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Sample records for adverse tissue response

  1. An Overview of Vascular Adverse Events Associated With Facial Soft Tissue Fillers: Recognition, Prevention, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ferneini, Elie M; Ferneini, Antoine M

    2016-08-01

    Minimally invasive facial cosmetic surgery procedures have seen an exponential increase in numbers over the past decade. The most commonly performed procedures are neuromodulator and soft tissue filler procedures. Although soft tissue fillers have a high safety and predictability profile, these procedures recently have been associated with serious and dire adverse events. This article will discuss some of the vascular complications associated with facial soft tissue fillers. Management and prevention of these adverse events also will be discussed. PMID:27067061

  2. An upside to adversity?: moderate cumulative lifetime adversity is associated with resilient responses in the face of controlled stressors.

    PubMed

    Seery, Mark D; Leo, Raphael J; Lupien, Shannon P; Kondrak, Cheryl L; Almonte, Jessica L

    2013-07-01

    Despite common findings suggesting that lack of negative life events should be optimal, recent work has revealed a curvilinear pattern, such that some cumulative lifetime adversity is instead associated with optimal well-being. This work, however, is limited in that responses to specific stressors as they occurred were not assessed, thereby precluding investigation of resilience. The current research addressed this critical gap by directly testing the relationship between adversity history and resilience to stressors. Specifically, we used a multimethod approach across two studies to assess responses to controlled laboratory stressors (respectively requiring passive endurance and active instrumental performance). Results revealed hypothesized U-shaped relationships: Relative to a history of either no adversity or nonextreme high adversity, a moderate number of adverse life events was associated with less negative responses to pain and more positive psychophysiological responses while taking a test. These results provide novel evidence in support of adversity-derived propensity for resilience that generalizes across stressors. PMID:23673992

  3. Correction of Adverse Response to Suxamethonium of Susceptible Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lister, David

    1973-01-01

    The adverse response to suxamethonium in susceptible pigs has been shown to be associated with changes in serum free thyroxine index. Pyrexia and acidosis can be controlled by the cautious administration of L-triiodo-thyronine (T-3). Successful correction has been achieved in eight episodes, and in six of these, where it was intended, rapid, uneventful, and complete recovery occurred. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4686556

  4. Diagnosis of adverse local tissue reactions following metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Brian P; Perry, Kevin I; Taunton, Michael J; Mabry, Tad M; Abdel, Matthew P

    2016-03-01

    Metal-on-metal (MOM) bearing surfaces in hip arthroplasty have distinct advantages that led to the increase in popularity in North America in the early 2000s. However, with their increased use, concerns such as local cytotoxicity and hypersensitivity reactions leading to soft tissue damage and cystic mass formation (known collectively as adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR)) became apparent. The clinical presentation of ALTR is highly variable. The diagnosis of ALTR in MOM articulations in hip arthroplasty can be challenging and a combination of clinical presentation, physical examination, implant track record, component positioning, serum metal ion levels, cross-sectional imaging, histopathologic analysis, and consideration of alternative diagnoses are essential. PMID:26816329

  5. Tissue Expander Placement to Prevent the Adverse Intestinal Effects of Radiotherapy in Malignant Pelvic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Shuichiro; Oue, Takaharu; Adachi, Kana; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Nakahata, Kengo; Ueno, Takehisa; Okuyama, Hiroomi

    2016-03-01

    We herein report the findings of 3 patients with primary Ewing sarcoma in a pelvic lesion who underwent the placement of a tissue expander (TE) before radiation therapy to prevent the adverse effects of radiotherapy. The simulation study showed that the TE drastically reduced volume of the intestine that was irradiated at all dose levels. All patients could receive the scheduled dose of radiotherapy without any acute and late complications such as diarrhea, melena, the dislodging of the TE, infection, or the formation of fistulae. In the 4-year (minimum) observation period, we did not observe intestinal complications in any of our patients. TE placement is considered to be a safe and effective method for preventing the adverse effects of radiotherapy in pediatric malignant pelvic tumors. PMID:26479989

  6. Diagnosis and Treatment of Adverse Local Tissue Reactions at the Head-Neck Junction.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Herbert J

    2016-07-01

    Modular junctions in total hip arthroplasty are susceptible to mechanically assisted crevice corrosion, leading to the release of metal wear debris. Adverse local tissue reactions result from an immune-mediated biological reaction to this debris and can have a profound effect on the surrounding periarticular soft tissue envelope. Patients often present with pain or muscle weakness and demonstrate elevated serum cobalt and chromium levels. Serum inflammatory markers and synovial fluid tests help distinguish these reactions from deep infection in the majority of cases; however, the presence of amorphous material or fragmented cells can lead to difficulty in some cases. Advanced cross-sectional imaging is essential in establishing the diagnosis. Early revision surgery is generally the treatment of choice for symptomatic adverse local tissue reaction from corrosion at the modular head-neck junction. The existing stem is retained, and a new ceramic head is placed on the existing trunnion whenever possible. This strategy generally leads to short-term improvement of symptoms with reliable clinical outcomes; however, longer term results are presently lacking. PMID:27113943

  7. Association of Increased Epicardial Adipose Tissue Thickness With Adverse Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chun-Yuan; Lee, Wen-Hsien; Hsu, Po-Chao; Lee, Meng-Kuang; Lee, Hung-Hao; Chiu, Cheng-An; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Chee-Siong; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Su, Ho-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The thickness of epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) was reported to be highly associated with the incidence and severity of atrial fibrillation (AF). This study was conducted to analyze the ability of EAT thickness in predicting adverse cardiovascular (CV) events in AF. In 190 persistent AF patients, we performed a comprehensive transthoracic echocardiographic examination with assessment of EAT thickness. The definition of CV events included CV mortality, hospitalization for heart failure, myocardial infarction, and stroke. There were 69 CV events including 19 CV deaths, 32 hospitalizations for heart failure, 3 myocardial infarctions, and 15 strokes during a mean follow-up of 29 (25th–75th percentile: 17–36) months. The multivariable analysis demonstrates that chronic heart failure, increased left ventricular (LV) mass index and the ratio of transmitral E-wave velocity to early diastolic mitral annulus velocity, decreased body mass index, and increased EAT thickness (per 1-mm increase, odds ratio 1.224, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.096–1.368, P < 0.001) were associated with adverse CV events. Additionally, the addition of EAT thickness to a model containing CHA2DS2-VASc score, left atrial volume index, and LV systolic and diastolic function significantly improved the values in predicting CV events (global χ2 increase 14.65, P < 0.001 and integrated discrimination improvement 0.10, 95% CI 0.04–0.16, P < 0.001). In AF, EAT thickness was useful in predicting adverse CV events. Additionally, EAT thickness could provide incremental value for CV outcome prediction over traditional clinical and echocardiographic parameters in AF. PMID:26986099

  8. Association of Increased Epicardial Adipose Tissue Thickness With Adverse Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chun-Yuan; Lee, Wen-Hsien; Hsu, Po-Chao; Lee, Meng-Kuang; Lee, Hung-Hao; Chiu, Cheng-An; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Chee-Siong; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lai, Wen-Ter; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Su, Ho-Ming

    2016-03-01

    The thickness of epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) was reported to be highly associated with the incidence and severity of atrial fibrillation (AF). This study was conducted to analyze the ability of EAT thickness in predicting adverse cardiovascular (CV) events in AF.In 190 persistent AF patients, we performed a comprehensive transthoracic echocardiographic examination with assessment of EAT thickness. The definition of CV events included CV mortality, hospitalization for heart failure, myocardial infarction, and stroke.There were 69 CV events including 19 CV deaths, 32 hospitalizations for heart failure, 3 myocardial infarctions, and 15 strokes during a mean follow-up of 29 (25th-75th percentile: 17-36) months. The multivariable analysis demonstrates that chronic heart failure, increased left ventricular (LV) mass index and the ratio of transmitral E-wave velocity to early diastolic mitral annulus velocity, decreased body mass index, and increased EAT thickness (per 1-mm increase, odds ratio 1.224, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.096-1.368, P < 0.001) were associated with adverse CV events. Additionally, the addition of EAT thickness to a model containing CHA2DS2-VASc score, left atrial volume index, and LV systolic and diastolic function significantly improved the values in predicting CV events (global χ increase 14.65, P < 0.001 and integrated discrimination improvement 0.10, 95% CI 0.04-0.16, P < 0.001).In AF, EAT thickness was useful in predicting adverse CV events. Additionally, EAT thickness could provide incremental value for CV outcome prediction over traditional clinical and echocardiographic parameters in AF. PMID:26986099

  9. Corrosion and Adverse Local Tissue Reaction in One Type of Modular Neck Stem.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Elie; Ward, Daniel M; Robbins, Claire E; Nandi, Sumon; Bono, James V; Talmo, Carl T

    2015-10-01

    Modular neck stems allow for optimization of joint biomechanics by restoring anteversion, offset, and limb length. A potential disadvantage is the generation of metal ions from fretting and crevice corrosion. We identified 118 total hip arthroplasty implanted with one type of dual-modular femoral component. Thirty-six required revision due to adverse local tissue reaction. Multivariate analysis isolated females and low offset necks as risk factors for failure. Kaplan-Meir analysis revealed small stem sizes failed at a higher rate during early follow-up period. Although the cobalt/chrome levels were higher in the failed group, these tests had low diagnostic accuracy for ALTR, while MRI scan was more sensitive. We conclude that the complications related to the use of dual modular stems of this design outweigh the potential benefits. PMID:26027523

  10. Implant based differences in adverse local tissue reaction in failed total hip arthroplasties: a morphological and immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) is characterized by periprosthetic soft tissue inflammation composed of a mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate, extensive soft tissue necrosis, and vascular changes. Multiple hip implant classes have been reported to result in ALTR, and clinical differences may represent variation in the soft tissue response at the cellular and tissue levels. The purpose of this study was to describe similarities and differences in periprosthetic tissue structure, organization, and cellular composition by conventional histology and immunohistochemistry in ALTR resulting from two common total hip arthroplasty (THA) implant classes. Methods Consecutive patients presenting with ALTR from two major hip implant classes (N = 54 patients with Dual-Modular Neck implant; N = 14 patients with Metal-on-Metal implant) were identified from our prospective Osteolysis Tissue Database and Repository. Clinical characteristics including age, sex, BMI, length of implantation, and serum metal ion levels were recorded. Retrieved synovial tissue morphology was graded using light microscopy and cellular composition was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results Length of implantation was shorter in the DMN group versus MoM THA group (21.3 [8.4] months versus 43.6 [13.8] months respectively; p < 0.005) suggesting differences in implant performance. Morphologic examination revealed a common spectrum of neo-synovial proliferation and necrosis in both groups. Macrophages were more commonly present in diffuse sheets (Grade 3) in the MoM relative to DMN group (p = 0.016). Perivascular lymphocytes with germinal centers (Grade 4) were more common in the DMN group, which trended towards significance (p = 0.066). Qualitative differences in corrosion product morphology were seen between the two groups. Immunohistochemistry showed features of a CD4 and GATA-3 rich lymphocyte reaction in both implants, with increased ratios of perivascular T

  11. Functional brown adipose tissue limits cardiomyocyte injury and adverse remodeling in catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Thoonen, Robrecht; Ernande, Laura; Cheng, Juan; Nagasaka, Yasuko; Yao, Vincent; Miranda-Bezerra, Alexandre; Chen, Chan; Chao, Wei; Panagia, Marcello; Sosnovik, David E; Puppala, Dheeraj; Armoundas, Antonis A; Hindle, Allyson; Bloch, Kenneth D; Buys, Emmanuel S; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle

    2015-07-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has well recognized thermogenic properties mediated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1); more recently, BAT has been demonstrated to modulate cardiovascular risk factors. To investigate whether BAT also affects myocardial injury and remodeling, UCP1-deficient (UCP1(-/-)) mice, which have dysfunctional BAT, were subjected to catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy. At baseline, there were no differences in echocardiographic parameters, plasma cardiac troponin I (cTnI) or myocardial fibrosis between wild-type (WT) and UCP1(-/-) mice. Isoproterenol infusion increased cTnI and myocardial fibrosis and induced left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in both WT and UCP1(-/-) mice. UCP1(-/-) mice also demonstrated exaggerated myocardial injury, fibrosis, and adverse remodeling, as well as decreased survival. Transplantation of WT BAT to UCP1(-/-) mice prevented the isoproterenol-induced cTnI increase and improved survival, whereas UCP1(-/-) BAT transplanted to either UCP1(-/-) or WT mice had no effect on cTnI release. After 3 days of isoproterenol treatment, phosphorylated AKT and ERK were lower in the LV's of UCP1(-/-) mice than in those of WT mice. Activation of BAT was also noted in a model of chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy, and was correlated to LV dysfunction. Deficiency in UCP1, and accompanying BAT dysfunction, increases cardiomyocyte injury and adverse LV remodeling, and decreases survival in a mouse model of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy. Myocardial injury and decreased survival are rescued by transplantation of functional BAT to UCP1(-/-) mice, suggesting a systemic cardioprotective role of functional BAT. BAT is also activated in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25968336

  12. Ingestion of gallium phosphide nanowires has no adverse effect on Drosophila tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolfsson, Karl; Schneider, Martina; Hammarin, Greger; Häcker, Udo; Prinz, Christelle N.

    2013-07-01

    Engineered nanoparticles have been under increasing scrutiny in recent years. High aspect ratio nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes and nanowires have raised safety concerns due to their geometrical similarity to asbestos fibers. III-V epitaxial semiconductor nanowires are expected to be utilized in devices such as LEDs and solar cells and will thus be available to the public. In addition, clean-room staff fabricating and characterizing the nanowires are at risk of exposure, emphasizing the importance of investigating their possible toxicity. Here we investigated the effects of gallium phosphide nanowires on the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila larvae and/or adults were exposed to gallium phosphide nanowires by ingestion with food. The toxicity and tissue interaction of the nanowires was evaluated by investigating tissue distribution, activation of immune response, genome-wide gene expression, life span, fecundity and somatic mutation rates. Our results show that gallium phosphide nanowires applied through the diet are not taken up into Drosophila tissues, do not elicit a measurable immune response or changes in genome-wide gene expression and do not significantly affect life span or somatic mutation rate.

  13. Tissue response to peritoneal implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picha, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    Peritoneal implants were fabricated from poly 2-OH, ethyl methacrylate (HEMA), polyetherurethane (polytetramethylene glycol 1000 MW, 1,4 methylene disocynate, and ethyl diamine), and untreated and sputter treated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The sputter treated PTFE implants were produced by an 8 cm diameter argon ion source. The treated samples consisted of ion beam sputter polished samples, sputter etched samples (to produce a microscopic surface cone texture) and surface pitted samples (produced by ion beam sputtering to result in 50 microns wide by 100 microns deep square pits). These materials were implanted in rats for periods ranging from 30 minutes to 14 days. The results were evaluated with regard to cell type and attachment kinetics onto the different materials. Scanning electron microscopy and histological sections were also evaluated. In general the smooth hydrophobic surfaces attracted less cells than the ion etched PTFE or the HEMA samples. The ion etching was observed to enhance cell attachment, multinucleated giant cell (MNGC) formation, cell to cell contact, and fibrous capsule formation. The cell responsed in the case of ion etched PTFE to an altered surface morphology. However, equally interesting was the similar attachment kinetics of HEMA verses the ion etched PTFE. However, HEMA resulted in a markedly different response with no MNGC's formation, minimal to no capsule formation, and sample coverage by a uniform cell layer.

  14. Adverse Events in Connective Tissue Disease–Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Rennie L.; Gabler, Nicole B.; Praestgaard, Amy; Merkel, Peter A.; Kawut, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with connective tissue disease (CTD)–associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have a poorer prognosis compared to those with idiopathic PAH, but little is known about the differences in treatment-related adverse events (AEs) and serious adverse events (SAEs) between these groups. This study was undertaken to characterize these differences. Methods Individual patient-level data from 10 randomized controlled trials of therapies for PAH were obtained from the US Food and Drug Administration. Patients diagnosed as having either CTD-associated PAH or idiopathic PAH were included. A treatment-by-diagnosis interaction term was used to examine whether the effect of treatment on occurrence of AEs differed between patients with CTD-associated PAH and those with idiopathic PAH. Studies were pooled using fixed-effect models. Results The study sample included 2,370 participants: 716 with CTD-associated PAH and 1,654 with idiopathic PAH. In the active treatment group compared to the placebo group, the risk of AEs was higher among patients with CTD-associated PAH than among those with idiopathic PAH (odds ratio [OR] 1.57, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.00–2.47 versus OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.69–1.26; P for interaction = 0.061), but there was no difference in the risk of SAEs in analyses adjusted for age, race, sex, hemodynamic findings, and laboratory values. Despite the higher occurrence of AEs in patients with CTD-associated PAH assigned to active therapy compared to those receiving placebo, the risk of drug discontinuation due to an AE was similar to that in patients with idiopathic PAH assigned to active therapy (P for interaction = 0.27). Conclusion Patients with CTD-associated PAH experienced more treatment-related AEs compared to those with idiopathic PAH in therapeutic clinical trials. These findings suggest that the overall benefit of advanced therapies for PAH may be attenuated by the greater frequency of AEs. PMID:26016953

  15. Cumulative Adversity Sensitizes Neural Response to Acute Stress: Association with Health Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dongju; Tsou, Kristen A; Ansell, Emily B; Potenza, Marc N; Sinha, Rajita

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative adversity (CA) increases stress sensitivity and risk of adverse health outcomes. However, neural mechanisms underlying these associations in humans remain unclear. To understand neural responses underlying the link between CA and adverse health symptoms, the current study assessed brain activity during stress and neutral-relaxing states in 75 demographically matched, healthy individuals with high, mid, and low CA (25 in each group), and their health symptoms using the Cornell Medical Index. CA was significantly associated with greater adverse health symptoms (P=0.01) in all participants. Functional magnetic resonance imaging results indicated significant associations between CA scores and increased stress-induced activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex, insula, striatum, right amygdala, hippocampus, and temporal regions in all 75 participants (p<0.05, whole-brain corrected). In addition to these regions, the high vs low CA group comparison revealed decreased stress-induced activity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in the high CA group (p<0.01, whole-brain corrected). Specifically, hypoactive medial OFC and hyperactive right hippocampus responses to stress were each significantly associated with greater adverse health symptoms (p<0.01). Furthermore, an inverse correlation was found between activity in the medial OFC and right hippocampus (p=0.01). These results indicate that high CA sensitizes limbic–striatal responses to acute stress and also identifies an important role for stress-related medial OFC and hippocampus responses in the effects of CA on increasing vulnerability to adverse health consequences. PMID:24051900

  16. Adverse tissue reaction to corrosion at the neck-stem junction after modular primary total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Gkagkalis, G; Mettraux, P; Omoumi, P; Mischler, S; Rüdiger, H A

    2015-02-01

    Complications related to the neck-stem junction of modular stems used for total hip arthroplasty (THA) are generating increasing concern. A 74-year-old male had increasing pain and a cutaneous reaction around the scar 1 year after THA with a modular neck-stem. Imaging revealed osteolysis of the calcar and a pseudo-tumour adjacent to the neck-stem junction. Serum cobalt levels were elevated. Revision surgery to exchange the stem and liner and to resect the pseudo-tumour was performed. Analysis of the stem by scanning electron microscopy and by energy dispersive X-ray and white light interferometry showed fretting corrosion at the neck-stem junction contrasting with minimal changes at the head-neck junction. Thus, despite dry assembly of the neck and stem on the back table at primary THA, full neck-stem contact was not achieved, and the resulting micromotion at the interface led to fretting corrosion. This case highlights the mechanism of fretting corrosion at the neck-stem interface responsible for adverse local tissue reactions. Clinical and radiological follow-up is mandatory in patients with dual-modular stems. PMID:25620029

  17. Resin luting materials: Tissue response in dog's teeth.

    PubMed

    Bezzon, Osvaldo L; Rivera, Daniella S H; Silva, Raquel A B; Oliveira, Daniela S B; Silva-Herzog, Daniel; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Lucisano, Marília P; Silva, Léa A B

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate radiographically and histologically the pulpal and periapical response to self-adhesive (Rely X™ Unicem) and self-etching and self-curing (Multilink(®)) resin-based luting materials in deep cavities in dogs' teeth. Deep class V cavities (0.5-mm-thick dentin) were prepared in 60 canine premolars and the following materials were applied on cavity floor: Groups I/V-RelyX™ Unicem; Groups II/VI-Multilink(®); Groups III/VII-zinc phosphate cement (control) and; Groups IV/VIII-gutta-percha (control). Cavities were restored with silver amalgam. Animals were euthanized after 10 days (groups I-IV) and 90 days (groups V-VIII). Tooth/bone blocks were radiographed and processed for histopathological evaluation of pulp and periapical tissue response to the materials. All materials presented similar histopathological features and radiographic findings at both periods. The pulp tissue was intact. The apical and periapical regions and periodontal ligament thickness were normal. No inflammatory cells, resorption of mineralized tissue (dentin, cementum, and alveolar bone) or bacteria were observed. The lamina dura was intact and no areas of periapical bone rarefaction or internal/external root resorption were observed radiographically. It can be concluded that Rely X™ Unicem and Multilink(®) caused no adverse tissue reactions and may be indicated for cementation of indirect restorations in deep dentin cavities without pulp exposure. PMID:26497153

  18. Baby on board: do responses to stress in the maternal brain mediate adverse pregnancy outcome?

    PubMed

    Douglas, Alison J

    2010-07-01

    Stress and adverse environmental surroundings result in suboptimal conditions in a pregnant mother such that she may experience poor pregnancy outcome including complete pregnancy failure and preterm labor. Furthermore her developing baby is at risk of adverse programming, which confers susceptibility to long term ill health. While some mechanisms at the feto-maternal interface underlying these conditions are understood, the underlying cause for their adverse adaptation is often not clear. Progesterone plays a key role at many levels, including control of neuroendocrine responses to stress, procuring the required immune balance and controlling placental and decidual function, and lack of progesterone can explain many of the unwanted consequences of stress. How stress that is perceived by the mother inhibits progesterone secretion and action is beginning to be investigated. This overview of maternal neuroendocrine responses to stress throughout pregnancy analyses how they interact to compromise progesterone secretion and precipitate undesirable effects in mother and offspring. PMID:20546772

  19. Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronical epithelial cells exposed to zinc

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to zincJenna M. Currier1,2, Wan-Yun Cheng1, Rory Conolly1, Brian N. Chorley1Zinc is a ubiquitous contaminant of ambient air that presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung...

  20. Adverse health consequences of US Government responses to the 2001 terrorist attacks.

    PubMed

    Levy, Barry S; Sidel, Victor W

    2011-09-01

    In response to the attacks on Sept 11, 2001 (9/11), and the related security concerns, the USA and its coalition partners began a war in Afghanistan and subsequently invaded Iraq. The wars caused many deaths of non-combatant civilians, further damaged the health-supporting infrastructure and the environment (already adversely affected by previous wars), forced many people to migrate, led to violations of human rights, and diverted resources away from important health needs. After 9/11 and the anthrax outbreak shortly afterwards, the USA and other countries have improved emergency preparedness and response capabilities, but these actions have often diverted attention and resources from more urgent health issues. The documentation and dissemination of information about the adverse health effects of these wars and about the diversion of resources could help to mitigate these consequences and prevent their recurrence. PMID:21890059

  1. Assessment on the adverse effects of Aminoglycosides and Flouroquinolone on sperm parameters and male reproductive tissue: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Khaki, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic therapies used in treatment of many diseases have adverse effects on fertility. This review analyzes previous comparative studies that surveyed the effects of two common groups of antibiotics on male fertility. Objective: To evaluate histo-pathological effects of fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides on sperm parameters and male reproductive tissue. Materials and Methods: Articles about the effects of aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones on male infertility, sperm parameters, male reproductive tissue, and spermatogenesis in English and Persian languages published on Google Scholar and PubMed databases from January 2000 to December 2013 were assessed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of aminoglycosides or fluoroquinolones on sperm parameters, artificial insemination, and male reproductive tract or RCTs comparing aminoglycosides vs. fluoroquinolones were eligible for inclusion. For ascertaining the reliability of study, data were extracted independently and in duplicate by two investigators. Results: Sperm viability was decreased significantly with streptomycin, gentamicin, and neomycin (p<0.001). Sperm motility was decreased significantly with gentamicin and neomycin (p<0.05). Total sperm count was significantly decreased with ofloxacin, gentamicin, streptomycin, and neomycin (p<0.022). There was significant decrease in post-thawing motility with low dose and high dose of ciprofloxacin. Testis weight was decreased with gentamicin and ofloxacin significantly (p<0.011). There was significant decrease in seminal vesicle weight with gentamicin, neomycin, and ofloxacin (p<0.022). Furthermore, changes in epididymis weight, percentage of total apoptotic cells, and diameter of seminiferous tubule were significant with all drugs including streptomycin, gentamicin, neomycin, and ofloxacin (p<0.05). Conclusion: Streptomycin has less negative effects on cell’s apoptosis and sperm parameters as compared to other drugs. Gentamicin

  2. Management of immune-related adverse events and kinetics of response with ipilimumab.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jeffrey S; Kähler, Katharina C; Hauschild, Axel

    2012-07-20

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against the immune checkpoint protein cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4; CD152)-ipilimumab and tremelimumab-have been investigated in metastatic melanoma and other cancers and have shown promising results. Recently, ipilimumab was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. We review the literature on managing the adverse effects and kinetics of tumor regression with ipilimumab and provide guidelines on their management. During treatment with these antibodies, a unique set of adverse effects may occur, called immune-related adverse events (irAEs). These include rashes, which may rarely progress to life-threatening toxic epidermal necrolysis, and colitis, characterized by a mild to moderate, but occasionally also severe and persistent diarrhea. Hypophysitis, hepatitis, pancreatitis, iridocyclitis, lymphadenopathy, neuropathies, and nephritis have also been reported with ipilimumab. Early recognition of irAEs and initiation of treatment are critical to reduce the risk of sequelae. Interestingly, irAEs correlated with treatment response in some studies. Unique kinetics of response have been observed with CTLA-4 blockade with at least four patterns: (1) response in baseline lesions by week 12, with no new lesions seen; (2) stable disease, followed by a slow, steady decline in total tumor burden; (3) regression of tumor after initial increase in total tumor burden; and (4) reduction in total tumor burden during or after the appearance of new lesion(s) after week 12. We provide a detailed description of irAEs and recommendations for practicing oncologists who are managing them, along with the unusual kinetics of response associated with ipilimumab therapy. PMID:22614989

  3. Business oriented EU human cell and tissue product legislation will adversely impact Member States' health care systems.

    PubMed

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Vanderkelen, Alain; De Vos, Daniel; Draye, Jean-Pierre; Rose, Thomas; Ceulemans, Carl; Ectors, Nadine; Huys, Isabelle; Jennes, Serge; Verbeken, Gilbert

    2013-12-01

    The transplantation of conventional human cell and tissue grafts, such as heart valve replacements and skin for severely burnt patients, has saved many lives over the last decades. The late eighties saw the emergence of tissue engineering with the focus on the development of biological substitutes that restore or improve tissue function. In the nineties, at the height of the tissue engineering hype, industry incited policymakers to create a European regulatory environment, which would facilitate the emergence of a strong single market for tissue engineered products and their starting materials (human cells and tissues). In this paper we analyze the elaboration process of this new European Union (EU) human cell and tissue product regulatory regime-i.e. the EU Cell and Tissue Directives (EUCTDs) and the Advanced Therapy Medicinal Product (ATMP) Regulation and evaluate its impact on Member States' health care systems. We demonstrate that the successful lobbying on key areas of regulatory and policy processes by industry, in congruence with Europe's risk aversion and urge to promote growth and jobs, led to excessively business oriented legislation. Expensive industry oriented requirements were introduced and contentious social and ethical issues were excluded. We found indications that this new EU safety and health legislation will adversely impact Member States' health care systems; since 30 December 2012 (the end of the ATMP transitional period) there is a clear threat to the sustainability of some lifesaving and established ATMPs that were provided by public health institutions and small and medium-sized enterprises under the frame of the EUCTDs. In the light of the current economic crisis it is not clear how social security systems will cope with the inflation of costs associated with this new regulatory regime and how priorities will be set with regard to reimbursement decisions. We argue that the ATMP Regulation should urgently be revised to focus on delivering

  4. The Symmetry of Adverse Local Tissue Reactions in Patients with Bilateral Simultaneous and Sequential ASR Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Madanat, Rami; Hussey, Daniel K; Donahue, Gabrielle S; Potter, Hollis G; Wallace, Robert; Bragdon, Charles R; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Malchau, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether patients with bilateral metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements have symmetric adverse local tissue reactions (ALTRs) at follow-up. An MRI of both hips was performed at a mean time of six years after surgery in 43 patients. The prevalence and severity of ALTRs were found to be similar in simultaneous hips but differences were observed in sequential hips. The order and timing of sequential hip arthroplasties did not affect the severity of ALTRs. Thus, in addition to metal ion exposure from an earlier MoM implant other factors may also play a role in the progression of ALTRs. Bilateral implants should be given special consideration in risk stratification algorithms for management of patients with MoM hip arthroplasty. PMID:26055146

  5. Adverse events to monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy: Focus on hypersensitivity responses.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Brian A

    2013-10-01

    Fifteen monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently registered and approved for the treatment of a range of different cancers. These mAbs are specific for a limited number of targets (9 in all). Four of these molecules are indeed directed against the B-lymphocyte antigen CD20; 3 against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 or ErbB2), 2 against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and 1 each against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD30, CD52, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily, member 11 (TNFSF11, best known as RANKL), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4). Collectively, the mAbs provoke a wide variety of systemic and cutaneous adverse events including the full range of true hypersensitivities: Type I immediate reactions (anaphylaxis, urticaria); Type II reactions (immune thrombocytopenia, neutopenia, hemolytic anemia); Type III responses (vasculitis, serum sickness; some pulmonary adverse events); and Type IV delayed mucocutaneous reactions as well as infusion reactions/cytokine release syndrome (IRs/CRS), tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and cardiac events. Although the term "hypersensitivity" is widely used, no common definition has been adopted within and between disciplines and the requirement of an immunological basis for a true hypersensitivity reaction is sometimes overlooked. Consequently, some drug-induced adverse events are sometimes incorrectly described as "hypersensitivities" while others that should be described are not. PMID:24251081

  6. 41 CFR 102-78.40 - What responsibilities do Federal agencies have when an undertaking adversely affects a historic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... guidance on the protection of historic and cultural properties in 36 CFR part 800. ... Federal agencies have when an undertaking adversely affects a historic or cultural property? 102-78.40...-78.40 What responsibilities do Federal agencies have when an undertaking adversely affects a...

  7. Mechanistic and dose considerations for supporting adverse pulmonary physiology in response to formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Chad M. Subramaniam, Ravi P.; Grafstroem, Roland C.

    2008-12-15

    Induction of airway hyperresponsiveness and asthma from formaldehyde inhalation exposure remains a debated and controversial issue. Yet, recent evidences on pulmonary biology and the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of formaldehyde lend support for such adverse effects. Specifically, altered thiol biology from accelerated enzymatic reduction of the endogenous bronchodilator S-nitrosoglutathione and pulmonary inflammation from involvement of Th2-mediated immune responses might serve as key events and cooperate in airway pathophysiology. Understanding what role these mechanisms play in various species and lifestages (e.g., child vs. adult) could be crucial for making more meaningful inter- and intra-species dosimetric extrapolations in human health risk assessment.

  8. History of Childhood Adversity is Positively Associated with Ventral Striatal Dopamine Responses to Amphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Oswald, Lynn M.; Wand, Gary S.; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Wong, Dean F.; Zhu, Shijun; Brasic, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood exposure to severe or chronic trauma is an important risk factor for the later development of adult mental health problems, such as substance abuse. Even in nonclinical samples of healthy adults, persons with a history of significant childhood adversity seem to experience greater psychological distress than those without this history. Evidence from rodent studies suggests that early life stress may impair dopamine function in ways that increase risks for drug abuse. However, the degree to which these findings translate to other species remains unclear. This study was conducted to examine associations between childhood adversity and dopamine and subjective responses to amphetamine in humans. Following intake assessment, 28 healthy male and female adults, ages 18–29 years, underwent two consecutive 90-minute positron emission tomography (PET) studies with high specific activity [11C]raclopride. The first scan was preceded by intravenous saline; the second by amphetamine (AMPH 0.3 mg/kg). Consistent with prior literature, findings showed positive associations between childhood trauma and current levels of perceived stress. Moreover, greater number of traumatic events and higher levels of perceived stress were each associated with higher ventral striatal dopamine responses to AMPH. Findings of mediation analyses further showed that a portion of the relationship between childhood trauma and dopamine release may be mediated by perceived stress. Overall, results are consistent with preclinical findings suggesting that early trauma may lead to enhanced sensitivity to psychostimulants and that this mechanism may underlie increased vulnerability for drug abuse. PMID:24448898

  9. Evidence Report: Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Sams, Clarence F.

    2013-01-01

    The Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response is identified by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Human Research Program (HRP) as a recognized risk to human health and performance in space. The HRP Program Requirements Document (PRD) defines these risks. This Evidence Report provides a summary of the evidence that has been used to identify and characterize this risk. It is known that human immune function is altered in- and post-flight, but it is unclear at present if such alterations lead to increased susceptibility to disease. Reactivation of latent viruses has been documented in crewmembers, although this reactivation has not been directly correlated with immune changes or with observed diseases. As described in this report, further research is required to better characterize the relationships between altered immune response and susceptibility to disease during and after spaceflight. This is particularly important for future deep-space exploration missions.

  10. Sex differences in metabolic and adipose tissue responses to juvenile-onset obesity in sheep.

    PubMed

    Bloor, Ian D; Sébert, Sylvain P; Saroha, Vivek; Gardner, David S; Keisler, Duane H; Budge, Helen; Symonds, Michael E; Mahajan, Ravi P

    2013-10-01

    Sex is a major factor determining adipose tissue distribution and the subsequent adverse effects of obesity-related disease including type 2 diabetes. The role of gender on juvenile obesity and the accompanying metabolic and inflammatory responses is not well established. Using an ovine model of juvenile onset obesity induced by reduced physical activity, we examined the effect of gender on metabolic, circulatory, and related inflammatory and energy-sensing profiles of the major adipose tissue depots. Despite a similar increase in fat mass with obesity between genders, males demonstrated a higher storage capacity of lipids within perirenal-abdominal adipocytes and exhibited raised insulin. In contrast, obese females became hypercortisolemic, a response that was positively correlated with central fat mass. Analysis of gene expression in perirenal-abdominal adipose tissue demonstrated the stimulation of inflammatory markers in males, but not females, with obesity. Obese females displayed increased expression of genes involved in the glucocorticoid axis and energy sensing in perirenal-abdominal, but not omental, adipose tissue, indicating a depot-specific mechanism that may be protective from the adverse effects of metabolic dysfunction and inflammation. In conclusion, young males are at a greater risk than females to the onset of comorbidities associated with juvenile-onset obesity. These sex-specific differences in cortisol and adipose tissue could explain the earlier onset of the metabolic-related diseases in males compared with females after obesity. PMID:23885012

  11. A Systematic Literature Review of Adverse Events Associated with Systemic Treatments Used in Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahnaz; Hackshaw, Michelle D.; Oglesby, Alan; Kaye, James A.; Skolnik, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    This systematic literature review describes adverse events (AEs) among patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) who received second-line or later anticancer therapies. Searches were conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for studies of adults with advanced or metastatic STS who received systemic anticancer therapy before enrollment in a randomized-controlled trial of pazopanib, another targeted cancer agent, or cytotoxic chemotherapy. Of 204 publications identified, seven articles representing six unique studies met inclusion criteria. Additional safety results for pazopanib were identified on ClinicalTrials.gov. Hematologic toxicities were common with all therapies evaluated (pazopanib, trabectedin, dacarbazine ± gemcitabine, gemcitabine ± docetaxel, cyclophosphamide, and ifosfamide). Studies differed in AE type, timing of assessment, and outcomes reported, although patient populations and AE assessment timing were relatively similar for pazopanib and trabectedin. AEs that were more common with trabectedin than pazopanib were anemia, neutropenia, nausea/vomiting, and elevations in aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. An AE that was more common with pazopanib than trabectedin was anorexia. Only the pazopanib study reported AE frequencies versus placebo. A planned meta-analysis was not feasible, as there was no common comparator. More well-designed studies that include common comparators are needed for comparison of safety effects among treatments for STS. PMID:27516726

  12. A Systematic Literature Review of Adverse Events Associated with Systemic Treatments Used in Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Colosia, Ann; Khan, Shahnaz; Hackshaw, Michelle D; Oglesby, Alan; Kaye, James A; Skolnik, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    This systematic literature review describes adverse events (AEs) among patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) who received second-line or later anticancer therapies. Searches were conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for studies of adults with advanced or metastatic STS who received systemic anticancer therapy before enrollment in a randomized-controlled trial of pazopanib, another targeted cancer agent, or cytotoxic chemotherapy. Of 204 publications identified, seven articles representing six unique studies met inclusion criteria. Additional safety results for pazopanib were identified on ClinicalTrials.gov. Hematologic toxicities were common with all therapies evaluated (pazopanib, trabectedin, dacarbazine ± gemcitabine, gemcitabine ± docetaxel, cyclophosphamide, and ifosfamide). Studies differed in AE type, timing of assessment, and outcomes reported, although patient populations and AE assessment timing were relatively similar for pazopanib and trabectedin. AEs that were more common with trabectedin than pazopanib were anemia, neutropenia, nausea/vomiting, and elevations in aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. An AE that was more common with pazopanib than trabectedin was anorexia. Only the pazopanib study reported AE frequencies versus placebo. A planned meta-analysis was not feasible, as there was no common comparator. More well-designed studies that include common comparators are needed for comparison of safety effects among treatments for STS. PMID:27516726

  13. Sexually Dimorphic Responses to Early Adversity: Implications for Affective Problems and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Pfaff, Donald

    2014-01-01

    During gestation, development proceeds at a pace that is unmatched by any other stage of the lifecycle. For these reason the human fetus is particularly susceptible not only to organizing influences, but also to pathogenic disorganizing influences. Growing evidence suggests that exposure to prenatal adversity leads to neurological changes that underlie lifetime risks for mental illness. Beginning early in gestation, males and females show differential developmental trajectories and responses to stress. It is likely that sex-dependent organization of neural circuits during the fetal period influences differential vulnerability to mental health problems. We consider in this review evidence that sexually dimorphic responses to early life stress are linked to two developmental disorders: affective problems (greater female prevalence) and autism spectrum disorder (greater male prevalence). Recent prospective studies illustrating the neurodevelopmental consequences of fetal exposure to stress and stress hormones for males and females are considered here. Plausible biological mechanisms including the role of the sexually differentiated placenta are discussed. We consider in this review evidence that sexually dimorphic responses to early life stress are linked to two sets of developmental disorders: affective problems (greater female prevalence) and autism spectrum disorders (greater male prevalence). PMID:25038479

  14. Response to self antigen imprints regulatory memory in tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Gratz, Iris K.; Paw, Jonathan S.; Lee, Karen; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Abbas, Abul K.

    2012-01-01

    Immune homeostasis in tissues is achieved through a delicate balance between pathogenic T cell responses directed at tissue-specific antigens and the ability of the tissue to inhibit these responses. The mechanisms by which tissues and the immune system communicate to establish and maintain immune homeostasis are currently unknown. Clinical evidence suggests that chronic or repeated exposure to self antigen within tissues leads to an attenuation of pathologic autoimmune responses, possibly as a means to mitigate inflammatory damage and preserve function. Many human organ-specific autoimmune diseases are characterized by the initial presentation of the disease being the most severe, with subsequent flares being of lesser severity and duration1. In fact, these diseases often spontaneously resolve, despite persistent tissue autoantigen expression2. In the practice of antigen-specific immunotherapy (antigen-SIT), allergens or self antigens are repeatedly injected in the skin, with a diminution of the inflammatory response occurring after each successive exposure3. Although these findings suggest that tissues acquire the ability to attenuate autoimmune reactions upon repeated responses to antigens, the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we show that upon expression of self antigen in a peripheral tissue, thymus-derived regulatory T cells (Treg cells) become activated, proliferate and differentiate into more potent suppressors, which mediate resolution of organ-specific autoimmunity. After resolution of the inflammatory response, activated Treg cells are maintained in the target tissue and are primed to attenuate subsequent autoimmune reactions when antigen is re-expressed. Thus, Treg cells function to confer ‘regulatory memory’ to the target tissue. These findings provide a framework for understanding how Treg cells respond when exposed to self antigen in peripheral tissues and offer mechanistic insight into how tissues regulate autoimmunity. PMID

  15. Factors influencing adverse skin responses in rats receiving repeated subcutaneous injections and potential impact on neurobehavior

    PubMed Central

    Levoe, S. Nikki; Flannery, Brenna M.; Brignolo, Laurie; Imai, Denise M.; Koehne, Amanda; Austin, Adam T.; Bruun, Donald A.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated subcutaneous (s.c.) injection is a common route of administration in chronic studies of neuroactive compounds. However, in a pilot study we noted a significant incidence of skin abnormalities in adult male Long-Evans rats receiving daily s.c. injections of peanut oil (1.0 ml/kg) in the subscapular region for 21 d. Histopathological analyses of the lesions were consistent with a foreign body reaction. Subsequent studies were conducted to determine factors that influenced the incidence or severity of skin abnormalities, and whether these adverse skin reactions influenced a specific neurobehavioral outcome. Rats injected daily for 21 d with food grade peanut oil had an earlier onset and greater incidence of skin abnormalities relative to rats receiving an equal volume (1.0 ml/kg/d) of reagent grade peanut oil or triglyceride of coconut oil. Skin abnormalities in animals injected daily with peanut oil were increased in animals housed on corncob versus paper bedding. Comparison of animals obtained from different barrier facilities exposed to the same injection paradigm (reagent grade peanut oil, 1.0 ml/kg/d s.c.) revealed significant differences in the severity of skin abnormalities. However, animals from different barrier facilities did not perform differently in a Pavlovian fear conditioning task. Collectively, these data suggest that environmental factors influence the incidence and severity of skin abnormalities following repeated s.c. injections, but that these adverse skin responses do not significantly influence performance in at least one test of learning and memory. PMID:25705100

  16. Host Responses in Tissue Repair and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Jeremy S.; Lupher, Mark; Thannickal, Victor J.

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblasts accumulate in the spaces between organ structures and produce extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, including collagen I. They are the primary “effector” cells in tissue remodeling and fibrosis. Previously, leukocyte progenitors termed fibrocytes and myofibroblasts generated from epithelial cells through epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were considered the primary sources of ECM-producing myofibroblasts in injured tissues. However, genetic fate mapping experiments suggest that mesenchyme-derived cells, known as resident fibroblasts, and pericytes are the primary precursors of scar-forming myofibroblasts, whereas epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and myeloid leukocytes contribute to fibrogenesis predominantly by producing key fibrogenic cytokines and by promoting cell-to-cell communication. Numerous cytokines derived from T cells, macrophages, and other myeloid cell populations are important drivers of myofibroblast differentiation. Monocyte-derived cell populations are key regulators of the fibrotic process: They act as a brake on the processes driving fibrogenesis, and they dismantle and degrade established fibrosis. We discuss the origins, modes of activation, and fate of myofibroblasts in various important fibrotic diseases and describe how manipulation of macrophage activation could help ameliorate fibrosis. PMID:23092186

  17. Free radical functionalization of surfaces to prevent adverse responses to biomedical devices

    PubMed Central

    Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Bax, Daniel V.; Kondyurin, Alexey; Yin, Yongbai; Nosworthy, Neil J.; Fisher, Keith; Waterhouse, Anna; Weiss, Anthony S.; dos Remedios, Cristobal G.; McKenzie, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Immobilizing a protein, that is fully compatible with the patient, on the surface of a biomedical device should make it possible to avoid adverse responses such as inflammation, rejection, or excessive fibrosis. A surface that strongly binds and does not denature the compatible protein is required. Hydrophilic surfaces do not induce denaturation of immobilized protein but exhibit a low binding affinity for protein. Here, we describe an energetic ion-assisted plasma process that can make any surface hydrophilic and at the same time enable it to covalently immobilize functional biological molecules. We show that the modification creates free radicals that migrate to the surface from a reservoir beneath. When they reach the surface, the radicals form covalent bonds with biomolecules. The kinetics and number densities of protein molecules in solution and free radicals in the reservoir control the time required to form a full protein monolayer that is covalently bound. The shelf life of the covalent binding capability is governed by the initial density of free radicals and the depth of the reservoir. We show that the high reactivity of the radicals renders the binding universal across all biological macromolecules. Because the free radical reservoir can be created on any solid material, this approach can be used in medical applications ranging from cardiovascular stents to heart-lung machines. PMID:21844370

  18. Low Concentrations of Silver Nanoparticles in Biosolids Cause Adverse Ecosystem Responses under Realistic Field Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Colman, Benjamin P.; Arnaout, Christina L.; Anciaux, Sarah; Gunsch, Claudia K.; Hochella, Michael F.; Kim, Bojeong; Lowry, Gregory V.; McGill, Bonnie M.; Reinsch, Brian C.; Richardson, Curtis J.; Unrine, Jason M.; Wright, Justin P.; Yin, Liyan; Bernhardt, Emily S.

    2013-01-01

    A large fraction of engineered nanomaterials in consumer and commercial products will reach natural ecosystems. To date, research on the biological impacts of environmental nanomaterial exposures has largely focused on high-concentration exposures in mechanistic lab studies with single strains of model organisms. These results are difficult to extrapolate to ecosystems, where exposures will likely be at low-concentrations and which are inhabited by a diversity of organisms. Here we show adverse responses of plants and microorganisms in a replicated long-term terrestrial mesocosm field experiment following a single low dose of silver nanoparticles (0.14 mg Ag kg−1 soil) applied via a likely route of exposure, sewage biosolid application. While total aboveground plant biomass did not differ between treatments receiving biosolids, one plant species, Microstegium vimeneum, had 32 % less biomass in the Slurry+AgNP treatment relative to the Slurry only treatment. Microorganisms were also affected by AgNP treatment, which gave a significantly different community composition of bacteria in the Slurry+AgNPs as opposed to the Slurry treatment one day after addition as analyzed by T-RFLP analysis of 16S-rRNA genes. After eight days, N2O flux was 4.5 fold higher in the Slurry+AgNPs treatment than the Slurry treatment. After fifty days, community composition and N2O flux of the Slurry+AgNPs treatment converged with the Slurry. However, the soil microbial extracellular enzymes leucine amino peptidase and phosphatase had 52 and 27% lower activities, respectively, while microbial biomass was 35% lower than the Slurry. We also show that the magnitude of these responses was in all cases as large as or larger than the positive control, AgNO3, added at 4-fold the Ag concentration of the silver nanoparticles. PMID:23468930

  19. Adverse cardiometabolic response to aerobic exercise training: Should this be a concern?

    PubMed Central

    Leifer, Eric S.; Church, Timothy S.; Earnest, Conrad P.; Fleg, Jerome L.; Hakkinen, Keijo; Karavirta, Laura; Kraus, William E.; Mikus, Catherine; Resnick, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    .36) for SBP. Conclusion Compared to control subjects, exercise subjects were not at an increased risk for meeting the AC thresholds for SBP, FI, TG, or HDL-C and significantly fewer exercise subjects met AC thresholds for FI, and HDL. Exercise subjects also had significantly more favorable mean changes in FI, TG, and HDL-C than control subjects. These findings do not support the concept that aerobic exercise training increases the risk of adverse changes in CV risk factors. and that, with respect to group responses PMID:26258860

  20. Tissue Specific Heterogeneity in Effector Immune Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Tufail, Saba; Badrealam, Khan Farheen; Sherwani, Asif; Gupta, Umesh D.; Owais, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Post pathogen invasion, migration of effector T-cell subsets to specific tissue locations is of prime importance for generation of robust immune response. Effector T cells are imprinted with distinct “homing codes” (adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors) during activation which regulate their targeted trafficking to specific tissues. Internal cues in the lymph node microenvironment along with external stimuli from food (vitamin A) and sunlight (vitamin D3) prime dendritic cells, imprinting them to play centre stage in the induction of tissue tropism in effector T cells. B cells as well, in a manner similar to effector T cells, exhibit tissue-tropic migration. In this review, we have focused on the factors regulating the generation and migration of effector T cells to various tissues along with giving an overview of tissue tropism in B cells. PMID:23986763

  1. Developing a Gene Biomarker at the Tipping Point of Adaptive and Adverse Responses in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Currier, Jenna M; Cheng, Wan-Yun; Menendez, Daniel; Conolly, Rory; Chorley, Brian N

    2016-01-01

    Determining mechanism-based biomarkers that distinguish adaptive and adverse cellular processes is critical to understanding the health effects of environmental exposures. Shifting from in vivo, low-throughput toxicity studies to high-throughput screening (HTS) paradigms and risk assessment based on in vitro and in silico testing requires utilizing toxicity pathway information to distinguish adverse outcomes from recoverable adaptive events. Little work has focused on oxidative stresses in human airway for the purposes of predicting adverse responses. We hypothesize that early gene expression-mediated molecular changes could be used to delineate adaptive and adverse responses to environmentally-based perturbations. Here, we examined cellular responses of the tracheobronchial airway to zinc (Zn) exposure, a model oxidant. Airway derived BEAS-2B cells exposed to 2-10 μM Zn2+ elicited concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity. Normal, adaptive, and cytotoxic Zn2+ exposure conditions were determined with traditional apical endpoints, and differences in global gene expression around the tipping point of the responses were used to delineate underlying molecular mechanisms. Bioinformatic analyses of differentially expressed genes indicate early enrichment of stress signaling pathways, including those mediated by the transcription factors p53 and NRF2. After 4 h, 154 genes were differentially expressed (p < 0.01) between the adaptive and cytotoxic Zn2+ concentrations. Nearly 40% of the biomarker genes were related to the p53 signaling pathway with 30 genes identified as likely direct targets using a database of p53 ChIP-seq studies. Despite similar p53 activation profiles, these data revealed widespread dampening of p53 and NRF2-related genes as early as 4 h after exposure at higher, unrecoverable Zn2+ exposures. Thus, in our model early increased activation of stress response pathways indicated a recoverable adaptive event. Overall, this study highlights the

  2. Developing a Gene Biomarker at the Tipping Point of Adaptive and Adverse Responses in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Currier, Jenna M.; Cheng, Wan-Yun; Menendez, Daniel; Conolly, Rory; Chorley, Brian N.

    2016-01-01

    Determining mechanism-based biomarkers that distinguish adaptive and adverse cellular processes is critical to understanding the health effects of environmental exposures. Shifting from in vivo, low-throughput toxicity studies to high-throughput screening (HTS) paradigms and risk assessment based on in vitro and in silico testing requires utilizing toxicity pathway information to distinguish adverse outcomes from recoverable adaptive events. Little work has focused on oxidative stresses in human airway for the purposes of predicting adverse responses. We hypothesize that early gene expression-mediated molecular changes could be used to delineate adaptive and adverse responses to environmentally-based perturbations. Here, we examined cellular responses of the tracheobronchial airway to zinc (Zn) exposure, a model oxidant. Airway derived BEAS-2B cells exposed to 2–10 μM Zn2+ elicited concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity. Normal, adaptive, and cytotoxic Zn2+ exposure conditions were determined with traditional apical endpoints, and differences in global gene expression around the tipping point of the responses were used to delineate underlying molecular mechanisms. Bioinformatic analyses of differentially expressed genes indicate early enrichment of stress signaling pathways, including those mediated by the transcription factors p53 and NRF2. After 4 h, 154 genes were differentially expressed (p < 0.01) between the adaptive and cytotoxic Zn2+ concentrations. Nearly 40% of the biomarker genes were related to the p53 signaling pathway with 30 genes identified as likely direct targets using a database of p53 ChIP-seq studies. Despite similar p53 activation profiles, these data revealed widespread dampening of p53 and NRF2-related genes as early as 4 h after exposure at higher, unrecoverable Zn2+ exposures. Thus, in our model early increased activation of stress response pathways indicated a recoverable adaptive event. Overall, this study highlights the

  3. Moderating role of FKBP5 genotype in the impact of childhood adversity on cortisol stress response during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, Arlette F; Holz, Nathalie; Boecker, Regina; Blomeyer, Dorothea; Rietschel, Marcella; Witt, Stephanie H; Schmidt, Martin H; Esser, Günter; Banaschewski, Tobias; Brandeis, Daniel; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Laucht, Manfred

    2014-06-01

    Recent research suggests an important role of FKBP5, a glucocorticoid receptor regulating co-chaperone, in the development of stress-related diseases such as depression and anxiety disorders. The present study aimed to replicate and extend previous evidence indicating that FKBP5 polymorphisms moderate hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) function by examining whether FKBP5 rs1360780 genotype and different measures of childhood adversity interact to predict stress-induced cortisol secretion. At age 19 years, 195 young adults (90 males, 105 females) participating in an epidemiological cohort study completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) to assess cortisol stress responsiveness and were genotyped for the FKBP5 rs1360780. Childhood adversity was assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and by a standardized parent interview yielding an index of family adversity. A significant interaction between genotype and childhood adversity on cortisol response to stress was demonstrated for exposure to childhood maltreatment as assessed by retrospective self-report (CTQ), but not for prospectively ascertained objective family adversity. Severity of childhood maltreatment was significantly associated with attenuated cortisol levels among carriers of the rs1360780 CC genotype, while no such effect emerged in carriers of the T allele. These findings point towards the functional involvement of FKBP5 in long-term alterations of neuroendocrine stress regulation related to childhood maltreatment, which have been suggested to represent a premorbid risk or resilience factor in the context of stress-related disorders. PMID:24411633

  4. Fetal tissue research: an ongoing story of professionally responsible success.

    PubMed

    Gelber, Shari E; McCullough, Laurence B; Chervenak, Frank A

    2015-12-01

    Therapies derived from fetal tissue research are some of the greatest success stories in medicine. Research using fetal tissue has allowed for development of vaccines for numerous diseases including polio, rubella, and measles. These vaccines have saved countless lives, improved quality of life, and decreased the need for induced abortion secondary to congenital infection. Research using cell lines derived from fetal tissue has assisted in better understanding disease pathogenesis and has served to produce human proteins as research reagents and therapies. Ongoing research points to the potential for fetal tissue to be used to cure debilitating diseases such as Parkinson disease. These scientific and medical advances are dependent on the use of fetal tissue from aborted fetuses. While the practice of induced abortion despite societal benefit may be theologically objectionable to some, these practices are professionally responsible. Federal regulations exist to discourage patients from being influenced by the societal benefit of fetal research in arriving at the decision to terminate as well as to prevent researchers from influencing a patient's decision. After a patient has chosen termination of pregnancy, it is consistent with professional responsibility to allow her to choose the disposition of the cadaveric fetal tissue. While some may view induced abortion and societal benefit from this practice as an ethical burden, the principle of justice makes it ethically obligatory to bear this ethical burden. The success story of cadaveric fetal tissue research and treatment should continue unhindered, to fulfill professional responsibility to current and future patients. PMID:26432465

  5. Psychological Well-Being and the Human Conserved Transcriptional Response to Adversity

    PubMed Central

    Fredrickson, Barbara L.; Grewen, Karen M.; Algoe, Sara B.; Firestine, Ann M.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Ma, Jeffrey; Cole, Steve W.

    2015-01-01

    Research in human social genomics has identified a conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA) characterized by up-regulated expression of pro-inflammatory genes and down-regulated expression of Type I interferon- and antibody-related genes. This report seeks to identify the specific aspects of positive psychological well-being that oppose such effects and predict reduced CTRA gene expression. In a new confirmation study of 122 healthy adults that replicated the approach of a previously reported discovery study, mixed effect linear model analyses identified a significant inverse association between expression of CTRA indicator genes and a summary measure of eudaimonic well-being from the Mental Health Continuum – Short Form. Analyses of a 2- representation of eudaimonia converged in finding correlated psychological and social subdomains of eudaimonic well-being to be the primary carriers of CTRA associations. Hedonic well-being showed no consistent CTRA association independent of eudaimonic well-being, and summary measures integrating hedonic and eudaimonic well-being showed less stable CTRA associations than did focal measures of eudaimonia (psychological and social well-being). Similar results emerged from analyses of pooled discovery and confirmation samples (n = 198). Similar results also emerged from analyses of a second new generalization study of 107 healthy adults that included the more detailed Ryff Scales of Psychological Well-being and found this more robust measure of eudaimonic well-being to also associate with reduced CTRA gene expression. Five of the 6 major sub-domains of psychological well-being predicted reduced CTRA gene expression when analyzed separately, and 3 remained distinctively prognostic in mutually adjusted analyses. All associations were independent of demographic characteristics, health-related confounders, and RNA indicators of leukocyte subset distribution. These results identify specific sub-dimensions of eudaimonic

  6. Psychological well-being and the human conserved transcriptional response to adversity.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Barbara L; Grewen, Karen M; Algoe, Sara B; Firestine, Ann M; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Ma, Jeffrey; Cole, Steve W

    2015-01-01

    Research in human social genomics has identified a conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA) characterized by up-regulated expression of pro-inflammatory genes and down-regulated expression of Type I interferon- and antibody-related genes. This report seeks to identify the specific aspects of positive psychological well-being that oppose such effects and predict reduced CTRA gene expression. In a new confirmation study of 122 healthy adults that replicated the approach of a previously reported discovery study, mixed effect linear model analyses identified a significant inverse association between expression of CTRA indicator genes and a summary measure of eudaimonic well-being from the Mental Health Continuum - Short Form. Analyses of a 2- representation of eudaimonia converged in finding correlated psychological and social subdomains of eudaimonic well-being to be the primary carriers of CTRA associations. Hedonic well-being showed no consistent CTRA association independent of eudaimonic well-being, and summary measures integrating hedonic and eudaimonic well-being showed less stable CTRA associations than did focal measures of eudaimonia (psychological and social well-being). Similar results emerged from analyses of pooled discovery and confirmation samples (n = 198). Similar results also emerged from analyses of a second new generalization study of 107 healthy adults that included the more detailed Ryff Scales of Psychological Well-being and found this more robust measure of eudaimonic well-being to also associate with reduced CTRA gene expression. Five of the 6 major sub-domains of psychological well-being predicted reduced CTRA gene expression when analyzed separately, and 3 remained distinctively prognostic in mutually adjusted analyses. All associations were independent of demographic characteristics, health-related confounders, and RNA indicators of leukocyte subset distribution. These results identify specific sub-dimensions of eudaimonic well

  7. Cellular mechanisms of tissue fibrosis. 6. Purinergic signaling and response in fibroblasts and tissue fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, David; Insel, Paul A

    2014-05-01

    Tissue fibrosis occurs as a result of the dysregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis. Tissue fibroblasts, resident cells responsible for the synthesis and turnover of ECM, are regulated via numerous hormonal and mechanical signals. The release of intracellular nucleotides and their resultant autocrine/paracrine signaling have been shown to play key roles in the homeostatic maintenance of tissue remodeling and in fibrotic response post-injury. Extracellular nucleotides signal through P2 nucleotide and P1 adenosine receptors to activate signaling networks that regulate the proliferation and activity of fibroblasts, which, in turn, influence tissue structure and pathologic remodeling. An important component in the signaling and functional responses of fibroblasts to extracellular ATP and adenosine is the expression and activity of ectonucleotideases that attenuate nucleotide-mediated signaling, and thereby integrate P2 receptor- and subsequent adenosine receptor-initiated responses. Results of studies of the mechanisms of cellular nucleotide release and the effects of this autocrine/paracrine signaling axis on fibroblast-to-myofibroblast conversion and the fibrotic phenotype have advanced understanding of tissue remodeling and fibrosis. This review summarizes recent findings related to purinergic signaling in the regulation of fibroblasts and the development of tissue fibrosis in the heart, lungs, liver, and kidney. PMID:24352335

  8. Genotype and Neuropsychological Response Inhibition as Resilience Promoters for ADHD, ODD, and CD under Conditions of Psychosocial Adversity

    PubMed Central

    Nigg, Joel; Nikolas, Molly; Friderici, Karen; Park, Leeyoung; Zucker, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Whereas child personality, IQ, and family factors have been identified as enabling a resilient response to psychosocial adversity, more direct biological resilience factors have been less well delineated. This is particularly so for child ADHD, which has received less attention from a resilience perspective than have associated externalizing disorders. Children from two independent samples were classified as resilient if they avoided developing ADHD, ODD, or CD in the face of family adversity. Two protective factors were examined for their potential relevance to prefrontal brain development: neuropsychological response inhibition, as assessed by the Stop task, and a composite catecholamine genotype risk score. Resilient children were characterized in both samples by more effective response inhibition, although the effect in the second sample was very small. Genotype was measured in Sample 1, and a composite high risk genotype index was developed by summing presence of risk across markers on three genes expressed in prefrontal cortex: dopamine transporter, dopamine D4 receptor, and noradrenergic alpha 2 receptor. Genotype was a reliable resilience indicator against development of ADHD and CD, but not ODD, in the face of psychosocial adversity. Results illustrate potential neurobiological protective factors related to development of prefrontal cortex that may enable children to avoid developing ADHD and CD in the presence of psychosocial adversity. PMID:17705902

  9. Association between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in XRCC3 and Radiation-Induced Adverse Effects on Normal Tissue: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yu-Zhe; Han, Fu-Jun; Liu, Min; Xia, Cheng-Cheng; Shi, Wei-Yan; Dong, Li-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) protein plays an important role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. The relationship between XRCC3 polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced adverse effects on normal tissue remains inconclusive. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to elucidate the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and radiation-induced adverse effects on normal tissue. All eligible studies up to December 2014 were identified through a search of the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases. Seventeen studies involving 656 cases and 2193 controls were ultimately included in this meta-analysis. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced normal tissue adverse effects. We found that the XRCC3 p.Thr241Met (rs861539) polymorphism was significantly associated with early adverse effects induced by radiotherapy (OR = 1.99, 95%CI: 1.31–3.01, P = 0.001). A positive association lacking statistical significance with late adverse effects was also identified (OR = 1.28, 95%CI: 0.97–1.68, P = 0.08). In addition, the rs861539 polymorphism was significantly correlated with a higher risk of adverse effects induced by head and neck area irradiation (OR = 2.41, 95%CI: 1.49–3.89, p = 0.0003) and breast irradiation (OR = 1.41, 95%CI: 1.02–1.95, p = 0.04), whereas the correlation was not significant for lung irradiation or pelvic irradiation. Furthermore, XRCC3 rs1799794 polymorphism may have a protective effect against late adverse effects induced by radiotherapy (OR = 0.47, 95%CI: 0.26–0.86, P = 0.01). Well-designed large-scale clinical studies are required to further validate our results. PMID:26091483

  10. Tissue response around silicon nitride implants in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Guedes e Silva, Cecilia C; König, Bruno; Carbonari, Marcelo José; Yoshimoto, Marcelo; Allegrini, Sérgio; Bressiani, José Carlos

    2008-02-01

    The chemical and dimensional stability associated with suitable fracture toughness and propitious tribological characteristics make silicon nitride-based ceramics potential candidates for biomedical applications, mainly as orthopedic implants. Considering this combination of properties, silicon nitride components were investigated in relation to their biocompatibility. For this study, two cylindrical implants were installed in each tibia of five rabbits and were kept in the animals for 8 weeks. During the healing time, tissue tracers were administrated in the animals so as to evaluate the bone growth around the implants. Eight weeks after the surgery, the animals were euthanized and histological analyses were performed. No adverse reactions were observed close to the implant. The osteogenesis process occurred during the entire period defined by the tracers. However, this process occurred more intensely 4 weeks after the surgery. In addition, the histological analyses showed that bone growth occurred preferentially in the cortical areas. Different kinds of tissue were identified on the implant surface, characterized by lamellar bone tissue containing osteocytes and osteons, by a noncalcified matrix containing osteoblasts, or by the presence of collagen III, which may change to collagen I or remain as a fibrous tissue. The results demonstrated that silicon nitride obtained according to the procedure proposed in this research is a biocompatible material. PMID:17607762

  11. Neutrophil swarming: an essential process of the neutrophil tissue response.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Korbinian; Lämmermann, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil infiltration into inflamed and infected tissues is a fundamental process of the innate immune response. While neutrophil interactions with the blood vessel wall have been intensely studied over the last decades, neutrophil dynamics beyond the vasculature have for a long time remained poorly investigated. Recent intravital microscopy studies of neutrophil populations directly at the site of tissue damage or microbial invasion have changed our perspective on neutrophil responses within tissues. Swarm-like migration patterns of neutrophils, referred to as 'neutrophil swarming', have been detected in diverse tissues under conditions of sterile inflammation and infection with various pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Current work has begun to unravel the molecular pathways choreographing the sequential phases of highly coordinated chemotaxis followed by neutrophil accumulation and the formation of substantial neutrophil clusters. It is now clear that intercellular communication among neutrophils amplifies their recruitment in a feed-forward manner, which provides them with a level of self-organization during neutrophil swarming. This review will summarize recent developments and current concepts on neutrophil swarming, an important process of the neutrophil tissue response with a critical role in maintaining the balance between host protection and inflammation-driven tissue destruction. PMID:27558329

  12. Healing responses following cryothermic and hyperthermic tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwin, Braden L.; Coad, James E.

