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Sample records for adverse structural remodeling

  1. Macro- and micronutrient dyshomeostasis in the adverse structural remodelling of myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Karl T.; Weglicki, William B.; Simpson, Robert U.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension and heart failure are worldwide health problems of ever-increasing proportions. A failure of the heart, during either systolic and/or diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle, has its origins rooted in an adverse structural, biochemical, and molecular remodelling of myocardium that involves its cellular constituents, extracellular matrix, and intramural coronary vasculature. Herein we focus on the pathogenic role of a dyshomeostasis of several macro- (i.e. Ca2+ and Mg2+) and micronutrients (i.e. Zn2+, Se2+, and vitamin D) in contributing to adverse remodelling of the myocardium and its failure as a pulsatile muscular pump. An improved understanding of how these macro- and micronutrients account for the causes and consequences of adverse myocardial remodelling carries with it the potential of identifying new biomarkers predictive of risk, onset and progression, and response to intervention(s), which could be monitored non-invasively and serially over time. Moreover, such incremental knowledge will serve as the underpinning to the development of novel strategies aimed at preventing and/or regressing the ongoing adverse remodelling of myocardium. The time is at hand to recognize the importance of macro- and micronutrient dyshomeostasis in the evaluation and management of hypertension and heart failure. PMID:18835843

  2. Air pollution and adverse cardiac remodeling: clinical effects and basic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yonggang; Goodson, Jamie M.; Zhang, Bo; Chin, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution has long been known to trigger cardiovascular events, primarily through activation of local and systemic inflammatory pathways that affect the vasculature. Detrimental effects of air pollution exposure on heart failure and cardiac remodeling have also been described in human populations. Recent studies in both human subjects and animal models have provided insights into the basic physiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms that play a role in adverse cardiac remodeling. This review will give a brief overview of the relationship between air pollution and cardiovascular disease, describe the clinical effects of air pollution exposure on cardiac remodeling, describe the basic mechanisms that affect remodeling as described in human and animal systems and will discuss future areas of investigation. PMID:26042051

  3. UM206, a selective Frizzled antagonist, attenuates adverse remodeling after myocardial infarction in swine.

    PubMed

    Uitterdijk, André; Hermans, Kevin C M; de Wijs-Meijler, Daphne P M; Daskalopoulos, Evangelos P; Reiss, Irwin K; Duncker, Dirk J; Matthijs Blankesteijn, W; Merkus, Daphne

    2016-02-01

    Modulation of Wnt/Frizzled signaling with UM206 reduced infarct expansion and prevented heart failure development in mice, an effect that was accompanied by increased myofibroblast presence in the infarct, suggesting that Wnt/Frizzled signaling has a key role in cardiac remodeling following myocardial infarction (MI). This study investigated the effects of modulation of Wnt/Frizzled signaling with UM206 in a swine model of reperfused MI. For this purpose, seven swine with MI were treated with continuous infusion of UM206 for 5 weeks. Six control swine were treated with vehicle. Another eight swine were sham-operated. Cardiac function was determined by echo in awake swine. Infarct mass was estimated at baseline by heart-specific fatty acid-binding protein ELISA and at follow-up using planimetry. Components of Wnt/Frizzled signaling, myofibroblast presence, and extracellular matrix were measured at follow-up with qPCR and/or histology. Results show that UM206 treatment resulted in a significant decrease in infarct mass compared with baseline (-41±10%), whereas infarct mass remained stable in the Control-MI group (+3±17%). Progressive dilation of the left ventricle occurred in the Control-MI group between 3 and 5 weeks after MI, while adverse remodeling was halted in the UM206-treated group. mRNA expression for Frizzled-4 and the Frizzled co-receptor LRP5 was increased in UM206-treated swine as compared with Control-MI swine. Myofibroblast presence was significantly lower in infarcted tissue of the UM206-treated animals (1.53±0.43% vs 3.38±0.61%) at 5 weeks follow-up. This study demonstrates that UM206 treatment attenuates adverse remodeling in a swine model of reperfused MI, indicating that Wnt/Frizzled signaling is a promising target to improve infarct healing and limit post-MI remodeling.

  4. Functional brown adipose tissue limits cardiomyocyte injury and adverse remodeling in catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Thoonen, Robrecht; Ernande, Laura; Cheng, Juan; Nagasaka, Yasuko; Yao, Vincent; Miranda-Bezerra, Alexandre; Chen, Chan; Chao, Wei; Panagia, Marcello; Sosnovik, David E.; Puppala, Dheeraj; Armoundas, Antonis A.; Hindle, Allyson; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has well recognized thermogenic properties mediated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1); more recently, BAT has been demonstrated to modulate cardiovascular risk factors. To investigate whether BAT also affects myocardial injury and remodeling, UCP1-deficient (UCP1−/−) mice, which have dysfunctional BAT, were subjected to catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy. At baseline, there were no differences in echocardiographic parameters, plasma cardiac troponin I (cTnI) or myocardial fibrosis between wild-type (WT) and UCP1−/− mice. Isoproterenol infusion increased cTnI and myocardial fibrosis and induced left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in both WT and UCP1−/− mice. UCP1−/− mice also demonstrated exaggerated myocardial injury, fibrosis, and adverse remodeling, as well as decreased survival. Transplantation of WT BAT to UCP1−/− mice prevented the isoproterenol-induced cTnI increase and improved survival, whereas UCP1−/− BAT transplanted to either UCP1−/− or WT mice had no effect on cTnI release. After 3 days of isoproterenol treatment, phosphorylated AKT and ERK were lower in the LV's of UCP1−/− mice than in those of WT mice. Activation of BAT was also noted in a model of chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy, and was correlated to LV dysfunction. Deficiency in UCP1, and accompanying BAT dysfunction, increases cardiomyocyte injury and adverse LV remodeling, and decreases survival in a mouse model of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy. Myocardial injury and decreased survival are rescued by transplantation of functional BAT to UCP1−/− mice, suggesting a systemic cardioprotective role of functional BAT. BAT is also activated in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25968336

  5. Estrogen inhibits mast cell chymase release to prevent pressure overload-induced adverse cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianping; Jubair, Shaiban; Janicki, Joseph S

    2015-02-01

    Estrogen regulation of myocardial chymase and chymase effects on cardiac remodeling are unknown. To test the hypothesis that estrogen prevents pressure overload-induced adverse cardiac remodeling by inhibiting mast cell (MC) chymase release, transverse aortic constriction or sham surgery was performed in 7-week-old intact and ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Three days before creating the constriction, additional groups of OVX rats began receiving 17β-estradiol, a chymase inhibitor, or a MC stabilizer. Left ventricular function, cardiomyocyte size, collagen volume fraction, MC density and degranulation, and myocardial and plasma chymase levels were assessed 18 days postsurgery. Aortic constriction resulted in ventricular hypertrophy in intact and OVX groups, whereas collagen volume fraction was increased only in OVX rats. Chymase protein content was increased by aortic constriction in the intact and OVX groups, with the magnitude of the increase being greater in OVX rats. MC density and degranulation, plasma chymase levels, and myocardial active transforming growth factor-β1 levels were increased by aortic constriction only in OVX rats. Estrogen replacement markedly attenuated the constriction-increased myocardial chymase, MC density and degranulation, plasma chymase, and myocardial active transforming growth factor-β1, as well as prevented ventricular hypertrophy and increased collagen volume fraction. Chymostatin attenuated the aortic constriction-induced ventricular hypertrophy and collagen volume fraction in the OVX rats similar to that achieved by estrogen replacement. Nedocromil yielded similar effects, except for the reduction of chymase content. We conclude that the estrogen-inhibited release of MC chymase is responsible for the cardioprotection against transverse aortic constriction-induced adverse cardiac remodeling.

  6. Mast Cell Inhibition Attenuates Myocardial Damage, Adverse Remodeling and Dysfunction during Fulminant Myocarditis in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Yair; Rinkevich-Shop, Shunit; Konen, Eli; Goitein, Orly; Kushnir, Tammar; Epstein, Frederick H.; Feinberg, Micha S.; Leor, Jonathan; Landa-Rouben, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Background Myocarditis is a life-threatening heart disease characterized by myocardial inflammation, necrosis and chronic fibrosis. While mast cell inhibition has been suggested to prevents fibrosis in rat myocarditis, little is known about its effectiveness in attenuating cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in myocarditis. Thus, we sought to test the hypothesis that mast cell inhibition will attenuate the inflammatory reaction and associated left ventricular (LV) remodeling and dysfunction after fulminant autoimmune myocarditis. Methods and Results To induce experimental autoimmune myocarditis, we immunized 30 rats with porcine cardiac myosin twice at a 7-day interval. On day 8 animals were randomized into treatment either with an intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 25mg/kg of cromolyn sodium (n=13), or an equivalent volume (~0.5ml IP) of normal saline (n=11). All animals were scanned by serial echocardiography studies before treatment (baseline echocardiogram) and after 20 days of cromolyn sodium (28 days after immunization). Furthermore, serial cardiac magnetic resonance was performed in a subgroup of 12 animals. After 20 days of treatment (28 days from first immunization), hearts were harvested for histopathological analysis. By echocardiography, cromolyn sodium prevented LV dilatation and attenuated LV dysfunction, compared with controls. Postmortem analysis of hearts showed that cromolyn sodium reduced myocardial fibrosis, as well as the number and size of cardiac mast cells in the inflamed myocardium, compared with controls. Conclusions Our study suggests that mast cell inhibition with cromolyn sodium attenuates adverse LV remodeling and dysfunction in myocarditis. This mechanism-based therapy is clinically relevant and could improve the outcome of patients at risk for inflammatory cardiomyopathy and heart failure. PMID:23172937

  7. Persistent Microvascular Obstruction After Myocardial Infarction Culminates in the Confluence of Ferric Iron Oxide Crystals, Proinflammatory Burden, and Adverse RemodelingCLINICAL PERSPECTIVE

    SciTech Connect

    Kali, Avinash; Cokic, Ivan; Tang, Richard; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kovarik, Libor; Yang, Hsin-Jung; Kumar, Andreas; Prato, Frank S.; Wood, John C.; Underhill, David; Marbán, Eduardo; Dharmakumar, Rohan

    2016-11-01

    Emerging evidence now supports the notion that persistent microvascular obstruction (PMO) may be more predictive of major adverse cardiovascular events than MI size itself. But, how PMO, a phenomenon limited to the acute/sub-acute period of MI, imparts adverse remodeling throughout the post MI period, particularly after its resolution, is incompletely understood. We hypothesized that PMOs resolve into chronic iron crystals within MI territories and actively impart a proinflammatory burden and adverse remodeling of infarction and LV in the chronic phase of MI. Canine models reperfused (n=20) and non-reperfused (n=20) with and without PMO were studied with serial cardiac MRI to characterize the spatiotemporal relationships between PMO, iron deposition, and infarct and LV remodeling indices between acute (day 7, post MI) and chronic (week 8, post MI). Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were used to validate the iron deposition, microscopically map and quantify the relationship between iron-rich chronic MI regions against pro-inflammatory macrophages, proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinase. Atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to determine the crystallinity of iron and assess the physical effects of iron on lysosomes within macrophages, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to identify the chemical composition of the iron composite. Results showed that PMOs lead to iron deposition within chronic MI and that the extent of chronic iron deposition is strongly related to PMO Volume (r>0.6, p<0.001). TEM and EDS analysis showed that iron within chronic MI is found within macrophages as aggregates of nanocrystals of ~2.5 nm diameter in ferric state. Correlative histological studies showed that iron content, proinflammatory burden and collagen degrading enzyme were highly correlated (r >0.7, p<0.001). Iron within chronic MI was significantly associated with infarct resorption (r>0.5, p<0.001) and adverse structural (r

  8. Overexpression of TIMP-1 in embryonic stem cells attenuates adverse cardiac remodeling following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Glass, Carley; Singla, Dinender K

    2012-01-01

    Transplanted embryonic stem (ES) cells, following myocardial infarction (MI), contribute to limited cardiac repair and regeneration with improved function. Therefore, novel strategies are still needed to understand the effects of genetically modified transplanted stem cells on cardiac remodeling. The present study evaluates whether transplanted mouse ES cells overexpressing TIMP-1, an antiapoptotic and antifibrotic protein, can enhance cardiac myocyte differentiation, inhibit native cardiac myocyte apoptosis, reduce fibrosis, and improve cardiac function in the infarcted myocardium. MI was produced in C57BL/6 mice by coronary artery ligation. TIMP-1-ES cells, ES cells, or culture medium (control) were transplanted into the peri-infarct region of the heart. Immunofluorescence, TUNEL staining, caspase-3 activity, ELISAs, histology, and echocardiography were used to identify newly differentiated cardiac myocytes and assess apoptosis, fibrosis, and heart function. Two weeks post-MI, significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced engraftment and cardiac myocyte differentiation was observed in TIMP-1-ES cell-transplanted hearts compared with hearts transplanted with ES cells and control. Hearts transplanted with TIMP-1-ES cells demonstrated a reduction in apoptosis as well as an increase (p< 0.05) in p-Akt activity compared with ES cells or culture media controls. Infarct size and interstitial and vascular fibrosis were significantly (p< 0.05) decreased in the TIMP-1-ES cell group compared to controls. Furthermore, MMP-9, a key profibrotic protein, was significantly (p < 0.01) reduced following TIMP-1-ES cell transplantation. Echocardiography data showed fractional shortening and ejection fraction were significantly (p< 0.05) improved in the TIMP-1-ES cell group compared with respective controls. Our data suggest that transplanted ES cells overexpressing TIMP-1 attenuate adverse myocardial remodeling and improve cardiac function compared with ES cells that may have therapeutic

  9. Berberine attenuates adverse left ventricular remodeling and cardiac dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction in rats: role of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao-Jun; Yang, Shao-Hua; Li, Ming-Hui; Iqbal, Javaid; Bourantas, Christos V; Mi, Qiong-Yu; Yu, Yi-Hui; Li, Jing-Jing; Zhao, Shu-Li; Tian, Nai-Liang; Chen, Shao-Liang

    2014-12-01

    The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that berberine, a plant-derived anti-oxidant, attenuates adverse left ventricular remodelling and improves cardiac function in a rat model of myocardial infarction (MI). Furthermore, the potential mechanisms that mediated the cardioprotective actions of berberine, in particular the effect on autophagy, were also investigated. Acute MI was induced by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery of Sprague-Dawley rats. Cardiac function was assessed by transthoracic echocardiography. The protein activity/levels of autophagy related to signalling pathways (e.g. LC-3B, Beclin-1) were measured in myocardial tissue by immunohistochemical staining and western blot. Four weeks after MI, berberine significantly prevented cardiac dysfunction and adverse cardiac remodelling. MI rats treated with low dose berberine (10 mg/kg per day) showed higher left ventricular ejection fraction and fractional shortening than those treated with high-dose berberine (50 mg/kg per day). Both doses reduced interstitial fibrosis and post-MI adverse cardiac remodelling. The cardioprotective action of berberine was associated with increased LC-3B II and Beclin-1 expressions. Furthermore, cardioprotection with berberine was potentially related to p38 MAPK inhibition and phospho-Akt activation. The present in vivo study showed that berberine is effective in promoting autophagy, and subsequently attenuating left ventricular remodelling and cardiac dysfunction after MI. The potential underlying mechanism is augmentation of autophagy through inhibition of p38 MAPK and activation of phospho-Akt signalling pathways.

  10. Pathological Role of Serum- and Glucocorticoid-Regulated Kinase 1 in Adverse Ventricular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saumya; Aiba, Takeshi; Rosenberg, Michael; Hessler, Katherine; Xiao, Chunyang; Quintero, Pablo A.; Ottaviano, Filomena G.; Knight, Ashley C.; Graham, Evan L.; Boström, Pontus; Morissette, Michael R.; del Monte, Federica; Begley, Michael J.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Background Heart failure is a growing cause of morbidity and mortality. Cardiac PI3-kinase signaling promotes cardiomyocyte survival and function but is paradoxically activated in heart failure, suggesting chronic activation of this pathway may become maladaptive. Here we investigated the downstream PI3-kinase effector, SGK1 (serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase-1), in heart failure and its complications. Methods and Results We found that cardiac SGK1 is activated in human and murine heart failure. We investigated the role of SGK1 in the heart using cardiac-specific expression of constitutively-active or dominant-negative SGK1. Cardiac-specific activation of SGK1 in mice increased mortality, cardiac dysfunction, and ventricular arrhythmias. The pro-arrhythmic effects of SGK1 were linked to biochemical and functional changes in the cardiac sodium channel and could be reversed by treatment with ranolazine, a blocker of the late sodium current. Conversely, cardiac-specific inhibition of SGK1 protected mice after hemodynamic stress from fibrosis, heart failure, and sodium channel alterations. Conclusions SGK1 appears both necessary and sufficient for key features of adverse ventricular remodeling and may provide a novel therapeutic target in cardiac disease. PMID:23019294

  11. Cardiac CaM Kinase II Genes δ and γ Contribute to Adverse Remodeling but Redundantly Inhibit Calcineurin-Induced Myocardial Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kreusser, Michael M.; Lehmann, Lorenz H.; Keranov, Stanislav; Hoting, Marc-Oscar; Oehl, Ulrike; Kohlhaas, Michael; Reil, Jan-Christian; Neumann, Kay; Schneider, Michael D.; Hill, Joseph A.; Dobrev, Dobromir; Maack, Christoph; Maier, Lars S.; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Katus, Hugo A.; Olson, Eric N.; Backs, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Background Ca2+-dependent signaling through CaM Kinase II (CaMKII) and calcineurin was suggested to contribute to adverse cardiac remodeling. However, the relative importance of CaMKII versus calcineurin for adverse cardiac remodeling remained unclear. Methods and Results We generated double-knockout mice (DKO) lacking the 2 cardiac CaMKII genes δ and γ specifically in cardiomyocytes. We show that both CaMKII isoforms contribute redundantly to phosphorylation not only of phospholamban, ryanodine receptor 2, and histone deacetylase 4, but also calcineurin. Under baseline conditions, DKO mice are viable and display neither abnormal Ca2+ handling nor functional and structural changes. On pathological pressure overload and β-adrenergic stimulation, DKO mice are protected against cardiac dysfunction and interstitial fibrosis. But surprisingly and paradoxically, DKO mice develop cardiac hypertrophy driven by excessive activation of endogenous calcineurin, which is associated with a lack of phosphorylation at the auto-inhibitory calcineurin A site Ser411. Likewise, calcineurin inhibition prevents cardiac hypertrophy in DKO. On exercise performance, DKO mice show an exaggeration of cardiac hypertrophy with increased expression of the calcineurin target gene RCAN1-4 but no signs of adverse cardiac remodeling. Conclusions We established a mouse model in which CaMKII’s activity is specifically and completely abolished. By the use of this model we show that CaMKII induces maladaptive cardiac remodeling while it inhibits calcineurin-dependent hypertrophy. These data suggest inhibition of CaMKII but not calcineurin as a promising approach to attenuate the progression of heart failure. PMID:25124496

  12. Endothelial progenitor cell transplantation decreases lymphangiogenesis and adverse myocardial remodeling in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Hyeong; Yoon, Jung Yeon; Ko, Seon Mi; Jin, Seon Ah; Kim, Jun Hyung; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Man; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Choi, Si Wan; Seong, In-Whan; Jeong, Jin Ok

    2011-08-31

    Cardiac lymphatic system in the remodeling after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been overlooked. We wanted to investigate the role of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and their contribution to lymphatic distribution in myocardial remodeling after AMI. Mouse (C57bl/6J) MI models were created by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery and were treated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or EPCs. Real-time RT-PCR with 2- to 4-week myocardial tissue samples revealed that lymphangiogenetic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C (8.5 fold, P < 0.05), VEGF-D (6.1 fold, P < 0.05), Lyve-1 (15 fold, P < 0.05), and Prox-1 (11 fold, P < 0.05) were expressed at significantly higher levels in the PBS group than the EPC group. The PBS group also showed a significantly higher density of lymphatic vessels in the peri-infarction area. Echocardiography showed that from 2 weeks after the treatment, left ventricle (LV) dimensions at both systole and diastole were significantly smaller in the EPC group than in the PBS group (P < 0.01) and LV fractional shortening was higher in the EPC group accordingly (P < 0.01). Lymphangiogenic markers increased in a mouse MI model. EPC transplantation decreased lymphangiogenesis and adverse ventricular remodeling after AMI. These novel findings suggest that new lymphatic vessels may be formed in severely damaged myocardium, and may be involved in adverse myocardial remodeling after AMI.

  13. Structural remodeling, trafficking and functions of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh

    2011-10-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) is a glycolipid that is covalently attached to proteins as a post-translational modification. Such modification leads to the anchoring of the protein to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. Proteins that are decorated with GPIs have unique properties in terms of their physical nature. In particular, these proteins tend to accumulate in lipid rafts, which are critical for the functions and trafficking of GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs). Recent studies mainly using mutant cells revealed that various structural remodeling reactions occur to GPIs present in GPI-APs as they are transported from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. This review examines the recent progress describing the mechanisms of structural remodeling of mammalian GPI-anchors, such as inositol deacylation, glycan remodeling and fatty acid remodeling, with particular focus on their trafficking and functions, as well as the pathogenesis involving GPI-APs and their deficiency.

  14. Circulating Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Function predict Major Adverse Cardiac Events and Early Adverse Left Ventricular Remodeling in Patients with ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Magdy, Abdel Hamid; Bakhoum, Sameh; Sharaf, Yasser; Sabry, Dina; El-Gengehe, Ahmed T; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and circulating endothelial cells (CECs) are mobilized from the bone marrow and increase in the early phase after ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic significance of CECs and indices of endothelial dysfunction in patients with STEMI. In 78 patients with acute STEMI, characterization of CD34+/VEGFR2+ CECs, and indices of endothelial damage/dysfunction such as brachial artery flow mediated dilatation (FMD) were determined. Blood samples for CECs assessment and quantification were obtained within 24 hours of admission and FMD was assessed during the index hospitalization. At 30 days follow up, the primary composite end point of major cardiac adverse events (MACE) consisting of all-cause mortality, recurrent non-fatal MI, or heart failure and the secondary endpoint of early adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling were analyzed. The 17 patients (22%) who developed MACE had significantly higher CEC level (P = 0.004), vWF level (P =0.028), and significantly lower FMD (P = 0.006) compared to the remaining patients. Logistic regression analysis showed that CECs level and LV ejection fraction were independent predictors of MACE. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) for CEC level, FMD, and the logistic model with both markers were 0.73, 0.75, and 0.82 respectively for prediction of the MACE. The 16 patients who developed the secondary endpoint had significantly higher CEC level compared to remaining patients (p =0.038). In conclusion, increased circulating endothelial cells and endothelial dysfunction predicted the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events and adverse cardiac remodeling in patients with STEMI. PMID:26864952

  15. The dynamic interaction between matrix metalloproteinase activity and adverse myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Janicki, Joseph S; Brower, Gregory L; Gardner, Jason D; Chancey, Amanda L; Stewart, James A

    2004-01-01

    The process of cardiac remodeling in response to cardiac injury and/or persistent elevations in wall stress generally relates to the progressive changes that occur in ventricular chamber dimensions and the various components of the myocardium, in particular the cardiomyocytes and the extracellular matrix. Volume overload, pressure overload or myocardial injury produces a sustained abnormal elevation in myocardial wall stress which initiates cardiac remodeling that frequently results in ventricular decompensation and heart failure. Regardless of the inciting cause, there appear to be three distinct phases to this process. In the initial phase, fibrillar collagen is partially degraded secondary to increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. Following this, there is a chronic compensatory phase during which MMP activity and collagen concentration return to normal while cardiomyocyte size continues to progressively increase. The final phase is attained once the compensatory hypertrophic mechanisms are exhausted and is characterized by elevated MMP activity, marked ventricular dilatation and prominent fibrosis. Details of this progressive, dynamic remodeling process and its effect on ventricular function during chronic volume overload, chronic pressure overload and following myocardial infarction will be the focus of this article.

  16. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Associated Factor 2 Signaling Provokes Adverse Cardiac Remodeling in the Adult Mammalian Heart

    PubMed Central

    Divakaran, Vijay G.; Evans, Sarah; Topkara, Veli K.; Diwan, Abhinav; Burchfield, Jana; Gao, Feng; Dong, Jianwen; Tzeng, Huei-Ping; Sivasubramanian, Natarajan; Barger, Philip M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily ligands that provoke a dilated cardiac phenotype signal through a common scaffolding protein termed TNF receptor associated factor 2 (TRAF2); however, virtually nothing is known with regard to TRAF2 signaling in the adult mammalian heart. Methods and Results We generated multiple founder lines of mice with cardiac restricted overexpression of TRAF2 and characterized the phenotype of mice with higher expression levels of TRAF2 (MHC-TRAF2HC). MHC-TRAF2HC transgenic mice developed a time-dependent increase in cardiac hypertrophy, LV dilation and adverse LV remodeling, and a significant decrease in LV +dP/dt and −dP/dt when compared to littermate (LM) controls (p < 0.05 compared to LM). During the early phases of LV remodeling there was a significant increase in total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity that corresponded with a decrease in total myocardial fibrillar collagen content. As the MHC-TRAF2HC mice aged, there was a significant decrease in total MMP activity accompanied by an increase in total fibrillar collagen content and an increase in myocardial tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 levels. There was a significant increase in NF-κB activation at 4 – 12 weeks and JNK activation at 4 weeks in the MHCs TRAF2HC mice. Transciptional profiling revealed that > 95% of the hypertrophic/dilated cardiomyopathy-related genes that were significantly upregulated genes in the MHC-TRAF2HC hearts contained κB elements in their promoters. Conclusions These results show for the first time that targeted overexpression of TRAF2 is sufficient to mediate adverse cardiac remodeling in the heart. PMID:23493088

  17. Endothelial SIRT1 prevents adverse arterial remodeling by facilitating HERC2-mediated degradation of acetylated LKB1

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bo; Man, Andy W.C.; Yang, Kangmin; Guo, Yumeng; Xu, Cheng; Tse, Hung-Fat; Han, Weiping; Bloksgaard, Maria; De Mey, Jo G.R.; Vanhoutte, Paul M.; Xu, Aimin; Wang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Aims-SIRT1 exerts potent activity against cellular senescence and vascular ageing. By decreasing LKB1 protein levels, it promotes the survival and regeneration of endothelial cells. The present study aims to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying SIRT1-mediated LKB1 degradation for the prevention of vascular ageing. Methods and Results-Co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that SIRT1, via its amino-terminus, binds to the DOC domain of HERC2 [HECT and RLD domain containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 2], which then ubiquitinates LKB1 in the nuclear compartment of endothelial cells. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that acetylation at lysine (K) 64 of LKB1 triggers the formation of SIRT1/HERC2/LKB1 protein complex and subsequent proteasomal degradation. In vitro cellular studies suggested that accumulation of acetylated LKB1 in the nucleus leads to endothelial activation, in turn stimulating the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and the production of extracellular matrix proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation quantitative PCR confirmed that acetylated LKB1 interacts with and activates TGFβ1 promoter, which is inhibited by SIRT1. Knocking down either SIRT1 or HERC2 results in an increased association of LKB1 with the positive regulatory elements of TGFβ1 promoter. In mice without endothelial nitric oxide synthase, selective overexpression of human SIRT1 in endothelium prevents hypertension and age-related adverse arterial remodeling. Lentiviral-mediated knockdown of HERC2 abolishes the beneficial effects of endothelial SIRT1 on both arterial remodeling and arterial blood pressure control. Conclusion-By downregulating acetylated LKB1 protein via HERC2, SIRT1 fine-tunes the crosstalk between endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells to prevent adverse arterial remodeling and maintain vascular homeostasis. PMID:27259994

  18. Endothelial SIRT1 prevents adverse arterial remodeling by facilitating HERC2-mediated degradation of acetylated LKB1.

    PubMed

    Bai, Bo; Man, Andy W C; Yang, Kangmin; Guo, Yumeng; Xu, Cheng; Tse, Hung-Fat; Han, Weiping; Bloksgaard, Maria; De Mey, Jo G R; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Xu, Aimin; Wang, Yu

    2016-06-28

    Aims-SIRT1 exerts potent activity against cellular senescence and vascular ageing. By decreasing LKB1 protein levels, it promotes the survival and regeneration of endothelial cells. The present study aims to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying SIRT1-mediated LKB1 degradation for the prevention of vascular ageing.Methods and Results-Co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that SIRT1, via its amino-terminus, binds to the DOC domain of HERC2 [HECT and RLD domain containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 2], which then ubiquitinates LKB1 in the nuclear compartment of endothelial cells. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that acetylation at lysine (K) 64 of LKB1 triggers the formation of SIRT1/HERC2/LKB1 protein complex and subsequent proteasomal degradation. In vitro cellular studies suggested that accumulation of acetylated LKB1 in the nucleus leads to endothelial activation, in turn stimulating the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and the production of extracellular matrix proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation quantitative PCR confirmed that acetylated LKB1 interacts with and activates TGFβ1 promoter, which is inhibited by SIRT1. Knocking down either SIRT1 or HERC2 results in an increased association of LKB1 with the positive regulatory elements of TGFβ1 promoter. In mice without endothelial nitric oxide synthase, selective overexpression of human SIRT1 in endothelium prevents hypertension and age-related adverse arterial remodeling. Lentiviral-mediated knockdown of HERC2 abolishes the beneficial effects of endothelial SIRT1 on both arterial remodeling and arterial blood pressure control.Conclusion-By downregulating acetylated LKB1 protein via HERC2, SIRT1 fine-tunes the crosstalk between endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells to prevent adverse arterial remodeling and maintain vascular homeostasis.

  19. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype.

  20. Targeted inhibition of Focal Adhesion Kinase Attenuates Cardiac Fibrosis and Preserves Heart Function in Adverse Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Fan, Guangpu; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Fei; Zhang, Peide; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xu; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis in post-myocardial infarction (MI), seen in both infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium, is beneficial to the recovery of heart function. But progressively pathological fibrosis impairs ventricular function and leads to poor prognosis. FAK has recently received attention as a potential mediator of fibrosis, our previous study reported that pharmacological inhibition of FAK can attenuate cardiac fibrosis in post MI models. However, the long-term effects on cardiac function and adverse cardiac remodelling were not clearly investigated. In this study, we tried to determine the preliminary mechanisms in regulating CF transformation to myofibroblasts and ECM synthesis relevant to the development of adverse cardiac remolding in vivo and in vitro. Our study provides even more evidence that FAK is directly related to the activation of CF in hypoxia condition in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Pharmacological inhibition of FAK significantly reduces myofibroblast differentiation; our in vivo data demonstrated that a FAK inhibitor significantly decreases fibrotic score, and preserves partial left ventricular function. Both PI3K/AKT signalling and ERK1/2 are necessary for hypoxia-induced CF differentiation and ECM synthesis; this process also involves lysyl oxidase (LOX). These findings suggest that pharmacological inhibition of FAK may become an effective therapeutic strategy against adverse fibrosis. PMID:28225063

  1. Vagus nerve stimulation mitigates intrinsic cardiac neuronal and adverse myocyte remodeling postmyocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Eric; Southerland, Elizabeth M; Hardwick, Jean C; Wright, Gary L; Ryan, Shannon; Li, Ying; KenKnight, Bruce H; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2015-10-01

    This paper aims to determine whether chronic vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) mitigates myocardial infarction (MI)-induced remodeling of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system (ICNS), along with the cardiac tissue it regulates. Guinea pigs underwent VNS implantation on the right cervical vagus. Two weeks later, MI was produced by ligating the ventral descending coronary artery. VNS stimulation started 7 days post-MI (20 Hz, 0.9 ± 0.2 mA, 14 s on, 48 s off; VNS-MI, n = 7) and was compared with time-matched MI animals with sham VNS (MI n = 7) vs. untreated controls (n = 8). Echocardiograms were performed before and at 90 days post-MI. At termination, IC neuronal intracellular voltage recordings were obtained from whole-mount neuronal plexuses. MI increased left ventricular end systolic volume (LVESV) 30% (P = 0.027) and reduced LV ejection fraction (LVEF) 6.5% (P < 0.001) at 90 days post-MI compared with baseline. In the VNS-MI group, LVESV and LVEF did not differ from baseline. IC neurons showed depolarization of resting membrane potentials and increased input resistance in MI compared with VNS-MI and sham controls (P < 0.05). Neuronal excitability and sensitivity to norepinephrine increased in MI and VNS-MI groups compared with controls (P < 0.05). Synaptic efficacy, as determined by evoked responses to stimulating input axons, was reduced in VNS-MI compared with MI or controls (P < 0.05). VNS induced changes in myocytes, consistent with enhanced glycogenolysis, and blunted the MI-induced increase in the proapoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein (P < 0.05). VNS mitigates MI-induced remodeling of the ICNS, correspondingly preserving ventricular function via both neural and cardiomyocyte-dependent actions.

  2. IGF-1 degradation by mouse mast cell protease 4 promotes cell death and adverse cardiac remodeling days after a myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Tejada, Thor; Tan, Lin; Torres, Rebecca A.; Calvert, John W.; Lambert, Jonathan P.; Zaidi, Madiha; Husain, Murtaza; Berce, Maria D.; Naib, Hussain; Pejler, Gunnar; Abrink, Magnus; Graham, Robert M.; Lefer, David J.; Naqvi, Nawazish; Husain, Ahsan

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death in adults. Here, we show that a few days after coronary artery ligation and reperfusion, the ischemia-injured heart elaborates the cardioprotective polypeptide, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), which activates IGF-1 receptor prosurvival signaling and improves cardiac left ventricular systolic function. However, this signaling is antagonized by the chymase, mouse mast cell protease 4 (MMCP-4), which degrades IGF-1. We found that deletion of the gene encoding MMCP-4 (Mcpt4), markedly reduced late, but not early, infarct size by suppressing IGF-1 degradation and, consequently, diminished cardiac dysfunction and adverse structural remodeling. Our findings represent the first demonstration to our knowledge of tissue IGF-1 regulation through proteolytic degradation and suggest that chymase inhibition may be a viable therapeutic approach to enhance late cardioprotection in postischemic heart disease. PMID:27274047

  3. Targeting TRAF3IP2 by Genetic and Interventional Approaches Inhibits Ischemia/Reperfusion-induced Myocardial Injury and Adverse Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Erikson, John M; Valente, Anthony J; Mummidi, Srinivas; Kandikattu, Hemanth Kumar; DeMarco, Vincent G; Bender, Shawn B; Fay, William P; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Chandrasekar, Bysani

    2017-02-10

    Re-establishing blood supply is the primary goal for reducing myocardial injury in subjects with ischemic heart disease. Paradoxically, reperfusion results in nitroxidative stress and a marked inflammatory response in the heart. TRAF3IP2 (TRAF3 Interacting Protein 2; previously known as CIKS or Act1) is an oxidative stress-responsive cytoplasmic adapter molecule that is an upstream regulator of both IκB kinase (IKK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and an important mediator of autoimmune and inflammatory responses. Here we investigated the role of TRAF3IP2 in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced nitroxidative stress, inflammation, myocardial dysfunction, injury, and adverse remodeling. Our data show that I/R up-regulates TRAF3IP2 expression in the heart, and its gene deletion, in a conditional cardiomyocyte-specific manner, significantly attenuates I/R-induced nitroxidative stress, IKK/NF-κB and JNK/AP-1 activation, inflammatory cytokine, chemokine, and adhesion molecule expression, immune cell infiltration, myocardial injury, and contractile dysfunction. Furthermore, Traf3ip2 gene deletion blunts adverse remodeling 12 weeks post-I/R, as evidenced by reduced hypertrophy, fibrosis, and contractile dysfunction. Supporting the genetic approach, an interventional approach using ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction-mediated delivery of phosphorothioated TRAF3IP2 antisense oligonucleotides into the LV in a clinically relevant time frame significantly inhibits TRAF3IP2 expression and myocardial injury in wild type mice post-I/R. Furthermore, ameliorating myocardial damage by targeting TRAF3IP2 appears to be more effective to inhibiting its downstream signaling intermediates NF-κB and JNK. Therefore, TRAF3IP2 could be a potential therapeutic target in ischemic heart disease.

  4. Structural remodeling of astrocytes in the injured CNS.

    PubMed

    Sun, Daniel; Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2012-12-01

    Astrocytes respond to all forms of CNS insult and disease by becoming reactive, a nonspecific but highly characteristic response that involves various morphological and molecular changes. Probably the most recognized aspect of reactive astrocytes is the formation of a glial scar that impedes axon regeneration. Although the reactive phenotype was first suggested more than 100 years ago based on morphological changes, the remodeling process is not well understood. We know little about the actual structure of a reactive astrocyte, how an astrocyte remodels during the progression of an insult, and how populations of these cells reorganize to form the glial scar. New methods of labeling astrocytes, along with transgenic mice, allow the complete morphology of reactive astrocytes to be visualized. Recent studies show that reactivity can induce a remarkable change in the shape of a single astrocyte, that not all astrocytes react in the same way, and that there is plasticity in the reactive response.

  5. Fibroblast Growth Factor-9 Enhances M2 Macrophage Differentiation and Attenuates Adverse Cardiac Remodeling in the Infarcted Diabetic Heart

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Dinender K.; Singla, Reetu D.; Abdelli, Latifa S.; Glass, Carley

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation has been implicated as a perpetrator of diabetes and its associated complications. Monocytes, key mediators of inflammation, differentiate into pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages upon infiltration of damaged tissue. However, the inflammatory cell types, which propagate diabetes progression and consequential adverse disorders, remain unclear. The current study was undertaken to assess monocyte infiltration and the role of fibroblast growth factor-9 (FGF-9) on monocyte to macrophage differentiation and cardioprotection in the diabetic infarcted heart. Db/db diabetic mice were assigned to sham, myocardial infarction (MI), and MI+FGF-9 groups. MI was induced by permanent coronary artery ligation and animals were subjected to 2D transthoracic echocardiography two weeks post-surgery. Immunohistochemical and immunoassay results from heart samples collected suggest significantly increased infiltration of monocytes (Mean ± SEM; MI: 2.02% ± 0.23% vs. Sham 0.75% ± 0.07%; p<0.05) and associated pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, MCP-1, and IL-6), adverse cardiac remodeling (Mean ± SEM; MI: 33% ± 3.04% vs. Sham 2.2% ± 0.33%; p<0.05), and left ventricular dysfunction (Mean ± SEM; MI: 35.4% ± 1.25% vs. Sham 49.19% ± 1.07%; p<0.05) in the MI group. Importantly, treatment of diabetic infarcted myocardium with FGF-9 resulted in significantly decreased monocyte infiltration (Mean ± SEM; MI+FGF-9: 1.39% ± 0.1% vs. MI: 2.02% ± 0.23%; p<0.05), increased M2 macrophage differentiation (Mean ± SEM; MI+FGF-9: 4.82% ± 0.86% vs. MI: 0.85% ± 0.3%; p<0.05) and associated anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10 and IL-1RA), reduced adverse remodeling (Mean ± SEM; MI+FGF-9: 11.59% ± 1.2% vs. MI: 33% ± 3.04%; p<0.05), and improved cardiac function (Fractional shortening, Mean ± SEM; MI+FGF-9: 41.51% ± 1.68% vs. MI: 35.4% ± 1.25%; p<0.05). In conclusion, our data suggest FGF-9 possesses novel therapeutic potential in its ability to

  6. Increased systolic load causes adverse remodeling of fetal aortic and mitral valves

    PubMed Central

    Louey, Samantha; Espinoza, Herbert; Chattergoon, Natasha; You, Fanglei; Thornburg, Kent L.; Giraud, George

    2015-01-01

    While abnormal hemodynamic forces alter fetal myocardial growth, little is known about whether such insults affect fetal cardiac valve development. We hypothesized that chronically elevated systolic load would detrimentally alter fetal valve growth. Chronically instrumented fetal sheep received either a continuous infusion of adult sheep plasma to increase fetal blood pressure, or a lactated Ringer's infusion as a volume control beginning on day 126 ± 4 of gestation. After 8 days, mean arterial pressure was higher in the plasma infusion group (63.0 mmHg vs. 41.8 mmHg, P < 0.05). Mitral annular septal-lateral diameter (11.9 mm vs. 9.1 mm, P < 0.05), anterior leaflet length (7.7 mm vs. 6.4 mm, P < 0.05), and posterior leaflet length (P2; 4.0 mm vs. 3.0 mm, P < 0.05) were greater in the elevated load group. mRNA levels of Notch-1, TGF-β2, Wnt-2b, BMP-1, and versican were suppressed in aortic and mitral valve leaflets; elastin and α1 type I collagen mRNA levels were suppressed in the aortic valves only. We conclude that sustained elevated arterial pressure load on the fetal heart valve leads to anatomic remodeling and, surprisingly, suppression of signaling and extracellular matrix genes that are important to valve development. These novel findings have important implications on the developmental origins of valve disease and may have long-term consequences on valve function and durability. PMID:26354842

  7. Estrogen attenuates chronic volume overload induced structural and functional remodeling in male rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Jason D; Murray, David B; Voloshenyuk, Tetyana G; Brower, Gregory L; Bradley, Jessica M; Janicki, Joseph S

    2010-02-01

    We have previously reported gender differences in ventricular remodeling and development of heart failure using the aortocaval fistula model of chronic volume overload in rats. In contrast to males, female rats exhibited no adverse ventricular remodeling and less mortality in response to volume overload. This gender-specific cardioprotection was lost following ovariectomy and was partially restored using estrogen replacement. However, it is not known if estrogen treatment would be as effective in males. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the structural and functional effects of estrogen in male rats subjected to chronic volume overload. Four groups of male rats were studied at 3 days and 8 wk postsurgery as follows: fistula and sham-operated controls, with and without estrogen treatment. Biochemical and histological studies were performed at 3 days postsurgery, with chronic structural and functional effects studied at 8 wk. Measurement of systolic and diastolic pressure-volume relationships was obtained using a blood-perfused isolated heart preparation. Both fistula groups developed significant ventricular hypertrophy after 8 wk of volume overload. Untreated rats with fistula exhibited extensive ventricular dilatation, which was coupled with a loss of systolic function. Estrogen attenuated left ventricular dilatation and maintained function in treated rats. Estrogen treatment was also associated with a reduction in oxidative stress and circulating endothelin-1 levels, as well as prevention of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activation and breakdown of ventricular collagen in the early stage of remodeling. These data demonstrate that estrogen attenuates ventricular remodeling and disease progression in male rats subjected to chronic volume overload.

  8. Structural Stability and Functional Remodeling of High-Density Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Gursky, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Lipoproteins are protein-lipid nanoparticles that transport lipids in circulation and are central in atherosclerosis and other disorders of lipid metabolism. Apolipoproteins form flexible structural scaffolds and important functional ligands on the particle surface and direct lipoprotein metabolism. Lipoproteins undergo multiple rounds of metabolic remodeling that is crucial to lipid transport. Important aspects of this remodeling, including apolipoprotein dissociation and particle fusion, are mimicked in thermal or chemical denaturation and are modulated by free energy barriers. Here we review our biophysical studies that revealed kinetic mechanism of lipoprotein stabilization and unraveled its structural basis. The main focus is on high-density lipoprotein (HDL). An inverse correlation between stability and functions of various HDLs in cholesterol transport suggests functional role of structural disorder. A mechanism for conformational adaptation of the major HDL proteins, apoA-I and apoA-II, to the increasing lipid load is proposed. Together, these studies help understand why HDL form discrete subclasses separated by kinetic barriers, which have distinct composition, conformation and functional properties. Understanding these properties may help improve HDL quality and develop novel therapies for cardiovascular disease. PMID:25749369

  9. Onset of hypertension during pregnancy is associated with long-term worse blood pressure control and adverse cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Roberto F; Reis, Muriel; Beppler, Ana Paula; Bellinazzi, Vera Regina; Mattos, Sandra S; Lima-Filho, José L; Cipolli, José A; Coelho-Filho, Otavio R; Pio-Magalhães, José A; Sposito, Andrei C; Matos-Souza, José R; Nadruz, Wilson

    2014-11-01

    Up to 20% of women with hypertensive pregnancy disorders might persist with chronic hypertension. This study compared clinical and echocardiographic features between women whose hypertension began as hypertensive pregnancy disorders (PH group) and women whose diagnosis of hypertension did not occur during pregnancy (NPH group). Fifty PH and 100 NPH women were cross-sectionally evaluated by clinical, laboratory, and echocardiography analysis, and the groups were matched by duration of hypertension. PH exhibited lower age (46.6 ± 1.4 vs. 65.3 ± 1.1 years; P < .001), but higher systolic (159.8 ± 3.9 vs. 148.0 ± 2.5 mm Hg; P = .009) and diastolic (97.1 ± 2.4 vs. 80.9 ± 1.3 mm Hg; P < .001) blood pressure than NPH, although used more antihypertensive classes (3.4 ± 0.2 vs. 2.6 ± 0.1; P < .001). Furthermore, PH showed higher left ventricular wall thickness and increased prevalence of concentric hypertrophy than NPH after adjusting for age and blood pressure. In conclusion, this study showed that PH may exhibit worse blood pressure control and adverse left ventricular remodeling compared with NPH.

  10. Involvement of Inflammation and Adverse Vascular Remodelling in the Blood Pressure Raising Effect of Repeatedly Heated Palm Oil in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chun-Yi; Kamisah, Yusof; Faizah, Othman; Jubri, Zakiah; Qodriyah, Hj Mohd Saad; Jaarin, Kamsiah

    2012-01-01

    Oil thermoxidation during deep frying generates harmful oxidative free radicals that induce inflammation and increase the risk of hypertension. This study aimed to investigate the effect of repeatedly heated palm oil on blood pressure, aortic morphometry, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: control, fresh palm oil (FPO), one-time-heated palm oil (1HPO), five-time-heated palm oil (5HPO), or ten-time-heated palm oil (10HPO). Feeding duration was six months. Blood pressure was measured at baseline and monthly using tail-cuff method. After six months, the rats were sacrificed and the aortic arches were dissected for morphometric and immunohistochemical analyses. FPO group showed significantly lower blood pressure than all other groups. Blood pressure was increased significantly in 5HPO and 10HPO groups. The aortae of 5HPO and 10HPO groups showed significantly increased thickness and area of intima-media, circumferential wall tension, and VCAM-1 than other groups. Elastic lamellae were disorganised and fragmented in 5HPO- and 10HPO-treated rats. VCAM-1 expression showed a significant positive correlation with blood pressure. In conclusion, prolonged consumption of repeatedly heated palm oil causes blood pressure elevation, adverse remodelling, and increased VCAM-1, which suggests a possible involvement of inflammation. PMID:22778962

  11. Biomass fuel smoke exposure was associated with adverse cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction in Peru.

    PubMed

    Burroughs Peña, M S; Velazquez, E J; Rivera, J D; Alenezi, F; Wong, C; Grigsby, M; Davila-Roman, V G; Gilman, R H; Miranda, J J; Checkley, W

    2016-12-19

    While household air pollution from biomass fuel combustion has been linked to cardiovascular disease, the effects on cardiac structure and function have not been well described. We sought to determine the association between biomass fuel smoke exposure and cardiac structure and function by transthoracic echocardiography. We identified a random sample of urban and rural residents living in the high-altitude region of Puno, Peru. Daily biomass fuel use was self-reported. Participants underwent transthoracic echocardiography. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine the relationship of biomass fuel use with echocardiographic measures of cardiac structure and function, adjusting for age, sex, height, body mass index, diabetes, physical activity, and tobacco use. One hundred and eighty-seven participants (80 biomass fuel users and 107 non-users) were included in this analysis (mean age 59 years, 58% women). After adjustment, daily exposure to biomass fuel smoke was associated with increased left ventricular internal diastolic diameter (P=.004), left atrial diameter (P=.03), left atrial area (four-chamber) (P=.004) and (two-chamber) (P=.03), septal E' (P=.006), and lateral E' (P=.04). Exposure to biomass fuel smoke was also associated with worse global longitudinal strain in the two-chamber view (P=.01). Daily biomass fuel use was associated with increased left ventricular size and decreased left ventricular systolic function by global longitudinal strain.

  12. Childhood adversity impacts on brain subcortical structures relevant to depression.

    PubMed

    Frodl, Thomas; Janowitz, Deborah; Schmaal, Lianne; Tozzi, Leonardo; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Stein, Dan J; Veltman, Dick J; Wittfeld, Katharina; van Erp, Theo G M; Jahanshad, Neda; Block, Andrea; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Lagopoulos, Jim; Hatton, Sean N; Hickie, Ian B; Frey, Eva Maria; Carballedo, Angela; Brooks, Samantha J; Vuletic, Daniella; Uhlmann, Anne; Veer, Ilya M; Walter, Henrik; Schnell, Knut; Grotegerd, Dominik; Arolt, Volker; Kugel, Harald; Schramm, Elisabeth; Konrad, Carsten; Zurowski, Bartosz; Baune, Bernhard T; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Thompson, Paul M; Hibar, Derrek P; Dannlowski, Udo; Grabe, Hans J

    2017-03-01

    Childhood adversity plays an important role for development of major depressive disorder (MDD). There are differences in subcortical brain structures between patients with MDD and healthy controls, but the specific impact of childhood adversity on such structures in MDD remains unclear. Thus, aim of the present study was to investigate whether childhood adversity is associated with subcortical volumes and how it interacts with a diagnosis of MDD and sex. Within the ENIGMA-MDD network, nine university partner sites, which assessed childhood adversity and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with MDD and controls, took part in the current joint mega-analysis. In this largest effort world-wide to identify subcortical brain structure differences related to childhood adversity, 3036 participants were analyzed for subcortical brain volumes using FreeSurfer. A significant interaction was evident between childhood adversity, MDD diagnosis, sex, and region. Increased exposure to childhood adversity was associated with smaller caudate volumes in females independent of MDD. All subcategories of childhood adversity were negatively associated with caudate volumes in females - in particular emotional neglect and physical neglect (independently from age, ICV, imaging site and MDD diagnosis). There was no interaction effect between childhood adversity and MDD diagnosis on subcortical brain volumes. Childhood adversity is one of the contributors to brain structural abnormalities. It is associated with subcortical brain abnormalities that are relevant to psychiatric disorders such as depression.

  13. Residual Myocardial Iron Following Intramyocardial Hemorrhage During the Convalescent Phase of Reperfused ST-Segment–Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Adverse Left Ventricular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Bulluck, Heerajnarain; Rosmini, Stefania; Abdel-Gadir, Amna; White, Steven K.; Bhuva, Anish N.; Treibel, Thomas A.; Fontana, Marianna; Ramlall, Manish; Hamarneh, Ashraf; Sirker, Alex; Herrey, Anna S.; Manisty, Charlotte; Yellon, Derek M.; Kellman, Peter; Moon, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Background— The presence of intramyocardial hemorrhage (IMH) in ST-segment–elevation myocardial infarction patients reperfused by primary percutaneous coronary intervention has been associated with residual myocardial iron at follow-up, and its impact on adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling is incompletely understood and is investigated here. Methods and Results— Forty-eight ST-segment–elevation myocardial infarction patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 4±2 days post primary percutaneous coronary intervention, of whom 40 had a follow-up scan at 5±2 months. Native T1, T2, and T2* maps were acquired. Eight out of 40 (20%) patients developed adverse LV remodeling. A subset of 28 patients had matching T2* maps, of which 15/28 patients (54%) had IMH. Eighteen of 28 (64%) patients had microvascular obstruction on the acute scan, of whom 15/18 (83%) patients had microvascular obstruction with IMH. On the follow-up scan, 13/15 patients (87%) had evidence of residual iron within the infarct zone. Patients with residual iron had higher T2 in the infarct zone surrounding the residual iron when compared with those without. In patients with adverse LV remodeling, T2 in the infarct zone surrounding the residual iron was also higher than in those without (60 [54–64] ms versus 53 [51–56] ms; P=0.025). Acute myocardial infarct size, extent of microvascular obstruction, and IMH correlated with the change in LV end-diastolic volume (Pearson’s rho of 0.64, 0.59, and 0.66, respectively; P=0.18 and 0.62, respectively, for correlation coefficient comparison) and performed equally well on receiver operating characteristic curve for predicting adverse LV remodeling (area under the curve: 0.99, 0.94, and 0.95, respectively; P=0.19 for receiver operating characteristic curve comparison). Conclusions— The majority of ST-segment–elevation myocardial infarction patients with IMH had residual myocardial iron at follow-up. This was associated with

  14. Structural remodeling and mechanical function in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Bridget Louise; Smaill, Bruce Henry; LeGrice, Ian John

    2012-02-01

    The cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) is the three-dimensional scaffold that defines the geometry and muscular architecture of the cardiac chambers and transmits forces produced during the cardiac cycle throughout the heart wall. The cardiac ECM is an active system that responds to the stresses to which it is exposed and in the normal heart is adapted to facilitate efficient mechanical function. There are marked differences in the short- and medium-term changes in ventricular geometry and cardiac ECM that occur as a result of volume overload, hypertension, and ischemic cardiomyopathy. Despite this, there is a widespread view that a common remodeling "phenotype" governs the final progression to end-stage heart failure in different forms of heart disease. In this review article, we make the case that this interpretation is not consistent with the clinical and experimental data on the topic. We argue that there is a need for new theoretical and experimental models that will enable stresses acting on the ECM and resultant deformations to be estimated more accurately and provide better spatial resolution of local signaling mechanisms that are activated as a result. These developments are necessary to link the effects of structural remodeling with altered cardiac mechanical function.

  15. Left ventricular structure and remodeling in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Pelà, Giovanna; Li Calzi, Mauro; Pinelli, Silvana; Andreoli, Roberta; Sverzellati, Nicola; Bertorelli, Giuseppina; Goldoni, Matteo; Chetta, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on cardiac alterations such as left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, and lower stroke volume in patients with COPD are discordant. In this study, we investigated whether early structural and functional cardiac changes occur in patients with COPD devoid of manifest cardiovascular disease, and we assessed their associations with clinical and functional features. Methods Forty-nine patients with COPD belonging to all Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classes were enrolled and compared with 36 controls. All subjects underwent clinical history assessment, lung function testing, blood pressure measurement, electrocardiography, and conventional and Doppler tissue echocardiography. Patients were also subjected to computed tomography to quantify emphysema score. Results Patients with COPD had lower LV cavity associated with a marked increase in relative wall thickness (RWT), suggesting concentric remodeling without significant changes in LV mass. RWT was significantly associated with ratio of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second to the forced vital capacity and emphysema score and was the only cardiac parameter that – after multivariate analysis – significantly correlated with COPD conditions in all individuals. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that RWT (with a cutoff point of 0.42) predicted the severity of COPD with 83% specificity and 56% sensitivity (area under the curve =0.69, 95% confidence interval =0.59–0.81). Patients with COPD showed right ventricular to be functional but no structural changes. Conclusion Patients with COPD without evident cardiovascular disease exhibit significant changes in LV geometry, resulting in concentric remodeling. In all individuals, RWT was significantly and independently related to COPD. However, its prognostic role should be determined in future studies. PMID:27257378

  16. Relationship between Left Ventricular Structural and Metabolic Remodelling in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Levelt, Eylem; Mahmod, Masliza; Piechnik, Stefan K.; Ariga, Rina; Francis, Jane M.; Rodgers, Christopher T.; Clarke, William T.; Sabharwal, Nikant; Schneider, Jurgen E.; Karamitsos, Theodoros D.; Clarke, Kieran; Rider, Oliver J.; Neubauer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Concentric left ventricular (LV) remodelling is associated with adverse cardiovascular events and is frequently observed in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Despite this, the cause of concentric remodelling in diabetes, per se, is unclear, but may be related to cardiac steatosis and impaired myocardial energetics. Thus, we investigated the relationship amongst myocardial metabolic changes and LV remodelling in T2DM. Forty-six non-hypertensive T2DM patients and twenty matched controls underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance to assess LV remodelling (LV mass to LV end diastolic volume ratio-LVMVR), function, pre- and post-contrast tissue characterisation using T1 mapping, 1H-, 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy for myocardial triglyceride content (MTG) and phosphocreatine to ATP ratio (PCr/ATP) respectively. When compared to body mass index and blood pressure matched controls, diabetes was associated with: concentric LV remodelling, higher MTG, impaired myocardial energetics and impaired systolic strain indicating a subtle contractile dysfunction. Importantly, cardiac steatosis independently predicted concentric remodelling and systolic strain. Extracellular volume fraction was unchanged, indicating absence of fibrosis. In conclusion, cardiac steatosis may contribute to LV concentric remodelling and contractile dysfunction in diabetes. As cardiac steatosis is modifiable, strategies aimed at reducing myocardial triglyceride may be beneficial in reversing concentric remodelling and improving contractile function in the diabetic heart. PMID:26438611

  17. Relationship Between Left Ventricular Structural and Metabolic Remodeling in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Levelt, Eylem; Mahmod, Masliza; Piechnik, Stefan K; Ariga, Rina; Francis, Jane M; Rodgers, Christopher T; Clarke, William T; Sabharwal, Nikant; Schneider, Jurgen E; Karamitsos, Theodoros D; Clarke, Kieran; Rider, Oliver J; Neubauer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Concentric left ventricular (LV) remodeling is associated with adverse cardiovascular events and is frequently observed in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Despite this, the cause of concentric remodeling in diabetes per se is unclear, but it may be related to cardiac steatosis and impaired myocardial energetics. Thus, we investigated the relationship between myocardial metabolic changes and LV remodeling in T2DM. Forty-six nonhypertensive patients with T2DM and 20 matched control subjects underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance to assess LV remodeling (LV mass-to-LV end diastolic volume ratio), function, tissue characterization before and after contrast using T1 mapping, and (1)H and (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy for myocardial triglyceride content (MTG) and phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratio, respectively. When compared with BMI- and blood pressure-matched control subjects, subjects with diabetes were associated with concentric LV remodeling, higher MTG, impaired myocardial energetics, and impaired systolic strain indicating a subtle contractile dysfunction. Importantly, cardiac steatosis independently predicted concentric remodeling and systolic strain. Extracellular volume fraction was unchanged, indicating the absence of fibrosis. In conclusion, cardiac steatosis may contribute to concentric remodeling and contractile dysfunction of the LV in diabetes. Because cardiac steatosis is modifiable, strategies aimed at reducing MTG may be beneficial in reversing concentric remodeling and improving contractile function in the hearts of patients with diabetes.

  18. Informing phenomenological structural bone remodelling with a mechanistic poroelastic model.

    PubMed

    Villette, Claire C; Phillips, Andrew T M

    2016-02-01

    Studies suggest that fluid motion in the extracellular space may be involved in the cellular mechanosensitivity at play in the bone tissue adaptation process. Previously, the authors developed a mesoscale predictive structural model of the femur using truss elements to represent trabecular bone, relying on a phenomenological strain-based bone adaptation algorithm. In order to introduce a response to bending and shear, the authors considered the use of beam elements, requiring a new formulation of the bone adaptation drivers. The primary goal of the study presented here was to isolate phenomenological drivers based on the results of a mechanistic approach to be used with a beam element representation of trabecular bone in mesoscale structural modelling. A single-beam model and a microscale poroelastic model of a single trabecula were developed. A mechanistic iterative adaptation algorithm was implemented based on fluid motion velocity through the bone matrix pores to predict the remodelled geometries of the poroelastic trabecula under 42 different loading scenarios. Regression analyses were used to correlate the changes in poroelastic trabecula thickness and orientation to the initial strain outputs of the beam model. Linear (R(2) > 0.998) and third-order polynomial (R(2) > 0.98) relationships were found between change in cross section and axial strain at the central axis, and between beam reorientation and ratio of bending strain to axial strain, respectively. Implementing these relationships into the phenomenological predictive algorithm for the mesoscale structural femur has the potential to produce a model combining biofidelic structure and mechanical behaviour with computational efficiency.

  19. Interleukin-1 Blockade With Anakinra to Prevent Adverse Cardiac Remodeling After Acute Myocardial Infarction (Virginia Commonwealth University Anakinra Remodeling Trial [VCU-ART] Pilot Study)

    PubMed Central

    Abbate, Antonio; Kontos, Michael C.; Grizzard, John D.; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe G. L.; Van Tassell, Benjamin W.; Robati, Roshanak; Roach, Lenore M.; Arena, Ross A.; Roberts, Charlotte S.; Varma, Amit; Gelwix, Christopher C.; Salloum, Fadi N.; Hastillo, Andrea; Dinarello, Charles A.; Vetrovec, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) initiates an intense inflammatory response in which interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays a central role. The IL-1 receptor antagonist is a naturally occurring antagonist, and anakinra is the recombinant form used to treat inflammatory diseases. The aim of the present pilot study was to test the safety and effects of IL-1 blockade with anakinra on left ventricular (LV) remodeling after AMI. Ten patients with ST-segment elevation AMI were randomized to either anakinra 100 mg/day subcutaneously for 14 days or placebo in a double-blind fashion. Two cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging and echocardiographic studies were performed during a 10- to 14-week period. The primary end point was the difference in the interval change in the LV end-systolic volume index (LVESVi) between the 2 groups on CMR imaging. The secondary end points included differences in the interval changes in the LV end-diastolic volume index, and C-reactive protein levels. A +2.0 ml/m2 median increase (interquartile range +1.0, +11.5) in the LVESVi on CMR imaging was seen in the placebo group and a –3.2 ml/m2 median decrease (interquartile range –4.5, –1.6) was seen in the anakinra group (p = 0.033). The median difference was 5.2 ml/m2. On echocardiography, the median difference in the LVESVi change was 13.4 ml/m2 (p = 0.006). Similar differences were observed in the LV end-diastolic volume index on CMR imaging (7.6 ml/m2, p = 0.033) and echocardiography (9.4 ml/m2, p = 0.008). The change in C-reactive protein levels between admission and 72 hours after admission correlated with the change in the LVESVi (R =+0.71, p = 0.022). In conclusion, in the present pilot study of patients with ST-segment elevation AMI, IL-1 blockade with anakinra was safe and favorably affected by LV remodeling. If confirmed in larger trials, IL-1 blockade might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent heart failure after AMI. PMID:23453459

  20. Interleukin-1 blockade with anakinra to prevent adverse cardiac remodeling after acute myocardial infarction (Virginia Commonwealth University Anakinra Remodeling Trial [VCU-ART] Pilot study).

    PubMed

    Abbate, Antonio; Kontos, Michael C; Grizzard, John D; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe G L; Van Tassell, Benjamin W; Robati, Roshanak; Roach, Lenore M; Arena, Ross A; Roberts, Charlotte S; Varma, Amit; Gelwix, Christopher C; Salloum, Fadi N; Hastillo, Andrea; Dinarello, Charles A; Vetrovec, George W

    2010-05-15

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) initiates an intense inflammatory response in which interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays a central role. The IL-1 receptor antagonist is a naturally occurring antagonist, and anakinra is the recombinant form used to treat inflammatory diseases. The aim of the present pilot study was to test the safety and effects of IL-1 blockade with anakinra on left ventricular (LV) remodeling after AMI. Ten patients with ST-segment elevation AMI were randomized to either anakinra 100 mg/day subcutaneously for 14 days or placebo in a double-blind fashion. Two cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging and echocardiographic studies were performed during a 10- to 14-week period. The primary end point was the difference in the interval change in the LV end-systolic volume index (LVESVi) between the 2 groups on CMR imaging. The secondary end points included differences in the interval changes in the LV end-diastolic volume index, and C-reactive protein levels. A +2.0 ml/m(2) median increase (interquartile range +1.0, +11.5) in the LVESVi on CMR imaging was seen in the placebo group and a -3.2 ml/m(2) median decrease (interquartile range -4.5, -1.6) was seen in the anakinra group (p = 0.033). The median difference was 5.2 ml/m(2). On echocardiography, the median difference in the LVESVi change was 13.4 ml/m(2) (p = 0.006). Similar differences were observed in the LV end-diastolic volume index on CMR imaging (7.6 ml/m(2), p = 0.033) and echocardiography (9.4 ml/m(2), p = 0.008). The change in C-reactive protein levels between admission and 72 hours after admission correlated with the change in the LVESVi (R = +0.71, p = 0.022). In conclusion, in the present pilot study of patients with ST-segment elevation AMI, IL-1 blockade with anakinra was safe and favorably affected by LV remodeling. If confirmed in larger trials, IL-1 blockade might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent heart failure after AMI.

  1. CREB Selectively Controls Learning-Induced Structural Remodeling of Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middei, Silvia; Spalloni, Alida; Longone, Patrizia; Pittenger, Christopher; O'Mara, Shane M.; Marie, Helene; Ammassari-Teule, Martine

    2012-01-01

    The modulation of synaptic strength associated with learning is post-synaptically regulated by changes in density and shape of dendritic spines. The transcription factor CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) is required for memory formation and in vitro dendritic spine rearrangements, but its role in learning-induced remodeling of neurons…

  2. Model structure and control of bone remodeling: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Pivonka, Peter; Zimak, Jan; Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S; Dunstan, Colin R; Sims, Natalie A; Martin, T John; Mundy, Gregory R

    2008-08-01

    It is generally accepted that RANKL is highly expressed in osteoblast precursor cells while OPG is highly expressed in mature osteoblasts, but to date no functional utility to the BMU has been proposed for this particular ligand-decoy-receptor expression profile. As discovered in the mid 90s, the RANK-RANKL-OPG signaling cascade is a major signaling pathway regulating bone remodeling. In this paper we study theoretically the functional implications of particular RANKL/OPG expression profiles on bone volume. For this purpose we formulate an extended bone-cell dynamics model describing functional behaviour of basic multicellular units (BMUs) responsible for bone resorption and formation. This model incorporates the RANK-RANKL-OPG signaling together with the regulating action of TGF-beta on bone cells. The bone-cell population model employed here builds on the work of Lemaire et al. (2004) [1], but incorporates the following significant modifications: (i) addition of a rate equation describing changes in bone volume with time as the key 'output function' tracking functional behaviour of BMUs, (ii) a rate equation describing release of TGF-beta from the bone matrix, (iii) expression of OPG and RANKL on both osteoblastic cell lines, and (iv) modified activator/repressor functions. Using bone volume as a functional selection criterion, we find that there is a preferred arrangement for ligand expression on particular cell types, and further, that this arrangement coincides with biological observations. We then investigate the model parameter space combinatorially, searching for preferred 'groupings' of changes in differentiation rates of various cell types. Again, a criterion of bone volume change is employed to identify possible ways of optimally controlling BMU responses. While some combinations of changes in differentiation rates are clearly unrealistic, other combinations of changes in differentiation rates are potentially functionally significant. Most importantly

  3. Analogy of strain energy density based bone-remodeling algorithm and structural topology optimization.

    PubMed

    Jang, In Gwun; Kim, Il Yong; Kwak, Byung Ban

    2009-01-01

    In bone-remodeling studies, it is believed that the morphology of bone is affected by its internal mechanical loads. From the 1970s, high computing power enabled quantitative studies in the simulation of bone remodeling or bone adaptation. Among them, Huiskes et al. (1987, "Adaptive Bone Remodeling Theory Applied to Prosthetic Design Analysis," J. Biomech. Eng., 20, pp. 1135-1150) proposed a strain energy density based approach to bone remodeling and used the apparent density for the characterization of internal bone morphology. The fundamental idea was that bone density would increase when strain (or strain energy density) is higher than a certain value and bone resorption would occur when the strain (or strain energy density) quantities are lower than the threshold. Several advanced algorithms were developed based on these studies in an attempt to more accurately simulate physiological bone-remodeling processes. As another approach, topology optimization originally devised in structural optimization has been also used in the computational simulation of the bone-remodeling process. The topology optimization method systematically and iteratively distributes material in a design domain, determining an optimal structure that minimizes an objective function. In this paper, we compared two seemingly different approaches in different fields-the strain energy density based bone-remodeling algorithm (biomechanical approach) and the compliance based structural topology optimization method (mechanical approach)-in terms of mathematical formulations, numerical difficulties, and behavior of their numerical solutions. Two numerical case studies were conducted to demonstrate their similarity and difference, and then the solution convergences were discussed quantitatively.

  4. Electrophysiological and Structural Remodeling in Heart Failure Modulate Arrhythmogenesis. 1D Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Juan F.; Cardona, Karen; Romero, Lucia; Ferrero, Jose M.; Trenor, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure is a final common pathway or descriptor for various cardiac pathologies. It is associated with sudden cardiac death, which is frequently caused by ventricular arrhythmias. Electrophysiological remodeling, intercellular uncoupling, fibrosis and autonomic imbalance have been identified as major arrhythmogenic factors in heart failure etiology and progression. Objective In this study we investigate in silico the role of electrophysiological and structural heart failure remodeling on the modulation of key elements of the arrhythmogenic substrate, i.e., electrophysiological gradients and abnormal impulse propagation. Methods Two different mathematical models of the human ventricular action potential were used to formulate models of the failing ventricular myocyte. This provided the basis for simulations of the electrical activity within a transmural ventricular strand. Our main goal was to elucidate the roles of electrophysiological and structural remodeling in setting the stage for malignant life-threatening arrhythmias. Results Simulation results illustrate how the presence of M cells and heterogeneous electrophysiological remodeling in the human failing ventricle modulate the dispersion of action potential duration and repolarization time. Specifically, selective heterogeneous remodeling of expression levels for the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and SERCA pump decrease these heterogeneities. In contrast, fibroblast proliferation and cellular uncoupling both strongly increase repolarization heterogeneities. Conduction velocity and the safety factor for conduction are also reduced by the progressive structural remodeling during heart failure. Conclusion An extensive literature now establishes that in human ventricle, as heart failure progresses, gradients for repolarization are changed significantly by protein specific electrophysiological remodeling (either homogeneous or heterogeneous). Our simulations illustrate and provide new insights into this

  5. Crystal structure and functional analysis of a nucleosome recognition module of the remodeling factor ISWI.

    PubMed

    Grüne, Tim; Brzeski, Jan; Eberharter, Anton; Clapier, Cedric R; Corona, Davide F V; Becker, Peter B; Müller, Christoph W

    2003-08-01

    Energy-dependent nucleosome remodeling emerges as a key process endowing chromatin with dynamic properties. However, the principles by which remodeling ATPases interact with their nucleosome substrate to alter histone-DNA interactions are only poorly understood. We have identified a substrate recognition domain in the C-terminal half of the remodeling ATPase ISWI and determined its structure by X-ray crystallography. The structure comprises three domains, a four-helix domain with a novel fold and two alpha-helical domains related to the modules of c-Myb, SANT and SLIDE, which are linked by a long helix. An integrated structural and functional analysis of these domains provides insight into how ISWI interacts with the nucleosomal substrate.

  6. Sustained myocardial production of stromal cell-derived factor-1α was associated with left ventricular adverse remodeling in patients with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Manabu; Yoshizaki, Toru; Shimizu, Takuya; Obata, Jun-ei; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Fujioka, Daisuke; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Yosuke; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2015-11-15

    The role of stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) expressed in infarcted myocardium is unknown in humans. We examined whether SDF-1α produced in an infarcted myocardial lesion may play a role in left ventricle (LV) remodeling and dysfunction in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We measured SDF-1α levels in plasma obtained from aortic root (AO) and anterior interventricular vein (AIV) in the early phase (2 wk after MI) and the chronic phase (6 mo after MI) in 80 patients with anterior MI. An increment in SDF-1α level from AO to AIV, reflecting SDF-1α release from infarcted myocardium, was more frequent in patients with MI in the early phase of MI [n = 52 (65%), P = 0.03] but not in the chronic phase of MI [n = 46 (58%), P = 0.11] compared with that in control patients [n = 6/17 (35%)]. On linear regression analysis, the transmyocardial gradient in SDF-1α level in the chronic phase of MI was correlated with percentage changes in LV end-diastolic volume index (r = 0.39, P < 0.001), LV end-systolic volume index (r = 0.38, P < 0.001), and LV ejection fraction (r = -0.26, P = 0.01) 6 mo after AMI. By contrast, the transmyocardial gradient of SDF-1α in the early phase of MI had no significant correlations. In conclusion, the production of SDF-1α in infarcted myocardium in the chronic phase of MI was associated with LV adverse remodeling and progressive dysfunction in AMI survivors.

