlying buildings. T...

  3. Biotoxicity of Mars soils: 1. Dry deposition of analog soils on microbial colonies and survival under Martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Golden, D. C.; Ming, Doug W.

    2012-11-01

    Six Mars analog soils were created to simulate a range of potentially biotoxic geochemistries relevant to the survival of terrestrial microorganisms on Mars, and included basalt-only (non-toxic control), salt, acidic, alkaline, aeolian, and perchlorate rich geochemistries. Experiments were designed to simulate the dry-deposition of Mars soils onto spacecraft surfaces during an active descent landing scenario with propellant engines. Six eubacteria were initially tested for tolerance to desiccation, and the spore-former Bacillus subtilis HA101 and non-spore former Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212 were identified to be strongly resistant (HA101) and moderately resistant (29212) to desiccation at 24 °C. Furthermore, tests with B. subtilis and E. faecalis demonstrated that at least 1 mm of Mars analog soil was required to fully attenuate the biocidal effects of a simulated Mars-normal equatorial UV flux. Biotoxicity experiments were conducted under simulated Martian conditions of 6.9 mbar, -10 °C, CO2-enriched anoxic atmosphere, and a simulated equatorial solar spectrum (200-1100 nm) with an optical depth of 0.1. For B. subtilis, the six analog soils were found, in general, to be of low biotoxicity with only the high salt and acidic soils exhibiting the capacity to inactivate a moderate number of spores (<1 log reductions) exposed 7 days to the soils under simulated Martian conditions. In contrast, the overall response of E. faecalis to the analog soils was more dramatic with between two and three orders of magnitude reductions in viable cells for most soils, and between six and seven orders of magnitude reductions observed for the high-salt soil. Results suggest that Mars soils are likely not to be overtly biotoxic to terrestrial microorganisms, and suggest that the soil geochemistries on Mars will not preclude the habitability of the Martian surface.

  4. The impact of standard preparation practice on the runoff and soil erosion rates under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaledi Darvishan, Abdulvahed; Homayounfar, Vafa; Hamidreza Sadeghi, Seyed

    2016-09-01

    The use of laboratory methods in soil erosion studies, rainfall simulation experiments, Gerlach troughs, and other measurements such as ring infiltrometer has been recently considered more and more because of many advantages in controlling rainfall properties and high accuracy of sampling and measurements. However, different stages of soil removal, transfer, preparation and placement in laboratory plots cause significant changes in soil structure and, subsequently, the results of runoff, sediment concentration and soil loss. Knowing the rate of changes in sediment concentration and soil loss variables with respect to the soil preparation for laboratory studies is therefore inevitable to generalize the laboratory results to field conditions. However, there has been little attention given to evaluate the effects of soil preparation on sediment variables. The present study was therefore conducted to compare sediment concentration and soil loss in natural and prepared soil. To achieve the study purposes, 18 field 1 × 1 m plots were adopted in an 18 % gradient slope with sandy-clay-loam soil in the Kojour watershed, northern Iran. A portable rainfall simulator was then used to simulate rainfall events using one or two nozzles of BEX: 3/8 S24W for various rainfall intensities with a constant height of 3 m above the soil surface. Three rainfall intensities of 40, 60 and 80 mm h-1 were simulated on both prepared and natural soil treatments with three replications. The sediment concentration and soil loss at five 3 min intervals after time to runoff were then measured. The results showed the significant increasing effects of soil preparation (p ≤ 0.01) on the average sediment concentration and soil loss. The increasing rates of runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss due to the study soil preparation method for laboratory soil erosion plots were 179, 183 and 1050 % (2.79, 2.83 and 11.50 times), respectively.

  5. Effects of agricultural practices of three crops on the soil communities under Mediterranean conditions: field evaluation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Sara; José Cerejeira, Maria; Abreu, Manuela; Sousa, José Paulo

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable agricultural production relies on soil communities as the main actors in key soil processes necessary to maintain sustainable soil functioning. Soil biodiversity influences soil physical and chemical characteristics and thus the sustainability of crop and agro-ecosystems functioning. Agricultural practices (e.g.: soil tillage, pesticides and fertilizer applications, irrigation) may affects negatively or positively soil biodiversity and abundances by modifying the relationships between organisms in the soil ecosystem. The present study aimed to study the influence of agricultural practices of three crops (potato, onion and maize) under Mediterranean climate conditions on soil macro- and mesofauna during their entire crop cycles. Effects on soil communities were assessed at a higher tier of environmental risk assessment comprising field testing of indigenous edaphic communities in a selected study-site located in a major agriculture region of Central Portugal, Ribatejo e Oeste, neighbouring protected wetlands. A reference site near the agricultural field site was selected as a Control site to compare the terrestrial communities' composition and variation along the crop cycle. The field soil and Control site soil are sandy loam soils. Crops irrigation was performed by center-pivot (automated sprinkler that rotates in a half a circle area) and by sprinklers. Soil macro- and mesofauna were collected at both sites (field and Control) using two methodologies through pitfall trapping and soil sampling. The community of soil macro- and mesofauna of the three crops field varied versus control site along the crops cycles. Main differences were due to arachnids, coleopterans, ants and adult Diptera presence and abundance. The feeding activity of soil fauna between control site and crop areas varied only for potato and onion crops vs. control site but not among crops. Concentration of pesticides residues in soil did not cause apparent negative effects on the soil

  6. Nitrogen release from rock and soil under simulated field conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holloway, J.M.; Dahlgren, R.A.; Casey, W.H.

    2001-01-01

    A laboratory study was performed to simulate field weathering and nitrogen release from bedrock in a setting where geologic nitrogen has been suspected to be a large local source of nitrate. Two rock types containing nitrogen, slate (1370 mg N kg-1) and greenstone (480 mg N kg-1), were used along with saprolite and BC horizon sand from soils derived from these rock types. The fresh rock and weathered material were used in batch reactors that were leached every 30 days over 6 months to simulate a single wet season. Nitrogen was released from rock and soil materials at rates between 10-20 and 10-19 mo1 N cm-2 s-1. Results from the laboratory dissolution experiments were compared to in situ soil solutions and available mineral nitrogen pools from the BC horizon of both soils. Concentrations of mineral nitrogen (NO3- + NH4+) in soil solutions reached the highest levels at the beginning of the rainy season and progressively decreased with increased leaching. This seasonal pattern was repeated for the available mineral nitrogen pool that was extracted using a KCl solution. Estimates based on these laboratory release rates bracket stream water NO3-N fluxes and changes in the available mineral nitrogen pool over the active leaching period. These results confirm that geologic nitrogen, when present, may be a large and reactive pool that may contribute as a non-point source of nitrate contamination to surface and ground waters. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Release of Pharmaceuticals under Reducing Conditions in a Wastewater-Irrigated Mexican Soil.

    PubMed

    Dalkmann, Philipp; Dresemann, Tim-Fabian; Siebe, Christina; Mansfeldt, Tim; Amelung, Wulf; Siemens, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Wastewater irrigation is often performed by flood irrigation, leading to changes in redox potential (Eh) of irrigated soils. In addition to soil organic matter, Fe-(hydr)oxides are important sorbents for pollutants, and biotransformation of pollutants can be accelerated under reducing conditions. Here, the influence of reducing conditions on the release of sorbed pharmaceuticals from soil and their potential accelerated dissipation was investigated in a microcosm study. Samples of a soil from the Mezquital Valley (Mexico) irrigated for 85 yr with untreated wastewater were incubated under oxidizing (Eh of 500 ± 20 mV), weakly reducing (Eh of 100 ± 20 mV), and moderately reducing (Eh of -100 ± 20 mV) soil conditions for 30 to 31 d. The concentrations of nine pharmaceuticals (bezafibrate, carbamazepine, ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, enrofloxacin, clarithromycin, diclofenac, and naproxen) were extracted via solid-phase extraction from soil slurries and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Low Eh did not lead to a release of formerly sorbed pharmaceuticals from the wastewater irrigated soil. High pH values (>8) of the examined soil resulting from denitrification under reducing conditions prevented the dissolution of Fe-(hydr)oxides and, hence, the potential release of pharmaceuticals. A trend of decreasing concentrations of sulfamethoxazole and bezafibrate with time under moderately reducing conditions supports previous findings of a transformation of these compounds under anaerobic conditions.

  8. Pore-scale investigation on the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in heterogeneous soils

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Chongxuan; Todd-Brown, Katherine E.; Liu, Yuanyuan; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2016-11-15

    The relationship between microbial respiration rate and soil moisture content is an important property for understanding and predicting soil organic carbon degradation, CO2 production and emission, and their subsequent effects on climate change. This paper reports a pore-scale modeling study to investigate the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in soils and to evaluate various factors that affect this response. X-ray computed tomography was used to derive soil pore structures, which were then used for pore-scale model investigation. The pore-scale results were then averaged to calculate the effective respiration rates as a function of water content in soils. The calculated effective respiration rate first increases and then decreases with increasing soil water content, showing a maximum respiration rate at water saturation degree of 0.75 that is consistent with field and laboratory observations. The relationship between the respiration rate and moisture content is affected by various factors, including pore-scale organic carbon bioavailability, the rate of oxygen delivery, soil pore structure and physical heterogeneity, soil clay content, and microbial drought resistivity. Simulations also illustrates that a larger fraction of CO2 produced from microbial respiration can be accumulated inside soil cores under higher saturation conditions, implying that CO2 flux measured on the top of soil cores may underestimate or overestimate true soil respiration rates under dynamic moisture conditions. Overall, this study provides mechanistic insights into the soil respiration response to the change in moisture conditions, and reveals a complex relationship between heterotrophic microbial respiration rate and moisture content in soils that is affected by various hydrological, geochemical, and biophysical factors.

  9. Soil-pore water distribution of silver and gold engineered nanoparticles in undisturbed soils under unsaturated conditions.

    PubMed

    Tavares, D S; Rodrigues, S M; Cruz, N; Carvalho, C; Teixeira, T; Carvalho, L; Duarte, A C; Trindade, T; Pereira, E; Römkens, P F A M

    2015-10-01

    Release of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) to soil is well documented but little is known on the subsequent soil-pore water distribution of ENPs once present in soil. In this study, the availability and mobility of silver (Ag) and gold (Au) ENPs added to agricultural soils were assessed in two separate pot experiments. Pore water samples collected from pots from day 1 to 45 using porous (<0.17 μm) membrane samplers suggest that both Ag and Au are retained almost completely within 24 h with less than 13% of the total added amount present in pore water on day 1. UV-Vis and TEM results showed that AuENPs in pore water were present as both homoaggregates and heteroaggregates until day 3 after which the concentration in pore water was too low to detect the presence of aggregates. A close relation between the concentration of Au and Fe in pore water suggests that the short term solubility of Au is partly controlled by natural soil colloids. Results suggest that under normal aerated soil conditions the actual availability of Ag and AuENPs is low which is relevant in view of risk assessment even though the impact of environmental conditions and soil properties on the reactivity of ENPs (and/or large ENPs aggregates) retained in the solid matrix need to be addressed further.

  10. Soil, water, and vegetation conditions in south Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.; Everitt, J. H.; Gerbermann, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Software development for a computer-aided crop and soil survey system is nearing completion. Computer-aided variety classification accuracies using LANDSAT-1 MSS data for a 600 hectare citrus farm were 83% for Redblush grapefruit and 91% for oranges. These accuracies indicate that there is good potential for computer-aided inventories of grapefruit and orange citrus orchards with LANDSAT-type MSS data. Mean digital values of clouds differed statistically from those for crop, soil, and water entities, and those for cloud shadows were enough lower than sunlit crop and soil to be distinguishable. The standard errors of estimate for the calibration of computer compatible tape coordinate system (pixel and record) to earth coordinate system (longitude and latitude) for 6 LANDSAT scenes ranged from 0.72 to 1.50 pixels and from 0.58 to 1.75 records.

  11. Soil, water, and vegetation conditions in south Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.; Everitt, J. H.; Gerbermann, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The best wavelengths in the 0.4 to 2.5 micron interval were determined for detecting lead toxicity and ozone damage, distinguishing succulent from woody species, and detecting silverleaf sunflower. A perpendicular vegetation index, a measure of the distance from the soil background line, in MSS 5 and MSS 7 data space, of pixels containing vegetation was developed and tested as an indicator of vegetation development and crop vigor. A table lookup procedure was devised that permits rapid identification of soil background and green biomass or phenological development in LANDSAT scenes without the need for training data.

  12. [Dynamics of soil microbial biomass and dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen under flooded condition].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shaojun; Peng, Peiqin; Rong, Xiangmin; Liu, Qiang; Tang, Qi

    2006-11-01

    With reddish yellow soil (RYS) and alluvial purple soil (APS), the two typical paddy soils in the Dongting Lake floodplain of China as test soils, an incubation test was conducted at 25 degrees C to study the dynamic changes of soil microbial biomass and dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen under flooded condition. Three treatments were installed, i.e., control (CK), ammonium sulfate (N), and rice straw powder plus ammonium sulfate (S-N). The results showed that during incubation, soil microbial biomass carbon (SMBC), soil microbial biomass nitrogen (SMBN), soil dissolved organic carbon (SDOC), and soil dissolved organic nitrogen (SDON) reached their maximum initially, decreased thereafter, and tended to be stable. After amending the substrates to the two soils, the averages of SMBC to soil total carbon, SMBN to soil total nitrogen, SDOC to soil total carbon, and SDON to soil total nitrogen were 2% - 3%, 2% - 3%, 1% or so, and 5% - 6%, respectively. In the two soils, the peak values of SMBC in treatment N and those of SMBN, SDOC and SDON in treatment S-N were the highest, while those of SMBC in treatments N and S-N had no significant difference. The peak values of SMBN, SDOC and SDON in RYS were significantly different between treatments N and S-N, while no significant difference was observed between the peak values of SMBN and SDOC in APS, because the fertility of RYS was lower than that of APS. In the first 7 days of incubation, SMBC/SMBN ratio was < 10, while after 14 days of incubation, this ratio was higher in treatment N than in treatment S-N at the same time in the same soil. The SDOC/SDON ratio in all treatments was the highest at the 3rd d, and the lowest at the 28th d of incubation.

  13. Improved Prediction of Quasi-Global Vegetation Conditions Using Remotely-Sensed Surface Soil Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolten, John; Crow, Wade

    2012-01-01

    The added value of satellite-based surface soil moisture retrievals for agricultural drought monitoring is assessed by calculating the lagged rank correlation between remotely-sensed vegetation indices (VI) and soil moisture estimates obtained both before and after the assimilation of surface soil moisture retrievals derived from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) into a soil water balance model. Higher soil moisture/VI lag correlations imply an enhanced ability to predict future vegetation conditions using estimates of current soil moisture. Results demonstrate that the assimilation of AMSR-E surface soil moisture retrievals substantially improve the performance of a global drought monitoring system - particularly in sparsely-instrumented areas of the world where high-quality rainfall observations are unavailable.

  14. Copper dynamics under alternating redox conditions is influenced by soil properties and contamination source.

    PubMed

    Balint, Ramona; Said-Pullicino, Daniel; Ajmone-Marsan, Franco

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effect of soil redox conditions on contaminant dynamics is of significant importance for evaluating their lability, mobility and potential transfer to other environmental compartments. Under changing redox conditions, soil properties and constituents such as Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides and organic matter (OM) may influence the behavior of associated metallic elements (MEs). In this work, the redox-driven release and redistribution of Cu between different soil pools was studied in three soils having different contamination sources. This was achieved by subjecting soil columns to a series of alternating reducing and oxidizing cycles under non-limiting C conditions, and assessing their influence on soil pore water, leachate and solid phase composition. Results showed that, in all soils, alternating redox conditions led to an increase in the distribution of Cu in the more labile fractions, consequently enhancing its susceptibility to loss. This was generally linked to the redox-driven cycling of Fe, Mn and dissolved organic matter (DOM). In fact, results suggested that the reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides and subsequent reprecipitation as poorly-ordered phases under oxic conditions contributed to the release and mobilization of Cu and/or Cu-containing organometallic complexes. However, the behavior of Cu, as well as the mechanisms controlling Cu release and loss with redox cycling, was influenced by both soil properties (e.g. pH, contents of easily reducible Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides) and source of Cu contamination.

  15. Soil Compaction and Root Growth under Field Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While plow pans (a thin layer of compacted soil at the bottom of the normal tillage depth) in the Central and Southern US tend to be genetic in origin, they were believed to be wheel-induced in the upper Midwest by running the rear tractor wheel in the plow furrow. But it was also believed that annu...

  16. Effects of redox conditions on the adsorption of dissolved organic matter to soil minerals and differently aged paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauerwein, Meike; Hanke, Alexander; Kaiser, Klaus; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2010-05-01

    Effects of redox conditions on the adsorption of dissolved organic matter to soil minerals and differently aged paddy soils Meike Sauerwein1, Alexander Hanke2, Klaus Kaiser3, Karsten Kalbitz2 1) Dept. of Soil Ecology, Bayreuth Centre of Ecology and Environmental Research (BayCEER), University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth, Germany, meike.sauerwein@gmail.com 2) Institute of ecosystem dynamics and biodiversity, University of Amsterdam, 1018 WV, Netherlands, a.hanke@uva.nl, k.kalbitz@uva.nl 3) Soil Sciences, Martin Luther University Halle, 06099 Halle, Germany, klaus.kaiser@landw.uni-halle.de Current knowledge on dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soils is based mainly on observations and experiments in aerobic environments. Adsorption to soil minerals is an important mechanism of DOM retention and stabilization against microbial decay under oxic conditions. Under anoxic conditions where hydrous iron oxides, the potential main adsorbents of DOM, possibly dissolve, the importance of adsorption seems questionable. Therefore, we studied the adsorption of DOM to selected soil minerals and to mineral soils under oxic and anoxic conditions. In detail, we tested the following hypotheses: 1. Minerals and soils adsorb less DOM under anoxic conditions than under oxic ones. 2. The reduced adsorption under anoxic conditions is result of the smaller adsorption to hydrous Fe oxides whereas adsorption to clay minerals and Al hydroxides is not sensitive to changes in redox conditions 3. DOM adsorption will increase with the number of redox cycles, thus time of soil formation, due to increasing contents of poorly crystalline Fe oxides. This will, however, cause a stronger sensitivity to redox changes as poor crystalline Fe oxides are more reactive. 4. Aromatic compounds, being preferentially adsorbed under oxic conditions, will be less strongly adsorbed under anoxic conditions. We chose paddy soils as models because their periodically and regular exposure to changing redox cycles, with

  17. Soil transport parameters of potassium under a tropical saline soil condition using STANMOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzanye da Silva Santos, Rafaelly; Honorio de Miranda, Jarbas; Previatello da Silva, Livia

    2015-04-01

    Environmental responsibility and concerning about the final destination of solutes in soil, so more studies allow a better understanding about the solutes behaviour in soil. Potassium is a macronutrient that is required in high concentrations, been an extremely important nutrient for all agricultural crops. It plays essential roles in physiological processes vital for plant growth, from protein synthesis to maintenance of plant water balance, and is available to plants dissolved in soil water while exchangeable K is loosely held on the exchange sites on the surface of clay particles. K will tend to be adsorbed onto the surface of negatively charged soil particles. Potassium uptake is vital for plant growth but in saline soils sodium competes with potassium for uptake across the plasma membrane of plant cells. This can result in high Na+:K+ ratios that reduce plant growth and eventually become toxic. This study aimed to obtain soil transport parameters of potassium in saline soil, such as: pore water velocity in soil (v), retardation factor (R), dispersivity (λ) and dispersion coefficient (D), in a disturbed sandy soil with different concentrations of potassium chlorate solution (KCl), which is one of the most common form of potassium fertilizer. The experiment was carried out using soil samples collected in a depth of 0 to 20 cm, applying potassium chlorate solution containing 28.6, 100, 200 and 500 mg L-1 of K. To obtain transport parameters, the data were adjusted with the software STANMOD. At low concentrations, interaction between potassium and soil occur more efficiently. It was observed that only the breakthrough curve prepared with solution of 500 mg L-1 reached the applied concentration, and the solution of 28.6 mg L-1 overestimated the parameters values. The STANMOD proved to be efficient in obtaining potassium transport parameters; KCl solution to be applied should be greater than 500 mg L-1; solutions with low concentrations tend to overestimate

  18. The conductance of a maize crop and the underlying soil to ozone under various environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pul, W. A. J.; Jacobs, A. F. G.

    1994-04-01

    Flux measurements of ozone and water vapour employing the eddy correlation technique were used to determine the surface conductance and canopy conductance to ozone. In the surface conductance to ozone, all surfaces at which ozone is destroyed and the transport process to these surfaces are included. The canopy conductance to ozone represents the ozone uptake of transpiring plant parts. The surface conductance to ozone of the maize crop and the underlying soil was generally larger than the canopy conductance to ozone. This means that beside the uptake by stomata, there was another important ozone sink. Under wet soil surface conditions, the surface conductance and the canopy conductance to ozone coincided. This indicates that the resistance of wet soil and the remaining plant parts (cuticle) to ozone was much larger than the stomatal or soil resistance. On the other hand, under dry soil conditions the conductances differ, largely caused by a variation in the transport process to the soil. The transport of ozone to soil increased with increasing friction velocity ( u *) and decreased with increasing atmospheric stability, leaf area index (LAI) or crop height (h). These effects for midday (unstable) conditions were parameterized with an “in-crop” aerodynamic resistance, r inc in a very straightforward way; r inc=13.9 LAI h/u *+67 (cc.=0.77). If the ozone flux in air pollution models is described with a simple resistance model (Big Leaf model), the extra destruction at the soil should be modelled using an “in-crop” aerodynamic resistance. For these measurements the ozone flux to the soil was 0 65% of the total ozone flux measured above the crop. Under wet soil conditions, this was less than 20%; under dry soil conditions, this was 30 65%.

  19. Soil microbial diversity, site conditions, shelter forest land, saline water drip-irrigation, drift desert.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhengzhong; Lei, Jiaqiang; Li, Shengyu; Xu, Xinwen

    2013-10-01

    Soil microbes in forest land are crucial to soil development in extreme areas. In this study, methods of conventional culture, PLFA and PCR-DGGE were utilized to analyze soil microbial quantity, fatty acids and microbial DNA segments of soils subjected to different site conditions in the Tarim Desert Highway forest land. The main results were as follows: the soil microbial amount, diversity indexes of fatty acid and DNA segment differed significantly among sites with different conditions (F < F0.05 ). Specifically, the values were higher in the middle and base of dunes than the top part of dunes and hardened flat sand, but all values for dunes were higher than for drift sand. Bacteria was dominant in the soil microbial community (>84%), followed by actinomycetes and then fungi (<0.05%). Vertical differences in the soil microbial diversity were insignificant at 0-35 cm. Correlation analysis indicated that the forest trees grew better as the soil microbial diversity index increased. Therefore, construction of the Tarim Desert Highway shelter-forest promoted soil biological development; however, for enhancing sand control efficiency and promoting sand development, we should consider the effects of site condition in the construction and regeneration of shelter-forest ecological projects.

  20. Bioavailability of freshly added and aged naphthalene in soils under gastric pH conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Z.; Simkins, S.; Xing, B.

    1999-12-01

    The bioavailability of hydrophobic organic chemicals decreases with aging in soil because of sequestration. However, assessments of the risk of exposure to contaminated soils are usually dependent on either chemical concentrations, which are measured using vigorous extraction methods, or models that assume an equilibrium without considering the actual conditions. The objective of this research was to determine the availability and desorption kinetics of freshly added and aged naphthalene from a peat and a mineral soil; naphthalene was desorbed into solutions with pH levels that approximate those found in different gastric regions. Soil and peat samples were spiked with radiolabeled and unlabeled naphthalene at 2 and 20 {micro}g/g and were aged from 0 to 135 d. Desorption kinetics were determined using a simulated stomach solution and a neutral solution that represented the pH of intestinal conditions and most soils. Peat sorbed much more naphthalene than did soil, and it allowed little desorption. Though both acidic and neutral extracting solutions could desorb naphthalene, little apparent effect of aging was observed in peat, whereas desorption from soil declined markedly with aging. In addition, the percentage of naphthalene that desorbed from soil was greater for the higher incubation concentration. The desorption of naphthalene from the peat and soil was higher into the neutral solution than into the gastric solution. These results suggest that aging, exposure conditions, concentration effect, and organic matter content should be taken into account in predictive models and risk assessments.

  1. Stress, deformation and micromorphological aspects of soil freezing under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetchick, Elizabeth

    In this thesis, frost heave is viewed as a process resulting from the interactions between thermodynamic conditions, soil environment controls such as texture, stress/deformation conditions and soil microstructure. A series of laboratory experiments was devised to investigate the links between these aspects. Because a limited number of studies exist on the development of internal stresses and strains in freezing soil, the work focussed on obtaining rheological data using conventional soil strain gauges and prototype stress transducers. A fine-grained unstructured silt was placed in a column (30 cm diameter by 100 cm length) and subjected to freezing and freeze-thaw cycles from the top down, lasting up to three months. Heat and water flows, as well as stresses and strains were monitored. The frozen soil was sectioned at the end of four of the experiments to examine the soil fabrics that had developed. From the experimental results, schematic stress and strain curves are proposed. For a single freeze cycle, compressive normal and tensile normal stresses were recorded simultaneously by the measuring devices within the freezing soil profile. Ice lens inception took place when the stress field changed, a condition which occurred either at the frost front level or at the base of the growing ice lens. Negative and positive strains reflected the different stress states that were sustained below and above the freezing front. Negative strains or soil consolidation took place as stresses increased before the passage of the frost line. Negligible soil strains were recorded as maximum soil consolidation was attained, before soil expansion. Distinct positive strain patterns indicating secondary and continuing heave, were recorded simultaneously throughout a thickness of soil, over a range of temperatures. Ice lens growth mostly took place as secondary frost heave, but continuing heave was measured, and the temperature conditions for both types of heave were determined. During

  2. Influence of soil conditions on dissolved organic matter leached from forest and wetland soils: a controlled growth chamber study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Ah; Nguyen, Hang Vo-Minh; Oh, Hae Sung; Hur, Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of various soil conditions, including drying-rewetting, nitrogen deposition, and temperature rise, on the quantities and the composition of dissolved organic matter leached from forest and wetland soils. A set of forest and wetland soils with and without the nitrogen deposition were incubated in the growth chambers under three different temperatures. The moisture contents were kept constant, except for two-week drying intervals. Comparisons between the original and the treated samples revealed that drying-rewetting was a crucial environmental factor driving changes in the amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The DOC was also notably increased by the nitrogen deposition to the dry forest soil and was affected by the temperature of the dry wetland soil. A parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis identified three sub-fractions of the fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) from the fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), and their compositions depended on drying-rewetting. The data as a whole, including the DOC and PARAFAC components and other optical indices, were possibly explained by the two main variables, which were closely related with the PARAFAC components and DOC based on principal component analysis (PCA). Our results suggested that the DOC and PARAFAC component information could provide a comprehensive interpretation of the changes in the soil-leached DOM in response to the different environmental conditions.

  3. Positive responses of coastal dune plants to soil conditioning by the invasive Lupinus nootkatensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanslin, Hans Martin; Kollmann, Johannes

    2016-11-01

    Invasive nitrogen-fixing plants drive vegetation dynamics and may cause irreversible changes in nutrient-limited ecosystems through increased soil resources. We studied how soil conditioning by the invasive alien Lupinus nootkatensis affected the seedling growth of co-occurring native plant species in coastal dunes, and whether responses to lupin-conditioned soil could be explained by fertilisation effects interacting with specific ecological strategies of the native dune species. Seedling performance of dune species was compared in a greenhouse experiment using field-collected soil from within or outside coastal lupin stands. In associated experiments, we quantified the response to nutrient supply of each species and tested how addition of specific nutrients affected growth of the native grass Festuca arundinacea in control and lupin-conditioned soil. We found that lupin-conditioned soil increased seedling biomass in 30 out of 32 native species; the conditioned soil also had a positive effect on seedling biomass of the invasive lupin itself. Increased phosphorus mobilisation by lupins was the major factor driving these positive seedling responses, based both on growth responses to addition of specific elements and analyses of plant available soil nutrients. There were large differences in growth responses to lupin-conditioned soil among species, but they were unrelated to selected autecological indicators or plant strategies. We conclude that Lupinus nootkatensis removes the phosphorus limitation for growth of native plants in coastal dunes, and that it increases cycling of other nutrients, promoting the growth of its own seedlings and a wide range of dune species. Finally, our study indicates that there are no negative soil legacies that prevent re-establishment of native plant species after removal of lupins.

  4. Breaking The Enzymatic Latch: Do Anaerobic Conditions Constrain Decomposition In Humid Tropical Forest Soil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    Anaerobic conditions have been proposed to impose a "latch" on soil organic matter decomposition by inhibiting the activity of extracellular enzymes that catalyze the transformation of organic polymers into monomers for microbial assimilation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that anaerobiosis inhibits soil hydrolytic enzyme activity in a humid tropical forest ecosystem in Puerto Rico. We sampled surface and sub-surface soil from each of 59 plots (n = 118) stratified across distinct topographical zones (ridges, slopes, and valleys) known to vary in soil oxygen (O2) concentrations, and measured the potential activity of five hydrolytic enzymes that decompose carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) substrates. We measured reduced iron (Fe (II)) concentrations in soil extractions to provide a spatially and temporally integrated index of anaerobic microbial activity, since iron oxides constitute the dominant anaerobic terminal electron acceptor in this ecosystem. Surprisingly, we observed positive relationships between Fe (II) concentrations and the activity of all enzymes that we assayed. Linear mixed effects models that included Fe (II) concentration, topographic position, and their interaction explained between 30 to 70 % of the variance of enzyme activity of β-1,4-glucosidase, β-cellobiohydrolase, β-xylosidase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, and acid phosphatase. Soils from ridges and slopes contained between 10 and 800 μg Fe (II) g-1 soil, and exhibited consistently positive relationships (p < 0.0001) between Fe (II) and enzyme activity. Valley soils did not display significant relationships between enzyme activity and Fe (II), although they displayed variation in soil Fe (II) concentrations similar to ridges and slopes. Overall, valleys exhibited lower enzyme activity and lower Fe (II) concentrations than ridges or slopes, possibly related to decreased root biomass and soil C. Our data provide no indication that anaerobiosis suppresses soil enzyme activity, but

  5. Improved forecasting of global vegetation conditions using remotely-sensed surface soil moisture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Timely and accurate monitoring of anomalies in root-zone soil water availability is essential for assessing global agricultural crop conditions. Root-zone soil moisture estimates are particularly important for obtaining forecasts of end-of-season crop yield fluctuations provided by the United States...

  6. An analysis of the dissipation of pharmaceuticals under thirteen different soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Kodešová, Radka; Kočárek, Martin; Klement, Aleš; Golovko, Oksana; Koba, Olga; Fér, Miroslav; Nikodem, Antonín; Vondráčková, Lenka; Jakšík, Ondřej; Grabic, Roman

    2016-02-15

    The presence of human and veterinary pharmaceuticals in the environment is recognized as a potential threat. Pharmaceuticals have the potential to contaminate soils and consequently surface and groundwater. Knowledge of contaminant behavior (e.g., sorption onto soil particles and degradation) is essential when assessing contaminant migration in the soil and groundwater environment. We evaluated the dissipation half-lives of 7 pharmaceuticals in 13 soils. The data were evaluated relative to the soil properties and the Freundlich sorption coefficients reported in our previous study. Of the tested pharmaceuticals, carbamazepine had the greatest persistence (which was mostly stable), followed by clarithromycin, trimethoprim, metoprolol, clindamycin, sulfamethoxazole and atenolol. Pharmaceutical persistence in soils was mostly dependent on the soil-type conditions. In general, lower average dissipation half-lives and variability (i.e., trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, clindamycin, metoprolol and atenolol) were found in soils of better quality (well-developed structure, high nutrition content etc.), and thus, probably better microbial conditions (i.e., Chernozems), than in lower quality soil (Cambisols). The impact of the compound sorption affinity onto soil particles on their dissipation rate was mostly negligible. Although there was a positive correlation between compound dissipation half-life and Freundlich sorption coefficient for clindamycin (R=0.604, p<0.05) and sulfamethoxazole (R=0.822, p<0.01), the half-life of sulfamethoxazole also decreased under better soil-type conditions. Based on the calculated dissipation and sorption data, carbamazepine would be expected to have the greatest potential to migrate in the soil water environment, followed by sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and metoprolol. The transport of clindamycin, clarithromycin and atenolol through the vadose zone seems less probable.

  7. Uranium partitioning under acidic conditions in a sandy soil aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.H. |; Serkiz, S.M.; Johnson, L.M.

    1995-07-01

    The partitioning of uranium in an aquifer down gradient of two large mixed waste sites was examined with respect to the solution and soil chemistry (e.g., pH redox potential and contaminant concentration) and aqueous-phase chemical speciation. This involved generation of field-derived, batch sorption, and reactive mineral surface sorption data. Field-derived distribution coefficients for uranium at these waste sites were found to vary between 0.40 and 15,000. Based on thermodynamic speciation modeling and a comparison of field and laboratory data, gibbsite is a potential reactive mineral surface present in modified soils at the sites. Uranium partitioning data are presented from field samples and laboratory studies of background soil and the mineral surface gibbsite. Mechanistic and empirical sorption models fit to the field-derived uranium partitioning data show an improvement of over two orders of magnitude, as measured by the normalized sum of errors squared, when compared with the single K{sub d} model used in previous risk work. Models fit to batch sorption data provided a better fit of sorbed uranium than do models fit to the field-derived data.

  8. On the Influence of Boundary Conditions in Modeling Heat Transfer in Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikailsoy, F. D.

    2017-01-01

    A procedure to determine the thermal diffusivity of soils, which is based on the heat-transfer equation, has been developed. Experimental investigations were carried out to establish the influence of boundary conditions on the soil surface on the solution of inverse problems of modeling of heat transfer in soil. On the basis of these data, the author has calculated thermal diffusivity in soils with the proposed methods developed for the case with one and two harmonics and a comparison of these methods has been made; the calculated characteristics and experimental results have also been compared.

  9. Temporal variability of soil water repellency in field conditions under humid Mediterranean climate (South of Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Murillo, Juan F.; Gabarron-Galeote, Miguel A.; Ruiz-Sinoga, Jose D.

    2013-04-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) has become an important field of scientific study because of its effects on soil hydrological behavior, including reduced matrix infiltration, development of fingered flow in structural or textural preferential flow paths, irregular wetting fronts, and increased runoff generation and soil erosion. The aim of this study is to evaluate the temporal variability of SWR in Mediterranean rangeland under humid Mediterranean climatic conditions (Tª=14.5 °C; P=1,010 mm y-1) in South of Spain. Every month from September 2008 to May 2009 (rainy season), soil moisture and SWR was measured in field conditions by means of gravimetric method and Water Drop Penetration Test, respectively. The entire tests were performed in differente eco-geomorphological conditions in the experimental site: North and South aspect hillslopes and beneath shrub and bare soil in every of them. The results indicate that: i) climatic conditions seem to be more transcendent than the vegetal cover for explaining the temporal variability of SWR in field conditions; ii) thus, SWR appears to be controlled by the antecedent rainfall and soil moisture; iii) more severity SWR were observed in patches characterized by sandier soils and/or greater organic matter contents; and iv) the factor 'hillslope aspect' was not found very influential in the degree of SWR.

  10. Changes in mineral soil biogeochemical cycling and environmental conditions following tree harvest in the Northeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vario, C.; Friedland, A.

    2012-12-01

    In the northeastern United States, reductions in carbon dioxide emissions have been attempted by using local wood as a renewable alternative to oil. Although woody biomass products are readily available, recent findings suggest that forest disturbance may cause release of carbon from the deeper mineral soil. Worldwide, deep soils sequester more than half of soil carbon, making it critical in the global carbon cycle; however, most studies on the effect of harvesting have focused on the organic soil horizon. Our research aimed to uncover changes in biogeochemistry and environmental conditions in deeper, mineral soil after clear cutting forests. We quantified post-harvest mineral soil carbon pools through a regional study. We utilized stands of different ages to measure the recovery of soil carbon over time since harvest. Stands included in this study were cut approximately 5, 12, 25, 50, or 120 ybp, in order to identify changes in soil carbon over time since harvest. We sampled harvested stands in six research or protected forests across New York, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Vermont. Soil samples were collected to a depth of 60 cm below the surface of the mineral soil using a gas-powered augur and 9.5 cm diameter drill bit. Soil samples were analyzed at Dartmouth College. In order to understand specific changes in mineral soil carbon dynamics following harvest, measurements of carbon fluxes, such as soil respiration and DOC transport were conducted at five different-aged stands at Bartlett Experimental Forest, NH. While parameters that may influence carbon storage—such as pH, clay content, tree cover and elevation— did not vary across the different-aged stands in each forest, carbon pools did vary over time. We found changes in carbon pools in at least three experimental forests across the northeast. At Bartlett Experimental Forest, we found a gradual decline in mineral soil carbon storage from between 85-87 Mg ha-1 in 120 year old and primary forest stands

  11. Impacts of microbial redox conditions on the phase distribution of pyrene in soil-water systems.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han S; Roper, J Chadwick; Pfaender, Frederic K

    2008-03-01

    Variations in the soil/sediment organic matter (SOM)-hydrophobic organic contaminant (HOC) bindings upon microbially mediated redox conditions were examined. While the extractability of pyrene associated with soil declined after its biodegradation began during aerobic incubation, its variations were almost constant (+/-3.0-4.4%) during anoxic/anaerobic incubations. The dissolved organic matter released from the soil incubated under highly reduced conditions became more humified and aromatic, had a higher average molecular weight, and was more polydispersed compared to that obtained from oxic incubation, similar to the SOM alterations in the early stage of diagenesis (humification). The concentrations of pyrene in the aqueous phase increased significantly during the soil incubations under highly reduced conditions due to its favorable interaction with the altered DOM. Our results suggest that the microbially mediated redox conditions have significant impacts on SOM and should be considered for the transport, fate, bioavailability, and exposure risk of HOCs in the geo-environments.

  12. Bioactivity of Several Herbicides on the Nanogram Level Under Different Soil Moisture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jung, S C; Kuk, Y I; Senseman, S A; Ahn, H G; Seong, C N; Lee, D J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a double-tube centrifuge method was employed to determine the effects of soil moisture on the bioactivity of cafenstrole, pretilachlor, benfuresate, oxyfluorfen and simetryn. In general, the available herbicide concentration in soil solution (ACSS) showed little change as soil moisture increased for herbicides. The total available herbicide in soil solution (TASS) typically increased as soil moisture increased for all herbicides. The relationship between TASS and % growth rate based on dry weight showed strong linear relationships for both cafenstrole and pretilachlor, with r2 values of 0.95 and 0.84, respectively. Increasing TASS values were consistent with increasing herbicide water solubility, with the exception of the ionizable herbicide simetryn. Plant absorption and % growth rate exhibited a strong linear relationship with TASS. According to the results suggested that TASS was a better predictor of herbicidal bioactivity than ACSS for all herbicides under unsaturated soil moisture conditions.

  13. Soil layer condensation peak as a response to soil water properties under Sudanese climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, S.; Motelica-Heino, M.; Ozier-Lafontaine, H.

    2012-04-01

    The soil apparent density is strongly dependent on their physico-chemical properties. It can be negatively impacted by human activities such as soil work or animal pasture or natural salinity influenced by irrigation.. In contrast it can be improved for different depths by agricultural practices. A « condensation peak » defined as an increase in the apparent density was found for the heterogeneous soils of Niger for several profiles of 5 soil classes and for a very shallow depth (10 cm maximum) with a very variable extreme depth (from 35 to 150 cm) associated with extreme density values (from 1.45 to 2). The depth of this peak, for soils neither saline nor vertic, varies inversely with the proportion of soil fine elements (silts+clays). However it corresponds to an average value of useful water (AWC) of 100mm (CV=24.4%). In sodic and alkaline soils this peak can be observed at shallow depths (from 53 to 61cm with a CV from 15 to 40%), thus for much lower AWC values (from 74 to 87cm with a CV from 26 to 47%). It can be found either below or above an impermeable horizon of a maximal density of 2.. This peak is likely to be associated with a multi-annual alternance of humectation-dessication at this depth. Its occurrence is based on an interplay of intrinsic physical and hydric soil properties but also on extrisnic parameters sch as the pluviometry, the location at the scale of the watershed and the micromodelling.

  14. Manganese oxide-coated redox bars as an indicator for reducing soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorau, Kristof; Mansfeldt, Tim

    2014-05-01

    Field identification of reducing soil conditions is of concern not only for soil pedogenesis but also for nutrient and pollutant dynamics in soils. We manufactured manganese (Mn) oxide-coated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bars and proved their suitability for identification of reducing soil conditions in both the laboratory and field. Birnessite (δ-MnO2) was synthesized according to a recently published method and was coated onto white PVC bars. We used microcosm devices with adjusted redox potentials (EH) to distinguish the onset and intensity of depletion patterns along the Mn oxide-coating and soil column experiments combined with field application to validate the enhanced removal of Mn against Fe oxide-coated bars under anaerobe soil conditions. Field application was performed at a site with shallow and strongly fluctuating water tables where water table depth and soil temperature were monitored. Three microcosm experiments adjusted to oxidizing (EH ~500 mV, pH 7), weakly reducing (EH ~175 mV, pH 7) and moderately reducing conditions (EH ~25 mV, pH 7) showed depending on the EH no, slight, or intense removal of the Mn oxide-coating, respectively. Moreover, the removal of Mn oxide (225 mm2 d-1) in soil column experiments exceeded the removal of Fe oxide (118 mm2 d-1). The enhanced removal of the Mn oxide-coating was also found under anaerobe conditions in field application. Consequently, identifying of reducing conditions in soils by Mn oxide-coated bars is possible. We recommend using this methodology for short-term monitoring, e.g. on weekly basis, since tri- and tetravalent Mn is the preferred electron acceptor compared with trivalent Fe.

  15. Effect of soil surface conditions on runoff velocity and sediment mean aggregate diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    César Ramos, Júlio; Bertol, Ildegardis; Paz González, Antonio; de Souza Werner, Romeu; Marioti, Juliana; Henrique Bandeira, Douglas; Andrighetti Leolatto, Lidiane

    2013-04-01

    Soil cover and soil management are the factors that most influence soil erosion by water, because they directly affect soil surface roughness and surface cover. The main effect of soil cover by crop residues consists in dissipation of kinetic energy of raindrops and also partly kinetic energy of runoff, so that the soil disaggregation is considerably reduced but, in addition, soil cover captures detached soil particles, retains water on its surface and decreases runoff volume and velocity. In turn, soil surface roughness, influences soil surface water storage and infiltration and also runoff volume and velocity, sediment retention and subsequently water and sediment losses. Based on the above rationale, we performed a field experiment to assess the influence of soil cover and soil surface roughness on decay of runoff velocity as well as on mean diameter of transported sediments (D50 index). The following treatments were evaluated: SRR) residues of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) on a smooth soil surfcace, SRV) residues of common vetch (Vicia sativa) on a smooth soil surface, SSR) scarification after cultivation of Italian ryegrass resulting in a rough surface, SSV) scarification after cultivation of common vetch resulting in a rough surface, and SBS) scarified bare soil with high roughness as a control. The field experiments was performed on an Inceptisol in South Brazil under simulated rainfall conditions during 2012. Experimental plots were 11 m long and 3.5 m wide with an area of 38.5 m2. Six successive simulated rainfall tests were applied using a rotating-boom rain simulator. During each test, rain intensity was 60 mmhr-1, whereas rain duration was 90 minutes. Runoff velocity showed no significant differences between cultivated treatments. However, when compared to bare soil treatment, SBS (0.178 m s-1) and irrespective of the presence of surface crop residues or scarification operations, cultivated soil treatments significantly reduced runoff velocity

  16. Soil, Water, and Vegetation Conditions in South Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Reflectance differences between the dead leaves of six crops (corn, cotton, sorghum, sugar cane, citrus, and avocado) and the respective bare soils where the dead leaves were lying on the ground were determined from laboratory spectrophotometric measurements over the 0.5- to 2.5 micron wavelength interval. The largest differences were in the near infrared waveband 0.75- to 1.35 microns. Leaf area index was predicted from plant height, percent ground cover, and plant population for irrigated and nonirrigated grain sorghum fields for the 1975 growing season.

  17. Sensitivity of soil moisture initialization for decadal predictions under different regional climatic conditions in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodayar, S.; Sehlinger, A.; Feldmann, H.; Kottmeier, C.

    2015-12-01

    The impact of soil initialization is investigated through perturbation simulations with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM. The focus of the investigation is to assess the sensitivity of simulated extreme periods, dry and wet, to soil moisture initialization in different climatic regions over Europe and to establish the necessary spin up time within the framework of decadal predictions for these regions. Sensitivity experiments consisted of a reference simulation from 1968 to 1999 and 5 simulations from 1972 to 1983. The Effective Drought Index (EDI) is used to select and quantify drought status in the reference run to establish the simulation time period for the sensitivity experiments. Different soil initialization procedures are investigated. The sensitivity of the decadal predictions to soil moisture initial conditions is investigated through the analysis of water cycle components' (WCC) variability. In an episodic time scale the local effects of soil moisture on the boundary-layer and the propagated effects on the large-scale dynamics are analysed. The results show: (a) COSMO-CLM reproduces the observed features of the drought index. (b) Soil moisture initialization exerts a relevant impact on WCC, e.g., precipitation distribution and intensity. (c) Regional characteristics strongly impact the response of the WCC. Precipitation and evapotranspiration deviations are larger for humid regions. (d) The initial soil conditions (wet/dry), the regional characteristics (humid/dry) and the annual period (wet/dry) play a key role in the time that soil needs to restore quasi-equilibrium and the impact on the atmospheric conditions. Humid areas, and for all regions, a humid initialization, exhibit shorter spin up times, also soil reacts more sensitive when initialised during dry periods. (e) The initial soil perturbation may markedly modify atmospheric pressure field, wind circulation systems and atmospheric water vapour distribution affecting atmospheric stability

  18. The potential of Chromolaena odorata (L) to decontaminate used engine oil impacted soil under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Atagana, Harrison Ifeanyichukwu

    2011-08-01

    This study reports on the use of Chromolaena odorata (L) R.M. King and H. Robinson, an Asteraceae (compositae) and an invasive alien weed in Africa for the remediation of soil contaminated with used engine oil. Used engine oilfrom a motor service garage was used to artificially contaminate soil taken from a garden to give total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) of between 1 and 40 g kg(-1). Chromolaena odorata (L), propagated by stem cuttings were transplanted into the contaminated soil and watered just enough to keep the soil at about 70% water holding capacity for 90 day. A set of control experiments containing 40 g kg(-1) used engine oil but without plants was set up. All experiments were set up in triplicates. Although the plants in the experiments containing higher than 30 g kg(-1) used engine oil showed relatively slower growth (fewer branches and leaves, and shorter in height) compared to those containing lower concentrations, the plants in all the experiments continued to grow until the end of the 90 day period. Residual TPH after 90 days showed that between 21 and 100% of oil was lost from the planted soil while only 11.5% was lost in the control, which did not contain plants during the same period. Analysis of plant tissues showed that both shoot and root tissues contained detectable levels of TPH and selected PAHs were also detectable. Biomass accumulation by Chromolaena odorata was affected adversely by concentrations of oil higher than 20 g kg(-1). Results of germination rates and germination energy measurements showed that Chromolaena odorata was able to reduce the toxicity of the contaminated soil after 90 days as compared to soils containing freshly contaminated soiL

  19. River basin soil-vegetation condition assessment applying mathematic simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Natalia; Trifonova, Tatiana; Shirkin, Leonid

    2013-04-01

    Meticulous attention paid nowadays to the problem of vegetation cover productivity changes is connected also to climate global transformation. At the same time ecosystems anthropogenic transformation, basically connected to the changes of land use structure and human impact on soil fertility, is developing to a great extent independently from climatic processes and can seriously influence vegetation cover productivity not only at the local and regional levels but also globally. Analysis results of land use structure and soil cover condition influence on river basin ecosystems productive potential is presented in the research. The analysis is carried out applying integrated characteristics of ecosystems functioning, space images processing results and mathematic simulation methods. The possibility of making permanent functional simulator defining connection between macroparameters of "phytocenosis-soil" system condition on the basis of basin approach is shown. Ecosystems of river catchment basins of various degrees located in European part of Russia were chosen as research objects. For the integrated assessment of ecosystems soil and vegetation conditions the following characteristics have been applied: 1. Soil-productional potential, characterizing the ability of natural and natural-anthropogenic ecosystem in certain soil-bioclimatic conditions for long term reproduction. This indicator allows for specific phytomass characteristics and ecosystem produce, humus content in soil and bioclimatic parameters. 2. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) has been applied as an efficient, remotely defined, monitoring indicator characterizing spatio-temporal unsteadiness of soil-productional potential. To design mathematic simulator functional simulation methods and principles on the basis of regression, correlation and factor analysis have been applied in the research. Coefficients values defining in the designed static model of phytoproductivity distribution has been

  20. Assessment of possibilities and conditions of irrigation in Hungary by digital soil map products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laborczi, Annamária; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Takács, Katalin; Szatmári, Gábor; Szabó, József; Pásztor, László

    2016-04-01

    Sustaining proper soil moisture is essentially important in agricultural management. However, irrigation can be really worth only, if we lay sufficient emphasis on soil conservation. Nationwide planning of irrigation can be taken place, if we have spatially exhaustive maps and recommendations for the different areas. Soil moisture in the pores originate from 'above' (precipitation), or from 'beneath' (from groundwater by capillary lift). The level of groundwater depends on topography, climatic conditions and water regime of the nearby river. The thickness of capillary zone is basicly related to the physical and water management properties of the soil. Accordingly the capillary rise of sandy soils - with very high infiltration rate and very poor water retaining capacity - are far smaller than in the case of clay soils - with very poor infiltration rate and high water retaining capacity. Applying irrigation water can be considered as a reinforcement from 'above', and it affects the salinity and sodicity as well as the soil structure, nutrient supply and soil formation. We defined the possibilities of irrigation according to the average salt content of the soil profile. The nationwide mapping of soil salinity was based on legacy soil profile data, and it was carried out by regression kriging. This method allows that environmental factors with exhaustive spatial extension, such as climatic-, vegetation-, topographic-, soil- and geologic layers can be taken into consideration to the spatial extension of the reference data. According to soil salinity content categories, the areas were delineated as 1. to be irrigated, 2. to be irrigated conditionally, 3. not to be irrigated. The conditions of irrigation was determined by the comparison of the 'actual' and the 'critical' depth of the water table. Since, if the water rises above the critical level, undesirable processes, such as salinization and alkalinization can be developed. The critical depth of the water table was

  1. Influences of solution chemical conditions on mobilization of TNT from contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Dante, D.A.; Tiller, C.L.; Pennell, K.D.

    1996-12-31

    2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and its byproducts are common contaminants on US military installations. Many potential remediation processes are in part limited by the transfer of TNT from the contaminated soil into the aqueous phase. The purpose of this research is to assess the release of TNT from contaminated soil under varying solution chemical conditions. In particular, influences of pH, aquatic natural organic matter, and addition of two surfactants is investigated. Uncontaminated soil was collected from a near-surface site at the Alabama Army Ammunition Plant and was artificially contaminated with TNT prior to the mobilization experiments. Results for the pH experiments show that more TNT is mobilized at neutral pH conditions than at low pH conditions. The presence of dissolved organic matter enhances the release of TNT from soil, but not by a large amount. Surfactant addition has the most significant effect on TNT mobilization.