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive, thermally ablative, interventional technologies have been changing the practice of medicine since before the turn of the 20th century. More recently, cryothermic and hyperthermic therapies have expanded in terms of their spectrum of thermal generators, modes for controlling and monitoring the treatment zone and both benign and malignant medical applications. The final tissue, and hence clinical outcome, of a thermal ablation is determined by the summation of direct primary (thermal) and secondary (apoptosis, ischemia, free radical, inflammation, wound healing, etc.) injury followed by possible cellular regeneration and scar formation. The initial thermal lesion can be broadly divided into two major zones of cellular death: 1) the complete ablation zone closer to the thermal source and 2) the peripheral transition zone with a decreasing gradient of cell death. While not applicable to cryotherapy, hyperthermic complete ablation zones are subdivided into two zones: 1) thermal or heat fixation and 2) coagulative necrosis. It is important to clearly differentiate these tissue zones because of their substantially different healing responses. Therefore, the development of clinically successful thermal therapies requires an understanding of tissue healing responses. The healing responses can be affected by a number of additional factors such as the tissue's anatomy, organ specific healing differences, blood supply, protein vs. lipid content, and other factors. Thus, effective biomedical instrument development requires both an understanding of thermal cell injury/death and the body's subsequent healing responses. This paper provides a general overview of the healing pathways that follow thermal tissue treatment.

  13. Mouse genetic approaches applied to the normal tissue radiation response

    PubMed Central

    Haston, Christina K.

    2012-01-01

    The varying responses of inbred mouse models to radiation exposure present a unique opportunity to dissect the genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and tissue injury. Such studies are complementary to human association studies as they permit both the analysis of clinical features of disease, and of specific variants associated with its presentation, in a controlled environment. Herein I review how animal models are studied to identify specific genetic variants influencing predisposition to radiation-induced traits. Among these radiation-induced responses are documented strain differences in repair of DNA damage and in extent of tissue injury (in the lung, skin, and intestine) which form the base for genetic investigations. For example, radiation-induced DNA damage is consistently greater in tissues from BALB/cJ mice, than the levels in C57BL/6J mice, suggesting there may be an inherent DNA damage level per strain. Regarding tissue injury, strain specific inflammatory and fibrotic phenotypes have been documented for principally, C57BL/6 C3H and A/J mice but a correlation among responses such that knowledge of the radiation injury in one tissue informs of the response in another is not evident. Strategies to identify genetic differences contributing to a trait based on inbred strain differences, which include linkage analysis and the evaluation of recombinant congenic (RC) strains, are presented, with a focus on the lung response to irradiation which is the only radiation-induced tissue injury mapped to date. Such approaches are needed to reveal genetic differences in susceptibility to radiation injury, and also to provide a context for the effects of specific genetic variation uncovered in anticipated clinical association studies. In summary, mouse models can be studied to uncover heritable variation predisposing to specific radiation responses, and such variations may point to pathways of importance to phenotype development in the clinic. PMID:22891164

  14. Erythropoietin Action in Stress Response, Tissue Maintenance and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Li; Dey, Soumyadeep; Alnaeeli, Mawadda; Suresh, Sukanya; Rogers, Heather; Teng, Ruifeng; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) regulation of red blood cell production and its induction at reduced oxygen tension provides for the important erythropoietic response to ischemic stress. The cloning and production of recombinant human EPO has led to its clinical use in patients with anemia for two and half decades and has facilitated studies of EPO action. Reports of animal and cell models of ischemic stress in vitro and injury suggest potential EPO benefit beyond red blood cell production including vascular endothelial response to increase nitric oxide production, which facilitates oxygen delivery to brain, heart and other non-hematopoietic tissues. This review discusses these and other reports of EPO action beyond red blood cell production, including EPO response affecting metabolism and obesity in animal models. Observations of EPO activity in cell and animal model systems, including mice with tissue specific deletion of EPO receptor (EpoR), suggest the potential for EPO response in metabolism and disease. PMID:24918289

  15. Erythropoietin action in stress response, tissue maintenance and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Li; Dey, Soumyadeep; Alnaeeli, Mawadda; Suresh, Sukanya; Rogers, Heather; Teng, Ruifeng; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) regulation of red blood cell production and its induction at reduced oxygen tension provides for the important erythropoietic response to ischemic stress. The cloning and production of recombinant human EPO has led to its clinical use in patients with anemia for two and half decades and has facilitated studies of EPO action. Reports of animal and cell models of ischemic stress in vitro and injury suggest potential EPO benefit beyond red blood cell production including vascular endothelial response to increase nitric oxide production, which facilitates oxygen delivery to brain, heart and other non-hematopoietic tissues. This review discusses these and other reports of EPO action beyond red blood cell production, including EPO response affecting metabolism and obesity in animal models. Observations of EPO activity in cell and animal model systems, including mice with tissue specific deletion of EPO receptor (EpoR), suggest the potential for EPO response in metabolism and disease. PMID:24918289

  16. Tissue response to mechanical vibrations for "sonoelasticity imaging".

    PubMed

    Parker, K J; Huang, S R; Musulin, R A; Lerner, R M

    1990-01-01

    The goal of "sonoelasticity imaging" is to differentiate between normal soft tissues and hard lesions. This is done by measuring and then displaying the ultrasound Doppler spectrum of regions within tissues which are mechanically forced with low frequency (20-1000 Hz) vibrations. The resolution and sensitivity of the technique ultimately rest on the spatial resolution of ultrasound Doppler detection, the low frequency mechanical properties of tissues, and the vibration response of layered, inhomogeneous regions with hard tumor inclusions and complicated boundary conditions set by the presence of skin, bones and other regions. An initial investigation has measured some tissue stiffness parameters, and applied these in a NASTRAN finite element analysis to simulate a prostate tumor in the pelvic cavity. The measurements show a wide separation between the elastic modulus of tumors and soft tissues such as muscle and prostate. NASTRAN analyses show the ability to delineate regions of different elasticity based on the pattern of vibration amplitudes. The ability to change vibration frequency within the 100-300 Hz band seems particularly helpful in simulations and experiments which visualize small stiff inclusions in tissues. Preliminary results support the postulate that sonoelasticity imaging can provide useful information concerning tissue properties that are not otherwise obtainable. PMID:2194336

  17. Striking a Balance in Communicating Pharmacogenetic Test Results: Promoting Comprehension and Minimizing Adverse Psychological and Behavioral Response

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Susanne B.; Mills, Rachel; Bosworth, Hayden

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing can provide information about a patient’s likelihood to respond to a medication or experience an adverse event, and be used to inform medication selection and/or dosing. Promoting patient comprehension of PGx test results will be important to improving engagement and understanding of treatment decisions Methods The discussion in this paper is based on our experiences and the literature on communication of genetic test results for disease risk and broad risk communication strategies. Results Clinical laboratory reports often describe PGx test results using standard terminology such as ‘poor metabolizer’ or ‘ultra-rapid metabolizer.’ While this type of terminology may promote patient recall with its simple, yet descriptive nature, it may be difficult for some patients to comprehend and/or cause adverse psychological or behavioral responses. Conclusion The language used to communicate results and their significance to patients will be important to consider in order to minimize confusion and potential psychological consequences such as increased anxiety that can adversely impact medication-taking behaviors. Practice Implications Due to patients’ unfamiliarity with PGx testing and the potential for confusion, adverse psychological effects, and decreased medication adherence, health providers need to be cognizant of the language used in discussing PGx test results with patients. PMID:24985359

  18. Mechanical response of brain tissue under blast loading.

    PubMed

    Laksari, Kaveh; Sadeghipour, Keyanoush; Darvish, Kurosh

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a framework for understanding the propagation of stress waves in brain tissue under blast loading has been developed. It was shown that tissue nonlinearity and rate dependence are the key parameters in predicting the mechanical behavior under such loadings, as they determine whether traveling waves could become steeper and eventually evolve into shock discontinuities. To investigate this phenomenon, in the present study, brain tissue has been characterized as a quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) material and a nonlinear constitutive model has been developed for the tissue that spans from medium loading rates up to blast rates. It was shown that development of shock waves is possible inside the head in response to high rate compressive pressure waves. Finally, it was argued that injury to the nervous tissue at the microstructural level could be partly attributed to the high stress gradients with high rates generated at the shock front and this was proposed as a mechanism of injury in brain tissue. PMID:24457112

  19. M1- and M2-Type Macrophage Responses Are Predictive of Adverse Outcomes in Human Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    de Gaetano, Monica; Crean, Daniel; Barry, Mary; Belton, Orina

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease caused by endothelial injury, lipid deposition, and oxidative stress. This progressive disease can be converted into an acute clinical event by plaque rupture and thrombosis. In the context of atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, macrophages uniquely possess a dual functionality, regulating lipid accumulation and metabolism and sustaining the chronic inflammatory response, two of the most well-documented pathways associated with the pathogenesis of the disease. Macrophages are heterogeneous cell populations and it is hypothesized that, during the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, macrophages in the developing plaque can switch from a pro-inflammatory (MΦ1) to an anti-inflammatory (MΦ2) phenotype and vice versa, depending on the microenvironment. The aim of this study was to identify changes in macrophage subpopulations in the progression of human atherosclerotic disease. Established atherosclerotic plaques from symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with existing coronary artery disease undergoing carotid endarterectomy were recruited to the study. Comprehensive histological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to quantify the cellular content and macrophage subsets of atherosclerotic lesion. In parallel, expression of MΦ1 and MΦ2 macrophage markers were analyzed by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Gross analysis and histological staining demonstrated that symptomatic plaques presented greater hemorrhagic activity and the internal carotid was the most diseased segment, based on the predominant prevalence of fibrotic and necrotic tissue, calcifications, and hemorrhagic events. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that both MΦ1 and MΦ2 macrophages are present in human plaques. However, MΦ2 macrophages are localized to more stable locations within the lesion. Importantly, gene and protein expression analysis of MΦ1/MΦ2 markers evidenced that MΦ1 markers and Th1

  20. Transgenic Zebrafish Reveal Tissue-Specific Differences in Estrogen Signaling in Response to Environmental Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki S.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ERs) in the larval heart compared with the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit tissue-specific effects similar to those of BPA and genistein, or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of ER genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: We observed selective patterns of ER activation in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue specificity in ER activation was due to differences in the expression of ER subtypes. ERα was expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 had the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activated the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero was associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves. Citation: Gorelick DA, Iwanowicz LR, Hung AL, Blazer VS, Halpern ME. 2014. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to

  1. Systemic inflammation regulates microglial responses to tissue damage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gyoneva, Stefka; Davalos, Dimitrios; Biswas, Dipankar; Swanger, Sharon A; Garnier-Amblard, Ethel; Loth, Francis; Akassoglou, Katerina; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2014-08-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, exist in either a "resting" state associated with physiological tissue surveillance or an "activated" state in neuroinflammation. We recently showed that ATP is the primary chemoattractor to tissue damage in vivo and elicits opposite effects on the motility of activated microglia in vitro through activation of adenosine A2A receptors. However, whether systemic inflammation affects microglial responses to tissue damage in vivo remains largely unknown. Using in vivo two-photon imaging of mice, we show that injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at levels that can produce both clear neuroinflammation and some features of sepsis significantly reduced the rate of microglial response to laser-induced ablation injury in vivo. Under proinflammatory conditions, microglial processes initially retracted from the ablation site, but subsequently moved toward and engulfed the damaged area. Analyzing the process dynamics in 3D cultures of primary microglia indicated that only A2A , but not A1 or A3 receptors, mediate process retraction in LPS-activated microglia. The A2A receptor antagonists caffeine and preladenant reduced adenosine-mediated process retraction in activated microglia in vitro. Finally, administration of preladenant before induction of laser ablation in vivo accelerated the microglial response to injury following systemic inflammation. The regulation of rapid microglial responses to sites of injury by A2A receptors could have implications for their ability to respond to the neuronal death occurring under conditions of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24807189

  2. Response of a tissue equivalent proportional counter to neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Robbins, D. E.; Gibbons, F.; Braby, L. A.

    2002-01-01

    The absorbed dose as a function of lineal energy was measured at the CERN-EC Reference-field Facility (CERF) using a 512-channel tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), and neutron dose equivalent response evaluated. Although there are some differences, the measured dose equivalent is in agreement with that measured by the 16-channel HANDI tissue equivalent counter. Comparison of TEPC measurements with those made by a silicon solid-state detector for low linear energy transfer particles produced by the same beam, is presented. The measurements show that about 4% of dose equivalent is delivered by particles heavier than protons generated in the conducting tissue equivalent plastic. c2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Virological Response and Muscular Adverse Events during Long-Term Clevudine Therapy in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Kook; Ko, Soon Young; Kwon, So Young; Park, Eugene; Kim, Jeong Han; Choe, Won Hyeok; Lee, Chang Hong

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, several reports issued clevudine induced myopathy in the long term use. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate antiviral effects and adverse events of clevudine monotherapy in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Patients and Methods The subjects were 110 treatment-naïve CHB patients. They were treated with 30 mg clevudine/day for more than six months. Virological and biochemical tests, including that for serum creatine kinase (CK), were monitored at baseline and at 3-month intervals during treatment period. Results In HBeAg-positive patients, the cumulative rates of virological response were 74.0 %, 68.5 %, and 67.3 % after one, two, and three years of clevudine treatment, respectively. Cumulative rates of HBeAg loss or seroconversion were 17.8 %, 30 %, and 31.5 % after one, two and, three years of clevudine treatment, respectively. In HBeAg-negative patients, the cumulative rates of virological response were 97.3 %, 100 %, and 94.6 %, respectively. Virological breakthrough occurred in 27 patients. The rtM204I mutation in HBV polymerase was predominantly detected. Muscular adverse events were observed in 15 patients. All patients with myopathy recovered after the cessation of clevudine monotherapy. Fluctuations in CK level during the clevudine treatment period were frequently observed irrespective of development of myopathy. Multiple episodes of CK elevation were significantly related to the development of myopathy. Conclusions Long-term clevudine monotherapy is effective for suppression of serum HBV DNA level and normalization of serum alanine amino transaminase levels, but associated with occurrence of rtM204I mutation. Clevudine-induced muscular adverse events are not uncommon, although they are totally reversible after cessation of the treatment. Muscular adverse events and serum CK level should be carefully monitored during long-term treatment with clevudine. PMID:23805155

  4. Adverse effects associated with a bioabsorbable guided tissue regeneration device in the treatment of human gingival recession defects. A clinicopathologic case report.

    PubMed

    Tatakis, D N; Trombelli, L

    1999-05-01

    This clinicopathologic case report documents an adverse effect associated with the use of a polylactic acid-based barrier in the treatment of human gingival recession defects. A total of 27 consecutively treated patients, in whom guided tissue regeneration with a polylactic acid barrier was used to correct gingival recession defects, were evaluated. This adverse effect consisted of a midradicular-apical swelling, generally asymptomatic, with no apparent predilection for gender, age, tooth type or location (maxilla/mandible), or surgical procedure. It was observed in 14 of 27 (52%) patients and 22 of 41 (54%) defects. The swelling decreased in size over time and in most cases, it completely resolved within 12 months postsurgery. Histopathologic evaluation of a 14-week specimen indicated characteristics (multinucleated giant cells, foamy macrophages) consistent with a foreign body reaction. These findings suggest that patients undergoing GTR procedures with synthetic absorbable devices for the treatment of gingival recession defects should be advised of the possible occurrence of such an adverse effect. PMID:10368059

  5. Long-Term Clinical Responses of Neoadjuvant Dendritic Cell Infusions and Radiation in Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Shailaja; Bui, Marilyn M.; Springett, Gregory; Conley, Anthony; Lavilla-Alonso, Sergio; Zhao, Xiuhua; Chen, Dungsa; Haysek, Randy; Gonzalez, Ricardo; Letson, G. Douglas; Finkelstein, Steven Eric; Chiappori, Alberto A.; Gabrilovitch, Dmitry I.; Antonia, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Patients with large >5 cm, high-grade resectable soft tissue sarcomas (STS) have the highest risk of distant metastases. Previously we have shown that dendritic cell (DC) based vaccines show consistent immune responses. Methods. This was a Phase I single institution study of neoadjuvant radiation with DC injections on 18 newly diagnosed high-risk STS patients. Neoadjuvant treatment consisted of 50 Gy of external beam radiation (EBRT), given in 25 fractions delivered five days/week, combined with four intratumoral injections of DCs followed by complete resection. The primary endpoint was to establish the immunological response to neoadjuvant therapy and obtain data on its clinical safety and outcomes. Results. There were no unexpected toxicities or serious adverse events. Twelve out of 18 (67%) patients were alive, of which an encouraging 11/18 (61%) were alive with no systemic recurrence over a period of 2–8 years. Favorable immunological responses correlated with clinical responses in some cases. Conclusions. This study provides clinical support to using dendritic cell injections along with radiation in sarcomas, which when used optimally in combination can help clinical outcomes in soft tissue sarcoma. Study registration number is NCT00365872. PMID:26880867

  6. Responsive Microgrooves for Formation of Harvestable Tissue Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Halil; Ozaydin-Ince, Gozde; Tsinman, Tonia; Gleason, Karen K.; Langer, Robert; Khademhosseini, Ali; Demirel, Melik C.

    2011-01-01

    Given its biocompatibility, elasticity and gas permeability, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is widely used to fabricate microgrooves and microfluidic devices for three dimensional (3D) cell culture studies. However, conformal coating of complex PDMS devices prepared by standard microfabrication techniques with desired chemical functionality is challenging. This study describes the conformal coating of PDMS microgrooves with Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) by using initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). These microgrooves guided the formation of tissue constructs from NIH-3T3 fibroblasts that could be retrieved by the temperature dependent swelling property and hydrophilicity change of the PNIPAAm. The thickness of swollen PNIPAAm films at 24 °C was approximately three times greater than at 37 °C. Furthermore, PNIPAAm coated microgroove surfaces exhibit increased hydrophilicity at 24 °C (contact angle θ = 30° ± 2) compared to 37 °C (θ = 50° ± 1). Thus PNIPAAm film on the microgrooves exhibits responsive swelling with higher hydrophilicity at room temperature which could be used to retrieve tissue constructs. The resulting tissue constructs were the same size as the grooves and could be used as modules in tissue fabrication. Given its ability to form and retrieve cell aggregates and its integration with standard microfabrication, PNIPAAm coated PDMS templates may become useful for 3D cell culture applications in tissue engineering and drug discovery. PMID:21449596

  7. The dynamic response of a viscoelastic biological tissue simulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Christopher; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Hazell, Paul; Allsop, Derek

    2009-06-01

    The development and optimisation of new projectiles requires comparative techniques to assess ballistic performance. Porcine gelatin has found a substantial niche in the ballistics community as a tissue mimic. Primarily due to its elasticity, gelatin has been shown to deform in a similar manner to biological tissues. Bullet impacts typically occur in the 350-850 m/s range and consequently, knowledge of the high strain rate dynamic properties of both the projectile constituents and target materials is desirable if simulations are to allow the optimisation of projectile design. A large body of knowledge exists on the dynamic properties of projectiles, however relatively little data exists in the literature on the dynamic response of flesh simulants. The Hugoniot for a 20 wt% porcine gelatin, which exhibits a ballistic response similar to that of human tissues at room temperature, is determined in this paper using the plate impact technique. Up-Us and Up-P relationships are determined for impact velocities in the range of 200-900 m/s. Good agreement with the limited available data from the literature for similar concentrations is found and the dynamic response established at impact stresses up to 3 times higher than that observed elsewhere. Additionally, high frequency elastic properties are investigated using ultrasound and compared to those observed elsewhere.

  8. Location, location, location: tissue-specific regulation of immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Pasare, Chandrashekhar

    2013-01-01

    Discovery of DCs and PRRs has contributed immensely to our understanding of induction of innate and adaptive immune responses. Activation of PRRs leads to secretion of inflammatory cytokines that regulate priming and differentiation of antigen-specific T and B lymphocytes. Pathogens enter the body via different routes, and although the same set of PRRs is likely to be activated, it is becoming clear that the route of immune challenge determines the nature of outcome of adaptive immunity. In addition to the signaling events initiated following innate-immune receptor activation, the cells of the immune system are influenced by the microenvironments in which they reside, and this has a direct impact on the resulting immune response. Specifically, immune responses could be influenced by specialized DCs, specific factors secreted by stromal cells, and also, by commensal microbiota present in certain organs. Following microbial detection, the complex interactions among DCs, stromal cells, and tissue-specific factors influence outcome of immune responses. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the phenotypic heterogeneity of innate and adaptive immune cells and how tissue-specific factors in the systemic and mucosal immune system influence the outcome of adaptive-immune responses. PMID:23825388

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of B Cell Immune Functions in Periodontitis: Mucosal Tissue Responses to the Oral Microbiome in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S.; Novak, M. John; Orraca, Luis; Martinez, Janis Gonzalez; Cunningham, Larry L.; Thomas, Mark V.; Stromberg, Arnold; Pandruvada, Subramanya N.; Gonzalez, Octavio A.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has shown activation of T and B cells in gingival tissues in experimental models and in humans diagnosed with periodontitis. The results of this adaptive immune response are noted both locally and systemically with antigenic specificity for an array of oral bacteria, including periodontopathic species, e.g., Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. It has been recognized through epidemiological studies and clinical observations that the prevalence of periodontitis increases with age. This report describes our studies evaluating gingival tissue transcriptomes in humans and specifically exploiting the use of a non-human primate model of naturally occurring periodontitis to delineate gingival mucosal tissue gene expression profiles focusing on cells/genes critical for the development of humoral adaptive immune responses. Patterns of B cell and plasmacyte genes were altered in aging healthy gingival tissues. Substantial increases in a large number of genes reflecting antigen-dependent activation, B cell activation, B cell proliferation, and B cell differentiation/maturation were observed in periodontitis in adults and aged animals. Finally, evaluation of the relationship of these gene expression patterns with those of various tissue destructive molecules (MMP2, MMP9, CTSK, TNFα, and RANKL) showed a greater frequency of positive correlations in healthy tissues versus periodontitis tissues, with only MMP9 correlations similar between the two tissue types. These results are consistent with B cell response activities in healthy tissues potentially contributing to muting the effects of the tissue destructive biomolecules, whereas with periodontitis this relationship is adversely affected and enabling a progression of tissue destructive events. PMID:27486459

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of B Cell Immune Functions in Periodontitis: Mucosal Tissue Responses to the Oral Microbiome in Aging.

    PubMed

    Ebersole, Jeffrey L; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S; Novak, M John; Orraca, Luis; Martinez, Janis Gonzalez; Cunningham, Larry L; Thomas, Mark V; Stromberg, Arnold; Pandruvada, Subramanya N; Gonzalez, Octavio A

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has shown activation of T and B cells in gingival tissues in experimental models and in humans diagnosed with periodontitis. The results of this adaptive immune response are noted both locally and systemically with antigenic specificity for an array of oral bacteria, including periodontopathic species, e.g., Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. It has been recognized through epidemiological studies and clinical observations that the prevalence of periodontitis increases with age. This report describes our studies evaluating gingival tissue transcriptomes in humans and specifically exploiting the use of a non-human primate model of naturally occurring periodontitis to delineate gingival mucosal tissue gene expression profiles focusing on cells/genes critical for the development of humoral adaptive immune responses. Patterns of B cell and plasmacyte genes were altered in aging healthy gingival tissues. Substantial increases in a large number of genes reflecting antigen-dependent activation, B cell activation, B cell proliferation, and B cell differentiation/maturation were observed in periodontitis in adults and aged animals. Finally, evaluation of the relationship of these gene expression patterns with those of various tissue destructive molecules (MMP2, MMP9, CTSK, TNFα, and RANKL) showed a greater frequency of positive correlations in healthy tissues versus periodontitis tissues, with only MMP9 correlations similar between the two tissue types. These results are consistent with B cell response activities in healthy tissues potentially contributing to muting the effects of the tissue destructive biomolecules, whereas with periodontitis this relationship is adversely affected and enabling a progression of tissue destructive events. PMID:27486459

  11. Responding to information about children in adversity: ten years of a differential response model in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Harries, Maria; Cant, Rosemary L; Bilson, Andy; Thorpe, David

    2015-01-01

    This article uses a comprehensive database about children in adversity collected over the 16-year period from 1990 to 2005 in the state of Western Australia. The focus of this interrogation is the effect of major changes in responses to information about children brought to the attention of the Western Australian statutory authority in a 10-year period during this 16 years. The initiative for these changes was termed New Directions, and its associated policy and practice changes were aimed at differentiating information expressing concerns about children and families from allegations of child maltreatment. They emphasized the provision of supportive and empowering services to families experiencing difficulties - a form of differential response to children in adversity. The article covers the period leading up to the policy and practice change and the 10 years during which these changes were implemented. It examines some effects of the new policy and comments on whether the changes resulted in missed opportunities to protect children from harm, which in turn, might have led to higher rates of re-reporting. The authors present an overall picture of the nature of the information accepted by the statutory authority and how the interpretation of that information might have affected subsequent outcomes for children. In doing so, it shows that the policy and consequential practice changes associated with a differential response mechanism had long lasting positive effects that, despite dire warnings, did not compromise the protection of the small group of children identified as requiring protective interventions. PMID:25043920

  12. The role of the monoamine oxidase A gene in moderating the response to adversity and associated antisocial behavior: a review

    PubMed Central

    Buades-Rotger, Macià; Gallardo-Pujol, David

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary factors are increasingly attracting the interest of behavioral scientists and practitioners. Our aim in the present article is to introduce some state-of-the-art topics in behavioral genetics, as well as selected findings in the field, in order to illustrate how genetic makeup can modulate the impact of environmental factors. We focus on the most-studied polymorphism to date for antisocial responses to adversity: the monoamine oxidase A gene. Advances, caveats, and promises of current research are reviewed. We also discuss implications for the use of genetic information in applied settings. PMID:25114607

  13. Differential responses of white adipose tissue and brown adipose tissue to caloric restriction in rats.

    PubMed

    Okita, Naoyuki; Hayashida, Yusuke; Kojima, Yumiko; Fukushima, Mayumi; Yuguchi, Keiko; Mikami, Kentaro; Yamauchi, Akiko; Watanabe, Kyoko; Noguchi, Mituru; Nakamura, Megumi; Toda, Toshifusa; Higami, Yoshikazu

    2012-05-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) slows the aging process and extends longevity, but the exact underlying mechanisms remain debatable. It has recently been suggested that the beneficial action of CR may be mediated in part by adipose tissue remodeling. Mammals have two types of adipose tissue: white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT). In this study, proteome analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF MS, and subsequent analyses were performed on both WAT and BAT from 9-month-old male rats fed ad libitum or subjected to CR for 6 months. Our findings suggest that CR activates mitochondrial energy metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis in WAT. It is likely that in CR animals WAT functions as an energy transducer from glucose to energy-dense lipid. In contrast, in BAT CR either had no effect on, or down-regulated, the mitochondrial electron transport chain, but enhanced fatty acid biosynthesis. This suggests that in CR animals BAT may change its function from an energy consuming system to an energy reservoir system. Based on our findings, we conclude that WAT and BAT cooperate to use energy effectively via a differential response of mitochondrial function to CR. PMID:22414572

  14. Tissue responses against tissue-engineered cartilage consisting of chondrocytes encapsulated within non-absorbable hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Sanshiro; Fujihara, Yuko; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Asawa, Yukiyo; Komura, Makoto; Nagata, Satoru; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    To disclose the influence of foreign body responses raised against a non-absorbable hydrogel consisting of tissue-engineered cartilage, we embedded human/canine chondrocytes within agarose and transplanted them into subcutaneous pockets in nude mice and donor beagles. One month after transplantation, cartilage formation was observed in the experiments using human chondrocytes in nude mice. No significant invasion of blood cells was noted in the areas where the cartilage was newly formed. Around the tissue-engineered cartilage, agarose fragments, a dense fibrous connective tissue and many macrophages were observed. On the other hand, no cartilage tissue was detected in the autologous transplantation of canine chondrocytes. Few surviving chondrocytes were observed in the agarose and no accumulation of blood cells was observed in the inner parts of the transplants. Localizations of IgG and complements were noted in areas of agarose, and also in the devitalized cells embedded within the agarose. Even if we had inhibited the proximity of the blood cells to the transplanted cells, the survival of the cells could not be secured. We suggest that these cytotoxic mechanisms seem to be associated not only with macrophages but also with soluble factors, including antibodies and complements. PMID:21916014

  15. Serum Response Factor in Muscle Tissues: From Development to Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Coletti, Dario; Daou, Nissrine; Hassani, Medhi; Li, Zhenlin; Parlakian, Ara

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle cells share various common characteristic features. During development the embryonic mesodermal layer contribute at different proportions to the formation of these tissues. At the functional level, contractility as well as its decline during ageing, are also common features. Cytoskeletal components of these tissues are characterized by various actin isoforms that govern through their status (polymerised versus monomeric) and their interaction with the myosins the contractile properties of these muscles. Finally, at the molecular level, a set of different transcription factors with the notable exception of Serum Response Factor SRF- which is commonly enriched in the 3 types of muscle- drive and maintain the differentiation of these cells (Myf5, MyoD, Myogenin for skeletal muscle; Nkx2.5, GATA4 for cardiomyocytes). In this review, we will focus on the transcription factor SRF and its role in the homeostasis of cardiac, smooth and skeletal muscle tissues as well as its behaviour during the age related remodelling process of these tissues with a specific emphasis on animal models and human data when available. PMID:27478561

  16. Photoacoustic monitoring of tumor and normal tissue response to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Laurie J.; Seshadri, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a recognized characteristic of tumors that influences efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a relatively new imaging technique that exploits the optical characteristics of hemoglobin to provide information on tissue oxygenation. In the present study, PAI based measures of tumor oxygen saturation (%sO2) were compared to oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of longitudinal relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) and ex-vivo histology in patient derived xenograft (PDX) models of head and neck cancer. PAI was utilized to assess early changes (24 h) in %sO2 following RT and chemoRT (CRT) and to assess changes in salivary gland hemodynamics following radiation. A significant increase in tumor %sO2 and R1 was observed following oxygen inhalation. Good spatial correlation was observed between PAI, MRI and histology. An early increase in %sO2 after RT and CRT detected by PAI was associated with significant tumor growth inhibition. Twenty four hours after RT, PAI also detected loss of hemodynamic response to gustatory stimulation in murine salivary gland tissue suggestive of radiation-induced vascular damage. Our observations illustrate the utility of PAI in detecting tumor and normal tissue hemodynamic response to radiation in head and neck cancers. PMID:26883660

  17. Optical Interferometric Response of Living Tissue to Cytoskeletal Anticancer Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, David; Jeong, Kwan; Turek, John

    2007-03-01

    Living tissue illuminated by short-coherence light can be optically sectioned in three dimensions using coherent detection such as interferometry. We have developed full-field coherence-gated imaging of tissue using digital holography. Two-dimensional image sections from a fixed depth are recorded as interference fringes with a CCD camera located at the optical Fourier plane. Fast Fourier transform of the digital hologram yields the depth-selected image. When the tissue is living, highly dynamic speckle is observed as fluctuating pixel intensities. The temporal autocorrelation functions are directly related to the degree of motility at depth. We have applied the cytoskeletal drugs nocodazole and colchicine to osteogenic sarcoma multicellular spheroids and observed the response holographically. Colchicine is an anticancer drug that inhibits microtubule polymerization and hence prevents spindle formation during mitosis. Nocodazole, on the other hand, depolymerizes microtubules. Both drugs preferentially inhibit rapidly-dividing cancer cells. We observe dose-response using motility as an effective contrast agent. This work opens the possibility for studies of three-dimensional motility as a multiplexed assay for drug discovery.

  18. Inflammatory Cytokines as Preclinical Markers of Adverse Responses to Chemical Stressors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: The in vivo cytokine response to chemical stressors is a promising mainstream tool used to assess potential systemic inflammation and immune function changes. Notably, new instrumentation and statistical analysis provide the selectivity and sensitivity to rapidly diff...

  19. Is prenatal childbirth preparation effective in decreasing adverse maternal and neonatal response to labor? A nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Hee; Nava-Ocampo, Alejandro A; Kim, Sun Kyung; Kim, Seo Hui; Kim, Yun Ju; Han, Jung Yeol; Ahn, Hyun Kyong; Ryu, Hyun Mee; Yang, Jae Hyug; Kim, Moon Young

    2008-04-01

    Sophrology, based on a combination of Western relaxation therapy and Eastern yoga and meditation might decrease maternal stress during labor. This study aimed to evaluate whether prenatal sophrologic childbirth preparation may decrease maternal and neonatal adverse response associated with delivery. In a nested case-control study, 69 nulliparous, singleton pregnant women who underwent an educational course of sophrologic childbirth preparation were compared to 69 nulliparous, singleton, age- and gestational age-matched pregnant women who did not receive any childbirth preparation. All babies were vaginally delivered. Groups were not different (P > 0.05) in the number of neonates born with meconium-stained amniotic fluid as well as in the number of babies with Apgar score < or = 7 at 1 and 5 minutes after birth. Duration of labor was not different between groups. The number of women requiring oxytocin and delivering babies with low pH blood levels tended to be lower in the group undergoing sophrologic childbirth preparation, i.e. 58.0% vs 72.5% (P = 0.07) and 1.4% vs 10.9% (P = 0.06), respectively. In conclusion, we were unable to confirm that prenatal sophrologic childbirth preparation has a definitive role in decreasing adverse maternal and fetal response to pain or in shortening labor. Prospective cohort studies with a larger sample size or randomized trials may help to clarify this gap. PMID:18551817

  20. Selenium toxicity from a misformulated dietary supplement, adverse health effects, and the temporal response in the nail biologic monitor.

    PubMed

    Morris, John Steven; Crane, Stacy B

    2013-04-01

    Use of dietary supplements in the U.S. has increased steadily over the last 25 years. While misformulation is uncommon, the consequences can be serious. A March 2008 voluntary market recall removed supplement products responsible for the most serious selenium toxicity outbreak that has occurred in the U.S. We quantified selenium concentrations in the misformulated supplement products, measured the temporal response in the nail biologic monitor, and associated exposure to self-reported selenosis symptoms. Subjects recruited through state health departments and referrals provided samples of the misformulated supplement products, exposure information, monthly toenail and or fingernail clippings or onycholysitic nail fragments, and listed their newly onset adverse health effects attributed to selenium toxicity. Ninety-seven subjects enrolled and submitted at least one test sample. Peak selenium concentrations (up to 18.3 and 44.1 μg/g for toenails and fingernails, respectively) were measured. Multiple samples (52 total) of all six recalled supplement lots were analyzed ranging from 22,300 to 32,200 μg selenium per daily dose. Average consumption was 30.9 ± 13.9 doses; 73 subjects provided follow-up data on selenosis symptoms at 2.50 ± 0.14 years. Nail samples accurately reflect exposure in this selenium toxicity outbreak, which resulted in long-term/permanent adverse health effects. PMID:23538937

  1. Selenium Toxicity from a Misformulated Dietary Supplement, Adverse Health Effects, and the Temporal Response in the Nail Biologic Monitor

    PubMed Central

    Morris, John Steven; Crane, Stacy B.

    2013-01-01

    Use of dietary supplements in the U.S. has increased steadily over the last 25 years. While misformulation is uncommon, the consequences can be serious. A March 2008 voluntary market recall removed supplement products responsible for the most serious selenium toxicity outbreak that has occurred in the U.S. We quantified selenium concentrations in the misformulated supplement products, measured the temporal response in the nail biologic monitor, and associated exposure to self-reported selenosis symptoms. Subjects recruited through state health departments and referrals provided samples of the misformulated supplement products, exposure information, monthly toenail and or fingernail clippings or onycholysitic nail fragments, and listed their newly onset adverse health effects attributed to selenium toxicity. Ninety-seven subjects enrolled and submitted at least one test sample. Peak selenium concentrations (up to 18.3 and 44.1 μg/g for toenails and fingernails, respectively) were measured. Multiple samples (52 total) of all six recalled supplement lots were analyzed ranging from 22,300 to 32,200 μg selenium per daily dose. Average consumption was 30.9 ± 13.9 doses; 73 subjects provided follow-up data on selenosis symptoms at 2.50 ± 0.14 years. Nail samples accurately reflect exposure in this selenium toxicity outbreak, which resulted in long-term/permanent adverse health effects. PMID:23538937

  2. Tissue engineering tools for modulation of the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Boehler, Ryan M.; Graham, John G.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds have emerged as a powerful tool within regenerative medicine. These materials are being designed to create environments that promote regeneration through a combination of: (i) scaffold architecture, (ii) the use of scaffolds as vehicles for transplanting progenitor cells, and/or (iii) localized delivery of inductive factors or genes encoding for these inductive factors. This review describes the techniques associated with each of these components. Additionally, the immune response is increasingly recognized as a factor influencing regeneration. The immune reaction to an implant begins with an acute response to the injury and innate recognition of foreign materials, with the subsequent chronic immune response involving specific recognition of antigens (e.g., transplanted cells) by the adaptive immune response, which can eventually lead to rejection of the implant. Thus, we also describe the impact of each component on the immune response, and strategies (e.g., material design, anti-inflammatory cytokine delivery, and immune cell recruitment/transplantation) to modulate, yet not eliminate, the local immune response in order to promote regeneration, which represents another important tool for regenerative medicine. PMID:21988690

  3. Diagnosis and Management of Adverse Local Tissue Reactions Secondary to Corrosion at the Head-Neck Junction in Patients With Metal on Polyethylene Bearings.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Darren R; Berger, Richard A; Paprosky, Wayne G; Sporer, Scott M; Jacobs, Joshua J; Della Valle, Craig J

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed 27 patients who underwent revision for an adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) secondary to corrosion at the head-neck junction with MoP bearings. Serum cobalt and chromium levels were elevated in all cases, with a mean cobalt of 11.2 ppb and chromium of 2.2 ppb. Patients underwent modular bearing exchange, including a ceramic head with a titanium sleeve in 23 of 27 cases with only one recurrence of ALTR in one of the four patients not treated with a ceramic head. The diagnosis of ALTR secondary to corrosion is associated with cobalt levels of >1 ppb with cobalt levels elevated above chromium. Retention of a well-fixed stem and modular exchange to a ceramic head leads to resolution of symptoms and decreases in metal levels. PMID:26321628

  4. The Confluence of Adverse Early Experience and Puberty on the Cortisol Awakening Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quevedo, Karina; Johnson, Anna E.; Loman, Michelle L.; LaFavor, Theresa L.; Gunnar, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Associations between early deprivation/neglect in the form of institutional care with the cortisol awakening response (CAR) were examined as a function of pubertal status among 12- and 13-year-old postinstitutionalized youth. CARs indexed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical reactivity. Postinstitutionalized youth were compared to youth adopted…

  5. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorelick, Daniel A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EED) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones, such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ER) in the larval heart compared to the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit similar tissue-specific effects as BPA and genistein or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: Selective patterns of ER activation were observed in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue-specificity in ER activation is due to differences in the expression of estrogen receptor subtypes. ERα is expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 has the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activate the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish has revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero is associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  6. Ascorbic Acid Reduces the Adverse Effects of Delayed Administration of Tissue Plasminogen Activator in a Rat Stroke Model.

    PubMed

    Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Amin, Fatemeh; Esmaeeli-Nadimi, Ali; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Kazemi-Arababadi, Mohammad; Kennedy, Derek

    2015-11-01

    Delayed treatment of stroke with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) induces overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) which leads to breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and causes more injuries to the brain parenchyma. In this study, the effect of ascorbic acid (AA), an antioxidant agent, on the delayed administration of r-tPA in a rat model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was investigated. Forty male rats were randomly divided into four groups: untreated control rats (ischaemic animals), AA-treated (500 mg/kg; 5 hr after stroke) rats, r-tPA-treated (5 hr after stroke 1 mg/kg) rats and rats treated with the combination of AA and r-tPA. Middle cerebral artery occlusion was induced by occluding the right middle cerebral artery (MCA). Infarct size, BBB, brain oedema and the levels of MMP-9 were measured at the end of study. Neurological deficits were evaluated at 24 and 48 hr after stroke. Compared to the control or r-tPA-treated animals, AA alone (p < 0.001) or in combination with r-tPA (p < 0.05) significantly decreased infarct volume. Ascorbic acid alone or r-tPA + AA significantly reduced BBB permeability (p < 0.05), levels of MMP-9 (p < 0.05 versus control; p < 0.01 versus r-tPA) and brain oedema (p < 0.001) when compared to either the control or the r-tPA-treated animals. Latency to the removal of sticky labels from the forepaw was also significantly decreased after the administration of AA + r-tPA (p < 0.05) at 24 or 48 hr after stroke. Based on our data, acute treatment with AA may be considered as a useful candidate to reduce the side effects of delayed application of r-tPA in stroke therapy. PMID:25899606

  7. Tissue communication in a systemic immune response of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hairu; Hultmark, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Several signaling pathways, including the JAK/STAT and Toll pathways, are known to activate blood cells (hemocytes) in Drosophila melanogaster larvae. They are believed to regulate the immune response against infections by parasitoid wasps, such as Leptopilina boulardi, but how these pathways control the hemocytes is not well understood. Here, we discuss the recent discovery that both muscles and fat body take an active part in this response. Parasitoid wasp infection induces Upd2 and Upd3 secretion from hemocytes, leading to JAK/STAT activation mainly in hemocytes and in skeletal muscles. JAK/STAT activation in muscles, but not in hemocytes, is required for an efficient encapsulation of wasp eggs. This suggests that Upd2 and Upd3 are important cytokines, coordinating different tissues for the cellular immune response in Drosophila. In the fat body, Toll signaling initiates a systemic response in which hemocytes are mobilized and activated hemocytes (lamellocytes) are generated. However, the contribution of Toll signaling to the defense against wasps is limited, probably because the wasps inject inhibitors that prevent the activation of the Toll pathway. In conclusion, parasite infection induces a systemic response in Drosophila larvae involving major organ systems and probably the physiology of the entire organism. PMID:27116253

  8. Cellular Responses and Tissue Depots for Nanoformulated Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Skinner, Andrea L.; Araínga, Mariluz A.; Puligujja, Pavan; Palandri, Diana L.; Baldridge, Hannah M.; Edagwa, Benson J.; McMillan, JoEllyn M.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2015-01-01

    Long-acting nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy (nanoART) induces a range of innate immune migratory, phagocytic and secretory cell functions that perpetuate drug depots. While recycling endosomes serve as the macrophage subcellular depots, little is known of the dynamics of nanoART-cell interactions. To this end, we assessed temporal leukocyte responses, drug uptake and distribution following both intraperitoneal and intramuscular injection of nanoformulated atazanavir (nanoATV). Local inflammatory responses heralded drug distribution to peritoneal cell populations, regional lymph nodes, spleen and liver. This proceeded for three days in male Balb/c mice. NanoATV-induced changes in myeloid populations were assessed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) with CD45, CD3, CD11b, F4/80, and GR-1 antibodies. The localization of nanoATV within leukocyte cell subsets was determined by confocal microscopy. Combined FACS and ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry assays determined nanoATV carriages by cell-based vehicles. A robust granulocyte, but not peritoneal macrophage nanoATV response paralleled zymosan A treatment. ATV levels were highest at sites of injection in peritoneal or muscle macrophages, dependent on the injection site. The spleen and liver served as nanoATV tissue depots while drug levels in lymph nodes were higher than those recorded in plasma. Dual polymer and cell labeling demonstrated a nearly exclusive drug reservoir in macrophages within the liver and spleen. Overall, nanoART induces innate immune responses coincident with rapid tissue macrophage distribution. Taken together, these works provide avenues for therapeutic development designed towards chemical eradication of human immunodeficiency viral infection. PMID:26716700

  9. Tissue engineering of electrically responsive tissues using polyaniline based polymers: a review.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Taimoor H; Rai, Ranjana; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-11-01

    Conducting polymers have found numerous applications as biomaterial components serving to effectively deliver electrical signals from an external source to the seeded cells. Several cell types including cardiomyocytes, neurons, and osteoblasts respond to electrical signals by improving their functional outcomes. Although a wide variety of conducting polymers are available, polyaniline (PANI) has emerged as a popular choice due to its attractive properties such as ease of synthesis, tunable conductivity, environmental stability, and biocompatibility. PANI in its pure form has exhibited biocompatibility both in vitro and in vivo, and has been combined with a host of biodegradable polymers to form composites having a range of mechanical, electrical, and surface properties. Moreover, recent studies in literature report on the functionalization of polyaniline oligomers with end segments that make it biodegradable and improve its biocompatibility, two properties which make these materials highly desirable for applications in tissue engineering. This review will discuss the features and properties of PANI based composites that make them effective biomaterials, and it provides a comprehensive summary of studies where the use of PANI as a biomaterial component has enhanced cellular function and behavior. We also discuss recent studies utilizing functionalized PANI oligomers, and conclude that electroactive PANI and its derivatives show great promise in eliciting favorable responses from various cell lines that respond to electrical stimuli, and are therefore effective biomaterials for the engineering of electrically responsive biological tissues and organs. PMID:25112936

  10. First Outbreak Response Using an Oral Cholera Vaccine in Africa: Vaccine Coverage, Acceptability and Surveillance of Adverse Events, Guinea, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Luquero, Francisco J.; Grout, Lise; Ciglenecki, Iza; Sakoba, Keita; Traore, Bala; Heile, Melat; Dialo, Alpha Amadou; Itama, Christian; Serafini, Micaela; Legros, Dominique; Grais, Rebecca F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite World Health Organization (WHO) prequalification of two safe and effective oral cholera vaccines (OCV), concerns about the acceptability, potential diversion of resources, cost and feasibility of implementing timely campaigns has discouraged their use. In 2012, the Ministry of Health of Guinea, with the support of Médecins Sans Frontières organized the first mass vaccination campaign using a two-dose OCV (Shanchol) as an additional control measure to respond to the on-going nationwide epidemic. Overall, 316,250 vaccines were delivered. Here, we present the results of vaccination coverage, acceptability and surveillance of adverse events. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a cross-sectional cluster survey and implemented adverse event surveillance. The study population included individuals older than 12 months, eligible for vaccination, and residing in the areas targeted for vaccination (Forécariah and Boffa, Guinea). Data sources were household interviews with verification by vaccination card and notifications of adverse events from surveillance at vaccination posts and health centres. In total 5,248 people were included in the survey, 3,993 in Boffa and 1,255 in Forécariah. Overall, 89.4% [95%CI:86.4–91.8%] and 87.7% [95%CI:84.2–90.6%] were vaccinated during the first round and 79.8% [95%CI:75.6–83.4%] and 82.9% [95%CI:76.6–87.7%] during the second round in Boffa and Forécariah respectively. The two dose vaccine coverage (including card and oral reporting) was 75.8% [95%CI: 71.2–75.9%] in Boffa and 75.9% [95%CI: 69.8–80.9%] in Forécariah respectively. Vaccination coverage was higher in children. The main reason for non-vaccination was absence. No severe adverse events were notified. Conclusions/Significance The well-accepted mass vaccination campaign reached high coverage in a remote area with a mobile population. Although OCV should not be foreseen as the long-term solution for global cholera control, they should be

  11. Biological responses of workplace particles and their association with adverse health effects on miners.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weihong; Stempelmann, Karin; Rehn, Steffeni; Diederichs, Herbert; Rehn, Bernd; Bruch, Joachim

    2004-12-01

    Epidemiological research has demonstrated the relationship between exposure to quartz dust and an elevated risk of pneumoconiosis and possible elevated risk of cancer. The current study was designed to evaluate the biological responses of workplace particles containing crystalline silica using an in vitro cell test. Respirable particle samples were sampled from four tin mines, where the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for pneumoconiosis was 51.6 and SMR for lung cancer was 2.2 in dust-exposed miners. Alveolar macrophages (AM) are considered as the target cells for primary dust effects. The samples were then measured at 15, 30, 60 and 120 microg particle per 10(6) AM for cytoxicity with the release of glucuronidase, lactate dehydrogenase, for reactive oxygen damage with H(2)O(2) release, and for ability to induce fibrosis using the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Pure quartz (DQ12) and corundum were used as controls. The results showed the samples from tin mines caused a higher cytoxicity when compared to corundum, yet lower when compared to quartz. However, reactive oxygen species release (148-177 nmol/3 x 10(5) AM in high concentration of 120 microg/10(6) AM) induced by the samples were significantly higher than that induced by quartz (57 nmol/3 x 10(5) AM) and corundum (62 nmol/3 x 10(5) AM). Furthermore, particle samples induced higher TNF-alpha secretion than corundum, the samples from Limu tin mine induced much higher TNF-alpha levels than that induced by DQ12 quartz. The results from the in vitro tests help elucidate the degree of hazard of dust particles in tin mines. The in vitro reaction patterns of AM also constitute a powerful tool to monitor biological and pathogenic responses of humans following dust particle exposure. PMID:15568045

  12. Pharmacovigilance Analysis of Serious Adverse Events Reported for Biologic Response Modifiers Used as Prophylaxis against Transplant Rejection: a Real-World Postmarketing Experience from the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS)

    PubMed Central

    Ali, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Immunosuppression by biologic response modifiers (BRM) is a crucial component for successful organ transplantation. In addition to their variable effectiveness in the prevention of organ rejection, these medications have safety concerns that complicate therapeutic outcomes in organ transplant patients. Objective: This study aims at identifying and characterizing safety signals of serious adverse events associated with exposure to BRM among organ transplant patients in a real-world environment. Methods: The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System was utilized to apply a pharmacovigilance disproportionality analysis to indentify serious adverse events. Associations between drugs and events were measured by empirical Bayes geometric mean (EBGM) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (EB05–EB95). Associations with EBGM≥2 were considered significant safety signals. Results: From 1997 to 2012, a total of 12,151 serious adverse event reports for BRM were reported; 15.6% of them (n=1,711) met the safety signal threshold of EB05>1, and 11.6% of these signals (n=199) were significant (EBGM≥2). Sirolimus and mycophenolate accounted for the majority of all signals; antithymocyte immunoglobulin (ATI) and cyclosporine contributed to the majority of significant signals. The following significant signals were identified for ATI (reduced therapeutic response, pulmonary edema, hypotension, serum sickness, infusion-related reaction, and anaphylactic reaction); for azathioprine (alternaria infection, fungal skin infection, and lymphoproliferative disorder); for cyclosporine (neurotoxicity, graft vs. host disease, and thyroid cancer); for cyclophosphamide (disease progression); for daclizumab (cytomegalovirus infection); and for tacrolimus (coma and tremor). 33.6% of these events contributed to patient death (n=67); 6.5% were life-threatening (n=13); 32.1% lead to hospitalization (n=64); and 27.6% resulted in other serious outcomes (n=55). Conclusion: Utilization

  13. Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Kunz, Hawley; Sams, Clarence F.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the effect of space travel on the human immune system has proven to be extremely challenging. Limited opportunities for in-flight studies, varying mission durations, technical and logistical obstacles, small subject numbers, and a broad range of potential assays have contributed to this problem. Additionally, the inherent complexity of the immune system, with its vast array of cell populations, sub-populations, diverse regulatory molecules, and broad interactions with other physiological systems, makes determining precise variables to measure very difficult. There is also the challenge of determining the clinical significance of any observed immune alterations. Will such a change lead to disease, or is it a transient subclinical observation related to short-term stress? The effect of this problem may be observed by scanning publications associated with immunity and spaceflight, which began to appear during the 1970s. Although individually they are each valid studies, the comprehensive literature to date suffers from widely varying sampling methods and assay techniques, low subject counts, and sometimes a disparate focus on narrow aspects of immunity. The most clinically relevant data are derived from in-flight human studies, which have demonstrated altered cell-mediated immunity and reactivation of latent herpes viruses. Much more data are available from post-flight testing of humans, with clear evidence of altered cytokine production patterns, altered leukocyte distribution, continued latent viral reactivation, and evidence of dramatically altered virus-specific immunity. It is unknown if post-flight assessments relate to the in-flight condition or are a response to landing stress and readaptation. In-flight culture of cells has clearly demonstrated that immune cells are gravity-sensitive and display altered functional characteristics. It is unknown if these data are related to in vivo immune cell function or are an artifact of microgravity culture

  14. Urinary Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) • Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 7 (IGFBP7) Predicts Adverse Outcome in Pediatric Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Westhoff, Jens H.; Tönshoff, Burkhard; Waldherr, Sina; Pöschl, Johannes; Teufel, Ulrike; Westhoff, Timm H.; Fichtner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background The G1 cell cycle inhibitors tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) have been identified as promising biomarkers for the prediction of adverse outcomes including renal replacement therapy (RRT) and mortality in critically ill adult patients who develop acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the prognostic value of urinary TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 in neonatal and pediatric AKI for adverse outcome has not been investigated yet. Methods The product of the urinary concentration of TIMP-2 and IGFBP7 ([TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7]) was assessed by a commercially available immunoassay (NephroCheck™) in a prospective cohort study in 133 subjects aged 0–18 years including 46 patients with established AKI according to pRIFLE criteria, 27 patients without AKI (non-AKI group I) and 60 apparently healthy neonates and children (non-AKI group II). AKI etiologies were: dehydration/hypovolemia (n = 7), hemodynamic instability (n = 7), perinatal asphyxia (n = 9), septic shock (n = 7), typical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS; n = 5), interstitial nephritis (n = 5), vasculitis (n = 4), nephrotoxic injury (n = 1) and renal vein thrombosis (n = 1). Results When AKI patients were classified into pRIFLE criteria, 6/46 (13%) patients fulfilled the criteria for the category “Risk”, 13/46 (28%) for “Injury”, 26/46 (57%) for “Failure” and 1/46 (2%) for “Loss”. Patients in the “Failure” stage had a median 3.7-fold higher urinary [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] compared to non-AKI subjects (P<0.001). When analyzed for AKI etiology, highest [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] values were found in patients with septic shock (P<0.001 vs. non-AKI I+II). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses in the AKI group revealed good performance of [TIMP-2]•[IGFBP7] in predicting 30-day (area under the curve (AUC) 0.79; 95% CI, 0.61–0.97) and 3-month mortality (AUC 0.84; 95% CI, 0.67–0.99) and moderate performance in predicting RRT

  15. Tissue response to the components of a hydroxyapatite-coated composite femoral implant.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S A; Pauyo, T; Lim, L; Legoux, J G; Bureau, M N

    2010-09-01

    Bone loss around femoral implants used for THA is a persistent clinical concern. It may be caused by stress shielding, generally attributed to a mismatch in stiffness between the implants and host bone. In this regard, a fatigue resistant, carbon fiber (CF) composite femoral implant with bone-matching stiffness has been developed. This study evaluated the tissue response to the three material components of this implant in normal and textured (blasted with 24 grit alumina) surfaces: the hydroxyapatite (HA) coating, the CF composite and the intermediate crystalline HA particulate composite layer to bond to the HA coating (blended). Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bilateral femoral implantation each receiving two rod-like implants. Bone apposition to the HA (37%) and textured Ti (41%) implants was not significantly different. Bone apposition to the untextured CF (14%) and blended (19%) implants and polished Ti (8%) implants was significantly lower. Bone apposition to the textured CF (9%) and blended (11%) implants was lower (but not statistically from the as received or untextured counterparts). Nearly all sections from femurs containing CF implants presented CF debris. There was no evidence of localized bone loss or any strong immune response associated with any of the implant materials. All materials were well tolerated with minimal inflammation despite the presence of particulate debris. The high degree of bone apposition to the HA-coated composite implants and the lack of short-term inflammation and adverse tissue response to the three material implant component support continued evaluation of this composite technology for use in THA. PMID:20730932

  16. Estradiol release kinetics determine tissue response in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Otto, Christiane; Kantner, Ingrid; Nubbemeyer, Reinhard; Schkoldow, Jenny; Fuchs, Iris; Krahl, Elisabeth; Vonk, Richardus; Schüler, Christiane; Fritzemeier, Karl-Heinrich; Erben, Reinhold G

    2012-04-01

    Estrogen replacement is an effective therapy of postmenopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, bone loss, and vaginal dryness. Undesired estrogen effects are the stimulation of uterine and mammary gland epithelial cell proliferation as well as hepatic estrogenicity. In this study, we examined the influence of different estradiol release kinetics on tissue responsivity in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Pulsed release kinetics was achieved by ip or sc administration of estradiol dissolved in physiological saline containing 10% ethanol (EtOH/NaCl) whereas continuous release kinetics was achieved by sc injection of estradiol dissolved in benzylbenzoate/ricinus oil (1+4, vol/vol). Initial 3-d experiments in OVX rats showed that pulsed ip estradiol administration had profoundly reduced stimulatory effects on the uterus and the liver compared with continuous release kinetics. On the other hand, both administration forms prevented severe vaginal atrophy. Based on these results, we compared the effects of pulsed (sc in EtOH/NaCl) vs. continuous (sc in benzylbenzoate/ricinus oil) estradiol release kinetics on bone, uterus, mammary gland, and liver in a 4-month study in OVX rats. Ovariectomy-induced bone loss was prevented by both administration regimes. However, pulsed estradiol resulted in lower uterine weight, reduced induction of hepatic gene expression, and reduced mammary epithelial hyperplasia relative to continuous estradiol exposure. We conclude that organ responsivity is influenced by different hormone release kinetics, a fact that might be exploited to reduce undesired estradiol effects in postmenopausal women. PMID:22334713

  17. A normal tissue dose response model of dynamic repair processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Markus; Belka, Claus

    2006-01-01

    A model is presented for serial, critical element complication mechanisms for irradiated volumes from length scales of a few millimetres up to the entire organ. The central element of the model is the description of radiation complication as the failure of a dynamic repair process. The nature of the repair process is seen as reestablishing the structural organization of the tissue, rather than mere replenishment of lost cells. The interactions between the cells, such as migration, involved in the repair process are assumed to have finite ranges, which limits the repair capacity and is the defining property of a finite-sized reconstruction unit. Since the details of the repair processes are largely unknown, the development aims to make the most general assumptions about them. The model employs analogies and methods from thermodynamics and statistical physics. An explicit analytical form of the dose response of the reconstruction unit for total, partial and inhomogeneous irradiation is derived. The use of the model is demonstrated with data from animal spinal cord experiments and clinical data about heart, lung and rectum. The three-parameter model lends a new perspective to the equivalent uniform dose formalism and the established serial and parallel complication models. Its implications for dose optimization are discussed.

  18. Gene expression responses in photosynthetic tissues to herbicides and pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When plants are attacked by pathogens, the photosynthetic tissue is often dramatically affected. The chloroplasts within this tissue can participate in defense by being a source of many plant secondary metabolites that serve as defense signaling compounds, antioxidants, and phytoalexins. The chlorop...

  19. DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY I. CHARACTERIZATION OF DATABASE AND DETERMINATION OF NO OBSERVED ADVERSE EFFECT LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental toxicity risk assessment currently relies on the estimation of reference doses or reference concentrations based on no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELS) and uncertainty factors. he benchmark dose (BMD) has been proposed as an alternative basis for reference va...

  20. Possession of ATM Sequence Variants as Predictor for Late Normal Tissue Responses in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Alice Y.; Fan, Grace; Atencio, David P.; Green, Sheryl; Formenti, Silvia C.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Iyengar, Preetha B.A.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Stock, Richard G.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: The ATM gene product is a central component of cell cycle regulation and genomic surveillance. We hypothesized that DNA sequence alterations in ATM predict for adverse effects after external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 131 patients with a minimum of 2 years follow-up who had undergone breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy were screened for sequence alterations in ATM using DNA from blood lymphocytes. Genetic variants were identified using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scoring schemes for skin and subcutaneous tissues were applied to quantify the radiation-induced effects. Results: Of the 131 patients, 51 possessed ATM sequence alterations located within exons or in short intron regions flanking each exon that encompass putative splice site regions. Of these 51 patients, 21 (41%) exhibited a minimum of a Grade 2 late radiation response. In contrast, of the 80 patients without an ATM sequence variation, only 18 (23%) had radiation-induced adverse responses, for an odds ratio of 2.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.2). Fifteen patients were heterozygous for the G{yields}A polymorphism at nucleotide 5557, which causes substitution of asparagine for aspartic acid at position 1853 of the ATM protein. Of these 15 patients, 8 (53%) exhibited a Grade 2-4 late response compared with 31 (27%) of the 116 patients without this alteration, for an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-9.4). Conclusion: Sequence variants located in the ATM gene, in particular the 5557 G{yields}A polymorphism, may predict for late adverse radiation responses in breast cancer patients.