  7. Structure of a RSC-nucleosome complex and insights into chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Yuriy; Ezeokonkwo, Chukwudi; Chung, Wen-Hsiang; Zhang, Fan; Kornberg, Roger D; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Lorch, Yahli; Asturias, Francisco J

    2008-12-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes, such as RSC, can reposition, evict or restructure nucleosomes. A structure of a RSC-nucleosome complex with a nucleosome determined by cryo-EM shows the nucleosome bound in a central RSC cavity. Extensive interaction of RSC with histones and DNA seems to destabilize the nucleosome and lead to an overall ATP-independent rearrangement of its structure. Nucleosomal DNA appears disordered and largely free to bulge out into solution as required for remodeling, but the structure of the RSC-nucleosome complex indicates that RSC is unlikely to displace the octamer from the nucleosome to which it is bound. Consideration of the RSC-nucleosome structure and published biochemical information suggests that ATP-dependent DNA translocation by RSC may result in the eviction of histone octamers from adjacent nucleosomes.

  8. Angiotensin receptor blockade and angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibition limit adverse remodeling of infarct zone collagens and global diastolic dysfunction during healing after reperfused ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Jugdutt, Bodh I; Idikio, Halliday; Uwiera, Richard R E

    2007-09-01

    To determine whether therapy with the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB) candesartan and the comparator angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) enalapril during healing after reperfused ST-elevation myocardial infarction (RSTEMI) limit adverse remodeling of infarct zone (IZ) collagens and left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction, we randomized 24 dogs surviving anterior RSTEMI (90-min coronary occlusion) to placebo, candesartan, and enalapril therapy between day 2 and 42. Six other dogs were sham. We measured regional IZ and non-infarct zone (NIZ) collagens (hydroxyproline; types I/III; cross-linking), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and topography at 6 weeks, and hemodynamics, LV diastolic and systolic function, and remodeling over 6 weeks. Compared to sham, placebo-RSTEMI differentially altered regional collagens, with more pronounced increase in TGF-beta, hydroxyproline, and type I, insoluble, and cross-linked collagens in the IZ than NIZ, and increased IZ soluble and type III collagens at 6 weeks, and induced persistent LV filling pressure elevation, diastolic and systolic dysfunction, and LV remodeling over 6 weeks. Compared to placebo-RSTEMI, candesartan and enalapril limited adverse regional collagen remodeling, with normalization of type III, soluble and insoluble collagens and decrease in pyridinoline cross-linking in the IZ at 6 weeks, and attenuation of LV filling pressure, diastolic dysfunction, and remodeling over 6 weeks. The results suggest that candesartan and enalapril during healing after RSTEMI prevent rather than worsen adverse remodeling of IZ collagens and LV diastolic dysfunction, supporting the clinical use of ARBs and ACEIs during subacute RSTEMI.

  9. Rapid Surface Cooling by ThermoSuit System Dramatically Reduces Scar Size, Prevents Post-Infarction Adverse Left Ventricular Remodeling, and Improves Cardiac Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wangde; Herring, Michael J; Hale, Sharon L; Kloner, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Background The long-term effects of transient hypothermia by the non-invasive ThermoSuit apparatus on myocardial infarct (MI) scar size, left ventricular (LV) remodeling, and LV function were assessed in rat MI model. Methods and Results Rats were randomized to normothermic or hypothermic groups (n=14 in each group) and subjected to 30 minutes coronary artery occlusion and 6 weeks of reperfusion. For hypothermia therapy, rats were placed into the ThermoSuit apparatus at 2 minutes after the onset of coronary artery occlusion, were taken out of the apparatus when the core body temperature reached 32°C (in ≈8 minutes), and were then allowed to rewarm. After 6 weeks of recovery, rats treated with hypothermia demonstrated markedly reduced scar size (expressed as % of left ventricular area: hypothermia, 6.5±1.1%; normothermia, 19.4±1.7%; P=1.3×10−6); and thicker anterior LV wall (hypothermia, 1.57±0.09 mm; normothermia, 1.07±0.05 mm; P=3.4×10−5); decreased postmortem left ventricular volume (hypothermia, 0.45±0.04 mL; normothermia, 0.6±0.03 mL; P=0.028); and better LV fractional shortening by echocardiography (hypothermia, 37.2±2.8%; normothermia, 18.9±2.3%; P=0.0002) and LV ejection fraction by LV contrast ventriculography (hypothermia, 66.8±2.3%; normothermia, 56.0±2.0%; P=0.0014). Conclusions Rapid, transient non-invasive surface cooling with the ThermoSuit apparatus in the acute phase of MI decreased scar size by 66.5%, attenuated adverse post-infarct left ventricular dilation and remodeling, and improved cardiac function in the chronic phase of experimental MI. PMID:26116692

  10. Electrophysiological and Structural Remodeling in Heart Failure Modulate Arrhythmogenesis. 2D Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Juan F.; Cardona, Karen; Martinez, Laura; Saiz, Javier; Trenor, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure is operationally defined as the inability of the heart to maintain blood flow to meet the needs of the body and it is the final common pathway of various cardiac pathologies. Electrophysiological remodeling, intercellular uncoupling and a pro-fibrotic response have been identified as major arrhythmogenic factors in heart failure. Objective In this study we investigate vulnerability to reentry under heart failure conditions by incorporating established electrophysiological and anatomical remodeling using computer simulations. Methods The electrical activity of human transmural ventricular tissue (5 cm×5 cm) was simulated using the human ventricular action potential model Grandi et al. under control and heart failure conditions. The MacCannell et al. model was used to model fibroblast electrical activity, and their electrotonic interactions with myocytes. Selected degrees of diffuse fibrosis and variations in intercellular coupling were considered and the vulnerable window (VW) for reentry was evaluated following cross-field stimulation. Results No reentry was observed in normal conditions or in the presence of HF ionic remodeling. However, defined amount of fibrosis and/or cellular uncoupling were sufficient to elicit reentrant activity. Under conditions where reentry was generated, HF electrophysiological remodeling did not alter the width of the VW. However, intermediate fibrosis and cellular uncoupling significantly widened the VW. In addition, biphasic behavior was observed, as very high fibrotic content or very low tissue conductivity hampered the development of reentry. Detailed phase analysis of reentry dynamics revealed an increase of phase singularities with progressive fibrotic components. Conclusion Structural remodeling is a key factor in the genesis of vulnerability to reentry. A range of intermediate levels of fibrosis and intercellular uncoupling can combine to favor reentrant activity. PMID:25054335

  11. Temporal pattern of left ventricular structural and functional remodeling following reversal of volume overload heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Kirk R.; Guggilam, Anuradha; Cismowski, Mary J.; Galantowicz, Maarten L.; West, Thomas A.; Stewart, James A.; Zhang, Xiaojin; Lord, Kevin C.

    2011-01-01

    Current surgical management of volume overload-induced heart failure (HF) leads to variable recovery of left ventricular (LV) function despite a return of LV geometry. The mechanisms that prevent restoration of function are unknown but may be related to the timing of intervention and the degree of LV contractile impairment. This study determined whether reduction of aortocaval fistula (ACF)-induced LV volume overload during the compensatory stage of HF results in beneficial LV structural remodeling and restoration of pump function. Rats were subjected to ACF for 4 wk; a subset then received a load-reversal procedure by closing the shunt using a custom-made stent graft approach. Echocardiography or in vivo pressure-volume analysis was used to assess LV morphology and function in sham rats; rats subjected to 4-, 8-, or 15-wk ACF; and rats subjected to 4-wk ACF followed by 4- or 11-wk reversal. Structural and functional changes were correlated to LV collagen content, extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, and hypertrophic markers. ACF-induced volume overload led to progressive LV chamber dilation and contractile dysfunction. Rats subjected to short-term reversal (4-wk ACF + 4-wk reversal) exhibited improved chamber dimensions (LV diastolic dimension) and LV compliance that were associated with ECM remodeling and normalization of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides. Load-independent parameters indicated LV systolic (preload recruitable stroke work, Ees) and diastolic dysfunction (tau, arterial elastance). These changes were associated with an altered α/β-myosin heavy chain ratio. However, these changes were normalized to sham levels in long-term reversal rats (4-wk ACF + 11-wk reversal). Acute hemodynamic changes following ACF reversal improve LV geometry, but LV dysfunction persists. Gradual restoration of function was related to normalization of eccentric hypertrophy, LV wall stress, and ECM remodeling. These results suggest that mild to moderate LV systolic

  12. Structural Basis for Host Membrane Remodeling Induced by Protein 2B of Hepatitis A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Vives-Adrián, Laia; Garriga, Damià; Buxaderas, Mònica; Fraga, Joana; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The complexity of viral RNA synthesis and the numerous participating factors require a mechanism to topologically coordinate and concentrate these multiple viral and cellular components, ensuring a concerted function. Similarly to all other positive-strand RNA viruses, picornaviruses induce rearrangements of host intracellular membranes to create structures that act as functional scaffolds for genome replication. The membrane-targeting proteins 2B and 2C, their precursor 2BC, and protein 3A appear to be primarily involved in membrane remodeling. Little is known about the structure of these proteins and the mechanisms by which they induce massive membrane remodeling. Here we report the crystal structure of the soluble region of hepatitis A virus (HAV) protein 2B, consisting of two domains: a C-terminal helical bundle preceded by an N-terminally curved five-stranded antiparallel β-sheet that displays striking structural similarity to the β-barrel domain of enteroviral 2A proteins. Moreover, the helicoidal arrangement of the protein molecules in the crystal provides a model for 2B-induced host membrane remodeling during HAV infection. IMPORTANCE No structural information is currently available for the 2B protein of any picornavirus despite it being involved in a critical process in viral factory formation: the rearrangement of host intracellular membranes. Here we present the structure of the soluble domain of the 2B protein of hepatitis A virus (HAV). Its arrangement, both in crystals and in solution under physiological conditions, can help to understand its function and sheds some light on the membrane rearrangement process, a putative target of future antiviral drugs. Moreover, this first structure of a picornaviral 2B protein also unveils a closer evolutionary relationship between the hepatovirus and enterovirus genera within the Picornaviridae family. PMID:25589659

  13. Childhood obesity and cardiac remodeling: from cardiac structure to myocardial mechanics.

    PubMed

    Tadic, Marijana; Cuspidi, Cesare

    2015-08-01

    Epidemic of obesity, especially morbid obesity, among children and adolescents, is a key factor associated with the dramatic increase in prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, and metabolic syndrome in this population. Furthermore, childhood obesity represents a very important predictor of obesity in adulthood that is related to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Overweight and obesity in children and adolescents are associated with impairment of cardiac structure and function. The majority of studies investigated the influence of obesity on left ventricular remodeling. However, the impact of obesity on the right ventricle, both the atria, and myocardial mechanics has been insufficiently studied. The aim of this review article is to summarize all data about heart remodeling in childhood, from cardiac size, throughout systolic and diastolic function, to myocardial mechanics, using a wide range of mainly echocardiographic techniques and parameters. Additionally, we sought to present current knowledge about the influence of weight loss, achieved by various therapeutic approaches, on the improvement of cardiac geometry, structure, and function in obese children and adolescents.

  14. Structural and functional remodeling of skeletal muscle microvasculature is induced by simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, M. D.; Colleran, P. N.; Wilkerson, M. K.; McCurdy, M. R.; Muller-Delp, J.

    2000-01-01

    Hindlimb unloading of rats results in a diminished ability of skeletal muscle arterioles to constrict in vitro and elevate vascular resistance in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether alterations in the mechanical environment (i.e., reduced fluid pressure and blood flow) of the vasculature in hindlimb skeletal muscles from 2-wk hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rats induces a structural remodeling of arterial microvessels that may account for these observations. Transverse cross sections were used to determine media cross-sectional area (CSA), wall thickness, outer perimeter, number of media nuclei, and vessel luminal diameter of feed arteries and first-order (1A) arterioles from soleus and the superficial portion of gastrocnemius muscles. Endothelium-dependent dilation (ACh) was also determined. Media CSA of resistance arteries was diminished by hindlimb unloading as a result of decreased media thickness (gastrocnemius muscle) or reduced vessel diameter (soleus muscle). ACh-induced dilation was diminished by 2 wk of hindlimb unloading in soleus 1A arterioles, but not in gastrocnemius 1A arterioles. These results indicate that structural remodeling and functional adaptations of the arterial microvasculature occur in skeletal muscles of the HU rat; the data suggest that these alterations may be induced by reductions in transmural pressure (gastrocnemius muscle) and wall shear stress (soleus muscle).

  15. Retinal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Kondo, M; Terasaki, H; Lin, Y; McCall, M; Marc, R E

    2012-07-01

    Retinal photoreceptor degeneration takes many forms. Mutations in rhodopsin genes or disorders of the retinal pigment epithelium, defects in the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter, ABCR gene defects, receptor tyrosine kinase defects, ciliopathies and transport defects, defects in both transducin and arrestin, defects in rod cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase, peripherin defects, defects in metabotropic glutamate receptors, synthetic enzymatic defects, defects in genes associated with signaling, and many more can all result in retinal degenerative disease like retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or RP-like disorders. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and AMD-like disorders are possibly due to a constellation of potential gene targets and gene/gene interactions, while other defects result in diabetic retinopathy or glaucoma. However, all of these insults as well as traumatic insults to the retina result in retinal remodeling. Retinal remodeling is a universal finding subsequent to retinal degenerative disease that results in deafferentation of the neural retina from photoreceptor input as downstream neuronal elements respond to loss of input with negative plasticity. This negative plasticity is not passive in the face of photoreceptor degeneration, with a phased revision of retinal structure and function found at the molecular, synaptic, cell, and tissue levels involving all cell classes in the retina, including neurons and glia. Retinal remodeling has direct implications for the rescue of vision loss through bionic or biological approaches, as circuit revision in the retina corrupts any potential surrogate photoreceptor input to a remnant neural retina. However, there are a number of potential opportunities for intervention that are revealed through the study of retinal remodeling, including therapies that are designed to slow down photoreceptor loss, interventions that are designed to limit or arrest remodeling events, and

  16. Crystal Structure of the Herpesvirus Nuclear Egress Complex Provides Insights into Inner Nuclear Membrane Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Weberruß, Marion; Lorenz, Michael; Cheleski, Juliana; Hellberg, Teresa; Whittle, Cathy; El Omari, Kamel; Vasishtan, Daven; Dent, Kyle C; Harlos, Karl; Franzke, Kati; Hagen, Christoph; Klupp, Barbara G; Antonin, Wolfram; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Grünewald, Kay

    2015-12-29

    Although nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is typically mediated through nuclear pore complexes, herpesvirus capsids exit the nucleus via a unique vesicular pathway. Together, the conserved herpesvirus proteins pUL31 and pUL34 form the heterodimeric nuclear egress complex (NEC), which, in turn, mediates the formation of tight-fitting membrane vesicles around capsids at the inner nuclear membrane. Here, we present the crystal structure of the pseudorabies virus NEC. The structure revealed that a zinc finger motif in pUL31 and an extensive interaction network between the two proteins stabilize the complex. Comprehensive mutational analyses, characterized both in situ and in vitro, indicated that the interaction network is not redundant but rather complementary. Fitting of the NEC crystal structure into the recently determined cryoEM-derived hexagonal lattice, formed in situ by pUL31 and pUL34, provided details on the molecular basis of NEC coat formation and inner nuclear membrane remodeling.

  17. Allergen-induced airway remodeling in brown norway rats: structural and metabolic changes in glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Narayanan; Siddiqui, Sana; Jo, Taisuke; Martin, James G; Ludwig, Mara S

    2012-01-01

    Increased proteoglycan (PG) deposition is a feature of airway remodeling in asthma. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) mediate many of the biological and mechanical properties of PGs by providing docking sites through their carbohydrate chains to bioactive ligands; therefore, it is imperative to define structural and metabolic changes of GAGs in asthma. Using a Brown Norway (BN) ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized and -challenged rat model to induce airway remodeling, we found excessive deposition of chondroitin/dermatan (CS/DS)-, heparan (HS), and keratan (KS) sulfate GAGs in the airways and bronchoalveolar lavage cells of OVA-challenged rats. Disaccharide composition of CS/DS of OVA-challenged rats was significantly different compared with saline-treated (SAL) control rats, with increased levels of 0-, 6-, and 4-sulfated disaccharides. Increases in the amount and a change in the proportion of CS/DS versus HS GAGs were noted in OVA-challenged rats. The higher content and sulfation of CS/DS disaccharides was reflected by the increased expression of xylosyltransferase-I, β1,3-glucuronosyltransferase-I, chondroitin-4, and chondroitin-6 sulfotransferase genes and protein expression of xylosyltransferase-I and β1,3-glucuronosyltransferase-I in OVA-challenged rats. Genes encoding the core proteins of the CS/DS and KS-containing PGs, such as versican, biglycan, decorin, and lumican, were overexpressed in OVA-challenged rats. Our results suggest that GAG biosynthetic enzymes may be involved in the altered expression of GAGs in the airways and are potential targets for inhibiting excess PG-GAG deposition and the airway remodeling process in asthma.

  18. Left Atrial Reverse Remodeling: Mechanisms, Evaluation, and Clinical Significance.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Liza; Abhayaratna, Walter P

    2017-01-01

    The left atrium is considered a biomarker for adverse cardiovascular outcomes, particularly in patients with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and atrial fibrillation in whom left atrial (LA) enlargement is of prognostic importance. LA enlargement with a consequent decrease in LA function represents maladaptive structural and functional "remodeling" that in turn promotes electrical remodeling and a milieu conducive for incident atrial fibrillation. Medical and nonmedical interventions may arrest this pathophysiologic process to the extent that subsequent reverse remodeling results in a reduction in LA size and improvement in LA function. This review examines cellular and basic mechanisms involved in LA remodeling, evaluates the noninvasive techniques that can assess these changes, and examines potential mechanisms that may initiate reverse remodeling.

  19. Role of TGF-β on cardiac structural and electrical remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Mondragón, Roberto; Galindo, Carlos A; Avila, Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    The type β transforming growth factors (TGF-βs) are involved in a number of human diseases, including heart failure and myocardial arrhythmias. In fact, during the last 20 years numerous studies have demonstrated that TGF-β affects the architecture of the heart under both normal and pathological conditions. Moreover, TGF-β signaling is currently under investigation, with the aim of discovering potential therapeutic roles in human disease. In contrast, only few studies have investigated whether TGF-β affects electrophysiological properties of the heart. This fact is surprising since electrical remodeling represents an important substrate for cardiac disease. This review discusses the potential role of TGF-β on cardiac excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, action potentials, and ion channels. We also discuss the effects of TGF-β on cardiac development and disease from structural and electrophysiological points of view. PMID:19337543

  20. Chromatin remodelers Isw1 and Chd1 maintain chromatin structure during transcription by preventing histone exchange

    PubMed Central

    Smolle, Michaela; Venkatesh, Swaminathan; Gogol, Madelaine M.; Li, Hua; Zhang, Ying; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2012-01-01

    Set2-mediated methylation of histone H3 Lys36 (H3K36) is a mark associated with the coding sequences of actively transcribed genes, yet plays a negative role during transcription elongation. It prevents trans-histone exchange over coding regions and signals for histone deacetylation in the wake of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) passage. We have found that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae the Isw1b chromatin-remodeling complex is specifically recruited to open reading frames (ORFs) by H3K36 methylation through the PWWP domain of its Ioc4 subunit in vivo and in vitro. Isw1b acts in conjunction with Chd1 to regulate chromatin structure by preventing trans-histone exchange from taking place over coding regions and thus maintains chromatin integrity during transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II. PMID:22922743

  1. Tangshen Formula Attenuates Colonic Structure Remodeling in Type 2 Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pengmin; Zhao, Jingbo; Yang, Xin; Zhao, Tingting; Yan, Meihua; Pan, Lin; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Aim. This study investigated the effect and mechanism of the Chinese herbal medicine Tangshen Formula (TSF) on GI structure remodeling in the rat model of diabetes. Methods. Type 2 diabetic rats were used. Wet weight per unit length, layer thicknesses, levels of collagens I and III, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and Smad2/3 expression in the rat colon were measured. Results. Compared with the control group animals, wet weight and layer thicknesses of the colon increased, and expressions of collagens I and III, NF-κB, IFN-γ, IL-6, TGF-β1, and Smad2/3 increased significantly in the diabetic animals. TSF inhibited increase in colonic wet weight and layer thicknesses, downregulated expressions of collagens I and III in the mucosal layer, and downregulated expressions of NF-κB, IFN-γ, IL-6, TGF-β1, and Smad2/3 in the colon wall. Furthermore, level of expression of NF-κB was associated with those of TGF-β1 and Smad2/3. Expression of TGF-β1 was associated with the most histomorphometric parameters including colonic weight, mucosal and muscle thicknesses, and levels of collagens I and III in mucosal layer. Conclusion. TSF appears to attenuate colonic structure remodeling in type 2 diabetic rats through inhibiting the overactivated pathway of NF-κB, thus reducing expressions of TGF-β1. PMID:28303157

  2. Dynamic structural remodelling of microglia in health and disease: a review of the models, the signals and the mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Walker, F Rohan; Beynon, Sarah B; Jones, Kimberley A; Zhao, Zidan; Kongsui, Ratchaniporn; Cairns, Murray; Nilsson, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Microglia are unique cells within the central nervous system because of their biophysical independence. As a result of this unusual property the cells must undergo significant structural remodelling in order to engage and connect with other elements within the central nervous system. Efficient remodelling is required for all activities that microglia are involved in ranging from monitoring synaptic information flow through to phagocytosis of tissue debris. Despite the fact that morphological remodelling is a pre-requisite to all microglial activities, relatively little research has been undertaken on the topic. This review examines what is known about how microglia transform themselves during development, under physiological conditions in response to changes in neuronal activity, and under pathological circumstances. Specific attention is given to exploring a variety of models that have been proposed to account for microglial transformation as well as the signals that are known to trigger these transformations.

  3. Structural basis for recognition and remodeling of the TBP:DNA:NC2 complex by Mot1

    PubMed Central

    Butryn, Agata; Schuller, Jan M; Stoehr, Gabriele; Runge-Wollmann, Petra; Förster, Friedrich; Auble, David T; Hopfner, Karl-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Swi2/Snf2 ATPases remodel substrates such as nucleosomes and transcription complexes to control a wide range of DNA-associated processes, but detailed structural information on the ATP-dependent remodeling reactions is largely absent. The single subunit remodeler Mot1 (modifier of transcription 1) dissociates TATA box-binding protein (TBP):DNA complexes, offering a useful system to address the structural mechanisms of Swi2/Snf2 ATPases. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of Mot1 in complex with TBP, DNA, and the transcription regulator negative cofactor 2 (NC2). Our data show that Mot1 reduces DNA:NC2 interactions and unbends DNA as compared to the TBP:DNA:NC2 state, suggesting that Mot1 primes TBP:NC2 displacement in an ATP-independent manner. Electron microscopy and cross-linking data suggest that the Swi2/Snf2 domain of Mot1 associates with the upstream DNA and the histone fold of NC2, thereby revealing parallels to some nucleosome remodelers. This study provides a structural framework for how a Swi2/Snf2 ATPase interacts with its substrate DNA:protein complex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07432.001 PMID:26258880

  4. Structure and metamorphic remodeling of the larval nervous system and musculature of Phoronis pallida (Phoronida).

    PubMed

    Santagata, Scott

    2002-01-01

    The structure of the larval nervous system and the musculature of Phoronis pallida were studied, as well as the remodeling of these systems at metamorphosis. The serotonergic portion of the apical ganglion is a U-shaped field of cell bodies that send projections into a central neuropil. The majority of the serotonergic cells are (at least) bipolar sensory cells, and a few are nonsensory cells. Catecholaminergic cell bodies border the apical ganglion. The second (hood) sense organ develops at competence and is composed of bipolar sensory cells that send projections into a secondary neuropil. Musculature of the competent larva includes circular and longitudinal muscle fibers of the body wall, as well as elevators and depressors of the tentacles and hood. The juvenile nervous system and musculature are developed prior to metamorphosis and are integrated with those of the larva. Components of the juvenile nervous system include a diffuse neural net of serotonergic cell bodies and fibers and longitudinal catecholaminergic fibers. The juvenile body wall musculature consists of longitudinal fibers that overlie circular muscle fibers, except in the cincture regions, where this pattern is reversed. Metamorphosis is initiated by the larval neuromuscular system but is completed by the juvenile neuromuscular system. During metamorphosis, the larval nervous system and the musculature undergo cell death, and the larval tentacles and gut are remodeled into the juvenile arrangement. Although the phoronid nervous system has often been described as deuterostome-like, these data show that several cytological aspects of the larval and juvenile neuromuscular systems also have protostome (lophotrochozoan) characteristics.

  5. Mechanistic micro-structural theory of soft tissues growth and remodeling: tissues with unidirectional fibers.

    PubMed

    Lanir, Yoram

    2015-04-01

    A new mechanistic theory was developed for soft tissues growth and remodeling (G&R). The theory considers tissues with unidirectional fibers. It is based on the loading-dependent local turnover events of each constituent and on the resulting evolution of the tissue micro-structure, the tissue dimensions and its mechanical properties. The theory incorporates the specific mechanical properties and turnover kinetics of each constituent, thereby establishing a general framework which can serve for future integration of additional mechanisms involved in G&R. The feasibility of the theory was examined by considering a specific realization of tissues with one fibrous constituent (collagen fibers), assuming a specific loading-dependent first-order fiber's turnover kinetics and the fiber's deposition characteristics. The tissue was subjected to a continuous constant rate growth. Model parameters were adopted from available data. The resulting predictions show qualitative agreement with a number of well-known features of tissues including the fibers' non-uniform recruitment density distribution, the associated tissue convex nonlinear stress-stretch relationship, and the development of tissue pre-stretch and pre-stress states. These results show that mechanistic micro-structural modeling of soft tissue G&R based on first principles can successfully capture the evolution of observed tissues' structure and size, and of their associated mechanical properties.

  6. The Ino80 chromatin-remodeling complex restores chromatin structure during UV DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sovan; Kiely, Rhian

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin structure is modulated during deoxyribonucleic acid excision repair, but how this is achieved is unclear. Loss of the yeast Ino80 chromatin-remodeling complex (Ino80-C) moderately sensitizes cells to ultraviolet (UV) light. In this paper, we show that INO80 acts in the same genetic pathway as nucleotide excision repair (NER) and that the Ino80-C contributes to efficient UV photoproduct removal in a region of high nucleosome occupancy. Moreover, Ino80 interacts with the early NER damage recognition complex Rad4–Rad23 and is recruited to chromatin by Rad4 in a UV damage–dependent manner. Using a modified chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we find that chromatin disruption during UV lesion repair is normal, whereas the restoration of nucleosome structure is defective in ino80 mutant cells. Collectively, our work suggests that Ino80 is recruited to sites of UV lesion repair through interactions with the NER apparatus and is required for the restoration of chromatin structure after repair. PMID:21135142

  7. Crystal Structure of the Herpesvirus Nuclear Egress Complex Provides Insights into Inner Nuclear Membrane Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Weberruß, Marion; Lorenz, Michael; Cheleski, Juliana; Hellberg, Teresa; Whittle, Cathy; El Omari, Kamel; Vasishtan, Daven; Dent, Kyle C.; Harlos, Karl; Franzke, Kati; Hagen, Christoph; Klupp, Barbara G.; Antonin, Wolfram; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Grünewald, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Summary Although nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is typically mediated through nuclear pore complexes, herpesvirus capsids exit the nucleus via a unique vesicular pathway. Together, the conserved herpesvirus proteins pUL31 and pUL34 form the heterodimeric nuclear egress complex (NEC), which, in turn, mediates the formation of tight-fitting membrane vesicles around capsids at the inner nuclear membrane. Here, we present the crystal structure of the pseudorabies virus NEC. The structure revealed that a zinc finger motif in pUL31 and an extensive interaction network between the two proteins stabilize the complex. Comprehensive mutational analyses, characterized both in situ and in vitro, indicated that the interaction network is not redundant but rather complementary. Fitting of the NEC crystal structure into the recently determined cryoEM-derived hexagonal lattice, formed in situ by pUL31 and pUL34, provided details on the molecular basis of NEC coat formation and inner nuclear membrane remodeling. PMID:26711332

  8. Atrial metabolism and tissue perfusion as determinants of electrical and structural remodelling in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Opacic, Dragan; van Bragt, Kelly A; Nasrallah, Hussein M; Schotten, Ulrich; Verheule, Sander

    2016-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common tachyarrhythmia in clinical practice. Over decades of research, a vast amount of knowledge has been gathered about the causes and consequences of AF related to cellular electrophysiology and features of the tissue structure that influence the propagation of fibrillation waves. Far less is known about the role of myocyte metabolism and tissue perfusion in the pathogenesis of AF. However, the rapid rates of electrical activity and contraction during AF must present an enormous challenge to the energy balance of atrial myocytes. This challenge can be met by scaling back energy demand and by increasing energy supply, and there are several indications that both phenomena occur as a result of AF. Still, there is ample evidence that these adaptations fall short of redressing this imbalance, which may represent a driving force for atrial electrical as well as structural remodelling. In addition, several 'metabolic diseases' such as diabetes, obesity, and abnormal thyroid function precipitate some well-known 'culprits' of the AF substrate such as myocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis, while some other AF risk factors, such as heart failure, affect atrial metabolism. This review provides an overview of metabolic and vascular alterations in AF and their involvement in its pathogenesis.

  9. Role of Endogenous Sulfur Dioxide in Regulating Vascular Structural Remodeling in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Selena; Tang, Chaoshu

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2), an emerging gasotransmitter, was discovered to be endogenously generated in the cardiovascular system. Recently, the physiological effects of endogenous SO2 were confirmed. Vascular structural remodeling (VSR), an important pathological change in many cardiovascular diseases, plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of the diseases. Here, the authors reviewed the research progress of endogenous SO2 in regulating VSR by searching the relevant data from PubMed and Medline. In spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and pulmonary hypertensive rats, SO2/aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) pathway was significantly altered. SO2 inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, promoted apoptosis, inhibited the synthesis of extracellular collagen but promoted its degradation, and enhanced antioxidative capacity, thereby playing a significant role in attenuating VSR. However, the detailed mechanisms needed to be further explored. Further studies in this field would be important for the better understanding of the pathogenesis of systemic hypertension and pulmonary hypertension. Also, clinical trials are needed to demonstrate if SO2 would be a potential therapeutic target in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27721913

  10. Structures of human SRP72 complexes provide insights into SRP RNA remodeling and ribosome interaction

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Matthias M. M.; Lapouge, Karine; Segnitz, Bernd; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard

    2017-01-01

    Co-translational protein targeting and membrane protein insertion is a fundamental process and depends on the signal recognition particle (SRP). In mammals, SRP is composed of the SRP RNA crucial for SRP assembly and function and six proteins. The two largest proteins SRP68 and SRP72 form a heterodimer and bind to a regulatory site of the SRP RNA. Despite their essential roles in the SRP pathway, structural information has been available only for the SRP68 RNA-binding domain (RBD). Here we present the crystal structures of the SRP68 protein-binding domain (PBD) in complex with SRP72-PBD and of the SRP72-RBD bound to the SRP S domain (SRP RNA, SRP19 and SRP68) detailing all interactions of SRP72 within SRP. The SRP72-PBD is a tetratricopeptide repeat, which binds an extended linear motif of SRP68 with high affinity. The SRP72-RBD is a flexible peptide crawling along the 5e- and 5f-loops of SRP RNA. A conserved tryptophan inserts into the 5e-loop forming a novel type of RNA kink-turn stabilized by a potassium ion, which we define as K+-turn. In addition, SRP72-RBD remodels the 5f-loop involved in ribosome binding and visualizes SRP RNA plasticity. Docking of the S domain structure into cryo-electron microscopy density maps reveals multiple contact sites between SRP68/72 and the ribosome, and explains the role of SRP72 in the SRP pathway. PMID:27899666

  11. Exogenous Expression of Human Protamine 1 (hPrm1) Remodels Fibroblast Nuclei into Spermatid-like Structures

    PubMed Central

    Iuso, Domenico; Czernik, Marta; Toschi, Paola; Fidanza, Antonella; Zacchini, Federica; Feil, Robert; Curtet, Sandrine; Buchou, Thierry; Shiota, Hitoshi; Khochbin, Saadi; Ptak, Grazyna Ewa; Loi, Pasqualino

    2015-01-01

    Summary Protamines confer a compact structure to the genome of male gametes. Here, we find that somatic cells can be remodeled by transient expression of protamine 1 (Prm1). Ectopically expressed Prm1 forms scattered foci in the nuclei of fibroblasts, which coalescence into spermatid-like structures, concomitant with a loss of histones and a reprogramming barrier, H3 lysine 9 methylation. Protaminized nuclei injected into enucleated oocytes efficiently underwent protamine to maternal histone TH2B exchange and developed into normal blastocyst stage embryos in vitro. Altogether, our findings present a model to study male-specific chromatin remodeling, which can be exploited for the improvement of somatic cell nuclear transfer. PMID:26628361

  12. Structural analyses of the chromatin remodeling enzymes INO80-C and SWR-C

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shinya; Tan, Dongyan; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Washburn, Michael P.; Hong, Eun-Jin Erica; Walz, Thomas; Peterson, Craig L.

    2015-01-01

    INO80-C and SWR-C are conserved members of a subfamily of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes that function in transcription and genome-maintenance pathways. A crucial role for these enzymes is to control chromosomal distribution of the H2A.Z histone variant. Here we use electron microscopy (EM) and two-dimensional (2D) class averaging to demonstrate that these remodeling enzymes have similar overall architectures. Each enzyme is characterized by a dynamic ‘tail’ domain and a compact ‘head’ that contains Rvb1/Rvb2 subunits organized as hexameric rings. EM class averages and mass spectrometry support the existence of single heterohexameric rings in both SWR-C and INO80-C. EM studies define the position of the Arp8/Arp4/Act1 module within INO80-C, and we find that this module enhances nucleosome binding affinity but is largely dispensable for remodeling activities. In contrast, the Ies6/Arp5 module is essential for INO80-C remodeling, and furthermore this module controls conformational changes that may couple nucleosome binding to remodeling. PMID:25964121

  13. Functional and structural remodeling of glutamate synapses in prefrontal and frontal cortex induced by behavioral stress.

    PubMed

    Musazzi, Laura; Treccani, Giulia; Popoli, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders, including mood disorders, is associated with abnormal function and regulation of the glutamatergic system. Consistently, preclinical studies on stress-based animal models of pathology showed that glucocorticoids and stress exert crucial effects on neuronal excitability and function, especially in cortical and limbic areas. In prefrontal and frontal cortex, acute stress was shown to induce enhancement of glutamate release/transmission dependent on activation of corticosterone receptors. Although the mechanisms whereby stress affects glutamate transmission have not yet been fully understood, it was shown that synaptic, non-genomic action of corticosterone is required to increase the readily releasable pool of glutamate vesicles, but is not sufficient to enhance transmission in prefrontal and frontal cortex. Slower, partly genomic mechanisms are probably necessary for the enhancement of glutamate transmission induced by stress. Combined evidence has suggested that the changes in glutamate release and transmission are responsible for the dendritic remodeling and morphological changes induced by stress and it has been argued that sustained alterations of glutamate transmission may play a key role in the long-term structural/functional changes associated with mood disorders in patients. Intriguingly, modifications of the glutamatergic system induced by stress in the prefrontal cortex seem to be biphasic. Indeed, while the fast response to stress suggests an enhancement in the number of excitatory synapses, synaptic transmission and working memory, long-term adaptive changes - including those consequent to chronic stress - induce opposite effects. Better knowledge of the cellular effectors involved in this biphasic effect of stress may be useful to understand the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders, and open new paths for the development of therapeutic approaches.

  14. Functional and Structural Remodeling of Glutamate Synapses in Prefrontal and Frontal Cortex Induced by Behavioral Stress

    PubMed Central

    Musazzi, Laura; Treccani, Giulia; Popoli, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders, including mood disorders, is associated with abnormal function and regulation of the glutamatergic system. Consistently, preclinical studies on stress-based animal models of pathology showed that glucocorticoids and stress exert crucial effects on neuronal excitability and function, especially in cortical and limbic areas. In prefrontal and frontal cortex, acute stress was shown to induce enhancement of glutamate release/transmission dependent on activation of corticosterone receptors. Although the mechanisms whereby stress affects glutamate transmission have not yet been fully understood, it was shown that synaptic, non-genomic action of corticosterone is required to increase the readily releasable pool of glutamate vesicles, but is not sufficient to enhance transmission in prefrontal and frontal cortex. Slower, partly genomic mechanisms are probably necessary for the enhancement of glutamate transmission induced by stress. Combined evidence has suggested that the changes in glutamate release and transmission are responsible for the dendritic remodeling and morphological changes induced by stress and it has been argued that sustained alterations of glutamate transmission may play a key role in the long-term structural/functional changes associated with mood disorders in patients. Intriguingly, modifications of the glutamatergic system induced by stress in the prefrontal cortex seem to be biphasic. Indeed, while the fast response to stress suggests an enhancement in the number of excitatory synapses, synaptic transmission and working memory, long-term adaptive changes – including those consequent to chronic stress – induce opposite effects. Better knowledge of the cellular effectors involved in this biphasic effect of stress may be useful to understand the pathophysiology of stress-related disorders, and open new paths for the development of therapeutic approaches. PMID

  15. Functional significance of the discordance between transcriptional profile and left ventricular structure/function during reverse remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Topkara, Veli K.; Chambers, Kari T.; Yang, Kai-Chien; Tzeng, Huei-Ping; Evans, Sarah; Weinheimer, Carla; Kovacs, Attila; Barger, Philip; Mann, Douglas L.

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms for reverse LV remodeling, we generated a conditional (doxycycline [dox] off) transgenic mouse tetracycline transactivating factor–TRAF2 (tTA-TRAF2) that develops a dilated heart failure (HF) phenotype upon expression of a proinflammatory transgene, TNF receptor–associated factor 2 (TRAF2), and complete normalization of LV structure and function when the transgene is suppressed. tTA-TRAF2 mice developed a significant increase in LV dimension with decreased contractile function, which was completely normalized in the tTA-TRAF2 mice fed dox for 4 weeks (tTA-TRAF2dox4W). Normalization of LV structure and function was accompanied by partial normalization (~60%) of gene expression associated with incident HF. Similar findings were observed in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy who underwent reverse LV remodeling following mechanical circulatory support. Persistence of the HF gene program was associated with an exaggerated hypertrophic response and increased mortality in tTA-TRAF2dox4W mice following transaortic constriction (TAC). These effects were no longer observed following TAC in tTA-TRAF2dox8W, wherein there was a more complete (88%) reversal of the incident HF genes. These results demonstrate that reverse LV remodeling is associated with improvements in cardiac myocyte biology; however, the persistence of the abnormal HF gene program may be maladaptive following perturbations in hemodynamic loading conditions. PMID:27158672

  16. The Effect of Irradiation on Bone Remodelling and the Structural Integrity of the Vertebral Column

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    1965. Schantz, A, AL Schiller and SP Kadish. Localized aplasia in irradiated vertebral bone marrow: A frequently overlooked gross observation. Arch...undergo the bone remodelling sequence together bone marrow-the soft, fatty substance filling the medullary cavaties and spongy extremities of the long

  17. Ventricular structure, function, and mechanics at high altitude: chronic remodeling in Sherpa vs. short-term lowlander adaptation.

    PubMed

    Stembridge, Mike; Ainslie, Philip N; Hughes, Michael G; Stöhr, Eric J; Cotter, James D; Nio, Amanda Q X; Shave, Rob

    2014-08-01

    Short-term, high-altitude (HA) exposure raises pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and decreases left-ventricular (LV) volumes. However, relatively little is known of the long-term cardiac consequences of prolonged exposure in Sherpa, a highly adapted HA population. To investigate short-term adaptation and potential long-term cardiac remodeling, we studied ventricular structure and function in Sherpa at 5,050 m (n = 11; 31 ± 13 yr; mass 68 ± 10 kg; height 169 ± 6 cm) and lowlanders at sea level (SL) and following 10 ± 3 days at 5,050 m (n = 9; 34 ± 7 yr; mass 82 ± 10 kg; height 177 ± 6 cm) using conventional and speckle-tracking echocardiography. At HA, PASP was higher in Sherpa and lowlanders compared with lowlanders at SL (both P < 0.05). Sherpa had smaller right-ventricular (RV) and LV stroke volumes than lowlanders at SL with lower RV systolic strain (P < 0.05) but similar LV systolic mechanics. In contrast to LV systolic mechanics, LV diastolic, untwisting velocity was significantly lower in Sherpa compared with lowlanders at both SL and HA. After partial acclimatization, lowlanders demonstrated no change in the RV end-diastolic area; however, both RV strain and LV end-diastolic volume were reduced. In conclusion, short-term hypoxia induced a reduction in RV systolic function that was also evident in Sherpa following chronic exposure. We propose that this was consequent to a persistently higher PASP. In contrast to the RV, remodeling of LV volumes and normalization of systolic mechanics indicate structural and functional adaptation to HA. However, altered LV diastolic relaxation after chronic hypoxic exposure may reflect differential remodeling of systolic and diastolic LV function.

  18. Structural Modeling of GR Interactions with the SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodeling Complex and C/EBP.

    PubMed

    Muratcioglu, Serena; Presman, Diego M; Pooley, John R; Grøntved, Lars; Hager, Gordon L; Nussinov, Ruth; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila

    2015-09-15

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a steroid-hormone-activated transcription factor that modulates gene expression. Transcriptional regulation by the GR requires dynamic receptor binding to specific target sites located across the genome. This binding remodels the chromatin structure to allow interaction with other transcription factors. Thus, chromatin remodeling is an essential component of GR-mediated transcriptional regulation, and understanding the interactions between these molecules at the structural level provides insights into the mechanisms of how GR and chromatin remodeling cooperate to regulate gene expression. This study suggests models for the assembly of the SWI/SNF-A (SWItch/Sucrose-NonFermentable) complex and its interaction with the GR. We used the PRISM algorithm (PRotein Interactions by Structural Matching) to predict the three-dimensional complex structures of the target proteins. The structural models indicate that BAF57 and/or BAF250 mediate the interaction between the GR and the SWI/SNF-A complex, corroborating experimental data. They further suggest that a BAF60a/BAF155 and/or BAF60a/BAF170 interaction is critical for association between the core and variant subunits. Further, we model the interaction between GR and CCAAT-enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBPs), since the GR can regulate gene expression indirectly by interacting with other transcription factors like C/EBPs. We observe that GR can bind to bZip domains of the C/EBPα homodimer as both a monomer and dimer of the DNA-binding domain. In silico mutagenesis of the predicted interface residues confirm the importance of these residues in binding. In vivo analysis of the computationally suggested mutations reveals that double mutations of the leucine residues (L317D+L335D) may disrupt the interaction between GR and C/EBPα. Determination of the complex structures of the GR is of fundamental relevance to understanding its interactions and functions, since the function of a protein or a

  19. Protective effects of epigallocatechin-3 gallate on atrial electrical and structural remodeling in a rabbit rapid atrial pacing model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jifa; Zhang, Xiao; Li, Ling; Su, Gang

    2015-03-01

    Epigallocatechin-3 gallate (EGCG) is the major catechin in green tea. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of EGCG on atrial electrical and structural remodeling in a rabbit rapid atrial pacing (RAP) model. New Zealand white rabbits were subjected to RAP with or without EGCG treatment. The atrial electrophysiology was studied. ELISA, Western blots, and RT-PCR were performed to determine the level of the inflammation markers, oxidative stress, and fibrogenic agents. Atrial tissue was stained with Masson's trichrome stain for fibrosis detection. RAP rabbits showed a significantly shorter atrial effective refractory period than control rabbits. Higher AF inducibility and longer AF duration were seen in the RAP group. AERP of rabbits received high dose EGCG were prolonged compared to RAP rabbits, and AF inducibility and duration of rabbits received high dose EGCG were lower. RAP rabbits have higher inflammation markers, higher oxidative stress, and more significant fibrosis within atrium, while high dose intervention of EGCG can lower the inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis induced by RAP. Results showed that EGCG have protective effects on atrial electrical and structural remodeling in a rabbit RAP model in terms of attenuating of inflammation and oxidative stress.

  20. Structure and membrane remodeling activity of ESCRT-III helical polymers

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, John; Clippinger, Amy K.; Talledge, Nathaniel; Skowyra, Michael L.; Saunders, Marissa G.; Naismith, Teresa V.; Colf, Leremy A.; Afonine, Pavel; Arthur, Christopher; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Hanson, Phyllis I.; Frost, Adam

    2015-12-18

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) proteins mediate fundamental membrane remodeling events that require stabilizing negative membrane curvature. These include endosomal intralumenal vesicle formation, HIV budding, nuclear envelope closure, and cytokinetic abscission. ESCRT-III subunits perform key roles in these processes by changing conformation and polymerizing into membrane-remodeling filaments. Here, we report the 4 angstrom resolution cryogenic electron microscopy reconstruction of a one-start, double-stranded helical copolymer composed of two different human ESCRT-III subunits, charged multivesicular body protein 1B (CHMP1B) and increased sodium tolerance 1 (IST1). The inner strand comprises “open” CHMP1B subunits that interlock in an elaborate domain-swapped architecture and is encircled by an outer strand of “closed” IST1 subunits. Unlike other ESCRT-III proteins, CHMP1B and IST1 polymers form external coats on positively curved membranes in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, our analysis suggests how common ESCRT-III filament architectures could stabilize different degrees and directions of membrane curvature.

  1. MT1-MMP-dependent remodeling of cardiac extracellular matrix structure and function following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Gerald C; Rowe, R Grant; Day, Sharlene M; Sabeh, Farideh; Atkinson, Jeffrey J; Cooke, Kenneth R; Weiss, Stephen J

    2012-05-01

    The myocardial extracellular matrix (ECM), an interwoven meshwork of proteins, glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and glycosaminoglycans that is dominated by polymeric fibrils of type I collagen, serves as the mechanical scaffold on which myocytes are arrayed for coordinated and synergistic force transduction. Following ischemic injury, cardiac ECM remodeling is initiated via localized proteolysis, the bulk of which has been assigned to matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family members. Nevertheless, the key effector(s) of myocardial type I collagenolysis both in vitro and in vivo have remained unidentified. In this study, using cardiac explants from mice deficient in each of the major type I collagenolytic MMPs, including MMP-13, MMP-8, MMP-2, MMP-9, or MT1-MMP, we identify the membrane-anchored MMP, MT1-MMP, as the dominant collagenase that is operative within myocardial tissues in vitro. Extending these observations to an in vivo setting, mice heterozygous for an MT1-MMP-null allele display a distinct survival advantage and retain myocardial function relative to wild-type littermates in an experimental model of myocardial infarction, effects associated with preservation of the myocardial type I collagen network as a consequence of the decreased collagenolytic potential of cardiac fibroblasts. This study identifies MT1-MMP as a key MMP responsible for effecting postinfarction cardiac ECM remodeling and cardiac dysfunction.

  2. Structure and membrane remodeling activity of ESCRT-III helical polymers.

    PubMed

    McCullough, John; Clippinger, Amy K; Talledge, Nathaniel; Skowyra, Michael L; Saunders, Marissa G; Naismith, Teresa V; Colf, Leremy A; Afonine, Pavel; Arthur, Christopher; Sundquist, Wesley I; Hanson, Phyllis I; Frost, Adam

    2015-12-18

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) proteins mediate fundamental membrane remodeling events that require stabilizing negative membrane curvature. These include endosomal intralumenal vesicle formation, HIV budding, nuclear envelope closure, and cytokinetic abscission. ESCRT-III subunits perform key roles in these processes by changing conformation and polymerizing into membrane-remodeling filaments. Here, we report the 4 angstrom resolution cryogenic electron microscopy reconstruction of a one-start, double-stranded helical copolymer composed of two different human ESCRT-III subunits, charged multivesicular body protein 1B (CHMP1B) and increased sodium tolerance 1 (IST1). The inner strand comprises "open" CHMP1B subunits that interlock in an elaborate domain-swapped architecture and is encircled by an outer strand of "closed" IST1 subunits. Unlike other ESCRT-III proteins, CHMP1B and IST1 polymers form external coats on positively curved membranes in vitro and in vivo. Our analysis suggests how common ESCRT-III filament architectures could stabilize different degrees and directions of membrane curvature.

  3. Stress-induced structural remodeling in hippocampus: Prevention by lithium treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Gwendolyn E.; Young, L. Trevor; Reagan, Lawrence P.; Chen, Biao; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2004-03-01

    Chronic restraint stress, psychosocial stress, as well as systemic or oral administration of the stress-hormone corticosterone induces a morphological reorganization in the rat hippocampus, in which adrenal steroids and excitatory amino acids mediate a reversible remodeling of apical dendrites on CA3 pyramidal cell neurons of the hippocampus. This stress-induced neuronal remodeling is accompanied also by behavioral changes, some of which can be prevented with selective antidepressant and anticonvulsive drug treatments. Lithium is an effective treatment for mood disorders and has neuroprotective effects, which may contribute to its therapeutic properties. Thus, we wanted to determine whether lithium treatment could prevent the effects of chronic stress on CA3 pyramidal cell neuroarchitecture and the associated molecular and behavioral measures. Chronic lithium treatment prevented the stress-induced decrease in dendritic length, as well as the stress-induced increase in glial glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) mRNA expression and the phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding in the hippocampus. Lithium treatment, however, did not prevent stress effects on behavior in the open field or the plus-maze. These data demonstrate that chronic treatment with lithium can protect the hippocampus from potentially deleterious effects of chronic stress on glutamatergic activation, which may be relevant to its therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder.

  4. Structure and membrane remodeling activity of ESCRT-III helical polymers

    DOE PAGES

    McCullough, John; Clippinger, Amy K.; Talledge, Nathaniel; ...

    2015-12-18

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) proteins mediate fundamental membrane remodeling events that require stabilizing negative membrane curvature. These include endosomal intralumenal vesicle formation, HIV budding, nuclear envelope closure, and cytokinetic abscission. ESCRT-III subunits perform key roles in these processes by changing conformation and polymerizing into membrane-remodeling filaments. Here, we report the 4 angstrom resolution cryogenic electron microscopy reconstruction of a one-start, double-stranded helical copolymer composed of two different human ESCRT-III subunits, charged multivesicular body protein 1B (CHMP1B) and increased sodium tolerance 1 (IST1). The inner strand comprises “open” CHMP1B subunits that interlock in an elaborate domain-swapped architecturemore » and is encircled by an outer strand of “closed” IST1 subunits. Unlike other ESCRT-III proteins, CHMP1B and IST1 polymers form external coats on positively curved membranes in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, our analysis suggests how common ESCRT-III filament architectures could stabilize different degrees and directions of membrane curvature.« less

  5. Using Structured Telephone Follow-up Assessments to Improve Suicide-related Adverse Event Detection

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Sarah A.; Zhang, Zi; Hillerns, Carla; Sullivan, Ashley F.; Boudreaux, Edwin D.; Miller, Ivan; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Adverse event (AE) detection and reporting practices were compared during the first phase of the Emergency Department Safety Assessment and Follow-up Evaluation (ED-SAFE), a suicide intervention study. Data were collected using a combination of chart reviews and structured telephone follow-up assessments post-enrollment. Beyond chart reviews, structured telephone follow-up assessments identified 45% of the total AEs in our study. Notably, detection of suicide attempts significantly varied by approach with 53 (18%) detected by chart review, 173 (59%) by structured telephone follow-up assessments, and 69 (23%) marked as duplicates. Findings provide support for utilizing multiple methods for more robust AE detection in suicide research. PMID:24588679

  6. Nonisothermal turbulent boundary-layer adverse pressure gradient large scale thermal structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, N.; White, B.R.; Lei, T.

    1994-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary-layer flow over a heated flat plate under equilibrium adverse-pressure-gradient conditions (beta = 1.8) were made for two different temperature difference cases (10 and 15 C) between the wall and the freestream. Space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations (T`) were obtained with a pair of subminiature temperature fluctuation probes. The mean convection velocities, the mean inclination angles, and coherence characteristics of the T` large-scale structure were determined. The present temperature structures measurements for a nonisothermal boundary layer are compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case with identical temperature differences previously reported, in which the mean convection velocity of the T` structure was a function of position y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested. The three major findings of the present study, as compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case, are (1) the mean convection speed of the T` structure under beta = 1.8 pressure-gradient conditions was found to be substantially lower in the logarithmic core region than the zero-pressure-gradient case. Additionally, the mean convection speed is felt by the authors to be a function of pressure-gradient parameter beta; (2) the mean inclination angle of the T` structure to the wall under the adverse-pressure-gradient flow was 32 deg, which compares favorably to the 30-deg value of the zero-pressure-gradient case; and (3) the limited data suggests that the mean convection velocity of the T` structure is a function of y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested. 11 refs.

  7. The Fun30 chromatin remodeler Fft3 controls nuclear organization and chromatin structure of insulators and subtelomeres in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Steglich, Babett; Strålfors, Annelie; Khorosjutina, Olga; Persson, Jenna; Smialowska, Agata; Javerzat, Jean-Paul; Ekwall, Karl

    2015-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, local chromatin structure and chromatin organization in the nucleus both influence transcriptional regulation. At the local level, the Fun30 chromatin remodeler Fft3 is essential for maintaining proper chromatin structure at centromeres and subtelomeres in fission yeast. Using genome-wide mapping and live cell imaging, we show that this role is linked to controlling nuclear organization of its targets. In fft3∆ cells, subtelomeres lose their association with the LEM domain protein Man1 at the nuclear periphery and move to the interior of the nucleus. Furthermore, genes in these domains are upregulated and active chromatin marks increase. Fft3 is also enriched at retrotransposon-derived long terminal repeat (LTR) elements and at tRNA genes. In cells lacking Fft3, these sites lose their peripheral positioning and show reduced nucleosome occupancy. We propose that Fft3 has a global role in mediating association between specific chromatin domains and the nuclear envelope.

  8. Long-Term Overexpression of Hsp70 Does Not Protect against Cardiac Dysfunction and Adverse Remodeling in a MURC Transgenic Mouse Model with Chronic Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Bianca C.; Sapra, Geeta; Patterson, Natalie L.; Cemerlang, Nelly; Kiriazis, Helen; Ueyama, Tomomi; Febbraio, Mark A.; McMullen, Julie R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous animal studies had shown that increasing heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) using a transgenic, gene therapy or pharmacological approach provided cardiac protection in models of acute cardiac stress. Furthermore, clinical studies had reported associations between Hsp70 levels and protection against atrial fibrillation (AF). AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia presenting in cardiology clinics and is associated with increased rates of heart failure and stroke. Improved therapies for AF and heart failure are urgently required. Despite promising observations in animal studies which targeted Hsp70, we recently reported that increasing Hsp70 was unable to attenuate cardiac dysfunction and pathology in a mouse model which develops heart failure and intermittent AF. Given our somewhat unexpected finding and the extensive literature suggesting Hsp70 provides cardiac protection, it was considered important to assess whether Hsp70 could provide protection in another mouse model of heart failure and AF. The aim of the current study was to determine whether increasing Hsp70 could attenuate adverse cardiac remodeling, cardiac dysfunction and episodes of arrhythmia in a mouse model of heart failure and AF due to overexpression of Muscle-Restricted Coiled-Coil (MURC). Cardiac function and pathology were assessed in mice at approximately 12 months of age. We report here, that chronic overexpression of Hsp70 was unable to provide protection against cardiac dysfunction, conduction abnormalities, fibrosis or characteristic molecular markers of the failing heart. In summary, elevated Hsp70 may provide protection in acute cardiac stress settings, but appears insufficient to protect the heart under chronic cardiac disease conditions. PMID:26660322

  9. Long-Term Overexpression of Hsp70 Does Not Protect against Cardiac Dysfunction and Adverse Remodeling in a MURC Transgenic Mouse Model with Chronic Heart Failure and Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Bianca C; Sapra, Geeta; Patterson, Natalie L; Cemerlang, Nelly; Kiriazis, Helen; Ueyama, Tomomi; Febbraio, Mark A; McMullen, Julie R

    2015-01-01

    Previous animal studies had shown that increasing heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) using a transgenic, gene therapy or pharmacological approach provided cardiac protection in models of acute cardiac stress. Furthermore, clinical studies had reported associations between Hsp70 levels and protection against atrial fibrillation (AF). AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia presenting in cardiology clinics and is associated with increased rates of heart failure and stroke. Improved therapies for AF and heart failure are urgently required. Despite promising observations in animal studies which targeted Hsp70, we recently reported that increasing Hsp70 was unable to attenuate cardiac dysfunction and pathology in a mouse model which develops heart failure and intermittent AF. Given our somewhat unexpected finding and the extensive literature suggesting Hsp70 provides cardiac protection, it was considered important to assess whether Hsp70 could provide protection in another mouse model of heart failure and AF. The aim of the current study was to determine whether increasing Hsp70 could attenuate adverse cardiac remodeling, cardiac dysfunction and episodes of arrhythmia in a mouse model of heart failure and AF due to overexpression of Muscle-Restricted Coiled-Coil (MURC). Cardiac function and pathology were assessed in mice at approximately 12 months of age. We report here, that chronic overexpression of Hsp70 was unable to provide protection against cardiac dysfunction, conduction abnormalities, fibrosis or characteristic molecular markers of the failing heart. In summary, elevated Hsp70 may provide protection in acute cardiac stress settings, but appears insufficient to protect the heart under chronic cardiac disease conditions.

  10. Histone H3 lysine 14 (H3K14) acetylation facilitates DNA repair in a positioned nucleosome by stabilizing the binding of the chromatin Remodeler RSC (Remodels Structure of Chromatin).

    PubMed

    Duan, Ming-Rui; Smerdon, Michael J

    2014-03-21

    Histone H3 acetylation is induced by UV damage in yeast and may play an important role in regulating the repair of UV photolesions in nucleosome-loaded genomic loci. However, it remains elusive how H3 acetylation facilitates repair. We generated a strongly positioned nucleosome containing homogeneously acetylated H3 at Lys-14 (H3K14ac) and investigated possible mechanisms by which H3K14 acetylation modulates repair. We show that H3K14ac does not alter nucleosome unfolding dynamics or enhance the repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers by UV photolyase. Importantly, however, nucleosomes with H3K14ac have a higher affinity for purified chromatin remodeling complex RSC (Remodels the Structure of Chromatin) and show greater cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer repair compared with unacetylated nucleosomes. Our study indicates that, by anchoring RSC, H3K14 acetylation plays an important role in the unfolding of strongly positioned nucleosomes during repair of UV damage.

  11. Coherent structures of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekimoto, Atsushi; Kitsios, Vassili; Atkinson, Callum; Jiménez, Javier; Soria, Julio

    2016-11-01

    The turbulence statistics and structures are studied in direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer (APG-TBL). The self-similar APG-TBL at the verged of separation is achieved by a modification of the far-field boundary condition to produce the desired pressure gradient. The turbulence statistics in the self-similar region collapse by using the scaling of the external velocity and the displacement thickness. The coherent structures of the APG-TBL are investigated and compared to those of zero-pressure gradient case and homogeneous shear flow. The support of the ARC, NCI and Pawsey SCC funded by the Australian and Western Australian governments as well as the support of PRACE funded by the European Union are gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Duration of Early Adversity and Structural Brain Development in Post-Institutionalized Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hodel, Amanda S.; Hunt, Ruskin H.; Cowell, Raquel A.; Van Den Heuvel, Sara E.; Gunnar, Megan R.; Thomas, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    For children reared in institutions for orphaned or abandoned children, multiple aspects of the early environment deviate from species-typical experiences, which may lead to alterations in neurobehavioral development. Although the effects of early deprivation and early life stress have been studied extensively in animal models, less is known about implications for human brain development. This structural neuroimaging study examined the long-term neural correlates of early adverse rearing environments in a large sample of 12–14 year old children (N = 110) who were internationally adopted from institutional care as young children (median age at adoption = 12 months) relative to a same age, comparison group reared with their biological families in the United States. History of institutional rearing was associated with broad changes in cortical volume even after controlling for variability in head size. Results suggested that prefrontal cortex was especially susceptible to early adversity, with significant reductions in volume (driven primarily by differences in surface area rather than cortical thickness) in post-institutionalized youth. Hippocampal volumes showed an association with duration of institutional care, with later-adopted children showing the smallest volumes relative to non-adopted controls. Larger amygdala volumes were not detected in this sample of post-institutionalized children. These data suggest that this temporally discrete period of early deprivation is associated with persisting alterations in brain morphology even years after exposure. Furthermore, these alterations are not completely ameliorated by subsequent environmental enrichment by early adolescence. PMID:25451478

  13. Duration of early adversity and structural brain development in post-institutionalized adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hodel, Amanda S; Hunt, Ruskin H; Cowell, Raquel A; Van Den Heuvel, Sara E; Gunnar, Megan R; Thomas, Kathleen M

    2015-01-15

    For children reared in institutions for orphaned or abandoned children, multiple aspects of the early environment deviate from species-typical experiences, which may lead to alterations in neurobehavioral development. Although the effects of early deprivation and early life stress have been studied extensively in animal models, less is known about implications for human brain development. This structural neuroimaging study examined the long-term neural correlates of early adverse rearing environments in a large sample of 12-14 year old children (N = 110) who were internationally adopted from institutional care as young children (median age at adoption = 12 months) relative to a same age, comparison group reared with their biological families in the United States. History of institutional rearing was associated with broad changes in cortical volume even after controlling for variability in head size. Results suggested that prefrontal cortex was especially susceptible to early adversity, with significant reductions in volume (driven primarily by differences in surface area rather than cortical thickness) in post-institutionalized youth. Hippocampal volumes showed an association with duration of institutional care, with later-adopted children showing the smallest volumes relative to non-adopted controls. Larger amygdala volumes were not detected in this sample of post-institutionalized children. These data suggest that this temporally discrete period of early deprivation is associated with persisting alterations in brain morphology even years after exposure. Furthermore, these alterations are not completely ameliorated by subsequent environmental enrichment by early adolescence.

  14. Role of reactive oxygen species in myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2007-03-01

    Adverse cardiac remodeling is a fundamental process in the progression to chronic heart failure. Although the mechanisms underlying cardiac remodeling are multi-factorial, a significant body of evidence points to the crucial roles of increased reactive oxygen species. This article reviews recent advances in delineating the different sources of production for reactive oxygen species (namely mitochondria, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled nitric oxide synthases, and NADPH oxidases) that may be involved in cardiac remodeling and the aspects of the remodeling process that they affect. These data could suggest new ways of targeting redox pathways for the prevention and treatment of adverse cardiac remodeling.

  15. Using Atomic Force Microscopy To Study Chromatin Structure and Nucleosome Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, D.; Bash, R.; Wang, H.; Yodh, J.; Lindsay, S.

    2007-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a technique that can directly image single molecules in solution and it therefore provides a powerful tool for obtaining unique insights into the basic properties of biological materials and the functional processes in which they are involved. We have used AFM to analyze basic features of nucleosomes in arrays, such as DNA-histone binding strength, cooperativity in template occupation, nucleosome stabilities, nucleosome locations and the effects of acetylation, to compare these features in different types of arrays and to track the response of array nucleosomes to the action of the human Swi-Snf ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling complex. These experiments required several specific adaptations of basic AFM methods, such as repetitive imaging of the same fields of molecules in liquid, the ability to change the environmental conditions of the sample being imaged and detection of specific types of molecules within compositionally complex samples. Here we describe the techniques that allowed such analyses to be carried out. PMID:17309844

  16. Time course of respiratory mechanics and pulmonary structural remodelling in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Patricia R M; Facchinetti, Livia D; Ferreira, Halina C; Negri, Elnara M; Capelozzi, Vera L; Faffe, Debora S; Zin, Walter A

    2004-10-12

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the time course of in vivo and in vitro respiratory mechanics and examine whether these parameters could reflect the temporal changes in lung parenchyma remodelling in paraquat (PQ)-induced lung injury. Measurements were done 1, 3 and 8 weeks after the intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of saline (control) or paraquat (7mgkg(-1)) in rats. Airway and tissue resistances increased from control in PQ1 and PQ3 and returned to control values in PQ8, in accordance with the magnitude of bronchoconstriction. Viscoelastic/inhomogeneous pressure, tissue elastance, the number of polymorphonuclear cells, and collagen fibre content in lung parenchyma increased in PQ1 and remained elevated in PQ3 and PQ8. Static elastance increased in PQ1, returned to control values after 3 weeks, and was correlated with the volume fraction of collapsed alveoli. In conclusion, there is a restoration of normal alveolar-capillary lung units with a gradual improvement in airway and tissue resistances and static elastance. However, the on-going fibrotic process kept elevated tissue elastance and viscoelastic/inhomogeneous pressure.

  17. Mechanisms of ATP Dependent Chromatin Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gangaraju, Vamsi K.; Bartholomew, Blaine

    2007-01-01

    The inter-relationship between DNA repair and ATP dependent chromatin remodeling has begun to become very apparent with recent discoveries. ATP dependent remodeling complexes mobilize nucleosomes along DNA, promote the exchange of histones, or completely displace nucleosomes from DNA. These remodeling complexes are often categorized based on the domain organization of their catalytic subunit. The biochemical properties and structural information of several of these remodeling complexes are reviewed. The different models for how these complexes are able to mobilize nucleosomes and alter nucleosome structure are presented incorporating several recent findings. Finally the role of histone tails and their respective modifications in ATP-dependent remodeling are discussed. PMID:17306844

  18. Safety Profile of Finasteride: Distribution of Adverse Effects According to Structural and Informational Dichotomies of the Mind/Brain.

    PubMed

    Motofei, Ion G; Rowland, David L; Manea, Mirela; Georgescu, Simona R; Păunică, Ioana; Sinescu, Ioanel

    2017-02-04

    Finasteride is currently used extensively for male androgenic alopecia and benign prostatic hyperplasia; however, some adverse effects are severe and even persistent after treatment cessation, the so-called 'post-finasteride syndrome'. The following most severe adverse effects-sexual dysfunction and depression-often occur together and may potentiate one other, a fact that could explain (at least in part) the magnitude and persistence of finasteride adverse effects. This paper presents the pharmacological action of finasteride and the corresponding adverse effects, the biological base explaining the occurrence, persistence and distribution of these adverse effects, and a possible therapeutic solution for post-finasteride syndrome. The distribution of finasteride adverse effects is presented within a comprehensive and modern neuro-endocrine perspective related to structural and informational dichotomies of the brain. Understanding the variation of finasteride side effects among different populations would be necessary not only to delineate the safety profile of finasteride for different subgroups of men (a subject may or may not be affected by a certain anti-hormonal compound dependent on the individual neuro-endocrine profile), but also as a possible premise for a therapeutic approach of finasteride adverse effects. Such therapeutic approach should include administration of exogenous hormones, which are deficient in men with post-finasteride syndrome, namely dihydrotestosterone (in right-handed men) or progesterone/dihydroprogesterone (in left-handed subjects).

  19. Adverse event detection (AED) system for continuously monitoring and evaluating structural health status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Jinsik; Ha, Dong Sam; Inman, Daniel J.; Owen, Robert B.

    2011-03-01

    Structural damage for spacecraft is mainly due to impacts such as collision of meteorites or space debris. We present a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for space applications, named Adverse Event Detection (AED), which integrates an acoustic sensor, an impedance-based SHM system, and a Lamb wave SHM system. With these three health-monitoring methods in place, we can determine the presence, location, and severity of damage. An acoustic sensor continuously monitors acoustic events, while the impedance-based and Lamb wave SHM systems are in sleep mode. If an acoustic sensor detects an impact, it activates the impedance-based SHM. The impedance-based system determines if the impact incurred damage. When damage is detected, it activates the Lamb wave SHM system to determine the severity and location of the damage. Further, since an acoustic sensor dissipates much less power than the two SHM systems and the two systems are activated only when there is an acoustic event, our system reduces overall power dissipation significantly. Our prototype system demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed concept.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy associated with endurance exercise training: Effects on the structural and functional remodeling of infarcted rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Lavorato, Victor Neiva; Del Carlo, Ricardo Junqueira; da Cunha, Daise Nunes Queiroz; Okano, Barbara Silva; Belfort, Felipe Gomes; de Freitas, Juliana Silveira; da Mota, Gloria de Fatima Alves; Quintão-Júnior, Judson Fonseca; Silame-Gomes, Luis Henrique Lobo; Drummond, Filipe Rios; Carneiro-Júnior, Miguel Araújo; de Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes; Monteiro, Betania Souza; Prímola-Gomes, Thales Nicolau; Natali, Antônio José

    2016-01-01

    We tested the effects of early mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy associated with endurance exercise on the structural and functional cardiac remodeling of rats with myocardial infarctation (MI). Male Wistar rats (40 days old) were divided into 6 groups: control and exercise sham; control and exercise MI; and control and exercise MI MSC. MI was surgically induced and bone marrow-derived MSCs were immediately injected via caudal vein (concentration: 1 × 10(6 )cells). Twenty-four hours later ET groups exercised on a treadmill (5 days/week; 60 min/day; 60% of maximal running velocity) for 12 weeks. Structural and functional changes were determined by echocardiography. Contractility and intracellular global calcium ([Ca(2 +)]i) transient were measured in myocytes from the left ventricular (LV) non-infarcted area. Calcium regulatory proteins were measured by Western blot. MI increased (p < 0.05) heart, ventricular and LV weights and its ratios to body weight; LV internal dimension in diastole (LVID-D) and in systole (LVID-S) and LV free wall in diastole (LVFW-D), but reduced the thickness of interventricular septum in systole (IVS-S), ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening (FS). MI augmented (p < 0.05) the times to peak and to half relaxation of cell shortening as well as the amplitude of the [Ca(2 +)]i transient and the times to peak and to half decay. Early MSCs therapy restored LVFW-D, IVS-S and the amplitude and time to half decay of the [Ca(2 +)]i transient. Early endurance exercise intervention increased (p < 0.05) LVFW-S, IVS-S, EF and FS, and reduced the times to peak and to half relaxation of cell shortening, and the amplitude of the [Ca(2 +)]i transient. Exercise training also increased the expression of left ventricular SERCA2a and PLBser16. Nevertheless, the combination of these therapies did not cause additive effects. In conclusion, combining early MSCs therapy and endurance exercise does not potentiate the benefits of such treatments to

  1. The Drosophila Mi-2 Chromatin-Remodeling Factor Regulates Higher-Order Chromatin Structure and Cohesin Dynamics In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fasulo, Barbara; Deuring, Renate; Murawska, Magdalena; Gause, Maria; Dorighi, Kristel M.; Schaaf, Cheri A.; Dorsett, Dale; Brehm, Alexander; Tamkun, John W.

    2012-01-01

    dMi-2 is a highly conserved ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling factor that regulates transcription and cell fates by altering the structure or positioning of nucleosomes. Here we report an unanticipated role for dMi-2 in the regulation of higher-order chromatin structure in Drosophila. Loss of dMi-2 function causes salivary gland polytene chromosomes to lose their characteristic banding pattern and appear more condensed than normal. Conversely, increased expression of dMi-2 triggers decondensation of polytene chromosomes accompanied by a significant increase in nuclear volume; this effect is relatively rapid and is dependent on the ATPase activity of dMi-2. Live analysis revealed that dMi-2 disrupts interactions between the aligned chromatids of salivary gland polytene chromosomes. dMi-2 and the cohesin complex are enriched at sites of active transcription; fluorescence-recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) assays showed that dMi-2 decreases stable association of cohesin with polytene chromosomes. These findings demonstrate that dMi-2 is an important regulator of both chromosome condensation and cohesin binding in interphase cells. PMID:22912596

  2. Insights into remodeling events during eukaryotic large ribosomal subunit assembly provided by high resolution cryo-EM structures.