  2. Soil genotoxicity induced by successive applications of chlorothalonil under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiangxiang; Cui, Ning; Zhou, Wei; Khorram, Mahdi Safaei; Wang, Donghong; Yu, Yunlong

    2014-05-01

    Greenhouse production of vegetables has been developed rapidly in China. High temperature and humidity inside the greenhouse make this environment more suitable for fast reproduction of fungal diseases. Fungicides are among the chemicals used extensively in the greenhouse to prevent crops from invasive infections by phytopathogens; however, little is known about the accumulation of fungicides in soil and their effect on soil quality under greenhouse conditions. In the present study, the accumulation of the fungicide chlorothalonil (CT) and its toxic metabolite hydroxy-chlorothalonil (HCT) in soil as well as their related soil genotoxicity under greenhouse conditions was investigated. The results indicated that both CT and HCT accumulated in soil with repeated applications of CT, and the accumulation level was strongly correlated to application dosage and its frequency. In addition, soil genotoxicity, which was measured by Vicia faba, also increased with the accumulation of CT and HCT, and the main contributor to this phenomenon was CT rather than HCT. The data demonstrated that successive applications of fungicides may result in their accumulation in soil and thus a decline in soil quality.

  3. Soil, water, and vegetation conditions in south Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.; Everitt, J. H.; Gerbermann, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Field spectral measurements and laboratory densitometric measurements showed that tree canopy reflectance differences among the Marrs, Redblush, and Valencia varieties in the visible spectral region were due to their different leaf chlorophyll concentrations. Field measurements of visible light reflectance were directly related to the tonal responses on infrared color photos of the varietal tree canopies. Consequently, densitometric measurements of the foliage on the infrared color transparency with red-filtered light successfully discriminated among the three varieties. Reflectance measurements with a field spectroradiometer on nine dates the growing season of two wheat varieties, Milam and Penjamo, documented their spectra over the 0.45 to 2.50 micron wavelength interval associated with plant cover and physiological development. An image analyzer system was used to optically planimeter the percentage of soil background, vegetation and shadow in the vertical photographs taken within the FOV of the spectroradiometer on each measurement date.

  4. Emissions of 1,3-Dichloropropene and Chloropicrin after Soil Fumigation under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yates, Scott R; Ashworth, Daniel J; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Qiaoping; Knuteson, James; van Wessenbeeck, Ian J

    2015-06-10

    Soil fumigation is an important agronomic practice in the production of many high-value vegetable and fruit crops, but the use of chemical fumigants can lead to excessive atmospheric emissions. A large-scale (2.9 ha) field experiment was conducted to obtain volatilization and cumulative emission rates for two commonly used soil fumigants under typical agronomic practices: 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin. The aerodynamic method and the indirect back-calculation method using ISCST3 and CALPUFF dispersion models were used to estimate flux loss from the treated field. Over the course of the experiment, the daily peak volatilization rates ranged from 12 to 30 μg m(-2) s(-1) for 1,3-D and from 0.7 to 2.6 μg m(-2) s(-1) for chloropicrin. Depending on the method used for quantification, total emissions of 1,3-D and chloropicrin, respectively, ranged from 16 to 35% and from 0.3 to 1.3% of the applied fumigant. A soil incubation study showed that the low volatilization rates measured for chloropicrin were due to particularly high soil degradation rates observed at this field site. Understanding and quantifying fumigant emissions from agricultural soil will help in developing best management practices to reduce emission losses, reducing adverse impacts to human and ecosystem health, and providing inputs for conducting risk assessments.

  5. Extreme Air Pollution Conditions Adversely Affect Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance: The Air Pollution and Cardiometabolic Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Brook, Robert D; Sun, Zhichao; Brook, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Rao, Xiaoquan; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Sun, Qinghua; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports that fine particulate matter adversely affects cardiometabolic diseases particularly in susceptible individuals; however, health effects induced by the extreme concentrations within megacities in Asia are not well described. We enrolled 65 nonsmoking adults with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the Beijing metropolitan area into a panel study of 4 repeated visits across 4 seasons since 2012. Daily ambient fine particulate matter and personal black carbon levels ranged from 9.0 to 552.5 µg/m(3) and 0.2 to 24.5 µg/m(3), respectively, with extreme levels observed during January 2013. Cumulative fine particulate matter exposure windows across the prior 1 to 7 days were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure elevations ranging from 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.7) to 2.7 (0.6-4.8) mm Hg per SD increase (67.2 µg/m(3)), whereas cumulative black carbon exposure during the previous 2 to 5 days were significantly associated with ranges in elevations in diastolic blood pressure from 1.3 (0.0-2.5) to 1.7 (0.3-3.2) mm Hg per SD increase (3.6 µg/m(3)). Both black carbon and fine particulate matter were significantly associated with worsening insulin resistance (0.18 [0.01-0.36] and 0.22 [0.04-0.39] unit increase per SD increase of personal-level black carbon and 0.18 [0.02-0.34] and 0.22 [0.08-0.36] unit increase per SD increase of ambient fine particulate matter on lag days 4 and 5). These results provide important global public health warnings that air pollution may pose a risk to cardiometabolic health even at the extremely high concentrations faced by billions of people in the developing world today.

  6. Bacterial diversity of soil aggregates of different sizes in various land use conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Ekaterina; Azida, Thakahova; Olga, Kutovaya

    2014-05-01

    The patterns of soil microbiome structure may be a universal and very sensitive indicator of soil quality (soil "health") used for optimization and biologization of agricultural systems. The understanding of how microbial diversity influenses, and is influenced by, the environment can only be attained by analyses at scales relevant to those at which processes influencing microbial diversity actually operate. The basic structural and functional unit of the soil is a soil aggregate, which is actually a microcosm of the associative co-existing groups of microorganisms that form characteristic ecological food chains. It is known that many important microbial processes occur in spatially segregated microenvironments in soil leading to a microscale biogeography. The Metagenomic library of typical chernozem in conditions of different land use systems was created. Total genomic DNA was extracted from 0.5 g of the frozen soil after mechanical destruction. Sample preparation and sequencing was performed on a GS Junior ("Roche»", Switzerland) according to manufacturer's recommendations, using the universal primers to the variable regions V4 gene 16S - rRNA - F515 (GTGCCAGCMGCCGCGGTAA) and R806 (GGACT-ACVSGGGTATCTAAT). It is shown that the system of land use is a stronger determinant of the taxonomic composition of the soil microbial community, rather than the size of the structural units. In soil samples from different land use systems the presence of accessory components was revealed. They may be used as indicators of processes of soil recovery, soil degradation or soil exhaustion processes occuring in the agroecosystems. The comparative analysis of microbial communities of chernozem aggregates investigated demonstrates the statistically valuable differences in the amount of bacterial phyla and Archean domain content as well as the species richness in aggregates of various size fractions. The occurrence of specific components in the taxonomic structure of micro-and macro

  7. Molybdenum isotope fractionation in soils: Influence of redox conditions, organic matter, and atmospheric inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, C.; Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Opfergelt, S.; Guicharnaud, R. A.; Halliday, A. N.; Burton, K. W.

    2015-08-01

    Molybdenum isotope fractionation accompanying soil development is studied across three pedogenic gradients encompassing a range of controlling factors. These factors include variable redox conditions, organic matter content, Fe and Mn oxy(hydr)oxide content, mineral composition, degree of weathering, pH, type and amount of atmospheric inputs, age, climate, and underlying rock type. Soil profiles from the island of Maui (Hawaii) along a precipitation gradient ranging from 850 to 5050 mm mean annual precipitation show a decrease in average soil δ98Mo from -0.04 ± 0.11‰ at the driest, most oxic site, which is indistinguishable from the basalt parent material (-0.09 ± 0.08‰), to -0.33 ± 0.10‰ at the wettest, most reducing site. A suite of 6 Icelandic soils display a broad trend with heavier δ98Mo values (up to +1.50 ± 0.09‰) in soil horizons that are more weathered and have higher organic matter content. Selective extractions of Mo from different soil components indicate that the association with organic matter and silicate or Ti-oxide residue dominates retention of Mo in these soils, with adsorption on Fe and Mn oxy(hydr)oxides playing a lesser role. Across all basaltic soils, δ98Mo values are lighter in soils that exhibit the most net Mo loss relative to the parent material, and δ98Mo values are heavier in soils that exhibit net Mo gains. A well-drained regolith profile in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico developed on quartz diorite shows heavier δ98Mo values than the parent material (up to +0.71 ± 0.10‰ with an integrated profile average of +0.28 ± 0.10‰) in soil and shallower saprolite, despite overall moderate loss of 28% of Mo relative to the bedrock. However, the deeper saprolite is unfractionated from bedrock (-0.01 ± 0.10‰, quartz diorite bedrock) indicating that rock weathering dissolution processes and secondary clay formation do not fractionate Mo isotopes. Our data suggest that the Mo mass balance and isotope composition of

  8. No-tillage lessens soil CO2 emissions the most under arid and sandy soil conditions: results from a meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, K.; Chivenge, P.; Ciais, P.; Chaplot, V.

    2015-09-01

    The management of agroecosystems plays a crucial role in the global carbon cycle with soil tillage leading to known organic carbon redistributions within soils and changes in soil CO2 emissions. Yet, discrepancies exist on the impact of tillage on soil CO2 emissions and on the main soil and environmental controls. A meta-analysis was conducted using 46 peer-reviewed publications totaling 174 paired observations comparing CO2 emissions over entire seasons or years from tilled and untilled soils across different climates, crop types and soil conditions with the objective of quantifying tillage impact on CO2 emissions and assessing the main controls. On average, tilled soils emitted 21 % more CO2 than untilled soils, which corresponded to a significant difference at P < 0.05. The difference increased to 29 % in sandy soils from arid climates with low soil organic carbon content (SOCC < 1 %) and low soil moisture, but tillage had no impact on CO2 fluxes in clayey soils with high background SOCC (> 3 %). Finally, nitrogen fertilization and crop residue management had little effect on the CO2 responses of soils to no-tillage. These results suggest no-tillage is an effective mitigation measure of carbon dioxide losses from dry land soils. They emphasize the importance of including information on soil factors such as texture, aggregate stability and organic carbon content in global models of the carbon cycle.

  9. No-tillage lessens soil CO2 emissions the most under arid and sandy soil conditions: results from a meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Khatab; Chivenge, Pauline; Ciais, Philippe; Chaplot, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    The management of agroecosystems plays a crucial role in the global carbon cycle with soil tillage leading to known organic carbon redistributions within soils and changes in soil CO2 emissions. Yet, discrepancies exist on the impact of tillage on soil CO2 emissions and on the main soil and environmental controls. A meta-analysis was conducted using 46 peer-reviewed publications totaling 174 paired observations comparing CO2 emissions over entire seasons or years from tilled and untilled soils across different climates, crop types and soil conditions with the objective of quantifying tillage impact on CO2 emissions and assessing the main controls. On average, tilled soils emitted 21 % more CO2 than untilled soils, which corresponded to a significant difference at P<0.05. The difference increased to 29 % in sandy soils from arid climates with low soil organic carbon content (SOCC < 1 %) and low soil moisture, but tillage had no impact on CO2 fluxes in clayey soils with high background SOCC (> 3 %). Finally, nitrogen fertilization and crop residue management had little effect on the CO2 responses of soils to no-tillage. These results suggest no-tillage is an effective mitigation measure of carbon dioxide losses from dry land soils. They emphasize the importance of including information on soil factors such as texture, aggregate stability and organic carbon content in global models of the carbon cycle.

  10. Antagonistic pleiotropy at the human IL6 promoter confers genetic resilience to the pro-inflammatory effects of adverse social conditions in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Cole, Steven W; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Manu, Kavya; Telzer, Eva H; Kiang, Lisa; Bower, Julienne E; Irwin, Michael R; Fuligni, Andrew J

    2011-07-01

    The authors tested the evolutionary genetic hypothesis that the functional form of an asymmetrically risky Gene × Environment interaction will differ as a function of age-related antagonistic pleiotropy (i.e., show opposite effects in young vs. old individuals). Previous studies have identified a polymorphism in the human IL6 promoter (rs1800795; IL6-74 G/C) that interacts with adverse socioenvironmental conditions to promote chronic inflammation in older adults (elevated C-reactive protein). This study identifies a protective effect of the same polymorphism in 17- to 19-year-old adolescents confronting socioeconomic adversity. Over 60% of the environmental risk contribution to the IL6 × Socioeconomic Status interaction could be accounted for by interpersonal stress and adult role burden. Thus, the IL6-174G allele does not represent an undifferentiated risk factor but instead sensitizes inflammatory biology to socioenvironmental conditions, conferring either genetic vulnerability or resilience depending on the developmental "somatic environment" that interacts with social conditions to influence gene expression.

  11. Soil microbial communities and enzyme activities in soils during historically extreme drought conditions in the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Southern High Plains region of Texas experienced a significant reduction in 2011 crop production due a record drought as it experienced the hottest summer since 1911 (> 48 days of temperatures above 37.7oC and only 37.8 mm precipitation). Soil microbial communities and their associated enzymati...

  12. Soil microbial communties and enzyme activities in soils during historically extreme drought conditions in the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Southern High Plains region of Texas experienced a significant reduction in 2011 crop production due a record drought as it experienced the hottest summer since 1911 (> 48 days of temperatures above 37.7oC and only 37.8 mm precipitation). Soil microbial communities and their associated enzymatic...

  13. Modeling Soil Sodicity Problems under Dryland and Irrigated Conditions: Case Studies in Argentina and Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso

    2014-05-01

    Salt-affected soils, both saline and sodic, my develop both under dryland and irrigated conditions, affecting negatively the physical and chemical soil properties, the crop production and the animal and human health.Among the development processes of salt-affected soils, the processes of sodification have been generally received less attention and is less understood than the development of saline soils. Although in both of them, hydrological processes are involved in their development, in the case of sodic soils we have to consider some additional chemical and physicochemical reactions, making more difficult their modeling and prediction. In this contribution we present two case studies: one related to the development of sodic soils in the lowlands of the Argentina Pampas, under dryland conditions and sub-humid temperate climate, with pastures for cattle production; the other deals with the development of sodic soils in the Colombia Cauca Valley, under irrigated conditions and tropical sub-humid climate, in lands used for sugarcane cropping dedicated to sugar and ethanol production. In both cases the development of sodicity in the surface soil is mainly related to the effects of the composition and level of groundwater, affected in the case of Argentina Pampas by the off-site changes in dryland use and management in the upper zones and by the drainage conditions in the lowlands, and in the case of the Cauca Valley, by the on-site irrigation and drainage management in lands with sugarcane. There is shown how the model SALSODIMAR, developed by the main author, based on the balance of water and soluble componentes of both the irrigation water and groundwater under different water and land management conditions, may be adapted for the diagnosis and prediction of both problems, and for the selection of alternatives for their management and amelioration.

  14. Environmental conditions affecting concentrations of He, CO2, O2 and N2 in soil gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, Margaret E.

    1994-01-01

    The measurement of concentrations of volatile species in soil gases has potential for use in geochemical exploration for concealed ore deposits and for monitoring of subsurface contaminants. However, the interpretation of anomalies in surficial gases can be difficult because soil-gas concentrations are dependent on both meteorological and environmental conditions.For this study, concentrations of He, CO2, O2 and N2 and meteorological conditions were monitored for 10–14 months at eight nonmineralized sites in both humid and dry environments. Gases were collected at 0.6–0.7-m depth at seven sites. At one site, gases were collected from 0.3-, 0.6-, 1.2-, and 2.0-m depths; diurnal monitoring studies were conducted at this site also. Rain and snowfall, soil and air temperatures, barometric pressure, and relative humidity were monitored at all the sites. The sand, silt and clay content, and the organic carbon content of surficial soil were measured at each site.Meteorological conditions generally affected He and CO2 concentrations in the same way at all the sites; however, these effects were modified by local environmental conditions. Both seasonal and diurnal concentration changes occurred. The most important seasonal concentration changes were related to rain and snowfall and soil and air temperatures. Seasonal changes tended to be larger then the diurnal changes, but both could be related to the same processes. Local conditions of soil type and organic content affected the amount of pore space and moisture present in the soil and therefore the soil-gas concentrations.

  15. Influence of green waste compost on azimsulfuron dissipation and soil functions under oxic and anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    García-Jaramillo, M; Cox, L; Hermosín, M C; Cerli, C; Kalbitz, K

    2016-04-15

    Concerns have been raised over the sustainability of intensive rice cultivation, where the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides has been associated with numerous environmental problems. The objective of this study was to test the effect of the herbicide azimsulfuron on important soil functions as affected by amendment with a byproduct of the olive oil industry. Soil was collected from a Mediterranean rice field. Part of it was amended with alperujo compost (AC). Amended and unamended soils were incubated for 43days in presence or not of azimsulfuron, under anoxic-flooded (AF) and oxic-unflooded (OU) conditions. We monitored the dissipation of the herbicide azimsulfuron, C mineralization, soil microbial biomass (SMB) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content and its nature. Under AF conditions, the application of compost produced an increase in the dissipation of the herbicide (up to 12.4%). It was related with the higher DOC content, 4 times higher than under OU conditions. Though increases in carbon turnover (under AF and OU conditions) and reduction of SMBC after herbicide application (only under AF conditions) were observed, the differences were not statistically significant. The application of this organic amendment is presented as an efficient management strategy to increase C turnover in agricultural soils and reduce some of the negative effects derived from the application of azimsulfuron under flooded conditions.

  16. Dynamic interplay between microbial denitrification and antibiotic resistance under enhanced anoxic denitrification condition in soil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingming; Ye, Mao; Liu, Kuan; Schwab, Arthur P; Liu, Manqiang; Jiao, Jiaguo; Feng, Yanfang; Wan, Jinzhong; Tian, Da; Wu, Jun; Li, Huixin; Hu, Feng; Jiang, Xin

    2017-03-01

    Mixed contamination of nitrate and antibiotics/antibiotic-resistant genes (ARGs) is an emerging environmental risk to farmland soil. This is the first study to explore the role of excessive anthropogenic nitrate input in the anoxic dissipation of soil antibiotic/ARGs. During the initial 10 days of incubation, the presence of soil antibiotics significantly inhibited NO3(-) dissipation, N2O production rate, and denitrifying genes (DNGs) abundance in soil (p < 0.05). Between days 10 and 30, by contrast, enhanced denitrification clearly prompted the decline in antibiotic contents and ARG abundance. Significantly negative correlations were detected between DNGs and ARGs, suggesting that the higher the DNG activity, the more dramatic is the denitrification and the greater are the antibiotic dissipation and ARG abundance. This study provides crucial knowledge for understanding the mutual interaction between soil DNGs and ARGs in the enhanced anoxic denitrification condition.

  17. Sensing technologies to measure metabolic activities in soil and assess its health conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cesare, Fabrizio; Macagnano, Antonella

    2013-04-01

    Soil is a complex ecosystem comprised of several and mutually interacting components, both abiotic (organo-mineral associations) and biotic (microbial and pedofaunal populations and plants), where a single parameter depends on other factors and affects the same and other factors, so that a network of influences among organisms coexists with the reciprocal actions between organisms and their environment. Therefore, it is difficult to undoubtedly determine what is the cause and what the effect within relationships between factors and processes. Soil is commonly studied through the evaluation and measurement of single parameters (e.g. the content of soil organic matter (SOM), microbial biomass, enzyme activities, pH, etc.), events (e.g. soil erosion, compaction, etc.) and processes (e.g. soil respiration, carbon fluxes, nitrification/denitrification, etc.), often carried out in laboratory conditions in order to limit the number of factors acting within the ecosystem under study, but missing the information about the global soil environment that way. In the last decade, several scientists have proposed and suggested the need for a holistic approach to soil ecosystems in different contexts. Recently, we have applied a sensing system developed in the last decades and capable of analysing complex mixtures of gases and volatiles (odours or aromas) in atmospheres, namely called electronic nose (EN). Typically, ENs are devices consisting of an array of differentially and partially specific, despite selective, sensors upon diverse coatings of sensitive films, i.e. interacting with single analytes of the same chemical class, despite not highly specific for a single substance, only, but showing also lower extent of cross-selectivity towards compounds of other chemical classes. ENs can be used in the classifications of odours by processing the collected responses of all sensors in the array through pattern recognition analyses, in order to obtain a chemical fingerprint

  18. Lignin decomposition and microbial community in paddy soils: effects of alternating redox conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerli, Chiara; Liu, Qin; Hanke, Alexander; Kaiser, Klaus; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    Paddy soils are characterised by interchanging cycles of anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Such fluctuations cause continuous changes in soil solution chemistry as well as in the composition and physiological responses of the microbial community. Temporary deficiency in oxygen creates conditions favourable to facultative or obligates anaerobic bacteria, while aerobic communities can thrive in the period of water absence. These alterations can strongly affect soil processes, in particular organic matter (OM) accumulation and mineralization. In submerged soils, lignin generally constitutes a major portion of the total OM because of hampered degradation under anoxic conditions. The alternating redox cycles resulting from paddy soil management might promote both degradation and preservation of lignin, affecting the overall composition and reactivity of total and dissolved OM. We sampled soils subjected to cycles of anoxic (rice growing period) and oxic (harvest and growth of other crops) conditions since 700 and 2000 years. We incubated suspended Ap material, sampled from the two paddy plus two corresponding non-paddy control soils under oxic and anoxic condition, for 3 months, interrupted by a short period of three weeks (from day 21 to day 43) with reversed redox conditions. At each sampling time (day 2, 21, 42, 63, 84), we determined lignin-derived phenols (by CuO oxidation) as well as phospholipids fatty acids contents and composition. We aimed to highlight changes in lignin decomposition as related to the potential rapid changes in microbial community composition. Since the studied paddy soils had a long history of wet rice cultivation, the microbial community should be well adapted to interchanging oxic and anoxic cycles, therefore fully expressing its activity at both conditions. In non-paddy soil changes in redox conditions caused modification of quantity and composition of the microbial community. On the contrary, in well-established paddy soils the microbial

  19. Rates of Root and Organism Growth, Soil Conditions, and Temporal and Spatial Development of the Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    WATT, MICHELLE; SILK, WENDY K.; PASSIOURA, JOHN B.

    2006-01-01

    • Background Roots growing in soil encounter physical, chemical and biological environments that influence their rhizospheres and affect plant growth. Exudates from roots can stimulate or inhibit soil organisms that may release nutrients, infect the root, or modify plant growth via signals. These rhizosphere processes are poorly understood in field conditions. • Scope and Aims We characterize roots and their rhizospheres and rates of growth in units of distance and time so that interactions with soil organisms can be better understood in field conditions. We review: (1) distances between components of the soil, including dead roots remnant from previous plants, and the distances between new roots, their rhizospheres and soil components; (2) characteristic times (distance2/diffusivity) for solutes to travel distances between roots and responsive soil organisms; (3) rates of movement and growth of soil organisms; (4) rates of extension of roots, and how these relate to the rates of anatomical and biochemical ageing of root tissues and the development of the rhizosphere within the soil profile; and (5) numbers of micro-organisms in the rhizosphere and the dependence on the site of attachment to the growing tip. We consider temporal and spatial variation within the rhizosphere to understand the distribution of bacteria and fungi on roots in hard, unploughed soil, and the activities of organisms in the overlapping rhizospheres of living and dead roots clustered in gaps in most field soils. • Conclusions Rhizosphere distances, characteristic times for solute diffusion, and rates of root and organism growth must be considered to understand rhizosphere development. Many values used in our analysis were estimates. The paucity of reliable data underlines the rudimentary state of our knowledge of root–organism interactions in the field. PMID:16551700

  20. Chemical conditioning of electrode reservoirs during electrokinetic soil flushing of Pb-contaminated silt loam

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B.E.; Berg, M.T.; Hatfield, J.H.; Thompson, J.C.

    1995-11-01

    The in-situ remediation of a lead-contaminated soil (silt loam, K{sub H} = 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm/s, soil Pb = 1,000 mg/kg) by electrokinetic (EK) soil flushing [60 V (DC)] was studied. Research focused on the chemical conditioning of the electrode reservoirs with either 500 {micro}S/cm (as NaNO{sub 3}, baseline behavior), acetic acid (HAc), HCl, or EDTA. For baseline tests there were significant amounts of lead transported through the soil, but the Pb precipitated or was readsorbed on the soil adjacent to the cathode because of the high soil pH in that region. The addition of 1 M HAc to the cathode reservoir prevented the formation of the basic conditions in the soil, and about 65% of the Pb was transported into the cathode. When HCl was added to the anode and HAc was added to the cathode, more than 75% of the lead resided in the cathode. Pb removals in the EDTA experiments were greater than those observed in the baseline experiments and were similar to those observed in the HCl-HAc experiments. A low anode reservoir pH resulting from a high current was the most likely reason.

  1. IT-based soil quality evaluation for agroecologically smart land-use planning in RF conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Activated in the first decades of XXI century global climate, economy and farming changes sharply actualized novel IT-based approaches in soil quality evaluation to address modern agricultural issues with agroecologically smart land-use planning. Despite global projected climate changes will affect a general decline of crop yields (IPCC 2014), RF boreal and subboreal regions will benefit from predicted and already particularly verified temperature warming and increased precipitation (Valentini, Vasenev, 2015) due to essential increasing of growing season length and mild climate conditions favorable for most prospective crops and best available agrotechnologies. However, the essential spatial heterogeneity is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central European region of Russia which is one of the biggest «food baskets» in RF. In these conditions potentially favorable climate circumstances will increase not only soil fertility and workability features but also their dynamics and spatial variability that determine crucial issues of IT-based soil quality evaluation systems development and agroecologically smart farming planning. Developed and verified within the LAMP project (RF Governmental projects #11.G34.31.0079 and #14.120.14.4266) regionally adapted DSS (ACORD-R - RF #2012612944) gives effective informational and methodological support for smart farming agroecological optimization in global climate and farming changes challenges. Information basis for agroecologically smart land-use planning consists of crops and agrotechnologies requirements, regional and local systems of agroecological zoning, local landscape and soil cover patterns, land quality and degradation risk assessments, current and previous farming practices results, agroclimatic predictions and production agroecological models, environmental limitations and planned profitability, fertilizing efficiency DSS ACORD-R. Smart land-use practice refers to sustainable balance

  2. Contributions of groundwater conditions to soil and water salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Ramsis B.; Otto, Claus J.; Fitzpatrick, Robert W.

    Salinization is the process whereby the concentration of dissolved salts in water and soil is increased due to natural or human-induced processes. Water is lost through one or any combination of four main mechanisms: evaporation, evapotranspiration, hydrolysis, and leakage between aquifers. Salinity increases from catchment divides to the valley floors and in the direction of groundwater flow. Salinization is explained by two main chemical models developed by the authors: weathering and deposition. These models are in agreement with the weathering and depositional geological processes that have formed soils and overburden in the catchments. Five soil-change processes in arid and semi-arid climates are associated with waterlogging and water. In all represented cases, groundwater is the main geological agent for transmitting, accumulating, and discharging salt. At a small catchment scale in South and Western Australia, water is lost through evapotranspiration and hydrolysis. Saline groundwater flows along the beds of the streams and is accumulated in paleochannels, which act as a salt repository, and finally discharges in lakes, where most of the saline groundwater is concentrated. In the hummocky terrains of the Northern Great Plains Region, Canada and USA, the localized recharge and discharge scenarios cause salinization to occur mainly in depressions, in conjunction with the formation of saline soils and seepages. On a regional scale within closed basins, this process can create playas or saline lakes. In the continental aquifers of the rift basins of Sudan, salinity increases along the groundwater flow path and forms a saline zone at the distal end. The saline zone in each rift forms a closed ridge, which coincides with the closed trough of the groundwater-level map. The saline body or bodies were formed by evaporation coupled with alkaline-earth carbonate precipitation and dissolution of capillary salts. Résumé La salinisation est le processus par lequel la

  3. Effects of activated sludge on the degradation of chlorate in soils under varying environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunxiao; Li, Huashou; Lin, Chuxia

    2009-03-15

    Incubation experiments were conducted to examine the effects of activated sludge on degradation of chlorate in soils. The results show that application of activated sludge could significantly promote the decomposition of soil chlorate though the degradation rate of chlorate did not necessarily increase with increasing application rate of the sludge. The effectiveness of activated sludge on soil chlorate degradation was significantly affected by temperature, moisture content and pH. There is a tendency that the rate of chlorate decomposition increased with increasing temperature and moisture content until optimal values of temperature and moisture content were reached. This can be attributed to the enhanced activity of chlorate-reducing microorganisms in hot and more reducing soil conditions. Soil pH also had important controls on the decomposition of chlorate. The experimental results demonstrate that neutral pH more favoured the degradation of soil chlorate, compared to either acidic or alkaline pH. While soil organic matter content could affect chlorate decomposition, its impact on the effectiveness of activated sludge on chlorate degradation was minor. This study has implications for developing cost-effective techniques for remediating chlorate-contaminated soils, particularly in the longan-producing countries.

  4. Stereoselective transformation of triadimefon to metabolite triadimenol in wheat and soil under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongwu; Li, Li; Qiu, Jing; Li, Wei; Yang, Shuming; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Qiu, Lihong

    2013-09-15

    Racemic triadimefon (TF) was applied to wheat and soil at three sites (Beijing, Huaibei, and Zhengzhou in China) under open field conditions. Its enantioselective degradation and stereoselective transformation to the major metabolite, triadimenol (TN), in wheat straw, grain and soil were investigated. At all sites, the degradation of TF enantiomers in straw and soil followed first-order kinetics. In soil from Beijing and Zhengzhou R-(-)-TF was preferentially degraded; however, preferential enantioselective degradations were not recorded in soil from Huaibei or in the straw from all sites. There were noticeable differences in the stereoselective formation of TN stereoisomers in all straw and soil samples. TN diastereomer A with high animal toxicity was preferentially produced via a reductive reaction in straw. In contrast, diastereomer B, was preferential in soil across the experimental period. Different TN concentrations were found in the order of SR-(-)-TN>RR-(+)-TN>RS-(+)-TN>SS-(-)-TN in straw, and RR-(+)-TN>SS-(-)-TN>SR-(-)-TN>RS-(+)-TN in soil. Neither TF nor TN was found in wheat grain at harvest. Because of differences in degradation, formation, and toxicity, the characterization of enantiomers and stereoisomers in this study contributes toward comprehensively assessing the fate and risk of chiral agrochemicals in the environment and food.

  5. Foliar photochemical processes and carbon metabolism under favourable and adverse winter conditions in a Mediterranean mixed forest, Catalonia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, D.; Chang, C. T.; Peñuelas, J.; Gracia, C.; Sabaté, S.

    2014-06-01

    Evergreen trees in the Mediterranean region must cope with a wide range of environmental stresses from summer drought to winter cold. The mildness of Mediterranean winters can periodically lead to favourable environmental conditions above the threshold for a positive carbon balance, benefitting evergreen woody species more than deciduous ones. The comparatively lower solar energy input in winter decreases the foliar light saturation point. This leads to a higher susceptibility to photoinhibitory stress especially when chilly (< 12 °C) or freezing temperatures (< 0 °C) coincide with clear skies and relatively high solar irradiances. Nonetheless, the advantage of evergreen species that are able to photosynthesize all year round where a significant fraction can be attributed to winter months, compensates for the lower carbon uptake during spring and summer in comparison to deciduous species. We investigated the ecophysiological behaviour of three co-occurring mature evergreen tree species (Quercus ilex L., Pinus halepensis Mill., and Arbutus unedo L.) during a period of mild winter conditions and their responses to a sudden cold period. The state of the photosynthetic machinery in both periods was thus tested by estimating the foliar photosynthetic potential with CO2 response curves in parallel with chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. The studied evergreen tree species benefited strongly from mild winter conditions by exhibiting extraordinarily high photosynthetic potentials similar to those under spring conditions. A sudden period of frost, however, negatively affected the photosynthetic apparatus, leading to significant decreases in key physiological parameters such as the maximum carboxylation velocity (Vc, max), the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (Jmax), and the optimal fluorometric quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm). This change persisted for several weeks after the cold period despite the recovery of the temperature to the conditions

  6. Agricultural machineries wheeling and soil qualities mapping in climatic changes conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergonzoli, S.; Servadio, P.

    2012-04-01

    and on control areas, a software GIS was used. Results shown the highest level of soil compaction caused by the traffic of WTN in term of CI and SS. In fact, increment ratio respect to the control measured after the tractors pass were: CI = 0.65 and 0.14 for WTN and for WTEL respectively; SS = 0.65 and 0.46 for WTN and WTEL respectively. Comparing the two different tires, significant differences were found particularly in the surface layers (0-0.20 m depth): mean values of CI and SS were higher for WTN (0.47 and 1.60 respectively) respect to WTEL. Track area covered by the two treatments respect to the whole field (16.32 ha) were: 0.025 for treatment WTN (0.27 m tires width) having an operative work width of 24 m ; 0.075 for treatment WTEL (0.85 m tires width) having an operative work width of 14 m. Results of this study highlighted that, in these field conditions (clay soil, water content over field capacity), tractor pass with very narrow tires caused a soil compaction level too high up to be impossible to traffic into the field. To operate at these soil water content conditions a tractors fitted with low aspect ratio and low inflation pressure tires is necessary. With lower soil water content, narrow tires allow carrying out fertilization into the inter-row avoiding crop trampling and compacting less percentage of field area respect to the a tractor equipped with large tires. Key words: Tractor, Soil trafficability, Soil compaction, Tires, GPS, GIS. Acknowledgements This work was carried out under the auspices of the special project "Sceneries of adaptation of the Italian agriculture to the climatic changes" (AGROSCENARI) of the Agricultural Research Council, and Italian Ministry of the Agricultural and Forestry Politics.

  7. Foliar photochemical processes and carbon metabolism under favourable and adverse winter conditions in a Mediterranean mixed forest, Catalonia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, D.; Chang, C. T.; Peñuelas, J.; Gracia, C.; Sabaté, S.

    2014-10-01

    Evergreen trees in the Mediterranean region must cope with a wide range of environmental stresses from summer drought to winter cold. The mildness of Mediterranean winters can periodically lead to favourable environmental conditions above the threshold for a positive carbon balance, benefitting evergreen woody species more than deciduous ones. The comparatively lower solar energy input in winter decreases the foliar light saturation point. This leads to a higher susceptibility to photoinhibitory stress especially when chilly (< 12 °C) or freezing temperatures (< 0 °C) coincide with clear skies and relatively high solar irradiances. Nonetheless, the advantage of evergreen species that are able to photosynthesize all year round where a significant fraction can be attributed to winter months, compensates for the lower carbon uptake during spring and summer in comparison to deciduous species. We investigated the ecophysiological behaviour of three co-occurring mature evergreen tree species (Quercus ilex L., Pinus halepensis Mill., and Arbutus unedo L.). Therefore, we collected twigs from the field during a period of mild winter conditions and after a sudden cold period. After both periods, the state of the photosynthetic machinery was tested in the laboratory by estimating the foliar photosynthetic potential with CO2 response curves in parallel with chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. The studied evergreen tree species benefited strongly from mild winter conditions by exhibiting extraordinarily high photosynthetic potentials. A sudden period of frost, however, negatively affected the photosynthetic apparatus, leading to significant decreases in key physiological parameters such as the maximum carboxylation velocity (Vc, max), the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (Jmax), and the optimal fluorometric quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm). The responses of Vc, max and Jmax were highly species specific, with Q. ilex exhibiting the highest and P

  8. Experimental Investigation of Soil and Atmospheric Conditions on the Momentum, Mass, and Thermal Boundary Layers Above the Land Atmosphere Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautz, A.; Smits, K. M.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Schulte, P.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impacts of soil conditions (i.e. soil type, saturation) and atmospheric forcings (i.e. velocity, temperature, relative humidity) on the momentum, mass, and temperature boundary layers. The atmospheric conditions tested represent those typically found in semi-arid and arid climates and the soil conditions simulate the three stages of evaporation. The data generated will help identify the importance of different soil conditions and atmospheric forcings with respect to land-atmospheric interactions which will have direct implications on future numerical studies investigating the effects of turbulent air flow on evaporation. The experimental datasets generated for this study were performed using a unique climate controlled closed-circuit wind tunnel/porous media facility located at the Center for Experimental Study of Subsurface Environmental Processes (CESEP) at the Colorado School of Mines. The test apparatus consisting of a 7.3 m long porous media tank and wind tunnel, were outfitted with a sensor network to carefully measure wind velocity, air and soil temperature, relative humidity, soil moisture, and soil air pressure. Boundary layer measurements were made between the heights of 2 and 500 mm above the soil tank under constant conditions (i.e. wind velocity, temperature, relative humidity). The soil conditions (e.g. soil type, soil moisture) were varied between datasets to analyze their impact on the boundary layers. Experimental results show that the momentum boundary layer is very sensitive to the applied atmospheric conditions and soil conditions to a much less extent. Increases in velocity above porous media leads to momentum boundary layer thinning and closely reflect classical flat plate theory. The mass and thermal boundary layers are directly dependent on both atmospheric and soil conditions. Air pressure within the soil is independent of atmospheric temperature and relative humidity - wind velocity and soil

  9. How do soil physical conditions for crop growth vary over time under established contrasting tillage regimes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallett, Paul; Stobart, Ron; Valentine, Tracy; George, Timothy; Morris, Nathan; Newton, Adrian; McKenzie, Blair

    2014-05-01

    When plant breeders develop modern cereal varieties for the sustainable intensification of agriculture, insufficient thought is given to the impact of tillage on soil physical conditions for crop production. In earlier work, we demonstrated that barley varieties that perform best in ploughed soil (the approach traditionally used for breeding trials) were not the same as those performing best under shallow non-inversion or zero-tillage. We also found that the Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) associated with improved phosphorus uptake, and hence useful for marker assisted breeding, were not robust between different tillage regimes. The impact of the soil environment had greater impact than the genetics in GxE interactions. It is obvious that soil tillage should be considered when breeding the next generation of crops. Tillage may also have important impacts on carbon storage, but we found that despite greater soil carbon at shallow depths under non-inversion tillage, the carbon stored throughout the soil profile was not affected by tillage. Studies on soil tillage impacts to crop productivity and soil quality are often performed in one season, on single sites that have had insufficient time to develop. Our current research explores multiple sites, on different soils, with temporal measurements of soil physical conditions under contrasting tillage regimes. We use the oldest established contemporary tillage experiments in the United Kingdom, with all sites sharing ploughed and shallow (7cm) non-inversion tillage treatments. In eastern Scotland (Mid Pilmore), the site also has zero tillage and deep ploughing (40 cm) treatments, and was established 11 years ago. In east England there are two sites, both also having a deep non-inversion tillage treatment, and they were established 6 (New Farm Systems) and 8 (STAR) years ago. We measure a range of crop and soil properties at sowing, one month after sowing and post-harvest, including rapid lab based assays that allow high

  10. Modeling the effect of adverse environmental conditions and clothing on temperature rise in a human body exposed to radio frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Moore, Stephen M; McIntosh, Robert L; Iskra, Steve; Wood, Andrew W

    2015-02-01

    This study considers the computationally determined thermal profile of a fully clothed, finely discretized, heterogeneous human body model, subject to the maximum allowable reference level for a 1-GHz radio frequency electromagnetic field for a worker, and also subject to adverse environmental conditions, including high humidity and high ambient temperature. An initial observation is that while electromagnetic fields at the occupational safety limit will contribute an additional thermal load to the tissues, and subsequently, cause an elevated temperature, the magnitude of this effect is far outweighed by that due to the conditions including the ambient temperature, relative humidity, and the type of clothing worn. It is envisaged that the computational modeling approach outlined in this paper will be suitably modified in future studies to evaluate the thermal response of a body at elevated metabolic rates, and for different body shapes and sizes including children and pregnant women.

  11. Effects of climatic conditions and soil properties on Cabernet Sauvignon berry growth and anthocyanin profiles.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guo; He, Yan-Nan; Yue, Tai-Xin; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Zhen-Wen

    2014-09-02

    Climatic conditions and soil type have significant influence on grape ripening and wine quality. The reported study was conducted in two "Cabernet Sauvignon (Vitis vinifera L.V)" vineyards located in Xinjiang, a semiarid wine-producing region of China during two vintages (2011 and 2012). The results indicate that soil and climate affected berry growth and anthocyanin profiles. These two localities were within a distance of 5 km from each other and had soils of different physical and chemical composition. For each vineyard, the differences of anthocyanin concentrations, and parameters concerning berry growth and composition between the two years could be explained by different climatic conditions. Soil effect was studied by investigation of differences in berry composition and anthocyanin profiles between the two vineyards in the same year, which could be explained mainly by the different soil properties, vine water and nitrogen status. Specifically, the soils with less water and organic matter produced looser clusters, heavier berry skins and higher TSS, which contributed to the excellent performance of grapes. Compared with 2011, the increases in anthocyanin concentrations for each vineyard in 2012 could be attributed to smaller number of extreme temperature (>35 °C) days and rainfall, lower vine water status and N level. The explanation for higher anthocyanin concentrations in grape skins from the soils with less water and organic matter could be the vine status differences, lighter berry weight and heavier skin weight at harvest. In particular, grapes from the soils with less water and organic matter had higher levels of 3'5'-substituded, O-methylated and acylated anthocyanins, which represented a positive characteristic conferring more stable pigmentation to the corresponding wine in the future. The present work clarifies the effects of climate and soil on berry growth and anthocyanin profiles, thus providing guidance for production of high-quality wine grapes

  12. [Leaching Remediation of Copper and Lead Contaminated Lou Soil by Saponin Under Different Conditions].

    PubMed

    Deng, Hong-xia; Yang, Ya-li; Li, Zhen; Xu, Yan; Li, Rong-hua; Meng, Zhao-fu; Yang, Ya-ti

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the leaching remediation effect of the eco-friendly biosurfactant saponin for Cu and Pb in contaminated Lou soil, batch tests method was used to study the leaching effect of saponin solution on single Cu, Pb contaminated Lou soil and mixed Cu and Pb contaminated Lou soil under different conditions such as reaction time, mass concentration of saponin, pH, concentration of background electrolyte and leaching times. The results showed that the maximum leaching removal effect of Cu and Pb in contaminated Lou soil was achieved by complexation of the heavy metals with saponin micelle, when the mass concentration of saponin solution was 50 g x L(-1), pH was 5.0, the reaction time was 240 min, and there was no background electrolyte. In single and mixed contaminated Lou soil, the leaching percentages of Cu were 29.02% and 25.09% after a single leaching with 50 g x L(-1) saponin under optimal condition, while the single leaching percentages of Pb were 31.56% and 28.03%, respectively. The result indicated the removal efficiency of Pb was more significant than that of Cu. After 4 times of leaching, the cumulative leaching percentages of Cu reached 58.92% and 53.11%, while the cumulative leaching percentages of Pb reached 77.69% and 65.32% for single and mixed contaminated Lou soil, respectively. The fractionation results of heavy metals in soil before and after a single leaching showed that the contents of adsorbed and exchangeable Cu and Pb increased in the contaminated soil, while the carbonate-bound, organic bound and sulfide residual Cu and Pb in the contaminated Lou soil could be effectively removed by saponin.

  13. Soil conditions moderate the effects of herbivores, but not mycorrhizae, on a native bunchgrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Brian M.; Orrock, John L.; Witter, Martha S.

    2016-11-01

    Herbivores, microbial mutualists, and soil nutrients can affect plant survival, growth, and reproduction, demographic parameters that are essential to plant restoration. In this study we ask: 1) whether native plants that form early associations with mycorrhizal fungi are more tolerant of mammalian grazers, and 2) how early plant associations with mycorrhizal fungi influence mammalian grazing across gradients in soil nutrients. In eight grassland sites in California (USA), we transplanted seedlings of a native bunchgrass, Stipa pulchra, that were or were not pretreated with mycorrhizal fungi in exclosures designed to exclude different guilds of vertebrate grazers. Pretreated plants had greater establishment eight months after transplantation than untreated plants. Mycorrhizal inoculation resulted in twofold greater biomass and fourfold greater seed production when plants were protected from herbivores; inoculation with mycorrhizae resulted in twofold greater biomass and seed production when plants were accessible by all herbivores. Soil phosphate and potassium concentrations influenced herbivory: vertebrate grazing had less effect on transplant biomass and seed production at sites with high phosphate - low potassium soils, but the effects of grazing were more severe in low phosphate - high potassium soils. Pretreatment with mycorrhizal fungi can result in greater survival, growth, and reproduction of transplanted seedlings of native bunchgrass S. pulchra. Our results also illustrate that soil conditions may influence the extent to which the vertebrate herbivore community limits restoration of S. pulchra: the effects of some small mammalian herbivores (e.g., voles) was little affected by soil conditions, but grazing by larger herbivores had a greater effect on S. pulchra performance at sites with low phosphate - high potassium soils. In helping identify the contribution of soil nutrients, herbivores, and mycorrhizae to establishment and performance, our work has

  14. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing to Detect Water Repellent Soil Conditions after Forest Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, S. A.; Robichaud, P. R.; Wu, J. Q.

    2002-12-01

    The burning of organic surface litter during forest fires often results in a water repellent soil layer at or near the soil surface. Organic matter is volatilized and a significant fraction moves into the upper soil layers (top 5 cm). Upon cooling, soil particles are coated with hydrophobic organic substances and the soil displays drastically reduced infiltration capabilities. The degree of water repellency is related to the amount of organic material on the surface prior to the fire, and the duration and temperature of the burn. Carbon compounds that are indicative of burned organic matter have been identified spectrally in soils under laboratory conditions. The 1000-2500 nm (near through short wave infrared) range is the span of the electromagnetic spectrum exhibiting significant adsorption for many organic compounds. Since burning alters surface organic matter and it is possible to detect such a change spectrally, a hyperspectral sensor should be able to provide information ultimately relating the change in organic matter to soil water repellency. This study aims to use a hyperspectral sensor to determine the degree of water repellency of surface soil in three burn classifications (low, moderate, and high) after a forest fire. One hundred eighty plots (sixty per burn class) were selected within the Hayman fire perimeter in southern Colorado in July 2002. A hand-held hyperspectral sensor was used to measure soil reflectance at several plots within each burn classification. An aerially- mounted hyperspectral sensor was also flown over the fire site. Twelve flight lines were flown to ensure contiguous coverage of the entire fire. The on-site ground truthing included both the Water Drop Penetration Time (WDPT) test and an infiltrometer test, with the former being a traditional method and the latter a new approach for testing water repellency. Both methods correlate the time to the start of infiltration with the degree of soil water repellency. The measured soil

  15. Microbial degradation of acenaphthene and naphthalene under denitrification conditions in soil-water systems.

    PubMed Central

    Mihelcic, J R; Luthy, R G

    1988-01-01

    This study examined the microbial degradation of acenaphthene and naphthalene under denitrification conditions at soil-to-water ratios of 1:25 and 1:50 with soil containing approximately 10(5) denitrifying organisms per g of soil. Under nitrate-excess conditions, both acenaphthene and naphthalene were degraded from initial aqueous-phase concentrations of about 1 and several mg/liter respectively, to nondetectable levels (less than 0.01 mg/liter) in less than 9 weeks. Acclimation periods of 12 to 36 days were observed prior to the onset of microbial degradation in tests with soil not previously exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, whereas acclimation periods were absent in tests with soil reserved from prior PAH degradation tests. It was judged that the apparent acclimation period resulted from the time required for a small population of organisms capable of PAH degradation to attain sufficient densities to exhibit detectable PAH reduction, rather than being a result of enzyme induction, mutation, or use of preferential substrate. About 0.9% of the naturally occurring soil organic carbon could be mineralized under denitrification conditions, and this accounted for the greater proportion of the nitrate depletion. Mineralization of the labile fraction of the soil organic carbon via microbial denitrification occurred without an observed acclimation period and was rapid compared with PAH degradation. Under nitrate-limiting conditions the PAH compounds were stable owing to the depletion of nitrate via the more rapid process of soil organic carbon mineralization. Soil sorption tests showed at the initiation of a test that the total mass of PAH compound was divided in comparable proportions between solute in the aqueous phase and solute sorbed on the solid phase. The microbial degradation of the PAH compound depends on the interrelationships between (i) the desorption kinetics and the reversibility of desorption of sorbed compound from the soil, (ii

  16. Selenium and sulfur relationships in alfalfa and soil under field conditions, San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Severson, R.C.; Gough, L.P.

    1992-01-01

    Relationships between total Se and S or soluble SeO4 and SO4 in soils and tissue concentrations in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), under field conditions in the San Joaquin Valley of California, suggest that the rate of accumulation of Se in alfalfa may be reduced in areas where high Se and S concentrations in soils were measured. These data suggest that the balance between carbonate and sulfate minerals in soil may have a greater influence on uptake of Se by alfalfa than does the balance of SeO4 and SO4 in soil solution. Soil and alfalfa were sampled from areas representing a wide range in soil Se and S concentrations. Specific sampling locations were selected based on a previous study of Se, S, and other elements where 721 soil samples were collected to map landscape variability and distribution of elements. Six multiple-linear regression equations were developed between total and/or soluble soil chemical constituents and tissue concentrations of Se in alfalfa. We chose a regression model that accounted for 72% of the variability in alfalfa Se concentrations based on an association of elements in soil (total C, S, Se, and Sr) determined by factor analysis. To prepare a map showing the spatial distribution of estimated alfalfa Se concentrations, the model was applied to the data from the previously collected 721 soil samples. Estimated alfalfa Se concentrations in most of the study area were within a range that is predicted to produce alfalfa with neither Se deficiency nor toxicity when consumed by livestock. A few small areas are predicted to produce alfalfa that potentially would not meet minimum dietary needs of livestock.

  17. Methane oxidation in landfill waste biocover soil: kinetics and sensitivity to ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Xia, Fang-Fang; Bai, Yun; Fang, Cheng-Ran; Shen, Dong-Sheng; He, Ruo

    2011-05-01

    Waste biocover soil was investigated as an alternative in regions with a shortage of landfill cover soil. In the work, effects of the composition, ambient conditions and nitrogen stress on CH(4) oxidation in waste biocover soil were studied. The results showed that the optimal composition of waste biocover soil as a landfill cover material for CH(4) oxidation was original pH value, 45% moisture and a particle size of ≤ 4mm. CH(4) oxidation rate increased rapidly over a CH(4) concentration range of 0.01-10% (v/v), and kept stable at CH(4) concentrations of 10-30% (v/v). The Michaelis-Menten model showed a good fit for the kinetic of CH(4) oxidation in landfill waste biocover soil with a maximum of 9.03 μmol/gd.w./h. The average Q(10) was 10.6 in the batch experiments. A level of 5% of oxygen concentration was enough to sustain the activity of methanotrophs community structure in waste biocover soil. Waste biocover soil had low baseline concentrations of NH(4)(+)-N and NO(3)(-)-N. Ammonia volatilization from landfills and nitrification in landfill waste biocover soils might stimulate CH(4) consumption at concentrations below 600 mg/kg. However, the contents of NH(4)(+)-N and NO(3)(-)-N above 1200 mg/kg would inhibit CH(4) oxidation in landfill waste biocover soil. Compared with NO(3)(-)-N, NH(4)(+)-N had a greater stimulating action as nutrient at lower concentrations and inhibitory effect at higher concentrations on CH(4) oxidation in landfill waste biocover soil.