  1. Mimicking brain tissues by doping scatterers into gelatin tissue phantoms and determination of chemical species responsible for NMPPAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Sudhir; Cullum, Brian M.

    2012-06-01

    It has been shown that non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS) has a great potential to be used as a high resolution surgical guidance technique during brain tumor surgery due to its ability of non-invasive or minimally invasive tumor differentiation. However, for experimental purposes associated with method validation, the use of real tissues is not always ideal because of issues such as availability, safety, storage, chemical doping, necessary control of size and shape, etc. To overcome these issues, tissue phantoms made from animal tissues and/or biochemical constituents, are often employed for such analyses. This work demonstrates the ability to develop and characterize gelatin based tissue phantoms with comparable optical and acoustic properties to real tissues by doping the phantoms with a scattering substance, 0.3 μm diameter Al2O3 particles. Using these phantoms, light scattering coefficients (μs) of 39 cm-1 have been generated, which are comparable to real brain tissue, thus making them a great alternative to real tissue for validation studies. In addition, this work also investigates the non-fluorescent species NAD+ found in the tissues, to evaluate its potential for being detected by NMPPAS. NMPPAS spectra of NAD+ shows a very promising beginning to determine other chemical species such as flavins, collagen, tryptophan, etc responsible for NMPPAS spectral signatures, associated with tumorogenesis.

  2. Elevated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response Contributes to Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Aging.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amiya Kumar; Garg, Sanjay Kumar; Mau, Theresa; O'Brien, Martin; Liu, Jianhua; Yung, Raymond

    2015-11-01

    Adipose tissue inflammation has been linked to age-related metabolic diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance in diet associated obesity has been correlated with aberrant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This study was undertaken to test our hypothesis that increased ER stress response contributes to age-associated adipose tissue inflammation. We found elevated ER stress response in adipose tissue of old (18-20 months) compared to young (4-6 months) mice. Elevated ER stress markers BIP (GRP78), CHOP, cleaved-ATF-6, phospho-IRE1α, and XBP-1 were observed in old compared to young adipose tissue stromal cells. Additionally, old adipose tissue stromal cells were more sensitive to an ER stress inducer, thapsigargin. Similar experiments with adipose tissue macrophages showed elevated Chop and Bip expression in old adipose tissue macrophages when induced with thapsigargin. Treatment of chemical chaperone 4-phenyle-butyric acid alleviated ER stress in adipose tissue stromal cells and adipose tissue macrophages and attenuated the production of IL-6 and MCP-1 by adipose tissue stromal cells, and TNF-α by adipose tissue macrophages from both young and old mice. Finally, old mice fed with 4-phenyle-butyric acid have reduced expression of ER stress and inflammatory cytokine genes. Our data suggests that an exaggerated ER stress response in aging adipose tissue contributes to age-associated inflammation that can be mitigated by treatment with chemical chaperones. PMID:25324219

  3. Difference in tumor incidence and other tissue responses to polyetherurethanes and polydimethylsiloxane in long-term subcutaneous implantation into rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, A; Kawasaki, Y; Takada, K; Aida, Y; Kurokama, Y; Kojima, S; Shintani, H; Matsui, M; Nohmi, T; Matsuoka, A

    1992-05-01

    The long-term (1- and 2-year) adverse tissue responses including tumor formation by subcutaneous implantation of polyurethanes (PUs) and silicone (Sil) films into rats were compared. The weight-averaged molecular weights (Mw) of the PUs prepared from 4,4'-diphenylmethanediisocyanate, poly(tetramethyleneglycol) of Mn = 1000 and 1,4-butanediol are 220,000 (U-4), 124,000 (U-6), and 55,600 (U-8). The 50:50 mixed film of U-6 and silicone (U-6/sil) was prepared by roll-mixing of the noncured silicone and the U-6 solution followed by evaporation of the solvent and heat-curing at 70 degrees C. The tissue responses around implants were classified into four groups as follows: (A) tumor, (B) atypical cell proliferation accompanied by preneoplastic changes, (C) cell proliferation without preneoplastic changes, (D) no obvious responses. In both implantation periods, the PUs gave higher incidents of the adverse responses including tumor formation in comparison to Sil. No significant molecular weight-dependent trend was found in a 1-year study using U-4, 6, and 8. Significant PU-dose-dependent trends were found in a 2-year study: the total active incidence (A+B+C), U-6(22/29) greater than U-6/sil(11/29) greater than sil(7/28); tumor incidence (A), U-6(11/29) greater than U-6/sil(2/29) = sil(2/28). No detectable amounts of 4,4'-methylenedianiline (MDA) were found in the PUs. The methanol extracts from the PUs were negative in the mutagenicity tests. These indicate no relationship between the tumor formation by the PU films and the mutagenicities of the chemicals (mainly oligomers) leached from the PUs. PMID:1512283

  4. 41 CFR 102-78.40 - What responsibilities do Federal agencies have when an undertaking adversely affects a historic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... guidance on the protection of historic and cultural properties in 36 CFR part 800. ... Federal agencies have when an undertaking adversely affects a historic or cultural property? 102-78.40... (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 78-HISTORIC PRESERVATION Historic Preservation §...

  5. DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY: I. CHARACTERIZATION OF DATA BASE AND DETERMINATION OF NO OBSERVED ADVERSE EFFECT LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental toxicity risk assessment currently relies on the estimation of reference doses or references concentrations based on the use of no-observed-adverse-effect-levels (NOAELs) and uncertainty factors. The benchmark dose (BMD) has been proposed as an alternative basis for...

  6. DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT FOR DEVELOPMENT TOXICITY: II. COMPARISON OF GENERIC BENCHMARK DOSE ESTIMATES WITH NO OBSERVED ADVERSE EFFECT LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental toxicity risk assessment currently relies on the estimation of reference doses (RfDDTS) or reference concentrations (RfCDTS) based on the use of no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELS) divided by uncertainty factors (UFs)The benchmark dose (BUD) has been proposed...

  7. Tissue response to a supplement high in aluminum and silicon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine the effects of sodium zeolite A (SZA) on mineral metabolism and tissue mineral composition in calves. Twenty calves were placed on study at three days of age, and were placed into one of two groups: SS, which received 0.05% BW SZA added to their milk replacer and CO, w...

  8. Dynamic gap junctional communication: a delimiting model for tissue responses.

    PubMed Central

    Christ, G J; Brink, P R; Ramanan, S V

    1994-01-01

    Gap junctions are aqueous intercellular channels formed by a diverse class of membrane-spanning proteins, known as connexins. These aqueous pores provide partial cytoplasmic continuity between cells in most tissues, and are freely permeable to a host of physiologically relevant second messenger molecules/ionic species (e.g., Ca2+, IP3, cAMP, cGMP). Despite the fact that these second messenger molecules/ionic species have been shown to alter junctional patency, there is no clear basis for understanding how dynamic and transient changes in the intracellular concentration of second messenger molecules might modulate the extent of intercellular communication among coupled cells. Thus, we have modified the tissue monolayer model of Ramanan and Brink (1990) to account for both the up-regulatory and down-regulatory effects on junctions by second messenger molecules that diffuse through gap junctions. We have chosen the vascular wall as our morphological correlate because of its anisotropy and large investment of gap junctions. The model allows us to illustrate the putative behavior of gap junctions under a variety of physiologically relevant conditions. The modeling studies demonstrated that transient alterations in intracellular second messenger concentrations are capable of producing 50-125% changes in the number of cells recruited into a functional syncytial unit, after activation of a single cell. Moreover, the model conditions required to demonstrate such physiologically relevant changes in intercellular diffusion among coupled cells are commonly observed in intact tissues and cultured cells. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:7811948

  9. Comparison of Newcastle disease vaccine administered as powder or liquid in relation to the serum antibody response and adverse vaccinal reactions in broilers.

    PubMed

    Landman, W J M; Huyge, K; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C; van Eck, J H H

    2015-01-01

    Liquid spray and aerosol mass vaccination of poultry have several drawbacks, such as uncontrolled deposition of vaccine particles in the respiratory tract and vaccine virus inactivation by formation and evaporation of droplets. These may be addressed by using dry powder vaccines with defined particle size distribution targeting the upper (primary vaccination) or the entire respiratory tract (booster vaccination). Therefore, a coarse Newcastle disease (LZ58 strain) powder vaccine was administered to specified pathogen free (SPF) broiler hens to compare the antibody response and adverse vaccinal reactions with those induced by a coarse liquid spray and a fine liquid aerosol. Groups of 40 broilers each housed in isolators were vaccinated at 4 days of age and intratracheally inoculated with Escherichia coli (strain 506) at 11 days of age. Adverse vaccinal reactions were evaluated by measuring body weight gain and mortality between 4 and 11 days of age and between 11 and 18 days of age, and by recording colibacillosis lesions at 18 days of age. The antibody serum response was measured at 18 days of age by the haemagglutination inhibition test. Despite the relative low initial vaccine virus loss and narrow particle size distribution of the powder vaccines in comparison with their liquid counter parts, no significant differences (P > 0.05) regarding adverse vaccinal reactions and antibody response were observed between broilers vaccinated with the powder vaccines or with their liquid counterparts. PMID:25588317

  10. Computational methods for describing the laser-induced mechanical response of tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.; McGlaun, J.M.; Farnsworth, A.

    1994-02-01

    Detailed computational modeling of laser surgery requires treatment of the photoablation of human tissue by high intensity pulses of laser light and the subsequent thermomechanical response of the tissue. Three distinct physical regimes must be considered to accomplish this: (1) the immediate absorption of the laser pulse by the tissue and following tissue ablation, which is dependent upon tissue light absorption characteristics; (2) the near field thermal and mechanical response of the tissue to this laser pulse, and (3) the potential far field (and longer time) mechanical response of witness tissue. Both (2) and (3) are dependent upon accurate constitutive descriptions of the tissue. We will briefly review tissue absorptivity and mechanical behavior, with an emphasis on dynamic loads characteristic of the photoablation process. In this paper our focus will center on the requirements of numerical modeling and the uncertainties of mechanical tissue behavior under photoablation. We will also discuss potential contributions that computational simulations can make in the design of surgical protocols which utilize lasers, for example, in assessing the potential for collateral mechanical damage by laser pulses.

  11. Responses of the pulp, periradicular and soft tissues following trauma to the permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Yu, C Y; Abbott, P V

    2016-03-01

    Trauma to the permanent teeth involves not only the teeth but also the pulp, the periodontal ligament, alveolar bone, gingiva and other associated structures. There are many variations in the types of injuries with varying severity and often a tooth may sustain more than one injury at the same time. In more severe trauma cases, there are many different cellular systems of mineralized hard and unmineralized soft tissues involved, each with varying potential for healing. Furthermore, the responses of the different tissues may be interrelated and dependent on each other. Hence, healing subsequent to dental trauma has long been known to be very complex. Because of this complexity, tissue responses and the consequences following dental trauma have been confusing and puzzling for many clinicians. In this review, the tissue responses are described under the tissue compartments typically involved following dental trauma: the pulp, periradicular and associated soft tissues. The factors involved in the mechanisms of trauma are analysed for their effects on the tissue responses. A thorough understanding of the possible tissue responses is imperative for clinicians to overcome the confusion and manage dental trauma adequately and conservatively in order to minimize the consequences following trauma. PMID:26923447

  12. Trends in anti-D immune globulin for childhood immune thrombocytopenia: Usage, response rates, and adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Long, Michelle; Kalish, Leslie A.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Grace, Rachael F.

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) added a black box warning to anti-D immune globulin (Rho(D) immune globulin, anti-D) for immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) to warn of the complications related to severe hemolysis. The objective of this retrospective medical record review was to examine recent trends in anti-D use to treat ITP and rates of adverse events in a single large pediatric hematology program. Over a 7-year period, 176 (35%) of 502 ITP patients at our center received anti-D. Anti-D was the second most commonly prescribed drug for ITP from 2003 to 2010 overall and was given first most frequently (41%). Sixty-four percent of patients responded to anti-D, but 36% had adverse effects, including five patients requiring hospitalization. From 2003 to 2010, the use of anti-D as an initial therapy for ITP significantly decreased (P < 0.001). This trend preceded the 2010 FDA black box warning. In our experience, anti-D was associated with a significant number of adverse effects when used as a treatment for ITP, although none were life-threatening. Despite recent guidelines suggesting anti-D therapy for initial treatment for ITP, anti-D therapy for ITP has significantly decreased over the past 7 years. PMID:22190130

  13. The response of human tissues to carbon reinforced epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Howard, C B; Tayton, K J; Gibbs, A

    1985-08-01

    The tissue surrounding carbon fibre reinforced epoxy resin plates applied to forearm and tibial fractures was biopsied in 32 patients at the time the plates were removed. The reaction was minimal and was compared with that in a control group of 16 similar patients in whom stainless steel plates were used. No significant histological differences were found. A series of experiments on rats, in which the histology was studied from 2 to 78 weeks, also showed that there was very little reaction to carbon fibre reinforced plastic. PMID:4030870

  14. Histological study of periradicular tissue responses to uninfected and infected devitalized pulps in dogs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Louis M; Di Fiore, Peter M; Lin, Jarshen; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2006-01-01

    Uninfected necrotic tissue, such as that which follows a myocardial or cerebral infarct, is capable of inducing an inflammatory reaction. Eventually, the infarct is organized by granulation tissue. Why then, does uninfected devitalized pulp tissue, such as in traumatized teeth, not cause periradicular inflammation and does not become organized by granulation tissue? Four beagle dogs were used in this experiment. A total of 48 teeth, which included 24 maxillary and 24 mandibular incisors, were aseptically devitalized, leaving residual pulp tissues in the root canals, and equally divided into two groups. Group A (24 uninfected): A sterile cotton pellet was placed deep into the canal orifice before the pulp chamber and access opening were closed with a layer of zinc-oxide eugenol cement followed by glass ionomer cement. Group B (24 infected): The teeth were left open to the oral cavity for 7 days and then closed with a cotton pellet and zinc-oxide eugenol and glass ionomer cement. The animals were sacrificed one year after the experiment and prepared for histological examination of periradicular tissue responses to uninfected and infected devitalized pulp tissues. The results indicate that uninfected devitalized pulp tissues did not continuously release inflammatory mediators and cause persistent periradicular inflammation over a period of one year. However, infected devitalized pulp tissues induced various degrees of periradicular inflammation. Only the apical few millimeters of uninfected devitalized pulp tissue in the root canals were organized by granulation tissue from vital periodontal ligament tissue. PMID:16410065

  15. Imaging radiation response in tumor and normal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rafat, Marjan; Ali, Rehan; Graves, Edward E

    2015-01-01

    Although X-ray computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the primary imaging modalities used in the clinic to monitor tumor response to radiation therapy, multi-modal molecular imaging may facilitate improved early and specific evaluation of this process. Fast and accurate imaging that can provide both quantitative and biological information is necessary to monitor treatment and ultimately to develop individualized treatment options for patients. A combination of molecular and anatomic information will allow for deeper insight into the mechanisms of tumor response, which will lead to more effective radiation treatments as well as improved anti-cancer drugs. Much progress has been made in nuclear medicine imaging probes and MRI techniques to achieve increased accuracy and the evaluation of relevant biomarkers of radiation response. This review will emphasize promising molecular imaging techniques that monitor various biological processes following radiotherapy, including metabolism, hypoxia, cell proliferation, and angiogenesis. PMID:26269771

  16. The skin tissue is adversely affected by TNF-alpha blockers in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis: a 5-year prospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Natalia P.; dos Reis Neto, Edgard Torres; Soares, Maria Roberta M. P.; Freitas, Daniele S.; Porro, Adriana; Ciconelli, Rozana M.; Pinheiro, Marcelo M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the incidence of and the main risk factors associated with cutaneous adverse events in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis following anti-TNF-α therapy. METHODS: A total of 257 patients with active arthritis who were taking TNF-α blockers, including 158 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 87 with ankylosing spondylitis and 12 with psoriatic arthritis, were enrolled in a 5-year prospective analysis. Patients with overlapping or other rheumatic diseases were excluded. Anthropometric, socioeconomic, demographic and clinical data were evaluated, including the Disease Activity Score-28, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index and Psoriasis Area Severity Index. Skin conditions were evaluated by two dermatology experts, and in doubtful cases, skin lesion biopsies were performed. Associations between adverse cutaneous events and clinical, demographic and epidemiological variables were determined using the chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors. The significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: After 60 months of follow-up, 71 adverse events (73.85/1000 patient-years) were observed, of which allergic and immune-mediated phenomena were the most frequent events, followed by infectious conditions involving bacterial (47.1%), parasitic (23.5%), fungal (20.6%) and viral (8.8%) agents. CONCLUSION: The skin is significantly affected by adverse reactions resulting from the use of TNF-α blockers, and the main risk factors for cutaneous events were advanced age, female sex, a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, disease activity and the use of infliximab. PMID:24141833

  17. Modal response of a computational vocal fold model with a substrate layer of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cameron L; Achuthan, Ajit; Erath, Byron D

    2015-02-01

    This study demonstrates the effect of a substrate layer of adipose tissue on the modal response of the vocal folds, and hence, on the mechanics of voice production. Modal analysis is performed on the vocal fold structure with a lateral layer of adipose tissue. A finite element model is employed, and the first six mode shapes and modal frequencies are studied. The results show significant changes in modal frequencies and substantial variation in mode shapes depending on the strain rate of the adipose tissue. These findings highlight the importance of considering adipose tissue in computational vocal fold modeling. PMID:25698044

  18. The fractional viscoelastic response of human breast tissue cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, B.; Babahosseini, H.; Mahmoodi, S. N.; Agah, M.

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical response of a living cell is notoriously complicated. The complex, heterogeneous characteristics of cellular structure introduce difficulties that simple linear models of viscoelasticity cannot overcome, particularly at deep indentation depths. Herein, a nano-scale stress-relaxation analysis performed with an atomic force microscope reveals that isolated human breast cells do not exhibit simple exponential relaxation capable of being modeled by the standard linear solid (SLS) model. Therefore, this work proposes the application of the fractional Zener (FZ) model of viscoelasticity to extract mechanical parameters from the entire relaxation response, improving upon existing physical techniques to probe isolated cells. The FZ model introduces a new parameter that describes the fractional time-derivative dependence of the response. The results show an exceptional increase in conformance to the experimental data compared to that predicted by the SLS model, and the order of the fractional derivative (α) is remarkably homogeneous across the populations, with a median value of 0.48 ± 0.06 for the malignant population and 0.51 ± 0.07 for the benign. The cells’ responses exhibit power-law behavior and complexity not associated with simple relaxation (SLS, α = 1) that supports the application of a fractional model. The distributions of some of the FZ parameters also preserve the distinction between the malignant and benign sample populations seen from the linear model and previous results while including the contribution of fast-relaxation behavior. The resulting viscosity, measured by a composite relaxation time, exhibits considerably less dispersion due to residual error than the distribution generated by the linear model and therefore serves as a more powerful marker for cell differentiation.

  19. Materials approaches for modulating neural tissue responses to implanted microelectrodes through mechanical and biochemical means

    PubMed Central

    Sommakia, Salah; Lee, Heui C.; Gaire, Janak; Otto, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Implantable intracortical microelectrodes face an uphill struggle for widespread clinical use. Their potential for treating a wide range of traumatic and degenerative neural disease is hampered by their unreliability in chronic settings. A major factor in this decline in chronic performance is a reactive response of brain tissue, which aims to isolate the implanted device from the rest of the healthy tissue. In this review we present a discussion of materials approaches aimed at modulating the reactive tissue response through mechanical and biochemical means. Benefits and challenges associated with these approaches are analyzed, and the importance of multimodal solutions tested in emerging animal models are presented. PMID:25530703

  20. Postprandial Responses to Lipid and Carbohydrate Ingestion in Repeated Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Biopsies in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dordevic, Aimee L.; Pendergast, Felicity J.; Morgan, Han; Villas-Boas, Silas; Caldow, Marissa K.; Larsen, Amy E.; Sinclair, Andrew J.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a primary site of meta-inflammation. Diet composition influences adipose tissue metabolism and a single meal can drive an inflammatory response in postprandial period. This study aimed to examine the effect lipid and carbohydrate ingestion compared with a non-caloric placebo on adipose tissue response. Thirty-three healthy adults (age 24.5 ± 3.3 year (mean ± standard deviation (SD)); body mass index (BMI) 24.1 ± 3.2 kg/m2, were randomised into one of three parallel beverage groups; placebo (water), carbohydrate (maltodextrin) or lipid (dairy-cream). Subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue biopsies and serum samples were collected prior to (0 h), as well as 2 h and 4 h after consumption of the beverage. Adipose tissue gene expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) increased in all three groups, without an increase in circulating TNF-α. Serum leptin (0.6-fold, p = 0.03) and adipose tissue leptin gene expression levels (0.6-fold, p = 0.001) decreased in the hours following the placebo beverage, but not the nutrient beverages. Despite increased inflammatory cytokine gene expression in adipose tissue with all beverages, suggesting a confounding effect of the repeated biopsy method, differences in metabolic responses of adipose tissue and circulating adipokines to ingestion of lipid and carbohydrate beverages were observed. PMID:26140541

  1. Postprandial Responses to Lipid and Carbohydrate Ingestion in Repeated Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Biopsies in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Dordevic, Aimee L; Pendergast, Felicity J; Morgan, Han; Villas-Boas, Silas; Caldow, Marissa K; Larsen, Amy E; Sinclair, Andrew J; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-07-01

    Adipose tissue is a primary site of meta-inflammation. Diet composition influences adipose tissue metabolism and a single meal can drive an inflammatory response in postprandial period. This study aimed to examine the effect lipid and carbohydrate ingestion compared with a non-caloric placebo on adipose tissue response. Thirty-three healthy adults (age 24.5 ± 3.3 year (mean ± standard deviation (SD)); body mass index (BMI) 24.1 ± 3.2 kg/m2, were randomised into one of three parallel beverage groups; placebo (water), carbohydrate (maltodextrin) or lipid (dairy-cream). Subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue biopsies and serum samples were collected prior to (0 h), as well as 2 h and 4 h after consumption of the beverage. Adipose tissue gene expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) increased in all three groups, without an increase in circulating TNF-α. Serum leptin (0.6-fold, p = 0.03) and adipose tissue leptin gene expression levels (0.6-fold, p = 0.001) decreased in the hours following the placebo beverage, but not the nutrient beverages. Despite increased inflammatory cytokine gene expression in adipose tissue with all beverages, suggesting a confounding effect of the repeated biopsy method, differences in metabolic responses of adipose tissue and circulating adipokines to ingestion of lipid and carbohydrate beverages were observed. PMID:26140541

  2. Early tissue responses to zoledronate, locally delivered by bone screw, into a compromised cancellous bone site: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In fracture treatment, adequate fixation of implants is crucial to long-term clinical performance. Bisphosphonates (BP), potent inhibitors of osteoclastic bone resorption, are known to increase peri-implant bone mass and accelerate primary fixation. However, adverse effects are associated with systemic use of BPs. Thus, Zoledronic acid (ZOL) a potent BP was loaded on bone screws and evaluated in a local delivery model. Whilst mid- to long-term effects are already reported, early cellular events occurring at the implant/bone interface are not well described. The present study investigated early tissue responses to ZOL locally delivered, by bone screw, into a compromised cancellous bone site. Methods ZOL was immobilized on fibrinogen coated titanium screws. Using a bilateral approach, ZOL loaded test and non-loaded control screws were implanted into femoral condyle bone defects, created by an overdrilling technique. Histological analyses of the local tissue effects such as new bone formation and osteointegration were performed at days 1, 5 and 10. Results Histological evaluation of the five day ZOL group, demonstrated a higher osseous differentiation trend. At ten days an early influx of mesenchymal and osteoprogenitor cells was seen and a higher level of cellular proliferation and differentiation (p < 5%). In the ZOL group bone-to-screw contact and bone volume values within the defect tended to increase. Local drug release did not induce any adverse cellular effects. Conclusion This study indicates that local ZOL delivery into a compromised cancellous bone site actively supports peri-implant osteogenesis, positively affecting mesenchymal cells, at earlier time points than previously reported in the literature. PMID:24656151

  3. Mechanical response tissue analyzer for estimating bone strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Steele, Charles; Mauriello, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    One of the major concerns for extended space flight is weakness of the long bones of the legs, composed primarily of cortical bone, that functions to provide mechanical support. The strength of cortical bone is due to its complex structure, described simplistically as cylinders of parallel osteons composed of layers of mineralized collagen. The reduced mechanical stresses during space flight or immobilization of bone on Earth reduces the mineral content, and changes the components of its matrix and structure so that its strength is reduced. Currently, the established clinical measures of bone strength are indirect. The measures are based on determinations of mineral density by means of radiography, photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computer tomography. While the mineral content of bone is essential to its strength, there is growing awareness of the limitations of the measurement as the sole predictor of fracture risk in metabolic bone diseases, especially limitations of the measurement as the sole predictor of fracture risk in metabolic bone diseases, especially osteoporosis. Other experimental methods in clinical trials that more directly evaluate the physical properties of bone, and do not require exposure to radiation, include ultrasound, acoustic emission, and low-frequency mechanical vibration. The last method can be considered a direct measure of the functional capacity of a long bone since it quantifies the mechanical response to a stimulus delivered directly to the bone. A low frequency vibration induces a response (impedance) curve with a minimum at the resonant frequency, that a few investigators use for the evaluation of the bone. An alternative approach, the method under consideration, is to use the response curve as the basis for determination of the bone bending stiffness EI (E is the intrinsic material property and I is the cross-sectional moment of inertia) and mass, fundamental mechanical properties of bone.

  4. Responsiveness of neoplastic and hyperplastic parathyroid tissues to calcium in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Habener, J F

    1978-01-01

    Secretory and biosynthetic responses of adenomatous, carcinomatous, and hyperplastic parathyroid tissues to variable concentrations of extracellular calcium were assessed in vitro. Tissues, obtained at the time of parathyroidectomy, were incubated for 4 h in media containing radioactive amino acids and varying (0.5-5.0 mM) concentrations of calcium. Amounts of newly synthesized and total parathyroid hormone and proparathyroid hormone in extracts of tissues and media were measured by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by radioimmunoassay, respectively. All tissues studied (six adenomas, two specimens of chief-cell hyperplasia, one carcinoma, and normal bovine and human glands) responded to changes in calcium concentrations; decreasing concentrations of calcium stimulated release and decreased tissue storage of hormone. Six of the abnormal tissues required greater than normal concentrations of calcium (1.8-2.4 mM for 50% of effect) to elicit secretory responses comparable with those of normal glands (1.4 mM). Maximum effects of calcium on release of hormone varied from 2- to 10-fold among different tissues. Release of some hormone persisted even in concentrations of calcium as high as 5.0 mM. Relative amounts of hormone released from and retained in the tissues varied greatly among the tissues, as did the absolute amounts of hormone produced; newly synthesized, labeled hormone ranged between 0.6 and 12% of total labeled protein, and immunoreactive hormone ranged between 0.015 and 0.9% of total tissue protein. Effects of calcium on hormone biosynthesis, as determined by analyses of amounts of proparathyroid hormone in the tissues, were variable among tissues and in many cases were negligible. These results indicate that neoplastic and hyperplastic parathyroid tissues retain secretory responsiveness to changes in extracellular concentrations of calcium. Responses, however, are highly variable among different tissues, and in many instances are abnormal, inasmuch as

  5. Biphasic Investigation of Tissue Mechanical Response During Freezing Front Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jamie; Han, Bumsoo; Chuong, Cheng-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Cryopreservation of engineered tissue (ET) has achieved limited success due to limited understanding of freezing-induced biophysical phenomena in ETs, especially fluid-matrix interaction within ETs. To further our understanding of the freezing-induced fluid-matrix interaction, we have developed a biphasic model formulation that simulates the transient heat transfer and volumetric expansion during freezing, its resulting fluid movement in the ET, elastic deformation of the solid matrix and the corresponding pressure redistribution within. Treated as a biphasic material, the ET consists of a porous solid matrix fully saturated with interstitial fluid. Temperature-dependent material properties were employed and phase change was included by incorporating the latent heat of phase change into an effective specific heat term. Model-predicted temperature distribution, the location of the moving freezing front, and the ET deformation rates through the time course compare reasonably well with experiments reported previously. Results from our theoretical model show that behind the marching freezing front, the ET undergoes expansion due to phase change of its fluid contents. It compresses the region preceding the freezing front leading to its fluid expulsion and reduced regional fluid volume fractions. The expelled fluid is forced forward and upward into the region further ahead of the compression zone causing a secondary expansion zone; which then compresses the region further downstream with much reduced intensity. Overall, it forms an alternating expansion-compression pattern which moves with the marching freezing front. The present biphasic model helps us to gain insights into some facets of the freezing process and cryopreservation treatment that could not be gleaned experimentally. Its resulting understanding will ultimately be useful to design and improve cryopreservation protocols for ETs. PMID:22757502

  6. Bone tissue response to plasma-nitrided titanium implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Emanuela Prado; Sverzut, Alexander Tadeu; Freitas, Gileade Pereira; Sá, Juliana Carvalho; Alves, Clodomiro; Beloti, Marcio Mateus; Rosa, Adalberto Luiz

    2015-01-01

    A current goal of dental implant research is the development of titanium (Ti) surfaces to improve osseointegration. Plasma nitriding treatments generate surfaces that favor osteoblast differentiation, a key event to the process of osteogenesis. Based on this, it is possible to hypothesize that plasma-nitrided Ti implants may positively impact osseointegration. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo bone response to Ti surfaces modified by plasma-nitriding treatments. Material and Methods Surface treatments consisted of 20% N2 and 80% H2, 450°C and 1.5 mbar during 1 h for planar and 3 h for hollow cathode. Untreated surface was used as control. Ten implants of each surface were placed into rabbit tibiae and 6 weeks post-implantation they were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Results Bone formation was observed in contact with all implants without statistically significant differences among the evaluated surfaces in terms of bone-to-implant contact, bone area between threads, and bone area within the mirror area. Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma nitriding treatments generate Ti implants that induce similar bone response to the untreated ones. Thus, as these treatments improve the physico-chemical properties of Ti without affecting its biocompatibility, they could be combined with modifications that favor bone formation in order to develop new implant surfaces. PMID:25760262

  7. Bone tissue response to plasma-nitrided titanium implant surfaces

    PubMed Central

    FERRAZ, Emanuela Prado; SVERZUT, Alexander Tadeu; FREITAS, Gileade Pereira; SÁ, Juliana Carvalho; ALVES, Clodomiro; BELOTI, Marcio Mateus; ROSA, Adalberto Luiz

    2015-01-01

    A current goal of dental implant research is the development of titanium (Ti) surfaces to improve osseointegration. Plasma nitriding treatments generate surfaces that favor osteoblast differentiation, a key event to the process of osteogenesis. Based on this, it is possible to hypothesize that plasma-nitrided Ti implants may positively impact osseointegration. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo bone response to Ti surfaces modified by plasma-nitriding treatments. Material and Methods Surface treatments consisted of 20% N2 and 80% H2, 450°C and 1.5 mbar during 1 h for planar and 3 h for hollow cathode. Untreated surface was used as control. Ten implants of each surface were placed into rabbit tibiae and 6 weeks post-implantation they were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Results Bone formation was observed in contact with all implants without statistically significant differences among the evaluated surfaces in terms of bone-to-implant contact, bone area between threads, and bone area within the mirror area. Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma nitriding treatments generate Ti implants that induce similar bone response to the untreated ones. Thus, as these treatments improve the physico-chemical properties of Ti without affecting its biocompatibility, they could be combined with modifications that favor bone formation in order to develop new implant surfaces. PMID:25760262

  8. Immune response in the adipose tissue of lean mice infected with the protozoan parasite Neospora caninum

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Luzia; Moreira, João; Melo, Joana; Bezerra, Filipa; Marques, Raquel M; Ferreirinha, Pedro; Correia, Alexandra; Monteiro, Mariana P; Ferreira, Paula G; Vilanova, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The adipose tissue can make important contributions to immune function. Nevertheless, only a limited number of reports have investigated in lean hosts the immune response elicited in this tissue upon infection. Previous studies suggested that the intracellular protozoan Neospora caninum might affect adipose tissue physiology. Therefore, we investigated in mice challenged with this protozoan if immune cell populations within adipose tissue of different anatomical locations could be differently affected. Early in infection, parasites were detected in the adipose tissue and by 7 days of infection increased numbers of macrophages, regulatory T (Treg) cells and T-bet+ cells were observed in gonadal, mesenteric, omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Increased expression of interferon-γ was also detected in gonadal adipose tissue of infected mice. Two months after infection, parasite DNA was no longer detected in these tissues, but T helper type 1 (Th1) cell numbers remained above control levels in the infected mice. Moreover, the Th1/Treg cell ratio was higher than that of controls in the mesenteric and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Interestingly, chronically infected mice presented a marked increase of serum leptin, a molecule that plays a role in energy balance regulation as well as in promoting Th1-type immune responses. Altogether, we show that an apicomplexa parasitic infection influences immune cellular composition of adipose tissue throughout the body as well as adipokine production, still noticed at a chronic phase of infection when parasites were already cleared from that particular tissue. This strengthens the emerging view that infections can have long-term consequences for the physiology of adipose tissue. PMID:25581844

  9. 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel Evidence Review for: The Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) met for a site visit in Houston, TX on February 3-4, 2014. The SRP reviewed the new Evidence Report for the Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response (from here on referred to as the 2013 Immune Evidence Report), as well as the Research Plan for this Risk that is in the current version of the Human Research Program’s (HRP) Integrated Research Plan (IRP).

  10. The Host Immune Response to Tissue-Engineered Organs: Current Problems and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Katherine; Fishman, Jonathan M; De Coppi, Paolo; Birchall, Martin A

    2016-06-01

    As the global health burden of chronic disease increases, end-stage organ failure has become a costly and intractable problem. De novo organ creation is one of the long-term goals of the medical community. One of the promising avenues is that of tissue engineering: the use of biomaterials to create cells, structures, or even whole organs. Tissue engineering has emerged from its nascent stage, with several proof-of-principle trials performed across various tissue types. As tissue engineering moves from the realm of case trials to broader clinical study, three major questions have emerged: (1) Can the production of biological scaffolds be scaled up accordingly to meet current and future demands without generating an unfavorable immune response? (2) Are biological scaffolds plus or minus the inclusion of cells replaced by scar tissue or native functional tissue? (3) Can tissue-engineered organs be grown in children and adolescents given the different immune profiles of children? In this review, we highlight current research in the immunological response to tissue-engineered biomaterials, cells, and whole organs and address the answers to these questions. PMID:26701069

  11. Olfactory responses of banana weevil predators to volatiles from banana pseudostem tissue and synthetic pheromone.

    PubMed

    Tinzaara, W; Gold, C S; Dicke, M; van Huis, A

    2005-07-01

    As a response to attack by herbivores, plants can emit a variety of volatile substances that attract natural enemies of these insect pests. Predators of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) such as Dactylosternum abdominale (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae) and Pheidole megacephala (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), are normally found in association with weevil-infested rotten pseudostems and harvested stumps. We investigated whether these predators are attracted to such environments in response to volatiles produced by the host plant, by the weevil, or by the weevil plant complex. We evaluated predator responses towards volatiles from banana pseudostem tissue (synomones) and the synthetic banana weevil aggregation pheromone Cosmolure+ in a two-choice olfactometer. The beetle D. abdominale was attracted to fermenting banana pseudostem tissue and Cosmolure+, whereas the ant P. megacephala was attracted only to fermented pseudostem tissue. Both predators were attracted to banana pseudostem tissue that had been damaged by weevil larvae irrespective of weevil presence. Adding pheromone did not enhance predator response to volatiles from pseudostem tissue fed on by weevils. The numbers of both predators recovered with pseudostem traps in the field from banana mats with a pheromone trap were similar to those in pseudostem traps at different distance ranges from the pheromone. Our study shows that the generalist predators D. abdominale and P. megacephala use volatiles from fermented banana pseudostem tissue as the major chemical cue when searching for prey. PMID:16222791

  12. The role of membrane ERα signaling in bone and other major estrogen responsive tissues.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, K L; Farman, H; Henning, P; Lionikaite, V; Movérare-Skrtic, S; Wu, J; Ryberg, H; Koskela, A; Gustafsson, J-Å; Tuukkanen, J; Levin, E R; Ohlsson, C; Lagerquist, M K

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) signaling leads to cellular responses in several tissues and in addition to nuclear ERα-mediated effects, membrane ERα (mERα) signaling may be of importance. To elucidate the significance, in vivo, of mERα signaling in multiple estrogen-responsive tissues, we have used female mice lacking the ability to localize ERα to the membrane due to a point mutation in the palmitoylation site (C451A), so called Nuclear-Only-ER (NOER) mice. Interestingly, the role of mERα signaling for the estrogen response was highly tissue-dependent, with trabecular bone in the axial skeleton being strongly dependent (>80% reduction in estrogen response in NOER mice), cortical and trabecular bone in long bones, as well as uterus and thymus being partly dependent (40-70% reduction in estrogen response in NOER mice) and effects on liver weight and total body fat mass being essentially independent of mERα (<35% reduction in estrogen response in NOER mice). In conclusion, mERα signaling is important for the estrogenic response in female mice in a tissue-dependent manner. Increased knowledge regarding membrane initiated ERα actions may provide means to develop new selective estrogen receptor modulators with improved profiles. PMID:27388455

  13. The role of membrane ERα signaling in bone and other major estrogen responsive tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, K. L.; Farman, H.; Henning, P.; Lionikaite, V.; Movérare-Skrtic, S.; Wu, J.; Ryberg, H.; Koskela, A.; Gustafsson, J.-Å.; Tuukkanen, J.; Levin, E. R.; Ohlsson, C.; Lagerquist, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) signaling leads to cellular responses in several tissues and in addition to nuclear ERα-mediated effects, membrane ERα (mERα) signaling may be of importance. To elucidate the significance, in vivo, of mERα signaling in multiple estrogen-responsive tissues, we have used female mice lacking the ability to localize ERα to the membrane due to a point mutation in the palmitoylation site (C451A), so called Nuclear-Only-ER (NOER) mice. Interestingly, the role of mERα signaling for the estrogen response was highly tissue-dependent, with trabecular bone in the axial skeleton being strongly dependent (>80% reduction in estrogen response in NOER mice), cortical and trabecular bone in long bones, as well as uterus and thymus being partly dependent (40–70% reduction in estrogen response in NOER mice) and effects on liver weight and total body fat mass being essentially independent of mERα (<35% reduction in estrogen response in NOER mice). In conclusion, mERα signaling is important for the estrogenic response in female mice in a tissue-dependent manner. Increased knowledge regarding membrane initiated ERα actions may provide means to develop new selective estrogen receptor modulators with improved profiles. PMID:27388455

  14. Planarian regeneration involves distinct stem cell responses to wounds and tissue absence

    PubMed Central

    Wenemoser, Danielle; Reddien, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    Regeneration requires signaling from a wound site for detection of the wound, and a mechanism that determines the nature of the injury to specify the appropriate regenerative response. Wound signals and tissue responses to wounds that elicit regeneration remain poorly understood. Planarians are able to regenerate from essentially any type of injury and present a novel system for the study of wound responses in regeneration initiation. Newly developed molecular and cellular tools now enable study of regeneration initiation using the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Planarian regeneration requires adult stem cells called neoblasts and amputation triggers two peaks in neoblast mitoses early in regeneration. We demonstrate that the first mitotic peak is a body-wide response to any injury and that a second, local, neoblast response is induced only when injury results in missing tissue. This second response was characterized by recruitment of neoblasts to wounds, even in areas that lack neoblasts in the intact animal. Subsequently, these neoblasts were induced to divide and differentiate near the wound, leading to formation of new tissue. We conclude that there exist two functionally distinct signaling phases of the stem cell wound response that distinguish between simple injury and situations that require the regeneration of missing tissue. PMID:20599901

  15. A Review of the Responses of Two- and Three-Dimensional Engineered Tissues to Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Hronik-Tupaj, Marie

    2012-01-01

    The application of external biophysical signals is one approach to tissue engineering that is explored less often than more traditional additions of exogenous biochemical and chemical factors to direct cell and tissue outcomes. The study of bioelectromagnetism and the field of electrotherapeutics have evolved over the years, and we review biocompatible electric stimulation devices and their successful application to tissue growth. Specifically, information on capacitively coupled alternating current, inductively coupled alternating current, and direct current devices is described. Cell and tissue responses from the application of these devices, including two- and three-dimensional in vitro studies and in vivo studies, are reviewed with regard to cell proliferation, adhesion, differentiation, morphology, and migration and tissue function. The current understanding of cellular mechanisms related to electric stimulation is detailed. The advantages of electric stimulation are compared with those pf other techniques, and areas in which electric fields are used as an adjuvant therapy for healing and regeneration are discussed. PMID:22046979

  16. Th1-skewed tissue responses to a mycolyl glycolipid in mycobacteria-infected rhesus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Hattori, Yuki; Komori, Takaya; Nakamura, Takashi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Sugita, Masahiko

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Glucose monomycolate (GMM) is a marker glycolipid for active tuberculosis. •Tissue responses to GMM involved up-regulation of Th1-attracting chemokines. •Th1-skewed local responses were mounted at the GMM-injected tissue. -- Abstract: Trehalose 6,6′-dimycolate (TDM) is a major glycolipid of the cell wall of mycobacteria with remarkable adjuvant functions. To avoid detection by the host innate immune system, invading mycobacteria down-regulate the expression of TDM by utilizing host-derived glucose as a competitive substrate for their mycolyltransferases; however, this enzymatic reaction results in the concomitant biosynthesis of glucose monomycolate (GMM) which is recognized by the acquired immune system. GMM-specific, CD1-restricted T cell responses have been detected in the peripheral blood of infected human subjects and monkeys as well as in secondary lymphoid organs of small animals, such as guinea pigs and human CD1-transgenic mice. Nevertheless, it remains to be determined how tissues respond at the site where GMM is produced. Here we found that rhesus macaques vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guerin mounted a chemokine response in GMM-challenged skin that was favorable for recruiting T helper (Th)1 T cells. Indeed, the expression of interferon-γ, but not Th2 or Th17 cytokines, was prominent in the GMM-injected tissue. The GMM-elicited tissue response was also associated with the expression of monocyte/macrophage-attracting CC chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL4 and CCL8. Furthermore, the skin response to GMM involved the up-regulated expression of granulysin and perforin. Given that GMM is produced primarily by pathogenic mycobacteria proliferating within the host, the Th1-skewed tissue response to GMM may function efficiently at the site of infection.

  17. Chronic intracortical microelectrode arrays induce non-uniform, depth-related tissue responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolley, Andrew J.; Desai, Himanshi A.; Otto, Kevin J.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Brain-implanted microelectrode arrays show promise as future clinical devices. However, biological responses to various designs, compositions and locations of these implants have not been fully characterized, and may impact the long-term functionality of these devices. In order to improve our understanding of the tissue conditions at the interface of chronic brain-implanted microdevices, we proposed utilizing advanced histology and microscopy techniques to image implanted devices and surrounding tissue intact within brain slices. We then proposed utilizing these methods to examine whether depth within the cerebral cortex affected tissue conditions around implants. Approach. Histological data was collected from rodent brain slices containing intact, intracortical microdevices four weeks after implantation surgery. Thick tissue sections containing the chronic implants were processed with fluorescent antibody labels, and imaged in an optical clearing solution using laser confocal microscopy. Main Results. Tissue surrounding microdevices exhibited two major depth-related phenomena: a non-uniform microglial coating along the device length and a dense mass of cells surrounding the implant in cerebral cortical layers I and II. Detailed views of the monocyte-derived immune cells improve our understanding of the close and complex association that immune cells have with chronic brain implants, and illuminated a possible relationship between cortical depth and the intensity of a chronic monocyte response around penetrating microdevices. The dense mass of cells contained vimentin, a protein not typically expressed highly in CNS cells, evidence that non-CNS cells likely descended down the face of the penetrating devices from the pial surface. Significance. Image data of highly non-uniform and depth-dependent biological responses along a device provides novel insight into the complexity of the tissue response to penetrating brain-implanted microdevices. The presented

  18. Repetitive TASER X26 discharge resulted in adverse physiologic events with a dose-response relationship related to the duration of discharge in anesthetized swine model.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Choi, Sang-Cheon; Ahn, Jung-Hwan; Min, Young-Gi

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of our study were to investigate the dose-response relationship of the TASER X26 discharge duration in an anesthetized swine model. Fourteen swines were anesthetized and then exposed to TASER X26 discharge for 5 sec (n = 5) or for 10 sec (n = 6). The sham control group (n = 3) was anesthetized and studied using the same protocol except TASER X26 discharges during the experiments. Hemodynamic parameters were obtained. Blood pressure and total peripheral resistance decreased significantly after TASER discharge and returned to baseline value at 15 min after 5 sec of TASER discharge but did not return to baseline values during the 30-min observation period after 10 sec of TASER discharge. Repetitive TASER X26 discharge resulted in adverse physiologic events with a dose-response relationship related to the duration of TASER X26 discharge in an anesthetized swine model. PMID:23066880

  19. Chronic tissue response to untethered microelectrode implants in the rat brain and spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersen, Ali; Elkabes, Stella; Freedman, David S.; Sahin, Mesut

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Microelectrodes implanted in the central nervous system (CNS) often fail in long term implants due to the immunological tissue response caused by tethering forces of the connecting wires. In addition to the tethering effect, there is a mechanical stress that occurs at the device-tissue interface simply because the microelectrode is a rigid body floating in soft tissue and it cannot reshape itself to comply with changes in the surrounding tissue. In the current study we evaluated the scar tissue formation to tetherless devices with two significantly different geometries in the rat brain and spinal cord in order to investigate the effects of device geometry. Approach. One of the implant geometries resembled the wireless, floating microstimulators that we are currently developing in our laboratory and the other was a (shank only) Michigan probe for comparison. Both electrodes were implanted into either the cervical spinal cord or the motor cortices, one on each side. Main results. The most pronounced astroglial and microglial reactions occurred within 20 μm from the device and decreased sharply at larger distances. Both cell types displayed the morphology of non-activated cells past the 100 μm perimeter. Even though the aspect ratios of the implants were different, the astroglial and microglial responses to both microelectrode types were very mild in the brain, stronger and yet limited in the spinal cord. Significance. These observations confirm previous reports and further suggest that tethering may be responsible for most of the tissue response in chronic implants and that the electrode size has a smaller contribution with floating electrodes. The electrode size may be playing primarily an amplifying role to the tethering forces in the brain whereas the size itself may induce chronic response in the spinal cord where the movement of surrounding tissues is more significant.

  20. JAK/STAT signalling mediates cell survival in response to tissue stress.

    PubMed

    La Fortezza, Marco; Schenk, Madlin; Cosolo, Andrea; Kolybaba, Addie; Grass, Isabelle; Classen, Anne-Kathrin

    2016-08-15

    Tissue homeostasis relies on the ability of tissues to respond to stress. Tissue regeneration and tumour models in Drosophila have shown that c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) acts as a prominent stress-response pathway promoting injury-induced apoptosis and compensatory proliferation. A central question remaining unanswered is how both responses are balanced by activation of a single pathway. Signalling through the Janus kinase/Signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway, which is a potential JNK target, is implicated in promoting compensatory proliferation. While we observe JAK/STAT activation in imaginal discs upon damage, our data demonstrate that JAK/STAT and its downstream effector Zfh2 promote the survival of JNK signalling cells. The JNK component fos and the pro-apoptotic gene hid are regulated in a JAK/STAT-dependent manner. This molecular pathway restrains JNK-induced apoptosis and spatial propagation of JNK signalling, thereby limiting the extent of tissue damage, as well as facilitating systemic and proliferative responses to injury. We find that the pro-survival function of JAK/STAT also drives tumour growth under conditions of chronic stress. Our study defines the function of JAK/STAT in tissue stress and illustrates how crosstalk between conserved signalling pathways establishes an intricate equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis and survival to restore tissue homeostasis. PMID:27385008

  1. Genetic Background Modulates lncRNA-Coordinated Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tang, Jonathan; Huang, Yurong; Nguyen, David H.; Costes, Sylvain V.; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as key regulators of diverse cell functions and processes. However, the relevance of lncRNAs in the cell and tissue response to ionizing radiation has not yet been characterized. Here we used microarray profiling to determine lncRNA and mRNA expression in mammary glands of BALB/c and SPRET/EiJ mice after low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) exposure. We found that unirradiated mammary tissues of these strains differed significantly in baseline expressions of 290 lncRNAs. LDIR exposure (10 cGy) induced a significant change in the expression of many lncRNAs. The vast majority of lncRNAs identified to be differentially expressed aftermore » LDIR in either BALB/c or SPRET/EiJ had a significantly correlated expression pattern with at least one LDIR responsive mRNA. Functional analysis revealed that the response to LDIR in BALB/c mice is highly dynamic with enrichment for genes involved in tissue injury, inflammatory responses, and mammary gland development at 2, 4, and 8 weeks after LDIR, respectively. Our study demonstrates that genetic background strongly influences the expression of lncRNAs and their response to radiation and that lncRNAs may coordinate the tissue response to LDIR exposure via regulation of coding mRNAs.« less

  2. Increasing the number of unloading/reambulation cycles does not adversely impact body composition and lumbar bone mineral density but reduces tissue sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shikha; Manske, Sarah L.; Judex, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    A single exposure to hindlimb unloading leads to changes in body mass, body composition and bone, but the consequences of multiple exposures are not yet understood. Within a 18 week period, adult C57BL/6 male mice were exposed to 1 (1x-HLU), 2 (2x-HLU) or 3 (3x-HLU) cycles of 2 weeks of hindlimb unloading (HLU) followed by 4 weeks of reambulation (RA), or served as ambulatory age-matched controls. In vivo μCT longitudinally tracked changes in abdominal adipose and lean tissues, lumbar vertebral apparent volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and upper hindlimb muscle cross-sectional area before and after the final HLU and RA cycle. During the final HLU cycle, significant decreases in total adipose tissue and vertebral vBMD in the three experimental groups occurred such that there were no significant between-group differences at the beginning of the final RA cycle. However, the magnitude of the HLU induced losses diminished in mice undergoing their 2nd or 3rd HLU cycle. Irrespective of the number of HLU/RA cycles, total adipose tissue and vertebral vBMD recovered and were no different from age-matched controls after the final RA period. In contrast, upper hindlimb muscle cross-sectional area was significantly lower than controls in all unloaded groups after the final RA period. These results suggest that tissues in the abdominal region are more resilient to multiple bouts of unloading and more amenable to recovery during reambulation than the peripheral musculoskeletal system.

  3. Early redox, Src family kinase, and calcium signaling integrate wound responses and tissue regeneration in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sa Kan; Freisinger, Christina M.; LeBert, Danny C.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue injury can lead to scar formation or tissue regeneration. How regenerative animals sense initial tissue injury and transform wound signals into regenerative growth is an unresolved question. Previously, we found that the Src family kinase (SFK) Lyn functions as a redox sensor in leukocytes that detects H2O2 at wounds in zebrafish larvae. In this paper, using zebrafish larval tail fins as a model, we find that wounding rapidly activated SFK and calcium signaling in epithelia. The immediate SFK and calcium signaling in epithelia was important for late epimorphic regeneration of amputated fins. Wound-induced activation of SFKs in epithelia was dependent on injury-generated H2O2. A SFK member, Fynb, was responsible for fin regeneration. This work provides a new link between early wound responses and late regeneration and suggests that redox, SFK, and calcium signaling are immediate “wound signals” that integrate early wound responses and late epimorphic regeneration. PMID:23045550

  4. Weight loss and lipolysis promote a dynamic immune response in murine adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kosteli, Aliki; Sugaru, Eiji; Haemmerle, Guenter; Martin, Jayne F.; Lei, Jason; Zechner, Rudolf; Ferrante, Anthony W.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity elicits an immune response characterized by myeloid cell recruitment to key metabolic organs, including adipose tissue. However, the response of immune cells to nonpathologic metabolic stimuli has been less well studied, and the factors that regulate the metabolic-dependent accumulation of immune cells are incompletely understood. Here we characterized the response of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) to weight loss and fasting in mice and identified a role for lipolysis in ATM recruitment and accumulation. We found that the immune response to weight loss was dynamic; caloric restriction of high-fat diet–fed mice led to an initial increase in ATM recruitment, whereas ATM content decreased following an extended period of weight loss. The peak in ATM number coincided with the peak in the circulating concentrations of FFA and adipose tissue lipolysis, suggesting that lipolysis drives ATM accumulation. Indeed, fasting or pharmacologically induced lipolysis rapidly increased ATM accumulation, adipose tissue chemoattractant activity, and lipid uptake by ATMs. Conversely, dietary and genetic manipulations that reduced lipolysis decreased ATM accumulation. Depletion of macrophages in adipose tissue cultures increased expression of adipose triglyceride lipase and genes regulated by FFA, and increased lipolysis. These data suggest that local lipid fluxes are central regulators of ATM recruitment and that once recruited, ATMs form lipid-laden macrophages that can buffer local increases in lipid concentration. PMID:20877011

  5. Metabolic profiling of the tissue-specific responses in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis towards Vibrio harveyi challenge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Ji, Chenglong; Zhao, Jianmin; Wang, Qing; Li, Fei; Wu, Huifeng

    2014-08-01

    Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is a marine aquaculture shellfish distributing widely along the coast in north China. In this work, we studied the differential metabolic responses induced by Vibrio harveyi in digestive gland and gill tissues from M. galloprovincialis using NMR-based metabolomics. The differential metabolic responses in the two tissue types were detected, except the similarly altered taurine and betaine. These metabolic responses suggested that V. harveyi mainly induced osmotic disruption and reduced energy demand via the metabolic pathways of glucose synthesis and ATP/AMP conversion in mussel digestive gland. In mussel gill tissues, V. harveyi basically caused osmotic stress and possible reduced energy demand as shown by the elevated phosphocholine that is involved in one of the metabolic pathways of ATP synthesis from ADP and phosphocholine. The altered mRNA expression levels of related genes (superoxide dismutase with copper and zinc, heat shock protein 90, defensin and lysozyme) suggested that V. harveyi induced clear oxidative and immune stresses in both digestive gland and gill tissues. However, the mRNA expression levels of both lysozyme and defensin in digestive gland were more significantly up-regulated than those in gill from V. harveyi-challenged mussel M. galloprovincialis, meaning that the immune organ, digestive gland, was more sensitive than gill. Overall, our results indicated that V. harveyi could induce tissue-specific metabolic responses in mussel M. galloprovincialis. PMID:24911264

  6. Influence of resveratrol release on the tissue response to mechanically adaptive cortical implants.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jessica K; Jorfi, Mehdi; Buchanan, Kelly L; Park, Daniel J; Foster, E Johan; Tyler, Dustin J; Rowan, Stuart J; Weder, Christoph; Capadona, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    The stability and longevity of recordings obtained from intracortical microelectrodes continues to remain an area of concern for neural interfacing applications. The limited longevity of microelectrode performance has been associated with the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and the neuroinflammatory response to the microelectrode. Here, we report the investigation of an additive approach that targets both mechanical and chemical factors believed to contribute to chronic BBB instability and the neuroinflammatory response associated with implanted intracortical microelectrodes. The implants investigated were based on a mechanically adaptive, compliant nanocomposite (NC), which reduces the tissue response and tissue strain. This material was doped with various concentrations of the antioxidant resveratrol with the objective of local and rapid delivery. In vitro analysis of resveratrol release, antioxidant activity, and cytotoxicity suggested that a resveratrol content of 0.01% was optimal for in vivo assessment. Thus, probes made from the neat NC reference and probes containing resveratrol (NC Res) were implanted into the cortical tissue of rats for up to sixteen weeks. Histochemical analysis suggested that at three days post-implantation, neither materials nor therapeutic approaches (independently or in combination) could alter the initial wound healing response. However, at two weeks post-implantation, the NC Res implant showed a reduction in activated microglia/macrophages and improvement in neuron density at the tissue-implant interface when compared to the neat NC reference. However, sixteen weeks post-implantation, when the antioxidant was exhausted, NC Res and the neat NC reference exhibited similar tissue responses. The data show that NC Res provides short-term, short-lived benefits due to the antioxidant release, and a long-term reduction in neuroinflammation on account of is mechanical adaptive, compliant nature. Together, these results

  7. Stress response of bovine artery and rat brain tissue due to combined translational shear and fixed unconfined compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Lauren

    During trauma resulting from impacts and blast waves, sinusoidal waves permeate the brain and cranial arterial tissue, both non-homogeneous biological tissues with high fluid contents. The experimental shear stress response to sinusoidal translational shear deformation at 1 Hz and 25% strain amplitude and either 0% or 33% compression is compared for rat brain tissue and bovine aortic tissue. Both tissues exhibit Mullins effect in shear. Harmonic wavelet decomposition, a novel application to the mechanical response of these tissues, shows significant 1 Hz and 3 Hz components. The 3 Hz component magnitude in brain tissue, which is much larger than in aortic tissue, may correlate to interstitial fluid induced drag forces that decrease on subsequent cycles perhaps because of damage resulting in easier fluid movement. The fluid may cause the quasiperiodic, viscoelastic behavior of brain tissue. The mechanical response differences under impact may cause shear damage between arterial and brain connections.

  8. Stem Cell-Based Microphysiological Osteochondral System to Model Tissue Response to Interleukin-1β

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative disease of the articular joint that involves both bone and cartilage degenerative changes. An engineered osteochondral tissue within physiological conditions will be of significant utility in understanding the pathogenesis of OA and testing the efficacy of potential disease-modifying OA drugs (DMOADs). In this study, a multichamber bioreactor was fabricated and fitted into a microfluidic base. When the osteochondral construct is inserted, two chambers are formed on either side of the construct (top, chondral; bottom, osseous) that is supplied by different medium streams. These medium conduits are critical to create tissue-specific microenvironments in which chondral and osseous tissues will develop and mature. Human bone marrow stem cell (hBMSCs)-derived constructs were fabricated in situ and cultured within the bioreactor and induced to undergo spatially defined chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation for 4 weeks in tissue-specific media. We observed tissue specific gene expression and matrix production as well as a basophilic interface suggesting a developing tidemark. Introduction of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) to either the chondral or osseous medium stream induced stronger degradative responses locally as well as in the opposing tissue type. For example, IL-1β treatment of the osseous compartment resulted in a strong catabolic response in the chondral layer as indicated by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity, and tissue-specific gene expression. This induction was greater than that seen with IL-1β application to the chondral component directly, indicative of active biochemical communication between the two tissue layers and supporting the osteochondral nature of OA. The microtissue culture system developed here offers novel capabilities for investigating the physiology of osteochondral tissue and pathogenic mechanisms of OA and serving as a high-throughput platform to test potential

  9. Stem cell-based microphysiological osteochondral system to model tissue response to interleukin-1β.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hang; Lozito, Thomas P; Alexander, Peter G; Gottardi, Riccardo; Tuan, Rocky S

    2014-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative disease of the articular joint that involves both bone and cartilage degenerative changes. An engineered osteochondral tissue within physiological conditions will be of significant utility in understanding the pathogenesis of OA and testing the efficacy of potential disease-modifying OA drugs (DMOADs). In this study, a multichamber bioreactor was fabricated and fitted into a microfluidic base. When the osteochondral construct is inserted, two chambers are formed on either side of the construct (top, chondral; bottom, osseous) that is supplied by different medium streams. These medium conduits are critical to create tissue-specific microenvironments in which chondral and osseous tissues will develop and mature. Human bone marrow stem cell (hBMSCs)-derived constructs were fabricated in situ and cultured within the bioreactor and induced to undergo spatially defined chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation for 4 weeks in tissue-specific media. We observed tissue specific gene expression and matrix production as well as a basophilic interface suggesting a developing tidemark. Introduction of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) to either the chondral or osseous medium stream induced stronger degradative responses locally as well as in the opposing tissue type. For example, IL-1β treatment of the osseous compartment resulted in a strong catabolic response in the chondral layer as indicated by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity, and tissue-specific gene expression. This induction was greater than that seen with IL-1β application to the chondral component directly, indicative of active biochemical communication between the two tissue layers and supporting the osteochondral nature of OA. The microtissue culture system developed here offers novel capabilities for investigating the physiology of osteochondral tissue and pathogenic mechanisms of OA and serving as a high-throughput platform to test potential

  10. Controlled release strategies for modulating immune responses to promote tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Courtney M; Park, Jonghyuck; Shea, Lonnie D

    2015-12-10

    Advances in the field of tissue engineering have enhanced the potential of regenerative medicine, yet the efficacy of these strategies remains incomplete, and is limited by the innate and adaptive immune responses. The immune response associated with injury or disease combined with that mounted to biomaterials, transplanted cells, proteins, and gene therapies vectors can contribute to the inability to fully restore tissue function. Blocking immune responses such as with anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive agents are either ineffective, as the immune response contributes significantly to regeneration, or have significant side effects. This review describes targeted strategies to modulate the immune response in order to limit tissue damage following injury, promote an anti-inflammatory environment that leads to regeneration, and induce antigen (Ag)-specific tolerance that can target degenerative diseases that destroy tissues and promote engraftment of transplanted cells. Focusing on targeted immuno-modulation, we describe local delivery techniques to sites of inflammation as well as systemic approaches that preferentially target subsets of immune populations. PMID:26264833

  11. The Tissue Implant Response Surrounding Subcutaneous TCP, HA, And ALCAP Bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Butler, K R; Benghuzzi, Hamed; Tucci, Michelle; Puckett, A D

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to quantify and further elucidate the tissue-implant response in the fibrous tissue surrounding tricalcium phosphate (TCP), hydroxyapatite (HA), and aluminum calcium phosphate (ALCAP) implants when implanted subcutaneously. Sixteen animals in four experimental groups (n = 4/group) were implanted with one implant each: Group I (control, TCP), Group II (HA), and Group III (ALCAP). At 90 days post-implantation, the fibrous tissue surrounding the implants was harvested. Sections of stained fibrous tissue were evaluated for the presence of macrophages, fibrocytes, neutrophils, vascularity and thickness for all three groups using semi-automated quantitative methods. The analysis indicated Group III demonstrated a significantly higher number of neutrophils but fewer macrophages and blood vessels per high power field and had a substantially thinner fibrous tissue capsule thickness compared to Groups I and II (alpha=0.05). Group II elicited a greater response of fibroblasts compared to Groups I and III suggesting HA may provide a slightly higher degree of stability to the implant. In total, these findings suggest both TCP and HA behave similarly in vivo when compared to ALCAP and may be better choices for subcutaneous soft-tissue application compared to ALCAP. PMID:25996746

  12. Characterization of photomorphogenic responses and signaling cascades controlled by phytochrome-A expressed in different tissues.