    PubMed

    Biedka, Stephanie; Wu, Shan; LaPeruta, Amber J; Gao, Ning; Woolford, John L

    2017-03-07

    Ribosomes are responsible for translating the genome, in the form of mRNA, into the proteome in all organisms. Biogenesis of ribosomes in eukaryotes is a complex process involving numerous remodeling events driven in part by the concerted actions of hundreds of protein assembly factors. A major challenge in studying eukaryotic ribosome assembly has, until recently, been a lack of structural data to facilitate understanding of the conformational and compositional changes the pre-ribosome undergoes during its construction. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has begun filling these gaps; recent advances in cryo-EM have enabled the determination of several high resolution pre-ribosome structures. This review focuses mainly on lessons learned from the study of pre-60S particles purified from yeast using the assembly factor Nog2 as bait. These Nog2 particles provide insight into many aspects of nuclear stages of 60S subunit assembly, including construction of major 60S subunit functional centers and processing of the ITS2 spacer RNA.

  3. Adverse Structural and Functional Effects of Marijuana on the Brain: Evidence Reviewed.

    PubMed

    Mandelbaum, David E; de la Monte, Suzanne M

    2017-01-01

    The growing use and legalization of cannabis are leading to increased exposures across all age groups, including in adolescence. The touting of its medicinal values stems from anecdotal reports related to treatment of a broad range of illnesses including epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, muscle spasms, arthritis, obesity, cancer, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, post-traumatic stress, inflammatory bowel disease, and anxiety. However, anecdotal data and the high level of interest in this treatment must not obscure objective assessments of any potential and realized short- and long-term adverse effects of cannabis, particularly with respect to age of onset and chronicity of exposure. This critical review focuses on evidence-based research designed to assess both therapeutic benefits and harmful effects of cannabis exposure and is combined with an illustration of the neuropathologic findings in a fatal case of cannabis-induced psychosis. The literature and reported case provide strong evidence that chronic cannabis abuse causes cognitive impairment and damages the brain, particularly white matter, where cannabinoid 1 receptors abound. Contrary to popular perception, there are few objective data supporting preferential use of cannabis over conventional therapy for restoration of central nervous system structure and function in disease states such as multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, or schizophrenia. Additional research is needed to determine if subsets of individuals with various neurological and psychiatric diseases derive therapeutic benefits from cannabis.

  4. The forkhead transcription factor FoxI1 remains bound to condensed mitotic chromosomes and stably remodels chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jizhou; Xu, Lisha; Crawford, Gregory; Wang, Zenfeng; Burgess, Shawn M

    2006-01-01

    All forkhead (Fox) proteins contain a highly conserved DNA binding domain whose structure is remarkably similar to the winged-helix structures of histones H1 and H5. Little is known about Fox protein binding in the context of higher-order chromatin structure in living cells. We created a stable cell line expressing FoxI1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) or FoxI1-V5 fusion proteins under control of the reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator doxycycline inducible system and found that unlike most transcription factors, FoxI1 remains bound to the condensed chromosomes during mitosis. To isolate DNA fragments directly bound by the FoxI1 protein within living cells, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIPs) with antibodies to either enhanced GFP or the V5 epitope and subcloned the FoxI1-enriched DNA fragments. Sequence analyses indicated that 88% (106/121) of ChIP sequences contain the consensus binding sites for all Fox proteins. Testing ChIP sequences with a quantitative DNase I hypersensitivity assay showed that FoxI1 created stable DNase I sensitivity changes in condensed chromosomes. The majority of ChIP targets and random targets increased in resistance to DNase I in FoxI1-expressing cells, but a small number of targets became more accessible to DNase I. Consistently, the accessibility of micrococcal nuclease to chromatin was generally inhibited. Micrococcal nuclease partial digestion generated a ladder in which all oligonucleosomes were slightly longer than those observed with the controls. On the basis of these findings, we propose that FoxI1 is capable of remodeling chromatin higher-order structure and can stably create site-specific changes in chromatin to either stably create or remove DNase I hypersensitive sites.

  5. Ectopic histone H3S10 phosphorylation causes chromatin structure remodeling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huai; Bao, Xiaomin; Cai, Weili; Blacketer, Melissa J; Belmont, Andrew S; Girton, Jack; Johansen, Jørgen; Johansen, Kristen M

    2008-02-01

    Histones are subject to numerous post-translational modifications that correlate with the state of higher-order chromatin structure and gene expression. However, it is not clear whether changes in these epigenetic marks are causative regulatory factors in chromatin structure changes or whether they play a mainly reinforcing or maintenance role. In Drosophila phosphorylation of histone H3S10 in euchromatic chromatin regions by the JIL-1 tandem kinase has been implicated in counteracting heterochromatization and gene silencing. Here we show, using a LacI-tethering system, that JIL-1 mediated ectopic histone H3S10 phosphorylation is sufficient to induce a change in higher-order chromatin structure from a condensed heterochromatin-like state to a more open euchromatic state. This effect was absent when a ;kinase dead' LacI-JIL-1 construct without histone H3S10 phosphorylation activity was expressed. Instead, the 'kinase dead' construct had a dominant-negative effect, leading to a disruption of chromatin structure that was associated with a global repression of histone H3S10 phosphorylation levels. These findings provide direct evidence that the epigenetic histone tail modification of H3S10 phosphorylation at interphase can function as a causative regulator of higher-order chromatin structure in Drosophila in vivo.

  6. Ventricular remodeling in heart failure: the role of myocardial collagen.

    PubMed

    Janicki, J S; Brower, G L; Henegar, J R; Wang, L

    1995-01-01

    Collagen which is present in the myocardium in relatively small amounts is the most abundant structural protein of the connective tissue network. Its structural organization consists of a complex weave of collagen fibers that surrounds and interconnects myocytes, groups of myocytes, muscle fibers and muscle bundles. The conformation of interstitial fibrillar collagen makes it highly resistant to degradation by all proteinases other than specific collagenases. In hearts with myocardial damage secondary to myocardial infarction, chronic ischemia, inflammation, or cardiomyopathy, a complex sequence of compensatory events occur that eventually result in an adverse left ventricular remodeling. This continual state of remodeling is characterized by persistent collagenase activity, fibrillar collagen degradation, and progressive myocyte loss. The net effect is a shift in the balance between collagen synthesis and degradation which leads to an inadequate fibrillar collagen matrix, progressive ventricular dilatation and sphericalization with wall thinning and eventual congestive heart failure.

  7. Moderate increase in histone acetylation activates the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter and remodels its nucleosome structure.

    PubMed Central

    Bartsch, J; Truss, M; Bode, J; Beato, M

    1996-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is regulated by steroid hormones through a hormone-responsive region that is organized in a positioned nucleosome. Hormone induction leads to a structural change of this nucleosome which makes its DNA more sensitive to cleavage by DNase I and enables simultaneous binding of all relevant transcription factors. In cells carrying either episomal or chromosomally integrated MMTV promoters, moderate acetylation of core histones, generated by treatment with low concentrations of the histone deacetylase inhibitors sodium butyrate or trichostatin A, enhances transcription from the MMTV promoter in the absence of hormone and potentiates transactivation by either glucocorticoids or progestins. At higher concentrations, histone deacetylase inhibitors reduce basal and hormone induced MMTV transcription. Inducing inhibitor concentrations lead to the same type of nucleosomal DNase I hypersensitivity as hormone treatment, suggesting that moderate acetylation of core histone activates the MMTV promoter by mechanisms involving chromatin remodeling similar to that generated by the inducing hormones. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8855250

  8. Structure of the SANT domain from the Xenopus chromatin remodeling factor ISWI

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, John R.; Elgar, Stuart J.; Khan, Seema I.; Zhang, Xing; Wade, Paul A.; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2008-09-17

    The SANT (Swi3, Ada2, N-Cor, and TFIIIB) module was first described as a putative DNA-binding domain with strong similarity to the helix-turn-helix DNA binding domain of Myb-related proteins. The X-ray structure of the C-terminal one third portion of the ATPase ISWI of Drosophila melangoaster, containing both SANT and SLIDE (SANT-Like ISWI Domain), confirmed the overall helix-turn-helix structural architecture of SANT as well as SLIDE. However, the DNA-contacting residues in Myb are not conserved in SANT and the structurally corresponding residues in the ISWI SANT domain are acidic, and therefore incompatible with DNA interaction. Recent studies suggested that SANT domains might be a histone-tail-binding module, including the DNA binding SANT domain of c-Myb. Here they present the X-ray structure of Xenopus laevis ISWI SANT domain, derived from limited proteolysis of a C-terminal fragment of ISWI protein.

  9. Structural snapshots of Xer recombination reveal activation by synaptic complex remodeling and DNA bending

    PubMed Central

    Bebel, Aleksandra; Karaca, Ezgi; Kumar, Banushree; Stark, W Marshall; Barabas, Orsolya

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial Xer site-specific recombinases play an essential genome maintenance role by unlinking chromosome multimers, but their mechanism of action has remained structurally uncharacterized. Here, we present two high-resolution structures of Helicobacter pylori XerH with its recombination site DNA difH, representing pre-cleavage and post-cleavage synaptic intermediates in the recombination pathway. The structures reveal that activation of DNA strand cleavage and rejoining involves large conformational changes and DNA bending, suggesting how interaction with the cell division protein FtsK may license recombination at the septum. Together with biochemical and in vivo analysis, our structures also reveal how a small sequence asymmetry in difH defines protein conformation in the synaptic complex and orchestrates the order of DNA strand exchanges. Our results provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of Xer recombination and a model for regulation of recombination activity during cell division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19706.001 PMID:28009253

  10. [THE CHANGES IN THE STRUCTURAL REMODELING OF THE CAROTID ARTERY IN PATIENTS WITH HYPERTENSION AND HEART VALVE CALCIFICATION UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF TREATMENT].

    PubMed

    Yuzvishina, O V

    2014-01-01

    In patients with essential hypertension (EH) and heart valves calcification (HVC) were studied the dynamics of the structural remodeling of the carotid artery under the influence of different variants of lipid-lowering therapy. Significant decrease in the thickness of the intimamedia, the frequency of new atherosclerotic plaques have been seen in patients with EH and HVC using high-dose atorvastatin compared with less.

  11. Expression Profiling after Prolonged Experimental Febrile Seizures in Mice Suggests Structural Remodeling in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Jongbloets, Bart C.; van Gassen, Koen L. I.; Kan, Anne A.; Olde Engberink, Anneke H. O.; de Wit, Marina; Wolterink-Donselaar, Inge G.; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J. A.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Onno; Holstege, Frank C. P.; de Graan, Pierre N. E.

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most prevalent type of seizures among children up to 5 years of age (2–4% of Western-European children). Complex febrile seizures are associated with an increased risk to develop temporal lobe epilepsy. To investigate short- and long-term effects of experimental febrile seizures (eFS), we induced eFS in highly febrile convulsion-susceptible C57BL/6J mice at post-natal day 10 by exposure to hyperthermia (HT) and compared them to normotherm-exposed (NT) mice. We detected structural re-organization in the hippocampus 14 days after eFS. To identify molecular candidates, which entrain this structural re-organization, we investigated temporal changes in mRNA expression profiles eFS 1 hour to 56 days after eFS. We identified 931 regulated genes and profiled several candidates using in situ hybridization and histology at 3 and 14 days after eFS. This is the first study to report genome-wide transcriptome analysis after eFS in mice. We identify temporal regulation of multiple processes, such as stress-, immune- and inflammatory responses, glia activation, glutamate-glutamine cycle and myelination. Identification of the short- and long-term changes after eFS is important to elucidate the mechanisms contributing to epileptogenesis. PMID:26684451

  12. Nucleosome Remodeling and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Peter B.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is kept flexible and dynamic to respond to environmental, metabolic, and developmental cues through the action of a family of so-called “nucleosome remodeling” ATPases. Consistent with their helicase ancestry, these enzymes experience conformation changes as they bind and hydrolyze ATP. At the same time they interact with DNA and histones, which alters histone–DNA interactions in target nucleosomes. Their action may lead to complete or partial disassembly of nucleosomes, the exchange of histones for variants, the assembly of nucleosomes, or the movement of histone octamers on DNA. “Remodeling” may render DNA sequences accessible to interacting proteins or, conversely, promote packing into tightly folded structures. Remodeling processes participate in every aspect of genome function. Remodeling activities are commonly integrated with other mechanisms such as histone modifications or RNA metabolism to assemble stable, epigenetic states. PMID:24003213

  13. Remodeling of the gut microbiota and structural shifts in Preeclampsia patients in South China.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Yang, H; Yin, Z; Jiang, X; Zhong, H; Qiu, D; Zhu, F; Li, R

    2017-04-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is one of the pregnancy metabolic diseases. Since Gut microbiota play important roles in the hosts' metabolism, it is necessary to investigate the gut microbiota in PE patients, so that some intestinal dysbiosis might be detected as a biomarker for PE early diagnosis or as a target for intervention. One hundred subjects were categorized into four groups: 26 PE patients in late pregnancy, healthy individuals in early, middle, and late pregnancy (26/24/24 women). Gut microbiota were analyzed by sequencing the V4 region of the 16S rDNA gene using Illuminal MiSeq. Data were analyzed by multivariate statistics. Bacteroidetes was the dominant bacterium (47.57-52.35%) in the pregnant women in South China. Tenericutes increased while Verrucomicrobia almost disappeared in late pregnancy. In the PE patients, there was an overall increase in pathogenic bacteria, Clostridium perfringens (p = 0.03) and Bulleidia moorei (p = 0.00) but a reduction in probiotic bacteria Coprococcus catus (p = 0.03). Our research suggests that there is a significant structural shift of the gut microbiota in PE patients, which might be associated with the occurrence and development of the disease. However, further studies are required to understand the underlying mechanisms.

  14. Bax assembles into large ring-like structures remodeling the mitochondrial outer membrane in apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Große, Lena; Wurm, Christian A; Brüser, Christian; Neumann, Daniel; Jans, Daniel C; Jakobs, Stefan

    2016-02-15

    The Bcl-2 family proteins Bax and Bak are essential for the execution of many apoptotic programs. During apoptosis, Bax translocates to the mitochondria and mediates the permeabilization of the outer membrane, thereby facilitating the release of pro-apoptotic proteins. Yet the mechanistic details of the Bax-induced membrane permeabilization have so far remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate that activated Bax molecules, besides forming large and compact clusters, also assemble, potentially with other proteins including Bak, into ring-like structures in the mitochondrial outer membrane. STED nanoscopy indicates that the area enclosed by a Bax ring is devoid of mitochondrial outer membrane proteins such as Tom20, Tom22, and Sam50. This strongly supports the view that the Bax rings surround an opening required for mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP). Even though these Bax assemblies may be necessary for MOMP, we demonstrate that at least in Drp1 knockdown cells, these assemblies are not sufficient for full cytochrome c release. Together, our super-resolution data provide direct evidence in support of large Bax-delineated pores in the mitochondrial outer membrane as being crucial for Bax-mediated MOMP in cells.

  15. Structural insights into the cooperative remodeling of membranes by amphiphysin/BIN1

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Julia; Basnet, Nirakar; Mizuno, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Amphiphysin2/BIN1 is a crescent-shaped N-BAR protein playing a key role in forming deeply invaginated tubes in muscle T-tubules. Amphiphysin2/BIN1 structurally stabilizes tubular formations in contrast to other N-BAR proteins involved in dynamic membrane scission processes; however, the molecular mechanism of the stabilizing effect is poorly understood. Using cryo-EM, we investigated the assembly of the amphiphysin/BIN1 on a membrane tube. We found that the N-BAR domains self-assemble on the membrane surface in a highly cooperative manner. Our biochemical assays and 3D reconstructions indicate that the N-terminal amphipathic helix H0 plays an important role in the initiation of the tube assembly and further in organizing BAR-mediated polymerization by locking adjacent N-BAR domains. Mutants that lack H0 or the tip portion, which is also involved in interactions of the neighboring BAR unit, lead to a disruption of the polymer organization, even though tubulation can still be observed. The regulatory region of amphiphysin/BIN1 including an SH3 domain does not have any apparent involvement in the polymer lattice. Our study indicates that the H0 helix and the BAR tip are necessary for efficient and organized self-assembly of amphiphysin/N-BAR. PMID:26487375

  16. Trabecular network arrangement within the human patella: how osteoarthritis remodels the 3D trabecular structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoechel, Sebastian; Deyhle, Hans; Toranelli, Mireille; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena

    2016-10-01

    Following the principles of "morphology reveals biomechanics", the anatomical structure of the cartilage-osseous interface and the supporting trabecular network show defined adaptation in their architectural properties to physiological loading. In case of a faulty relationship, the ability to support the load diminishes and the onset of osteoarthritis (OA) may arise and disturb the balanced formation and resorption processes. To describe and quantify the changes occurring, 10 human OA patellae were analysed concerning the architectural parameters of the trabecular network within the first five mms by the evaluation of 3Dmicro-CT datasets. The analysed OA-samples showed a strong irregularity for all trabecular parameters across the trabecular network, no regularity in parameter distribution was found. In general, we saw a decrease of material in the OA population as BV/TV, BS/TV, Tb.N and Tb.Th were decreased and the spacing increased. The development into depth showed a logarithmic dependency, which revealed the greatest difference for all parameters within the first mm in comparison to the physiologic samples. The differences decreased towards the 5th mm. The interpretation of the mathematic dependency leads to the conclusion that the main impact of OA is beneath the subchondral bone plate (SBP) and lessens with depth. Next to the clear difference in material, the architectural arrangement is more rod-like and isotropic just beneath the SBP in comparison to the plate-like and more anisotropic physiological arrangement.

  17. A visual study of the coherent structure of the turbulent boundary layer in flow with adverse pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Qi Xiang

    1990-06-01

    Experimental investigations were carried out on the coherent structures of turbulent boundary layers in flow with adverse pressure gradient and, in the vicinity of separation, extensive visual observations using the hydrogen-bubble technique were performed. In a flow with adverse pressure gradient, the structures are larger, and thus more details were observed. By a suitable manipulation of the generation of hydrogen-bubble time lines, some new results were obtained in observing plan views near the wall. The long streaks downstream along the interface regions between low-speed and high-speed streaks are continually stretching, and their velocity may be greater than that of high-speed streaks; the hydrogen bubbles in the long streaks generally have a longer life. Streamwise (x, y) vortices were also observed along the interface regions between high-speed and low-speed streaks. Transverse (z) vortices were observed at the front of the high-speed regions.

  18. Nucleosome dynamics during chromatin remodeling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Precise positioning of nucleosomes around regulatory sites is achieved by the action of chromatin remodelers, which use the energy of ATP to slide, evict or change the composition of nucleosomes. Chromatin remodelers act to bind nucleosomes, disrupt histone-DNA interactions and translocate the DNA around the histone core to reposition nucleosomes. Hence, remodeling is expected to involve nucleosomal intermediates with a structural organization that is distinct from intact nucleosomes. We describe the identification of a partially unwrapped nucleosome structure using methods that map histone-DNA contacts genome-wide. This alternative nucleosome structure is likely formed as an intermediate or by-product during nucleosome remodeling by the RSC complex. Identification of the loss of histone-DNA contacts during chromatin remodeling by RSC in vivo has implications for the regulation of transcriptional initiation.

  19. Interactions of early adversity with stress-related gene polymorphisms impact regional brain structure in females

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arpana; Labus, Jennifer; Kilpatrick, Lisa A.; Bonyadi, Mariam; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Heendeniya, Nuwanthi; Bradesi, Sylvie; Chang, Lin; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2015-01-01

    Early adverse life events (EALs) have been associated with regional thinning of the subgenual cingulate cortex (sgACC), a brain region implicated in the development of disorders of mood and affect, and often comorbid functional pain disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Regional neuroinflammation related to chronic stress system activation has been suggested as a possible mechanism underlying these neuroplastic changes. However, the interaction of genetic and environmental factors in these changes is poorly understood. The current study aimed to evaluate the interactions of EALs and candidate gene polymorphisms in influencing thickness of the sgACC. 210 female subjects (137 healthy controls; 73 IBS) were genotyped for stress and inflammation-related gene polymorphisms. Genetic variation with EALs, and diagnosis on sgACC thickness was examined, while controlling for race, age, and total brain volume. Compared to HCs, IBS had significantly reduced sgACC thickness (p = 0.03). Regardless of disease group (IBS vs. HC), thinning of the left sgACC was associated with a significant gene-gene environment interaction between the IL-1β genotype, the NR3C1 haplotype, and a history of EALs (p = 0.05). Reduced sgACC thickness in women with the minor IL-1β allele, was associated with EAL total scores regardless of NR3C1 haplotype status (p = 0.02). In subjects homozygous for the major IL-1β allele, reduced sgACC with increasing levels of EALs was seen only with the less common NR3C1 haplotype (p = 0.02). These findings support an interaction between polymorphisms related to stress and inflammation and early adverse life events in modulating a key region of the emotion arousal circuit. PMID:25630611

  20. Teaching resources. Chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Lue, Neal F

    2005-07-26

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes and slides for a class covering chromatin remodeling mechanisms and is part of the course "Cell Signaling Systems: a Course for Graduate Students." The lecture begins with a discussion of chromatin organization and then proceeds to describe the process of chromatin remodeling through a review of chromatin remodeling complexes and methods used to study their function.

  1. ToxAlerts: A Web Server of Structural Alerts for Toxic Chemicals and Compounds with Potential Adverse Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The article presents a Web-based platform for collecting and storing toxicological structural alerts from literature and for virtual screening of chemical libraries to flag potentially toxic chemicals and compounds that can cause adverse side effects. An alert is uniquely identified by a SMARTS template, a toxicological endpoint, and a publication where the alert was described. Additionally, the system allows storing complementary information such as name, comments, and mechanism of action, as well as other data. Most importantly, the platform can be easily used for fast virtual screening of large chemical datasets, focused libraries, or newly designed compounds against the toxicological alerts, providing a detailed profile of the chemicals grouped by structural alerts and endpoints. Such a facility can be used for decision making regarding whether a compound should be tested experimentally, validated with available QSAR models, or eliminated from consideration altogether. The alert-based screening can also be helpful for an easier interpretation of more complex QSAR models. The system is publicly accessible and tightly integrated with the Online Chemical Modeling Environment (OCHEM, http://ochem.eu). The system is open and expandable: any registered OCHEM user can introduce new alerts, browse, edit alerts introduced by other users, and virtually screen his/her data sets against all or selected alerts. The user sets being passed through the structural alerts can be used at OCHEM for other typical tasks: exporting in a wide variety of formats, development of QSAR models, additional filtering by other criteria, etc. The database already contains almost 600 structural alerts for such endpoints as mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, skin sensitization, compounds that undergo metabolic activation, and compounds that form reactive metabolites and, thus, can cause adverse reactions. The ToxAlerts platform is accessible on the Web at http://ochem.eu/alerts, and it is constantly

  2. The Structural Basis of Functional Improvement in Response to Human Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Hearts with Post-Infarct LV Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Ye, Lei; Zhong, Jia; Li, Xin; Yan, Chen; Chandler, Margaret P.; Calvin, Steve; Xiao, Feng; Negia, Mesfin; Low, Walter C.; Zhang, Jianyi; Yu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Cellular therapy for myocardial repair has been one of the most intensely investigated interventional strategies for acute myocardium infarction. Although the therapeutic potential of stem cells has been demonstrated in various studies, the underlying mechanisms for such improvement are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the long-term effects of stem cell therapy on both myocardial fiber organization and regional contractile function using a rat model of post-infarct remodeling. Human non-hematopoietic umbilical cord blood stem cells (nh-UCBSCs) were administered via tail vein to rats 2 days after infarct surgery. Animals were maintained without immunosuppressive therapy. In vivo and ex vivo MR imaging was performed on infarct hearts ten months after cell transplantation. Compared to the age-matched rats exposed to the identical surgery, both global and regional cardiac function of the nh-UCBSC-treated hearts, such as ejection fraction, ventricular strain and torsion, were significantly improved. More importantly, the treated hearts exhibited preserved fiber orientation and water diffusivities that were similar to those in sham-operated control hearts. These data provide the first evidence that nh-UCBSC treatment may prevent/delay untoward structural remodeling in post-infarct hearts, which supports the improved LV function observed in vivo in the absence of immunosuppression, suggesting a beneficial paracrine effect that occurred with the cellular therapy. PMID:24332083

  3. Airway remodeling in asthma: what really matters.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbach, Heinz; Wagner, Christina; Wegmann, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Airway remodeling is generally quite broadly defined as any change in composition, distribution, thickness, mass or volume and/or number of structural components observed in the airway wall of patients relative to healthy individuals. However, two types of airway remodeling should be distinguished more clearly: (1) physiological airway remodeling, which encompasses structural changes that occur regularly during normal lung development and growth leading to a normal mature airway wall or as an acute and transient response to injury and/or inflammation, which ultimately results in restoration of a normal airway structures; and (2) pathological airway remodeling, which comprises those structural alterations that occur as a result of either disturbed lung development or as a response to chronic injury and/or inflammation leading to persistently altered airway wall structures and function. This review will address a few major aspects: (1) what are reliable quantitative approaches to assess airway remodeling? (2) Are there any indications supporting the notion that airway remodeling can occur as a primary event, i.e., before any inflammatory process was initiated? (3) What is known about airway remodeling being a secondary event to inflammation? And (4), what can we learn from the different animal models ranging from invertebrate to primate models in the study of airway remodeling? Future studies are required addressing particularly pheno-/endotype-specific aspects of airway remodeling using both endotype-specific animal models and "endotyped" human asthmatics. Hopefully, novel in vivo imaging techniques will be further advanced to allow monitoring development, growth and inflammation of the airways already at a very early stage in life.

  4. Altered Liver Proteoglycan/Glycosaminoglycan Structure as a Manifestation of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling upon BCG-induced Granulomatosis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, L B; Shkurupy, V A; Putyatina, A N

    2017-01-01

    Experimental BCG-induced granulomatosis in mice was used to study changes in the dynamics of individual liver proteoglycan components reflecting phasic extracellular matrix remodeling, determined by the host-parasite interaction and associated with granuloma development. In the early BCG-granulomatosis period, the increase in individual proteoglycan components promotes granuloma formation, providing conditions for mycobacteria adhesion to host cells, migration of phagocytic cells from circulation, and cell-cell interaction leading to granuloma development and fibrosis. Later, reduced reserve capacity of the extracellular matrix, development of interstitial fibrosis and granuloma fibrosis can lead to trophic shortage for cells within the granulomas, migration of macrophages out of them, and development of spontaneous necrosis and apoptosis typical of tuberculosis.

  5. Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 in Obese, Normotensive Adolescents is Associated with Adverse Cardiac Structure

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Farah N.; Falkner, Bonita; Gidding, Samuel S.; Price, Heather E.; Keith, Scott W.; Langman, Craig B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) is a biomarker for cardiovascular (CV) disease. Obesity may promote FGF23 production in the absence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We sought to determine among normotensive African American adolescents, whether FGF23 levels are higher in obese compared with normal weight African American adolescents; and to determine the relationship of FGF23 with markers of cardiac structure and insulin resistance. Study design Cross-sectional data were obtained from a cohort of 130 normotensive, African American adolescents aged 13-18 years old without CKD; 74 were obese; 56 were normal weight. Plasma C-terminal FGF23, fasting glucose and insulin, and hsCRP were measured; participants underwent M-mode echocardiography. Results FGF23 was skewed and approximately normally distributed after natural log transformation (logFGF23). FGF23 levels were higher in obese versus normal weight participants (geometric mean 43 vs. 23 RU/mL, p<0.01). FGF23 values were significantly higher in participants with eccentric or concentric cardiac hypertrophy compared with those without hypertrophy (p<0.01). LogFGF23 directly correlated with BMI, BMI z-score, waist circumference, fasting insulin levels, and HOMA scores. Regression models adjusted for age, sex, and hsCRP suggest that each 10% increase in FGF23 is associated with 1.31 unit increase in LVM (p<0.01), 0.29 unit increase in LVMI (p<0.01), and 0.01 unit increase in left atrial dimension indexed to height (p=0.02). Conclusions In this sample of obese African American adolescents, FGF23 blood levels were associated with abnormal cardiac structure. We postulate that FGF23 may be an early marker of cardiac injury in obese but otherwise healthy African American adolescents. PMID:25063724

  6. Building and Remodeling Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Deanna L.; Huntley, George W.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic junctions are generated by adhesion proteins that bridge the synaptic cleft to firmly anchor pre- and postsynaptic membranes. Several cell adhesion molecule (CAM) families localize to synapses, but it is not yet completely understood how each synaptic CAM family contributes to synapse formation and/or structure, and whether or how smaller groups of CAMs serve as minimal, functionally cooperative adhesive units upon which structure is based. Synapse structure and function evolve over the course of development, and in mature animals, synapses are composed of a greater number of proteins, surrounded by a stabilizing extracellular matrix, and often contacted by astrocytic processes. Thus, in mature networks undergoing plasticity, persistent changes in synapse strength, morphology or number must be accompanied by selective and regulated remodeling of the neuropil. Recent work indicates that regulated, extracellular proteolysis may be essential for this, and rather than simply acting permissively to enable synapse plasticity, is more likely playing a proactive role in driving coordinated synaptic structural and functional modifications that underlie persistent changes in network activity. PMID:20882551

  7. Structural Brain Network Reorganization and Social Cognition Related to Adverse Perinatal Condition from Infancy to Early Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Fischi-Gomez, Elda; Batalle, Dafnis; Borradori-Tolsa, Cristina; Eixarch, Elisenda; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Gratacós, Eduard; Hüppi, Petra S.

    2016-01-01

    Adverse conditions during fetal life have been associated to both structural and functional changes in neurodevelopment from the neonatal period to adolescence. In this study, connectomics was used to assess the evolution of brain networks from infancy to early adolescence. Brain network reorganization over time in subjects who had suffered adverse perinatal conditions is characterized and related to neurodevelopment and cognition. Three cohorts of prematurely born infants and children (between 28 and 35 weeks of gestational age), including individuals with a birth weight appropriated for gestational age and with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), were evaluated at 1, 6, and 10 years of age, respectively. A common developmental trajectory of brain networks was identified in both control and IUGR groups: network efficiencies of the fractional anisotropy (FA)-weighted and normalized connectomes increase with age, which can be related to maturation and myelination of fiber connections while the number of connections decreases, which can be associated to an axonal pruning process and reorganization. Comparing subjects with or without IUGR, a similar pattern of network differences between groups was observed in the three developmental stages, mainly characterized by IUGR group having reduced brain network efficiencies in binary and FA-weighted connectomes and increased efficiencies in the connectome normalized by its total connection strength (FA). Associations between brain networks and neurobehavioral impairments were also evaluated showing a relationship between different network metrics and specific social cognition-related scores, as well as a higher risk of inattention/hyperactivity and/or executive functional disorders in IUGR children. PMID:28008304

  8. Lactate adversely affects the in vitro formation of endothelial cell tubular structures through the action of TGF-{beta}1

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Stephan A. . E-mail: leoni.kunz-schughart@oncoray.de; Gaumann, Andreas; Wondrak, Marit; Eckermann, Christoph; Schulte, Stephanie; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Wheatley, Denys N.; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A.

    2007-07-15

    When lactate accumulation in a tumor microenvironment reaches an average concentration of 10-20 mM, it tends to reflect a high degree of malignancy. However, the hypothesis that tumor-derived lactate has a number of partially adverse biological effects on malignant and tumor-associated host cells requires further evidence. The present study attempted to evaluate the impact of lactate on the process of angiogenesis, in particular on the formation of tubular structures. The endothelial cell (EC) network in desmoplastic breast tumors is primarily located in areas of reactive fibroblastic stroma. We employed a fibroblast-endothelial cell co-culture model as in vitro angiogenesis system normally producing florid in vitro tubule formation to analyze this situation. In contrast to previous studies, we found that lactate significantly reduces EC network formation in a dose-dependent manner as quantified by semi-automated morphometric analyses following immunohistochemical staining. The decrease in CD31-positive tubular structures and the number of intersections was independent of VEGF supplementation and became more pronounced in the presence of protons. The number of cells, primarily of the fibroblast population, was reduced but cell loss could not be attributed to a decrease in proliferative activity or pronounced apoptotic cell death. Treatment with 10 mM lactate was accompanied by enhanced mRNA expression and release of TGF-{beta}1, which also shows anti-angiogenic activity in the model. Both TGF-{beta}1 and lactate induced myofibroblastic differentiation adjacent to the EC tubular structures. The lactate response on the EC network was diminished by TGF-{beta}1 neutralization, indicating a causal relationship between lactate and TGF-{beta}1 in the finely tuned processes of vessel formation and maturation which may also occur in vivo within tumor tissue.

  9. Widespread Myocardial Delivery of Heart-Derived Stem Cells by Nonocclusive Triple-Vessel Intracoronary Infusion in Porcine Ischemic Cardiomyopathy: Superior Attenuation of Adverse Remodeling Documented by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Histology

    PubMed Central

    Tseliou, Eleni; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Dawkins, James; Gallet, Romain; Kreke, Michelle; Smith, Rachel; Middleton, Ryan; Valle, Jackelyn; Marbán, Linda; Kar, Saibal; Makkar, Rajendra; Marbán, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Single-vessel, intracoronary infusion of stem cells under stop-flow conditions has proven safe but achieves only limited myocardial coverage. Continuous flow intracoronary delivery to one or more coronary vessels may achieve broader coverage for treating cardiomyopathy, but has not been investigated. Using nonocclusive coronary guiding catheters, we infused allogeneic cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) either in a single vessel or sequentially in all three coronary arteries in porcine ischemic cardiomyopathy and used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess structural and physiological outcomes. Vehicle-infused animals served as controls. Single-vessel stop-flow and continuous-flow intracoronary infusion revealed equivalent effects on scar size and function. Sequential infusion into each of the three major coronary vessels under stop-flow or continuous-flow conditions revealed equal efficacy, but less elevation of necrotic biomarkers with continuous-flow delivery. In addition, multi-vessel delivery resulted in enhanced global and regional tissue function compared to a triple-vessel placebo-treated group. The functional benefits after global cell infusion were accompanied histologically by minimal inflammatory cellular infiltration, attenuated regional fibrosis and enhanced vessel density in the heart. Sequential multi-vessel non-occlusive delivery of CDCs is safe and provides enhanced preservation of left ventricular function and structure. The current findings provide preclinical validation of the delivery method currently undergoing clinical testing in the Dilated cardiomYopathy iNtervention With Allogeneic MyocardIally-regenerative Cells (DYNAMIC) trial of CDCs in heart failure patients. PMID:26784932

  10. A Structure-Based Approach for Mapping Adverse Drug Reactions to the Perturbation of Underlying Biological Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wallach, Izhar; Jaitly, Navdeep; Lilien, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADR), also known as side-effects, are complex undesired physiologic phenomena observed secondary to the administration of pharmaceuticals. Several phenomena underlie the emergence of each ADR; however, a dominant factor is the drug's ability to modulate one or more biological pathways. Understanding the biological processes behind the occurrence of ADRs would lead to the development of safer and more effective drugs. At present, no method exists to discover these ADR-pathway associations. In this paper we introduce a computational framework for identifying a subset of these associations based on the assumption that drugs capable of modulating the same pathway may induce similar ADRs. Our model exploits multiple information resources. First, we utilize a publicly available dataset pairing drugs with their observed ADRs. Second, we identify putative protein targets for each drug using the protein structure database and in-silico virtual docking. Third, we label each protein target with its known involvement in one or more biological pathways. Finally, the relationships among these information sources are mined using multiple stages of logistic-regression while controlling for over-fitting and multiple-hypothesis testing. As proof-of-concept, we examined a dataset of 506 ADRs, 730 drugs, and 830 human protein targets. Our method yielded 185 ADR-pathway associations of which 45 were selected to undergo a manual literature review. We found 32 associations to be supported by the scientific literature. PMID:20808786

  11. Remodeling A School Shop?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, G. E.

    1970-01-01

    Presents guidelines for remodeling a school shop combining major considerations of funds, program changes, class management, and flexibility, with the needs of wiring, painting, and placement of equipment. (Author)

  12. Frontiers in growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Unlike common engineering materials, living matter can autonomously respond to environmental changes. Living structures can grow stronger, weaker, larger, or smaller within months, weeks, or days as a result of a continuous microstructural turnover and renewal. Hard tissues can adapt by increasing their density and grow strong. Soft tissues can adapt by increasing their volume and grow large. For more than three decades, the mechanics community has actively contributed to understand the phenomena of growth and remodeling from a mechanistic point of view. However, to date, there is no single, unified characterization of growth, which is equally accepted by all scientists in the field. Here we shed light on the continuum modeling of growth and remodeling of living matter, and give a comprehensive overview of historical developments and trends. We provide a state-of-the-art review of current research highlights, and discuss challenges and potential future directions. Using the example of volumetric growth, we illustrate how we can establish and utilize growth theories to characterize the functional adaptation of soft living matter. We anticipate this review to be the starting point for critical discussions and future research in growth and remodeling, with a potential impact on life science and medicine. PMID:22919118

  13. Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Larissa A; Laurie, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complex, progressive condition arising from a variety of genetic and pathogenic causes. Patients present with a spectrum of histologic and pathophysiological features, likely reflecting the diversity in underlying pathogenesis. It is widely recognized that structural alterations in the vascular wall contribute to all forms of pulmonary hypertension. Features characteristic of the remodeled vasculature in patients with pulmonary hypertension include increased stiffening of the elastic proximal pulmonary arteries, thickening of the intimal and/or medial layer of muscular arteries, development of vaso-occlusive lesions and the appearance of cells expressing smooth muscle specific markers in normally non-muscular small diameter vessels, resulting from proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and cellular trans-differentiation. The development of several animal models of pulmonary hypertension has provided the means to explore the mechanistic underpinnings of pulmonary vascular remodeling, although none of the experimental models currently used entirely replicates the pulmonary arterial hypertension observed in patients. Herein, we provide an overview of the histological abnormalities observed in humans with pulmonary hypertension and in preclinical models and discuss insights gained regarding several key signaling pathways contributing to the remodeling process. In particular, we will focus on the roles of ion homeostasis, endothelin-1, serotonin, bone morphogenetic proteins, Rho kinase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, highlighting areas of cross-talk between these pathways and potentials for therapeutic targeting. PMID:23334338

  14. Small artery remodelling in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Rizzoni, Damiano

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this article is to briefly review available data regarding changes in the structure of microvessels observed in patients with diabetes mellitus, and possible correction by effective treatment. The development of structural changes in the systemic vasculature is the end result of established hypertension. In essential hypertension, small arteries of smooth muscle cells are restructured around a smaller lumen and there is no net growth of the vascular wall, although in some secondary forms of hypertension, a hypertrophic remodelling may be detected. Moreover, in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus a hypertrophic remodelling of subcutaneous small arteries is present. Indices of small resistance artery structure, such as the tunica media to internal lumen ratio, may have a strong prognostic significance in hypertensive and diabetic patients, over and above all other known cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, regression of vascular alterations is an appealing goal of antihypertensive treatment. Different antihypertensive drugs seem to have different effect on vascular structure. In diabetic hypertensive patients, a significant regression of structural alterations of small resistance arteries with drugs blocking the renin–angiotensin system (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers) was demonstrated. Alterations in the microcirculation represent a common pathological finding, and microangiopathy is one of the most important mechanisms involved in the development of organ damage as well as of clinical events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Renin–angiotensin system blockade seems to be effective in preventing/regressing alterations in microvascular structure. PMID:20646125

  15. Bone remodeling as a spatial evolutionary game.

    PubMed

    Ryser, Marc D; Murgas, Kevin A

    2017-04-07

    Bone remodeling is a complex process involving cell-cell interactions, biochemical signaling and mechanical stimuli. Early models of the biological aspects of remodeling were non-spatial and focused on the local dynamics at a fixed location in the bone. Several spatial extensions of these models have been proposed, but they generally suffer from two limitations: first, they are not amenable to analysis and are computationally expensive, and second, they neglect the role played by bone-embedded osteocytes. To address these issues, we developed a novel model of spatial remodeling based on the principles of evolutionary game theory. The analytically tractable framework describes the spatial interactions between zones of bone resorption, bone formation and quiescent bone, and explicitly accounts for regulation of remodeling by bone-embedded, mechanotransducing osteocytes. Using tools from the theory of interacting particle systems we systematically classified the different dynamic regimes of the spatial model and identified regions of parameter space that allow for global coexistence of resorption, formation and quiescence, as observed in physiological remodeling. In coexistence scenarios, three-dimensional simulations revealed the emergence of sponge-like bone clusters. Comparison between spatial and non-spatial dynamics revealed substantial differences and suggested a stabilizing role of space. Our findings emphasize the importance of accounting for spatial structure and bone-embedded osteocytes when modeling the process of bone remodeling. Thanks to the lattice-based framework, the proposed model can easily be coupled to a mechanical model of bone loading.

  16. Niflumic Acid Attenuated Pulmonary Artery Tone and Vascular Structural Remodeling of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Induced by High Pulmonary Blood Flow In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Ma, Jianfa; Pang, Yusheng; Lao, Jinquan; Pan, Xuanren; Tang, Qiaoyun; Zhang, Feng; Su, Danyan; Qin, Suyuan; Shrestha, Arnav Prasad

    2015-10-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) play a vital role in regulating pulmonary artery tone during pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induced by high blood flow. The role of CaCCs inhibitor niflumic acid (NFA) in vivo during this process requires further investigation. We established the PAH model by abdominal shunt surgery and treated with NFA in vivo. Fifty rats were randomly divided into normal, sham, shunt, NFA group 1 (0.2 mg/kg), and NFA group 2 (0.4 mg/kg). Pathological changes, right ventricle hypertrophy index, arterial wall area/vessel area, and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter were analyzed. Then contraction reactions of pulmonary arteries were measured. Finally, the electrophysiological characteristics of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells were investigated using patch-clamp technology. After 11 weeks of shunting, PAH developed, accompanied with increased right ventricle hypertrophy index, arterial wall area/vessel area, and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter. In the NFA treatment groups, the pressure and pathological changes were alleviated. The pulmonary artery tone in the shunt group increased, whereas it decreased after NFA treatment. The current density of CaCC was higher in the shunt group, and it was decreased in the NFA treatment groups. In conclusion, NFA attenuated pulmonary artery tone and structural remodeling in PAH induced by high pulmonary blood flow in vivo. CaCCs were involved and the augmented current density was alleviated by NFA treatment.

  17. Repurposing doxycycline for synucleinopathies: remodelling of α-synuclein oligomers towards non-toxic parallel beta-sheet structured species

    PubMed Central

    González-Lizárraga, Florencia; Socías, Sergio B.; Ávila, César L.; Torres-Bugeau, Clarisa M.; Barbosa, Leandro R. S.; Binolfi, Andres; Sepúlveda-Díaz, Julia E.; Del-Bel, Elaine; Fernandez, Claudio O.; Papy-Garcia, Dulce; Itri, Rosangela; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Chehín, Rosana N.

    2017-01-01

    Synucleinophaties are progressive neurodegenerative disorders with no cure to date. An attractive strategy to tackle this problem is repurposing already tested safe drugs against novel targets. In this way, doxycycline prevents neurodegeneration in Parkinson models by modulating neuroinflammation. However, anti-inflammatory therapy per se is insufficient to account for neuroprotection. Herein we characterise novel targets of doxycycline describing the structural background supporting its effectiveness as a neuroprotector at subantibiotic doses. Our results show that doxycycline reshapes α-synuclein oligomers into off-pathway, high-molecular-weight species that do not evolve into fibrils. Off-pathway species present less hydrophobic surface than on-pathway oligomers and display different β-sheet structural arrangement. These structural changes affect the α-synuclein ability to destabilize biological membranes, cell viability, and formation of additional toxic species. Altogether, these mechanisms could act synergically giving novel targets for repurposing this drug. PMID:28155912

  18. Repurposing doxycycline for synucleinopathies: remodelling of α-synuclein oligomers towards non-toxic parallel beta-sheet structured species.

    PubMed

    González-Lizárraga, Florencia; Socías, Sergio B; Ávila, César L; Torres-Bugeau, Clarisa M; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Binolfi, Andres; Sepúlveda-Díaz, Julia E; Del-Bel, Elaine; Fernandez, Claudio O; Papy-Garcia, Dulce; Itri, Rosangela; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Chehín, Rosana N

    2017-02-03

    Synucleinophaties are progressive neurodegenerative disorders with no cure to date. An attractive strategy to tackle this problem is repurposing already tested safe drugs against novel targets. In this way, doxycycline prevents neurodegeneration in Parkinson models by modulating neuroinflammation. However, anti-inflammatory therapy per se is insufficient to account for neuroprotection. Herein we characterise novel targets of doxycycline describing the structural background supporting its effectiveness as a neuroprotector at subantibiotic doses. Our results show that doxycycline reshapes α-synuclein oligomers into off-pathway, high-molecular-weight species that do not evolve into fibrils. Off-pathway species present less hydrophobic surface than on-pathway oligomers and display different β-sheet structural arrangement. These structural changes affect the α-synuclein ability to destabilize biological membranes, cell viability, and formation of additional toxic species. Altogether, these mechanisms could act synergically giving novel targets for repurposing this drug.

  19. Neural remodeling in retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert E; Jones, Bryan W; Watt, Carl B; Strettoi, Enrica

    2003-09-01

    Mammalian retinal degenerations initiated by gene defects in rods, cones or the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) often trigger loss of the sensory retina, effectively leaving the neural retina deafferented. The neural retina responds to this challenge by remodeling, first by subtle changes in neuronal structure and later by large-scale reorganization. Retinal degenerations in the mammalian retina generally progress through three phases. Phase 1 initiates with expression of a primary insult, followed by phase 2 photoreceptor death that ablates the sensory retina via initial photoreceptor stress, phenotype deconstruction, irreversible stress and cell death, including bystander effects or loss of trophic support. The loss of cones heralds phase 3: a protracted period of global remodeling of the remnant neural retina. Remodeling resembles the responses of many CNS assemblies to deafferentation or trauma, and includes neuronal cell death, neuronal and glial migration, elaboration of new neurites and synapses, rewiring of retinal circuits, glial hypertrophy and the evolution of a fibrotic glial seal that isolates the remnant neural retina from the surviving RPE and choroid. In early phase 2, stressed photoreceptors sprout anomalous neurites that often reach the inner plexiform and ganglion cell layers. As death of rods and cones progresses, bipolar and horizontal cells are deafferented and retract most of their dendrites. Horizontal cells develop anomalous axonal processes and dendritic stalks that enter the inner plexiform layer. Dendrite truncation in rod bipolar cells is accompanied by revision of their macromolecular phenotype, including the loss of functioning mGluR6 transduction. After ablation of the sensory retina, Müller cells increase intermediate filament synthesis, forming a dense fibrotic layer in the remnant subretinal space. This layer invests the remnant retina and seals it from access via the choroidal route. Evidence of bipolar cell death begins in

  20. Temperature-induced cardiac remodelling in fish

    PubMed Central

    Keen, Adam N.; Klaiman, Jordan M.; Shiels, Holly A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thermal acclimation causes the heart of some fish species to undergo significant remodelling. This includes changes in electrical activity, energy utilization and structural properties at the gross and molecular level of organization. The purpose of this Review is to summarize the current state of knowledge of temperature-induced structural remodelling in the fish ventricle across different levels of biological organization, and to examine how such changes result in the modification of the functional properties of the heart. The structural remodelling response is thought to be responsible for changes in cardiac stiffness, the Ca2+ sensitivity of force generation and the rate of force generation by the heart. Such changes to both active and passive properties help to compensate for the loss of cardiac function caused by a decrease in physiological temperature. Hence, temperature-induced cardiac remodelling is common in fish that remain active following seasonal decreases in temperature. This Review is organized around the ventricular phases of the cardiac cycle – specifically diastolic filling, isovolumic pressure generation and ejection – so that the consequences of remodelling can be fully described. We also compare the thermal acclimation-associated modifications of the fish ventricle with those seen in the mammalian ventricle in response to cardiac pathologies and exercise. Finally, we consider how the plasticity of the fish heart may be relevant to survival in a climate change context, where seasonal temperature changes could become more extreme and variable. PMID:27852752

  1. Chromatin remodelling: the industrial revolution of DNA around histones.

    PubMed

    Saha, Anjanabha; Wittmeyer, Jacqueline; Cairns, Bradley R

    2006-06-01

    Chromatin remodellers are specialized multi-protein machines that enable access to nucleosomal DNA by altering the structure, composition and positioning of nucleosomes. All remodellers have a catalytic ATPase subunit that is similar to known DNA-translocating motor proteins, suggesting DNA translocation as a unifying aspect of their mechanism. Here, we explore the diversity and specialization of chromatin remodellers, discuss how nucleosome modifications regulate remodeller activity and consider a model for the exposure of nucleosomal DNA that involves the use of directional DNA translocation to pump 'DNA waves' around the nucleosome.

  2. The Chd Family of Chromatin Remodelers

    PubMed Central

    Marfella, Concetta G.A.; Imbalzano, Anthony N.

    2007-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling enzymes contribute to the dynamic changes that occur in chromatin structure during cellular processes such as transcription, recombination, repair, and replication. Members of the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (Chd) family of enzymes belong to the SNF2 superfamily of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers. The Chd proteins are distinguished by the presence of two N-terminal chromodomains that function as interaction surfaces for a variety of chromatin components. Genetic, biochemical, and structural studies demonstrate that Chd proteins are important regulators of transcription and play critical roles during developmental processes. Numerous Chd proteins are also implicated in human disease. PMID:17350655

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi infection and benznidazole therapy independently stimulate oxidative status and structural pathological remodeling of the liver tissue in mice.

    PubMed

    Novaes, Rômulo Dias; Santos, Eliziária C; Cupertino, Marli C; Bastos, Daniel S S; Oliveira, Jerusa M; Carvalho, Thaís V; Neves, Mariana M; Oliveira, Leandro L; Talvani, André

    2015-08-01

    This study used a murine model of Chagas disease to investigate the isolated and combined impact of Trypanosoma cruzi infection and benznidazole (BZ) therapy on liver structure and function. Male C57BL/6 mice were challenged with T. cruzi and BZ for 15 days. Serum levels of cytokines and hepatic enzymes, liver oxidative stress, morphology, collagen, and glycogen content were monitored. Separately, T. cruzi infection and BZ treatment resulted in a pro-oxidant status and hepatic reactive damage. Concurrently, both T. cruzi infection and BZ treatment induced upregulation of antioxidant enzymes and pathological reorganization of the liver parenchyma and stroma. T. cruzi infection increased serum levels of Th1 cytokines, which were reduced by BZ in both infected and non-infected animals. BZ also induced functional organ damage, increasing serum levels of liver enzymes. When combined, T. cruzi infection and BZ therapy elicited intense hepatic reactive damage that was not compensated by antioxidant enzymatic reaction, subsequently culminating in more severe morphofunctional hepatic injury. Taken together, these findings indicate that during specific treatment of Chagas disease, hepatic pathology may be a result of an interaction between BZ metabolism and specific mechanisms activated during the natural course of T. cruzi infection, rather than an isolated toxic effect of BZ on liver structure and function.

  4. Defective branched chain amino acid catabolism contributes to cardiac dysfunction and remodeling following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Fuyang; Xia, Yunlong; Zhao, Shihao; Yan, Wenjun; Wang, Helin; Lee, Yan; Li, Congye; Zhang, Ling; Lian, Kun; Gao, Erhe; Cheng, Hexiang; Tao, Ling

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac metabolic remodeling is a central event during heart failure (HF) development following myocardial infarction (MI). It is well known that myocardial glucose and fatty acid dysmetabolism contribute to post-MI cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. However, the role of amino acid metabolism in post-MI HF remains elusive. Branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are an important group of essential amino acids and function as crucial nutrient signaling in mammalian animals. The present study aimed to determine the role of cardiac BCAA metabolism in post-MI HF progression. Utilizing coronary artery ligation-induced murine MI models, we found that myocardial BCAA catabolism was significantly impaired in response to permanent MI, therefore leading to an obvious elevation of myocardial BCAA abundance. In MI-operated mice, oral BCAA administration further increased cardiac BCAA levels, activated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, and exacerbated cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. These data demonstrate that BCAAs act as a direct contributor to post-MI cardiac pathologies. Furthermore, these BCAA-mediated deleterious effects were improved by rapamycin cotreatment, revealing an indispensable role of mTOR in BCAA-mediated adverse effects on cardiac function/structure post-MI. Of note, pharmacological inhibition of branched chain ketoacid dehydrogenase kinase (BDK), a negative regulator of myocardial BCAA catabolism, significantly improved cardiac BCAA catabolic disorders, reduced myocardial BCAA levels, and ameliorated post-MI cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. In conclusion, our data provide the evidence that impaired cardiac BCAA catabolism directly contributes to post-MI cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. Moreover, improving cardiac BCAA catabolic defects may be a promising therapeutic strategy against post-MI HF.

  5. Cardiac hypertrophy and structural and metabolic remodeling related to seasonal dormancy in the first annual cycle in tegu lizards.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Lilian Cristina; do Nascimento, Lucas Francisco R; Colquhoun, Alison; Abe, Augusto S; de Souza, Silvia Cristina R

    2013-07-01

    Morpho-functional adjustments in the heart of juvenile tegu lizards (Tupinambis merianae) were analyzed at distinct seasonal periods to investigate how the demands of growth and of energy saving are reconciled during the first annual cycle. The relative ventricular mass (Mv) was 31% and 69% larger in late autumn and winter dormancy, respectively, compared to early autumn. This effect did not persist during unfed arousal, suggesting that protein accumulates in the heart during hypometabolism and is degraded on arousal. Both the hypertrophy and the atrophy were disproportionate in the largest individuals. In contrast, Mv was smaller in lizards that were starved during spring activity compared to fed lizards, this effect being larger in smaller individuals. In late autumn and winter dormancy the spongy myocardium had 8% of the section area covered by lacunary spaces, which expanded after food intake during arousal and reached 29% in spring activity together with higher density of cardiomyocytes. Total and soluble proteins per mass unity were unchanged, and maximum activities of selected enzymes suggest sustained glycolytic and aerobic capacities during hypometabolism. Results indicate that important structural adjustments occur in the heart in anticipation of dormancy, and that the protein balance in the tissue is maintained at winter temperatures ~17°C.

  6. Remodeling the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baule, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses items that need to be considered when remodeling a school media center. Highlights include space and location for various functions, including projections of print versus electronic media; electrical and data wiring needs; lighting; security and supervision; and reuse of existing furniture and equipment. (LRW)

  7. Prediction of Left Ventricular Remodeling after a Myocardial Infarction: Role of Myocardial Deformation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huttin, Olivier; Coiro, Stefano; Selton-Suty, Christine; Juillière, Yves; Donal, Erwan; Magne, Julien; Sadoul, Nicolas; Zannad, Faiez; Rossignol, Patrick; Girerd, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Aims Left ventricular (LV) adverse or reverse remodeling after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI) is the best outcome to assess the benefit of revascularization. Speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) may accurately identify early deformation impairment, while also being predictive of LV remodeling during follow-up. This systematic analysis aimed to provide a comprehensive review of current findings on STE as a predictor of LV remodeling after MI. Methods PubMed databases were searched through December 2014 to identify studies in adults targeting the association between LV remodeling and STE. Meta-regression was performed for longitudinal analysis. Results A total of 23 prospective studies (3066 patients) were found eligible. Eleven studies reported an association between STE and adverse remodeling and twelve studies with reverse remodeling. Using peak systolic longitudinal strain, the most accurate cut-off to predict adverse remodeling and reverse remodeling ranged from -12.8% to -10.2% and from -13.7% to -9.5%, respectively. In smaller studies, assessment of circumferential strain and torsion showed additive value in predicting remodeling. Meta-regression analysis revealed that longitudinal STE was associated with adverse remodeling (pooled univariable OR = 1.27, 1.17–1.38, p<0.001; pooled multivariable OR = 1.38, 1.13–1.70, p = 0.002) while pooled ORs of longitudinal STE only tended to predict reverse remodeling (pooled OR = 0.75, 0.54–1.06, p = 0.09). Conclusions This systematic review suggests that STE is associated with changes in LV volume or function regardless of underlying mechanisms and deformation direction. Meta-regression demonstrates a strong association between peak longitudinal systolic strain and adverse remodeling. Added STE predictive value over other clinical, biological and imaging variables remains to be proven. PMID:28036335

  8. Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Rory B; Baggish, Aaron L

    2012-01-01

    Early investigations in the late 1890s and early 1900s documented cardiac enlargement in athletes with above-normal exercise capacity and no evidence of cardiovascular disease. Such findings have been reported for more than a century and continue to intrigue scientists and clinicians. It is well recognized that repetitive participation in vigorous physical exercise results in significant changes in myocardial structure and function. This process, termed exercise-induced cardiac remodeling (EICR), is characterized by structural cardiac changes including left ventricular hypertrophy with sport-specific geometry (eccentric vs concentric). Associated alterations in both systolic and diastolic functions are emerging as recognized components of EICR. The increasing popularity of recreational exercise and competitive athletics has led to a growing number of individuals exhibiting these findings in routine clinical practice. This review will provide an overview of EICR in athletes.

  9. Zika Virus Induced Cellular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Rossignol, Evan D; Peters, Kristen N; Connor, John H; Bullitt, Esther

    2017-03-20

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has been associated with morbidities such as Guillain-Barré, infant microcephaly, and ocular disease. The spread of this positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus and its growing public health threat underscore gaps in our understanding of basic ZIKV virology. To advance knowledge of the virus replication cycle within mammalian cells, we use serial section three-dimensional electron tomography to demonstrate the widespread remodeling of intracellular membranes upon infection with ZIKV. We report extensive structural rearrangements of the endoplasmic reticulum and reveal stages of the ZIKV viral replication cycle. Structures associated with RNA genome replication and virus assembly are observed integrated within the endoplasmic reticulum, and we show viruses in transit through the Golgi apparatus for viral maturation, and subsequent cellular egress. This study characterizes in detail the three-dimensional ultrastructural organization of the ZIKV replication cycle stages. Our results show close adherence of the ZIKV replication cycle to the existing flavivirus replication paradigm.

  10. Role of Arginase in Vessel Wall Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Durante, William

    2013-01-01

    Arginase metabolizes the semi-essential amino acid l-arginine to l-ornithine and urea. There are two distinct isoforms of arginase, arginase I and II, which are encoded by separate genes and display differences in tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and molecular regulation. Blood vessels express both arginase I and II but their distribution appears to be cell-, vessel-, and species-specific. Both isoforms of arginase are induced by numerous pathologic stimuli and contribute to vascular cell dysfunction and vessel wall remodeling in several diseases. Clinical and experimental studies have documented increases in the expression and/or activity of arginase I or II in blood vessels following arterial injury and in pulmonary and arterial hypertension, aging, and atherosclerosis. Significantly, pharmacological inhibition or genetic ablation of arginase in animals ameliorates abnormalities in vascular cells and normalizes blood vessel architecture and function in all of these pathological states. The detrimental effect of arginase in vascular remodeling is attributable to its ability to stimulate vascular smooth muscle cell and endothelial cell proliferation, and collagen deposition by promoting the synthesis of polyamines and l-proline, respectively. In addition, arginase adversely impacts arterial remodeling by directing macrophages toward an inflammatory phenotype. Moreover, the proliferative, fibrotic, and inflammatory actions of arginase in the vasculature are further amplified by its capacity to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) synthesis by competing with NO synthase for substrate, l-arginine. Pharmacologic or molecular approaches targeting specific isoforms of arginase represent a promising strategy in treating obstructive fibroproliferative vascular disease. PMID:23717309

  11. Revealing remodeler function: Varied and unique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastlund, Allen

    Chromatin remodelers perform a necessary and required function for the successful expression of our genetic code. By modifying, shifting, or ejecting nucleosomes from the chromatin structure they allow access to the underlying DNA to the rest of the cell's machinery. This research has focused on two major remodeler motors from major families of chromatin remodelers: the trimeric motor domain of RSC and the motor domain of the ISWI family, ISWI. Using primarily stopped-flow spectrofluorometry, I have categorized the time-dependent motions of these motor domains along their preferred substrate, double-stranded DNA. Combined with collected ATP utilization data, I present the subsequent analysis and associated conclusions that stem from the underlying assumptions and models. Interestingly, there is little in common between the investigated proteins aside from their favored medium. While RSC exhibits modest translocation characteristics and highly effective motion with the ability for large molecular forces, ISWI is not only structurally different but highly inefficient in its motion leading to difficulties in determining its specific translocation mechanics. While chromatin remodeling is a ubiquitous facet of eukaryotic life, there remains much to be understood about their general mechanisms.

  12. Chromatin Remodeling and Plant Immunity.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Zhu, Q; Liu, Y; Zhang, Q

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling, an important facet of the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, is performed by two major types of multisubunit complexes, covalent histone- or DNA-modifying complexes, and ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling complexes. Snf2 family DNA-dependent ATPases constitute the catalytic subunits of ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling complexes, which accounts for energy supply during chromatin remodeling. Increasing evidence indicates a critical role of chromatin remodeling in the establishment of long-lasting, even transgenerational immune memory in plants, which is supported by the findings that DNA methylation, histone deacetylation, and histone methylation can prime the promoters of immune-related genes required for disease defense. So what are the links between Snf2-mediated ATP-dependent chromosome remodeling and plant immunity, and what mechanisms might support its involvement in disease resistance?

  13. Cardioprotective effects of lysyl oxidase inhibition against volume overload-induced extracellular matrix remodeling.

    PubMed

    El Hajj, Elia C; El Hajj, Milad C; Ninh, Van K; Gardner, Jason D

    2016-03-01

    A hallmark of heart failure (HF) is adverse extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, which is regulated by the collagen cross-linking enzyme, lysyl oxidase (LOX). In this study, we evaluate the efficacy of LOX inhibition to prevent adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling and dysfunction using an experimental model of HF. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to surgically induced volume overload (VO) by creation of aortocaval fistula (ACF). A LOX inhibitor, beta-aminopropionitrile (BAPN; 100 mg/kg/day), was administered to rats with ACF or sham surgery at eight weeks postsurgery. Echocardiography was used to assess progressive alterations in cardiac ventricular structure and function. Left ventricular (LV) catheterization was used to assess alterations in contractility, stiffness, LV pressure and volume, and other indices of cardiac function. The LV ECM alterations were assessed by: (a) histological staining of collagen, (b) protein expression of collagen types I and III, (c) hydroxyproline assay, and (d) cross-linking assay. LOX inhibition attenuated VO-induced increases in cardiac stress, and attenuated increases in interstitial myocardial collagen, total collagen, and protein levels of collagens I and III. Both echocardiography and catheterization measurements indicated improved cardiac function post-VO in BAPN treated rats vs. untreated. Inhibition of LOX attenuated VO-induced decreases in LV stiffness and cardiac function. Overall, our data indicate that LOX inhibition was cardioprotective in the volume overloaded heart.

  14. Remodeling with the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Bodzin, S.

    1997-05-01

    Remodeling is the perfect time to improve daylighting, direct gain heating and shading with passive solar techniques. It can also provide the best opportunity to add solar water heating or even photoboltaics to a home. This article describes addition of such energy efficient plans to a home in terms of what is needed and what the benefits are: adding windows, North glass, east and west glass, south glass, daylighting, the roof, shingles and roofing tiles, walls and floors, solar hot water, photovoltaics. Two side bars discuss the sunplace: a passive solar room and angles and overhangs.

  15. Nonenzymatic biomimetic remodeling of phospholipids in synthetic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Brea, Roberto J; Rudd, Andrew K; Devaraj, Neal K

    2016-08-02

    Cell membranes have a vast repertoire of phospholipid species whose structures can be dynamically modified by enzymatic remodeling of acyl chains and polar head groups. Lipid remodeling plays important roles in membrane biology and dysregulation can lead to disease. Although there have been tremendous advances in creating artificial membranes to model the properties of native membranes, a major obstacle has been developing straightforward methods to mimic lipid membrane remodeling. Stable liposomes are typically kinetically trapped and are not prone to exchanging diacylphospholipids. Here, we show that reversible chemoselective reactions can be harnessed to achieve nonenzymatic spontaneous remodeling of phospholipids in synthetic membranes. Our approach relies on transthioesterification/acyl shift reactions that occur spontaneously and reversibly between tertiary amides and thioesters. We demonstrate exchange and remodeling of both lipid acyl chains and head groups. Using our synthetic model system we demonstrate the ability of spontaneous phospholipid remodeling to trigger changes in vesicle spatial organization, composition, and morphology as well as recruit proteins that can affect vesicle curvature. Membranes capable of chemically exchanging lipid fragments could be used to help further understand the specific roles of lipid structure remodeling in biological membranes.

  16. Anti-remodeling effects of rapamycin in experimental heart failure: dose response and interaction with angiotensin receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Bishu, Kalkidan; Ogut, Ozgur; Kushwaha, Sudhir; Mohammed, Selma F; Ohtani, Tomohito; Xu, Xiaolei; Brozovich, Frank V; Redfield, Margaret M

    2013-01-01

    While neurohumoral antagonists improve outcomes in heart failure (HF), cardiac remodeling and dysfunction progress and outcomes remain poor. Therapies superior or additive to standard HF therapy are needed. Pharmacologic mTOR inhibition by rapamycin attenuated adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in experimental heart failure (HF). However, these studies used rapamycin doses that produced blood drug levels targeted for primary immunosuppression in human transplantation and therefore the immunosuppressive effects may limit clinical translation. Further, the relative or incremental effect of rapamycin combined with standard HF therapies targeting upstream regulators of cardiac remodeling (neurohumoral antagonists) has not been defined. Our objectives were to determine if anti-remodeling effects of rapamycin were preserved at lower doses and whether rapamycin effects were similar or additive to a standard HF therapy (angiotensin receptor blocker (losartan)). Experimental murine HF was produced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). At three weeks post-TAC, male mice with established HF were treated with placebo, rapamycin at a dose producing immunosuppressive drug levels (target dose), low dose (50% target dose) rapamycin, losartan or rapamycin + losartan for six weeks. Cardiac structure and function (echocardiography, catheterization, pathology, hypertrophic and fibrotic gene expression profiles) were assessed. Downstream mTOR signaling pathways regulating protein synthesis (S6K1 and S6) and autophagy (LC3B-II) were characterized. TAC-HF mice displayed eccentric hypertrophy, systolic dysfunction and pulmonary congestion. These perturbations were attenuated to a similar degree by oral rapamycin doses achieving target (13.3±2.1 ng/dL) or low (6.7±2.5 ng/dL) blood levels. Rapamycin treatment decreased mTOR mediated regulators of protein synthesis and increased mTOR mediated regulators of autophagy. Losartan monotherapy did not attenuate remodeling, whereas

  17. Tissue remodelling in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Lars; Ruppert, Clemens; Ochs, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Many lung diseases result in fibrotic remodelling. Fibrotic lung disorders can be divided into diseases with known and unknown aetiology. Among those with unknown aetiology, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a common diagnosis. Because of its progressive character leading to a rapid decline in lung function, it is a fatal disease with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Thus, IPF has motivated many studies in the last few decades in order to increase our mechanistic understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. The current concept suggests an ongoing injury of the alveolar epithelium, an impaired regeneration capacity, alveolar collapse and, finally, a fibroproliferative response. The origin of lung injury remains elusive but a diversity of factors, which will be discussed in this article, has been shown to be associated with IPF. Alveolar epithelial type II (AE2) cells play a key role in lung fibrosis and their crucial role for epithelial regeneration, stabilisation of alveoli and interaction with fibroblasts, all known to be responsible for collagen deposition, will be illustrated. Whereas mechanisms of collagen deposition and fibroproliferation are the focus of many studies in the field, the awareness of other mechanisms in this disease is currently limited to biochemical and imaging studies including quantitative assessments of lung structure in IPF and animal models assigning alveolar collapse and collapse induration crucial roles for the degradation of the lung resulting in de-aeration and loss of surface area. Dysfunctional AE2 cells, instable alveoli and mechanical stress trigger remodelling that consists of collapsed alveoli absorbed by fibrotic tissue (i.e., collapse induration).

  18. To Remodel or To Build?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, Todd

    2009-01-01

    The question of remodeling an existing house to make it wheelchair accessible or building a new barrier-free house is a difficult decision. This article presents some initial questions and considerations followed by a list of pros and cons for remodeling an existing house vs. building a new house.

  19. No-Regrets Remodeling, 2nd Edition

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-01

    No-Regrets Remodeling, sponsored by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is an informative publication that walks homeowners and/or remodelers through various home remodeling projects. In addition to remodeling information, the publication provides instruction on how to incorporate energy efficiency into the remodeling process. The goal of the publication is to improve homeowner satisfaction after completing a remodeling project and to provide the homeowner with a home that saves energy and is comfortable and healthy.

  20. Remodeling of endogenous mammary epithelium by breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Parashurama, Natesh; Lobo, Neethan A; Ito, Ken; Mosley, Adriane R; Habte, Frezghi G; Zabala, Maider; Smith, Bryan R; Lam, Jessica; Weissman, Irving L; Clarke, Michael F; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2012-10-01

    Poorly regulated tissue remodeling results in increased breast cancer risk, yet how breast cancer stem cells (CSC) participate in remodeling is unknown. We performed in vivo imaging of changes in fluorescent, endogenous duct architecture as a metric for remodeling. First, we quantitatively imaged physiologic remodeling of primary branches of the developing and regenerating mammary tree. To assess CSC-specific remodeling events, we isolated CSC from MMTV-Wnt1 (mouse mammary tumor virus long-term repeat enhancer driving Wnt1 oncogene) breast tumors, a well studied model in which tissue remodeling affects tumorigenesis. We confirm that CSC drive tumorigenesis, suggesting a link between CSC and remodeling. We find that normal, regenerating, and developing gland maintain a specific branching pattern. In contrast, transplantation of CSC results in changes in the branching patterns of endogenous ducts while non-CSC do not. Specifically, in the presence of CSC, we identified an increased number of branches, branch points, ducts which have greater than 40 branches (5/33 for CSC and 0/39 for non-CSC), and histological evidence of increased branching. Moreover, we demonstrate that only CSC implants invade into surrounding stroma with structures similar to developing mammary ducts (nine for CSC and one for non-CSC). Overall, we demonstrate a novel approach for imaging physiologic and pathological remodeling. Furthermore, we identify unique, CSC-specific, remodeling events. Our data suggest that CSC interact with the microenvironment differently than non-CSC, and that this could eventually be a therapeutic approach for targeting CSC.