  18. Multiplication of certain soil micro-organisms under simulated Martian conditions.

    PubMed

    Imshenetsky, A A; Kusjurina, L A; Jakshina, V M

    1970-01-01

    According to earlier observations, severe UV irradiation kills all micro-organisms in a chamber with simulated Martian conditions. However, even a thin soil layer protects buried micro-organisms from UV irradiation. The chief limiting factor for microbial multiplication under simulated Martian conditions seems to be soil humidity. Several micro-organisms were isolated from harsh environments (e.g., from Arctic, Antarctic desert and high-mountain soil samples). A strain of an oligonitrophilic mycococcus, isolated from Dixon Island, proved to be most resistant to low humidity. It multiplied in a mixture of limonite (maximal hygroscopical humidity 3.8%) + 2% (w/w) garden soil kept in a chamber simulating Martian conditions. Total cell count increased 7.6-fold and, in some experiments, 26-fold in 14 days. The oligonitrophilic mycococcus was able to grow even at a humidity level of 2.5%, that is less than maximal hygroscopical (3.8%). Under these conditions cell count increased 10-fold in 36 days. Thus, it was shown that even in Earth soils there are xerophytic micro-organisms which are able to multiply in limonite of low humidity. These data might correct our current concepts concerning microbial water requirements. One might speculate that Martian micro-organisms belong to xerophytic species.

  19. Risk of Adverse Health Outcomes & Decrements in Performance due to Inflight Medical Conditions: ExMC Pharmacy Research Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonsen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element of NASA's Human Research Program is charged with identifying medical capabilities that can address the challenges of prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease and injuries that could occur during exploration missions beyond Earth's orbit. Faced with the obstacle of access to in-flight medical care, and limitations of vehicle space, time, and communications; it is necessary to prioritize what medical consumables are manifested for the flight, and which medical conditions are addressed. Studies of astronaut health establish the incidence of common and high risk medical conditions that require medical intervention during long-duration exploration missions. In 2000, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened a committee of experts, Committee on Creating a Vision for Space Medicine during Travel beyond Earth Orbit, to examine the issues surrounding astronaut health and safety for long duration space missions. Two themes run throughout the committee's final report: (1) that not enough is known about the risks to human health during long-duration missions beyond Earth's orbit or about what can effectively mitigate those risks to enable humans to travel and work safely in the environment of deep space and (2) that everything reasonable should be done to gain the necessary information before humans are sent on missions of space exploration (IOM, 2001). Although several spaceflight focused pharmaceutical research studies have been conducted, few have provided sufficient data regarding medication usage or potency changes during spaceflight. The Du pharmaceutical stability study assessed medications flown on space shuttles to and from the International Space Station (ISS) from 2006 until 2008; of which some medications were still viable beyond their expiration dates (Du et al, 2011). However, as with many spaceflight studies, the small 'n' associated with this study limits the ability to draw strong conclusions from it

  20. Modeling soil evaporation efficiency in a range of soil and atmospheric conditions using a meta-analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, O.; Stefan, V. G.; Amazirh, A.; Chanzy, A.; Ceschia, E.; Er-Raki, S.; Gentine, P.; Tallec, T.; Ezzahar, J.; Bircher, S.; Beringer, J.; Khabba, S.

    2016-05-01

    A meta-analysis data-driven approach is developed to represent the soil evaporative efficiency (SEE) defined as the ratio of actual to potential soil evaporation. The new model is tested across a bare soil database composed of more than 30 sites around the world, a clay fraction range of 0.02-0.56, a sand fraction range of 0.05-0.92, and about 30,000 acquisition times. SEE is modeled using a soil resistance (rss) formulation based on surface soil moisture (θ) and two resistance parameters rss,ref and θefolding. The data-driven approach aims to express both parameters as a function of observable data including meteorological forcing, cut-off soil moisture value θ1/2 at which SEE=0.5, and first derivative of SEE at θ1/2, named Δθ1/2-1. An analytical relationship between >(rss,ref;θefolding) and >(θ1/2;Δθ1/2-1>) is first built by running a soil energy balance model for two extreme conditions with rss = 0 and rss˜∞ using meteorological forcing solely, and by approaching the middle point from the two (wet and dry) reference points. Two different methods are then investigated to estimate the pair >(θ1/2;Δθ1/2-1>) either from the time series of SEE and θ observations for a given site, or using the soil texture information for all sites. The first method is based on an algorithm specifically designed to accomodate for strongly nonlinear SEE>(θ>) relationships and potentially large random deviations of observed SEE from the mean observed SEE>(θ>). The second method parameterizes θ1/2 as a multi-linear regression of clay and sand percentages, and sets Δθ1/2-1 to a constant mean value for all sites. The new model significantly outperformed the evaporation modules of ISBA (Interaction Sol-Biosphère-Atmosphère), H-TESSEL (Hydrology-Tiled ECMWF Scheme for Surface Exchange over Land), and CLM (Community Land Model). It has potential for integration in various land-surface schemes, and real calibration capabilities using combined thermal and microwave

  1. Volatilization modeling of two herbicides from soil in a wind tunnel experiment under varying humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Martina; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2012-11-20

    Volatilization of pesticides from the bare soil surface is drastically reduced when the soil is under dry conditions (i.e., water content lower than the permanent wilting point). This effect is caused by the hydrated mineral surfaces that become available as additional sorption sites under dry conditions. However, established volatilization models do not explicitly consider the hydrated mineral surfaces as an independent sorption compartment and cannot correctly cover the moisture effect on volatilization. Here we integrated the existing mechanistic understanding of sorption of organic compounds to mineral surfaces and its dependence on the hydration status into a simple volatilization model. The resulting model was tested with reported experimental data for two herbicides from a wind tunnel experiment under various well-defined humidity conditions. The required equilibrium sorption coefficients of triallate and trifluralin to the mineral surfaces, K(min/air), at 60% relative humidity were fitted to experimental data and extrapolated to other humidity conditions. The model captures the general trend of the volatilization in different humidity scenarios. The results reveal that it is essential to have high quality input data for K(min/air), the available specific surface area (SSA), the penetration depth of the applied pesticide solution, and the humidity conditions in the soil. The model approach presented here in combination with an improved description of the humidity conditions under dry conditions can be integrated into existing volatilization models that already work well for humid conditions but still lack the mechanistically based description of the volatilization process under dry conditions.

  2. Prediction of soil and ground water contamination with fungicides of different classes according to soil and climate conditions in Ukrain and other European countries.

    PubMed

    Vavrinevych, O; Antonenko, A; Omelchuk, S; Korshun, M; Bardov, V

    2015-05-01

    It was established that most of tested pesticides are moderately and low persistent in soil and climatic conditions of Ukraine, but more stable in Western and Northern Europe countries due to peculiarities of their climate type and soil characteristics. In addition, it was determined that all studied fungicides pertain to non- and low mobile compound (except moderately mobile pyrimethanil). Recommendations on application of studied fungicides in soil and climatic conditions of Ukraine and other European countries were given.

  3. Fate of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) in Saturated Soil Under Various Redox Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, I.; Menahem, A.; Berkowitz, B.

    2014-12-01

    The growing use of PPCPs results in their increasing release to the aquatic environment. Consequently, understanding the fate of PPCPs under environmentally relevant conditions that account for dynamic flow and varying redox states is critical. In this study, the transport of two organometallic PPCPs, Gd-DTPA and Roxarsone (As complex) and their metal salts (Gd(NO3)3, AsNaO2), is investigated. The former is used widely as a contrasting agent for MRI, while the latter is applied extensively as a food additive in the broiler poultry industry. Both of these compounds are excreted from the body, almost unchanged chemically. Gadolinium complexes are not fully eliminated in wastewater treatment and can reach groundwater via irrigation with treated wastewater; Roxarsone can enter groundwater via leaching from manure used as fertilizer. Studies have shown that the transport of PPCPs in groundwater is affected by environmental conditions such as redox states, pH, and soil type. For this study, column experiments using sand or Mediterranean red sandy clay soil were performed under several redox conditions: aerobic, nitrate-reducing, iron-reducing, sulfate-reducing, methanogenic, and very strongly chemical reducing. Batch experiments to determine adsorption isotherms were also performed for the complexes and metal salts. We found that Gd-DTPA transport was affected by the soil type and was not affected by the redox conditions. In contrast, Roxarsone transport was affected mainly by the different redox conditions, showing delayed breakthrough curves as the conditions became more biologically reduced (strong chemical reducing conditions did not affect the transport). We also observed that the metal salts show essentially no transport while the organic complexes display much faster breakthrough. The results suggest that transport of these PPCPs through soil and groundwater is determined by the redox conditions, as well as by soil type and the form of the applied metal (as salt

  4. Leaching of oryzalin and diuron through undisturbed vineyard soil columns under outdoor conditions.

    PubMed

    Landry, David; Dousset, Sylvie; Andreux, Francis

    2006-03-01

    Field studies monitoring herbicide pollution in the vineyards of Burgundy (France) have revealed that drinking water reservoirs are contaminated with several pre-emergence herbicides. An assessment of the leaching of two such herbicides, diuron and oryzalin, was therefore performed using lysimeters, under outdoor conditions, from May 2001 to May 2002. Four vineyard soils from Vosne-Romanée (Burgundy) were chosen along a topolithosequence: a rendosol and three calcosols. After 673 mm of rainfall, greater amounts of diuron than oryzalin were measured in percolates: respectively 0.10-0.84% and 0.02-0.43% of applied herbicide, depending on soils. Measurements for diuron metabolites detected greater amounts of DCPMU than DCPU in the percolates: respectively 0.05-0.13% and 0-0.04% of the applied diuron. At the end of the monitoring period, more residues of diuron than oryzalin were recovered in the soil profiles: respectively 4.6-9% and 1.4-4.4%. The oryzalin residues were found mainly in the upper 10 cm of soil columns, whereas diuron residues were present in the whole core. The mobility of both oryzalin and diuron seems fairly well-related to soil organic carbon content; the mobility of diuron is also related to soil texture (sand and coarse material contents). Under such experimental conditions, this study confirms that diuron leaching, and therefore potential groundwater contamination, is greater than that of oryzalin.

  5. One-against-All Weighted Dynamic Time Warping for Language-Independent and Speaker-Dependent Speech Recognition in Adverse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianglilan; Sun, Jiping; Luo, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Considering personal privacy and difficulty of obtaining training material for many seldom used English words and (often non-English) names, language-independent (LI) with lightweight speaker-dependent (SD) automatic speech recognition (ASR) is a promising option to solve the problem. The dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm is the state-of-the-art algorithm for small foot-print SD ASR applications with limited storage space and small vocabulary, such as voice dialing on mobile devices, menu-driven recognition, and voice control on vehicles and robotics. Even though we have successfully developed two fast and accurate DTW variations for clean speech data, speech recognition for adverse conditions is still a big challenge. In order to improve recognition accuracy in noisy environment and bad recording conditions such as too high or low volume, we introduce a novel one-against-all weighted DTW (OAWDTW). This method defines a one-against-all index (OAI) for each time frame of training data and applies the OAIs to the core DTW process. Given two speech signals, OAWDTW tunes their final alignment score by using OAI in the DTW process. Our method achieves better accuracies than DTW and merge-weighted DTW (MWDTW), as 6.97% relative reduction of error rate (RRER) compared with DTW and 15.91% RRER compared with MWDTW are observed in our extensive experiments on one representative SD dataset of four speakers' recordings. To the best of our knowledge, OAWDTW approach is the first weighted DTW specially designed for speech data in adverse conditions. PMID:24520317

  6. One-against-all weighted dynamic time warping for language-independent and speaker-dependent speech recognition in adverse conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianglilan; Sun, Jiping; Luo, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Considering personal privacy and difficulty of obtaining training material for many seldom used English words and (often non-English) names, language-independent (LI) with lightweight speaker-dependent (SD) automatic speech recognition (ASR) is a promising option to solve the problem. The dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm is the state-of-the-art algorithm for small foot-print SD ASR applications with limited storage space and small vocabulary, such as voice dialing on mobile devices, menu-driven recognition, and voice control on vehicles and robotics. Even though we have successfully developed two fast and accurate DTW variations for clean speech data, speech recognition for adverse conditions is still a big challenge. In order to improve recognition accuracy in noisy environment and bad recording conditions such as too high or low volume, we introduce a novel one-against-all weighted DTW (OAWDTW). This method defines a one-against-all index (OAI) for each time frame of training data and applies the OAIs to the core DTW process. Given two speech signals, OAWDTW tunes their final alignment score by using OAI in the DTW process. Our method achieves better accuracies than DTW and merge-weighted DTW (MWDTW), as 6.97% relative reduction of error rate (RRER) compared with DTW and 15.91% RRER compared with MWDTW are observed in our extensive experiments on one representative SD dataset of four speakers' recordings. To the best of our knowledge, OAWDTW approach is the first weighted DTW specially designed for speech data in adverse conditions.

  7. Soil texture and climatc conditions for biocrust growth limitation: a meta analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Thomas; Subbotina, Mariia

    2015-04-01

    Along with afforestation, attempts have been made to combat desertification by managing soil crusts, and is has been reported that recovery rates of biocrusts are dependent on many factors, including the type, severity, and extent of disturbance; structure of the vascular plant community; conditions of adjoining substrates; availability of inoculation material; and climate during and after disturbance (Belnap & Eldridge 2001). Because biological soil crusts are known to be more stable on and to prefer fine substrates (Belnap 2001), the question arises as to how successful crust management practices can be applied to coarser soil. In previous studies we observed similar crust biomasses on finer soils under arid and on coarser soils under temperate conditions. We hypothesized that the higher water holding capacity of finer substrates would favor crust development, and that the amount of silt and clay in the substrate that is required for enhanced crust development would vary with changes in climatic conditions. In a global meta study, climatic and soil texture threshold values promoting BSC growth were derived. While examining literature sources, it became evident that the amount of studies to be incorporated into this meta analysis was reversely related to the amount of common environmental parameters they share. We selected annual mean precipitaion, mean temperature and the amount of silt and clay as driving variables for crust growth. Response variable was the "relative crust biomass", which was computed per literature source as the ratio between each individual crust biomass value of the given study to the study maximum value reported. We distinguished lichen, green algal, cyanobacterial and moss crusts. To quantify threshold conditions at which crust biomass responded to differences in texture and climate, we (I) determined correlations between bioclimatic variables, (II) calculated linear models to determine the effect of typical climatic variables with soil

  8. Microhabitat Effects on N2O Emissions from Floodplain Soils under Controlled Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Martin; Lehmann, Moritz; Niklaus, Pascal; Frey, Beat; Kuhn, Thomas; Luster, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Semi-terrestrial soils such as floodplain soils are considered to be potential hotspots of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The quantitative assessment of N2O release from these hot spots under field conditions, and of the microbial pathways that underlie net N2O production (ammonium oxidation, nitrifier-denitrification, and denitrification) is challenging in the environment because of the high spatial and temporal variability. The production and consumption of N2O appears to be linked to the presence or absence of micro-niches, providing specific conditions that may be favorable to either of the microbial pathways that produce or consume N2O. The availability of oxygen, reactive organic carbon, and dissolved nitrogen substrates likely play key roles with regards to the net production of N2O. Previous field studies demonstrated, for example, that flooding can trigger "hot moments" of enhanced N2O emission through a close coupling of niches with high and low oxygen availabilities. Such microhabitat effects likely depend on soil aggregate formation, plant soil interactions in the rhizosphere and the degradation of organic matter accumulations. In order to assess how these factors can modulate N2O production and consumption under simulated flooding/drying conditions, we have set up a mesocosm experiment with model soils comprising various mixtures of N-rich floodplain soil aggregates (4000 - 250 µm representing large aggregates, or <250 µm representing small aggregates) and inert matrix material (glass beads of 150 - 250 µm size, or quartz sand of 2000 - 3200 µm size, respectively). Soils containing the different aggregate size groups were either planted with willow (Salix viminalis L.), mixed with leaf litter or left untreated. At several time points before, during and after a simulated flood event, we measure the net efflux rate of N2O. In addition, soil water content, redox potential as well as carbon and nitrogen substrate availability are monitored. In order to

  9. Fate and effect of imidacloprid on vermicompost-amended soils under dissimilar conditions: Risk for soil functions, structure, and bacterial abundance.

    PubMed

    Castillo Diaz, Jean Manuel; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Beguet, Jérèmie; Nogales, Rogelio; Romero, Esperanza

    2017-02-01

    The fate and impact of pesticide on soil depend partly on the agricultural practices, such as prior treatment with pesticide and/or organic amendments. As a means of determining how the previous soil conditions can affect the fate of imidacloprid (IMI) and its effect on soil functions, experiments were made with soil samples, double-amended or not with either vine-shoot (W) or olive cake (O) vermicompost or contaminated or not with IMI. These soil samples, incubated for 3months, were placed in two microcosms (M1 with the pre-amended soils and M2 with the pre-exposed soils), treated with IMI and amended with vermicomposts and then incubated for 3months. The IMI distribution on soil fractions, sorption processes, dissipation kinetics, and biochemical as well as genetic structure and bacterial abundance were determined to assess the fate and impact of IMI on the soil. The addition of W vermicompost to the soil reduced the IMI availability. The dissipation kinetic in soils from M1 and M2 followed, respectively, a single first-order and a double first-order in parallel models. The lowest IMI persistence corresponded to the soil from M2 amended with O-vermicompost with DT50 and DT90 values of 67d and 265d, while in the other soils 90% dissipation required >512d. The vermicomposts-amended contaminated soils increased the dehydrogenase activity by 2- and 4-fold respect the control soils. However, the urease activity decreased due to the IMI influence. The changes in the bacterial community in the contaminated soil amended with O-vermicompost during incubation were correlated with the dissipation rate constant of IMI, suggesting a better tolerance of microorganisms to IMI. Thus, in the soil contaminated with IMI, the amendment with the vermicompost from olive cake can mitigate the impact of this insecticide on soil functions and promote its depuration capability while minimizing environmental risks.

  10. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Cations in an Unsaturated Fractured Soil Under Transient Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Joseph

    2015-01-31

    Rainfall experiments were conducted using intact soil cores and an instrumented soil pedon to examine the effect of physical heterogeneity and rainfall characteristics on the mobilization of colloids, organic matter, cesium, and strontium in a fractured soil. To measure the spatial variability of infiltration of colloids and contaminants, samples were collected through a 19-port grid placed below the soil core in laboratory study and in 27 samplers at multiple depths in the soil pedon in the field study. Cesium and strontium were applied to the soil cores and the soil pedon prior to mobilization experiments. Rainwater solutions of multiple ionic strengths and organic matter concentrations were applied to the soil cores and soil pedon to mobilize in situ colloids, cesium, and strontium. The mobilization of colloids and metal cations occurred through preferential flow paths in the soil cores. Compared to steady rainfall, greater amounts of colloids were mobilized during rainfall interrupted by pauses, which indicates that the supply of colloids to be mobilized was replenished during the pauses. A maximum in the amount of mobilized colloids were mobilized during a rainfall following a pause of 2.5 d. Pauses of shorter or longer duration resulted in less colloid mobilization. Freeze-thaw cycles, a transient condition in winter, enhanced colloid mobilization and colloid-facilitated transport of cesium and strontium in the soil cores. The exchange of solutes between the soil matrix and macropores caused a hysteretic mobilization of colloids, cesium, and strontium during changes in ionic strength. Colloid-facilitated mobilization of cesium and strontium was important at low ionic strength in fractures where slow flow allowed greater exchange of flow between the fractures and the surrounding matrix. The release of cesium and strontium by cation exchange occurred at high ionic strength in fractures where there is a little exchange of pore water with the surrounding matrix

  11. Transport of gadolinium- and arsenic-based pharmaceuticals in saturated soil under various redox conditions.

    PubMed

    Menahem, Adi; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2016-02-01

    The release of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) to the soil-water environment necessitates understanding of PPCP transport behavior under conditions that account for dynamic flow and varying redox states. This study investigates the transport of two organometallic PPCPs, Gd-DTPA and roxarsone (arsenic compound) and their metal salts (Gd(NO3)3, AsNaO2); Gd-DTPA is used widely as a contrasting agent for MRI, while roxarsone is applied extensively as a food additive in the broiler poultry industry. Here, we present column experiments using sand and Mediterranean red sandy clay soil, performed under several redox conditions. The metal salts were almost completely immobile. In contrast, transport of Gd-DTPA and roxarsone was affected by the soil type. Roxarsone was also affected by the different redox conditions, showing delayed breakthrough curves as the redox potential became more negative due to biological activity (chemically-strong reducing conditions did not affect the transport). Mechanisms that include adsorptive retardation for aerobic and nitrate-reducing conditions, and non-adsorptive retardation for iron-reducing, sulfate-reducing and biologically-strong reducing conditions, are suggested to explain the roxarsone behavior. Gd-DTPA is found to be a stable complex, with potential for high mobility in groundwater systems, whereas roxarsone transport through groundwater systems is affected by redox environments, demonstrating high mobility under aerobic and nitrate-reducing conditions and delayed transport under iron-reducing, sulfate-reducing and biologically-strong reducing conditions.

  12. A coupled model of soil water-heat-solute movement under the mulched drip irrigation condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H.; Tian, F.; Gao, L.; Hu, H.

    2010-12-01

    : The mulched drip irrigation (MDI), first developed in northwestern part of China (Xinjiang Province) in the cotton field in 1996, can obtain higher yield while at the lower cost of water consumption and thus becomes popular rapidly. However, it has the potential risk of salinizing the arable soil. Also, plastic film can alter the energy balance at the ground surface and invoke the regime shifting of soil heat transfer. It is, therefore, necessary to simulate the inter-related movement of water, heat, and dissolvable solute in the soil under the MDI condition for the purpose of sustainable agricultural production as well as of climate change issue. With the different boundary condition and irrigation rate, the transportation and distribution features of water-heat-salt under the MDI condition are significantly different from those under the other irrigation methods. The existing tools such as HYDRUS and VS2DH(T) could not set up the special boundary condition relevant to MDI, e.g., the moving ponded area. A new two-dimensional numerical model of Richard’s equation and Convection-Dispersion equations was developed which coupled soil water, solute, and heat together. For the homogenous and isotropic porous media, the soil water-heat-solute movement under the MDI condition is considered as 2D problem. The Richards and solute convection-diffusive equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations (ODEs) through spatial semi-discretization, and so do the corresponding boundary conditions. The resultant ODEs are solved using a state-of-the-art solver, CVODE developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The model is validated against the numerical examples as well as the field data. The results show the high numerical efficiency, the high simulation accuracy, and the flexibility of the model to mimic changing boundary conditions. Key words: numerical model, Richard’s equation, Convection-Diffusive equation, CVODE

  13. Effects of transgenic Bt cotton on soil fertility and biology under field conditions in subtropical inceptisol.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raman Jeet; Ahlawat, I P S; Singh, Surender

    2013-01-01

    Although there is large-scale adoption of Bt cotton by the farmers because of immediate financial gain, there is concern that Bt crops release Bt toxins into the soil environment which reduces soil chemical and biological activities. However, the majorities of such studies were mainly performed under pot experiments, relatively little research has examined the direct and indirect effects of associated cover crop of peanut with fertilization by combined application of organic and inorganic sources of nitrogen under field conditions. We compared soil chemical and biological parameters of Bt cotton with pure crop of peanut to arrive on a valid conclusion. Significantly higher dehydrogenase enzyme activity and KMnO(4)-N content of soil were observed in Bt cotton with cover crop of peanut over pure Bt cotton followed by pure peanut at all the crop growth stages. However, higher microbial population was maintained by pure peanut over intercropped Bt cotton, but these differences were related to the presence of high amount of KMnO(4)-N content of soil. By growing cover crop of peanut between Bt cotton rows, bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes population increased by 60%, 14%, and 10%, respectively, over Bt cotton alone. Bt cotton fertilized by combined application of urea and farm yard manure (FYM) maintained higher dehydrogenase enzyme activity, KMnO(4)-N content of soil and microbial population over urea alone. Significant positive correlations were observed for dry matter accumulation, dehydrogenase enzyme activity, KMnO(4)-N content, and microbial population of soil of Bt cotton, which indicates no harmful effects of Bt cotton on soil biological parameters and associated cover crop. Our results suggest that inclusion of cover crop of peanut and FYM in Bt cotton enhanced soil chemical and biological parameters which can mask any negative effect of the Bt toxin on microbial activity and thus on enzymatic activities.

  14. Effect of femoral head size on the wear of metal on metal bearings in total hip replacements under adverse edge-loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Fisher, John; Williams, Sophie; Tipper, Joanne L; Jennings, Louise M

    2013-02-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings have shown low-wear rates under standard hip simulator conditions; however, retrieval studies have shown large variations in wear rates and mechanisms. High-wear in vivo has caused catastrophic complications and has been associated with steep cup-inclination angle (rotational malpositioning). However, increasing the cup-inclination angle in vitro has not replicated the increases in wear to the same extent as those observed in retrievals. Clinically relevant wear rates, patterns, and particles were observed in vitro for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings when microseparation (translational malpositioning) conditions were introduced into the gait cycle. In the present study, 28 and 36-mm MoM bearings were investigated under adverse conditions. Increasing the cup angle from 45° to 65° resulted in a significant increase in the wear rate of the 28 mm bearings. However, for the 36 mm bearings, head-rim contact did not occur under the steep cup-angle condition, and the wear rate did not increase. The introduction of microseparation to the gait cycle significantly increased the wear rate of the MoM bearings. Cup angle and head size did not influence the wear rate under microseparation conditions. This study indicated that high-in vivo wear rates were associated with edge loading due to rotational malpositioning such as high-cup-inclination angle and translational malpositioning that could occur due to several surgical factors. Translational malpositioning had a more dominant effect on the wear rate. Preclinical simulation testing should be undertaken with translational and rotational malpositioning conditions as well as standard walking cycle conditions defined by the ISO standard.

  15. Land agroecological quality assessment in conditions of high spatial soil cover variability at the Pereslavskoye Opolye.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morev, Dmitriy; Vasenev, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    The essential spatial variability is mutual feature for most natural and man-changed soils at the Central region of European territory of Russia. The original spatial heterogeneity of forest soils has been further complicated by a specific land-use history and human impacts. For demand-driven land-use planning and decision making the quantitative analysis and agroecological interpretation of representative soil cover spatial variability is an important and challenging task that receives increasing attention from private companies, governmental and environmental bodies. Pereslavskoye Opolye is traditionally actively used in agriculture due to dominated high-quality cultivated soddy-podzoluvisols which are relatively reached in organic matter (especially for conditions of the North part at the European territory of Russia). However, the soil cover patterns are often very complicated even within the field that significantly influences on crop yield variability and have to be considered in farming system development and land agroecological quality evaluation. The detailed investigations of soil regimes and mapping of the winter rye yield have been carried in conditions of two representative fields with slopes sharply contrasted both in aspects and degrees. Rye biological productivity and weed infestation have been measured in elementary plots of 0.25 m2 with the following analysis the quality of the yield. In the same plot soil temperature and moisture have been measured by portable devices. Soil sampling was provided from three upper layers by drilling. The results of ray yield detailed mapping shown high differences both in average values and within-field variability on different slopes. In case of low-gradient slope (field 1) there is variability of ray yield from 39.4 to 44.8 dt/ha. In case of expressed slope (field 2) the same species of winter rye grown with the same technology has essentially lower yield and within-field variability from 20 to 29.6 dt/ha. The

  16. Chromium Release from a COPR-Contaminated Soil at Varying Water Content and Redox Conditions.

    PubMed

    Matern, Katrin; Mansfeldt, Tim

    2016-07-01

    Many soils in the region of Kanpur, North India, are heavily affected by the leather industry and its upstream supplier sector, as indicated by elevated chromium (Cr) contents. Under reducing conditions-for instance, at water saturation after monsoon rain or flood irrigation-the dynamic and species distribution of Cr may be affected due to changes in redox potential (E). In this study, the influence of E on the speciation and release of Cr from a contaminated agricultural soil was investigated. A soil sample that was affected by hyperalkaline leachate from chromite ore processing residue, was taken and packed in soil columns, and subjected to a saturation-drainage-saturation cycle. After initial water saturation, the E dropped slowly to minimum values of around ‒100 mV (calculated to pH 7), while E was controlled by CrO/CrO(s), or CrO/(Fe,Cr)OOH redox couples. Soil drainage resulted in a quick return to oxidizing conditions; i.e., E > 300 mV. The Cr species distribution and release showed a clear trend with E. At the beginning of the experiment, under oxidizing and weakly reducing conditions (E range from >100 to 300 mV), Cr(VI) was released in particular. However, under moderately reducing conditions (E range from 100 to -100 mV), Cr was gradually immobilized and irreversible sequestered via reductive precipitation. The results presented in this study provide an improved understanding of the mobility of Cr(VI) in contaminated soils at varying water contents, which is essential for the evaluation of environmental risks in this region.

  17. Exploring transport dynamics of "new" and "old" tracers under varying hydrologic conditions in structured soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Joshua; Callaghan, Michael; Mikulic, Danijela; Cey, Edwin

    2016-04-01

    Fine-grained, structured soils are prone to preferential flow along macropores that can enhance vertical migration of surface applied contaminants ("new" solutes) due to water bypassing the soil matrix. This same bypass phenomenon can also inhibit the flushing of in situ salt or other contaminants ("old" solutes), thereby hampering reclamation of previously impacted soils. In all cases, mass exchange between the soil matrix and macropores is a significant control on water and solute movement in the soil profile. The dynamics of these mass exchange processes and the associated transport of both new and old tracers were studied in field- and core-scale experiments on low permeability, macroporous soils. A multi-year investigation of new (DFBA) and old (Cl) tracer transport was completed on two 20 x 20 m test plots within a tile-drained field. Irrigation water was applied to one test plot, while the second plot served as an unirrigated control. Detailed monitoring, including wells, lysimeters, tensiometers, soil cores, tile drains, and electrical resistivity tomography, revealed a comprehensive picture of the hydraulic system response and distribution of chemical tracers over multiple field seasons. A large difference in solute transport within and between seasons was attributed to temporally varying hydrologic (water table and soil moisture) conditions, despite similar total volumes of water application. Time-varying soil hydraulic properties and soil macropore saturation were believed to play a major role, and were explored in more detail with large, intact soil monolith experiments. Two paired-core infiltration experiments were completed using the same volumes of irrigation water, but different irrigation rates and durations. The migration of new (Br, I, and dye) and old (Cl) tracers was monitored throughout the experiments, and the final tracer distribution was characterized by destructive sampling at the conclusion of irrigation. The spatial and temporal

  18. Soil response to perennial herbaceous biofeedstocks under rainfed conditions in the northern Great Plains, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial herbaceous biofeedstocks (PHB) have been proposed to confer multiple ecosystem services to agricultural lands. However, the role of PHBs to affect change in soil condition is not well documented, particularly for treatments with multiple species. The objective of this study was to quanti...

  19. NATIONAL RESULTS FROM THE 2011 NATIONAL WETLAND CONDITION ASSESSMENT (NWCA) SOILS ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2011, US Environmental Protection Agency conducted the first National Wetland Condition Assessment (NWCA). Field crews conducted one-day surveys of over 1000 wetlands across the contiguous United States. For every wetland sampled, soils were collected by layer (i.e., horizon)...

  20. Bacillus spp. from rainforest soil promote plant growth under limited nitrogen conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of PGPR (Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria) isolated from rainforest on different plants under limited nitrogen conditions. Methods and Results: Bacterial isolates from a Peruvian rainforest soil were screened for plant growth promoting effects...

  1. Assessing the evolution of soil moisture and vegetation conditions during the 2012 United States flash drought

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examines the evolution of several model-based and satellite-derived drought metrics sensitive to soil moisture and vegetation conditions during the extreme flash drought event that impacted major agricultural areas across the central U.S. during 2012. Standardized anomalies from the remo...

  2. Flight in Adverse Environmental Condition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    to 0) exposed. llaysia A)OO. During MS approach in poor visibilityt thundeatorms and heavy rain Aircraft undershot And came to rest 1000 water * before...It calcul des avions I Is rafalt, tiles oot slot-s ith utillis Pour trotrwer dts vs~turs d"Intensiti do ratsle I PoatUt des bn. Devuls Son appart -ion...mean wind Is rather difficult. Using earth fixed sensors, a temporal *vraging Is performed for each measuring point. Out the question for the right

  3. Tree vegetation and waste amendments to improve the physical condition of copper mine soils.

    PubMed

    Asensio, V; Vega, F A; Andrade, M L; Covelo, E F

    2013-01-01

    Mine soils are often physically degraded, which hinders plants development. The untreated soils at the depleted copper mine in Touro (Galicia, north-west Spain) have no vegetation and are probably physically degraded. These mine soils were reclaimed both by planting trees and amending with waste (sewage sludge and paper mill residues). The purpose was to determine the effect of these treatments on the physical quality of the soils of the Touro mine under field conditions. We evaluated the physical situation of both the settling pond and the mine tailings in Touro, then comparing them with their respective treated areas: vegetated, amended or with both treatments at the same time. We corroborated that the physical degradation of untreated soils was considerable: low porosity, high density and less than 50% of water stable aggregates. The trees that were planted increased porosity, probably due to root activity. The added amendments increased the mean weight diameter (MWD), the percentage of water stable aggregates (WSA) and the stability index (SI) due to the high organic carbon content in the added wastes. We verified that using both treatments at the same time is better than using only one to improve the physical situation of mine soils.

  4. Observing soil water dynamics under two field conditions by a novel sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, W.; Sun, Y.; Schulze Lammers, P.; Schumann, H.; Berg, A.; Shi, C.; Wang, C.

    2011-10-01

    SummarySufficiently available soil water is a basic requirement in agricultural production. Monitoring soil water dynamics (SWD) in the root zone is an optimal approach for managing a crop's growth. This study presents a novel sensor system that simultaneously measures volumetric soil water content (VSWC), apparent electrical conductivity (EC a) and soil temperature at two different soil depths (shallow: 16 cm; deep: 36 cm). For testing its feasibility in the field, two prototypes were installed, one in bare soil and the other in a sugar beet ( Beta vulgaris L.) field in the summer of 2010. Following a sequence of rainfall events randomly distributed over the experimental period, we observed distinct responses from the sensors at each monitored depth in both field conditions. In addition to the multi-parameter measurements, the novel sensor design includes a series of technical advantages such as solar-powered operation, wireless communication, and being relatively easy to install/remove. Thus, the developed wireless sensor system is promising for networked applications in precision farming.

  5. Global Evaporation Estimates from SMAP Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrievals Using Conditional Sampling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreugdenhil, M.; Entekhabi, D.; Konings, A. G.; Salvucci, G.; Hogan, P.

    2015-12-01

    Evaporation links the water, energy and carbon cycles over land yet even its climatology on global scale is not observed. Tower-based flux measurements are sparse and do not cover diverse biomes and climates. In the last decades, many strategies to derive evaporation based on remote sensing measurements have been developed. However, these methods are dependent on a variety of assumptions and auxiliary data, making them more prone to error propagation. A more data-driven method was developed by Salvucci (2001), who found that under statistical stationary conditions the expected change in soil moisture storage is zero when conditioned to a certain storage for a certain time interval. Consequently, using the water balance, precipitation conditionally averaged to the soil moisture storage is equal to the total loss: evaporation and drainage. Using only soil moisture and precipitation data as model inputs reduces the sources of uncertainty. In this presentation we provide the first estimates of global evaporation from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive mission by applying the conditional sampling method to passive microwave soil moisture time series and in situ precipitation data. The obtained evaporation estimates show a good correspondence to measured evaporation from eddy correlation towers over selected field sites. Subsequently, a simple approach is developed to directly estimate evaporation from SMAP soil moisture data. This approach enables the investigation of dynamics in evaporation during the dry-down after storms. The timing of the transition between the different stages of evaporation is assessed for different climates especially the transition from stage 1 to stage 2 evaporation; atmosphere limited evaporation to soil limited evaporation respectively. Investigations into the dynamics of unstressed evaporation and transpiration and the transition from stage 1 to stage 2 evaporation increases our understanding of water stress and soil desiccation. It also

  6. Microbial inoculants and organic amendment improves plant establishment and soil rehabilitation under semiarid conditions.

    PubMed

    Mengual, Carmen; Schoebitz, Mauricio; Azcón, Rosario; Roldán, Antonio

    2014-02-15

    The re-establishment of autochthonous shrub species is an essential strategy for recovering degraded soils under semiarid Mediterranean conditions. A field assay was carried out to determine the combined effects of the inoculation with native rhizobacteria (Bacillus megaterium, Enterobacter sp, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus sp) and the addition of composted sugar beet (SB) residue on physicochemical soil properties and Lavandula dentata L. establishment. One year after planting, Bacillus sp. and B. megaterium + SB were the most effective treatments for increasing shoot dry biomass (by 5-fold with respect to control) and Enterobacter sp + SB was the most effective treatments for increasing dry root biomass. All the treatments evaluated significantly increased the foliar nutrient content (NPK) compared to control values (except B. thuringiensis + SB). The organic amendment had significantly increased available phosphorus content in rhizosphere soil by 29% respect to the control. Enterobacter sp combined with sugar beet residue improved total N content in soil (by 46% respect to the control) as well as microbiological and biochemical properties. The selection of the most efficient rhizobacteria strains and their combined effect with organic residue seems to be a critical point that drives the effectiveness of using these biotechnological tools for the revegetation and rehabilitation of degraded soils under semiarid conditions.

  7. Daytime and nighttime groundwater contributions to soils with different surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xuguang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Shi, Wenjuan

    2015-12-01

    Contributions of groundwater to the soil-water balance play an important role in areas with shallow water tables. The characteristics of daytime and nighttime water flux using non-weighing lysimeters were studied from June to September 2012 and 2013 in the extremely arid Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in northwestern China. The study consisted of nine treatments: three surface conditions, bare soil and cotton plants, each with water tables at depths of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 m; and plastic mulch with a water table at 1.5 m but with three percentages of open areas (POAs) in the plastic. The groundwater supply coefficient (SC) and the groundwater contribution (GC) generally varied with surface conditions. Both SC and GC decreased in the bare-soil and cotton treatments with increasing depth of the groundwater. Both SC and GC increased in the plastic-mulch treatment with increasing POA. Average nighttime GCs in the bare-soil treatments in July and August (the midsummer months) were 50.8-60.8 and 53.2-65.3 %, respectively, of the total daily contributions. Average nighttime GCs in the cotton treatments in July and August were 51.4-60.2 and 51.5-58.1 %, respectively, of the total daily contributions. The average GCs in June and September, however, were lower at night than during the daytime. Soil temperature may thus play a more important role than air temperature in the upflow of groundwater.

  8. Mosses influence phosphorus cycling in rich fens by driving redox conditions in shallow soils.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Katherine F; Bedford, Barbara L

    2011-09-01

    Mosses play an integral role in the hydrologic regimes of ecosystems where they cover the soil surface, and thus affect biogeochemical cycling of elements influenced by soil oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, including the plant growth-limiting nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus (P). In rich fens where P often limits plant growth, we hypothesized that feedbacks between mosses and redox conditions would determine P availability to shallow-rooted forb species that constitute much of these wetlands' unusually high plant species diversity. In a moss removal experiment in three fens, forb tissue P and microbial P were greater while anion exchange membrane (AEM) resin P was lower where mosses occurred than where they were removed, suggesting both higher availability and greater demand for P in moss-covered soils. Coupled physicochemical and biological mechanisms drove moss effects on P cycling, ultimately through effects on soil oxygenation or reduction: higher redox potential underlying mosses corresponded to greater microbial activity, phosphatase enzyme activity, and colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), all of which can promote greater P availability to plants. These more oxidized soils stimulated: (1) greater microbial activity and root vigor; (2) correspondingly greater P demand via microbial uptake, forb uptake, and iron (Fe)-P reactions; and (3) greater P supply through soil and root phosphatase activity and AMF colonization. This work demonstrates that mosses improve vascular plant P acquisition by alleviating stresses caused by reducing conditions that would otherwise prevail in shallow underlying soils, thus providing a mechanism by which mosses facilitate plant species diversity in rich fens.

  9. Antimony retention and release from drained and waterlogged shooting range soil under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Hockmann, Kerstin; Tandy, Susan; Lenz, Markus; Reiser, René; Conesa, Héctor M; Keller, Martin; Studer, Björn; Schulin, Rainer

    2015-09-01

    Many soils polluted by antimony (Sb) are subject to fluctuating waterlogging conditions; yet, little is known about how these affect the mobility of this toxic element under field conditions. Here, we compared Sb leaching from a calcareous shooting range soil under drained and waterlogged conditions using four large outdoor lysimeters. After monitoring the leachate samples taken at bi-weekly intervals for >1.5 years under drained conditions, two of the lysimeters were subjected to waterlogging with a water table fluctuating according to natural rainfall water infiltration. Antimony leachate concentrations under drained conditions showed a strong seasonal fluctuation between 110 μg L(-1) in summer and <40 μg L(-1) in winter, which closely correlated with fluctuations in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations. With the development of anaerobic conditions upon waterlogging, Sb in leachate decreased to 2-5 μg L(-1) Sb and remained stable at this level. Antimony speciation measurements in soil solution indicated that this decrease in Sb(V) concentrations was attributable to the reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) and the stronger sorption affinity of the latter to iron (Fe) (hydr)oxide phases. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering seasonal and waterlogging effects in the assessment of the risks from Sb-contaminated sites.

  10. [Effect of nitrogen nutrition on endogenous hormone content of maize under soil drought conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suiqi; Shan, Lun

    2003-09-01

    It is realized in recent years that roots play an important role in the control of shoot growth and development, not only because they can continuously provide the shoot with water and nutrients, but also because some chemical messengers are produced in roots to response soil drought stress and transported through transpiration stream to shoot where physiological processes are regulated. Extensive studies showed that the decrease of leaf conductance was closely related to the increase of xylem ABA concentration, suggesting that ABA can act as a water stress signal to regulate the physiological response of shoot. Fertilizer plays an important role in increasing crop yield and water use efficiency (WUE) on dry-land farming. It is not clear, however, whether the application of N fertilizer can affect the root's signal intensity in drought stress and thus regulate its stomatal responses. Experiment with 3 water levels (35%, 55% [symbol: see text] 75% +/- 5% of field capacity) and 2 N fertilizer levels (high N and low N) was designed to investigate the effect of soil drought and N nutrition on endogenous hormone concentration (ABA and ZRs) and stomatal conductivity of maize under potted conditions. The results showed that the application of N significantly increased the stomatal conductivity of maize leaf under both drought and watered conditions. Meanwhile, it markedly decreased the ABA concentration in root xylem sap, but increased ABA concentration in leaf of maize under soil drought conditions. The application of N decreased ZRs concentration in root xylem sap as well, which means that ZRs did not play a role in counteractive to ABA under soil drought conditions. The lower ABA concentration in root xylem sap of high N maize rather than the higher ABA concentration in maize leaf accounted for the higher stomatal conductivity of high N maize leaf under soil drought conditions.

  11. Temporal and spatial development of surface soil conditions at two created riverine marshes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christopher J; Mitsch, William J; Nairn, Robert W

    2005-01-01

    The amount of time it takes for created wetlands to develop soils comparable to natural wetlands is relatively unknown. Surface soil changes over time were evaluated in two created wetlands (approximately 1 ha each) at the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park in Columbus, Ohio. The two wetlands were constructed in 1993 to be identical in size and geomorphology, and maintained to have the same hydrology. The only initial difference between the wetlands was that one was planted with native macrophytes while the other was not. In May 2004, soil samples were collected (10 yr and 2 mo after the wetlands were flooded) and compared to samples collected in 1993 (after the wetlands were excavated but before flooding) and 1995 (18 mo after the wetlands were flooded). In all three years, soils were split into surface (0-8 cm) and subsurface (8-16 cm) depths and analyzed for soil organic matter, total C, total P, available P, exchangeable cations, and pH. Soils in the two wetlands have changed substantially through sedimentation and organic accretion. Between 1993 and 1995, soils were most influenced by the deposition of senescent macroalgae, the mobilization of soluble nutrients, and the precipitation of CaCO(3). Between 1995 and 2004, soil parameters were influenced more by the deposition of organic matter from colonized macrophyte communities. Mean percent organic matter at the surface increased from 5.3 +/- 0.1% in 1993, 6.1 +/- 0.2% in 1995, to 9.5 +/- 0.2% in 2004. Mean total P increased from 493 +/- 18 microg g(-1) in 1993, 600 +/- 23 microg g(-1) in 1995, to 724 +/- 20 microg g(-1) in 2004. Spatial analyses of percent organic matter (a commonly used indicator of hydric soil condition) at both wetlands in 1993, 1995, and 2004 showed that soil conditions have become increasingly more variable. High spatial structure (autocorrelation) between data points was detected in 1993 and 2004, with data in 2004 exhibiting a much higher overall variance and narrower range of

  12. A Lagrangian model for soil water dynamics during rainfall-driven conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehe, Erwin; Jackisch, Conrad

    2016-09-01

    Within this study we propose a stochastic approach to simulate soil water dynamics in the unsaturated zone by using a non-linear, space domain random walk of water particles. Soil water is represented by particles of constant mass, which travel according to the Itô form of the Fokker-Planck equation. The model concept builds on established soil physics by estimating the drift velocity and the diffusion term based on the soil water characteristics. A naive random walk, which assumes all water particles to move at the same drift velocity and diffusivity, overestimated depletion of soil moisture gradients compared to a Richards solver. This is because soil water and hence the corresponding water particles in smaller pore size fractions are, due to the non-linear decrease in soil hydraulic conductivity with decreasing soil moisture, much less mobile. After accounting for this subscale variability in particle mobility, the particle model and a Richards solver performed highly similarly during simulated wetting and drying circles in three distinctly different soils. Both models were in very good accordance during rainfall-driven conditions, regardless of the intensity and type of the rainfall forcing and the shape of the initial state. Within subsequent drying cycles the particle model was typically slightly slower in depleting soil moisture gradients than the Richards model. Within a real-world benchmark, the particle model and the Richards solver showed the same deficiencies in matching observed reactions of topsoil moisture to a natural rainfall event. The particle model performance, however, clearly improved after a straightforward implementation of rapid non-equilibrium infiltration, which treats event water as different types of particles, which travel initially in the largest pore fraction at maximum velocity and experience a slow diffusive mixing with the pre-event water particles. The proposed Lagrangian approach is hence a promising, easy

  13. Measurements of heat fluxes and soil moisture patterns in the field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanda, M.; Snehota, M.; Haase, T.; Wild, J.

    2011-12-01

    New combined thermal and soil moisture unit coded TMS2 is presented. It is a prototype designed on good experience with TMS1. The device combines three thermometers for use approximately at -10, 0 and +15 cm relative to soil surface when installed vertically. Soil moisture measurement is performed based on time domain transmission (TDT) principle for the full range of soil moisture. Presented new version incorporates lifetime power supply for approximately 5 year operation and life time permanent data storage (0.5 mil logs) if values are acquired every 10 minutes. Lifetime operation log accompanies lifetime data storage with lockable data blocks. Data are retrieved by contact portable pocket collector. Both vertical/surface or buriable/subsurface installation is possible thanks to additional communication interface on demand. Original model TMS1, proved durability in harsh outdoor environment with good functioning in wet conditions withstanding mechanical destruction. Extended testing in the sandstone area of the National Park Bohemian Switzerland, Czech Republic is performed since 2009 by the Institute of Botany of the ASCR. Results of long-term measurement at hundreds of localities are successfully used for i) evaluation of species-specific environmental requirements (for different species of plants, bryophytes and fungi) and ii) extrapolation of microclimatic conditions over large areas of rugged sandstone relief with assistance of accurate, LiDAR based, digital terrain model. TMS1 units are also applied for continuous measurement of temperature and moisture of coarse woody debris, which serves as an important substrate for establishment and growth of seedlings and is thus crucial for natural regeneration of many forest ecosystems. The TMS1 sensors have been tested and calibrated in soil laboratories of Czech Technical University in Prague for three soil materials: arenic cambisol, podzol and quartz sand, showing good linearity and minor influence of the

  14. [Effect of different N, P and K fertilizers on soil pH and available Cd under waterlogged conditions].

    PubMed

    Jia, Ka-La-Tie; Yu, Hua; Feng, Wen-Qiang; Qin, Yu-Sheng; Zhao, Jing; Liao, Ming-Lan; Wang, Chang-Quan; Tu, Shi-Hua

    2009-11-01

    In order to tackle the problem of Cd pollution in paddy soils and investigate soil available Cd as affected by different fertilizers, incubation experiments were carried out to study the effects of different N, P and K fertilizers and pH by adding acid or base on soil available Cd under waterlogged conditions. Results revealed that soil pH increased sharply after the soil was flooded, especially at the beginning of incubation, and gradually decreased with incubation time and finally tended to approach the neutral values. The patterns of soil pH change were just opposite to those of soil available Cd, a negative correlation observed between the two. Soil flooding made the soil available Cd drop by 58.2%-84.1%. There were significant differences between different fertilizer types/varieties on soil available Cd, being most complex with N fertilizers and followed by K and P fertilizers. Among the fertilizers studied, ammonium chloride showed the unique ability in reducing soil pH and enhancing soil available Cd, and urea, single super phosphate and potassium chloride also promoted to a less extent amounts of Cd extracted from the soil. Ammonium sulfate, potassium sulfate and mono-ammonium phosphate significantly decreased soil available Cd compared to the CK treatment. Whether or not the soil was flooded, soil available Cd was highly negatively correlated with soil pH after adding acid or base (R = - 0.994 without incubation and R = - 0.919 after incubation for 60 d). The results further suggest that in the Cd polluted paddy soil, use of ammonium chloride should be avoided, S bearing fertilizers in combination with alkaline materials can be adopted, and the rice field should be flooded all the time during growing season, all the these practices can effectively lower soil available Cd.

  15. Testing of Icy-Soil Sample Delivery in Simulated Martian Conditions (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    This movie clip shows testing under simulated Mars conditions on Earth in preparation for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander using its robotic arm for delivering a sample to the doors of a laboratory oven.

    The icy soil used in the testing flowed easily from the scoop during all tests at Martian temperatures. On Mars, icy soil has stuck to the scoop, a surprise that may be related to composition of the soil at the landing site.

    This testing was done at Honeybee Robotics Spacecraft Mechanisms Corp., New York, which supplied the Phoenix scoop.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASAaE(TM)s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Microhabitat Effects on N2O Emissions from Floodplain Soils under Controlled Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Martin; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Niklaus, Pascal A.; Kuhn, Thomas; Luster, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Semi-terrestrial soils such as floodplain soils are considered to be potential hotspots of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The quantitative assessment of N2O release from these hotspots under field conditions, and of the microbial pathways that underlie net N2O production (ammonium oxidation, nitrifier-denitrification, and denitrification) is challenging because of their high spatial and temporal variability. The production and consumption of N2O appears to be linked to the presence or absence of micro-niches, providing specific conditions that may be favorable to either of the relevant microbial pathways. Flood events have been shown to trigger moments of enhanced N2O emission through a close coupling of niches with high and low oxygen availabilities. This coupling might be modulated by microhabitat effects related to soil aggregate formation, root soil interactions and the degradation of organic matter accumulations. In order to assess how these factors can modulate N2O production and consumption under simulated flooding/drying conditions, we have set up a mesocosm experiment with N-rich floodplain soils comprising different combinations of soil aggregate size classes and inert matrix material. These model soils were either planted with basket willow (Salix viminalis L.), mixed with leaf litter, or left untreated. Throughout a simulated flood event, we repeatedly measured the net N2O production rate. In addition, soil water content, redox potential, as well as C and N substrate availability were monitored. In order to gain insight into the sources of, and biogeochemical controls on N2O production, we also measured the bulk δ15N signature of the produced N2O, as well as its intramolecular 15N site preference (SP). In this presentation we focus on a period of enhanced N2O emission during the drying phase after 48 hrs of flooding. We will discuss the observed emission patterns in the context of possible treatment effects. Soils with large aggregates showed a

  17. AgRISTARS: Soil moisture/early warning and crop condition assessment. Interface control document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The interactions and support functions required between the early warning/crop condition assessment (EW/CCA) project and soil moisture (SM) project are defined. The EW Project aims to develop, test and evaluate techniques and procedures for adapting remote sensing technology to provide early warning of events and the timely assessment of those factors which affect the quality and quantity of production of economically important crops. Those techniques to augment and reinforce the current assessment activities are to be developed to improve the definition of the relationship between the plant(s) and its environment. This assessment and evaluation will certainly include the need for soil moisture measurement and estimation. The SM Project aims to develop, test, and evaluate techniques and procedures to measure or predict soil moisture in the root zone using both contact and remote sensors.