    PubMed

    Kirchenbauer, Daniel; Viczián, András; Ádám, Éva; Hegedűs, Zoltán; Klose, Cornelia; Leppert, Michael; Hiltbrunner, Andreas; Kircher, Stefan; Schäfer, Eberhard; Nagy, Ferenc

    2016-07-01

    The photoreceptor phytochrome A acts as a light-dependent molecular switch and regulates responses initiated by very low fluences of light (VLFR) and high fluences (HIR) of far-red light. PhyA is expressed ubiquitously, but how phyA signaling is orchestrated to regulate photomorphogenesis is poorly understood. To address this issue, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana phyA-201 mutant lines expressing the biologically active phyA-YFP photoreceptor in different tissues, and analyzed the expression of several reporter genes, including ProHY5:HY5-GFP and Pro35S:CFP-PIF1, and various FR-HIR-dependent physiological responses. We show that phyA action in one tissue is critical and sufficient to regulate flowering time and root growth; control of cotyledon and hypocotyl growth requires simultaneous phyA activity in different tissues; and changes detected in the expression of reporters are not restricted to phyA-containing cells. We conclude that FR-HIR-controlled morphogenesis in Arabidopsis is mediated partly by tissue-specific and partly by intercellular signaling initiated by phyA. Intercellular signaling is critical for many FR-HIR induced responses, yet it appears that phyA modulates the abundance and activity of key regulatory transcription factors in a tissue-autonomous fashion. PMID:27027866

  13. Dose convolution filter: Incorporating spatial dose information into tissue response modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yimei; Joiner, Michael; Zhao Bo; Liao Yixiang; Burmeister, Jay

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: A model is introduced to integrate biological factors such as cell migration and bystander effects into physical dose distributions, and to incorporate spatial dose information in plan analysis and optimization. Methods: The model consists of a dose convolution filter (DCF) with single parameter {sigma}. Tissue response is calculated by an existing NTCP model with DCF-applied dose distribution as input. The authors determined {sigma} of rat spinal cord from published data. The authors also simulated the GRID technique, in which an open field is collimated into many pencil beams. Results: After applying the DCF, the NTCP model successfully fits the rat spinal cord data with a predicted value of {sigma}=2.6{+-}0.5 mm, consistent with 2 mm migration distances of remyelinating cells. Moreover, it enables the appropriate prediction of a high relative seriality for spinal cord. The model also predicts the sparing of normal tissues by the GRID technique when the size of each pencil beam becomes comparable to {sigma}. Conclusions: The DCF model incorporates spatial dose information and offers an improved way to estimate tissue response from complex radiotherapy dose distributions. It does not alter the prediction of tissue response in large homogenous fields, but successfully predicts increased tissue tolerance in small or highly nonuniform fields.

  14. Sympathetic denervation impairs responses of brown adipose tissue to VMH stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Minokoshi, Y.; Saito, M.; Shimazu, T.

    1986-11-01

    Effects of unilateral surgical denervation of the interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) on its thermogenic and lipogenic responses to electrical stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) nucleus were studied in anesthetized rats. The rapid rise in IBAT temperature in response to VMH stimulation was greatly suppressed in the denervated IBAT, whereas the temperature response was not impaired in the contralateral innervated IBAT in the same animals. Similarly, the increased rates of conversion of (/sup 14/C) glucose and (/sup 3/H)H/sub 2/O to fatty acids and glyceride glycerol in vivo in IBAT after VMH stimulation were almost completely inhibited by sympathetic denervation. These results indicate clearly that the increases in lipogenic and thermogenic activities in IBAT in response to VMH stimulation are mediated by the sympathetic nerve supply of this tissue.

  15. Multi-responsive hydrogels for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, Jennifer M.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-responsive hydrogels, or ‘intelligent’ hydrogels that respond to more than one environmental stimulus, have demonstrated great utility as a regenerative biomaterial in recent years. They are structured biocompatible materials that provide specific and distinct responses to varied physiological or externally applied stimuli. As evidenced by a burgeoning number of investigators, multi-responsive hydrogels are endowed with tunable, controllable and even biomimetic behavior well-suited for drug delivery and tissue engineering or regenerative growth applications. This article encompasses recent developments and challenges regarding supramolecular, layer-by-layer assembled and covalently cross-linked multi-responsive hydrogel networks and their application to drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:26816625

  16. Switch from Stress Response to Homeobox Transcription Factors in Adipose Tissue After Profound Fat Loss

    PubMed Central

    Stavrum, Anne-Kristin; Stansberg, Christine; Holdhus, Rita; Hoang, Tuyen; Veum, Vivian L.; Christensen, Bjørn Jostein; Våge, Villy; Sagen, Jørn V.; Steen, Vidar M.; Mellgren, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Background In obesity, impaired adipose tissue function may promote secondary disease through ectopic lipid accumulation and excess release of adipokines, resulting in systemic low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and organ dysfunction. However, several of the genes regulating adipose tissue function in obesity are yet to be identified. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to identify novel candidate genes that may regulate adipose tissue function, we analyzed global gene expression in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue before and one year after bariatric surgery (biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, BPD/DS) (n = 16). Adipose tissue from lean healthy individuals was also analyzed (n = 13). Two different microarray platforms (AB 1700 and Illumina) were used to measure the differential gene expression, and the results were further validated by qPCR. Surgery reduced BMI from 53.3 to 33.1 kg/m2. The majority of differentially expressed genes were down-regulated after profound fat loss, including transcription factors involved in stress response, inflammation, and immune cell function (e.g., FOS, JUN, ETS, C/EBPB, C/EBPD). Interestingly, a distinct set of genes was up-regulated after fat loss, including homeobox transcription factors (IRX3, IRX5, HOXA5, HOXA9, HOXB5, HOXC6, EMX2, PRRX1) and extracellular matrix structural proteins (COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1, COL5A1, COL6A3). Conclusions/Significance The data demonstrate a marked switch of transcription factors in adipose tissue after profound fat loss, providing new molecular insight into a dichotomy between stress response and metabolically favorable tissue development. Our findings implicate homeobox transcription factors as important regulators of adipose tissue function. PMID:20543949

  17. Response of plant nutrient stoichiometry to fertilization varied with plant tissues in a tropical forest

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Qifeng; Zou, Bi; Li, Yingwen; Chen, Yao; Zhang, Weixin; Mao, Rong; Ding, Yongzhen; Wang, Jun; Lu, Xiankai; Li, Xiaobo; Tang, Jianwu; Li, Zhian; Wang, Faming

    2015-01-01

    Plant N:P ratios are widely used as indices of nutrient limitation in terrestrial ecosystems, but the response of these metrics in different plant tissues to altered N and P availability and their interactions remains largely unclear. We evaluated changes in N and P concentrations, N:P ratios of new leaves (<1 yr), older leaves (>1 yr), stems and mixed fine roots of seven species after 3-years of an N and P addition experiment in a tropical forest. Nitrogen addition only increased fine root N concentrations. P addition increased P concentrations among all tissues. The N × P interaction reduced leaf and stem P concentrations, suggesting a negative effect of N addition on P concentrations under P addition. The reliability of using nutrient ratios as indices of soil nutrient availability varied with tissues: the stoichiometric metrics of stems and older leaves were more responsive indicators of changed soil nutrient availability than those of new leaves and fine roots. However, leaf N:P ratios can be a useful indicator of inter-specific variation in plant response to nutrients availability. This study suggests that older leaf is a better choice than other tissues in the assessment of soil nutrient status and predicting plant response to altered nutrients using nutrients ratios. PMID:26416169

  18. Response of plant nutrient stoichiometry to fertilization varied with plant tissues in a tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Mo, Qifeng; Zou, Bi; Li, Yingwen; Chen, Yao; Zhang, Weixin; Mao, Rong; Ding, Yongzhen; Wang, Jun; Lu, Xiankai; Li, Xiaobo; Tang, Jianwu; Li, Zhian; Wang, Faming

    2015-01-01

    Plant N:P ratios are widely used as indices of nutrient limitation in terrestrial ecosystems, but the response of these metrics in different plant tissues to altered N and P availability and their interactions remains largely unclear. We evaluated changes in N and P concentrations, N:P ratios of new leaves (<1 yr), older leaves (>1 yr), stems and mixed fine roots of seven species after 3-years of an N and P addition experiment in a tropical forest. Nitrogen addition only increased fine root N concentrations. P addition increased P concentrations among all tissues. The N × P interaction reduced leaf and stem P concentrations, suggesting a negative effect of N addition on P concentrations under P addition. The reliability of using nutrient ratios as indices of soil nutrient availability varied with tissues: the stoichiometric metrics of stems and older leaves were more responsive indicators of changed soil nutrient availability than those of new leaves and fine roots. However, leaf N:P ratios can be a useful indicator of inter-specific variation in plant response to nutrients availability. This study suggests that older leaf is a better choice than other tissues in the assessment of soil nutrient status and predicting plant response to altered nutrients using nutrients ratios. PMID:26416169

  19. Adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) associated with corrosion products in metal-on-metal and dual modular neck total hip replacements is associated with upregulation of interferon gamma-mediated chemokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Kolatat, Kritti; Perino, Giorgio; Wilner, Gabrielle; Kaplowitz, Elianna; Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Boettner, Friedrich; Westrich, Geoffrey H; Jerabek, Seth A; Goldring, Steven R; Purdue, P Edward

    2015-10-01

    Adverse local tissue reactions (ALTR) associated with tribocorrosion following total hip arthroplasty (THA) have become a significant clinical concern in recent years. In particular, implants featuring metal-on-metal bearing surfaces and modular femoral stems have been reported to result in elevated rates of ALTR. These tribocorrosion-related tissue reactions are characterized by marked necrosis and lymphocytic infiltration, which contrasts sharply with the macrophagic and foreign body giant cell inflammation associated with polyethylene wear particle induced peri-implant osteolysis. In this study, we characterize tribocorrosion-associated ALTR at a molecular level. Gene expression profiling of peri-implant tissue around failing implants identifies upregulation of numerous inflammatory mediators in ALTR, including several interferon gamma inducible factors, most notably the chemokines MIG/CXCL9 and IP-10/CXCL10. This expression profile is distinct from that associated with polyethylene wear induced osteolysis, which is characterized by induction of markers of alternative macrophage activation, such as chitotriosidase (CHIT-1). Importantly, MIG/CXCL9 and IP-10/CXCL10 are also elevated at the protein level in the synovial fluid and, albeit more moderately, the serum, of ALTR patients, raising the possibility that these factors may serve as circulating biomarkers for the early detection of ALTR in at-risk patients. PMID:25940887

  20. Thermodynamic response of soft biological tissues to pulsed infrared-laser irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, V; Nishioka, N S; Mikić, B B

    1996-01-01

    The physical mechanisms that achieve tissue removal through the delivery of short pulses of high-intensity infrared laser radiation, in a process known as laser ablation, remain obscure. The thermodynamic response of biological tissue to pulsed infrared laser irradiation was investigated by measuring and analyzing the stress transients generated by Q-sw Er:YSGG (lambda = 2.79 microns) and TEA CO2 (lambda = 10.6 microns) laser irradiation of porcine dermis using thin-film piezoelectric transducers. For radiant exposures that do not produce material removal, the stress transients are consistent with thermal expansion of the tissue samples. The temporal structure of the stress transients generated at the threshold radiant exposure for ablation indicates that the onset of material removal is delayed with respect to irradiation. Once material removal is achieved, the magnitude of the peak compressive stress and its variation with radiant exposure are consistent with a model that considers this process as an explosive event occurring after the laser pulse. This mechanism is different from ArF- and KrF-excimer laser ablation where absorption of ultraviolet radiation by the collagenous tissue matrix leads to tissue decomposition during irradiation and results in material removal via rapid surface vaporization. It appears that under the conditions examined in this study, explosive boiling of tissue water is the process that mediates the ablation event. This study provides evidence that the dynamics and mechanism of tissue ablation processes can be altered by targeting tissue water rather than the tissue structural matrix. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:8744336

  1. Radioadaptive Response for Reproductive Cell Death Demonstrated in In Vivo Tissue Model of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huangqi; Chen, Liangwen; Liu, Jialu; Shi, Jue; Li, Qingqing; Wang, Ting; Wu, Lijun; Zhan, Furu; Bian, Po

    2016-04-01

    Reproductive cell death (RCD) occurs after one or more cell divisions resulting from an insult such as radiation exposure or other treatments with carcinogens or mutagens. The radioadaptive response for RCD is usually investigated by in vitro or in vivo clonogenic assay. To date, this has not been demonstrated in the vulval tissue in Caenorhabditis elegans ( C. elegans ), which is a well established in vivo model for radiation-induced RCD. In this study to determine whether radioadaptive response occurs in the vulval tissue model of C. elegans , early larval worms were gamma irradiated with lower adaptive doses, followed by higher challenge doses. The ratio of protruding vulva was used to assess the RCD of vulval cells. The results of this study showed that the radioadaptive response for RCD in this vulval tissue model could be well induced by dose combinations of 5 + 75 Gy and 5 + 100 Gy at the time point of 14-16 h in worm development. In addition, the time course analysis indicated that radioresistance in vulval cells developed within 1.75 h after an adaptive dose and persisted for only a short period of time (2-4 h). DNA damage checkpoint and non-homologous end joining were involved in the radioadaptive response, exhibiting induction of protruding vulva in worms deficient in these two pathways similar to their controls. Interestingly, the DNA damage checkpoint was not active in the somatic vulval cells, and it was therefore suggested that the DNA damage checkpoint might mediate the radioadaptive response in a cell nonautonomous manner. Here, we show evidence of the occurrence of a radioadaptive response for RCD in the vulval tissue model of C. elegans . This finding provides a potential opportunity to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms of the radioadaptive response for RCD, in view of the abundant genetic resources of C. elegans . PMID:27023260

  2. Cortisol elevation and serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase in response to adverse job conditions: how are they interrelated?

    PubMed

    Härenstam, A; Theorell, T

    1990-10-01

    This study explores the use of plasma cortisol as an indicator of psychologically straining work. As plasma cortisol and liver function might be associated through biological mechanisms, this paper has a secondary object, namely to explore the interaction between cortisol and liver function. As an index of liver function the serum level of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GT) was used. The study sample was 2,000 prison employees from 67 different prisons in Sweden. Questionnaires and health examinations were used as well as measurements of plasma cortisol and serum GT. Very few work-related factors were associated with plasma cortisol unless analyzed separately for high and low level of serum GT. Two-way analyses of variance showed significant differences in the physiological "responses" to straining work with regard to psychic strain at work (men), social support at work (men), job role (men), loneliness at work (men and women), management style (women) and overtime work (women) between "low serum GT" and "high serum GT" individuals. Aggregated analyses showed that prison means of work-related factors were in some respects associated with prison means of plasma cortisol. The conclusion is that in individually based analyses plasma cortisol is difficult to use as an indicator of straining work, especially if the level of serum GT is unknown. PMID:1983313

  3. High incidence of adverse cerebral blood flow responses to spreading depolarization in the aged ischemic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Menyhárt, Ákos; Makra, Péter; Szepes, Borbála É; Tóth, Orsolya M; Hertelendy, Péter; Bari, Ferenc; Farkas, Eszter

    2015-12-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SDs) occur spontaneously in the brain after stroke, exacerbate ischemic injury, and thus emerge as a potential target of intervention. Aging predicts worse outcome from stroke; yet, the impact of age on SD evolution is not clear. Cerebral ischemia was induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion in young (8-9 weeks old, n = 8) and old (2 year olds, n = 6) anesthetized rats. Sham-operated animals of both age groups served as control (n = 12). Electrocorticogram, direct current potential, and cerebral blood flow (CBF) variations were acquired via a small craniotomy above the parietal cortex. SDs were elicited by KCl through a second craniotomy distal to the recording site. Ischemia and age delayed the recovery from SD. CBF decreased progressively during ischemia in the old animals selectively, and inverse neurovascular coupling with SD evolved in the old but not in the young ischemic group. We propose that (mal)adaptation of cerebrovascular function with aging impairs the SD-related CBF response, which is implicated in the intensified expansion of ischemic damage in the old brain. PMID:26346140

  4. Spectral and fluorescence imaging of immune system and tissue response to an immunogenic agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Se-woon; Acharya, Abhinav; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2009-05-01

    Imaging of immune system and tissue response to immunogenic agents can be important to the development of new biomaterials. Additionally, quantitative functional imaging can be useful for testing and evaluation of methods to alter or control the immune system response to implanted materials. In this preliminary study, we employ spectral imaging and fluorescence imaging to measure immune system and tissue response to implanted immunogenic agents. Poly (D,L lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) with a 50:50 composition was used to create immunogenic microparticles (MPs). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) encapsulated in the MPs was used to provoke a tissue immune response in mice and encapsulated fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was used to fluorescently label the MPs for imaging. Control MPs did not contain LPS. The MPs were delivered at 50 particles/μL in a total volume of 20μL by subcutaneous injection in the skin of a nude mouse in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber preparation. Cultured immune cells from a mouse leukemic monocyte macrophage cell line were exogenously labeled with the fluorescent dye DiD in solution at a concentration of 8000cells/μL. Immediately after window chamber surgery and implantation of the MPs, 100μL of the fluorescent macrophage solution was administered via the tail vein. Fluorescence imaging was used to track MPs and macrophages while spectral imaging was used for imaging and measurement of hemoglobin saturation in the tissue microvasculature. Imaging was performed periodically over about three days. The spectral and fluorescence imaging combination enabled detailed observations of the macrophage response and functional effects on the tissue.

  5. Cellular Response to a Novel Fetal Acellular Collagen Matrix: Implications for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rennert, Robert C.; Garg, Ravi K.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. PriMatrix (TEI Biosciences Inc., Boston, MA, USA) is a novel acellular collagen matrix derived from fetal bovine dermis that is designed for use in partial- and full-thickness wounds. This study analyzes the cellular response to PriMatrix in vivo, as well as the ability of this matrix to facilitate normal tissue regeneration. Methods. Five by five mm squares of rehydrated PriMatrix were implanted in a subcutaneous fashion on the dorsum of wild-type mice. Implant site tissue was harvested for histology, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and flow cytometric analyses at multiple time points until day 28. Results. PriMatrix implants were found to go through a biological progression initiated by a transient infiltrate of inflammatory cells, followed by mesenchymal cell recruitment and vascular development. IHC analysis revealed that the majority of the implanted fetal dermal collagen fibers persisted through day 28 but underwent remodeling and cellular repopulation to form tissue with a density and morphology consistent with healthy dermis. Conclusions. PriMatrix implants undergo progressive in vivo remodeling, facilitating the regeneration of histologically normal tissue through a mild inflammatory and progenitor cell response. Regeneration of normal tissue is especially important in a wound environment, and these findings warrant further investigation of PriMatrix in this setting. PMID:23970899

  6. Red fluorescent protein responsible for pigmentation in trematode-infected Porites compressa tissues.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Caroline V; Roth, Melissa S; Gates, Ruth D

    2009-02-01

    Reports of coral disease have increased dramatically over the last decade; however, the biological mechanisms that corals utilize to limit infection and resist disease remain poorly understood. Compromised coral tissues often display non-normal pigmentation that potentially represents an inflammation-like response, although these pigments remain uncharacterized. Using spectral emission analysis and cryo-histological and electrophoretic techniques, we investigated the pink pigmentation associated with trematodiasis, infection with Podocotyloides stenometre larval trematode, in Porites compressa. Spectral emission analysis reveals that macroscopic areas of pink pigmentation fluoresce under blue light excitation (450 nm) and produce a broad emission peak at 590 nm (+/-6) with a 60-nm full width at half maximum. Electrophoretic protein separation of pigmented tissue extract confirms the red fluorescence to be a protein rather than a low-molecular-weight compound. Histological sections demonstrate green fluorescence in healthy coral tissue and red fluorescence in the trematodiasis-compromised tissue. The red fluorescent protein (FP) is limited to the epidermis, is not associated with cells or granules, and appears unstructured. These data collectively suggest that the red FP is produced and localized in tissue infected by larval trematodes and plays a role in the immune response in corals. PMID:19218493

  7. Inflammatory response assessment of a hybrid tissue-engineered heart valve leaflet.

    PubMed

    Alavi, S Hamed; Liu, Wendy F; Kheradvar, Arash

    2013-02-01

    Despite substantial research in the past few decades, only slight progress has been made toward developing biocompatible, tissue-engineered scaffolds for heart valve leaflets that can withstand the dynamic pressure inside the heart. Recent progress on the development of hybrid scaffolds, which are composed of a thin metal mesh enclosed by multi-layered tissue, appear to be promising for heart valve engineering. This approach retains all the advantages of biological scaffolds while developing a strong extracellular matrix backbone to withstand dynamic loading. This study aims to test the inflammatory response of hybrid tissue-engineered leaflets based on characterizing the activation of macrophage cells cultured on the surfaces of the tissue construct. The results indicate that integration of biological layers around a metal mesh core-regardless of its type-may reduce the evoked inflammatory responses by THP-1 monocyte-like cells. This observation implies that masking a metal implant within a tissue construct prior to implantation can hide it from the immune system and may improve the implant's biocompatibility. PMID:23053298

  8. Tissue healing response following hyperthermic vapor ablation in the porcine longissimus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grantham, John T.; Grisez, Brian T.; Famoso, Justin; Hoey, Michael; Dixon, Chris; Coad, James E.

    2015-03-01

    As the use of hyperthermic ablation technologies has increased, so too has the need to understand their effects on tissue and their healing responses. This study was designed to characterize tissue injury and healing following hyperthermic vapor ablation in the in vivo porcine longissimus muscle model. The individual ablations were performed using the NxThera Vapor Delivery System (NxThera Inc., Minneapolis, MN). To assess the vapor ablation's evolution, the swine were euthanized post-treatment on Day 0, Day 3, Day 7, Day 14, Day 28, Day 45 and Day 90. Triphenyltetrazolium chloride viability staining (TTC staining) was used to macroscopically assess the extent of each vapor ablation within the tissue. The ablation associated healing responses were then histologically evaluated for acute inflammation, chronic inflammation, foreign body reaction and fibrosis. Two zones of tissue injury were initially identified in the ablations: 1) a central zone of complete coagulative necrosis and 2) an outer "transition zone" of viable and non-viable cells. The ablations initially increased in size from Day 0 to Day 7 and then progressively decreased in size though Day 45. The initial Day 3 healing changes originated in the transition zone with minimal acute and chronic inflammation. As time progressed, granulation tissue began to form by Day 7 and peaked around Day 14. Collagen formation, deposition and remodeling began in the adjacent healthy tissue by Day 28, replaced the ablation site by Day 45 and reorganized by Day 90. In conclusion, this vapor ablation technology provided a non-desiccating form of hyperthermic ablation that resulted in coagulative necrosis without a central thermally/heat-fixed tissue component, followed a classical wound healing pathway, and healed with minimal associated inflammation.

  9. Digital Image Analysis for Morphometric Evaluation of Tissue Response after Implanting Alloplastic Vascular Prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zippel, Roland; Hoene, Andreas; Walschus, Uwe; Jarchow, Raymond; Ueberrueck, Torsten; Patrzyk, Maciej; Schlosser, Michael; Wilhelm, Lutz

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the suitability of digital image analysis, using the KS400 software system, for the morphometric evaluation of the tissue response after prosthesis implantation in an animal model. Twenty-four female pigs aged 10 weeks were implanted with infrarenal Dacron® prostheses for 14, 21, 28, and 116 days. Following the explantation and investigation of the neointima region, the expression of beta-1-integrin, the proliferation rate by means of Ki-67 positive cells, and the intima thickness were evaluated as exemplary parameters of the tissue response after implantation. Frozen tissue sections were immunohistochemically stained and subsequently examined using computer-aided image analysis. A maximum expression of 32.9% was observed for beta-1-integrin 14 days after implantation, gradually declining over time to 9.8% after 116 days. The proliferation rate was found to be 19% on day 14, increasing to 39% on day 21 with a subsequent gradual decline to 5% after 116 days. The intima thickness increased from 189.9 [mu]m on day 14 to 1228.0 [mu]m on day 116. In conclusion, digital image analysis was found to be an efficient and reproducible method for the morphometric evaluation of a peri-prosthetic tissue response.

  10. Feasibility studies of electrical impedance spectroscopy for monitoring tissue response to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brian C.; Osterman, Kendra S.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Lilge, Lothar D.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    1998-05-01

    Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been evaluated as a non- or minimally-invasive technique to monitor the acute tissue response to photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this study the EIS spectra of normal muscle tissue in the rat hind leg were monitored immediately before and at time intervals up to 96 hours post-PDT treatment with different photosensitizers (Photofrin, ALA-induced PpIX, BenzoPorphyrin Derivative), at varying photosensitizer and light doses. EIS measurements were made using a pair of solid matrix Ag-AgCl electrodes placed parallel to one another on either side of the muscle mass and interfaced to a precision LCR impedance meter scanning the frequency range 1 - 1000 KHz. Independent histological grading of tissue injury was performed on tissue sections from treated and untreated legs at the 96 hour end point. Significant and PDT dose-dependent changes in the EIS spectra following treatment were observed, including increases in conductivity which correlated with the immediate post-PDT edematous response with Photofrin and ALA and which resolved or partially-resolved over the measurement time course. Photofrin treatments exhibited a clear drug dose response at 96 hours that was evident in both the EIS spectra and the histological sections. These changes included significant tissue necrosis as well as edema, inflammation and early fibroplasia. The BPD data were less clear, but potentially quite interesting. Most striking were below unity ratios of treated-to-untreated muscle spectra components at 24 hours which reversed to above unity by 96 hours in the through skin measurements. This phenomenon is indicative of a tissue response distinctly different than that observed with Photofrin or ALA. These data also suggest that EIS measured changes are sensitive enough to detect differences in PDT-initiated tissue damage that may be photosensitize-specific. While the data are derived from a small number of animals, the findings are quite encouraging in

  11. Linking the response of endocrine regulated genes to adverse effects on sex differentiation improves comprehension of aromatase inhibition in a Fish Sexual Development Test.

    PubMed

    Muth-Köhne, Elke; Westphal-Settele, Kathi; Brückner, Jasmin; Konradi, Sabine; Schiller, Viktoria; Schäfers, Christoph; Teigeler, Matthias; Fenske, Martina

    2016-07-01

    The Fish Sexual Development Test (FSDT) is a non-reproductive test to assess adverse effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals. With the present study it was intended to evaluate whether gene expression endpoints would serve as predictive markers of endocrine disruption in a FSDT. For proof-of-concept, a FSDT according to the OECD TG 234 was conducted with the non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor fadrozole (test concentrations: 10μg/L, 32μg/L, 100μg/L) using zebrafish (Danio rerio). Gene expression analyses using quantitative RT-PCR were included at 48h, 96h, 28days and 63days post fertilization (hpf, dpf). The selection of genes aimed at finding molecular endpoints which could be directly linked to the adverse apical effects of aromatase inhibition. The most prominent effects of fadrozole exposure on the sexual development of zebrafish were a complete sex ratio shift towards males and an acceleration of gonad maturation already at low fadrozole concentrations (10μg/L). Due to the specific inhibition of the aromatase enzyme (Cyp19) by fadrozole and thus, the conversion of C19-androgens to C18-estrogens, the steroid hormone balance controlling the sex ratio of zebrafish was altered. The resulting key event is the regulation of directly estrogen-responsive genes. Subsequently, gene expression of vitellogenin 1 (vtg1) and of the aromatase cyp19a1b isoform (cyp19a1b), were down-regulated upon fadrozole treatment compared to controls. For example, mRNA levels of vtg1 were down-regulated compared to the controls as early as 48 hpf and 96 hpf. Further regulated genes cumulated in pathways suggested to be controlled by endocrine mechanisms, like the steroid and terpenoid synthesis pathway (e.g. mevalonate (diphospho) decarboxylase (mvd), lanosterol synthase (2,3-oxidosqualene-lanosterol cyclase; lss), methylsterol monooxygenase 1 (sc4mol)) and in lipid transport/metabolic processes (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (star), apolipoprotein Eb (apoEb)). Taken together

  12. Comparative tissue transcriptomics reveal prompt inter-organ communication in response to local bacterial kidney infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mucosal infections elicit inflammatory responses via regulated signaling pathways. Infection outcome depends strongly on early events occurring immediately when bacteria start interacting with cells in the mucosal membrane. Hitherto reported transcription profiles on host-pathogen interactions are strongly biased towards in vitro studies. To detail the local in vivo genetic response to infection, we here profiled host gene expression in a recent experimental model that assures high spatial and temporal control of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) infection within the kidney of a live rat. Results Transcriptional profiling of tissue biopsies from UPEC-infected kidney tissue revealed 59 differentially expressed genes 8 h post-infection. Their relevance for the infection process was supported by a Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. Early differential expression at 3 h and 5 h post-infection was of low statistical significance, which correlated to the low degree of infection. Comparative transcriptomics analysis of the 8 h data set and online available studies of early local infection and inflammation defined a core of 80 genes constituting a "General tissue response to early local bacterial infections". Among these, 25% were annotated as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) regulated. Subsequent experimental analyses confirmed a systemic increase of IFN-γ in rats with an ongoing local kidney infection, correlating to splenic, rather than renal Ifng induction and suggested this inter-organ communication to be mediated by interleukin (IL)-23. The use of comparative transcriptomics allowed expansion of the statistical data handling, whereby relevant data could also be extracted from the 5 h data set. Out of the 31 differentially expressed core genes, some represented specific 5 h responses, illustrating the value of comparative transcriptomics when studying the dynamic nature of gene regulation in response to infections. Conclusion Our hypothesis-free approach identified

  13. Examining the Role of Nasopharyngeal-associated Lymphoreticular Tissue (NALT) in Mouse Responses to Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Cisney, Emily D.; Fernandez, Stefan; Hall, Shannan I.; Krietz, Gale A.; Ulrich, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    The nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoreticular tissues (NALT) found in humans, rodents, and other mammals, contribute to immunity in the nasal sinuses1-3. The NALT are two parallel bell-shaped structures located in the nasal passages above the hard palate, and are usually considered to be secondary components of the mucosal-associated lymphoid system4-6. Located within the NALT are discrete compartments of B and T lymphocytes interspersed with antigen-presenting dendritic cells4,7,8. These cells are surrounded by an epithelial cell layer intercalated with M-cells that are responsible for antigen retrieval from the mucosal surfaces of the air passages9,10. Naive lymphocytes circulating through the NALT are poised to respond to first encounters with respiratory pathogens7. While NALT disappear in humans by the age of two years, the Waldeyer's Ring and similarly structured lymphatic organs continue to persist throughout life6. In contrast to humans, mice retain NALT throughout life, thus providing a convenient animal model for the study of immune responses originating within the nasal sinuses11. Cultures of single-cell suspensions of NALT are not practical due to low yields of mononuclear cells. However, NALT biology can be examined by ex vivo culturing of the intact organ, and this method has the additional advantage of maintaining the natural tissue structure. For in vivo studies, genetic knockout models presenting defects limited to NALT are not currently available due to a poor understanding of the developmental pathway. For example, while lymphotoxin-α knockout mice have atrophied NALT, the Peyer's patches, peripheral lymph nodes, follicular dendritic cells and other lymphoid tissues are also altered in these genetically manipulated mice12,13. As an alternative to gene knockout mice, surgical ablation permanently eliminates NALT from the nasal passage without affecting other tissues. The resulting mouse model has been used to establish relationships between NALT

  14. The developing schistosome worms elicit distinct immune responses in different tissue regions.

    PubMed

    McWilliam, Hamish E G; Driguez, Patrick; Piedrafita, David; Maupin, Kevin A; Haab, Brian B; McManus, Donald P; Meeusen, Els N T

    2013-08-01

    Schistosome parasites follow a complex migration path through various tissues, changing their antigenic profile as they develop. A thorough understanding of the antibody response in each tissue region could help unravel the complex immunology of these developing parasites and aid vaccine design. Here we used a novel strategy for analysing the local antibody responses induced by Schistosoma japonicum infection at each site of infection. Cells from rat lymph nodes draining the sites of larval migration (the skin and lungs), the liver-lymph nodes where adults reside and the spleens were cultured to allow the in vivo-induced antibody-secreting cells to release antibody into the media. The amount and isotype of antibodies secreted in the supernatants differed significantly in the different lymph nodes and spleen, corresponding with the migration path of the schistosome worms. In addition, there were significant differences in binding specificity, as determined by surface labelling, western blots and by screening a glycan array. Through capturing the local antibody response, this study has revealed dramatic differences in the quality and specificity of the immune response at different tissue sites, and highlighted the existence of stage-specific protein and carbohydrate antigens. This will provide a valuable tool for the isolation of novel vaccine targets against the larval stages of schistosomes. PMID:23856766

  15. The brain tissue response to surgical injury and its possible contribution to glioma recurrence.

    PubMed

    Hamard, Lauriane; Ratel, David; Selek, Laurent; Berger, François; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Wion, Didier

    2016-05-01

    Surgery is the first line therapy for glioma. However, glioma recurs in 90 % of the patients in the resection margin. The impact of surgical brain injury (SBI) on glioma recurrence is largely overlooked. Herein, we review some of the mechanisms involved in tissue repair that may impact glioma recurrence at the resection margin. Many processes or molecules involved in tissue repair after brain injury are also critical for glioma growth. They include a wide array of secreted growth factors, cytokines and transcription factors including NFКB and STAT3 which in turn activate proliferative and anti-apoptotic genes and processes such as angiogenesis and inflammation. Because some residual glioma cells always remain in the tumor resection margin, there are now compelling arguments to suggest that some aspects of the brain tissue response to SBI can also participate to glioma recurrence at the resection margin. Brain tissue response to SBI recruits angiogenesis and inflammation that precede and then follow tumor recurrence at the resection margin. The healing response to SBI is double edged, as inflammation is involved in regeneration and healing, and has both pro- and anti-tumorigenic functions. A promising therapeutic approach is to normalize and re-educate the molecular and cellular responses at the resection margin to promote anti-tumorigenic processes involved in healing while inhibiting pro-tumorigenic activities. Manipulation of the inflammatory response to SBI to prevent local recurrence could also enhance the efficacy of other therapies such as immunotherapy. However, our current knowledge is far from sufficient to achieve this goal. Acknowledging, understanding and manipulating the double-edged role played by SBI in glioma recurrence is surely challenging, but it cannot be longer delayed. PMID:26961772

  16. Methods of Assessing Human Tendon Metabolism and Tissue Properties in Response to Changes in Mechanical Loading.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, S Peter

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a number of methodological developments have improved the opportunities to study human tendon. Microdialysis enables sampling of interstitial fluid in the peritendon tissue, while sampling of human tendon biopsies allows direct analysis of tendon tissue for gene- and protein expression as well as protein synthesis rate. Further the (14)C bomb-pulse method has provided data on long-term tissue turnover in human tendon. Non-invasive techniques allow measurement of tendon metabolism (positron emission tomography (PET)), tendon morphology (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)), and tendon mechanical properties (ultrasonography combined with force measurement during movement). Finally, 3D cell cultures of human tendon cells provide the opportunity to investigate cell-matrix interactions in response to various interventions. PMID:27535251

  17. SU-E-J-31: Biodynamic Imaging of Cancer Tissue and Response to Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nolte, D; Turek, J; Childress, M; An, R; Merrill, D; Matei, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure intracellular motions inside three-dimensional living cancer tissue samples to establish a novel set of biodynamic biomarkers that assess tissue proliferative activity and sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy. Methods: Biodynamic imaging (BDI) uses digital holography with low-coherence low-intensity light illumination to construct 3D holograms from depths up to a millimeter deep inside cancer tissue models that include multicellular tumor spheroids and ex vivo cancer biopsies from canine non-Hodgkins lymphoma and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) mouse explants. Intracellular motions modulate the holographic intensity with frequencies related to the Doppler effect caused by the motions of a wide variety of intracellular components. These motions are affected by applied therapeutic agents, and BDI produces unique fingerprints of the action of specific drugs on the motions in specific cell types. In this study, chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin for canine lymphoma and oxoplatin for ovarian) are applied to the living tissue models and monitored over 10 hours by BDI. Results: Multicellular spheroids and patient biopsies are categorized as either sensitive or insensitive to applied therapeutics depending on the intracellular Doppler signatures of chemotherapy response. For both lymphoma and EOC there is strong specificity to the two types of sensitivities, with sensitive cell lines and biopsies exhibiting a global cessation of proliferation and strong suppression of metabolic activity, while insensitive cell lines and biopsies show moderate activation of Doppler frequencies associated with membrane processes and possible membrane trafficking. Conclusion: This work supports the hypothesis that biodynamic biomarkers from three-dimensional living tumor tissue, that includes tissue heterogeneity and measured within 24 hours of surgery, is predictive of near-term patient response to therapy. Future work will correlate biodynamic biomarkers with

  18. Placental Features of Late-Onset Adverse Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Lucy E.; Wareing, Mark; Greenwood, Susan L.; Jones, Rebecca L.; Sibley, Colin P.; Johnstone, Edward D.; Heazell, Alexander E. P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Currently, no investigations reliably identify placental dysfunction in late pregnancy. To facilitate the development of such investigations we aimed to identify placental features that differ between normal and adverse outcome in late pregnancy in a group of pregnancies with reduced fetal movement. Methods Following third trimester presentation with reduced fetal movement (N = 100), placental structure ex vivo was measured. Placental function was then assessed in terms of (i) chorionic plate artery agonist responses and length-tension characteristics using wire myography and (ii) production and release of placentally derived hormones (by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbant assay of villous tissue and explant conditioned culture medium). Results Placentas from pregnancies ending in adverse outcome (N = 23) were ~25% smaller in weight, volume, length, width and disc area (all p<0.0001) compared with those from normal outcome pregnancies. Villous and trophoblast areas were unchanged, but villous vascularity was reduced (median (interquartile range): adverse outcome 10 (10–12) vessels/mm2 vs. normal outcome 13 (12–15), p = 0.002). Adverse outcome pregnancy placental arteries were relatively insensitive to nitric oxide donated by sodium nitroprusside compared to normal outcome pregnancy placental arteries (50% Effective Concentration 30 (19–50) nM vs. 12 (6–24), p = 0.02). Adverse outcome pregnancy placental tissue contained less human chorionic gonadotrophin (20 (11–50) vs. 55 (24–102) mIU/mg, p = 0.007) and human placental lactogen (11 (6–14) vs. 27 (9–50) mg/mg, p = 0.006) and released more soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (21 (13–29) vs. 5 (2–15) ng/mg, p = 0.01) compared with normal outcome pregnancy placental tissue. Conclusion These data provide a description of the placental phenotype of adverse outcome in late pregnancy. Antenatal tests that accurately reflect elements of this phenotype may

  19. Bystander and Adaptive Responses in Tissue Models exposed to Low Radiation Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. Prise

    2007-01-02

    The overall goal is characterization of 3D tissue models that can be used for investigation of the mechanisms underlying radiation-induced bystander effect at low doses (20 cGy or less) of low LET ionizing radiation, using a unique focused soft X-ray microprobe that had been upgraded to provide a range of focused soft X-ray energies, some sufficient to penetrate 3D models (Ref DE-FG02-01ER63236). The proposed studies will include an examination of whether the passage of a single electron track can trigger bystander responses in the 3D tissue models and, if so, whether the response is altered by increased or decreased levels of oxidative stress. Our existing multi-photon/confocal in-depth microscopy techniques will be used to develop assays for damage induced within intact 3D tissue models. The working hypothesis is that organization of cells into tissues, particularly involving more than one cell type, alters expression of the radiation-induced bystander effect compared to that seen in isolated single cell types in monolayer.

  20. In Vivo Nonlinear Optical Imaging of Immune Responses: Tissue Injury and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yan; Yan, Bo; Xu, Jin; Sun, Qiqi; He, Sicong; Jiang, Jun; Wen, Zilong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a noninvasive imaging approach based on multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy to in vivo image the responses of immune cells (neutrophils) to the tissue injury and bacterial infection in a zebrafish model. Specifically, the second harmonic generation from myosin thick filaments in sarcomere enabled a clear visualization of the muscle injury and infection. Two-photon excited fluorescence was used to track the behavior of the neutrophils that were transgenically labeled by red fluorescent protein. The corresponding reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) two-photon excited fluorescence images revealed a detailed morphological transformation process of individual neutrophils during muscle tissue injury and bacterial infection. The analysis of time-resolved NADH signals from the neutrophils provided important biological insights of the cellular energy metabolism during the immune responses. We found a significant increase of free/protein-bound NADH ratios in activated neutrophils in bacterial-infected tissue. In this study, we also discovered that, under 720 nm excitation, two wild-type strains (DH5α and BL21) of bacteria Escherichia coli emitted distinct endogenous fluorescence of double-peak at ∼450 and ∼520 nm, respectively. We demonstrated that the double-peak fluorescence signal could be used to differentiate the E. coli from surrounding tissues of dominant NADH signals, and to achieve label-free tracking of E. coli bacteria in vivo. PMID:25418312

  1. Tumor Cell Response to Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy Differs Markedly From Cells in Normal Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, Robin L.; Rothkamm, Kai; Restall, Christina M.; Cann, Leonie; Ruwanpura, Saleela; Meachem, Sarah; Yagi, Naoto; Svalbe, Imants; Lewis, Robert A.; Williams, Bryan R.G.; Rogers, Peter A.W.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) can be effective at destroying tumors in animal models while causing very little damage to normal tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular processes behind this observation of potential clinical importance. Methods and Materials: MRT was performed using a lattice of 25 {mu}m-wide, planar, polychromatic, kilovoltage X-ray microbeams, with 200-{mu}m peak separation. Inoculated EMT-6.5 tumor and normal mouse skin tissues were harvested at defined intervals post-MRT. Immunohistochemical detection of {gamma}-H2AX allowed precise localization of irradiated cells, which were also assessed for proliferation and apoptosis. Results: MRT significantly reduced tumor cell proliferation by 24 h post-irradiation (p = 0.002). An unexpected finding was that within 24 h of MRT, peak and valley irradiated zones were indistinguishable in tumors because of extensive cell migration between the zones. This was not seen in MRT-treated normal skin, which appeared to undergo a coordinated repair response. MRT elicited an increase in median survival times of EMT-6.5 and 67NR tumor-inoculated mice similar to that achieved with conventional radiotherapy, while causing markedly less normal tissue damage. Conclusions: This study provides evidence of a differential response at a cellular level between normal and tumor tissues after synchrotron MRT.

  2. Investigation of endocrine and immunological response in fat tissue to hyperbaric oxygen administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Şen, H; Erbağ, G; Ovali, M A; Öztopuz, R Ö; Uzun, M

    2016-01-01

    Though HBO treatment is becoming more common, the mechanism of action is not fully known. The positive effects of HBO administration on the inflammatory response is thought to be a possible basic mechanism. As a result, we aimed to research whether endocrine and immunological response of fat tissue changes in rats given HBO treatment model. This research was carried out on Wistar albino rats, they were treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Their fatty tissue were taken from the abdomen, gene expression of the cytokines and adipokines were analyzed with Real time PCR method. When the gene expression of hormones and cytokines by fat tissue was examined, the leptin, visfatin, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-10 levels in the HBO treatment group were statistically significantly increased compared to the control group (p=0.0313, p=0.0156, p=0.0156, p=0.0156, p=0.0313). In conclusion, in our study we identified that HBO administration affected the endochrinological functions of fat tissue. PMID:27188864

  3. Quantitative analysis of the tissue response to chronically implanted microwire electrodes in rat cortex.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Brent D; Tresco, Patrick A

    2010-03-01

    Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain how the brain tissue reaction to single unit recording electrodes influences biocompatibility including progressive changes in the spatial distribution of reactive astrocytes, and the loss of neurons over the indwelling period. To examine these hypotheses, the spatial distribution of biomarkers associated with the foreign body response to insulated microwires placed in rat cerebral cortex was analyzed 2, 4, and 12 weeks after implantation using quantitative methods. We observed a stereotypical tissue response that was similar in some aspects to that previously reported for penetrating planar silicon microelectrode arrays with some specific differences including an overall lower degree of cortical tissue reactivity. While we found no evidence that reactive gliosis increases over time or that neuronal loss is progressive, we did find evidence of persistent inflammation and enhanced BBB permeability at the electrode brain tissue interface that extended over the 3 month indwelling period and that exhibited more animal to animal variability at 3 months than at 2 and 4 weeks. PMID:19963267

  4. Tissue Oxygenation Response to Mild Hypercapnia during Cardiopulmonary Bypass with Constant Pump Output

    PubMed Central

    Akça, Ozan; Sessler, Daniel I; DeLong, Diane; Keijner, Raymond; Ganzel, Brian; Doufas, Anthony G

    2006-01-01

    Background Tissue oxygenation is the primary determinant of wound infection risk. Mild hypercapnia markedly improves cutaneous, subcutaneous, and muscular tissue oxygenation in volunteers and patients. However, relative contributions of increased cardiac output and peripheral vasodilation to this response remains unknown. We thus tested the hypothesis that increased cardiac output is the dominant mechanism. Methods We recruited 10 ASA III patients, aged 40–65 years, undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass for this crossover trial. After induction of anaesthesia, a Silastic tonometer was inserted subcutaneously in the upper arm. Subcutaneous tissue oxygen tension was measured with both polarographic electrode and fluorescence-based systems. Oximeter probes were placed bilaterally on the forehead to monitor cerebral oxygenation. After initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass, in random order patients were exposed to two arterial CO2 partial pressures for 30 minutes each: 35 (normocapnia) or 50 mmHg (hypercapnia). Bypass pump flow was kept constant throughout the measurement periods. Results Hypercapnia during bypass had essentially no effect on PaO2, mean arterial pressure, or tissue temperature. PaCO2 and pH differed significantly. Subcutaneous tissue oxygenation was virtually identical during the two PaCO2 periods (139 [50,163] vs. 145 [38,158], P=0.335) (median [range]). In contrast, cerebral oxygen saturation (our positive control measurement) was significantly less during normocapnia (57 [28,67]%) than hypercapnia (64 [37,89]%, P=0.025). Conclusions Mild hypercapnia, which normally markedly increases tissue oxygenation, did not do so during cardiopulmonary bypass with fixed pump output. This suggests that hypercapnia normally increases tissue oxygenation by increasing cardiac output rather than direct dilation of peripheral vessels. PMID:16675511

  5. Response of tobacco tissue cultures growing in contact with lunar fines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.; Walkinshaw, C. H.; Laseter, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    During the quarantine periods following each Apollo mission to the moon, various biological systems were placed in the presence of lunar material to determine if pathogenic agents were present. Although no detrimental effects resulted, various responses by the several plant systems tested were noted. One such response was the increased pigmentation observed in the callus tissue cultures of tobacco. Further investigations revealed that these tissues grown in the presence of lunar material resulted in as much as a 35% increase in total pigments while differences in fatty acid and sterol concentrations were also noted when compared to the controls. It is believed that these changes brought about by the lunar material can be attributed to a change in the nutritional environment caused by its dissolution.

  6. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  7. Immune Responses to HIV and SIV in Mucosal Tissues: “Location, Location, Location”

    PubMed Central

    Shacklett, Barbara L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes research literature regarding mucosal immunity to HIV and SIV, with an emphasis on work published within the past 18 months. Recent findings Notable recent studies have focused on the pivotal events occurring within mucosal tissues during acute HIV/SIV infection that serve to establish a balance between detrimental immune activation and beneficial adaptive responses. In cervicovaginal mucosa, an early inflammatory response leads to recruitment of susceptible target cells. At this acute stage, the in vivo ratio between CD8+ effector cells and infected CD4+ T-cells may be critical for limiting viral dissemination. Acute infection is also accompanied by loss of germinal center architecture and T/B cell apoptosis in Peyer’s patches of the gastrointestinal tract. During chronic infection, mucosal CD8+ T-cells may play a role in immune control, as suggested by studies of elite controllers. Summary Mucosal tissues serve as the major portal of entry for HIV, and house a majority of the body’s lymphocytes, including CD4+ T-cells that are targets for infection. Recent studies have focused renewed attention on events occurring immediately after transmission, and underscore the concept that the balance between inflammation and protective immunity is established by host responses in mucosal tissues. PMID:20543589

  8. Liver but not adipose tissue is responsive to the pattern of enteral feeding

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Yolanda F.; Lundblad, Tammy M.; Ford, Eric A.; House, Lawrence M.; McGuinness, Owen P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nutritional support is an important aspect of medical care, providing calories to patients with compromised nutrient intake. Metabolism has a diurnal pattern, responding to the light cycle and food intake, which in turn can drive changes in liver and adipose tissue metabolism. In this study, we assessed the response of liver and white adipose tissue (WAT) to different feeding patterns under nutritional support (total enteral nutrition or TEN). Mice received continuous isocaloric TEN for 10 days or equal calories of chow once a day (Ch). TEN was given either at a constant (CN, same infusion rate during 24 h) or variable rate (VN, 80% of calories fed at night, 20% at day). Hepatic lipogenesis and carbohydrate‐responsive element‐binding protein (ChREBP) expression increased in parallel with the diurnal feeding pattern. Relative to Ch, both patterns of enteral feeding increased adiposity. This increase was not associated with enhanced lipogenic gene expression in WAT; moreover, lipogenesis was unaffected by the feeding pattern. Surprisingly, leptin and adiponectin expression increased. Moreover, nutritional support markedly increased hepatic and adipose FGF21 expression in CN and VN, despite being considered a fasting hormone. In summary, liver but not WAT, respond to the pattern of feeding. While hepatic lipid metabolism adapts to the pattern of nutrient availability, WAT does not. Moreover, sustained delivery of nutrients in an isocaloric diet can cause adiposity without the proinflammatory state observed in hypercaloric feeding. Thus, the liver but not adipose tissue is responsive to the pattern of feeding behavior. PMID:24744913

  9. Stages of the Inflammatory Response in Pathology and Tissue Repair after Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Askenase, Michael H; Sansing, Lauren H

    2016-06-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a major health concern, with high rates of mortality and morbidity and no highly effective clinical interventions. Basic research in animal models of ICH has provided insight into its complex pathology, in particular revealing the role of inflammation in driving neuronal death and neurologic deficits after hemorrhage. The response to ICH occurs in four distinct phases: (1) initial tissue damage and local activation of inflammatory factors, (2) inflammation-driven breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, (3) recruitment of circulating inflammatory cells and subsequent secondary immunopathology, and (4) engagement of tissue repair responses that promote tissue repair and restoration of neurologic function. The development of CNS inflammation occurs over many days after initial hemorrhage and thus may represent an ideal target for treatment of the disease, but further research is required to identify the mechanisms that promote engagement of inflammatory versus anti-inflammatory pathways. In this review, the authors examine how experimental models of ICH have uncovered critical mediators of pathology in each of the four stages of the inflammatory response, and focus on the role of the immune system in these processes. PMID:27214704

  10. Early inflammatory response in soft tissues induced by thin calcium phosphates.

    PubMed

    Rydén, L; Molnar, D; Esposito, M; Johansson, A; Suska, F; Palmquist, A; Thomsen, P

    2013-09-01

    The inflammatory response to titanium and hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated titanium in living tissue is controlled by a number of humoral factors, of which monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) has been specifically linked to the recruitment of monocytes. These cells subsequently mature into tissue-bound macrophages. Macrophages adhering to the proteins adsorbed at the implant surface play a pivotal role in initiating the rejection or integration of the foreign material. Despite this, little is known about the initial inflammatory events that occur in soft tissues following the implantation of titanium and HA-coated titanium implants. In this study, circular discs of commercially pure titanium (c.p. Ti) with either a thin crystalline HA coating or amorphous HA coating or uncoated were implanted subcutaneously into rats. The implants were retrieved after 24 and 72 h. The lactate dehydrogenase (LD) activity, DNA content, expression of MCP-1, interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), as well as monocyte and polymorphonuclear granulocyte counts in the exudate surrounding the implants were analyzed. There were significantly higher DNA and LD levels around the titanium implants at 24 h compared with HA-coated titanium. A rapid decrease in MCP-1 levels was observed for all the implants over the period of observation. No statistically significant differences were found between the two HA-coated implants. Our results suggest a difference in the early soft-tissue response to HA-coated implants when compared with titanium implants, expressed as a downregulation of inflammatory cell recruitment. This suggests that thin HA coatings are promising surfaces for soft tissue applications. PMID:23463679

  11. The agr Inhibitors Solonamide B and Analogues Alter Immune Responses to Staphylococccus aureus but Do Not Exhibit Adverse Effects on Immune Cell Functions.

    PubMed

    Baldry, Mara; Kitir, Betül; Frøkiær, Hanne; Christensen, Simon B; Taverne, Nico; Meijerink, Marjolein; Franzyk, Henrik; Olsen, Christian A; Wells, Jerry M; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to antibiotic resistance with the community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strains such as USA300 being of particular concern. The inhibition of bacterial virulence has been proposed as an alternative approach to treat multi-drug resistant pathogens. One interesting anti-virulence target is the agr quorum-sensing system, which regulates virulence of CA-MRSA in response to agr-encoded autoinducing peptides. Agr regulation confines exotoxin production to the stationary growth phase with concomitant repression of surface-expressed adhesins. Solonamide B, a non-ribosomal depsipeptide of marine bacterial origin, was recently identified as a putative anti-virulence compound that markedly reduced expression of α-hemolysin and phenol-soluble modulins. To further strengthen solonamide anti-virulence candidacy, we report the chemical synthesis of solonamide analogues, investigation of structure-function relationships, and assessment of their potential to modulate immune cell functions. We found that structural differences between solonamide analogues confer significant differences in interference with agr, while immune cell activity and integrity is generally not affected. Furthermore, treatment of S. aureus with selected solonamides was found to only marginally influence the interaction with fibronectin and biofilm formation, thus addressing the concern that application of compounds inducing an agr-negative state may have adverse interactions with host factors in favor of host colonization. PMID:26731096

  12. The agr Inhibitors Solonamide B and Analogues Alter Immune Responses to Staphylococccus aureus but Do Not Exhibit Adverse Effects on Immune Cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Baldry, Mara; Kitir, Betül; Frøkiær, Hanne; Christensen, Simon B.; Taverne, Nico; Meijerink, Marjolein; Franzyk, Henrik; Olsen, Christian A.; Wells, Jerry M.; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to antibiotic resistance with the community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strains such as USA300 being of particular concern. The inhibition of bacterial virulence has been proposed as an alternative approach to treat multi-drug resistant pathogens. One interesting anti-virulence target is the agr quorum-sensing system, which regulates virulence of CA-MRSA in response to agr-encoded autoinducing peptides. Agr regulation confines exotoxin production to the stationary growth phase with concomitant repression of surface-expressed adhesins. Solonamide B, a non-ribosomal depsipeptide of marine bacterial origin, was recently identified as a putative anti-virulence compound that markedly reduced expression of α-hemolysin and phenol-soluble modulins. To further strengthen solonamide anti-virulence candidacy, we report the chemical synthesis of solonamide analogues, investigation of structure–function relationships, and assessment of their potential to modulate immune cell functions. We found that structural differences between solonamide analogues confer significant differences in interference with agr, while immune cell activity and integrity is generally not affected. Furthermore, treatment of S. aureus with selected solonamides was found to only marginally influence the interaction with fibronectin and biofilm formation, thus addressing the concern that application of compounds inducing an agr-negative state may have adverse interactions with host factors in favor of host colonization. PMID:26731096

  13. Structure-function relationships in radiation-induced cell and tissue lesions: special references to the contributions of scanning electron microscopy and hematopoietic tissue responses

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.

    1987-03-01

    Contributions of scanning electron microscopy to the field of radiation biology are briefly reviewed and presented in terms of an overall goal to identify and characterize the structural features of radiation-induced lesions in vital cell and tissue targets. In the context of lesion production, the major radiation-elicited response sequences, the types and nature of measured end points, and governing temporal and radiobiological parameters are discussed and illustrated by using results derived from both in vitro cell systems and in vivo studies that measured tissue responses from various organ systems (respiratory, digestive, circulatory, and central nervous systems). Work in our laboratory on the nature of early and late hematopathologic tissue responses (aplastic anemia and myeloid leukemia) induced by protracted radiation exposure and the bridging effect of repair processes relative to the expression of these pathologies is highlighted.

  14. Transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling of chicken adipose tissue in response to insulin neutralization and fasting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Domestic broiler chickens rapidly accumulate adipose tissue due to intensive genetic selection for rapid growth and are naturally hyperglycemic and insulin resistant, making them an attractive addition to the suite of rodent models used for studies of obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans. Furthermore, chicken adipose tissue is considered as poorly sensitive to insulin and lipolysis is under glucagon control. Excessive fat accumulation is also an economic and environmental concern for the broiler industry due to the loss of feed efficiency and excessive nitrogen wasting, as well as a negative trait for consumers who are increasingly conscious of dietary fat intake. Understanding the control of avian adipose tissue metabolism would both enhance the utility of chicken as a model organism for human obesity and insulin resistance and highlight new approaches to reduce fat deposition in commercial chickens. Results We combined transcriptomics and metabolomics to characterize the response of chicken adipose tissue to two energy manipulations, fasting and insulin deprivation in the fed state. Sixteen to 17 day-old commercial broiler chickens (ISA915) were fed ad libitum, fasted for five hours, or fed but deprived of insulin by injections of anti-insulin serum. Pair-wise contrasts of expression data identified a total of 2016 genes that were differentially expressed after correction for multiple testing, with the vast majority of differences due to fasting (1780 genes). Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analyses indicated that a short term fast impacted expression of genes in a broad selection of pathways related to metabolism, signaling and adipogenesis. The effects of insulin neutralization largely overlapped with the response to fasting, but with more modest effects on adipose tissue metabolism. Tissue metabolomics indicated unique effects of insulin on amino acid metabolism. Conclusions Collectively, these data provide a foundation for further study into the

  15. Monosaccharide-Responsive Phenylboronate-Polyol Cell Scaffolds for Cell Sheet and Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Rachamalla Maheedhar; Srivastava, Akshay; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Analyte-responsive smart polymeric materials are of great interest and have been actively investigated in the field of regenerative medicine. Phenylboronate containing copolymers form gels with polyols under alkaline conditions. Monosaccharides, by virtue of their higher affinity towards boronate, can displace polyols and solubilize such gels. In the present study, we investigate the possibility of utilizing phenylboronate-polyol interactions at physiological pH in order to develop monosaccharide-responsive degradable scaffold materials for systems dealing with cells and tissues. Amine assisted phenylboronate-polyol interactions were employed to develop novel hydrogel and cryogel scaffolds at neutral pH. The scaffolds displayed monosaccharide inducible gel-sol phase transformability. In vitro cell culture studies demonstrated the ability of scaffolds to support cell adhesion, viability and proliferation. Fructose induced gel degradation is used to recover cells cultured on the hydrogels. The cryogels displayed open macroporous structure and superior mechanical properties. These novel phase transformable phenylboronate-polyol based scaffolds displayed a great potential for various cell sheet and tissue engineering applications. Their monosaccharide responsiveness at physiological pH is very useful and can be utilized in the fields of cell immobilization, spheroid culture, saccharide recognition and analyte-responsive drug delivery. PMID:24167587

  16. Effect of retinol on the hyperthermal response of normal tissue in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, M.A.; Marigold, J.C.L.; Hume, S.P.

    1983-07-01

    The effect of prior administration of retinol, a membrane labilizer, on the in vivo hyperthermal response of lysosomes was investigated in the mouse spleen using a quantitative histochemical assay for the lysosomal enzyme acid phosphatase. A dose of retinol which had no effect when given alone enhanced the thermal response of the lysosome, causing an increase in lysosomal membrane permeability. In contrast, the same dose of retinol had no effect on the gross hyperthermal response of mouse intestine; a tissue which is relatively susceptible to hyperthermia. Thermal damage to intestine was assayed directly by crypt loss 1 day after treatment or assessed as thermal enhancement of x-ray damage by counting crypt microcolonies 4 days after a combined heat and x-ray treatment. Thus, although the hyperthermal response of the lysosome could be enhanced by the administration of retinol, thermal damage at a gross tissue level appeared to be unaffected, suggesting that lysosomal membrane injury is unlikely to be a primary event in hyperthermal cell killing.

  17. The effect of retinol on the hyperthermal response of normal tissue in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, M.A.; Marigold, J.C.; Hume, S.P.

    1983-07-01

    The effect of prior administration of retinol, a membrane labilizer, on the in vivo hyperthermal response of lysosomes was investigated in the mouse spleen using a quantitative histochemical assay for the lysosomal enzyme acid phosphatase. A dose of retinol which had no effect when given alone enhanced the thermal response of the lysosome, causing an increase in lysosomal membrane permeability. In contrast, the same dose of retinol had no effect on the gross hyperthermal response of mouse intestine; a tissue which is relatively susceptible to hyperthermia. Thermal damage to intestine was assayed directly by crypt loss 1 day after treatment or assessed as thermal enhancement of X-ray damage by counting crypt microcolonies 4 days after a combined heat and X-ray treatment. Thus, although the hyperthermal response of the lysosome could be enhanced by the administration of retinol, thermal damage at a gross tissue level appeared to be unaffected, suggesting that lysosomal membrane injury is unlikely to be a primary event in hyperthermal cell killing.

  18. The response of tissue-equivalent proportional counters to heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Nikjoo, Hooshang; Khvostunov, Igor K; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2002-04-01

    The paper presents a theoretical model for the response of a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) irradiated with charged particles. Heavy ions and iron ions in particular constitute a significant part of radiation in space. TEPCs are used for all space shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) missions to estimate the dose and radiation quality (in terms of lineal energy) inside spacecraft. The response of the tissue-equivalent proportional counters shows distortions at the wall/cavity interface. In this paper, we present microdosimetric investigation using Monte Carlo track structure calculations to simulate the response of a TEPC to charged particles of various LET (1 MeV protons, 2.4 MeV alpha particles, 46 MeV/nucleon 20Ne, 55 MeV/nucleon 20Ne, 45 MeV/nucleon 40Ar, and 1.05 GeV/nucleon 56Fe). Data are presented for energy lost and energy absorbed in the counter cavity and wall. The model calculations are in good agreement with the results of Rademacher et al. (Radiat. Res. 149, 387-389, 1998), including the study of the interface between the wall and the sensitive region of the counter. It is shown that the anomalous response observed at large event sizes in the experiment is due to an enhanced entry of secondary electrons from the wall into the gas cavity. PMID:11893246

  19. 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel Research Plan Review for: The Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) participated in a meeting with representatives from the Human Research Program (HRP) Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element and HRP management on February 3-4, 2014 in Houston, TX to review the updated Research Plan for the Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response in the HRP Integrated Research Plan. The SRP is impressed with the work the immune discipline has done since the 2012 SRP review and agrees with the new wording of the Gaps, no longer questions, now statements. The SRP also likes the addition of adding targets for closing the Gaps, but it is not clear how they got to some of the interim stages (interval percentages). A major concern that the SRP has mentioned since the initial 2009 SRP meeting is that there is still not enough emphasis on the interdisciplinary aspect of the immune risk associated with other risks (i.e., nutrition, radiation, etc.). The SRP recommends that a "translational SRP" or advisory group be developed that is composed of members from all of the HRP SRPs. The SRP also thinks that the immune discipline should consider a more systems biology approach. Lastly, the SRP is concerned that the risks observed in research from low Earth orbit (LEO) missions may not accurately reflect all the risks of longer duration flight beyond LEO. Also, there does not seem to be a concern for immune responses that may occur when someone is in space longer than six months, for example, a Mars mission would take three years. The absence of disease in past and current flight scenarios does not mean the risk may not be there in future flight settings.