  1. HCM-Linked Δ 160E Cardiac Troponin T Mutation Causes Unique Progressive Structural and Molecular Ventricular Remodeling in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Rachel K.; Grinspan, Lauren Tal; Jimenez, Jesus; Guinto, Pia J.; Ertz-Berger, Briar; Tardiff, Jil C.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a primary disease of cardiac muscle, and one of the most common causes of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in young people. Many mutations in cardiac troponin T (cTnT) lead to a complex form of HCM with varying degrees of ventricular hypertrophy and ~65% of all cTnT mutations occur within or flanking the elongated N-terminal TNT1 domain. Biophysical studies have predicted that distal TNT1 mutations, including Δ160E, cause disease by a novel, yet unknown mechanism as compared to N-terminal mutations. To begin to address the specific effects of this commonly observed cTnT mutation we generated two independent transgenic mouse lines carrying variant doses of the mutant transgene. Hearts from the 30% and 70% cTnT Δ160E lines demonstrated a highly unique, dose-dependent disruption in cellular and sarcomeric architecture and a highly progressive pattern of ventricular remodeling. While adult ventricular myocytes isolated from Δ160E transgenic mice exhibited dosage-independent mechanical impairments, decreased sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium load and SERCA2a calcium uptake activity, the observed decreases in calcium transients were dosage-dependent. The latter findings were concordant with measures of calcium regulatory proteins abundance and phosphorylation state. Finally, studies of whole heart physiology in the isovolumic mode demonstrated dose-dependent differences in the degree of cardiac dysfuction. We conclude that the observed clinical severity of the cTnT Δ160E mutation is caused by a combination of direct sarcomeric disruption coupled to a profound disregulation of Ca2+ homeostasis at the cellular level that results in a unique and highly progressive pattern of ventricular remodeling. PMID:23434821

  2. The adverse effects of reduced cerebral perfusion on cognition and brain structure in older adults with cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L; Gunstad, John; Jerskey, Beth A; Xu, Xiaomeng; Clark, Uraina S; Hassenstab, Jason; Cote, Denise M; Walsh, Edward G; Labbe, Donald R; Hoge, Richard; Cohen, Ronald A; Sweet, Lawrence H

    2013-01-01

    Background It is well established that aging and vascular processes interact to disrupt cerebral hemodynamics in older adults. However, the independent effects of cerebral perfusion on neurocognitive function among older adults remain poorly understood. We examined the associations among cerebral perfusion, cognitive function, and brain structure in older adults with varying degrees of vascular disease using perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) arterial spin labeling (ASL). Materials and methods 52 older adults underwent neuroimaging and were administered the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), and measures of attention/executive function. ASL and T1-weighted MRI were used to quantify total brain perfusion, total brain volume (TBV), and cortical thickness. Results Regression analyses showed reduced total brain perfusion was associated with poorer performance on the MMSE, RBANS total index, immediate and delayed memory composites, and Trail Making Test B. Reduced frontal lobe perfusion was associated with worse executive and memory function. A similar pattern emerged between temporal lobe perfusion and immediate memory. Regression analyses revealed that decreased total brain perfusion was associated with smaller TBV and mean cortical thickness. Regional effects of reduced total cerebral perfusion were found on temporal and parietal lobe volumes and frontal and temporal cortical thickness. Discussion Reduced cerebral perfusion is independently associated with poorer cognition, smaller TBV, and reduced cortical thickness in older adults. Conclusion Prospective studies are needed to clarify patterns of cognitive decline and brain atrophy associated with cerebral hypoperfusion. PMID:24363966

  3. Balancing chromatin remodeling and histone modifications in transcription

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Emily; Pillus, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin remodelers use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to reposition or evict nucleosomes or to replace canonical histones with histone variants. By regulating nucleosome dynamics, remodelers gate access to the underlying DNA for replication, repair, and transcription. Nucleosomes are subject to extensive post-translational modifications that can recruit regulatory proteins or alter the local chromatin structure. Just as extensive cross-talk has been observed between different histone post-translational modifications, there is growing evidence for both coordinated and antagonistic functional relationships between nucleosome remodeling and modifying machineries. Defining the combined functions of the complexes that alter nucleosome interactions, position, and stability is key to understanding processes that require access to DNA, particularly with growing appreciation of their contributions to human health and disease. Here, we highlight recent advances in the interactions between histone modifications and the ISWI and CHD1 chromatin remodelers from studies in budding yeast, fission yeast, flies, and mammalian cells, with a focus on yeast. PMID:23870137

  4. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  5. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY VASCULAR REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Sharma, Shruti; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is a complex multifactorial process that involves the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This remodeling process encompasses concentric medial thickening of small arterioles, neomuscularization of previously nonmuscular capillary-like vessels, and structural wall changes in larger pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arterial muscularization is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In addition, in uncontrolled pulmonary hypertension, the clonal expansion of apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells leads to the formation of plexiform lesions. Based upon a large number of studies in animal models, the three major stimuli that drive the vascular remodeling process are inflammation, shear stress and hypoxia. Although, the precise mechanisms by which these stimuli impair pulmonary vascular function and structure are unknown, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage appears to play an important role. ROS are highly reactive due to their unpaired valence shell electron. Oxidative damage occurs when the production of ROS exceeds the quenching capacity of the anti-oxidant mechanisms of the cell. ROS can be produced from complexes in the cell membrane (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), cellular organelles (peroxisomes and mitochondria), and in the cytoplasm (xanthine oxidase). Furthermore, low levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-arginine the rate limiting co-factor and substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), can cause the uncoupling of eNOS, resulting in decreased NO production and increased ROS production. This review will focus on the ROS generation systems, scavenger antioxidants, and oxidative stress associated alterations in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23897679

  6. Scar prevention and remodeling: a review of the medical, surgical, topical and light treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, Leonard Y; El Tal, Abdel Kader; Stiff, Mark A; Fakhouri, Tarek M

    2014-08-01

    Cosmetic, functional, and structural sequelae of scarring are innumerable, and measures exist to optimize and ultimately minimize these sequelae. To evaluate the innumerable methods available to decrease the cosmetic, functional, and structural repercussions of scarring, pubMed search of the English literature with key words scar, scar revision, scar prevention, scar treatment, scar remodeling, cicatrix, cicatrix treatment, and cicatrix remodeling was done. Original articles and reviews were examined and included. Seventy-nine manuscripts were reviewed. Techniques, comparisons, and results were reviewed and tabulated. Overall, though topical modalities are easier to use and are usually more attractive to the patient, the surgical approaches still prove to be superior and more reliable. However, advances in topical medications for scar modification are on the rise and a change towards medical treatment of scars may emerge as the next best approach. Comparison studies of the innumerable specific modalities for scar revision and prevention are impossible. Standardization of techniques is lacking. Scarring, the body's natural response to a wound, can create many adverse effects. At this point, the practice of sound, surgical fundamentals still trump the most advanced preventative methods and revision techniques. Advances in medical approaches are available, however, to assist the scarring process, which even the most advanced surgical fundamentals will ultimately lead to. Whether through newer topical therapies, light treatment, or classical surgical intervention, our treatment armamentarium of scars has expanded and will allow us to maximize scar prevention and to minimize scar morbidity.

  7. Relationship between self-reported residential indoor remodeling and semen quality: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Miao, Mao-Hua; Li, Zheng; Li, De-Kun; Yan, Bei; Liang, Hong; Zhi, Er-Lei; Du, Hong-Wei; Yuan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the association between residential indoor remodeling and poor semen quality. Sperm donors aged 18-45 years old were recruited in Shanghai, China. Semen specimens were collected and analyzed. An in-person interview was conducted to obtain information on the history of indoor remodeling and potential confounders. A total of 70 participants with abnormal semen quality (case group) and 68 controls were examined. A total of 20 subjects reported indoor remodeling in the recent 24 months, and among them 17 subjects reported indoor remodeling in the recent 12 months. Compared with participants with no history of indoor remodeling, participants with a history of indoor remodeling in the recent 24 months were more than three times as likely to have poor sperm quality (adjusted odds ratio = 3.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.3-12.0) after controlling for potential confounders. The association was strengthened when the analysis was restricted to those who had indoor remodeling in the recent 12 months. Our findings provide preliminary evidence that indoor remodeling has an adverse effect on semen quality.

  8. Association of left atrial reservoir function with left atrial structural remodeling related to left ventricular dysfunction in asymptomatic patients with hypertension: evaluation by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Hirokazu; Oishi, Yoshifumi; Mizuguchi, Yukio; Iuchi, Arata; Nagase, Norio; Ara, Nusrat; Oki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Left atrial (LA) structural and functional abnormalities are vital steps on the pathway toward heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in asymptomatic patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of LA function, particularly reservoir function, with LA structural remodeling related to the left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in asymptomatic patients with hypertension (HT) using conventional, tissue Doppler, and 2-D speckle-tracking echocardiography. Fifty age-matched healthy individuals and 140 patients with HT, including 75 with LA volume index (LAVI)<29 ml/m2 (normal LA group) and 65 with LAVI≥29 ml/m2 (large LA group), were enrolled. We defined peak early diastolic transmitral flow velocity/peak early diastolic mitral annular motion velocity (E/e')/peak systolic LA strain (S-LAs) as LA diastolic stiffness. The LV mass index, relative LV wall thickness, peak atrial systolic transmitral flow velocity, LA total, active, and passive emptying volume indexes, and E/e'/S-LAs were greatest, and S-LAs, peak early diastolic LA strain, peak systolic LV longitudinal strain and circumferential strain rate, and peak early diastolic LV radial strain rate were lower in the large LA group compared with control and/or normal LA group. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that aging, LA remodeling, and LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction are defined as strong predictors related to increased LA diastolic stiffness in the large LA group. HT alters LA dynamics significantly, with resultant increased LA volume and diastolic stiffness related to LV diastolic and systolic dysfunction, even in asymptomatic patients. Earlier treatment with renin–angiotensin system inhibitors may improve abnormal LA-LV interaction in this patient population.

  9. Ventricular remodeling in global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Anversa, P; Zhang, X; Li, P; Olivetti, G; Cheng, W; Reiss, K; Sonnenblick, E H; Kajstura, J

    1995-06-01

    To determine the effects of chronic constriction of the left coronary artery on the function and structure of the heart, coronary artery narrowing was surgically induced in rats and ventricular pump performance, extent and distribution of myocardial damage, and the hypertrophic and hyperplastic response of myocytes were examined. Alterations in cardiac hemodynamics were found in all rats, but the characteristics of the physiological properties of the heart allowed a separation of the animals into two groups which exhibited left ventricular dysfunction and failure, respectively. Left ventricular hypertrophy occurred in both groups and was characterized by ventricular dilatation and wall thinning which were more severe in the failing animals. Multiple foci of myocardial damage across the wall were seen in all animals but tissue injury was more prominent in the endomyocardium and in failing rats. The anatomical and hemodynamic changes resulted in a significant increase in diastolic wall stress which paralleled the depression in ventricular performance. Myocyte cell loss and myocyte cellular hypertrophy were more severe with ventricular failure than with dysfunction. Finally, diastolic overload appeared to be coupled with activation of the DNA synthetic machinery of myocytes and nuclear mitotic division. In conclusion, a fixed lesion of the left coronary artery leads to abnormalities in cardiac dynamics with marked increases in diastolic wall stress and extensive ventricular remodeling in spite of compensatory myocyte cellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia in the remaining viable tissue.

  10. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes.

    PubMed

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-02-19

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1-2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome.

  11. Retinal remodeling triggered by photoreceptor degenerations.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryan W; Watt, Carl B; Frederick, Jeanne M; Baehr, Wolfgang; Chen, Ching-Kang; Levine, Edward M; Milam, Ann H; Lavail, Matthew M; Marc, Robert E

    2003-09-08

    Many photoreceptor degenerations initially affect rods, secondarily leading to cone death. It has long been assumed that the surviving neural retina is largely resistant to this sensory deafferentation. New evidence from fast retinal degenerations reveals that subtle plasticities in neuronal form and connectivity emerge early in disease. By screening mature natural, transgenic, and knockout retinal degeneration models with computational molecular phenotyping, we have found an extended late phase of negative remodeling that radically changes retinal structure. Three major transformations emerge: 1) Müller cell hypertrophy and elaboration of a distal glial seal between retina and the choroid/retinal pigmented epithelium; 2) apparent neuronal migration along glial surfaces to ectopic sites; and 3) rewiring through evolution of complex neurite fascicles, new synaptic foci in the remnant inner nuclear layer, and new connections throughout the retina. Although some neurons die, survivors express molecular signatures characteristic of normal bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells. Remodeling in human and rodent retinas is independent of the initial molecular targets of retinal degenerations, including defects in the retinal pigmented epithelium, rhodopsin, or downstream phototransduction elements. Although remodeling may constrain therapeutic intervals for molecular, cellular, or bionic rescue, it suggests that the neural retina may be more plastic than previously believed.

  12. Cytokines profile in hypertensive patients with left ventricular remodeling and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Haddad, Francois; Knez, Judita; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Sung, Janine; Cauwenberghs, Nicholas; Thijs, Lutgarde; Karakikes, Ioannis; Maecker, Holden; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Wu, Joseph C; Staessen, Jan A

    2015-12-01

    There is strong evidence that inflammatory mediators play a key role in the progression to heart failure in patients with systemic hypertension (HTN). The present study aimed to identify a set of cytokines that are associated with early left ventricular (LV) remodeling and dysfunction as captured by echocardiography in patients with HTN in a cross-sectional case-control study nested within the FLEMish study on ENvironment, Genes and Health Outcome. We identified three groups of participants from the cohort: normotensive subjects (normotension; n = 30), HTN with normal LV structure and function (HTN [LV-]; n = 30), and HTN with evidence of adverse LV remodeling (HTN [LV+]; n = 50). We measured cytokines using a 63-plex Luminex platform. Using partial least squares-discriminant analysis, we constructed three latent variables from the measured cytokines that explained 35%-45% of the variance between groups. We identified five common cytokines (interleukin 18, monokine induced by gamma interferon, hepatocyte growth factor, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78, and vascular endothelial growth factor D) with a stable signal which had a major impact on the construction of the latent variables. Among these cytokines, after adjustment for confounders, interleukin 18 remained significantly different between HTN participants with and without LV involvement (P = .02). Moreover, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and leptin showed a consistent upward trend in all HTN patients compared with normotensive subjects. In conclusion, in HTN patients with LV remodeling or/and dysfunction, we identified a set of cytokines strongly associated with LV maladaptation. We also found a distinct profile of inflammatory biomarkers that characterize HTN.

  13. Rat Heterotopic Heart Transplantation Model to Investigate Unloading-Induced Myocardial Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xuebin; Segiser, Adrian; Carrel, Thierry P.; Tevaearai Stahel, Hendrik T.; Most, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    Unloading of the failing left ventricle in order to achieve myocardial reverse remodeling and improvement of contractile function has been developed as a strategy with the increasing frequency of implantation of left ventricular assist devices in clinical practice. But, reverse remodeling remains an elusive target, with high variability and exact mechanisms still largely unclear. The small animal model of heterotopic heart transplantation (hHTX) in rodents has been widely implemented to study the effects of complete and partial unloading on cardiac failing and non-failing tissue to better understand the structural and molecular changes that underlie myocardial recovery. We herein review the current knowledge on the effects of volume unloading the left ventricle via different methods of hHTX in rats, differentiating between changes that contribute to functional recovery and adverse effects observed in unloaded myocardium. We focus on methodological aspects of heterotopic transplantation, which increase the correlation between the animal model and the setting of the failing unloaded human heart. Last, but not least, we describe the late use of sophisticated techniques to acquire data, such as small animal MRI and catheterization, as well as ways to assess unloaded hearts under “reloaded” conditions. While giving regard to certain limitations, heterotopic rat heart transplantation certainly represents the crucial model to mimic unloading-induced changes in the heart and as such the intricacies and challenges deserve highest consideration. Careful translational research will further improve our knowledge of the reverse remodeling process and how to potentiate its effect in order to achieve recovery of contractile function in more patients. PMID:27807535

  14. Overlapping chromatin-remodeling systems collaborate genome wide at dynamic chromatin transitions.

    PubMed

    Morris, Stephanie A; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; John, Sam; Wiench, Malgorzata; Johnson, Thomas A; Schiltz, R Louis; Hager, Gordon L

    2014-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling is an essential process required for the dynamic organization of chromatin structure. Here we describe the genome-wide location and activity of three remodeler proteins with diverse physiological functions in the mouse genome: Brg1, Chd4 and Snf2h. The localization patterns of all three proteins substantially overlap with one another and with regions of accessible chromatin. Furthermore, using inducible mutant variants, we demonstrate that the catalytic activity of these proteins contributes to the remodeling of chromatin genome wide and that each of these remodelers can independently regulate chromatin reorganization at distinct sites. Many regions require the activity of more than one remodeler to regulate accessibility. These findings provide a dynamic view of chromatin organization and highlight the differential contributions of remodelers to chromatin maintenance in higher eukaryotes.

  15. Echocardiographic Predictors for Left Ventricular Remodeling after Acute ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction with Low Risk Group: Speckle Tracking Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyun-Min; Lee, Joo Myung; Cha, Myung-Jin; Yoon, Yeonyee E.; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Kim, Yong-Jin; Sohn, Dae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background We sought to assess echocardiographic predictors of left ventricular (LV) adverse remodeling after successfully reperfused acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). LV remodeling is commonly found in STEMI patients and it may suggest adverse outcome in acute myocardial infarction. We sought to identify whether 2D strain and torsion be independent parameters for prediction of LV adverse remodeling. Methods We investigated 208 patients with low-risk STEMI patients who had follow up echocardiography at 6 or more months. After clinical assessments, all patients received revascularization according to current guideline. LV remodeling was defined as > 20% increase in end-diastolic volume (EDV) at follow up. Results During the follow-up (11.9 ± 5.3 months), 53 patients (25.5%) showed LV remodeling. In univariate analysis, EDV, end-systolic volume, deceleration time (DT), CK-MB, and global longitudinal strain (GLS) were associated with LV remodeling. In multivariate analysis, EDV [hazard ratio (HR): 0.922, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.897–0.948, p< 0.001], GLS (HR: 0.842, 95% CI: 0.728–0.974, p = 0.020), DT (HR: 0.989, 95% CI: 0.980–0.998, p = 0.023) and CK-MB (HR: 1.003, 95% CI: 1.000–1.005, p = 0.033) independently predicted LV remodeling. However, global circumferential strain, net twist, and twist or untwist rate were not associated with remodeling. Conclusion Of various parameters of speckle strain, only GLS predicted adverse remodeling in STEMI patients. PMID:27358705

  16. Kinetic Control of Nucleosome Displacement by ISWI/ACF Chromatin Remodelers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florescu, Ana-Maria; Schiessel, Helmut; Blossey, Ralf

    2012-09-01

    Chromatin structure is dynamically organized by chromatin remodelers, motor protein complexes which move and remove nucleosomes. The regulation of remodeler action has recently been proposed to underlie a kinetic proofreading scheme which combines the recognition of histone-tail states and the ATP-dependent loosening of DNA around nucleosomes. Members of the ISWI-family of remodelers additionally recognize linker length between nucleosomes. Here, we show that the additional proofreading step involving linker length alone is sufficient to promote the formation of regular arrays of nucleosomes. ATP-dependent remodeling by bidirectional motors is shown to reinforce positioning as compared to statistical positioning.

  17. CHD chromatin remodelers and the transcription cycle.

    PubMed

    Murawska, Magdalena; Brehm, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers modulate DNA access of transcription factors and RNA polymerases by "opening" or "closing" chromatin structure. However, this view is far too simplistic. Recent findings have demonstrated that these enzymes not only set the stage for the transcription machinery to act but are actively involved at every step of the transcription process. As a consequence, they affect initiation, elongation, termination and RNA processing. In this review we will use the CHD family as a paradigm to illustrate the progress that has been made in revealing these new concepts.

  18. Chemistry of bone remodelling preserved in extant and fossil Sirenia.

    PubMed

    Anné, Jennifer; Wogelius, Roy A; Edwards, Nicholas P; van Veelen, Arjen; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Manning, Phillip L

    2016-05-01

    Bone remodelling is a crucial biological process needed to maintain elemental homeostasis. It is important to understand the trace elemental inventories that govern these processes as malfunctions in bone remodelling can have devastating effects on an organism. In this study, we use a combination of X-ray techniques to map, quantify, and characterise the coordination chemistry of trace elements within the highly remodelled bone tissues of extant and extinct Sirenia (manatees and dugongs). The dense bone structure and unique body chemistry of sirenians represent ideal tissues for studying both high remodelling rates as well as unique fossilisation pathways. Here, elemental maps revealed uncorrelated patterning of Ca and Zn within secondary osteons in both extant and fossil sirenians, as well as elevated Sr within the connecting canals of fossil sirenians. Concentrations of these elements are comparable between extant and fossil material indicating geochemical processing of the fossil bone has been minimal. Zn was found to be bound in the same coordination within the apatite structure in both extant and fossil bone. Accurate quantification of trace elements in extant material was only possible when the organic constituents of the bone were included. The comparable distributions, concentrations, and chemical coordination of these physiologically important trace elements indicate the chemistry of bone remodelling has been preserved for 19 million years. This study signifies the powerful potential of merging histological and chemical techniques in the understanding of physiological processes in both extant and extinct vertebrates.

  19. RNA helicase proteins as chaperones and remodelers

    PubMed Central

    Jarmoskaite, Inga; Russell, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Superfamily 2 helicase proteins are ubiquitous in RNA biology and have an extraordinarily broad set of functional roles. Central among these roles are to promote rearrangements of structured RNAs and to remodel RNA-protein complexes (RNPs), allowing formation of native RNA structure or progression through a functional cycle of structures. While all superfamily 2 helicases share a conserved helicase core, they are divided evolutionarily into several families, and it is principally proteins from three families, the DEAD-box, DEAH/RHA and Ski2-like families, that function to manipulate structured RNAs and RNPs. Strikingly, there are emerging differences in the mechanisms of these proteins, both between families and within the largest family (DEAD-box), and these differences appear to be tuned to their RNA or RNP substrates and their specific roles. This review outlines basic mechanistic features of the three families and surveys individual proteins and the current understanding of their biological substrates and mechanisms. PMID:24635478

  20. Sequence-targeted nucleosome sliding in vivo by a hybrid Chd1 chromatin remodeler

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers regulate chromatin dynamics by modifying nucleosome positions and occupancy. DNA-dependent processes such as replication and transcription rely on chromatin to faithfully regulate DNA accessibility, yet how chromatin remodelers achieve well-defined nucleosome positioning in vivo is poorly understood. Here, we report a simple method for site-specifically altering nucleosome positions in live cells. By fusing the Chd1 remodeler to the DNA binding domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ume6 repressor, we have engineered a fusion remodeler that selectively positions nucleosomes on top of adjacent Ume6 binding motifs in a highly predictable and reproducible manner. Positioning of nucleosomes by the fusion remodeler recapitulates closed chromatin structure at Ume6-sensitive genes analogous to the endogenous Isw2 remodeler. Strikingly, highly precise positioning of single founder nucleosomes by either chimeric Chd1-Ume6 or endogenous Isw2 shifts phased chromatin arrays in cooperation with endogenous chromatin remodelers. Our results demonstrate feasibility of engineering precise nucleosome rearrangements through sequence-targeted chromatin remodeling and provide insight into targeted action and cooperation of endogenous chromatin remodelers in vivo. PMID:26993344

  1. Chromatin dynamics: Interplay between remodeling enzymes and histone modifications

    PubMed Central

    Swygert, Sarah G.; Peterson, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dynamics play an essential role in regulating the accessibility of genomic DNA for a variety of nuclear processes, including gene transcription and DNA repair. The posttranslational modification of the core histones and the action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes represent two primary mechanisms by which chromatin dynamics are controlled and linked to nuclear events. Although there are examples in which a histone modification or a remodeling enzyme may be sufficient to drive a chromatin transition, these mechanisms typically work in concert to integrate regulatory inputs, leading to a coordinated alteration in chromatin structure and function. Indeed, site-specific histone modifications can facilitate the recruitment of chromatin remodeling enzymes to particular genomic regions, or they can regulate the efficiency or the outcome of a chromatin remodeling reaction. Conversely, chromatin remodeling enzymes can also influence, and sometimes directly modulate, the modification state of histones. These functional interactions are generally complex, frequently transient, and often require the association of myriad additional factors. PMID:24583555

  2. Biological remodelling: Stationary energy, configurational change, internal variables and dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garikipati, K.; Olberding, J. E.; Narayanan, H.; Arruda, E. M.; Grosh, K.; Calve, S.

    2006-07-01

    Remodelling is defined as an evolution of microstructure or variations in the configuration of the underlying manifold. The manner in which a biological tissue and its subsystems remodel their structure is treated in a continuum mechanical setting. While some examples of remodelling are conveniently modelled as evolution of the reference configuration—Case I—others are more suited to an internal variable description—Case II. In this paper, we explore the applicability of stationary energy states to remodelled systems. A variational treatment is introduced by assuming that stationary energy states are attained by changes in microstructure via one of the two mechanisms—Cases I and II. The configurational change of a long-chain molecule is presented as an example of Case I, and collagen fibre reorientation in in vitro tissue constructs as an example of Case II. The second example is further studied for its thermodynamic dissipation characteristics. This leads to an important finding on the limitation of purely mechanical treatments of some types of remodelling phenomena.

  3. Remodeling Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hestenes, David

    2013-01-01

    Radical reform in science and mathematics education is needed to prepare citizens for challenges of the emerging knowledge-based global economy. We consider definite proposals to establish: (1) "Standards of science and math literacy" for all students. (2) "Integration of the science curriculum" with structure of matter,…

  4. Dynamical DNA accessibility induced by chromatin remodeling and protein binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montel, F.; Faivre-Moskalenko, C.; Castelnovo, M.

    2014-11-01

    Chromatin remodeling factors are enzymes being able to alter locally chromatin structure at the nucleosomal level and they actively participate in the regulation of gene expression. Using simple rules for individual nucleosome motion induced by a remodeling factor, we designed simulations of the remodeling of oligomeric chromatin, in order to address quantitatively collective effects in DNA accessibility upon nucleosome mobilization. Our results suggest that accessibility profiles are inhomogeneous thanks to borders effects like protein binding. Remarkably, we show that the accessibility lifetime of DNA sequence is roughly doubled in the vicinity of borders as compared to its value in bulk regions far from the borders. These results are quantitatively interpreted as resulting from the confined diffusion of a large nucleosome depleted region.

  5. Regulation of the Golgi Complex by Phospholipid Remodeling Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kevin D.; Clarke, Benjamin A.; Brown, William J.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian Golgi complex is a highly dynamic organelle consisting of stacks of flattened cisternae with associated coated vesicles and membrane tubules that contribute to cargo import and export, intra-cisternal trafficking, and overall Golgi architecture. At the morphological level, all of these structures are continuously remodeled to carry out these trafficking functions. Recent advances have shown that continual phospholipid remodeling by phospholipase A (PLA) and lysophospholipid acyltransferase (LPAT) enzymes, which deacylate and reacylate Golgi phospholipids, respectively, contributes to this morphological remodeling. Here we review the identification and characterization of four cytoplasmic PLA enzymes and one integral membrane LPAT that participate in the dynamic functional organization of the Golgi complex, and how some of these enzymes are integrated to determine the relative abundance of COPI vesicle and membrane tubule formation. PMID:22562055

  6. Diabetes mellitus and atrial remodeling: mechanisms and potential upstream therapies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qitong; Liu, Tong; Ng, Chee Y; Li, Guangping

    2014-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice, and its prevalence has increasing substantially over the last decades. Recent data suggest that there is an increased risk of AF among the patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). However, the potential molecular mechanisms regarding DM-related AF and diabetic atrial remodeling are not fully understood. In this comprehensive review, we would like to summarize the potential relationship between diabetes and atrial remodeling, including structural, electrical, and autonomic remodeling. Also, some upstream therapies, such as thiazolidinediones, probucol, ACEI/ARBs, may play an important role in the prevention and treatment of AF. Therefore, large prospective randomized, controlled trials and further experimental studies should be challengingly continued.

  7. Probing Nucleosome Remodeling by Unzipping Single DNA Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Michelle

    2006-03-01

    At the core of eukaryotic chromatin is the nucleosome, which consists of 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.65 turns around an octamer of histone proteins. Even this lowest level of genomic compaction presents a strong barrier to DNA-binding cellular factors that are required for essential processes such as transcription, DNA replication, recombination and repair. Chromatin remodeling enzymes use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to regulate accessibility of the genetic code by altering chromatin structure. While remodeling enzymes have been the subject of extensive research in recent years, their precise mechanism remains unclear. In order to probe the structure of individual nucleosomes and their remodeling, we assembled a histone octamer onto a DNA segment containing a strong nucleosome positioning sequence. As the DNA double helix was unzipped through the nucleosome using a feedback-enhanced optical trap, the presence of the nucleosome was detected as a series of dramatic increases in the tension in the DNA, followed by sudden tension reductions. Analysis of the unzipping force throughout the disruption accurately revealed the spatial location and fine structure of the nucleosome to near base pair precision. Using this approach, we investigate how remodeling enzymes may alter the location and structure of a nucleosome.

  8. Analgesic Drugs Alter Connective Tissue Remodeling and Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Chad C.

    2015-01-01

    Exercising individuals commonly consume analgesics but these medications alter tendon and skeletal muscle connective tissue properties, possibly limiting a person from realizing the full benefits of exercise training. I detail the novel hypothesis that analgesic medications alter connective tissue structure and mechanical properties by modifying fibroblast production of growth factors and matrix enzymes, which are responsible for extracellular matrix remodeling. PMID:26509485

  9. Analgesic Drugs Alter Connective Tissue Remodeling and Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Chad C

    2016-01-01

    Exercising individuals commonly consume analgesics, but these medications alter tendon and skeletal muscle connective tissue properties, possibly limiting a person from realizing the full benefits of exercise training. I detail the novel hypothesis that analgesic medications alter connective tissue structure and mechanical properties by modifying fibroblast production of growth factors and matrix enzymes, which are responsible for extracellular matrix remodeling.

  10. Vascular remodeling: A redox-modulated mechanism of vessel caliber regulation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Leonardo Y; Laurindo, Francisco R M

    2017-01-18

    Vascular remodeling, i.e. whole-vessel structural reshaping, determines lumen caliber in (patho)physiology. Here we review mechanisms underlying vessel remodeling, with emphasis in redox regulation. First, we discuss confusing terminology and focus on strictu sensu remodeling. Second, we propose a mechanobiological remodeling paradigm based on the concept of tensional homeostasis as a setpoint regulator. We first focus on shear-mediated models as prototypes of remodeling closely dominated by highly redox-sensitive endothelial function. More detailed discussions focus on mechanosensors, integrins, extracellular matrix, cytoskeleton and inflammatory pathways as potential of mechanisms potentially coupling tensional homeostasis to redox regulation. Further discussion of remodeling associated with atherosclerosis and injury repair highlights important aspects of redox vascular responses. While neointima formation has not shown consistent responsiveness to antioxidants, vessel remodeling has been more clearly responsive, indicating that despite the multilevel redox signaling pathways, there is a coordinated response of the whole vessel. Among mechanisms that may orchestrate redox pathways, we discuss roles of superoxide dismutase activity and extracellular protein disulfide isomerase. We then discuss redox modulation of aneurysms, a special case of expansive remodeling. We propose that the redox modulation of vascular remodeling may reflect (1) remodeling pathophysiology is dominated by a particularly redox-sensitive cell type, e.g., endothelial cells (2) redox pathways are temporospatially coordinated at an organ level across distinct cellular and acellular structures or (3) the tensional homeostasis setpoint is closely connected to redox signaling. The mechanobiological/redox model discussed here can be a basis for improved understanding of remodeling and helps clarifying mechanisms underlying prevalent hard-to-treat diseases.

  11. Remodeling of ribosomal genes in somatic cells by Xenopus egg extract

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrup, Olga; Hyttel, Poul; Klaerke, Dan A.; Collas, Philippe

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} Xenopus egg extract remodels nuclei and alter cell growth characteristics. {yields} Ribosomal genes are reprogrammed within 6 h after extract exposure. {yields} rDNA reprogramming involves promoter targeting of SNF2H remodeling complex. {yields} Xenopus egg extract does not initiate stress-related response in somatic cells. {yields} Aza-cytidine elicits a stress-induced response in reprogrammed cells. -- Abstract: Extracts from Xenopus eggs can reprogram gene expression in somatic nuclei, however little is known about the earliest processes associated with the switch in the transcriptional program. We show here that an early reprogramming event is the remodeling of ribosomal chromatin and gene expression. This occurs within hours of extract treatment and is distinct from a stress response. Egg extract elicits remodeling of the nuclear envelope, chromatin and nucleolus. Nucleolar remodeling involves a rapid and stable decrease in ribosomal gene transcription, and promoter targeting of the nucleolar remodeling complex component SNF2H without affecting occupancy of the transcription factor UBF and the stress silencers SUV39H1 and SIRT1. During this process, nucleolar localization of UBF and SIRT1 is not altered. On contrary, azacytidine pre-treatment has an adverse effect on rDNA remodeling induced by extract and elicits a stress-type nuclear response. Thus, an early event of Xenopus egg extract-mediated nuclear reprogramming is the remodeling of ribosomal genes involving nucleolar remodeling complex. Condition-specific and rapid silencing of ribosomal genes may serve as a sensitive marker for evaluation of various reprogramming methods.

  12. IFNL3 mRNA structure is remodeled by a functional non-coding polymorphism associated with hepatitis C virus clearance.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi-Fan; Mauger, David M; Goldstein, David B; Urban, Thomas J; Weeks, Kevin M; Bradrick, Shelton S

    2015-11-04

    Polymorphisms near the interferon lambda 3 (IFNL3) gene strongly predict clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We analyzed a variant (rs4803217 G/T) located within the IFNL3 mRNA 3' untranslated region (UTR); the G allele (protective allele) is associated with elevated therapeutic HCV clearance. We show that the IFNL3 3' UTR represses mRNA translation and the rs4803217 allele modulates the extent of translational regulation. We analyzed the structures of IFNL3 variant mRNAs at nucleotide resolution by SHAPE-MaP. The rs4803217 G allele mRNA forms well-defined 3' UTR structure while the T allele mRNA is more dynamic. The observed differences between alleles are among the largest possible RNA structural alterations that can be induced by a single nucleotide change and transform the UTR from a single well-defined conformation to one with multiple dynamic interconverting structures. These data illustrate that non-coding genetic variants can have significant functional effects by impacting RNA structure.

  13. Intrinsic, Functional, and Structural Properties of β-Thymosins and β-Thymosin/WH2 Domains in the Regulation and Coordination of Actin Self-Assembly Dynamics and Cytoskeleton Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Renault, L

    2016-01-01

    β-Thymosins are a family of heat-stable multifunctional polypeptides that are expressed as small proteins of about 5kDa (~45 amino acids) almost exclusively in multicellular animals. They were first isolated from the thymus. As full-length or truncated polypeptides, they appear to stimulate a broad range of extracellular activities in various signaling pathways, including tissue repair and regeneration, inflammation, cell migration, and immune defense. However, their cell surface receptors and structural mechanisms of regulations in these multiple pathways remain still poorly understood. Besides their extracellular activities, they belong to a larger family of small, intrinsically disordered actin-binding domains called WH2/β-thymosin domains that have been identified in more than 1800 multidomain proteins found in different taxonomic domains of life and involved in various actin-based motile processes including cell morphogenesis, motility, adhesions, tissue development, intracellular trafficking, or pathogen infections. This review briefly surveys the main recent findings to understand how these small, intrinsically disordered but functional domains can interact with many unrelated partners and can thus integrate and coordinate various intracellular activities in actin self-assembly dynamics and cell signaling pathways linked to their cytoskeleton remodeling.

  14. Costs of a more spacious home after remodelling by hermit crabs.

    PubMed

    Laidre, Mark E; Patten, Eli; Pruitt, Lisa

    2012-12-07

    Architectural creations occur throughout the animal kingdom, with invertebrates and vertebrates building structures such as homes to maximize their Darwinian fitness. Animal architects face many trade-offs in building optimally designed structures. But what about animals that do not build, and those that only remodel the original creations of others: do such secondary architects face similar trade-offs? Recent evidence has revealed that hermit crabs-animals well known for opportunistically moving into remnant gastropod shells-can also act as secondary architects, remodelling the shells they inherit from gastropods. Remodelling has only been found among terrestrial hermits (Coenobita spp.), not marine hermits. Here we investigate the potential trade-offs Coenobita compressus faces from remodelling by subjecting its remodelled and unremodelled homes to controlled engineering crush tests, which parallel the homes being crushed by predators. While remodelled homes are significantly more spacious and lightweight than unremodelled homes, we find that the homes attain these beneficial qualities at a cost: a reduced resistance to being crushed. Hermit crabs may therefore only remodel their homes to thresholds set by the bite force of their predators. Our results suggest that, like primary animal architects, which face trade-offs when optimizing architectural designs, secondary animal architects face trade-offs when remodelling such designs.

  15. Epac2-mediated dendritic spine remodeling: implications for disease

    PubMed Central

    Woolfrey, Kevin M.; Srivastava, Deepak P.

    2010-01-01

    In the mammalian forebrain, most glutamatergic excitatory synapses occur on small dendritic protrusions called dendritic spines. Dendritic spines are highly plastic and can rapidly change morphology in response to numerous stimuli. This dynamic remodeling of dendritic spines is thought to be critical for information processing, memory and cognition. Conversely, multiple studies have revealed that neuropathologies such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are linked with alterations in dendritic spine morphologies and miswiring of neural circuitry. One compelling hypothesis is that abnormal dendritic spine remodeling is a key contributing factor for this miswiring. Ongoing research has identified a number of mechanisms that are critical for the control of dendritic spine remodeling. Among these mechanisms, regulation of small GTPase signaling by guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) is emerging as a critical mechanism for integrating physiological signals in the control of dendritic spine remodeling. Furthermore, multiple proteins associated with regulation of dendritic spine remodeling have also been implicated with multiple neuropathologies, including ASDs. Epac2, a GEF for the small GTPase Rap, has recently been described as a novel cAMP(yet PKA-independent) target localized to dendritic spines. Signaling via this protein in response to pharmacological stimulation or cAMP accumulation, via the dopamine D1/5 receptor, results in Rap activation, promotes structural destabilization, in the form of dendritic spine shrinkage, and functional depression due to removal of GluR2/3-containing AMPA receptors. In addition, Epac2 forms macromolecular complexes with ASD-associated proteins, which are sufficient to regulate Epac2 localization and function. Furthermore, rare nonsynonymous variants of the EPAC2 gene associated with the ASD phenotype alter protein function, synaptic protein distribution, and spine morphology. We review here the role of Epac2 in the remodeling

  16. Quantitative analysis of 3D extracellular matrix remodelling by pancreatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Benjamin K.; Cortes, Ernesto; Rice, Alistair J.; Sarper, Muge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling is integral to numerous physiological and pathological processes in biology, such as embryogenesis, wound healing, fibrosis and cancer. Until recently, most cellular studies have been conducted on 2D environments where mechanical cues significantly differ from physiologically relevant 3D environments, impacting cellular behaviour and masking the interpretation of cellular function in health and disease. We present an integrated methodology where cell-ECM interactions can be investigated in 3D environments via ECM remodelling. Monitoring and quantification of collagen-I structure in remodelled matrices, through designated algorithms, show that 3D matrices can be used to correlate remodelling with increased ECM stiffness observed in fibrosis. Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the key effectors of the stromal fibrosis associated to pancreatic cancer. We use PSCs to implement our methodology and demonstrate that PSC matrix remodelling capabilities depend on their contractile machinery and β1 integrin-mediated cell-ECM attachment. PMID:27170254

  17. Traditional Chinese Medication Qiliqiangxin attenuates cardiac remodeling after acute myocardial infarction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Lichan; Shen, Sutong; Fu, Siyi; Fang, Hongyi; Wang, Xiuzhi; Das, Saumya; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Zhou, Yonglan; Kong, Xiangqing; Xiao, Junjie; Li, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    In a multicenter randomized double-blind study we demonstrated that Qiliqiangxin (QLQX), a traditional Chinese medicine, had a protective effect in heart failure patients. However, whether and via which mechanism QLQX attenuates cardiac remodeling after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is still unclear. AMI was created by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery in mice. Treating the mice in the initial 3 days after AMI with QLQX did not change infarct size. However, QLQX treatment ameliorated adverse cardiac remodeling 3 weeks after AMI including better preservation of cardiac function, decreased apoptosis and reduced fibrosis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) was down-regulated in control animals after AMI and up-regulated by QLQX administration. Interestingly, expression of AKT, SAPK/JNK, and ERK was not altered by QLQX treatment. Inhibition of PPARγ reduced the beneficial effects of QLQX in AMI remodeling, whereas activation of PPARγ failed to provide additional improvement in the presence of QLQX, suggesting a key role for PPARγ in the effects of QLQX during cardiac remodeling after AMI. This study indicates that QLQX attenuates cardiac remodeling after AMI by increasing PPARγ levels. Taken together, QLQX warrants further investigation as as a therapeutic intervention to mitigate remodeling and heart failure after AMI. PMID:25669146

  18. Erythrocyte Stiffness during Morphological Remodeling Induced by Carbon Ion Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Baoping; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Jizeng

    2014-01-01

    The adverse effect induced by carbon ion radiation (CIR) is still an unavoidable hazard to the treatment object. Thus, evaluation of its adverse effects on the body is a critical problem with respect to radiation therapy. We aimed to investigate the change between the configuration and mechanical properties of erythrocytes induced by radiation and found differences in both the configuration and the mechanical properties with involving in morphological remodeling process. Syrian hamsters were subjected to whole-body irradiation with carbon ion beams (1, 2, 4, and 6 Gy) or X-rays (2, 4, 6, and 12 Gy) for 3, 14 and 28 days. Erythrocytes in peripheral blood and bone marrow were collected for cytomorphological analysis. The mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were determined using atomic force microscopy, and the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was analyzed via western blotting. The results showed that dynamic changes were evident in erythrocytes exposed to different doses of carbon ion beams compared with X-rays and the control (0 Gy). The magnitude of impairment of the cell number and cellular morphology manifested the subtle variation according to the irradiation dose. In particular, the differences in the size, shape and mechanical properties of the erythrocytes were well exhibited. Furthermore, immunoblot data showed that the expression of the cytoskeletal protein spectrin-α1 was changed after irradiation, and there was a common pattern among its substantive characteristics in the irradiated group. Based on these findings, the present study concluded that CIR could induce a change in mechanical properties during morphological remodeling of erythrocytes. According to the unique characteristics of the biomechanical categories, we deduce that changes in cytomorphology and mechanical properties can be measured to evaluate the adverse effects generated by tumor radiotherapy. Additionally, for the first time, the current study provides a new

  19. Reprogramming of fibroblast nuclei in cloned bovine embryos involves major structural remodeling with both striking similarities and differences to nuclear phenotypes of in vitro fertilized embryos.

    PubMed

    Popken, Jens; Brero, Alessandro; Koehler, Daniela; Schmid, Volker J; Strauss, Axel; Wuensch, Annegret; Guengoer, Tuna; Graf, Alexander; Krebs, Stefan; Blum, Helmut; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Wolf, Eckhard; Cremer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear landscapes were studied during preimplantation development of bovine embryos, generated either by in vitro fertilization (IVF), or generated as cloned embryos by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) of bovine fetal fibroblasts, using 3-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy (3D-CLSM) and structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM). Nuclear landscapes of IVF and SCNT embryonic nuclei were compared with each other and with fibroblast nuclei. We demonstrate that reprogramming of fibroblast nuclei in cloned embryos requires changes of their landscapes similar to nuclei of IVF embryos. On the way toward the 8-cell stage, where major genome activation occurs, a major lacuna, enriched with splicing factors, was formed in the nuclear interior and chromosome territories (CTs) were shifted toward the nuclear periphery. During further development the major lacuna disappeared and CTs were redistributed throughout the nuclear interior forming a contiguous higher order chromatin network. At all stages of development CTs of IVF and SCNT embryonic nuclei were built up from chromatin domain clusters (CDCs) pervaded by interchromatin compartment (IC) channels. Quantitative analyses revealed a highly significant enrichment of RNA polymerase II and H3K4me3, a marker for transcriptionally competent chromatin, at the periphery of CDCs. In contrast, H3K9me3, a marker for silent chromatin, was enriched in the more compacted interior of CDCs. Despite these striking similarities, we also detected major differences between nuclear landscapes of IVF and cloned embryos. Possible implications of these differences for the developmental potential of cloned animals remain to be investigated. We present a model, which integrates generally applicable structural and functional features of the nuclear landscape.

  20. Reprogramming of fibroblast nuclei in cloned bovine embryos involves major structural remodeling with both striking similarities and differences to nuclear phenotypes of in vitro fertilized embryos

    PubMed Central

    Popken, Jens; Brero, Alessandro; Koehler, Daniela; Schmid, Volker J; Strauss, Axel; Wuensch, Annegret; Guengoer, Tuna; Graf, Alexander; Krebs, Stefan; Blum, Helmut; Zakhartchenko, Valeri; Wolf, Eckhard; Cremer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear landscapes were studied during preimplantation development of bovine embryos, generated either by in vitro fertilization (IVF), or generated as cloned embryos by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) of bovine fetal fibroblasts, using 3-dimensional confocal laser scanning microscopy (3D-CLSM) and structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM). Nuclear landscapes of IVF and SCNT embryonic nuclei were compared with each other and with fibroblast nuclei. We demonstrate that reprogramming of fibroblast nuclei in cloned embryos requires changes of their landscapes similar to nuclei of IVF embryos. On the way toward the 8-cell stage, where major genome activation occurs, a major lacuna, enriched with splicing factors, was formed in the nuclear interior and chromosome territories (CTs) were shifted toward the nuclear periphery. During further development the major lacuna disappeared and CTs were redistributed throughout the nuclear interior forming a contiguous higher order chromatin network. At all stages of development CTs of IVF and SCNT embryonic nuclei were built up from chromatin domain clusters (CDCs) pervaded by interchromatin compartment (IC) channels. Quantitative analyses revealed a highly significant enrichment of RNA polymerase II and H3K4me3, a marker for transcriptionally competent chromatin, at the periphery of CDCs. In contrast, H3K9me3, a marker for silent chromatin, was enriched in the more compacted interior of CDCs. Despite these striking similarities, we also detected major differences between nuclear landscapes of IVF and cloned embryos. Possible implications of these differences for the developmental potential of cloned animals remain to be investigated. We present a model, which integrates generally applicable structural and functional features of the nuclear landscape. PMID:25482066

  1. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  2. Thiocolchicoside: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    Thiocolchicoside has long been used as a muscle relaxant, despite a lack of proven efficacy beyond the placebo effect. Its chemical structure consists of colchicine, a sugar (ose) and a sulphur-containing radical (thio), and its adverse effects are therefore likely to be similar to those of colchicine. Using the standard Prescrire methodology, we reviewed the available data on the adverse effects of thiocolchicoside. Liver injury, pancreatitis, seizures, blood cell disorders, severe cutaneous disorders, rhabdomyolysis and reproductive disorders have all been recorded in the French and European pharmacovigilance databases and in the periodic updates that the companies concerned submit to regulatory agencies. These data do not specify the frequency of the disorders nor do they identify the most susceptible patient populations. Thiocolchicoside is teratogenic in experimental animals and also damages chromosomes. Human data are limited to a follow-up of about 30 pregnant women (no major malformations) and reports of altered spermatogenesis, including cases of azoospermia. In practice, there is no justification for exposing patients to the adverse effects of thiocolchicoside. It is better to use an effective, well-known analgesic for patients complaining of muscle pain, starting with paracetamol.

  3. Pulsatile Fluid Shear in Bone Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frangos, John A.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to elucidate the sensitivity to transients in fluid shear stress in bone remodeling. Bone remodeling is clearly a function of the local mechanical environment which includes interstitial fluid flow. Traditionally, load-induced remodeling has been associated with low frequency (1-2 Hz) signals attributed to normal locomotion. McLeod and Rubin, however, demonstrated in vivo remodeling events associated with high frequency (15-30 Hz) loading. Likewise, other in vivo studies demonstrated that slowly applied strains did not trigger remodeling events. We therefore hypothesized that the mechanosensitive pathways which control bone maintenance and remodeling are differentially sensitive to varying rates of applied fluid shear stress.

  4. Chromatin remodeling: from transcription to cancer.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Moshe

    2014-09-01

    In this short review article, I have tried to trace the path that led my laboratory from the early studies of the structure of papova minichromosomes and transcription control to the investigation of chromatin remodeling complexes of the SWI/SNF family. I discuss briefly the genetic and biochemical studies that lead to the discovery of the SWI/SNF complex in yeast and drosophila and summarize some of the studies on the developmental role of the murine complex. The discovery of the tumor suppressor function of the SNF5/INI1/SMARCB1 gene in humans and the identification of frequent mutations in other subunits of this complex in different human tumors opened a fascinating field of research on this epigenetic regulator. The hope is to better understand tumor development and to develop novel treatments.

  5. Cardiac mast cell regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-related ventricular remodeling in chronic pressure or volume overload.

    PubMed

    Janicki, Joseph S; Brower, Gregory L; Gardner, Jason D; Forman, Mary F; Stewart, James A; Murray, David B; Chancey, Amanda L

    2006-02-15

    The chronic elevation in ventricular wall stress secondary to ventricular volume or pressure overload leads to structural remodeling of the muscular, vascular and extracellular matrix components of the myocardium. While initially a compensatory response, the progressive hypertrophy and ventricular dilatation induced by this condition ultimately have a detrimental effect on ventricular function, resulting in heart failure. Fibrillar collagen provides the skeletal framework which interconnects the cardiomyocytes, thereby maintaining ventricular shape and size and contributing to tissue stiffness. Accordingly, these myocardial collagen fibers must be disrupted for ventricular dilatation, sphericalization and wall thinning to occur. The presence of an abundant, latent matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) population which coexists with myocardial fibrillar collagen has been documented. Thus, the potential for collagen degradation to exceed synthesis exists should there be significant activation of this latent MMP system. Mast cells are known to store and release a variety of biologically active mediators including TNF-alpha and proteases such as tryptase and chymase, which can induce MMP activation. Increased cardiac mast cell density has been implicated in the pathophysiology of human end-stage cardiomyopathy and experimental myocardial infarction, hypertension and chronic volume overload secondary to mitral regurgitation and aorto-caval fistula. The potential role of cardiac mast cells in activating MMPs, which then results in fibrillar collagen degradation and adverse myocardial remodeling secondary to chronic volume and pressure overload will be the subject of this review.

  6. Rapid formation and remodeling of postsynaptic densities in developing dendrites.

    PubMed

    Marrs, G S; Green, S H; Dailey, M E

    2001-10-01

    The dynamics of postsynaptic density (PSD) formation and remodeling were investigated in live developing hippocampal tissue slices. Time lapse imaging of transfected neurons expressing GFP-tagged PSD95, a prominent PSD protein, revealed that up to 40% of PSDs in developing dendrites are structurally dynamic; they rapidly (<15 min) appear or disappear, but also grow, shrink and move within shafts and spines. New spines containing PSDs were formed by conversion of dynamic filopodia-like spine precursors in which PSDs appeared de novo, or by direct extension of spines or spine precursors carrying preformed PSDs from the shaft. PSDs are therefore highly dynamic structures that can undergo rapid structural alteration within dendrite shafts, spines and spine precursors, permitting rapid formation and remodeling of synaptic connections in developing CNS tissues.

  7. Adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Foley, Georgina

    2017-04-05

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article defined the different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and explored when they can occur. It emphasised the importance of being knowledgeable about medications, considering patient safety when patients are taking medications, being alert to the possibility of ADRs, and recognising and responding to suspected ADRs.

  8. Lymph node biophysical remodeling is associated with melanoma lymphatic drainage.

    PubMed

    Rohner, Nathan Andrew; McClain, Jacob; Tuell, Sara Lydia; Warner, Alex; Smith, Blair; Yun, Youngho; Mohan, Abhinav; Sushnitha, Manuela; Thomas, Susan Napier

    2015-11-01

    Tissue remodeling is a characteristic of many solid tumor malignancies including melanoma. By virtue of tumor lymphatic transport, remodeling pathways active within the local tumor microenvironment have the potential to be operational within lymph nodes (LNs) draining the tumor interstitium. Here, we show that lymphatic drainage from murine B16 melanomas in syngeneic, immune-competent C57Bl/6 mice is associated with LN enlargement as well as nonuniform increases in bulk tissue elasticity and viscoelasticity, as measured by the response of whole LNs to compression. These remodeling responses, which quickly manifest in tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLNs) after tumor inoculation and before apparent metastasis, were accompanied by changes in matrix composition, including up to 3-fold increases in the abundance of soluble collagen and hyaluronic acid. Intranodal pressures were also significantly increased in TDLNs (+1 cmH2O) relative to both non-tumor-draining LNs (-1 cmH2O) and LNs from naive animals (-1 to 2 cmH2O). These data suggest that the reorganization of matrix structure, composition, and fluid microenvironment within LNs associated with tumor lymphatic drainage parallels remodeling seen in primary malignancies and has the potential to regulate the adhesion, proliferation, and signaling function of LN-resident cells involved in directing melanoma disease progression.

  9. Chd5 orchestrates chromatin remodeling during sperm development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wangzhi; Wu, Jie; Kim, Sang-Yong; Zhao, Ming; Hearn, Stephen A.; Zhang, Michael Q.; Meistrich, Marvin L.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most remarkable chromatin remodeling processes occurs during spermiogenesis, the post-meiotic phase of sperm development during which histones are replaced with sperm-specific protamines to repackage the genome into the highly compact chromatin structure of mature sperm. Here we identify Chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 5 (Chd5) as a master regulator of the histone-to-protamine chromatin remodeling process. Chd5 deficiency leads to defective sperm chromatin compaction and male infertility in mice, mirroring the observation of low CHD5 expression in testes of infertile men. Chd5 orchestrates a cascade of molecular events required for histone removal and replacement, including histone 4 (H4) hyperacetylation, histone variant expression, nucleosome eviction, and DNA damage repair. Chd5 deficiency also perturbs expression of transition proteins (Tnp1/Tnp2) and protamines (Prm1/2). These findings define Chd5 as a multi-faceted mediator of histone-to-protamine replacement and depict the cascade of molecular events underlying chromatin remodeling during this process of extensive chromatin remodeling. PMID:24818823

  10. Bone remodeling after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bellorin-Font, Ezequiel; Rojas, Eudocia; Carlini, Raul G; Suniaga, Orlando; Weisinger, José R

    2003-06-01

    Several studies have indicated that bone alterations after transplantation are heterogeneous. Short-term studies after transplantation have shown that many patients exhibit a pattern consistent with adynamic bone disease. In contrast, patients with long-term renal transplantation show a more heterogeneous picture. Thus, while adynamic bone disease has also been described in these patients, most studies show decreased bone formation and prolonged mineralization lag-time faced with persisting bone resorption, and even clear evidence of generalized or focal osteomalacia in many patients. Thus, the main alterations in bone remodeling are a decrease in bone formation and mineralization up against persistent bone resorption, suggesting defective osteoblast function, decreased osteoblastogenesis, or increased osteoblast death rates. Indeed, recent studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that there is an early decrease in osteoblast number and surfaces, as well as in reduced bone formation rate and delayed mineralization after transplantation. These alterations are associated with an early increase in osteoblast apoptosis that correlates with low levels of serum phosphorus. These changes were more frequently observed in patients with low turnover bone disease. In contrast, PTH seemed to preserve osteoblast survival. The mechanisms of hypophosphatemia in these patients appear to be independent of PTH, suggesting that other phosphaturic factors may play a role. However, further studies are needed to determine the nature of a phosphaturic factor and its relationship to the alterations of bone remodeling after transplantation.

  11. Remodeling, Renovation, & Conversion of Educational Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Physical Plant Administrators of Universities and Colleges, Washington, DC.

    Based on a series of workshops, this collection of papers provides a framework for thought--emphasizing planning within time, flexibility, and maintenance constraints--as well as a practical guide for actual engineering of remodeling/renovation/conversion projects. Is remodeling always less expensive than new construction? Should high initial…

  12. Chromatin remodeling: nucleosomes bulging at the seams.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Craig L

    2002-04-02

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes, such as SWI/SNF, hydrolyze thousands of ATPs to regulate gene expression on chromatin fibers. Recent mechanistic studies suggest that these enzymes generate localized changes in DNA topology that drive formation of multiple, remodeled nucleosomal states.

  13. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  14. SUN4 is essential for nuclear remodeling during mammalian spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Calvi, Alessandra; Wong, Arnette Shi Wei; Wright, Graham; Wong, Esther Sook Miin; Loo, Tsui Han; Stewart, Colin L; Burke, Brian

    2015-11-15

    One of the more dramatic examples of cellular reorganization occurs during spermiogenesis in which a roughly spherical spermatid is transformed into a mature sperm cell. A highlight of this process involves nuclear remodeling whereby the round spermatid nucleus is sculpted into an elongated and polar structure. This transformation in nuclear architecture features chromatin condensation, changes in the composition and organization of the nuclear lamina and redistribution and elimination of nuclear pore complexes. The manchette, a cytoplasmic microtubule-based structure is thought to play a crucial role in the remodeling process. Here we show that SUN4, a spermatid nuclear membrane protein has an essential function in coupling the manchette to the nuclear periphery. In the absence of SUN4, manchette microtubules appear highly disorganized and the nucleus itself fails to elongate. Consequently, mice deficient in SUN4 display globozoospermia with associated infertility.

  15. Galectin-3 and post-myocardial infarction cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Meijers, Wouter C; van der Velde, A Rogier; Pascual-Figal, Domingo A; de Boer, Rudolf A

    2015-09-15

    This review summarizes the current literature regarding the involvement and the putative role(s) of galectin-3 in post-myocardial infarction cardiac remodeling. Post-myocardial infarction remodeling is characterized by acute loss of myocardium, which leads to structural and biomechanical changes in order to preserve cardiac function. A hallmark herein is fibrosis formation, both in the early and late phase following acute myocardial infarction. Galectin-3, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which is a shared factor in fibrosis formation in multiple organs, has an established role in cardiac fibrosis in the setting of pressure overload, neuro-endocrine activation and hypertension, but its role in post- myocardial infarction remodeling has received less attention. However, accumulative experimental studies have shown that myocardial galectin-3 expression is upregulated after myocardial infarction, both on mRNA and protein level. This already occurs shortly after myocardial infarction in the infarcted and border zone area, and also at a later stage in the spared myocardium, contributing to tissue repair and fibrosis. This is associated with typical aspects of fibrosis formation, such as apposition of matricellular proteins and increased factors of collagen turnover. Interestingly, myocardial fibrosis in experimental post-myocardial infarction cardiac remodeling could be attenuated by galectin-3 inhibition. In clinical studies, circulating galectin-3 levels have been shown to identify patients at risk for new-onset heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Circulating galectin-3 levels also predict progressive left ventricular dilatation after myocardial infarction. From literature we conclude that galectin-3 is an active player in cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. Future studies should focus on the dynamics of galectin-3 activation after myocardial infarction, and study the possibilities to target galectin-3.

  16. Adverse reactions to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan L; Nelson, Michael R; Hershey, Joyce N; Engler, Renata J M

    2003-06-01

    (The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.) Immunization healthcare is becoming increasingly complex as the number and types of vaccines have continued to expand. Like all prescription drugs, vaccines may be associated with adverse events. The majority of these reactions are self-limited and not associated with prolonged disability. The media, Internet and public advocacy groups have focused on potentially serious vaccine-associated adverse events with questions raised about causal linkages to increasing frequencies of diseases such as autism and asthma. Despite a lack of evidence of a causal relationship to a variety of vaccine safety concerns, including extensive reviews by the Institute of Medicine, questions regarding vaccine safety continue to threaten the success of immunization programs. Risk communication arid individual risk assessment is further challenged by the public health success of vaccine programs creating the perception that certain vaccines are no longer necessary or justified because of the rare reaction risk. There is a need for improved understanding of true vaccine contraindications and precautions as well as host factors and disease threat in order to develop a patient specific balanced risk communication intervention. When they occur, vaccine related adverse events must be treated, documented and reported through the VAERS system. The increasing complexity of vaccination health care has led the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to identify Vaccine Safety Assessment and Evaluation as a potential new specialty.

  17. Extracellular Matrix Remodeling During the Progression of Volume Overload-Induced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Kirk R.; Stewart, James A.; Lucchesi, Pamela A.

    2009-01-01

    Volume overload-induced heart failure results in progressive left ventricular remodeling characterized by chamber dilation, eccentric cardiac myocyte hypertrophy and changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling changes. The ECM matrix scaffold is an important determinant of the structural integrity of the myocardium and actively participates in force transmission across the LV wall. In response to this hemodynamic overload, the ECM undergoes a distinct pattern of remodeling that differs from pressure overload. Once thought to be a static entity, the ECM is now regarded to be a highly adaptive structure that is dynamically regulated by mechanical stress, neurohormonal activation, inflammation and oxidative stress, that result in alterations in collagen and other matrix components and a net change in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activation. These changes dictate overall ECM turnover during volume overload hear failure progression. This review will discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms that dictate the temporal patterns of ECM remodeling during heart disease progression. PMID:19524591

  18. Role of thyroid hormones in ventricular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Viswanathan; Gerdes, A Martin

    2015-04-01

    Cardiac remodeling includes alterations in molecular, cellular, and interstitial systems contributing to changes in size, shape, and function of the heart. This may be the result of injury, alterations in hemodynamic load, neurohormonal effects, electrical abnormalities, metabolic changes, etc. Thyroid hormones (THs) serve as master regulators for diverse remodeling processes of the cardiovascular system-from the prenatal period to death. THs promote a beneficial cardiomyocyte shape and improve contractility, relaxation, and survival via reversal of molecular remodeling. THs reduce fibrosis by decreasing interstitial collagen and reduce the incidence and duration of arrhythmias via remodeling ion channel expression and function. THs restore metabolic function and also improve blood flow both by direct effects on the vessel architecture and decreasing atherosclerosis. Optimal levels of THs both in the circulation and in cardiac tissues are critical for normal homeostasis. This review highlights TH-based remodeling and clinically translatable strategies for diverse cardiovascular disorders.

  19. Mitral valve leaflet remodelling during pregnancy: insights into cell-mediated recovery of tissue homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rego, Bruno V; Wells, Sarah M; Lee, Chung-Hao; Sacks, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about how valvular tissues grow and remodel in response to altered loading. In this work, we used the pregnancy state to represent a non-pathological cardiac volume overload that distends the mitral valve (MV), using both extant and new experimental data and a modified form of our MV structural constitutive model. We determined that there was an initial period of permanent set-like deformation where no remodelling occurs, followed by a remodelling phase that resulted in near-complete restoration of homeostatic tissue-level behaviour. In addition, we observed that changes in the underlying MV interstitial cell (MVIC) geometry closely paralleled the tissue-level remodelling events, undergoing an initial passive perturbation followed by a gradual recovery to the pre-pregnant state. Collectively, these results suggest that valvular remodelling is actively mediated by average MVIC deformations (i.e. not cycle to cycle, but over a period of weeks). Moreover, tissue-level remodelling is likely to be accomplished by serial and parallel additions of fibrillar material to restore the mean homeostatic fibre stress and MVIC geometries. This finding has significant implications in efforts to understand and predict MV growth and remodelling following such events as myocardial infarction and surgical repair, which also place the valve under altered loading conditions.

  20. [Ventricular "remodeling" after myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Cohen-Solal, A; Himbert, D; Guéret, P; Gourgon, R

    1991-06-01

    Cardiac failure is the principal medium-term complication of myocardial infarction. Changes in left ventricular geometry are observed after infarction, called ventricular remodeling, which, though compensatory initially, cause ventricular failure in the long-term. Experimental and clinical studies suggest that early treatment by coronary recanalisation, trinitrin and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may prevent or limit the expansion and left ventricular dilatation after infarction, so improving ventricular function, and, at least in the animal, reduce mortality. Large scale trials with converting enzyme inhibitors are currently under way to determine the effects of this new therapeutic option. It would seem possible at present, independently of any reduction in the size of the infarction, to reduce or delay left ventricular dysfunction by interfering with the natural process of dilatation and ventricular modeling after infarction.

  1. Calcium signalling remodelling and disease.

    PubMed

    Berridge, Michael J

    2012-04-01

    A wide range of Ca2+ signalling systems deliver the spatial and temporal Ca2+ signals necessary to control the specific functions of different cell types. Release of Ca2+ by InsP3 (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) plays a central role in many of these signalling systems. Ongoing transcriptional processes maintain the integrity and stability of these cell-specific signalling systems. However, these homoeostatic systems are highly plastic and can undergo a process of phenotypic remodelling, resulting in the Ca2+ signals being set either too high or too low. Such subtle dysregulation of Ca2+ signals have been linked to some of the major diseases in humans such as cardiac disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Quantitative computed tomography imaging of airway remodeling in severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Fetita, Catalin I.; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous condition and approximately 5–10% of asthmatic subjects have severe disease associated with structure changes of the airways (airway remodeling) that may develop over time or shortly after onset of disease. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) imaging of the tracheobronchial tree and lung parenchyma has improved during the last 10 years, and has enabled investigators to study the large airway architecture in detail and assess indirectly the small airway structure. In severe asthmatics, morphologic changes in large airways, quantitatively assessed using 2D-3D airway registration and recent algorithms, are characterized by airway wall thickening, luminal narrowing and bronchial stenoses. Extent of expiratory gas trapping, quantitatively assessed using lung densitometry, may be used to assess indirectly small airway remodeling. Investigators have used these quantitative imaging techniques in order to attempt severity grading of asthma, and to identify clusters of asthmatic patients that differ in morphologic and functional characteristics. Although standardization of image analysis procedures needs to be improved, the identification of remodeling pattern in various phenotypes of severe asthma and the ability to relate airway structures to important clinical outcomes should help target treatment more effectively. PMID:26981458

  3. Quantitative computed tomography imaging of airway remodeling in severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Philippe A; Fetita, Catalin I; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous condition and approximately 5-10% of asthmatic subjects have severe disease associated with structure changes of the airways (airway remodeling) that may develop over time or shortly after onset of disease. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) imaging of the tracheobronchial tree and lung parenchyma has improved during the last 10 years, and has enabled investigators to study the large airway architecture in detail and assess indirectly the small airway structure. In severe asthmatics, morphologic changes in large airways, quantitatively assessed using 2D-3D airway registration and recent algorithms, are characterized by airway wall thickening, luminal narrowing and bronchial stenoses. Extent of expiratory gas trapping, quantitatively assessed using lung densitometry, may be used to assess indirectly small airway remodeling. Investigators have used these quantitative imaging techniques in order to attempt severity grading of asthma, and to identify clusters of asthmatic patients that differ in morphologic and functional characteristics. Although standardization of image analysis procedures needs to be improved, the identification of remodeling pattern in various phenotypes of severe asthma and the ability to relate airway structures to important clinical outcomes should help target treatment more effectively.

  4. Nebivolol Attenuates Maladaptive Proximal Tubule Remodeling in Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Melvin R.; Habibi, Javad; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, Dilek; Johnson, Megan; Tilmon, Roger; Jain, Deepika; Ferrario, Carlos; Sowers, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims The impact of nebivolol therapy on the renal proximal tubular cell (PTC) structure and function was investigated in a transgenic (TG) rodent model of hypertension and the cardiometabolic syndrome. The TG Ren2 rat develops nephropathy with proteinuria, increased renal angiotensin II levels and oxidative stress, and PTC remodeling. Nebivolol, a β1-antagonist, has recently been shown to reduce albuminuria, in part, through reductions in renal oxidative stress. Accordingly, we hypothesized that nebivolol therapy would attenuate PTC damage and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Methods Young Ren2 (R2-N) and SD (SD-N) rats were treated with nebivolol (10 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (R2-C; SD-C) for 3 weeks. PTC structure and function were tested using transmission electron microscopy and functional measurements. Results Nebivolol treatment decreased urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, tubulointerstitial ultrastructural remodeling and fibrosis, NADPH oxidase activity, 3-nitrotyrosine levels, and increased megalin and lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 immunostaining in PTCs. Ultrastructural abnormalities that were improved with therapy included altered canalicular structure, reduced endosomes/lysosomes and PTC vacuoles, basement membrane thickening, and mitochondrial remodeling/fragmentation. Conclusion These observations support the notion that nebivolol may improve PTC reabsorption of albumin and other glomerular filtered small molecular weight proteins in association with the attenuation of oxidative stress, tubulointerstitial injury and fibrosis in this rat model of metabolic kidney disease. PMID:20110666

  5. Adverse Effects of Excess Residual PbI2 on Photovoltaic Performance, Charge Separation, and Trap-State Properties in Mesoporous Structured Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao-Yi; Hao, Ming-Yang; Han, Jun; Yu, Man; Qin, Yujun; Zhang, Pu; Guo, Zhi-Xin; Ai, Xi-Cheng; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2017-03-17

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have rapidly come to prominence in the photovoltaic field. In this context, CH3 NH3 PbI3 , as the most widely adopted active layer, has been attracting great attention. Generally, in a CH3 NH3 PbI3 layer, unreacted PbI2 inevitably coexists with the perovskite crystals, especially following a two-step fabrication process. There appears to be a consensus that an appropriate amount of unreacted PbI2 is beneficial to the overall photovoltaic performance of a device, the only disadvantageous aspect of excess residual PbI2 being viewed as its insulating nature. However, the further development of such perovskite-based devices requires a deeper understanding of the role of residual PbI2 . In this work, PbI2 -enriched and PbI2 -controlled perovskite films, as two extreme cases, have been prepared by modulating the crystallinity of a pre-deposited PbI2 film. The effects of excess residual PbI2 have been elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and optoelectronic studies. The initial charge separation, the trap-state density, and the trap-state distribution have all been found to be adversely affected in PbI2 -enriched devices, to the detriment of photovoltaic performance. This leads to a biphasic recombination process and accelerates the charge carrier recombination dynamics.

  6. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  7. Maternal Uterine Vascular Remodeling During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Osol, George; Mandala, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    Sufficient uteroplacental blood flow is essential for normal pregnancy outcome and is accomplished by the coordinated growth and remodeling of the entire uterine circulation, as well as the creation of a new fetal vascular organ: the placenta. The process of remodeling involves a number of cellular processes, including hyperplasia and hypertrophy, rearrangement of existing elements, and changes in extracellular matrix. In this review, we provide information on uterine blood flow increases during pregnancy, the influence of placentation type on the distribution of uterine vascular resistance, consideration of the patterns, nature, and extent of maternal uterine vascular remodeling during pregnancy, and what is known about the underlying cellular mechanisms. PMID:19196652

  8. The solid state environment orchestrates embryonic development and tissue remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damsky, C. H.; Moursi, A.; Zhou, Y.; Fisher, S. J.; Globus, R. K.

    1997-01-01

    Cell interactions with extracellular matrix and with other cells play critical roles in morphogenesis during development and in tissue homeostasis and remodeling throughout life. Extracellular matrix is information-rich, not only because it is comprised of multifunctional structural ligands for cell surface adhesion receptors, but also because it contains peptide signaling factors, and proteinases and their inhibitors. The functions of these groups of molecules are extensively interrelated. In this review, three primary cell culture models are described that focus on adhesion receptors and their roles in complex aspects of morphogenesis and remodeling: the regulation of proteinase expression by fibronectin and integrins in synovial fibroblasts; the regulation of osteoblast differentiation and survival by fibronectin, and the regulation of trophoblast differentiation and invasion by integrins, cadherins and immunoglobulin family adhesion receptors.

  9. ATP dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Saladi, Srinivas Vinod; de la Serna, Ivana L

    2010-03-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent cells that can self renew or be induced to differentiate into multiple cell lineages, and thus have the potential to be utilized in regenerative medicine. Key pluripotency specific factors (Oct 4/Sox2/Nanog/Klf4) maintain the pluripotent state by activating expression of pluripotency specific genes and by inhibiting the expression of developmental regulators. Pluripotent ES cells are distinguished from differentiated cells by a specialized chromatin state that is required to epigenetically regulate the ES cell phenotype. Recent studies show that in addition to pluripotency specific factors, chromatin remodeling enzymes play an important role in regulating ES cell chromatin and the capacity to self-renew and to differentiate. Here we review recent studies that delineate the role of ATP dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes in regulating ES cell chromatin structure.

  10. Pulmonary arterial remodeling revealed by microfocal x-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Johnson, Roger H.; Dhyani, Anita H.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2001-05-01

    Animal models and micro-CT imaging are useful for understanding the functional consequences of, and identifying the genes involved in, the remodeling of vascular structures that accompanies pulmonary vascular disease. Using a micro-CT scanner to image contrast-enhanced arteries in excised lungs from fawn hooded rats (a strain genetically susceptible to hypoxia induced pulmonary hypertension), we found that portions of the pulmonary arterial tree downstream from a given diameter were morphometrically indistinguishable. This 'self-consistency' property provided a means for summarizing the pulmonary arterial tree architecture and mechanical properties using a parameter vector obtained from measurements of the contiguous set of vessel segments comprising the longest (principal) pathway and its branches over a range of vascular pressures. This parameter vector was used to characterize the pulmonary vascular remodeling that occurred in rats exposed to a hypoxic (11.5% oxygen) environment and provided the input to a hemodynamic model relating structure to function. The major effect of the remodeling was a longitudinally (pulmonary artery to arterioles) uniform decrease in vessel distensibility that resulted in a 90% increase in arterial resistance. Despite the almost uniform change in vessel distensibility, over 50% of the resistance increase was attributable to vessels with unstressed diameters less than 125 microns.