  18. Dissipation rate and residue distribution of dufulin in tomato and soil under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huijun; Shi, Mengmeng; Hu, Deyu; Zhang, Kankan; Zhang, Yuping; Lu, Ping; Zeng, Song; Yang, Song; Song, Baoan

    2014-06-01

    Dissipation rate and residue distribution of dufulin in tomato and soil under field conditions were investigated in Guiyang, Tianjin, and Haikou during 2011-2012, using ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Average recoveries of dufulin in tomato and soil ranged from 91.03 % to 95.16 % and 94.35 % to 98.34 %, respectively, with relative standard deviations of 1.16 %-3.97 %. Dufulin dissipation followed first-order kinetics. Dufulin had half-lives of 2.8, 4.7, and 9.0 days in tomato and 6.1, 8.2, and 17.2 days in soil in Guiyang, Tianjin, and Haikou, respectively. At harvest, dufulin residues in tomato samples collected 5 days after the last application at 3 times recommended dosage applied every 5 days were below 1.0 mg kg(-1).

  19. Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 cell surface hydrophobicity and survival of the cells under adverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Shakirova, Laisana; Grube, Mara; Gavare, Marita; Auzina, Lilija; Zikmanis, Peteris

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 and the survival of these cells were examined in response to varied cultivation conditions and adverse environmental conditions. An inverse linear relationship (P < 0.01) was detected between the CSH of intact L. acidophilus La5 and B. lactis Bb12 and survival of cells subjected to subsequent freezing/thawing, long-term storage or exposure to mineral and bile acids. The observed relationships were supported by significant correlations between the CSH and changes in composition of the cell envelopes (proteins, lipids and carbohydrates) of L. acidophilus La5 and B. lactis Bb12 examined using FT-IR spectroscopy and conventional biochemical analysis methods. The results also suggest that the estimates of hydrophobicity, being a generalized characteristic of cell surfaces, are important parameters to predict the ability of intact probiotic bacteria to endure extreme environments and therefore should be monitored during cultivation. A defined balance of cell components, which can be characterized by the reduced CSH values, apparently helps to ensure the resistance, improved viability and hence the overall probiotic properties of bacteria.

  20. Atrazine degradation by fungal co-culture enzyme extracts under different soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Chan-Cupul, Wilberth; Heredia-Abarca, Gabriela; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Refugio

    2016-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the atrazine degradation by fungal enzyme extracts (FEEs) in a clay-loam soil microcosm contaminated at field application rate (5 μg g(-1)) and to study the influence of different soil microcosm conditions, including the effect of soil sterilization, water holding capacity, soil pH and type of FEEs used in atrazine degradation through a 2(4) factorial experimental design. The Trametes maxima-Paecilomyces carneus co-culture extract contained more laccase activity and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content (laccase = 18956.0 U mg protein(-1), H2O2 = 6.2 mg L(-1)) than the T. maxima monoculture extract (laccase = 12866.7 U mg protein(-1), H2O2 = 4.0 mg L(-1)). Both extracts were able to degrade atrazine at 100%; however, the T. maxima monoculture extract (0.32 h) achieved a lower half-degradation time than its co-culture with P. carneus (1.2 h). The FEE type (p = 0.03) and soil pH (p = 0.01) significantly affected atrazine degradation. The best degradation rate was achieved by the T. maxima monoculture extract in an acid soil (pH = 4.86). This study demonstrated that both the monoculture extracts of the native strain T. maxima and its co-culture with P. carneus can efficiently and quickly degrade atrazine in clay-loam soils.

  1. A hydrometeorological approach for probabilistic simulation of monthly soil moisture under bare and crop land conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sarit Kumar; Maity, Rajib

    2015-04-01

    This study focuses on the probabilistic estimation of monthly soil moisture variation by considering (a) the influence of hydrometeorological forcing to model the temporal variation and (b) the information of Hydrological Soil Groups (HSGs) and Agro-Climatic Zones (ACZs) to capture the spatial variation. The innovative contributions of this study are: (i) development of a Combined Hydro-Meteorological (CHM) index to extract the information of different influencing hydrometeorological variables, (ii) consideration of soil-hydrologic characteristics (through HSGs) and climate regime-based zoning for agriculture (through ACZs), and (iii) quantification of uncertainty range of the estimated soil moisture. Usage of Supervised Principal Component Analysis (SPCA) in the development of the CHM index helps to eliminate the "curse of dimensionality," typically arises in the multivariate analysis. The usage of SPCA also ensures the maximum possible association between the developed CHM index and soil moisture variation. The association between these variables is modeled through their joint distribution which is obtained by using the theory of copula. The proposed approach is also spatially transferable, since the information on HSGs and ACZs is considered. The "leave-one-out" cross-validation (LOO-CV) approach is adopted for stations belong to a particular HSG to examine the spatial transferability. The simulated soil moisture values are also compared with a few existing soil moisture data sets, derived from different Land Surface Models (LSMs) or retrieved from different satellite-based missions. The potential of the proposed approach is found to be promising and even applicable to crop land also, though with a lesser degree of efficiency as compared to bare land conditions.

  2. Water dynamics and groundwater contributions in a young mountain soil under different meteorological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negm, Amro; Falocchi, Marco; Barontini, Stefano; Ranzi, Roberto; Bacchi, Baldassare

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater contribution to the soil-water content and to the evapotranspiration is a major uncertainty to assess the water balance. Particularly in mountain environments, where the soil and the depth of the water table are shallow, both percolation and water rise from the water table can happen. Aiming at better understanding these processes at the local scale, a micrometeorological station, equipped with both traditional sensors, an eddy covariance (EC) apparatus with a 20Hz sonic anemometer and infrared CO2 and H2O gas analyser, and four multiplexed TDR probes, was installed at Cividate Camuno (Oglio river basin, Central Italian Alps, Italy, 274ma.s.l.), in a mountain environment with complex topography and Alpine sublitoranean climate. The young, anthropised, soil upper layers are about 40cm deep and mainly covered by alfalfa (Medicago sativa), wild carrot (Daucus carota) and yarrow (Achillea millefolium). Field and laboratory tests were performed to characterise the soil hydraulic properties. Particularly the soil-water retention relationships were measured by means of a low- and a high-pressure Richards' apparatus, and the hydraulic conductivity at saturation of each soil layer was estimated by 2-dimensional, axis-symmetrical, inverse modelling of field infiltration tests from single ring infiltrometer. The measurements were performed during Summer 2012 and Summer 2013. The groundwater exchange was numerically estimated both in wet (Summer 2012) and in dry meteorlogical conditions (Summer 2013). Evapotranspiration was assessed by means of Penman-Monteith method, which was found to be in the range between EC-estimated fluxes and an indirect estimate based on the Bowen ratio correction for Summer 2012. The two seasons are meteorologically very different and it results also in the soil-water regime. During Summer 2012, the weather was relatively wet, the soil did not reach very small water contents, so that precipitation was able to percolate towards the

  3. Benefits and limitations of pig slurry to reclaim bare mine soils under Mediterranean semiarid conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Acosta, Jose A.; Kabas, Sebla; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Ángeles Muñoz, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effects of pig slurry application on reclamation of mine soils from Cartagena-La Unión Mining District (SE Spain) were investigated in a field experiment. Exchangeable metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn), total organic carbon, total nitrogen, soluble carbon, microbial biomass and three enzyme activities were periodically monitored during 67 days. In addition, one year after the application of the pig slurry, soil and developed vegetation was sampled. Results showed that only exchangeable Cd and Zn significantly decreased in the amended plots, mainly for Cd, with decreases of 98%. The rest of metals and chemical properties did not change with time after application of amendments, showing values not significantly different than those present before pig slurry application. Soluble carbon, microbial biomass carbon and the enzyme activities increased after the application of pig slurry. However, after various days these parameters started a decreasing trend until reaching values similar to the control from approximately day 25. Thus, mainly precipitation as phosphate from the waste was very effective for Cd immobilization. No increments were observed in soil organic carbon because the organic carbon applied with the slurry was too low to be significantly detected. Nonetheless, pig slurry is a good fertilizer owing to the high quantity of nutrients provided, needed to promote the development of vegetation. One year after application, a native vegetation cover (25-30%) was reached by spontaneous colonization. Triggered plant growth by the effect of amendment improved soil conditions, particularly by the help of the medium created by their rhizosphere systems. Increments in soil organic carbon and total nitrogen, and decreases in the exchangeable metals fraction concentration were observed in rhizospheric soils when compared to the bare soils. This improvement in soil quality mediated by vegetation was more efficient than the direct effect of the amendment. In

  4. Testing of the hydromechanical prediction model of soil erosion under the conditions of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogichaishvili, G. P.; Kirvalidze, D. R.; Gorjomeladze, O. L.

    2014-09-01

    A hydromechanical model for predicting water (rain-induced) soil erosion was tested on the experimental plots of the Research Institute of Tea and Subtropical Crops in Zendidi village (the Ajara Autonomous Republic) and the Sabashvili Institute of Soil Science, Agrochemistry, and Melioration in Khevi and Kitskhi villages (Upper Imeretia, Western Georgia). A comparison of factual and predicted values of rain-induced erosion for the plots with permanent black fallow showed that the model overestimated the average annual soil loss for the yellow-brown strongly eroded soil in Zendidi village by 23.22 t/ha (133%). This value ranged in different years from 18 to 1052%. For the plots with corn, the predicted value of annual erosion was by 16.94 t/ha higher than the factual value (overestimation of 488%). A comparison of factual and predicted values of rainfall erosion for the plots under sprinkling irrigation also showed that the predicted soil loss was higher than the factual one by 4.14-30.40 t/ha for corn, 6.76-11.14 t/ha for winter wheat, and 15.75-24.12 t/ha for the plots with stubble of winter wheat and barley. Thus, the hydromechanical model for predicting water erosion inadequately describes it under the conditions of Western Georgia and has to be refined.

  5. Methanogenic archaea are globally ubiquitous in aerated soils and become active under wet anoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Roey; Claus, Peter; Conrad, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The prototypical representatives of the Euryarchaeota—the methanogens—are oxygen sensitive and are thought to occur only in highly reduced, anoxic environments. However, we found methanogens of the genera Methanosarcina and Methanocella to be present in many types of upland soils (including dryland soils) sampled globally. These methanogens could be readily activated by incubating the soils as slurry under anoxic conditions, as seen by rapid methane production within a few weeks, without any additional carbon source. Analysis of the archaeal 16S ribosomal RNA gene community profile in the incubated samples through terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and quantification through quantitative PCR indicated dominance of Methanosarcina, whose gene copy numbers also correlated with methane production rates. Analysis of the δ13C of the methane further supported this, as the dominant methanogenic pathway was in most cases aceticlastic, which Methanocella cannot perform. Sequences of the key methanogenic enzyme methyl coenzyme M reductase retrieved from the soil samples before incubation confirmed that Methanosarcina and Methanocella are the dominant methanogens, though some sequences of Methanobrevibacter and Methanobacterium were also detected. The global occurrence of only two active methanogenic archaea supports the hypothesis that these are autochthonous members of the upland soil biome and are well adapted to their environment. PMID:22071343

  6. Degradation behavior of soy protein-wheat gluten films in simulated soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, S K; Hettiarachchy, N S; Were, L

    2000-07-01

    Films containing soy protein and wheat gluten were exposed to simulated farmland soil mix over a period of 30 days and monitored for degradation. The simulated farmland soil mix (topsoil/sand/Sunshine compost/vermiculite, 59:6:25:10, wt %) was mixed and stored at ambient humidity (48-55%) and temperature (20-24 degrees C); the soil mix was constantly maintained at 15% moisture by weight. Research focused on evaluating the effectiveness of gluten and cysteine additions on biodegradable behavior in the simulated farmland soil conditions. The four types of films, soy protein (S:G 1:0); soy protein with cysteine addition (S:G 1:0 + CYS); soy protein-wheat gluten (S:G 4:1); and soy protein-wheat gluten with cysteine addition (S:G 4:1 + CYS), were prepared at pH 7. 0 for degradation studies. Soy protein-gluten film rapidly degraded with 50% weight loss in about 10 days and with up to 95% weight loss in 30 days. Tensile strength and elongation of all soy protein-gluten films significantly decreased in 3 days. However, cysteine addition delayed the degradation rate of soy protein-gluten films. Soy protein-wheat gluten film disintegrated after 20 days in the simulated farmland soil environment. These results suggest that wheat gluten and cysteine addition to soy protein-based films could delay degradation rates due to their high disulfide contents.

  7. Biotite weathering in podzolic soil under conditions of a model field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, T. A.; Tolpeshta, I. I.; Topunova, I. V.

    2010-10-01

    The biotite changes in the 1-5 μm fraction after its occurrence in the F, H, AE, and E horizons of a pale-podzolic soil for five years under conditions of a model field experiment were assessed by X-ray diffraction analysis. It was found that the main changes of the biotite in all the horizons included the degradational transformation of its crystal lattice to interstratified mica-vermiculite structures and vermiculite. The intensity of this process gradually decreased from the F horizon down the profile in parallel with the decrease in the amount of roots and the abundance and activity of microbiota. Chloritized structures were present among the products of the biotite weathering in the H, AE, and E horizons; the degree of chloritization gradually increased from the H horizon to the E horizon. The main identified products of the biotite weathering in the AE and E horizons formed during the 5 years of the model experiment were identified in the clay and fine-silt fractions from these horizons of the native pale-podzolic soils. Therefore, the vermiculite, soil chlorite, and mixed-layer illite-vermiculite minerals in the soils studied could be considered as products of the recent soil functioning. The obtained results and literature data showed that the weathering of biotite resulted in the formation of K- and Al-buffer systems.

  8. Soil application of Beauveria bassiana to control Ceratitis capitata in semi field conditions.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ali; Sermann, Helga; Lerche, Sandra; Büttner, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    The Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) is a highly polyphagous pest of economic importance cultures in Syria, as in many other parts of the world. The potential of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiona BALS (VUIL.) strain 412 against adults of Mediterranean fruit fly C. capitata was evaluated in semi field conditions during the summer. Soil (5-7 cm high) was filled into plastic container (27 cm x 32 cm). In one container 75 pupae, two days before emergency, were spread uniformly on the soil. Then the pupae were covered with soil (4-5 cm layer). After that, 30 ml suspension of fungal spores (4 x 10(8) spores/ml) was applied to the soil surface using a dash bottle. This corresponded to a spore density of 1.3 x 10(7) spores/cm2 on soil. Water and food (1:4 yeast, sucrose) were placed in the cages for the emerged flies. The semi-field evaluation of B. bassiana revealed a fly mortality of about 46% compared to 16% in the control. In addition 72% of dead flies were moulded in the treatment. These results indicated that the entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana was pathogen against the adults of C. capitata not only in the laboratory condition but also under field condition. That means B. bassiana could decrease the offspring of C. capitata. Therefore B. bassiana could be an effective factor to control C. capitata in combination with other control methods, used in IPM program in the field.

  9. Formation of diphenylthioarsinic acid from diphenylarsinic acid under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Shihoko; Guan, Ling; Nakajima, Mami; Fujii, Kunihiko; Nonaka, Masanori; Harada, Naoki

    2013-11-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is a toxic phenylarsenical compound often found around sites contaminated with phenylarsenic chemical warfare agents, diphenylcyanoarsine or diphenylchloroarsine, which were buried in soil after the World Wars. This research concerns the elucidation of the chemical structure of an arsenic metabolite transformed from DPAA under anaerobic sulfate-reducing soil conditions. In LC/ICP-MS analysis, the retention time of the metabolite was identical to that of a major phenylarsenical compound synthesized by chemical reaction of DPAA and hydrogen sulfide. Moreover the mass spectra for the two compounds measured using LC/TOF-MS were similar. Subsequent high resolution mass spectral analysis indicated that two major ions at m/z 261 and 279, observed on both mass spectra, were attributable to C12H10AsS and C12H12AsSO, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that the latter ion is the molecular-related ion ([M+H](+)) of diphenylthioarsinic acid (DPTA; (C6H5)2AsS(OH)) and the former ion is its dehydrated fragment. Thus, our results reveal that DPAA can be transformed to DPTA, as a major metabolite, under sulfate-reducing soil conditions. Moreover, formation of diphenyldithioarsinic acid and subsequent dimerization were predicted by the chemical reaction analysis of DPAA with hydrogen sulfide. This is the first report to elucidate the occurrence of DPAA-thionation in an anaerobic soil.

  10. Impact of soil moisture initial conditions on multi model summer predictions over mid-latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardilouze, Constantin; Prodhomme, Chloé; Batté, Lauriane; Déqué, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Land surface initial conditions have been recognized as a potential source of predictability at seasonal time scales. As an example, results from GLACE-2 (phase 2 of the Global Land-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment) highlighted the impact of spring soil moisture in summer near-surface air temperature prediction over Europe and Northern America with global long-range forecast systems (Koster et al., 2011, van den Hurk et al.,2012). Yet, few studies have explored such an influence over a sufficient hindcast period to produce a robust quantitative assessment. In the framework of the FP7-SPECS project, dedicated experiments have been carried out with June-August hindcasts from 5 distinct Atmosphere Ocean Global Climate Models initialized either by realistic or climatological soil moisture conditions on May 1st. Realistic initialization leads to an improved 2-meter temperature prediction skill over parts of Europe in the multi model, particularly the Balkans peninsula which had been identified as a hot spot of soil moisture-atmosphere coupling (Seneviratne et al. 2006) However no improvement was found over North-American Great Plains in spite of the high potential of this region. Further analyses suggest that this lack of skill stems from a common shortcoming of the models. All of them tend to overestimate the positive feedback between soil moisture, temperature and precipitation with respect to the observations. Hence, tackling model systematic biases over the US Southern Great Plains appears as a necessary prerequisite for summer predictability enhancement.

  11. Soil structure, colloids, and chemical transport as affected by short-term reducing conditions: a laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de-Campos, A. B.; Mamedov, A. I.; Huang, C.; Wagner, L. E.

    2008-12-01

    Upland soils in the Midwestern US often undergo reducing conditions when soils are temporally flooded during the spring and remain water saturated for days or weeks. Short-term reducing conditions change the chemistry of the soil and may affect soil structure and solution chemical transport. The effects of short-term reducing conditions on chemical and physical properties of the soils, colloids, and associated chemical/nutrients transport are still not well understood and was the objective of our study. A biogeochemical reactor was built to achieve reducing conditions. Three cultivated and three uncultivated soils with different organic carbon contents were incubated in the reactor for 1 hour and 3 days under anaerobic conditions. Effects of the redox state on soil structure (pore size distribution) and drainable porosity, colloids mobility, and chemical transport were determined using high energy moisture characteristic and analytical methods. After each treatment, the soil solution was collected for redox potential (Eh), pH, and electrical conductivity (EC) measurements, and chemical analysis of metals (Ca, Mg, K), nutrients (N, P), and dissolved organic carbon. Strongly reducing conditions were achieved after 3 days of incubation and were followed by a decrease in soil porosity and an increase in pH, EC, clay dispersion, swelling, colloids mobility, and associated chemical transport. The trend for each soil depended on their initial structural stability and chemical properties. The structure of cultivated soils and the leaching of nutrients and carbon from uncultivated soils were more sensitive to the redox state. A strong correlation was found between changes in Eh and drainable porosity. The role of short-term reducing conditions on changes in redox sensitive elements, organic matter decomposition, pH, and EC and their influence on soil structure and soil particles or colloids/chemical transport for both soil groups are discussed in the paper. This study

  12. Dissipation of pendimethalin in soil and its residues in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Sondhia, Shobha

    2012-11-01

    Disappearance of pendimethalin in the soil of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) at 0-110 days, and terminal residues in plant samples have been studied under field conditions. Pendimethalin was applied as pre-emergence herbicide at 750, 350 and 180 g a.i. ha(-1) in winter, in chickpea crop. The dissipation of pendimethalin in the chickpea field soil conditions followed first order kinetics showing a half-life of 11.23 days averaged over all doses. Low pendimethalin residues were found in plant samples. 0.025, 0.015, <0.001 μg g(-1) residues of pendimethalin were found in grains at 750, 350 and 185 g a.i. ha(-1) treatments, respectively. Much lower pendimethalin residues were found in straw viz. 0.015 to <0.001 μg g(-1) at 750, 350 and 185 g a.i. ha(-1) treatments, respectively.

  13. About climate variabilitiy leading the hydric condition of the soil in the rainfed region of Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pántano, V. C.; Penalba, O. C.

    2013-05-01

    Extreme events of temperature and rainfall have a socio-economic impact in the rainfed agriculture production region in Argentina. The magnitude of the impact can be analyzed through the water balance which integrates the characteristics of the soil and climate conditions. Changes observed in climate variables during the last decades affected the components of the water balance. As a result, a displacement of the agriculture border towards the west was produced, improving the agricultural production of the region. The objective of this work is to analyze how the variability of rainfall and temperature leads the hydric condition of the soil, with special focus on extreme events. The hydric conditions of the soil (HC= Excess- Deficit) were estimated from the monthly water balance (Thornthwaite and Mather method, 1957), using monthly potential evapotranspiration (PET) and monthly accumulated rainfall (R) for 33 stations (period 1970-2006). Information of temperature and rainfall was provided by National Weather Service and the effective capacity of soil water was considered from Forte Lay and Spescha (2001). An agricultural extreme condition occurs when soil moisture and rainfall are inadequate or excessive for the development of the crops. In this study, we define an extreme event when the variable is less (greater) than its 20% and 10% (80% and 90%) percentile. In order to evaluate how sensitive is the HC to water and heat stress in the region, different conditional probabilities were evaluated. There is a weaker response of HC to extreme low PET while extreme low R leads high values of HC. However, this behavior is not always observed, especially in the western region where extreme high and low PET show a stronger influence over the HC. Finally, to analyze the temporal variability of extreme PET and R, leading hydric condition of the soil, the number of stations presenting extreme conditions was computed for each month. As an example, interesting results were

  14. A Guide to Soil Reports and Differing Site Conditions for Construction Professionals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    Foundation Engineering Handbook, Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, New York, NY., Page 3. 87 Ibid., Pages 4 /5. 88 Ibid., Page 6. 89 C.R.I. Clayton, N.E...ASCE, 110( 4 ). Dowding, C.H., 1978, Site Characterization & Exploration, American Society of Civil Engineers, New York, NY. Gaskins, "Changed Conditions...listed and discussed_. gommon problems in soil reports which have led to court cases.are also discussed. , 4 n aj iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF

  15. Using NASA UAVSAR Datasets to Link Soil Moisture to Crop Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davitt, A. W. D.; McDonald, K. C.; Azarderakhsh, M.; Winter, J.

    2015-12-01

    California and The Central Valley are experiencing one of that region's worst, persistent droughts, which represents the continuation of a prolonged drought that started in the early 2000's. Due to the continued drought, many agricultural regions in The Central Valley have been experiencing water shortages, negatively impacting agricultural production and the socio-economics of the region. Due to these impacts, there has been an increased incentive to find new ways to conserve water for use in irrigation. Recent advances in remote sensing techniques provide the ability for end users to better understand field conditions so they may make more informed decisions on irrigation timing and amounts. However, a good understanding of soil moisture and its role in crop health and yield is lacking to support informed water management decisions. Though known to be important, a robust understanding of the role of the spatio-temporal patterns in soil moisture linked to crop health is lacking. Remote sensing platforms such as NASA's Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) provide the capacity to obtain within-field measurements to estimate within-field and field-to-field variability in soil moisture. UAVSAR radar images acquired from 2010 to 2014 for Yolo County, California are being examined to determine the suitability of high resolution (field scale) multi-temporal L-band radar backscatter imagery for soil moisture assessment and crop conditions through the growing season. By using such data and linking to in-situ meteorology measurements, modeling (MIMICS), and other remote sensing derived datasets (Sentinel, Landsat, MODIS, and TOPS-SIMS), an integrated monitoring system can potentially support the assessment of agricultural field conditions. This allows growers to optimize the use of limited water supplies through informed water management practices, potentially improving crop conditions and yield in a water stressed region.

  16. Effects of long-term continuous cropping on soil nematode community and soil condition associated with replant problem in strawberry habitat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingyue; Lewis, Edwin E.; Liu, Qizhi; Li, Heqin; Bai, Chunqi; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-01-01

    Continuous cropping changes soil physiochemical parameters, enzymes and microorganism communities, causing “replant problem” in strawberry cultivation. We hypothesized that soil nematode community would reflect the changes in soil conditions caused by long-term continuous cropping, in ways that are consistent and predictable. To test this hypothesis, we studied the soil nematode communities and several soil parameters, including the concentration of soil phenolic acids, organic matter and nitrogen levels, in strawberry greenhouse under continuous-cropping for five different durations. Soil pH significantly decreased, and four phenolic acids, i.e., p-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, cinnamic acid and p-coumaric acid, accumulated with time under continuous cropping. The four phenolic acids were highly toxic to Acrobeloides spp., the eudominant genus in non-continuous cropping, causing it to reduce to a resident genus after seven-years of continuous cropping. Decreased nematode diversity indicated loss of ecosystem stability and sustainability because of continuous-cropping practice. Moreover, the dominant decomposition pathway was altered from bacterial to fungal under continuous cropping. Our results suggest that along with the continuous-cropping time in strawberry habitat, the soil food web is disturbed, and the available plant nutrition as well as the general health of the soil deteriorates; these changes can be indicated by soil nematode community. PMID:27506379

  17. Effects of long-term continuous cropping on soil nematode community and soil condition associated with replant problem in strawberry habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingyue; Lewis, Edwin E.; Liu, Qizhi; Li, Heqin; Bai, Chunqi; Wang, Yuzhu

    2016-08-01

    Continuous cropping changes soil physiochemical parameters, enzymes and microorganism communities, causing “replant problem” in strawberry cultivation. We hypothesized that soil nematode community would reflect the changes in soil conditions caused by long-term continuous cropping, in ways that are consistent and predictable. To test this hypothesis, we studied the soil nematode communities and several soil parameters, including the concentration of soil phenolic acids, organic matter and nitrogen levels, in strawberry greenhouse under continuous-cropping for five different durations. Soil pH significantly decreased, and four phenolic acids, i.e., p-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, cinnamic acid and p-coumaric acid, accumulated with time under continuous cropping. The four phenolic acids were highly toxic to Acrobeloides spp., the eudominant genus in non-continuous cropping, causing it to reduce to a resident genus after seven-years of continuous cropping. Decreased nematode diversity indicated loss of ecosystem stability and sustainability because of continuous-cropping practice. Moreover, the dominant decomposition pathway was altered from bacterial to fungal under continuous cropping. Our results suggest that along with the continuous-cropping time in strawberry habitat, the soil food web is disturbed, and the available plant nutrition as well as the general health of the soil deteriorates; these changes can be indicated by soil nematode community.

  18. Monitoring of the CO2 emission and the contents of microbial biomass in agroecosystems on gray forest soils of the Cisbaikal region under conditions of fluoride pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomazkina, L. V.

    2015-08-01

    The influence of the technogenic pollution of gray forest soils in the forest-steppe zone of the Cisbaikal region with fluorides emitted by aluminum smelters on the functioning and state of local agroecosystems was studied within the framework of a long-term agroecological monitoring program. Hydrothermic conditions of the growing season during the monitoring period (1997-2012) were compared with the climatic norm (1961-1990). It was found that the adverse effect of the technogenic pollution on the agroecosystem becomes more pronounced during the years with abnormal weather conditions. An increase in the CO2 emission into the atmosphere as a response of the microbial complex to the rise in the air temperatures was characterized by the linear dependence irrespectively of the degree of soil contamination. The methods of systems analysis were applied to generalize the results. The considered agroecosystem was studied as the system of particular components (soil-microorganisms-plants-atmosphere) integrated by the carbon fluxes. The regimes of the agroecosystem functioning and the ecological loads on it were estimated on the basis of data on the fluxes of net mineralized and (re)immobilized carbon. The environmental factors affecting the state and functioning of the agroecosystem were identified.

  19. Associations between childhood adversity, adult stressful life events, and past-year drug use disorders in the National Epidemiological Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).

    PubMed

    Myers, Bronwyn; McLaughlin, Katie A; Wang, Shuai; Blanco, Carlos; Stein, Dan J

    2014-12-01

    Stress sensitization, whereby CA lowers tolerance to later stressors, has been proposed as a potential mechanism explaining the association between exposure to childhood adversities (CA) and drug use disorders in adulthood. However, this mechanism remains untested. This paper begins to address this gap through exploring associations between CA exposure and stressful events in adulthood for predicting drug use disorders. We used data drawn from Wave 2 of the U.S. National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (n = 34,653) to explore whether the association between past-year stressful life events and the 12-month prevalence of disordered cannabis, stimulant, and opiate use varied by the number of types of CA that an individual was exposed to. Past-year stressful life events were associated with an increased risk of cannabis, stimulant, and opiate use disorders among men and women. Exposure to CA was associated with increased risk for disordered cannabis use among men and women and opiate use among men only. Finally, we found significant associations between exposure to CA and past-year stressful life events in predicting disordered drug use, but only for women in relation to disordered stimulant and opiate use. Findings are suggestive of possible stress sensitization effects in predicting disordered stimulant and opiate use among women. Implications of these findings for the prevention and treatment of drug use disorders and for future research are discussed.

  20. Associations between childhood adversity, adult stressful life events, and past-year drug use disorders in the National Epidemiological Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Bronwyn; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Wang, Shuai; Blanco, Carlos; Stein, Dan J.

    2014-01-01

    Stress sensitization, whereby CA lowers tolerance to later stressors, has been proposed as a potential mechanism explaining the association between exposure to childhood adversities (CA) and drug use disorders in adulthood. However this mechanism remains untested. This paper begins to address this gap through exploring associations between CA exposure and stressful events in adulthood for predicting drug use disorders. We used data drawn from Wave 2 of the U.S. National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (n=34,653) to explore whether the association between past-year stressful life events and the 12-month prevalence of disordered cannabis, stimulant and opiate use varied by the number of types of CA that an individual was exposed to. Past-year stressful life events were associated with an increased risk of cannabis, stimulant and opiate use disorders among men and women. Exposure to CA was associated with increased risk for disordered cannabis use among men and women and opiate use among men only. Finally, we found significant associations between exposure to CA and past year stressful life events in predicting disordered drug use, but only for women in relation to disordered stimulant and opiate use. Findings are suggestive of possible stress sensitization effects in predicting disordered stimulant and opiate use among women. Implications of these findings for the prevention and treatment of drug use disorders and for future research are discussed. PMID:25134042

  1. Effects of Temperature on Solute Transport Parameters in Differently-Textured Soils at Saturated Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, S.; Arihara, M.; Kawamoto, K.; Nishimura, T.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface warming driven by global warming, urban heat islands, and increasing use of shallow geothermal heating and cooling systems such as the ground source heat pump, potentially causes changes in subsurface mass transport. Therefore, understanding temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics is essential to accurately assess environmental risks due to increased subsurface temperature. In this study, one-dimensional solute transport experiments were conducted in soil columns under temperature control to investigate effects of temperature on solute transport parameters, such as solute dispersion and diffusion coefficients, hydraulic conductivity, and retardation factor. Toyoura sand, Kaolin clay, and intact loamy soils were used in the experiments. Intact loamy soils were taken during a deep well boring at the Arakawa Lowland in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. In the transport experiments, the core sample with 5-cm diameter and 4-cm height was first isotropically consolidated, whereafter 0.01M KCl solution was injected to the sample from the bottom. The concentrations of K+ and Cl- in the effluents were analyzed by an ion chromatograph to obtain solute breakthrough curves. The solute transport parameters were calculated from the breakthrough curves. The experiments were conducted under different temperature conditions (15, 25, and 40 oC). The retardation factor for the intact loamy soils decreased with increasing temperature, while water permeability increased due to reduced viscosity of water at higher temperature. Opposite, the effect of temperature on solute dispersivity for the intact loamy soils was insignificant. The effects of soil texture on the temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics will be further investigated from comparison of results from differently-textured samples.

  2. Immobilization remediation of Cd-polluted soil with different water condition.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianrui; Xu, Yingming

    2017-05-15

    To demonstrate effects of water management on soil Cd immobilization using palygorskite, the investigation evaluated impacts of palygorskite on uptake of Cd present in soils with different water condition by rice plant. Pot experiment results showed that, pH, available Fe and P in untreated soils were higher in continuous flooding than in traditional irrigation and wetting irrigation, which were reasons for lower soil exchangeable Cd and plant Cd in continuous flooding. In control group (untreated soils), compared to traditional irrigation, continuous flooding reduced brown rice Cd by 37.9%, that in wetting irrigation increased by 31.0%. At palygorskite concentrations of 5 g kg(-1), 10 g kg(-1) and 15 g kg(-1), brown rice Cd reduced by 16.7%, 44.4% and 55.6% under continuous flooding, 13.8%, 34.5% and 44.8% under traditional irrigation, 13.1%, 36.8% and 47.3% under wetting irrigation (p < 0.05). At the same palygorskite addition, decreasing amplitude of brown rice Cd was higher in continuous flooding than in traditional irrigation and wetting irrigation. Competition for adsorption sites in root coating between Cd(2+) and Fe(2+) was another factor governing plant Cd. In control group, compared to traditional irrigation, root coating Fe(II) increased by 124.5% and root coating Cd reduced by 17.6% upon continuous flooding (p < 0.05). In conclusion, palygorskite addition combined with continuous flooding was an efficacious technique to stabilize Cd in paddy soils.

  3. Conditioning of a mesoscale hydrologic model with proxy soil moisture fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaniego-Eguiguren, L. E.; Bardossy, A.; Kumar, R.

    2009-12-01

    Multiscale monitoring and data assimilation techniques are fundamental to improve the predictability of mesoscale distributed hydrologic models. In-situ measurements along with remote sensed information can be used to condition the parametrization of distributed models aiming at reducing their prediction uncertainty of both energy and mass balances. One of the key state variables responsible for the feedback mechanisms in the land-surface-atmosphere system is the soil moisture. This variable, on the contrary to other water fluxes, has a long memory and depends greatly on local conditions. The spatial distribution of soil moisture is therefore crucial to determine the spatial patterns of both surface runoff and actual evaporation. There are a number of proxies that can be used to describe the evolution of this state variable. They can be obtained at different resolutions, for example, the land surface temperature of the MODIS (NASA) sensor (1 x 1) km or the surface soil moisture (SSM) data based on ERS and METOP scatterometers (12.5 x 12.5) km. In this study we develop local-neighborhood estimators that help to constrain the spatio-temporal evolution of the top-layer soil moisture during a period of time. These estimators are included in the calibration process as a penalty function. The mesoscale hydrologic model (mHM) employed in this study is forced with (1 x 1) km daily meteorological variables such as precipitation, temperature and potential evapotranspiration. All parameters of mHM were regionalized with a multi-scale parametrization technique. The model was set up in the Neckar Basin in south Germany for the period 2001 to 2007, from which the first four years were used for calibration. The spin up period of the model was from 1992 to 2001. The search of good parameter sets was carried out with simulated annealing. Multiscale conditioning of soil moisture states in addition to the commonly used streamflow data lead to a significant reduction of the

  4. Behavior of two phenyl urea herbicides in clayey soils and effect of alternating dry-wet conditions on their availability.

    PubMed

    Haouari, Jamila; Dahchour, Abdelmalek; Peña-Heras, Arancha; Louchard, Xzavier; Lennartz, Berndt; Alaoui, Mohamed Elbelghiti; Satrallah, Ahmad

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption and mobility of linuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-methoxy-1-methylurea) and diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea) were studied in clayey soils from the Gharb area (Morocco). Soils A and B were planted with sun flower (Helianthus annuus) while soil C was planted with sugar cane (Saccharum offcinarum). Adsorption was studied for linuron in soils A and B, while mobility was studied only in soil B. Adsorption data were found to fit the Freundlich equation with correlation coefficients r2 > 0.9. Freundlich coefficients (Kf, nf) were in agreement with L and S isotherm types for soils A and B, respectively. Values of Koc (195 and 102) indicate moderate adsorption. Desorption isotherms for linuron showed hysteresis for both soils. The pesticide would be more bound to soil A (H = 8.44) than to soil B (H = 4.01). The effect of alternating wet and dry conditions was tested for soils A and B. Results showed that retention would increase in soil subject to an additional wet and dry cycle. In the case of diuron isotherm was of type L in soil C. Desorption was noticeable at high concentrations and tended to decrease when concentrations diminished. Mobility of linuron was tested in polyvinyle chloride (PVC) columns, which received different treatments before their percolation. The pesticide was more mobile in a previously saturated column. In columns subject to a drying step after saturation with water, linuron mobility was greatly reduced.

  5. Carbon and Nitrogen dynamics in forest soils depending on light conditions and tree species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselinovic, Bojana; Hager, Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Climate change mitigation actions under the Kyoto Protocol apply among other decreases of CO2-emissions and/or increases of carbon (C) stocks. As soils represent the second biggest C-reservoir on Earth, an exact estimation of the stocks and reliable knowledge on C-dynamics in forest soils is of high importance. Anyhow, here, the accurate GHG-accounting, emission reductions and increase in C stocks is hampered due to lack of reliable data and solid statistical methods for the factors which influence C-sequestration in and its release from these systems. In spite of good progress in the scientific research, these factors are numerous and diverse in their interactions. This work focuses on influence of the economically relevant tree species - Picea abies, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus spp. - and light conditions on forest floor and mineral soil C and N dynamics in forest soils. Spruce monocultures have been widely used management practices in central European forests during the past century. Such stands are in lower altitudes and on heavy and water logged soils unstable and prone to disturbances, especially to windthrows. We hypothesize that windthrow areas loose C & N and that the establishment of the previous nutrient stocks is, if at all, only possible to be reached over the longer periods of time. We research also how the increased OM depletion affects the change of C & N stocks in forest floor vs. mineral soil. Conversion of such secondary spruce monocultures to site adequate beech and oak forests may enable higher stocks allocated predominantly as stable organic carbon and as plant available nitrogen. For this purpose sites at 300-700 m altitude with planosols were chosen in the region of the Northern Alpine Foothills. A false chronosequence approach was used in order to evaluate the impacts of the tree species and change in light conditions on dynamic of C & N in the forest floor and mineral soil, over the period 0-100 (for oak 120 y.) years. The C- and N

  6. Mobilization and Release of colloidal Carbon from a Soil Column Under Redox Oscillation Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsar, M. Z.; Jin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM), the most mobile form of carbon (C), strongly influences the cycling, distribution and behavior of C in soil. In wetlands, the reductive dissolution of iron and manganese oxy-hydroxides releases large quantities of DOM into the soil solution. The objective of this study is to quantify the changes in aqueous organic carbon concentration in different sized fractions induced by reduction of iron and increase in pH. Twenty four cm long soil columns were prepared. Columns were run under oxic (as control) and anoxic conditions. Two platinum redox probes were inserted at 10 and 17 cm depths from the soil surface to monitor the redox status of the column. Anoxic and oxic conditions were maintained by flushing with either nitrogen or oxygen gas through the soil. No additional organic sources were added. After 35 days of anoxic environment, column leachate samples were separated by differential centrifugation into five colloidal sized fractions (<450 nm, <220 nm, <100 nm, <50 nm and <2.3 nm). Immediately after the 1st reduction half cycle, the leachate samples were collected inside the glove box and the soil columns were flushed with oxygen to prepare for 2nd reduction half cycle. After 1st reduction half cycle, the pH, ionic strength and aqueous (Fe2+) concentration of the column extracts were increased whereas the Eh value was decreased. The range of pH, Eh, ionic strength and concentration of Fe2+ was 6.38 to 6.91, -219 to -275 mV, 13.74 to 18.84 mM and 1.8 to 3.41 mg L-1, respectively. Following the anoxic incubation, the total desorbed C was increased up to 139 mg L-1. The distribution of C across the five particle size fractions was 3.68-11.73% (> 450 nm), 0.59-5.12% (450-220 nm), 0.45-4.91% (220-100 nm), 0.18-2.91% (100-50 nm), 15.48-35.23% (50 nm - 2.3 nm) and 49.15-63.94% (<2.3 nm). The preliminary results confirmed the release of more nanoparticulate (50-2.3 nm) and truly dissolved (<2.3 nm) organic matter from the anoxic soil column

  7. Nitrous oxide emissions in southern Poland from agricultural soils under various tillage conditions and from urban soils under strong anthropopression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkowski, M.; Bartyzel, J.; Zięba, D.; Ciaciek, K.; Nęcki, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of field measurements performed at: (i) the agricultural sites managed by Institute of Plant Acclimatization and Husbandry (ZDHAR) in Grodkowice (Malopolska, Poland), and (ii) the urban sites located in Kraków, Poland. For agricultural measurements, several sites have been selected for measurements of N2O emissions during two campaigns - in spring and autumn 2014. The investigated crops were chosen to represent the regional agriculture and included wheat, canola and maize under various tillage conditions, as well as an uncultivated grassland as a control site. For urban environment, measurement campaigns have been performed at the university's campus lawn and at a large urban meadow, both located in the centre of Kraków agglomeration. The sites were chosen to be representative of the urban green areas typical of Central Europe. The static chamber method was chosen to quantify soil-atmosphere N2O fluxes. Chamber enclosures have been performed every 3-5 days, depending on the conditions prevailing at the sites during the intermediate periods. From each enclosure, five 50-ml air samples have been collected for subsequent analysis of nitrous oxide concentrations. Well-established gas chromatography methods, with a precision of a single N2O measurement better than 0.5 ppb were employed. The measured concentrations were then used in a linear emission model to calculate N2O fluxes. Results of agricultural campaigns show large variability of N2O emissions, with maximum fluxes in the order of 120 ng N-N2O m-2 s-1, driven mainly by availability of nitrogen in soil and water. For fertilized sites, largest emissions values were observed several days after the rainfall events. Notable differences between sites under alternative tillage techniques have been observed. Observations at the urban sites revealed significant fluxes of N2O, with average daily values in some cases exceeding those observed at agricultural fields.

  8. Leaf structure vs. nutrient relationships vary with soil conditions in temperate shrubs and trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinemets, Ülo; Kull, Kalevi

    2003-09-01

    dependent on extensive root systems, but not that of readily mobile and temporarily variable elements such as N, this correlation was attributed to more extensive root systems in larger plants. Our study indicates that foliar structure vs. [N] and [P] relations may be separately regulated, but also that the generality of leaf structure vs. nutrient content relations may vary depending on soil conditions.

  9. Dissipation of chlorpyrifos and residue analysis in rice, soil and water under paddy field conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Shen, Yan; Yu, Xiang-yang; Liu, Xian-jin

    2012-04-01

    The analytical method for the residues of chlorpyrifos in rice plants, water and soil was developed and dissipation of chlorpyrifos under field conditions was studied. The limit of detection (LOD) of chlorpyrifos was 0.006 mg kg(-1) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was found to be 0.04 mg kg(-1) in rice plant (water) and 0.02 mg kg(-1) in the other substrates, respectively. The results showed that the initial residues of chlorpyrifos in Nanjing and Guangxi were 4.99 and 6.05 mg kg(-1) (rice plant), 1.35 and 1.58 mg kg(-1) (water) and 0.51 and 0.63 mg kg(-1) (soil), respectively. The half-lives of chlorpyrifos in rice plant, water and soil from Nanjing were 4.28, 0.58 and 1.35 day, respectively, and the half-lives of those from Guangxi were 3.86, 0.52 and 1.21 day, respectively. The husked rice, rice hull and straw samples were found to contain chlorpyrifos well below the maximum residue limit (MRL) following the recommended dosage, the residues of chlorpyrifos in soil were undetectable under all application levels and frequencies after 28 day of applications.

  10. [Ammonia volatilization of slow release compound fertilizer in different soils water conditions].

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-feng; Wang, Zheng-yin; You, Yuan; Li, Jing-chao

    2010-08-01

    By using venting method incubation experiment, we studied the ammonia volatilization and kinetics characteristics of uncoated slowed release compound fertilizer (SRF) under different soil water conditions and the growth and nitrogen utilization efficiency of rice in pot experiment. Results indicated that the ammonia volatilization of SRF under waterflooding reached the peak ahead of 3-4 days compared to the moist treatment. The peak and accumulation of ammonia volatilization in the waterflooding treatments were higher than those under the moist condition. SRF could significantly reduce total ammonia volatilization compared to the common compound fertilizer (CCF), reduced by 50.6% and 22.8% in the moist treatment and reduced by 24.2% and 10.4% in the waterflooding treatment,but the loss of ammonia volatilization of SRF was higher significantly than that of the coated fertilizer (CRF). Ammonia volatilization increased with the increasing of fertilizer application. The dynamics of ammonia volatilization of SRF could be quantitatively described with three equations: the first order kinetics equation, Elovich equation and parabola equation. Compared to moist condition, the biomass of rice plant in SRF, CCF and SRF treatments increased by 67.86%, 78.25% and 48.75%, and nitrogen utilization efficiency increased by 57.73%, 80.70% and 12.06% under waterflooding condition, respectively. Comparing with CCF, nitrogen utilization efficiency in SRF treatment improved by 59.10% and 10.40% under two soil moisture conditions. SRF could reduce ammonia volatilization and improve biomass and nitrogen utilization efficiency.

  11. [CO2 response process and its simulation of Prunus sibirica photosynthesis under different soil moisture conditions].

    PubMed

    Wu, Qin; Zhang, Guang-Can; Pei, Bin; Xu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, Yu; Fang, Li-Dong

    2013-06-01

    Taking the two-year old potted Prunus sibirica seedlings as test materials, and using CIRAS-2 photosynthetic system, this paper studied the CO2 response process of P. sibirica photosynthesis in semi-arid loess hilly region under eight soil moisture conditions. The CO2 response data of P. sibirica were fitted and analyzed by rectangular hyperbola model, exponential equation, and modified rectangular hyperbola model. Meanwhile, the quantitative relationships between the photosynthesis and the soil moisture were discussed. The results showed that the CO2 response process of P. sibirica photosynthesis had obvious response characteristics to the soil moisture threshold. The relative soil water content (RWC) required to maintain the higher photosynthetic rate (P(n)) and carboxylation efficiency (CE) of P. sibirica was in the range of 46.3%-81.9%. In this RWC range, the photosynthesis did not appear obvious CO2 saturated inhibition phenomenon. When the RWC exceeded this range, the photosynthetic capacity (P(n max)), CE, and CO2 saturation point (CSP) decreased evidently. Under different soil moisture conditions, there existed obvious differences among the three models in simulating the CO2 response data of P. sibirica. When the RWC was in the range of 46.3%-81.9%, the CO2 response process and the characteristic parameters such as CE, CO2 compensation point (see symbol), and photorespiration rate (R(p)) could be well fitted by the three models, and the accuracy was in the order of modified rectangular hyperbola model > exponential equation > rectangular hyperbola model. When the RWC was too high or too low, namely, the RWC was > 81.9% or < 46.3%, only the modified rectangular hyperbola model could well fit the CO2 response process and the characteristic parameters. It was suggested that when the RWC was from 46.3% to 81.9%, the photosynthetic efficiency of P. sibirica was higher, and, as compared with rectangular hyperbola model and exponential equation, modified

  12. Roles of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Soil Abiotic Conditions in the Establishment of a Dry Grassland Community

    PubMed Central

    Knappová, Jana; Pánková, Hana; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of soil biota in the composition of mature plant communities is commonly acknowledged. In contrast, the role of soil biota in the early establishment of new plant communities and their relative importance for soil abiotic conditions are still poorly understood. Aims and Methods The aim of this study was to understand the effects of soil origin and soil fungal communities on the composition of a newly established dry grassland plant community. We used soil from two different origins (dry grassland and abandoned field) with different pH and nutrient and mineral content. Grassland microcosms were established by sowing seeds of 54 species of dry grassland plants into the studied soils. To suppress soil fungi, half of the pots were regularly treated with fungicide. In this way, we studied the independent and combined effects of soil origin and soil community on the establishment of dry grassland communities. Key Results The effect of suppressing the soil fungal community on the richness and composition of the plant communities was much stronger than the effect of soil origin. Contrary to our expectations, the effects of these two factors were largely additive, indicating the same degree of importance of soil fungal communities in the establishment of species-rich plant communities in the soils from both origins. The negative effect of suppressing soil fungi on species richness, however, occurred later in the soil from the abandoned field than in the soil from the grassland. This result likely occurred because the negative effects of the suppression of fungi in the field soil were caused mainly by changes in plant community composition and increased competition. In contrast, in the grassland soil, the absence of soil fungi was limiting for plants already at the early stages of their establishment, i.e., in the phases of germination and early recruitment. While fungicide affects not only arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi but also other biota, our data

  13. Effect of anoxic vs. oxic conditions in soils on composition of mobile OM as revealed from comprehensive fluorescence analysis of soil effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Andreas; Ritschel, Thomas; Totsche, Kai

    2014-05-01

    The fractionation of OM due to sorption of DOM on mineral surfaces has drawn much attention in soil science. This is mainly motivated by the implied stabilization of OM and the disposition of less affine organic molecules as mobile compounds within porous media, both processes significantly affecting the carbon cycling and that of OM-associated elements. In this study, we provide a time-resolved assessment of mobile OM in soil effluents on the basis of fluorescence excitation-emission-matrices (EEM). Our comprehensive fluorescence EEM analysis was based on a supervised parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) that permits the fixing of selected components. We estimated the protein content in soil effluent OM with a reference for microbially produced proteins from Bacillus subtilis. The soil effluent was obtained from soil columns filled with topsoil either from a floodplain site or a maize field. Except for the 1 mM NaCl influent, nothing was added to the soil columns. Under water-saturated conditions, the activity of autochthonous microbial communities induced anoxic conditions within the soil columns resulting in the microbial reduction of pedogenic Fe(III) oxides and subsequent discharge of mobile Fe2+ during percolation. Upon re-aeration of the soil effluent, Fe2+ re-oxidized and precipitated as organo-mineral ferrihydrite in the soil effluent. EEM from consecutively sampled effluent fractions pointed to a mainly invariant soil effluent OM composition, where fulvic acid-like components were predominant. However, the OM, which was associated with the effluent ferrihydrite, was enriched in proteins, which was confirmed by corresponding FTIR spectra. This suggests the preferential association of proteins with in situ-precipitated ferrihydrite, rendering proteins less mobile in soils, where precipitation and immobilization of ferrihydrite occurs. Consequently, one would assume lower protein concentrations in the soil effluent if ferrihydrite precipitation occurs within

  14. Transport of bromide measured by soil coring, suction plates, and lysimeters under transient flow conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasteel, R.; Pütz, Th.; Vereecken, H.

    2003-04-01

    Lysimeter studies are one step within the registration procedure of pesticides. Flow and transport in these free-draining lysimeters do not reflect the field situation mainly because of the occurence of a zone of local saturation at the lower boundary (seepage face). The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of flow and transport behaviour of bromide detected with different measuring devices (lysimeters, suction plates, and soil coring) by comparing experimental results with numerical simulations in heterogeneous flow domains. We applied bromide as a small pulse to the bare soil surface (Orthic Luvisol) of the three devices and the displacement of bromide was regurlarly sampled for three years under natural wheather conditions. Based on the mean breakthrough curves we observe experimentally that lysimeters have a lower effective pore-water velocity and exhibit more solute spreading resulting in a larger dispersivity than the suction plates. This can be ascribed to the artefact of the lower boundary. We performed numerical transport simulations in 2-D heterogeneous flow fields (scaling approach) choosing appropriate boundary conditions for the various devices. The simulations allow to follow the temporal evolution of flow and transport processes in the various devices and to gain additional process understanding. We conclude that the model is essentially capable to reproduce the main experimental findings only if we account for the spatial correlation structure of the hydraulic properties, i.e. soil heterogeneity.