  20. Identification of biomarkers responsive to chronic exposure to pharmaceuticals in target tissues of Carcinus maenas.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Martínez, G V; Del Valls, T A; Martín-Díaz, M L

    2013-01-01

    A 28-day bioassay was performed with Carcinus maenas to evaluate chronic effects caused by exposure to caffeine and ibuprofen (0.1-50 μg L(-1)) in sea water. Lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) was evaluated in hemolymph applying the neutral red retention assay (NRRA); several biomarkers including ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), dibenzylfluorescein dealkylase (DBF), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and DNA damage were studied in gill, hepatopancreas, muscle and gonad tissues. In crabs exposed to environmental concentrations of the drugs, retention time was reduced by 50%. EROD and DBFOD activities were induced by caffeine in muscle and hepatopancreas tissues (p < 0.05); GST activity was activated by ibuprofen in gill, hepatopancreas and muscle at the highest concentrations tested (p < 0.05). All tissues showed GPX activity and LPO induction (p < 0.05). Crabs exposed to caffeine and ibuprofen showed evidence of DNA damage mainly in hepatopancreas tissues (p < 0.05). Environmental concentrations of pharmaceuticals induce LMS and the biochemical responses studied in this crab. This methodology is a suitable technique for assessing pharmaceutical toxicity in the marine environment. PMID:23562135

  1. Histotripsy Fractionation of Prostate Tissue: Local Effects and Systemic Response in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Christopher R.; Hall, Timothy L; Cain, Charles A.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Zhen; Roberts, William W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Histotripsy is an extracorporeal ultrasound (US) technology that utilizes cavitational mechanisms to produce non-thermal tissue destruction. Previously, we demonstrated the feasibility of histotripsy for fractionation and immediate debulking of prostate tissue. The purpose of this study is to characterize the local effects and systemic response after histotripsy treatment of prostate tissue in an in-vivo canine model. Materials and Methods Histotripsy was applied transabdominally to the prostate in eighteen intact male canine subjects under general anesthesia. Acoustic bursts (4 microseconds) were delivered at 300 Hz pulse repetition rate from a highly focused 750 kHz piezoelectric US transducer (15 cm aperture, 3×3×8 mm focal volume). The prostate and surrounding structures were harvested at prescribed time points (0, 7, 28, or 56 days) following histotripsy. Blood and urine parameters were assessed periodically while clinical evaluation incorporating a validated veterinary pain scale was performed daily. Results Conventional transrectal US imaging facilitated targeting of the focal volume and provided real-time assessment of cavitation activity. Fractionation of the targeted volume and clearance of the resultant debris with urination produced a treatment cavity within each prostate. No acoustic collateral damage was seen and urothelialization of the treatment cavity occurred within 28 days of treatment. Only transient lab abnormalities and minimal hematuria were noted after treatment. Pain scores revealed only mild post treatment discomfort. Conclusions Histotripsy produced consistent tissue fractionation and prostate debulking without collateral acoustic injury or clinical side effects and was well tolerated in the canine model. PMID:21334667

  2. Isoliquiritigenin Attenuates Adipose Tissue Inflammation in vitro and Adipose Tissue Fibrosis through Inhibition of Innate Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yasuharu; Nagai, Yoshinori; Honda, Hiroe; Okamoto, Naoki; Yamamoto, Seiji; Hamashima, Takeru; Ishii, Yoko; Tanaka, Miyako; Suganami, Takayoshi; Sasahara, Masakiyo; Miyake, Kensuke; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ILG) is a flavonoid derived from Glycyrrhiza uralensis and potently suppresses NLRP3 inflammasome activation resulting in the improvement of diet-induced adipose tissue inflammation. However, whether ILG affects other pathways besides the inflammasome in adipose tissue inflammation is unknown. We here show that ILG suppresses adipose tissue inflammation by affecting the paracrine loop containing saturated fatty acids and TNF-α by using a co-culture composed of adipocytes and macrophages. ILG suppressed inflammatory changes induced by the co-culture through inhibition of NF-κB activation. This effect was independent of either inhibition of inflammasome activation or activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. Moreover, ILG suppressed TNF-α-induced activation of adipocytes, coincident with inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation. Additionally, TNF-α-mediated inhibition of Akt phosphorylation under insulin signaling was alleviated by ILG in adipocytes. ILG suppressed palmitic acid-induced activation of macrophages, with decreasing the level of phosphorylated Jnk expression. Intriguingly, ILG improved high fat diet-induced fibrosis in adipose tissue in vivo. Finally, ILG inhibited TLR4- or Mincle-stimulated expression of fibrosis-related genes in stromal vascular fraction from obese adipose tissue and macrophages in vitro. Thus, ILG can suppress adipose tissue inflammation by both inflammasome-dependent and -independent manners and attenuate adipose tissue fibrosis by targeting innate immune sensors. PMID:26975571

  3. Cardiac tissue enriched factors serum response factor and GATA-4 are mutual coregulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belaguli, N. S.; Sepulveda, J. L.; Nigam, V.; Charron, F.; Nemer, M.; Schwartz, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Combinatorial interaction among cardiac tissue-restricted enriched transcription factors may facilitate the expression of cardiac tissue-restricted genes. Here we show that the MADS box factor serum response factor (SRF) cooperates with the zinc finger protein GATA-4 to synergistically activate numerous myogenic and nonmyogenic serum response element (SRE)-dependent promoters in CV1 fibroblasts. In the absence of GATA binding sites, synergistic activation depends on binding of SRF to the proximal CArG box sequence in the cardiac and skeletal alpha-actin promoter. GATA-4's C-terminal activation domain is obligatory for synergistic coactivation with SRF, and its N-terminal domain and first zinc finger are inhibitory. SRF and GATA-4 physically associate both in vivo and in vitro through their MADS box and the second zinc finger domains as determined by protein A pullout assays and by in vivo one-hybrid transfection assays using Gal4 fusion proteins. Other cardiovascular tissue-restricted GATA factors, such as GATA-5 and GATA-6, were equivalent to GATA-4 in coactivating SRE-dependent targets. Thus, interaction between the MADS box and C4 zinc finger proteins, a novel regulatory paradigm, mediates activation of SRF-dependent gene expression.

  4. A robotic indenter for minimally invasive measurement and characterization of soft tissue response.

    PubMed

    Samur, Evren; Sedef, Mert; Basdogan, Cagatay; Avtan, Levent; Duzgun, Oktay

    2007-08-01

    The lack of experimental data in current literature on material properties of soft tissues in living condition has been a significant obstacle in the development of realistic soft tissue models for virtual reality based surgical simulators used in medical training. A robotic indenter was developed for minimally invasive measurement of soft tissue properties in abdominal region during a laparoscopic surgery. Using the robotic indenter, force versus displacement and force versus time responses of pig liver under static and dynamic loading conditions were successfully measured to characterize its material properties in three consecutive steps. First, the effective elastic modulus of pig liver was estimated as 10-15 kPa from the force versus displacement data of static indentations based on the small deformation assumption. Then, the stress relaxation function, relating the variation of stress with respect to time, was determined from the force versus time response data via curve fitting. Finally, an inverse finite element solution was developed using ANSYS finite element package to estimate the optimum values of viscoelastic and nonlinear hyperelastic material properties of pig liver through iterations. The initial estimates of the material properties for the iterations were extracted from the experimental data for faster convergence of the solutions. PMID:17509927

  5. Response functions for computing absorbed dose to skeletal tissues from neutron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bahadori, Amir A; Johnson, Perry; Jokisch, Derek W; Eckerman, Keith F; Bolch, Wesley E

    2011-11-01

    Spongiosa in the adult human skeleton consists of three tissues-active marrow (AM), inactive marrow (IM) and trabecularized mineral bone (TB). AM is considered to be the target tissue for assessment of both long-term leukemia risk and acute marrow toxicity following radiation exposure. The total shallow marrow (TM(50)), defined as all tissues lying within the first 50 µm of the bone surfaces, is considered to be the radiation target tissue of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. For irradiation by sources external to the body, kerma to homogeneous spongiosa has been used as a surrogate for absorbed dose to both of these tissues, as direct dose calculations are not possible using computational phantoms with homogenized spongiosa. Recent micro-CT imaging of a 40 year old male cadaver has allowed for the accurate modeling of the fine microscopic structure of spongiosa in many regions of the adult skeleton (Hough et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 2309-46). This microstructure, along with associated masses and tissue compositions, was used to compute specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values for protons originating in axial and appendicular bone sites (Jokisch et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 6857-72). These proton SAFs, bone masses, tissue compositions and proton production cross sections, were subsequently used to construct neutron dose-response functions (DRFs) for both AM and TM(50) targets in each bone of the reference adult male. Kerma conditions were assumed for other resultant charged particles. For comparison, AM, TM(50) and spongiosa kerma coefficients were also calculated. At low incident neutron energies, AM kerma coefficients for neutrons correlate well with values of the AM DRF, while total marrow (TM) kerma coefficients correlate well with values of the TM(50) DRF. At high incident neutron energies, all kerma coefficients and DRFs tend to converge as charged-particle equilibrium is established across the bone site. In the range of 10 eV to 100 Me

  6. Brain Tissue Responses to Neural Implants Impact Signal Sensitivity and Intervention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Implantable biosensors are valuable scientific tools for basic neuroscience research and clinical applications. Neurotechnologies provide direct readouts of neurological signal and neurochemical processes. These tools are generally most valuable when performance capacities extend over months and years to facilitate the study of memory, plasticity, and behavior or to monitor patients’ conditions. These needs have generated a variety of device designs from microelectrodes for fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) and electrophysiology to microdialysis probes for sampling and detecting various neurochemicals. Regardless of the technology used, the breaching of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) to insert devices triggers a cascade of biochemical pathways resulting in complex molecular and cellular responses to implanted devices. Molecular and cellular changes in the microenvironment surrounding an implant include the introduction of mechanical strain, activation of glial cells, loss of perfusion, secondary metabolic injury, and neuronal degeneration. Changes to the tissue microenvironment surrounding the device can dramatically impact electrochemical and electrophysiological signal sensitivity and stability over time. This review summarizes the magnitude, variability, and time course of the dynamic molecular and cellular level neural tissue responses induced by state-of-the-art implantable devices. Studies show that insertion injuries and foreign body response can impact signal quality across all implanted central nervous system (CNS) sensors to varying degrees over both acute (seconds to minutes) and chronic periods (weeks to months). Understanding the underlying biological processes behind the brain tissue response to the devices at the cellular and molecular level leads to a variety of intervention strategies for improving signal sensitivity and longevity. PMID:25546652

  7. Dietary response of sympatric deer to fire using stable isotope analysis of liver tissue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, W. David; Zimmerman, T.J.; Leslie, David M., Jr.; Jenks, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon (??13C) and nitrogen (??15N) isotopes in biological samples from large herbivores identify photosynthetic pathways (C3 vs. C4) of plants they consumed and can elucidate potential nutritional characteristics of dietary selection. Because large herbivores consume a diversity of forage types, ??13C and ??15N in their tissue can index ingested and assimilated diets through time. We assessed ??13C and ??15N in metabolically active liver tissue of sympatric mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and white-tailed deer (O. virginianus) to identify dietary disparity resulting from use of burned and unburned areas in a largely forested landscape. Interspecific variation in dietary disparity of deer was documented 2-3 years post-fire in response to lag-time effects of vegetative response to burning and seasonal (i.e., summer, winter) differences in forage type. Liver ??13C for mule deer were lower during winter and higher during summer 2 years post-fire on burned habitat compared to unburned habitat suggesting different forages were consumed by mule deer in response to fire. Liver ??15N for both species were higher on burned than unburned habitat during winter and summer suggesting deer consumed more nutritious forage on burned habitat during both seasons 2 and 3 years post-fire. Unlike traditional methods of dietary assessment that do not measure uptake of carbon and nitrogen from dietary components, analyses of stable isotopes in liver or similar tissue elucidated ??13C and ??15N assimilation from seasonal dietary components and resulting differences in the foraging ecology of sympatric species in response to fire.

  8. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  9. Brown Adipose Tissue Exhibits a Glucose-Responsive Thermogenic Biorhythm in Humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul; Bova, Ron; Schofield, Lynne; Bryant, Wendy; Dieckmann, William; Slattery, Anthony; Govendir, Matt A; Emmett, Louise; Greenfield, Jerry R

    2016-04-12

    High abundance of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is linked to lower glycaemia in humans, leading to the belief that BAT may protect against diabetes. The relationship between BAT glucose utilization and systemic glucose homeostasis has not been defined. In this paper we have characterized glycaemic excursions and BAT thermogenic responses in human brown adipocytes, BAT explants, and healthy adults through supraclavicular temperature profiling, revealing their circadian coupling in vivo and in vitro, orchestrated by UCP1, GLUT4, and Rev-erbα biorhythms. Extent of glycated haemoglobin also correlated positively with environmental temperature among community-dwelling patients. These data uncover potential crosstalk between BAT and glucose regulatory pathways, evident on cellular, tissue, individual, and population levels, and provide impetus to search for BAT harnessing strategies for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26972823

  10. A kelp with integrity: Macrocystis pyrifera prioritises tissue maintenance in response to nitrogen fertilisation.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Tiffany A; Hepburn, Christopher D

    2016-09-01

    Our understanding of the response of vascular, terrestrial plants to nitrogen (N) addition is advanced and provides the foundation for modern agriculture. In comparison, information on responses of marine macroalgae to increased nitrogen is far less developed. We investigated how in situ pulses of nitrate (NO3 (-)) affected the growth and N physiology of Macrocystis pyrifera by adding N using potassium nitrate dissolution blocks during a period of low seawater N concentration. Multiple parameters (e.g. growth, pigments, soluble NO3 (-)) were measured in distinct tissues throughout entire fronds (apical meristem, stipe, adult blade, mature blade, sporophyll, and holdfast). Unexpectedly, N fertilisation did not enhance elongation rates within the frond, but instead thickness (biomass per unit area) increased in adult blades. Increased blade thickness may have enhanced tissue integrity as fertilised kelp had lower rates of blade erosion. Tissue chemistry also responded to enrichment; pigmentation, soluble NO3 (-), and % N were higher throughout fertilised fronds. Labelled (15)N traced N uptake and translocation from N sources in the kelp canopy to sinks in the holdfast, 10 m below. This is the first evidence of long-distance (>1 m) transport of N in macroalgae. Patterns in physiological parameters suggest that M. pyrifera displays functional differentiation between canopy and basal tissues that may aid in nutrient-tolerance strategies, similar to those seen in higher plants and unlike those seen in more simple algae (i.e. non-kelps). This study highlights how little we know about N additions and N-use strategies within kelp compared to the wealth of literature available for higher plants. PMID:27170330

  11. The thermodynamic response of soft biological tissues to pulsed ultraviolet laser irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, V; Nishioka, N S; Mikić, B B

    1995-01-01

    The physical mechanisms that enable short pulses of high-intensity ultraviolet laser radiation to remove tissue, in a process known as laser ablation, remain obscure. The thermodynamic response of biological tissue to pulsed laser irradiation was investigated by measuring and subsequently analyzing the stress transients generated by pulsed argon fluorine (ArF, lambda = 193 nm) and krypton fluorine (KrF, lambda = 248 nm) excimer laser irradiation of porcine dermis using thin-film piezoelectric transducers. For radiant exposures that do not cause material removal, the stress transients are consistent with rapid thermal expansion of the tissue. At the threshold radiant exposure for ablation, the peak stress amplitude generated by 248 nm irradiation is more than an order of magnitude larger than that produced by 193 nm irradiation. For radiant exposures where material removal is achieved, the temporal structure of the stress transient indicates that the onset of material removal occurs during irradiation. In this regime, the variation of the peak compressive stress with radiant exposure is consistent with laser-induced rapid surface vaporization. For 193 nm irradiation, ionization of the ablated material occurs at even greater radiant exposures and is accompanied by a change in the variation of peak stress with radiant exposure consistent with a plasma-mediated ablation process. These results suggest that absorption of ultraviolet laser radiation by the extracellular matrix of tissue leads to decomposition of tissue on the time scale of the laser pulse. The difference in volumetric energy density at ablation threshold between the two wavelengths indicates that the larger stresses generated by 248 nm irradiation may facilitate the onset of material removal. However, once material removal is achieved, the stress measurements demonstrate that energy not directly responsible for target decomposition contributes to increasing the specific energy of the plume (and plasma

  12. Immune sensitization of equine bronchus: glutathione, IL-1β expression and tissue responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Matera, MG; Calzetta, L; Peli, A; Scagliarini, A; Matera, C; Cazzola, M

    2005-01-01

    Background Increasing clinical epidemiological and experimental evidence indicates that excess of production of reactive oxygen free radicals (ROS) induced by an oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of a number of human airway disorders, as well as equine recurrent airway obstruction. Free-radicals modulate the activation of transcription factors, such as nuclear factor-(NF)-κB and activator protein (AP)-1, in several different cells. This activation leads to expression of many pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β. We have hypothesized that equine airway sensitization might induce an oxidative stress and increase the ROS production, which in turn might enhance a production of IL-1β and airway hyperresponsiveness. Methods We have examined the effect of passive sensitization on IL-1β mRNA expression and electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced contraction in equine isolated bronchi, and the potential interference of reduced-glutathione (GSH), an antioxidant, with these responses. Bronchi passively sensitized with serum from animals suffering from heaves and having high total level of IgE, and control tissues, either pretreated or not with GSH (100 μM), were used to quantify IL-1β mRNA. Other tissues were used to study the effect of EFS (3–10–25 Hz). Results Mean IL-1β mRNA expression was higher in passively sensitized than in control rings. GSH significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the IL-1β mRNA expression only in passively sensitized bronchi. ELF induced a frequency-dependent contraction in both non-sensitized and passively sensitized tissues, with a significantly greater response always observed in sensitized tissues. GSH did not modify the EFS-induced contraction in non-sensitized bronchi, but significantly (p < 0.05) decreased it in passively sensitized tissues. Conclusion Our data indicate that the passive sensitization of equine bronchi induces inflammation and hyperresponsiveness. These effects might be due to an

  13. [Focusing on tissue biomarkers. Estrogens as key players in the immune response and autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Vásárhelyi, Barna; Mészáros, Katalin; Karvaly, Gellért; Patócs, Attila

    2015-12-20

    Estrogens modulate the immune response as well as the risk and progression of autoimmune disorders. Their effects are mediated by nuclear receptors (i.e. estrogen receptor alpha and beta), membrane receptors, and are influenced by their interactions with other hormones. Locally produced hormones and cytokines are the main factors in maintaining tissue homeostasis. The response of immune cells to estrogens is related to their developmental stage. The diverse effects of estrogens on various autoimmune disorders are the result of the versatility of their pathomechanism. In general, progression of B-cell mediated disorders is aggravated by estrogens. Their effects on T-cell mediated disorders, on the other hand, are driven by Th1 or Th2 dominance. As estrogens promote the escalation of the Th2 immune response, Th2-dominant disorders are aggravated, while Th1-dominant disorders are ameliorated upon high estrogen levels. Inflammation on its own also modulates the impact of estrogens. Inflammatory cytokines alter the expression of the alpha and beta estrogen receptors as well as the activity of estrogen metabolizing enzymes. Monitoring the local, tissue-wide interaction between hormones and immune cells would provide a better tool for identification and characterization of molecules involved in this system. To date, routinely used laboratory methods have a limited role in monitoring the local effects of estrogens. In this current paper the authors summarize the role of estrogens in immune system and overview those novel methods which are useful in the investigation of local endocrine milieu. PMID:26654543

  14. Gene Expression Profile Analysis as a Prognostic Indicator of Normal Tissue Response to Simulated Space Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, Michael; Stivers, David N.

    2004-01-01

    This project was funded as a pilot project to determine the feasibility of using gene expression profiles to characterize the response of human cells to exposure to particulate radiations such as those encountered in the spaceflight environment. We proposed to use microarray technology to examine the gene expression patterns of a bank of well-characterized human fibroblast cell cultures. These fibroblast cultures were derived from breast or head and neck cancer patients who exhibited normal, minimal, or severe normal tissue reactions following low LET radiation exposure via radiotherapy. Furthermore, determination of SF2 values from fibroblasts cultured from these individuals were predictive of risk for severe late reactions. We hypothesized that by determining the expression of thousands of genes we could identify gene expression patterns that reflect how normal tissues respond to high Z and energy (HZE) particles, that is, that there are molecular signatures for HZE exposures. We also hypothesized that individuals who are intrinsically radiosensitive may elicit a unique response. Because this was funded as a pilot project we focused our initial studies on logistics and appropriate experimental design, and then to test our hypothesis that there is a unique molecular response to specific particles, in this case C and Fe, for primary human skin fibroblasts.

  15. Eosinophils and IL-4 Support Nematode Growth Coincident with an Innate Response to Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lu; Beiting, Daniel P.; Gebreselassie, Nebiat G.; Gagliardo, Lucille F.; Ruyechan, Maura C.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.; Appleton, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the functions of eosinophils extend beyond host defense and allergy to metabolism and tissue regeneration. These influences have strong potential to be relevant in worm infections in which eosinophils are prominent and parasites rely on the host for nutrients to support growth or reproduction. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the observation that eosinophils promote growth of Trichinella spiralis larvae in skeletal muscle. Our results indicate that IL-4 and eosinophils are necessary for normal larval growth and that eosinophils from IL-4 competent mice are sufficient to support growth. The eosinophil-mediated effect operates in the absence of adaptive immunity. Following invasion by newborn larvae, host gene expression in skeletal muscle was compatible with a regenerative response and a shift in the source of energy in infected tissue. The presence of eosinophils suppressed local inflammation while also influencing nutrient homeostasis in muscle. Redistribution of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and phosphorylation of Akt were observed in nurse cells, consistent with enhancement of glucose uptake and glycogen storage by larvae that is known to occur. The data are consistent with a mechanism in which eosinophils promote larval growth by an IL-4 dependent mechanism that limits local interferon-driven responses that otherwise alter nutrient metabolism in infected muscle. Our findings document a novel interaction between parasite and host in which worms have evolved a strategy to co-opt an innate host cell response in a way that facilitates their growth. PMID:26720604

  16. Multi-scale mechanical response of freeze-dried collagen scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Offeddu, Giovanni S; Ashworth, Jennifer C; Cameron, Ruth E; Oyen, Michelle L

    2015-02-01

    Tissue engineering has grown in the past two decades as a promising solution to unresolved clinical problems such as osteoarthritis. The mechanical response of tissue engineering scaffolds is one of the factors determining their use in applications such as cartilage and bone repair. The relationship between the structural and intrinsic mechanical properties of the scaffolds was the object of this study, with the ultimate aim of understanding the stiffness of the substrate that adhered cells experience, and its link to the bulk mechanical properties. Freeze-dried type I collagen porous scaffolds made with varying slurry concentrations and pore sizes were tested in a viscoelastic framework by macroindentation. Membranes made up of stacks of pore walls were indented using colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. It was found that the bulk scaffold mechanical response varied with collagen concentration in the slurry consistent with previous studies on these materials. Hydration of the scaffolds resulted in a more compliant response, yet lesser viscoelastic relaxation. Indentation of the membranes suggested that the material making up the pore walls remains unchanged between conditions, so that the stiffness of the scaffolds at the scale of seeded cells is unchanged; rather, it is suggested that thicker pore walls or more of these result in the increased moduli for the greater slurry concentration conditions. PMID:25460922

  17. Eosinophils and IL-4 Support Nematode Growth Coincident with an Innate Response to Tissue Injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Beiting, Daniel P; Gebreselassie, Nebiat G; Gagliardo, Lucille F; Ruyechan, Maura C; Lee, Nancy A; Lee, James J; Appleton, Judith A

    2015-12-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the functions of eosinophils extend beyond host defense and allergy to metabolism and tissue regeneration. These influences have strong potential to be relevant in worm infections in which eosinophils are prominent and parasites rely on the host for nutrients to support growth or reproduction. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the observation that eosinophils promote growth of Trichinella spiralis larvae in skeletal muscle. Our results indicate that IL-4 and eosinophils are necessary for normal larval growth and that eosinophils from IL-4 competent mice are sufficient to support growth. The eosinophil-mediated effect operates in the absence of adaptive immunity. Following invasion by newborn larvae, host gene expression in skeletal muscle was compatible with a regenerative response and a shift in the source of energy in infected tissue. The presence of eosinophils suppressed local inflammation while also influencing nutrient homeostasis in muscle. Redistribution of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and phosphorylation of Akt were observed in nurse cells, consistent with enhancement of glucose uptake and glycogen storage by larvae that is known to occur. The data are consistent with a mechanism in which eosinophils promote larval growth by an IL-4 dependent mechanism that limits local interferon-driven responses that otherwise alter nutrient metabolism in infected muscle. Our findings document a novel interaction between parasite and host in which worms have evolved a strategy to co-opt an innate host cell response in a way that facilitates their growth. PMID:26720604

  18. Response functions for computing absorbed dose to skeletal tissues from neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir A.; Johnson, Perry; Jokisch, Derek W.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-11-01

    Spongiosa in the adult human skeleton consists of three tissues—active marrow (AM), inactive marrow (IM) and trabecularized mineral bone (TB). AM is considered to be the target tissue for assessment of both long-term leukemia risk and acute marrow toxicity following radiation exposure. The total shallow marrow (TM50), defined as all tissues lying within the first 50 µm of the bone surfaces, is considered to be the radiation target tissue of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. For irradiation by sources external to the body, kerma to homogeneous spongiosa has been used as a surrogate for absorbed dose to both of these tissues, as direct dose calculations are not possible using computational phantoms with homogenized spongiosa. Recent micro-CT imaging of a 40 year old male cadaver has allowed for the accurate modeling of the fine microscopic structure of spongiosa in many regions of the adult skeleton (Hough et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 2309-46). This microstructure, along with associated masses and tissue compositions, was used to compute specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values for protons originating in axial and appendicular bone sites (Jokisch et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 6857-72). These proton SAFs, bone masses, tissue compositions and proton production cross sections, were subsequently used to construct neutron dose-response functions (DRFs) for both AM and TM50 targets in each bone of the reference adult male. Kerma conditions were assumed for other resultant charged particles. For comparison, AM, TM50 and spongiosa kerma coefficients were also calculated. At low incident neutron energies, AM kerma coefficients for neutrons correlate well with values of the AM DRF, while total marrow (TM) kerma coefficients correlate well with values of the TM50 DRF. At high incident neutron energies, all kerma coefficients and DRFs tend to converge as charged-particle equilibrium is established across the bone site. In the range of 10 eV to 100 Me

  19. CGRRF1 as a novel biomarker of tissue response to metformin in the context of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Schmandt, Rosemarie; Celestino, Joseph; McCampbell, Adrienne; Yates, Melinda S.; Urbauer, Diana L.; Broaddus, Russell R.; Loose, David S.; Shipley, Gregory L.; Lu, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Obesity-associated hyperestrogenism and hyperinsulinemia contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of endometrial cancer. We recently demonstrated that metformin, a drug long used for treatment of type 2 diabetes, attenuates both insulin- and estrogen-mediated proliferative signaling in the obese rat endometrium. In this study, we sought to identify tissue biomarkers that may prove clinically useful to predict tissue response for both prevention and therapeutic studies. We identified CGRRF1 (Cell growth regulator with ring finger domain 1) as a novel metformin-responsive gene and characterized its possible role in endometrial cancer prevention. Methods CGRRF1 mRNA expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR in the endometrium of obese and lean rats, and also in normal and malignant human endometrium. CGRRF1 levels were genetically manipulated in endometrial cancer cells, and its effects on proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by MTT and western blot. Results CGRRF1 is significantly induced by metformin treatment in the obese rat endometrium. In vitro studies demonstrate that overexpression of CGRRF1 inhibits endometrial cancer cell proliferation. Analysis of human endometrial tumors reveal that CGRRF1 expression is significantly lower in hyperplasia, Grade 1, Grade 2, Grade 3, MMMT, and UPSC endometrial tumors compared to normal human endometrium (p<0.05), suggesting that loss of CGRRF1 is associated with the presence of disease. Conclusion CGRRF1 represents a novel, reproducible tissue marker of metformin response in the obese endometrium. Furthermore, our preliminary data suggests that up-regulation of CGRRF1 expression may prove clinically useful in the prevention or treatment of endometrial cancer. PMID:24680596

  20. An essential role for TH2-type response in limiting acute tissue damage during experimental helminth infection.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Helminths induce potent Th2-type immune responses that can lead to worm expulsion, but it remains undetermined whether components of this response can enhance the wound healing responses elicited as these large multi-cellular parasites traffic thru vital tissues. We used a model of helminth infecti...

  1. Dysfunctional Astrocytic and Synaptic Regulation of Hypothalamic Glutamatergic Transmission in a Mouse Model of Early-Life Adversity: Relevance to Neurosteroids and Programming of the Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Benjamin G.; Cunningham, Linda; Cooper, Michelle A.; Corteen, Nicole L.; Seifi, Mohsen; Swinny, Jerome D.; Lambert, Jeremy J.

    2013-01-01

    Adverse early-life experiences, such as poor maternal care, program an abnormal stress response that may involve an altered balance between excitatory and inhibitory signals. Here, we explored how early-life stress (ELS) affects excitatory and inhibitory transmission in corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF)-expressing dorsal-medial (mpd) neurons of the neonatal mouse hypothalamus. We report that ELS associates with enhanced excitatory glutamatergic transmission that is manifested as an increased frequency of synaptic events and increased extrasynaptic conductance, with the latter associated with dysfunctional astrocytic regulation of glutamate levels. The neurosteroid 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one (5α3α-THPROG) is an endogenous, positive modulator of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) that is abundant during brain development and rises rapidly during acute stress, thereby enhancing inhibition to curtail stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis. In control mpd neurons, 5α3α-THPROG potently suppressed neuronal discharge, but this action was greatly compromised by prior ELS exposure. This neurosteroid insensitivity did not primarily result from perturbations of GABAergic inhibition, but rather arose functionally from the increased excitatory drive onto mpd neurons. Previous reports indicated that mice (dams) lacking the GABAAR δ subunit (δ0/0) exhibit altered maternal behavior. Intriguingly, δ0/0 offspring showed some hallmarks of abnormal maternal care that were further exacerbated by ELS. Moreover, in common with ELS, mpd neurons of δ0/0 pups exhibited increased synaptic and extrasynaptic glutamatergic transmission and consequently a blunted neurosteroid suppression of neuronal firing. This study reveals that increased synaptic and tonic glutamatergic transmission may be a common maladaptation to ELS, leading to enhanced excitation of CRF-releasing neurons, and identifies neurosteroids as putative early regulators of the stress

  2. Targeting the finite-deformation response of wavy biological tissues with bio-inspired material architectures.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenqiong; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    2013-12-01

    The Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm driven by a homogenized-based model is employed to target the response of three types of heart-valve chordae tendineae with different stiffening characteristics due to different degrees of waviness of collagen fibril/fiber bundles. First, geometric and material parameters are identified through an extensive parametric study that produce excellent agreement of the simulated response based on simplified unit cell architectures with the actual response of the complex biological tissue. These include amplitude and wavelength of the crimped chordae microstructure, elastic moduli of the constituent phases, and degree of microstructural refinement of the stiff phase at fixed volume fraction whose role in the stiffening response is elucidated. The study also reveals potential non-uniqueness of bio-inspired wavy microstructures in attaining the targeted response of certain chordae tendineae crimp configurations. The homogenization-based Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm, whose predictions are validated through the parametric study, is then shown to be an excellent tool in identifying optimal unit cell architectures in the design space that exhibits very steep gradients. Finally, defect criticality of optimal unit cell architectures is investigated in order to assess their feasibility in replacing actual biological tendons with stiffening characteristics. PMID:24018396

  3. Complex responses to Si quantum dots accumulation in carp liver tissue: Beyond oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Serban, Andreea Iren; Stanca, Loredana; Sima, Cornelia; Staicu, Andrea Cristina; Zarnescu, Otilia; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2015-09-01

    The use of quantum dots (QDs) in biomedical applications is limited due to their inherent toxicity caused by the heavy metal core of the particles. Consequently, silicon-based QDs are expected to display diminished toxicity. We investigated the in vivo effects induced by Si/SiO2 QDs intraperitoneally injected in crucian carp liver. The QDs contained a crystalline Si core encased in a SiO2 shell, with a size between 2.75 and 11.25nm and possess intrinsic fluorescence (Ex 325nm/Em ∼690nm). Tissue fluorescence microscopy analysis revealed the presence of QDs in the liver for at least 2weeks after injection. Although protein and lipid oxidative stress markers showed the onset of oxidative stress, the hepatic tissue exhibited significant antioxidant adaptations (increase of antioxidant enzymes, recovery of glutathione levels), sustained by the activation of Hsp30 and Hsp70 chaperoning proteins. The increased activity of cyclooxigenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) support the idea that Si/SiO2 QDs have a potential to induce inflammatory response, a scenario also indicated by the profile of Hsp60 and Hsp90 heat shock proteins. MMPs profile and the recovery of oxidative stress markers suggested a tissue remodelation phase after 3weeks from QDs administration. PMID:26079203

  4. Effects of glyphosate on hepatic tissue evaluating melanomacrophages and erythrocytes responses in neotropical anuran Leptodactylus latinasus.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Iglesias, Juan Manuel; Franco-Belussi, Lilian; Moreno, Liliana; Tripole, Susana; de Oliveira, Classius; Natale, Guillermo Sebastián

    2016-05-01

    Glyphosate (GLY) is the most used herbicide worldwide and its effects on anurans are well known. Pollutants can cause physiological and morphological effects. Therefore, this study evaluated the effects of GLY on hepatic melanomacrophages as a response to environmental stressors. Three treatments were exposed to different concentrations of pure GLY (100, 1000, and 10,000 μg g(-1), respectively), and there was also a control group. After the experimental time, liver and blood were analyzed. Melanomacrophages (MMCs) were located between the hepatocyte cordons, close to sinusoids. GLY increased the melanin area in MMCs of Leptodactylus latinasus exposed since lowest concentration until highest concentration. GLY also changed the occurrence of hepatic catabolism pigments into melanomacrophages and erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities; therefore, it can interfere with the hepatic metabolism. In conclusion, GLY promotes alterations in the hepatic tissue and erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities. Furthermore, MMCs may be useful as morphological responses of GLY effects. PMID:26856864

  5. Differential immune responses in mice infected with the tissue-dwelling nematode Trichinella zimbabwensis.

    PubMed

    Onkoba, W N; Chimbari, M J; Kamau, J M; Mukaratirwa, S

    2016-09-01

    To improve diagnostic tools, immunotherapies and vaccine development for trichinellosis surveillance and control there is a need to understand the host immune responses induced during infection with Trichinella zimbabwensis, a tissue-dwelling nematode. In this study, we sought to determine immune responses induced in mice during T. zimbabwensis infection. The parasite strain used (Code ISS1209) was derived from a naturally infected crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) and is the main Trichinella species prevalent in southern Africa. Sixty 6- to 8-week-old female BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to two equal groups: T. zimbabwensis-infected (n= 30) and the non-infected control group (n= 30). Levels of serum tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), interleukin-4 (IL-4) as well as parasite-specific IgM, IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b and IgG3 antibody responses were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cytokines and antibodies provided information on T-helper 1 (Th1)- and Th2-type, T-regulatory and antibody responses. Results showed that during the intestinal stage of infection, higher levels of parasite-specific IgM, IgG, IgG1 (P <  0.05) and IL-10 and TNF-α (P <  0.001) were observed in the Trichinella-infected group compared with the non-infected control group. In the parasite establishment and tissue migration phases, levels of IgG1 and IgG3 were elevated (P <  0.001), while those of IgM (P <  0.01) declined on days 21 and 35 post infection (pi) compared to the enteric phase. Our findings show that distinct differences in Th1- and Th2-type and T-regulatory responses are induced during the intestinal, tissue migration and larval establishment stages of T. zimbabwensis infection. PMID:26294082

  6. Tissue-Specific Activation of a Single Gustatory Receptor Produces Opposing Behavioral Responses in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Ryan M.; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Understanding sensory systems that perceive environmental inputs and neural circuits that select appropriate motor outputs is essential for studying how organisms modulate behavior and make decisions necessary for survival. Drosophila melanogaster oviposition is one such important behavior, in which females evaluate their environment and choose to lay eggs on substrates they may find aversive in other contexts. We employed neurogenetic techniques to characterize neurons that influence the choice between repulsive positional and attractive egg-laying responses toward the bitter-tasting compound lobeline. Surprisingly, we found that neurons expressing Gr66a, a gustatory receptor normally involved in avoidance behaviors, receive input for both attractive and aversive preferences. We hypothesized that these opposing responses may result from activation of distinct Gr66a-expressing neurons. Using tissue-specific rescue experiments, we found that Gr66a-expressing neurons on the legs mediate positional aversion. In contrast, pharyngeal taste cells mediate the egg-laying attraction to lobeline, as determined by analysis of mosaic flies in which subsets of Gr66a neurons were silenced. Finally, inactivating mushroom body neurons disrupted both aversive and attractive responses, suggesting that this brain structure is a candidate integration center for decision-making during Drosophila oviposition. We thus define sensory and central neurons critical to the process by which flies decide where to lay an egg. Furthermore, our findings provide insights into the complex nature of gustatory perception in Drosophila. We show that tissue-specific activation of bitter-sensing Gr66a neurons provides one mechanism by which the gustatory system differentially encodes aversive and attractive responses, allowing the female fly to modulate her behavior in a context-dependent manner. PMID:22798487

  7. Influenza infection induces host DNA damage and dynamic DNA damage responses during tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Parrish, Marcus; Chan, Tze Khee; Yin, Lu; Rai, Prashant; Yoshiyuki, Yamada; Abolhassani, Nona; Tan, Kong Bing; Kiraly, Orsolya; Chow, Vincent TK; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses account for significant morbidity worldwide. Inflammatory responses, including excessive generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), mediate lung injury in severe Influenza infections. However, the molecular basis of inflammation-induced lung damage is not fully understood. Here, we studied influenza H1N1 infected cells in vitro, as well as H1N1 infected mice, and we monitored molecular and cellular responses over the course of two weeks in vivo. We show that influenza induces DNA damage both when cells are directly exposed to virus in vitro (measured using the comet assay) and also when cells are exposed to virus in vivo (estimated via γH2AX foci). We show that DNA damage, as well as responses to DNA damage, persist in vivo until long after virus has been cleared, at times when there are inflammation associated RONS (measured by xanthine oxidase activity and oxidative products). The frequency of lung epithelial and immune cells with increased γH2AX foci is elevated in vivo, especially for dividing cells (Ki-67 positive) exposed to oxidative stress during tissue regeneration. Additionally, we observed a significant increase in apoptotic cells as well as increased levels of DSB repair proteins Ku70, Ku86 and Rad51 during the regenerative phase. In conclusion, results show that influenza induces DNA both in vitro and in vivo, and that DNA damage responses are activated, raising the possibility that DNA repair capacity may be a determining factor for tissue recovery and disease outcome. PMID:25809161

  8. Novel Whole-tissue Quantitative Assay of Nitric Oxide Levels in Drosophila Neuroinflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Ajjuri, Rami R.; O'Donnell, Janis M.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a complex innate immune response vital to the healthy function of the central nervous system (CNS). Under normal conditions, an intricate network of inducers, detectors, and activators rapidly responds to neuron damage, infection or other immune infractions. This inflammation of immune cells is intimately associated with the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease and ALS. Under compromised disease states, chronic inflammation, intended to minimize neuron damage, may lead to an over-excitation of the immune cells, ultimately resulting in the exacerbation of disease progression. For example, loss of dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain, a hallmark of PD, is accelerated by the excessive activation of the inflammatory response. Though the cause of PD is largely unknown, exposure to environmental toxins has been implicated in the onset of sporadic cases. The herbicide paraquat, for example, has been shown to induce Parkinsonian-like pathology in several animal models, including Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we have used the conserved innate immune response in Drosophila to develop an assay capable of detecting varying levels of nitric oxide, a cell-signaling molecule critical to the activation of the inflammatory response cascade and targeted neuron death. Using paraquat-induced neuronal damage, we assess the impact of these immune insults on neuroinflammatory stimulation through the use of a novel, quantitative assay. Whole brains are fully extracted from flies either exposed to neurotoxins or of genotypes that elevate susceptibility to neurodegeneration then incubated in cell-culture media. Then, using the principles of the Griess reagent reaction, we are able to detect minor changes in the secretion of nitric oxide into cell-culture media, essentially creating a primary live-tissue model in a simple procedure. The utility of this model is amplified by the robust genetic and molecular

  9. Development of an Ex Vivo Tissue Platform To Study the Human Lung Response to Coxiella burnetii.

    PubMed

    Graham, Joseph G; Winchell, Caylin G; Kurten, Richard C; Voth, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute debilitating flu-like illness that can also present as chronic endocarditis. Disease typically occurs following inhalation of contaminated aerosols, resulting in an initial pulmonary infection. In human cells, C. burnetii generates a replication niche termed the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) by directing fusion with autophagosomes and lysosomes. C. burnetii requires this lysosomal environment for replication and uses a Dot/Icm type IV secretion system to generate the large PV. However, we do not understand how C. burnetii evades the intracellular immune surveillance that triggers an inflammatory response. We recently characterized human alveolar macrophage (hAM) infection in vitro and found that avirulent C. burnetii triggers sustained interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Here, we evaluated infection of ex vivo human lung tissue, defining a valuable approach for characterizing C. burnetii interactions with a human host. Within whole lung tissue, C. burnetii preferentially replicated in hAMs. Additionally, IL-1β production correlated with formation of an apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain (ASC)-dependent inflammasome in response to infection. We also assessed potential activation of a human-specific noncanonical inflammasome and found that caspase-4 and caspase-5 are processed during infection. Interestingly, although inflammasome activation is closely linked to pyroptosis, lytic cell death did not occur following C. burnetii-triggered inflammasome activation, indicating an atypical response after intracellular detection. Together, these studies provide a novel platform for studying the human innate immune response to C. burnetii. PMID:26902725

  10. Development of an inhalable, stimuli-responsive particulate system for delivery to deep lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Yasmine; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Tammam, Salma; Lamprecht, Alf; Ali, Mohamed Ehab; Schmidt, Annette; Sollazzo, Silvio; Mathur, Sanjay

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer, the deadliest solid tumor among all types of cancer, remains difficult to treat. This is a result of unavoidable exposure to carcinogens, poor diagnosis, the lack of targeted drug delivery platforms and limitations associated with delivery of drug to deep lung tissues. Development of a non-invasive, patient-convenient formula for the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics to cancer in deep lung tissue is the aim of this study. The formulation consisted of inhalable polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/maltodextrin (MD)-based microparticles (MPs) encapsulating chitosan (CS) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with either drug only or drug and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Drug release from CS NPs was enhanced with the aid of MNPs by a factor of 1.7 in response to external magnetic field. Preferential toxicity by CS NPs was shown towards tumor cells (A549) in comparison to cultured fibroblasts (L929). The prepared spray freeze dried (SFD) powders for CS NPs and CS MNPs were of the same size at ∼6μm. They had a fine particle fraction (FPF≤5.2μm) of 40-42% w/w and mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 5-6μm as determined by the Next Generation Impactor (NGI). SFD-MPs of CS MNPs possess higher MMAD due to the high density associated with encapsulated MNPs. The developed formulation demonstrates several capabilities including tissue targeting, controlled drug release, and the possible imaging and diagnostic values (due to its MNPs content) and therefore represents an improved therapeutic platform for drug delivery to cancer in deep lung tissue. PMID:27244047

  11. Homeostatic Tissue Responses in Skin Biopsies from NOMID Patients with Constitutive Overproduction of IL-1β

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, Pamela; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Johnson-Huang, Leanne M.; Harden, Jamie Lynn; Pierson, Katherine C.; Dolan, Joseph G.; Novitskaya, Inna; Coats, Israel; Estes, Jacob; Cowen, Edward W.; Plass, Nicole; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Sun, Hong-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The autoinflammatory disorder, Neonatal-onset Multisystem Inflammatory Disease (NOMID) is the most severe phenotype of disorders caused by mutations in CIAS1 that result in increased production and secretion of active IL-1β. NOMID patients present with systemic and organ-specific inflammation of the skin, central nervous system and bone, and respond dramatically to treatment with IL-1 blocking agents. We compared the cellular infiltrates and transcriptome of skin biopsies from patients with NOMID (n = 14) before treatment (lesional (LS) and non-lesional (pre-NL) skin) and after treatment (post-NL) with the IL-1 blocker anakinra (recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist, Kineret®, Swedish Orphan Biovitrum AB, SOBI), to normal skin (n = 5) to assess tissue responses in the context of untreated and treated disease. Abundant neutrophils distinguish LS skin from pre-NL and post-NL skin. CD11c+ dermal dendritic cells and CD163+ macrophages expressed activated caspase-1 and are a likely source of cutaneous IL-1 production. Treatment with anakinra led to the disappearance of neutrophils, but CD3+ T cells and HLA-DR+ cells remained elevated. Among the upregulated genes IL-6, IL-8, TNF, IL-17A, CCL20, and the neutrophil defensins DEFA1 and DEFA3 were differentially regulated in LS tissues (compared to normal skin). Important significantly downregulated pathways in LS skin included IL-1R/TLR signaling, type I and II cytokine receptor signaling, mitochondrial dysfunction, and antigen presentation. The differential expression and regulation of microRNAs and pathways involved in post-transcriptional modification were suggestive of epigenetic modification in the chronically inflamed tissue. Overall, the dysregulated genes and pathways suggest extensive “adaptive” mechanisms to control inflammation and maintain tissue homeostasis, likely triggered by chronic IL-1 release in the skin of patients with NOMID. PMID:23226210

  12. Epidermal Homeostasis and Radiation Responses in a Multiscale Tissue Modeling Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2013-01-01

    The surface of skin is lined with several thin layers of epithelial cells that are maintained throughout life time by a small population of stem cells. High dose radiation exposures could injure and deplete the underlying proliferative cells and induce cutaneous radiation syndrome. In this work we propose a multiscale computational model for skin epidermal dynamics that links phenomena occurring at the subcellular, cellular, and tissue levels of organization, to simulate the experimental data of the radiation response of swine epidermis, which is closely similar to human epidermis. Incorporating experimentally measured histological and cell kinetic parameters, we obtain results of population kinetics and proliferation indexes comparable to observations in unirradiated and acutely irradiated swine experiments. At the sub-cellular level, several recently published Wnt signaling controlled cell-cycle models are applied and the roles of key components and parameters are analyzed. Based on our simulation results, we demonstrate that a moderate increase of proliferation rate for the survival proliferative cells is sufficient to fully repopulate the area denuded by high dose radiation, as long as the integrity of underlying basement membrane is maintained. Our work highlights the importance of considering proliferation kinetics as well as the spatial organization of tissues when conducting in vivo investigations of radiation responses. This integrated model allow us to test the validity of several basic biological rules at the cellular level and sub-cellular mechanisms by qualitatively comparing simulation results with published research, and enhance our understanding of the pathophysiological effects of ionizing radiation on skin.

  13. Pathogenesis, tissue distribution and host response to Rhabdochlamydia porcellionis infection in rough woodlouse Porcellio scaber.

    PubMed

    Kostanjšek, Rok; Pirc Marolt, Tinkara

    2015-02-01

    Rhabdochlamydia porcellionis is a known intracellular pathogen in digestive glands of the terrestrial isopod crustacean Porcellio scaber. To describe the pathogenesis, tissue distribution and host response to R. porcellionis, we conducted microscopic observations and localization of infection in tissues by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH). Digestive glands were confirmed as the primary site of infection. From there, R. porcellionis disseminates either through the apical membrane of infected cells into the lumen of digestive glands and further throughout the digestive tract or into the surrounding hemocoel by rupture of the basal membrane and lamina of infected digestive gland cells. Once in the hemocoel, R. porcellionis infects hindgut cells, hemocytes and hemopoetic tissues while the ventral nerve cord and gonads seem to be devoid of infection despite the presence of rhabdochlamydia on the surface of these organs. The host response to R. porcellionis includes aggregation of hemocytes around the infected cells and formation of multilayered melanized nodules exhibiting endogenous fluorescence. The structure of nodules is asymmetric when hemocytes are deposited on the basal side of infected gut and digestive glands cells, or symmetric, when nodules entrapping clusters of rhabdochlamydiae are deposited on other organs in the hemocoel. The study also revealed a high prevalence of infection in P. scaber populations (up to 27%) and confirmed its detrimental effect on the host. Although agility, behavior and molting cycle of infected animals appear unaffected, in the later stages R. porcellionis infection manifests as severe damage to the digestive system and decreased feeding, which eventually lead to the death of the host organism. PMID:25593037

  14. Scar Tissue.

    PubMed

    McLean, Haydn J

    2015-12-01

    Scar tissue is associated with physical wounds and their mending, but it is also descriptive in portraying the emotional scarring that occurs following adversity, resulting in potential psychological morbidity. Provided the adversity is not severe, such challenges to adaptability may provoke Andrew Solomon's process of forging meaning and building identity. Perceiving an emotional constitution as analogous to the immune system provides a metaphor for appreciating the benefits of emotional challenges, which may provoke greater emotional resilience or posttraumatic growth. PMID:26631526

  15. Biologics in dermatology: adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2015-12-01

    Biologics are a group of drugs that precisely affect certain specific steps in the immune response and are an extremely useful group when used in an appropriate setting. However, their use can often be a double-edged sword. Careful patient selection and thorough knowledge of adverse effects is a key to their successful use in various disorders. The initial enthusiasm has gradually given way to a more cautious approach wherein a balance is sought between clinical usefulness and expected side effects. The adverse effects of the biologics most commonly used in dermatology have been carefully listed for ready reference. The plausible causes of the adverse reactions are succinctly outlined along with their incriminating factor(s). Besides, in brief, the attention has been focused on their management. The content should provide an essential didactic content for educating the practitioner. PMID:26147909

  16. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low dose/low LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Munira A Kadhim

    2010-03-05

    To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e., less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these “non-targeted” responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander responses in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/H and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition on two non-targeted radiation responses in these models; the bystander effect and genomic instability, which we believe are closely related. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to doses approaching a single electron traversal. Using conventional X-ray and γ-ray sources, novel dish separation and targeted irradiation approaches, we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various bystander conditions at doses down to a few electron tracks. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for bystander targeted studies. Mechanistic studies of instability and the bystander response in different cell lineages will focus initially on the role of cytokines which have been shown to be involved in bystander signaling and the initiation of instability. These studies also aim

  17. Biophysical Investigation of Tissue Dynamics and Evidence for a Wounding Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Glenn; Tokutake, Yoichiro; Peralta, Xomalin; Mao, Albert; Hutson, M. Shane; Venakides, Stephanos; Kiehart, Dan

    2003-11-01

    We have been investigating the forces responsible for tissue dynamics in the fruit fly Drosophila, focusing on dorsal closure where two sheets of lateral epidermis close over a sheet of amnioserosa. Dorsal closure is a model system for various aspects of cell movement in vertebrate development and wound healing. We have refined a UV-laser microbeam to perturb the system; (visible) laser confocal microscopy has been used to visualize the response; and a theoretical model has been proposed to account for dorsal closure in terms of four force producing processes that are coordinated in space and synchronized in time (1). Here we report on the response to specific wounding patterns that interrogate zipping, one of these processes. We account for the responses, and find evidence that for some patterns the force produced by the amnioserosa increases as a consequence of wounding allowing dorsal closure to complete on schedule. This research has been supported by the DoD MFEL Program and by the NIH. 1. Science 300, 145-149 (2003).

  18. Avian gut-associated lymphoid tissues and intestinal immune responses to Eimeria parasites.

    PubMed Central

    Lillehoj, H S; Trout, J M

    1996-01-01

    Coccidiosis, an intestinal infection caused by intracellular protozoan parasites belonging to several different species of Eimeria, seriously impairs the growth and feed utilization of livestock and poultry. Host immune responses to coccidial infection are complex. Animals infected with Eimeria spp. produce parasite-specific antibodies in both the circulation and mucosal secretions. However, it appears that antibody-mediated responses play a minor role in protection against coccidiosis. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that cell-mediated immunity plays a major role in resistance to infection. T lymphocytes appear to respond to coccidial infection through both cytokine production and a direct cytotoxic attack on infected cells. The exact mechanisms by which T cells eliminate the parasites, however, remain unclear. Although limited information is available on the intestinal immune system of chickens, gut lymphoid tissues have evolved specialized features that reflect their role as the first line of defense at mucosal surfaces, including both immunoregulatory cells and effector cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of the avian intestinal immune system and mucosal immune responses to Eimeria spp., providing an overview of the complex cellular and molecular events involved in intestinal immune responses to enteric pathogens. PMID:8809465

  19. Fibroblast Response to Lanthanoid Metal Ion Stimulation: Potential Contribution to Fibrotic Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, William; Perone, Patricia; Walker, Kyle; Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; DaSilva, Marissa; Dame, Michael K.; Varani, James

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare each of the 14 naturally occurring lanthanoid metal ions for ability to stimulate pro-fibrotic responses in human dermal fibroblasts. When fibroblasts were exposed to individual lanthanoids over the concentration range of 1–100 μM, increased proliferation was observed with each of the agents as compared with control cells that were already proliferating rapidly in a growth factor-enriched culture medium. Dose-response differences were observed among the individual metal ions. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 levels were also increased in response to lanthanoid exposure but type I procollagen production was not. A dose–response relationship between induction of proliferation and increased MMP-1 was observed. Non-lanthanoid transition metal ions (aluminum, copper, cobalt, iron, magnesium, manganese, nickel, and zinc) were examined in the same assays; there was little stimulation with any of these metals. When epidermal keratinocytes were examined in place of dermal fibroblasts, there was no growth stimulation with any of the lanthanoids. Several of the lanthanoid metals inhibited keratinocyte proliferation at higher concentrations (50–100 μM). PMID:21484406

  20. Effects of Coralliophila violacea on tissue loss in the scleractinian corals Porites spp. depend on host response.

    PubMed

    Raymundo, L J; Work, T M; Miller, R L; Lozada-Misa, P L

    2016-04-12

    We investigated interactions between the corallivorous gastropod Coralliophila violacea and its preferred hosts Porites spp. Our objectives were to experimentally determine whether tissue loss could progress in Porites during or after Coralliophila predation on corals with and without tissue loss and to histologically document snail predation. In 64% of feeding scars, tissue regenerated within 3 wk, leaving no trace of predation. However, in roughly 28% of scars, lesions progressed to subacute tissue loss resembling white syndrome. In feeding experiments, scars from snails previously fed diseased tissue developed progressive tissue loss twice as frequently as scars from snails previously fed healthy tissue. Scars from previously healthy-fed snails were 3 times as likely to heal as those from previously diseased-fed snails. Histology revealed marked differences in host responses to snails; P. cylindrica manifested a robust inflammatory response with fewer secondary colonizing organisms such as algae, sponges, and helminths, whereas P. rus showed no evident inflammation and more secondary colonization. We conclude that lesion progression associated with Coralliophila may be associated with secondary colonization of coral tissues damaged by predator-induced trauma and necrosis. Importantly, variation at the cellular level should be considered when explaining interspecific differences in host responses in corals impacted by phenomena such as predation. PMID:27068505

  1. Effects of Coralliophila violacea on tissue loss in the scleractinian corals Porites spp. depend on host response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymundo, L.; Work, Thierry M.; Miller, R.L.; Lozada-Misa, P.L.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated interactions between the corallivorous gastropod Coralliophila violacea and its preferred hosts Porites spp. Our objectives were to experimentally determine whether tissue loss could progress in Porites during or after Coralliophila predation on corals with and without tissue loss and to histologically document snail predation. In 64% of feeding scars, tissue regenerated within 3 wk, leaving no trace of predation. However, in roughly 28% of scars, lesions progressed to subacute tissue loss resembling white syndrome. In feeding experiments, scars from snails previously fed diseased tissue developed progressive tissue loss twice as frequently as scars from snails previously fed healthy tissue. Scars from previously healthy-fed snails were 3 times as likely to heal as those from previously diseased-fed snails. Histology revealed marked differences in host responses to snails; P. cylindrica manifested a robust inflammatory response with fewer secondary colonizing organisms such as algae, sponges, and helminths, whereas P. rus showed no evident inflammation and more secondary colonization. We conclude that lesion progression associated with Coralliophila may be associated with secondary colonization of coral tissues damaged by predator-induced trauma and necrosis. Importantly, variation at the cellular level should be considered when explaining interspecific differences in host responses in corals impacted by phenomena such as predation.

  2. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype. PMID:26919895

  3. Enhancement of thermal response of normal and malignant tissues by Corynebacterium parvum. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, M.; Yamashita, T.; Suit, H.D.; Gerweck, L.E.

    1984-06-01

    Further studies were carried out on the combined effects of Corynebacterium parvum and hyperthermia on animal tissues and cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. Experimental animals were C3Hf/Sed mice derived from a defined flora mouse colony. Tumors were eighth-generation isotransplants of a spontaneous fibrosarcoma, FSa-II. Hyperthermia was given by immersing the mouse foot or culture flasks in the constant temperature water bath. Present experiments include thermal enhancement of C. parvum at different temperatures, effect of the agent on the kinetics of thermal resistance, and the mechanism of the thermal enhancement. The thermal enhancement by C. parvum was independent of temperature in a range between 42.5 and 46.5 degrees, and it increased with decreasing temperature. The analysis of the Arrhenius plot suggested a comparable activation energy for combined treatments and for heat alone between 42.5 and 46.5 degrees. The thermal resistance developed very rapidly in both normal and tumor tissues. Systemic administration of C. parvum failed to modify the kinetics of thermal resistance. Several experiments were attempted in order to disclose the mechanism. A single injection of C. parvum-induced macrophages failed to enhance thermal response of the mouse foot, while 3 daily injections of the macrophages enhanced the response, indicating that the enhancement by C. parvum is at least partly attributed to the C. parvum-induced macrophages. Whole-body irradiation of 6 Gy and/or administration of anti-mouse T-cell serum and histamine failed to inhibit the C. parvum enhancement of thermal response. No thermal enhancement was observed for Chinese hamster ovary cells treated at 43.0 degrees in vitro with C. parvum or thiomersalate, a preservative supplemented in C. parvum, although cytotoxic effect was shown at a high concentration of thiomersalate.

  4. Prediction of treatment response and metastatic disease in soft tissue sarcoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhidzadeh, Hamidreza; Zhou, Mu; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Raghavan, Meera.; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2014-03-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are a heterogenous group of malignant tumors comprised of more than 50 histologic subtypes. Based on spatial variations of the tumor, predictions of the development of necrosis in response to therapy as well as eventual progression to metastatic disease are made. Optimization of treatment, as well as management of therapy-related side effects, may be improved using progression information earlier in the course of therapy. Multimodality pre- and post-gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRI) were taken before and after treatment for 30 patients. Regional variations in the tumor bed were measured quantitatively. The voxel values from the tumor region were used as features and a fuzzy clustering algorithm was used to segment the tumor into three spatial regions. The regions were given labels of high, intermediate and low based on the average signal intensity of pixels from the post-contrast T1 modality. These spatially distinct regions were viewed as essential meta-features to predict the response of the tumor to therapy based on necrosis (dead tissue in tumor bed) and metastatic disease (spread of tumor to sites other than primary). The best feature was the difference in the number of pixels in the highest intensity regions of tumors before and after treatment. This enabled prediction of patients with metastatic disease and lack of positive treatment response (i.e. less necrosis). The best accuracy, 73.33%, was achieved by a Support Vector Machine in a leave-one-out cross validation on 30 cases predicting necrosis < 90% post treatment and metastasis.