  11. Tension-dependent nucleosome remodeling at the pericentromere in yeast.

    PubMed

    Verdaasdonk, Jolien S; Gardner, Ryan; Stephens, Andrew D; Yeh, Elaine; Bloom, Kerry

    2012-07-01

    Nucleosome positioning is important for the structural integrity of chromosomes. During metaphase the mitotic spindle exerts physical force on pericentromeric chromatin. The cell must adjust the pericentromeric chromatin to accommodate the changing tension resulting from microtubule dynamics to maintain a stable metaphase spindle. Here we examine the effects of spindle-based tension on nucleosome dynamics by measuring the histone turnover of the chromosome arm and the pericentromere during metaphase in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that both histones H2B and H4 exhibit greater turnover in the pericentromere during metaphase. Loss of spindle-based tension by treatment with the microtubule-depolymerizing drug nocodazole or compromising kinetochore function results in reduced histone turnover in the pericentromere. Pericentromeric histone dynamics are influenced by the chromatin-remodeling activities of STH1/NPS1 and ISW2. Sth1p is the ATPase component of the Remodels the Structure of Chromatin (RSC) complex, and Isw2p is an ATP-dependent DNA translocase member of the Imitation Switch (ISWI) subfamily of chromatin-remodeling factors. The balance between displacement and insertion of pericentromeric histones provides a mechanism to accommodate spindle-based tension while maintaining proper chromatin packaging during mitosis.

  12. Oral Adverse Events Associated with Tyrosine Kinase and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitors in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Structured Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Joel B.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Ouwerkerk, Jan; Logan, Richard M.; Brakenhoff, Jan A.; Lacouture, Mario E.; Gelderblom, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Background. Oral adverse events (OAEs) associated with multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORIs) are underestimated but frequent and novel presentations of mucosal manifestations. Because optimal antitumor activity requires maintaining the optimal dose, it is essential to avoid unintended treatment delays or interruptions. Methods. We review the reported prevalence and appearance of OAEs with TKIs and mTORIs and the current oral assessment tools commonly used in clinical trials. We discuss the correlations between OAEs and hand–foot skin reaction (HFSR) and rash. Results. The reported prevalence of oral mucositis/stomatitis of any grade is 4% for pazopanib, 28% for sorafenib, 38% for sunitinib, 41% for temsirolimus, and 44% for everolimus. Oral lesions associated with these agents have been reported to more closely resemble aphthous stomatitis than OM caused by conventional agents. In addition, these agents may result in symptoms such as oral mucosal pain, dysgeusia, and dysphagia, in the absence of clinical lesions. Because of these factors, OAEs secondary to targeted agents may be underreported. In addition, a correlation between OAEs and HFSR was identified. Conclusions. OAEs caused by TKIs and mTORIs may represent dose-limiting toxicities, especially considering the fact that even low grades of OAEs may be troubling to the patient. We discuss how these novel AEs can be assessed because current mucositis assessment tools have limitations. Prospective studies investigating the pathogenesis, risk factors, and management of OAEs are needed in order to minimize the impact on patient's health-related quality of life. PMID:22207567

  13. The Role of Hippo/YAP Signaling in Vascular Remodeling and Related Diseases.

    PubMed

    He, Jinlong; Bao, Qiankun; Yan, Meng; Liang, Jing; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Chunjiong; Ai, Ding

    2017-04-03

    Vascular remodeling is a vital process of a wide range of cardiovascular diseases and represents the altered structure and arrangement of blood vessels. The Hippo pathway controls organ size by regulating cell survival, proliferation and apoptosis. Yes-associated protein (YAP), a transcription coactivator, is a downstream effector of the Hippo pathway. Emerging evidence supports that the Hippo/YAP pathway plays an important role in vascular-remodeling and related cardiovascular diseases. The Hippo/YAP pathway has been shown to alter extracellular matrix production or degradation and the growth, death and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, which contributes to vascular remodeling in cardiovascular diseases such as pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerosis, restenosis, aortic aneurysms and angiogenesis. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent findings about the roles and mechanisms of Hippo/YAP signaling in vascular-remodeling and related diseases.

  14. Collagen remodeling in photo-thermal damaged skin with optical coherence tomography and multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shu-lian; Li, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-man; Yu, Lili

    2009-08-01

    Cutaneous photo-thermal damage is the common damages in clinical medicine; it is a complex and dynamic process that follows an orderly sequence of events. The sequence can be roughly divided into three distinct, yet sequentially overlapping phases-inflammation, granulation tissue formation, and tissue remodeling. Characteristic structural changes associated with each phase could provide a basis for photo-thermal damage assessment with imaging technologies. Monitoring the skin tissue response during the skin after irradiated by laser and tracing the process of skin remodeling would help to understand the mechanism of photo-thermal. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) imaging were used to observe the process of the collagen remodeling in mouse dermis photo-thermal injured which after irradiated by intense pulsed light source (IPLs) in this paper. Our finding showed that the OCT and MPM techniques can image the process of collagen remodeling in mouse dermis.

  15. The driving forces of membrane remodeling by non-intrinsically curved proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Christopher J.; Stachowiak, Jeanne C.; Schmid, Eva M.; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2011-03-01

    Membranes are dynamically remodeled during numerous processes essential to cells. Among the most well-studied effectors of this remodeling are BAR family proteins, which are small and have a banana-like intrinsic curvature that senses, forms, and stabilizes curved membranes without expending energy as ATP or GTP. Recent experiments in reduced systems have shown, however, that small proteins that feature no such intrinsic curvature can similarly cluster at and dramatically remodel membranes. These proteins have no distinguishing features other than their size and their membrane-binding sites, and the dominant effect that is driving curvature is not well understood. Here, we present a coarse-grained simulation study that captures protein steric and binding effects as well as membrane fluctuations at large scales. We use this model to systematically test for the role that such attributes play in the resulting dynamics and equilibrium structures of remodeling processes that feature this motif.

  16. Reverse remodeling and recovery from cachexia in rats with aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Yaser; Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Khan, M Usman; Green, Kelly D; Ahokas, Robert A; Gerling, Ivan C; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Weber, Karl T

    2012-08-15

    The congestive heart failure (CHF) syndrome with soft tissue wasting, or cachexia, has its pathophysiologic origins rooted in neurohormonal activation. Mechanical cardiocirculatory assistance reveals the potential for reverse remodeling and recovery from CHF, which has been attributed to device-based hemodynamic unloading whereas the influence of hormonal withdrawal remains uncertain. This study addresses the signaling pathways induced by chronic aldosteronism in normal heart and skeletal muscle at organ, cellular/subcellular, and molecular levels, together with their potential for recovery (Recov) after its withdrawal. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were examined at 4 wk of aldosterone/salt treatment (ALDOST) and following 4-wk Recov. Compared with untreated, age-/sex-/strain-matched controls, ALDOST was accompanied by 1) a failure to gain weight, reduced muscle mass with atrophy, and a heterogeneity in cardiomyocyte size across the ventricles, including hypertrophy and atrophy at sites of microscopic scarring; 2) increased cardiomyocyte and mitochondrial free Ca(2+), coupled to oxidative stress with increased H(2)O(2) production and 8-isoprostane content, and increased opening potential of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore; 3) differentially expressed genes reflecting proinflammatory myocardial and catabolic muscle phenotypes; and 4) reversal to or toward recovery of these responses with 4-wk Recov. Aldosteronism in rats is accompanied by cachexia and leads to an adverse remodeling of the heart and skeletal muscle at organ, cellular/subcellular, and molecular levels. However, evidence presented herein implicates that these tissues retain their inherent potential for recovery after complete hormone withdrawal.

  17. Simulations of trabecular remodeling and fatigue: is remodeling helpful or harmful?

    PubMed

    van Oers, René F M; van Rietbergen, Bert; Ito, Keita; Huiskes, Rik; Hilbers, Peter A J

    2011-05-01

    Microdamage-targeted resorption is paradoxal, because it entails the removal of bone from a region that was already overloaded. Under continued intense loading, resorption spaces could potentially cause more damage than they remove. To investigate this problem, we incorporated damage algorithms in a computer-simulation model for trabecular remodeling. We simulated damage accumulation and bone remodeling in a trabecular architecture, for two fatigue regimens, a 'moderate' regimen, and an 'intense' regimen with a higher number of loading cycles per day. Both simulations were also performed without bone remodeling to investigate if remodeling removed or exacerbated the damage. We found that remodeling tends to remove damage under the 'moderate' fatigue regimen, but it exacerbates damage under the 'intense' regimen. This harmful effect of remodeling may play a role in the development of stress fractures.

  18. Minireview: Nuclear Receptor Regulation of Osteoclast and Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zixue; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells essential for skeletal remodeling and regeneration. However, excessive osteoclasts often contribute to prevalent bone degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis, and cancer bone metastasis. Osteoclast dysregulation is also associated with rare disorders such as osteopetrosis, pycnodysostosis, Paget's disease, and Gorham-Stout syndrome. The nuclear receptor (NR) family of transcription factors functions as metabolic sensors that control a variety of physiological processes including skeletal homeostasis and serves as attractive therapeutic targets for many diseases. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the new players and the new mechanisms for how NRs regulate osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. An enhanced understanding of NR functions in osteoclastogenesis will facilitate the development of not only novel osteoprotective medicine but also prudent strategies to minimize the adverse skeletal effects of certain NR-targeting drugs for a better treatment of cancer and metabolic diseases. PMID:25549044

  19. The angiotensin receptor blocker losartan reduces coronary arteriole remodeling in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Husarek, Kathryn E; Katz, Paige S; Trask, Aaron J; Galantowicz, Maarten L; Cismowski, Mary J; Lucchesi, Pamela A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular complications are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and are associated with alterations of blood vessel structure and function. Although endothelial dysfunction and aortic stiffness have been documented, little is known about the effects of T2DM on coronary microvascular structural remodeling. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system plays an important role in large artery stiffness and mesenteric vessel remodeling in hypertension and T2DM. The goal of this study was to determine whether the blockade of AT1R signaling dictates vascular smooth muscle growth that partially underlies coronary arteriole remodeling in T2DM. Control and db/db mice were given AT1R blocker losartan via drinking water for 4 weeks. Using pressure myography, we found that coronary arterioles from 16-week db/db mice undergo inward hypertrophic remodeling due to increased wall thickness and wall-to-lumen ratio with a decreased lumen diameter. This remodeling was accompanied by decreased elastic modulus (decreased stiffness). Losartan treatment decreased wall thickness, wall-to-lumen ratio, and coronary arteriole cell number in db/db mice. Losartan treatment did not affect incremental elastic modulus. However, losartan improved coronary flow reserve. Our data suggest that Ang II-AT1R signaling mediates, at least in part, coronary arteriole inward hypertrophic remodeling in T2DM without affecting vascular mechanics, further suggesting that targeting the coronary microvasculature in T2DM may help reduce cardiac ischemic events.

  20. Mesenteric Resistance Arteries in Type 2 Diabetic db/db Mice Undergo Outward Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Smith, Flavia M.; Katz, Paige S.; Trask, Aaron J.; Stewart, James A.; Lord, Kevin C.; Varner, Kurt J.; Vassallo, Dalton V.; Lucchesi, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Resistance vessel remodeling is controlled by myriad of hemodynamic and neurohormonal factors. This study characterized structural and molecular remodeling in mesenteric resistance arteries (MRAs) in diabetic (db/db) and control (Db/db) mice. Methods Structural properties were assessed in isolated MRAs from 12 and 16 wk-old db/db and Db/db mice by pressure myography. Matrix regulatory proteins were measured by Western blot analysis. Mean arterial pressure and superior mesenteric blood flow were measured in 12 wk-old mice by telemetry and a Doppler flow nanoprobe, respectively. Results Blood pressure was similar between groups. Lumen diameter and medial cross-sectional area were significantly increased in 16 wk-old db/db MRA compared to control, indicating outward hypertrophic remodeling. Moreover, wall stress and cross-sectional compliance were significantly larger in diabetic arteries. These remodeling indices were associated with increased expression of matrix regulatory proteins matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-12, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, TIMP-2, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in db/db arteries. Finally, superior mesenteric artery blood flow was increased by 46% in 12 wk-old db/db mice, a finding that preceded mesenteric resistance artery remodeling. Conclusions These data suggest that flow-induced hemodynamic changes may supersede the local neurohormonal and metabolic milieu to culminate in hypertrophic outward remodeling of type 2 DM mesenteric resistance arteries. PMID:21829729

  1. Aromatic small molecules remodel toxic soluble oligomers of amyloid beta through three independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Ladiwala, Ali Reza A; Dordick, Jonathan S; Tessier, Peter M

    2011-02-04

    In protein conformational disorders ranging from Alzheimer to Parkinson disease, proteins of unrelated sequence misfold into a similar array of aggregated conformers ranging from small oligomers to large amyloid fibrils. Substantial evidence suggests that small, prefibrillar oligomers are the most toxic species, yet to what extent they can be selectively targeted and remodeled into non-toxic conformers using small molecules is poorly understood. We have evaluated the conformational specificity and remodeling pathways of a diverse panel of aromatic small molecules against mature soluble oligomers of the Aβ42 peptide associated with Alzheimer disease. We find that small molecule antagonists can be grouped into three classes, which we herein define as Class I, II, and III molecules, based on the distinct pathways they utilize to remodel soluble oligomers into multiple conformers with reduced toxicity. Class I molecules remodel soluble oligomers into large, off-pathway aggregates that are non-toxic. Moreover, Class IA molecules also remodel amyloid fibrils into the same off-pathway structures, whereas Class IB molecules fail to remodel fibrils but accelerate aggregation of freshly disaggregated Aβ. In contrast, a Class II molecule converts soluble Aβ oligomers into fibrils, but is inactive against disaggregated and fibrillar Aβ. Class III molecules disassemble soluble oligomers (as well as fibrils) into low molecular weight species that are non-toxic. Strikingly, Aβ non-toxic oligomers (which are morphologically indistinguishable from toxic soluble oligomers) are significantly more resistant to being remodeled than Aβ soluble oligomers or amyloid fibrils. Our findings reveal that relatively subtle differences in small molecule structure encipher surprisingly large differences in the pathways they employ to remodel Aβ soluble oligomers and related aggregated conformers.

  2. MYOCARDIAL REMODELING IN LOW-RENIN HYPERTENSION. MOLECULAR PATHWAYS TO CELLULAR INJURY IN RELATIVE ALDOSTERONISM

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Syamal K.; Gandhi, Malay S.; Kamalov, German; Ahokas, Robert A.; Sun, Yao; Gerling, Ivan C.; Weber, Karl T.

    2010-01-01

    The pathologic hypertrophy of hypertensive heart disease is related to the quality not quantity of myocardium; the presence of fibrosis is inevitably linked to structural and functional insufficiencies with increased cardiovascular risk. Inappropriate (relative to dietary Na+) elevations in plasma aldosterone, or relative aldosteronism, are accompanied by suppressed plasma renin activity, elevation in arterial pressure, and dyshomeostasis of divalent cations. The accompanying hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia, and hypozincemia of aldosteronism contribute to the appearance of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Parathyroid hormone-mediated intracellular Ca2+ overloading of cardiac myocytes and mitochondria leads to the induction of oxidative stress and molecular pathways associated with cardiomyocyte necrosis and scarring of myocardium, while the dyshomeostasis of Zn2+ compromises antioxidant defenses. This dyshomeostasis of Ca2+ and Zn2+ is intrinsically coupled as pro- and antioxidant, respectively, raising the prospect for therapeutic strategies designed to mitigate intracellular Ca2+ overloading while enhancing Zn2+-mediated antioxidant defenses, thus preventing adverse myocardial remodeling with fibrosis, associated diastolic dysfunction, and cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:19895752

  3. Factors affecting left ventricular remodeling after valve replacement for aortic stenosis. An overview

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Emmanuel; Troise, Giovanni; Cirillo, Marco; Brunelli, Federico; Tomba, Margherita Dalla; Mhagna, Zen; Tasca, Giordano; Quaini, Eugenio

    2006-01-01

    Although a small percentage of patients with critical aortic stenosis do not develop left ventricle hypertrophy, increased ventricular mass is widely observed in conditions of increased afterload. There is growing epidemiological evidence that hypertrophy is associated with excess cardiac mortality and morbidity not only in patients with arterial hypertension, but also in those undergoing aortic valve replacement. Valve replacement surgery relieves the aortic obstruction and prolongs the life of many patients, but favorable or adverse left ventricular remodeling is affected by a large number of factors whose specific roles are still a subject of debate. Age, gender, hemodynamic factors, prosthetic valve types, myocyte alterations, interstitial structures, blood pressure control and ethnicity can all influence the process of left ventricle mass regression, and myocardial metabolism and coronary artery circulation are also involved in the changes occurring after aortic valve replacement. The aim of this overview is to analyze these factors in the light of our experience, elucidate the important question of prosthesis-patient mismatch by considering the method of effective orifice area, and discuss surgical timings and techniques that can improve the management of patients with aortic valve stenosis and maximize the probability of mass regression. PMID:16803632

  4. Raise the Floor When Remodeling Science Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools, 1972

    1972-01-01

    A new remodeling idea adopts the concept of raised floor covering gas, water, electrical, and drain lines. The accessible floor has removable panels set into an adjustable support frame 24 inches above a concrete subfloor. (Author)

  5. Lead Poisoning in Remodeling of Old Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Bart

    1973-01-01

    An article based on Dr. Muriel D. Wolf's study of elevated blood lead levels in children and adults present during the remodeling of old homes. Lead poisoning examples, symptoms, and precautions are given. (ST)

  6. B.B. Contracting & Remodeling Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    B.B. Contracting & Remodeling (the Company) is located in St. Louis, Missouri. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in St. Louis, Missouri.

  7. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  8. Nucleosome recognition and spacing by chromatin remodelling factor ISW1a.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Timothy J

    2012-04-01

    Nucleosomes are actively positioned along DNA by ATP-dependent, chromatin remodelling factors. A structural model for the ISW1a chromatin remodelling factor from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in complex with a dinucleosome substrate was constructed from the X-ray structures of ISW1a (ΔATPase) with and without DNA bound, two different cryo-EM (cryo-electron microscopy) structures of ISW1a (ΔATPase) bound to a nucleosome, and site-directed photo-cross-linking analyses in solution. The X-ray structure of ISW1a (ΔATPase) with DNA bound suggests that DNA sequence may be involved in nucleosome recognition and thereby specificity of promoter interaction. The model suggests how the highly ordered nucleosome arrays observed by mapping nucleosomes in genes and their promoter regions could be generated by a chromatin remodelling factor.

  9. Tissue remodeling investigation in varicose veins

    PubMed Central

    Ghaderian, Sayyed Mohammad Hossein; Khodaii, Zohreh

    2012-01-01

    Although the etiology of varicose veins remains unknown, recent studies have focused on endothelial cell integrity and function because the endothelium regulates vessel tone and synthesizes many pro- and anti-inflammatory factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the evidence involving the endothelium in the development of varicose vein disease. In addition, tissue remodeling was investigated in varicose veins to determine the expression of different types of collagen. Tissue specimens of superficial varicose veins and control saphenous vein were used for immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscope (TEM). α-smooth muscle actin, and collagen I, III, IV antibodies were applied for immunohistochemical investigation. Findings of this study showed alterations of the intima, such as focal intimal discontinuity and denudation of endothelium; and the media, such as irregular arrangements of smooth muscle cells and collagen fibres in varicose veins. Our findings showed some changes in terms of distribution of types I, III and IV collagen in the intima and media of varicose vein walls compared with controls. These alterations to the media suggest that the pathological abnormality in varicose veins may be due to the loss of muscle tone as a result of the breakup of its regular structure by the collagen fibres. These findings only described some changes in terms of distribution of these types of collagen in the intima and media of varicose vein walls which may result in venous wall dysfunction in varicosis. PMID:24551759

  10. Fibrinolysis inhibitors adversely affect remodeling of tissues sealed with fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Lissy K; Vijayan Lal, Arthur; Uma Shankar, P R; Mohanty, Mira

    2003-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to determine if aprotinin and epsilon -amino caproic acid increases the quality of Fibrin glue. A rat model was used for tissues such as liver and skin while rabbits were used for application of glue in dura mater. Apposition of all the tissues, glued with fibrin was found to be good and remnants of the polymerized fibrin were seen even on the seventh day of application, though inhibitors were not incorporated with the glue. In skin, excessive amounts of fibrin remained as a result of addition of aprotinin and epsilon -amino caproic acid, as compared to the glue applied without any inhibitor. After dural sealing, the wound repair and new bone formation at craniotomy site progressed well in the fibrin glue applied area as compared to the commercially available glue that contained aprotinin. The adhesive strength of the glue without or with fibrinolysis inhibitors was found to be similar, after 1h grafts on rat back. The observations from this study suggests that the use of aprotinin with fibrin glue may not be required because, even liver tissue that is known to have high fibrinolytic activity was sealed and repaired well in the absence of plasminogen inhibitors. On the other hand, it was found that if inhibitors were added, nondegraded matrix remained in the tissue even after 15 days and affected migration of repair cells. Thus, the inhibition of fibrinolysis after fibrin glue application is found detrimental to wound healing.

  11. Localized tissue mineralization regulated by bone remodelling: A computational approach

    PubMed Central

    Decco, Oscar; Adams, George; Cook, Richard B.; García Aznar, José Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Bone is a living tissue whose main mechanical function is to provide stiffness, strength and protection to the body. Both stiffness and strength depend on the mineralization of the organic matrix, which is constantly being remodelled by the coordinated action of the bone multicellular units (BMUs). Due to the dynamics of both remodelling and mineralization, each sample of bone is composed of structural units (osteons in cortical and packets in cancellous bone) created at different times, therefore presenting different levels of mineral content. In this work, a computational model is used to understand the feedback between the remodelling and the mineralization processes under different load conditions and bone porosities. This model considers that osteoclasts primarily resorb those parts of bone closer to the surface, which are younger and less mineralized than older inner ones. Under equilibrium loads, results show that bone volumes with both the highest and the lowest levels of porosity (cancellous and cortical respectively) tend to develop higher levels of mineral content compared to volumes with intermediate porosity, thus presenting higher material densities. In good agreement with recent experimental measurements, a boomerang-like pattern emerges when plotting apparent density at the tissue level versus material density at the bone material level. Overload and disuse states are studied too, resulting in a translation of the apparent–material density curve. Numerical results are discussed pointing to potential clinical applications. PMID:28306746

  12. Atrial Electrophysiological Remodeling and Fibrillation in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Sandeep V.; Workman, Antony J.

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) causes complex, chronic changes in atrial structure and function, which can cause substantial electrophysiological remodeling and predispose the individual to atrial fibrillation (AF). Pharmacological treatments for preventing AF in patients with HF are limited. Improved understanding of the atrial electrical and ionic/molecular mechanisms that promote AF in these patients could lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Animal models of HF have identified numerous changes in atrial ion currents, intracellular calcium handling, action potential waveform and conduction, as well as expression and signaling of associated proteins. These studies have shown that the pattern of electrophysiological remodeling likely depends on the duration of HF, the underlying cardiac pathology, and the species studied. In atrial myocytes and tissues obtained from patients with HF or left ventricular systolic dysfunction, the data on changes in ion currents and action potentials are largely equivocal, probably owing mainly to difficulties in controlling for the confounding influences of multiple variables, such as patient’s age, sex, disease history, and drug treatments, as well as the technical challenges in obtaining such data. In this review, we provide a summary and comparison of the main animal and human electrophysiological studies to date, with the aim of highlighting the consistencies in some of the remodeling patterns, as well as identifying areas of contention and gaps in the knowledge, which warrant further investigation. PMID:27812293

  13. Bortezomib protects from varicose-like venous remodeling.

    PubMed

    Pfisterer, Larissa; Meyer, Ralph; Feldner, Anja; Drews, Oliver; Hecker, Markus; Korff, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Despite the high prevalence of venous diseases that are associated with and based on the structural reorganization of the venous vessel wall, not much is known about their mechanistic causes. In this context, we demonstrated that the quantity of myocardin, a transcriptional regulator of the contractile and quiescent smooth muscle cell phenotype, was diminished in proliferating synthetic venous smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of human and mouse varicose veins by 51 and 60%, respectively. On the basis of the relevance of proteasomal activity for such phenotypic changes, we hypothesized that the observed VSMC activation is attenuated by the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. This drug fully abolished VSMC proliferation and loss of myocardin in perfused mouse veins and blocked VSMC invasion in collagen gels by almost 80%. In line with this, topical transdermal treatment with bortezomib diminished VSMC proliferation by 80%, rescued 90% of VSMC myocardin abundance, and inhibited varicose-like venous remodeling by 67 to 72% in a mouse model. Collectively, our data indicate that the proteasome plays a pivotal role in VSMC phenotype changes during venous remodeling processes. Its inhibition protects from varicose-like vein remodeling in mice and may thus serve as a putative therapeutic strategy to treat human varicose veins.

  14. Localized tissue mineralization regulated by bone remodelling: A computational approach.

    PubMed

    Berli, Marcelo; Borau, Carlos; Decco, Oscar; Adams, George; Cook, Richard B; García Aznar, José Manuel; Zioupos, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Bone is a living tissue whose main mechanical function is to provide stiffness, strength and protection to the body. Both stiffness and strength depend on the mineralization of the organic matrix, which is constantly being remodelled by the coordinated action of the bone multicellular units (BMUs). Due to the dynamics of both remodelling and mineralization, each sample of bone is composed of structural units (osteons in cortical and packets in cancellous bone) created at different times, therefore presenting different levels of mineral content. In this work, a computational model is used to understand the feedback between the remodelling and the mineralization processes under different load conditions and bone porosities. This model considers that osteoclasts primarily resorb those parts of bone closer to the surface, which are younger and less mineralized than older inner ones. Under equilibrium loads, results show that bone volumes with both the highest and the lowest levels of porosity (cancellous and cortical respectively) tend to develop higher levels of mineral content compared to volumes with intermediate porosity, thus presenting higher material densities. In good agreement with recent experimental measurements, a boomerang-like pattern emerges when plotting apparent density at the tissue level versus material density at the bone material level. Overload and disuse states are studied too, resulting in a translation of the apparent-material density curve. Numerical results are discussed pointing to potential clinical applications.

  15. Telithromycin: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Telithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic that has been marketed since the early 2000s. It has not been shown to be more effective against any bacteria than other macrolide antibiotics. Its antibacterial activity is in no way remarkable. In early 2014, we reviewed its adverse effect profile using data from periodic safety update reports, drug regulatory agencies, and detailed published case reports. In addition to the adverse effect profile telithromycin shares with the other macrolides, it provokes several specific adverse effects: visual disturbances due to impaired accommodation; taste and smell disorders; severe liver damage; worsening of myasthenia gravis; rhabdomyolysis; and loss of consciousness. Prolongation of the QT interval with standard oral doses is a worrisome adverse effect. In practice, it is better not to use telithromycin as it exposes patients to disproportionate, serious adverse effects. When treatment with a macrolide antibiotic appears necessary, it is prudent to choose a different macrolide, such as spiramycin or azithromycin, which have fewer adverse effects.

  16. Biomarkers to Predict Reverse Remodeling and Myocardial Recovery in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Motiwala, Shweta R; Gaggin, Hanna K

    2016-10-01

    Left ventricular remodeling appears to be a critical link between cardiac injury and the development and progression of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). Several drug and device therapies that modify and reverse the remodeling process in patients with HFrEF are closely associated with improvement in clinical outcomes. Reverse remodeling, including partial or complete recovery of systolic function and structure, is possible but its determinants are incompletely understood. Methods to predict reverse remodeling in response to therapy are not well defined. Though non-invasive imaging techniques remain the most widely used methods of assessing reverse remodeling, serum biomarkers are now being investigated as more specific, mechanistically driven, and clinically useful predictors of reverse remodeling. Biomarkers that reflect myocyte stretch and stress, myocyte injury and necrosis, inflammation and fibrosis, and extracellular matrix turnover may be particularly valuable for predicting pathophysiologic changes and prognosis in individual patients. Their use may ultimately allow improved application of precision medicine in chronic HF.

  17. Determinants of ovine compact bone viscoelastic properties: effects of architecture, mineralization, and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Les, C M; Spence, C A; Vance, J L; Christopherson, G T; Patel, B; Turner, A S; Divine, G W; Fyhrie, D P

    2004-09-01

    Significant decreases in ovine compact bone viscoelastic properties (specifically, stress-rate sensitivity, and damping efficiency) are associated with three years of ovariectomy and are particularly evident at higher frequencies [Proc. Orthop. Res. Soc. 27 (2002) 89]. It is unclear what materials or architectural features of bone are responsible for either the viscoelastic properties themselves, or for the changes in those properties that were observed with estrogen depletion. In this study, we examined the relationship between these viscoelastic mechanical properties and features involving bone architecture (BV/TV), materials parameters (ash density, %mineralization), and histologic evidence of remodeling (%remodeled, cement line interface). The extent of mineralization was inversely proportional to the material's efficiency in damping stress oscillations. The damping characteristics of bone material from ovariectomized animals were significantly more sensitive to variation in mineralization than was bone from control animals. At low frequencies (6 Hz or less), increased histologic evidence of remodeling was positively correlated with increased damping efficiency. However, the dramatic decreases in stress-rate sensitivity that accompanied 3-year ovariectomy were seen throughout the bone structure and occurred even in areas with little or no secondary Haversian remodeling as well as in areas of complete remodeling. Taken together, these data suggest that, while the mineral component may modify the viscoelastic behavior of bone, the basic mechanism underlying bone viscoelastic behavior, and of the changes in that behavior with estrogen depletion, reside in a non-mineral component of the bone that can be significantly altered in the absence of secondary remodeling.

  18. Changes in pulmonary arterial wall mechanical properties and lumenal architecture with induced vascular remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molthen, Robert C.; Heinrich, Amy E.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2004-04-01

    To explore and quantify pulmonary arterial remodeling we used various methods including micro-CT, high-resolution 3-dimensional x-ray imaging, to examine the structure and function of intact pulmonary vessels in isolated rat lungs. The rat is commonly used as an animal model for studies of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and the accompanying vascular remodeling, where vascular remodeling has been defined primarily by changes in the vessel wall composition in response to hypertension inducing stimuli such as chronic hypoxic exposure (CHE) or monocrotaline (MCT) injection. Little information has been provided as to how such changes affect the vessel wall mechanical properties or the lumenal architecture of the pulmonary arterial system that actually account for the hemodynamic consequences of the remodeling. In addition, although the link between primary forms of pulmonary hypertension and inherited genetics is well established, the role that genetic coding plays in hemodynamics and vascular remodeling is not. Therefore, we are utilizing Fawn-Hooded (FH), Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Brown Norway (BN)rat strains along with unique imaging methods to parameterize both vessel distensibility and lumenal morphometry using a principal pulmonary arterial pathway analysis based on self-consistency. We have found for the hypoxia model, in addition to decreased body weight, increased hematocrit, increased right ventricular hypertrophy, the distensibility of the pulmonary arteries is shown to decrease significantly in the presence of remodeling.

  19. Cardiac remodelling and RAS inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ferrario, Carlos M.

    2016-01-01

    Risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes are known to augment the activity and tissue expression of angiotensin II (Ang II), the major effector peptide of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS). Overstimulation of the RAS has been implicated in a chain of events that contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular (CV) disease, including the development of cardiac remodelling. This chain of events has been termed the CV continuum. The concept of CV disease existing as a continuum was first proposed in 1991 and it is believed that intervention at any point within the continuum can modify disease progression. Treatment with antihypertensive agents may result in regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, with different drug classes exhibiting different degrees of efficacy. The greatest decrease in left ventricular mass is observed following treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is), which inhibit Ang II formation. Although ACE-Is and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) provide significant benefits in terms of CV events and stroke, mortality remains high. This is partly due to a failure to completely suppress the RAS, and, as our knowledge has increased, an escape phenomenon has been proposed whereby the human sequence of the 12 amino acid substrate angiotensin-(1-12) is converted to Ang II by the mast cell protease, chymase. Angiotensin-(1-12) is abundant in a wide range of organs and has been shown to increase blood pressure in animal models, an effect abolished by the presence of ACE-Is or ARBs. This review explores the CV continuum, in addition to examining the influence of the RAS. We also consider novel pathways within the RAS and how new therapeutic approaches that target this are required to further reduce Ang II formation, and so provide patients with additional benefits from a more complete blockade of the RAS. PMID:27105891

  20. Periosteal response in translation-induced bone remodelling.

    PubMed Central

    Feik, S A; Ellender, G; Crowe, D M; Ramm-Anderson, S M

    1990-01-01

    Translation of transplanted bones induces strain in the periosteum and subsequent bone remodelling. This study examines the periosteal response on the leading and trailing sides of translated bones using an in vivo model where internal bone strain is virtually eliminated. Caudal vertebrae from 4 days old rats were threaded onto the arms of pre-stressed helical torsion springs and transplanted subcutaneously. In the experimental rats, the appliances were activated seven days later causing the bones to translate. Tissues were examined both optically and by transmission electron microscopy. A connective tissue sheath or capsule forms around the bones and, as the arms of the appliance move apart, traction on the enveloping soft tissues produces compression of the periosteum on the leading side and tension on the trailing side with remodelling occurring in a direction opposite to translation. The control periosteum has an ordered structure with well-delineated osteogenic, mid- and fibrous zones. During translation the periosteum on the leading side is consistently narrower than on the trailing side and shows a gradual reduction in formative activity followed by resorption in select areas. Cells and fibres are aligned predominantly parallel to the bone surface. Accelerated formation characterises the trailing side during the translation phase with increased activity and widening of all three periosteal layers. The fibrous layer merges with the connective tissue sheath which frequently is oriented approximately perpendicular to the bone surface. The direction of remodelling is reversed when translation ceases with corresponding changes visible in the periosteum, the osteoblastic layer being the last to show changes. A normal periosteal structure and remodelling pattern is regained when equilibrium of the bones within the soft tissues is attained. This study shows that the enveloping soft tissues profoundly influence the nature and rate of bone remodelling. The changes are

  1. Periprosthetic Bone Remodelling in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    GEORGEANU, Vlad; ATASIEI, Tudor; GRUIONU, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical studies have shown that the displacement of the prosthesis components, especially of the tibial one is higher during the first year, after which it reaches an equilibrum position compatible with a good long term functioning. This displacement takes place due to bone remodelling close to the implant secondary to different loading concentrations over different areas of bone. Material and Method: Our study implies a simulation on a computational model using the finite element analysis. The simulation started taking into account arbitrary points because of non-linear conditions of bone-prosthesis interface and it was iterative.. A hundred consecutive situations corresponding to intermediate bone remodelling phases have been calculated according to given loadings. Bone remodelling was appreciated as a function of time and bone density for each constitutive element of the computational model created by finite element method. For each constitutive element a medium value of stress during the walking cycle was applied. Results: Analyse of proximal epiphysis-prosthesis complex slices showed that bone density increase is maintained all over the stem in the immediately post-operative period. At 10 months, the moment considered to be the end of bone remodelling, areas with increased bone density are fewer and smaller. Meanwhile, their distribution with a concentration toward the internal compartment in the distal metaphysis is preserved. Conclusions: After the total knee arthroplasty the tibial bone suffered a process of remodelling adapted to the new stress conditions. This bone remodelling can influence, sometimes negatively, especially in the cases with tibial component varus malposition, the fixation, respectively the survival of the prosthesis. This process has been demonstrated both by clinical trials and by simulation, using the finite elements method of periprosthetic bone remodelling. PMID:25553127

  2. Prenatal programming: adverse cardiac programming by gestational testosterone excess

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Arpita K.; Hoang, Vanessa; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Gilbreath, Ebony; Mietelka, Kristy A.

    2016-01-01

    Adverse events during the prenatal and early postnatal period of life are associated with development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Prenatal exposure to excess testosterone (T) in sheep induces adverse reproductive and metabolic programming leading to polycystic ovarian syndrome, insulin resistance and hypertension in the female offspring. We hypothesized that prenatal T excess disrupts insulin signaling in the cardiac left ventricle leading to adverse cardiac programming. Left ventricular tissues were obtained from 2-year-old female sheep treated prenatally with T or oil (control) from days 30–90 of gestation. Molecular markers of insulin signaling and cardiac hypertrophy were analyzed. Prenatal T excess increased the gene expression of molecular markers involved in insulin signaling and those associated with cardiac hypertrophy and stress including insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K), Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), nuclear factor of activated T cells –c3 (NFATc3), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) compared to controls. Furthermore, prenatal T excess increased the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT and mTOR. Myocardial disarray (multifocal) and increase in cardiomyocyte diameter was evident on histological investigation in T-treated females. These findings support adverse left ventricular remodeling by prenatal T excess. PMID:27328820

  3. Bacillus volatiles adversely affect the physiology and ultra-structure of Ralstonia solanacearum and induce systemic resistance in tobacco against bacterial wilt

    PubMed Central

    Tahir, Hafiz Abdul Samad; Gu, Qin; Wu, Huijun; Niu, Yuedi; Huo, Rong; Gao, Xuewen

    2017-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by various bacteria have significant potential to enhance plant growth and to control phytopathogens. Six of the most effective antagonistic Bacillus spp. were used in this study against Ralstonia solanacearum (Rsc) TBBS1, the causal agent of bacterial wilt disease in tobacco. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 and Bacillus artrophaeus LSSC22 had the strongest inhibitory effect against Rsc. Thirteen VOCs produced by FZB42 and 10 by LSSC22 were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Benzaldehyde, 1,2-benzisothiazol-3(2 H)-one and 1,3-butadiene significantly inhibited the colony size, cell viability, and motility of pathogens and negatively influenced chemotaxis. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy revealed severe morphological and ultra-structural changes in cells of Rsc. Furthermore, VOCs altered the transcriptional expression level of PhcA (a global virulence regulator), type III secretion system (T3SS), type IV secretion system (T4SS), extracellular polysaccharides and chemotaxis-related genes, which are major contributors to pathogenicity, resulting in decreased wilt disease. The VOCs significantly up-regulated the expression of genes related to wilt resistance and pathogen defense. Over-expression of EDS1 and NPR1 suggest the involvement of SA pathway in induction of systemic resistance. Our findings provide new insights regarding the potential of antibacterial VOCs as a biocontrol tool against bacterial wilt diseases. PMID:28091587

  4. Bacillus volatiles adversely affect the physiology and ultra-structure of Ralstonia solanacearum and induce systemic resistance in tobacco against bacterial wilt.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Hafiz Abdul Samad; Gu, Qin; Wu, Huijun; Niu, Yuedi; Huo, Rong; Gao, Xuewen

    2017-01-16

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by various bacteria have significant potential to enhance plant growth and to control phytopathogens. Six of the most effective antagonistic Bacillus spp. were used in this study against Ralstonia solanacearum (Rsc) TBBS1, the causal agent of bacterial wilt disease in tobacco. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 and Bacillus artrophaeus LSSC22 had the strongest inhibitory effect against Rsc. Thirteen VOCs produced by FZB42 and 10 by LSSC22 were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Benzaldehyde, 1,2-benzisothiazol-3(2 H)-one and 1,3-butadiene significantly inhibited the colony size, cell viability, and motility of pathogens and negatively influenced chemotaxis. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy revealed severe morphological and ultra-structural changes in cells of Rsc. Furthermore, VOCs altered the transcriptional expression level of PhcA (a global virulence regulator), type III secretion system (T3SS), type IV secretion system (T4SS), extracellular polysaccharides and chemotaxis-related genes, which are major contributors to pathogenicity, resulting in decreased wilt disease. The VOCs significantly up-regulated the expression of genes related to wilt resistance and pathogen defense. Over-expression of EDS1 and NPR1 suggest the involvement of SA pathway in induction of systemic resistance. Our findings provide new insights regarding the potential of antibacterial VOCs as a biocontrol tool against bacterial wilt diseases.

  5. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  6. Retinal remodeling in inherited photoreceptor degenerations.

    PubMed

    Marc, Robert E; Jones, Bryan W

    2003-10-01

    Photoreceptor degenerations initiated in rods or the retinal pigmented epithelium usually evoke secondary cone death and sensory deafferentation of the surviving neural retina. In the mature central nervous system, deafferentation evokes atrophy and connective re-patterning. It has been assumed that the neural retina does not remodel, and that it is a passive survivor. Screening of advanced stages of human and rodent retinal degenerations with computational molecular phenotyping has exposed a prolonged period of aggressive negative remodeling in which neurons migrate along aberrant glial columns and seals, restructuring the adult neural retina (1). Many neurons die, but survivors rewire the remnant inner plexiform layer (IPL), forming thousands of novel ectopic microneuromas in the remnant inner nuclear layer (INL). Bipolar and amacrine cells engage in new circuits that are most likely corruptive. Remodeling in human and rodent retinas emerges regardless of the molecular defects that initially trigger retinal degenerations. Although remodeling may constrain therapeutic intervals for molecular, cellular, or bionic rescue, the exposure of intrinsic retinal remodeling by the removal of sensory control in retinal degenerations suggests that neuronal organization in the normal retina may be more plastic than previously believed.

  7. Obesity and carotid artery remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kozakova, M; Palombo, C; Morizzo, C; Højlund, K; Hatunic, M; Balkau, B; Nilsson, P M; Ferrannini, E

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective: The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity-related changes in carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) might represent not only preclinical atherosclerosis but an adaptive remodeling meant to preserve circumferential wall stress (CWS) in altered hemodynamic conditions characterized by body size-dependent increase in stroke volume (SV) and blood pressure (BP). Subjects/Methods: Common carotid artery (CCA) luminal diameter (LD), IMT and CWS were measured in three different populations in order to study: (A) cross-sectional associations between SV, BP, anthropometric parameters and CCA LD (266 healthy subjects with wide range of body weight (24–159 kg)); (B) longitudinal associations between CCA LD and 3-year IMT progression rate (ΔIMT; 571 healthy non-obese subjects without increased cardiovascular (CV) risk); (C) the impact of obesity on CCA geometry and CWS (88 obese subjects without CV complications and 88 non-obese subjects matched for gender and age). Results: CCA LD was independently associated with SV that was determined by body size. In the longitudinal study, baseline LD was an independent determinant of ΔIMT, and ΔIMT of subjects in the highest LD quartile was significantly higher (28±3 μm) as compared with those in the lower quartiles (8±3, 16±4 and 16±3 μm, P=0.001, P<0.05 and P=0.01, respectively). In addition, CCA CWS decreased during the observational period in the highest LD quartile (from 54.2±8.6 to 51.6±7.4 kPa, P<0.0001). As compared with gender- and age-matched lean individuals, obese subjects had highly increased CCA LD and BP (P<0.0001 for both), but only slightly higher CWS (P=0.05) due to a significant increase in IMT (P=0.005 after adjustment for confounders). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in obese subjects, the CCA wall thickens to compensate the luminal enlargement caused by body size-induced increase in SV, and therefore, to normalize the wall stress. CCA diameter in obesity could

  8. Molecular Aspects of Exercise-induced Cardiac Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Bianca C; McMullen, Julie R

    2016-11-01

    Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling is typically an adaptive response associated with cardiac myocyte hypertrophy and renewal, increased cardiac myocyte contractility, sarcomeric remodeling, cell survival, metabolic and mitochondrial adaptations, electrical remodeling, and angiogenesis. Initiating stimuli/triggers of cardiac remodeling include increased hemodynamic load, increased sympathetic activity, and the release of hormones and growth factors. Prolonged and strenuous exercise may lead to maladaptive exercise-induced cardiac remodeling including cardiac dysfunction and arrhythmia. In addition, this article describes novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of heart failure that target mechanisms responsible for adaptive exercise-induced cardiac remodeling, which are being developed and tested in preclinical models.

  9. Analysis of site-specific N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Ivan; Lin, Chia-wei; Grant, Oliver C; Fleurkens, Susanna; Villiger, Thomas K; Soos, Miroslav; Morbidelli, Massimo; Woods, Robert J; Gauss, Robert; Aebi, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The hallmark of N-linked protein glycosylation is the generation of diverse glycan structures in the secretory pathway. Dynamic, non-template-driven processes of N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi provide the cellular setting for structural diversity. We applied newly developed mass spectrometry-based analytics to quantify site-specific N-glycan remodeling of the model protein Pdi1p expressed in insect cells. Molecular dynamics simulation, mutational analysis, kinetic studies of in vitro processing events and glycan flux analysis supported the defining role of the protein in N-glycan processing. PMID:26240167

  10. Rethinking the Measurement of Adversity.

    PubMed

    Mersky, Joshua P; Janczewski, Colleen E; Topitzes, James

    2017-02-01

    Research on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) has unified the study of interrelated risks and generated insights into the origins of disorder and disease. Ten indicators of child maltreatment and household dysfunction are widely accepted as ACEs, but further progress requires a more systematic approach to conceptualizing and measuring ACEs. Using data from a diverse, low-income sample of women who received home visiting services in Wisconsin ( N = 1,241), this study assessed the prevalence of and interrelations among 10 conventional ACEs and 7 potential ACEs: family financial problems, food insecurity, homelessness, parental absence, parent/sibling death, bullying, and violent crime. Associations between ACEs and two outcomes, perceived stress and smoking, were examined. The factor structure and test-retest reliability of ACEs was also explored. As expected, prevalence rates were high compared to studies of more representative samples. Except for parent/sibling death, all ACEs were intercorrelated and associated at the bivariate level with perceived stress and smoking. Exploratory factor analysis confirmed that conventional ACEs loaded on two factors, child maltreatment and household dysfunction, though a more complex four-factor solution emerged once new ACEs were introduced. All ACEs demonstrated acceptable test-retest reliability. Implications and future directions toward a second generation of ACE research are discussed.

  11. Soluble Endoglin Modulates Aberrant Cerebral Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongmei; Hao, Qi; Kim, Helen; Su, Hua; Letarte, Michelle; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Lawton, Michael T.; Barbaro, Nicholas M.; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Young, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are an important cause of neurological morbidity in young adults. The pathophysiology of these lesions is poorly understood. A soluble form of endoglin (sEng) has been shown to cause endothelial dysfunction and induce preeclampsia. We tested if sEng would be elevated in brain AVM tissues relative to epilepsy brain tissues, and also investigated whether sEng overexpression via gene transfer in the mouse brain would induce vascular dysplasia and associated changes in downstream signaling pathways. Methods Expression levels of sEng in surgical specimens were determined by Western blot assay and ELISA. Vascular dysplasia, levels of MMP and oxidative stress were determined by immunohistochemistry and gelatin zymography. Results Brain AVMs (n=33) had higher mean sEng levels (245 ± 175 vs 100 ± 60, % of control, P=0.04) compared with controls (n=8), as determined by Western blot. In contrast, membrane-bound Eng was not significantly different (108 ± 79 vs 100 ± 63, % of control, P=0.95). sEng gene transduction in the mouse brain induced abnormal vascular structures. It also increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity by 490 ± 30% (MMP-9), 220 ± 30% (MMP-2), and oxidants by 260 ± 20% (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal) at 2 weeks after injection, suggesting that MMPs and oxidative radicals may mediate sEng-induced pathological vascular remodeling. Interpretation The results suggest that elevated sEng may play a role in the generation of sporadic brain AVMs. Our findings may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention for patients with brain AVMs. PMID:19670444

  12. Scar remodeling after strabismus surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, I H

    1999-01-01

    limitation of versions, less separation of the tendons from sclera, and thicker appearance of the scar segments. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in the repair procedure reduced the recurrence rate. Histologic examination of the clinical stretched scar specimens showed dense connective tissue that was less well organized compared with normal tendon. In the tissue culture studies, cells cultured from the stretched scar specimens grew rapidly and were irregularly shaped. A high-molecular-weight protein was identified in the culture medium. By contrast, cells cultured from normal tendon (controls) grew more slowly and regularly, stopped growing at 4 days, and produced less total protein than cultured stretched scar specimens. In the animal model studies, the collagenase-treated sites showed elongated scars with increased collagen between the muscle and the sclera, as well as increased collagen creep rates, compared with the saline-treated controls. The use of nonabsorbable sutures in collagenase-treated animal model surgery sites was associated with shorter, thicker scars compared with similar sites sutured with absorbable sutures. CONCLUSIONS: A lengthened or stretched, remodeled scar between an operated muscle tendon and sclera is a common occurrence and is a factor contributing to the variability of outcome after strabismus repair, even years later. This abnormality may be revealed by careful exploration of previously operated muscles. Definitive repair requires firm reattachment of tendon to sclera with nonabsorbable suture support. Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 FIGURE 18 FIGURE 19 FIGURE 20 FIGURE 21 FIGURE 22 FIGURE 23 FIGURE 24 FIGURE 25 FIGURE 26 FIGURE 27 FIGURE 28 FIGURE 29 FIGURE 30 FIGURE 31 FIGURE 32 FIGURE 33 FIGURE 34 FIGURE 35 FIGURE 36 FIGURE 37 FIGURE 38 FIGURE 39 FIGURE 40 FIGURE 41 FIGURE 42 FIGURE 43 FIGURE 44 FIGURE 45 FIGURE 46 FIGURE 52

  13. Strategies for Energy Efficient Remodeling: SEER 2003 Case Study Report

    SciTech Connect

    2004-11-01

    The goal of the Strategies for Energy Efficiency in Remodeling (SEER) project is to provide information, based on research and case studies, to remodelers and consumers about opportunities to increase home energy performance.

  14. Cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, S; Allegra, A; Calapai, G; Musolino, C; Gangemi, S

    2015-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) used principally in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), myelodysplastic syndromes (MS) and amyloidosis. Adverse reactions related to lenalidomide include myelosuppression (mainly neutropenia but also thrombocytopenia), gastrointestinal problems, skin eruption, atrial fibrillation and asthenia, decreased peripheral blood stem cell yield during stem cell collection, venous thromboembolism, and secondary malignances. In this review we focused our attention on the cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

  15. Seasonal and post-trauma remodeling in cone-dominant ground squirrel retina.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Dana K; Sajdak, Benjamin S; Li, Wei; Jones, Bryan W

    2016-09-01

    With a photoreceptor mosaic containing ∼85% cones, the ground squirrel is one of the richest known mammalian sources of these important retinal cells. It also has a visual ecology much like the human's. While the ground squirrel retina is understandably prominent in the cone biochemistry, physiology, and circuitry literature, far less is known about the remodeling potential of its retinal pigment epithelium, neurons, macroglia, or microglia. This review aims to summarize the data from ground squirrel retina to this point in time, and to relate them to data from other brain areas where appropriate. We begin with a survey of the ground squirrel visual system, making comparisons with traditional rodent models and with human. Because this animal's status as a hibernator often goes unnoticed in the vision literature, we then present a brief primer on hibernation biology. Next we review what is known about ground squirrel retinal remodeling concurrent with deep torpor and with rapid recovery upon re-warming. Notable here is rapidly-reversible, temperature-dependent structural plasticity of cone ribbon synapses, as well as pre- and post-synaptic plasticity throughout diverse brain regions. It is not yet clear if retinal cell types other than cones engage in torpor-associated synaptic remodeling. We end with the small but intriguing literature on the ground squirrel retina's remodeling responses to insult by retinal detachment. Notable for widespread loss of (cone) photoreceptors, there is surprisingly little remodeling of the RPE or Müller cells. Microglial activation appears minimal, and remodeling of surviving second- and third-order neurons seems absent, but both require further study. In contrast, traumatic brain injury in the ground squirrel elicits typical macroglial and microglial responses. Overall, the data to date strongly suggest a heretofore unrecognized, natural checkpoint between retinal deafferentiation and RPE and Müller cell remodeling events. As we

  16. Ceramide inhibitor myriocin restores insulin/insulin growth factor signaling for liver remodeling in experimental alcohol-related steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lizarazo, Diana; Zabala, Valerie; Tong, Ming; Longato, Lisa; de la Monte, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Alcohol-related liver disease (ALD) is mediated in part by insulin resistance. Attendant dysregulation of lipid metabolism increases accumulation of hepatic ceramides that worsen insulin resistance and compromise the structural and functional integrity of the liver. Insulin and insulin growth factor (IGF) stimulate aspartyl-asparaginyl-β-hydroxylase (AAH), which promotes cell motility needed for structural maintenance and remodeling of the liver. AAH mediates its effects by activating Notch, and in ALD, insulin/IGF signaling, AAH, and Notch are inhibited. Method To test the hypothesis that in ALD, hepatic ceramide load contributes to impairments in insulin, AAH, and Notch signaling, control and chronic ethanol-fed adult Long–Evans rats were treated with myriocin, an inhibitor of serine palmitoyl transferase. Livers were used to assess steatohepatitis, insulin/IGF pathway activation, and expression of AAH–Notch signaling molecules. Results Chronic ethanol-fed rats had steatohepatitis with increased ceramide levels; impairments in signaling through the insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate, and Akt; and decreased expression of AAH, Notch, Jagged, Hairy–Enhancer of Split-1, hypoxiainducible factor 1α, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Myriocin abrogated many of these adverse effects of ethanol, particularly hepatic ceramide accumulation, steatohepatitis, and impairments of insulin signaling through Akt, AAH, and Notch. Conclusions In ALD, the histopathology and impairments in insulin/IGF responsiveness can be substantially resolved by ceramide inhibitor treatments, even in the context of continued chronic ethanol exposure. PMID:23802886

  17. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  18. Interleukin-2/Anti-Interleukin-2 Immune Complex Attenuates Cardiac Remodeling after Myocardial Infarction through Expansion of Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhipeng; Yu, Kunwu; Chen, Long; Li, Weihua; Xiao, Hong; Huang, Zhengrong

    2016-01-01

    CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have protective effects in wound healing and adverse ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We hypothesize that the interleukin- (IL-) 2 complex comprising the recombinant mouse IL-2/anti-IL-2 mAb (JES6-1) attenuates cardiac remodeling after MI through the expansion of Treg. Mice were subjected to surgical left anterior descending coronary artery ligation and treated with either PBS or IL-2 complex. The IL-2 complex significantly attenuates ventricular remodeling, as demonstrated by reduced infarct size, improved left ventricular (LV) function, and attenuated cardiomyocyte apoptosis. The IL-2 complex increased the percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells, which may be recruited to the infarcted heart, and decreased the frequencies of IFN-γ- and IL-17-producing CD4+ T helper (Th) cells among the CD4+Foxp3- T cells in the spleen. Furthermore, the IL-2 complex inhibited the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines as well as macrophage infiltrates in the infarcted myocardium and induced the differentiation of macrophages from M1 to M2 phenotype in border zone of infarcted myocardium. Our studies indicate that the IL-2 complex may serve as a promising therapeutic approach to attenuate adverse remodeling after MI through expanding Treg cells specifically.

  19. Re-Modelling as De-Professionalisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Meryl

    2006-01-01

    The article sets out the consequences of the British Government's remodelling agenda and its emphasis on less demarcation, for the professional status of teachers in England. It describes how the National Agreement on Raising Standards and Tackling Workload, reached between five of the six trade unions for teachers and headteachers paves the way…

  20. Challenging Modernization: Remodelling the Education Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butt, Graham; Gunter, Helen

    2005-01-01

    This special edition enables an in-depth look at the process of modernization of education in England, in relation to other international developments. In particular we focus on the reform of teachers? work by examining the antecedence of the current policy of remodelling through three articles based on the Evaluation of the Department for…

  1. Retinal remodeling in human retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Jones, B W; Pfeiffer, R L; Ferrell, W D; Watt, C B; Marmor, M; Marc, R E

    2016-09-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) in the human is a progressive, currently irreversible neural degenerative disease usually caused by gene defects that disrupt the function or architecture of the photoreceptors. While RP can initially be a disease of photoreceptors, there is increasing evidence that the inner retina becomes progressively disorganized as the outer retina degenerates. These alterations have been extensively described in animal models, but remodeling in humans has not been as well characterized. This study, using computational molecular phenotyping (CMP) seeks to advance our understanding of the retinal remodeling process in humans. We describe cone mediated preservation of overall topology, retinal reprogramming in the earliest stages of the disease in retinal bipolar cells, and alterations in both small molecule and protein signatures of neurons and glia. Furthermore, while Müller glia appear to be some of the last cells left in the degenerate retina, they are also one of the first cell classes in the neural retina to respond to stress which may reveal mechanisms related to remodeling and cell death in other retinal cell classes. Also fundamentally important is the finding that retinal network topologies are altered. Our results suggest interventions that presume substantial preservation of the neural retina will likely fail in late stages of the disease. Even early intervention offers no guarantee that the interventions will be immune to progressive remodeling. Fundamental work in the biology and mechanisms of disease progression are needed to support vision rescue strategies.

  2. Immune modulation of resistance artery remodelling.

    PubMed

    Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2012-01-01

    Low-grade inflammation plays a role in cardiovascular disease. The innate and the adaptive immune responses participate in mechanisms that contribute to inflammatory responses. It has been increasingly appreciated that different subsets of lymphocytes and the cytokines they produce modulate the vascular remodelling that occurs in cardiovascular disease. Effector T cells such as T-helper (Th) 1 (interferon-γ-producing) and Th2 lymphocytes (that produce interleukin-4), as well as Th17 (that produce interleukin-17), and T suppressor lymphocytes including regulatory T cells (Treg), which express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are involved in the remodelling of small arteries that occurs under the action of angiotensin II, deoxycorticosterone-salt and aldosterone-salt, as well as in models of hypertension such as the Dahl-salt-sensitive rat. The mechanism whereby the immune system is activated is unclear, but it has been suggested that neo-antigens may be generated by the elevation of blood pressure or other stimuli, leading to the activation of the immune response. Activated Th1 may contribute to vascular remodelling directly on blood vessels via effects of the cytokines produced or indirectly by actions on the kidney. The protective effect of Treg may be mediated similarly directly or via renal effects. These data offer promise for the discovery of new therapeutic targets to ameliorate vascular remodelling, which could lead to improved outcome in cardiovascular disease in humans.

  3. Endothelial cell dynamics in vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Barbacena, Pedro; Carvalho, Joana R; Franco, Claudio A

    2016-01-01

    In this ESCHM 2016 conference talk report, we summarise two recently published original articles Franco et al. PLoS Biology 2015 and Franco et al. eLIFE 2016. The vascular network undergoes extensive vessel remodelling to become fully functional. Is it well established that blood flow is a main driver for vascular remodelling. It has also been proposed that vessel pruning is a central process within physiological vessel remodelling. However, despite its central function, the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating vessel regression, and their interaction with blood flow patterns, remain largely unexplained. We investigated the cellular process governing developmental vascular remodelling in mouse and zebrafish. We established that polarised reorganization of endothelial cells is at the core of vessel regression, representing vessel anastomosis in reverse. Moreover, we established for the first time an axial polarity map for all endothelial cells together with an in silico method for the computation of the haemodynamic forces in the murine retinal vasculature. Using network-level analysis and microfluidics, we showed that endothelial non-canonical Wnt signalling regulates endothelial sensitivity to shear forces. Loss of Wnt5a/11 renders endothelial cells more sensitive to shear, resulting in axial polarisation at lower shear stress levels. Collectively our data suggest that non-canonical Wnt signalling stabilizes forming vascular networks by reducing endothelial shear sensitivity, thus keeping vessels open under low flow conditions that prevail in the primitive plexus.

  4. Pulmonary arterial strain- and remodeling-induced stiffening are differentiated in a chronic model of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Golob, Mark J; Tabima, Diana M; Wolf, Gregory D; Johnston, James L; Forouzan, Omid; Mulchrone, Ashley M; Kellihan, Heidi B; Bates, Melissa L; Chesler, Naomi C

    2017-04-11

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a debilitating vascular disease that leads to pulmonary artery (PA) stiffening, which is a predictor of patient mortality. During PH development, PA stiffening adversely affects right ventricular function. PA stiffening has been investigated through the arterial nonlinear elastic response during mechanical testing using a canine PH model. However, only circumferential properties were reported and in the absence of chronic PH-induced PA remodeling. Remodeling can alter arterial nonlinear elastic properties via chronic changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) content and geometry. Here, we used an established constitutive model to demonstrate and differentiate between strain-stiffening, which is due to nonlinear elasticity, and remodeling-induced stiffening, which is due to ECM and geometric changes, in a canine model of chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH). To do this, circumferential and axial tissue strips of large extralobar PAs from control and CTEPH tissues were tested in uniaxial tension, and data were fit to a phenomenological constitutive model. Strain-induced stiffening was evident from mechanical testing as nonlinear elasticity in both directions and computationally by a high correlation coefficient between the mechanical data and model (R(2)=0.89). Remodeling-induced stiffening was evident from a significant increase in the constitutive model stress parameter, which correlated with increased PA collagen content and decreased PA elastin content as measured histologically. The ability to differentiate between strain- and remodeling-induced stiffening in vivo may lead to tailored clinical treatments for PA stiffening in PH patients.

  5. Remodeling of chromatin under low intensity diffuse ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Sandra; Budhiraja, Gaurav; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2012-08-01

    A variety of mechanotransduction pathways mediate the response of fibroblasts or chondrocytes to ultrasound stimulation. In addition, regulatory pathways that co-ordinate stimulus-specific cellular responses are likely to exist. In this study, analysis was confined to the hypothesis that ultrasound stimulation (US) influences the chromatin structure, and that these changes may reflect a regulatory pathway that connects nuclear architecture, chromatin structure and gene expression. Murine fibroblasts seeded on tissue culture plates were stimulated with US (5.0 MHz (14 kPa), 51-s per application) and the thermal denaturation profiles of nuclei isolated from fibroblasts were assessed by dynamic scanning calorimetry (DSC). When compared to the thermal profiles obtained from the nuclei of non-stimulated cells, the nuclei obtained from stimulated cells showed a change in peak profiles and peak areas, which is indicative of chromatin remodeling. Independently, US was also observed to impact the histone (H1):chromatin association as measured indirectly by DAPI staining. Based on our work, it appears plausible that US can produce a remodeling of chromatin, thus triggering signal cascade and other intracellular mechanisms.

  6. Epigenetic regulation and chromatin remodeling in learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Somi; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms of memory formation and maintenance has been a major goal in the field of neuroscience. Memory formation and maintenance are tightly controlled complex processes. Among the various processes occurring at different levels, gene expression regulation is especially crucial for proper memory processing, as some genes need to be activated while some genes must be suppressed. Epigenetic regulation of the genome involves processes such as DNA methylation and histone post-translational modifications. These processes edit genomic properties or the interactions between the genome and histone cores. They then induce structural changes in the chromatin and lead to transcriptional changes of different genes. Recent studies have focused on the concept of chromatin remodeling, which consists of 3D structural changes in chromatin in relation to gene regulation, and is an important process in learning and memory. In this review, we will introduce three major epigenetic processes involved in memory regulation: DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone acetylation. We will also discuss general mechanisms of long-term memory storage and relate the epigenetic control of learning and memory to chromatin remodeling. Finally, we will discuss how epigenetic mechanisms can contribute to the pathologies of neurological disorders and cause memory-related symptoms. PMID:28082740

  7. Multiple modes of chromatin remodeling by Forkhead box proteins.

    PubMed

    Lalmansingh, Avin S; Karmakar, Sudipan; Jin, Yetao; Nagaich, Akhilesh K

    2012-07-01

    Forkhead box (FOX) proteins represent a large family of transcriptional regulators unified by their DNA binding domain (DBD) known as a 'forkhead' or 'winged helix' domain. Over 40 FOX genes have been identified in the mammalian genome. FOX proteins share significant sequence similarities in the DBD which allow them to bind to a consensus DNA response element. However, their modes of action are quite diverse as they regulate gene expression by acting as pioneer factors, transcription factors, or both. This review focuses on the mechanisms of chromatin remodeling with an emphasis on three sub-classes-FOXA, FOXO, and FOXP members. FOXA proteins serve as pioneer factors to open up local chromatin structure and thereby increase accessibility of chromatin to factors regulating transcription. FOXP proteins, in contrast, function as classic transcription factors to recruit a variety of chromatin modifying enzymes to regulate gene expression. FOXO proteins represent a hybrid subclass having dual roles as pioneering factors and transcription factors. A subset of FOX proteins interacts with condensed mitotic chromatin and may function as 'bookmarking' agents to maintain transcriptional competence at specific genomic sites. The overall diversity in chromatin remodeling function by FOX proteins is related to unique structural motifs present within the DBD flanking regions that govern selective interactions with core histones and/or chromatin coregulatory proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chromatin in time and space.

  8. Extracellular Matrix Molecular Remodeling in Human Liver Fibrosis Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Baiocchini, Andrea; Montaldo, Claudia; Conigliaro, Alice; Grimaldi, Alessio; Correani, Virginia; Mura, Francesco; Ciccosanti, Fabiola; Rotiroti, Nicolina; Brenna, Alessia; Montalbano, Marzia; D’Offizi, Gianpiero; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Alessandro, Riccardo; Piacentini, Mauro; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Maras, Bruno; Del Nonno, Franca; Tripodi, Marco; Mancone, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver damage leads to pathological accumulation of ECM proteins (liver fibrosis). Comprehensive characterization of the human ECM molecular composition is essential for gaining insights into the mechanisms of liver disease. To date, studies of ECM remodeling in human liver diseases have been hampered by the unavailability of purified ECM. Here, we developed a decellularization method to purify ECM scaffolds from human liver tissues. Histological and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that the ECM scaffolds, devoid of plasma and cellular components, preserved the three-dimensional ECM structure and zonal distribution of ECM components. This method has been then applied on 57 liver biopsies of HCV-infected patients at different stages of liver fibrosis according to METAVIR classification. Label-free nLC-MS/MS proteomics and computation biology were performed to analyze the ECM molecular composition in liver fibrosis progression, thus unveiling protein expression signatures specific for the HCV-related liver fibrotic stages. In particular, the ECM molecular composition of liver fibrosis was found to involve dynamic changes in matrix stiffness, flexibility and density related to the dysregulation of predominant collagen, elastic fibers and minor components with both structural and signaling properties. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular bases underlying ECM remodeling in liver fibrosis and suggests new molecular targets for fibrolytic strategies. PMID:26998606

  9. The Three A’s in Asthma – Airway Smooth Muscle, Airway Remodeling & Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Keglowich, L.F; Borger, P

    2015-01-01

    Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and its prevalence is still rising. Acute asthma attacks are characterized by severe symptoms such as breathlessness, wheezing, tightness of the chest, and coughing, which may lead to hospitalization or death. Besides the acute symptoms, asthma is characterized by persistent airway inflammation and airway wall remodeling. The term airway wall remodeling summarizes the structural changes in the airway wall: epithelial cell shedding, goblet cell hyperplasia, hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles, basement membrane thickening and increased vascular density. Airway wall remodeling starts early in the pathogenesis of asthma and today it is suggested that remodeling is a prerequisite for other asthma pathologies. The beneficial effect of bronchial thermoplasty in reducing asthma symptoms, together with the increased potential of ASM cells of asthmatics to produce inflammatory and angiogenic factors, indicate that the ASM cell is a major effector cell in the pathology of asthma. In the present review we discuss the ASM cell and its role in airway wall remodeling and angiogenesis. PMID:26106455

  10. Adaptive Redox Response of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells to Stimulation with Lipopolysaccharide Inflammagen: Mechanisms of Remodeling of Tissue Barriers in Sepsis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-08

    Mechanisms of Remodeling of Tissue Barriers in Sepsis Nikolai V. Gorbunov1*, Bradley R. Garrison1, Dennis P. McDaniel2, Min Zhai1, Pei-Jyun Liao1... sepsis [2, 5]. This problem leads to the searching for other potential mechanisms that could produce adverse effects on host metabolome resulting...understanding of the basic cellular mechanisms implicated in redox adaptive responses in 16 tissue barriers. This particular area of the molecular

  11. The Chromodomains of the Chd1 Chromatin Remodeler Regulate DNA Access to the ATPase Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Hauk, G.; McKnight, J; Nodelman, I; Bowman, G

    2010-01-01

    Chromatin remodelers are ATP-driven machines that assemble, slide, and remove nucleosomes from DNA, but how the ATPase motors of remodelers are regulated is poorly understood. Here we show that the double chromodomain unit of the Chd1 remodeler blocks DNA binding and activation of the ATPase motor in the absence of nucleosome substrates. The Chd1 crystal structure reveals that an acidic helix joining the chromodomains can pack against a DNA-binding surface of the ATPase motor. Disruption of the chromodomain-ATPase interface prevents discrimination between nucleosomes and naked DNA and reduces the reliance on the histone H4 tail for nucleosome sliding. We propose that the chromodomains allow Chd1 to distinguish between nucleosomes and naked DNA by physically gating access to the ATPase motor, and we hypothesize that related ATPase motors may employ a similar strategy to discriminate among DNA-containing substrates.

  12. Transcriptional network analysis for the regulation of left ventricular hypertrophy and microvascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Moral, Aida; Mancini, Massimiliano; D'Amati, Giulia; Camici, Paolo; Petretto, Enrico

    2013-12-01

    Hypertension and cardiomyopathies share maladaptive changes of cardiac morphology, eventually leading to heart failure. These include left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), myocardial fibrosis, and structural remodeling of coronary microcirculation, which is the morphologic hallmark of coronary microvascular dysfunction. To pinpoint the complex molecular mechanisms and pathways underlying LVH-associated cardiac remodeling independent of blood pressure effects, we employed gene network approaches to the rat heart. We used the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat model showing many features of human hypertensive cardiomyopathy, for which we collected histological and histomorphometric data of the heart and coronary vasculature, and genome-wide cardiac gene expression. Here, we provide a large catalogue of gene co-expression networks in the heart that are significantly associated with quantitative variation in LVH, microvascular remodeling, and fibrosis-related traits. Many of these networks were significantly conserved to human idiopathic and/or ischemic cardiomyopathy patients, suggesting a potential role for these co-expressed genes in human heart disease.

  13. Modalities for Visualization of Cortical Bone Remodeling: The Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Kimberly D; Cooper, David M L

    2015-01-01

    Bone's ability to respond to load-related phenomena and repair microdamage is achieved through the remodeling process, which renews bone by activating groups of cells known as basic multicellular units (BMUs). The products of BMUs, secondary osteons, have been extensively studied via classic two-dimensional techniques, which have provided a wealth of information on how histomorphology relates to skeletal structure and function. Remodeling is critical in maintaining healthy bone tissue; however, in osteoporotic bone, imbalanced resorption results in increased bone fragility and fracture. With increasing life expectancy, such degenerative bone diseases are a growing concern. The three-dimensional (3D) morphology of BMUs and their correlation to function, however, are not well-characterized and little is known about the specific mechanisms that initiate and regulate their activity within cortical bone. We believe a key limitation has been the lack of 3D information about BMU morphology and activity. Thus, this paper reviews methodologies for 3D investigation of cortical bone remodeling and, specifically, structures associated with BMU activity (resorption spaces) and the structures they create (secondary osteons), spanning from histology to modern ex vivo imaging modalities, culminating with the growing potential of in vivo imaging. This collection of papers focuses on the theme of "putting the 'why' back into bone architecture." Remodeling is one of two mechanisms "how" bone structure is dynamically modified and thus an improved 3D understanding of this fundamental process is crucial to ultimately understanding the "why."

  14. Low carbohydrate/high-fat diet attenuates cardiac hypertrophy, remodeling, and altered gene expression in hypertension

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of dietary fat intake on the development of left ventricular hypertrophy and accompanying structural and molecular remodeling in response to hypertension are not understood. The present study compared the effects of a high-fat versus a low-fat diet on development of left ventricular hype...

  15. Association Between Myocardial Mechanics and Ischemic LV Remodeling.

    PubMed

    D'Elia, Nicholas; D'hooge, Jan; Marwick, Thomas H

    2015-12-01

    The outcomes associated with heart failure after myocardial infarction are still poor. Both global and regional left ventricular (LV) remodeling are associated with the progression of the post-infarct patient to heart failure, but although global remodeling can be accurately measured, regional LV remodeling has been more difficult to investigate. Preliminary evidence suggests that post-MI assessment of LV mechanics using stress and strain may predict global (and possibly regional) LV remodeling. A method of predicting both global and regional LV remodeling might facilitate earlier, targeted, and more extensive clinical intervention in those most likely to benefit from novel interventions such as cell therapy.