  15. Quantifying the timescales over which exogenous and endogenous conditions affect soil respiration.

    PubMed

    Barron-Gafford, Greg A; Cable, Jessica M; Bentley, Lisa Patrick; Scott, Russell L; Huxman, Travis E; Jenerette, G Darrel; Ogle, Kiona

    2014-04-01

    Understanding how exogenous and endogenous factors and above-ground-below-ground linkages modulate carbon dynamics is difficult because of the influences of antecedent conditions. For example, there are variable lags between above-ground assimilation and below-ground efflux, and the duration of antecedent periods are often arbitrarily assigned. Nonetheless, developing models linking above- and below-ground processes is crucial for estimating current and future carbon dynamics. We collected data on leaf-level photosynthesis (Asat ) and soil respiration (Rsoil ) in different microhabitats (under shrubs vs under bunchgrasses) in the Sonoran Desert. We evaluated timescales over which endogenous and exogenous factors control Rsoil by analyzing data in the context of a semimechanistic temperature-response model of Rsoil that incorporated effects of antecedent exogenous (soil water) and endogenous (Asat ) conditions. For both microhabitats, antecedent soil water and Asat significantly affected Rsoil , but Rsoil under shrubs was more sensitive to Asat than that under bunchgrasses. Photosynthetic rates 1 and 3 d before the Rsoil measurement were most important in determining current-day Rsoil under bunchgrasses and shrubs, respectively, indicating a significant lag effect. Endogenous and exogenous controls are critical drivers of Rsoil , but the relative importance and the timescale over which each factor affects Rsoil depends on above-ground vegetation and ecosystem structure characteristics.

  16. Plant nutrients do not covary with soil nutrients under changing climatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wentao; Elser, James J.; Lü, Xiao-Tao; Wang, Zhengwen; Bai, Edith; Yan, Caifeng; Wang, Chao; Li, Mai-He; Zimmermann, Niklaus E.; Han, Xingguo; Xu, Zhuwen; Li, Hui; Wu, Yunna; Jiang, Yong

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) play vital roles in plant growth and development. Yet how climate regimes and soil fertility influence plant N and P stoichiometry is not well understood, especially in the belowground plant parts. Here we investigated plant aboveground and belowground N and P concentrations ([N] and [P]) and their stoichiometry in three dominant genera along a 2200 km long climatic gradient in northern China. Results showed that temperature explained more variation of [N] and [P] in C4 plants, whereas precipitation exerted a stronger influence on [N] and [P] in C3 plants. Both plant aboveground and belowground [N] and [P] increased with decreasing precipitation, and increasing temperatures yet were negatively correlated with soil [N] and [P]. Plant N:P ratios were unrelated with all climate and soil variables. Plant aboveground and belowground [N] followed an allometric scaling relationship, but the allocation of [P] was isometric. These results imply that internal processes stabilize plant N:P ratios and hence tissue N:P ratios may not be an effective parameter for predicting plant nutrient limitation. Our results also imply that past positive relationships between plant and nutrient stocks may be challenged under changing climatic conditions. While any modeling would need to be able to replicate currently observed relationships, it is conceivable that some relationships, such as those between temperature or rainfall and carbon:nutrient ratios, should be different under changing climatic conditions.

  17. Successional stage of biological soil crusts: an accurate indicator of ecohydrological condition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Wilcox, Bradford P.; Van Scoyoc, Matthew V.; Phillips, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are a key component of many dryland ecosystems. Following disturbance, biological soil crusts will recover in stages. Recently, a simple classification of these stages has been developed, largely on the basis of external features of the crusts, which reflects their level of development (LOD). The classification system has six LOD classes, from low (1) to high (6). To determine whether the LOD of a crust is related to its ecohydrological function, we used rainfall simulation to evaluate differences in infiltration, runoff, and erosion among crusts in the various LODs, across a range of soil depths and with different wetting pre-treatments. We found large differences between the lowest and highest LODs, with runoff and erosion being greatest from the lowest LOD. Under dry antecedent conditions, about 50% of the water applied ran off the lowest LOD plots, whereas less than 10% ran off the plots of the two highest LODs. Similarly, sediment loss was 400 g m-2 from the lowest LOD and almost zero from the higher LODs. We scaled up the results from these simulations using the Rangeland Hydrology and Erosion Model. Modelling results indicate that erosion increases dramatically as slope length and gradient increase, especially beyond the threshold values of 10 m for slope length and 10% for slope gradient. Our findings confirm that the LOD classification is a quick, easy, nondestructive, and accurate index of hydrological condition and should be incorporated in field and modelling assessments of ecosystem health.

  18. Sensitivity analyses of a colloid-facilitated contaminant transport model for unsaturated heterogeneous soil conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Périard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean

    2013-04-01

    effects and the one-at-a-time approach (O.A.T); and (ii), we applied Sobol's global sensitivity analysis method which is based on variance decompositions. Results illustrate that ψm (maximum sorption rate of mobile colloids), kdmc (solute desorption rate from mobile colloids), and Ks (saturated hydraulic conductivity) are the most sensitive parameters with respect to the contaminant travel time. The analyses indicate that this new module is able to simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. However, validations under laboratory conditions are needed to confirm the occurrence of the colloid transport phenomenon and to understand model prediction under non-saturated soil conditions. Future work will involve monitoring of the colloidal transport phenomenon through soil column experiments. The anticipated outcome will provide valuable information on the understanding of the dominant mechanisms responsible for colloidal transports, colloid-facilitated contaminant transport and, also, the colloid detachment/deposition processes impacts on soil hydraulic properties. References: Šimůnek, J., C. He, L. Pang, & S. A. Bradford, Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably Saturated Porous Media: Numerical Model and Experimental Verification, Vadose Zone Journal, 2006, 5, 1035-1047 Šimůnek, J., M. Šejna, & M. Th. van Genuchten, The C-Ride Module for HYDRUS (2D/3D) Simulating Two-Dimensional Colloid-Facilitated Solute Transport in Variably-Saturated Porous Media, Version 1.0, PC Progress, Prague, Czech Republic, 45 pp., 2012.

  19. Soil moisture variations in remotely sensed and reanalysis datasets during weak monsoon conditions over central India and central Myanmar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Sourabh; Kar, Sarat C.; Sharma, Anu Rani

    2016-03-01

    Variation of soil moisture during active and weak phases of summer monsoon JJAS (June, July, August, and September) is very important for sustenance of the crop and subsequent crop yield. As in situ observations of soil moisture are few or not available, researchers use data derived from remote sensing satellites or global reanalysis. This study documents the intercomparison of soil moisture from remotely sensed and reanalyses during dry spells within monsoon seasons in central India and central Myanmar. Soil moisture data from the European Space Agency (ESA)—Climate Change Initiative (CCI) has been treated as observed data and was compared against soil moisture data from the ECMWF reanalysis-Interim (ERA-I) and the climate forecast system reanalysis (CFSR) for the period of 2002-2011. The ESA soil moisture correlates rather well with observed gridded rainfall. The ESA data indicates that soil moisture increases over India from west to east and from north to south during monsoon season. The ERA-I overestimates the soil moisture over India, while the CFSR soil moisture agrees well with the remotely sensed observation (ESA). Over Myanmar, both the reanalysis overestimate soil moisture values and the ERA-I soil moisture does not show much variability from year to year. Day-to-day variations of soil moisture in central India and central Myanmar during weak monsoon conditions indicate that, because of the rainfall deficiency, the observed (ESA) and the CFSR soil moisture values are reduced up to 0.1 m3/m3 compared to climatological values of more than 0.35 m3/m3. This reduction is not seen in the ERA-I data. Therefore, soil moisture from the CFSR is closer to the ESA observed soil moisture than that from the ERA-I during weak phases of monsoon in the study region.

  20. Seasonality of soil erosion under mediterranean conditions at the Alqueva Dam watershed.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Vera; Panagopoulos, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Alqueva reservoir created the largest artificial lake of Western Europe in 2010. Since then, the region has faced challenges due to land-use changes that may increase the risk of erosion and shorten the lifetime of the reservoir, increasing the need to promote land management sustainability. This paper investigates the aspect of seasonality of soil erosion using a comprehensive methodology that integrates the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) approach, geographic information systems, geostatistics, and remote-sensing. An experimental agro-silvo pastoral area (typical land-use) was used for the RUSLE factors update. The study confirmed the effect of seasonality on soil erosion rates under Mediterranean conditions. The highest rainfall erosivity values occurred during the autumn season (433.6 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1)), when vegetation cover is reduced after the long dry season. As a result, the autumn season showed the highest predicted erosion (9.9 t ha(-1)), contributing 65 % of the total annual erosion. The predicted soil erosion for winter was low (1.1 t ha(-1)) despite the high rainfall erosivity during that season (196.6 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1)). The predicted annual soil loss was 15.1 t ha(-1), and the sediment amount delivery was 4,314 × 10(3) kg. Knowledge of seasonal variation would be essential to outline sustainable land management practices. This model will be integrated with World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies methods to support decision-making in that watershed, and it will involve collaboration with both local people and governmental institutions.

  1. Predicting soil fumigant air concentrations under regional and diverse agronomic conditions.

    PubMed

    Cryer, Steven A

    2005-01-01

    SOFEA (SOil Fumigant Exposure Assessment system; Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN) is a new stochastic numerical modeling tool for evaluating and managing human inhalation exposure potential associated with the use of soil fumigants. SOFEA calculates fumigant concentrations in air arising from volatility losses from treated fields for large agricultural regions using multiple transient source terms (treated fields), geographical information systems (GIS) information, agronomic specific variables, user-specified buffer zones, and field reentry intervals. A modified version of the USEPA Industrial Source Complex Short Term model (ISCST3) is used for air dispersion calculations. Weather information, field size, application date, application rate, application type, soil incorporation depth, pesticide degradation rates in air, tarp presence, field retreatment, and other sensitive parameters are varied stochastically using Monte Carlo techniques to mimic region and crop specific agronomic practices. Regional land cover, elevation, and population information can be used to refine source placement (treated fields), dispersion calculations, and risk assessments. This paper describes the technical algorithms of SOFEA and offers comparisons of simulation predictions for the soil fumigant 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) to actual regional air monitoring measurements from Kern, California. Comparison of simulation results to daily air monitoring observations is remarkable over the entire concentration distribution (average percent deviation of 44% and model efficiency of 0.98), especially considering numerous inputs such as meteorological conditions for SOFEA were unavailable and approximated by neighboring regions. Both current and anticipated and/or forecasted fumigant scenarios can be simulated using SOFEA to provide risk managers and product stewards the necessary information to make sound regulatory decisions regarding the use of soil fumigants in agriculture.

  2. Seasonality of Soil Erosion Under Mediterranean Conditions at the Alqueva Dam Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Vera; Panagopoulos, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The Alqueva reservoir created the largest artificial lake of Western Europe in 2010. Since then, the region has faced challenges due to land-use changes that may increase the risk of erosion and shorten the lifetime of the reservoir, increasing the need to promote land management sustainability. This paper investigates the aspect of seasonality of soil erosion using a comprehensive methodology that integrates the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) approach, geographic information systems, geostatistics, and remote-sensing. An experimental agro-silvo pastoral area (typical land-use) was used for the RUSLE factors update. The study confirmed the effect of seasonality on soil erosion rates under Mediterranean conditions. The highest rainfall erosivity values occurred during the autumn season (433.6 MJ mm ha-1 h-1), when vegetation cover is reduced after the long dry season. As a result, the autumn season showed the highest predicted erosion (9.9 t ha-1), contributing 65 % of the total annual erosion. The predicted soil erosion for winter was low (1.1 t ha-1) despite the high rainfall erosivity during that season (196.6 MJ mm ha-1 h-1). The predicted annual soil loss was 15.1 t ha-1, and the sediment amount delivery was 4,314 × 103 kg. Knowledge of seasonal variation would be essential to outline sustainable land management practices. This model will be integrated with World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies methods to support decision-making in that watershed, and it will involve collaboration with both local people and governmental institutions.

  3. Comparing the ensemble and extended Kalman filters for in situ soil moisture assimilation with contrasting conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbairn, D.; Barbu, A. L.; Mahfouf, J.-F.; Calvet, J.-C.; Gelati, E.

    2015-12-01

    Two data assimilation (DA) methods are compared for their ability to produce an accurate soil moisture analysis using the Météo-France land surface model: (i) SEKF, a simplified extended Kalman filter, which uses a climatological background-error covariance, and (ii) EnSRF, the ensemble square root filter, which uses an ensemble background-error covariance and approximates random rainfall errors stochastically. In situ soil moisture observations at 5 cm depth are assimilated into the surface layer and 30 cm deep observations are used to evaluate the root-zone analysis on 12 sites in south-western France (SMOSMANIA network). These sites differ in terms of climate and soil texture. The two methods perform similarly and improve on the open loop. Both methods suffer from incorrect linear assumptions which are particularly degrading to the analysis during water-stressed conditions: the EnSRF by a dry bias and the SEKF by an over-sensitivity of the model Jacobian between the surface and the root-zone layers. These problems are less severe for the sites with wetter climates. A simple bias correction technique is tested on the EnSRF. Although this reduces the bias, it modifies the soil moisture fluxes and suppresses the ensemble spread, which degrades the analysis performance. However, the EnSRF flow-dependent background-error covariance evidently captures seasonal variability in the soil moisture errors and should exploit planned improvements in the model physics. Synthetic twin experiments demonstrate that when there is only a random component in the precipitation forcing errors, the correct stochastic representation of these errors enables the EnSRF to perform better than the SEKF. It might therefore be possible for the EnSRF to perform better than the SEKF with real data, if the rainfall uncertainty was accurately captured. However, the simple rainfall error model is not advantageous in our real experiments. More realistic rainfall error models are suggested.

  4. Evaluation of soil moisture regime prediction methods under different ecological conditions in the Pre-Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaiza Usuga, J. C.; de Bello, F.; Pauwels, V. R. N.

    2009-04-01

    conditions where computational power is limited, and if one is careful in the interpretation of its results, the conclusions from this paper indicate that more attention should be paid to the use of hydrologic models for the estimation of soil moisture regimes.

  5. Soil and glass surface photodegradation of etofenprox under simulated california rice growing conditions.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Martice; Cahill, Thomas; Tjeerdema, Ronald

    2011-07-27

    Photolysis is an important degradation process to consider when evaluating a pesticide's persistence in a rice field environment. To simulate both nonflooded and flooded California rice field conditions, the photolytic degradation of etofenprox, an ether pyrethroid, was characterized on an air-dried rice soil and a flooded rice soil surface by determination of its half-life (t(1/2)), dissipation rate constant (k) and identification and quantitation of degradation products using LC/MS/MS. Photodegradation was also characterized on a glass surface alone to rule out confounding soil factors. Measured photolytic dissipation rates were used as input parameters into a multimedia environmental fate model to predict etofenprox persistence in a rice field environment. Photolytic degradation proceeded at a faster rate (0.23/day, t(1/2) = 3.0 days) on the flooded soil surface compared to the air-dried surface (0.039/day, t(1/2) = 18 days). Etofenprox degradation occurred relatively quickly on the glass surface (3.1/day, t(1/2) = 0.23 days or 5.5 h) compared to both flooded and air-dried soil layers. Oxidation of the ether moiety to the ester was the major product on all surfaces (max % yield range = 0.2 ± 0.1% to 9.3 ± 2.3%). The hydroxylation product at the 4' position of the phenoxy phenyl ring was detected on all surfaces (max % yield range = 0.2 ± 0.1% to 4.1 ± 1.0%). The air-dried soil surface did not contain detectable residues of the ester cleavage product, whereas it was quantitated on the flooded soil (max % yield = 0.6 ± 0.3%) and glass surface (max % yield = 3.6 ± 0.6%). Dissipation of the insecticide in dark controls was significantly different (p < 0.05) compared to the light-exposed surfaces indicating that degradation was by photolysis. Laboratory studies and fate model predictions suggest photolysis will be an important process in the overall degradation of etofenprox in a rice field environment.

  6. Attribution of soil moisture dynamics - Initial conditions vs. atmospheric forcing and the role of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orth, Rene; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2014-05-01

    conditions versus the atmospheric forcing for monthly soil moisture variations. We find that initial soil moisture anomalies are overall more important than the forcing, even if less pronounced in summer. Especially in southern Europe we show high drought forecasting potential, whereas the forcing is more important in Central and North-eastern Europe.

  7. Growing Opuntia (cactus) and Brassica species for the long-term remediation of selenium-contaminated soil under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identifying alternative crops for planting in Se-containing agricultural soils of western central California will depend upon the plants’ ability to tolerate high salt and boron (B) conditions. Multi-year field studies were conducted on Se-laden soils with different cactus clones (Opuntia-ficus indi...

  8. CANOPY CONDUCTANCE OF PINUS TAEDA, LIQUIDAMBAR STYRACIFLUA AND QUERCUS PHELLOS UNDER VARYING ATMOSPHERIC AND SOIL WATER CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sap flow, and atmospheric and soil water data were collected in closed-top chambers under conditions of high soil water potential for saplings of Liquidambar styraciflua L., Quercus phellos L., and Pinus taeda L., three co-occurring species in the southeastern USA. Responses of c...

  9. Mathematic simulation of soil-vegetation condition and land use structure applying basin approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishchenko, Natalia; Shirkin, Leonid; Krasnoshchekov, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystems anthropogenic transformation is basically connected to the changes of land use structure and human impact on soil fertility. The Research objective is to simulate the stationary state of river basins ecosystems. Materials and Methods. Basin approach has been applied in the research. Small rivers basins of the Klyazma river have been chosen as our research objects. They are situated in the central part of the Russian plain. The analysis is carried out applying integrated characteristics of ecosystems functioning and mathematic simulation methods. To design mathematic simulator functional simulation methods and principles on the basis of regression, correlation and factor analysis have been applied in the research. Results. Mathematic simulation resulted in defining possible permanent conditions of "phytocenosis-soil" system in coordinates of phytomass, phytoproductivity, humus percentage in soil. Ecosystem productivity is determined not only by vegetation photosynthesis activity but also by the area ratio of forest and meadow phytocenosis. Local maximums attached to certain phytomass areas and humus content in soil have been defined on the basin phytoproductivity distribution diagram. We explain the local maximum by synergetic effect. It appears with the definite ratio of forest and meadow phytocenosis. In this case, utmost values of phytomass for the whole area are higher than just a sum of utmost values of phytomass for the forest and meadow phytocenosis. Efficient correlation of natural forest and meadow phytocenosis has been defined for the Klyazma river. Conclusion. Mathematic simulation methods assist in forecasting the ecosystem conditions under various changes of land use structure. Nowadays overgrowing of the abandoned agricultural lands is very actual for the Russian Federation. Simulation results demonstrate that natural ratio of forest and meadow phytocenosis for the area will restore during agricultural overgrowing.

  10. Soil Water Retention and Relative Permeability for Conditions from Oven-Dry to Full Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.

    2011-11-04

    Common conceptual models for unsaturated flow often rely on the oversimplified representation of medium pores as a bundle of cylindrical capillaries and assume that the matric potential is attributed to the capillary force only. The adsorptive surface forces are ignored. It is often assumed that aqueous flow is negligible when a soil is near or at the residual water content. These models are successful at high and medium water contents but often give poor results at low water contents. These models do not apply to conditions at which the water content is less than the residual water content. We extend the lower bound of existing water-retention functions and conductivity models from residual water content to the oven-dry condition (i.e., zero water content) by defining a state-dependent, residual-water content for a soil drier than a critical value. Furthermore, a hydraulic conductivity model for smooth uniform spheres was modified by introducing a correction factor to describe the film flow-induced hydraulic conductivity for natural porous media. The total unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is the sum of those due to capillary and film flow. The extended retention and conductivity models were verified measurements. Results show that, when the soil is at high and intermediate water content, there is no difference between the un-extended and the extended models; when the soil is at low water content, the un-extended models overestimate the water content but underestimate the conductivity. The extended models match the retention and conductivity measurements well.

  11. Energy crop (Sida hermaphrodita) fertilization using digestate under marginal soil conditions: A dose-response experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabel, Moritz; Bueno Piaz Barbosa, Daniela; Horsch, David; Jablonowski, Nicolai David

    2014-05-01

    The global demand for energy security and the mitigation of climate change are the main drivers pushing energy-plant production in Germany. However, the cultivation of these plants can cause land use conflicts since agricultural soil is mostly used for plant production. A sustainable alternative to the conventional cultivation of food-based energy-crops is the cultivation of special adopted energy-plants on marginal lands. To further increase the sustainability of energy-plant cultivation systems the dependency on synthetic fertilizers needs to be reduced via closed nutrient loops. In the presented study the energy-plant Sida hermaphrodita (Malvaceae) will be used to evaluate the potential to grow this high potential energy-crop on a marginal sandy soil in combination with fertilization via digestate from biogas production. With this dose-response experiment we will further identify an optimum dose, which will be compared to equivalent doses of NPK-fertilizer. Further, lethal doses and deficiency doses will be observed. Two weeks old Sida seedlings were transplanted to 1L pots and fertilized with six doses of digestate (equivalent to a field application of 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, 160t/ha) and three equivalent doses of NPK-fertilizer. Control plants were left untreated. Sida plants will grow for 45 days under greenhouse conditions. We hypothesize that the nutrient status of the marginal soil can be increased and maintained by defined digestate applications, compared to control plants suffering of nutrient deficiency due to the low nutrient status in the marginal substrate. The dose of 40t/ha is expected to give a maximum biomass yield without causing toxicity symptoms. Results shall be used as basis for further experiments on the field scale in a field trial that was set up to investigate sustainable production systems for energy crop production under marginal soil conditions.

  12. Effect of boundary conditions on measured water retention behavior within soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-torres, S.; Scheuermann, A.; Pedroso, D.; Li, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Soil Water Characteristic Curve (SWCC) is a practical representation of the behavior of soil water by relating the suction (difference between the air and water pressures to the moisture content (water saturation). The SWCC is characterized by a hysteresis loop, which is thought to be unique in that any drainage-imbibition cycle lies within a main hysteresis loop limited by two different curves for drainage and imbibition. This 'uniqueness' is the main argument for considering the SWCC as a material-intrinsic feature that characterizes the pore structure and its interaction with fluids. Models have been developed with the SWCC as input data to describe the evolution of the water saturation and the suction within soils. One example of these models is the widely used Richard's equation [1]. In this work we present a series of numerical simulations to evaluate the 'unique' nature of the SWCC. The simulations involves the use of the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) [2] within a regular soil, modelling the flow behavior of two immiscible fluids: wetting and non-wetting. The soil is packed within a cubic domain to resemble the experimental setups that are commonly used for measuring the SWCC[3]. The boundary conditions ensure that the non-wetting phase enters through one cubic face and the wetting phase enters trough the opposite phase, with no flow boundary conditions in the remaining 4 cubic faces. The SWCC known features are inspected including the presence of the common limit curves for different cycles involving varying limits for the suction. For this stage of simulations, the SWCC is indeed unique. Later, different boundary conditions are applied with the two fluids each injected from 3 opposing faces into the porous medium. The effect of this boundary condition change is a net flow direction, which is different from that in the previous case. A striking result is observed when both SWCC are compared and found to be noticeable different. Further analysis is

  13. The Land-use influence on soil GHG emission in condition of Moscow megalopolis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizirskaya, Maria; Epikhina, Anna; Vasenev, Ivan; Valentini, Riccardo

    2013-04-01

    he modern Global climate change problems are closely connected to greenhouses gases (GHG) balance in dominated landscapes. This problem is especially actual in case of sharply man-changed urban landscapes. Up to now not so many studies have deal with urbanization (functional zoning, land-use type, soil contamination etc.) effect on soils GHG emission spatial-temporal variability at the local and regional scale, although the global scale land-use changes and human impacts are reported to be the main factors behind soil CO2 emission. Moscow megalopolis (with population 12-16 million) is the biggest one not only for European territory of Russia but for Europe too. Our study has been done in representative urban landscapes with different land-use practices typical for Moscow: urban forest (widespread in the North of Moscow) and green lawns with different functional zoning (11 sites in total). Forest sites have been studied during 7 years and differ in mesorelief (small hill summit and two slopes). Green lawns vary in the functional use (residential, recreational and industrial) and level of human impact (normal and high). In each plot soil respiration was measured in field conditions using Li-6400-XT system. We separate autotrophic (root-derived) and heterotrophic (microbial-derived) soil respiration in the field using micro (1mm) and macro (1 cm) pore meshes. The measurements have been done weekly since June till October 2012 in 3 replicas per each plot. Additionally we analyze CH4 emission using the exposition chamber measurements method. The conducted research have shown high temporal and spatial variability of CO2 and CH4 fluxes due to functional zoning, slope, vegetation type, land-use practice, soil microclimate characteristics. The highest CO2 emission is typical for green lawns where the CO2 fluxes reached 3.3 µmol CO2m-2s-1, which is 2.5-3 times more than the one of the urban forest. Comparative analysis of the roots and microorganisms contribution in total

  14. Runoff sensitivity over Asia: Role of climate variables and initial soil conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Di; Mishra, Ashok K.; Zhang, Ke

    2017-02-01

    We applied statistical and numerical modeling approach to evaluate the sensitivity of runoff (ROF) to climate variables using Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) data and regional climate model (RegCM4). It was observed that ROF is more sensitive to precipitation (P) compared to other analyzed hydroclimatic variables (potential evapotranspiration (PET), 2 m air temperature (T2m), solar radiation (Rn), specific humidity (SSH), and wind speed (U), especially over India, Indochina, and south-north-northeast China semihumid-humid climate transition zones based on the higher correlation coefficient (>0.7) and elasticity (>2). The abnormal positive T2m-ROF observed over Tibetan Plateau region (TP) may be due to its high topography and cold weather regime, while positive PET-ROF over India and north China-southeast Mongolia regions can be attributed to the stronger influence of local land-atmosphere interactions. Soil moisture (SM) reflects high correlation with runoff, especially over the climate transition zones (i.e., India and Indochina-southeast China). The initial wet (dry) soil moisture (SM) anomalies lead to an increase (decrease) of ROF in each season with the hot spots mainly located in middle to high latitudes (spring), TP and northeast (summer and autumn), and Indochina (autumn) regions. Such influence can persist almost 4 months in spring while only about 1 month in autumn during dry and wet conditions. The wet condition has stronger influence at beginning but dissipates quickly, while the dry condition can last longer within the same season. The impact of initial soil temperature anomalies on ROF is weaker than SM, with the only obvious ROF changes located over south China (spring and summer) and north India (autumn).

  15. Electrokinetic remediation of a Cu contaminated red soil by conditioning catholyte pH with different enhancing chemical reagents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong-Mei; Deng, Chang-Fen; Cang, Long

    2004-07-01

    The effect of enhancement reagents on the efficiency of electrokinetic remediation of Cu contaminated red soil is evaluated. The enhancement agents were a mix of organic acids, including lactic acid+NaOH, HAc-NaAc and HAc-NaAc+EDTA. The soil was prepared to an initial Cu concentration of 438 mgkg(-1) by incubating the soil with CuSO4 solution in a flooded condition for 1 month. Sequential extraction showed that Cu was partitioned in the soil as follows: 195 mgkg(-1) as water soluble and exchangeable, 71 mgkg(-1) as carbonate bound and 105 mgkg(-1) as Fe and Mn oxides. The results indicate that neutralizing the catholyte pH maintains a lower soil pH compared to that without electrokinetic treatment. The electric currents varied depending upon the conditioning solutions and increased with an increasing applied voltage potential. The electroosmotic flow rate changed significantly when different conditioning enhancing reagents were used. It was observed that lactic acid+NaOH treatments resulted in higher soil electric conductivities than HAc-NaAc and HAc-NaAc+EDTA treatments. Ultimately, enhancement by lactic acid+NaOH resulted in highest removal efficiency (81% Cu removal) from the red soil. The presence of EDTA did not enhance Cu removal efficiencies from the red soil, because EDTA complexed with Cu to form negatively charge complexes, which slowly migrated toward the anode chamber retarding Cu2+ transport towards the cathode.

  16. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions. [south Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Emissive and reflective data for 10 days, and IR data for 6 nights in south Texas scenes were analyzed after procedures were developed for removing cloud-affected data. HCMM radiometric temperatures were: within 2 C of dewpoint temperatures on nights when air temperature approached dewpoint temperatures; significantly correlated with variables important in evapotranspiration; and, related to freeze severity and planting depth soil temperatures. Vegetation greenness indexes calculated from visible and reflective IR bands of NOAA-6 to -9 meteorological satellites will be useful in the AgRISTARS program for seasonal crop development, crop condition, and drought applications.

  17. Measurements of soil carbon dioxide emissions from two maize agroecosystems at harvest under different tillage conditions.

    PubMed

    Giacomo, Gerosa; Angelo, Finco; Fabio, Boschetti; Stefano, Brenna; Riccardo, Marzuoli

    2014-01-01

    In this study a comparison of the soil CO2 fluxes emitted from two maize (Zea mays L.) fields with the same soil type was performed. Each field was treated with a different tillage technique: conventional tillage (30 cm depth ploughing) and no-tillage. Measurements were performed in the Po Valley (Italy) from September to October 2012, covering both pre- and postharvesting conditions, by means of two identical systems based on automatic static soil chambers. Main results show that no-tillage technique caused higher CO2 emissions than conventional tillage (on average 2.78 and 0.79 μmol CO2 m(-2) s(-1), resp.). This result is likely due to decomposition of the organic litter left on the ground of the no-tillage site and thus to an increased microbial and invertebrate respiration. On the other hand, fuel consumption of conventional tillage technique is greater than no-tillage consumptions. For these reasons this result cannot be taken as general. More investigations are needed to take into account all the emissions related to the field management cycle.

  18. Effects of mycorrhizal colonization on growth parameters of onion under different irrigation and soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Bolandnazar, Saheb Ali; Neyshabouri, Mohammad Reza; Aliasgharzad, Nasser; Chaparzadeh, Nader

    2007-05-01

    The effects of three Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF), Glomus versiforme, G. intraradices and G. etonicatum) and three irrigation intervals (7, 9 and 11 days) on growth of onion (Allium cepa L.) cv. Red Azar Shahr were studied under two soil conditions (sterilized and non-sterilized). The results indicated that, AMF colonization improved plant height, Leaf Area Index (LAI), total biomass, bulb dry mass and diameter, Harvest Index (HI) and chlorophyll content (p < 0.001). Bulbing occurred 10-15 days earlier in mycorrhizal plants. Irrigation interval decreased biomass, LAI, Leaf Area Ratio (LAR), bulb diameter and dry mass and chlorophyll content (b and total) at 11 day irrigation interval. In term of interaction, G. versiforme at 9 day and non-mycorrhizal plants at 11 day produced the greatest and the lowest LAI (8.56 vs. 1.57), respectively. Mycorrhizal onions in contrary to non-mycorrhizal ones produced more LAI and biomass in sterilized soil and inoculation with G. etonicatum and the non-mycorrhizal onions in sterilized soil had the highest and the lowest biomass, respectively.

  19. Organization of biogeochemical nitrogen pathways with switch-like adjustment in fluctuating soil redox conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Sanjay; Bera, Soumen; Rashid, Mubasher; Medvinsky, Alexander B.; Acquisti, Claudia; Li, Bai-Lian

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen is cycled throughout ecosystems by a suite of biogeochemical processes. The high complexity of the nitrogen cycle resides in an intricate interplay between reversible biochemical pathways alternatively and specifically activated in response to diverse environmental cues. Despite aggressive research, how the fundamental nitrogen biochemical processes are assembled and maintained in fluctuating soil redox conditions remains elusive. Here, we address this question using a kinetic modelling approach coupled with dynamical systems theory and microbial genomics. We show that alternative biochemical pathways play a key role in keeping nitrogen conversion and conservation properties invariant in fluctuating environments. Our results indicate that the biochemical network holds inherent adaptive capacity to stabilize ammonium and nitrate availability, and that the bistability in the formation of ammonium is linked to the transient upregulation of the amo-hao mediated nitrification pathway. The bistability is maintained by a pair of complementary subsystems acting as either source or sink type systems in response to soil redox fluctuations. It is further shown how elevated anthropogenic pressure has the potential to break down the stability of the system, altering substantially ammonium and nitrate availability in the soil, with dramatic effects on biodiversity. PMID:28280580

  20. Nitrogen partitioning in oak leaves depends on species, provenance, climate conditions and soil type.

    PubMed

    Hu, B; Simon, J; Kuster, T M; Arend, M; Siegwolf, R; Rennenberg, H

    2013-01-01

    Climate-tolerant tree species and/or provenances have to be selected to ensure the high productivity of managed forests in Central Europe under the prognosticated climate changes. For this purpose, we studied the responses of saplings from three oak species (i.e. Quercus robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens) and provenances of different climatic origin (i.e. low or high rainfall, low or high temperature habitats) with regard to leaf nitrogen (N) composition as a measure of N nutrition. Saplings were grown in model ecosystems on either calcareous or acidic soil and subjected to one of four treatments (control, drought, air warming or a combination of drought and air warming). Across species, oak N metabolism responded to the influence of drought and/or air warming with an increase in leaf amino acid N concentration at the expense of structural N. Moreover, provenances or species from drier habitats were more tolerant to the climate conditions applied, as indicated by an increase in amino acid N (comparing species) or soluble protein N (comparing provenances within a species). Furthermore, amino acid N concentrations of oak leaves were significantly higher on calcareous compared to acidic soil. From these results, it can be concluded that seeds from provenances or species originating from drier habitats and - if available - from calcareous soil types may provide a superior seed source for future forest establishment.

  1. Cryptogamic community structure as a bioindicator of soil condition along a pollution gradient.

    PubMed

    Rola, Kaja; Osyczka, Piotr

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to determine changes in the structure of cryptogamic vegetation of poor psammophilous grassland along a pollution gradient near a zinc smelter to evaluate the potential of species assemblages as bioindicators of soil condition. Lichens and bryophytes were examined in study plots along six transects in four distance zones, and the physicochemical properties of corresponding soil samples were analysed. Four different responses of species to substrate contamination were identified, with a distinct group of species resistant to and favoured by metal contamination. Although species richness decreases as one approaches the smelter, the gradual replacement of certain sensitive species by resistant ones was observed along the pollution gradient. The results enabled us to develop a useful tool to diagnose strongly polluted sites. Two different cryptogamic assemblages of well-recognised key species characteristic for strongly polluted and lightly polluted sites were distinguished. We conclude that cryptogamic community structure clearly corresponds to the degree of soil contamination, thus demonstrating high bioindicative value. The study confirmed the high relevance of the community approach in metal pollution biomonitoring.

  2. Modeling fecal bacteria transport and retention in agricultural and urban soils under saturated and unsaturated flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Balkhair, Khaled S

    2017-03-01

    Pathogenic bacteria, that enter surface water bodies and groundwater systems through unmanaged wastewater land application, pose a great risk to human health. In this study, six soil column experiments were conducted to simulate the vulnerability of agricultural and urban field soils for fecal bacteria transport and retention under saturated and unsaturated flow conditions. HYDRUS-1D kinetic attachment and kinetic attachment-detachment models were used to simulate the breakthrough curves of the experimental data by fitting model parameters. Results indicated significant differences in the retention and drainage of bacteria between saturated and unsaturated flow condition in the two studied soils. Flow under unsaturated condition retained more bacteria than the saturated flow case. The high bacteria retention in the urban soil compared to agricultural soil is ascribed not only to the dynamic attachment and sorption mechanisms but also to the greater surface area of fine particles and low flow rate. All models simulated experimental data satisfactorily under saturated flow conditions; however, under variably saturated flow, the peak concentrations were overestimated by the attachment-detachment model and underestimated by the attachment model with blocking. The good match between observed data and simulated concentrations by the attachment model which was supported by the Akaike information criterion (AIC) for model selection indicates that the first-order attachment coefficient was sufficient to represent the quantitative and temporal distribution of bacteria in the soil column. On the other hand, the total mass balance of the drained and retained bacteria in all transport experiments was in the range of values commonly found in the literature. Regardless of flow conditions and soil texture, most of the bacteria were retained in the top 12 cm of the soil column. The approaches and the models used in this study have proven to be a good tool for simulating fecal

  3. Experimental study on the effect of temperature and flux conditions on moisture distribution in vadose zone soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinguo; Zheng, Hu

    2017-02-01

    Moisture distribution in vadose zone soil is the most important parameter for land productivity and vegetation status of ecological systems, and is sensitive to temperature variation. In this study, laboratory scale tests were conducted to determine the effect of temperature on variation in moisture distribution in covered and uncovered conditions. The results indicated that soil moisture from 2.65 to 20 cm was positively correlated with temperature and temperature gradient, and the top 2.65 to 5 cm was dramatically influenced by temperature changes in both covered and uncovered conditions. The moisture content when temperature was increasing was higher than that when temperature was decreasing for the same temperature, when the film covered the top of the soil column. In contrast, the moisture content when temperature was increasing was lower than when the temperature was decreasing for the uncovered soil column. The difference between treatments was not maintained as soil depth increased.

  4. Analysis of soil water repellency under different eco-geomorphological conditions in Mediterranean environments (South of Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Donaire, Virginia; Gabarron-Galeote, Miguel A.; Martinez-Murillo, Juan F.; Ruiz-Sinoga, Jose D.

    2013-04-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) is a soil property that reduces its water affinity. Although it has been frequently related to wildfires, different studies in recent decades have shown that repellent soils are not rare, and they are widely spread around the world under various climatic, soil and vegetation conditions, on burned and unburned soils. The research described here was carried out in two Mediterranean rangelands containing similar Mediterranean tree and shrub species but differing in soil conditions. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of vegetal species, pH, soil organic matter (SOM), soil water content (SWC) and prescribed fire over SWR. In June 2011, two samples from the first 5 cm of soil, one up and one downslope from plants, were collected under the dominant species of the two study areas (Nerja -NE- and Almogía -AL-), in a north-facing hillslope . In NE the selected species were Pinus halepensis (Ph), Cistus clusii (Cc), Rosmarinus officinalis (Ro), Thymus vulgaris (Tv) and Stipa tenacissima (St). In addition samples were collected in bare soil (Bs, at least 1.5m far away from the nearest shrub), under burned shrubs (Bsc) and in burned bare soil (Bbs). A controlled fire was conducted in April 2011. In AL the selected species were Quercus suber (Qs), Cistus monspeliensis (Cm) and Cistus albidus (Ca). The results indicate: i) SWR is a common phenomenon in Mediterranean environments, in acid as well as in alkaline soils, but with a great variability in every study area depending on the vegetal species (Ro and Qs) were those more repellent to water; ii) OM seems to be a more influential factor over soil water repellency than acidity, which only was found a controlling factor for alkaline soils; iii climate and vegetation type, influencing SOM leading to hydrophobic conditions, are more key factors controlling SWR than bedrock characteristics; iv) SWC threshold for water repellency to be disappeared were not clearly stated independently of

  5. Influence of Soil Moisture Conditions On The Flood Frequency Distribution: A Case Study With 10000 Years Synthetic Rainfall Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martina, M.; Todini, E.

    Soil moisture conditions within the catchment have a primary importance for the anal- ysis of flood risk but insufficiency of data or unavailability of measurements make them useless for operative purposes. Therefore classical simulation techniques to es- timate design flood can not consider the effects of the catchment initial soil moisture conditions. The aim of this work is to assess the influence of the soil conditions on water flow during flood event and especially on the flood frequency distribution. The proposed technique makes use of a stochastic point process, Neyman-Scott Rectan- gular Pulse, for generating a 10000 years rainfall series combined with a physically based rainfall-runoff model, TOPKAPI, for transforming rainfall into discharge and mean soil moisture conditions within the catchment. Finally the annual maximum floods have been extracted from the discharge series and their frequency distribution has been analyzed. The results have been compared with those from a traditional sim- ulation approach which uses a rainfall intensity-duration (IDF) relationship combined with the same rainfall-runoff TOPKAPI model but initialized by arbitrary soil mois- ture conditions. As it was expected the comparison shows that the influence of the soil conditions on flood frequency distribution is not negligible and gives reasonability to the methodology applied . The chosen study area is a North-Italian catchment where several years of hourly rainfall data series were available.

  6. Gas-geochemical condition and ecological functions of urban soils in areas with gas generating grounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozharova, Nadezhda; Lebed-Sharlevich, Iana; Kulachkova, Svetlana

    2014-05-01

    Rapid urbanization and expansion of city borders lead to development of new areas, often following with relief changes, covering of gully-ravine systems and river beds with technogenic grounds containing construction and municipal waste. Decomposition of organic matter in these grounds is a source of methane and carbon dioxide. Intensive generation and accumulation of CO2 and CH4 into grounds may cause a fire and explosion risk for constructed objects. Gases emission to the atmosphere changes the global balance of GHGs and negatively influences on human health. The aim of this investigation is to study gas-geochemical condition and ecological functions of urban soils in areas with gas generating grounds. Studied areas are the gully-ravine systems or river beds, covered with technogenic grounds during land development. Stratigraphic columns of these grounds are 5-17 meters of man-made loamy material with inclusion of construction waste. Gas generating layer with increased content of organic matter, reductive conditions and high methanogenic activity (up to 1.0 ng*g-1*h-1) is situated at the certain depth. Maximum CH4 and CO2 concentrations in this layer reach dangerous values (2-10% and 11%, respectively) in the current standards. In case of disturbance of ground layer (e.g. well-drilling) methane is rapidly transferred by convective flux to atmosphere. The rate of CH4 emission reaches 100 mg*m-2*h-1 resulting in its atmospheric concentration growth by an order of magnitude compared with background. In normal occurrence of grounds methane gradually diffuses into the upper layers by pore space, consuming on different processes (e.g. formation of organic matter, nitrogen compounds or specific particles of magnetite), and emits to atmosphere. CH4 emission rate varies from 1 to 40 mg*m-2*h-1 increasing with depth of grounds. Carbon dioxide emission is about 100 mg*m-2*h-1. During soil formation on gas generating grounds bacterial oxidation of methane, one of the most

  7. Microbial degradation of acenapthene and napthalene under denitrification conditions in soil--water systems: Annual report, October 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Mihelcic, J.R.; Luthy, R.G.

    1987-10-01

    This study examined the microbial degradation of acenaphthene and naphthalene under denitrification conditions at soil-to-water ratios of 1:25 and 1:50 with soil containing approximately 10/sup 5/ denitrifying organisms per gram of soil. Under nitrate-excess conditions, both acenaphthene and naphthalene were degraded microbially from initial aqueous-phase concentrations of about one and several mg/l, respectively, to nondetectable levels (<0.01 mg/l) in time periods less than 9 weeks. Acclimation periods of 12 to 36 days were observed prior to the onset of microbial degradation in tests with soil not previously exposed to PAH, while acclimation periods were absent in tests with soil reserved from prior PAH degradation tests. It was judged that the apparent acclimation period resulted from the time for a small population of organisms capable of PAH degradation to attain sufficient densities to exhibit detectable PAH reduction. About 0.9 percent of the naturally occurring soil organic carbon could be mineralized under denitrification conditions, and this accounted for the greater proportion of the nitrate depletion. The mineralization of the labile fraction of the soil organic carbon via microbial denitrification occurred without an observed acclimation period, and was rapid compared to PAH degradation. Under nitrate-limiting conditions the PAH compounds were stable owing to the depletion of nitrate via the more rapid process of soil organic carbon mineralization. The microbial degradation of the PAH compound depends on the interrelationships between: the desorption kinetics and the reversibility of desorption of sorbed compound from the soil, the concentration of PAH-degrading microorganisms, and the competing reaction for nitrate utilization via mineralization of the labile fraction of naturally occurring soil organic carbon. 44 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Warmer and drier conditions and nitrogen fertilizer application altered methanotroph abundance and methane emissions in a vegetable soil.

    PubMed

    Ran, Yu; Xie, Jianli; Xu, Xiaoya; Li, Yong; Liu, Yapeng; Zhang, Qichun; Li, Zheng; Xu, Jianming; Di, Hongjie

    2017-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas, and soil can both be a source and sink for atmospheric CH4. It is not clear how future climate change may affect soil CH4 emissions and related microbial communities. The aim of this study was to determine the interactive effects of a simulated warmer and drier climate scenarios and the application of different nitrogen (N) sources (urea and manure) on CH4 emissions and related microbial community abundance in a vegetable soil. Greenhouses were used to control simulated climate conditions which gave 2.99 °C warmer and 6.2% lower water content conditions. The field experiment was divided into two phases. At the beginning of phase II, half of the greenhouses were removed to study possible legacy effects of the simulated warmer and drier conditions. The responses in methanogen and methanotroph abundance to a simulated climate change scenario were determined using real-time PCR. The results showed that the simulated warmer and drier conditions in the greenhouses significantly decreased CH4 emissions largely due to the lower soil moisture content. For the same reason, CH4 emissions of treatments in phase I were much lower than the same treatments in phase II. The abundance of methanotrophs showed a more significant response than methanogens to the simulated climate change scenario, increasing under simulated drier conditions. Methanogenic community abundance remained low, except where manure was applied which provided a source of organic C that stimulated methanogen growth. Soil moisture content was a major driver for methanotroph abundance and strongly affected CH4 emissions. The application of N source decreased CH4 emissions probably because of increased methanotrophic activity. CH4 emissions were positively correlated to methanogenic abundance and negatively correlated to methanotrophic abundance. These results demonstrate that projected future climate change conditions can have a feedback impact on CH4 emissions from the

  9. Genotype and neuropsychological response inhibition as resilience promoters for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder under conditions of psychosocial adversity.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Joel; Nikolas, Molly; Friderici, Karen; Park, Leeyoung; Zucker, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Whereas child personality, IQ, and family factors have been identified as enabling a resilient response to psychosocial adversity, more direct biological resilience factors have been less well delineated. This is particularly so for child attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which has received less attention from a resilience perspective than have associated externalizing disorders. Children from two independent samples were classified as resilient if they avoided developing ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), or conduct disorder (CD) in the face of family adversity. Two protective factors were examined for their potential relevance to prefrontal brain development: neuropsychological response inhibition, as assessed by the Stop task, and a composite catecholamine genotype risk score. Resilient children were characterized in both samples by more effective response inhibition, although the effect in the second sample was very small. Genotype was measured in Sample 1, and a composite high risk genotype index was developed by summing presence of risk across markers on three genes expressed in prefrontal cortex: dopamine transporter, dopamine D4 receptor, and noradrenergic alpha-2 receptor. Genotype was a reliable resilience indicator against development of ADHD and CD, but not ODD, in the face of psychosocial adversity. Results illustrate potential neurobiological protective factors related to development of prefrontal cortex that may enable children to avoid developing ADHD and CD in the presence of psychosocial adversity.

  10. Protective effect of Klebsiella bacteria on lawn grasses under conditions of soil salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emtsev, V. T.; Sokolova, A. Ya.; Selitskaya, O. V.

    2010-07-01

    The protective effect of the inoculation of lawn grasses grown under conditions of soil salinization with bacteria of the Klebsiella genus ( K. planticola and K. pneumoniae) was demonstrated. It was found that K. pneumoniae improves the plant growth under conditions of a high concentration of sodium chloride. It was also shown that the inoculation of lawn grasses with these bacteria optimizes the morphophysiological parameters of the plants and increases the number of mitoses in the apical parts of the roots, which leads to a less significant decrease in the mitotic index under the impact of salinization. The capacity of K. planticola to penetrate into the plants may favor the activation of protective mechanisms improving the immunological status of the plants and, hence, their tolerance to salinization.

  11. Effect of land abandonment on soil organic carbon fractions along a precipitation gradient in Mediterranean conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabarron-Galeote, Miguel A.; Trigalet, Sylvain; van Wesemael, Bas

    2015-04-01

    Land abandonment has been the main land use change in rural European Mediterranean areas over the last decades. The secondary succession process following land abandonment is strongly affected by precipitation, which in consequence determines the parallel change of soil organic carbon (SOC) and other soil properties. SOC is usually assumed to increase due to the intensification of plant residues inputs to soil, above as well below ground. However, SOC is composed of different fractions with contrasting resistance to decomposition that can have different responses to land abandonment. The objectives of this study are: i) to determine the net effect of land abandonment on the different soil organic carbon fractions; ii) to assess the relation between vegetation evolution and SOC fractions; iii) to establish the conditions with the greater potential to store stable SOC along a precipitation gradient. Three field sites with contrasting annual precipitation (GAU: 1080.5 mm yr-1- ALM: 650 mm yr-1- GER: 350 mm yr-1) were selected. On each site Fields abandoned in different periods, as verified on aerial photographs taken in 1956, 1977, 1984, 1998, 2001, 2004 and 2009, were selected using a chronosequence approach. The fractionation protocol implemented was based on the separation of different soil particle sizes, which are associated to SOC pools with different degree of stability. Samples of the first 10 cm of soil were added to a sodium-hexametaphosphate (HMP) solution (40 g L-1) and shaken horizontally for 1h (150 r.p.m.). The soil solution was then sieved consecutively through two meshes of 250 µm and 50 µm, obtaining the following fractions: i) >250 µm (coarse fraction), it contains coarse particles (coarse sand) and plant residues (particulate organic matter, POM), easily decomposable, that constitute the more labile SOC pool; ii) 50 - 250 µm (mid fraction), it contains fine sand, fine POM easily decomposable and stable microaggregates, that contains SOC

  12. Biological dinitrogen fixation by selected soil cyanobacteria as affected by strain origin, morphotype, and light conditions.

    PubMed

    Hrčková, K; Simek, M; Hrouzek, P; Lukešová, A

    2010-09-01

    The potential for N(2) fixation by heterocystous cyanobacteria isolated from soils of different geographical areas was determined as nitrogenase activity (NA) using the acetylene reduction assay. Morphology of cyanobacteria had the largest influence on NA determined under light conditions. NA was generally higher in species lacking thick slime sheaths. The highest value (1446 nmol/h C(2)H(4) per g fresh biomass) was found in the strain of branched cyanobacterium Hassalia (A Has1) from the polar region. A quadratic relationship between NA and biomass was detected in the Tolypothrix group under light conditions. The decline of NA in dark relative to light conditions ranged from 37 to 100 % and differed among strains from distinct geographical areas. Unlike the NA of temperate and tropical strains, whose decline in dark relative to light was 24 and 17 %, respectively, the NA of polar strains declined to 1 % in the dark. This difference was explained by adaptation to different light conditions in temperate, tropical, and polar habitats. NA was not related to the frequency of heterocysts in strains of the colony-forming cyanobacterium Nostoc. Colony morphology and life cycle are therefore more important for NA then heterocyst frequency. NA values probably reflect the environmental conditions where the cyanobacterium was isolated and the physiological and morphological state of the strain.