  5. Bombyx E75 isoforms display stage- and tissue-specific responses to 20-hydroxyecdysone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang; Guo, Enen; Hossain, Muktadir S.; Li, Qingrong; Cao, Yang; Tian, Ling; Deng, Xiaojuan; Li, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Resulted from alternative splicing of the 5′ exons, the nuclear receptor gene E75 in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, processes three mRNA isoforms, BmE75A, BmE75B and BmE75C. From the early 5th larval instar to the prepupal stages, BmE75A mRNA and protein levels in the prothoracic glands display developmental profiles similar to ecdysteroid titer. In the fat body, mRNA levels but not protein levels of all three BmE75 isoforms correlate with ecdysteroid titer; moreover, proteins of all three BmE75 isoforms disappear at the prepupal stages, and a modified BmE75 protein with smaller molecular weight and cytoplasm localization occurs. At the early 5th larval instar stage, treatment of the prothoracic glands and fat body with 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and/or cycloheximide (CHX) revealed that BmE75A is 20E primary-responsive at both mRNA and protein levels, while BmE75B and BmE75C exhibit various responses to 20E. At the early wandering stage, RNAi-mediated reduction of gene expression of the 20E nuclear receptor complex, EcR-USP, significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of all three BmE75 isoforms in both tissues. In conclusion, BmE75 isoforms display stage- and tissue-specific responses to 20E at both mRNA and protein levels; moreover, they are regulated by other unknown factors at the protein level. PMID:26166384

  6. Bombyx E75 isoforms display stage- and tissue-specific responses to 20-hydroxyecdysone.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Guo, Enen; Hossain, Muktadir S; Li, Qingrong; Cao, Yang; Tian, Ling; Deng, Xiaojuan; Li, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Resulted from alternative splicing of the 5' exons, the nuclear receptor gene E75 in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, processes three mRNA isoforms, BmE75A, BmE75B and BmE75C. From the early 5(th) larval instar to the prepupal stages, BmE75A mRNA and protein levels in the prothoracic glands display developmental profiles similar to ecdysteroid titer. In the fat body, mRNA levels but not protein levels of all three BmE75 isoforms correlate with ecdysteroid titer; moreover, proteins of all three BmE75 isoforms disappear at the prepupal stages, and a modified BmE75 protein with smaller molecular weight and cytoplasm localization occurs. At the early 5(th) larval instar stage, treatment of the prothoracic glands and fat body with 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and/or cycloheximide (CHX) revealed that BmE75A is 20E primary-responsive at both mRNA and protein levels, while BmE75B and BmE75C exhibit various responses to 20E. At the early wandering stage, RNAi-mediated reduction of gene expression of the 20E nuclear receptor complex, EcR-USP, significantly decreased mRNA and protein levels of all three BmE75 isoforms in both tissues. In conclusion, BmE75 isoforms display stage- and tissue-specific responses to 20E at both mRNA and protein levels; moreover, they are regulated by other unknown factors at the protein level. PMID:26166384

  7. Modeling the response of normal and ischemic cardiac tissue to electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Sunil Mani

    Heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide, is often caused by ventricular fibrillation. A common treatment for this lethal arrhythmia is defibrillation: a strong electrical shock that resets the heart to its normal rhythm. To design better defibrillators, we need a better understanding of both fibrillation and defibrillation. Fundamental mysteries remain regarding the mechanism of how the heart responds to a shock, particularly anodal shocks and the resultant hyperpolarization. Virtual anodes play critical roles in defibrillation, and one cannot build better defibrillators until these mechanisms are understood. We are using mathematical modeling to numerically simulate observed phenomena, and are exploring fundamental mechanisms responsible for the heart's electrical behavior. Such simulations clarify mechanisms and identify key parameters. We investigate how systolic tissue responds to an anodal shock and how refractory tissue reacts to hyperpolarization by studying the dip in the anodal strength-interval curve. This dip is due to electrotonic interaction between regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization following a shock. The dominance of the electrotonic mechanism over calcium interactions implies the importance of the spatial distribution of virtual electrodes. We also investigate the response of localized ischemic tissue to an anodal shock by modeling a regional elevation of extracellular potassium concentration. This heterogeneity leads to action potential instability, 2:1 conduction block (alternans), and reflection-like reentry at the boarder of the normal and ischemic regions. This kind of reflection (reentry) occurs due to the delay between proximal and distal segments to re-excite the proximal segment. Our numerical simulations are based on the bidomain model, the state-of-the-art mathematical description of how cardiac tissue responds to shocks. The dynamic LuoRudy model describes the active properties of the membrane. To model ischemia

  8. A Rodent Model to Evaluate the Tissue Response to a Biological Scaffold When Adjacent to a Synthetic Material.

    PubMed

    Dearth, Christopher L; Keane, Timothy J; Scott, Jeffrey R; Daly, Kerry A; Badylak, Stephen F

    2015-10-01

    The use of biologic scaffold materials adjacent to synthetic meshes is commonplace. A prevalent clinical example is two-staged breast reconstruction, where biologic scaffolds are used to provide support and coverage for the inferior aspect of the synthetic expander. However, limited data exist regarding either the kinetics of biologic scaffold integration or the host tissue response to the biologic scaffold materials used for this application or other applications in which such scaffold materials are used. The present study evaluated the temporal host response to a biological scaffold when placed adjacent to a synthetic material. Evaluation criteria included quantification of material contracture and characterization of the host cell response and tissue remodeling events. Results show a decreased thickness of the collagenous tissue layer at biologic scaffold/silicone interface compared to the abdominal wall/silicone interface during the 12-week experimental time course. All test materials were readily incorporated into surrounding host tissue. PMID:26176992

  9. Interrogating the viscoelastic properties of tissue using viscoelastic response (VISR) ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzo, Mallory Renee

    Affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 newborn males, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic disorders in humans. Boys with DMD suffer progressive loss of muscle strength and function, leading to wheelchair dependence, cardiac and respiratory compromise, and death during young adulthood. There are currently no treatments that can halt or reverse the disease progression, and translating prospective treatments into clinical trials has been delayed by inadequate outcome measures. Current outcome measures, such as functional and muscle strength assessments, lack sensitivity to individual muscles, require subjective effort of the child, and are impacted by normal childhood growth and development. The goal of this research is to develop Viscoelastic Response (VisR) ultrasound which can be used to delineate compositional changes in muscle associated with DMD. In VisR, acoustic radiation force (ARF) is used to produce small, localized displacements within the muscle. Using conventional ultrasound to track the motion, the displacement response of the tissue can be evaluated against a mechanical model. In order to develop signal processing techniques and assess mechanical models, finite element method simulations are used to model the response of a viscoelastic material to ARF excitations. Results are then presented demonstrating VisR differentiation of viscoelastic changes with progressive dystrophic degeneration in a dog model of DMD. Finally, clinical feasibility of VisR imaging is demonstrated in two boys with DMD.

  10. Mating-responsive genes in reproductive tissues of female Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Paul D.; Kapelnikov, Anat; Heifetz, Yael; Bender, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Male-derived accessory gland proteins that are transferred to females during mating have profound effects on female reproductive physiology including increased ovulation, mating inhibition, and effects on sperm utilization and storage. The extreme rates of evolution seen in accessory gland proteins may be driven by sperm competition and sexual conflict, processes that may ultimately drive complex interactions between female- and male-derived molecules and sperm. However, little is known of how gene expression in female reproductive tissues changes in response to the presence of male molecules and sperm. To characterize this response, we conducted parallel genomic and proteomic analyses of gene expression in the reproductive tract of 3-day-old unmated and mated female Drosophila melanogaster. Using DNA microarrays, we identified 539 transcripts that are differentially expressed in unmated vs. mated females and revealed a striking peak in differential expression at 6 h postmating and a marked shift from primarily down-regulated to primarily up-regulated transcripts within 3 h after mating. Combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analyses, we identified 84 differentially expressed proteins at 3 h postmating, including proteins that appeared to undergo posttranslational modification. Together, our observations define transcriptional and translational response to mating within the female reproductive tract and suggest a bimodal model of postmating gene expression initially correlated with mating and the final stages of female reproductive tract maturation and later with the declining presence of male reproductive molecules and with sperm maintenance and utilization. PMID:16798875

  11. The nuclear lamina is mechano-responsive to ECM elasticity in mature tissue

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Joe; Discher, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT How cells respond to physical cues in order to meet and withstand the physical demands of their immediate surroundings has been of great interest for many years, with current research efforts focused on mechanisms that transduce signals into gene expression. Pathways that mechano-regulate the entry of transcription factors into the cell nucleus are emerging, and our most recent studies show that the mechanical properties of the nucleus itself are actively controlled in response to the elasticity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in both mature and developing tissue. In this Commentary, we review the mechano-responsive properties of nuclei as determined by the intermediate filament lamin proteins that line the inside of the nuclear envelope and that also impact upon transcription factor entry and broader epigenetic mechanisms. We summarize the signaling pathways that regulate lamin levels and cell-fate decisions in response to a combination of ECM mechanics and molecular cues. We will also discuss recent work that highlights the importance of nuclear mechanics in niche anchorage and cell motility during development, hematopoietic differentiation and cancer metastasis, as well as emphasizing a role for nuclear mechanics in protecting chromatin from stress-induced damage. PMID:24963133

  12. Image-guided genomic analysis of tissue response to laser-induced thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackanos, Mark A.; Helms, Mike; Kalish, Flora; Contag, Christopher H.

    2011-05-01

    The cytoprotective response to thermal injury is characterized by transcriptional activation of ``heat shock proteins'' (hsp) and proinflammatory proteins. Expression of these proteins may predict cellular survival. Microarray analyses were performed to identify spatially distinct gene expression patterns responding to thermal injury. Laser injury zones were identified by expression of a transgene reporter comprised of the 70 kD hsp gene and the firefly luciferase coding sequence. Zones included the laser spot, the surrounding region where hsp70-luc expression was increased, and a region adjacent to the surrounding region. A total of 145 genes were up-regulated in the laser irradiated region, while 69 were up-regulated in the adjacent region. At 7 hours the chemokine Cxcl3 was the highest expressed gene in the laser spot (24 fold) and adjacent region (32 fold). Chemokines were the most common up-regulated genes identified. Microarray gene expression was successfully validated using qRT- polymerase chain reaction for selected genes of interest. The early response genes are likely involved in cytoprotection and initiation of the healing response. Their regulatory elements will benefit creating the next generation reporter mice and controlling expression of therapeutic proteins. The identified genes serve as drug development targets that may prevent acute tissue damage and accelerate healing.

  13. Cardiac and vascular responses of isolated rat tissues treated with diterpenes from Sinularia flexibilis (coelenterata: octocorallia).

    PubMed

    Aceret, T L; Brown, L; Miller, J; Coll, J C; Sammarco, P W

    1996-10-01

    The marine environment is a rich source of compounds with cardiovascular activity. This study characterizes the cardiac and vascular responses in isolated rat tissues of flexibilide, dihydroflexibilide and sinulariolide, three diterpenes isolated from the soft coral Sinularia flexibilis. On rat left ventricular papillary muscles, dihydroflexibilide and flexibilide showed similar potencies (-log EC50 = 4.69 +/- 0.05 and 4.66 +/- 0.06, respectively); the maximal response to dihydroflexibilide of 1.4 +/- 0.2 mN was 35 +/- 7% that of calcium chloride in the same muscles. All diterpenes relaxed rat thoracic aortic rings precontracted with KC1 (100 mM) with similar potencies (flexibilide, -log EC50 = 4.17 +/- 0.06). Flexibilide was further characterized and shown to increase force in isolated rat left atria by 0.8 +/- 0.5 mN at 1 x 10(-4) M, to increase rate of contraction in isolated rat right atria by 18 +/- 5 beta/min at 3 x 10(-5) M and to completely relax endothelium-denuded rat thoracic aortic rings (-log EC50 = 4.14 +/- 0.05). Toxicity as indicated by the occurrence of ectopic beats was not observed with the diterpenes at concentrations which produced complete relaxation of blood vessels, maximal positive inotropic activity and minor positive chronotropic responses. Thus, these compounds may be useful lead compounds in the search for improved treatment of cardiovascular disease, especially heart failure. PMID:8931257

  14. Response to deep hypoglycemia does not involve glucoreceptors in carotid perfused tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Cane, P.; Haun, C.K.; Evered, J.; Youn, J.H.; Bergman, R.N. )

    1988-11-01

    In the present study the authors examined whether the magnified hormonal counter-regulatory response seen during deep hypoglycemia (40 mg/dl) could be attenuated by supplying the forebrain with glucose furnished through carotid infusion. Two protocols were performed in conscious dogs. In the first protocol they infused glucose bilaterally into the carotid circulation to produce a forebrain glycemia of 55 {plus minus} 1 mg/dl whereas systemic glycemia declined to 39 {plus minus} 2 mg/dl. In the second protocol as a control they infused glucose into the systemic circulation at a rate matched to protocol 1 so that both systemic and jugular plasma glucose concentrations were equivalent to the systemic glucose concentrations in protocol 1. In spite of a substantial difference in forebrain glycemia there were no differences in the counter-regulatory responses of catecholamines or glucagon. In addition, through the use of radiolabeled microspheres, they defined the precise regions of the forebrain irrigated during bilateral intracarotid glucose infusions. The concentration of microspheres was high in the forebrain but very low in the hindbrain. The results indicate that glucoreceptor cells in tissues perfused by carotid arteries may play a tautological role in the sympathetic response to hypoglycemia and imply that glucose-sensitive receptors must also be located elsewhere in the central nervous system or in the periphery.

  15. MicroRNA-155 drives TH17 immune response and tissue injury in experimental crescentic GN.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Christian F; Kapffer, Sonja; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Schmidt, Tilman; Bennstein, Sabrina B; Peters, Anett; Stege, Gesa; Brix, Silke R; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Turner, Jan-Eric; Steinmetz, Oliver M; Wolf, Gunter; Stahl, Rolf A K; Panzer, Ulf

    2013-12-01

    CD4(+) T cells play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, including human and experimental crescentic GN. Micro-RNAs (miRs) have emerged as important regulators of immune cell development, but the impact of miRs on the regulation of the CD4(+) T cell immune response remains to be fully clarified. Here, we report that miR-155 expression is upregulated in the kidneys of patients with ANCA-associated crescentic GN and a murine model of crescentic GN (nephrotoxic nephritis). To elucidate the potential role of miR-155 in T cell-mediated inflammation, nephritis was induced in miR-155(-/-) and wild-type mice. The systemic and renal nephritogenic TH17 immune response decreased markedly in nephritic miR-155(-/-) mice. Consistent with this finding, miR-155-deficient mice developed less severe nephritis, with reduced histologic and functional injury. Adoptive transfer of miR-155(-/-) and wild-type CD4(+) T cells into nephritic recombination activating gene 1-deficient (Rag-1(-/-)) mice showed the T cell-intrinsic importance of miR-155 for the stability of pathogenic TH17 immunity. These findings indicate that miR-155 drives the TH17 immune response and tissue injury in experimental crescentic GN and show that miR-155 is a potential therapeutic target in TH17-mediated diseases. PMID:23949802

  16. Image-guided genomic analysis of tissue response to laser-induced thermal stress

    PubMed Central

    Mackanos, Mark A.; Helms, Mike; Kalish, Flora; Contag, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    The cytoprotective response to thermal injury is characterized by transcriptional activation of “heat shock proteins” (hsp) and proinflammatory proteins. Expression of these proteins may predict cellular survival. Microarray analyses were performed to identify spatially distinct gene expression patterns responding to thermal injury. Laser injury zones were identified by expression of a transgene reporter comprised of the 70 kD hsp gene and the firefly luciferase coding sequence. Zones included the laser spot, the surrounding region where hsp70-luc expression was increased, and a region adjacent to the surrounding region. A total of 145 genes were up-regulated in the laser irradiated region, while 69 were up-regulated in the adjacent region. At 7 hours the chemokine Cxcl3 was the highest expressed gene in the laser spot (24 fold) and adjacent region (32 fold). Chemokines were the most common up-regulated genes identified. Microarray gene expression was successfully validated using qRT- polymerase chain reaction for selected genes of interest. The early response genes are likely involved in cytoprotection and initiation of the healing response. Their regulatory elements will benefit creating the next generation reporter mice and controlling expression of therapeutic proteins. The identified genes serve as drug development targets that may prevent acute tissue damage and accelerate healing. PMID:21639585

  17. Cruzipain induces autoimmune response against skeletal muscle and tissue damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Giordanengo, L; Fretes, R; Díaz, H; Cano, R; Bacile, A; Vottero-Cima, E; Gea, S

    2000-09-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate whether cruzipain, a major Trypanosoma cruzi antigen, is able to induce in mice an autoimmune response and skeletal muscle damage. We demonstrate that immunization with cruzipain triggers immunoglobulin G antibody binding to a 210-kDa antigen from a syngeneic skeletal muscle extract. The absorption of immune sera with purified myosin completely eliminated this reactivity, confirming that the protein identified is really myosin. We also found that spleen cells from immunized mice proliferated in response to a skeletal muscle extract rich in myosin and to purified myosin. Cells from control mice did not proliferate against any of the antigens tested. In addition, we observed an increase in plasma creatine kinase activity, a biochemical marker of muscle damage. Histological studies showed inflammatory infiltrates and myopathic changes in skeletal muscle of immunized animals. Electromyographic studies of these mice revealed changes such as are found in inflammatory or necrotic myopathy. Altogether, our results suggest that this experimental model provides strong evidence for a pathogenic role of anticruzipain immune response in the development of muscle tissue damage. PMID:10951444

  18. MicroRNA-155 Drives TH17 Immune Response and Tissue Injury in Experimental Crescentic GN

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Christian F.; Kapffer, Sonja; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Schmidt, Tilman; Bennstein, Sabrina B.; Peters, Anett; Stege, Gesa; Brix, Silke R.; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Turner, Jan-Eric; Steinmetz, Oliver M.; Wolf, Gunter; Stahl, Rolf A. K.

    2013-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, including human and experimental crescentic GN. Micro-RNAs (miRs) have emerged as important regulators of immune cell development, but the impact of miRs on the regulation of the CD4+ T cell immune response remains to be fully clarified. Here, we report that miR-155 expression is upregulated in the kidneys of patients with ANCA-associated crescentic GN and a murine model of crescentic GN (nephrotoxic nephritis). To elucidate the potential role of miR-155 in T cell-mediated inflammation, nephritis was induced in miR-155−/− and wild-type mice. The systemic and renal nephritogenic TH17 immune response decreased markedly in nephritic miR-155−/− mice. Consistent with this finding, miR-155–deficient mice developed less severe nephritis, with reduced histologic and functional injury. Adoptive transfer of miR-155−/− and wild-type CD4+ T cells into nephritic recombination activating gene 1-deficient (Rag-1−/−) mice showed the T cell-intrinsic importance of miR-155 for the stability of pathogenic TH17 immunity. These findings indicate that miR-155 drives the TH17 immune response and tissue injury in experimental crescentic GN and show that miR-155 is a potential therapeutic target in TH17-mediated diseases. PMID:23949802

  19. Fuz Regulates Craniofacial Development through Tissue Specific Responses to Signaling Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zichao; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Niederreither, Karen; Venugopalan, Shankar; Florez, Sergio; Finnell, Richard H.; Amendt, Brad A.

    2011-01-01

    The planar cell polarity effector gene Fuz regulates ciliogenesis and Fuz loss of function studies reveal an array of embryonic phenotypes. However, cilia defects can affect many signaling pathways and, in humans, cilia defects underlie several craniofacial anomalies. To address this, we analyzed the craniofacial phenotype and signaling responses of the Fuz−/− mice. We demonstrate a unique role for Fuz in regulating both Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt/β-catenin signaling during craniofacial development. Fuz expression first appears in the dorsal tissues and later in ventral tissues and craniofacial regions during embryonic development coincident with cilia development. The Fuz−/− mice exhibit severe craniofacial deformities including anophthalmia, agenesis of the tongue and incisors, a hypoplastic mandible, cleft palate, ossification/skeletal defects and hyperplastic malformed Meckel's cartilage. Hh signaling is down-regulated in the Fuz null mice, while canonical Wnt signaling is up-regulated revealing the antagonistic relationship of these two pathways. Meckel's cartilage is expanded in the Fuz−/− mice due to increased cell proliferation associated with the up-regulation of Wnt canonical target genes and decreased non-canonical pathway genes. Interestingly, cilia development was decreased in the mandible mesenchyme of Fuz null mice, suggesting that cilia may antagonize Wnt signaling in this tissue. Furthermore, expression of Fuz decreased expression of Wnt pathway genes as well as a Wnt-dependent reporter. Finally, chromatin IP experiments demonstrate that β-catenin/TCF-binding directly regulates Fuz expression. These data demonstrate a new model for coordination of Hh and Wnt signaling and reveal a Fuz-dependent negative feedback loop controlling Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:21935430

  20. PREDICTING THE RISKS OF NEUROTOXIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BASED ON TARGET TISSUE DOSE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative exposure-dose-response models relate the external exposure of a substance to the dose in the target tissue, and then relate the target tissue dose to production of adverse outcomes. We developed exposure-dose-response models to describe the affects of acute exposure...

  1. The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

    2012-12-01

    Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1α, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, TNF α, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

  2. The spatio-temporal strain response of oedematous and nonoedematous tissue to sustained compression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Berry, Gearóid P; Bamber, Jeffrey C; Mortimer, Peter S; Bush, Nigel L; Miller, Naomi R; Barbone, Paul E

    2008-04-01

    Poroelastic theory predicts that compression-induced fluid flow through a medium reveals itself via the spatio-temporal behaviour of the strain field. Such strain behaviour has already been observed in simple poroelastic phantoms using generalised elastographic techniques (Berry et al. 2006a, 2006b). The aim of this current study was to investigate the extent to which these techniques could be applied in vivo to image and interpret the compression-induced time-dependent local strain response in soft tissue. Tissue on both arms of six patients presenting with unilateral lymphoedema was subjected to a sustained compression for up to 500 s, and the induced strain was imaged as a function of time. The strain was found to exhibit time-dependent spatially varying behaviour, which we interpret to be consistent with that of a heterogeneous poroelastic material. This occurred in both arms of all patients, although it was more easily seen in the ipsilateral (affected) arm than in the contralateral (apparently unaffected) arm in five out of the six patients. Further work would appear to be worthwhile to determine if poroelasticity imaging could be used in future both to diagnose lymphoedema and to explore the patho-physiology of the condition. PMID:18222033

  3. Changes in Tissue Oxygen Saturation in Response to Different Calf Compression Sleeves

    PubMed Central

    Dermont, T.; Morizot, L.; Bouhaddi, M.; Ménétrier, A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The purpose was to examine the changes in tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) in response to the application of different commercially available calf compression sleeves. Methods. Eight subjects came to the laboratory to complete a session in seated position including 10 min of quiet rest followed by 3 min measuring calf StO2 without compression sleeves and then alternating of 3 min of passive rest and 3 min measuring StO2 with calf compression sleeves. A total of 15 different commercially available compression sleeves were studied in a randomized order. Calf StO2 was recorded using near-infrared spectroscopy. Results. StO2 was significantly increased with all compression sleeves (p < 0.05) compared with no compression (from +6.9% for the least effective to +22.6% for the most effective). Large differences were observed between compression sleeves (p < 0.05). StO2 was positively correlated with compression pressure (p < 0.05; r = 0.84). Conclusion. This study shows that wearing compression sleeves from various brands differently affects tissue oxygen saturation. Differences were linked to the compression pressure: higher compression pressures were associated with higher StO2. PMID:26464899

  4. Mapping QTLs for Tissue Culture Response in Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Zhao, Tuanjie; Yu, Deyue; Gai, Junyi

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control the tissue culture response in soybean were detected by using 184 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from two varieties: Kefeng No.1 and Nannong 1138-2. The molecular map consisting of 834 molecular markers using this population covered space 2307.83 cM of the genome throughout 24 linkage groups. The performance of tissue culture in soybean was evaluated by two indices: callus induction frequency (CIF) and somatic embryos initiation frequency (SEIF). They were expressed as the number of explants producing callus/ the number of total explants and the number of explants producing somatic embryos/ the number of total explants, respectively. The RIL lines showed continuous segregation for both indices. With the composite interval mapping (CIM) described in Windows QTL Cartographer Version 2.5, three quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were identified for the frequency of callus induction, on chromosomes B2 and D2, accounting for phenotypic variation from 5.84% to 16.60%; four QTLs on chromosome G were detected for the frequency of somatic embryos initiation and explained the phenotypic variation from 7.79% to 14.16%. The information of new QTLs identified in the present study will contribute to genetic improvement of regeneration traits with marker-assisted selection (MAS) in soybean. PMID:21952936

  5. Measuring the contractile response of isolated tissue using an image sensor.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Martín, David; Hernández-Jiménez, José Gerardo; Rodríguez-Valido, Manuel; Borges, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Isometric or isotonic transducers have traditionally been used to study the contractile/relaxation effects of drugs on isolated tissues. However, these mechanical sensors are expensive and delicate, and they are associated with certain disadvantages when performing experiments in the laboratory. In this paper, a method that uses an image sensor to measure the contractile effect of drugs on blood vessel rings and other luminal organs is presented. The new method is based on an image-processing algorithm, and it provides a fast, easy and non-expensive way to analyze the effects of such drugs. In our tests, we have obtained dose-response curves from rat aorta rings that are equivalent to those achieved with classical mechanic sensors. PMID:25903550

  6. PACAP is essential for the adaptive thermogenic response of brown adipose tissue to cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Diané, Abdoulaye; Nikolic, Nikolina; Rudecki, Alexander P; King, Shannon M; Bowie, Drew J; Gray, Sarah L

    2014-09-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a widely distributed neuropeptide that acts as a neurotransmitter, neuromodulator, neurotropic factor, neuroprotectant, secretagogue, and neurohormone. Owing to its pleiotropic biological actions, knockout of Pacap (Adcyap1) has been shown to induce several abnormalities in mice such as impaired thermoregulation. However, the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. A previous report has shown that cold-exposed Pacap null mice cannot supply appropriate levels of norepinephrine (NE) to brown adipocytes. Therefore, we hypothesized that exogenous NE would rescue the impaired thermogenic response of Pacap null mice during cold exposure. We compared the adaptive thermogenic capacity of Pacap(-/-) to Pacap(+/+) mice in response to NE when housed at room temperature (24 °C) and after a 3.5-week cold exposure (4 °C). Biochemical parameters, expression of thermogenic genes, and morphological properties of brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) were also characterized. Results showed that there was a significant effect of temperature, but no effect of genotype, on the resting metabolic rate in conscious, unrestrained mice. However, the normal cold-induced increase in the basal metabolic rate and NE-induced increase in thermogenesis were severely blunted in cold-exposed Pacap(-/-) mice. These changes were associated with altered substrate utilization, reduced β3-adrenergic receptor (β3-Ar (Adrb3)) and hormone-sensitive lipase (Hsl (Lipe)) gene expression, and increased fibroblast growth factor 2 (Fgf2) gene expression in BAT. Interestingly, Pacap(-/-) mice had depleted WAT depots, associated with upregulated uncoupling protein 1 expression in inguinal WATs. These results suggest that the impairment of adaptive thermogenesis in Pacap null mice cannot be rescued by exogenous NE perhaps in part due to decreased β3-Ar-mediated BAT activation. PMID:25056115

  7. Biophysical mechanisms responsible for pulsed low-level laser excitation of neural tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jonathon; Kao, Chris; Konrad, Peter; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Jansen, E. Duco

    2006-02-01

    Background/Objective: The traditional method of stimulating neural activity has been based on electrical methods and remains the gold standard to date despite inherent limitations. We have previously shown a new paradigm to in vivo neural activation based on pulsed infrared light, which provides a contact-free, spatially selective, artifact-free method without incurring tissue damage that may have significant advantages over electrical stimulation in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The goal of this study was to investigate the physical mechanism of this phenomenon, which we propose is a photo-thermal effect from transient tissue temperature changes resulting in direct or indirect activation of transmembrane ion channels causing propagation of the action potential. Methods: Rat sciatic nerve preparation was stimulated in vivo with the Holmium:YAG laser (2.12μm), Free Electron Laser (2.1μm), Alexandrite laser (690nm), and the prototype for a solid state commercial laser nerve stimulator built by Aculight (1.87μm) to determine contributions of photobiological responses from laser tissue interactions, including temperature, pressure, electric field, and photochemistry, underlying the biophysical mechanism of stimulation. Single point temperature measurements were made with a microthermocouple adjacent to the excitation site, while an infrared camera was used for 2-D radiometry of the irradiated surface. Displacement from laser-induced pressure waves or thermoelastic expansion was measured using a PS-OCT system. Results: Results exclude a direct photochemical, electric field, or pressure wave effect as the mechanism of optical stimulation. Measurements show relative small contributions from thermoelastic expansion (300 nm) with the laser parameters used for nerve stimulation. The maximum change in tissue temperature is about 9°C (average increase of 3.66 °C) at stimulation threshold radiant exposures. Conclusion: Neural activation with pulsed

  8. Degradation characteristics, cell viability and host tissue responses of PDLLA-based scaffold with PRGD and β-TCP nanoparticles incorporation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jiling; Xiong, Feng; Li, Binbin; Chen, Heping; Yin, Yixia; Dai, Honglian; Li, Shipu

    2016-09-01

    This study is aimed to evaluate the degradation characteristics, cell viability and host tissue responses of PDLLA/PRGD/β-TCP (PRT) composite nerve scaffold, which was fabricated by poly(d, l-lactic acid) (PDLLA), RGD peptide(Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Tyr, GRGDY, abbreviated as RGD) modified poly-{(lactic acid)-co-[(glycolic acid)-alt-(l-lysine)]}(PRGD) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). The scaffolds' in vitro degradation behaviors were investigated in detail by analysing changes in weight loss, pH and morphology. Then, the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl) -2,5-diphenyl-2 -H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and cell live/dead assay were carried out to assess their cell viability. Moreover, in vivo degradation patterns and host inflammation responses were monitored by subcutaneous implantation of PRT scaffold in rats. Our data showed that, among the tested scaffolds, the PRT scaffold had the best buffering capacity (pH = 6.1-6.3) and fastest degradation rate (12.4%, 8 weeks) during in vitro study, which was contributed by the incorporation of β-TCP nanoparticles. After in vitro and in vivo degradation, the high porosity structure of PRT could be observed using scanning electron microscopy. Meanwhile, the PRT scaffold could significantly promote cell survival. In the PRT scaffold implantation region, less inflammatory cells (especially for neutrophil and lymphocyte) could be detected. These results indicated that the PRT composite scaffold had a good biodegradable property; it could improve cells survival and reduced the adverse host tissue inflammation responses. PMID:27252885

  9. Degradation characteristics, cell viability and host tissue responses of PDLLA-based scaffold with PRGD and β-TCP nanoparticles incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jiling; Xiong, Feng; Li, Binbin; Chen, Heping; Yin, Yixia; Dai, Honglian; Li, Shipu

    2016-01-01

    This study is aimed to evaluate the degradation characteristics, cell viability and host tissue responses of PDLLA/PRGD/β-TCP (PRT) composite nerve scaffold, which was fabricated by poly(d, l-lactic acid) (PDLLA), RGD peptide(Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Tyr, GRGDY, abbreviated as RGD) modified poly-{(lactic acid)-co-[(glycolic acid)-alt-(l-lysine)]}(PRGD) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). The scaffolds’ in vitro degradation behaviors were investigated in detail by analysing changes in weight loss, pH and morphology. Then, the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl) -2,5-diphenyl-2 -H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and cell live/dead assay were carried out to assess their cell viability. Moreover, in vivo degradation patterns and host inflammation responses were monitored by subcutaneous implantation of PRT scaffold in rats. Our data showed that, among the tested scaffolds, the PRT scaffold had the best buffering capacity (pH = 6.1–6.3) and fastest degradation rate (12.4%, 8 weeks) during in vitro study, which was contributed by the incorporation of β-TCP nanoparticles. After in vitro and in vivo degradation, the high porosity structure of PRT could be observed using scanning electron microscopy. Meanwhile, the PRT scaffold could significantly promote cell survival. In the PRT scaffold implantation region, less inflammatory cells (especially for neutrophil and lymphocyte) could be detected. These results indicated that the PRT composite scaffold had a good biodegradable property; it could improve cells survival and reduced the adverse host tissue inflammation responses. PMID:27252885

  10. Effects of the Variation in Brain Tissue Mechanical Properties on the Intracranial Response of a 6-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shihai; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiangnan; Ruan, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue mechanical properties are of importance to investigate child head injury using finite element (FE) method. However, these properties used in child head FE model normally vary in a large range in published literatures because of the insufficient child cadaver experiments. In this work, a head FE model with detailed anatomical structures is developed from the computed tomography (CT) data of a 6-year-old healthy child head. The effects of brain tissue mechanical properties on traumatic brain response are also analyzed by reconstruction of a head impact on engine hood according to Euro-NCAP testing regulation using FE method. The result showed that the variations of brain tissue mechanical parameters in linear viscoelastic constitutive model had different influences on the intracranial response. Furthermore, the opposite trend was obtained in the predicted shear stress and shear strain of brain tissues caused by the variations of mentioned parameters. PMID:26495031

  11. The Circulatory and Metabolic Responses to Hypoxia in Humans - With Special Reference to Adipose Tissue Physiology and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Ilkka H A; Boushel, Robert; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue metabolism and circulation play an important role in human health. It is well-known that adipose tissue mass is increased in response to excess caloric intake leading to obesity and further to local hypoxia and inflammatory signaling. Acute exercise increases blood supply to adipose tissue and mobilization of fat stores for energy. However, acute exercise during systemic hypoxia reduces subcutaneous blood flow in healthy young subjects, but the response in overweight or obese subjects remains to be investigated. Emerging evidence also indicates that exercise training during hypoxic exposure may provide additive benefits with respect to many traditional cardiovascular risk factors as compared to exercise performed in normoxia, but unfavorable effects of hypoxia have also been documented. These topics will be covered in this brief review dealing with hypoxia and adipose tissue physiology. PMID:27621722

  12. Effects of the Variation in Brain Tissue Mechanical Properties on the Intracranial Response of a 6-Year-Old Child.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shihai; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiangnan; Ruan, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue mechanical properties are of importance to investigate child head injury using finite element (FE) method. However, these properties used in child head FE model normally vary in a large range in published literatures because of the insufficient child cadaver experiments. In this work, a head FE model with detailed anatomical structures is developed from the computed tomography (CT) data of a 6-year-old healthy child head. The effects of brain tissue mechanical properties on traumatic brain response are also analyzed by reconstruction of a head impact on engine hood according to Euro-NCAP testing regulation using FE method. The result showed that the variations of brain tissue mechanical parameters in linear viscoelastic constitutive model had different influences on the intracranial response. Furthermore, the opposite trend was obtained in the predicted shear stress and shear strain of brain tissues caused by the variations of mentioned parameters. PMID:26495031

  13. The Circulatory and Metabolic Responses to Hypoxia in Humans – With Special Reference to Adipose Tissue Physiology and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Heinonen, Ilkka H. A.; Boushel, Robert; Kalliokoski, Kari K.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue metabolism and circulation play an important role in human health. It is well-known that adipose tissue mass is increased in response to excess caloric intake leading to obesity and further to local hypoxia and inflammatory signaling. Acute exercise increases blood supply to adipose tissue and mobilization of fat stores for energy. However, acute exercise during systemic hypoxia reduces subcutaneous blood flow in healthy young subjects, but the response in overweight or obese subjects remains to be investigated. Emerging evidence also indicates that exercise training during hypoxic exposure may provide additive benefits with respect to many traditional cardiovascular risk factors as compared to exercise performed in normoxia, but unfavorable effects of hypoxia have also been documented. These topics will be covered in this brief review dealing with hypoxia and adipose tissue physiology. PMID:27621722

  14. Bone Response to Surface-Modified Titanium Implants: Studies on the Early Tissue Response to Implants with Different Surface Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Larsson Wexell, C.; Thomsen, P.; Aronsson, B.-O.; Tengvall, P.; Rodahl, M.; Lausmaa, J.; Kasemo, B.; Ericson, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of experimental studies, the bone formation around systematically modified titanium implants is analyzed. In the present study, three different surface modifications were prepared and evaluated. Glow-discharge cleaning and oxidizing resulted in a highly stoichiometric TiO2 surface, while a glow-discharge treatment in nitrogen gas resulted in implants with essentially a surface of titanium nitride, covered with a very thin titanium oxide. Finally, hydrogen peroxide treatment of implants resulted in an almost stoichiometric TiO2, rich in hydroxyl groups on the surface. Machined commercially pure titanium implants served as controls. Scanning Auger Electron Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy revealed no significant differences in oxide thickness or surface roughness parameters, but differences in the surface chemical composition and apparent topography were observed. After surface preparation, the implants were inserted in cortical bone of rabbits and evaluated after 1, 3, and 6 weeks. Light microscopic evaluation of the tissue response showed that all implants were in contact with bone and had a large proportion of newly formed bone within the threads after 6 weeks. There were no morphological differences between the four groups. Our study shows that a high degree of bone contact and bone formation can be achieved with titanium implants of different surface composition and topography. PMID:24174936

  15. Pea embryonic tissues show common responses to the replication of a wide range of viruses.

    PubMed

    Escaler, M; Aranda, M A; Thomas, C L; Maule, A J

    2000-02-15

    The response of pea embryonic tissues to the replication of a range of different viruses was investigated using in situ hybridization to analyze changes in the expression of two host genes, heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) and lipoxygenase (lox1). Excised pea embryos were infected using microprojectile bombardment with a nonseed transmissible strain of Pea seed-borne mosaic potyvirus, or with Pea early browning tobravirus (PEBV), White Clover mosaic potexvirus, or Beet curly top geminivirus. Collectively, these examples represent families of viruses with differing genomic features, differing numbers of genomic components and differing replication strategies. In all cases, there was an induction of hsp70 associated with virus replication and, in most cases, a downregulation of lox1. Hence, either each virus has a direct inducer of these common responses or the induction is indirectly the result of a generic feature of virus infection. By exploiting the bipartite nature of the PEBV genome, the coat protein gene and genes involved in vector transmission were excluded as potential inducers. PMID:10662627

  16. Endovascular laser–tissue interactions and biological responses in relation to endovenous laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Heger, Michal; van Golen, Rowan F; Broekgaarden, Mans; van den Bos, Renate R; Neumann, H A Martino; van Gulik, Thomas M; van Gemert, Martin J C

    2014-03-01

    Endovenous laser treatment (ELT) has evolved into a frequently employed modality for the treatment of leg varicose veins. Due to the very high complete response rates, minimal complications and side effects, and the possibility to monitor therapeutic outcome noninvasively by duplex ultrasound, a considerable amount of reports have been published on clinical and translational studies, whereas disproportionally few studies have been performed to elucidate the molecular and cellular basis for post-ELT vessel obliteration. Consequently, this review addresses the putative molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for varicose vein obliteration following laser irradiation in the context of endovenous laser–tissue interactions. First, the histological profile of laser-treated varicose veins is summarized, and an account is given of the temporal and spatial dynamics of cells involved in inflammation and remodeling in the heat-affected vein segment. Inasmuch as thrombotic occlusion of the venous lumen blocks circulatory access to the affected vessel segment and thermal damage in the vascular wall causes most cells to die, the majority of cells involved in inflammation and remodeling have to be recruited. Second, the (possible) biochemical triggers for the chemotactic attraction of immune cells and fibroblasts are identified, comprising (1) thermal coagula, (2) thrombi, (3) dead and dying cells in the vein wall, and (4) thermally denatured extracellular matrix proteins in the vein wall. The molecular biology underlying the chemotactic signaling and subsequent obliterative remodeling is elucidated. Finally, the relative contribution of every biochemical trigger to obliterative remodeling is addressed. PMID:24232911

  17. Simulated Response of a Tissue-equivalent Proportional Counter on the Surface of Mars.

    PubMed

    Northum, Jeremy D; Guetersloh, Stephen B; Braby, Leslie A; Ford, John R

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainties persist regarding the assessment of the carcinogenic risk associated with galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure during a mission to Mars. The GCR spectrum peaks in the range of 300(-1) MeV n to 700 MeV n(-1) and is comprised of elemental ions from H to Ni. While Fe ions represent only 0.03% of the GCR spectrum in terms of particle abundance, they are responsible for nearly 30% of the dose equivalent in free space. Because of this, radiation biology studies focusing on understanding the biological effects of GCR exposure generally use Fe ions. Acting as a thin shield, the Martian atmosphere alters the GCR spectrum in a manner that significantly reduces the importance of Fe ions. Additionally, albedo particles emanating from the regolith complicate the radiation environment. The present study uses the Monte Carlo code FLUKA to simulate the response of a tissue-equivalent proportional counter on the surface of Mars to produce dosimetry quantities and microdosimetry distributions. The dose equivalent rate on the surface of Mars was found to be 0.18 Sv y(-1) with an average quality factor of 2.9 and a dose mean lineal energy of 18.4 keV μm(-1). Additionally, albedo neutrons were found to account for 25% of the dose equivalent. It is anticipated that these data will provide relevant starting points for use in future risk assessment and mission planning studies. PMID:26313586

  18. Dose-Dependent Response of Tissue-Engineered Intervertebral Discs to Dynamic Unconfined Compressive Loading

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Katherine D.; Mozia, Robert I.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the limitations of current surgical methods in the treatment of degenerative disc disease, tissue-engineered intervertebral discs (TE-IVDs) have become an important target. This study investigated the biochemical and mechanical responses of composite TE-IVDs to dynamic unconfined compression. TE-IVDs were manufactured by floating an injection molded alginate nucleus pulposus (NP) in a type I collagen annulus fibrosus (AF) that was allowed to contract for 2 weeks before loading. The discs were mechanically stimulated at a range of strain amplitude (1–10%) for 2 weeks with a duty cycle of 1 h on–1 h off–1 h on before being evaluated for their biochemical and mechanical properties. Mechanical loading increased all properties in a dose-dependent manner. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) increased between 2.8 and 2.2 fold in the AF and NP regions, respectively, whereas the hydroxyproline content increased between 1.2 and 1.8 fold. The discs also experienced a 2-fold increase in the equilibrium modulus and a 4.3-fold increase in the instantaneous modulus. Full effects for all properties were seen by 5% strain amplitude. These data suggest that dynamic loading increases the functionality of our TE-IVDs with region-dependent responses using a method that may be scaled up to larger disc models to expedite maturation for implantation. PMID:25277703

  19. Acetylbritannilactone Modulates MicroRNA-155-Mediated Inflammatory Response in Ischemic Cerebral Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ya; Zhang, Xiangjian; Dong, Lipeng; Zhao, Jingru; Zhang, Cong; Zhu, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory responses play a critical role in ischemic brain injury. MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) induces the expression of inflammatory cytokines, and acetylbritannilactone (ABL) exerts potent antiinflammatory actions by inhibiting expression of inflammation-related genes. However, the functions of miR-155 and the actual relationship between ABL and miR-155 in ischemia-induced cerebral inflammation remain unclear. In this study, cerebral ischemia of wild-type (WT) and miR-155−/− mice was induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). pAd-miR-155 was injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle 24 h before MCAO to induce miR-155 overexpression. MCAO mice and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated BV2 cells were used to examine the effects of ABL and miR-155 overexpression or deletion on the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. We demonstrated that ABL treatment significantly reduced neurological deficits and cerebral infarct volume by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression in ischemic cerebral tissue and OGD-treated BV2 cells. Mechanistic studies suggested that the observed decrease in TNF-α and IL-1β expression was attributable to the ABL-induced suppression of the expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). We further found that miR-155 promoted TNF-α and IL-1β expression by upregulating TLR4 and downregulating the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), while ABL exerted an inhibitory effect on miR-155-mediated gene expression. In conclusion, miR-155 mediates inflammatory responses in ischemic cerebral tissue by modulating TLR4/MyD88 and SOCS1 expression, and ABL exerts its antiinflammatory action by suppressing miR-155 expression, suggesting a novel miR-155-based therapy for ischemic stroke. PMID:25811992

  20. Acetylbritannilactone Modulates MicroRNA-155-Mediated Inflammatory Response in Ischemic Cerebral Tissues.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ya; Zhang, Xiangjian; Dong, Lipeng; Zhao, Jingru; Zhang, Cong; Zhu, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory responses play a critical role in ischemic brain injury. MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) induces the expression of inflammatory cytokines, and acetylbritannilactone (ABL) exerts potent antiinflammatory actions by inhibiting expression of inflammation-related genes. However, the functions of miR-155 and the actual relationship between ABL and miR-155 in ischemia-induced cerebral inflammation remain unclear. In this study, cerebral ischemia of wild-type (WT) and miR-155(-/-) mice was induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). pAd-miR-155 was injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle 24 h before MCAO to induce miR-155 overexpression. MCAO mice and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated BV2 cells were used to examine the effects of ABL and miR-155 overexpression or deletion on the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. We demonstrated that ABL treatment significantly reduced neurological deficits and cerebral infarct volume by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression in ischemic cerebral tissue and OGD-treated BV2 cells. Mechanistic studies suggested that the observed decrease in TNF-α and IL-1β expression was attributable to the ABL-induced suppression of the expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). We further found that miR-155 promoted TNF-α and IL-1β expression by upregulating TLR4 and downregulating the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), while ABL exerted an inhibitory effect on miR-155-mediated gene expression. In conclusion, miR-155 mediates inflammatory responses in ischemic cerebral tissue by modulating TLR4/MyD88 and SOCS1 expression, and ABL exerts its antiinflammatory action by suppressing miR-155 expression, suggesting a novel miR-155-based therapy for ischemic stroke. PMID:25811992

  1. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low

    SciTech Connect

    Kadhim, Munira A

    2012-08-22

    The above studies will provide fundamental mechanistic information relating genetic predisposition to important low dose phenomena, and will aid in the development of Department of Energy policy, as well as radiation risk policy for the public and the workplace. We believe the proposed studies accurately reflect the goals of the DOE low dose program. To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e. less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these "non-targeted responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation with a focus on the induction of genomic instability (GI) in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition in these models on genomic instability. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to the dose of 10mGy (0.01Gy) X-rays. Using conventional X-ray and we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various conditions at a range of doses down to the very low dose of 0.01Gy. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for such studies. Mechanistic studies of instability in different cell

  2. Defect in the sodium-modulated tissue responsiveness to angiotensin II in essential hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Shoback, D M; Williams, G H; Moore, T J; Dluhy, R G; Podolsky, S; Hollenberg, N K

    1983-01-01

    ) after sodium restriction. In contrast, there was no significant difference in the aldosterone response to AII infusion between the low and high sodium diets in the AbR. Thus, a substantial subgroup of essential hypertensives has an abnormality in responsiveness to AII in two systems central to volume homeostasis: the kidney and adrenal. They fail to modulate their renal blood flow and aldosterone responses to AII with changes in dietary sodium intake. Moreover, basal renal blood flow does not increase appropriately with increased sodium intake. These abnormalities, which may be due to an increased local production of AII or a defect in the AII receptors in these three target tissues, could contribute to the elevated blood pressure. PMID:6358261

  3. Pressure-induced near infrared spectra response as a valuable source of information for soft tissue classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugmas, Blaž; Bürmen, Miran; Bregar, Maksimilijan; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2013-04-01

    Acquiring near infrared spectra in vivo usually requires a fiber-optic probe to be pressed against the tissue. The applied pressure can significantly affect the optical properties of the underlying tissue, and thereby the acquired spectra. The existing studies consider these effects to be distortions. In contrast, we hypothesize that the pressure-induced spectral response is site- and tissue-specific, providing additional information for the tissue classification. For the purpose of this study, a custom system was designed for dynamic pressure control and rapid acquisition of spectra. The pressure-induced spectral response was studied at three proximate skin sites of the human hand. The diffuse reflectance and scattering were found to decrease with the applied contact pressure. In contrast, the concentrations of chromophores, and consequently the absorption, increased with the applied contact pressure. The pressure-induced changes in the tissue optical properties were found to be site-specific and were modeled as a polynomial function of the applied contact pressure. A quadratic discriminant analysis classification of the tissue spectra acquired at the three proximate skin sites, based on the proposed pressure-induced spectral response model, resulted in a high (90%) average classification sensitivity and specificity, clearly supporting the working hypothesis.

  4. The adult brain tissue response to hollow fiber membranes of varying surface architecture with or without cotransplanted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning

    A variety of biomaterials have been chronically implanted into the central nervous system (CNS) for repair or therapeutic purposes. Regardless of the application, chronic implantation of materials into the CNS induces injury and elicits a wound healing response, eventually leading to the formation of a dense extracellular matrix (ECM)-rich scar tissue that is associated with the segregation of implanted materials from the surrounding normal tissue. Often this reaction results in impaired performance of indwelling CNS devices. In order to enhance the performance of biomaterial-based implantable devices in the CNS, this thesis investigated whether adult brain tissue response to implanted biomaterials could be manipulated by changing biomaterial surface properties or further by utilizing the biology of co-transplanted cells. Specifically, the adult rat brain tissue response to chronically implanted poly(acrylonitrile-vinylchloride) (PAN-PVC) hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) of varying surface architecture were examined temporally at 2, 4, and 12 weeks postimplantation. Significant differences were discovered in the brain tissue response to the PAN-PVC HFMs of varying surface architecture at 4 and 12 weeks. To extend this work, whether the soluble factors derived from a co-transplanted cellular component further affect the brain tissue response to an implanted HFM in a significant way was critically exploited. The cells used were astrocytes, whose ability to influence scar formation process following CNS injury by physical contact with the host tissue had been documented in the literature. Data indicated for the first time that astrocyte-derived soluble factors ameliorate the adult brain tissue reactivity toward HFM implants in an age-dependent manner. While immature astrocytes secreted soluble factors that suppressed the brain tissue reactivity around the implants, mature astrocytes secreted factors that enhanced the gliotic response. These findings prove the feasibility

  5. Tissue contaminants and associated transcriptional response in trout liver from high elevation lakes of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, P.W.; Aluru, N.; Black, R.W.; Vijayan, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    The consistent cold temperatures and large amount of precipitation in the Olympic and Cascade ranges of Washington State are thought to enhance atmospheric deposition of contaminants. However, little is known about contaminant levels in organisms residing in these remote high elevation lakes. We measured total mercury and 28 organochlorine compounds in trout collected from 14 remote lakes in the Olympic, Mt. Rainer, and North Cascades National Parks. Mercury was detected in trout from all lakes sampled (15 to 262 ??g/kg ww), while two organochlorines, total polychlorinated biphenyls (tPCB) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), were also detected in these fish tissues (<25 ??g/kg ww). In sediments, organochlorine levels were below detection, while median total and methyl mercury were 30.4 and 0.34 ??g/ kg dry weight (ww), respectively. Using fish from two lakes, representing different contaminant loading levels (Wilcox lake: high; Skymo lake: low), we examined transcriptional response in the liver using a custom-made low-density targeted rainbow trout cDNA microarray. We detected significant differences in liver transcriptional response, including significant changes in metabolic, endocrine, and immune-related genes, in fish collected from Wilcox Lake compared to Skymo Lake. Overall, our results suggest that local urban areas contribute to the observed contaminant patterns in these high elevation lakes, while the transcriptional changes point to a biological response associated with exposure to these contaminants in fish. Specifically, the gene expression pattern leads us to hypothesize a role for mercury in disrupting the metabolic and reproductive pathways in fish from high elevation lakes in western Washington. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  6. Tissue contaminants and associated transcriptional response in trout liver from high elevation lakes of Washington.

    PubMed

    Moran, Patrick W; Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Black, Robert W; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2007-09-15

    The consistent cold temperatures and large amount of precipitation in the Olympic and Cascade ranges of Washington State are thought to enhance atmospheric deposition of contaminants. However, little is known about contaminant levels in organisms residing in these remote high elevation lakes. We measured total mercury and 28 organochlorine compounds in trout collected from 14 remote lakes in the Olympic, Mt. Rainer, and North Cascades National Parks. Mercury was detected in trout from all lakes sampled (15 to 262 microg/kg ww), while two organochlorines, total polychlorinated biphenyls (tPCB) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), were also detected in these fish tissues (<25 microg/kg ww). In sediments, organochlorine levels were below detection, while median total and methyl mercury were 30.4 and 0.34 microg/kg dry weight (ww), respectively. Using fish from two lakes, representing different contaminant loading levels (Wilcox lake: high; Skymo lake: low), we examined transcriptional response in the liver using a custom-made low-density targeted rainbow trout cDNA microarray. We detected significant differences in liver transcriptional response, including significant changes in metabolic, endocrine, and immune-related genes, in fish collected from Wilcox Lake compared to Skymo Lake. Overall, our results suggest that local urban areas contribute to the observed contaminant patterns in these high elevation lakes, while the transcriptional changes point to a biological response associated with exposure to these contaminants in fish. Specifically, the gene expression pattern leads us to hypothesize a role for mercury in disrupting the metabolic and reproductive pathways in fish from high elevation lakes in western Washington. PMID:17948813

  7. Tissue viability imaging: microvascular response to vasoactive drugs induced by iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Henricson, Joakim; Nilsson, Anders; Tesselaar, Erik; Nilsson, Gert; Sjöberg, Folke

    2009-09-01

    When one is studying the physiology of the cutaneous microcirculation there is a need for relevant non-invasive and versatile techniques. In this study we used a new optical device, the tissue viability imager (TiVi), to map changes in cutaneous microvascular concentrations of red blood cells during iontophoresis of vasoactive substances (noradrenaline (NA) and phenylephrine (Phe) for vasoconstriction and acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) for vasodilatation). We aimed to present data both individually and pooled, using a four-variable logistic dose response model that is commonly used in similar in vitro vascular studies. The accuracy of the TiVi was also investigated by calculating the coefficient of variation and comparing it with similar tests previously done using laser Doppler imaging. Tests were also performed using the TiVi and LDPI simultaneously to further compare the two methods. Results showed that the TiVi is capable of quantifying vascular responses to iontophorised noradrenaline and phenylephrine without the need to increase background flow first. Fitting the TiVi data to the dose response model resulted in ED(50)-values with narrow confidence intervals and acceptable r(2) values. Mean ED(50)-values for the TiVi did not differ significantly from similar values obtained using laser Doppler. Results further seem to suggest that when the blood perfusion increases during vasodilatation in skin the initial phase relies mainly on an increase in red blood cell concentration whereas the further perfusion increase is due to an increase in red blood cell velocity. PMID:19409397

  8. Rat subcutaneous tissue response to calcium silicate containing different arsenic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    MINOTTI, Paloma Gagliardi; ORDINOLA-ZAPATA, Ronald; MIDENA, Raquel Zanin; MARCIANO, Marina Angélica; CAVENAGO, Bruno Cavalini; BRAMANTE, Clovis Monteiro; GARCIA, Roberto Brandão; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Hungaro; de MORAES, Ivaldo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the response of rat subcutaneous tissue in implanted polyethylene tubes that were filled with GMTA Angelus and Portland cements containing different arsenic concentrations. Material and Methods Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was utilized to obtain the values of the arsenic concentration in the materials. Thirty-six rats were divided into 3 groups of 12 animals for each experimental period. Each animal received two implants of polyethylene tubes filled with different test cements and the lateral of the tubes was used as a control group. After 15, 30 and 60 days of implantation, the animals were killed and the specimens were prepared for descriptive and morphometric analysis considering: inflammatory cells, collagen fibers, fibroblasts, blood vessels and other components. The results were analyzed utilizing the Kuskal-Wallis test and the Dunn´s Multiple test for comparison (p<0.05). Results The materials showed, according to atomic absorption spectrophotometry, the following doses of arsenic: GMTA Angelus: 5.01 mg/kg, WPC Irajazinho: 0.69 mg/kg, GPC Minetti: 18.46 mg/kg and GPC Votoran: 10.76 mg/kg. In a 60-day periods, all specimens displayed a neoformation of connective tissue with a structure of fibrocellular aspect (capsule). Control groups and MTA Angelus produced the lower amount of inflammatory reaction and GPC Minetti, the highest reaction. Conclusions There was no direct relationship between the concentration of arsenic present in the composition of the materials and the intensity of the inflammatory reactions. Higher values, as 18.46 mg/kg of arsenic in the cement, produce characteristics of severe inflammation reaction at the 60-day period. The best results were found in MTA angelus. PMID:25075671

  9. In vivo corrosion behaviour of magnesium alloy in association with surrounding tissue response in rats.

    PubMed

    Miura, Chieko; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Imai, Yoshimichi; Mukai, Toshiji; Yamamoto, Akiko; Sano, Yuya; Ikeo, Naoko; Isozaki, Shuji; Takahashi, Toru; Oikawa, Miho; Kumamoto, Hiroyuki; Tachi, Masahiro

    2016-04-01

    Biodegradable magnesium (Mg) alloys are the most promising candidates for osteosynthesis devices. However, their in vivo corrosion behaviour has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of the physiological environment surrounding Mg alloys on their corrosion behaviour. A Mg-1.0Al alloy with a fine-grained structure was formed into plates using titanium (Ti) as a control. These plates were implanted into the subperiosteum in the head, subcutaneous tissue of the back, and in the muscle of the femur of rats for 1, 2 and 4 weeks. The volumes of the remaining Mg alloy and of the insoluble salt deposition and gas cavities around the Mg alloy were determined by microtomography, and the volume losses were calculated. Then, the tissue response around the plates in each implantation site was examined histopathologically, and its relation to the respective volume loss was analyzed. These analyses determined that the Mg alloy was corroded fastest in the head, at an intermediate level in the back, and slowest in the femur. The insoluble salt deposition at the Mg alloy surface had no influence on the volume loss. Gas cavities formed around the Mg alloy at all implantation sites and decreased after 4 weeks. Histopathological examination revealed that the Mg alloy exhibited good biocompatibility, as was seen with Ti. In addition, vascularized fibrous capsules formed around the plates and became mature with time. Notably, the volume loss in the different anatomical locations correlated with capsule thickness. Together, our results suggest that, to facilitate the successful clinical application of Mg alloys, it will be necessary to further comprehend their interactions with specific in vivo environments. PMID:26947358

  10. Of flies, mice, and men: evolutionarily conserved tissue damage responses and aging.

    PubMed

    Neves, Joana; Demaria, Marco; Campisi, Judith; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-01-12

    Studies in flies, mice, and human models have provided a conceptual framework for how paracrine interactions between damaged cells and the surrounding tissue control tissue repair. These studies have amassed evidence for an evolutionarily conserved secretory program that regulates tissue homeostasis. This program coordinates cell survival and proliferation during tissue regeneration and repair in young animals. By virtue of chronic engagement, however, it also contributes to the age-related decline of tissue homeostasis leading to degeneration, metabolic dysfunction, and cancer. Here, we review recent studies that shed light on the nature and regulation of this evolutionarily conserved secretory program. PMID:25584795

  11. Of flies, mice and men: Evolutionarily conserved tissue damage responses and aging

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Joana; Demaria, Marco; Campisi, Judith; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Studies in flies, mice, and human models have provided a conceptual framework for how paracrine interactions between damaged cells and the surrounding tissue control tissue repair. These studies have amassed evidence for an evolutionarily conserved secretory program that regulates tissue homeostasis. This program coordinates cell survival and proliferation during tissue regeneration and repair in young animals. By virtue of chronic engagement, however, it also contributes to the age-related decline of tissue homeostasis leading to degeneration, metabolic dysfunction and cancer. Here we review recent studies that shed light on the nature and regulation of this evolutionary conserved secretory program. PMID:25584795

  12. Characterization and response of antioxidant systems in the tissues of the freshwater pond snail (Lymnaea stagnalis) during acute copper exposure.

    PubMed

    Atli, Gülüzar; Grosell, Martin

    2016-07-01

    The response of enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; glutathione peroxidase, GPX and glutathione reductase, GR) and non-enzymatic responses (glutathione, GSH, oxidized glutathione, GSSG and GSH/GSSG) against acute Cu toxicity (2-90μg/mL for 48h) in different tissues of Lymnaea stagnalis were measured. Incubation conditions for enzymatic activity measurements were optimized for L. stagnalis tissues. Three examined tissues, the hepatopancreas, the foot muscle and the mantle, exhibited variable responses in antioxidant parameters as a function of Cu concentrations. The most responsive antioxidant enzymes were GPX and CAT while GR appeared less sensitive. In general antioxidant enzymes at higher Cu concentrations though GSH levels at lower Cu concentrations exhibited the greatest changes in hepatopancreas and foot muscle, respectively. All antioxidant enzymes except GR increased after exposure to the highest Cu concentration in mantle. Total and reduced GSH increased in hepatopancreas but decreased with GSH/GSSG ratios at all Cu concentrations in foot muscle. The present results show that antioxidants respond to acute Cu exposure at concentrations as low as 2μg Cu/L in adult L. stagnalis with variable responses in different tissues. Antioxidants both including enzymatic and non-enzymatic parameters may account, in part, for the high tolerance to acute metal exposure observed in adult L. stagnalis and could form suited biomarkers to evaluate the metal exposure and toxicity in aquatic environment even at relatively low level short term exposure. PMID:27108202

  13. Designing PolyHEMA Substrates that Mimic the Viscoelastic Response of Soft Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Brian; Tripathi, Anubhav; Morgan, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    Matching the mechanical properties of a biomaterial to soft tissue is often overlooked despite the fact that it’s well known that cells respond to and are capable of changing their mechanical environment. In this paper, we used NaCl and alginate beads as porogens to make a series of micro- and macro-porous pHEMA substrates [poly(2-hydroxyethly methacrylate)] and quantified their mechanical behavior under low-magnitude shear loads over physiologically relevant frequencies. Using a stress-controlled rheometer, we performed isothermal (37°C) frequency response experiments between 0.628 and 75.4 rad/s [0.01–12Hz] at 0.1% strain. Both micro- and macro-porous pHEMA substrates were predominately elastic in nature with a narrow range of G′ and G″ values that mimicked the response of human skin. The magnitude of the G′ and G″ values of the macro-porous substrates were designed to closely match human skin. To determine how cell growth might alter their mechanical properties, pHEMA substrates were functionalized and human skin fibroblasts grown on them for fourteen days. As a result of cell growth, the magnitude of G′ and G″ increased at low frequencies while also altering the degree of high frequency dependence, indicating that cellular interactions with the micro-pore infrastructure has a profound effect on the viscoelastic behavior of the substrates. These data could be fit to a mathematical model describing a soft solid. A quantitative understanding of the mechanical behavior of biomaterials in regimes that are physiologically relevant and how these mechanics may change after implantation may aid in the design of new materials. PMID:21496821

  14. Adverse cutaneous drug eruptions: current understanding.

    PubMed

    Hoetzenecker, W; Nägeli, M; Mehra, E T; Jensen, A N; Saulite, I; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Guenova, E; Cozzio, A; French, L E

    2016-01-01

    Adverse cutaneous drug reactions are recognized as being major health problems worldwide causing considerable costs for health care systems. Most adverse cutaneous drug reactions follow a benign course; however, up to 2% of all adverse cutaneous drug eruptions are severe and life-threatening. These include acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Physicians should be aware of specific red flags to rapidly identify these severe cutaneous drug eruptions and initiate appropriate treatment. Besides significant progress in clinical classification and treatment, recent studies have greatly enhanced our understanding in the pathophysiology of adverse cutaneous drug reactions. Genetic susceptibilities to certain drugs have been identified in SJS/TEN patients, viral reactivation in DRESS has been elucidated, and the discovery of tissue resident memory T cells helps to better understand the recurrent site-specific inflammation in patients with fixed drug eruption. PMID:26553194

  15. The response of the rabbit subsynovial connective tissue to a stress-relaxation test.

    PubMed

    Morizaki, Yutaka; Vanhees, Matthias; Thoreson, Andrew R; Larson, Dirk; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2012-03-01

    The subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) in the carpal tunnel may play a role in the etiology of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), yet the material properties of the SSCT remain unclear. Thus, we investigated the mechanical response of the SSCT in a rabbit model. Twenty-four rabbit cadaver paws were used for mechanical testing; two paws were used for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging. After testing normal tendon excursion, the divided third digit flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon was pulled to displacements of 2, 3.5, 5, or 8 mm, maintained at that position until force decay, and then the process was repeated. Normal excursion of the FDS averaged 4.8 mm. The ratio of the second peak force to the first peak force in the 2 mm group was 0.98 (SD = 0.16), which was significantly higher than the other groups (3.5 mm: 0.74, 5 mm, 0.63, and 8 mm: 0.59; p < 0.05). SEM showed ruptured fibrils in the displaced specimen. The declining force ratio with displacements >2 mm suggests damage to the SSCT within the physiological tendon excursion. These data may be useful in understanding SSCT mechanics in CTS, which is associated with SSCT fibrosis. PMID:21898581

  16. Accuracy and reproducibility of bending stiffness measurements by mechanical response tissue analysis in artificial human ulnas.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Patricia A; Ellerbrock, Emily R; Bowman, Lyn; Loucks, Anne B

    2014-11-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by reduced bone strength, but no FDA-approved medical device measures bone strength. Bone strength is strongly associated with bone stiffness, but no FDA-approved medical device measures bone stiffness either. Mechanical Response Tissue Analysis (MRTA) is a non-significant risk, non-invasive, radiation-free, vibration analysis technique for making immediate, direct functional measurements of the bending stiffness of long bones in humans in vivo. MRTA has been used for research purposes for more than 20 years, but little has been published about its accuracy. To begin to investigate its accuracy, we compared MRTA measurements of bending stiffness in 39 artificial human ulna bones to measurements made by Quasistatic Mechanical Testing (QMT). In the process, we also quantified the reproducibility (i.e., precision and repeatability) of both methods. MRTA precision (1.0±1.0%) and repeatability (3.1 ± 3.1%) were not as high as those of QMT (0.2 ± 0.2% and 1.3+1.7%, respectively; both p<10(-4)). The relationship between MRTA and QMT measurements of ulna bending stiffness was indistinguishable from the identity line (p=0.44) and paired measurements by the two methods agreed within a 95% confidence interval of ± 5%. If such accuracy can be achieved on real human ulnas in situ, and if the ulna is representative of the appendicular skeleton, MRTA may prove clinically useful. PMID:25261885

  17. Radiation microbeams as spatial and temporal probes of subcellular and tissue response

    PubMed Central

    Schettino, Giuseppe; Al-Rashid, Shahnaz T.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the effects of ionising radiations are key to determining their optimal use in therapy and assessing risks from exposure. The development of microbeams where radiations can be delivered in a highly temporal and spatially constrained manner has been a major advance. Several different types of radiation microbeams have been developed using X-rays, charged particles and electrons. For charged particles, beams can be targeted with sub-micron accuracy into biological samples and the lowest possible dose of a single particle track can be delivered with high reproducibility. Microbeams have provided powerful tools for understanding the kinetics of DNA damage and formation under conditions of physiological relevance and have significant advantages over other approaches for producing localised DNA damage, such as variable wavelength laser beam approaches. Recent studies have extended their use to probing for radiosensitive sites outside the cell nucleus, and testing for mechanisms underpinning bystander responses where irradiated and non-irradiated cells communicate with each other. Ongoing developments include the ability to locally target regions of 3-D tissue models and ultimately to target localised regions in vivo. With future advances in radiation delivery and imaging microbeams will continue to be applied in a range of biological studies. PMID:20079877

  18. Degenerative Tissue Responses to Space-like Radiation Doses in a Rodent Model of Simulated Microgravity.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Parimal; Akel, Nisreen; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Gaddy, Dana; Griffin, Robert J; Yadlapalli, Jai Shankar K; Dobretsov, Maxim

    2016-03-01

    This study examines acute and degenerative tissue responses to space-like radiation doses in a rodent model of simulated microgravity. We have studied four groups of rats, control (CON), irradiated (IR), irradiated and hindlimb suspended (IR-HLS), and suspended (HLS) that were maintained for two weeks. IR and IR+HLS groups were exposed to five sessions of X-ray irradiation (1.2 Gy each, at 3-4 days intervals). Body weights, soleus muscle weights, and hindlimb bone mineral density (BMD) were measured. Results show that compared to CON animals, IR, HLS, and IR+HLS group reduced the body weight gain significantly. IR-associated growth retardation appeared to be closely linked to acute and transient post-IR 'anorexia' (a decrease in food intake). HLS but not IR induced major changes in the musculoskeletal system, consisting in decreases in soleus muscle mass and bone mineral density of distal femur and proximal tibia. Additional dosimetric studies showed that the effect of IR on weight is detectable at 0.3 Gy X-ray doses, while no threshold dose for the IR-produced decrease in food intake could be observed. This study suggests that space flight-associated anorexia and musculoskeletal degenerative changes may be driven by different, radiation- and microgravity-associated (respectively) mechanisms. PMID:27098627

  19. Metabolomic Response of Human Skin Tissue to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zeping; Kim, Young-Mo; Sowa, Marianne B.; Robinson, Robert J.; Gao, Xiaoli; Metz, Thomas O.; Morgan, William F.; Zhang, Qibin

    2012-05-18

    Understanding how human organs respond to ionizing radiation (IR) at a systems biology level and identifying biomarkers for IR exposure at low doses can help provide a scientific basis for establishing radiation protection standards. Little is known regarding the physiological responses to low dose IR at the metabolite level, which represents the end-point of biochemical processes inside cells. Using a full thickness human skin tissue model and GC-MS-based metabolomics analysis, we examined the metabolic perturbations at three time points (3, 24 and 48 hr) after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. PLS-DA score plots revealed dose- and time-dependent clustering between sham and irradiated groups. Importantly, a comparable number of metabolites were detected to have significant change 48 hr after exposure to 3 and 10 cGy of irradiation, when compared with the high dose of 200 cGy. Biochemical pathway analysis showed perturbations to DNA/RNA damage and repair, lipid and energy metabolisms, even at low doses of IR.