  16. Multiscale Characterization of Impact of Infarct Size on Myocardial Remodeling in an Ovine Infarct Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Li, Tielou; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2015-01-01

    The surviving myocardium initially compensates the loss of injured myocardium after myocardial infarction (MI) and gradually becomes progressively dysfunctional. There have been limited studies on the effect of infarct size on temporal and spatial alterations in the myocardium during progressive myocardial remodeling. MI with three infarct sizes, i.e. 15, 25 and 35% of the left ventricular (LV) wall, was created in an ovine infarction model. The progressive LV remodeling over a 12-week period was studied. Echocardiography, sonomicrometry, and histological and molecular analyses were carried out to evaluate cardiac function, regional tissue contractile function, structural remodeling and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and calcium handling proteins. Twelve weeks after MI, the 15, 25 and 35% MI groups had normalized LV end diastole volumes of 1.4 ± 0.2, 1.7 ± 0.3 and 2.0 ± 0.4 ml/kg, normalized end systole volumes of 1.0 ± 0.1, 1.0 ± 0.2 and 1.3 ± 0.3 ml/kg and LV ejection fractions of 43 ± 3, 42 ± 6 and 34 ± 4%, respectively. They all differed from the sham group (p < 0.05). All the three MI groups exhibited larger wall areal expansion (remodeling strain), larger cardiomyocyte size and altered expression of calcium handing proteins in the adjacent myocardium compared to the remote counterpart from the infarct. A significant correlation was found between cardiomyocyte size and remodeling strain in the adjacent zone. A comparative analysis among the three MI groups showed that a larger infarct size (35 vs. 15% MI) was associated with larger remodeling strain, more serious impairment in the cellular structure and composition, and regional contractile function at regional tissue level and LV function at organ level.

  17. [Bone Cell Biology Assessed by Microscopic Approach. The effects of bisphosphonates on bone remodeling, microdamage accumulation and fracture repair process].

    PubMed

    Mashiba, Tasuku

    2015-10-01

    Basically bisphosphonates are the agents that prevent the deterioration of bone structure due to suppressed bone remodeling although they are able to increase the thickness of cortical bone by suppressing bone resorption in the cortical surfaces. On the other hand, suppression of bone remodeling allows microdamage accumulation by impaired repair of damages, therefore, severe remodeling suppression over long time period could promote bone fatigue process, leading to fatigue fractures such as atypical femoral fracture. The use of bisphosphonate after fracture may delays natural fracture healing process due to suppressed callus remodeling. Bisphosphonate that has high binding affinity to bone easily accumulates in bone, therefore, easily causes severely suppressed bone turnover following long term treatment, and its effects last longer even after withdrawal.

  18. A histone-fold complex and FANCM form a conserved DNA-remodeling complex to maintain genome stability.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhijiang; Delannoy, Mathieu; Ling, Chen; Daee, Danielle; Osman, Fekret; Muniandy, Parameswary A; Shen, Xi; Oostra, Anneke B; Du, Hansen; Steltenpool, Jurgen; Lin, Ti; Schuster, Beatrice; Décaillet, Chantal; Stasiak, Andrzej; Stasiak, Alicja Z; Stone, Stacie; Hoatlin, Maureen E; Schindler, Detlev; Woodcock, Christopher L; Joenje, Hans; Sen, Ranjan; de Winter, Johan P; Li, Lei; Seidman, Michael M; Whitby, Matthew C; Myung, Kyungjae; Constantinou, Angelos; Wang, Weidong

    2010-03-26

    FANCM remodels branched DNA structures and plays essential roles in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. Here, we show that FANCM forms a conserved DNA-remodeling complex with a histone-fold heterodimer, MHF. We find that MHF stimulates DNA binding and replication fork remodeling by FANCM. In the cell, FANCM and MHF are rapidly recruited to forks stalled by DNA interstrand crosslinks, and both are required for cellular resistance to such lesions. In vertebrates, FANCM-MHF associates with the Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex, promotes FANCD2 monoubiquitination in response to DNA damage, and suppresses sister-chromatid exchanges. Yeast orthologs of these proteins function together to resist MMS-induced DNA damage and promote gene conversion at blocked replication forks. Thus, FANCM-MHF is an essential DNA-remodeling complex that protects replication forks from yeast to human.

  19. Membrane remodeling during reticulocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Xinhua; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel A.

    2010-01-01

    The transition of reticulocytes into erythrocytes is accompanied by extensive changes in the structure and properties of the plasma membrane. These changes include an increase in shear resistance, loss of surface area, and acquisition of a biconcave shape. The processes by which these changes are effected have remained largely undefined. Here we examine how the expression of 30 distinct membrane proteins and their interactions change during murine reticulocyte maturation. We show that tubulin and cytosolic actin are lost, whereas the membrane content of myosin, tropomyosin, intercellular adhesion molecule-4, glucose transporter-4, Na-K-ATPase, sodium/hydrogen exchanger 1, glycophorin A, CD47, Duffy, and Kell is reduced. The degradation of tubulin and actin is, at least in part, through the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway. In regard to the protein-protein interactions, the formation of membrane-associated spectrin tetramers from dimers is unperturbed, whereas the interactions responsible for the formation of the membrane-skeletal junctions are weaker in reticulocytes, as is the attachment of transmembrane proteins to these structures. This weakness, in part, results from the elevated phosphorylation of 4.1R in reticulocytes, which leads to a decrease in shear resistance by reducing its interaction with spectrin and actin. These observations begin to unravel the mechanistic basis of crucial changes accompanying reticulocyte maturation. PMID:20038785

  20. Regulation and impairments of dynamic desmosome and corneodesmosome remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Yasuo

    2013-04-30

    Desmosomes and corneodesmosomes are the most important adhering junctions to provide strength for the epidermal sheet structure made of living keratinocytes and enucleated corneocytes, respectively. These junctions are connected directly with transmembrane desmosomal cadherins, desmogleins (Dsgs) and desmocollins (Dscs), mainly Dsg1/Dsc1 and Dsg3/Dsc3 in desmosomes and Dsg1/Dsc1 with corneodesmosin in corneodesmosomes. Dsgs and Dscs are associated with several proteins at their inner cytoplasmic domains to anchor keratin intermediate filaments. Desmosomes are not static, but dynamic units that undergo regular remodeling to allow for keratinocyte outward-migration in the epidermis. Recently, two mutually-reversible desmosomal adhesion states have been recognized, i.e., "stable hyper-adhesion (Ca(2+)-independent)" and "dynamic weak-adhesion (Ca(2+)-dependent)". A remarkable impairment of this remodeling is observed in pemphigus vulgaris (an autoimmune blistering disease), caused by anti-Dsg3 antibodies, generating a weak-adhesion desmosome state. Immediately after formation, corneodesmosomes normally commit to degradation, which is complicatedly regulated by proteolytic cleavage of their respective extracellular portion(s), via kallikrein-regulated peptidases and cathepsins. This proteolytic activity is in turn controlled by a variety of inhibitory agents, including protease inhibitors, cholesterol sulfate, and an acidic gradient. The impairment of protease control causes keratinization disorders. This review focuses on the dynamic regulation of desmosomes and corneodesmosomes in relation to keratinization disorders.

  1. Integrative models of vascular remodeling during tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Heiko; Welter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Malignant solid tumors recruit the blood vessel network of the host tissue for nutrient supply, continuous growth, and gain of metastatic potential. Angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels), vessel cooption (the integration of existing blood vessels into the tumor vasculature), and vessel regression remodel the healthy vascular network into a tumor-specific vasculature that is in many respects different from the hierarchically organized arterio-venous blood vessel network of the host tissues. Integrative models based on detailed experimental data and physical laws implement in silico the complex interplay of molecular pathways, cell proliferation, migration, and death, tissue microenvironment, mechanical and hydrodynamic forces, and the fine structure of the host tissue vasculature. With the help of computer simulations high-precision information about blood flow patterns, interstitial fluid flow, drug distribution, oxygen and nutrient distribution can be obtained and a plethora of therapeutic protocols can be tested before clinical trials. In this review, we give an overview over the current status of integrative models describing tumor growth, vascular remodeling, blood and interstitial fluid flow, drug delivery, and concomitant transformations of the microenvironment. © 2015 The Authors. WIREs Systems Biology and Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25808551

  2. Early remodeling of the neocortex upon episodic memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Bero, Adam W; Meng, Jia; Cho, Sukhee; Shen, Abra H; Canter, Rebecca G; Ericsson, Maria; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2014-08-12

    Understanding the mechanisms by which long-term memories are formed and stored in the brain represents a central aim of neuroscience. Prevailing theory suggests that long-term memory encoding involves early plasticity within hippocampal circuits, whereas reorganization of the neocortex is thought to occur weeks to months later to subserve remote memory storage. Here we report that long-term memory encoding can elicit early transcriptional, structural, and functional remodeling of the neocortex. Parallel studies using genome-wide RNA sequencing, ultrastructural imaging, and whole-cell recording in wild-type mice suggest that contextual fear conditioning initiates a transcriptional program in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that is accompanied by rapid expansion of the synaptic active zone and postsynaptic density, enhanced dendritic spine plasticity, and increased synaptic efficacy. To address the real-time contribution of the mPFC to long-term memory encoding, we performed temporally precise optogenetic inhibition of excitatory mPFC neurons during contextual fear conditioning. Using this approach, we found that real-time inhibition of the mPFC inhibited activation of the entorhinal-hippocampal circuit and impaired the formation of long-term associative memory. These findings suggest that encoding of long-term episodic memory is associated with early remodeling of neocortical circuits, identify the prefrontal cortex as a critical regulator of encoding-induced hippocampal activation and long-term memory formation, and have important implications for understanding memory processing in healthy and diseased brain states.

  3. Membrane Remodeling by a Bacterial Phospholipid-Methylating Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Danne, Linna; Aktas, Meriyem; Unger, Andreas; Linke, Wolfgang A.; Erdmann, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Membrane deformation by proteins is a universal phenomenon that has been studied extensively in eukaryotes but much less in prokaryotes. In this study, we discovered a membrane-deforming activity of the phospholipid N-methyltransferase PmtA from the plant-pathogenic bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens. PmtA catalyzes the successive three-step N-methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine to phosphatidylcholine. Here, we defined the lipid and protein requirements for the membrane-remodeling activity of PmtA by a combination of transmission electron microscopy and liposome interaction studies. Dependent on the lipid composition, PmtA changes the shape of spherical liposomes either into filaments or small vesicles. Upon overproduction of PmtA in A. tumefaciens, vesicle-like structures occur in the cytoplasm, dependent on the presence of the anionic lipid cardiolipin. The N-terminal lipid-binding α-helix (αA) is involved in membrane deformation by PmtA. Two functionally distinct and spatially separated regions in αA can be distinguished. Anionic interactions by positively charged amino acids on one face of the helix are responsible for membrane recruitment of the enzyme. The opposite hydrophobic face of the helix is required for membrane remodeling, presumably by shallow insertion into the lipid bilayer. PMID:28196959

  4. Microscale mechanisms of agarose-induced disruption of collagen remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Theresa A; Lee, Tae Geol; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Moon, Dae Won; Kumar, Sanjay

    2011-08-01

    Cells are strongly influenced by the local structure and mechanics of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We recently showed that adding agarose to soft collagen ECMs can mechanically stiffen these hydrogels by two orders of magnitude while limiting 3D cell motility, which we speculated might derive from agarose-mediated inhibition of collagen fiber deformation and remodeling. Here, we directly address this hypothesis by investigating the effects of agarose on cell-collagen interactions at the microscale. Addition of agarose progressively restricts cell spreading, reduces stress fiber and focal adhesion assembly, and inhibits macroscopic gel compaction. While time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy fail to reveal agarose-induced alterations in collagen ligand presentation, the latter modality shows that agarose strongly impairs cell-directed assembly of large collagen bundles. Agarose-mediated inhibition of cell spreading and cytoarchitecture can be rescued by β-agarase digestion or by covalently crosslinking the matrix with glutaraldehyde. Based on these results, we argue that cell spreading and motility on collagen requires local matrix stiffening, which can be achieved via cell-mediated fiber remodeling or by chemically crosslinking the fibers. These findings provide new mechanistic insights into the regulatory function of agarose and bear general implications for cell adhesion and motility in fibrous ECMs.

  5. Ventricular remodeling: from bedside to molecule.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, R; Flugelman, M Y; Halon, D A; Lewis, B S

    1997-01-01

    The multiple mechanisms that bring about the decompensation of the hypertrophic remodeled myocardium are synergistic and not fully understood. Our current hypothesis is that the increased stress on the ventricle is initially offset by compensatory myocardial hypertrophy. In many instances, however, progressive ventricular dilatation and heart failure occur as a result of maladaptive hypertrophy (abnormal myosin-actin production), programmed cell death (apoptosis) and/or changes in the interstitial vasculature and collagen composition. The molecular and genetic background to these processes includes changes in myocardial gene expression, activation of the local tissue renin-angiotensin and other neurohormonal systems, increased matrix metalloproteinase activity (including collagenase), and expression of certain components of the immune system, such as TNF-alpha. Future research will hopefully provide better methods for limiting the remodeling-ventricular dilatation process by novel pharmacotherapies, gene therapy and, possibly, surgical therapy, and determine the impact of such interventions on survival.

  6. Chromatin Remodeling, DNA Damage Repair and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baohua; Yip, Raymond KH; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to a variety of environmental and endogenous conditions causing DNA damage, which is detected and repaired by conserved DNA repair pathways to maintain genomic integrity. Chromatin remodeling is critical in this process, as the organization of eukaryotic DNA into compact chromatin presents a natural barrier to all DNA-related events. Studies on human premature aging syndromes together with normal aging have suggested that accumulated damages might lead to exhaustion of resources that are required for physiological functions and thus accelerate aging. In this manuscript, combining the present understandings and latest findings, we focus mainly on discussing the role of chromatin remodeling in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulation of aging. PMID:23633913

  7. [Remodeling of Cardiovascular System: Causes and Consequences].

    PubMed

    Lopatina, E V; Kipenko, A V; Penniyaynen, V A; Pasatetckaia, N A; Tsyrline, V A

    2016-01-01

    Literature and our data suggest the regulatory action of a number of biologically active substances (catecholamines, cardiac glycosides, β-blockers, angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor) on the growth and proliferation of heart cells. By using of organotypic tissue culture has proved that the basis of this regulation is the ability of test substances, receptor- or transducer-mediated signaling to modulate the function of Na⁺, K⁺-ATPase. There is a delay in the development of vascular smooth muscle in the late postnatal period in rats with the blockade of the sympathetic nervous system in the prenatal period. The relationship between vascular remodeling and contractile activity is described. It seems that one of the causes of high blood pressure is a remodeling of the cardiovascular system, which precedes the development of hypertension.

  8. Remodeling of Calcium Entry Pathways in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Carlos; Sobradillo, Diego; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Núñez, Lucía

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+) entry pathways play important roles in control of many cellular functions, including long-term proliferation, migration and cell death. In recent years, it is becoming increasingly clear that, in some types of tumors, remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways could contribute to cancer hallmarks such as excessive proliferation, cell migration and invasion as well as resistance to cell death or survival. In this chapter we briefly review findings related to remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways in cancer with emphasis on the mechanisms that contribute to increased store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and store-operated currents (SOCs) in colorectal cancer cells. Finally, since SOCE appears critically involved in colon tumorogenesis, the inhibition of SOCE by aspirin and other NSAIDs and its possible contribution to colon cancer chemoprevention is reviewed.

  9. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Hallucinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, C.L.; Dube, S.R.; Felitti, V.J.; Anda, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: Little information is available about the contribution of multiple adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to the likelihood of reporting hallucinations. We used data from the ACE study to assess this relationship. Methods:: We conducted a survey about childhood abuse and household dysfunction while growing up, with questions about health…

  10. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  11. Urbanicity, social adversity and psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Andreas; Deserno, Lorenz; Reininghaus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in research on geographical variation in the incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses. In this paper, we review the evidence on variation in incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses in terms of place, as well as the individual- and area-level factors that account for this variation. We further review findings on potential mechanisms that link adverse urban environment and psychosis. There is evidence from earlier and more recent studies that urbanicity is associated with an increased incidence of schizophrenia and non-affective psychosis. In addition, considerable variation in incidence across neighbourhoods has been observed for these disorders. Findings suggest it is unlikely that social drift alone can fully account for geographical variation in incidence. Evidence further suggests that the impact of adverse social contexts – indexed by area-level exposures such as population density, social fragmentation and deprivation – on risk of psychosis is explained (confounding) or modified (interaction) by environmental exposures at the individual level (i.e., cannabis use, social adversity, exclusion and discrimination). On a neurobiological level, several studies suggest a close link between social adversity, isolation and stress on the one hand, and monoamine dysfunction on the other, which resembles findings in schizophrenia patients. However, studies directly assessing correlations between urban stress or discrimination and neurobiological alterations in schizophrenia are lacking to date. PMID:24096775

  12. Reverse engineering adverse outcome pathways.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Edward J; Chipman, J Kevin; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or incompletely characterized, mechanisms of action. The application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) can be used to overcome these limitations. This approach was used to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows (FHM, Pimephales promelas). Gene expression changes in FHM ovaries in response to seven different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions, were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. Potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide were examined using two mutual information-based methods to infer gene regulatory networks and potential AOPs. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict network paths from stressor to adverse outcome as candidate AOPs. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment, thus leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biological processes, biomarkers, or alternative endpoints that can be used to monitor an AOP. Finally, the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology were identified and a road map for the utilization of these tools presented.

  13. Mechanisms of epigenetic remodelling during preimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo Juan; Canovas, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics involves mechanisms independent of modifications in the DNA sequence that result in changes in gene expression and are maintained through cell divisions. Because all cells in the organism contain the same genetic blueprint, epigenetics allows for cells to assume different phenotypes and maintain them upon cell replication. As such, during the life cycle, there are moments in which the epigenetic information needs to be reset for the initiation of a new organism. In mammals, the resetting of epigenetic marks occurs at two different moments, which both happen to be during gestation, and include primordial germ cells (PGCs) and early preimplantation embryos. Because epigenetic information is reversible and sensitive to environmental changes, it is probably no coincidence that both these extensive periods of epigenetic remodelling happen in the female reproductive tract, under a finely controlled maternal environment. It is becoming evident that perturbations during the extensive epigenetic remodelling in PGCs and embryos can lead to permanent and inheritable changes to the epigenome that can result in long-term changes to the offspring derived from them, as indicated by the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypothesis and recent demonstration of inter- and trans-generational epigenetic alterations. In this context, an understanding of the mechanisms of epigenetic remodelling during early embryo development is important to assess the potential for gametic epigenetic mutations to contribute to the offspring and for new epimutations to be established during embryo manipulations that could affect a large number of cells in the offspring. It is of particular interest to understand whether and how epigenetic information can be passed on from the gametes to the embryo or offspring, and whether abnormalities in this process could lead to transgenerationally inheritable phenotypes. The aim of this review is to highlight recent progress made in

  14. [Remodeling in asthma: review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Montero Mora, Patricia; González Espinosa, Alicia Ma; Guidos Foguelbach, Guillermo A; Tinajero Castañeda, Olga Adriana; Serrano Cuevas, Saúl

    2003-01-01

    Remodeling, understood as a new or different reconstruction, has been observed in every organ after a chronic inflammatory response. In allergy, it has very important clinical consequences. As an example, in asthma this process is responsible for functional deterioration. In this case, the myofibroblasts play a central role in the process, together with a succession of products that are involved. In this bibliographic review we analyze the most important factors.

  15. Right ventricular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Franco, Veronica

    2012-07-01

    The right ventricle (RV) is in charge of pumping blood to the lungs for oxygenation. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by high pulmonary vascular resistance and vascular remodeling, which results in a striking increase in RV afterload and subsequent failure. There is still unexploited potential for therapies that directly target the RV with the aim of supporting and protecting the right side of the heart, striving to prolong survival in patients with PAH.

  16. Psoriatic architecture constructed by epidermal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Hajime; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi

    2004-08-01

    Epidermal remodeling is the concept that epidermal architecture is determined by a simple self-organizing mechanism; epidermal hyperproliferation constructs typical psoriatic architecture. This is based on the assumption that the enlargements in both the two-dimensional proliferative compartment (basal cell layer) and three-dimensional whole epidermal volume coexist. During this process, the dermal papillae become markedly, but passively, expanded by enlargement of the proliferative compartment. This creates a considerable shrinkage force against the crowded basal cell layer, which is forced to lose adherence to the dermal extracellular matrix (ECM). This results in anoikis, a type of apoptosis characterized by cell detachment, and, consequently, a markedly diminished epidermal turnover time in psoriasis. The papillary shrinkage force also explains the fact that dermal papillary height does not exceed a certain limit. At the cessation of hyperproliferation a normalisation remodeling takes place toward normal tissue architecture. Thus the concept of epidermal remodeling explains the self-organizing mechanism of the architectural change in psoriasis, which is essentially a reversible disorder depending on epidermal hyperproliferation.

  17. Application of Petri nets in bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingxi; Yokota, Hiroki

    2009-07-06

    Understanding a mechanism of bone remodeling is a challenging task for both life scientists and model builders, since this highly interactive and nonlinear process can seldom be grasped by simple intuition. A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) have been built for simulating bone formation as well as bone resorption. Although solving ODEs numerically can provide useful predictions for dynamical behaviors in a continuous time frame, an actual bone remodeling process in living tissues is driven by discrete events of molecular and cellular interactions. Thus, an event-driven tool such as Petri nets (PNs), which may dynamically and graphically mimic individual molecular collisions or cellular interactions, seems to augment the existing ODE-based systems analysis. Here, we applied PNs to expand the ODE-based approach and examined discrete, dynamical behaviors of key regulatory molecules and bone cells. PNs have been used in many engineering areas, but their application to biological systems needs to be explored. Our PN model was based on 8 ODEs that described an osteoprotegerin linked molecular pathway consisting of 4 types of bone cells. The models allowed us to conduct both qualitative and quantitative evaluations and evaluate homeostatic equilibrium states. The results support that application of PN models assists understanding of an event-driven bone remodeling mechanism using PN-specific procedures such as places, transitions, and firings.

  18. Aggravated myocardial infarction-induced cardiac remodeling and heart failure in histamine-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinmiao; Hong, Tao; Ding, Suling; Deng, Long; Abudupataer, Mieradilijiang; Zhang, Weiwei; Tong, Minghong; Jia, Jianguo; Gong, Hui; Zou, Yunzeng; Wang, Timothy C.; Ge, Junbo; Yang, Xiangdong

    2017-01-01

    Histamine has pleiotropic pathophysiological effects, but its role in myocardial infarction (MI)-induced cardiac remodeling remains unclear. Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) is the main enzyme involved in histamine production. Here, we clarified the roles of HDC-expressing cells and histamine in heart failure post-MI using HDC-EGFP transgenic mice and HDC-knockout (HDC−/−) mice. HDC+CD11b+ myeloid cell numbers markedly increased in the injured hearts, and histamine levels were up-regulated in the circulation post-MI. HDC−/− mice exhibited more adverse cardiac remodeling, poorer left ventricular function and higher mortality by increasing cardiac fibrogenesis post-MI. In vitro assays further confirmed that histamine inhibited heart fibroblast proliferation. Furthermore, histamine enhanced the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-6 phosphorylation level in murine heart fibroblasts, and the inhibitive effects of histamine on fibroblast proliferation could be blocked by JAK3/STAT6 signaling selective antagonist. STAT6-knockout (STAT6−/−) mice had a phenotype similar to that of HDC−/− mice post-MI; however, in contrast to HDC−/− mice, the beneficial effects of exogenous histamine injections were abrogated in STAT6−/− mice. These data suggest that histamine exerts protective effects by modulating cardiac fibrosis and remodeling post-MI, in part through the STAT6-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:28272448

  19. [Remodeling of the aging heart : Sinus node dysfunction and atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Weirich, Jörg

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of both sinus node dysfunction (SND) and atrial fibrillation (AF) increases with age. SND and AF frequently coexist. Likewise, they are often associated with cardiovascular diseases. Both arrhythmias share similar pathomechanisms such as structural and functional remodeling, i. e., degenerative fibrosis and altered Ca(2+) handling, respectively. A growing body of evidence suggests an important role for the CamKII (Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II) in structural as well as in functional remodeling. In the sinus node, remodeling leads to degenerative fibrosis and as a consequence to sinus node arrest or to reentry (brady/tachycardia). In the atrium, remodeling sets the conditions for reentry and its triggering mechanisms, especially the conditions for triggered activity on the basis of delayed afterdepolarizations (DAD). Thus, SND and AF seem to be different phenotypes of related pathophysiological mechanisms. On the other hand, it remains controversial as to whether SND causes AF or vice versa.

  20. Radiotherapy-induced right ventricular remodelling: The missing piece of the puzzle.

    PubMed

    Tadic, Marijana; Cuspidi, Cesare; Hering, Dagmara; Venneri, Lucia; Grozdic-Milojevic, Isidora

    2017-02-01

    The number of studies demonstrating that right ventricular structure, function and mechanics are valuable predictors of cardiovascular and total morbidity and mortality in patients with a wide range of cardiovascular conditions is constantly increasing. Most studies that evaluated the influence of radiotherapy on the heart focused on left ventricular remodelling, which is why current guidelines only recommend detailed assessment of the left ventricle. Data regarding right ventricular changes in cancer patients treated with radiotherapy are scarce. Given that radiotherapy more often induces late cardiac impairment - unlike chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity, which is usually acute - it is quite reasonable to follow these patients echocardiographically for a long time (even for 20years after initiation of radiotherapy). Investigations that have followed cancer survivors for at least 10years after radiotherapy agree that right ventricular structure, systolic/diastolic function and mechanics are significantly impaired. The mechanisms of radiation-induced right ventricular remodelling are still unclear, but it is thought that fibrosis is the dominant factor in myocardial remodelling and vascular changes. Many factors may contribute to right ventricular impairment during and after radiotherapy: cumulative radiation dose; dose per treatment; delivery technique; radiation target (chest and mediastinum); and co-morbidities. In this review, we aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the potential mechanisms of radiation-induced right ventricular remodelling, and to summarize clinical studies involving radiotherapy-treated cancer patients.

  1. Pro-arrhythmogenic effects of atrial fibrillation-induced electrical remodelling: insights from the three-dimensional virtual human atria.

    PubMed

    Colman, Michael A; Aslanidi, Oleg V; Kharche, Sanjay; Boyett, Mark R; Garratt, Clifford; Hancox, Jules C; Zhang, Henggui

    2013-09-01

    Chronic atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with structural and electrical remodelling in the atria, which are associated with a high recurrence of AF. Through biophysically detailed computer modelling, this study investigated mechanisms by which AF-induced electrical remodelling promotes and perpetuates AF. A family of Courtemanche-Ramirez-Nattel variant models of human atrial cell action potentials (APs), taking into account of intrinsic atrial electrophysiological properties, was modified to incorporate various experimental data sets on AF-induced changes of major ionic channel currents (ICaL, IKur, Ito, IK1, IKs, INaCa) and on intracellular Ca(2+) handling. The single cell models for control and AF-remodelled conditions were incorporated into multicellular three-dimensional (3D) atrial tissue models. Effects of the AF-induced electrical remodelling were quantified as the changes of AP profile, AP duration (APD) and its dispersion across the atria, and the vulnerability of atrial tissue to the initiation of re-entry. The dynamic behaviour of re-entrant excitation waves in the 3D models was characterised. In our simulations, AF-induced electrical remodelling abbreviated atrial APD non-uniformly across the atria; this resulted in relatively short APDs co-existing with marked regional differences in the APD at junctions of the crista terminalis/pectinate muscle, pulmonary veins/left atrium. As a result, the measured tissue vulnerability to re-entry initiation at these tissue junctions was increased. The AF-induced electrical remodelling also stabilized and accelerated re-entrant excitation waves, leading to rapid and sustained re-entry. Under the AF-remodelled condition, re-entrant scroll waves in the 3D model degenerated into persistent and erratic wavelets, leading to fibrillation. In conclusion, realistic 3D atrial tissue models indicate that AF-induced electrical remodelling produces regionally heterogeneous and shortened APD; these respectively facilitate

  2. Adverse drug reactions: part II.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-11-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must be effectively practiced by all health care providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  3. Adverse drug reactions: Part I.

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2010-10-01

    Pharmacovigilance is the process of identifying, monitoring, and effectively reducing adverse drug reactions. Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an important consideration when assessing a patient's health. The proliferation of new pharmaceuticals means that the incidence of ADRs is increasing. The goal for all health care providers must be to minimize the risk of ADRs as much as possible. Steps to achieve this include understanding the pharmacology for all drugs prescribed and proactively assessing and monitoring those patients at greatest risk for developing an ADR. Groups at greatest risk for developing ADRs include the elderly, children, and pregnant patients, as well as others. Pharmacovigilance must effectively be practiced by all health providers in order to avoid ADRs.

  4. [Finasteride adverse effects: An update].

    PubMed

    Carreño-Orellana, Néstor; Moll-Manzur, Catherina; Carrasco-Zuber, Juan Eduardo; Álvarez-Véliz, Sergio; Berroeta-Mauriziano, Daniela; Porras-Kusmanic, Ninoska

    2016-12-01

    Finasteride is a 5-α reductase inhibitor that is widely used in the management of benign prostate hyperplasia and male pattern hair loss. It is well known that these agents improve the quality of life in men suffering from these conditions. However, they are associated with some transient and even permanent adverse effects. The aim of this article is to clarify the controversies about the safety of finasteride by analyzing the evidence available in the literature.

  5. [Pain as adverse drug reaction].

    PubMed

    Böhmdorfer, Birgit; Schaffarzick, Daniel; Nagano, Marietta; Janowitz, Susanne Melitta; Schweitzer, Ekkehard

    2012-09-01

    We present a multidisciplinary (anaesthesiology--clinical pharmacy--bioinformatics) analysis of pain as possible adverse drug reaction taking different manifestations of pain, indication groups, relevance to the Austrian drug market and possible mechanistic influence of drugs on development and apprehension of pain into consideration.We designed an overview that shows how transmitters that play a part in nociception and antinociception can be influenced by drugs. This allows conclusions to the dolorigene potential of therapeutics.

  6. Adverse food-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Alie; van Hunsel, Florence; Bast, Aalt

    2015-12-01

    Food supplements and herbal products are increasingly popular amongst consumers. This leads to increased risks of interactions between prescribed drugs and these products containing bioactive ingredients. From 1991 up to 2014, 55 cases of suspected adverse drug reactions due to concomitant intake of health-enhancing products and drugs were reported to Lareb, the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre. An overview of these suspected interactions is presented and their potential mechanisms of action are described. Mainly during the metabolism of xenobiotics and due to the pharmacodynamics effects interactions seem to occur, which may result in adverse drug reactions. Where legislation is seen to distinct food and medicine, legislation concerning these different bioactive products is less clear-cut. This can only be resolved by increasing the molecular knowledge on bioactive substances and their potential interactions. Thereby potential interactions can be better understood and prevented on an individual level. By considering the dietary pattern and use of bioactive substances with prescribed medication, both health professionals and consumers will be increasingly aware of interactions and these interactive adverse effects can be prevented.

  7. Alternative lengthening of telomeres: remodeling the telomere architecture.

    PubMed

    Conomos, Dimitri; Pickett, Hilda A; Reddel, Roger R

    2013-01-01

    To escape from the normal limits on proliferative potential, cancer cells must employ a means to counteract the gradual telomere attrition that accompanies semi-conservative DNA replication. While the majority of human cancers do this by up-regulating telomerase enzyme activity, most of the remainder use a homologous recombination-mediated mechanism of telomere elongation known as alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). Many molecular details of the ALT pathway are unknown, and even less is known regarding the mechanisms by which this pathway is activated. Here, we review current findings about telomere structure in ALT cells, including DNA sequence, shelterin content, and heterochromatic state. We speculate that remodeling of the telomere architecture may contribute to the emergence and maintenance of the ALT phenotype.

  8. Neural plasticity and network remodeling: From concepts to pathology.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Erez James; Quarta, Eros; Bravi, Riccardo; Granato, Alberto; Minciacchi, Diego

    2017-03-06

    Neuroplasticity has been subject to a great deal of research in the last century. Recently, significant emphasis has been placed on the global effect of localized plastic changes throughout the central nervous system, and on how these changes integrate in a pathological context. Specifically, alterations of network functionality have been described in various pathological contexts to which corresponding structural alterations have been proposed. However, considering the amount of literature and the different pathological contexts, an integration of this information is still lacking. In this paper we will review the concepts of neural plasticity as well as their repercussions on network remodeling and provide a possible explanation to how these two concepts relate to each other. We will further examine how alterations in different pathological contexts may relate to each other and will discuss the concept of plasticity diseases, its models and implications.

  9. Control of bone remodelling by applied dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyon, L. E.; Rubin, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    The data showing the relationship between bone mass and peak strain magnitude prepared and submitted for publication. The data from experiments relating remodelling activity with static or dynamic loads were prepared and submitted for publication. Development of programs to relate the location of remodelling activity with he natural and artificial dynamic strain distributions continued. Experiments on the effect of different strain rates on the remodelling response continued.

  10. The Effect of Rosuvastatin on Inflammation, Matrix Turnover and Left Ventricular Remodeling in Dilated Cardiomyopathy: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gjertsen, Erik; Ueland, Thor; Yndestad, Arne; Godang, Kristin; Stueflotten, Wenche; Andreassen, Johanna; Svendsmark, Rolf; Smith, Hans-Jørgen; Aakhus, Svend; Aukrust, Pål; Gullestad, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Background Dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by left ventricular dilatation and dysfunction. Inflammation and adverse remodeling of the extracellular matrix may be involved in the pathogenesis. Statins reduce levels of low density lipoprotein cholesterol, but may also attenuate inflammation and affect matrix remodeling. We hypothesized that treatment with rosuvastatin would reduce or even reverse left ventricular remodeling in dilated cardiomyopathy. Materials and Methods In this multicenter, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study, 71 patients were randomized to 10 mg of rosuvastatin or matching placebo. Physical examination, blood sampling, echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging were performed at baseline and at six months’ follow-up. The pre-specified primary end point was the change in left ventricular ejection fraction from baseline to six months. Results Over all, left ventricular ejection fraction improved 5 percentage points over the duration of the study, but there was no difference in the change in left ventricular ejection fraction between patients allocated to rosuvastatin and those allocated to placebo. Whereas serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration fell significantly in the treatment arm, rosuvastatin did not affect plasma or serum levels of a wide range of inflammatory variables, including C-reactive protein. The effect on markers of extracellular matrix remodeling was modest. Conclusion Treatment with rosuvastatin does not improve left ventricular ejection fraction in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00505154 PMID:24586994

  11. Nucleosome remodelers in double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Seeber, Andrew; Hauer, Michael; Gasser, Susan M

    2013-04-01

    ATP-dependent nucleosome remodelers use ATP hydrolysis to shift, evict and exchange histone dimers or octamers and have well-established roles in transcription. Earlier work has suggested a role for nucleosome remodelers such as INO80 in double-strand break (DSB) repair. This review will begin with an update on recent studies that explore how remodelers are recruited to DSBs. We then examine their impact on various steps of repair, focusing on resection and the formation of the Rad51-ssDNA nucleofilament. Finally, we will explore new studies that implicate remodelers in the physical movement of chromatin in response to damage.

  12. LRP1 regulates remodeling of the extracellular matrix by fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gaultier, Alban; Hollister, Margaret; Reynolds, Irene; Hsieh, En-hui; Gonias, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1) is an endocytic receptor for diverse proteases, protease inhibitors, and other plasma membrane proteins, including the urokinase receptor (uPAR). LRP1 also functions in cell-signaling and regulates gene expression. The goal of this study was to determine whether LRP1 regulates remodeling of provisional extracellular matrix (ECM) by fibroblasts. To address this problem, we utilized an in vitro model in which type I collagen was reconstituted and overlaid with fibronectin. Either the collagen or fibronectin was fluorescently-labeled. ECM remodeling by fibroblasts deficient in LRP1, uPAR, or MT1-MMP was studied. MT1-MMP was required for efficient remodeling of the deep collagen layer but not involved in fibronectin remodeling. Instead, fibronectin was remodeled by a system that required urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPAR, and exogenously-added plasminogen. LRP1 markedly inhibited fibronectin remodeling by regulating cell-surface uPAR and plasminogen activation. LRP1 also regulated remodeling of the deep collagen layer but not by controlling MT1-MMP. Instead, LRP1 deficiency or inhibition de-repressed a secondary pathway for collagen remodeling, which was active in MT1-MMP-deficient cells but not in uPAR-deficient cells. These results demonstrate that LRP1 regulates ECM remodeling principally by repressing pathways that require plasminogen activation by uPA in association with uPAR. PMID:19699300

  13. Bacterial genome remodeling through bacteriophage recombination.

    PubMed

    Menouni, Rachid; Hutinet, Geoffrey; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages co-exist and co-evolve with their hosts in natural environments. Virulent phages lyse infected cells through lytic cycles, whereas temperate phages often remain dormant and can undergo lysogenic or lytic cycles. In their lysogenic state, prophages are actually part of the host genome and replicate passively in rhythm with host division. However, prophages are far from being passive residents: they can modify or bring new properties to their host. In this review, we focus on two important phage-encoded recombination mechanisms, i.e. site-specific recombination and homologous recombination, and how they remodel bacterial genomes.

  14. miR-222 is Necessary for Exercise-induced Cardiac Growth and Protects Against Pathological Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojun; Xiao, Junjie; Zhu, Han; Wei, Xin; Platt, Colin; Damilano, Federico; Xiao, Chunyang; Bezzerides, Vassilios; Boström, Pontus; Che, Lin; Zhang, Chunxiang; Spiegelman, Bruce M; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Exercise induces physiological cardiac growth and protects the heart against pathological remodeling. Recent work suggests exercise also enhances the heart’s capacity for repair, which could be important for regenerative therapies. While microRNAs are important in certain cardiac pathologies, less is known about their functional roles in exercise-induced cardiac phenotypes. We profiled cardiac microRNA expression in two distinct models of exercise and found microRNA-222 (miR-222) was upregulated in both. Downstream miR-222 targets modulating cardiomyocyte phenotype were identified, including HIPK1 and Homeobox-1. Inhibition of miR-222 in vivo completely blocked cardiac and cardiomyocyte growth in response to exercise, while reducing markers of cardiomyocyte proliferation. Importantly, mice with inducible cardiomyocyte miR-222 expression were resistant to adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction after ischemic injury. These studies implicate miR-222 as necessary for exercise-induced cardiomyocyte growth and proliferation in the adult mammalian heart and show that it is sufficient to protect the heart against adverse remodeling. PMID:25863248

  15. miR-222 is necessary for exercise-induced cardiac growth and protects against pathological cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Xiao, Junjie; Zhu, Han; Wei, Xin; Platt, Colin; Damilano, Federico; Xiao, Chunyang; Bezzerides, Vassilios; Boström, Pontus; Che, Lin; Zhang, Chunxiang; Spiegelman, Bruce M; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2015-04-07

    Exercise induces physiological cardiac growth and protects the heart against pathological remodeling. Recent work suggests exercise also enhances the heart's capacity for repair, which could be important for regenerative therapies. While microRNAs are important in certain cardiac pathologies, less is known about their functional roles in exercise-induced cardiac phenotypes. We profiled cardiac microRNA expression in two distinct models of exercise and found microRNA-222 (miR-222) was upregulated in both. Downstream miR-222 targets modulating cardiomyocyte phenotypes were identified, including HIPK1 and HMBOX1. Inhibition of miR-222 in vivo completely blocked cardiac and cardiomyocyte growth in response to exercise while reducing markers of cardiomyocyte proliferation. Importantly, mice with inducible cardiomyocyte miR-222 expression were resistant to adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction after ischemic injury. These studies implicate miR-222 as necessary for exercise-induced cardiomyocyte growth and proliferation in the adult mammalian heart and show that it is sufficient to protect the heart against adverse remodeling.

  16. Characterization of right ventricular remodeling and failure in a chronic pulmonary hypertension model

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Hadri, Lahouaria; Santos-Gallego, Carlos; Fish, Kenneth; Hammoudi, Nadjib; Chaanine, Antoine; Torquato, Samantha; Naim, Charbel; Ibanez, Borja; Pereda, Daniel; García-Alvarez, Ana; Fuster, Valentin; Sengupta, Partho P.; Leopold, Jane A.; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2014-01-01

    In pulmonary hypertension (PH), right ventricular (RV) dysfunction and failure is the main determinant of a poor prognosis. We aimed to characterize RV structural and functional differences during adaptive RV remodeling and progression to RV failure in a large animal model of chronic PH. Postcapillary PH was created surgically in swine (n = 21). After an 8- to 14-wk follow-up, two groups were identified based on the development of overt heart failure (HF): PH-NF (nonfailing, n = 12) and PH-HF (n = 8). In both groups, invasive hemodynamics, pressure-volume relationships, and echocardiography confirmed a significant increase in pulmonary pressures and vascular resistance consistent with PH. Histological analysis also demonstrated distal pulmonary arterial (PA) remodeling in both groups. Diastolic dysfunction, defined by a steeper RV end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship and longitudinal strain, was found in the absence of HF as an early marker of RV remodeling. RV contractility was increased in both groups, and RV-PA coupling was preserved in PH-NF animals but impaired in the PH-HF group. RV hypertrophy was present in PH-HF, although there was evidence of increased RV fibrosis in both PH groups. In the PH-HF group, RV sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase2a expression was decreased, and endoplasmic reticulum stress was increased. Aldosterone levels were also elevated in PH-HF. Thus, in the swine pulmonary vein banding model of chronic postcapillary PH, RV remodeling occurs at the structural, histological, and molecular level. Diastolic dysfunction and fibrosis are present in adaptive RV remodeling, whereas the onset of RV failure is associated with RV-PA uncoupling, defective calcium handling, and hyperaldosteronism. PMID:25158063

  17. Effect of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Haploinsufficiency on Stress-Induced Remodeling of Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Magariños, A.M.; Li, C.J.; Toth, J. Gal; Bath, K.G.; Jing, D.; Lee, F.S.; McEwen, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces the remodeling (i.e., retraction and simplification) of the apical dendrites of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in rats, suggesting that intrahippocampal connectivity can be affected by a prolonged stressful challenge. Since the structural maintenance of neuronal dendritic arborizations and synaptic connectivity requires neurotrophic support, we investigated the potential role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin enriched in the hippocampus and released from neurons in an activity-dependent manner, as a mediator of the stress-induced dendritic remodeling. The analysis of Golgi-impregnated hippocampal sections revealed that wild type (WT) C57BL/6 male mice showed a similar CA3 apical dendritic remodeling in response to three weeks of CRS to that previously described for rats. Haploinsufficient BDNF mice (BDNF±) did not show such remodeling, but, even without CRS, they presented shorter and simplified CA3 apical dendritic arbors, like those observed in stressed WT mice. Furthermore, unstressed BDNF± mice showed a significant decrease in total hippocampal volume. The dendritic arborization of CA1 pyramidal neurons was not affected by CRS or genotype. However, only in WT mice, CRS induced changes in the density of dendritic spine shape subtypes in both CA1 and CA3 apical dendrites. These results suggest a complex role of BDNF in maintaining the dendritic and spine morphology of hippocampal neurons and the associated volume of the hippocampal formation. The inability of CRS to modify the dendritic structure of CA3 pyramidal neurons in BDNF± mice suggests an indirect, perhaps permissive, role of BDNF in mediating hippocampal dendritic remodeling. PMID:20095008

  18. Effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor haploinsufficiency on stress-induced remodeling of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Magariños, A M; Li, C J; Gal Toth, J; Bath, K G; Jing, D; Lee, F S; McEwen, B S

    2011-03-01

    Chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces the remodeling (i.e., retraction and simplification) of the apical dendrites of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in rats, suggesting that intrahippocampal connectivity can be affected by a prolonged stressful challenge. Since the structural maintenance of neuronal dendritic arborizations and synaptic connectivity requires neurotrophic support, we investigated the potential role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin enriched in the hippocampus and released from neurons in an activity-dependent manner, as a mediator of the stress-induced dendritic remodeling. The analysis of Golgi-impregnated hippocampal sections revealed that wild type (WT) C57BL/6 male mice showed a similar CA3 apical dendritic remodeling in response to three weeks of CRS to that previously described for rats. Haploinsufficient BDNF mice (BDNF(±) ) did not show such remodeling, but, even without CRS, they presented shorter and simplified CA3 apical dendritic arbors, like those observed in stressed WT mice. Furthermore, unstressed BDNF(±) mice showed a significant decrease in total hippocampal volume. The dendritic arborization of CA1 pyramidal neurons was not affected by CRS or genotype. However, only in WT mice, CRS induced changes in the density of dendritic spine shape subtypes in both CA1 and CA3 apical dendrites. These results suggest a complex role of BDNF in maintaining the dendritic and spine morphology of hippocampal neurons and the associated volume of the hippocampal formation. The inability of CRS to modify the dendritic structure of CA3 pyramidal neurons in BDNF(±) mice suggests an indirect, perhaps permissive, role of BDNF in mediating hippocampal dendritic remodeling.

  19. Quantification of Protein-Induced Membrane Remodeling Kinetics In Vitro with Lipid Multilayer Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Lowry, Troy W.; Hariri, Hanaa; Prommapan, Plengchart; Kusi-Appiah, Aubrey; Vafai, Nicholas; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A.; Van Winkle, David H.; Stagg, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic self-organization of lipids in biological systems is a highly regulated process that enables the compartmentalization of living systems at micro- and nanoscopic scales. Consequently, quantitative methods for assaying the kinetics of supramolecular remodeling such as vesicle formation from planar lipid bilayers or multilayers are needed to understand cellular self-organization. Here, a new nanotechnology-based method for quantitative measurements of lipid–protein interactions is presented and its suitability for quantifying the membrane binding, inflation, and budding activity of the membrane-remodeling protein Sar1 is demonstrated. Lipid multilayer gratings are printed onto surfaces using nanointaglio and exposed to Sar1, resulting in the inflation of lipid multilayers into unilamellar structures, which can be observed in a label-free manner by monitoring the diffracted light. Local variations in lipid multilayer volume on the surface is used to vary substrate availability in a microarray format. A quantitative model is developed that allows quantification of binding affinity (KD) and kinetics (kon and koff). Importantly, this assay is uniquely capable of quantifying membrane remodeling. Upon Sar1-induced inflation of single bilayers from surface supported multilayers, the semicylindrical grating lines are observed to remodel into semispherical buds when a critical radius of curvature is reached. PMID:26649649

  20. RSC remodeling of oligo-nucleosomes: an atomic force microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Montel, Fabien; Castelnovo, Martin; Menoni, Hervé; Angelov, Dimitar; Dimitrov, Stefan; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine

    2011-01-01

    The ‘remodels structure of chromatin’ (RSC) complex is an essential chromatin remodeling factor that is required for the control of several processes including transcription, repair and replication. The ability of RSC to relocate centrally positioned mononucleosomes at the end of nucleosomal DNA is firmly established, but the data on RSC action on oligo-nucleosomal templates remains still scarce. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we have quantitatively studied the RSC-induced mobilization of positioned di- and trinucleosomes as well as the directionality of mobilization on mononucleosomal template labeled at one end with streptavidin. AFM imaging showed only a limited set of distinct configurational states for the remodeling products. No stepwise or preferred directionality of the nucleosome motion was observed. Analysis of the corresponding reaction pathways allows deciphering the mechanistic features of RSC-induced nucleosome relocation. The final outcome of RSC remodeling of oligosome templates is the packing of the nucleosomes at the edge of the template, providing large stretches of DNA depleted of nucleosomes. This feature of RSC may be used by the cell to overcome the barrier imposed by the presence of nucleosomes. PMID:21138962

  1. Quantification of Protein-Induced Membrane Remodeling Kinetics In Vitro with Lipid Multilayer Gratings.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Troy W; Hariri, Hanaa; Prommapan, Plengchart; Kusi-Appiah, Aubrey; Vafai, Nicholas; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A; Van Winkle, David H; Stagg, Scott M; Lenhert, Steven

    2016-01-27

    The dynamic self-organization of lipids in biological systems is a highly regulated process that enables the compartmentalization of living systems at micro- and nanoscopic scales. Consequently, quantitative methods for assaying the kinetics of supramolecular remodeling such as vesicle formation from planar lipid bilayers or multilayers are needed to understand cellular self-organization. Here, a new nanotechnology-based method for quantitative measurements of lipid-protein interactions is presented and its suitability for quantifying the membrane binding, inflation, and budding activity of the membrane-remodeling protein Sar1 is demonstrated. Lipid multilayer gratings are printed onto surfaces using nanointaglio and exposed to Sar1, resulting in the inflation of lipid multilayers into unilamellar structures, which can be observed in a label-free manner by monitoring the diffracted light. Local variations in lipid multilayer volume on the surface is used to vary substrate availability in a microarray format. A quantitative model is developed that allows quantification of binding affinity (K D ) and kinetics (kon and koff ). Importantly, this assay is uniquely capable of quantifying membrane remodeling. Upon Sar1-induced inflation of single bilayers from surface supported multilayers, the semicylindrical grating lines are observed to remodel into semispherical buds when a critical radius of curvature is reached.

  2. Maternal chromatin remodeling during maturation and after fertilization in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Spinaci, Marcella; Seren, Eraldo; Mattioli, Mauro

    2004-10-01

    Immunofluorescence staining with antibodies against acetylated histone H4 and 5-methylcytosine was carried out to investigate female chromatin remodeling throughout oocyte maturation and chromatin rearrangement involving both male and female genomes after fertilization. Oocyte cytoplasm remodels female chromatin in preparation of the fertilizing event and the subsequent chromatin rearrangement. Histone H4 are in fact progressively deacetylated whereas demethylating enzymes do not seem to be active over this period. The acetylase/deacetylase balance seems to be cell cycle dependent as female chromatin is deacetylated during maturation and reacetylated at telophase II stage both after fertilization and activation. On the contrary, DNA demethylation seems to be strictly selective. It is in fact confined to the remodeling of paternal genome after fertilization of mature oocytes as the ooplasm is not effective in demethylating either paternal chromatin in germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) fertilized oocytes or maternal genome of partenogenetically activated oocytes. Surprisingly, we induced maternal chromatin demethylation after fertilization by treating oocytes with a combination of a methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-azacytidine (5-AzaC), and a reversible and specific inhibitor of histone deacetylase, trichostatin A (TSA). This treatment likely induces a hyperacetylation of histones (thus favoring the access to demethylating enzymes by opening female chromatin structure) associated with a block of reparative methylation by inhibiting methytransferases. This manipulation of chromatin remodeling may have applications regarding the biological significance of aberrant DNA methylation.

  3. Genetic manipulation of periostin expression reveals a role in cardiac hypertrophy and ventricular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Toru; Xu, Jian; Kaiser, Robert A.; Melendez, Jaime; Hambleton, Michael; Sargent, Michelle A.; Lorts, Angela; Brunskill, Eric W.; Dorn, Gerald W.; Conway, Simon J.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Robbins, Jeffrey; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2009-01-01

    The cardiac extracellular matrix is a dynamic structural support network that is both influenced by, and a regulator of, pathological remodeling and hypertrophic growth. In response to pathologic insults the adult heart re-expresses the secreted extracellular matrix protein periostin (Pn). Here we show that Pn is critically involved in regulating the cardiac hypertrophic response, interstitial fibrosis, and ventricular remodeling following long-term pressure overload stimulation and myocardial infarction. Mice lacking the gene encoding Pn (Postn) were more prone to ventricular rupture in the first 10 days after a myocardial infarction, but surviving mice showed less fibrosis and better ventricular performance. Pn−/− mice also showed less fibrosis and hypertrophy following long-term pressure overload, suggesting an intimate relationship between Pn and the regulation of cardiac remodeling. In contrast, inducible overexpression of Pn in the heart protected mice from rupture following myocardial infarction and induced spontaneous hypertrophy with aging. With respect to a mechanism underlying these alterations, Pn−/− hearts showed an altered molecular program in fibroblast function. Indeed, fibroblasts isolated from Pn−/− hearts were less effective in adherence to cardiac myocytes and were characterized by a dramatic alteration in global gene expression (7% of all genes). These are the first genetic data detailing the function of Pn in the adult heart as a regulator of cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. PMID:17569887

  4. Soluble ADAM33 initiates airway remodeling to promote susceptibility for allergic asthma in early life

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Elizabeth R.; Kelly, Joanne F.C.; Howarth, Peter H.; Wilson, David I.; Holgate, Stephen T.; Davies, Donna E.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airways disease that usually begins in early life and involves gene-environment interactions. Although most asthma exhibits allergic inflammation, many allergic individuals do not have asthma. Here, we report how the asthma gene a disintegrin and metalloprotease 33 (ADAM33) acts as local tissue susceptibility gene that promotes allergic asthma. We show that enzymatically active soluble ADAM33 (sADAM33) is increased in asthmatic airways and plays a role in airway remodeling, independent of inflammation. Furthermore, remodeling and inflammation are both suppressed in Adam33-null mice after allergen challenge. When induced in utero or added ex vivo, sADAM33 causes structural remodeling of the airways, which enhances postnatal airway eosinophilia and bronchial hyperresponsiveness following subthreshold challenge with an aeroallergen. This substantial gene-environment interaction helps to explain the end-organ expression of allergic asthma in genetically susceptible individuals. Finally, we show that sADAM33-induced airway remodeling is reversible, highlighting the therapeutic potential of targeting ADAM33 in asthma. PMID:27489884

  5. A multiscale analytical approach for bone remodeling simulations: linking scales from collagen to trabeculae.

    PubMed

    Colloca, Michele; Blanchard, Romane; Hellmich, Christian; Ito, Keita; van Rietbergen, Bert

    2014-07-01

    Bone is a dynamic and hierarchical porous material whose spatial and temporal mechanical properties can vary considerably due to differences in its microstructure and due to remodeling. Hence, a multiscale analytical approach, which combines bone structural information at multiple scales to the remodeling cellular activities, could form an efficient, accurate and beneficial framework for the prognosis of changes in bone properties due to, e.g., bone diseases. In this study, an analytical formulation of bone remodeling integrated with multiscale micromechanical models is proposed to investigate the effects of structural changes at the nanometer level (collagen scale) on those at higher levels (tissue scale). Specific goals of this study are to derive a mechanical stimulus sensed by the osteocytes using a multiscale framework, to test the accuracy of the multiscale model for the prediction of bone density, and to demonstrate its multiscale capabilities by predicting changes in bone density due to changes occurring at the molecular level. At each different level, the bone composition was modeled as a two-phase material which made it possible to: (1) find a closed-form solution for the energy-based mechanical stimulus sensed by the osteocytes and (2) describe the anisotropic elastic properties at higher levels as a function of the stiffness of the elementary components (collagen, hydroxyapatite and water) at lower levels. The accuracy of the proposed multiscale model of bone remodeling was tested first by comparing the analytical bone volume fraction predictions to those obtained from the corresponding μFE-based computational model. Differences between analytical and numerical predictions were less than 1% while the computational time was drastically reduced, namely by a factor of 1 million. In a further analysis, the effects of changes in collagen and hydroxyapatite volume fractions on the bone remodeling process were simulated, and it was found that such changes

  6. Adverse responses to local anaesthetics.

    PubMed

    Fisher, M M; Graham, R

    1984-11-01

    Progressive challenge was used to investigate twenty-seven patients with a history of an adverse response to local anaesthesia. True allergy was detected in only one patient. The method does not exclude reactions to additives and preservatives in local anaesthetics. If preservative-free local anaesthetics are used for subsequent exposure in patients with no response to progressive challenge, subsequent exposure is safe. The possibility that some of these patients may be reacting to preservatives in the solutions cannot be excluded by such testing. Where possible preservative-free local anaesthetic preparations should be used for subsequent anaesthesia.

  7. Adverse Outcomes in Group Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roback, Howard B.

    2000-01-01

    Group forms of therapy have been growing at a rapid rate, in part because of their documented effectiveness and economic considerations such as managed care. It is therefore becoming increasingly important to assess the psychological risks of these interventions. The author provides an overview of the published literature and conference presentations on negative effects in adult outpatient groups. Although much of the literature on adverse outcomes in group therapy focuses on single risk factors (e.g., negative leader, group process, or patient characteristics), the author argues that an interactional model should be encouraged. Means of reducing casualties are also discussed, as well as methodological issues and research directions. PMID:10896735

  8. Right ventricular relative wall thickness as a predictor of outcomes and of right ventricular reverse remodeling for patients with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sano, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Motoji, Yoshiki; Fukuda, Yuko; Mochizuki, Yasuhide; Hatani, Yutaka; Matsuzoe, Hiroki; Hatazawa, Keiko; Shimoura, Hiroyuki; Ooka, Junichi; Ryo-Koriyama, Keiko; Nakayama, Kazuhiko; Matsumoto, Kensuke; Emoto, Noriaki; Hirata, Ken-Ichi

    2017-03-01

    Mid-term right ventricular (RV) reverse remodeling after treatment in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with long-term outcome as well as baseline RV remodeling. However, baseline factors influencing mid-term RV reverse remodeling after treatment and its prognostic capability remain unclear. We studied 54 PH patients. Mid-term RV remodeling was assessed in terms of the RV area, which was traced planimetrically at the end-systole (RVESA). RV reverse remodeling was defined as a relative decrease in the RVESA of at least 15% at 10.2 ± 9.4 months after treatment. Long-term follow-up was 5 years. Adverse events occurred in ten patients (19%) and mid-term RV reverse remodeling after treatment was observed in 37 (69%). Patients with mid-term RV reverse remodeling had more favorable long-term outcomes than those without (log-rank: p = 0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that RV relative wall thickness (RV-RWT), as calculated as RV free-wall thickness/RV basal linear dimension at end-diastole, was an independent predictor of mid-term RV reverse remodeling (OR 1.334; 95% CI, 1.039-1.713; p = 0.03). Moreover, patients with RV-RWT ≥0.21 showed better long-term outcomes than did those without (log-rank p = 0.03), while those with RV-RWT ≥0.21 and mid-term RV reverse remodeling had the best long-term outcomes. Patients with RV-RWT <0.21 and without mid-term RV reverse remodeling, on the other hand, had worse long-term outcomes than other sub-groups. In conclusions, RV-RWT could predict mid-term RV reverse remodeling after treatment in PH patients, and was associated with long-term outcomes. Our finding may have clinical implications for better management of PH patients.

  9. Diffuse myocardial fibrosis by T1-mapping in children with subclinical anthracycline cardiotoxicity: relationship to exercise capacity, cumulative dose and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The late cardiotoxic effects of anthracycline chemotherapy influence morbidity and mortality in the growing population of childhood cancer survivors. Even with lower anthracycline doses, evidence of adverse cardiac remodeling and reduced exercise capacity exist. We aim to examine the relationship between cardiac structure, function and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) tissue characteristics with chemotherapy dose and exercise capacity in childhood cancer survivors. Methods Thirty patients (15 ± 3 years), at least 2 years following anthracycline treatment, underwent CMR, echocardiography, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (peak VO2). CMR measured ventricular function, mass, T1 and T2 values, and myocardial extracellular volume fraction, ECV, a measure of diffuse fibrosis based on changes in myocardial T1 values pre- and post-gadolinium. Cardiac function was also assessed with conventional and speckle tracking echocardiography. Results Patients had normal LVEF (59 ± 7%) but peak VO2 was 17% lower than age-predicted normal values and were correlated with anthracycline dose (r = −0.49). Increased ECV correlated with decreased mass/volume ratio (r = −0.64), decreased LV wall thickness/height ratio (r = −0.72), lower peak VO2(r = −0.52), and higher cumulative dose (r = 0.40). Echocardiographic measures of systolic and diastolic function were reduced compared to normal values (p < 0.01), but had no relation to ECV, peak VO2 or cumulative dose. Conclusions Myocardial T1 and ECV were found to be early tissue markers of ventricular remodeling that may represent diffuse fibrosis in children with normal ejection fraction post anthracycline therapy, and are related to cumulative dose, exercise capacity and myocardial wall thinning. PMID:23758789

  10. Vascular remodeling underlies rebleeding in hemophilic arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Vikas; Olmer, Merissa; Joshi, Shweta; Durden, Donald L; Cramer, Thomas J; Barnes, Richard Fw; Ball, Scott T; Hughes, Tudor H; Silva, Mauricio; Luck, James V; Moore, Randy E; Mosnier, Laurent O; von Drygalski, Annette

    2015-11-01

    Hemophilic arthropathy is a debilitating condition that can develop as a consequence of frequent joint bleeding despite adequate clotting factor replacement. The mechanisms leading to repeated spontaneous bleeding are unknown. We investigated synovial, vascular, stromal, and cartilage changes in response to a single induced hemarthrosis in the FVIII-deficient mouse. We found soft-tissue hyperproliferation with marked induction of neoangiogenesis and evolving abnormal vascular architecture. While soft-tissue changes were rapidly reversible, abnormal vascularity persisted for months and, surprisingly, was also seen in uninjured joints. Vascular changes in FVIII-deficient mice involved pronounced remodeling with expression of α-Smooth Muscle Actin (SMA), Endoglin (CD105), and vascular endothelial growth factor, as well as alterations of joint perfusion as determined by in vivo imaging. Vascular architecture changes and pronounced expression of α-SMA appeared unique to hemophilia, as these were not found in joint tissue obtained from mouse models of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis and from patients with the same conditions. Evidence that vascular changes in hemophilia were significantly associated with bleeding and joint deterioration was obtained prospectively by dynamic in vivo imaging with musculoskeletal ultrasound and power Doppler of 156 joints (elbows, knees, and ankles) in a cohort of 26 patients with hemophilia at baseline and during painful episodes. These observations support the hypothesis that vascular remodeling contributes significantly to bleed propagation and development of hemophilic arthropathy. Based on these findings, the development of molecular targets for angiogenesis inhibition may be considered in this disease.

  11. Specific remodeling of splenic architecture by cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Chris A; De Trez, Carl; Schneider, Kirsten; Ha, Sukwon; Patterson, Ginelle; Ware, Carl F

    2006-03-01

    Efficient immune defenses are facilitated by the organized microarchitecture of lymphoid organs, and this organization is regulated by the compartmentalized expression of lymphoid tissue chemokines. Mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection induces significant remodeling of splenic microarchitecture, including loss of marginal zone macrophage populations and dissolution of T and B cell compartmentalization. MCMV preferentially infected the splenic stroma, targeting endothelial cells (EC) as revealed using MCMV-expressing green fluorescent protein. MCMV infection caused a specific, but transient transcriptional suppression of secondary lymphoid chemokine (CCL21). The loss of CCL21 was associated with the failure of T lymphocytes to locate within the T cell zone, although trafficking to the spleen was unaltered. Expression of CCL21 in lymphotoxin (LT)-alpha-deficient mice is dramatically reduced, however MCMV infection further reduced CCL21 levels, suggesting that viral modulation of CCL21 was independent of LTalpha signaling. Activation of LTbeta-receptor signaling with an agonistic antibody partially restored CCL21 mRNA expression and redirected transferred T cells to the splenic T cell zone in MCMV-infected mice. These results indicate that virus-induced alterations in lymphoid tissues can occur through an LT-independent modulation of chemokine transcription, and targeting of the LT cytokine system can counteract lymphoid tissue remodeling by MCMV.

  12. Densitometric evaluation of periprosthetic bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo Domenico; Cervi, Valentina; Piolanti, Nicola; Ciapini, Gianluca; Andreani, Lorenzo; Castellini, Iacopo; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Summary The application of Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in orthopaedic surgery gradually has been extended from the study of osteoporosis to different areas of interest like the study of the relation between bone and prosthetic implants. Aim of this review is to analyze changes that occur in periprosthetic bone after the implantation of a total hip arthroplasty (THA) or a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In THA the pattern of adaptive bone remodeling with different cementless femoral stems varies and it appears to be strictly related to the design and more specifically to where the femoral stem is fixed on bone. Short stems with metaphyseal fixation allow the maintenance of a more physiologic load transfer to the proximal femur decreasing the entity of bone loss. Femoral bone loss after TKA seems to be related to the stress shielding induced by the implants while tibial bone remodeling seems to be related to postoperative changes in knee alignment (varus/valgus) and consequently in tibial load transfer. After both THA and TKA stress shielding seems to be an inevitable phenomenon that occurs mainly in the first year after surgery. PMID:25568658

  13. Bone remodelling analysis of the humerus after a shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Quental, Carlos; Folgado, João; Fernandes, Paulo R; Monteiro, Jacinto

    2012-10-01

    The shoulder arthroplasty has become an efficient treatment for some pathologies. However there are complications that can compromise its success. Among them, the stress shielding effect on the humerus has been reported as a possible cause of failure. The objective of this work was to investigate the bone remodelling in the humerus after a shoulder arthroplasty. For this purpose, computational models were developed to analyse the stress shielding contribution to the humeral component failure of shoulder arthroplasties, with a cemented and an uncemented prosthesis. A computational remodelling model was used to characterize the bone apparent density at each site of the humerus. The density distribution was obtained by the solution of a problem that takes into account both structural stiffness and the metabolic cost of bone maintenance. Bone was subjected to 6 load cases that include the glenohumeral reaction force and the action of 10 muscles. In the implanted models, different interface conditions were tested for the bone-implant and the cement-implant interfaces. Moreover, a pathological case defined by a poorer quality of bone was considered. In the healthy situation, the models that better model in vivo conditions showed no significant changes in bone mass. However, the results for the pathological case showed some bone resorption which supports the importance given to the quality of bone in the success of the joint replacement. Bearing in mind the conditions addressed, the results lead to conclude that the stress shielding is not a key factor for the humeral component failure of shoulder arthroplasties in a healthy situation though several issues, including muscle function and bone quality, may heighten its effect.

  14. Left ventricular remodeling after experimental myocardial cryoinjury in rats.

    PubMed

    Ciulla, Michele M; Paliotti, Roberta; Ferrero, Stefano; Braidotti, Paola; Esposito, Arturo; Gianelli, Umberto; Busca, Giuseppe; Cioffi, Ugo; Bulfamante, Gaetano; Magrini, Fabio

    2004-01-01

    The standard coronary ligation, the most studied model of experimental myocardial infarction in rats, is limited by high mortality and produces unpredictable areas of necrosis. To standardize the location and size of the infarct and to elucidate the mechanisms of myocardial remodeling and its progression to heart failure, we studied the functional, structural, and ultrastructural changes of myocardial infarction produced by experimental myocardial cryoinjury. The cryoinjury was successful in 24 (80%) of 30 male adult CD rats. A subepicardial infarct was documented on echocardiograms, with an average size of about 21%. Macroscopic examination reflected closely the stamp of the instrument used, without transition zones to viable myocardium. Histological examination, during the acute setting, revealed an extensive area of coagulation necrosis and hemorrhage in the subepicardium. An inflammatory infiltrate was evident since the 7th hour, whereas the reparative phase started within the first week, with proliferation of fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and myocytes. From the 7th day, deposition of collagen fibers was reported with a reparative scar completed at the 30th day. Ultrastructural study revealed vascular capillary damage and irreversible alterations of the myocytes in the acute setting and confirmed the histological findings of the later phases. The damage was associated with a progressive left ventricular (LV) remodeling, including thinning of the infarcted area, hypertrophy of the noninfarcted myocardium, and significant LV dilation. This process started from the 60th day and progressed over the subsequent 120 days period; at 180 days, a significant increase in LV filling pressure, indicative of heart failure, was found. In conclusion, myocardial cryodamage, although different in respect to ischemic damage, causes a standardized injury reproducing the cellular patterns of coagulation necrosis, early microvascular reperfusion, hemorrhage, inflammation

  15. "Adversative Conjunction": The Poetics of Linguistic Opposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallerstein, Nicholas

    1992-01-01

    The general use of adversative conjunction in (primarily) English and U.S. poetry is outlined. The contention is that the adversative is not merely a grammatical convenience but sometimes a highly functional tool of rhetorical strategy. (36 references) (LB)

  16. The international serious adverse events consortium.

    PubMed

    Holden, Arthur L; Contreras, Jorge L; John, Sally; Nelson, Matthew R

    2014-11-01

    The International Serious Adverse Events Consortium is generating novel insights into the genetics and biology of drug-induced serious adverse events, and thereby improving pharmaceutical product development and decision-making.

  17. Evaluation of the National Remodelling Team: Year 3. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Claire; Eames, Anna; Wilson, Rebekah; Walker, Matthew; Sharp, Caroline

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) evaluation was to examine the effectiveness and impact of the work of the National Remodelling Team (NRT) in completing the third phase of the remodeling program and its effectiveness in applying its model, tools and techniques to the extended schools program. This evaluation has…

  18. CCR3 Blockade Attenuates Eosinophilic Ileitis and Associated Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Masterson, Joanne C; McNamee, Eóin N; Jedlicka, Paul; Fillon, Sophie; Ruybal, Joseph; Hosford, Lindsay; Rivera-Nieves, Jesús; Lee, James J; Furuta, Glenn T

    2011-11-01

    Intestinal remodeling and stricture formation is a complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that often requires surgical intervention. Although eosinophils are associated with mucosal remodeling in other organs and are increased in IBD tissues, their role in IBD-associated remodeling is unclear. Histological and molecular features of ileitis and remodeling were assessed using immunohistochemical, histomorphometric, flow cytometric, and molecular analysis (real-time RT-PCR) techniques in a murine model of chronic eosinophilic ileitis. Collagen protein was assessed by Sircol assay. Using a spontaneous eosinophilic Crohn's-like mouse model SAMP1/SkuSlc, we demonstrate an association between ileitis progression and remodeling over the course of 40 weeks. Mucosal and submucosal eosinophilia increased over the time course and correlated with increased histological inflammatory indices. Ileitis and remodeling increased over the 40 weeks, as did expression of fibronectin. CCR3-specific antibody-mediated reduction of eosinophils resulted in significant decrease in goblet cell hyperplasia, muscularis propria hypertrophy, villus blunting, and expression of inflammatory and remodeling genes, including fibronectin. Cellularity of local mesenteric lymph nodes, including T- and B-lymphocytes, was also significantly reduced. Thus, eosinophils participate in intestinal remodeling, supporting eosinophils as a novel therapeutic target.

  19. Internal strain drives spontaneous periodic buckling in collagen and regulates remodeling.

    PubMed

    Dittmore, Andrew; Silver, Jonathan; Sarkar, Susanta K; Marmer, Barry; Goldberg, Gregory I; Neuman, Keir C

    2016-07-26

    Fibrillar collagen, an essential structural component of the extracellular matrix, is remarkably resistant to proteolysis, requiring specialized matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to initiate its remodeling. In the context of native fibrils, remodeling is poorly understood; MMPs have limited access to cleavage sites and are inhibited by tension on the fibril. Here, single-molecule recordings of fluorescently labeled MMPs reveal cleavage-vulnerable binding regions arrayed periodically at ∼1-µm intervals along collagen fibrils. Binding regions remain periodic even as they migrate on the fibril, indicating a collective process of thermally activated and self-healing defect formation. An internal strain relief model involving reversible structural rearrangements quantitatively reproduces the observed spatial patterning and fluctuations of defects and provides a mechanism for tension-dependent stabilization of fibrillar collagen. This work identifies internal-strain-driven defects that may have general and widespread regulatory functions in self-assembled biological filaments.