  13. An evaluation of models of bare soil evaporation formulated with different land surface boundary conditions and assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, Kathleen M.; Ngo, Viet V.; Cihan, Abdullah; Sakaki, Toshihiro; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2012-12-01

    Bare soil evaporation is a key process for water exchange between the land and the atmosphere and an important component of the water balance. However, there is no agreement on the best modeling methodology to determine evaporation under different atmospheric boundary conditions. Also, there is a lack of directly measured soil evaporation data for model validation to compare these methods to establish the validity of their mathematical formulations. Thus, a need exists to systematically compare evaporation estimates using existing methods to experimental observations. The goal of this work is to test different conceptual and mathematical formulations that are used to estimate evaporation from bare soils to critically investigate various formulations and surface boundary conditions. Such a comparison required the development of a numerical model that has the ability to incorporate these boundary conditions. For this model, we modified a previously developed theory that allows nonequilibrium liquid/gas phase change with gas phase vapor diffusion to better account for dry soil conditions. Precision data under well-controlled transient heat and wind boundary conditions were generated, and results from numerical simulations were compared with experimental data. Results demonstrate that the approaches based on different boundary conditions varied in their ability to capture different stages of evaporation. All approaches have benefits and limitations, and no one approach can be deemed most appropriate for every scenario. Comparisons of different formulations of the surface boundary condition validate the need for further research on heat and vapor transport processes in soil for better modeling accuracy.

  14. Use of the Priestley-Taylor evaporation equation for soil water limited conditions in a small forest clearcut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, A.L.; Childs, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Priestley-Taylor equation, a simplification of the Penman equation, was used to allow calculations of evapotranspiration under conditions where soil water supply limits evapotranspiration. The Priestley-Taylor coefficient, ??, was calculated to incorporate an exponential decrease in evapotranspiration as soil water content decreases. The method is appropriate for use when detailed meteorological measurements are not available. The data required to determine the parameter for the ?? coefficient are net radiation, soil heat flux, average air temperature, and soil water content. These values can be obtained from measurements or models. The dataset used in this report pertains to a partially vegetated clearcut forest site in southwest Oregon with soil depths ranging from 0.48 to 0.70 m and weathered bedrock below that. Evapotranspiration was estimated using the Bowen ratio method, and the calculated Priestley-Taylor coefficient was fitted to these estimates by nonlinear regression. The calculated Priestley-Taylor coefficient (?????) was found to be approximately 0.9 when the soil was near field capacity (0.225 cm3 cm-3). It was not until soil water content was less than 0.14 cm3 cm-3 that soil water supply limited evapotranspiration. The soil reached a final residual water content near 0.05 cm3 cm-3 at the end of the growing season. ?? 1991.

  15. Soil Water Content Sensor Response to Organic Matter Content under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Fares, Ali; Awal, Ripendra; Bayabil, Haimanote K.

    2016-01-01

    Studies show that the performance of soil water content monitoring (SWCM) sensors is affected by soil physical and chemical properties. However, the effect of organic matter on SWCM sensor responses remains less understood. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to (i) assess the effect of organic matter on the accuracy and precision of SWCM sensors using a commercially available soil water content monitoring sensor; and (ii) account for the organic matter effect on the sensor’s accuracy. Sand columns with seven rates of oven-dried sawdust (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%, 12% and 18% v/v, used as an organic matter amendment), thoroughly mixed with quartz sand, and a control without sawdust were prepared by packing quartz sand in two-liter glass containers. Sand was purposely chosen because of the absence of any organic matter or salinity, and also because sand has a relatively low cation exchange capacity that will not interfere with the treatment effect of the current work. Sensor readings (raw counts) were monitored at seven water content levels (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.18, 0.24, and 0.30 cm3 cm−3) by uniformly adding the corresponding volumes of deionized water in addition to the oven-dry one. Sensor readings were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the organic matter level and water content. Sensor readings were strongly correlated with the organic matter level (R2 = 0.92). In addition, the default calibration equation underestimated the water content readings at the lower water content range (<0.05 cm3 cm−3), while it overestimated the water content at the higher water content range (>0.05 cm3 cm−3). A new polynomial calibration equation that uses raw count and organic matter content as covariates improved the accuracy of the sensor (RMSE = 0.01 cm3 cm−3). Overall, findings of this study highlight the need to account for the effect of soil organic matter content to improve the accuracy and precision of the tested sensor under different soils and

  16. Soil Water Content Sensor Response to Organic Matter Content under Laboratory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Fares, Ali; Awal, Ripendra; Bayabil, Haimanote K

    2016-08-05

    Studies show that the performance of soil water content monitoring (SWCM) sensors is affected by soil physical and chemical properties. However, the effect of organic matter on SWCM sensor responses remains less understood. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to (i) assess the effect of organic matter on the accuracy and precision of SWCM sensors using a commercially available soil water content monitoring sensor; and (ii) account for the organic matter effect on the sensor's accuracy. Sand columns with seven rates of oven-dried sawdust (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%, 12% and 18% v/v, used as an organic matter amendment), thoroughly mixed with quartz sand, and a control without sawdust were prepared by packing quartz sand in two-liter glass containers. Sand was purposely chosen because of the absence of any organic matter or salinity, and also because sand has a relatively low cation exchange capacity that will not interfere with the treatment effect of the current work. Sensor readings (raw counts) were monitored at seven water content levels (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12, 0.18, 0.24, and 0.30 cm³ cm(-3)) by uniformly adding the corresponding volumes of deionized water in addition to the oven-dry one. Sensor readings were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the organic matter level and water content. Sensor readings were strongly correlated with the organic matter level (R² = 0.92). In addition, the default calibration equation underestimated the water content readings at the lower water content range (<0.05 cm³ cm(-3)), while it overestimated the water content at the higher water content range (>0.05 cm³ cm(-3)). A new polynomial calibration equation that uses raw count and organic matter content as covariates improved the accuracy of the sensor (RMSE = 0.01 cm³ cm(-3)). Overall, findings of this study highlight the need to account for the effect of soil organic matter content to improve the accuracy and precision of the tested sensor under different soils and

  17. Pupal development of Aethina tumida (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) in thermo-hygrometric soil conditions encountered in temperate climates.

    PubMed

    Bernier, M; Fournier, V; Giovenazzo, P

    2014-04-01

    The pupal development of Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) was studied at various combinations of thermo-hygrometric soil conditions (temperatures of 16, 18, and 20 degrees C and soil water content levels of 0.37, 0.56, and 0.73 m3 water per cubic meter of dry soil) representative of southeastern Canada. Survivorship and development duration of A. tumida pupae, as well as sex ratio and life span of emerging adults, were assessed. Assays were conducted in growth chambers on an average of 50 third-instar larvae per thermo-hygrometric combination. Results show that survivorship of pupae decreased with lower temperature and higher soil water content. Pupal development time shortened as temperature increased (69-78 d at 16 degrees C, 47-54 d at 18 degrees C, and 36-39 d at 20 degrees C), but was longer in dryer soil. Optimal soil water content for pupal development was 0.56 m3 water per cubic meter of soil. We estimated that the minimum development temperature for pupae is between 10.2 and 13.2 degrees C, depending on soil water content. The sex ratio of emerging adults was influenced by soil water content. We measured one female to one male for dry and intermediately wet soils and three females to one male for wet soils. Higher soil water content reduced the life span of emerging adults by half. This study contributes to a better understanding of A. tumida population dynamics in eastern Canada.

  18. Sensible heat balance estimates of transient soil ice contents for freezing and thawing conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil ice content is an important component for winter soil hydrology. The sensible heat balance (SHB) method using measurements from heat pulse probes (HPP) is a possible way to determine transient soil ice content. In a previous study, in situ soil ice contents estimates with the SHB method were in...

  19. Effect of climatic conditions on the development of soil water repellency in soils treated with the wastewater of the olive oil production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaumann, Gabriele E.; Peikert, Benjamin; Tamimi, Nesreen; Steinmetz, Zacharias; Fischer, Jonas; Bibus, Daniel; Marei Sawalha, Amer; Dag, Arnon

    2014-05-01

    The disposal of untreated wastewater on soil can induce severe water repellency. The final degree of water repellency may strongly depend on the environmental conditions prevailing during and after disposal. Also unpolluted soil can develop severe water repellency upon exposure to extreme heat or draught events. The induced water repellency can be either persistent or of transient nature. However, the underlying mechanisms are not yet completely understood. The objective of this study was to investigate how climatic conditions determine the development and persistence of water repellency following wastewater disposal. Our hypothesis was that amphiphilic organic wastewater compounds physically sorb onto surfaces, which renders them hydrophobic. Depending on temperature and moisture, those compounds are degraded, chemically incorporated into SOM, or irreversibly sorbed to soil particles during the time after the first waste water-soil contact. According to our hypothesis, biological communities favor degradation and transformation of OM of waste water into SOM under moist soil conditions. This would reduce the initial hydrophobization. In contrast, drying irreversibly renders soil hydrophobic and phytotoxic due to immobilization of OMW OM in the soil. To test these hypotheses, we investigated effects of olive mil wastewater (OMW), the effluent originating from olive oil production, directly applied to soil. In Israel and Palastine, olive oil production generates large amounts of OMW within a short period of time between November and January. As sewage facilities do not accept OMW, it is often disposed onto soil, which leads to severe soil and groundwater pollution. If the above mentioned hypotheses match, pollution and hydrophobization might be minimized if the wastewater is discharged at the right time of the year. In order to test this, we conducted field (2-3 years) and laboratory (60 days) experiments in Israel (Gilat, arid climate) and in the West Bank (Bait

  20. Soil Conditions That Can Alter Natural Suppression of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Ohio Specialty Crop Soils.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michele L; LeJeune, Jeffrey T; McSpadden Gardener, Brian

    2015-07-01

    Food-borne pathogen persistence in soil fundamentally affects the production of safe vegetables and small fruits. Interventions that reduce pathogen survival in soil would have positive impacts on food safety by minimizing preharvest contamination entering the food chain. Laboratory-controlled studies determined the effects of soil pH, moisture content, and soil organic matter (SOM) on the survivability of this pathogen through the creation of single-parameter gradients. Longitudinal field-based studies were conducted in Ohio to quantify the extent to which field soils suppressed Escherichia coli O157:H7 survival. In all experiments, heat-sensitive microorganisms were responsible for the suppression of E. coli O157 in soil regardless of the chemical composition of the soil. In laboratory-based studies, soil pH and moisture content were primary drivers of E. coli O157 survival, with increases in pH after 48 h (P = 0.02) and decreases in moisture content after 48 h (P = 0.007) significantly increasing the log reduction of E. coli O157 numbers. In field-based experiments, E. coli O157 counts from both heated and unheated samples were sensitive to both season (P = 0.004 for heated samples and P = 0.001 for unheated samples) and region (P = 0.002 for heated samples and P = 0.001 for unheated samples). SOM was observed to be a more significant driver of pathogen suppression than the other two factors after 48 h at both planting and harvest (P = 0.002 at planting and P = 0.058 at harvest). This research reinforces the need for both laboratory-controlled experiments and longitudinal field-based experiments to unravel the complex relationships controlling the survival of introduced organisms in soil.

  1. Effects of initial soil condition on the effectiveness of biological geotextiles in reducing interrill runoff and erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, T.; Poesen, J.

    2009-04-01

    The effectiveness of a surface cover material (e.g. geotextiles, rock fragments, mulches, vegetation) in reducing runoff and soil erosion rates is often only assessed by the fraction of the soil surface covered. However, there are indications that soil structure has important effects on the runoff and erosion-reducing effectiveness of the cover materials. This study investigates the impact of initial soil condition (i.e. fine tilth versus sealed soil surface) on the effectiveness of biological geotextiles in increasing infiltration rates and in reducing runoff and interrill erosion rates on a medium and steep slope gradient. Rainfall was simulated during 60 minutes with an intensity of 67 mm h-1 on an interrill erosion plot having two slope gradients (i.e. 15 and 45%) and filled with an erodible sandy loam. Five biological and three simulated geotextiles with different cover percentage were tested on two simulated initial soil conditions (i.e. fine tilth and sealed soil surface). Final infiltration rates on a sealed soil surface (7.5-18.5 mm h-1) are observed after ca. 10 minutes of rainfall compared to ca. 50 minutes of rainfall on an initial seedbed (16.4-56.7 mm h-1). On the two tested slope gradients, significantly (α = 0.05) smaller runoff coefficients (RC) are observed on an initial seedbed (8.2% < RC < 59.8%) compared to a sealed soil surface (75.7% < RC < 87.0%). On an initial seedbed, decreasing RC are observed with an increasing simulated geotextile cover. However, on an initial sealed soil surface no significant effect of simulated geotextile cover on RC is observed. On a 15% slope gradient, calculated b-values from the mulch factor equation equalled 0.054 for an initial fine tilth and 0.022 for a sealed soil surface, indicating a higher effectiveness of geotextiles in reducing interrill erosion on a fine tilth compared to a sealed soil surface. Therefore, this study demonstrates the importance of applying geotextiles on the soil surface before the

  2. Impact of sewage sludge conditioning and dewatering on the fate of nonylphenol in sludge-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Kouloumbos, V N; Schäffer, A; Corvini, P F-X

    2008-08-01

    The fate of (14)C-labelled p353-nonylphenol (NP) in soils amended with differently treated sludges originating from the same precursor sludge was assessed. The effects of commonly applied conditioning and dewatering techniques were investigated. Nonylphenol was degraded considerably faster in soils amended with liquid sludge, while a significant portion of it remained intact and extractable by organic solvents when sludge had been centrifuged before soil amendment. Mineralization was reduced or even inhibited when freeze-thaw or lime conditioning was applied, respectively. Flocculation by an acrylamide-based cationic polymer led to the formation of a nitro-addition product of nonylphenol in soil, as well to decreased mineralization rates after prolonged incubation times. Possible mechanisms underlying the observations are suggested and discussed.

  3. Glyphosate transport through weathered granite soils under irrigated and non-irrigated conditions--Barcelona, Spain.

    PubMed

    Candela, Lucila; Caballero, Juan; Ronen, Daniel

    2010-05-15

    The transport of Glyphosate ([N-phosphonomethyl] glycine), AMPA (aminomethylphosphonic acid, CH(6)NO(3)P), and Bromide (Br(-)) has been studied, in the Mediterranean Maresme area of Spain, north of Barcelona, where groundwater is located at a depth of 5.5m. The unsaturated zone of weathered - granite soils was characterized in adjacent irrigated and non-irrigated experimental plots where 11 and 10 boreholes were drilled, respectively. At the non irrigated plot, the first half of the period was affected by a persistent and intense rainfall. After 69 days of application residues of Glyphosate up to 73.6 microgg(-1) were detected till a depth of 0.5m under irrigated conditions, AMPA, analyzed only in the irrigated plot was detected till a depth of 0.5m. According to the retardation coefficient of Glyphosate as compared to that of Br(-) for the topsoil and subsoil (80 and 83, respectively) and the maximum observed migration depth of Br(-) (2.9 m) Glyphosate and AMPA should have been detected till a depth of 0.05 m only. Such migration could be related to the low content of organic matter and clays in the soils; recharge generated by irrigation and heavy rain, and possible preferential solute transport and/or colloidal mediated transport.

  4. Methane production and growth of microorganisms under different moisture conditions in soils with added chitin and without it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manucharova, N. A.; Yaroslavtsev, A. M.; Kornyushenko, E. G.; Stepanov, A. L.; Smagin, A. V.; Zvyagintsev, D. G.; Sudnitsyn, I. I.

    2007-08-01

    The limits of soil moisture providing the possibility of methane production and growth of microorganisms in soils with added chitin and without it were determined. Samples of gray forest, soddy-podzolic, gley taiga, chestnut, and chernozemic soils were studied. It was found that methane emission increases significantly under a high soil moisture content in the presence of chitin. The increase of the soil moisture up to the maximum water-holding capacity enhanced the emission of methane by two-six times. The dynamics of the methane emission from the soils in the course of microbial successions initiated by the addition of chitin or by the soil moistening to different levels were studied by the gas-chromatographic method. The population density and biomass of fungal, bacterial, and actinomycetic complexes under different moister levels were studied by the method of luminescent microscopy. It was determined that many microorganisms participate in the transformation of chitin in the soil under conditions of oxygen deficiency (upon the increased moisture content). Prokaryotes dominated by actinomycetes were the group that increased its biomass most actively (the biomass doubling took place).

  5. Arthropod assemblage related to volatile cues in flowering wheat: interaction between aphid herbivory and soil conditions as induction factors.

    PubMed

    Lenardis, Adriana E; Szpeiner, Alfonsina; Ghersa, Claudio M

    2014-04-01

    Volatile cues released by plants play an important role in plant-insect interactions and are influenced by pests or soil conditions affecting plant metabolism. Field microcosm experiments were used to characterize arthropod spontaneous assemblies in homogenous unstressed wheat patches exposed to volatile cues coming from wheat plants with different levels of stress. The design was a factorial completely randomized block design with three replications. Source wheat pots combined two stress factors: 1) soil degradation level: high and low, and 2) aphid herbivory: with (A) and without (B). Eighteen experimental units consisted of source stressed wheat pots, connected by tubes conducting the volatile cues to sink wheat patches. These patches were located at the end of the tubes placed in a flowering wheat field. Arthropod assemblies on wheat sinks were different between years and they were associated to the source cues. Soil condition was the main discriminating factor among arthropods when a clear contrast between high and low soil degradation was observed, whereas aphid herbivory was the main discriminating factor when soil condition effects were absent. Main soil properties related with arthropods assembly were Mg and K in the first year and cation exchange capacity, total nitrogen, and pH in the second year of experiment. According to this study, spontaneous arthropod distributions in the homogeneous, unstressed wheat patch responded to the volatile cues coming from wheat sources growing in particular soil conditions. It is possible to suggest that soil-plant-herbivore interactions change wheat cues and this phenomenon produces significant differences in neighboring arthropod community structure.

  6. AgRISTARS: Early warning and crop condition assessment. Plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator); Nixon, P. R.; Gausman, H. W.; Namken, L. N.; Leamer, R. W.; Richardson, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Emissive (10.5 to 12.5 microns) and reflective (0.55 to 1.1 microns) data for ten day scenes and infrared data for six night scenes of southern Texas were analyzed for plant cover, soil temperature, freeze, water stress, and evapotranspiration. Heat capacity mapping mission radiometric temperatures were: within 2 C of dewpoint temperatures, significantly correlated with variables important in evapotranspiration, and related to freeze severity and planting depth soil temperatures.

  7. Plant uptake and determination of arsenic species in soil solution under flooded conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Onken, B.M.; Hossner, L.R.

    1995-03-01

    Previous studies have not identified the different As species present in soil systems and determined if effective differences exist between As species with respect to plant parameters such as growth rate and As uptake. This study determined the species and concentrations of As present in soil solution of flooded soils and correlated them to As concentration, P concentration, an growth rate of plants grown in treated soils. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) was grown in two soils treated with 0, 5, 25, 35, and 45 mg As kg{sup -1} soil added as either Na-arsenate or Na-arsenite. Soil solution samples and plant samples were collected over a period of 60 d. The As concentration of rice plants best correlated to the mean soil solution arsenate concentration in a Beaumont clay (fine, montmorillonitic, thermic Entic Pelludert) and to the mean soil solution arsenite concentration in a Midland silt loam (fine, montmorillonitic, thermic Typic Ochraqualf). In both soils, plant P concentration was best correlated to the amount of As added to the soil rather than any soil solution As concentration. Plant weight was best correlated to the mean soil solution arsenate concentration in both soils. The rate of As uptake by plants increased as the rate of plant growth increased. Plants grown in soils treated with As had higher rates of As uptake for similar rates of growth when compared with plants in untreated soils. However, growth per unit of As uptake was higher for plants in untreated soils than plants in As treated soils. 31 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Examination of Technetium Transport Through Soils Under Contrasting Redox Conditions: Batch and Column Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dozier, R.; Montgomery, D.; Wylie, E. M.; Dogan, M.; Moysey, S. M.; Powell, B. A.; Martinez, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    Experiments were performed under various reducing conditions to evaluate the transport behavior of technetium-99 (99Tc) in the presence of sandy clay loam soil from the Savannah River Site (SRS) and goethite, magnetite, and iron sulfide, which were selected for their increasing reducing potential. The experiments were conducted to investigate how redox reaction equilibria and rates affect the overall mobility of 99Tc as it transitions between the mobile Tc(VII) and immobile Tc(IV). Under oxygen-rich conditions, batch sorption isotherms measured for TcO4- across the concentration range 0.5 to 50 μg/L were linear with distribution coefficients (Kd) of 0.78 mL/g or lower, with decreasing sorption for goethite, magnetite, and iron sulfide, respectively. Addition of Na2S resulted in a marked increase in apparent 99Tc sorption to the solid phase, with Kd of 43 mL/g, 35 mL/g, and 29 mL/g, following the same mineral trend as previously. The increased Kd values are possibly due to reduction of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), resulting in the formation of TcO2(s). SRS soil batch sorption isotherms measured for TcO4- across the same concentration range were also linear, with Kd of 0.7 mL/g for unadjusted pH, 5.1 mL/g for pH of around 6, and 6.7 mL/g for pH of around 4. Kinetic batch sorption tests showed less than 10% 99Tc sorption in an oxidizing environment and greater than 95% sorption in a reducing environment, with both reactions occurring on the order of minutes. In contrast, desorption experiments initiated by transferring the samples from a reducing environment (0.1% H2(g)/99.9% N2(g)) to atmospheric conditions resulted in a slow desorption step on the order of days. Column experiments conducted with the SRS sands indicate a retardation factor of 1.17 for 99Tc under oxygen rich conditions. Additional column experiments are being conducted to evaluate 99Tc transport dependencies on transitions between oxygen rich and poor conditions.

  9. Fate of thiodicarb and its metabolite methomyl in sandy loam soil under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Sushma; Chauhan, Reena; Kumari, Beena; Singh, Rajvir

    2015-07-01

    Fate of thiodicarb and its major metabolite in sandy loam soil were studied by applying thiodicarb (Larvin 75 WP) at 500 and 1000 g a. i. ha(-1) under laboratory conditions. Samples drawn periodically were analysed on GC-FTD equipped with capillary column. The average initial deposits of total thiodicarb (thiodicarb and methomyl) were 0.025 and 0.035 mg kg(-1) at single and double dosages, respectively. Residues of thiodicarb reached below the determination level (BDL) of 0.005 mg kg(-1) after 15 days. Half-life periods for total thiodicarb were calculated to be 5.90 and 8.29 days at two doses, respectively, following first-order kinetics.

  10. Introducing lower boundary conditions perturbations in a convection-permitting ensemble system: sensitivity to soil moisture perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, Riccardo; Loglisci, Nicola

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the behavior of the high-resolution COSMO model, having convection explicitly solved, to different soil moisture initializations. This work is devoted to understand if and how the model is sensitive to the initial condition of the soil water content. Four different case studies, representing four different meteorological regimes, have been selected for such a purpose using different soil moisture fields prepared ad hoc. Results confirm that the model is very sensitive to the perturbation of the initial conditions of the soil water content, showing a significant spread increase in main prognostic variables, near the soil as well as upper in the atmosphere. These results suggest that an ensemble system, based on a high-resolution convection-permitting model, could benefit in terms of spread increase if a perturbation of the initial conditions of the soil moisture would be added to the classic perturbation of the atmosphere. For an evaluation of the performances of this kind of ensemble system, a comparison with observations should be performed.

  11. Nitrous oxide emissions from soils in southern Poland under various tillage conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkowski, Michal; Zieba, Damian; Ciaciek, Klaudia; Necki, Jaroslaw; Rozanski, Kazimierz

    2015-04-01

    Due to close ties of nitrogen cycle with the production of food, appropriate mitigation policies need to be considered in order to reduce the impact of reactive N compounds on both human health and the environment. These policies strongly rely on quantitative information with respect to fluxes of reactive nitrogen compounds to the atmosphere and mechanisms controlling those fluxes on a various time and space scales. One of these compounds is nitrous oxide - currently the most important human-emitted ozone depleting substance and one of the most important greenhouse gases. In this study, which is a part of broader, regional (Southern Poland) analysis of nitrous oxide circulation, we present the results of field measurements performed at the Institute of Plant Acclimatization and Husbandry (ZDHAR) in Grodkowice (Malopolska). Several representative sites have been selected for measurements of N2O emissions during two campaigns - in spring (March) and autumn (October) 2014. The investigated crops were chosen to represent the regional agriculture and included wheat, canola and maize under various tillage conditions (with and without tilling), as well as an uncultivated grassland as a control site. The static chamber method was chosen to quantify soil-atmosphere N2O fluxes. Chamber enclosures have been performed every 3-5 days, depending on the conditions prevailing at the sites during the intermediate periods (e.g. rainfall or fertilization events). From each enclosure, five 50-ml air samples have been collected for subsequent analysis of nitrous oxide concentrations. Well-established gas chromatography methods, with a precision of a single N2O measurement better than 0.5 ppb were employed. The measured concentrations were then used in a linear emission model to calculate N2O fluxes. Other trace gases (CH4, CO2, SF6) were also measured in each sample for quality control purposes. Result for both campaigns show large variability of N2O emissions, with maximum fluxes in

  12. Experimental study on evaporation from seasonally frozen soils under various water, solute and groundwater conditions in Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mousong; Huang, Jiesheng; Wu, Jingwei; Tan, Xiao; Jansson, Per-Erik

    2016-04-01

    Soil freezing and thawing significantly impact water balance in cold regions. To improve estimations of evaporation from seasonally frozen and saline soils, field experiments representing various water and solute conditions were conducted during a 5-month-period in Inner Mongolia, China. A mass balance method was used to estimate evaporation from frost tubes (5.5 × 300 cm) with treatments combining three solute contents (0.2%, 0.4%, and 0.6% g g-1 dry soil) with three initial groundwater table depth (GWTDs) (2.0, 1.5, and 1.0 m). The dynamics of water, heat and solute transport in the frost tubes and in field plots were also investigated. Seasonal changes in evaporation rates were observed during soil freezing/thawing periods. Low evaporation rates were maintained when the soil was deeply frozen (e.g., in P3), and relatively higher values occurred at the beginning and the end of the experiments (e.g., in P1 and P5). The cumulative evaporation amount increased with an increase in initial solute content and declined with a lowering of the initial GWTDs. Solute accumulation with water in the surface layer during freezing decreased the osmotic potential in soil, resulting in obvious freezing point depressions and higher liquid water contents in the uppermost layer of soil. During the soil thawing periods, no evidence of any control of water availability on evaporation was noticed, although the surface soil contained large amounts of water. This study has led to an improved understanding of the coupled effects of water, heat and solute on evaporation from seasonally frozen saline soils and also has important implications for water and energy balance studies in cold regions.

  13. Emissions of 1,3-dichloropropene and chloropicrin after soil fumigation under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil fumigation is an important agronomic practice in the production of many high-value vegetable and fruit crops. The use of soil fumigant chemicals can lead to excessive atmospheric emissions and information is needed to develop best management practices so that use of soil fumigants does not har...

  14. Soil biochemical properties and microbial resilience in agroforestry systems: effects on wheat growth under controlled drought and flooding conditions.

    PubMed

    Rivest, David; Lorente, Miren; Olivier, Alain; Messier, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Agroforestry is increasingly viewed as an effective means of maintaining or even increasing crop and tree productivity under climate change while promoting other ecosystem functions and services. This study focused on soil biochemical properties and resilience following disturbance within agroforestry and conventional agricultural systems and aimed to determine whether soil differences in terms of these biochemical properties and resilience would subsequently affect crop productivity under extreme soil water conditions. Two research sites that had been established on agricultural land were selected for this study. The first site included an 18-year-old windbreak, while the second site consisted in an 8-year-old tree-based intercropping system. In each site, soil samples were used for the determination of soil nutrient availability, microbial dynamics and microbial resilience to different wetting-drying perturbations and for a greenhouse pot experiment with wheat. Drying and flooding were selected as water stress treatments and compared to a control. These treatments were initiated at the beginning of the wheat anthesis period and maintained over 10 days. Trees contributed to increase soil nutrient pools, as evidenced by the higher extractable-P (both sites), and the higher total N and mineralizable N (tree-based intercropping site) found in the agroforestry compared to the conventional agricultural system. Metabolic quotient (qCO2) was lower in the agroforestry than in the conventional agricultural system, suggesting higher microbial substrate use efficiency in agroforestry systems. Microbial resilience was higher in the agroforestry soils compared to soils from the conventional agricultural system (windbreak site only). At the windbreak site, wheat growing in soils from agroforestry system exhibited higher aboveground biomass and number of grains per spike than in conventional agricultural system soils in the three water stress treatments. At the tree

  15. Effect of operating conditions in soil aquifer treatment on the removals of pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    PubMed

    He, Kai; Echigo, Shinya; Itoh, Sadahiko

    2016-09-15

    Soil aquifer treatment (SAT) is an alternative advanced treatment for wastewater reclamation, and it has the potential to control micropollutants including pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). However, the relationship of operating conditions in SAT and removals of micropollutants was not clear. In this study, the effects of operating conditions on the removals of PPCPs were evaluated by using lab-scale columns and plant pilot-scale reactors under different operating conditions. Firstly, weathered granite soil (WGS), standard sand (SAND) and Toyoura standard sand (TS) have different soil characteristics such as total organic carbon (TOC) and cation exchange capacity (CEC). In the columns with these packing materials, the removals of carboxylic analgesics and antilipidemics were effective regardless packing materials. The removals of antibiotics were more effective in WGS than in TS and SAND, indicating high TOC and CEC enhance the sorption in SAT. Secondly, with the extension of hydraulic retention time (HRT), the removals of sulfamethoxazole, acetaminophen, crotamiton, and antipyrine were improved in WGS columns, and adaptable biodegradation for moderately removable PPCPs was formed. Thirdly, the removal efficiencies of sulfamethoxazole and crotamiton were higher in the WGS column under vadose condition than in the WGS column under saturated condition, because of aerobic condition in WGS column under vadose condition. Though long HRT and vadose condition had positive influence on the removals of several PPCPs such as sulfamethoxazole, WGS column with an HRT of 7days under saturated condition removed most PPCPs.

  16. Fate and stability of nonextractable residues of [{sup 14}C]PAH in contaminated soils under environmental stress conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Eschenbach, A.; Mahro, B.; Wienberg, R.

    1998-09-01

    It has been recognized during recent years that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) may form nonextractable residues in soil and that this process may be stimulated by microbial activities. To use that process intentionally for soil bioremediation, one must ensure that the formed nonextractable PAH residues will not be released from the soil on the long run. The long-term stability of four different nonextractable [{sup 14}C]PAH residues ([{sup 14}C]naphthalene, [{sup 14}C]anthracene, [{sup 14}C]pyrene, and [{sup 14}C]benzo[a]pyrene) was therefore monitored under different ecological stress conditions. It was found that a considerable fraction of the total [{sup 14}C]PAH residues could be released as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from the soil being partly due to a biogenic reduction of the nonextractable {sup 14}C residue fraction. The turnover of this fraction was comparable to the natural turnover rate for humic substances. Neither the addition of humus-degrading microorganisms nor a mechanical stress treatment of the soil structure by freezing and thawing led to a mobilization of the nonextractable [{sup 14}C]PAH residues. However, a significant mobilization of the nonextractable {sup 14}C activity occurred when EDTA was added to the soil. The metal-organic soil complexes were destabilized by this complexing agent and released {sup 14}C activity that was attached to colloidal or dissolved organic matter.

  17. Role of microorganisms in emission of nitrous oxide and methane in pulse cultivated soil under laboratory incubation condition.

    PubMed

    Jena, Jyotsnarani; Ray, Sanak; Srichandan, Haragobinda; Das, Anuradha; Das, Trupti

    2013-03-01

    Soil from a pulse cultivated farmers land of Odisha, India, have been subjected to incubation studies for 40 consecutive days, to establish the impact of various nitrogenous fertilizers and water filled pore space (WFPS) on green house gas emission (N2O & CH4). C2H2 inhibition technique was followed to have a comprehensive understanding about the individual contribution of nitrifiers and denitrifiers towards the emission of N2O. Nevertheless, low concentration of C2H2 (5 ml: flow rate 0.1 kg/cm(2)) is hypothesized to partially impede the metabolic pathways of denitrifying bacterial population, thus reducing the overall N2O emission rate. Different soil parameters of the experimental soil such as moisture, total organic carbon, ammonium content and nitrate-nitrogen contents were measured at regular intervals. Application of external N-sources under different WFPS conditions revealed the diverse role played by the indigenous soil microorganism towards green house gas emission. Isolation of heterotrophic microorganisms (Pseudomonas) from the soil samples, further supported the fact that denitrification might be prevailing during specific conditions thus contributing to N2O emission. Statistical analysis showed that WFPS was the most influential parameter affecting N2O formation in soil in absence of an inhibitor like C2H2.

  18. Transformation and accumulation of PAH and bound residues in soil under extreme conditions - a risk assessment approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschenbach, Annette

    2010-05-01

    The degradation of PAH in contaminated soil does not proceed completely in the majority of cases. However microorganisms which are able to degrade PAH are present in PAH-contaminated soils normally. A total degradation of PAH in contaminated soils is often limited by a lack of bioavailability, which results from a lack of mass transfer. The analytical depletion of contaminants in soil is not only based on degradation processes but also on a fixation or immobilization of the xenobiotic substances as stronger adsorbed to or bound residues in the soil matrix. These bound residues were verified by using 14C-labelled PAH in different soil samples. To evaluate the long term fate of theses PAH-residues the stability and transformation of 14C-labelled non-extractable PAH-residues was investigated in detail under different extreme ecological and climate conditions such as biological stress, freezing and thawing cycles, and chemical worst case conditions. The transformation and remobilization of non-extractable PAH-residues was observed in long-time experiments and was very limited in general (Eschenbach et al. 2001). Only small amounts of non extractable residues were transformed and converted to CO2 and thereby detoxified. However the treatment with a complexing agent led to an increase of extractable 14C-activity. In a further set of experiments the long term risk of a groundwater contamination was assessed. Therefore the elution rate of 14C-PAH was investigated by a routinely usable column test system. It was found that the PAH elution was not solely controlled by desorption processes. The extractable PAH concentrations and elution rates were affected by the mineralization and formation of bound residues as well. For the assessment of the maximum PAH release rate the soil material was treated by extreme and worst case conditions as well. The impact of the elution of bidestillated water, of repeated freeze-thaw cycles and a simulation of acidic rain was investigated. The

  19. Persistence behavior of Fantac biostimulant in chili and soil under subtropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anjana; Bhatia, Gunjan; Srivastava, P C

    2008-05-01

    The persistence of the biostimulant Fantac (N-ATCA) in chili and soil was evaluated at two application rates (0.25 and 0.50 microg g(-1)) by high-performance liquid chromatography. At 0.25 microg g(-1) Fantac persisted up to 3 days in soil and 5 days in chili. However, at 0.50 microg g(-1) Fantac residues persisted up to 5 days both in soil and chili. The dissipation of the biostimulant from soil and chili appeared to occur in a single phase and conformed to first-order kinetics. Half-lives of Fantac in soil and chili were calculated.

  20. Effectiveness of biological geotextiles in reducing runoff and soil loss under different environmental conditions using laboratory and field plot data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, T.

    2009-04-01

    Preliminary investigations suggest biological geotextiles could be an effective and inexpensive soil conservation method, with enormous global potential. Biological geotextiles are a possible temporary alternative for vegetation cover and can offer immediate soil protection. However, limited data are available on the erosion-reducing effects of biological geotextiles. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of selected types of biological geotextile in reducing runoff and soil loss under controlled laboratory conditions and under field conditions reflecting different environments (i.e. continental, temperate and tropical). In laboratory experiments, interrill runoff, interrill erosion and concentrated flow erosion were simulated using various rainfall intensities, flow shear stresses and slope gradients. Field plot data on the effects of biological geotextiles on sheet and rill erosion were collected in several countries under natural rainfall (U.K., Hungary, Lithuania, South Africa, Brazil, China and Thailand). The laboratory experiments indicate that all tested biological geotextiles were effective in reducing interrill runoff (on average 59% of the value for bare soil) and interrill erosion rates (on average 16% of the value for bare soil). Since simulated concentrated flow discharge sometimes flowed below the geotextiles, the effectiveness in reducing concentrated flow erosion was significantly less (on average 59% of the value for bare soil). On field plots, where both interrill and rill erosion occur, all tested geotextiles reduced runoff depth by a mean of 54% of the control value for bare soil and in some cases, runoff depth increased compared to bare soil surfaces, which can be attributed to the impermeable and hydrophobic characteristics of some biological geotextiles. In the field, soil loss rates due to interrill and rill erosion were reduced by a mean of 21% of the value of bare soil by biological geotextiles. This study

  1. Evaluation of the Langmuir model in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool for high soil phosphorus condition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus adsorption by a water treatment residual was tested through Langmuir and linear sorption isotherms and applied in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The objective of this study was to use laboratory and greenhouse experimental phosphorus data to evaluate the performance of a modi...

  2. Simulated soil crust conditions in a chamber system provide new insights on cyanobacterial acclimation to desiccation.

    PubMed

    Raanan, Hagai; Oren, Nadav; Treves, Haim; Berkowicz, Simon M; Hagemann, Martin; Pade, Nadin; Keren, Nir; Kaplan, Aaron

    2016-02-01

    Environmental research often faces two major hurdles: (i) fluctuating spatial and temporal conditions and consequently large variability in the organisms' abundance and performance, and (ii) complex, costly logistics involved in field experiments. Measurements of physiological parameters or molecular analyses often represent single shot experiments. To study desiccation acclimation of filamentous cyanobacteria, the founders and main primary producers in desert biological soil crusts (BSC), we constructed an environmental chamber that can reproducibly and accurately simulate ambient conditions and measure microorganism performance. We show that recovery from desiccation of BSC cyanobacteria and Leptolyngbya ohadii isolated thereof are strongly affected by dehydration rate following morning dew. This effect is most pronounced in cells exposed to high light and temperature in the dry phase. Simultaneous measurements of water content, gas exchange and fluorescence were performed during dehydration. Photosynthetic performance measured by fluorescence begins declining when light intensity reaches values above 100 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), even in fully hydrated cells. In contrast, photosynthetic rates measured using O2 evolution and CO2 uptake increased during rising irradiance to the point where the water content declined below ∼ 50%. Thus, fluorescence cannot serve as a reliable measure of photosynthesis in desert cyanobacteria. The effects of drying on gas exchange are discussed.

  3. Acclimation of microorganisms to harsh soil crust conditions: Experimental and genomic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raanan, Hagai; Kaplan, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSC) are formed by the adhesion of sand particles to cyanobacterial exo- polysaccharides and play an important role in stabilizing sandy desert. Its destruction promotes desertification. These organisms cope with extreme temperatures, excess light and frequent hydration/dehydration cycles; the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. With the genome of newly sequenced Leptolyngbya, isolated from Nizzana BSC, we conduct comparative genomics of three desiccation tolerant cyanobacteria. This yield 46 unique genes, some of them similar to genes involve in sporulation of the gram positive bacteria Bacillus. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms taking place during desiccation we built an environmental chamber capable of simulating dynamic changes of environmental conditions in the crust. This chamber allows us to perform repetitive and accurate desiccation/rehydration experiments and follow cyanobacterial physiological and molecular response to such environmental changes. When we compared fast desiccation (less than 5 min) of isolated cyanobacteria to simulation of natural desiccation, we observed a 60% lower fluorescence recovery rate. The extent of damage from desiccation depended on the stress conditions during the dry period. These results suggest that cyanobacteria activated protection mechanisms in response to desiccation stress but which were not activated in 5 min desiccation tests. Gene expression patterns during desiccation are being analyzed in order to provide a better understanding of desiccation stress protection mechanisms.

  4. [Infiltration characteristics of soil water on loess slope land under intermittent and repetitive rainfall conditions].

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Shao, Ming-An

    2008-07-01

    Based on the experiments of controlled intermittent and repetitive rainfall on slope land, the infiltration and distribution characteristics of soil water on loess slope land were studied. The results showed that under the condition of intermittent rainfall, the cumulative runoff during two rainfall events increased linearly with time, and the wetting front also increased with time. In the interval of the two rainfall events, the wetting front increased slowly, and the infiltration rate was smaller on steeper slope than on flat surface. During the second rainfall event, there was an obvious decreasing trend of infiltration rate with time. The cumulative infiltration on 15 degrees slope land was larger than that of 25 degrees slope land, being 178 mm and 88 mm, respectively. Under the condition of repetitive rainfall, the initial infiltration rate during each rainfall event was relatively large, and during the first rainfall, both the infiltration rate and the cumulative infiltration at various stages were larger than those during the other three rainfall events. However, after the first rainfall, there were no obvious differences in the infiltration rate among the next three rainfall events. The more the rainfall event, the deeper the wetting front advanced.

  5. Fluorescence EEM and FT-IR analyses for examination of soil organic matter compositions affected by incubation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-Ah; Vo-Minh Nguyen, Hang; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of soil drying-rewetting, nitrogen deposition, and temperature rise on the changes in dissolved soil organic matter quantities and their compositions.A PARAFAC method was employed to analyze the changes in the sub-fractions of fluorescent DOM components, which revealed that the dry forest soil accumulated relatively more amino acid type DOM than humic-like substances whereas the other soil groups showed the opposite trend.Nitrogen deposition, and temperature rise did not induce significant changes in the fluorescent DOM components. FT-IR analysis results were compared with the fluorescence EEM results, which provided complementary information about the characteristic functional groups of DOM. A principal component analysis (PCA) with the PARAFAC component scores, and the intensity ratios of representative FT-IR peaks gave a comprehensive interpretation on the changes of DOM compositions in response to the variations in the incubation conditions.

  6. A Comparison of Entomopathogenic Nematode Longevity in Soil under Laboratory Conditions.

    PubMed

    Shapiro-Ilan, David I; Stuart, Robin J; McCoy, Clayton W

    2006-03-01

    We compared the longevity of 29 strains representing 11 entomopathogenic nematode species in soil over 42 to 56 d. A series of five laboratory experiments were conducted with six to eight nematode strains in each and one or more nematode strains in common, so that qualitative comparisons could be made across experiments. Nematodes included Heterorhabditis bacteriophora (four strains), H. indica (Homl), H. marelatus (Point Reyes), H megidis (UK211), H. mexicana (MX4), Steinernema carpocapsae (eight strains), S. diaprepesi, S. feltiae (SN), S. glaseri (NJ43), S. rarum (17C&E), and S. riobrave (nine strains). Substantial within-species variation in longevity was observed in S. carpocapsae, with the Sal strain exhibiting the greatest survival. The Sal strain was used as a standard in all inter-species comparisons. In contrast, little intra-species variation was observed in S. riobrave. Overall, we estimated S. carpocapsae (Sal) and S. diaprepesi to have the highest survival capability. A second level of longevity was observed in H. bacteriophora (Lewiston), H. megidis, S. feltiae, and S. riobrave (3-3 and 355). Lower levels of survivability were observed in other H. bacteriophora strains (Hb, HP88, and Oswego), as well as S. glaseri and S. rarum. Relative to S. glaseri and S. rarum, a lower tier of longevity was observed in H. indica and H. marelatus, and in H. mexicana, respectively. Although nematode persistence can vary under differing soil biotic and abiotic conditions, baseline data on longevity such as those reported herein may be helpful when choosing the best match for a particular target pest.

  7. Speciation and Release Kinetics of Cadmium in an Alkaline Paddy Soil Under Various Flooding Periods and Draining Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    S Khaokaew; R Chaney; G Landrot; M Ginder-Vogel; D Sparks

    2011-12-31

    This study determined Cd speciation and release kinetics in a Cd-Zn cocontaminated alkaline paddy soil, under various flooding periods and draining conditions, by employing synchrotron-based techniques, and a stirred-flow kinetic method. Results revealed that varying flooding periods and draining conditions affected Cd speciation and its release kinetics. Linear least-squares fitting (LLSF) of bulk X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra of the air-dried, and the 1 day-flooded soil samples, showed that at least 50% of Cd was bound to humic acid. Cadmium carbonates were found as the major species at most flooding periods, while a small amount of cadmium sulfide was found after the soils were flooded for longer periods. Under all flooding and draining conditions, at least 14 mg/kg Cd was desorbed from the soil after a 2-hour desorption experiment. The results obtained by micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF) spectroscopy showed that Cd was less associated with Zn than Ca, in most soil samples. Therefore, it is more likely that Cd and Ca will be present in the same mineral phases rather than Cd and Zn, although the source of these two latter elements may originate from the same surrounding Zn mines in the Mae Sot district.

  8. Efficacy of ivermectin and albendazole alone and in combination for treatment of soil-transmitted helminths in pregnancy and adverse events: a randomized open label controlled intervention trial in Masindi district, western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Ndyomugyenyi, Richard; Kabatereine, Narcis; Olsen, Annette; Magnussen, Pascal

    2008-12-01

    A randomized open-label trial, including 834 pregnant women, examined efficacy and recorded adverse events of ivermectin (ivc) and albendazole (alb) alone and combined (comb) on soil-transmitted helminth infections (STHs) in the second trimester of pregnancy. One abortion occurred in the alb group and 10 stillbirths (1, 5, 3, and 1) in the ivc, alb, comb, and the reference group (ref) with no STHs, respectively. Two babies were born with congenital abnormalities (1 [ivc] and 1 [ref]). The prevalence of anemia at first antenatal care (ANC) visit was 20.6% (23.7% [ivc], 21.1% [alb], 22.2% [comb], and 16.1% [ref]). Anemia was reduced to 8.5% at 36 weeks of gestation with 10.9% (ivc), 11.5% (alb), 7.7% (comb), and 6.9% (ref). Hookworm cure rates were 29.4% (ivc), 95.5% (alb), and 92.6% (comb). No severe adverse events were reported by the women after the administration of ivc, alb, or comb during the second trimester of pregnancy, but long-term pharmacovigillance is needed to assess safety of ivc, alb, or comb in pregnancy.

  9. Sorption of vanadium (V) onto natural soil colloids under various solution pH and ionic strength conditions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiuhua; Yu, Lin; Wang, Changzhao; Yin, Xianqiang; Mosa, Ahmed; Lv, Jialong; Sun, Huimin

    2017-02-01

    Batch sorption kinetics and isothermal characteristics of V(V) were investigated on three natural soil colloids (manual loessial soil colloid (MSC), aeolian sandy soil colloid (ASC), and cultivated loessial soil colloid (CSC)) under various solution pH and ionic strength (IS) conditions. Colloids were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). AFM micrographs showed CSC with an aggregated shape with larger particle diameter as compared with ASC and MSC. XRD spectra revealed the presence of different minerals in natural soil colloids including biotite, kaolinite, calcite and quartz, which might contribute to sorption process. The sorption ability decreased with increase of colloidal particle size. The sorption was mainly attributed to complexation by active carboxylate and alcohol groups of colloidal components. Sorption kinetics and isotherms of V(V) onto natural soil colloids were best fitted with Pseudo-second-order and Freundlich models. Langmuir model indicated that sorption capacity of MSC and ASC was comparable (285.7 and 238.1 mg g(-1)); however, CSC exhibited the lowest sorption capacity (41.5 mg g(-1)) due to its larger particle diameter and aggregated shape. The maximum V(V) sorption capacity reached plateau values at a solution pH ranged between 5.0 and 9.0 for MSC and ASC, and 6.0-8.0 for CSC. Sorption capacity of V(V) onto natural soil colloids decreased with increasing IS. Based on result of this study we can conclude that sorption of V(V) onto natural soil colloids is pH- and IS-dependent. These findings provide insights on the remediation of vanadium-contaminated soils.

  10. Mobilization and transport of metal-rich colloidal particles from mine tailings into soil under transient chemical and physical conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cong; Wu, Yaoguo; Hu, Sihai; Raza, Muhammad Ali; Fu, Yilin

    2016-04-01

    Exposed mine tailing wastes with considerable heavy metals can release hazardous colloidal particles into soil under transient chemical and physical conditions. Two-layered packed columns with tailings above and soils below were established to investigate mobilization and transport of colloidal particles from metal-rich mine tailings into soil under transient infiltration ionic strength (IS: 100, 20, 2 mM) and flow rate (FR: 20.7, 41, and 62.3 mm h(-1)), with Cu and Pb as representatives of the heavy metals. Results show that the tailing particles within the colloidal size (below 2 μm) were released from the columns. A step-decrease in infiltration IS and FR enhanced, whereas a step-increase in the IS and FR restrained the release of tailing particles from the column. The effects of step-changing FR were unexpected due to the small size of the released tailing particles (220-342 nm, being not sensitive to hydrodynamic shear force), the diffusion-controlled particle release process and the relatively compact pore structure. The tailing particles present in the solution with tested IS were found negatively charged and more stable than soil particles, which provides favorable conditions for tailing particles to be transported over a long distance in the soil. The mobilization and transport of Cu and Pb from the tailings into soil were mediated by the tailing particles. Therefore, the inherent toxic tailing particles could be considerably introduced into soil under certain conditions (IS reduction or FR decrease), which may result in serious environmental pollution.

  11. Desorption of nitramine and nitroaromatic explosive residues from soils detonated under controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Thomas A; Walsh, Marianne E; McGrath, Christian J; Weiss, Charles A; Jaramillo, Ashley Marie; Trainor, Thomas P

    2011-02-01

    Potentially toxic nitroaromatic and nitramine compounds are introduced onto soils during detonation of explosives. The present study was conducted to investigate the desorption and transformation of explosive compounds loaded onto three soils through controlled detonation. The soils were proximally detonated with Composition B, a commonly used military explosive containing 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), and octahydro 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX). Gas-exchangeable surface areas were measured from pristine and detonated soils. Aqueous batches of detonated soils were prepared by mixing each soil with ultrapure water. Samples were collected for 141 d and concentrations of Composition B compounds and TNT transformation products 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2ADNT), 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4ADNT), and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (1,3,5-TNB) were measured. The RDX, HMX, and TNT concentrations in detonated soil batches exhibited first-order physical desorption for the first, roughly, 10 d and then reached steady state apparent equilibrium within 40 d. An aqueous batch containing powdered Composition B in water was sampled over time to quantify TNT, RDX, and HMX dissolution from undetonated Composition B particles. The TNT, RDX, and HMX concentrations in aqueous batches of pure Composition B reached equilibrium within 6, 11, and 20 d, respectively. Detonated soils exhibited lower gas-exchangeable surface areas than their pristine counterparts. This is likely due to an explosive residue coating on detonated soil surfaces, shock-induced compaction, sintering, and/or partial fusion of soil particles under the intense heat associated with detonation. Our results suggest that explosive compounds loaded to soils through detonation take longer to reach equilibrium concentrations in aqueous batches than soils loaded with explosive residues through aqueous addition. This is likely due to the heterogeneous interactions between

  12. A dual-porous, biophysical void structure model of soil for the understanding of the conditions causing nitrous oxide emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, G. Peter; Maurizio Laudone, G.; Whalle, W. Richard; Bird, Nigel; Gregory, Andrew; Cardenas, Laura; Misselbrook, Tom

    2010-05-01

    periodic boundary conditions, and with a critical percolation path with the correct percolation characteristics and void volume of the macro-porosity of the soil. • A solid phase between the pores of the large unit cell, with the correct volume of the fraction of larger soil aggregates (larger 1 mm). • All the remaining pores of the large unit cell, which are not part of the critical percolation path, filled with smaller unit cells, which account for the micro-porosity of the soil sample. We describe the construction of a model that closely matches the following characteristics of a specific example of typical arable soil, taken from the Warren field of the Rothamsted experimental farm at Woburn, although the model can be used for a wide range of soils: (i) macroporosity and microporosity as measured by the water retention curve, (ii) the shape of the water retention characteristic under a wide range of tensions, (iii) the soil texture, and (iv) the extent of irreducible water content. Process model We will describe the insertion of Michaelis-Menten kinetics and Crank-Nicholson diffusion equations into the precisely scaled model, building on previous diffusion modelling (Laudone, G. M. et al, Chem.Eng.Sci., 2008). Comparison with experiment A comparison with experimental results sheds light on (i) the positional relationships of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria relative to the critical percolation path, (ii) the relationship between the critical percolation path and the preferential / critical flow path (Figure 4), (iii) the extent of ignorance about the reaction kinetics of some of the fundamental processes occurring, (iv) the soil conditions that cause nitrous oxide emission, and (v) the effect of soil compaction on the emission. Acknowledgement This presentation is a summary of the some of the work of the BBSRC funded U.K. soil research consortium "Soil Programme for Quality and Resilience" (BB/E001793/1 and others), of which Matthews is principal investigator.