  20. General adverse response to cyclophosphamide in Chinese patients with systemic autoimmune diseases in recent decade—a single-center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Dai, Guowei; Zhang, Zhuoli

    2015-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the adverse reaction to cyclophosphamide (CYC) in Chinese patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. Patients with systemic autoimmune diseases who were exposed to CYC and followed up regularly for at least 2 years in Rheumatology Department during June 2003 to June 2013 were enrolled into this study. Participants were divided into per oral (PO) group and intravenous (IV) group. The adverse effects to CYC were recorded and analyzed. A total of 419 patients were enrolled in this study. The occurrence rates of gastrointestinal discomfort, alopecia, myelosuppression, secondary infection, abnormal liver function, dizziness/headache, menstrual disturbance and reversal to normal menstruation after discontinuation of CYC were 21.5%, 12.4%, 7.4 %, 3.6%, 3.1%, 3.1%, 30.3% and 31.0%, respectively. None of the patients had hemorrhagic cystitis. The significant risk factors for gastrointestinal discomfort were female, exposure to CYC for a long time and intravenous route. Risk factors for mylosuppression were female and combination with other immunosuppressants. Risk factors were female gender for alopecia and older age for menstrual disturbance. Female patients were much more likely to have gastrointestinal discomfort, mylosuppression and alopecia when CYC was administrated intravenously. Risk factors were older age for menstrual disturbance and the combination with other immunosuppressants for myelosuppression. Hemorrhagic cystitis did not appear in our series for the possible reason of prophylactic hydration before intravenous injection and maybe racial difference. PMID:25053381

  1. Bioprinted 3D Primary Liver Tissues Allow Assessment of Organ-Level Response to Clinical Drug Induced Toxicity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Juergen; Robbins, Justin B.; Crogan-Grundy, Candace; Presnell, Sharon C.; Singer, Thomas; Roth, Adrian B.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling clinically relevant tissue responses using cell models poses a significant challenge for drug development, in particular for drug induced liver injury (DILI). This is mainly because existing liver models lack longevity and tissue-level complexity which limits their utility in predictive toxicology. In this study, we established and characterized novel bioprinted human liver tissue mimetics comprised of patient-derived hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells in a defined architecture. Scaffold-free assembly of different cell types in an in vivo-relevant architecture allowed for histologic analysis that revealed distinct intercellular hepatocyte junctions, CD31+ endothelial networks, and desmin positive, smooth muscle actin negative quiescent stellates. Unlike what was seen in 2D hepatocyte cultures, the tissues maintained levels of ATP, Albumin as well as expression and drug-induced enzyme activity of Cytochrome P450s over 4 weeks in culture. To assess the ability of the 3D liver cultures to model tissue-level DILI, dose responses of Trovafloxacin, a drug whose hepatotoxic potential could not be assessed by standard pre-clinical models, were compared to the structurally related non-toxic drug Levofloxacin. Trovafloxacin induced significant, dose-dependent toxicity at clinically relevant doses (≤ 4uM). Interestingly, Trovafloxacin toxicity was observed without lipopolysaccharide stimulation and in the absence of resident macrophages in contrast to earlier reports. Together, these results demonstrate that 3D bioprinted liver tissues can both effectively model DILI and distinguish between highly related compounds with differential profile. Thus, the combination of patient-derived primary cells with bioprinting technology here for the first time demonstrates superior performance in terms of mimicking human drug response in a known target organ at the tissue level. PMID:27387377

  2. Proteome changes in banana fruit peel tissue in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lina; Song, Jun; Forney, Charles; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Fillmore, Sherry; Zhang, ZhaoQi

    2016-01-01

    Banana (Musa AAA group) is one of the most consumed fruits in the world due to its flavor and nutritional value. As a typical climacteric fruit, banana responds to ethylene treatment, which induces rapid changes of color, flavor (aroma and taste), sweetness and nutritional composition. It has also been reported that ripening bananas at temperatures above 24 °C inhibits chlorophyll breakdown and color formation but increases the rate of senescence. To gain fundamental knowledge about the effects of high temperature and ethylene on banana ripening, a quantitative proteomic study employing multiplex peptide stable isotope dimethyl labeling was conducted. In this study, green (immature) untreated banana fruit were subjected to treatment with 10 μL L−1 of ethylene for 24 h. After ethylene treatment, treated and untreated fruit were stored at 20 or 30 °C for 24 h. Fruit peel tissues were then sampled after 0 and 1 day of storage, and peel color and chlorophyll fluorescence were evaluated. Quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on the fruit peels after 1 day of storage. In total, 413 common proteins were identified and quantified from two biological replicates. Among these proteins, 91 changed significantly in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments. Cluster analysis on these 91 proteins identified 7 groups of changed proteins. Ethylene treatment and storage at 20 °C induced 40 proteins that are correlated with pathogen resistance, cell wall metabolism, ethylene biosynthesis, allergens and ribosomal proteins, and it repressed 36 proteins that are associated with fatty acid and lipid metabolism, redox–oxidative responses, and protein biosynthesis and modification. Ethylene treatment and storage at 30 °C induced 32 proteins, which were mainly similar to those in group 1 but also included 8 proteins in group 3 (identified as chitinase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 1, cysteine synthase, villin-2, leucine-transfer RNA ligase, CP47

  3. Proteome changes in banana fruit peel tissue in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments.

    PubMed

    Du, Lina; Song, Jun; Forney, Charles; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Fillmore, Sherry; Zhang, ZhaoQi

    2016-01-01

    Banana (Musa AAA group) is one of the most consumed fruits in the world due to its flavor and nutritional value. As a typical climacteric fruit, banana responds to ethylene treatment, which induces rapid changes of color, flavor (aroma and taste), sweetness and nutritional composition. It has also been reported that ripening bananas at temperatures above 24 °C inhibits chlorophyll breakdown and color formation but increases the rate of senescence. To gain fundamental knowledge about the effects of high temperature and ethylene on banana ripening, a quantitative proteomic study employing multiplex peptide stable isotope dimethyl labeling was conducted. In this study, green (immature) untreated banana fruit were subjected to treatment with 10 μL L(-1) of ethylene for 24 h. After ethylene treatment, treated and untreated fruit were stored at 20 or 30 °C for 24 h. Fruit peel tissues were then sampled after 0 and 1 day of storage, and peel color and chlorophyll fluorescence were evaluated. Quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on the fruit peels after 1 day of storage. In total, 413 common proteins were identified and quantified from two biological replicates. Among these proteins, 91 changed significantly in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments. Cluster analysis on these 91 proteins identified 7 groups of changed proteins. Ethylene treatment and storage at 20 °C induced 40 proteins that are correlated with pathogen resistance, cell wall metabolism, ethylene biosynthesis, allergens and ribosomal proteins, and it repressed 36 proteins that are associated with fatty acid and lipid metabolism, redox-oxidative responses, and protein biosynthesis and modification. Ethylene treatment and storage at 30 °C induced 32 proteins, which were mainly similar to those in group 1 but also included 8 proteins in group 3 (identified as chitinase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 1, cysteine synthase, villin-2, leucine-transfer RNA ligase, CP47

  4. Connective tissue responses to some heavy metals. II. Lead: histology and ultrastructure.

    PubMed Central

    Ellender, G.; Ham, K. N.

    1987-01-01

    Lead loaded ion exchange resin beads implanted into the loose connective tissue of the rat pinna induced local lesions which differed widely from those of the control (sodium loaded) beads (Ellender & Ham 1987). These lesions were characterized by changes in the granulation tissue and the approximating connective tissue. Granulation tissue contained mononuclear phagocytes in various guises, and some cells with intranuclear inclusion bodies. The matrix of the granulation tissue contained collagen fibrils having a wide range of diameters suggestive of altered collagen biosynthesis. Foci of collagen mineralization occurred in zones of combined trauma and lead impregnation. Once mineralized they became enveloped by giant cells and epithelioid cells. Lead in damaged tissues is thought to modify the protective mechanism of calcification inhibition and the biosynthesis of the matrix. Images Fig. 6 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 PMID:3040063

  5. Characterization of effector mechanisms at the host: parasite interface during the immune response to tissue-dwelling intestinal nematode parasites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The protective immune response that develops following infection with many tissue dwelling intestinal nematode parasites is characterized by elevations in IL-4 and IL-13 and increased numbers of CD4+ T cells, granulocytes, and macrophages. These cells accumulate at the site of infection, and in many...

  6. Effect of insertion speed on tissue response and insertion mechanics of a chronically implanted silicon-based neural probe.

    PubMed

    Welkenhuysen, M; Andrei, A; Ameye, L; Eberle, W; Nuttin, B

    2011-11-01

    In this study, the effect of insertion speed on long-term tissue response and insertion mechanics was investigated. A dummy silicon parylene-coated probe was used in this context and implanted in the rat brain at 10 μm/s (n = 6) or 100 μm/s (n = 6) to a depth of 9 mm. The insertion mechanics were assessed by the dimpling distance, and the force at the point of penetration, at the end of the insertion phase, and after a 3-min rest period in the brain. After 6 weeks, the tissue response was evaluated by estimating the amount of gliosis, inflammation, and neuronal cell loss with immunohistochemistry. No difference in dimpling, penetration force, or the force after a 3-min rest period in the brain was observed. However, the force at the end of the insertion phase was significantly higher when inserting the probes at 100 μm/s compared to 10 μm/s. Furthermore, an expected tissue response was seen with an increase of glial and microglial reactivity around the probe. This reaction was similar along the entire length of the probe. However, evidence for a neuronal kill zone was observed only in the most superficial part of the implant. In this region, the lesion size was also greatest. Comparison of the tissue response between insertion speeds showed no differences. PMID:21896383

  7. Clinical response and mortality in tigecycline complicated intra-abdominal infection and complicated skin and soft-tissue infection trials.

    PubMed

    Bassetti, Matteo; McGovern, Paul C; Wenisch, Christoph; Meyer, R Daniel; Yan, Jean Li; Wible, Michele; Rottinghaus, Scott T; Quintana, Alvaro

    2015-09-01

    An imbalance in all-cause mortality was noted in tigecycline phase 3 and 4 comparative clinical trials across all studied indications. We investigated clinical failure and mortality in phase 3 and 4 complicated skin and soft-tissue infection (cSSTI) and complicated intra-abdominal infection (cIAI) tigecycline trials using descriptive analyses of a blinded adjudication of mortality and multivariate regression analyses. Attributable mortality analyses of cSSTI revealed death due to infection in 0.1% of each treatment group (P=1.000). In cIAI, there were no significant differences between tigecycline (1.2%) and comparator (0.7%) subjects who died due to infection (P=0.243). For cIAI clinical failure, treatment interaction with organ dysfunction was observed with no difference observed between clinical cure for tigecycline (85.4%) and comparator (76.7%) treatment groups (odds ratio=0.58, 95% confidence interval 0.28-1.19). Tigecycline-treated subjects had more adverse events of secondary pneumonias (2.1% vs. 1.2%) and more adverse events of secondary pneumonias with an outcome of death (0.5% vs. 0.1%). These analyses do not suggest that tigecycline is a factor either for failure (cSSTI and cIAI studies) or for death (cIAI studies). PMID:26155003

  8. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  9. The biocontrol endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 induces systemic defense responses in aerial tissues upon colonization of olive roots

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Lama Cabanás, Carmen; Schilirò, Elisabetta; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, a native olive root endophyte and effective biocontrol agent (BCA) against Verticillium wilt of olive, is able to trigger a broad range of defense responses in root tissues of this woody plant. In order to elucidate whether strain PICF7 also induces systemic defense responses in above-ground organs, aerial tissues of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after root bacterization with this endophytic BCA. A suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library, enriched in up-regulated genes, was generated. This strategy enabled the identification of 376 ESTs (99 contigs and 277 singlets), many of them related to response to different stresses. Five ESTs, involved in defense responses, were selected to carry out time-course quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments aiming to: (1) validate the induction of these genes, and (2) shed light on their expression pattern along time (from 1 to 15 days). Induction of olive genes potentially coding for lipoxygenase 2, catalase, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase, and phenylananine ammonia-lyase was thus confirmed at some time points. Computational analysis also revealed that different transcription factors were up-regulated in olive aerial tissues (i.e., JERF, bHLH, WRKY), as previously reported for roots. Results confirmed that root colonization by this endophytic bacterium does not only trigger defense responses in this organ but also mounts a wide array of systemic defense responses in distant tissues (stems, leaves). This sheds light on how olive plants respond to the “non-hostile” colonization by a bacterial endophyte and how induced defense response can contribute to the biocontrol activity of strain PICF7. PMID:25250017

  10. Induction of Non-Targeted Stress Responses in Mammary Tissues by Heavy Ions

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yunfei; Lam, Roy K. K.; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Uchihori, Yukio; Yu, Peter K. N.; Hei, Tom K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Side effects related to radiation exposures are based primarily on the assumption that the detrimental effects of radiation occur in directly irradiated cells. However, several studies have reported over the years of radiation-induced non-targeted/ abscopal effects in vivo that challenge this paradigm. There is evidence that Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) plays an important role in modulating non-targeted effects, including DNA damages in vitro and mutagenesis in vivo. While most reports on radiation-induced non-targeted response utilize x-rays, there is little information available for heavy ions. Methods and Materials Adult female transgenic gpt delta mice were exposed to an equitoxic dose of either carbon or argon particles using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan. The mice were stratified into 4 groups of 5 animals each: Control; animals irradiated under full shielding (Sham-irradiated); animals receiving whole body irradiation (WBIR); and animals receiving partial body irradiation (PBIR) to the lower abdomen with a 1 x 1 cm2 field. The doses used in the carbon ion group (4.5 Gy) and in argon particle group (1.5 Gy) have a relative biological effectiveness equivalent to a 5 Gy dose of x-rays. 24 hours after irradiation, breast tissues in and out of the irradiated field were harvested for analysis. Induction of COX2, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX), and apoptosis-related cysteine protease-3 (Caspase-3) antibodies were examined in the four categories of breast tissues using immunohistochemical techniques. Analysis was performed by measuring the intensity of more than 20 individual microscopic fields and comparing the relative fold difference. Results In the carbon ion group, the relative fold increase in COX2 expression was 1.01 in sham-irradiated group (p > 0.05), 3.07 in PBIR (p < 0.05) and 2.50 in WBIR (p < 0.05), respectively, when

  11. Oestrogens Downregulate Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor through Oestrogen Response Elements in the 5'-Flanking Region.

    PubMed

    Ali, Huda Omar; Stavik, Benedicte; Myklebust, Christiane Filion; Andersen, Elisabeth; Dahm, Anders E A; Iversen, Nina; Sandset, Per Morten; Skretting, Grethe

    2016-01-01

    Oestrogens influence the pathology and development of hormone-sensitive breast cancers. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) has been shown to be associated with breast cancer pathogenesis. Recently, we found TFPI mRNA levels to be significantly reduced by oestrogens in a breast cancer cell line (MCF7), a process mediated through the oestrogen receptor alpha (ERα). The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism(s) by which oestrogens may regulate TFPI at the transcriptional level. The TFPI 5'-flanking region contains three oestrogen response element (ERE) half-sites at positions -845, -769 and -50. Constructs containing the wild type or mutated ERE half-sites of the TFPI 5'-flanking region were generated in a luciferase reporter gene vector and transiently co-transfected with an ERα expression vector into HEK293 cells and subsequently treated with oestrogens. We found that luciferase activity was significantly downregulated after oestrogen stimulation in cells transfected with the wild type construct, an effect that was abolished by mutating either ERE half-sites. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay suggested direct and specific interaction of ERα with the ERE half-sites in the TFPI 5'-flanking region. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that ERα was recruited to the region -899 to -578 of the TFPI 5'-flanking region in vivo, where the ERE half-sites -845 and -769 are located. Our results indicate that ERα can interact with all three ERE half-sites in the TFPI 5'-flanking region and thus participate in the repression of oestrogen mediated TFPI transcription in breast cancer cells. PMID:26999742

  12. Role of elasticity on the Rheological Response of the Uterus Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi Khorasani, Nariman; Piroozram, Parastoo

    2015-11-01

    N. Khorasani and P. piroozram Department of Mechanical Engineering, Payame Noor University, 19395-3697, Tehran, Iran, The effect of uterus tissue viscoelasticity on its internal pressure is explored. The tissue of the uterus is presented by a linear viscoelastic model with two major time constants. A proper user defined function is developed and incorporated in the simulation software, to represent the model. The geometry of the uterus is separately modeled. It is found that viscoelasticity of the tissue which can be controlled and altered by change the concentration can directly affect its internal pressure. It is also observed that the pressure decreases as the moisture of the tissue is increased. The study is repeated for several practical conditions and parameters pertaining to the viscoelasticity of the tissue are evaluated.

  13. Emission of Hydrogen Sulfide by Leaf Tissue in Response to l-Cysteine 1

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Jiro; Schmidt, Ahlert; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Filner, Philip

    1982-01-01

    Leaf discs and detached leaves exposed to l-cysteine emitted a volatile sulfur compound which was proven by gas chromatography to be H2S. This phenomenon was demonstrated in all nine species tested (Cucumis sativus, Cucurbita pepo, Nicotiana tabacum, Coleus blumei, Beta vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris, Medicago sativa, Hordeum vulgare, and Gossypium hirsutum). The emission of volatile sulfur by cucumber leaves occurred in the dark at a similar rate to that in the light. The emission of leaf discs reached the maximal rate, more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, 2 to 4 hours after starting exposure to l-cysteine; then it decreased. In the case of detached leaves, the maximum occurred 5 to 10 h after starting exposure. The average emission rate of H2S during the first 4 hours from leaf discs of cucurbits in response to 10 millimolar l-cysteine, was usually more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, i.e. 0.24 micromoles per hour per square decimeter. Leaf discs exposed to 1 millimolar l-cysteine emitted only 2% as much as did the discs exposed to 10 millimolar l-cysteine. The emission from leaf discs and from detached leaves lasted for at least 5 and 15 hours, respectively. However, several hours after the maximal emission, injury of the leaves, manifested as chlorosis, was evident. H2S emission was a specific consequence of exposure to l-cysteine; neither d-cysteine nor l-cystine elicited H2S emission. Aminooxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate dependent enzymes, inhibited the emission. In a cell free system from cucumber leaves, H2S formation and its release occurred in response to l-cysteine. Feeding experiments with [35S]l-cysteine showed that most of the sulfur in H2S was derived from sulfur in the l-cysteine supplied and that the H2S emitted for 9 hours accounted for 7 to 10% of l-cysteine taken up. 35S-labeled SO32− and SO42− were found in the tissue extract in addition to internal soluble S2−. These findings

  14. Mechanistic and quantitative studies of bystander response in 3D tissues for low-dose radiation risk estimations

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, Sally A.

    2013-06-12

    We have used the MatTek 3-dimensional human skin model to study the gene expression response of a 3D model to low and high dose low LET radiation, and to study the radiation bystander effect as a function of distance from the site of irradiation with either alpha particles or low LET protons. We have found response pathways that appear to be specific for low dose exposures, that could not have been predicted from high dose studies. We also report the time and distance dependent expression of a large number of genes in bystander tissue. the bystander response in 3D tissues showed many similarities to that described previously in 2D cultured cells, but also showed some differences.

  15. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  16. Reduced tonicity stimulates an inflammatory response in nucleus pulposus tissue that can be limited by a COX-2-specific inhibitor.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Bart; Potier, Esther; van DIjk, Maarten; Langelaan, Marloes; Papen-Botterhuis, Nicole; Ito, Keita

    2015-11-01

    In intervertebral disc herniation with nucleus pulposus (NP) extrusion, the elicited inflammatory response is considered a key pain mechanism. However, inflammatory cytokines are reported in extruded herniated tissue, even before monocyte infiltration, suggesting that the tissue itself initiates the inflammation. Since herniated tissue swells, we investigated whether this simple mechanobiological stimulus alone could provoke an inflammatory response that could cause pain. Furthermore, we investigated whether sustained-release cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) inhibitor would be beneficial in such conditions. Healthy bovine NP explants were allowed to swell freely or confined. The swelling explants were treated with Celecoxib, applied either as a bolus or in sustained-release. Swelling explants produced elevated levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) for 28 days, while confined explants did not. Both a high concentration bolus and 10 times lower concentration in sustained release completely inhibited PGE2 production, but did not affect IL-6 production. Swelling of NP tissue, without the inflammatory system response, can trigger cytokine production and Celecoxib, even in bolus form, may be useful for pain control in extruded disc herniation. PMID:25991050

  17. Insulin response in individual tissues of control and gold thioglucose-obese mice in vivo with (1-/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Cooney, G.J.; Astbury, L.D.; Williams, P.F.; Caterson, I.D.

    1987-02-01

    The dose-response characteristics of several glucose-utilizing tissues (brain, heart, white adipose tissue, brown adipose tissue, and quadriceps muscle) to a single injection of insulin have been compared in control mice and mice made obese with a single injection of gold thioglucose (GTG). Tissue content of (1-/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose 6-phosphate and blood disappearance rate of (1-/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) were measured at nine different insulin doses and used to calculate rates of 2-DG uptake and phosphorylation in tissues from control and obese mice. The insulin sensitivity of tissues reflected in the ED50 of insulin response varied widely, and brown adipose tissue was the most insulin-sensitive tissue studied. In GTG-obese mice, heart, quadriceps, and brown adipose tissue were insulin resistant (demonstrated by increased ED50), whereas in white adipose tissue, 2-DG phosphorylation was more sensitive to insulin. Brain 2-DG phosphorylation was insulin independent in control and obese animals. The largest decrease in insulin sensitivity in GTG-obese mice was observed in brown adipose tissue. The loss of diet-induced thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue as a result of the hypothalamic lesion in GTG-obese mice could be a major cause of insulin resistance in brown adipose tissue. Because brown adipose tissue can make a major contribution to whole-body glucose utilization, insulin resistance in this tissue may have a significant effect on whole-animal glucose homeostasis in GTG-obese mice.

  18. Identification of immune genes and proteins involved in the response of bovine mammary tissue to Staphylococcus aureus infection

    PubMed Central

    Lutzow, Ylva C Strandberg; Donaldson, Laurelea; Gray, Christian P; Vuocolo, Tony; Pearson, Roger D; Reverter, Antonio; Byrne, Keren A; Sheehy, Paul A; Windon, Ross; Tellam, Ross L

    2008-01-01

    Background Mastitis in dairy cattle results from infection of mammary tissue by a range of micro-organisms but principally coliform bacteria and Gram positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. The former species are often acquired by environmental contamination while S. aureus is particularly problematic due to its resistance to antibiotic treatments and ability to reside within mammary tissue in a chronic, subclinical state. The transcriptional responses within bovine mammary epithelial tissue subjected to intramammary challenge with S. aureus are poorly characterised, particularly at the earliest stages of infection. Moreover, the effect of infection on the presence of bioactive innate immune proteins in milk is also unclear. The nature of these responses may determine the susceptibility of the tissue and its ability to resolve the infection. Results Transcriptional profiling was employed to measure changes in gene expression occurring in bovine mammary tissues sampled from three dairy cows after brief and graded intramammary challenges with S. aureus. These limited challenges had no significant effect on the expression pattern of the gene encoding β-casein but caused coordinated up-regulation of a number of cytokines and chemokines involved in pro-inflammatory responses. In addition, the enhanced expression of two genes, S100 calcium-binding protein A12 (S100A12) and Pentraxin-3 (PTX3) corresponded with significantly increased levels of their proteins in milk from infected udders. Both genes were shown to be expressed by mammary epithelial cells grown in culture after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. There was also a strong correlation between somatic cell count, a widely used measure of mastitis, and the level of S100A12 in milk from a herd of dairy cows. Recombinant S100A12 inhibited growth of Escherichia coli in vitro and recombinant PTX3 bound to E. coli as well as C1q, a subunit of the first component of the complement cascade. Conclusion The

  19. Epigenomic Mechanisms of Early Adversity and HPA Dysfunction: Considerations for PTSD Research.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Patrick O

    2013-01-01

    Childhood adversity can have life-long consequences for the response to stressful events later in life. Abuse or severe neglect are well-known risk factors for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), at least in part via changes in neural systems mediating the endocrine response to stress. Determining the biological signatures of risk for stress-related mental disorders such as PTSD is important for identifying homogenous subgroups and improving treatment options. This review will focus on epigenetic regulation in early life by adversity and parental care - prime mediators of offspring neurodevelopment - in order to address several questions: (1) what have studies of humans and analogous animal models taught us about molecular mechanisms underlying changes in stress-sensitive physiological systems in response to early life trauma? (2) What are the considerations for studies relating early adversity and PTSD risk, going forward? I will summarize studies in animals and humans that address the epigenetic response to early adversity in the brain and in peripheral tissues. In so doing, I will describe work on the glucocorticoid receptor and other well-characterized genes within the stress response pathway and then turn to genomic studies to illustrate the use of increasingly powerful high-throughput approaches to the study of epigenomic mechanisms. PMID:24133457

  20. Early Growth Response1and Fatty Acid Synthase Expression is Altered in Tumor Adjacent Prostate Tissue and Indicates Field Cancerization

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Anna C.; Trujillo, Kristina A.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Fleet, Trisha M.; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Severns, Virginia; Shah, Satyan K.; Davis, Michael S.; Smith, Anthony Y.; Griffith, Jeffrey K.; Fischer, Edgar G.; Bisoffi, Marco

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Field cancerization denotes the occurrence of molecular alterations in histologically normal tissues adjacent to tumors. In prostate cancer, identification of field cancerization has several potential clinical applications. However, prostate field cancerization remains ill defined. Our previous work has shown up-regulated mRNA of the transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR-1) and the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS) in tissues adjacent to prostate cancer. METHODS Immunofluorescence data were analyzed quantitatively by spectral imaging and linear unmixing to determine the protein expression levels of EGR-1 and FAS in human cancerous, histologically normal adjacent, and disease-free prostate tissues. RESULTS EGR-1 expression was elevated in both structurally intact tumor adjacent (1.6× on average) and in tumor (3.0× on average) tissues compared to disease-free tissues. In addition, the ratio of cytoplasmic versus nuclear EGR-1 expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent and tumor tissues. Similarly, FAS expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent (2.7× on average) and in tumor (2.5× on average) compared to disease-free tissues. CONCLUSIONS EGR-1 and FAS expression is similarly deregulated in tumor and structurally intact adjacent prostate tissues and defines field cancerization. In cases with high suspicion of prostate cancer but negative biopsy, identification of field cancerization could help clinicians target areas for repeat biopsy. Field cancerization at surgical margins on prostatectomy specimen should also be looked at as a predictor of cancer recurrence. EGR-1 and FAS could also serve as molecular targets for chemoprevention. PMID:22127986

  1. Systems biology of tissue-specific response to Anaplasma phagocytophilum reveals differentiated apoptosis in the tick vector Ixodes scapularis.

    PubMed

    Ayllón, Nieves; Villar, Margarita; Galindo, Ruth C; Kocan, Katherine M; Šíma, Radek; López, Juan A; Vázquez, Jesús; Alberdi, Pilar; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Kopáček, Petr; de la Fuente, José

    2015-03-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging pathogen that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Infection with this zoonotic pathogen affects cell function in both vertebrate host and the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. Global tissue-specific response and apoptosis signaling pathways were characterized in I. scapularis nymphs and adult female midguts and salivary glands infected with A. phagocytophilum using a systems biology approach combining transcriptomics and proteomics. Apoptosis was selected for pathway-focused analysis due to its role in bacterial infection of tick cells. The results showed tissue-specific differences in tick response to infection and revealed differentiated regulation of apoptosis pathways. The impact of bacterial infection was more pronounced in tick nymphs and midguts than in salivary glands, probably reflecting bacterial developmental cycle. All apoptosis pathways described in other organisms were identified in I. scapularis, except for the absence of the Perforin ortholog. Functional characterization using RNA interference showed that Porin knockdown significantly increases tick colonization by A. phagocytophilum. Infection with A. phagocytophilum produced complex tissue-specific alterations in transcript and protein levels. In tick nymphs, the results suggested a possible effect of bacterial infection on the inhibition of tick immune response. In tick midguts, the results suggested that A. phagocytophilum infection inhibited cell apoptosis to facilitate and establish infection through up-regulation of the JAK/STAT pathway. Bacterial infection inhibited the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in tick salivary glands by down-regulating Porin expression that resulted in the inhibition of Cytochrome c release as the anti-apoptotic mechanism to facilitate bacterial infection. However, tick salivary glands may promote apoptosis to limit bacterial infection through induction of the extrinsic apoptosis pathway. These dynamic changes in response to A

  2. Material Tissue Interaction-From Toxicity to Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, G; Widbiller, M; Galler, K M

    2016-01-01

    The topic of material tissue interaction has gained increasing interest over recent decades from both the dental profession and the public. The primary goal initially was to avoid adverse reactions after the application of dental materials. New laboratory test methods have been developed, and currently premarket testing programs, which attempt to guarantee a basic level of patient safety, are legally required worldwide. The dentist is responsible for selecting the correct indication as well as the proper handling of any newly emerging risk. Apart from this phenomenon-oriented "inert materials concept," the "analytical concept" focuses primarily on analyzing the reasons for adverse reactions, and identifying their associated modifying factors, in order to prevent them or to develop new and more biocompatible materials. The "concept of bioactivity" involves addressing the possibility of positively influencing tissue by materials application, such as the generation of tertiary dentin or antibacterial effects. Finally, tissue regeneration may be supported and promoted by the use of various suitable materials (matrices/scaffolds) into which stem cells can migrate or be seeded, leading to cell differentiation and the generation of new tissue. These new dental materials must also fulfill additional requirements such as controlled degradability in order to be suitable for clinical use. Clearly, the field of material tissue interaction is complex and comprises a wide range of issues. To be successful as dentists in the future, practitioners should remain informed of these important new developments and have the argumentative competence to both properly advise and treat their patients. PMID:26645359

  3. Changes in connective tissue of M. semitendinosus as a response to different growth paths in steers.

    PubMed

    Harper, G S; Allingham, P G; Le Feuvre, R P

    1999-10-01

    The effect of growth path, as opposed to advancing age, on the biophysical and biochemical properties of muscle connective tissue was investigated. Nine-month old Brahman-cross steers were grown across either an uninterrupted path, or paths that incorporated weight-loss and then weight gain on two different diets: one group was realimented on pasture, whilst the other was realimented on a grain-based diet. Biophysical attributes of connective tissue toughness (Compression and Adhesion) in the semitendinosus muscle, were significantly reduced by treatment (P<0.05): weight loss with grain realimentation being the least tough in regard to the connective tissue component. Variance within the biophysical attributes was modelled statistically. Statistically significant models included terms for the post-slaughter connective tissue content as well as tissue contents of the enzymes lactate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase. The data suggest that biochemical measurements made up to 100 days prior to slaughter, may have value as indicators of final connective tissue toughness. PMID:22063087

  4. Reproductive Hormone and Transcriptomic Responses of Pituitary Tissue in Anestrus Gilts Induced by Nutrient Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shengyu; Wang, Dingyue; Zhou, Dongsheng; Lin, Yan; Che, Lianqiang; Fang, Zhengfeng; Wu, De

    2015-01-01

    The onset of estrus is a critical sign of female sexual maturity. The pituitary plays a vital role in this process by the secretion of reproductive hormones. To investigate the effects of nutrient restriction on reproductive function and the underlying mechanisms involved, deep RNA sequencing of pituitary gland tissue was carried out to determine the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between gilts in normal estrus, and gilts in which anestrus was induced by nutrient restriction. Gilts which had gone through two estrus cycles were fed a normal (CON, 2.86kg/d, n = 10) or nutrient restricted (NR, 1kg/d, n = 10) diet. The NR gilts experienced another three estrus cycles, but did not express estrus symptoms at the anticipated 6th and 7th cycles. Body weight gain in NR gilts was significantly decreased by nutrient restriction. Gilts were considered as anestrus when blood progesterone concentrations lower than 1.0 ng/mL from three consecutive blood samples were recorded. Circulating concentrations of progesterone (< 1.0 ng/mL vs. 2.1 ng/mL) and estradiol (208.6 ng/mL vs. 371.8 ng/mL) were significantly lower in the NR gilts than in the CON gilts. Between 5,360,000 and 5,370,000 sequence reads per sample from the CON and NR gilts’ pituitaries were obtained and mapped to the porcine genome. Analysis of read counts revealed 185 DEGs. Expression of selected genes was validated by the use of quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Bioinformatic analysis identified that the genes identified were enriched in the GO terms “neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction”, “GnRH signaling pathway” and “immune response system”. Our findings provide a new perspective for understanding the nutrient restriction-induced reproductive impairment at the pituitary transcriptional level, and how this is linked to hormone secretion. Moreover, the transcriptomic changes in anestrus gilts associated with nutrient restriction could be a resource for targeted studies of genes and pathways

  5. Tissue-specific responses of oxidative stress biomarkers and antioxidant defenses in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss during a vaccination against furunculosis.

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, Halyna; Kurhaluk, Natalia; Grudniewska, Joanna; Andriichuk, Anastasiia

    2014-08-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of vaccination against furunculosis on responses of oxidative stress and antioxidant defenses in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss muscle, gills, liver, and brain tissues. The oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde and carbonyl derivatives of protein oxidative destruction levels), antioxidant defenses (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase), and total antioxidant capacity in different tissues of rainbow trout were measured. Our data showed that exposure of trout to vaccine against furunculosis produced changes (either increase or decrease) in oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes responses, and these responses showed marked organ differences, associated with tissue patterns. Our study demonstrated that vaccinated trout showed alteration in antioxidant defenses and oxidative stress responses, with higher severity in the liver, compared with other tissues. Our data also suggest that vaccination against furunculosis induced lipid peroxidation in gill and liver tissues. However, muscle and brain tissue are capable of restoring its pro- and antioxidant balance after vaccination. PMID:24599827

  6. Heat stress in pigs is accompanied by adipose tissue-specific responses that favor increased triglyceride storage.

    PubMed

    Qu, H; Yan, H; Lu, H; Donkin, S S; Ajuwon, K M

    2016-05-01

    Heat stress (HS) negatively affects all aspects of performance in pigs. Although certain tissue-specific responses in the liver, skeletal muscle, and intestine are known, there is paucity of information on responses within the adipose tissue. Therefore, the objective of this study was to delineate adipose tissue responses during HS in pigs. Thirty crossbred (Ossabaw × Duroc × Landrace) pigs were assigned to 3 treatments for 7 d. Treatments were 1) control and libitum fed (CON) with room temperature set at 20°C ± 1°C, 2) pair fed (PF) with room temperature as the CON treatment but pair fed to HS pigs, and 3) HS with room temperature 35°C ± 1°C and ad libitum access to feed. Compared with CON pigs, HS pigs had decreased feed intake and elevated skin temperature and respiration rate ( < 0.01). Blood urea nitrogen was higher ( = 0.01) in HS pigs compared with CON pigs only in males. In both subcutaneous and mesenteric adipose tissue, mRNA abundance of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) was more elevated ( < 0.01) in HS groups compared with the CON and PF groups. Heat stress also caused increased heat shock protein 70 (HSP70; = 0.067) and CCAT/enhancer-binding homologous protein (CHOP) content ( < 0.05) in the mesenteric fat compared with the CON treatment. In conclusion, induction of PCK1 expression in adipose tissue by HS suggests elevated glyceroneogenesis might be involved in the increased fat storage in pigs under HS. PMID:27285686

  7. Early sorafenib-related adverse events predict therapy response of TACE plus sorafenib: A multicenter clinical study of 606 HCC patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Li, Hailiang; Bai, Wei; Liu, Jueshi; Lv, Weifu; Sahu, Sonia; Guan, Sheng; Qin, Xiao; Wang, Wenhui; Ren, Weixin; Mu, Wei; Guo, Weidong; Gu, Shanzhi; Ma, Yilong; Yin, Zhanxin; Guo, Wengang; Wang, Wenjun; Wang, Yongji; Duran, Rafael; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Zhuoli; Han, Guohong

    2016-08-15

    The purpose of our study was to test the hypothesis that sorafenib-related dermatologic adverse events (AEs) as an early biomarker can predict the long-term outcomes following the combination therapy of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) plus sorafenib (TACE-S). The intermediate-stage hepatocellular carcinoma patients who received either TACE-S or TACE-alone treatment were consecutively included into analysis. In the TACE-S group, patients with ≥ grade 2 dermatologic AEs within the first month of sorafenib initiation were defined as responders; whereas those with < grade 2 were defined as nonresponders. In the TACE-S group, the median overall survival (OS) of the responders was significantly longer than that of nonresponders (28.9 months vs. 16.8 months, respectively; p = 0.004). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that nonresponders were significantly associated with an increased risk of death compared with responders (HR = 1.9; 95% confidence Interval-CI: 1.3-2.7; p = 0.001). The survival analysis showed that the median OS was 27.9 months (95% CI: 25.0-30.8) among responders treated with TACE-S vs.18.3 months (95% CI: 14.5-22.1) among those who received TACE-alone (p = 0.046). The median time to progression was 13.1 months (95% CI: 4.4-21.8) in the TACE-S group, a duration that was significantly longer than that in the TACE-alone group [5 months (95% CI: 6.4-13.3), p = 0.014]. This study demonstrated that sorafenib-related dermatologic AEs are clinical biomarkers to identify responders from all of the patients for TACE-S therapy. Sorafenib-related dermatologic AEs, clinical biomarkers, can predict the efficacy of TACE-S in future randomized controlled trials. PMID:27038145

  8. Real-time monitoring of thermal and mechanical tissue response to modulated phased-array HIFU beams in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dalong; Ballard, John R.; Haritonova, Alyona; Choi, Jeungwan; Bischof, John; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2012-10-01

    An integrated system employing real-time ultrasound thermography and strain imaging in monitoring tissue response to phased-array heating patterns has been developed. The imaging system is implemented on a commercially available scanner (SonixRP) at frame rates > 500 fps with limited frame sizes covering the vicinity of the HIFU focal spot. These frame rates are sufficient to capture tissue motion and deformation even in the vicinity of large arteries. With the high temporal and spatial resolution of our strain imaging system, we are able to capture and separate tissue strains due to natural motion (breathing and pulsation) from HIFU induced strains (thermal and mechanical). We have collected in vivo strain imaging during sub-therapeutic and therapeutic HIFU exposure in swine and rat model. A 3.5-MHz phased array was used to generate sinusoidally-modulated pHIFU beams at different intensity levels and durations near blood vessels of different sizes (e.g. femoral in the swine and rat models). The results show that our approach is capable of characterizing the thermal and mechanical tissue response to sub-therapeutic pHIFU beam. For therapeutic pHIFU beams, the approach is still capable of localizing the therapeutic beam, but the results at the focal spot are complicated by bubble generation.

  9. Model neural prostheses with integrated microfluidics: a potential intervention strategy for controlling reactive cell and tissue responses.

    PubMed

    Retterer, Scott T; Smith, Karen L; Bjornsson, Christopher S; Neeves, Keith B; Spence, Andrew J H; Turner, James N; Shain, William; Isaacson, Michael S

    2004-11-01

    Model silicon intracortical probes with microfluidic channels were fabricated and tested to examine the feasibility of using diffusion-mediated delivery to deliver therapeutic agents into the volume of tissue exhibiting reactive responses to implanted devices. Three-dimensional probe structures with microfluidic channels were fabricated using surface micromachining and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) techniques. In vitro functional tests of devices were performed using fluorescence microscopy to record the transient release of Texas Red labeled transferrin (TR-transferrin) and dextran (TR-dextran) from the microchannels into 1% w/v agarose gel. In vivo performance was characterized by inserting devices loaded with TR-transferrin into the premotor cortex of adult male rats. Brain sections were imaged using confocal microscopy. Diffusion of TR-transferrin into the extracellular space and uptake by cells up to 400 microm from the implantation site was observed in brain slices taken 1 h postinsertion. The reactive tissue volume, as indicated by the presence of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), was characterized using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. The reactive tissue volume extended 600, 800, and 400 microm radially from the implantation site at 1 h, 24 h, and 6 weeks following insertion, respectively. These results indicate that diffusion-mediated delivery can be part of an effective intervention strategy for the treatment of reactive tissue responses around chronically implanted intracortical probes. PMID:15536908

  10. Tissue-specific responses to the LRPPRC founder mutation in French Canadian Leigh Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sasarman, Florin; Nishimura, Tamiko; Antonicka, Hana; Weraarpachai, Woranontee; Shoubridge, Eric A.; Allen, Bruce; Burelle, Yan; Charron, Guy; Coderre, Lise; DesRosiers, Christine; Laprise, Catherine; Morin, Charles; Rioux, John; Shoubridge, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    French Canadian Leigh Syndrome (LSFC) is an early-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a distinct pattern of tissue involvement. Most cases are caused by a founder missense mutation in LRPPRC. LRPPRC forms a ribonucleoprotein complex with SLIRP, another RNA-binding protein, and this stabilizes polyadenylated mitochondrial mRNAs. LSFC fibroblasts have reduced levels of LRPPRC and a specific complex IV assembly defect; however, further depletion of mutant LRPPRC results in a complete failure to assemble a functional oxidative phosphorylation system, suggesting that LRPPRC levels determine the nature of the biochemical phenotype. We tested this hypothesis in cultured muscle cells and tissues from LSFC patients. LRPPRC levels were reduced in LSFC muscle cells, resulting in combined complex I and IV deficiencies. A similar combined deficiency was observed in skeletal muscle. Complex IV was only moderately reduced in LSFC heart, but was almost undetectable in liver. Both of these tissues showed elevated levels of complexes I and III. Despite the marked biochemical differences, the steady-state levels of LRPPRC and mitochondrial mRNAs were extremely low, LRPPRC was largely detergent-insoluble, and SLIRP was undetectable in all LSFC tissues. The level of the LRPPRC/SLIRP complex appeared much reduced in control tissues by the first dimension blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) analysis compared with fibroblasts, and even by second dimension analysis it was virtually undetectable in control heart. These results point to tissue-specific pathways for the post-transcriptional handling of mitochondrial mRNAs and suggest that the biochemical defects in LSFC reflect the differential ability of tissues to adapt to the mutation. PMID:25214534

  11. Normal Liver Tissue Density Dose Response in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, Christopher C.; Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the temporal dose response of normal liver tissue for patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine noncontrast follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 34 patients who received SBRT between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed at a median of 8 months post-SBRT (range, 0.7-36 months). SBRT-induced normal liver tissue density changes in follow-up CT scans were evaluated at 2, 6, 10, 15, and 27 months. The dose distributions from planning CTs were mapped to follow-up CTs to relate the mean Hounsfield unit change ({Delta}HU) to dose received over the range 0-55 Gy in 3-5 fractions. An absolute density change of 7 HU was considered a significant radiographic change in normal liver tissue. Results: Increasing radiation dose was linearly correlated with lower post-SBRT liver tissue density (slope, -0.65 {Delta}HU/5 Gy). The threshold for significant change (-7 {Delta}HU) was observed in the range of 30-35 Gy. This effect did not vary significantly over the time intervals evaluated. Conclusions: SBRT induces a dose-dependent and relatively time-independent hypodense radiation reaction within normal liver tissue that is characterized by a decrease of >7 HU in liver density for doses >30-35 Gy.

  12. Tissue-specific Patterning of the Host Innate Immune Response by Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Russell E. N.; Berube, Bryan J.; Sampedro, Georgia R.; DeDent, Andrea C.; Wardenburg, Juliane Bubeck

    2014-01-01

    Immunomodulatory cytotoxins are prominent virulence factors produced by Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of bacterial sepsis, skin infection, and pneumonia. S. aureus α-toxin is a pore-forming toxin that utilizes a widely-expressed receptor, ADAM10, to injure the host epithelium, endothelium, and immune cells. As each host tissue is characterized by a unique composition of resident cells and recruited immune cells, the outcome of α-toxin-mediated injury may depend on the infected tissue environment. Utilizing myeloid lineage-specific Adam10 knockout mice, we show that α-toxin exerts tissue-specific effects on innate immunity to staphylococcal infection. Loss of ADAM10 expression exacerbates skin infection, yet affords protection against lethal pneumonia. These diverse outcomes are not related to altered immune cell recruitment, but rather correlate with a defect in toxin-induced IL-1β production. Extension of these studies through analysis of ADAM10 double knockout mice affecting both the myeloid lineage and either the skin or lung epithelium highlight the prominence of toxin-induced injury to the epithelium in governing the outcome of infection. Together, these studies provide evidence of tissue specificity of pore-forming cytotoxin action in modulation of host immunity, and illustrate that the outcome of infection is a collective manifestation of all effects of the toxin within the tissue microenvironment. PMID:24820433

  13. Response of adipose tissue to early infection with Trypanosoma cruzi (Brazil strain).

    PubMed

    Nagajyothi, Fnu; Desruisseaux, Mahalia S; Machado, Fabiana S; Upadhya, Rajendra; Zhao, Dazhi; Schwartz, Gary J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Albanese, Chris; Lisanti, Michael P; Chua, Streamson C; Weiss, Louis M; Scherer, Philipp E; Tanowitz, Herbert B

    2012-03-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) and adipocytes are targets of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Adipose tissue obtained from CD-1 mice 15 days after infection, an early stage of infection revealed a high parasite load. There was a significant increase in macrophages in infected adipose tissue and a reduction in lipid accumulation, adipocyte size, and fat mass and increased expression of lipolytic enzymes. Infection increased levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and TLR9 and in the expression of components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ were increased in WAT, whereas protein and mRNA levels of adiponectin were significantly reduced in BAT and WAT. The mRNA levels of cytokines, chemokines, and their receptors were increased. Nuclear Factor Kappa B levels were increased in BAT, whereas Iκκ-γ levels increased in WAT. Adipose tissue is an early target of T. cruzi infection. PMID:22293433

  14. Arabidopsis thaliana NIP7;1 is involved in tissue arsenic distribution and tolerance in response to arsenate.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Emma R; Maathuis, Frans J M

    2016-03-01

    The Arabidopsis aquaglyceroporin NIP7;1 is involved in uptake and tolerance to the trivalent arsenic species arsenite. Here, we show that NIP7;1 is also involved in the response to pentavalent arsenate. Loss of function of NIP7;1 improved tolerance to arsenate and reduced arsenic levels in both the phloem and xylem, resulting in altered arsenic distribution between tissues. There was no clear correlation between growth and shoot arsenic concentration. This is the first report detailing the involvement of a NIP transporter in response to arsenate. The data suggest that these proteins are relevant targets for breeding and engineering arsenic tolerance in crops. PMID:26898223

  15. Pulp tissue response to Portland cement associated with different radio pacifying agents on pulpotomy of human primary molars.

    PubMed

    Marques, N; Lourenço Neto, N; Fernandes, A P; Rodini, C; Hungaro Duarte, M; Rios, D; Machado, M A; Oliveira, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the response of Portland cement associated with different radio pacifying agents on pulp treatment of human primary teeth by clinical and radiographic exams and microscopic analysis. Thirty mandibular primary molars were randomly divided into the following groups: Group I - Portland cement; Group II - Portland cement with iodoform (Portland cement + CHI3 ); Group III - Portland cement with zirconium oxide (Portland cement + ZrO2 ); and treated by pulpotomy technique (removal of a portion of the pulp aiming to maintain the vitally of the remaining radicular pulp tissue using a therapeutic dressing). Clinical and radiographic evaluations were recorded at 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up. The teeth at the regular exfoliation period were extracted and processed for histological analysis. Data were tested using statistical analysis with a significance level of 5%. The microscopic findings were descriptively analysed. All treated teeth were clinically and radiographically successful at follow-up appointments. The microscopic analysis revealed positive response to pulp repair with hard tissue barrier formation and pulp calcification in the remaining roots of all available teeth. The findings of this study suggest that primary teeth pulp tissue exhibited satisfactory biological response to Portland cement associated with radio pacifying agents. However, further studies with long-term follow-up are needed to determine the safe clinical indication of this alternative material for pulp therapy of primary teeth. PMID:26258985

  16. Essential role of peripheral node addressin in lymphocyte homing to nasal-associated lymphoid tissues and allergic immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ohmichi, Yukari; Hirakawa, Jotaro; Imai, Yasuyuki; Fukuda, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    Nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) is a mucosal immune tissue that provides immune responses against inhaled antigens. Lymphocyte homing to NALT is mediated by specific interactions between lymphocytes and high endothelial venules (HEVs) in NALT. In contrast to HEVs in other mucosal lymphoid tissues, NALT HEVs strongly express peripheral node addressins (PNAds) that bear sulfated glycans recognized by the monoclonal antibody MECA-79. We investigated the role of PNAd in lymphocyte homing to NALT using sulfotransferase N-acetylglucosamine-6-O-sulfotransferase (GlcNAc6ST) 1 and GlcNAc6ST-2 double knockout (DKO) mice. The expression of PNAd in NALT HEVs was eliminated in DKO mice. Short-term homing assays indicated that lymphocyte homing to NALT was diminished by 90% in DKO mice. Production of antigen-specific IgE and the number of sneezes in response to nasally administered ovalbumin were also substantially diminished. Consistently, the NALT of DKO mice showed reduced production of IL-4 and increased production of IL-10 together with an increase in CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Compared with the homing of CD4+CD25− conventional T cells, the homing of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells to NALT was less dependent on the L-selectin–PNAd interaction but was partially dependent on PSGL-1 (P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1) and CD44. These results demonstrate that PNAd is essential for lymphocyte homing to NALT and nasal allergic responses. PMID:21518796

  17. [Accessory mitral tissue responsible for left ventricular outflow obstruction. Reports of 7 cases].

    PubMed

    Arnaud-Crozat, E; Nottin, R; Chambran, P; Serraf, A; Verrier, J F; Detroux, M; Lacour-Gayet, F; Planche, C; Langlois, J; Binet, J P

    1990-09-01

    The authors report the medico-surgical experience of Marie Lannelongue hospital of a rare condition: accessory mitral valve tissue. Seven patients aged 2 to 28 years (average: 8.7 years) had left ventricular outflow obstruction due to accessory mitral valve tissue. The diagnostic was not obvious clinically and was based on the association of echocardiographic and angiographic data. This condition was associated with another intra-cardiac malformation in 6 of the 7 patients. Surgical treatment included resection of the accessory mitral valve tissue by an aortic or combined aorto-left atrial approach, together with correction of the associated intracardiac abnormality. The postoperative results were excellent with the regression of the ventriculo-aortic pressure gradient and the physiological integrity of the mitral valve. PMID:2122834

  18. How tissue injury alarms the immune system and causes a systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is very prevalent among critically ill patients, particularly those with extensive tissue injury. Although downstream mediators (cytokines) and effector cells (phagocytes) have been identified, proximal mediators originating from injured tissues remained elusive. Alarmins (“danger signals”) released by necrotic/injured cells have been identified recently and certainly play a role in triggering local and systemic inflammation in critically ill patients. The most promising alarmin candidates are of mitochondrial origin, i.e. mitochondrial DNA and the chemotactic factor fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLP). ATP also is released from necrotic tissues and stimulates the assembly of the inflammasome, leading to the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1ß. The identification of novel alarmins opens new therapeutic avenues for the treatment of severe SIRS, and SIRS-dependent organ dysfunction. PMID:22788849

  19. Unexpected soft tissue changes in response to root coverage using an acellular dermal matrix allograft: 12–year follow up.

    PubMed

    Batista, Eraldo L; Goergen, Josiane E; Machado, Larissa L; Santayana de Lima, Eduardo M

    2014-01-01

    A woman undergoing orthodontic treatment presented with recession and reduced keratinized gingiva on teeth 31 and 41. The patient declined creation of a donor site for conventional autogenous connective soft tissue grafting and opted for an acellular dermal matrix soft tissue substitute for root coverage. Orthodontic treatment followed, and the patient returned for orthognatic surgery after 12 years. Long-term follow up revealed that root coverage remained stable over time and creeping attachment on both teeth was observed. Unexpectedly, an increase in the width of keratinized gingiva was observed. No adverse effects of orthodontic treatment carried out after grafting were observed. PMID:25437945

  20. Cell kinetics during regeneration in the sponge Halisarca caerulea: how local is the response to tissue damage?

    PubMed

    Alexander, Brittany E; Achlatis, Michelle; Osinga, Ronald; van der Geest, Harm G; Cleutjens, Jack P M; Schutte, Bert; de Goeij, Jasper M

    2015-01-01

    Sponges have a remarkable capacity to rapidly regenerate in response to wound infliction. In addition, sponges rapidly renew their filter systems (choanocytes) to maintain a healthy population of cells. This study describes the cell kinetics of choanocytes in the encrusting reef sponge Halisarca caerulea during early regeneration (0-8 h) following experimental wound infliction. Subsequently, we investigated the spatial relationship between regeneration and cell proliferation over a six-day period directly adjacent to the wound, 1 cm, and 3 cm from the wound. Cell proliferation was determined by the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). We demonstrate that during early regeneration, the growth fraction of the choanocytes (i.e., the percentage of proliferative cells) adjacent to the wound is reduced (7.0 ± 2.5%) compared to steady-state, undamaged tissue (46.6 ± 2.6%), while the length of the cell cycle remained short (5.6 ± 3.4 h). The percentage of proliferative choanocytes increased over time in all areas and after six days of regeneration choanocyte proliferation rates were comparable to steady-state tissue. Tissue areas farther from the wound had higher rates of choanocyte proliferation than areas closer to the wound, indicating that more resources are demanded from tissue in the immediate vicinity of the wound. There was no difference in the number of proliferative mesohyl cells in regenerative sponges compared to steady-state sponges. Our data suggest that the production of collagen-rich wound tissue is a key process in tissue regeneration for H. caerulea, and helps to rapidly occupy the bare substratum exposed by the wound. Regeneration and choanocyte renewal are competing and negatively correlated life-history traits, both essential to the survival of sponges. The efficient allocation of limited resources to these life-history traits has enabled the ecological success and diversification of sponges. PMID:25780772

  1. Cell kinetics during regeneration in the sponge Halisarca caerulea: how local is the response to tissue damage?

    PubMed Central

    Achlatis, Michelle; Osinga, Ronald; van der Geest, Harm G.; Cleutjens, Jack P.M.; Schutte, Bert; de Goeij, Jasper M.

    2015-01-01

    Sponges have a remarkable capacity to rapidly regenerate in response to wound infliction. In addition, sponges rapidly renew their filter systems (choanocytes) to maintain a healthy population of cells. This study describes the cell kinetics of choanocytes in the encrusting reef sponge Halisarca caerulea during early regeneration (0–8 h) following experimental wound infliction. Subsequently, we investigated the spatial relationship between regeneration and cell proliferation over a six-day period directly adjacent to the wound, 1 cm, and 3 cm from the wound. Cell proliferation was determined by the incorporation of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU). We demonstrate that during early regeneration, the growth fraction of the choanocytes (i.e., the percentage of proliferative cells) adjacent to the wound is reduced (7.0 ± 2.5%) compared to steady-state, undamaged tissue (46.6 ± 2.6%), while the length of the cell cycle remained short (5.6 ± 3.4 h). The percentage of proliferative choanocytes increased over time in all areas and after six days of regeneration choanocyte proliferation rates were comparable to steady-state tissue. Tissue areas farther from the wound had higher rates of choanocyte proliferation than areas closer to the wound, indicating that more resources are demanded from tissue in the immediate vicinity of the wound. There was no difference in the number of proliferative mesohyl cells in regenerative sponges compared to steady-state sponges. Our data suggest that the production of collagen-rich wound tissue is a key process in tissue regeneration for H. caerulea, and helps to rapidly occupy the bare substratum exposed by the wound. Regeneration and choanocyte renewal are competing and negatively correlated life-history traits, both essential to the survival of sponges. The efficient allocation of limited resources to these life-history traits has enabled the ecological success and diversification of sponges. PMID:25780772

  2. [Adverse reaction of pseudoephedrine].

    PubMed

    López Lois, G; Gómez Carrasco, J A; García de Frías, E

    2005-04-01

    We present a case of a 7 years old girl who developed an episode of myoclonic movements and tremors after being medicated with a not well quantified amount of a pseudoephedrine/antihistamine combination. We want to highlight the potential toxicity of pseudoephedrine, usually administered as part of cold-syrup preparations which are used for symptomatic treatment of upper respiratory tract cough and congestion associated with the common cold and allergic rhinitis. Although these products are generally considered to be safe either by physicians and parents, we can't underestimate the potential adverse events and toxic effects that can occur when administering these medications. PMID:15826569

  3. Effects of mercuric chloride on chemiluminescent response of phagocytes and tissue lysozyme activity in Tilapia, Oreochromis aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Low, K.W.; Sin, Y.M.