  20. Internal strain drives spontaneous periodic buckling in collagen and regulates remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Dittmore, Andrew; Silver, Jonathan; Sarkar, Susanta K.; Marmer, Barry; Goldberg, Gregory I.; Neuman, Keir C.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrillar collagen, an essential structural component of the extracellular matrix, is remarkably resistant to proteolysis, requiring specialized matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to initiate its remodeling. In the context of native fibrils, remodeling is poorly understood; MMPs have limited access to cleavage sites and are inhibited by tension on the fibril. Here, single-molecule recordings of fluorescently labeled MMPs reveal cleavage-vulnerable binding regions arrayed periodically at ∼1-µm intervals along collagen fibrils. Binding regions remain periodic even as they migrate on the fibril, indicating a collective process of thermally activated and self-healing defect formation. An internal strain relief model involving reversible structural rearrangements quantitatively reproduces the observed spatial patterning and fluctuations of defects and provides a mechanism for tension-dependent stabilization of fibrillar collagen. This work identifies internal–strain-driven defects that may have general and widespread regulatory functions in self-assembled biological filaments. PMID:27402741

  1. Simulated Microgravity and Recovery-Induced Remodeling of the Left and Right Ventricle.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guohui; Li, Yuheng; Li, Hongxing; Sun, Weijia; Cao, Dengchao; Li, Jianwei; Zhao, Dingsheng; Song, Jinping; Jin, Xiaoyan; Song, Hailin; Yuan, Xinxin; Wu, Xiaorui; Li, Qi; Xu, Qing; Kan, Guanghan; Cao, Hongqing; Ling, Shukuan; Li, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    Physiological adaptations to microgravity involve alterations in cardiovascular systems. These adaptations result in cardiac remodeling and orthostatic hypotension. However, the response of the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) following hindlimb unloading (HU) and hindlimb reloading (HR) is not clear and the underlying mechanism remains to be understood. In this study, three groups of mice were subjected to HU by tail suspension for 28 days. Following this, two groups were allowed to recover for 7 or 14 days. The control group was treated equally, with the exception of tail suspension. Echocardiography was performed to detect the structure and function changes of heart. Compared with the control, the HU group of mice showed reduced LV-EF (ejection fraction), and LV-FS (fractional shortening). However, mice that were allowed to recover for 7 days after HU (HR-7d) showed increased LVIDs (systolic LV internal diameter) and LV Vols (systolic LV volume). Mice that recovered for 14 days (HR-14d) returned to the normal state. In comparison, RV-EF and RV-FS didn't recover to the normal conditions till being reloaded for 14 days. Compared with the control, RVIDd (diastolic RV internal diameter), and RV Vold (diastolic RV volume) were reduced in HU group and recovered to the normal conditions in HR-7d and HR-14d groups, in which groups RVIDs (systolic RV internal diameter) and RV Vols (systolic RV volume) were increased. Histological analysis and cardiac remodeling gene expression results indicated that HU induces left and right ventricular remodeling. Western blot demonstrated that the phosphorylation of HDAC4 and ERK1/2 and the ratio of LC3-II / LC3-I, were increased following HU and recovered following HR in both LV and RV, and the phosphorylation of AMPK was inhibited in both LV and RV following HU, but only restored in LV following HR for 14 days. These results indicate that simulated microgravity leads to cardiac remodeling, and the remodeling changes can

  2. Simulated Microgravity and Recovery-Induced Remodeling of the Left and Right Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Guohui; Li, Yuheng; Li, Hongxing; Sun, Weijia; Cao, Dengchao; Li, Jianwei; Zhao, Dingsheng; Song, Jinping; Jin, Xiaoyan; Song, Hailin; Yuan, Xinxin; Wu, Xiaorui; Li, Qi; Xu, Qing; Kan, Guanghan; Cao, Hongqing; Ling, Shukuan; Li, Yingxian

    2016-01-01

    Physiological adaptations to microgravity involve alterations in cardiovascular systems. These adaptations result in cardiac remodeling and orthostatic hypotension. However, the response of the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) following hindlimb unloading (HU) and hindlimb reloading (HR) is not clear and the underlying mechanism remains to be understood. In this study, three groups of mice were subjected to HU by tail suspension for 28 days. Following this, two groups were allowed to recover for 7 or 14 days. The control group was treated equally, with the exception of tail suspension. Echocardiography was performed to detect the structure and function changes of heart. Compared with the control, the HU group of mice showed reduced LV-EF (ejection fraction), and LV-FS (fractional shortening). However, mice that were allowed to recover for 7 days after HU (HR-7d) showed increased LVIDs (systolic LV internal diameter) and LV Vols (systolic LV volume). Mice that recovered for 14 days (HR-14d) returned to the normal state. In comparison, RV-EF and RV-FS didn't recover to the normal conditions till being reloaded for 14 days. Compared with the control, RVIDd (diastolic RV internal diameter), and RV Vold (diastolic RV volume) were reduced in HU group and recovered to the normal conditions in HR-7d and HR-14d groups, in which groups RVIDs (systolic RV internal diameter) and RV Vols (systolic RV volume) were increased. Histological analysis and cardiac remodeling gene expression results indicated that HU induces left and right ventricular remodeling. Western blot demonstrated that the phosphorylation of HDAC4 and ERK1/2 and the ratio of LC3-II / LC3-I, were increased following HU and recovered following HR in both LV and RV, and the phosphorylation of AMPK was inhibited in both LV and RV following HU, but only restored in LV following HR for 14 days. These results indicate that simulated microgravity leads to cardiac remodeling, and the remodeling changes can

  3. Cervical collagen network remodeling in normal pregnancy and disrupted parturition in Antxr2 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kyoko; Reeves, Claire; Vink, Joy; Kitajewski, Jan; Wapner, Ronald; Jiang, Hongfeng; Cremers, Serge; Myers, Kristin

    2014-02-01

    The remodeling of the cervix from a rigid barrier into a compliant structure, which dilates to allow for delivery, is a critical process for a successful pregnancy. Changes in the mechanical properties of cervical tissue during remodeling are hypothesized to be related to the types of collagen crosslinks within the tissue. To further understand normal and abnormal cervical remodeling, we quantify the material properties and collagen crosslink density of cervical tissue throughout pregnancy from normal wild-type and Anthrax Toxin Receptor 2 knockout (Antxr2-/-) mice. Antxr2-/- females are known to have a parturition defect, in part, due to an excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the cervix, particularly collagen. In this study, we determined the mechanical properties in gestation-timed cervical samples by osmotic loading and measured the density of mature collagen crosslink, pyridinoline (PYD), by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS). The equilibrium material response of the tissue to loading was investigated using a hyperelastic material model where the stresses in the material are balanced by the osmotic swelling tendencies of the glycosaminoglycans and the tensile restoring forces of a randomly-oriented crosslinked collagen fiber network. This study shows that the swelling response of the cervical tissue increased with decreasing PYD density in normal remodeling. In the Antxr2-/- mice, there was no significant increase in swelling volume or significant decrease in crosslink density with advancing gestation. By comparing the ECM-mechanical response relationships in normal and disrupted parturition mouse models this study shows that a reduction of collagen crosslink density is related to cervical softening and contributes to the cervical remodeling process.

  4. Exploring susceptibility to atrial and ventricular arrhythmias resulting from remodeling of the passive electrical properties in the heart: a simulation approach

    PubMed Central

    Trayanova, Natalia A.; Boyle, Patrick M.; Arevalo, Hermenegild J.; Zahid, Sohail

    2014-01-01

    Under diseased conditions, remodeling of the cardiac tissue properties (“passive properties”) takes place; these are aspects of electrophysiological behavior that are not associated with active ion transport across cell membranes. Remodeling of the passive electrophysiological properties most often results from structural remodeling, such as gap junction down-regulation and lateralization, fibrotic growth infiltrating the myocardium, or the development of an infarct scar. Such structural remodeling renders atrial or ventricular tissue as a major substrate for arrhythmias. The current review focuses on these aspects of cardiac arrhythmogenesis. Due to the inherent complexity of cardiac arrhythmias, computer simulations have provided means to elucidate interactions pertinent to this spatial scale. Here we review the current state-of-the-art in modeling atrial and ventricular arrhythmogenesis as arising from the disease-induced changes in the passive tissue properties, as well as the contributions these modeling studies have made to our understanding of the mechanisms of arrhythmias in the heart. Because of the rapid advance of structural imaging methodologies in cardiac electrophysiology, we chose to present studies that have used such imaging methodologies to construct geometrically realistic models of cardiac tissue, or the organ itself, where the regional remodeling properties of the myocardium can be represented in a realistic way. We emphasize how the acquired knowledge can be used to pave the way for clinical applications of cardiac organ modeling under the conditions of structural remodeling. PMID:25429272

  5. Vessel remodelling, pregnancy hormones and extravillous trophoblast function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jessie Z-J; Sheehan, Penelope M; Brennecke, Shaun P; Keogh, Rosemary J

    2012-02-26

    During early human pregnancy, extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells from the placenta invade the uterine decidual spiral arterioles and mediate the remodelling of these vessels such that a low pressure, high blood flow can be supplied to the placenta. This is essential to facilitate normal growth and development of the foetus. Defects in remodelling can manifest as the serious pregnancy complication pre-eclampsia. During the period of vessel remodelling three key pregnancy-associated hormones, human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG), progesterone (P(4)) and oestradiol (E(2)), are found in high concentrations at the maternal-foetal interface. Potentially these hormones may control EVT movement and thus act as regulators of vessel remodelling. This review will discuss what is known about how these hormones affect EVT proliferation, migration and invasion during vascular remodelling and the potential relationship between hCG, P(4), E(2) and the development of pre-eclampsia.

  6. Proliferation and tissue remodeling in cancer: the hallmarks revisited.

    PubMed

    Markert, E K; Levine, A J; Vazquez, A

    2012-10-04

    Although cancers are highly heterogeneous at the genomic level, they can manifest common patterns of gene expression. Here, we use gene expression signatures to interrogate two major processes in cancer, proliferation and tissue remodeling. We demonstrate that proliferation and remodeling signatures are partially independent and result in four distinctive cancer subtypes. Cancers with the proliferation signature are characterized by signatures of p53 and PTEN inactivation and concomitant Myc activation. In contrast, remodeling correlates with RAS, HIF-1α and NFκB activation. From the metabolic point of view, proliferation is associated with upregulation of glycolysis and serine/glycine metabolism, whereas remodeling is characterized by a downregulation of oxidative phosphorylation. Notably, the proliferation signature correlates with poor outcome in lung, prostate, breast and brain cancer, whereas remodeling increases mortality rates in colorectal and ovarian cancer.

  7. Chromatin remodeling in DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yunhe; Shen, Xuetong

    2007-04-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes use ATP hydrolysis to remodel nucleosomes and have well-established functions in transcription. However, emerging lines of evidence suggest that chromatin remodeling complexes are important players in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair as well. The INO80 and SWI2 subfamilies of chromatin remodeling complexes have been found to be recruited to the double-strand lesions and to function directly in both homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining, the two major conserved DSB repair pathways. Improperly repaired DSBs are implicated in cancer development in higher organisms. Understanding how chromatin remodeling complexes contribute to DSB repair should provide new insights into the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and might suggest new targets for cancer treatment.

  8. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  9. Chondromodulin I Is a Bone Remodeling Factor

    PubMed Central

    Nakamichi, Yuko; Shukunami, Chisa; Yamada, Takashi; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Kawano, Hirotaka; Sato, Takashi; Nishizaki, Yuriko; Yamamoto, Yoko; Shindo, Masayo; Yoshimura, Kimihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Hiraki, Yuji; Kato, Shigeaki

    2003-01-01

    Chondromodulin I (ChM-I) was supposed from its limited expression in cartilage and its functions in cultured chondrocytes as a major regulator in cartilage development. Here, we generated mice deficient in ChM-I by targeted disruption of the ChM-I gene. No overt abnormality was detected in endochondral bone formation during embryogenesis and cartilage development during growth stages of ChM-I−/− mice. However, a significant increase in bone mineral density with lowered bone resorption with respect to formation was unexpectedly found in adult ChM-I−/− mice. Thus, the present study established that ChM-I is a bone remodeling factor. PMID:12509461

  10. Molecular mechanisms of synaptic remodeling in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan J; Pandey, Subhash C

    2015-08-05

    Alcohol use and alcohol addiction represent dysfunctional brain circuits resulting from neuroadaptive changes during protracted alcohol exposure and its withdrawal. Alcohol exerts a potent effect on synaptic plasticity and dendritic spine formation in specific brain regions, providing a neuroanatomical substrate for the pathophysiology of alcoholism. Epigenetics has recently emerged as a critical regulator of gene expression and synaptic plasticity-related events in the brain. Alcohol exposure and withdrawal induce changes in crucial epigenetic processes in the emotional brain circuitry (amygdala) that may be relevant to the negative affective state defined as the "dark side" of addiction. Here, we review the literature concerning synaptic plasticity and epigenetics, with a particular focus on molecular events related to dendritic remodeling during alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Targeting epigenetic processes that modulate synaptic plasticity may yield novel treatments for alcoholism.

  11. Matrix Remodeling in Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Tejaswini; O'Reilly, Philip; Antony, Veena B; Gaggar, Amit; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema are chronic lung diseases characterized by a progressive decline in lung function, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. A hallmark of these diseases is recurrent or persistent alveolar epithelial injury, typically caused by common environmental exposures such as cigarette smoke. We propose that critical determinants of the outcome of the injury-repair processes that result in fibrosis versus emphysema are mesenchymal cell fate and associated extracellular matrix dynamics. In this review, we explore the concept that regulation of mesenchymal cells under the influence of soluble factors, in particular transforming growth factor-β1, and the extracellular matrix determine the divergent tissue remodeling responses seen in pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema.

  12. Cell wall remodeling under abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Plants exposed to abiotic stress respond to unfavorable conditions on multiple levels. One challenge under drought stress is to reduce shoot growth while maintaining root growth, a process requiring differential cell wall synthesis and remodeling. Key players in this process are the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidases, which initially cross-link phenolic compounds and glycoproteins of the cell walls causing stiffening. The function of ROS shifts after having converted all the peroxidase substrates in the cell wall. If ROS-levels remain high during prolonged stress, OH°-radicals are formed which lead to polymer cleavage. In concert with xyloglucan modifying enzymes and expansins, the resulting cell wall loosening allows further growth of stressed organs. PMID:25709610

  13. Bone Remodeling and Energy Metabolism: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Francisco J. A.; Rosen, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Bone mineral, adipose tissue and energy metabolism are interconnected by a complex and multilevel series of networks. Calcium and phosphorus are utilized for insulin secretion and synthesis of high energy compounds. Adipose tissue store lipids and cholecalciferol, which, in turn, can influence calcium balance and energy expenditure. Hormones long-thought to solely modulate energy and mineral homeostasis may influence adipocytic function. Osteoblasts are a target of insulin action in bone. Moreover, endocrine mediators, such as osteocalcin, are synthesized in the skeleton but regulate carbohydrate disposal and insulin secretion. Finally, osteoblasts and adipocytes originate from the same mesenchymal progenitor. The mutual crosstalk between osteoblasts and adipocytes within the bone marrow microenvironment plays a crucial role in bone remodeling. In the present review we provide an overview of the reciprocal control between bone and energy metabolism and its clinical implications. PMID:26273493

  14. Impact of Short-Term Treatment with Telmisartan on Cerebral Arterial Remodeling in SHR

    PubMed Central

    Foulquier, Sébastien; Lartaud, Isabelle; Dupuis, François

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Chronic hypertension decreases internal diameter of cerebral arteries and arterioles. We recently showed that short-term treatment with the angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan restored baseline internal diameter of small cerebral arterioles in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), via reversal of structural remodeling and inhibition of the angiotensin II vasoconstrictor response. As larger arteries also participate in the regulation of cerebral circulation, we evaluated whether similar short-term treatment affects middle cerebral arteries of SHR. Methods Baseline internal diameters of pressurised middle cerebral arteries from SHR and their respective controls, Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) and responses to angiotensin II were studied in a small vessel arteriograph. Pressure myogenic curves and passive internal diameters were measured following EDTA deactivation, and elastic modulus from stress-strain relationships. Results Active baseline internal diameter was 23% lower in SHR compared to WKY, passive internal diameter (EDTA) 28% lower and elastic modulus unchanged. Pressure myogenic curves were shifted to higher pressure values in SHR. Telmisartan lowered blood pressure but had no effect on baseline internal diameter nor on structural remodeling (passive internal diameter and elastic modulus remained unchanged compared to SHR). Telmisartan shifted the pressure myogenic curve to lower pressure values than SHR. Conclusion In the middle cerebral arteries of SHR, short-term treatment with telmisartan had no effect on structural remodeling and did not restore baseline internal diameter, but allowed myogenic tone to adapt towards lower pressure values. PMID:25333878

  15. Differential nuclear remodeling of mammalian somatic cells by Xenopus laevis oocyte and egg cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Alberio, Ramiro; Johnson, Andrew D.; Stick, Reimer; Campbell, Keith H.S. . E-mail: keith.campbell@nottingham.ac.uk

    2005-07-01

    The mechanisms governing nuclear reprogramming have not been fully elucidated yet; however, recent studies show a universally conserved ability of both oocyte and egg components to reprogram gene expression in somatic cells. The activation of genes associated with pluripotency by oocyte/egg components may require the remodeling of nuclear structures, such that they can acquire the features of early embryos and pluripotent cells. Here, we report on the remodeling of the nuclear lamina of mammalian cells by Xenopus oocyte and egg extracts. Lamin A/C is removed from somatic cells incubated in oocyte and egg extracts in an active process that requires permeable nuclear pores. Removal of lamin A/C is specific, since B-type lamins are not changed, and it is not dependent on the incorporation Xenopus egg specific lamin III. Moreover, transcriptional activity is differentially regulated in somatic cells incubated in the extracts. Pol I and II transcriptions are maintained in cells in oocyte extracts; however, both activities are abolished in egg extracts. Our study shows that components of oocyte and egg extracts can modify the nuclear lamina of somatic cells and that this nuclear remodeling induces a structural change in the nucleus which may have implications for transcriptional activity. These experiments suggest that modifications in the nuclear lamina structure by the removal of somatic proteins and the incorporation of oocyte/egg components may contribute to the reprogramming of somatic cell nuclei and may define a characteristic configuration of pluripotent cells.

  16. Remodeling of the fovea in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Spund, B; Ding, Y; Liu, T; Selesnick, I; Glazman, S; Shrier, E M; Bodis-Wollner, I

    2013-05-01

    To quantify the thickness of the inner retinal layers in the foveal pit where the nerve fiber layer (NFL) is absent, and quantify changes in the ganglion cells and inner plexiform layer. Pixel-by-pixel volumetric measurements were obtained via Spectral-Domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) from 50 eyes of Parkinson disease (PD) (n = 30) and 50 eyes of healthy control subjects (n = 27). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) were used to classify individual subjects with respect to sensitivity and specificity calculations at each perifoveolar distance. Three-dimensional topographic maps of the healthy and PD foveal pit were created. The foveal pit is thinner and broader in PD. The difference becomes evident in an annular zone between 0.5 and 2 mm from the foveola and the optimal (ROC-defined) zone is from 0.75 to 1.5 mm. This zone is nearly devoid of NFL and partially overlaps the foveal avascular zone. About 78 % of PD eyes can be discriminated from HC eyes based on this zone. ROC applied to OCT pixel-by-pixel analysis helps to discriminate PD from HC retinae. Remodeling of the foveal architecture is significant because it may provide a visible and quantifiable signature of PD. The specific location of remodeling in the fovea raises a novel concept for exploring the mechanism of oxidative stress on retinal neurons in PD. OCT is a promising quantitative tool in PD research. However, larger scale studies are needed before the method can be applied to clinical follow-ups.

  17. Adverse events in healthcare: learning from mistakes.

    PubMed

    Rafter, N; Hickey, A; Condell, S; Conroy, R; O'Connor, P; Vaughan, D; Williams, D

    2015-04-01

    Large national reviews of patient charts estimate that approximately 10% of hospital admissions are associated with an adverse event (defined as an injury resulting in prolonged hospitalization, disability or death, caused by healthcare management). Apart from having a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality, adverse events also result in increased healthcare costs due to longer hospital stays. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of adverse events are preventable. Through identifying the nature and rate of adverse events, initiatives to improve care can be developed. A variety of methods exist to gather adverse event data both retrospectively and prospectively but these do not necessarily capture the same events and there is variability in the definition of an adverse event. For example, hospital incident reporting collects only a very small fraction of the adverse events found in retrospective chart reviews. Until there are systematic methods to identify adverse events, progress in patient safety cannot be reliably measured. This review aims to discuss the need for a safety culture that can learn from adverse events, describe ways to measure adverse events, and comment on why current adverse event monitoring is unable to demonstrate trends in patient safety.

  18. Prognostic heterogeneity of diastolic abnormalities along left ventricular remodeling continuum according to survival rates and laser polarimetry of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boychuk, T. M.; Ivashchuk, O. I.; Kolomoiets, M. Y.; Mikhaliev, K. O.; Chursina, T. Y.

    2011-09-01

    The results of examination of 35 arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease patients are presented. The clinical, paraclinical and echocardiographic examinations were performed, and the parameters of prognosis (survival) according to Seattle Heart Failure Model, as well as the optical (polarimetric) properties of erythrocytic suspension were determined. The group of patients under examination was stratified by patterns of remodeling of left ventricle (LV). It was determined that increasing of anisotropy of erythrocytic suspension along LV remodeling patterns continuum correlates with aggravation of structural and functional state of LV and is associated with unfavorable prognosis.

  19. Prognostic heterogeneity of diastolic abnormalities along left ventricular remodeling continuum according to survival rates and laser polarimetry of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boychuk, T. M.; Ivashchuk, O. I.; Kolomoiets, M. Y.; Mikhaliev, K. O.; Chursina, T. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The results of examination of 35 arterial hypertension and coronary heart disease patients are presented. The clinical, paraclinical and echocardiographic examinations were performed, and the parameters of prognosis (survival) according to Seattle Heart Failure Model, as well as the optical (polarimetric) properties of erythrocytic suspension were determined. The group of patients under examination was stratified by patterns of remodeling of left ventricle (LV). It was determined that increasing of anisotropy of erythrocytic suspension along LV remodeling patterns continuum correlates with aggravation of structural and functional state of LV and is associated with unfavorable prognosis.

  20. PECAM-1 is necessary for flow-induced vascular remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongming; Tzima, Ellie

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Vascular remodeling is a physiological process that occurs in response to long-term changes in hemodynamic conditions, but may also contribute to the pathophysiology of intima-media thickening (IMT) and vascular disease. Shear stress detection by the endothelium is thought to be an important determinant of vascular remodeling. Previous work showed that Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is a component of a mechanosensory complex that mediates endothelial cell (EC) responses to shear stress. METHODS AND RESULTS We tested the hypothesis that PECAM-1 contributes to vascular remodeling by analyzing the response to partial carotid artery ligation in PECAM-1 knockout mice and wild-type littermates. PECAM-1 deficiency resulted in impaired vascular remodeling and significantly reduced IMT in areas of low flow. Inward remodeling was associated with PECAM-1-dependent NFκB activation, surface adhesion molecule expression and leukocyte infiltration as well as Akt activation and vascular cell proliferation. CONCLUSIONS PECAM-1 plays a crucial role in the activation of the NFκB and Akt pathways and inflammatory cell accumulation during vascular remodeling and IMT. Elucidation of some of the signals that drive vascular remodeling represent pharmacologically tractable targets for the treatment of restenosis after balloon angioplasty or stent placement. PMID:19390054

  1. Sfh1p, a component of a novel chromatin-remodeling complex, is required for cell cycle progression.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Y; Cairns, B R; Kornberg, R D; Laurent, B C

    1997-01-01

    Several eukaryotic multiprotein complexes, including the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Snf/Swi complex, remodel chromatin for transcription. In contrast to the Snf/Swi proteins, Sfh1p, a new Snf5p paralog, is essential for viability. The evolutionarily conserved domain of Sfh1p is sufficient for normal function, and Sfh1p interacts functionally and physically with an essential Snf2p paralog in a novel nucleosome-restructuring complex called RSC (for remodels the structure of chromatin). A temperature-sensitive sfh1 allele arrests cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, and the Sfh1 protein is specifically phosphorylated in the G1 phase. Together, these results demonstrate a link between chromatin remodeling and progression through the cell division cycle, providing genetic clues to possible targets for RSC function. PMID:9154831

  2. Western diet consumption promotes vascular remodeling in non-senescent mice consistent with accelerated senescence, but does not modify vascular morphology in senescent ones.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Ana Paula; Onetti, Yara; Oliveira, María Aparecida; Carvalho, Maria Helena; Heras, Magda; Vila, Elisabet; Jiménez-Altayó, Francesc

    2014-07-01

    Senescence accelerated mice (SAM) are susceptible to developing vascular dysfunction and remodeling. Food intake and type of diet have also been identified as determining factors in vascular remodeling. However, the interplay between senescence and diet in vascular remodeling is largely unknown. We aimed to analyze structure of large (aorta) and small (mesenteric; MA) arteries from seven-month-old SAM prone (SAMP8) and resistant (SAMR1) mice that received a Western-type high-fat diet (WD; 8weeks). Aortic structure was assessed by morphometric analysis of hematoxylin and eosin-stained cross sections, and collagen content by qRT-PCR, immunofluorescence and picrosirius red. In MAs, structural and mechanical properties were measured by pressure myography; elastin and collagen content by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence; nuclei distribution by confocal microscopy; and apoptosis by qRT-PCR and TUNEL assay. In aorta, wall thickness (WT), but not cross-sectional area (CSA), was increased by senescence, and WD only increased WT in SAMR1. WD intake, but not senescence, was associated with increased collagen deposition. In MAs, senescence diminished WT and CSA, without altering collagen and elastin deposition, reduced the number of MA wall cells, and increased pro apoptotic activation. WD consumption promoted in SAMR1 the same remodeling observed with senescence, while in SAMP8 the senescence-associated changes remained unaffected. The mechanisms involved in WD-induced MA remodeling in SAMR1 mimicked those observed in senescence per se. Our study reveals qualitatively different remodeling in aortas and MAs from senescent mice. Consumption of a WD induced remodeling of the SAMR1 vasculature similar to that induced by senescence, while it did not promote any further alteration in the latter. Therefore, we propose that increased consumption of fat-enriched diets could promote accelerated senescence of the non-senescent vasculature, although it does not exacerbate vascular

  3. Adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Messerli, F H

    1981-09-01

    Early essential hypertension is asymptomatic and should remain so throughout treatment. In view of the increasing number of available antihypertensive agents, clinicians need to become familiar with the potential side effects of these drugs. By placing more emphasis on non-pharmacological treatment (sodium restriction, weight loss, exercise) and thoroughly evaluating each case in particular, the pharmacological regimen can be optimally tailored to the patient's needs. Potential side effects should be predicted and can often be avoided; if they become clinically significant they should be rapidly recognised and corrected. These side effects can be easily remembered in most instances, as they fall into 3 broad categories: (a) those caused by an exaggerated therapeutic effect; (b) those due to a non-therapeutic pharmacological effect; and (c) those caused by a non-therapeutic, non-pharmacological effect probably representing idiosyncratic reactions. This review focuses mainly on adverse effects of the second and third kind. Each group of drugs in general shares the common side effects of the first two categories, while each individual drug has its own idiosyncratic side effects.

  4. Inhalation of hydrogen gas attenuates left ventricular remodeling induced by intermittent hypoxia in mice.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tetsuya; Yoshioka, Toshitaka; Hasegawa, Kenichi; Miyamura, Masatoshi; Mori, Tatsuhiko; Ukimura, Akira; Matsumura, Yasuo; Ishizaka, Nobukazu

    2011-09-01

    Sleep apnea syndrome increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We previously reported that intermittent hypoxia increases superoxide production in a manner dependent on nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate and accelerates adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling. Recent studies have suggested that hydrogen (H(2)) may have an antioxidant effect by reducing hydroxyl radicals. In this study, we investigated the effects of H(2) gas inhalation on lipid metabolism and LV remodeling induced by intermittent hypoxia in mice. Male C57BL/6J mice (n = 62) were exposed to intermittent hypoxia (repetitive cycle of 1-min periods of 5 and 21% oxygen for 8 h during daytime) for 7 days. H(2) gas (1.3 vol/100 vol) was given either at the time of reoxygenation, during hypoxic conditions, or throughout the experimental period. Mice kept under normoxic conditions served as controls (n = 13). Intermittent hypoxia significantly increased plasma levels of low- and very low-density cholesterol and the amount of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-modified protein adducts in the LV myocardium. It also upregulated mRNA expression of tissue necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and brain natriuretic peptide, increased production of superoxide, and induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, nuclear deformity, mitochondrial degeneration, and interstitial fibrosis. H(2) gas inhalation significantly suppressed these changes induced by intermittent hypoxia. In particular, H(2) gas inhaled at the timing of reoxygenation or throughout the experiment was effective in preventing dyslipidemia and suppressing superoxide production in the LV myocardium. These results suggest that inhalation of H(2) gas was effective for reducing oxidative stress and preventing LV remodeling induced by intermittent hypoxia relevant to sleep apnea.

  5. Pioglitazone alleviates cardiac and vascular remodelling and improves survival in monocrotaline induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Arnica; Trappiel, Manuela; Berghausen, Eva Maria; Ten Freyhaus, Henrik; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Odenthal, Margarete; Blaschke, Florian; Er, Fikret; Gassanov, Natig; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Baldus, Stephan; Kappert, Kai; Caglayan, Evren

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a fatal disease with limited therapeutic options. Pathophysiological changes comprise obliterative vascular remodelling of small pulmonary arteries, elevated mean pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) due to elevated resistance of pulmonary vasculature, adverse right ventricular remodelling, and heart failure. Recent findings also indicate a role of increased inflammation and insulin resistance underlying the development of PAH. We hypothesized that treatment of this condition with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activator pioglitazone, known to regulate the expression of different genes addressing insulin resistance, inflammatory changes, and vascular remodelling, could be a beneficial approach. PAH was induced in adult rats by a single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline (MCT). Pioglitazone was administered for 2 weeks starting 3 weeks after MCT-injection. At day 35, hemodynamics, organ weights, and -indices were measured. We performed morphological and molecular characterization of the pulmonary vasculature, including analysis of the degree of muscularization, proliferation rates, and medial wall thickness of the small pulmonary arteries. Furthermore, markers of cardiac injury, collagen content, and cardiomyocyte size were analyzed. Survival rates were monitored throughout the experimental period. Pioglitazone treatment improved survival, reduced PASP, muscularization of small pulmonary arteries, and medial wall thickness. Further, MCT-induced right ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis were attenuated. This was accompanied with reduced cardiac expression of brain natriuretic peptide, as well as decreased cardiomyocyte size. Finally, pulmonary macrophage content and osteopontin gene expression were attenuated. Based on the beneficial impact of pioglitazone, activation of PPARγ might be a promising treatment option in PAH.

  6. Membrane remodeling and organization: Elements common to prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Vega-Cabrera, Luz A; Pardo-López, Liliana

    2017-02-01

    Membrane remodeling processes in eukaryotes, such as those involved in endocytosis and intracellular trafficking, are mediated by a large number of structural, accessory and regulatory proteins. These processes occur in all cell types, enabling the exchange of signals and/or nutrients with the external medium and with neighboring cells; likewise, they are required for the intracellular trafficking of various cargo molecules between organelles, as well as the recycling of these structures. Recent studies have demonstrated that some elements of the molecular machinery involved in regulating and mediating endocytosis in eukaryotic cells are also present in some bacteria, where they participate in processes such as cell division, sporulation and signal transduction. However, the mechanism whereby this prokaryotic machinery carries out such functions has barely begun to be elucidated. This review summarizes recent information about the cytoskeletal and membrane-organizing proteins for which bacterial homologs have been identified; given their known functions, they may be considered to be part of an ancestral membrane organization system that first emerged in prokaryotes and which further evolved into the more complex regulatory networks operating in eukaryotes. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(2):55-62, 2017.

  7. Bile-induced peptidoglycan remodelling in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sara B; Cava, Felipe; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; García-Del Portillo, Francisco; de Pedro, Miguel A; Casadesús, Josep

    2015-04-01

    Changes in the peptidoglycan (PG) structure of Salmonella enterica are detected in the presence of a sublethal concentration of sodium deoxycholate (DOC): (i) lower proportions of Braun lipoprotein (Lpp)-bound muropeptides; (ii) reduced levels of muropeptides cross-linked by L(meso)-diaminopimelyl-D(meso)-diaminopimelic acid (L-D) peptide bridges (3-3 cross-links). Similar structural changes are found in S. enterica cultures adapted to grow in the presence of a lethal concentration of DOC, suggesting that reduced anchoring of Braun protein to PG and low occurrence of 3-3 cross-links may increase S. enterica resistance to bile. This view is further supported by additional observations: (i) A triple mutant lacking L,D-transpeptidases YbiS, ErfK, and YcfS, which does not contain Lpp anchored to PG, is hyper-resistant to bile; (ii) enhanced 3-3 cross-linking upon overexpression of YnhG transpeptidase causes a decrease in bile resistance. These observations suggest that remodelling of the cell wall may be added to the list of adaptive responses that permit survival of S. enterica in the presence of bile.

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, tobacco smoke, and epigenetic remodeling in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Klingbeil, E. C.; Hew, K. M.; Nygaard, U. C.; Nadeau, K. C.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental determinants including aerosolized pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and tobacco smoke have been associated with exacerbation and increased incidence of asthma. The influence of aerosolized pollutants on the development of immune dysfunction in asthmatics has been suggested to be mediated through epigenetic remodeling. Genome accessibility and transcription are regulated primarily through DNA methylation, histone modification, and microRNA transcript silencing. Epigenetic remodeling has been shown in studies to be associated with Th2 polarization and associated cytokine and chemokine regulation in the development of asthma. This review will present evidence for the contribution of the aerosolized pollutants PAH and environmental tobacco smoke to epigenetic remodeling in asthma. PMID:24760221

  9. Cardiac Remodeling: Concepts, Clinical Impact, Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Pharmacologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is defined as a group of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes that manifest clinically as changes in size, mass, geometry and function of the heart after injury. The process results in poor prognosis because of its association with ventricular dysfunction and malignant arrhythmias. Here, we discuss the concepts and clinical implications of cardiac remodeling, and the pathophysiological role of different factors, including cell death, energy metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, collagen, contractile proteins, calcium transport, geometry and neurohormonal activation. Finally, the article describes the pharmacological treatment of cardiac remodeling, which can be divided into three different stages of strategies: consolidated, promising and potential strategies. PMID:26647721

  10. OAE: The Ontology of Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A medical intervention is a medical procedure or application intended to relieve or prevent illness or injury. Examples of medical interventions include vaccination and drug administration. After a medical intervention, adverse events (AEs) may occur which lie outside the intended consequences of the intervention. The representation and analysis of AEs are critical to the improvement of public health. Description The Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE), previously named Adverse Event Ontology (AEO), is a community-driven ontology developed to standardize and integrate data relating to AEs arising subsequent to medical interventions, as well as to support computer-assisted reasoning. OAE has over 3,000 terms with unique identifiers, including terms imported from existing ontologies and more than 1,800 OAE-specific terms. In OAE, the term ‘adverse event’ denotes a pathological bodily process in a patient that occurs after a medical intervention. Causal adverse events are defined by OAE as those events that are causal consequences of a medical intervention. OAE represents various adverse events based on patient anatomic regions and clinical outcomes, including symptoms, signs, and abnormal processes. OAE has been used in the analysis of several different sorts of vaccine and drug adverse event data. For example, using the data extracted from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), OAE was used to analyse vaccine adverse events associated with the administrations of different types of influenza vaccines. OAE has also been used to represent and classify the vaccine adverse events cited in package inserts of FDA-licensed human vaccines in the USA. Conclusion OAE is a biomedical ontology that logically defines and classifies various adverse events occurring after medical interventions. OAE has successfully been applied in several adverse event studies. The OAE ontological framework provides a platform for systematic representation and analysis of

  11. Remodeling of myocardium in rat with chronic dyslipidemia and under conditions of verapamil treatment.

    PubMed

    Klinnikova, M G; Yuzhik, E I; Pichigin, V I; Lushnikova, E L

    2014-11-01

    The type and intensity of remodeling (structural reorganization) of the myocardium in Wistar rats were studied under conditions of experimental chronic dyslipidemia and verapamil treatment. Long (64 days) atherogenic diet caused dyslipidemia and led to reduction of the heart percent weight. The cytopathic effect of dyslipidemia manifested in more intense lytic injuries of cardiomyocytes, development of diffuse and small focal cardiosclerosis under conditions of manifest circulatory disorders. Remodeling of the myocardium during various periods of the experiment manifested in a higher connective tissue/cardiomyocyte volume ratio (by 74% after 30 days and by 58-62% after 64 days of experiment). Verapamil injection promoted attenuation of lytic changes in cardiomyocytes and in fibroplastic reactions of the stroma, but failed to prevent them completely.

  12. Human Upf1 is a highly processive RNA helicase and translocase with RNP remodelling activities

    PubMed Central

    Fiorini, Francesca; Bagchi, Debjani; Le Hir, Hervé; Croquette, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    RNA helicases are implicated in most cellular RNA-dependent events. In eukaryotes however, only few have been functionally characterized. Upf1 is a RNA helicase essential for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Here, using magnetic tweezers and bulk assays, we observe that human Upf1 is able to translocate slowly over long single-stranded nucleic acids with a processivity >10 kb. Upf1 efficiently translocates through double-stranded structures and protein-bound sequences, demonstrating that Upf1 is an efficient ribonucleoprotein complex remodeler. Our observation of processive unwinding by an eukaryotic RNA helicase reveals that Upf1, once recruited onto NMD mRNA targets, can scan the entire transcript to irreversibly remodel the mRNP, facilitating its degradation by the NMD machinery. PMID:26138914

  13. Human Upf1 is a highly processive RNA helicase and translocase with RNP remodelling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Francesca; Bagchi, Debjani; Le Hir, Hervé; Croquette, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    RNA helicases are implicated in most cellular RNA-dependent events. In eukaryotes however, only few have been functionally characterized. Upf1 is a RNA helicase essential for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Here, using magnetic tweezers and bulk assays, we observe that human Upf1 is able to translocate slowly over long single-stranded nucleic acids with a processivity >10 kb. Upf1 efficiently translocates through double-stranded structures and protein-bound sequences, demonstrating that Upf1 is an efficient ribonucleoprotein complex remodeler. Our observation of processive unwinding by an eukaryotic RNA helicase reveals that Upf1, once recruited onto NMD mRNA targets, can scan the entire transcript to irreversibly remodel the mRNP, facilitating its degradation by the NMD machinery.

  14. REMOD: A Tool for Analyzing and Remodeling the Dendritic Architecture of Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozelos, Panagiotis; Stefanou, Stefanos S.; Bouloukakis, Georgios; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic morphology is a key determinant of how individual neurons acquire a unique signal processing profile. The highly branched dendritic structure that originates from the cell body, explores the surrounding 3D space in a fractal-like manner, until it reaches a certain amount of complexity. Its shape undergoes significant alterations under various physiological or neuropathological conditions. Yet, despite the profound effect that these alterations can have on neuronal function, the causal relationship between the two remains largely elusive. The lack of a systematic approach for remodeling neural cells and their dendritic trees is a key limitation that contributes to this problem. Such causal relationships can be inferred via the use of large-scale neuronal models whereby the anatomical plasticity of neurons is accounted for, in order to enhance their biological relevance and hence their predictive performance. To facilitate this effort, we developed a computational tool named REMOD that allows the structural remodeling of any type of virtual neuron. REMOD is written in Python and can be accessed through a dedicated web interface that guides the user through various options to manipulate selected neuronal morphologies. REMOD can also be used to extract meaningful morphology statistics for one or multiple reconstructions, including features such as sholl analysis, total dendritic length and area, path length to the soma, centrifugal branch order, diameter tapering and more. As such, the tool can be used both for the analysis and/or the remodeling of neuronal morphologies of any type. PMID:26778971

  15. REMOD: A Tool for Analyzing and Remodeling the Dendritic Architecture of Neural Cells.

    PubMed

    Bozelos, Panagiotis; Stefanou, Stefanos S; Bouloukakis, Georgios; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic morphology is a key determinant of how individual neurons acquire a unique signal processing profile. The highly branched dendritic structure that originates from the cell body, explores the surrounding 3D space in a fractal-like manner, until it reaches a certain amount of complexity. Its shape undergoes significant alterations under various physiological or neuropathological conditions. Yet, despite the profound effect that these alterations can have on neuronal function, the causal relationship between the two remains largely elusive. The lack of a systematic approach for remodeling neural cells and their dendritic trees is a key limitation that contributes to this problem. Such causal relationships can be inferred via the use of large-scale neuronal models whereby the anatomical plasticity of neurons is accounted for, in order to enhance their biological relevance and hence their predictive performance. To facilitate this effort, we developed a computational tool named REMOD that allows the structural remodeling of any type of virtual neuron. REMOD is written in Python and can be accessed through a dedicated web interface that guides the user through various options to manipulate selected neuronal morphologies. REMOD can also be used to extract meaningful morphology statistics for one or multiple reconstructions, including features such as sholl analysis, total dendritic length and area, path length to the soma, centrifugal branch order, diameter tapering and more. As such, the tool can be used both for the analysis and/or the remodeling of neuronal morphologies of any type.

  16. Actinin-4 Governs Dendritic Spine Dynamics and Promotes Their Remodeling by Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowska, Magdalena; Chávez, Andrés E.; Lutzu, Stefano; Castillo, Pablo E.; Bukauskas, Feliksas F.; Francesconi, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are dynamic, actin-rich protrusions in neurons that undergo remodeling during neuronal development and activity-dependent plasticity within the central nervous system. Although group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are critical for spine remodeling under physiopathological conditions, the molecular components linking receptor activity to structural plasticity remain unknown. Here we identify a Ca2+-sensitive actin-binding protein, α-actinin-4, as a novel group 1 mGluR-interacting partner that orchestrates spine dynamics and morphogenesis in primary neurons. Functional silencing of α-actinin-4 abolished spine elongation and turnover stimulated by group 1 mGluRs despite intact surface receptor expression and downstream ERK1/2 signaling. This function of α-actinin-4 in spine dynamics was underscored by gain-of-function phenotypes in untreated neurons. Here α-actinin-4 induced spine head enlargement, a morphological change requiring the C-terminal domain of α-actinin-4 that binds to CaMKII, an interaction we showed to be regulated by group 1 mGluR activation. Our data provide mechanistic insights into spine remodeling by metabotropic signaling and identify α-actinin-4 as a critical effector of structural plasticity within neurons. PMID:25944910

  17. Chd1 remodelers maintain open chromatin and regulate the epigenetics of differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, Jenna; Ekwall, Karl

    2010-05-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is packaged around octamers of histone proteins into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin. In addition to enabling meters of DNA to fit within the confines of a nucleus, the structure of chromatin has functional implications for cell identity. Covalent chemical modifications to the DNA and to histones, histone variants, ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, small noncoding RNAs and the level of chromatin compaction all contribute to chromosomal structure and to the activity or silencing of genes. These chromatin-level alterations are defined as epigenetic when they are heritable from mother to daughter cell. The great diversity of epigenomes that can arise from a single genome permits a single, totipotent cell to generate the hundreds of distinct cell types found in humans. Two recent studies in mouse and in fly have highlighted the importance of Chd1 chromatin remodelers for maintaining an open, active chromatin state. Based on evidence from fission yeast as a model system, we speculate that Chd1 remodelers are involved in the disassembly of nucleosomes at promoter regions, thus promoting active transcription and open chromatin. It is likely that these nucleosomes are specifically marked for disassembly by the histone variant H2A.Z.

  18. Epigallocatechin Gallate Remodels Overexpressed Functional Amyloids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Increases Biofilm Susceptibility to Antibiotic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Stenvang, Marcel; Dueholm, Morten S; Vad, Brian S; Seviour, Thomas; Zeng, Guanghong; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Søndergaard, Mads T; Christiansen, Gunna; Meyer, Rikke Louise; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Otzen, Daniel E

    2016-12-16

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the major polyphenol in green tea. It has antimicrobial properties and disrupts the ordered structure of amyloid fibrils involved in human disease. The antimicrobial effect of EGCG against the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been shown to involve disruption of quorum sensing (QS). Functional amyloid fibrils in P. aeruginosa (Fap) are able to bind and retain quorum-sensing molecules, suggesting that EGCG interferes with QS through structural remodeling of amyloid fibrils. Here we show that EGCG inhibits the ability of Fap to form fibrils; instead, EGCG stabilizes protein oligomers. Existing fibrils are remodeled by EGCG into non-amyloid aggregates. This fibril remodeling increases the binding of pyocyanin, demonstrating a mechanism by which EGCG can affect the QS function of functional amyloid. EGCG reduced the amyloid-specific fluorescent thioflavin T signal in P. aeruginosa biofilms at concentrations known to exert an antimicrobial effect. Nanoindentation studies showed that EGCG reduced the stiffness of biofilm containing Fap fibrils but not in biofilm with little Fap. In a combination treatment with EGCG and tobramycin, EGCG had a moderate effect on the minimum bactericidal eradication concentration against wild-type P. aeruginosa biofilms, whereas EGCG had a more pronounced effect when Fap was overexpressed. Our results provide a direct molecular explanation for the ability of EGCG to disrupt P. aeruginosa QS and modify its biofilm and strengthens the case for EGCG as a candidate in multidrug treatment of persistent biofilm infections.

  19. ISWI ATP-dependent remodeling of nucleoplasmic ω-speckles in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lo Piccolo, Luca; Attardi, Andrea; Bonaccorso, Rosa; Li Greci, Lorenzo; Giurato, Giorgio; Ingrassia, Antonia Maria Rita; Onorati, Maria Cristina

    2017-02-20

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) belong to the RNA-binding proteins family. They are involved in processing heterogeneous nuclear RNAs (hnRNAs) into mature mRNAs. These proteins participate in every step of mRNA cycle, such as mRNA export, localization, translation, stability and alternative splicing. At least 14 major hnRNPs, which have structural and functional homologues in mammals, are expressed in Drosophila melanogaster. Until now, six of these hnRNPs are known to be nucleus-localized and associated with the long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) heat shock responsive ω (hsrω) in the omega speckle compartments (ω-speckles). The chromatin remodeler ISWI is the catalytic subunit of several ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes, and it is an essential factor for organization of ω-speckles. Indeed, in ISWI null mutant, severe defects in ω-speckles structure are detectable. Here, we clarify the role of ISWI in the hnRNPs‒hsrω interaction. Moreover, we describe how ISWI by its remodeling activity, controls hsrω and hnRNPs engagement in ω-speckles. Finally, we demonstrate that the sequestration of hnRNPs in ω-speckles nuclear compartment is a fundamental event in gene expression control and represents a key step in the regulation of several pathways.

  20. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 Gene Delivery Ameliorates Post-Infarction Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, Ravi; Nilles, Kathleen; Gibson, Gregory; Burkhead, Benjamin; Mathier, Michael; McNamara, Dennis; McTiernan, Charles F.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothesis Adenoviral-mediated (AdV-T2) overexpression of TIMP-2 would blunt ventricular remodeling and improve survival in a murine model of chronic ischemic injury. Methods Male mice (n=124) aged 10–14 weeks underwent either 1) left coronary artery ligation to induce myocardial infarction (MI group, n=36), 2) myocardial injection of 6×1010 viral particles of AdV-T2 immediately post-MI (MI+T2 group, n=30), 3) myocardial injection of 6×1010 viral particles of a control adenovirus (MI+Ct, n=38), or 4) received no intervention (controls, n=20). On post-MI day 7, surviving mice (n=79) underwent echocardiographic, immunohistochemical and biochemical analysis. Results In infarcted animals, the MI+T2 group demonstrated improved survival (p< 0.02), better preservation of developed pressure and ventricular diameter (p<0.04), and the lowest expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 (P<0.04) compared with MI and MI+Ct groups.. All infarcted hearts displayed significantly increased inflammatory cell infiltration (p<0.04 versus control, MI, or MI+T2), with infiltration highest in the MI+Ct group and lowest in the MI+T2 group (p<0.04). Conclusions Adenoviral mediated myocardial delivery of the TIMP-2 gene improves post-MI survival and limits adverse remodeling in a murine model of myocardial infarction. PMID:21348952

  1. Arabidopsis FORGETTER1 mediates stress-induced chromatin memory through nucleosome remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Brzezinka, Krzysztof; Altmann, Simone; Czesnick, Hjördis; Nicolas, Philippe; Gorka, Michal; Benke, Eileen; Kabelitz, Tina; Jähne, Felix; Graf, Alexander; Kappel, Christian; Bäurle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Plants as sessile organisms can adapt to environmental stress to mitigate its adverse effects. As part of such adaptation they maintain an active memory of heat stress for several days that promotes a more efficient response to recurring stress. We show that this heat stress memory requires the activity of the FORGETTER1 (FGT1) locus, with fgt1 mutants displaying reduced maintenance of heat-induced gene expression. FGT1 encodes the Arabidopsis thaliana orthologue of Strawberry notch (Sno), and the protein globally associates with the promoter regions of actively expressed genes in a heat-dependent fashion. FGT1 interacts with chromatin remodelers of the SWI/SNF and ISWI families, which also display reduced heat stress memory. Genomic targets of the BRM remodeler overlap significantly with FGT1 targets. Accordingly, nucleosome dynamics at loci with altered maintenance of heat-induced expression are affected in fgt1. Together, our results suggest that by modulating nucleosome occupancy, FGT1 mediates stress-induced chromatin memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17061.001 PMID:27680998

  2. New insights into cathepsin D in mammary tissue development and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Margaryan, Naira V; Kirschmann, Dawn A; Lipavsky, Alina; Bailey, Caleb M; Hendrix, Mary J C; Khalkhali-Ellis, Zhila

    2010-09-01

    Cathepsin D (CatD) is a lysosomal aspartyl endopeptidase originally considered a "house keeping enzyme" involved in the clearance of unwanted proteins. However, recent studies have revealed CatD's involvement in apoptosis and autophagy, thus signifying an important function in the proper development and maintenance of multi-cellular organs. In the mammary gland, matrix degradation and the remodeling process are orchestrated by proteolytic enzymes, but the role of CatD at distinct developmental stages has remained mostly unexplored. Based on our previous studies we sought to address the role of this endopeptidase in mammary gland development and remodeling. By employing a mouse model, we report a previously unidentified participation of CatD in different stages of mammary gland development. Our findings reveal that CatD undergoes distinct protein processing at different stages of mammary gland development, and this customized processing results in differential enzymatic activity (constitutive and low pH activatable) best fitting particular stage(s) of development. In addition, at the onset of involution the N-glycan structure of this endopeptidase switches from a mixed high mannose and hybrid structure to an almost exclusively high mannose type, but reverts back to the original N-glycan composition by day 4 of involution. Our findings illuminate (at least in part) the "raison d'être" for CatD's numerous and highly regulated proteolytic processing steps from the pro-form to the mature enzyme. In the mammary gland, specific cleavage product(s) perform specialized function(s) befitting each stage of remodeling. It is noteworthy that deregulated synthesis, secretion and glycosylation of CatD are hallmarks of cancer progression. Thus, identifying the role of CatD in a dynamic normal tissue undergoing highly regulated cycles of remodeling could provide valuable information illuminating the deregulation of CatD associated with cancer development and metastasis.

  3. Hospital deaths and adverse events in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adverse events are considered a major international problem related to the performance of health systems. Evaluating the occurrence of adverse events involves, as any other outcome measure, determining the extent to which the observed differences can be attributed to the patient's risk factors or to variations in the treatment process, and this in turn highlights the importance of measuring differences in the severity of the cases. The current study aims to evaluate the association between deaths and adverse events, adjusted according to patient risk factors. Methods The study is based on a random sample of 1103 patient charts from hospitalizations in the year 2003 in 3 teaching hospitals in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The methodology involved a retrospective review of patient charts in two stages - screening phase and evaluation phase. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between hospital deaths and adverse events. Results The overall mortality rate was 8.5%, while the rate related to the occurrence of an adverse event was 2.9% (32/1103) and that related to preventable adverse events was 2.3% (25/1103). Among the 94 deaths analyzed, 34% were related to cases involving adverse events, and 26.6% of deaths occurred in cases whose adverse events were considered preventable. The models tested showed good discriminatory capacity. The unadjusted odds ratio (OR 11.43) and the odds ratio adjusted for patient risk factors (OR 8.23) between death and preventable adverse event were high. Conclusions Despite discussions in the literature regarding the limitations of evaluating preventable adverse events based on peer review, the results presented here emphasize that adverse events are not only prevalent, but are associated with serious harm and even death. These results also highlight the importance of risk adjustment and multivariate models in the study of adverse events. PMID:21929810

  4. Early life adversity: Lasting consequences for emotional learning.

    PubMed

    Krugers, Harm J; Arp, J Marit; Xiong, Hui; Kanatsou, Sofia; Lesuis, Sylvie L; Korosi, Aniko; Joels, Marian; Lucassen, Paul J

    2017-02-01

    The early postnatal period is a highly sensitive time period for the developing brain, both in humans and rodents. During this time window, exposure to adverse experiences can lastingly impact cognitive and emotional development. In this review, we briefly discuss human and rodent studies investigating how exposure to adverse early life conditions - mainly related to quality of parental care - affects brain activity, brain structure, cognition and emotional responses later in life. We discuss the evidence that early life adversity hampers later hippocampal and prefrontal cortex functions, while increasing amygdala activity, and the sensitivity to stressors and emotional behavior later in life. Exposure to early life stress may thus on the one hand promote behavioral adaptation to potentially threatening conditions later in life -at the cost of contextual memory formation in less threatening situations- but may on the other hand also increase the sensitivity to develop stress-related and anxiety disorders in vulnerable individuals.

  5. Characterizing "Adversity" of Pathology Findings in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The identification of adverse health effects has a central role in the development and risk/safety assessment of chemical entities and pharmaceuticals. There is currently a need for better alignment in the toxicologic pathology community regarding how nonclinical adversity is determined and characterized. The European Society of Toxicologic Pathology (ESTP) therefore coordinated a workshop in June 2015 to review available definitions of adversity, weigh determining and qualifying factors of adversity based on case examples, and recommend a practical approach to define and characterize adversity in toxicology reports. The international group of expert pathologists and toxicologists emphasized that a holistic, weight-of-evidence, case-specific approach should be followed for each adversity assessment. It was recommended that nonclinical adversity should typically be determined at a morphological level (most often the organ) in the pathology report and should refer specifically to the test species. Final adversity calls, integration of target pharmacology/pathway information, and consideration of human translation should generally be made in toxicology overview reports. Differences in interpretation and implications of adversity calls between (agro)chemical and pharmaceutical industries and among world regions were highlighted. The results of this workshop should serve a valuable prerequisite for future organ- or lesion-specific workshops planned by the ESTP. This

  6. Molecular Imaging of Angiogenesis and Vascular Remodeling in Cardiovascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Golestani, Reza; Jung, Jae-Joon; Sadeghi, Mehran M.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis and vascular remodeling are involved in a wide array of cardiovascular diseases, from myocardial ischemia and peripheral arterial disease, to atherosclerosis and aortic aneurysm. Molecular imaging techniques to detect and quantify key molecular and cellular players in angiogenesis and vascular remodeling (e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors, αvβ3 integrin, and matrix metalloproteinases) can advance vascular biology research and serve as clinical tools for early diagnosis, risk stratification, and selection of patients who would benefit most from therapeutic interventions. To target these key mediators, a number of molecular imaging techniques have been developed and evaluated in animal models of angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. This review of the state of the art molecular imaging of angiogenesis and vascular (and valvular) remodeling, will focus mostly on nuclear imaging techniques (positron emission tomography and single photon emission tomography) that offer high potential for clinical translation. PMID:27275836

  7. Prostacyclin receptor-dependent modulation of pulmonary vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hoshikawa, Y; Voelkel, N F; Gesell, T L; Moore, M D; Morris, K G; Alger, L A; Narumiya, S; Geraci, M W

    2001-07-15

    Prostacyclin (PGI(2)) reduces pulmonary vascular resistance and attenuates vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through signal transduction following ligand binding to its receptor. Because patients with severe pulmonary hypertension have a reduced PGI(2) receptor (PGI-R) expression in the remodeled pulmonary arterial smooth muscle, we hypothesized that pulmonary vascular remodeling may be modified PGI-R dependently. To test this hypothesis, PGI-R knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were subjected to a simulated altitude of 17,000 ft or Denver altitude for 3 wk, and right ventricular pressure and lung histology were assessed. The PGI-R KO mice developed more severe pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling after chronic hypoxic exposure when compared to the WT mice. Our results indicate that PGI(2) and its receptor play an important role in the regulation of hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling, and that the absence of a functional receptor worsens pulmonary hypertension.

  8. Roles of chromatin remodellers in DNA double strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Jeggo, Penny A; Downs, Jessica A

    2014-11-15

    Now that we have a good understanding of the DNA double strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms and DSB-induced damage signalling, attention is focusing on the changes to the chromatin environment needed for efficient DSB repair. Mutations in chromatin remodelling complexes have been identified in cancers, making it important to evaluate how they impact upon genomic stability. Our current understanding of the DSB repair pathways suggests that each one has distinct requirements for chromatin remodelling. Moreover, restricting the extent of chromatin modifications could be a significant factor regulating the decision of pathway usage. In this review, we evaluate the distinct DSB repair pathways for their potential need for chromatin remodelling and review the roles of ATP-driven chromatin remodellers in the pathways.

  9. Determining School District Renovation/Remodeling/Repair Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Donald G.; Phillips, Paul

    1991-01-01

    Bond issue funds were earmarked for remodeling 10 schools in a Florida school district. Describes a physical plant survey instrument used to examine each district school building to determine the district needs and the method that prioritizes those needs. (MLF)

  10. Postinfarct Left Ventricular Remodelling: A Prevailing Cause of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Alessio; Lombardi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic disease with high morbidity and mortality, which represents a growing challenge in medicine. A major risk factor for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is a history of myocardial infarction. The expansion of a large infarct scar and subsequent regional ventricular dilatation can cause postinfarct remodelling, leading to significant enlargement of the left ventricular chamber. It has a negative prognostic value, because it precedes the clinical manifestations of heart failure. The characteristics of the infarcted myocardium predicting postinfarct remodelling can be studied with cardiac magnetic resonance and experimental imaging modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging can identify the changes in the architecture of myocardial fibers. This review discusses all the aspects related to postinfarct left ventricular remodelling: definition, pathogenesis, diagnosis, consequences, and available therapies, together with experimental interventions that show promising results against postinfarct remodelling and heart failure. PMID:26989555

  11. Roles and activities of chromatin remodeling ATPases in plants.

    PubMed

    Han, Soon-Ki; Wu, Miin-Feng; Cui, Sujuan; Wagner, Doris

    2015-07-01

    Chromatin remodeling ATPases and their associated complexes can alter the accessibility of the genome in the context of chromatin by using energy derived from the hydrolysis of ATP to change the positioning, occupancy and composition of nucleosomes. In animals and plants, these remodelers have been implicated in diverse processes ranging from stem cell maintenance and differentiation to developmental phase transitions and stress responses. Detailed investigation of their roles in individual processes has suggested a higher level of selectivity of chromatin remodeling ATPase activity than previously anticipated, and diverse mechanisms have been uncovered that can contribute to the selectivity. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the roles and activities of chromatin remodeling ATPases in plants.

  12. The effect of exercise training on transverse tubules in normal, remodeled, and reverse remodeled hearts.

    PubMed

    Kemi, Ole J; Hoydal, Morten A; Macquaide, Niall; Haram, Per M; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Ellingsen, Oyvind; Smith, Godfrey L; Wisloff, Ulrik

    2011-09-01

    The response of transverse (T)-tubules to exercise training in health and disease remains unclear. Therefore, we studied the effect of exercise training on the density and spacing of left ventricle cardiomyocyte T-tubules in normal and remodeled hearts that associate with detubulation, by confocal laser scanning microscopy. First, exercise training in normal rats increased cardiomyocyte volume by 16% (P < 0.01), with preserved T-tubule density. Thus, the T-tubules adapted to the physiologic hypertrophy. Next, we studied T-tubules in a rat model of metabolic syndrome with pressure overload-induced concentric left ventricle hypertrophy, evidenced by 15% (P < 0.01) increased cardiomyocyte size. These rats had only 85% (P < 0.01) of the T-tubule density of control rats. Exercise training further increased cardiomyocyte volume by 8% (P < 0.01); half to that in control rats, but the T-tubule density remained unchanged. Finally, post-myocardial infarction heart failure induced severe cardiac pathology, with a 70% (P < 0.01) increased cardiomyocyte volume that included both eccentric and concentric hypertrophy and 55% (P < 0.01) reduced T-tubule density. Exercise training reversed 50% (P < 0.01) of the pathologic hypertrophy, whereas the T-tubule density increased by 40% (P < 0.05) compared to sedentary heart failure, but remained at 60% of normal hearts (P < 0.01). Physiologic hypertrophy associated with conserved T-tubule spacing (~1.8-1.9 µm), whereas in pathologic hypertrophy, T-tubules appeared disorganized without regular spacing. In conclusion, cardiomyocytes maintain the relative T-tubule density during physiologic hypertrophy and after mild concentric pathologic hypertrophy, whereas after severe pathologic remodeling with a substantial loss of T-tubules; exercise training reverses the remodeling and partly corrects the T-tubule density.

  13. Cardiovascular remodeling and the peripheral serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Ayme-Dietrich, Estelle; Aubertin-Kirch, Gaëlle; Maroteaux, Luc; Monassier, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Plasma 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin), released from blood platelets, plays a major role in the human cardiovascular system. Besides the effect of endogenous serotonin, many drugs targeting serotonergic receptors are widely used in the general population (antiobesity agents, antidepressants, antipsychotics, antimigraine agents), and may enhance the cardiovascular risk. Depending on the type of serotonin receptor activated and its location, the use of these compounds triggers acute and chronic effects. The acute cardiovascular response to 5-HT, named the Bezold-Jarish reflex, leads to intense bradycardia associated with atrioventricular block, and involves 5-HT3, 5-HT1B/1D, 5-HT7 and 5-HT2A/2B receptors. The chronic contribution of 5-HT and its receptors (5-HT4 and 5-HT2A/2B) in cardiovascular tissue remodeling, with a particular emphasis on cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and valve degeneration, will be explored in this review. Finally, through the analysis of the effects of sarpogrelate, some new aspects of 5-HT2A receptor pharmacology in vasomotor tone regulation and the interaction between endothelial and smooth muscle cells will also be discussed. The aim of this review is to emphasize the cardiac side effects caused by serotonin receptor activation, and to highlight their possible prevention by the development of new drugs targeting this system.

  14. KyoT2 downregulates airway remodeling in asthma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mei; Ou-Yang, Hai-Feng; Han, Xing-Peng; Ti, Xin-Yu; Wu, Chang-Gui

    2015-01-01

    The typical pathological features of asthma are airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). KyoT2, a negative modulator of Notch signaling, has been linked to asthma in several previous studies. However, whether KyoT2 is involved in the regulation of airway remodeling or the modulation of airway resistance in asthma is unclear. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of KyoT2 in preventing asthma-associated airway remodeling and AHR. BALB/c mice were used to generate a mouse model of asthma. Additionally, the expression of Hes1 and Notch1 in airway was analyzed using Immunofluorescence examination. The asthmatic mice were intranasally administered adenovirus expressing KyoT2 and were compared to control groups. Furthermore, subepithelial fibrosis and other airway remodeling features were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin staining, Van Gieson's staining and Masson's trichrome staining. AHR was also evaluated. This study revealed that KyoT2 downregulated the expression of Hes1, repressed airway remodeling, and alleviated AHR in asthmatic mice. It is reasonable to assume that KyoT2 downregulates airway remodeling and resistance in asthmatic mice through a Hes1-dependent mechanism. Therefore, KyoT2 is a potential clinical treatment strategy for asthma.

  15. FSTL1 PROMOTES ASTHMATIC AIRWAY REMODELING BY INDUCING ONCOSTATIN M

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marina; Beppu, Andrew; Rosenthal, Peter; Pham, Alexa; Das, Sudipta; Karta, Maya; Song, Dae Jin; Vuong, Christine; Doherty, Taylor; Croft, Michael; Zuraw, Bruce; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Xiang; Aceves, Seema; Chouiali, Fazila; Hamid, Qutayba; Broide, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic asthma is associated with airway remodeling and decline in lung function. Here we show that follistatin like 1 (Fstl1), a mediator not previously associated with asthma is highly expressed by macrophages in the lungs of severe human asthmatics. Chronic allergen challenged Lys-Cretg/Fstl1Δ/Δ mice in whom Fstl1 is inactivated in macrophages/myeloid cells had significantly reduced airway remodeling and reduced levels of oncostatin M (OSM) a cytokine previously not known to be regulated by Fstl1. The importance of the Fstl1 induction of OSM to airway remodeling was demonstrated in murine studies in which administration of Fstl1 induced airway remodeling and increased OSM, while administration of an anti-OSM antibody blocked the effect of Fstl1 on inducing airway remodeling, eosinophilic airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness all cardinal features of asthma. Overall, these studies demonstrate that the Fstl1/oncostatin M pathway may be a novel pathway to inhibit airway remodeling in severe human asthma. PMID:26355153

  16. Lung remodeling in aging surfactant protein D deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jan Philipp; Arkenau, Martina; Knudsen, Lars; Wedekind, Dirk; Ochs, Matthias

    2017-02-07

    Pulmonary surfactant, a mixture of lipids and proteins at the air-liquid interface of alveoli, prevents the lungs from collapsing due to surface tension. One constituent is surfactant-associated protein-D (SP-D), a protein involved in surfactant homeostasis and innate immunity. Mice deficient in SP-D (SP-D (-/-)) has been described as developing a characteristic phenotype which affects the surfactant system (including changes in the intra-cellular and intra-alveolar surfactant pool, alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages), lung architecture and its inflammatory state (development of an emphysema-like pathology, inflammatory cell infiltration). Furthermore, it has been described that these mice develop sub-pleural fibrosis and a thickening of alveolar septal walls. The aim of the present study was to systematically investigate the long term progression of this phenotype with special focus on parenchymal remodeling, whether there are progressive emphysematous changes and whether there is progressive septal wall thickening which might indicate the development of pulmonary fibrosis. By means of design-based stereology and light microscopy, lungs of wild type (wt) and SP-D (-/-) mice of four age groups (3, 6, 12 and ∼18 months) were investigated. The data do not suggest a relevant spontaneous pro-fibrotic remodeling or a destructive process in the aging SP-D (-/-) mice. We demonstrated neither a significant destructive emphysema nor significant thickening of alveolar septal walls, but the data suggest an increase in the number weighted mean alveolar volume in aging SP-D (-/-) mice without loss of alveoli or alveolar epithelial surface area per lung. This increase may reflect over-distension due to altered mechanical properties of alveoli. In the light of our findings and data from the literature, the question arises as to whether a lack of SP-D promotes structural changes in the lung which have been described as being associated with aging lungs

  17. Inhibitory Effects of Resveratrol on Airway Remodeling by Transforming Growth Factor-β/Smad Signaling Pathway in Chronic Asthma Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwa Young; Kim, In Kyoung; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Kwon, Soon Suk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Asthma is a chronic airway disease characterized by airway remodeling, leading to a progressive decline in lung function. Therapeutic agents that attenuate airway remodeling can complement the limited effects of traditional glucocorticoids. In this study, we investigated the effect of resveratrol on allergic airway inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of chronic bronchial asthma. Methods Peribronchial smooth muscle thickening that developed in mice challenged with a 3-month repeated exposure to ovalbumin (OVA) was used to study airway remodeling. Oral resveratrol was administered daily during the OVA challenge. The expression of TGF-β1/Smad signaling proteins and downstream mesenchymal markers in the presence or absence of resveratrol was examined in bronchial epithelial cells. Results OVA sensitization and chronic challenge increased airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, goblet cell hyperplasia, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), and collagen deposition. Resveratrol effectively suppressed OVA-induced airway inflammation and remodeling. The expression of TGF-β1/phosphorylated Smad2/3 was increased in the lung tissues of OVA-challenged mice but effectively inhibited by resveratrol. In bronchial epithelial cells, the TGF-β1-induced expression of the mesenchymal markers snail, slug, vimentin, and α-SMA was suppressed by resveratrol treatment. Conclusions Resveratrol effectively ameliorated both airway inflammation and airway structural changes in a mouse model of bronchial asthma. These effects were mediated by decreased TGF-β1 expression, in turn suppressing TGF-β1/Smad signaling and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process. Our results demonstrate the potential benefits of resveratrol for the treatment of airway remodeling associated with bronchial asthma. PMID:27826959

  18. Adolescent nicotine-induced dendrite remodeling in the nucleus accumbens is rapid, persistent, and D1-dopamine receptor dependent.

    PubMed

    Ehlinger, D G; Bergstrom, H C; Burke, J C; Fernandez, G M; McDonald, C G; Smith, R F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic nicotine exposure during adolescence induces dendritic remodeling of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) shell. While nicotine-induced dendritic remodeling has frequently been described as persistent, the trajectory of dendrite remodeling is unknown. Specifically, no study to date has characterized the structural plasticity of dendrites in the NAcc immediately following chronic nicotine, leaving open the possibility that dendrite remodeling emerges gradually over time. Further, the neuropharmacological mechanisms through which nicotine induces dendrite remodeling are not well understood. To address these questions, rats were co-administered chronic nicotine (0.5 mg/kg) and the D1-dopamine receptor (D1DR) antagonist SCH-23390 (0.05 mg/kg) subcutaneously every other day during adolescence. Brains were then processed for Golgi-Cox staining either 1 day or 21 days following drug exposure and dendrites from MSNs in the NAcc shell digitally reconstructed in 3D. Spine density was also measured at both time points. Our morphometric results show (1) the formation of new dendritic branches and spines 1 day following nicotine exposure, (2) new dendritic branches, but not spine density, remains relatively stable for at least 21 days, (3) the co-administration of SCH-23390 completely blocked nicotine-induced dendritic remodeling of MSNs at both early and late time points, suggesting the formation of new dendritic branches in response to nicotine is D1DR-dependent, and (4) SCH-23390 failed to block nicotine-induced increases in spine density. Overall this study provides new insight into how nicotine influences the normal trajectory of adolescent brain development and demonstrates a persistent form of nicotine-induced neuroplasticity in the NAcc shell that develops rapidly and is D1DR dependent.

  19. The stability of memories during brain remodeling: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Blackiston, Douglas J; Shomrat, Tal; Levin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important features of the nervous system is memory: the ability to represent and store experiences, in a manner that alters behavior and cognition at future times when the original stimulus is no longer present. However, the brain is not always an anatomically stable structure: many animal species regenerate all or part of the brain after severe injury, or remodel their CNS toward a new configuration as part of their life cycle. This raises a fascinating question: what are the dynamics of memories during brain regeneration? Can stable memories remain intact when cellular turnover and spatial rearrangement modify the biological hardware within which experiences are stored? What can we learn from model species that exhibit both, regeneration and memory, with respect to robustness and stability requirements for long-term memories encoded in living tissues? In this Perspective, we discuss relevant data in regenerating planaria, metamorphosing insects, and hibernating ground squirrels. While much remains to be done to understand this remarkable process, molecular-level insight will have important implications for cognitive science, regenerative medicine of the brain, and the development of non-traditional computational media in synthetic bioengineering. PMID:27066165

  20. Diabetic Cardiomyopathy and Metabolic Remodeling of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Battiprolu, Pavan K.; Lopez-Crisosto, Camila; Wang, Zhao V.; Nemchenko, Andriy; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus are each increasing rapidly in societies around the globe. The majority of patients with diabetes succumb ultimately to heart disease, much of which stems from atherosclerotic disease and hypertension. However, the diabetic milieu is itself intrinsically noxious to the heart, and cardiomyopathy can develop independent of elevated blood pressure or coronary artery disease. This process, termed diabetic cardiomyopathy, is characterized by significant changes in the physiology, structure, and mechanical function of the heart. Presently, therapy for patients with diabetes focuses largely on glucose control, and attention to the heart commences with the onset of symptoms. When the latter develops, standard therapy for heart failure is applied. However, recent studies highlight that specific elements of the pathogenesis of diabetic heart disease are unique, raising the prospect of diabetes-specific therapeutic intervention. Here, we review recently unveiled insights into the pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy and associated metabolic remodeling with an eye toward identifying novel targets with therapeutic potential. PMID:23123443

  1. Vessel Remodeling after Intima-to-Intima Contact Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Hyeonjung; Kim, Hyodong; Hong, Changbae; Kwon, Sun Young

    2017-01-01

    Background Intima-to-intima microanastomotic vascular remodeling was explored, utilizing a polylactide-caprolactone absorbable vein coupler model (PAVCM), which was designed to simulate a non-absorbable counterpart system with the sole exception of being absorbable. Methods Six New Zealand white rabbits were used. After transection of the jugular vein, 2 PAVCMs were placed, 1 at each transected end. The stumps were slipped through the PAVCMs, and the venous wall was everted 90° to achieve intima-to-intima contact. Reanastomosis of the transected jugular vein was performed bilaterally in 3 rabbits. In the other 3 rabbits, the jugular vein (20 mm) harvested from one side was interpositionally grafted to the jugular vein on the opposite side to ease the anastomotic tension. Patency testing, ultrasonography, and histologic assessments were conducted postoperatively at weeks 2, 4, 12, 16, 22, and 26. Results All anastomotic sites were patent, without stenosis, occlusion, or dilatation. In the histologic sections, immature endothelial regeneration was observed at week 2, which was completed by week 4. Regeneration of the tunica media was noted at week 12. Between week 22 and week 26, the tunica media fully regenerated and the coupler dissipated entirely. Conclusions Despite the absence of a coupler to act as an anastomotic buttress, the structure and function of all the vessels appeared normal, even histologically. These outcomes are true milestones in the development of an absorbable vein coupler. PMID:28352597

  2. Exploiting Lipid Permutation Symmetry to Compute Membrane Remodeling Free Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubnis, Greg; Risselada, Herre Jelger; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2016-10-01

    A complete physical description of membrane remodeling processes, such as fusion or fission, requires knowledge of the underlying free energy landscapes, particularly in barrier regions involving collective shape changes, topological transitions, and high curvature, where Canham-Helfrich (CH) continuum descriptions may fail. To calculate these free energies using atomistic simulations, one must address not only the sampling problem due to high free energy barriers, but also an orthogonal sampling problem of combinatorial complexity stemming from the permutation symmetry of identical lipids. Here, we solve the combinatorial problem with a permutation reduction scheme to map a structural ensemble into a compact, nondegenerate subregion of configuration space, thereby permitting straightforward free energy calculations via umbrella sampling. We applied this approach, using a coarse-grained lipid model, to test the CH description of bending and found sharp increases in the bending modulus for curvature radii below 10 nm. These deviations suggest that an anharmonic bending term may be required for CH models to give quantitative energetics of highly curved states.