  13. Response of epikarst hydrochemical changes to soil CO2 and weather conditions at Chenqi, Puding, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rui; Liu, Zaihua; Zeng, Cheng; Zhao, Min

    2012-10-01

    SummaryKarst processes-related carbon cycle, as a result of the water-carbonate rock-CO2 gas-aquatic organism interaction, significantly affects global carbon budget. In karst areas, soil CO2 is a major chemical driving force for the karst processes and has significant impact on the geochemical processes of the water-rock-gas-organism system. Currently, there have been many studies mainly focusing on the hydrochemical responses of the epikarst water system to weather conditions. However, few studies examine the direct correlation between the hydrochemical parameters in epikarst systems and soil CO2. We chose an epikarst spring system at Chenqi, Puding, SW China to monitor both the concentration of soil CO2 and hydrochemical parameters at high-resolution (every 15 min) during July 2010-December 2011 covering a complete hydrologic year, and to investigate the response of hydrochemical changes to soil CO2 and weather conditions. It was found that both soil CO2 and rainfall are the major driving forces for the epikarst hydrochemical variations. The soil CO2 effect on hydrochemical variations was reflected in all seasonal, diurnal and storm-scales. There was an increase in pCO2 and electrical conductivity (EC) but a decrease in pH caused by the increase in soil CO2 in spring-summer growing season, while a decrease in pCO2 and EC but an increase in pH caused by the decrease in soil CO2 happened in autumn-winter dormant season. Similar variations were also found on diurnal scales but with a time lag of a few hours between hydrochemical changes and soil CO2 change during dry season, showing effect of the groundwater recharge mode as well as the complexity of the supply path (quick flow by conduit or slow flow by fracture). During rainy seasons, however, hydrochemical changes in epikarst groundwater were regulated by both dilution and soil CO2 effects. Under high-intensity rainfall, the dilution effect was dominant, indicated by a quick decrease in EC, pH and calcite

  14. Adjustment of corn nitrogen in-season fertilization based on soil texture and weather conditions: a Meta-analysis of North American trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil properties and weather conditions are known to affect soil nitrogen (N) availability and plant N uptake. However, studies examining N response as affected by soil and weather sometimes give conflicting results. Meta-analysis is a statistical method for estimating treatment effects in a series o...

  15. Soils of loamy watersheds of coastal tundra in the north of Yakutia: Pedogenetic conditions and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubin, S. V.; Lupachev, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    This paper considers regularities governing the formation of automorphic tundra soils on glacial loamy deposits containing relict organic matter mainly represented by very fine plant detritus. Drainage, microtopography, and cryoturbation activity are the major controls of the development of these soils. With an increase in drainage, the following pedogenetic trend is observed on the surface of yedoma (Ice Complex) areas: gleyzem-cryozem-cryometamorphic soil. The climate change in the Holocene induced quick transformation of topography and general landscape situation and promoted formation and development of cryogenic soil complexes in the considered territory. Upon the low intensity of pedogenesis, the features and properties of previous soil formation stages are often preserved in the soil profiles; these are: gleyzation, peat accumulation, and cryoturbation.

  16. Evaporation from Soils Under Thermal Boundary Conditions: Experimental and Modeling Investigation to Compare Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Based Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, K. M.; Cihan, A.; Sakaki, T.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2010-12-01

    In the shallow subsurface immediately below the land-atmosphere interface, it is widely recognized that the movement of water vapor is closely coupled to thermal processes. However, their mutual interactions are rarely considered in most soil water modeling efforts or in practical applications where it becomes necessary to understand and predict the spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture. The validation of numerical models that are designed to capture these processes is difficult due to the inherent complexities of the problem in field systems and the scarcity of field or laboratory data with accurately known hydraulic and thermal parameters of soils, thus limiting the testing and refinement of heat and water transfer theories. In addition, it is often assumed in traditional soil physics applications that water vapor concentration in the air adjacent to the water phase in soil pores is always in equilibrium with liquid water, i.e., vaporization occurs instantaneously, which can result in over prediction of evaporation from soil. The goal of this work is to perform controlled experiments under transient conditions of soil moisture and temperature using soil with accurately known hydraulic/thermal properties and use this data to test existing theories and develop appropriate numerical models. In this work, water vapor flow under varying temperature gradients was implemented based on a concept that allows non-equilibrium liquid/gas phase change with gas phase vapor diffusion. In order to validate this new approach, we developed a long column apparatus equipped with a network of sensors and generated data under well-controlled thermal boundary conditions at the soil surface. Water saturation, capillary pressure, temperature, relative humidity and column weight to record total mass of water in the column were continuously monitored. Results from numerical simulations based on the conventional equilibrium and non-equilibrium approaches were compared with

  17. Impact of Leaching Conditions on Constituents Release from Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) and FGDG-Soil Mixture

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interest in using Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum(FGDG) has increased recently. This study evaluates the leaching characteristics of trace elements in "modern" FGDG (produced after fly ash removal) and FGDG-mixed soil (SF) under different environmental conditions using rece...

  18. Elemental concentrations in the seed of mutants and natural variants of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under varying soil conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentrations of mineral nutrients in seeds are critical to both the life cycle of plants as well as human nutrition. These concentrations are strongly influenced by soil conditions, as shown here by quantifying the concentration of 14 elements in seeds from Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown un...

  19. Simulating soybean productivity under rainfed conditions for major soil types using APEX model in East Central Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because soybean is commonly grown under rainfed conditions in Mississippi, and farmers recognize benefits of installing irrigation, knowledge of rainfed soybean productivity and yield difference of different soil types is needed for deciding where irrigation may be most effective. This research empl...

  20. Soil-ecological conditions of Korean pine growth in its natural area and upon introduction in the European part of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, M. M.

    2015-05-01

    Socioeconomic expediency and soil-ecological potential of introducing Korean pine ( Pinus koraiensis) in the forest zone of the European part of Russia are discussed. The specificity of soil-ecological conditions and technologies applied for growing Korean pine in some tree farms in the Far East region and in the European part of Russia are compared. The main soil-ecological factors and optimum soil parameters for the successful development of Korean pine in its natural and introduction areas are determined. It is shown that development of Korean pine seedlings on well-drained soils depends on the contents of potassium, humus, and physical clay in the soils. The seedlings gain maximum size upon their growing on soddypodzolic soils (Retisols). The analysis of mineral nutrition of pine seedlings of different ages, soil conditions, and seasonal growth phases shows that the contents of potassium and some microelements play the leading role in the successful growth of introduced Korean pine.

  1. Monitoring Soil Moisture Deficit Effects on Vegetation Parameters Using Radiative Transfer Models Inversion and Hyperspectral Measurements Under Controlled Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Bagher; Van der Tol, Christiaan; Verhoef, Wouter

    2016-08-01

    Plant-available soil moisture is a key element which affects plant properties in their ecosystems. This study shows Poa pratensis -a species of grass- responses to soil moisture deficit during an artificial drought episode in a greenhouse experiment. We used radiative transfer model inversion to monitor the gradual manifestation of soil moisture deficit effects on vegetation in a laboratory setting. Plots of 21 cm x 14.5 cm surface area with Poa pratensis plants that formed a closed canopy were subjected to water stress for 40 days. In a regular weekly schedule, canopy reflectance was measured. The 1-D bidirectional canopy reflectance model SAIL, coupled with the leaf optical properties model PROSPECT, was inverted using hyperspectral measurements by means of an iterative optimization method to retrieve vegetation biophysical and biochemical parameters (mainly; LAI, Cab, Cw, Cdm and Cs). The relationships between these retrieved parameters with soil moisture content were established in two separated groups; stress and non-stressed. All parameters retrieved by model inversion using canopy spectral data showed good correlation with soil moisture content in the drought episode. These parameters co- varied with soil moisture content under the stress condition (Chl: R2= 0.91, Cw: R2= 0.97, Cs: R2= 0.88 and LAI: R2=0.48) at the canopy level.

  2. Effects of sulfate and selenite on mercury methylation in a mercury-contaminated rice paddy soil under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjie; Dang, Fei; Zhong, Huan; Wei, Zhongbo; Li, Ping

    2016-03-01

    Biogeochemical cycling of sulfur and selenium (Se) could play an important role in methylmercury (MeHg) dynamics in soil, while their potential effects on MeHg production in rice paddy soil are less understood. The main objective of this study was to explore the effects of sulfate and selenite on net MeHg production in contaminated rice paddy soil, characterized with massive MeHg production and thus MeHg accumulation in rice. A series of microcosm incubation experiments were conducted using a contaminated paddy soil amended with sulfate and/or selenite, in which sulfate-reducing bacteria were mainly responsible for MeHg production. Our results demonstrated that sulfate addition reduced solid and dissolved MeHg levels in soils by ≤18 and ≤25 %, respectively. Compared to sulfate, selenite was more effective in inhibiting net MeHg production, and the inhibitory effect depended largely on amended selenite doses. Moreover, sulfate input played a dual role in affecting Hg-Se interactions in soil, which could be explained by the dynamics of sulfate under anoxic conditions. Therefore, the effects of sulfate and selenium input should be carefully considered when assessing risk of Hg in anoxic environments (e.g., rice paddy field and wetland).

  3. Migration, Neighborhoods, and Networks: Approaches to Understanding How Urban Environmental Conditions Affect Syndemic Adverse Health Outcomes Among Gay, Bisexual and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Egan, James E.; Kurtz, Steven P.; Latkin, Carl; Chen, Minxing; Tobin, Karin; Yang, Cui; Koblin, Beryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Adopting socioecological, intersectionality, and lifecourse theoretical frameworks may enhance our understanding of the production of syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM). From this perspective, we present preliminary data from three related studies that suggest ways in which social contexts may influence the health of MSM. The first study, using cross-sectional data, looked at migration of MSM to the gay resort area of South Florida, and found that amount of time lived in the area was associated with risk behaviors and HIV infection. The second study, using qualitative interviews, observed complex interactions between neighborhood-level social environments and individual-level racial and sexual identity among MSM in New York City. The third study, using egocentric network analysis with a sample of African American MSM in Baltimore, found that sexual partners were more likely to be found through face-to-face means than the Internet. They also observed that those who co-resided with a sex partner had larger networks of people to depend on for social and financial support, but had the same size sexual networks as those who did not live with a partner. Overall, these findings suggest the need for further investigation into the role of macro-level social forces on the emotional, behavioral, and physical health of urban MSM. PMID:21369730

  4. Demonstration of the "conditioning effect" in soil organic matter in support of a pore deformation mechanism for sorption hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuefeng; Pignatello, Joseph J

    2002-11-01

    Hysteresis, or isotherm nonsingularity, is a confounding issue in sorption research that undermines the commonplace assumption of reversibility in environmental fate and effects models for organic compounds in soil media. Until now, a molecular-level mechanism for true hysteresis when the sorbate is retrievable, structurally intact, has not been forthcoming. We show here that two organic soils exhibit the "conditioning effect", which refers to the enhancement in sorption of a compound following brief exposure of the sorbent to high concentrations of the same or a similar compound. The conditioning effect has been used in support of a pore deformation mechanism for hysteresis in glassy polymers. By this mechanism, the sorbate causes irreversible changes in the structure of internal nanopores (holes) in the organic matrix upon its sorption. Trichloromethane was the test solute for dichloromethane-conditioned Pahokee soil (44.6% organic carbon), and chlorobenzene and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene were the test solutes for benzene-conditioned Mount Pleasant silt loam (4.5% organic carbon). In each case, the isotherm of the test solute in the conditioned soil was shifted upward of, and was less linear than, the corresponding isotherm in the nonconditioned control. Application of the polymer-based Dual-Mode (partitioning-hole filling) Model shows an expansion of the hole domain as a result of conditioning. The memory of the conditioning effect persists for longer than 96 days at 21 degrees C but is lost upon heating the sample at 100 degrees C. A three-step (sorption-desorption-resorption) experiment demonstrated hysteresis followed by enhanced resorption, implying a mechanistic relationship between hysteresis and the conditioning effect. The results indicate that irreversible pore deformation is a mechanism for hysteresis in natural organic matter materials and suggest that slow matrix relaxation may contribute to the often-observed long-term resistance of some contaminants to

  5. Measuring Water Content and Desorption Isotherms in Soil Simulants Under Martian Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, T.; Aharonson, O.; Schorghofer, N.; Hecht, M. H.; Bridges, N.; Green, J. R.

    2003-12-01

    Theoretical predictions as well as recent spacecraft observations indicate that large quantities of ice is present in the high latitudes upper decimeters to meters of the Martian regolith. At shallower depths and warmer locations small amounts of H2O, either adsorbed or free, may be present transiently. We seek to simulate Mars surface conditions and to observe the effects of temperature cycling (diurnal and seasonal scale) on the water content profiles of several soil simulants. To model the upper Martian regolith, we begin by using crushed JSC Mars-1 palagonite with particles in the 50 micron to sub-micron size range. Spheres of pure silica in the 10 to 40 mm range may also be used to study the effects of grain surface morphology and composition. Simulants with various water contents are brought to Mars pressures and monitored. A line source heat-pulse probe is being prepared to monitor water content profiles in real-time and to be calibrated against water content samples measured with thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. Initial experiments will allow us to monitor water content; more refined investigations will permit the determination of desorption isotherms.

  6. Bioremediation of polychlorinated-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans contaminated soil using simulated compost-amended landfill reactors under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Wu, Jer-Horng; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Chang, Juu-En

    2016-07-15

    Compost-amended landfill reactors were developed to reduce polychlorinated-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in contaminated soils. By periodically recirculating leachate and suppling oxygen, the online monitoring of the oxidation reduction potential confirmed that the reactors were maintained under hypoxic conditions, with redox levels constantly fluctuating between -400 and +80mV. The subsequent reactor operation demonstrated that PCDD/F degradation in soil could be facilitated by amending compost originating from the cow manure and waste sludge and that the degradation might be affected by the availability of easily degradable substrates in the soil and compost. The pyrosequencing analysis of V4/V5 regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes suggested that species richness of the soil microbial community was increased by a factor of 1.37-1.61. Although the bacterial community varied with the compost origin and changed markedly during reactor operation, it was dominated by Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. The aerotolerant anaerobic Sedimentibacter and Propionibacterium spp., and the uncultured Chloroflexi group could be temporarily induced to a high abundance by amending the cow manure compost; the bacterial growths were associated with the rapid degradation of PCDD/Fs. Overall, the novel bioremediation method for PCDD/F-contaminated soils using hypoxic conditions was effective, simple, energy saving, and thus easily practicable.

  7. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  8. A novel method for tracing the movement of multiple individual soil particles under rainfall conditions using florescent videography.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Robert; Pates, Jackie; Quinton, John

    2016-04-01

    The importance of developing new techniques to study soil movement cannot be underestimated especially those that integrate new technology. Currently there are limited empirical data available about the movement of individual soil particles, particularly high quality time-resolved data. Here we present a new technique which allows multiple individual soil particles to be traced in real time under simulated rainfall conditions. The technique utilises fluorescent videography in combination with a fluorescent soil tracer, which is based on natural particles. The system has been successfully used on particles greater than ~130 micrometres diameter. The technique uses HD video shot at 50 frames per second, providing extremely high temporal (0.02 s) and spatial resolution (sub-millimetre) of a particle's location without the need to perturb the system. Once the tracer has been filmed then the images are processed and analysed using a particle analysis and visualisation toolkit written in python. The toolkit enables the creation of 2 and 3-D time-resolved graphs showing the location of 1 or more particles. Quantitative numerical analysis of a pathway (or collection of pathways) is also possible, allowing parameters such as particle speed and displacement to be assessed. Filming the particles removes the need to destructively sample material and has many side-benefits, reducing the time, money and effort expended in the collection, transport and laboratory analysis of soils, while delivering data in a digital form which is perfect for modern computer-driven analysis techniques. There are many potential applications for the technique. High resolution empirical data on how soil particles move could be used to create, parameterise and evaluate soil movement models, particularly those that use the movement of individual particles. As data can be collected while rainfall is occurring it may offer the ability to study systems under dynamic conditions(rather than rainfall of a

  9. Transformation of humus substances in the long-drained surface-gleyed soddy-podzolic soils under conditions of pronounced microrelief and different agrogenic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikova, M. F.

    2016-08-01

    The transformation of humus substances resulting from artificial drainage of the surface-gleyed soddy-podzolic soils under conditions of pronounced microtopography and different agrogenic loads was studied. The studied soil characteristics included acid-base conditions, the content and group composition of humus, the ratios between the fractions of humus acids, and optical density of humic acids. The features attesting to humus degradation were found in the soils of microdepressions periodically subjected to excessive surface moistening, in the soils of different landforms upon the construction of drainage trenches, and in the plowed non-fertilized soils. The response of humus characteristics to the changes in the ecological situation in the period of active application of agrochemicals for reclamation of the agrotechnogenically disturbed soils was traced. It was shown that the long-term dynamics of the particular parameters of the biological productivity of the soil depend on the hydrological and agrogenic factors, as well as on the weather conditions.

  10. Conditions in Home and Transplant Soils Have Differential Effects on the Performance of Diploid and Allotetraploid Anthericum Species

    PubMed Central

    Černá, Lucie; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Due to increased levels of heterozygosity, polyploids are expected to have a greater ability to adapt to different environments than their diploid ancestors. While this theoretical pattern has been suggested repeatedly, studies comparing adaptability to changing conditions in diploids and polyploids are rare. The aim of the study was to determine the importance of environmental conditions of origin as well as target conditions on performance of two Anthericum species, allotetraploid A. liliago and diploid A. ramosum and to explore whether the two species differ in the ability to adapt to these environmental conditions. Specifically, we performed a common garden experiment using soil from 6 localities within the species’ natural range, and we simulated the forest and open environments in which they might occur. We compared the performance of diploid A. ramosum and allotetraploid A. liliago originating from different locations in the different soils. The performance of the two species was not affected by simulated shading but differed strongly between the different target soils. Growth of the tetraploids was not affected by the origin of the plants. In contrast, diploids from the most nutrient poor soil performed best in the richest soil, indicating that diploids from deprived environments have an increased ability to acquire nutrients when available. They are thus able to profit from transfer to novel nutrient rich environments. Therefore, the results of the study did not support the general expectation that the polyploids should have a greater ability than the diploids to adapt to a wide range of conditions. In contrast, the results are in line with the observation that diploids occupy a wider range of environments than the allotetraploids in our system. PMID:25607545

  11. Fast effects of biochar amendment on soil C and N dynamics, nutrient availability and fertility under controlled conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Rosa, J. M.; Knicker, H.

    2012-04-01

    The shift towards a biobased economy will probably trigger the application of bioenergy by-products and charred residues to the soil as either amendments or fertilizers. However, limited research has been done to determine how this will influence C and N dynamics and soil functioning. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of 15N enriched pyrogenic organic matter (15N-PyOM) on C and N mineralisation, nutrient availability and fertility of amended soil. A typical Andalusian agricultural soil (calcareous Rhodoxeralf) was amended (0.1% w/w) with 15N enriched-biochar produced from Lolium perenne. The bioavailability and partitioning of the 15N from the biochars was tested by determining its content in the soil and the ray grass grown on this soil under controlled conditions for 72 days. After 30, 60 and 72 days of incubation, soil samples were analyzed for C, N, 15N, microbial biomass C. In addition, the chemical alteration of the 15N-containing organic structures during mobilization/immobilization was followed by solid-state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Soil amendment led to a general increase in the biomass production and N retention. After 72 days of incubation, 10 % of the 15N added in the soil with the PyOM had been degraded and available for grass growth. 15N and 13C NMR spectra confirmed that part of the pyrogenic heterocyclic N has been transformed into amide N, possibly by the use of microbiologically mobilized 15N from the char. Newer results indicate that PyOM can be microbially degraded, the efficiency of which depends on its chemical composition and properties. The chemical properties of the used material as well as the optimal conditions for microbial decay during the laboratory incubation experiments are likely to have augmented PyOM decomposition. In summary, our results indicate that: i) a re-evaluation of the potential of pyrogenic material as a sink of C and N is needed. ii) the characterization of the chemical composition of char material is

  12. A new top boundary condition for modeling surface diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer: theoretical analysis and application to soil evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. Y.; Riley, W. J.

    2013-02-01

    We describe a new top boundary condition (TBC) for representing the air-soil diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer. This new TBC (1) accounts for the multi-phase flow of a generic tracer; (2) accounts for effects of soil temperature, pH, solubility, sorption, and desorption processes; (3) enables a smooth transition between wet and dry soil conditions; (4) is compatible with the conductance formulation for modeling air-water volatile tracer exchange; and (5) is applicable to site, regional, and global land models. Based on the new TBC, we developed new formulations for bare-soil resistance and corresponding soil evaporation efficiency. The new soil resistance is predicted as the reciprocal of the harmonic sum of two resistances: (1) gaseous and aqueous molecular diffusion and (2) liquid mass flow resulting from the hydraulic pressure gradient between the soil surface and center of the topsoil control volume. We compared the predicted soil evaporation efficiency with those from several field and laboratory soil evaporation measurements and found good agreement with the typically observed two-stage soil evaporation curves. Comparison with the soil evaporation efficiency equation of Lee and Pielke (1992; hereafter LP92) indicates that their equation can overestimate soil evaporation when the atmospheric resistance is low and underestimate soil evaporation when the soil is dry. Using a synthetic inversion experiment, we demonstrated that using inverted soil resistance data from field measurements to derive empirical soil resistance formulations resulted in large uncertainty because (1) the inverted soil resistance data are always severely impacted by measurement error and (2) the derived empirical equation is very sensitive to the number of data points and the assumed functional form of the resistance. We expect the application of our new TBC in land models will provide a consistent representation for the diffusive tracer exchange at the soil-air interface.

  13. A new top boundary condition for modeling surface diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer: theoretical analysis and application to soil evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, J. Y.; Riley, W. J.

    2012-10-01

    We describe a new top boundary condition (TBC) for representing the air-soil diffusive exchange of a generic volatile tracer. This new TBC (1) accounts for the multi-phase flow of a generic tracer; (2) accounts for effects of soil temperature, pH, solubility, sorption, and desorption processes; (3) enables a smooth transition between wet and dry soil conditions; (4) is compatible with the conductance formulation for modeling air-water volatile tracer exchange; and (5) is applicable to site, regional, and global land models. Based on the new TBC, we developed new formulations for bare-soil resistance and corresponding soil evaporation efficiency. The new soil resistance is predicted as the reciprocal of the harmonic sum of two resistances: (1) gaseous and aqueous molecular diffusion and (2) liquid mass flow resulting from the hydraulic pressure gradient between the soil surface and center of the topsoil control volume. The resulting soil evaporation efficiency reasonably explains the two-stage soil evaporation curves typically observed in field and laboratory soil evaporation measurements. Comparison with the soil evaporation efficiency equation of Lee and Pielke (1992; hereafter LP92) indicates that their equation can overestimate soil evaporation when the atmospheric resistance is low and underestimate soil evaporation when the soil is dry. Using a synthetic inversion experiment, we demonstrated that using inverted soil resistance data from field measurements to derive empirical soil resistance formulations resulted in large uncertainty because (1) the inverted soil resistance data is always severely impacted by measurement error and (2) the derived empirical equation is very sensitive to the number of data points and the assumed functional form of the resistance. We expect the application of our new TBC in land models will provide a consistent representation for the diffusive tracer exchange at the soil-air interface.

  14. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  15. Hyperspectral remote sensing estimation of crop residue cover: Soil mineralogy, surface conditions, and their effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation tillage practices can enhance soil organic carbon content (SOC), improve soil structure, and reduce erosion. However, direct assessment of tillage practice for monitoring SOC change over large regions is difficult. Remote sensing of crop residue cover (CRC) can help assess tillage pra...

  16. Effect of meteorology and soil condition on metolachlor and atrazine volatilization over a 10 year period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatilization of pesticides can detrimentally affect the environment by contaminating soil and surface waters far away from where the pesticides were applied. A 10-year study was conducted to focus on the impact of soil and climatic factors governing herbicide volatilization from an agricultural f...

  17. Simple surface foam application enhances bioremediation of oil-contaminated soil in cold conditions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Jongshin; Kim, Jaisoo

    2015-04-09

    Landfarming of oil-contaminated soil is ineffective at low temperatures, because the number and activity of micro-organisms declines. This study presents a simple and versatile technique for bioremediation of diesel-contaminated soil, which involves spraying foam on the soil surface without additional works such as tilling, or supply of water and air. Surfactant foam containing psychrophilic oil-degrading microbes and nutrients was sprayed twice daily over diesel-contaminated soil at 6 °C. Removal efficiencies in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) at 30 days were 46.3% for landfarming and 73.7% for foam-spraying. The first-order kinetic biodegradation rates for landfarming and foam-spraying were calculated as 0.019 d(-1) and 0.044 d(-1), respectively. Foam acted as an insulating medium, keeping the soil 2 °C warmer than ambient air. Sprayed foam was slowly converted to aqueous solution within 10-12h and infiltrated the soil, providing microbes, nutrients, water, and air for bioaugmentation. Furthermore, surfactant present in the aqueous solution accelerated the dissolution of oil from the soil, resulting in readily biodegradable aqueous form. Significant reductions in hydrocarbon concentration were simultaneously observed in both semi-volatile and non-volatile fractions. As the initial soil TPH concentration increased, the TPH removal rate of the foam-spraying method also increased.

  18. Nitrite-Driven Nitrous Oxide Production Under Aerobic Soil Conditions: Kinetics and Biochemical Controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrite (NO2-) can accumulate during nitrification in soil following fertilizer application. While the role of NO2- as a substrate regulating nitrous oxide (N2O) production is recognized, kinetic data are not available that allow for estimating N2O production or soil-to-atmosphere fluxes as a functi...

  19. Simulated Corn Yield Responses to Limited-Water Irrigation Under Varying Soil and Climate Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water holding capacity of soils is a key factor in successful dryland and irrigated agriculture as it influences the fraction of precipitation and irrigation that is stored in the soil profile that can be subsequently used for crop production. There is a well-known dependence of water holding capaci...

  20. Mapping soil water content under sparse vegetation and changeable sky conditions: comparison of two thermal inertia approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, Antonino; Capodici, Fulvio; Ciraolo, Giuseppe; La Loggia, Goffredo

    2013-01-01

    a sufficient condition to obtain accurate estimates of soil water content. A corrective coefficient taking into account actual sky cloudiness throughout the day allows better estimates of thermal inertia and, thus, of soil water content.

  1. Impact of conservation agriculture on catchment runoff and soil loss under changing climate conditions in May Zeg-zeg (Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanckriet, Sil; Araya, Tesfay; Cornelis, Wim; Verfaillie, Els; Poesen, Jean; Govaerts, Bram; Bauer, Hans; Deckers, Jozef; Haile, Mitiku; Nyssen, Jan

    2012-12-01

    SummaryThis study evaluates the practice of conservation agriculture (CA) in the May Zeg-zeg catchment (MZZ; 187 ha) in the North Ethiopian Highlands as a soil management technique for reducing soil loss and runoff, and assesses the consequences of future large-scale implementation on soil and hydrology at catchment-level. The study of such practice is important especially under conditions of climate change, since EdGCM (Educational Global Climate Model) simulation predicts by 2040 an increase in precipitation by more than 100 mm yr-1 in the study area. Firstly, field-saturated infiltration rates, together with soil texture and soil organic carbon contents, were measured. The relation with local topography allows to generate a pedotransfer function for field-saturated infiltration rate, and spatial interpolation with Linear Regression Mapping was used to map field-saturated infiltration rates optimally within the catchment. Secondly, on several farmlands, CA was checked against plain tillage (PT) for values of field-saturated infiltration rates, soil organic carbon, runoff and soil loss. Results show no significant differences for infiltration rates but significant differences for runoff and soil loss (as measured in the period 2005-2011). Runoff coefficients were 30.4% for PT and 18.8% for CA; soil losses were 35.4 t ha-1 yr-1 for PT and 14.4 t ha-1 yr-1 for CA. Thirdly, all collected information was used to predict future catchment hydrological response for full-implementation of CA under the predicted wetter climate (simulation with EdGCM). Curve Numbers for farmlands with CA were calculated. An area-weighted Curve Number allows the simulation of the 2011 rainy season runoff, predicting a total runoff depth of 23.5 mm under CA and 27.9 mm under PT. Furthermore, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation management factor P was calibrated for CA. Results also show the important influence of increased surface roughness on water ponding, modeled with a hydrologic

  2. Elemental Concentrations in the Seed of Mutants and Natural Variants of Arabidopsis thaliana Grown under Varying Soil Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Stephen C.; Akmakjian, Garo; Sladek, Chris; Mendoza-Cozatl, David; Morrissey, Joe B.; Saini, Nick; Mittler, Ron; Baxter, Ivan; Salt, David E.; Ward, John M.; Schroeder, Julian I.; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Harper, Jeffrey F.

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of mineral nutrients in seeds are critical to both the life cycle of plants as well as human nutrition. These concentrations are strongly influenced by soil conditions, as shown here by quantifying the concentration of 14 elements in seeds from Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under four different soil conditions: standard, or modified with NaCl, heavy metals, or alkali. Each of the modified soils resulted in a unique change to the seed ionome (the mineral nutrient content of the seeds). To help identify the genetic networks regulating the seed ionome, changes in elemental concentrations were evaluated using mutants corresponding to 760 genes as well as 10 naturally occurring accessions. The frequency of ionomic phenotypes supports an estimate that as much as 11% of the A. thaliana genome encodes proteins of functional relevance to ion homeostasis in seeds. A subset of mutants were analyzed with two independent alleles, providing five examples of genes important for regulation of the seed ionome: SOS2, ABH1, CCC, At3g14280 and CNGC2. In a comparison of nine different accessions to a Col-0 reference, eight accessions were observed to have reproducible differences in elemental concentrations, seven of which were dependent on specific soil conditions. These results indicate that the A. thaliana seed ionome is distinct from the vegetative ionome, and that elemental analysis is a sensitive approach to identify genes controlling ion homeostasis, including those that regulate gene expression, phospho-regulation, and ion transport. PMID:23671651

  3. Measuring, understanding and implementing (or at least trying) soil and water conservation in agricultural areas in Mediterranean conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Jose Alfonso; Burguet, María; Castillo, Carlos; de Luna, Elena; Guzmán, Gema; Lora, Ángel; Lorite, Ignacio; Mora, José; Pérez, Rafael; Soriano, María A.; Taguas, Encarnación V.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding soil erosion processes is the first step for designing and implementing effective soil conservation strategies. In agricultural areas, spatially in arid and semiarid conditions, water conservation is interlinked with soil conservation, and usually need to be addressed simultaneously to achieve success in their use by farmers. This is so for different reasons, but usually because some reduction in runoff is required to prevent soil erosion or to the need to design soil conservation systems that do maintain a favourable water balance for the crop to prevent yield reductions. The team presenting this communication works around both issues in Southern Spain, interconnecting several lines of research with the final objective of contribute to reverse some severe issues relating soil conservation in agricultural areas, mostly on tree crops (olives and vineyards). One of these lines is long-term experiments measuring, runoff and sediment losses at plot and small catchment scale. In these experiments we test the effect of different soil management alternatives on soil and water conservation. We also measured the evolution of soil properties and, in some cases, the evolution of soil moisture as well as nutrient and carbon losses with runoff and sediment. We also tests in these experiments new cover crops, from species better adapted to the rainfall regime of the region to mixes with several species to increase biodiversity. We complement these studies with surveys of soil properties in commercial farms. I some of these farms we follow the introduction by farmers of the cover crop strategies previously developed in our experimental fields. These data are invaluable to elaborate, calibrate and validate different runoff generation, water balance, and water erosion models and hillslope and small catchment scale. This allows us to elaborate regional analysis of the effect of different strategies to soil and water conservation in olive growing areas, and to refine

  4. No tillage effect on water retention characteristics of soil aggregates in rainfed semiarid conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Moure, Nuria; López, M. Victoria; Moret, David

    2010-05-01

    The evaluation of changes in soil moisture retention characteristics associated to alterations in soil structure is of great interest in tillage studies. Most of these studies have evaluated soil properties in samples of total soil but not in individual aggregates. However, soil behavior at a macroscale level depends on the aggregate properties. A better knowledge of aggregate characteristics, as the water retention properties, will help to explain, for example, the response of soil to tillage, compaction and crop growth, and hence, to plan adequate soil management practices. In this study we determine the water retention curve of soil aggregates of different sizes from a soil under two tillage systems (conventional and no tillage). The study was carried out in a silty clay loam soil of semiarid Aragon (NE Spain). Two tillage systems were compared: no tillage (NT) and conventional tillage with mouldboard plough (CT). Water retention curves (WRC) were determined for soil surface aggregates (0-5 cm) of three different sizes (8-4, 4-2 and 2-1 mm in diameter) by using the TDR-pressure cell (Moret et al. 2008. Soil Till. Res, 100, 114-119). The TDR-pressure cell is a non-destructive method which permits determining WRC with the only one and same soil sample. Thus, the pressure cell was filled with aggregates up to 4 cm height, weighted and wetted to saturation from the bottom. Pressure steps were sequentially applied at -0.5, -1.5, -3, -5, -10, -33, -100, -300 kPa, and water content of each aggregate sample was measured gravimetrically and by TDR 24 h after starting each pressure head step. The volume of the sample within the cell was also determined at this moment in order to obtain the bulk density and thus calculate the volumetric water content. A good relationship was obtained between the volumetric water content calculated from the gravimetric water content and the corresponding values measured by TDR (r2=0.907; p≤0.05). Within the same tillage treatment, no

  5. Amendment of biochar reduces the release of toxic elements under dynamic redox conditions in a contaminated floodplain soil.

    PubMed

    Rinklebe, Jörg; Shaheen, Sabry M; Frohne, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Biochar (BC) can be used to remediate soils contaminated with potential toxic elements (PTEs). However, the efficiency of BC to immobilize PTEs in highly contaminated floodplain soils under dynamic redox conditions has not been studied up to date. Thus, we have (i) quantified the impact of pre-definite redox conditions on the release dynamics of dissolved aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn) in a highly contaminated soil (CS) (non-treated) and in the same soil treated with 10 g kg(-1) biochar based material (CS+BC), and (ii) assessed the efficacy of the material to reduce the concentrations of PTEs in soil solution under dynamic redox conditions using an automated biogeochemical microcosm apparatus. The impact of redox potential (EH), pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and sulfate (SO4(2-)) on dynamics of PTEs was also determined. The EH was lowered to +68 mV and afterwards increased stepwise to +535 mV. Significant negative correlation between EH and pH in CS and CS+BC was detected. The systematic increase of EH along with decrease of pH favors the mobilization of PTEs in CS and CS+BC. The material addition seems to have little effect on redox processes because pattern of EH/pH and release dynamics of PTEs was basically similar in CS and CS+BC. However, concentrations of dissolved PTEs were considerably lower in CS+BC than in CS which demonstrates that BC is able to decrease concentrations of dissolved PTEs even under dynamic redox conditions.

  6. Adverse weather impacts on arable cropping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Damages due to extreme or adverse weather strongly depend on crop type, crop stage, soil conditions and management. The impact is largest during the sensitive periods of the farming calendar, and requires a modelling approach to capture the interactions between the crop, its environment and the occurrence of the meteorological event. The hypothesis is that extreme and adverse weather events can be quantified and subsequently incorporated in current crop models. Since crop development is driven by thermal time and photoperiod, a regional crop model was used to examine the likely frequency, magnitude and impacts of frost, drought, heat stress and waterlogging in relation to the cropping season and crop sensitive stages. Risk profiles and associated return levels were obtained by fitting generalized extreme value distributions to block maxima for air humidity, water balance and temperature variables. The risk profiles were subsequently confronted with yields and yield losses for the major arable crops in Belgium, notably winter wheat, winter barley, winter oilseed rape, sugar beet, potato and maize at the field (farm records) to regional scale (statistics). The average daily vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and reference evapotranspiration (ET0) during the growing season is significantly lower (p < 0.001) and has a higher variability before 1988 than after 1988. Distribution patterns of VPD and ET0 have relevant impacts on crop yields. The response to rising temperatures depends on the crop's capability to condition its microenvironment. Crops short of water close their stomata, lose their evaporative cooling potential and ultimately become susceptible to heat stress. Effects of heat stress therefore have to be combined with moisture availability such as the precipitation deficit or the soil water balance. Risks of combined heat and moisture deficit stress appear during the summer. These risks are subsequently related to crop damage. The methodology of defining

  7. A theoretical model for the initiation of debris flow in unconsolidated soil under hydrodynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, C.-X.; Zhou, J.-W.; Cui, P.; Hao, M.-H.; Xu, F.-G.

    2014-06-01

    Debris flow is one of the catastrophic disasters in an earthquake-stricken area, and remains to be studied in depth. It is imperative to obtain an initiation mechanism and model of the debris flow, especially from unconsolidated soil. With flume experiments and field investigation on the Wenjiagou Gully debris flow induced from unconsolidated soil, it can be found that surface runoff can support the shear force along the slope and lead to soil strength decreasing, with fine particles migrating and forming a local relatively impermeable face. The surface runoff effect is the primary factor for accelerating the unconsolidated slope failure and initiating debris flow. Thus, a new theoretical model for the initiation of debris flow in unconsolidated soil was established by incorporating hydrodynamic theory and soil mechanics. This model was validated by a laboratory test and proved to be better suited for unconsolidated soil failure analysis. In addition, the mechanism analysis and the established model can provide a new direction and deeper understanding of debris flow initiation with unconsolidated soil.

  8. Pyrimethanil residue and dissipation in tomatoes and soil under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Congyun; Lu, Dahai; Wang, Youcheng; Wan, Kai; Huang, Jianxiang; Wang, Fuhua

    2013-11-01

    A residue analytical method to detect pyrimethanil in tomatoes and soil was developed by using high-performance liquid chromatography with a diode array detector. The dissipation and residue level of pyrimethanil in tomatoes and soil were also investigated. Results showed that the average recoveries are in the range of 87.2 to 90.0 % with a relative standard difference of 2.22 to 7.61 % in tomatoes and soil. In Guangdong, Shandong, and Yunnan, the half-lives of pyrimethanil in tomatoes were 1.8, 3.6, and 4.2 days and those in soil were 4.0, 3.3, and 3.9 days, respectively. The dissipation rate of pyrimethanil in tomatoes and soil was affected by temperature, precipitation, and soil type. The terminal residue results showed that when pesticide pyrimethanil was used under the experiment design, all the results were far below the available maximum residue limits. Low residues in tomatoes and soil suggest that this pesticide is safe to use under the recommended dosage.

  9. Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. Optimising post-mining soil conditions to maximise restoration success in a biodiverse semiarid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Rojas, Miriam; Erickson, Todd; Merritt, David; Dixon, Kingsley

    2014-05-01

    The original topsoil of mine degraded areas is frequently lost or damaged, which together with the absence of soil forming materials is a major constraint for seed germination and establishment in post-mining restoration. Thus, management of the available topsoil and the use of alternative growth media are critical to improve restoration areas disturbed through mining. Here we are developing laboratory and field trials to define the optimal range for physical and chemical properties of potentially suitable natural and 're-made' soil substrates and growth medium for 20 selected native plant species from the mining intensive Pilbara region of Western Australia. In this semiarid area, water is a limiting factor for seedling establishment, which is compounded by the lack of organic matter of post-disturbance soils. Therefore, particular attention is given to indicators of soil biological activity such as soil respiration, and hydrological soil properties such as water holding capacity, infiltration, hydraulic conductivity and soil water repellence. This research is part of a broader multi-study approach, the Restoration Seedbank Initiative project, a partnership between The University of Western Australia, BHP Billiton Iron Ore, and Kings Park and Botanic Garden to develop the science and underpinning knowledge to achieve biodiverse restoration in the Pilbara region, where land areas disturbed by mining exceed 40,000 ha. Achieving restoration success is critical as the Pilbara region is an ancient landscape with diverse geology and high levels of regional and local endemism in plants and animals.

  11. Soil pollution indices conditioned by medieval metallurgical activity - A case study from Krakow (Poland).

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Joanna; Mazurek, Ryszard; Gąsiorek, Michał; Setlak, Marcin; Zaleski, Tomasz; Waroszewski, Jaroslaw

    2016-11-01

    The studied soil profile under the Main Market Square (MMS) in Krakow was characterised by the influence of medieval metallurgical activity. In the presented soil section lithological discontinuity (LD) was found, which manifests itself in the form of cultural layers (CLs). Moreover, in this paper LD detection methods based on soil texture are presented. For the first time, three different ways to identify the presence of LD in the urban soils are suggested. The presence of LD had an influence on the content and distribution of heavy metals within the soil profile. The content of heavy metals in the CLs under the MMS in Krakow was significantly higher than the content in natural horizons. In addition, there were distinct differences in the content of heavy metals within CLs. Profile variability and differences in the content of heavy metals and phosphorus within the CLs under the MMS were activity indicators of Krakow inhabitants in the past. This paper presents alternative methods for the assessment of the degree of heavy metal contamination in urban soils using selected pollution indices. On the basis of the studied total concentration of heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Cu, Mn, Cr, Cd, Ni, Sn, Ag) and total phosphorus content, the Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo), Enrichment Factor (EF), Sum of Pollution Index (PIsum), Single Pollution Index (PI), Nemerow Pollution Index (PINemerow) and Potential Ecological Risk (RI) were calculated using different local and reference geochemical backgrounds. The use of various geochemical backgrounds is helpful to evaluate the assessment of soil pollution. The individual CLs differed from each other according to the degree of pollution. The different values of pollution indices within the studied soil profile showed that LDS should not be evaluated in terms of contamination as one, homogeneous soil profile but each separate CL should be treated individually.

  12. Color estimation of forest-steppe soils by digital photography under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeeva, A. A.; Aleksandrova, A. B.; Koposov, G. F.

    2016-09-01

    Numerical values in the RGB, HSB, and L*a*b systems for the colors of structurally differentiated soils (Luvisols) in the Volga-Kama forest-steppe have been obtained using a digital camera. A high correlation has been revealed between the soil color and the content of humus in the range 0.39-6%. When the content of humus exceeds 6%, the color of humus horizon varies only slightly. A regression equation within the RRGB range from 85 to 173 has been calculated for the rapid determination of humus content in low- and medium-humus texturally differentiated soils of the Volga-Kama forest-steppe.

  13. On the spatial distribution of the transpiration and soil moisture of a Mediterranean heterogeneous ecosystem in water-limited conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curreli, Matteo; Corona, Roberto; Montaldo, Nicola; Albertson, John D.; Oren, Ram

    2014-05-01

    Mediterranean ecosystems are characterized by a strong heterogeneity, and often by water-limited conditions. In these conditions contrasting plant functional types (PFT, e.g. grass and woody vegetation) compete for the water use. Both the vegetation cover spatial distribution and the soil properties impact the soil moisture (SM) spatial distribution. Indeed, vegetation cover density and type affects evapotranspiration (ET), which is the main lack of the soil water balance in these ecosystems. With the objective to carefully estimate SM and ET spatial distribution in a Mediterranean water-limited ecosystem and understanding SM and ET relationships, an extended field campaign is carried out. The study was performed in a heterogeneous ecosystem in Orroli, Sardinia (Italy). The experimental site is a typical Mediterranean ecosystem where the vegetation is distributed in patches of woody vegetation (wild olives mainly) and grass. Soil depth is low and spatially varies between 10 cm and 40 cm, without any correlation with the vegetation spatial distribution. ET, land-surface fluxes and CO2 fluxes are estimated by an eddy covariance technique based micrometeorological tower. But in heterogeneous ecosystems a key assumption of the eddy covariance theory, the homogeneity of the surface, is not preserved and the ET estimate may be not correct. Hence, we estimate ET of the woody vegetation using the thermal dissipation method (i.e. sap flow technique) for comparing the two methodologies. Due the high heterogeneity of the vegetation and soil properties of the field a total of 54 sap flux sensors were installed. 14 clumps of wild olives within the eddy covariance footprint were identified as the most representative source of flux and they were instrumented with the thermal dissipation probes. Measurements of diameter at the height of sensor installation (height of 0.4 m above ground) were recorded in all the clumps. Bark thickness and sapwood depth were measured on several

  14. Soil-plant-atmosphere conditions regulating convective cloud formation above southeastern US pine plantations.

    PubMed

    Manoli, Gabriele; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Novick, Kimberly; Oishi, Andrew Christopher; Noormets, Asko; Marani, Marco; Katul, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    Loblolly pine trees (Pinus taeda L.) occupy more than 20% of the forested area in the southern United States, represent more than 50% of the standing pine volume in this region, and remove from the atmosphere about 500 g C m-2 per year through net ecosystem exchange. Hence, their significance as a major regional carbon sink can hardly be disputed. What is disputed is whether the proliferation of young plantations replacing old forest in the southern United States will alter key aspects of the hydrologic cycle, including convective rainfall, which is the focus of the present work. Ecosystem fluxes of sensible (Hs) and latent heat (LE) and large-scale, slowly evolving free atmospheric temperature and water vapor content are known to be first-order controls on the formation of convective clouds in the atmospheric boundary layer. These controlling processes are here described by a zero-order analytical model aimed at assessing how plantations of different ages may regulate the persistence and transition of the atmospheric system between cloudy and cloudless conditions. Using the analytical model together with field observations, the roles of ecosystem Hs and LE on convective cloud formation are explored relative to the entrainment of heat and moisture from the free atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that cloudy-cloudless regimes at the land surface are regulated by a nonlinear relation between the Bowen ratio Bo=Hs/LE and root-zone soil water content, suggesting that young/mature pines ecosystems have the ability to recirculate available water (through rainfall predisposition mechanisms). Such nonlinearity was not detected in a much older pine stand, suggesting a higher tolerance to drought but a limited control on boundary layer dynamics. These results enable the generation of hypotheses about the impacts on convective cloud formation driven by afforestation/deforestation and groundwater depletion projected to increase following increased human population in the

  15. The impact of engineered cobalt, iron, nickel and silver nanoparticles on soil bacterial diversity under field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Vishal; Collins, Daniel; Walker, Virginia K.; Shah, Shreya

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of how engineered nanoparticles (NPs) migrate through soil and affect microbial communities is scarce. In the current study we examined how metal NPs, including those from the iron triad (iron, cobalt and nickel), moved through pots of soil maintained under winter field conditions for 50 days, when mesophilic bacteria may not be dividing. Based on total metal analysis, cobalt and nickel were localized in the top layer of soil, even after exposure to high precipitation and freeze-thaw cycles. In contrast, a bimodal distribution of silver was observed. Due to high endogenous levels of iron, the migration pattern of these NPs could not be determined. Pyrosequence analysis of the bacterial communities revealed that there was no significant engineered NP-mediated decline in microbial richness. However, analysis of individual genera showed that Sphingomonas and Lysobacter were represented by fewer sequences in horizons containing elevated metal levels whereas there was an increase in the numbers of Flavobacterium and Niastella. Collectively, the results indicate that along with the differential migration behavior of NPs in the soil matrix, their impact on soil bacterial diversity appears to be dependent on environmental parameters.

  16. Wear of surface-engineered metal-on-metal bearings for hip prostheses under adverse conditions with the head loading on the rim of the cup.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Ian; Williams, Sophie; Isaac, Graham; Hatto, Peter; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2013-04-01

    Clinical studies have found high wear rates, elevated ion levels and high revision rates of large-diameter metal-on-metal surface replacement bearings in some patients, which have been associated with edge loading of the head on the rim of the cup. We have simulated increased wear and ion levels in metal-on-metal bearings in vitro by introducing variations in translational and rotational positioning of the components, which reproduces stripe wear on the femoral head, cup rim wear and clinically relevant large as well as small wear particles. There is interest in technologies such as surface engineering, which might reduce metal wear and the release of wear particles and ions. Reduced wear with surface-engineered surface replacements compared to metal-on-metal controls has been reported under standard walking conditions with correctly aligned and concentric components. In this in vitro study, the wear of chromium nitride surface-engineered metal-on-metal bearings under conditions of microseparation associated with translational and rotational malpositioning of the components was investigated and the results were compared with a previously reported study of metal-on-metal bearings under the same conditions. Simulations were conducted using our unique hip simulation microseparation methodologies, which reproduce accelerated wear in metal-on-metal bearings and have previously been clinically validated with ceramic-on-ceramic bearings. Four of the six surface-engineered bearings had evidence of head contact on the rim of the cup, which produced stripe wear on the femoral head. Four of the six surface-engineered bearings (two without stripe and two with stripe wear) had lower wear than the previously reported high wearing metal-on-metal bearings. At 2 million cycles, two of the surface-engineered bearings had substantially increased wear rates, four times higher than the high wear rates previously reported for metal-on-metal bearings under the same conditions. There was

  17. [Seasonal dynamics of soil organic carbon and active organic carbon fractions in Calamagrostis angustifolia wetlands topsoil under different water conditions].

    PubMed

    Hou, Cui-Cui; Song, Chang-Chun; Li, Ying-Chen; Guo, Yue-Dong

    2011-01-01

    The experiment was carried in Sanjiang Plain in the northeast of China during the growing season in 2009. Soil organic carbon (SOC), as well as the soil active organic carbon fractions in the 0-20 cm soil layer of Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland under different water conditions were on monthly observation. Based on the research and indoor analysis, the seasonal dynamics of light fractions of soil organic carbon (LFOC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) were analyzed. The results indicated that the SOC contents had significantly seasonal dynamics, and the hydrological circle had apparently driving effect on LFOC and MBC during the growing season, especially under the seasonal flooded condition. The freeze-thaw process reduced the SOC, LFOC, MBC contents, with the decreases of 74.53%, 80.93%, 83.09%, while both carbon contents of light and heavy fractions were reduced at the same time. The result also showed that the seasonal flooding condition increased the proportion of LFOC in topsoil, which was larger in marsh meadow (13.58%) than in wet meadow (11.96%), whilst the MBC in marsh meadow (1 397.21 mg x kg(-1)) was less than the latter (1 603.65 mg x kg(-1)), proving that the inundated environment inhibited the mineralization and decomposition of organic matter. But the microbial activity could be adaptive to the flooding condition. During the growing season the MBC soared to 1 829.21 mg x kg(-1) from 337.56 mg x kg(-1) in July, and the microbial quotient was 1.51 times higher than that in June, indicating the high microbial efficacy of soil organic matter. Meanwhile, there was a significant correlation between the contents of LFOC and SOC (r = 0.816), suggesting that higher LFOC content was favorable to the soil carbon accumulation. Moreover, in the seasonal flooded Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland the soil LFOC content was significantly correlated with MBC (r = 0.95), implying that the available carbon source had more severe restriction on the microbial

  18. Linkage Of A Finite Element Flow Model With A Soil Moisture Model: Challanges Under Semiarid Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, T.; Siebert, C.; Krause, P.