  3. Epigenetic Regulation of Bone Remodeling and Its Impacts in Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghayor, Chafik; Weber, Franz E.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics describes mechanisms which control gene expression and cellular processes without changing the DNA sequence. The main mechanisms in epigenetics are DNA methylation in CpG-rich promoters, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). DNA methylation modifies the function of the DNA and correlates with gene silencing. Histone modifications including acetylation/deacetylation and phosphorylation act in diverse biological processes such as transcriptional activation/inactivation and DNA repair. Non-coding RNAs play a large part in epigenetic regulation of gene expression in addition to their roles at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Osteoporosis is the most common skeletal disorder, characterized by compromised bone strength and bone micro-architectural deterioration that predisposes the bones to an increased risk of fracture. It is most often caused by an increase in bone resorption that is not sufficiently compensated by a corresponding increase in bone formation. Nowadays it is well accepted that osteoporosis is a multifactorial disorder and there are genetic risk factors for osteoporosis and bone fractures. Here we review emerging evidence that epigenetics contributes to the machinery that can alter DNA structure, gene expression, and cellular differentiation during physiological and pathological bone remodeling. PMID:27598138

  4. The Circadian NAD+ Metabolism: Impact on Chromatin Remodeling and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Bessho, Yasumasa

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is known to be a stochastic phenomenon. The stochastic gene expression rate is thought to be altered by topological change of chromosome and/or by chromatin modifications such as acetylation and methylation. Changes in mechanical properties of chromosome/chromatin by soluble factors, mechanical stresses from the environment, or metabolites determine cell fate, regulate cellular functions, or maintain cellular homeostasis. Circadian clock, which drives the expression of thousands of genes with 24-hour rhythmicity, has been known to be indispensable for maintaining cellular functions/homeostasis. During the last decade, it has been demonstrated that chromatin also undergoes modifications with 24-hour rhythmicity and facilitates the fine-tuning of circadian gene expression patterns. In this review, we cover data which suggests that chromatin structure changes in a circadian manner and that NAD+ is the key metabolite for circadian chromatin remodeling. Furthermore, we discuss the relationship among circadian clock, NAD+ metabolism, and aging/age-related diseases. In addition, the interventions of NAD+ metabolism for the prevention and treatment of aging and age-related diseases are also discussed. PMID:28050554

  5. The ADF/cofilin family: actin-remodeling proteins.

    PubMed

    Maciver, Sutherland K; Hussey, Patrick J

    2002-01-01

    The ADF/cofilins are a family of actin-binding proteins expressed in all eukaryotic cells so far examined. Members of this family remodel the actin cytoskeleton, for example during cytokinesis, when the actin-rich contractile ring shrinks as it contracts through the interaction of ADF/cofilins with both monomeric and filamentous actin. The depolymerizing activity is twofold: ADF/cofilins sever actin filaments and also increase the rate at which monomers leave the filament's pointed end. The three-dimensional structure of ADF/cofilins is similar to a fold in members of the gelsolin family of actin-binding proteins in which this fold is typically repeated three or six times; although both families bind polyphosphoinositide lipids and actin in a pH-dependent manner, they share no obvious sequence similarity. Plants and animals have multiple ADF/cofilin genes, belonging in vertebrates to two types, ADF and cofilins. Other eukaryotes (such as yeast, Acanthamoeba and slime moulds) have a single ADF/cofilin gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the ADF/cofilins reveals that, with few exceptions, their relationships reflect conventional views of the relationships between the major groups of organisms.

  6. G-quadruplex recognition and remodeling by the FANCJ helicase

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Colin G.; Spies, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Guanine rich nucleic acid sequences can form G-quadruplex (G4) structures that interfere with DNA replication, repair and RNA transcription. The human FANCJ helicase contributes to maintaining genomic integrity by promoting DNA replication through G4-forming DNA regions. Here, we combined single-molecule and ensemble biochemical analysis to show that FANCJ possesses a G4-specific recognition site. Through this interaction, FANCJ targets G4-containing DNA where its helicase and G4-binding activities enable repeated rounds of stepwise G4-unfolding and refolding. In contrast to other G4-remodeling enzymes, FANCJ partially stabilizes the G-quadruplex. This would preserve the substrate for the REV1 translesion DNA synthesis polymerase to incorporate cytosine across from a replication-stalling G-quadruplex. The residues responsible for G-quadruplex recognition also participate in interaction with MLH1 mismatch-repair protein, suggesting that the FANCJ activity supporting replication and its participation in DNA interstrand crosslink repair and/or heteroduplex rejection are mutually exclusive. Our findings not only describe the mechanism by which FANCJ recognizes G-quadruplexes and mediates their stepwise unfolding, but also explain how FANCJ chooses between supporting DNA repair versus promoting DNA replication through G-rich sequences. PMID:27342280

  7. Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Obesity on Cardiac Remodeling: The Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Korcarz, Claudia E.; Peppard, Paul E.; Young, Terry B.; Chapman, Carrie B.; Hla, K. Mae; Barnet, Jodi H.; Hagen, Erika; Stein, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To characterize the prospective associations of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with future echocardiographic measures of adverse cardiac remodeling Methods: This was a prospective long-term observational study. Participants had overnight polysomnography followed by transthoracic echocardiography a mean (standard deviation) of 18.0 (3.7) y later. OSA was characterized by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI, events/hour). Echocardiography was used to assess left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function and mass, left atrial volume and pressure, cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, and right ventricular (RV) systolic function, size, and hemodynamics. Multivariate regression models estimated associations between log10(AHI+1) and future echocardiographic findings. A secondary analysis looked at oxygen desaturation indices and future echocardiographic findings. Results: At entry, the 601 participants were mean (standard deviation) 47 (8) y old (47% female). After adjustment for age, sex, and body mass index, baseline log10(AHI+1) was associated significantly with future reduced LV ejection fraction and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) ≤ 15 mm. After further adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, participants with higher baseline log10(AHI+1) had lower future LV ejection fraction (β = −1.35 [standard error = 0.6]/log10(AHI+1), P = 0.03) and higher odds of TAPSE ≤ 15 mm (odds ratio = 6.3/log10(AHI+1), 95% confidence interval = 1.3–30.5, P = 0.02). SaO2 desaturation indices were associated independently with LV mass, LV wall thickness, and RV area (all P < 0.03) Conclusions: OSA is associated independently with decreasing LV systolic function and with reduced RV function. Echocardiographic measures of adverse cardiac remodeling are strongly associated with OSA but are confounded by obesity. Hypoxia may be a stimulus for hypertrophy in individuals with OSA. Citation: Korcarz CE, Peppard PE, Young TB, Chapman CB, Hla

  8. Pathophysiology and clinical relevance of pulmonary remodelling in pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Jocelyn; Guazzi, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in left heart disease, classified as group II, is the most common form of PH that occurs in approximately 60% of cases of reduced and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. Although relatively much is known about hemodynamic stages (passive or reactive) and their consequences on the right ventricle (RV) there is no consensus on the best hemodynamic definition of group II PH. In addition, the main pathways that lead to lung capillary injury and impaired biology of small artery remodelling processes are largely unknown. Typical lung manifestations of an increased pulmonary pressure and progressive RV-pulmonary circulation uncoupling are an abnormal alveolar capillary gas diffusion, impaired lung mechanics (restriction), and exercise ventilation inefficiency. Of several classes of pulmonary vasodilators currently clinically available, oral phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition, because of its strong selectivity for targeting the cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the pulmonary circulation, is increasingly emerging as an attractive opportunity to reach hemodynamic benefits, reverse capillary injury, and RV remodelling, and improve functional capacity. Guanylate cyclase stimulators offer an additional intriguing opportunity but the lack of selectivity and systemic effects might preclude some of the anticipated benefits on the pulmonary circulation. Future trials will determine whether new routes of pharmacologic strategy aimed at targeting lung structural and vascular remodelling might affect morbidity and mortality in left heart disease populations. We believe that this therapeutic goal rather than a pure hemodynamic effect might ultimately emerge as an important challenge for the clinician.

  9. Chromatin remodelers clear nucleosomes from intrinsically unfavorable sites to establish nucleosome-depleted regions at promoters.

    PubMed

    Tolkunov, Denis; Zawadzki, Karl A; Singer, Cara; Elfving, Nils; Morozov, Alexandre V; Broach, James R

    2011-06-15

    Most promoters in yeast contain a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR), but the mechanisms by which NDRs are established and maintained in vivo are currently unclear. We have examined how genome-wide nucleosome placement is altered in the absence of two distinct types of nucleosome remodeling activity. In mutants of both SNF2, which encodes the ATPase component of the Swi/Snf remodeling complex, and ASF1, which encodes a histone chaperone, distinct sets of gene promoters carry excess nucleosomes in their NDRs relative to wild-type. In snf2 mutants, excess promoter nucleosomes correlate with reduced gene expression. In both mutants, the excess nucleosomes occupy DNA sequences that are energetically less favorable for nucleosome formation, indicating that intrinsic histone-DNA interactions are not sufficient for nucleosome positioning in vivo, and that Snf2 and Asf1 promote thermodynamic equilibration of nucleosomal arrays. Cells lacking SNF2 or ASF1 still accomplish the changes in promoter nucleosome structure associated with large-scale transcriptional reprogramming. However, chromatin reorganization in the mutants is reduced in extent compared to wild-type cells, even though transcriptional changes proceed normally. In summary, active remodeling is required for distributing nucleosomes to energetically favorable positions in vivo and for reorganizing chromatin in response to changes in transcriptional activity.

  10. Local alignment vectors reveal cancer cell-induced ECM fiber remodeling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoungkoo; Konen, Jessica; Wilkinson, Scott; Marcus, Adam I; Jiang, Yi

    2017-01-03

    Invasive cancer cells interact with the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM), remodeling ECM fiber network structure by condensing, degrading, and aligning these fibers. We developed a novel local alignment vector analysis method to quantitatively measure collagen fiber alignment as a vector field using Circular Statistics. This method was applied to human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines, embedded as spheroids in a collagen gel. Collagen remodeling was monitored using second harmonic generation imaging under normal conditions and when the LKB1-MARK1 pathway was disrupted through RNAi-based approaches. The results showed that inhibiting LKB1 or MARK1 in NSCLC increases the collagen fiber alignment and captures outward alignment vectors from the tumor spheroid, corresponding to high invasiveness of LKB1 mutant cancer cells. With time-lapse imaging of ECM micro-fiber morphology, the local alignment vector can measure the dynamic signature of invasive cancer cell activity and cell-migration-induced ECM and collagen remodeling and realigning dynamics.

  11. Piezo1 in Smooth Muscle Cells Is Involved in Hypertension-Dependent Arterial Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Retailleau, Kevin; Duprat, Fabrice; Arhatte, Malika; Ranade, Sanjeev Sumant; Peyronnet, Rémi; Martins, Joana Raquel; Jodar, Martine; Moro, Céline; Offermanns, Stefan; Feng, Yuanyi; Demolombe, Sophie; Patel, Amanda; Honoré, Eric

    2015-11-10

    The mechanically activated non-selective cation channel Piezo1 is a determinant of vascular architecture during early development. Piezo1-deficient embryos die at midgestation with disorganized blood vessels. However, the role of stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) in arterial smooth muscle cells in the adult remains unknown. Here, we show that Piezo1 is highly expressed in myocytes of small-diameter arteries and that smooth-muscle-specific Piezo1 deletion fully impairs SAC activity. While Piezo1 is dispensable for the arterial myogenic tone, it is involved in the structural remodeling of small arteries. Increased Piezo1 opening has a trophic effect on resistance arteries, influencing both diameter and wall thickness in hypertension. Piezo1 mediates a rise in cytosolic calcium and stimulates activity of transglutaminases, cross-linking enzymes required for the remodeling of small arteries. In conclusion, we have established the connection between an early mechanosensitive process, involving Piezo1 in smooth muscle cells, and a clinically relevant arterial remodeling.

  12. Chromatin remodeling complexes in the assembly of long noncoding RNA-dependent nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tetsuya; Hirose, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Paraspeckles are subnuclear structures that assemble on nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 (NEAT1) long noncoding (lnc)RNA. Paraspeckle formation requires appropriate NEAT1 biogenesis and subsequent assembly with multiple prion-like domain (PLD) containing RNA-binding proteins. We found that SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes function as paraspeckle components that interact with paraspeckle proteins (PSPs) and NEAT1. SWI/SNF complexes play an essential role in paraspeckle formation that does not require their ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity. Instead, SWI/SNF complexes facilitate organization of the PSP interaction network required for intact paraspeckle assembly. SWI/SNF complexes may collectively bind multiple PSPs to recruit them onto NEAT1. SWI/SNF complexes are also required for Sat III (Satellite III) lncRNA-dependent formation of nuclear stress bodies under heat shock conditions. Organization of the lncRNA-dependent omega speckle in Drosophila also depends on the chromatin remodeling complex. These findings raise the possibility that a common mechanism controls the formation of lncRNA-dependent nuclear body architecture.

  13. Calcitriol attenuates cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in a murine model of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ling; Cao, Jia-Tian; Liang, Yan; Zhao, Yi-Chao; Lin, Xian-Hua; Li, Xiao-Cui; Tan, Ya-Jing; Li, Jing-Yi; Zhou, Cheng-Liang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex reproductive and metabolic disorder affecting 10 % of reproductive-aged women, and is well associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors. However, there are few data concerning the direct association of PCOS with cardiac pathologies. The present study aims to investigate the changes in cardiac structure, function, and cardiomyocyte survival in a PCOS model, and explore the possible effect of calcitriol administration on these changes. PCOS was induced in C57BL/6J female mice by chronic dihydrotestosterone administration, as evidenced by irregular estrous cycles, obesity and dyslipidemia. PCOS mice progressively developed cardiac abnormalities including cardiac hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, myocardial apoptosis, and cardiac dysfunction. Conversely, concomitant administration of calcitriol significantly attenuated cardiac remodeling and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and improved cardiac function. Molecular analysis revealed that the beneficial effect of calcitriol was associated with normalized autophagy function by increasing phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase and inhibiting phosphorylation levels of mammalian target of rapamycin complex. Our findings provide the first evidence for the presence of cardiac remodeling in a PCOS model, and vitamin D supplementation may be a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of PCOS-related cardiac remodeling.

  14. Catestatin-A Novel Predictor of Left Ventricular Remodeling After Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dan; Xie, Hong; Wang, Xinyu; Liang, Ying; Yu, Haiyi; Gao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Catestatin was discovered as a potent inhibitor of catecholamine secretion and plays important roles in the cardiovascular system. Our previous study demonstrates a close relationship between catestatin levels and prognosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Using the same population, the goal of this study is to investigate the ability of catestatin to predict left ventricular (LV) remodeling in STEMI patients. 72 patients and 30 controls were included. Catestatin was sampled after admission to the emergency room (ER), at day3 (D3), and day7 (D7) after STEMI. Echocardiography was performed at D3 and after 65 months for evaluation of LVEDD, EF, IVS, LVPW, E, A, E’, E/A, and E/E’. The changes of these parameters from D3 to 65 months were used to reflect the changes of ventricular structure and function. We found that plasma catestatin levels at D3 were highly correlated with the changes of LVEDD, EF, E, A, E’, E/A, as well as E/E’. Patients with higher catestatin levels developed worse ventricular function during the follow-up period. Single-point catestatin was effective to predict LVEDD change. And concurrently increasing catestatin and NT-proBNP levels predicted the highest risk of LV remodeling. This study suggests an important prognostic information of catestatin on LV remodeling.

  15. Local alignment vectors reveal cancer cell-induced ECM fiber remodeling dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoungkoo; Konen, Jessica; Wilkinson, Scott; Marcus, Adam I.; Jiang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Invasive cancer cells interact with the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM), remodeling ECM fiber network structure by condensing, degrading, and aligning these fibers. We developed a novel local alignment vector analysis method to quantitatively measure collagen fiber alignment as a vector field using Circular Statistics. This method was applied to human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines, embedded as spheroids in a collagen gel. Collagen remodeling was monitored using second harmonic generation imaging under normal conditions and when the LKB1-MARK1 pathway was disrupted through RNAi-based approaches. The results showed that inhibiting LKB1 or MARK1 in NSCLC increases the collagen fiber alignment and captures outward alignment vectors from the tumor spheroid, corresponding to high invasiveness of LKB1 mutant cancer cells. With time-lapse imaging of ECM micro-fiber morphology, the local alignment vector can measure the dynamic signature of invasive cancer cell activity and cell-migration-induced ECM and collagen remodeling and realigning dynamics. PMID:28045069

  16. Remodeling of left circumflex coronary arterial tree in pacing-induced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a very serious heart disease that manifests an imbalance between left ventricle supply and demand. Although the mechanical demand of the failing heart has been well characterized, the systematic remodeling of the entire coronary arterial tree that constitutes the supply of the myocardium is lacking. We hypothesize that the well-known increase in ventricle wall stress during CHF causes coronary vascular rarefaction to increase the vascular flow resistance, which in turn compromises the perfusion of the heart. Morphometric (diameters, length, and numbers) data of the swine left circumflex (LCx) arterial tree were measured in both CHF (n = 6) and control (n = 6) groups, from which a computer reconstruction of the entire LCx tree was implemented down to the capillary level to enable a hemodynamic analysis of coronary circulation. The vascular flow resistance was increased by ∼75% due to a significant decrease of vessel numbers (∼45%) and diameters in the first capillary segments (∼10%) of the LCx arterial tree after 3-4 wk of pacing. The structural remodeling significantly changed the wall shear stress in vessel segments of the entire LCx arterial tree of CHF animals. This study enhances our knowledge of coronary arterial tree remodeling in heart failure, which provides a deeper understanding of the deterioration of supply-demand relation in left ventricle. PMID:26159756

  17. Mouse stem cells seeded into decellularized rat kidney scaffolds endothelialize and remodel basement membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Edward A.; Abrahamson, Dale R.; St. John, Patricia; Clapp, William L.; Williams, Matthew J.; Terada, Naohiro; Hamazaki, Takashi; Ellison, Gary W.; Batich, Christopher D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction To address transplant organ shortage, a promising strategy is to decellularize kidneys in a manner that the scaffold retains signals for seeded pluripotent precursor cells to differentiate and recapitulate native structures: matrix-to-cell signaling followed by cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, thereby remodeling and replacing the original matrix. This would reduce scaffold antigenicity and enable xeno-allografts. Results DAPI-labeled cells in arterial vessels and glomeruli were positive for both endothelial lineage markers, BsLB4 and VEGFR2. Rat scaffold’s basement membrane demonstrated immunolabeling with anti-mouse laminin β1. Labeling intensified over time with 14 day incubations. Conclusion We provide new evidence for matrix-to-cell signaling in acellular whole organ scaffolds that induces differentiation of pluripotent precursor cells to endothelial lineage. Production of mouse basement membrane supports remodeling of host (rat)-derived scaffolds and thereby warrants further investigation as a promising approach for xenotransplantation. Methods We previously showed that murine embryonic stem cells arterially seeded into acellular rat whole kidney scaffolds multiply and demonstrate morphologic, immunohistochemical and gene expression evidence for differentiation. Vascular cell endothelialization was now further tested by endothelial specific BsLB4 lectin and anti-VEGFR2 (Flk1) antibodies. Remodeling of the matrix basement membranes from rat to mouse (“murinization”) was assessed by a monoclonal antibody specific for mouse laminin β1 chain. PMID:22692231

  18. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib reduces lung inflammation and remodelling in experimental allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, AL; Magalhães, RF; Branco, VC; Silva, JD; Cruz, FF; Marques, PS; Ferreira, TPT; Morales, MM; Martins, MA; Olsen, PC

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Asthma is characterized by chronic lung inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. Despite recent advances in understanding of its pathophysiology, asthma remains a major public health problem, and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In this context, we sought to ascertain whether treatment with the TK inhibitor dasatinib might repair inflammatory and remodelling processes, thus improving lung function, in a murine model of asthma. Experimental Approach Animals were sensitized and subsequently challenged, with ovalbumin (OVA) or saline. Twenty‐four hours after the last challenge, animals were treated with dasatinib, dexamethasone, or saline, every 12 h for 7 consecutive days. Twenty‐four hours after the last treatment, the animals were killed, and data were collected. Lung structure and remodelling were evaluated by morphometric analysis, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy of lung sections. Inflammation was assessed by cytometric analysis and ELISA, and lung function was evaluated by invasive whole‐body plethysmography. Key Results In OVA mice, dasatinib, and dexamethasone led to significant reductions in airway hyperresponsiveness. Dasatinib was also able to attenuate alveolar collapse, contraction index, and collagen fibre deposition, as well as increasing elastic fibre content, in OVA mice. Concerning the inflammatory process, dasatinib reduced inflammatory cell influx to the airway and lung‐draining mediastinal lymph nodes, without inducing the thymic atrophy promoted by dexamethasone. Conclusions and Implications In this model of allergic asthma, dasatinib effectively blunted the inflammatory and remodelling processes in asthmatic lungs, enhancing airway repair and thus improving lung mechanics. PMID:26989986

  19. Understanding adverse events: human factors.

    PubMed Central

    Reason, J

    1995-01-01

    (1) Human rather than technical failures now represent the greatest threat to complex and potentially hazardous systems. This includes healthcare systems. (2) Managing the human risks will never be 100% effective. Human fallibility can be moderated, but it cannot be eliminated. (3) Different error types have different underlying mechanisms, occur in different parts of the organisation, and require different methods of risk management. The basic distinctions are between: Slips, lapses, trips, and fumbles (execution failures) and mistakes (planning or problem solving failures). Mistakes are divided into rule based mistakes and knowledge based mistakes. Errors (information-handling problems) and violations (motivational problems) Active versus latent failures. Active failures are committed by those in direct contact with the patient, latent failures arise in organisational and managerial spheres and their adverse effects may take a long time to become evident. (4) Safety significant errors occur at all levels of the system, not just at the sharp end. Decisions made in the upper echelons of the organisation create the conditions in the workplace that subsequently promote individual errors and violations. Latent failures are present long before an accident and are hence prime candidates for principled risk management. (5) Measures that involve sanctions and exhortations (that is, moralistic measures directed to those at the sharp end) have only very limited effectiveness, especially so in the case of highly trained professionals. (6) Human factors problems are a product of a chain of causes in which the individual psychological factors (that is, momentary inattention, forgetting, etc) are the last and least manageable links. Attentional "capture" (preoccupation or distraction) is a necessary condition for the commission of slips and lapses. Yet, its occurrence is almost impossible to predict or control effectively. The same is true of the factors associated with

  20. Strategic approaches to adverse outcome pathway development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are conceptual frameworks for organizing biological and toxicological knowledge in a manner that supports extrapolation of data pertaining to the initiation or early progression of toxicity to an apical adverse outcome that occurs at a level of org...

  1. Multiscale molecular dynamics simulations of membrane remodeling by Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs family proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Chan; Haohua, Wen; Lanyuan, Lu; Jun, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Membrane curvature is no longer thought of as a passive property of the membrane; rather, it is considered as an active, regulated state that serves various purposes in the cell such as between cells and organelle definition. While transport is usually mediated by tiny membrane bubbles known as vesicles or membrane tubules, such communication requires complex interplay between the lipid bilayers and cytosolic proteins such as members of the Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) superfamily of proteins. With rapid developments in novel experimental techniques, membrane remodeling has become a rapidly emerging new field in recent years. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are important tools for obtaining atomistic information regarding the structural and dynamic aspects of biological systems and for understanding the physics-related aspects. The availability of more sophisticated experimental data poses challenges to the theoretical community for developing novel theoretical and computational techniques that can be used to better interpret the experimental results to obtain further functional insights. In this review, we summarize the general mechanisms underlying membrane remodeling controlled or mediated by proteins. While studies combining experiments and molecular dynamics simulations recall existing mechanistic models, concurrently, they extend the role of different BAR domain proteins during membrane remodeling processes. We review these recent findings, focusing on how multiscale molecular dynamics simulations aid in understanding the physical basis of BAR domain proteins, as a representative of membrane-remodeling proteins. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21403182) and the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong, China (Grant No. CityU 21300014).

  2. Rod photoreceptors protect from cone degeneration-induced retinal remodeling and restore visual responses in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Carole J.; Alvarez-Delfin, Karen; Fadool, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Humans are largely dependent upon cone-mediated vision. However, death or dysfunction of rods, the predominant photoreceptor subtype, results in secondary loss of cones, remodeling of retinal circuitry and blindness. The changes in circuitry may contribute to the vision deficit and undermine attempts at restoring sight. We exploit zebrafish larvae as a genetic model to specifically characterize changes associated with photoreceptor degenerations in a cone-dominated retina. Photoreceptors form synapses with two types of second order neurons, bipolar cells and horizontal cells. Using cell-specific reporter gene expression and immunolabeling for postsynaptic glutamate receptors, significant remodeling is observed following cone degeneration in the pde6cw59 larval retina but not rod degeneration in the Xops:mCFPq13 line. In adults, rods and cones are present in approximately equal numbers, and in pde6cw59 mutants glutamate receptor expression and synaptic structures in the outer plexiform layer are preserved, and visual responses are gained in these once-blind fish. We propose that the abundance of rods in the adult protects the retina from cone degeneration-induced remodeling. We test this hypothesis by genetically manipulating the number of rods in larvae. We show that an increased number and uniform distribution of rods in lor/tbx2bp22bbtl or six7 morpholino-injected larvae protect from pde6cw59-induced secondary changes. The observations that remodeling is a common consequence of photoreceptor death across species, and that in zebrafish a small number of surviving photoreceptors afford protection from degeneration-induced changes provides a model for systematic analysis of factors that slow or even prevent the secondary deteriorations associated with neural degenerative disease. PMID:23365220

  3. 25-Hydroxycholesterol promotes fibroblast-mediated tissue remodeling through NF-κB dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Tomohiro; Sugiura, Hisatoshi; Koarai, Akira; Kikuchi, Takashi; Hiramatsu, Masataka; Kawabata, Hiroki; Akamatsu, Keiichiro; Hirano, Tsunahiko; Nakanishi, Masanori; Matsunaga, Kazuto; Minakata, Yoshiaki; Ichinose, Masakazu

    2013-05-01

    Abnormal structural alterations termed remodeling, including fibrosis and alveolar wall destruction, are important features of the pathophysiology of chronic airway diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC) is enzymatically produced by cholesterol 25-hydorxylase (CH25H) in macrophages and is reported to be involved in the formation of arteriosclerosis. We previously demonstrated that the expression of CH25H and production of 25HC were increased in the lungs of COPD. However, the role of 25-HC in lung tissue remodeling is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of 25-HC on fibroblast-mediated tissue remodeling using human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) in vitro. 25-HC significantly augmented α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) (P<0.001) and collagen I (P<0.001) expression in HFL-1. 25-HC also significantly enhanced the release and activation of matrix metallaoproteinase (MMP)-2 (P<0.001) and MMP-9 (P<0.001) without any significant effect on the production of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2. 25-HC stimulated transforming growth factor (TGF)-β{sub 1} production (P<0.01) and a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody restored these 25-HC-augmented pro-fibrotic responses. 25-HC significantly promoted the translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 into the nuclei (P<0.01), but not phospholylated-c-jun, a complex of activator protein-1. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB restored the 25-HC-augmented pro-fibrotic responses and TGF-β{sub 1} release. These results suggest that 25-HC could contribute to fibroblast-mediated lung tissue remodeling by promoting myofibroblast differentiation and the excessive release of extracellular matrix protein and MMPs via an NF-κB-TGF-β dependent pathway.

  4. Extracellular matrix remodelling in response to venous hypertension: proteomics of human varicose veins

    PubMed Central

    Barallobre-Barreiro, Javier; Oklu, Rahmi; Lynch, Marc; Fava, Marika; Baig, Ferheen; Yin, Xiaoke; Barwari, Temo; Potier, David N.; Albadawi, Hassan; Jahangiri, Marjan; Porter, Karen E.; Watkins, Michael T.; Misra, Sanjay; Stoughton, Julianne; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Aims Extracellular matrix remodelling has been implicated in a number of vascular conditions, including venous hypertension and varicose veins. However, to date, no systematic analysis of matrix remodelling in human veins has been performed. Methods and results To understand the consequences of venous hypertension, normal and varicose veins were evaluated using proteomics approaches targeting the extracellular matrix. Varicose saphenous veins removed during phlebectomy and normal saphenous veins obtained during coronary artery bypass surgery were collected for proteomics analysis. Extracellular matrix proteins were enriched from venous tissues. The proteomics analysis revealed the presence of >150 extracellular matrix proteins, of which 48 had not been previously detected in venous tissue. Extracellular matrix remodelling in varicose veins was characterized by a loss of aggrecan and several small leucine-rich proteoglycans and a compensatory increase in collagen I and laminins. Gene expression analysis of the same tissues suggested that the remodelling process associated with venous hypertension predominantly occurs at the protein rather than the transcript level. The loss of aggrecan in varicose veins was paralleled by a reduced expression of aggrecanases. Chymase and tryptase β1 were among the up-regulated proteases. The effect of these serine proteases on the venous extracellular matrix was further explored by incubating normal saphenous veins with recombinant enzymes. Proteomics analysis revealed extensive extracellular matrix degradation after digestion with tryptase β1. In comparison, chymase was less potent and degraded predominantly basement membrane-associated proteins. Conclusion The present proteomics study provides unprecedented insights into the expression and degradation of structural and regulatory components of the vascular extracellular matrix in varicosis. PMID:27068509

  5. Structural remodeling of fibrous astrocytes after axonal injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Daniel; Lye-Barthel, Ming; Masland, Richard H; Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2010-10-20

    Reactive astrocytes are a pathological hallmark of many CNS injuries and neurodegenerations. They are characterized by hypertrophy of the soma and processes and an increase in the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein. Because the cells obscure each other in immunostaining, little is known about the behavior of a single reactive astrocyte, nor how single astrocytes combine to form the glial scar. We have investigated the reaction of fibrous astrocytes to axonal degeneration using a transgenic mouse strain expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein in small subsets of astrocytes. Fibrous astrocytes in the optic nerve and corpus callosum initially react to injury by hypertrophy of the soma and processes. They retract their primary processes, simplifying their shape and dramatically reducing their spatial coverage. At 3 d after crush, quantitative analysis revealed nearly a twofold increase in the thickness of the primary processes, a halving of the number of primary processes leaving the soma and an eightfold reduction in the spatial coverage. In the subsequent week, they partially reextend long processes, returning to a near-normal morphology and an extensive spatial overlap. The resulting glial scar consists of an irregular array of astrocyte processes, contrasting with their original orderly arrangement. These changes are in distinct contrast to those reported for reactive protoplasmic astrocytes of the gray matter, in which the number of processes and branchings increase, but the cells continue to maintain nonoverlapping individual territories throughout their response to injury.

  6. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-07-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapula's material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone element's remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than actual

  7. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-07-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapula’s material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone element’s remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than

  8. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Wagner, Willi L.; Bennett, Robert D.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D.; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.

    2015-01-01

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends (“E”). Septal retraction, observed in 20–30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  9. Klotho and Phosphate Are Modulators of Pathologic Uremic Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Mingjun; Cho, Han Jun; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Paek, Jean; Hill, Kathy; Shelton, John; Amaral, Ansel P.; Faul, Christian; Taniguchi, Masatomo; Wolf, Myles; Brand, Markus; Takahashi, Masaya; Kuro-o, Makoto; Hill, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction in CKD is characterized by aberrant cardiac remodeling with hypertrophy and fibrosis. CKD is a state of severe systemic Klotho deficiency, and restoration of Klotho attenuates vascular calcification associated with CKD. We examined the role of Klotho in cardiac remodeling in models of Klotho deficiency—genetic Klotho hypomorphism, high dietary phosphate intake, aging, and CKD. Klotho-deficient mice exhibited cardiac dysfunction and hypertrophy before 12 weeks of age followed by fibrosis. In wild-type mice, the induction of CKD led to severe cardiovascular changes not observed in control mice. Notably, non-CKD mice fed a high-phosphate diet had lower Klotho levels and greatly accelerated cardiac remodeling associated with normal aging compared with those on a normal diet. Chronic elevation of circulating Klotho because of global overexpression alleviated the cardiac remodeling induced by either high-phosphate diet or CKD. Regardless of the cause of Klotho deficiency, the extent of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis correlated tightly with plasma phosphate concentration and inversely with plasma Klotho concentration, even when adjusted for all other covariables. High-fibroblast growth factor–23 concentration positively correlated with cardiac remodeling in a Klotho-deficient state but not a Klotho-replete state. In vitro, Klotho inhibited TGF-β1–, angiotensin II–, or high phosphate–induced fibrosis and abolished TGF-β1– or angiotensin II–induced hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, Klotho deficiency is a novel intermediate mediator of pathologic cardiac remodeling, and fibroblast growth factor–23 may contribute to cardiac remodeling in concert with Klotho deficiency in CKD, phosphotoxicity, and aging. PMID:25326585

  10. Low levels of natural IgM antibodies against phosphorylcholine are independently associated with vascular remodeling in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Gleissner, Christian A; Erbel, Christian; Haeussler, Julia; Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Domschke, Gabriele; Linden, Fabian; Doesch, Andreas O; Conradson, Göran; Buss, Sebastian J; Hofmann, Nina P; Gitsioudis, Gitsios; Katus, Hugo A; Korosoglou, Grigorios

    2015-01-01

    Low anti-phosphorylcholine (PC) IgM plasma levels have been associated with increased incidence of adverse events in coronary artery disease (CAD). The underlying mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesized that atheroprotection mediated by anti-PC IgM antibodies is associated with reduced vascular remodeling and therefore tested whether anti-PC IgM plasma levels independently predict vascular remodeling. In a prospective cross-sectional study, anti-PC IgM plasma levels were measured in 175 consecutive patients with suspected CAD undergoing cardiac computed tomography angiography. Plaque morphology was thoroughly analyzed. Vascular remodeling was defined by a change in the vessel diameter at the plaque site in comparison to the reference segment proximal to the lesion (reference diameter) of ≥10%. Mean age of the patients was 64.8 ± 10.7 years, 48.6% were female. In 98 patients CAD was diagnosed, 57 (58.2%) of which displayed non-obstructive CAD (stenosis <50%), whereas 41 (41.8%) exhibited obstructive CAD (stenosis ≥50%). In 34 of 98 (34.7%) CAD patients vascular remodeling was present. Mean anti-PC IgM levels did not differ between patients with and without CAD (70.8 ± 52.7 vs. 69.1 ± 55.1 U/mL). However, anti-PC IgM levels were significantly lower in CAD patients compared to those without vascular remodeling (46.6 ± 31.6 vs. 73.3 ± 58.5 U/mL, P = 0.024). Using multivariate logistic regression, anti-PC IgM plasma levels independently predicted coronary vascular remodeling (HR 0.322, 95% confidence interval 0.121-0.856, P = 0.023). In conclusion, low anti-PC IgM levels are independently associated with coronary vascular remodeling. These findings may represent the link between in vitro studies demonstrating atheroprotective effects of anti-PC IgM and clinical data demonstrating that low anti-PC IgM levels are associated with adverse outcome in CAD patients.

  11. Children of Misfortune: Early Adversity and Cumulative Inequality in Perceived Life Trajectories1

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Markus H.; Ferraro, Kenneth F.; Mustillo, Sarah A.

    2011-01-01

    Adversity early in life may alter pathways of aging, but what interpretive processes can soften the blow of early insults? Drawing from cumulative inequality theory, the authors analyze trajectories of life evaluations and then consider whether early adversity offsets favorable expectations for the future. Results reveal that early adversity contributes to more negative views of the past but rising expectations for the future. Early adversity also has enduring effects on life evaluations, offsetting the influence of buoyant expectations. The findings draw attention to the limits of human agency under the constraints of early adversity—a process described as biographical structuration. PMID:21648247

  12. Synergistic childhood adversities and complex adult psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Karen T; Harris, William W; Putnam, Frank W

    2013-08-01

    Numerous studies find a cumulative effect of different types of childhood adversities on increasing risk for serious adult mental and medical outcomes. This study uses the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication sample to investigate the cumulative impact of 8 childhood adversities on complex adult psychopathology as indexed by (a) number of lifetime diagnoses according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994); (b) number of 4 DSM-IV disorder categories (mood, anxiety, impulse control, and substance abuse disorders); and (c) coexistence of internalizing and externalizing disorders. Seven of the 8 childhood adversities were significantly associated with complex adult psychopathology. Individuals with 4 or more childhood adversities had an odds ratio of 7.3, 95% confidence interval [4.7, 11.7] for 4 disorder categories. Additive and multiplicative synergistic effects increasing adult psychopathology were found for specific pairwise combinations of childhood adversities. Synergistic patterns differed by gender suggesting that women are more impacted by sexual abuse and men by economic hardship. The absence of childhood adversities was protective, in that it significantly decreased an individual's risk for subsequent adult mental illness. The results support the clinical impression that increased childhood adversity is associated with more complex adult psychopathology.

  13. Patterns and Implications of Intracranial Arterial Remodeling in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Ye; Anwar, Zeeshan; Intrapiromkul, Jarunee; liu, Li; Zeiler, Steven R.; Leigh, Richard; Zhang, Yiyi; Guallar, Eliseo; Wasserman, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Preliminary studies suggest ntracranial arteries are capable of accommodating plaque formation by remodeling. We sought to study the ability and extent of intracranial arteries to remodel using 3D high-resolution black blood MRI (BBMRI) and investigate its relation to ischemic events. Methods 42 patients with cerebrovascular ischemic events underwent 3D time-of-flight MRA and contrast-enhanced BBMRI examinations at 3T for intracranial atherosclerotic disease. Each plaque was classified by location (e.g., posterior vs. anterior circulation) and its likelihood to have caused a stroke identified on MRI (culprit, indeterminate, or non-culprit). Lumen area (LA), outer wall area (OWA), and wall area (WA) were measured at the lesion and reference sites. Plaque burden was calculated as WA divided by OWA. The arterial remodeling ratio (RR) was calculated as OWA at the lesion site divided by OWA at the reference site, after adjusting for vessel tapering. Arterial remodeling was categorized as positive if RR >1.05, intermediate if 0.95≤RR ≤ 1.05, and negative if RR <0.95. Results 137 plaques were identified in 42 patients (37% [50] posterior, 63% [87] anterior). Compared with anterior circulation plaques, posterior circulation plaques had a larger plaque burden (77.7±15.7 vs. 69.0±14.0, p=0.008), higher RR (1.14±0.38 vs. 0.95±0.32, p=0.002), and more often exhibited positive remodeling (54.0% vs.29.9%, p=0.011). Positive remodeling was marginally associated with downstream stroke presence when adjusted for plaque burden (OR 1.34, 95% CI: 0.99–1.81). Conclusions Intracranial arteries remodel in response to plaque formation, and posterior circulation arteries have a greater capacity for positive remodeling and, consequently, may more likely elude angiographic detection. Arterial remodeling may provide insight into stroke risk. PMID:26742795

  14. [Early left ventricular remodelling following acute coronary accident].

    PubMed

    Gaertner, Roger; Logeart, Damien; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Mercadier, Jean-Jacques

    2004-01-01

    Ventricular remodelling following acute coronary syndromes is both complex and multiform. It is due to the response of the myocardium to the different agressions associated with these syndromes, in particular the ischemia and necrosis downstream of the occluded artery. We must not however neglect the role of the remodelling of the lesions resulting from spontaneous reperfusion or provoked by the cells and tissues associated with coronary microcirculation embolisms and the no-reflow phenomenon. Acute post-infarct remodelling is dominated by early ventricular dilatation which largely affects late prognosis, necrosis elimination and its replacement by a fibrotic scar in parallel with a compensatory hypertrophy of the non-infarcted myocardium. The diverse cellular and molecular components of this remodelling are increasingly well-known, allowing us to better explain the beneficial effects of the currently available medications and providing us with new potential therapeutic targets. A grading of this knowledge associated with the identification of new risk factors and early therapeutic interventions should help us to further limit the deleterious aspects of this remodelling in the goal of preventing, or at least delaying, the devolution towards heart failure.

  15. Subtype-specific neuronal remodeling during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Veverytsa, Lyubov; Allan, Douglas W

    2013-01-01

    During metamorphosis in holometabolous insects, the nervous system undergoes dramatic remodeling as it transitions from its larval to its adult form. Many neurons are generated through post-embryonic neurogenesis to have adult-specific roles, but perhaps more striking is the dramatic remodeling that occurs to transition neurons from functioning in the larval to the adult nervous system. These neurons exhibit a remarkable degree of plasticity during this transition; many subsets undergo programmed cell death, others remodel their axonal and dendritic arbors extensively, whereas others undergo trans-differentiation to alter their terminal differentiation gene expression profiles. Yet other neurons appear to be developmentally frozen in an immature state throughout larval life, to be awakened at metamorphosis by a process we term temporally-tuned differentiation. These multiple forms of remodeling arise from subtype-specific responses to a single metamorphic trigger, ecdysone. Here, we discuss recent progress in Drosophila melanogaster that is shedding light on how subtype-specific programs of neuronal remodeling are generated during metamorphosis.

  16. Wall tissue remodeling regulates longitudinal tension in arteries.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Zane S; Gotlieb, Avrum I; Langille, B Lowell

    2002-05-03

    Changes in blood pressure or flow induce arterial remodeling that normalizes mechanical loads that are imposed on arterial tissue. Arteries are also under substantial longitudinal stretch (axial strain) that may be altered by growth or atrophy of tissues to which they are attached. We therefore tested whether axial strain is also regulated in a negative feedback manner through arterial remodeling. Axial strain in rabbit carotid arteries was increased from 62+/-2% to 97+/-2% without altering other mechanical loads on wall tissues. Strain was reduced within 3 days and completely normalized by 7 days. Remodeling involved tissue elaboration, endothelial cell replication rates were increased by >50-fold and smooth muscle cell replication rates were increased by >15-fold, and substantially elevated DNA, elastin, and collagen contents were recorded. Also, increased rates of apoptosis were indicated by degradation of DNA into oligonucleosomes, and matrix remodeling was reflected in enlarged fenestrae in the internal elastic lamina and increased expression and activation of gelatinases, especially matrix metalloproteinase-2. Intriguingly, reduced axial strain was not normalized, presumably because remodeling processes, apart from cell contraction, are ineffective in decreasing strain, and arterial smooth muscle orientation precludes large effects of contraction on axial strain.

  17. Cortical remodeling during menopause, rheumatoid arthritis, glucocorticoid and bisphosphonate therapy.

    PubMed

    Aeberli, Daniel; Schett, Georg

    2013-03-21

    Bone mass, bone geometry and its changes are based on trabecular and cortical bone remodeling. Whereas the effects of estrogen loss, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), glucocorticoid (GC) and bisphosphonate (BP) on trabecular bone remodeling have been well described, the effects of these conditions on the cortical bone geometry are less known. The present review will report current knowledge on the effects of RA, GC and BP on cortical bone geometry and its clinical relevance. Estrogen deficiency, RA and systemic GC lead to enhanced endosteal bone resorption. While in estrogen deficiency and under GC therapy endosteal resorption is insufficiently compensated by periosteal apposition, RA is associated with some periosteal bone apposition resulting in a maintained load-bearing capacity and stiffness. In contrast, BP treatment leads to filling of endosteal bone cavities at the epiphysis; however, periosteal apposition at the bone shaft seems to be suppressed. In summary, estrogen loss, RA and GC show similar effects on endosteal bone remodeling with an increase in bone resorption, whereas their effect on periosteal bone remodeling may differ. Despite over 50 years of GC therapy and over 25 years of PB therapy, there is still need for better understanding of the skeletal effects of these drugs as well as of inflammatory disease such as RA on cortical bone remodeling.

  18. Focal myocardial infarction induces global remodeling of cardiac sympathetic innervation: neural remodeling in a spatial context

    PubMed Central

    Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Yagishita, Daigo; Patel, Krishan J.; Vaseghi, Marmar; Zhou, Wei; Yamakawa, Kentaro; So, Eileen; Lux, Robert L.; Mahajan, Aman

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) induces neural and electrical remodeling at scar border zones. The impact of focal MI on global functional neural remodeling is not well understood. Sympathetic stimulation was performed in swine with anteroapical infarcts (MI; n = 9) and control swine (n = 9). A 56-electrode sock was placed over both ventricles to record electrograms at baseline and during left, right, and bilateral stellate ganglion stimulation. Activation recovery intervals (ARIs) were measured from electrograms. Global and regional ARI shortening, dispersion of repolarization, and activation propagation were assessed before and during sympathetic stimulation. At baseline, mean ARI was shorter in MI hearts than control hearts (365 ± 8 vs. 436 ± 9 ms, P < 0.0001), dispersion of repolarization was greater in MI versus control hearts (734 ± 123 vs. 362 ± 32 ms2, P = 0.02), and the infarcted region in MI hearts showed longer ARIs than noninfarcted regions (406 ± 14 vs. 365 ± 8 ms, P = 0.027). In control animals, percent ARI shortening was greater on anterior than posterior walls during right stellate ganglion stimulation (P = 0.0001), whereas left stellate ganglion stimulation showed the reverse (P = 0.0003). In infarcted animals, this pattern was completely lost. In 50% of the animals studied, sympathetic stimulation, compared with baseline, significantly altered the direction of activation propagation emanating from the intramyocardial scar during pacing. In conclusion, focal distal anterior MI alters regional and global pattern of sympathetic innervation, resulting in shorter ARIs in infarcted hearts, greater repolarization dispersion, and altered activation propagation. These conditions may underlie the mechanisms by which arrhythmias are initiated when sympathetic tone is enhanced. PMID:23893167

  19. Age‐related remodeling of small arteries is accompanied by increased sphingomyelinase activity and accumulation of long‐chain ceramides

    PubMed Central

    Ohanian, Jacqueline; Liao, Aiyin; Forman, Simon P.; Ohanian, Vasken

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The structure and function of large arteries alters with age leading to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Age‐related large artery remodeling and arteriosclerosis is associated with increased collagen deposition, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Bioactive sphingolipids are known to regulate these processes, and are also involved in aging and cellular senescence. However, less is known about age‐associated alterations in small artery morphology and function or whether changes in arterial sphingolipids occur in aging. We show that mesenteric small arteries from old sheep have increased lumen diameter and media thickness without a change in media to lumen ratio, indicative of outward hypertrophic remodeling. This remodeling occurred without overt changes in blood pressure or pulse pressure indicating it was a consequence of aging per se. There was no age‐associated change in mechanical properties of the arteries despite an increase in total collagen content and deposition of collagen in a thickened intima layer in arteries from old animals. Analysis of the sphingolipid profile showed an increase in long‐chain ceramide (C14–C20), but no change in the levels of sphingosine or sphingosine‐1‐phosphate in arteries from old compared to young animals. This was accompanied by a parallel increase in acid and neutral sphingomyelinase activity in old arteries compared to young. This study demonstrates remodeling of small arteries during aging that is accompanied by accumulation of long‐chain ceramides. This suggests that sphingolipids may be important mediators of vascular aging. PMID:24872355

  20. Reconstructing a missing link in the evolution of a recently diverged phosphotriesterase by active-site loop remodeling.

    PubMed

    Afriat-Jurnou, Livnat; Jackson, Colin J; Tawfik, Dan S

    2012-08-07

    Only decades after the introduction of organophosphate pesticides, bacterial phosphotriesterases (PTEs) have evolved to catalyze their degradation with remarkable efficiency. Their closest known relatives, lactonases, with promiscuous phosphotriasterase activity, dubbed PTE-like lactonases (PLLs), share only 30% sequence identity and also differ in the configuration of their active-site loops. PTE was therefore presumed to have evolved from a yet unknown PLL whose primary activity was the hydrolysis of quorum sensing homoserine lactones (HSLs) (Afriat et al. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 13677-13686). However, how PTEs diverged from this presumed PLL remains a mystery. In this study we investigated loop remodeling as a means of reconstructing a homoserine lactonase ancestor that relates to PTE by few mutational steps. Although, in nature, loop remodeling is a common mechanism of divergence of enzymatic functions, reproducing this process in the laboratory is a challenge. Structural and phylogenetic analyses enabled us to remodel one of PTE's active-site loops into a PLL-like configuration. A deletion in loop 7, combined with an adjacent, highly epistatic, point mutation led to the emergence of an HSLase activity that is undetectable in PTE (k(cat)/K(M) values of up to 2 × 10(4)). The appearance of the HSLase activity was accompanied by only a minor decrease in PTE's paraoxonase activity. This specificity change demonstrates the potential role of bifunctional intermediates in the divergence of new enzymatic functions and highlights the critical contribution of loop remodeling to the rapid divergence of new enzyme functions.

  1. Elevated expression of placental growth factor is associated with airway-wall vascular remodelling and thickening in smokers with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dong; Lai, Tianwen; Yuan, Yalian; Chen, Min; Xia, Jun; Li, Wen; Pan, Guihai; Yuan, Binfan; Lv, Quanchao; Li, Yanyu; Li, Dongmin; Wu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The increased expression of placental growth factor (PlGF) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and allergy-related asthma suggests its role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. In asthmatic smokers, airway remodelling is accompanied by an accelerated decline in lung function. However, whether PlGF contributes to the persistent airflow obstruction and vascular remodelling typically seen in asthmatic smokers is unknown. In this study we measured lung function, airway-wall thickening, and PlGF levels in serum and induced sputum in 74 asthmatic and 42 healthy smokers and never-smokers. Using human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMECs), we evaluated the in vitro effects of PlGF on each step of vascular remodelling, including proliferation, migration, stress-fibre expression, and tubule formation. Our data showed significantly higher serum and sputum PlGF levels in asthma patients, especially asthmatic smokers, than in healthy controls. Serum and sputum PlGF levels correlated negatively with post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and the FEV1/forced vital capacity, but positively with airway-wall thickening. Stimulation of HLMECs with rhPlGF promoted all of the steps of airway-microvascular remodelling. These findings provide insights into the influence of cigarette smoking on the structural changes in the airways of asthmatics and the important pathogenic role played by PlGF. PMID:28220848

  2. Glucocorticoid-induced p11 over-expression and chromatin remodeling: a novel molecular mechanism of traumatic stress?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Li, He; Hu, Xianzhang; Li, Xiao Xia; Smerin, Stanley; Ursano, Robert

    2011-06-01

    While the actions of glucocorticoids on brain function have been comprehensively studied, understanding of the underlying genomic mechanisms is advancing slowly. Recently, it was found that p11 is associated with traumatic stress and depression, and glucocorticoids regulate expression of the p11 gene. The ligand-activated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) interacts with two glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) in the p11 promoter region to up-regulate the p11 gene. RU486, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, and mutation of GREs both block glucocorticoid-induced p11 over-expression, suggesting that glucocorticoid-induced p11 over-expression is mediated by GR and GREs. Thus, the p11 gene can be transcriptionally activated. There is evidence that this transcriptional activation is mediated by the remodeling of chromatin complexes in response to glucocorticoid receptor-regulated promotors. The regulation of eukaryotic gene expression by chromatin remodeling is complex and is essential for numerous cellular processes. The association of linker-histone, non-histone and heterochromatin-specific proteins plays a key role in the generation of higher-order chromatin structures. Understanding the chromatin remodeling involved in the glucocorticoid-mediated increase of p11 expression by stress may clarify stress-induced over-expression of p11 and also identify a new therapeutic target for post-traumatic disorder and depressive disorders, i.e., chromatin remodeling.

  3. Genetic screen in Drosophila muscle identifies autophagy-mediated T-tubule remodeling and a Rab2 role in autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Naonobu; Huang, Wilson; Lin, Tzu-han; Groulx, Jean-Francois; Jean, Steve; Nguyen, Jen; Kuchitsu, Yoshihiko; Koyama-Honda, Ikuko; Mizushima, Noboru; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Kiger, Amy A

    2017-01-01

    Transverse (T)-tubules make-up a specialized network of tubulated muscle cell membranes involved in excitation-contraction coupling for power of contraction. Little is known about how T-tubules maintain highly organized structures and contacts throughout the contractile system despite the ongoing muscle remodeling that occurs with muscle atrophy, damage and aging. We uncovered an essential role for autophagy in T-tubule remodeling with genetic screens of a developmentally regulated remodeling program in Drosophila abdominal muscles. Here, we show that autophagy is both upregulated with and required for progression through T-tubule disassembly stages. Along with known mediators of autophagosome-lysosome fusion, our screens uncovered an unexpected shared role for Rab2 with a broadly conserved function in autophagic clearance. Rab2 localizes to autophagosomes and binds to HOPS complex members, suggesting a direct role in autophagosome tethering/fusion. Together, the high membrane flux with muscle remodeling permits unprecedented analysis both of T-tubule dynamics and fundamental trafficking mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23367.001 PMID:28063257

  4. Comparison of Macitentan and Bosentan on Right Ventricular Remodeling in a Rat Model of Non-vasoreactive Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Landskroner, Kyle; Bauer, Yasmina; Vercauteren, Magali; Rey, Markus; Renault, Berengère; Studer, Rolf; Vezzali, Enrico; Freti, Diego; Hadana, Hakim; Schläpfer, Manuela; Cattaneo, Christophe; Bortolamiol, Céline; Weber, Edgar; Whitby, Brian R.; Delahaye, Stéphane; Wanner, Daniel; Steiner, Pauline; Nayler, Oliver; Hess, Patrick; Clozel, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We compared the efficacy of macitentan, a novel dual endothelin A/endothelin B receptor antagonist, with that of another dual endothelin receptor antagonist, bosentan, in a rat model of non-vasoreactive pulmonary hypertension (PH) with particular emphasis on right ventricular (RV) remodeling. Methods and Results: Unlike monocrotaline or hypoxic/sugen rats, bleomycin-treated rats presented a non-vasoreactive PH characterized by the absence of pulmonary dilatation to adenosine. We therefore chose the bleomycin rat model to compare the effects of the maximally effective doses of macitentan and bosentan on pulmonary vascular and RV remodeling. Macitentan (100 mg·kg−1·d−1), but not bosentan (300 mg·kg−1·d−1), significantly prevented pulmonary vascular remodeling, RV hypertrophy, and cardiomyocyte diameter increase. Cardiac protection by macitentan was associated with a significant attenuation of genes related to cell hypertrophy and extracellular matrix remodeling. Microautoradiography and high performance liquid chromatography analysis showed greater distribution of macitentan than bosentan in the RV and pulmonary tissue. Conclusions: Macitentan was more efficacious than bosentan in preventing the development of pulmonary and RV hypertrophies in a model of non-vasoreactive PH. Greater ability to distribute into the tissue could contribute to the greater structural improvement by macitentan compared with bosentan. PMID:26230396

  5. Stress, sex and neural adaptation to a changing environment: mechanisms of neuronal remodeling

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Bruce S.

    2010-01-01

    The adult brain is much more resilient and adaptable than previously believed, and adaptive structural plasticity involves growth and shrinkage of dendritic trees, turnover of synapses and limited amounts of neurogenesis in the forebrain, especially the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation. Stress and sex hormones help to mediate adaptive structural plasticity, which has been extensively investigated in hippocampus and to a lesser extent in prefrontal cortex and amygdala, all brain regions that are involved in cognitive and emotional functions. Stress and sex hormones exert their effects on brain structural remodeling through both classical genomic as well as non-genomic mechanisms, and they do so in collaboration with neurotransmitters and other intra- and extracellular mediators. This review will illustrate the actions of estrogen on synapse formation in the hippocampus and the process of stress-induced remodelling of dendrites and synapses in the hippocampus, amygdala and prefrontal cortex. The influence of early developmental epigenetic events, such as early life stress and brain sexual differentiation, is noted along with the interactions between sex hormones and the effects of stress on the brain. Because hormones influence brain structure and function and because hormone secretion is governed by the brain, applied molecular neuroscience techniques can begin to reveal the role of hormones in brain-related disorders and the treatment of these diseases. A better understanding of hormone-brain interactions should promote more flexible approaches to the treatment of psychiatric disorders, as well as their prevention through both behavioral and pharmaceutical interventions. PMID:20840167

  6. Remodeling of blood vessels: responses of diameter and wall thickness to hemodynamic and metabolic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Pries, Axel R; Reglin, Bettina; Secomb, Timothy W

    2005-10-01

    Vascular functions, including tissue perfusion and peripheral resistance, reflect continuous structural adaptation (remodeling) of blood vessels in response to several stimuli. Here, a theoretical model is presented that relates the structural and functional properties of microvascular networks to the adaptive responses of individual segments to hemodynamic and metabolic stimuli. All vessels are assumed to respond, according to a common set of adaptation rules, to changes in wall shear stress, circumferential wall stress, and tissue metabolic status (indicated by partial pressure of oxygen). An increase in vessel diameter with increasing wall shear stress and an increase in wall mass with increased circumferential stress are needed to ensure stable vascular adaptation. The model allows quantitative predictions of the effects of changes in systemic hemodynamic conditions or local adaptation characteristics on vessel structure and on peripheral resistance. Predicted effects of driving pressure on the ratio of wall thickness to vessel diameter are consistent with experimental observations. In addition, peripheral resistance increases by approximately 65% for an increase in driving pressure from 50 to 150 mm Hg. Peripheral resistance is predicted to be markedly increased in response to a decrease in vascular sensitivity to wall shear stress, and to be decreased in response to increased tissue metabolic demand. This theoretical approach provides a framework for integrating available information on structural remodeling in the vascular system and predicting responses to changing conditions or altered vascular reactivity, as may occur in hypertension.

  7. [Cardiovascular pharmacotherapy. Risks and adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Voigt, N; Heijman, J; Dobrev, D

    2014-03-01

    Adverse side effects of drugs are a significantly underestimated problem in modern medicine. In this review article, we summarize common adverse side effects of cardiovascular drugs. In particular, we highlight the factors promoting these adverse side effects in patients, including reduced hepatic or renal clearance in elderly patients that often requires dosage adjustment. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between drugs (e.g. through the cytochrome P450 system or P-glycoproteins) can modify the plasma concentration of many compounds, thereby also increasing the likelihood of unwanted side effects. The most prominent cardiac side effects include arrhythmias, e.g. atrioventricular (AV) block, drug-induced long-QT syndrome and torsade de pointes and altered inotropy. Non-cardiac side effects are subsequently discussed grouped by drug class. A better understanding of the risks and side effects of cardiovascular drugs is expected to reduce the mortality and morbidity associated with adverse side effects.

  8. Childhood adversities and psychosis: evidence, challenges, implications

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Craig; Gayer‐Anderson, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    There is a substantial body of research reporting evidence of associations between various forms of childhood adversity and psychosis, across the spectrum from experiences to disorder. This has been extended, more recently, to include studies of cumulative effects, of interactions with other factors, of specific effects, and of putative biological and psychological mechanisms. In this paper we evaluate this research and highlight the remaining methodological issues and gaps that temper, but do not dismiss, conclusions about the causal role of childhood adversity. We also consider the emerging work on cumulative, synergistic, and specific effects and on mechanisms; and discuss the broader implications of this line of research for our understanding of psychosis. We conclude that the current balance of evidence is that childhood adversities – particularly exposure to multiple adversities involving hostility and threat – do, in some people, contribute to the onset of psychotic experiences and psychotic disorders. PMID:27265690

  9. Childhood adversity: a review of measurement instruments.

    PubMed

    Burgermeister, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Measurement instruments are needed to stimulate research on the long-term outcomes of childhood adversity. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to locate, describe, and assess instruments to measure retrospective perceptions of childhood adversity. An electronic search of instruments was conducted using a combination of keywords that included child maltreatment, child trauma, and childhood stressful events. Nine instruments were located and described according to format, definition of childhood adversity as measured by the instrument, characteristics of the sample used in development and testing, reliability and validity evidence, and feasibility for use. Six out of the nine instruments were suitable for investigators who require a comprehensive measure of childhood adversity. Corroboration with independent sources and use of randomized samples are needed to improve upon reports of validity.

  10. RACIAL RESIDENTIAL SEGREGATION AND ADVERSE BIRTH OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    INTRODUCTION. The disparity between black and white women's adverse birth outcomes has been subject to much investigation, yet the factors underlying its persistence remain elusive, which has encouraged research on neighborhood-level influences, including racial residential segr...

  11. Adverse Outcome Pathways: From Definition to Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    A challenge for both human health and ecological toxicologists is the transparent application of mechanistic (e.g., molecular, biochemical, histological) data to risk assessments. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a conceptual framework designed to meet this need. Specifical...

  12. Suppression of Eosinophil Integrins Prevents Remodeling of Airway Smooth Muscle in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Januskevicius, Andrius; Gosens, Reinoud; Sakalauskas, Raimundas; Vaitkiene, Simona; Janulaityte, Ieva; Halayko, Andrew J.; Hoppenot, Deimante; Malakauskas, Kestutis

    2017-01-01

    Background: Airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling is an important component of the structural changes to airways seen in asthma. Eosinophils are the prominent inflammatory cells in asthma, and there is some evidence that they contribute to ASM remodeling via released mediators and direct contact through integrin–ligand interactions. Eosinophils express several types of outer membrane integrin, which are responsible for cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions. In our previous study we demonstrated that asthmatic eosinophils show increased adhesion to ASM cells and it may be important factor contributing to ASM remodeling in asthma. According to these findings, in the present study we investigated the effects of suppression of eosinophil integrin on eosinophil-induced ASM remodeling in asthma. Materials and Methods: Individual combined cell cultures of immortalized human ASM cells and eosinophils from peripheral blood of 22 asthmatic patients and 17 healthy controls were prepared. Eosinophil adhesion was evaluated using eosinophil peroxidase activity assay. Genes expression levels in ASM cells and eosinophils were measured using quantitative real-time PCR. ASM cell proliferation was measured using alamarBlue® solution. Eosinophil integrins were blocked by incubating with Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide. Results: Eosinophils from the asthma group showed increased outer membrane α4β1 and αMβ2 integrin expression, increased adhesion to ASM cells, and overexpression of TGF-β1 compared with eosinophils from the healthy control group. Blockade of eosinophil RGD-binding integrins by Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide significantly reduced adhesion of eosinophils to ASM cells in both groups. Integrin-blocking decreased the effects of eosinophils on TGF-β1, WNT-5a, and extracellular matrix protein gene expression in ASM cells and ASM cell proliferation in both groups. These effects were more pronounced in the asthma group compared with the control group. Conclusion

  13. Design of Adverse Drug Events-Scorecards.

    PubMed

    Marcilly, Romaric; Chazard, Emmanuel; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine; Hackl, Werner; Băceanu, Adrian; Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design of Adverse Drug Event-Scorecards. The scorecards described are innovative and novel, not having previously been reported in the literature. The Scorecards provide organizations (e.g. hospitals) with summary information about Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) using a Web-based platform. The data used in the Scorecards are routinely updated and report on ADEs detected through data mining processes. The development of the ADE Scorecards is ongoing and they are currently undergoing clinical testing.

  14. [Allergies and adverse events associated with fluoroquinolones].

    PubMed

    Muller, Y; Andrey, D; Emonet, S; Harr, T; Spoerl, D

    2015-04-08

    The prescription ot fluoroquinolones has been constantly increasing over the past decade. consequently, an increasing number of hyper-sensitivity reactions and adverse events have been reported. The aim of the review is to discuss the incidence of hypersensitivity reactions either IgE (immediate) or T cells mediated (delayed). We will make an overview ofthe diagnostic tools available to detect such hypersensitivity reactions. Finally, the specific adverse events associated with fluoroquinolones, including tendinopathy, chondrotoxicity, peripheral neuropathy or retinal detachment will be discussed.

  15. Childhood adversity and frequent medical consultations.

    PubMed

    Fiddler, Maggie; Jackson, Judy; Kapur, Navneet; Wells, Adrian; Creed, Francis

    2004-01-01

    We assessed possible psychological mediators of the relationship between childhood adversity and frequent medical consultations among new outpatients at neurology, cardiology, and gastroenterology clinics. We assessed whether these differed in patients with and without organic disease that explained their symptoms. At first clinic visit we recorded Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS--anxiety and depression subscale scores), Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ--four subscales: consequences, cure, identity, timeline), Health Anxiety Questionnaire (total score), and Symptom Amplification Scale (total score). Subjects were divided into two groups according to whether they had experienced any type of childhood adversity using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Schedule. Outcome was the (log) number of medical consultations for 12 months before and 6 months after the index clinic visits. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine mediators; this was performed separately for patients with symptoms explained and not explained by organic disease. One-hundred and twenty-nine patients (61% response) were interviewed. Fifty-two (40.3%) had experienced childhood adversity; they made a median of 16 doctor visits compared with 10 for those without adversity (adjusted P=.026). IPQ identity score (number of symptoms attributed to the illness) and HAD depression scores were significantly associated with both childhood adversity and number of medical consultations and these variables acted as mediators between childhood adversity and frequency of consultation in the multiple regression analyses. This association was limited to patients with medically unexplained symptoms and was mediated by IPQ Identity Score (number of symptoms attributed to the patient's illness) and HAD depression score. Sexual abuse and overt neglect were the adversities most closely associated with frequent consultations. In patients with medically unexplained symptoms the association

  16. Adverse drug reactions in hospitalized Colombian children

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Agudelo, Daniela; Burgos-Flórez, Francisco Javier; Vaca, Claudia; Serrano-Meriño, Dolores Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The occurrence of adverse drug reactions is an important issue due to the lack of drug safety data in children. Objective: To describe the Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatient children under 6 years of age in two general pediatrics wards located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Methods: A prospective cohort study based on intensive pharmacovigilance was conducted during six months in order to monitor the emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions in inpatients children under 6 years of age with at least one medication prescribed. The study was conducted in two pediatric wards of two hospitals located in Barranquilla, Colombia. Naranjo´s Algorithm was used to evaluate imputability, the modified Hartwig and Siegel assessment scale to establish severity and the Schumock and Thornton criteria to determine preventability. Results: Of a total of 772 monitored patients, 156 Adverse Drug Reactions were detected on 147 children. The cumulative incidence of Adverse Drug Reactions was 19.0% (147/772); the incidence density was 37.6 Adverse Drug Reactions per 1,000 patients-days (147/3,913). The frequency was higher in children under 2 years of age (12.7%). Emergence of Adverse Drug Reactions was higher in male patients (RR= 1.66; 95% CI= 1.22-2.22, p= 0.001) and in those who used systemic antibiotics (RR= 1.82; 95% CI= 1.17-2.82, p= 0.005). Conclusions: Adverse Drug Reactions are common among hospitalized children and represent an additional burden of morbidity and risk, particularly in those who used several medicines, including antibiotics. PMID:27821893

  17. Recognizing and reporting adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, L. M.; Colley, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Although physicians in practice are most likely to see patients with adverse drug reactions, they may fail to recognize an adverse effect or to attribute it to a drug effect and, when recognized, they may fail to report serious reactions to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To recognize and attribute an adverse event to a drug effect, physicians should review the patient's clinical course, looking at patient risk factors, the known adverse reactions to the suspected drug, and the likelihood of a causal relationship between the drug and the adverse event-based on the temporal relationship, response to stopping or restarting the drug, and whether other factors could explain the reaction. Once an adverse drug reaction has been identified, the patient should be informed and appropriate documentation made in the patient's medical record. Serious known reactions and all reactions to newly released drugs or those not previously known to occur (even if the certainty is low) should be reported to the FDA. PMID:1536067

  18. Passive ventricular remodeling in cardiac disease: focus on heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Elise L.; Boulaksil, Mohamed; van Rijen, Harold V. M.; Vos, Marc A.; van Veen, Toon A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Passive ventricular remodeling is defined by the process of molecular ventricular adaptation to different forms of cardiac pathophysiology. It includes changes in tissue architecture, such as hypertrophy, fiber disarray, alterations in cell size and fibrosis. Besides that, it also includes molecular remodeling of gap junctions, especially those composed by Connexin43 proteins (Cx43) in the ventricles that affect cell-to-cell propagation of the electrical impulse, and changes in the sodium channels that modify excitability. All those alterations appear mainly in a heterogeneous manner, creating irregular and inhomogeneous electrical and mechanical coupling throughout the heart. This can predispose to reentry arrhythmias and adds to a further deterioration into heart failure. In this review, passive ventricular remodeling is described in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM), Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM), Ischemic Cardiomyopathy (ICM), and Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy (ACM), with a main focus on the heterogeneity of those alterations mentioned above. PMID:25566084

  19. Dynamic regulation of transcription factors by nucleosome remodeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Hada, Arjan; Sen, Payel; Olufemi, Lola; Hall, Michael A; Smith, Benjamin Y; Forth, Scott; McKnight, Jeffrey N; Patel, Ashok; Bowman, Gregory D; Bartholomew, Blaine; Wang, Michelle D

    2015-06-05

    The chromatin landscape and promoter architecture are dominated by the interplay of nucleosome and transcription factor (TF) binding to crucial DNA sequence elements. However, it remains unclear whether nucleosomes mobilized by chromatin remodelers can influence TFs that are already present on the DNA template. In this study, we investigated the interplay between nucleosome remodeling, by either yeast ISW1a or SWI/SNF, and a bound TF. We found that a TF serves as a major barrier to ISW1a remodeling, and acts as a boundary for nucleosome repositioning. In contrast, SWI/SNF was able to slide a nucleosome past a TF, with concurrent eviction of the TF from the DNA, and the TF did not significantly impact the nucleosome positioning. Our results provide direct evidence for a novel mechanism for both nucleosome positioning regulation by bound TFs and TF regulation via dynamic repositioning of nucleosomes.

  20. Remodeling of legacy systems in health care using UML.

    PubMed

    Garde, Sebastian; Knaup, Petra; Herold, Ralf

    2002-01-01

    Research projects in the field of Medical Informatics often involve the development of application systems. Usually they are developed over a longer period of time, so that at a certain point of time a systematically planned reimplementation is necessary. The first step of reimplementation should be a systematic and comprehensive remodeling. When using UML for this task a systematic approach for remodeling activities is missing. Therefore, we developed a method for remodeling of legacy systems (Qumquad) and applied it to DOSPO, a documentation and therapy planning system for pediatric oncology. Qumquad helps to systematically carry out three steps: the modeling of the current actual state of the application system, the systematic identification of weak points and the development of a target concept for reimplementation considering the identified weak points. Results show that this approach is valuable and feasible and could be applied to various application systems in health care.

  1. Dynamic remodeling of microbial biofilms by functionally distinct exopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chew, Su Chuen; Kundukad, Binu; Seviour, Thomas; van der Maarel, Johan R C; Yang, Liang; Rice, Scott A; Doyle, Patrick; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2014-08-