    2008-12-01

    The arid to semiarid Middle East is a region of extreme growth of population. Hence, the rare and over- expoitated water resources in that region have to be more protected against antropogenic and geogenic pollution. One way to help solving that complex issue is to develop an intelligent and integrated strategy to manage all available water resources, which is the aim of the multilateral SMART-project in the Lower Jordan Valley. To generate such an IWRM, all water resources (groundwater, surface runoff, waste water) of the valley and its shoulders have to be quanti- and qualitatively evaluated. The strategy of SMART is to upscale knowledge, extracted from local catchment areas to the project scale, which covers the area between Sea of Galilee, Jerusalem, Dead Sea and Amman. The study areas of the here presented sub-project are the Wadis Qilt (Palestine) and Al Arab (Jordan). The aim of the sub-project is to evaluate natural resources on catchment scale by combining hydrochemical and hydraulical methods to develop a high precision model. Concerning the quantification of the system, two seperated models will be linked: a numerical finite element flow-model for the groundwater passage and a new devolped hydrological model JAMS, which is excellently prepared for humid conditions. The power of JAMS is the highly accurate assessment of soil moisture balance and consequently of surface runoff and groundwater recharge. However, the empirical equations and input parameters have to be adjusted onto the conditions of the semiarid Wadi Al Arab and the arid Wadi Qilt. After the adaption of JAMS, the spatially and temporarily differentiated calculation of runoff and groundwater recharge is possible. Beside climatic gradients, the key issue is, to correctly evaluate the evapotranspiration in respect to the different classes of landuse. In the study area Wadi Al Arab, the groundwater recharge was calculated as area-indicated output parameter of JAMS. This output was used to be the

  19. Biodegradation of aged diesel in diverse soil matrixes: impact of environmental conditions and bioavailability on microbial remediation capacity.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Nora B; van Gaans, Pauline; Langenhoff, Alette A M; Maphosa, Farai; Smidt, Hauke; Grotenhuis, Tim; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2013-07-01

    While bioremediation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) is in general a robust technique, heterogeneity in terms of contaminant and environmental characteristics can impact the extent of biodegradation. The current study investigates the implications of different soil matrix types (anthropogenic fill layer, peat, clay, and sand) and bioavailability on bioremediation of an aged diesel contamination from a heterogeneous site. In addition to an uncontaminated sample for each soil type, samples representing two levels of contamination (high and low) were also used; initial TPH concentrations varied between 1.6 and 26.6 g TPH/kg and bioavailability between 36 and 100 %. While significant biodegradation occurred during 100 days of incubation under biostimulating conditions (64.4-100 % remediation efficiency), low bioavailability restricted full biodegradation, yielding a residual TPH concentration. Respiration levels, as well as the abundance of alkB, encoding mono-oxygenases pivotal for hydrocarbon metabolism, were positively correlated with TPH degradation, demonstrating their usefulness as a proxy for hydrocarbon biodegradation. However, absolute respiration and alkB presence were dependent on soil matrix type, indicating the sensitivity of results to initial environmental conditions. Through investigating biodegradation potential across a heterogeneous site, this research illuminates the interplay between soil matrix type, bioavailability, and bioremediation and the implications of these parameters for the effectiveness of an in situ treatment.

  20. Application of nitrate to enhance biodegradation of gasoline components in soil by indigenous microorganisms under anoxic condition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Su-Cai; Song, Yun; Wang, Dong; Wei, Wen-Xia; Yang, Yan; Men, Bin; Li, Jia-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic/anoxic biodegradation of hydrocarbons offers an attractive approach to the removal of these compounds from polluted environments such as aquifers, aquatic sediments, submerged soils and subsurface soils. The application of nitrate was investigated to accelerate the degradation of gasoline components such as mono-aromatic hydrocarbons and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in soil by indigenous microorganisms under anoxic condition. The addition of nitrate had little effect on the degradation of mono-aromatic hydrocarbons m- & p-xylene, o-xylene, sec-butylbenzene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, but facilitated the degradation of TPH (C6-C12) and mono-aromatic hydrocarbons toluene and ethylbenzene markedly. Furthermore, the more nitrate added, the higher the percentage of toluene, ethylbenzene and TPH (C6-C12) degraded after 180 days of anoxic incubation. Microorganisms capable of degrading toluene, ethylbenzene and TPH (C6-C12) with nitrate as the electron acceptor under anaerobic/anoxic condition are composed predominantly of Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma- or Delta-proteobacteria. Beta- and Gamma-proteobacteria were the main components of indigenous microorganisms, and accounted for 83-100% of the total amount of indigenous microorganisms in soil used in this study. Furthermore, the total amount of indigenous microorganisms increased with nitrate added. The addition of nitrate stimulated the growth of indigenous microorganisms, and therefore facilitated the degradation of toluene, ethylbenzene and TPH (C6-C12).

  1. Local climatic conditions constrain soil yeast diversity patterns in Mediterranean forests, woodlands and scrub biome.

    PubMed

    Yurkov, Andrey M; Röhl, Oliver; Pontes, Ana; Carvalho, Cláudia; Maldonado, Cristina; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2016-02-01

    Soil yeasts represent a poorly known fraction of the soil microbiome due to limited ecological surveys. Here, we provide the first comprehensive inventory of cultivable soil yeasts in a Mediterranean ecosystem, which is the leading biodiversity hotspot for vascular plants and vertebrates in Europe. We isolated and identified soil yeasts from forested sites of Serra da Arrábida Natural Park (Portugal), representing the Mediterranean forests, woodlands and scrub biome. Both cultivation experiments and the subsequent species richness estimations suggest the highest species richness values reported to date, resulting in a total of 57 and 80 yeast taxa, respectively. These values far exceed those reported for other forest soils in Europe. Furthermore, we assessed the response of yeast diversity to microclimatic environmental factors in biotopes composed of the same plant species but showing a gradual change from humid broadleaf forests to dry maquis. We observed that forest properties constrained by precipitation level had strong impact on yeast diversity and on community structure and lower precipitation resulted in an increased number of rare species and decreased evenness values. In conclusion, the structure of soil yeast communities mirrors the environmental factors that affect aboveground phytocenoses, aboveground biomass and plant projective cover.

  2. Bioremediation of oil refinery sludge by landfarming in semiarid conditions: influence on soil microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Marin, J A; Hernandez, T; Garcia, C

    2005-06-01

    Bioremediation of a refinery sludge containing hydrocarbons in a semi-arid climate using landfarming techniques is described. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of this technique to reduce the total hydrocarbon content added to the soil with the refinery sludge in semiarid climate (low rain and high temperature). In addition, we have evaluated the effect of this technique on the microbial activity of the soil involved. For this, biological parameters (carbon fractions, microbial biomass carbon, basal respiration and ATP) and biochemical parameters(different enzymatic activities) were determined. The results showed that 80% of the hydrocarbons were eliminated in eleven months, half of this reduction taking place during the first three months. The labile carbon fractions, MBC, basal respiration and ATP of the soils submitted to landfarming showed higher values than the control soil during the first months of the process, although these values fell down by the end of the experimental period as the hydrocarbons were degraded by mineralisation. All the enzymatic activities studied: oxidoreductases such as dehydrogenase activity, and hydrolases of C(beta-glucosidase activity) and N Cycle (urease and protease) showed higher values in the soils amended with the refinery sludge than in the control. As in the case of the previous parameters, these value fell down as the bioremediation of the hydrocarbons progressed, many of them reaching levels similar to those of the control soil after eleven months.

  3. Pressure-Water Content Relations for a Sandy, Granitic Soil Under Field and Laboratory Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, D. G.; McNamara, J. M.; Gribb, M. M.

    2001-12-01

    A new sensor was developed to measure soil water potential in order to determine the predominant mechanisms of snowmelt delivery to streamflow. The sensors were calibrated for +50 to -300 cm for application on steep granitic slopes and deployed at three depths and 2 locations on a slope in a headwater catchment of the Idaho Batholith throughout the 2001 snowmelt season. Soil moisture was measured simultaneously with Water Content Reflectometers (Cambell Scientific, Logan, UT), that were calibrated in situ with Time Domain Reflectometry measurements. Sensor performance was evaluated in a laboratory soil column via side-by-side monitoring during injection of water with a cone permeameter. Soil characteristic curves were also determined for the field site by multi-step outflow tests. Comparison of the results from the field study to those from the laboratory experiment and to the characteristic curves demonstrate the utility of the new sensor for recording dynamic changes in soil water status. During snowmelt, the sensor responded to both matric potential and bypass-flow pore potential. Large shifts in the pressure record that correspond to changes in the infiltration flux indicate initiation and cessation of macropore flow. The pore pressure records may be used to document the frequency, timing and duration of bypass flow that are not apparent from the soil moisture records.

  4. Sugar beet factory lime affects the mobilization of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn under dynamic redox conditions in a contaminated floodplain soil.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Sabry M; Rinklebe, Jörg

    2017-01-15

    The impact of sugar beet factory lime (SBFL) on the release dynamics and mobilization of toxic metals (TMs) under dynamic redox conditions in floodplain soils has not been studied up to date. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify the scientific hypothesis that SBFL is able to immobilize Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn under different redox potentials (EH) in a contaminated floodplain soil. For this purpose, the non-treated contaminated soil (CS) and the same soil treated with SBFL (CS+SBFL) were flooded in the laboratory using a highly sophisticated automated biogeochemical microcosm apparatus. The experiment was conducted stepwise from reducing (-13 mV) to oxidizing (+519 mV) soil conditions. Soil pH decreased under oxic conditions in CS (from 6.9 to 4.0) and in CS+SBFL (from 7.5 to 4.4). The mobilization of Cu, Cr, Pb, and Fe were lower in CS+SBFL than in CS under both reducing/neutral and oxic/acidic conditions. Those results demonstrate that SBFL is able to decrease concentrations of these elements under a wide range of redox and pH conditions. The mobilization of Cd, Co, Mn, Mo, Ni, and Zn were higher in CS+SBFL than in CS under reducing/neutral conditions; however, these concentrations showed an opposite behavior under oxic/acidic conditions and were lower in CS+SBFL than in CS. We conclude that SBFL immobilized Cu, Cr, Pb, and Fe under dynamic redox conditions and immobilized Cd, Co, Mn, Mo, Ni, and Zn under oxic acidic conditions; however, the latter elements were mobilized under reducing neutral conditions in the studied soil. Therefore, the addition of SBFL to acid floodplain soils contaminated with TMs might be an important alternative for ameliorating these soils with view to a sustainable management of these soils.

  5. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  6. Quantitative inhibition of soil C and N cycling by ectomycorrhizal fungi under field condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averill, C.; Hawkes, C.

    2014-12-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) ecosystems store more carbon than non-ectomycorrhizal ecosystems at global scale. Recent theoretical and empirical work suggests the presence of ECM fungi allows plants to compete directly with decomposers for soil nitrogen (N) via exo-enzyme synthesis. Experimental ECM exclusion often results in a release from competition of saprotrophic decomposers, allowing for increased C-degrading enzyme production, increased microbial biomass, and eventually declines in soil C stocks. Our knowledge of this phenomenon is limited, however, to the presence or absence of ECM fungi. It remains unknown if competitive repression of saprotrophic microbes and soil C cycling by ECM fungi varies with ECM abundance. This is particularly relevant to global change experiments when manipulations alter plant C allocation to ECM symbionts. To test if variation in ECM abundance alters the competitive inhibition of saprotrophic soil microbes (quantitative inhibition) we established experimental ECM exclusion treatments along an ECM abundance gradient. We dug trenches to experimentally exclude ECM fungi, allowing us to test for competitive release of soil saprotrophs from competition. To control for disturbance we placed in-growth bags both inside and outside of trenches. Consistent with the quantitative inhibition hypothesis, sites with more ECM fungi had significantly less microbial biomass per unit soil C and lower rates of N mineralization. Consistent with a release from competition, C-degrading enzyme activities were higher and gross proteolytic rates were lower per unit microbial biomass inside compared to outside trenches. We interpret this to reflect increased microbial investment in C-acquisition and decreased investment in N-acquisition in the absence of ECM fungi. Furthermore, the increase in C-degrading enzymes per unit microbial biomass was significantly greater in sites with the most abundant ECM fungi. Based on these results, ECM-saprotroph competition does

  7. Pore size distribution of soil near saturation as affected by soil type, land use, and soil amendments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, A. I.; Wagner, L. E.; Levy, G. J.

    2008-12-01

    Storage and flow of water in soil voids, which are related to the size and geometry of the voids and flow rate are usually controlled by the void of the smallest size. Another reason for the complexity of water flow in soils is the intricate nature and change of the soil pores due to the modification of soil structure under different agricultural management and climatic conditions. Shrinking and swelling stresses enhance breakdown of aggregates and to subsequent collapse of pores, thus adversely affecting the movement of water and solutes in the soil. Our objective was to study the role of soil type, nature of cultivation, waste and soil stabilizers application, and soil condition on disturbed soil pore-size distribution, drainable porosity and water holding capacity at near saturation (infiltration porosity) using the high energy moisture characteristic method. In this method, the wetting process of the aggregates is accurately controlled, and the energy of hydration and entrapped air are the main forces responsible for aggregate breakdown. We studied a large number (> 300) of soil samples from different climatic regions varying (i) in their inherent properties (clay mineralogy, dispersion potential, texture, organic matter, Fe and Al oxides content), and; (ii) the conditions prevailing in the soil (water quality, salinity, sodicity, redox potential, type of tillage); and finally that were subjected to the addition of different soil amendments (polymers, gypsum, manure, sludge). The results showed that structural stability and pore size distribution strongly depended on soil type, conditions prevailing in the soil and the type of amendment used. Detailed analyses of the results provided valuable information on inter- and intra- aggregate porosities that may have vital bearing on the understanding of (i) solution transport processes in different soil types under different treatments or with different solute concentration, and (ii) down-profile transport of soil

  8. Ecophysiology of Trembling Aspen in Response to Root-Zone Conditions and Competition on Reclaimed Mine Soil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockstette, S.; Landhäusser, S.; Pinno, B.; Dyck, M. F.

    2014-12-01

    Reclaimed soils are typically characterized by increased bulk densities, penetration resistances and poor soil structure as well as associated problems with hydrology and aeration. As a result, available rooting space for planted tree seedlings is often restricted to a shallow layer of topsoil, which is usually of higher quality and is cultivated prior to planting. This may hinder the development of healthy root systems, thus drastically increasing the risk for plant stress by limiting access to soil resources such as water, nutrients and oxygen. These problems are exacerbated when herbaceous plants compete for the same resources within this limited root-zone. To understand how limited rooting space affects the physiology of young trees, we experimentally manipulated soil conditions and levels of competition at a reclaimed mine site in central Alberta, Canada. The site was characterized by heavily compacted, fine textured subsoil (~2.0 Mg ha-1), capped with 15 cm of topsoil (~1.5 Mg ha-1). In a replicated study (n=6) half the plots were treated with a subsoil plow to a depth of about 60 cm to increase available rooting spece. Subsequently, trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and smooth brome (Bromus inermis L.) were planted to create four vegetation covers: aspen (a), brome (b), aspen + brome (ab) and control (c) (no vegetation). Various soil properties, including texture, bulk density, penetration resistance and water availability, in conjunction with plant parameters such as root and shoot growth, leaf area development, sap flow, and stomatal conductance have since been monitored, both in-situ and through destructive sampling. Our results indicate that the soil treatment was effective in lowering bulk densities and penetration resistance, while improving moisture retention characteristics. Tree seedling growth and leaf area development were significantly greater without competition, but did not differ between soil treatments. The soil treatment generally

  9. [137Cs and 90Sr accumulation in birch wood (Betula pendula Roth.) growing in regions with different soil conditions].

    PubMed

    Perevolotskiĭ, A N; Bulavik, I M; Perevolotskaia, T V; Paskrobko, L A; Andrush, S N

    2005-01-01

    The studies of 137Cs and 90Sr accumulation characteristics by birch wood (Betula pendula Roth.) growing in different edaphic conditions. Were conducted was stated that the increase in soil fertility from trophotops A to D results in 5-fold 137Cs transfer factor decrease and 2-fold decrease of 90Sr. Soil humidity increase for each grade of trophic net results happens the increase of 137Cs transfer factors to wood and decrease for 90Sr. Total activity of 37Cs and 90Sr in birch wood plantation depends on plantation productivity and on radionuclide transfer factors depending on different plantation conditions. In the most prevailing edaphotops (B2, B3, C2 and C3) birch wood accumulates 0.6-1.2% of 137Cs and 13-19% of 90Sr from total activity of radionuclides in biogeocenosis.

  10. Soils affected by heavy metals due to old mining on perudic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrigo, Jordi; Elustondo, David; Laheras, Ester; Oiarzabal, Maite; Jaume, Bech

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this work is to assess the actual status of the soils of a natural environment surrounding an abandoned mine (exploited since the Roman Age) where Pb, Zn, Fe and Cu were obtained. The study has been carried out in the Aitzondo valley (Guipuzkoa, North of Iberian Peninsula), which cross the exploited mountainous area with middle temperatures and perudic soil moisture regime Soils in the valley are polygenic, acids, very washed and sometimes show redoximorphic features and have undergone a great mobilization of trace metals due to these physical-chemical characteristics that enhance the heavy metals solubility and mobility. The analysis of soil surface samples shows a punctual and intense pollution at Meazuri area (where the mine is located) and another more dispersal and wide pollution due to the parent material (Palaeozoic shales). The main soil type of the area has been characterized by means of the performance of a soil and six surface samples have been collected along an altitudinal transect, which goes down from 460 to 75 meters. Both profile and surface samples have been analysed for suitable parameters due to their repercussion in mobility and fixation of some heavy metals (organic matter, clay content…). Total (Na, K, Mg, Ca, Al, Fe, Mn, Ti, Cd, Cr) and extractable fraction (using NH4Ac-EDTA pH=4.65, as extracting agent, have been analysed. Trace elements Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn have been measured. On summary, the soils studied are characterized by high levels of trace metals inherited from the parent material whose composition shows a great metallic richness. Hence, values of trace metals are very high even in remote areas where there has not been anthropic influence. Besides, the physical-chemical properties (acidity, base saturation, organic matter) have enhanced the mobility of trace metals. The anthropogenic activity (mining activity) has caused an increase in values of several metals, reaching, in some cases, concentrations above the

  11. Critical analysis of the thermal inertia approach to map soil water content under sparse vegetation and changeable sky conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltese, Antonino; Capodici, Fulvio; Corbari, Chiara; Ciraolo, Giuseppe; La Loggia, Goffredo; Sobrino, José Antonio

    2012-09-01

    sparse vegetation coverage. Results verify that the thermal inertia method can be applied on sparsely vegetated soil characterized by fractional cover up to ~0.25 (maximum value within this experiment); a lumped value of the phase difference allows a good estimate of the thermal inertia, whereas the comparison with the three-temperature approach did not give conclusive responses because ground radiometric temperatures were not acquired in optimal conditions. Results also show that clear sky only at the time of the remote sensing acquisitions is not a sufficient condition to apply the thermal inertia method. A corrective coefficient taking into account the actual sky cloudiness throughout the day allows accurate estimates of the spatial distribution of the thermal inertia (r2 ~ 0.9) and soil water content (r2 ~ 0.7).

  12. Positive feedback of crop residue incorporation on dissolved organic carbon contents under anaerobic conditions in temperate rice paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said-Pullicino, Daniel; Sodano, Marcella; Bertora, Chiara; Lerda, Cristina; Sacco, Dario; Celi, Luisella

    2016-04-01

    Rice paddy soils are generally characterized by large concentrations and fluxes of DOC in comparison to other ecosystems. Our recent studies have shown that the combination of relatively high pore-water DOC concentrations under anoxic soil conditions (>10-20 mg C l-1) and important percolation fluxes of water during field flooding may contribute significant organic C inputs into the subsoil (18-51 g C m-2) over the cropping season. Crop residues incorporated into the soil after harvest represent the main input of organic C into paddy soils, returning about 200-300 g C m-2 y-1 in single-cropped rice paddies. The anaerobic decomposition of these residues may supply important amounts of DOC to soil pore waters. Moreover, the supply of electron donors with the input of residue-derived labile OM may further increase DOC contents by stimulating the microbially-catalyzed reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides under anoxic conditions, and release of DOC previously stabilized on the mineral matrix (i.e. positive feedback). This could have important implications on organic C inputs into the subsoil as well as substrate availability for methane production. We therefore hypothesized that crop residue management practices that influence the amount of labile organic matter present in the soil at the time of field flooding may strongly influence soil solution DOC concentrations as well as the positive feedback on the release of soil-derived DOC. We tested this hypothesis at field-scale by evaluating variations in the contents and quality of DOC above and beneath the plough pan over the cropping season as a function of crop residue management practices involving: tillage and crop residue incorporation in spring (SPR), tillage and crop residue incorporation in spring, dry seeding and 1 month delayed flooding (DRY), tillage and crop residue incorporation in autumn (AUT), and straw removal after harvest and tillage in spring (REM). Moreover, we linked changes in DOC

  13. Impact of rainfall spatial distribution on rainfall-runoff modelling efficiency and initial soil moisture conditions estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramblay, Y.; Bouvier, C.; Ayral, P.-A.; Marchandise, A.

    2011-01-01

    A good knowledge of rainfall is essential for hydrological operational purposes such as flood forecasting. The objective of this paper was to analyze, on a relatively large sample of flood events, how rainfall-runoff modeling using an event-based model can be sensitive to the use of spatial rainfall compared to mean areal rainfall over the watershed. This comparison was based not only on the model's efficiency in reproducing the flood events but also through the estimation of the initial conditions by the model, using different rainfall inputs. The initial conditions of soil moisture are indeed a key factor for flood modeling in the Mediterranean region. In order to provide a soil moisture index that could be related to the initial condition of the model, the soil moisture output of the Safran-Isba-Modcou (SIM) model developed by Météo-France was used. This study was done in the Gardon catchment (545 km2) in South France, using uniform or spatial rainfall data derived from rain gauge and radar for 16 flood events. The event-based model considered combines the SCS runoff production model and the Lag and Route routing model. Results show that spatial rainfall increases the efficiency of the model. The advantage of using spatial rainfall is marked for some of the largest flood events. In addition, the relationship between the model's initial condition and the external predictor of soil moisture provided by the SIM model is better when using spatial rainfall, in particular when using spatial radar data with R2 values increasing from 0.61 to 0.72.

  14. Soils and waste water purification from oil products using combined methods under the North conditions.

    PubMed

    Evdokimova, Galina A; Gershenkop, Alexander Sh; Mozgova, Natalia P; Myazin, Vladimir A; Fokina, Nadejda V

    2012-01-01

    Oil and gas production and transportation in Russia is increasingly moving to the north regions. Such regions are characterized by relatively low self-purification capacity of the natural environments from the contaminants due to slow character of the energy exchange and mass transfer processes. Off-shore field development in the Barents Sea and oil product transportation can result in contamination, as confirmed by the national and international practice of the developed oil and gas regions. The research aims at development of the soil bioremediation methods and industrial waste water purification contaminated by oil products in the north-western region of Russia. The dynamics of oil products carry-over have been investigated under the field model experiments in podzolic soils: gas condensate, diesel fuel and mazut from oil and the plants were selected for phyto-remediation of contaminated soils under high north latitudes. It is shown that soil purification from light hydrocarbons takes place during one vegetation period. In three months of the vegetation period the gas condensate was completely removed from the soil, diesel fuel - almost completely (more than 90%). Residual amounts of heavy hydrocarbons were traced, even 1.5 later. The following plants that were highly resistant to the oil product contamination were recommended for bioremediation: Phalaroides arundinacea, Festuca pratensis, Phleum pratense, Leymus arenarius. There has been developed and patented the combined method of treatment of waste water contaminated with hydrocarbons based on inorganic coagulants and local oil-oxidizing bacteria.

  15. Monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions of three Mediterranean species through calcareous and siliceous soils in natural conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormeño, E.; Fernandez, C.; Bousquet-Mélou, A.; Greff, S.; Morin, E.; Robles, C.; Vila, B.; Bonin, G.

    Little is known about terpene emissions released by plants in response to abiotic factors, except for climate-related factors. Standard emissions ( ES) of monoterpenes ( ESM) and sesquiterpenes ( ESS) of Rosmarinus officinalis, Pinus halepensis and Cistus albidus in siliceous and calcareous sites were examined. Their dependency on some nutrients in these soils was also analyzed. The study was carried out in the south of France at the end of March, when C. albidus exhibited a leaf growth state, while the other two species exhibited a pre-budbreak state. The results revealed that ES of all major monoterpenes released by R. officinalis and ES of α-pinene and α-humulene of P. halepensis were higher in plants growing in calcareous soils. In contrast, for C. albidus, ESM and ES of β-bourbonene and α-humulene were higher in siliceous soils. ESM of all species was mainly correlated with nitrogen ( N) and available phosphorous (P A), while dependency on Ca 2+ or K + was variable. None of these nutrients was significantly correlated with ESS, suggesting that sesquiterpene synthesis pathway requires different nutrient supplies. While higher soil nutrient content stimulated ESM of R. officinalis and P. halepensis, it had a negative effect on ESM of C. albidus, probably because C. albidus exhibited a different phenological state. Considering the soil nature, and particularly N and P A as inputs in plant terpene inventories could hence contribute to obtain more accurate terpene estimates.

  16. Comparison of linuron degradation in the presence of pesticide mixtures in soil under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Swarcewicz, Maria; Gregorczyk, Andrzej; Sobczak, Justyna

    2013-10-01

    It is widely recognised that complex interactions occur between chemicals in mixtures. In many agricultural situations, the use of tank mixes and complex spray programs is a common practice. Insecticides, fungicides and a herbicide being applied in potato protection were used in this research. Interactions between linuron and insecticides, such as thiamethoxam or clothianidin, and fungicides, such as mancozeb or chlorothalonil, were examined in soil. The degradation rate of linuron in soil during laboratory incubation in six treatments was studied. Mixtures of linuron with mancozeb in sandy loam and clay loam soils had a significant effect on the persistence of this herbicide. For example, for the same herbicide, t 1/2 values for linuron were from 37 days in sandy loam to 44 days in clay loam. These values changed (64-67 days) when thiamethoxam and mancozeb were in soil. When mancozeb was added only, the half-life values were from 59 to 62 days, respectively. Other mixtures with chlorothalonil, thiamethoxam and clothianidin did not have any effect. In order to compare linuron degradation rates in soils, a single first-order model and expanded statistical analysis were used.

  17. Influence of forest stands on soil and ecosystem carbon stocks in the conditions of the European part of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaganov, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Forest stands are one of the most important components of ecosystems, both in Russia and around the world and at the same time forest vegetation is able to provide environment-modifying effect on the occupied landscape and, in particular, on the soil cover. Currently, due to the large interest in the carbon cycle, there is a question about the influence of forest vegetation on carbon stocks in ecosystems and in particular in the soil cover. To perform the study we selected 9 objects located in the European part of Russia from the area of the southern taiga to the semi-desert zone: Novgorod region, Kostroma region, Moscow region (2 objects), Penza region, Voronezh region, Volgograd region (2 objects) and Astrakhan region. For studying the influence of forest vegetation on the soil`s carbon, we organized the following experiment scheme: in each of the objects two key sites were selected, so that they originally were in the same soil conditions and the difference between them was only in a course development of vegetation - forest or grass. One part of the experimental sites, presenting forest vegetation, were the restored forests on abandoned lands with the age of 70-200 years. The second part of the experimental sites were artificial forest plantations aged from 60 to 112 years planted on the originally treeless forest-steppe or steppe landscapes. Perennial hayfields, perennial abandoned agricultural landscapes and virgin steppe areas were used as reference sites with grass vegetation. For each forest site we estimated the major carbon pools: phytomass, mortmass (dead wood, dry grass), debris, litter and soil. All data were recalculated using the conversion factors in carbon stocks in t C ha-1. We collected soil samples every 10 cm until the depth of 50 cm, and then at 50-75 and 75-100 cm soil layers. Bulk density and total organic carbon were determined by CHN analyzer. As a result, the soil`s carbon was also calculated into t C ha-1. We found out that the total

  18. A standardized approach for estimating the permeability of plastic films to soil fumigants under various field and environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Papiernik, Sharon K; Yates, Scott R; Chellemi, Daniel O

    2011-01-01

    Minimizing atmospheric emissions of soil fumigants is critical for protecting human and environmental health. Covering the soil surface with a plastic tarp is a common approach to restrict fumigant emissions. The mass transfer of the fumigant vapors through the tarp is often the rate-limiting factor in fumigant emissions. An approach for standardizing measurements of film permeability is proposed that is based on determining the resistance (R) of films to diffusion of fumigants. Using this approach, values were determined for more than 200 film-chemical combinations under a range of temperature, relative humidity, and film handling conditions. Resistance to diffusion was specific for each fumigant/film combination, with the largest range of values observed for the fumigant chloropicrin. For each fumigant, decreased with increasing temperature. Changes in film permeability due to increases in temperature or field installation were generally less than a factor of five. For one film, values determined under conditions of very high relative humidity (approximately 100%) were at least 100 times lower than when humidity was very low (approximately 2%). This approach simplifies the selection of appropriate films for soil fumigation by providing rapid, reproducible, and precise measurements of their permeability to specific fumigants and application conditions.

  19. Influence of soil minerals on chromium(VI) reduction by sulfide under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yeqing; Deng, Baolin; Kim, Chulsung; Thornton, Edward C

    2007-04-12

    The effects of soil minerals on chromate (CrVIO42-, noted as Cr(VI)) reduction by sulfide were investigated in the pH range of 7.67 to 9.07 under the anoxic condition. The examined minerals included montmorillonite (Swy-2), illite (IMt-2), kaolinite (KGa-2), aluminum oxide (gamma-Al2O3), titanium oxide (TiO2, P-25, primarily anatase), and silica (SiO2). Based on their effects on Cr(VI) reduction, these minerals were categorized into three groups: (i) minerals catalyzing Cr(VI) reduction - illite; (ii) minerals with no effect - Al2O3; and (iii) minerals inhibiting Cr(VI) reduction- kaolinite, montmorillonite, SiO2 and TiO2 . The catalysis of illite was attributed primarily to the low concentration of iron solubilized from the mineral, which could accelerate Cr(VI) reduction by shuttling electrons from sulfide to Cr(VI). Additionally, elemental sulfur produced as the primary product of sulfide oxidation could further catalyze Cr(VI) reduction in the heterogeneous system. Previous studies have shown that adsorption of sulfide onto elemental sulfur nanoparticles could greatly increase sulfide reactivity towards Cr(VI) reduction. Consequently, the observed rate constant, kobs, increased with increasing amounts of both iron solubilized from illite and elemental sulfur produced during the reaction. The catalysis of iron, however, was found to be blocked by phenanthroline, a strong complexing agent for ferrous iron. In this case, the overall reaction rate at the initial stage of reaction was pseudo first order with respect to Cr(VI), i.e., the reaction kinetics was similar to that in the homogeneous system, because elemental sulfur exerted no effect at the initial stage prior to accumulation of elemental sulfur nanoparticles. In the suspension of kaolinite, which belonged to group (iii), an inhibitive effect to Cr(VI) reduction was observed and subsequently examined in more details. The inhibition was due to the sorption of elemental sulfur onto kaolinite, which reduced or

  20. Influence of soil minerals on chromium(VI) reduction by sulfide under anoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yeqing; Deng, Baolin; Kim, Chulsung; Thornton, Edward C

    2007-01-01

    The effects of soil minerals on chromate (CrVIO42-, noted as Cr(VI)) reduction by sulfide were investigated in the pH range of 7.67 to 9.07 under the anoxic condition. The examined minerals included montmorillonite (Swy-2), illite (IMt-2), kaolinite (KGa-2), aluminum oxide (γ-Al2O3), titanium oxide (TiO2, P-25, primarily anatase), and silica (SiO2). Based on their effects on Cr(VI) reduction, these minerals were categorized into three groups: (i) minerals catalyzing Cr(VI) reduction – illite; (ii) minerals with no effect – Al2O3; and (iii) minerals inhibiting Cr(VI) reduction- kaolinite, montmorillonite, SiO2 and TiO2 . The catalysis of illite was attributed primarily to the low concentration of iron solubilized from the mineral, which could accelerate Cr(VI) reduction by shuttling electrons from sulfide to Cr(VI). Additionally, elemental sulfur produced as the primary product of sulfide oxidation could further catalyze Cr(VI) reduction in the heterogeneous system. Previous studies have shown that adsorption of sulfide onto elemental sulfur nanoparticles could greatly increase sulfide reactivity towards Cr(VI) reduction. Consequently, the observed rate constant, kobs, increased with increasing amounts of both iron solubilized from illite and elemental sulfur produced during the reaction. The catalysis of iron, however, was found to be blocked by phenanthroline, a strong complexing agent for ferrous iron. In this case, the overall reaction rate at the initial stage of reaction was pseudo first order with respect to Cr(VI), i.e., the reaction kinetics was similar to that in the homogeneous system, because elemental sulfur exerted no effect at the initial stage prior to accumulation of elemental sulfur nanoparticles. In the suspension of kaolinite, which belonged to group (iii), an inhibitive effect to Cr(VI) reduction was observed and subsequently examined in more details. The inhibition was due to the sorption of elemental sulfur onto kaolinite, which reduced

  1. Arsenic removal from contaminated soil via biovolatilization by genetically engineered bacteria under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Jian; Sun, Guoxin

    2011-01-01

    In Rhodopseudomonas palustris, an arsM gene, encoding bacterial and archaeal homologues of the mammalian Cyt19 As(III) S-adenosylmethionine methytransferase, was regulated by arsenicals. An expression of arsM was introduced into strains for the methylation of arsenic. When arsM was expressed in Sphingomonas desiccabilis and Bacillus idriensis, it had 10 folds increase of methyled arsenic gas compared to wild type in aqueous system. In soil system, about 2.2%-4.5% of arsenic was removed by biovolatilization during 30 days. This study demonstrated that arsenic could be removed through volatilization from the contaminated soil by bacteria which have arsM gene expressed. These results showed that it is possible to use microorganisms expressing arsM as an inexpensive, efficient strategy for arsenic bioremediation from contaminated water and soil.

  2. The effect of freeze-thaw conditions on arctic soil bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Niraj; Grogan, Paul; Chu, Haiyan; Christiansen, Casper T; Walker, Virginia K

    2013-02-28

    Climate change is already altering the landscape at high latitudes. Permafrost is thawing, the growing season is starting earlier, and, as a result, certain regions in the Arctic may be subjected to an increased incidence of freeze-thaw events. The potential release of carbon and nutrients from soil microbial cells that have been lysed by freeze-thaw transitions could have significant impacts on the overall carbon balance of arctic ecosystems, and therefore on atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, the impact of repeated freezing and thawing with the consequent growth and recrystallization of ice on microbial communities is still not well understood. Soil samples from three distinct sites, representing Canadian geographical low arctic, mid-arctic and high arctic soils were collected from Daring Lake, Alexandra Fjord and Cambridge Bay sampling sites, respectively. Laboratory-based experiments subjected the soils to multiple freeze-thaw cycles for 14 days based on field observations (0 °C to -10 °C for 12 h and -10 °C to 0 °C for 12 h) and the impact on the communities was assessed by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) methyl ester analysis and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Both data sets indicated differences in composition and relative abundance between the three sites, as expected. However, there was also a strong variation within the two high latitude sites in the effects of the freeze-thaw treatment on individual PLFA and 16S-based phylotypes. These site-based heterogeneities suggest that the impact of climate change on soil microbial communities may not be predictable a priori; minor differential susceptibilities to freeze-thaw stress could lead to a "butterfly effect" as described by chaos theory, resulting in subsequent substantive differences in microbial assemblages. This perspectives article suggests that this is an unwelcome finding since it will make future predictions for the impact of on-going climate change on soil microbial communities in

  3. Fungal Diversity in Permafrost and Tallgrass Prairie Soils under Experimental Warming Conditions

    PubMed Central

    StLouis, Derek; Cole, James R.; Luo, Yiqi; Wu, Liyou; Schuur, E. A. G; Zhou, Jizhong; Tiedje, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Soil fungi play a major role in terrestrial ecosystem functioning through interactions with soil structure, plants, micro- and mesofauna, and nutrient cycling through predation, pathogenesis, mutualistic, and saprotrophic roles. The diversity of soil fungi was assessed by sequencing their 28S rRNA gene in Alaskan permafrost and Oklahoma tallgrass prairie soils at experimental sites where the effect of climate warming is under investigation. A total of 226,695 reads were classified into 1,063 genera, covering 62% of the reference data set. Using the Bayesian Classifier offered by the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) with 50% bootstrapping classification confidence, approximately 70% of sequences were returned as “unclassified” at the genus level, although the majority (∼65%) were classified at the class level, which provided insight into these lesser-known fungal lineages. Those unclassified at the genus level were subjected to BLAST analysis against the ARB-SILVA database, where ∼50% most closely matched nonfungal taxa. Compared to the more abundant sequences, a higher proportion of rare operational taxonomic units (OTU) were successfully classified to genera at 50% bootstrap confidence, indicating that the fungal rare biosphere in these sites is not composed of sequencing artifacts. There was no significant effect after 1 year of warming on the fungal community structure at both sites, except perhaps for a few minor members, but there was a significant effect of sample depth in the permafrost soils. Despite overall significant community structure differences driven by variations in OTU dominance, the prairie and permafrost soils shared 90% and 63% of all fungal sequences, respectively, indicating a fungal “seed bank” common between both sites. PMID:24014534

  4. Influence of soil properties and test conditions on sorption and desorption of testosterone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, batch sorption and desorption experiments were conducted for testosterone using four agricultural soils and five clay minerals. Significant differences in sorption behavior were observed between abiotic and biotic systems. The Freundlich sorption coefficient Kf (µg per g)/(µg per mL) ...

  5. Long-term Tillage Influences on Soil Physical Properties under Dryland Conditions in Northeastern Montana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the effect of long-term (>20 yrs) tillage [no-till (NT), spring till (ST), and fall and spring till (FST)] under continuous spring wheat on soil penetration resistance (PR), bulk density ('b), water content ('m) and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) under dryland cropping systems. S...

  6. Effect of meteorology and soil condition on metolachlor and atrazine volatilization over a 10 year period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 10-year study was conducted to focus on the impact of soil and climatic factors governing herbicide volatilization from an agricultural field. For the first 5 years, metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl) acetamide] and atrazine [6-chloro-N-ethyl-N’-(1-methyl...

  7. Ammonia-limited conditions cause of Thaumarchaeal dominance in volcanic grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Daebeler, Anne; Bodelier, Paul L E; Hefting, Mariet M; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2015-03-01

    The first step of nitrification is carried out by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). It is largely unknown, by which mechanisms these microbes are capable of coexistence and how their respective contribution to ammonia oxidation may differ with varying soil characteristics. To determine how different levels of ammonium availability influence the extent of archaeal and bacterial contributions to ammonia oxidation, microcosm incubations with controlled ammonium levels were conducted. Net nitrification was monitored and ammonia-oxidizer communities were quantified. Additionally, the nitrification inhibitor allylthiourea (ATU) was applied to discriminate between archaeal and bacterial contributions to soil ammonia oxidation. Thaumarchaeota, which were the only ammonia oxidizers detectable at the start of the incubation, grew in all microcosms, but AOB later became detectable in ammonium amended microcosms. Low and high additions of ammonium increasingly stimulated AOB growth, while AOA were only stimulated by the low addition. Treatment with ATU had no effect on net nitrification and sizes of ammonia-oxidizing communities suggesting that the effective concentration of ATU to discriminate between archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidation is not the same in different soils. Our results support the niche-differentiating potential of ammonium concentration for AOA and AOB, and we conclude that ammonium limitation can be a major reason for absence of detectable AOB in soil.

  8. Impacts of tundra fire on active layer condition and estimation of true resistivity value of soil in Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, K.; Sawada, Y.; Narita, K.; Fukuda, M.

    2007-12-01

    In Seward Peninsula, southwest Alaska, large tundra fires were occurred in 1997 and 2002, and a discontinuous permafrost area burned widely near the Kougarok River. After fires, a vegetation condition was destroyed and a ground surface thermal condition was changed. Then, field observations were conducted at burned and unburned sites in summer 2005, 2006 and 2007, in order to clarify impacts of the tundra fire on thermal and water conditions of active layer. From pit surveys, ground temperatures at burned sites showed 4-5 °C higher values than those at unburned sites. Soil water contents at burned sites showed relative high values in 2005, but low in 2006. Active layer thicknesses were significantly different between burned and unburned sites, about 60cm and 40cm, respectively. There is no significant increasing of the thickness between 2005 and 2006, however, the thickness in 2007 at north-facing sites increased to 80cm at the burned site and 50cm at the unburned site, respectively. Apparent electrical resistivity values up to 1m deep were obtained from electrical soundings in 2006, and values at burned sites were lower than those at unburned sites due to the thick active layer whose resistivity value is relatively low. As an apparent resistivity value is generally produced from the combination of a true resistivity value and a thickness of a layer, a simple calculation was carried out in order to estimate a true resistivity value of unfrozen mineral soil in the active layer. The calculated results showed that the true resistivity at burned sites was higher than that at unburned sites, which was seemed to correspond to a relative low water condition. This result is in agreement with the measured result of water content in 2006. Using this method, the apparent resistivity may show a soil water condition.

  9. Influence of elevated ozone concentration on methanotrophic bacterial communities in soil under field condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. Z.; Zhong, M.

    2015-05-01

    The open top chamber (OTC) method was used in combination with real-time quantitative PCR and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) techniques in the wheat field to study the influence of different levels of O3 concentrations (ambient air filtered by activated carbons, 40 ppb, 80 ppb and 120 ppb) on the quantity and community structure of methanotrophic bacteria. O3 stress can influence the potential methane oxidation rate (PMOR) and potential methane production rate (PMPR) in the farmland soil. O3 treatment of 40 ppb improved significantly the 16S rRNA gene copy number in the total methanotrophic bacteria pmoA, and type I and type II methanotrophic bacteria in the soil depth of 0-20 cm. When the O3 concentration reached 120 ppb, the 16S rRNA gene copy number in the total methanotrophic bacteria pmoA and type I methanotrophic bacteria decreased significantly as compared to the control treatment in 10-20 cm layer. The 16s rRNA gene copy number of total methanotrophic bacteria pmoA and type I and type II methanotrophic bacteria were influenced by different O3 concentration and soil depth. The T-RFLP analysis indicated that O3 stress influenced significantly the community structure of the methanotrophic bacteria in soil, causing potential threat to the diversity of methanotrophic bacteria. It seems to imply that the rise of O3 concentration could produce an impact on the carbon cycling and the methane emission of the wheat field soil by changing the community structure and diversity of methanotrophic bacteria, which then influences the global climate change.

  10. Evaluating the efficacy of distributed detention structures to reduce downstream flooding under variable rainfall, antecedent soil, and structural storage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Nicholas W.; Arenas Amado, Antonio; Schilling, Keith E.; Weber, Larry J.

    2016-10-01

    This research systematically analyzed the influence of antecedent soil wetness, rainfall depth, and the subsequent impact on peak flows in a 45 km2 watershed. Peak flows increased with increasing antecedent wetness and rainfall depth, with the highest peak flows occurring under intense precipitation on wet soils. Flood mitigation structures were included and investigated under full and empty initial storage conditions. Peak flows were reduced at the outlet of the watershed by 3-17%. The highest peak flow reductions occurred in scenarios with dry soil, empty project storage, and low rainfall depths. These analyses showed that with increased rainfall depth, antecedent moisture conditions became increasingly less impactful. Scaling invariance of peak discharges were shown to hold true within this basin and were fit through ordinary least squares regression for each design scenario. Scale-invariance relationships were extrapolated beyond the outlet of the analyzed basin to the point of intersection of with and without structure scenarios. In each scenario extrapolated peak discharge benefits depreciated at a drainage area of approximately 100 km2. The associated drainage area translated to roughly 2 km downstream of the Beaver Creek watershed outlet. This work provides an example of internal watershed benefits of structural flood mitigation efforts, and the impact the may exert outside of the basin. Additionally, the influence of 1.8 million in flood reduction tools was not sufficient to routinely address downstream flood concerns, shedding light on the additional investment required to alter peak flows in large basins.

  11. Plant growth promoting activity of an auxin and siderophore producing isolate of Streptomyces under saline soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Akram; Karimi, Ebrahim; Dahaji, Peyman Abaszadeh; Javid, Majid Ghorbani; Dalvand, Yadola; Askari, Hossein

    2012-04-01

    A biocontrol Streptomyces isolate (C) was tested for its plant growth promoting qualities under saline conditions. Exposure to elevated osmotic strengths up to 300 mM NaCl increased dry weight and cfu/ml significantly. The isolate C produced indolyl-3-acetic acid (IAA) into the medium in the amount of 2.4 μg/ml. The amount of auxin increased after adding salt and reached to 4.7 μg/ml in 300 mM NaCl. Biosynthesis of siderophore was detectable and increased in presence of NaCl. Streptomyces isolate C showed good solubilization of tricalcium phosphate in culture medium with 92 mg/l. Solubilization decreased in presence of NaCl. Soil treatment with isolate C increased the growth and development of wheat plant in normal and saline conditions. In this treatment there were significant increases in germination rate, percentage and uniformity, shoot length and dry weight compared to the control. Applying the bacterial inocula increased the concentration of N, P, Fe and Mn in wheat shoots grown in normal and saline soil, but had non-significant effect on other micro and macronutrients concentrations. Results of this study show that Streptomyces isolate C has potential to be utilized as biofertilizer in saline soils.

  12. Comparison of three approaches to model grapevine organogenesis in conditions of fluctuating temperature, solar radiation and soil water content

    PubMed Central

    Pallas, B.; Loi, C.; Christophe, A.; Cournède, P. H.; Lecoeur, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims There is increasing interest in the development of plant growth models representing the complex system of interactions between the different determinants of plant development. These approaches are particularly relevant for grapevine organogenesis, which is a highly plastic process dependent on temperature, solar radiation, soil water deficit and trophic competition. Methods The extent to which three plant growth models were able to deal with the observed plasticity of axis organogenesis was assessed. In the first model, axis organogenesis was dependent solely on temperature, through thermal time. In the second model, axis organogenesis was modelled through functional relationships linking meristem activity and trophic competition. In the last model, the rate of phytomer appearence on each axis was modelled as a function of both the trophic status of the plant and the direct effect of soil water content on potential meristem activity. Key Results The model including relationships between trophic competition and meristem behaviour involved a decrease in the root mean squared error (RMSE) for the simulations of organogenesis by a factor nine compared with the thermal time-based model. Compared with the model in which axis organogenesis was driven only by trophic competition, the implementation of relationships between water deficit and meristem behaviour improved organogenesis simulation results, resulting in a three times divided RMSE. The resulting model can be seen as a first attempt to build a comprehensive complete plant growth model simulating the development of the whole plant in fluctuating conditions of temperature, solar radiation and soil water content. Conclusions We propose a new hypothesis concerning the effects of the different determinants of axis organogenesis. The rate of phytomer appearance according to thermal time was strongly affected by the plant trophic status and soil water deficit. Futhermore, the decrease in meristem

  13. Test of local adaptation to biotic interactions and soil abiotic conditions in the ant-tended Chamaecrista fasciculata (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Abdala-Roberts, Luis; Marquis, Robert J

    2007-11-01

    Few previous studies have assessed the role of herbivores and the third trophic level in the evolution of local adaptation in plants. The overall objectives of this study were to determine (1) whether local adaptation is present in the ant-defended plant, Chamaecrista fasciculata, and (2) the contribution of ant-plant-herbivore interactions and soil source to such adaptation. We used three C. fasciculata populations and performed both a field and a greenhouse experiment. The first involved reciprocally transplanting C. fasciculata seedlings from each population-source to each site, and subsequently applying one of three treatments to one-third of the seedlings of each population-source at each site: control, reduced ant density and reduced folivory. The greenhouse experiment involved reciprocal transplants of population-sources with soil sources to test for a soil-source effect on flower production and local adaptation to soil conditions. Field results showed that ant and herbivore treatments reduced ant density (increasing folivory) and herbivore damage relative to controls, respectively; however, these manipulations did not impact C. fasciculata reproduction or the likelihood of survival. In contrast, greenhouse results showed that soil source significantly affected flower production. Overall, plants in both experiments, regardless of population-source, always had higher reproductive output at one specific site. Native populations did not outperform nonnative ones, causing us to reject the hypothesis of local adaptation. The absence of treatment effects on plant reproduction and the likelihood of survival suggest a limited effect of ants and folivores on C. fasciculata fitness and local adaptation during the study year. Temporally inconsistent effects of biotic forces across years, coupled with the young age of populations, relative proximity of populations and possible counter effects of seed predators may reduce the likelihood of local adaptation in the

  14. Efficiency of some soil bacteria for chemical oxygen demand reduction of synthetic chlorsulfuron solutions under agiated culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Erguven, G O; Yildirim, N

    2016-05-30

    This study searches the efficiency of certain soil bacteria on chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of synthetic chlorsulfuron solutions under agitated culture conditions. It also aims to determine the turbidity of liquid culture medium with chlorsulfuron during bacterial incubation for 120 hours. As a result the highest and lowest COD removal efficiency of bacteria was determined for Bacillus simplex as 94% and for Micrococcus luteus as 70%, respectively at the end of the 96th hour. It was found that COD removal efficiency showed certain differences depend on the bacterial species. It was also observed that B. simplex had the highest COD removal efficiency and it was a suitable bacterium species for bioremediation of a chlorsulfuron contaminated soils.

  15. The Effect of Freeze-Thaw Conditions on Arctic Soil Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Niraj; Grogan, Paul; Chu, Haiyan; Christiansen, Casper T.; Walker, Virginia K.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is already altering the landscape at high latitudes. Permafrost is thawing, the growing season is starting earlier, and, as a result, certain regions in the Arctic may be subjected to an increased incidence of freeze-thaw events. The potential release of carbon and nutrients from soil microbial cells that have been lysed by freeze-thaw transitions could have significant impacts on the overall carbon balance of arctic ecosystems, and therefore on atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, the impact of repeated freezing and thawing with the consequent growth and recrystallization of ice on microbial communities is still not well understood. Soil samples from three distinct sites, representing Canadian geographical low arctic, mid-arctic and high arctic soils were collected from Daring Lake, Alexandra Fjord and Cambridge Bay sampling sites, respectively. Laboratory-based experiments subjected the soils to multiple freeze-thaw cycles for 14 days based on field observations (0 °C to −10 °C for 12 h and −10 °C to 0 °C for 12 h) and the impact on the communities was assessed by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) methyl ester analysis and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Both data sets indicated differences in composition and relative abundance between the three sites, as expected. However, there was also a strong variation within the two high latitude sites in the effects of the freeze-thaw treatment on individual PLFA and 16S-based phylotypes. These site-based heterogeneities suggest that the impact of climate change on soil microbial communities may not be predictable a priori; minor differential susceptibilities to freeze-thaw stress could lead to a “butterfly effect” as described by chaos theory, resulting in subsequent substantive differences in microbial assemblages. This perspectives article suggests that this is an unwelcome finding since it will make future predictions for the impact of on-going climate change on soil microbial communities

  16. [Finasteride adverse effects: An update].

    PubMed

    Carreño-Orellana, Néstor; Moll-Manzur, Catherina; Carrasco-Zuber, Juan Eduardo; Álvarez-Véliz, Sergio; Berroeta-Mauriziano, Daniela; Porras-Kusmanic, Ninoska

    2016-12-01

    Finasteride is a 5-α reductase inhibitor that is widely used in the management of benign prostate hyperplasia and male pattern hair loss. It is well known that these agents improve the quality of life in men suffering from these conditions. However, they are associated with some transient and even permanent adverse effects. The aim of this article is to clarify the controversies about the safety of finasteride by analyzing the evidence available in the literature.

  17. Horizontal Heat Impact of Urban Structures on the Surface Soil Layer and Its Diurnal Patterns under Different Micrometeorological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongxuan; Hu, Dan; Wang, Xiaolin; Han, Fengsen; Li, Yuanzheng; Wu, Xiaogang; Ma, Shengli

    2016-01-01