    1995-02-01

    Phagocytosis is an important defense mechanism against foreign pathogenic organisms. The cells involved are phagocytes which are comprised of peripheral blood monocytes (tissue macrophages) and polymorphonuclear (PMN) leucocytes. These cells can be activated by either particulate or soluble stimuli and undergo a respiratory burst from which several reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be formed. The reactive oxygen species and some hydrolases generated in the cells are the major antibacterial agents released during phagocytosis. Chemiluminescence (CL) is emitted, in vitro, from phagocytizing human PMN neutrophils. A similar CL response was also encountered in fish phagocytes. ROS was the causative agent of the CL emitted during in vitro phagocytosis. Phagocytic activity can be monitored by measuring the CL response of the phagocytes. Lysozyme is one of the potent hydrolases which are involved in the destruction of pathogens during phagocytosis. In fish, it was found predominantly in haematopoietic tissues, PMN leucocytes and moncytes. This enzyme has been shown to have antibacterial activity against several pathogens in fish. A combined oxidative and hydrolytic attack upon the engulfed pathogens allow phagocytes to kill infectious agents effectively. However, severe suppression or enhancement of these two functions caused by some exogenous factors may be detrimental to the host tissues. It has been reported that inorganic mercury could inhibit, in vitro, the respiratory burst and the microbicidal activities of human PMN leucocytes. It was also reported that increased in vitro release of lysozyme was found in mercury-treated human PMN leucocytes. However, such work has not been reported in fish. The aim of this research was to examine whether mercury could exert similar effects on the CL response in phagocytes and tissue lysozyme activity in fish after they were exposed to different concentrations of mercuric chloride over a period of 3 wks. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Cloning Changes the Response to Obesity of Innate Immune Factors in Blood, Liver, and Adipose Tissues in Domestic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Rødgaard, Tina; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Stagsted, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of cloned pigs as porcine obesity models reflecting obesity-associated changes in innate immune factor gene expression profiles. Liver and adipose tissue expression of 43 innate immune genes as well as serum concentrations of six immune factors were analyzed in lean and diet-induced obese cloned domestic pigs and compared to normal domestic pigs (obese and lean). The number of genes affected by obesity was lower in cloned animals than in control animals. All genes affected by obesity in adipose tissues of clones were downregulated; both upregulation and downregulation were observed in the controls. Cloning resulted in a less differentiated adipose tissue expression pattern. Finally, the serum concentrations of two acute-phase proteins (APPs), haptoglobin (HP) and orosomucoid (ORM), were increased in obese clones as compared to obese controls as well as lean clones and controls. Generally, the variation in phenotype between individual pigs was not reduced in cloned siblings as compared to normal siblings. Therefore, we conclude that cloning limits both the number of genes responding to obesity as well as the degree of tissue-differentiated gene expression, concomitantly with an increase in APP serum concentrations only seen in cloned, obese pigs. This may suggest that the APP response seen in obese, cloned pigs is a consequence of the characteristic skewed gene response to obesity in cloned pigs, as described in this work. This should be taken into consideration when using cloned animals as models for innate responses to obesity. PMID:23668862

  5. Peripharyngeal tissue deformation, stress distributions, and hyoid bone movement in response to mandibular advancement.

    PubMed

    Amatoury, Jason; Kairaitis, Kristina; Wheatley, John R; Bilston, Lynne E; Amis, Terence C

    2015-02-01

    Mandibular advancement (MA) increases upper airway (UA) patency and decreases collapsibility. Furthermore, MA displaces the hyoid bone in a cranial-anterior direction, which may contribute to MA-associated UA improvements via redistribution of peripharyngeal tissue stresses (extraluminal tissue pressure, ETP). In the present study, we examined effects of MA on ETP distributions, deformation of the peripharyngeal tissue surface (UA geometry), and hyoid bone position. We studied 13 supine, anesthetized, tracheostomized, spontaneously breathing adult male New Zealand White rabbits. Graded MA was applied from 0 to ∼4.5 mm. ETP was measured at six locations distributed throughout three UA regions: tongue, hyoid, and epiglottis. Axial computed tomography images of the UA (nasal choanae to glottis) were acquired and used to measure lumen geometry (UA length; regional cross-sectional area) and hyoid displacement. MA resulted in nonuniform decreases in ETP (greatest at tongue region), ranging from -0.11 (-0.15 to -0.06) to -0.82 (-1.09 to -0.54) cmH2O/mm MA [linear mixed-effects model slope (95% confidence interval)], across all sites. UA length decreased by -0.5 (-0.8 to -0.2) %/mm accompanied by nonuniform increases in cross-sectional area (greatest at hyoid region) ranging from 7.5 (3.6-11.4) to 18.7 (14.9-22.5) %/mm. The hyoid bone was displaced in a cranial-anterior direction by 0.42 (0.36-0.44) mm/mm MA. In summary, MA results in nonuniform changes in peripharyngeal tissue pressure distributions and lumen geometry. Displacement of the hyoid bone with MA may play a pivotal role in redistributing applied MA loads, thus modifying tissue stress/deformation distributions and determining resultant UA geometry outcomes. PMID:25505028

  6. Adverse drug reactions in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ferner, R E

    2015-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) - that is, unintended and harmful responses to medicines - are important to dermatologists because many present with cutaneous signs and because dermatological treatments can cause serious ADRs. The detection of ADRs to new drugs is often delayed because they have a long latency or are rare or unexpected. This means that ADRs to newer agents emerge only slowly after marketing. ADRs are part of the differential diagnosis of unusual rashes. A good drug history that includes details of drug dose, time-course of the reaction and factors that may make the patient more susceptible, will help. For example, Stevens-Johnson syndrome with abacavir is much commoner in patients with HLA-B*5701, and has a characteristic time course. Newer agents have brought newer reactions; for example, acneiform rashes associated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors such as erlotinib. Older systemic agents used to treat skin disease, including corticosteroids and methotrexate, cause important ADRs. The adverse effects of newer biological agents used in dermatology are becoming clearer; for example, hypersensitivity reactions or loss of efficacy from antibody formation and progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy due to reactivation of latent JC (John Cunningham) virus infections during efalizumab treatment. Unusual or serious harm from medicines, including ADRs, medication errors and overdose, should be reported. The UK Yellow Card scheme is online, and patients can report their own ADRs. PMID:25622648

  7. Adverse effects of reduced oxygen tension on the proliferative capacity of rat kidney and insulin-secreting cell lines involve DNA damage and stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Jones, R. Huw; Tarry-Adkins, Jane; Smith, Noel H.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Standard cell culture conditions do not reflect the physiological environment in terms of oxygen tension (20% vs 3%). The effects of lowering oxygen tension on cell proliferation in culture can be beneficial as well as detrimental depending on the cell line studied, but the molecular mechanism underlying such effects is not fully understood. We observed that the proliferative capacity of the rat cell lines NRK and INS-1 was inhibited when cultured under 3% oxygen as compared to 20% oxygen. Suppression of proliferation in NRK cells was accompanied by induction of DNA double strand breaks whereas in INS-1 cells it was accompanied by up-regulation of p53 and p27. Although Sirt1 was up-regulated in both cell lines by 3% oxygen the effects on antioxidant enzymes (MnSOD, CuZnSOD and catalase) were cell line specific. Marked up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was detected in both NRK and INS-1 cells when cultured in 3% oxygen. HO-1 expression can be readily induced by exposure to hydrogen peroxide in culture. These results suggest that reduced oxygen tension suppresses the proliferative capacity of these two cell lines through a stress response that is similar to an oxidative stress response but the molecular events that lead to the reduced cell proliferation are cell line specific. PMID:18692496

  8. Adverse effects of reduced oxygen tension on the proliferative capacity of rat kidney and insulin-secreting cell lines involve DNA damage and stress responses

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Jianhua Jones, R. Huw; Tarry-Adkins, Jane; Smith, Noel H.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2008-10-01

    Standard cell culture conditions do not reflect the physiological environment in terms of oxygen tension (20% vs 3%). The effects of lowering oxygen tension on cell proliferation in culture can be beneficial as well as detrimental depending on the cell line studied, but the molecular mechanism underlying such effects is not fully understood. We observed that the proliferative capacity of the rat cell lines NRK and INS-1 was inhibited when cultured under 3% oxygen as compared to 20% oxygen. Suppression of proliferation in NRK cells was accompanied by induction of DNA double strand breaks whereas in INS-1 cells it was accompanied by up-regulation of p53 and p27. Although Sirt1 was up-regulated in both cell lines by 3% oxygen the effects on antioxidant enzymes (MnSOD, CuZnSOD and catalase) were cell line specific. Marked up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was detected in both NRK and INS-1 cells when cultured in 3% oxygen. HO-1 expression can be readily induced by exposure to hydrogen peroxide in culture. These results suggest that reduced oxygen tension suppresses the proliferative capacity of these two cell lines through a stress response that is similar to an oxidative stress response but the molecular events that lead to the reduced cell proliferation are cell line specific.

  9. Brown and white adipose tissues: intrinsic differences in gene expression and response to cold exposure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rosell, Meritxell; Kaforou, Myrsini; Frontini, Andrea; Okolo, Anthony; Chan, Yi-Wah; Nikolopoulou, Evanthia; Millership, Steven; Fenech, Matthew E.; MacIntyre, David; Turner, Jeremy O.; Moore, Jonathan D.; Blackburn, Edith; Gullick, William J.; Cinti, Saverio; Montana, Giovanni; Parker, Malcolm G.

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipocytes dissipate energy, whereas white adipocytes are an energy storage site. We explored the plasticity of different white adipose tissue depots in acquiring a brown phenotype by cold exposure. By comparing cold-induced genes in white fat to those enriched in brown compared with white fat, at thermoneutrality we defined a “brite” transcription signature. We identified the genes, pathways, and promoter regulatory motifs associated with “browning,” as these represent novel targets for understanding this process. For example, neuregulin 4 was more highly expressed in brown adipose tissue and upregulated in white fat upon cold exposure, and cell studies showed that it is a neurite outgrowth-promoting adipokine, indicative of a role in increasing adipose tissue innervation in response to cold. A cell culture system that allows us to reproduce the differential properties of the discrete adipose depots was developed to study depot-specific differences at an in vitro level. The key transcriptional events underpinning white adipose tissue to brown transition are important, as they represent an attractive proposition to overcome the detrimental effects associated with metabolic disorders, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24549398

  10. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis to Identify Anthocyanin Biosynthesis Genes Responsible for Tissue-Specific Pigmentation in Zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud.)

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jong Hwa; Kim, June-Sik; Kim, Seungill; Soh, Hye Yeon; Shin, Hosub; Jang, Hosung; Ryu, Ju Hyun; Kim, Ahyeong; Yun, Kil-Young; Kim, Shinje; Kim, Ki Sun; Choi, Doil; Huh, Jin Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud.) is commonly found in temperate climate regions and widely used for lawns, in part, owing to its uniform green color. However, some zoysiagrass cultivars accumulate red to purple pigments in their spike and stolon tissues, thereby decreasing the aesthetic value. Here we analyzed the anthocyanin contents of two zoysiagrass cultivars ‘Anyang-jungji’ (AJ) and ‘Greenzoa’ (GZ) that produce spikes and stolons with purple and green colors, respectively, and revealed that cyanidin and petunidin were primarily accumulated in the pigmented tissues. In parallel, we performed a de novo transcriptome assembly and identified differentially expressed genes between the two cultivars. We found that two anthocyanin biosynthesis genes encoding anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) and dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) were preferentially upregulated in the purple AJ spike upon pigmentation. Both ANS and DFR genes were also highly expressed in other zoysiagrass cultivars with purple spikes and stolons, but their expression levels were significantly low in the cultivars with green tissues. We observed that recombinant ZjDFR1 and ZjANS1 proteins successfully catalyze the conversions of dihydroflavonols into leucoanthocyanidins and leucoanthocyanidins into anthocyanidins, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that upregulation of ANS and DFR is responsible for tissue-specific anthocyanin biosynthesis and differential pigmentation in zoysiagrass. The present study also demonstrates the feasibility of a de novo transcriptome analysis to identify the key genes associated with specific traits, even in the absence of reference genome information. PMID:25905914

  11. Tissue expression of glandular kallikrein and its response to 17 beta-estradiol in the acclimatized carp.

    PubMed

    Haussmann, Denise; Vidal, Rene; Figueroa, Jaime

    2006-06-01

    Cyprinus carpio skeletal muscle kallikrein was isolated to apparent homogeneity, and a polyclonal antiserum against the purified protein was generated. Glandular kallikrein expression and tissue distribution were assessed using both Western blots and immunohistochemistry. A 39-kDa protein was detected in skeletal muscle, the gill, kidney, and pituitary gland, where an additional 72-kDa immunoreactive band was observed. Immunohistochemistry revealed immunoreactive kallikrein in the intermuscle tissue, epithelial gill cells, apical portion of distal and proximal tubular cells in the kidney, mucus and epithelial cells of the skin, intestinal tube, and prolactin-producing cells of the pituitary gland. In addition, the effect of 17beta-estradiol on kallikrein expression was analyzed in three different tissues of winter- and summer-acclimatized male carps. A 2.5-fold (p<0.05) increase in kallikrein immunoreactivity due to estrogen treatment was observed in winter-acclimatized carp muscle, but not in summer-acclimatized fish. In contrast, the gill responded differently, since a 2-fold (p<0.05) increase was found only in summer-acclimatized carps. Kallikrein immunoreactivity in the kidney increased both in summer- (2.5 fold) and in winter-acclimatized carps (1.5 fold). The signals obtained demonstrate the existence of tissue-specific variable responses to estrogen treatment in vivo, between winter and summer-acclimatized carp. PMID:16849838

  12. Brown and white adipose tissues: intrinsic differences in gene expression and response to cold exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Rosell, Meritxell; Kaforou, Myrsini; Frontini, Andrea; Okolo, Anthony; Chan, Yi-Wah; Nikolopoulou, Evanthia; Millership, Steven; Fenech, Matthew E; MacIntyre, David; Turner, Jeremy O; Moore, Jonathan D; Blackburn, Edith; Gullick, William J; Cinti, Saverio; Montana, Giovanni; Parker, Malcolm G; Christian, Mark

    2014-04-15

    Brown adipocytes dissipate energy, whereas white adipocytes are an energy storage site. We explored the plasticity of different white adipose tissue depots in acquiring a brown phenotype by cold exposure. By comparing cold-induced genes in white fat to those enriched in brown compared with white fat, at thermoneutrality we defined a "brite" transcription signature. We identified the genes, pathways, and promoter regulatory motifs associated with "browning," as these represent novel targets for understanding this process. For example, neuregulin 4 was more highly expressed in brown adipose tissue and upregulated in white fat upon cold exposure, and cell studies showed that it is a neurite outgrowth-promoting adipokine, indicative of a role in increasing adipose tissue innervation in response to cold. A cell culture system that allows us to reproduce the differential properties of the discrete adipose depots was developed to study depot-specific differences at an in vitro level. The key transcriptional events underpinning white adipose tissue to brown transition are important, as they represent an attractive proposition to overcome the detrimental effects associated with metabolic disorders, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24549398

  13. Screening for adverse events.

    PubMed

    Karson, A S; Bates, D W

    1999-02-01

    Adverse events (AEs) in medical patients are common, costly, and often preventable. Development of quality improvement programs to decrease the number and impact of AEs demands effective methods for screening for AEs on a routine basis. Here we describe the impact, types, and potential causes of AEs and review various techniques for identifying AEs. We evaluate the use of generic screening criteria in detail and describe a recent study of the sensitivity and specificity of individual generic screening criteria and combinations of these criteria. In general, the most sensitive screens were the least specific and no small sub-set of screens identified a large percentage of adverse events. Combinations of screens that were limited to administrative data were the least expensive, but none were particularly sensitive, although in practice they might be effective since routine screening is currently rarely done. As computer systems increase in sophistication sensitivity will improve. We also discuss recent studies that suggest that programs that screen for and identify AEs can be useful in reducing AE rates. While tools for identifying AEs have strengths and weaknesses, they can play an important role in organizations' quality improvement portfolios. PMID:10468381

  14. Intense THz pulses cause H2AX phosphorylation and activate DNA damage response in human skin tissue

    PubMed Central

    Titova, Lyubov V.; Ayesheshim, Ayesheshim K.; Golubov, Andrey; Fogen, Dawson; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Hegmann, Frank A.; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Recent emergence and growing use of terahertz (THz) radiation for medical imaging and public security screening raise questions on reasonable levels of exposure and health consequences of this form of electromagnetic radiation. In particular, picosecond-duration THz pulses have shown promise for novel diagnostic imaging techniques. However, the effects of THz pulses on human cells and tissues thus far remain largely unknown. We report on the investigation of the biological effects of pulsed THz radiation on artificial human skin tissues. We observe that exposure to intense THz pulses for ten minutes leads to a significant induction of H2AX phosphorylation, indicating that THz pulse irradiation may cause DNA damage in exposed skin tissue. At the same time, we find a THz-pulse-induced increase in the levels of several proteins responsible for cell-cycle regulation and tumor suppression, suggesting that DNA damage repair mechanisms are quickly activated. Furthermore, we find that the cellular response to pulsed THz radiation is significantly different from that induced by exposure to UVA (400 nm). PMID:23577291

  15. Tissue response of apatite-filled resin cement and titanium-reinforced apatite dental implants in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ogiso, M; Tabata, T; Nakabayashi, N; Yamashita, Y; Borgese, D

    1993-01-01

    Abutment and root portion divided two-piece dental implants were designed to modify the one-piece dense hydroxyapatite (D-HAP) implant. The initial placement of the root portion endosseously ensured an aseptic environment and physical stability for the implant during the bone healing period. The outer D-HAP shell of the root portion was fortified by an inner titanium cylinder and cemented with an adhesive resin cement containing 4-methacryloyoxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META) and reinforced by fine apatite filler. Upon attaining integration of the bone and implant, the abutment was screwed and fixed into the screw hole of the root portion. The tissue response of both the apatite-filled resin cement and root portion of the two-piece implant was studied by animal canine experiments. Light and electron microscopic examination of specimens taken from experimental animal tissue showed bone contacted directly not only the exposed apatite filler at the surface of the apatite-filled resin cement, but also the resin portion. These findings of direct bone contact suggested that the tissue response of apatite-filled resin cement was approximately similar to the usual D-HAP. Because most of the surface of the outer D-HAP shell of the root portion came in contact with bone, it prevented the deposition of contamination on the D-HAP surface during the manufacturing procedures of the root portion. PMID:10148567

  16. [Procedure adverse events: nursing care in central venous catheter fracture].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Juan, Eva; Maqueda-Palau, Mònica; Romero-Grilo, Cristina; Muñoz-Moles, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    In a intensive care unit (ICU) there are many factors that can lead to the occurrence of adverse events. A high percentage of these events are associated with the administration of drugs. Diagnostic tests, such as computed tomography, is common in critically ill patients and technique can be performed with injection of contrast agent to enhance the visualization of soft tissue. The contrast is a medication and the nurse is responsible for its proper administration. The management of the critically ill patient is complex. ICU team and radiology shares responsibility for the care and safety of the patient safety during the transfer and performing tests with contrast. The World Health Organisation patient safety strategies, recommends analysing errors and learning from them. Therefore, it was decided to investigate the causes of the category E severity adverse events that occurred in a patient who was admitted to the ICU for septic shock of abdominal origin. An abdominal computed tomography was performed with contrast which was injected through a central venous catheter. The contrast did not appear in the image. What happened? Causal analysis helped to understand what triggered the event. A care plan and an algorithm were drafted to prevent it from happening again, with the following objectives: improving knowledge, skills and promoting positive attitudes towards patient safety, working at primary, secondary and tertiary care levels. PMID:24439203

  17. Exposure to residual concentrations of elements from a remediated coal fly ash spill does not adversely influence stress and immune responses of nestling tree swallows

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Michelle L.; Hopkins, William A.; Hallagan, John J.; Jackson, Brian P.; Hawley, Dana M.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities often produce pollutants that can affect the physiology, growth and reproductive success of wildlife. Many metals and trace elements play important roles in physiological processes, and exposure to even moderately elevated concentrations of essential and non-essential elements could have subtle effects on physiology, particularly during development. We examined the effects of exposure to a number of elements from a coal fly ash spill that occurred in December 2008 and has since been remediated on the stress and immune responses of nestling tree swallows. We found that nestlings at the site of the spill had significantly greater blood concentrations of Cu, Hg, Se and Zn in 2011, but greater concentrations only of Se in 2012, in comparison to reference colonies. The concentrations of elements were below levels of significant toxicological concern in both years. In 2011, we found no relationship between exposure to elements associated with the spill and basal or stress-induced corticosterone concentrations in nestlings. In 2012, we found that Se exposure was not associated with cell-mediated immunity based on the response to phytohaemagglutinin injection. However, the bactericidal capacity of nestling plasma had a positive but weak association with blood Se concentrations, and this association was stronger at the spill site. Our results indicate that exposure to these low concentrations of elements had few effects on nestling endocrine and immune physiology. The long-term health consequences of low-level exposure to elements and of exposure to greater element concentrations in avian species require additional study. PMID:27293639

  18. Oxidative stress in marine bivalves tissues in response to accumulation of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chelomin, V.P.; Belcheva, N.N.; Zakartsev, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    Using model aquarium experiments the authors have shown that the accumulation of heavy metals (copper and cadmium) by the tissues of marine bivalves (Mytilus edulis, Mizuhopecten yessoensis) is followed by a complex of alterations in the lipid matrix of some membrane organelles. It is supposed that the disturbance of balance of prooxidant and antioxidant processes is the main mechanism in heavy metal-inducible damage, of membranes. This possibility is supported by results of levels of conjugated dienes, malondialdehyde and Shiff`s bases, determined as indicators of lipid peroxidation in different tissues of molluscs, markedly increased with metal accumulation. Unlike to cadmium, the copper possess prooxidative activity, stimulating the peroxidation of membrane lipids directly. In spite of some distinctions the intracellular antioxidative systems (glutathione system and tocopherol) showed extreme sensitivity to the accumulation of both metals. It was demonstrated that the accumulation of these metals was followed by die changes of glutathione and tocopherol contents and the inhibition of glutathione-reductase. activity,, but it was not correlated with changes of Se-depending glutathioneperoxidase activity. As it results from kinetic data the most damages of glutathione system are revealed on this earliest stages of metal accumulation when metallothionein synthesis is on the low level. The amount of glutathione in the tissues was restored almost to their original level when metallothionein synthesis increases markedly. But, total amount of peroxides is retained on the high level for a long period of time. On the basis of results it is reasonable to assume that the accumulation of these metals by mollusc tissues does not proceed without leaving a trace. This process is a potential menace for increasing of destructive events in consequence of disturbance of balance of prooxidant and antioxidant processes.

  19. Computational Simulation of the Mechanical Response of Brain Tissue under Blast Loading

    PubMed Central

    Laksari, Kaveh; Assari, Soroush; Seibold, Benjamin; Sadeghipour, Keya; Darvish, Kurosh

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, numerical simulations of nonlinear wave propagation and shock formation in brain tissue have been presented and a new mechanism of injury for Blast-Induced Neurotrauma (BINT) is proposed. A quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) constitutive material model was used that encompasses the nonlinearity as well as the rate dependence of the tissue relevant to BINT modeling. A one-dimensional model was implemented using the discontinuous Galerkin -finite element method and studied with displacement-input and pressure-input boundary conditions. The model was validated against LS-DYNA finite element code and theoretical results for speci c conditions that resulted in shock wave formation. It was shown that a continuous wave can become a shock wave as it propagates in the QLV brain tissue when the initial changes in acceleration are beyond a certain limit. The high spatial gradient of stress and strain at the shock front cause large relative motions at the cellular scale at high temporal rates even when the maximum stresses and strains are relatively low. This gradient-induced local deformation may occur away from the boundary and is proposed as a contributing factor to the diffuse nature of BINT. PMID:25205088

  20. Computational simulation of the mechanical response of brain tissue under blast loading.

    PubMed

    Laksari, Kaveh; Assari, Soroush; Seibold, Benjamin; Sadeghipour, Keya; Darvish, Kurosh

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, numerical simulations of nonlinear wave propagation and shock formation in brain tissue have been presented and a new mechanism of injury for blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) is proposed. A quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) constitutive material model was used that encompasses the nonlinearity as well as the rate dependence of the tissue relevant to BINT modeling. A one-dimensional model was implemented using the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method and studied with displacement- and pressure-input boundary conditions. The model was validated against LS-DYNA finite element code and theoretical results for specific conditions that resulted in shock wave formation. It was shown that a continuous wave can become a shock wave as it propagates in the QLV brain tissue when the initial changes in acceleration are beyond a certain limit. The high spatial gradient of stress and strain at the shock front cause large relative motions at the cellular scale at high temporal rates even when the maximum stresses and strains are relatively low. This gradient-induced local deformation may occur away from the boundary and is proposed as a contributing factor to the diffuse nature of BINT. PMID:25205088

  1. Modeling Therapy Response and Spatial Tissue Distribution of Erlotinib in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Grüner, Barbara M; Winkelmann, Isabel; Feuchtinger, Annette; Sun, Na; Balluff, Benjamin; Teichmann, Nicole; Herner, Alexander; Kalideris, Evdokia; Steiger, Katja; Braren, Rickmer; Aichler, Michaela; Esposito, Irene; Schmid, Roland M; Walch, Axel; Siveke, Jens T

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is likely the most aggressive and therapy-resistant of all cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the emerging technology of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) as a powerful tool to study drug delivery and spatial tissue distribution in PDAC. We utilized an established genetically engineered mouse model of spontaneous PDAC to examine the distribution of the small-molecule inhibitor erlotinib in healthy pancreas and PDAC. MALDI IMS was utilized on sections of single-dose or long-term-treated mice to measure drug tissue distribution. Histologic and statistical analyses were performed to correlate morphology, drug distribution, and survival. We found that erlotinib levels were significantly lower in PDAC compared with healthy tissue (P = 0.0078). Survival of long-term-treated mice did not correlate with overall levels of erlotinib or with overall histologic tumor grade but did correlate both with the percentage of atypical glands in the cancer (P = 0.021, rs = 0.59) and the level of erlotinib in those atypical glands (P = 0.019, rs = 0.60). The results of this pilot study present MALDI IMS as a reliable technology to study drug delivery and spatial distribution of compounds in a preclinical setting and support drug imaging-based translational approaches. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 1145-52. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26823494

  2. Fiber optics in adverse environments

    SciTech Connect

    Lyous, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation effects in optical fibers are considered, taking into account recent progress in the investigation of radiation resistant optical fibers, radiation damage in optical fibers, radiation-induced transient absorption in optical fibers, X-ray-induced transient attenuation at low temperatures in polymer clad silica (PCS) fibers, optical fiber composition and radiation hardness, the response of irradiated optical waveguides at low temperatures, and the effect of ionizing radiation on fiber-optic waveguides. Other topics explored are related to environmental effects on components of fiber optic systems, and radiation detection systems using optical fibers. Fiber optic systems in adverse environments are also discussed, giving attention to the survivability of Army fiber optics systems, space application of fiber optics systems, fiber optic wavelength multiplexing for civil aviation applications, a new fiber optic data bus topology, fiber optics for aircraft engine/inlet control, and application of fiber optics in high voltage substations.

  3. The Small-RNA Profiles of Almond (Prunus dulcis Mill.) Reproductive Tissues in Response to Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Shiran, Behrouz; Rabei, Mohammad; Fallahi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Spring frost is an important environmental stress that threatens the production of Prunus trees. However, little information is available regarding molecular response of these plants to the frost stress. Using high throughput sequencing, this study was conducted to identify differentially expressed miRNAs, both the conserved and the non-conserved ones, in the reproductive tissues of almond tolerant H genotype under cold stress. Analysis of 50 to 58 million raw reads led to identification of 174 unique conserved and 59 novel microRNAs (miRNAs). Differential expression pattern analysis showed that 50 miRNA families were expressed differentially in one or both of almond reproductive tissues (anther and ovary). Out of these 50 miRNA families, 12 and 15 displayed up-regulation and down-regulation, respectively. The distribution of conserved miRNA families indicated that miR482f harbor the highest number of members. Confirmation of miRNAs expression patterns by quantitative real- time PCR (qPCR) was performed in cold tolerant (H genotype) alongside a sensitive variety (Sh12 genotype). Our analysis revealed differential expression for 9 miRNAs in anther and 3 miRNAs in ovary between these two varieties. Target prediction of miRNAs followed by differential expression analysis resulted in identification of 83 target genes, mostly transcription factors. This study comprehensively catalogued expressed miRNAs under different temperatures in two reproductive tissues (anther and ovary). Results of current study and the previous RNA-seq study, which was conducted in the same tissues by our group, provide a unique opportunity to understand the molecular basis of responses of almond to cold stress. The results can also enhance the possibility for gene manipulation to develop cold tolerant plants. PMID:27253370

  4. The Small-RNA Profiles of Almond (Prunus dulcis Mill.) Reproductive Tissues in Response to Cold Stress.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Marzieh; Ghazanfari, Farahnaz; Fadaei, Adeleh; Ahmadi, Laleh; Shiran, Behrouz; Rabei, Mohammad; Fallahi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Spring frost is an important environmental stress that threatens the production of Prunus trees. However, little information is available regarding molecular response of these plants to the frost stress. Using high throughput sequencing, this study was conducted to identify differentially expressed miRNAs, both the conserved and the non-conserved ones, in the reproductive tissues of almond tolerant H genotype under cold stress. Analysis of 50 to 58 million raw reads led to identification of 174 unique conserved and 59 novel microRNAs (miRNAs). Differential expression pattern analysis showed that 50 miRNA families were expressed differentially in one or both of almond reproductive tissues (anther and ovary). Out of these 50 miRNA families, 12 and 15 displayed up-regulation and down-regulation, respectively. The distribution of conserved miRNA families indicated that miR482f harbor the highest number of members. Confirmation of miRNAs expression patterns by quantitative real- time PCR (qPCR) was performed in cold tolerant (H genotype) alongside a sensitive variety (Sh12 genotype). Our analysis revealed differential expression for 9 miRNAs in anther and 3 miRNAs in ovary between these two varieties. Target prediction of miRNAs followed by differential expression analysis resulted in identification of 83 target genes, mostly transcription factors. This study comprehensively catalogued expressed miRNAs under different temperatures in two reproductive tissues (anther and ovary). Results of current study and the previous RNA-seq study, which was conducted in the same tissues by our group, provide a unique opportunity to understand the molecular basis of responses of almond to cold stress. The results can also enhance the possibility for gene manipulation to develop cold tolerant plants. PMID:27253370

  5. Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

    2005-07-01

    Lack of accurate data for epidemiological studies of low dose radiation effects necessitates development of dosimetric models allowing prediction of cancer risks for different organs. The objective of this work is to develop a model of the radiation response of human bronchiolar tissue with single cell resolution. The computer model describes epithelial tissue as an ensemble of individual cells, with the geometry of a human bronchiole and the properties of different cell types are taken into account. The model simulates the tissue kinetics and radiation exposure in four dimensions: three spatial dimensions and a temporal dimension. The bronchiole is modeled as a regular hollow cylinder with the epithelial cells of three different types (basal, secretory, and ciliated) lining its interior. For the purposes of assessment of radiation damage to the cells only the nuclei of the cells have been modeled. Subroutines describing cellular kinetics have been developed to simulate cell turnover in a normal epithelial tissue. Monte Carlo subroutines have been developed to simulate exposure to alpha particles; the GEANT4 toolkit has been used to simulate exposure to low LET radiation. Each hit cell is provided with a record of energy deposition, and this record is passed to the progeny if the cell survives. The model output provides data on the number of basal progenitor cells in different phases of a cell life-cycle and secretory to ciliated cell ratio after several generations of cell proliferation. The model calculates labeling and mitotic indices and estimates the average cell turnover time for the bronchiolar tissue. Microdosimetric calculations are performed for cells traversed by ionizing particles. The model will be used to assess the accumulation of damage in cells due to protracted low level radiation exposure. The model output may provide directions for the future experimental design.

  6. ISMP Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA’s MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:24421544

  7. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions. PMID:25458866

  8. Phosphoprotein network analysis of white adipose tissues unveils deregulated pathways in response to high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Asfa, Alli Shaik; Qiu, Beiying; Wee, Sheena; Choi, Hyungwon; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Despite efforts in the last decade, signaling aberrations associated with obesity remain poorly understood. To dissect molecular mechanisms that define this complex metabolic disorder, we carried out global phosphoproteomic analysis of white adipose tissue (WAT) from mice fed on low-fat diet (LFD) and high-fat diet (HFD). We quantified phosphorylation levels on 7696 peptides, and found significant differential phosphorylation levels in 282 phosphosites from 191 proteins, including various insulin-responsive proteins and metabolic enzymes involved in lipid homeostasis in response to high-fat feeding. Kinase-substrate prediction and integrated network analysis of the altered phosphoproteins revealed underlying signaling modulations during HFD-induced obesity, and suggested deregulation of lipogenic and lipolytic pathways. Mutation of the differentially-regulated novel phosphosite on cytoplasmic acetyl-coA forming enzyme ACSS2 (S263A) upon HFD-induced obesity led to accumulation of serum triglycerides and reduced insulin-responsive AKT phosphorylation as compared to wild type ACSS2, thus highlighting its role in obesity. Altogether, our study presents a comprehensive map of adipose tissue phosphoproteome in obesity and reveals many previously unknown candidate phosphorylation sites for future functional investigation. PMID:27180971

  9. Phosphoprotein network analysis of white adipose tissues unveils deregulated pathways in response to high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Asfa, Alli Shaik; Qiu, Beiying; Wee, Sheena; Choi, Hyungwon; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Despite efforts in the last decade, signaling aberrations associated with obesity remain poorly understood. To dissect molecular mechanisms that define this complex metabolic disorder, we carried out global phosphoproteomic analysis of white adipose tissue (WAT) from mice fed on low-fat diet (LFD) and high-fat diet (HFD). We quantified phosphorylation levels on 7696 peptides, and found significant differential phosphorylation levels in 282 phosphosites from 191 proteins, including various insulin-responsive proteins and metabolic enzymes involved in lipid homeostasis in response to high-fat feeding. Kinase-substrate prediction and integrated network analysis of the altered phosphoproteins revealed underlying signaling modulations during HFD-induced obesity, and suggested deregulation of lipogenic and lipolytic pathways. Mutation of the differentially-regulated novel phosphosite on cytoplasmic acetyl-coA forming enzyme ACSS2 (S263A) upon HFD-induced obesity led to accumulation of serum triglycerides and reduced insulin-responsive AKT phosphorylation as compared to wild type ACSS2, thus highlighting its role in obesity. Altogether, our study presents a comprehensive map of adipose tissue phosphoproteome in obesity and reveals many previously unknown candidate phosphorylation sites for future functional investigation. PMID:27180971

  10. Modulation of tissue inflammatory response by histamine receptors in scorpion envenomation pathogenesis: involvement of H4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Lamraoui, Amal; Adi-Bessalem, Sonia; Laraba-Djebari, Fatima

    2014-10-01

    The inflammatory response caused by scorpion venoms is a key event in the pathogenesis of scorpion envenomation. This response was assessed in the cardiac, pulmonary, and gastric tissues of envenomed mice. The results reveal an increase of permeability in cardiac, pulmonary, and gastric vessels accompanied by an edema-forming, inflammatory cell infiltration, and imbalanced redox status. These effects are correlated with severe tissue alterations and concomitant increase of metabolic enzymes in sera. Pretreatment of mice with antagonists of H1, H2, or H4 receptors markedly alleviated these alterations in the heart and lungs. Nevertheless, the blockade of the H3 receptor slightly reduced these disorders. Histamine H2 and H4 receptors were the most pharmacological targets involved in the gastric oxidative inflammation. These findings could help to better understand the role of histamine in scorpion venom-induced inflammatory response and propose new therapy using as targets the H4 receptor in addition to histamine H1 and H2 receptors to attenuate the induced inflammatory disorders encountered in scorpion envenoming. PMID:24858599

  11. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase suppresses the adverse phenotype of endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells and improves endocrine response in endocrine-sensitive cells.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Stephen; Barnfather, Peter; Hayes, Edd; Bramble, Pamela; Christensen, James; Nicholson, Robert I; Barrett-Lee, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Acquired resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer is a major clinical problem. Previous reports have demonstrated that cell models of acquired endocrine resistance have altered cell-matrix adhesion and a highly migratory phenotype, features which may impact on tumour spread in vivo. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase that regulates signalling pathways central to cell adhesion, migration and survival and its expression is frequently deregulated in breast cancer. In this study, we have used the novel FAK inhibitor PF573228 to address the role of FAK in the development of endocrine resistance. Whilst total-FAK expression was similar between endocrine-sensitive and endocrine-resistant MCF7 cells, FAK phosphorylation status (Y397 or Y861) was altered in resistance. PF573228 promoted a dose-dependent inhibition of FAK phosphorylation at Y397 but did not affect other FAK activation sites (pY407, pY576 and pY861). Endocrine-resistant cells were more sensitive to these inhibitory effects versus MCF7 (mean IC(50) for FAK pY397 inhibition: 0.43 μM, 0.05 μM and 0.13 μM for MCF7, TamR and FasR cells, respectively). Inhibition of FAK pY397 was associated with a reduction in TamR and FasR adhesion to, and migration over, matrix components. PF573228 as a single agent (0-1 μM) did not affect the growth of MCF7 cells or their endocrine-resistant counterparts. However, treatment of endocrine-sensitive cells with PF573228 and tamoxifen combined resulted in greater suppression of proliferation versus single agent treatment. Together these data suggest the importance of FAK in the process of endocrine resistance, particularly in the development of an aggressive, migratory cell phenotype and demonstrate the potential to improve endocrine response through combination treatment. PMID:20354780

  12. Tissue Responses to Postoperative Laser Therapy in Diabetic Rats Submitted to Excisional Wounds

    PubMed Central

    de Loura Santana, Cristiano; de Fátima Teixeira Silva, Daniela; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Prates, Renato Araujo; Souza, Amanda Pires; Gomes, Mariana Teixeira; de Azevedo Sampaio, Brunna Pileggi; Shibuya, Josiane Ferraretto; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; França, Cristiane Miranda

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study about low-level laser therapy biomodulation on a full-thickness burn model we showed that single and fractionated dose regimens increased wound healing and leukocyte influx similarly when compared with untreated control. In order to verify if this finding would be similar in an impaired wound model, we investigated the effect of single and multiple irradiations on wound closure rate, type of inflammatory infiltrate, myofibroblasts, collagen deposition, and optical retardation of collagen in diabetic rats. Female Wistar rats in the same estrous cycle had diabetes induced with streptozotocin and an 8-mm excisional wound performed with a punch. The experimental groups were: control group – untreated ulcer; single-dose group – ulcer submitted to single dose of diode laser therapy (λ = 660 ± 2 nm; P = 30 mW; energy density: 4 J/cm2) and fractionated-dose group – ulcer submitted to 1 J/cm2 laser therapy on Days 1, 3, 8, and 10. The ulcers were photographed on the experimental days and after euthanasia tissue samples were routinely processed for histological and immunohistochemistry analyses. Independently of the energy density, laser therapy accelerated wound closure by approximately 40% in the first three days in comparison to the control group. Laser therapy increased acute inflammatory infiltrate until Day 3. Both laser groups exhibited more myofibroblasts and better collagen organization than the control group. The findings demonstrate that low-level laser therapy in the immediate postoperative period can enhance the tissue repair process in a diabetes model. Similar effects were achieved with laser therapy applied a single time with an energy density of 4 J/cm2 and applied four times with an energy density of 1 J/cm2. The application of laser therapy in the inflammatory phase was the most important factor to the enhancement of the tissue repair process. PMID:25909480

  13. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN MOUSE BLADDER TISSUE IN RESPONSE TO INORGANIC ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic human exposures to high arsenic concentrations are associated with lung, skin, and bladder cancer. Considerable controversy exists concerning arsenic mode of action and low dose extrapolation. This investigation was designed to identify dose-response changes in gene expre...

  14. Study of Hind Limb Tissue Gas Phase Formation in Response to Suspended Adynamia and Hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Bruce D.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that reduced joint/muscle activity (hypo kinesia) as well as reduced or null loading of limbs (adynamia) in gravity would result in reduced decompression-induced gas phase and symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS). Finding a correlation between the two phenomena would correspond to the proposed reduction in tissue gas phase formation in astronauts undergoing decompression during extravehicular activity (EVA) in microgravity. The observation may further explain the reported low incidence of DCS in space.

  15. Expression of Estrogen-Related Gene Markers in Breast Cancer Tissue Predicts Aromatase Inhibitor Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Irene; Lin, Zhihong; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Reierstad, Scott; Khan, Seema A.; Bulun, Serdar E.

    2013-01-01

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the most effective class of drugs in the endocrine treatment of breast cancer, with an approximate 50% treatment response rate. Our objective was to determine whether intratumoral expression levels of estrogen-related genes are predictive of AI responsiveness in postmenopausal women with breast cancer. Primary breast carcinomas were obtained from 112 women who received AI therapy after failing adjuvant tamoxifen therapy and developing recurrent breast cancer. Tumor ERα and PR protein expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of 5 estrogen-related genes–AKR1C3, aromatase, ERα, and 2 estradiol/ERα target genes, BRCA1 and PR–were measured by real-time PCR. Tumor protein and mRNA levels were compared with breast cancer progression rates to determine predictive accuracy. Responsiveness to AI therapy–defined as the combined complete response, partial response, and stable disease rates for at least 6 months–was 51%; rates were 56% in ERα-IHC-positive and 14% in ERα-IHC-negative tumors. Levels of ERα, PR, or BRCA1 mRNA were independently predictive for responsiveness to AI. In cross-validated analyses, a combined measurement of tumor ERα and PR mRNA levels yielded a more superior specificity (36%) and identical sensitivity (96%) to the current clinical practice (ERα/PR-IHC). In patients with ERα/PR-IHC-negative tumors, analysis of mRNA expression revealed either non-significant trends or statistically significant positive predictive values for AI responsiveness. In conclusion, expression levels of estrogen-related mRNAs are predictive for AI responsiveness in postmenopausal women with breast cancer, and mRNA expression analysis may improve patient selection. PMID:24223121

  16. System Model Network for Adipose Tissue Signatures Related to Weight Changes in Response to Calorie Restriction and Subsequent Weight Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Montastier, Emilie; Villa-Vialaneix, Nathalie; Caspar-Bauguil, Sylvie; Hlavaty, Petr; Tvrzicka, Eva; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Saris, Wim H. M.; Langin, Dominique; Kunesova, Marie; Viguerie, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Nutrigenomics investigates relationships between nutrients and all genome-encoded molecular entities. This holistic approach requires systems biology to scrutinize the effects of diet on tissue biology. To decipher the adipose tissue (AT) response to diet induced weight changes we focused on key molecular (lipids and transcripts) AT species during a longitudinal dietary intervention. To obtain a systems model, a network approach was used to combine all sets of variables (bio-clinical, fatty acids and mRNA levels) and get an overview of their interactions. AT fatty acids and mRNA levels were quantified in 135 obese women at baseline, after an 8-week low calorie diet (LCD) and after 6 months of ad libitum weight maintenance diet (WMD). After LCD, individuals were stratified a posteriori according to weight change during WMD. A 3 steps approach was used to infer a global model involving the 3 sets of variables. It consisted in inferring intra-omic networks with sparse partial correlations and inter-omic networks with regularized canonical correlation analysis and finally combining the obtained omic-specific network in a single global model. The resulting networks were analyzed using node clustering, systematic important node extraction and cluster comparisons. Overall, AT showed both constant and phase-specific biological signatures in response to dietary intervention. AT from women regaining weight displayed growth factors, angiogenesis and proliferation signaling signatures, suggesting unfavorable tissue hyperplasia. By contrast, after LCD a strong positive relationship between AT myristoleic acid (a fatty acid with low AT level) content and de novo lipogenesis mRNAs was found. This relationship was also observed, after WMD, in the group of women that continued to lose weight. This original system biology approach provides novel insight in the AT response to weight control by highlighting the central role of myristoleic acid that may account for the beneficial

  17. Metabolic activity of brown, "beige," and white adipose tissues in response to chronic adrenergic stimulation in male mice.

    PubMed

    Labbé, Sébastien M; Caron, Alexandre; Chechi, Kanta; Laplante, Mathieu; Lecomte, Roger; Richard, Denis

    2016-07-01

    Classical brown adipocytes such as those found in interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) represent energy-burning cells, which have been postulated to play a pivotal role in energy metabolism. Brown adipocytes can also be found in white adipose tissue (WAT) depots [e.g., inguinal WAT (iWAT)] following adrenergic stimulation, and they have been referred to as "beige" adipocytes. Whether the presence of these adipocytes, which gives iWAT a beige appearance, can confer a white depot with some thermogenic activity remains to be seen. In consequence, we designed the present study to investigate the metabolic activity of iBAT, iWAT, and epididymal white depots in mice. Mice were either 1) kept at thermoneutrality (30°C), 2) kept at 30°C and treated daily for 14 days with an adrenergic agonist [CL-316,243 (CL)], or 3) housed at 10°C for 14 days. Metabolic activity was assessed using positron emission tomography imaging with fluoro-[(18)F]deoxyglucose (glucose uptake), fluoro-[(18)F]thiaheptadecanoic acid (fatty acid uptake), and [(11)C]acetate (oxidative activity). In each group, substrate uptakes and oxidative activity were measured in anesthetized mice in response to acute CL. Our results revealed iBAT as a major site of metabolic activity, which exhibited enhanced glucose and nonesterified fatty acid uptakes and oxidative activity in response to chronic cold and CL. On the other hand, beige adipose tissue failed to exhibit appreciable increase in oxidative activity in response to chronic cold and CL. Altogether, our results suggest that the contribution of beige fat to acute-CL-induced metabolic activity is low compared with that of iBAT, even after sustained adrenergic stimulation. PMID:27143559

  18. Investigation of the spatiotemporal responses of nanoparticles in tumor tissues with a small-scale mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Huang, Chih-Kang; Lu, Kuo-Wei; Horng, Tzyy-Leng; Lin, Win-Li

    2013-01-01

    The transport and accumulation of anticancer nanodrugs in tumor tissues are affected by many factors including particle properties, vascular density and leakiness, and interstitial diffusivity. It is important to understand the effects of these factors on the detailed drug distribution in the entire tumor for an effective treatment. In this study, we developed a small-scale mathematical model to systematically study the spatiotemporal responses and accumulative exposures of macromolecular carriers in localized tumor tissues. We chose various dextrans as model carriers and studied the effects of vascular density, permeability, diffusivity, and half-life of dextrans on their spatiotemporal concentration responses and accumulative exposure distribution to tumor cells. The relevant biological parameters were obtained from experimental results previously reported by the Dreher group. The area under concentration-time response curve (AUC) quantified the extent of tissue exposure to a drug and therefore was considered more reliable in assessing the extent of the overall drug exposure than individual concentrations. The results showed that 1) a small macromolecule can penetrate deep into the tumor interstitium and produce a uniform but low spatial distribution of AUC; 2) large macromolecules produce high AUC in the perivascular region, but low AUC in the distal region away from vessels; 3) medium-sized macromolecules produce a relatively uniform and high AUC in the tumor interstitium between two vessels; 4) enhancement of permeability can elevate the level of AUC, but have little effect on its uniformity while enhancement of diffusivity is able to raise the level of AUC and improve its uniformity; 5) a longer half-life can produce a deeper penetration and a higher level of AUC distribution. The numerical results indicate that a long half-life carrier in plasma and a high interstitial diffusivity are the key factors to produce a high and relatively uniform spatial AUC

  19. Identification of SNPs associated with susceptibility for development of adverse reactions to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Barry S

    2011-02-01

    Although cancer treatment with radiation can produce high cure rates, adverse effects often result from radiotherapy. These toxicities are manifested as damage to normal tissues and organs in the radiation field. In recognition of the substantial variation in the intrinsic response of individuals to radiation, an effort began approximately 10 years ago to discover the genetic markers, primarily SNPs, which are associated with susceptibility for the development of these adverse responses to radiation therapy. The goal of this research is to identify the SNPs that could serve as the basis of an assay to predict which cancer patients are most likely to develop complications resulting from radiotherapy. This would permit personalization and optimization of the treatment plan for each cancer patient. PMID:21332318

  20. Tissue-specific molecular immune response to lipopolysaccharide challenge in emaciated anadromous Arctic charr.

    PubMed

    Philip, Anju M; Jørgensen, Even H; Maule, Alec G; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2014-07-01

    Anadromous Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) undergo voluntary winter fasting for months in the Arctic. We tested the hypothesis that extended fasting will compromise the ability of this species to evoke an immune response. Charr were either fed or fasted for 85 days and challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the molecular immune response in the liver and spleen assessed at 8 and 96 h post-injection. LPS increased IL-1β, IL-8, and serum amyloid protein A (SAA) mRNA levels in both groups, but the liver IL-1β and IL-8, and spleen IL-8 responses were reduced in the fasted group. Fasting upregulated SOCS-1 and SOCS-2 mRNA abundance, while LPS stimulated SOCS-3 mRNA abundance and this response was higher in the fasted liver. Collectively, extended fasting and emaciation does not curtail the capacity of charr to evoke an immune response, whereas upregulation of SOCS may be a key adaptation to conserve energy by restricting the inflammatory response. PMID:24594135

  1. Tissue-specific induction of Hsp90 mRNA and plasma cortisol response in chinook salmon following heat shock, seawater challenge, and handling challenge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palmisano, Aldo N.; Winton, J.R.; Dickhoff, Walton W.

    2000-01-01

    In studying the whole-body response of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to various stressors, we found that 5-hour exposure to elevated temperature (mean 21.6??C; + 10.6??C over ambient) induced a marked increase in Hsp90 messenger RNA accumulation in heart, brain, gill, muscle, liver, kidney, and tail fin tissues. The most vital tissues (heart, brain, gill, and muscle) showed the greatest Hsp90-mRNA response, with heart tissue increasing approximately 35-fold, Heat shock induced no increase in plasma cortisol. In contrast, a standard handling challenge induced high plasma cortisol levels, but no elevation in Hsp90 mRNA in any tissue, clearly separating the physiological and cellular stress responses. We saw no increase either in tissue Hsp90 mRNA levels or in plasma cortisol concentrations after exposing the fish to seawater overnight.

  2. Temporal changes in stress and tissue-specific metabolic responses to municipal wastewater effluent exposure in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Ings, Jennifer S; Oakes, Ken D; Vijayan, Mathilakath M; Servos, Mark R

    2012-08-01

    Sub-chronic exposure to municipal wastewater effluent (MWWE) in situ was recently shown to impact the acute response to a secondary stressor in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). However, little is known about whether MWWE exposure in itself is stressful to the animal. To address this, we carried out a laboratory study to examine the organismal and cellular stress responses and tissue-specific metabolic capacity in trout exposed to MWWE. Juvenile rainbow trout were exposed to 0, 20 and 90% MWWE (from a tertiary wastewater treatment plant), that was replenished every 2d, for 14 d. Fish were sampled 2, 8 or 14 d post-exposure. Plasma cortisol, glucose and lactate levels were measured as indicators of organismal stress response, while inducible heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), constitutive heat shock protein 70 (hsc70) and hsp90 expression in the liver were used as markers of cellular stress response. Impact of MWWE on cortisol signaling was ascertained by determining glucocorticoid receptor protein (GR) expression in the liver, brain and, heart, and metabolic capacity was evaluated by measuring liver glycogen content and tissue-specific activities of key enzymes in intermediary metabolism. Plasma glucose and lactate levels were unaffected by exposure to MWWEs, whereas cortisol showed a transient increase in the 20% group at 8d. Liver hsc70 and hsp90, but not hsp70 expression, were higher in the 90% MWWE group after 8d. There was a temporal change in GR expression in the liver and heart, but not brain of trout exposed to MWWE. Liver glycogen content and activities liver gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), and alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT) were significantly affected by MWWE exposure. The glycolytic enzymes pyruvate kinase (PK) and hexokinase (HK) activities were significantly higher temporally by MWWE exposure in the gill and heart, but not in the liver and brain. Overall, a 14 d exposure to MWWE evokes a cellular stress response and

  3. Pilot Study: Unique Response of Bone Tissue During an Investigation of Radio-Adaptive Effects in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibonga, J. D.; Iwaniec, U.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: We obtained bone tissue to evaluate the collateral effects of experiments designed to investigate molecular mechanisms of radio-adaptation in a mouse model. Radio-adaptation describes a process by which the prior exposure to low dose radiation can protect against the toxic effect of a subsequent high dose exposure. In the radio-adaptation experiments, C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to either a Sham or a priming Low Dose (5 cGy) of Cs-137 gamma rays before being exposed to either a Sham or High Dose (6 Gy) 24 hours later. ANALYSIS: Bone tissue were obtained from two experiments where mice were sacrificed at 3 days (n=3/group, 12 total) and at 14 days (n=6/group, 24 total) following high dose exposure. Tissues were analyzed to 1) evaluate a radio-adaptive response in bone tissue and 2) describe cellular and microstructural effects for two skeletal sites with different rates of bone turnover. One tibia and one lumbar vertebrae (LV2), collected at the 3-day time-point, were analyzed by bone histomorphometry and micro-CT to evaluate the cellular response and any evidence of microarchitectural impact. Likewise, tibia and LV2, collected at the 14-day time-point, were analyzed by micro-CT alone to evaluate resulting changes to bone structure and microarchitecture. The data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA to evaluate the effects of the priming low dose radiation, of the high dose radiation, and of any interaction between the priming low and high doses of radiation. Bone histomorphometry was performed in the cancellous bone (aka trabecular bone) compartments of the proximal tibial metaphysis and of LV2. RESULTS: Cellular Response @ 3 Days The priming Low Dose radiation decreased osteoblast-covered bone perimeter in the proximal tibia and the total cell density in the bone marrow in the LV2. High Dose radiation, regardless of prior exposure to priming dose, dramatically reduced total cell density in bone marrow of both the long bone and vertebra. However, in the proximal

  4. Enterotoxemia in the goat: the humoral response and local tissue reaction following vaccination with two different bacterin-toxoids.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, T E; Butler, D G; Bell, J A

    1983-04-01

    A vaccination trial involving 72 goats was designed to compare the epsilon antitoxin titres and local reactions at the injection sites, of two commercial enterotoxemia vaccines. Three dosage regimens were used for each vaccine (12 goats per group). Although no significant differences were noted in humoral immune response between the two vaccines (P = 0.05), one vaccine regime resulted in low titres (P = 0.05) on two occasions. Local tissue reactions at injection sites persisted for six months in 53% of the goats regardless of vaccine used or dosage administered. No immunological basis for the reported differences in vaccine efficacy between sheep and goats was observed in this trial. PMID:6309346

  5. TISSUE SPECIFIC RESPONSES TO ABERRANT FGF SIGNALING IN COMPLEX HEAD PHENOTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Motch, Susan M.; Pankratz, Talia L.; Wang, Yingli; Aldridge, Kristina; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of fibroblast growth factor and receptor (FGF/FGFR) signaling in bone development is well studied, partly because mutations in FGFRs cause human diseases of achondroplasia and FGFR-related craniosynostosis syndromes including Crouzon syndrome. The FGFR2c C342Y mutation is a frequent cause of Crouzon syndrome, characterized by premature cranial vault suture closure, midfacial deficiency and neurocranial dysmorphology. Here, using newborn Fgfr2cC342Y/+ Crouzon syndrome mice, we tested whether the phenotypic effects of this mutation go beyond the skeletal tissues of the skull, altering the development of other non-skeletal head tissues including the brain, the eyes, the nasopharynx and the inner ears. Results Quantitative analysis of 3D multimodal imaging (high resolution micro computed tomography and magnetic resonance microscopic images) revealed local differences in skull morphology and coronal suture patency between Fgfr2cC342Y/+ mice and unaffected littermates, as well as changes in brain shape but not brain size, significant reductions in nasopharyngeal and eye volumes, and no difference in inner ear volume in Fgfr2cC342Y/+ mice. Conclusion These findings provide an expanded catalogue of clinical phenotypes in Crouzon syndrome caused by aberrant FGF/FGFR signaling and evidence of the broad role for FGF/FGFR signaling in development and evolution of the vertebrate head. PMID:23172727

  6. Disentangling linear and nonlinear brain responses to evoked deep tissue pain

    PubMed Central

    Loggia, Marco L.; Edwards, Robert R.; Kim, Jieun; Vangel, Mark G.; Wasan, Ajay; Gollub, Randy L.; Harris, Richard E.; Park, Kyungmo; Napadow, Vitaly

    2012-01-01

    Pain stimuli evoke widespread responses in the brain. However, our understanding of the physiological significance underlying heterogeneous response within different pain-activated and -deactivated regions is still limited. Using functional MRI, we evaluated brain responses to a wide range of stimulus intensity levels (1 innocuous, 7 painful) in order to estimate region-specific stimulus-response functions, which we hypothesized could illuminate that region’s functional relationship to pain. Linear and nonlinear brain responses to pain were estimated through independent Legendre polynomial transformations of pain ratings within a general linear model. This approach identified at least five different, regionally-specific activity profiles in the brain. Linearly increasing (e.g., primary somatosensory/motor cortex, insulae) and intensity-independent (e.g., secondary somatosensory cortex) activation was noted in traditional pain processing areas, potentially reflecting sensory encoding and all-or-none salience responses, respectively. Multiple activity profiles were seen in areas of the default mode network (DMN): intensity-independent deactivation (e.g., posterior cingulate cortex), linearly decreasing (e.g., contralateral inferior parietal lobule), and quadratic (U-shaped; e.g., medial prefrontal cortex). The latter observation suggests that: 1) different DMN subregions exhibit functional heterogeneity and 2) some DMN subregions respond in a percept-related manner to pain, suggesting closer linkage between the DMN and pain processing than previously thought. Future studies should apply a similar approach using innocuous stimuli of multiple intensities in order to evaluate whether the response profiles reported here can also be generalized to nonpainful somatosensory processing. PMID:22883925

  7. Physiological response of cardiac tissue to bisphenol a: alterations in ventricular pressure and contractility

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Daina; Chandra, Akhil; Jaimes, Rafael; Sarvazyan, Narine; Kay, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Biomonitoring studies have indicated that humans are routinely exposed to bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical that is commonly used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Epidemiological studies have shown that BPA exposure in humans is associated with cardiovascular disease; however, the direct effects of BPA on cardiac physiology are largely unknown. Previously, we have shown that BPA exposure slows atrioventricular electrical conduction, decreases epicardial conduction velocity, and prolongs action potential duration in excised rat hearts. In the present study, we tested if BPA exposure also adversely affects cardiac contractile performance. We examined the impact of BPA exposure level, sex, and pacing rate on cardiac contractile function in excised rat hearts. Hearts were retrogradely perfused at constant pressure and exposed to 10−9-10−4 M BPA. Left ventricular developed pressure and contractility were measured during sinus rhythm and during pacing (5, 6.5, and 9 Hz). Ca2+ transients were imaged from whole hearts and from neonatal rat cardiomyocyte layers. During sinus rhythm in female hearts, BPA exposure decreased left ventricular developed pressure and inotropy in a dose-dependent manner. The reduced contractile performance was exacerbated at higher pacing rates. BPA-induced effects on contractile performance were also observed in male hearts, albeit to a lesser extent. Exposure to BPA altered Ca2+ handling within whole hearts (reduced diastolic and systolic Ca2+ transient potentiation) and neonatal cardiomyocytes (reduced Ca2+ transient amplitude and prolonged Ca2+ transient release time). In conclusion, BPA exposure significantly impaired cardiac performance in a dose-dependent manner, having a major negative impact upon electrical conduction, intracellular Ca2+ handing, and ventricular contractility. PMID:25980024

  8. Strategies for optimizing the response of cancer and normal tissues to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Moding, Everett J.; Kastan, Michael B.; Kirsch, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 50% of all patients with cancer receive radiation therapy at some point during the course of their treatment, and the majority of these patients are treated with curative intent. Despite recent advances in the planning of radiation treatment and the delivery of image-guided radiation therapy, acute toxicity and potential long-term side effects often limit the ability to deliver a sufficient dose of radiation to control tumours locally. In the past two decades, a better understanding of the hallmarks of cancer and the discovery of specific signalling pathways by which cells respond to radiation have provided new opportunities to design molecularly targeted therapies to increase the therapeutic window of radiation therapy. Here, we review efforts to develop approaches that could improve outcomes with radiation therapy by increasing the probability of tumour cure or by decreasing normal tissue toxicity. PMID:23812271

  9. Molecular Imaging Using Fluorescence and Bioluminescence to Reveal Tissue Response to Laser-Mediated Thermal Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackanos, Mark A.; Jansen, E. Duco; Contag, Christopher H.

    For decades biological investigation has focused on a reductionist approach, which has greatly advanced our understanding of the biological process, but has also served to move the analysis further and further away from the living body. This was necessary as we sought to identify the cells, genes, mutations and/or etiological agents that were associated with a given process. The information generated through these approaches can now be used to advance more integrative strategies in which specific cellular and molecular events can be studied in context of the functional circulation and intact organ systems of living animals, and humans. Essential tools for integrative analyses of biology include imaging modalities that enable visualization of structure and function in the living body. The relatively recent development of molecular probes as exogenous contrast agents and reporter genes that encode proteins with unique properties that can be distinguished from tissues and cells has ushered in a new set of approaches that are being called molecular imaging.

  10. Non-damaging laser therapy of the macula: Titration algorithm and tissue response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Lavinsky, Daniel; Dalal, Roopa; Huie, Philip

    2014-02-01

    Retinal photocoagulation typically results in permanent scarring and scotomata, which limit its applicability to the macula, preclude treatments in the fovea, and restrict the retreatments. Non-damaging approaches to laser therapy have been tested in the past, but the lack of reliable titration and slow treatment paradigms limited their clinical use. We developed and tested a titration algorithm for sub-visible and non-damaging treatments of the retina with pulses sufficiently short to be used with pattern laser scanning. The algorithm based on Arrhenius model of tissue damage optimizes the power and duration for every energy level, relative to the threshold of lesion visibility established during titration (and defined as 100%). Experiments with pigmented rabbits established that lesions in the 50-75% energy range were invisible ophthalmoscopically, but detectable with Fluorescein Angiography and OCT, while at 30% energy there was only very minor damage to the RPE, which recovered within a few days. Patients with Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) and Central Serous Retinopathy (CSR) have been treated over the edematous areas at 30% energy, using 200μm spots with 0.25 diameter spacing. No signs of laser damage have been detected with any imaging modality. In CSR patients, subretinal fluid resolved within 45 days. In DME patients the edema decreased by approximately 150μm over 60 days. After 3-4 months some patients presented with recurrence of edema, and they responded well to retreatment with the same parameters, without any clinically visible damage. This pilot data indicates a possibility of effective and repeatable macular laser therapy below the tissue damage threshold.

  11. Tissue-based multiphoton analysis of actomyosin and structural responses in human trabecular meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jose M.; Ko, Minhee K.; Pouw, Andrew; Tan, James C. H.

    2016-01-01

    The contractile trabecular meshwork (TM) modulates aqueous humor outflow resistance and intraocular pressure. The primary goal was to visualize and quantify human TM contractile state by analyzing actin polymerization (F-actin) by 2-photon excitation fluorescence imaging (TPEF) in situ. A secondary goal was to ascertain if structural extracellular matrix (ECM) configuration changed with contractility. Viable ex vivo human TM was incubated with latrunculin-A (Lat-A) or vehicle prior to Alexa-568-phalloidin labeling and TPEF. Quantitative image analysis was applied to 2-dimensional (2D) optical sections and 3D image reconstructions. After Lat-A exposure, (a) the F-actin network reorganized as aggregates; (b) F-actin-associated fluorescence intensity was reduced by 48.6% (mean; p = 0.007; n = 8); (c) F-actin 3D distribution was reduced by 68.9% (p = 0.040); (d) ECM pore cross-sectional area and volume were larger by 36% (p = 0.032) and 65% (p = 0.059) respectively and pores appeared more interconnected; (e) expression of type I collagen and elastin, key TM structural ECM proteins, were unaltered (p = 0.54); and (f) tissue viability was unchanged (p = 0.39) relative to vehicle controls. Thus Lat-A-induced reduction of actomyosin contractility was associated with TM porous expansion without evidence of reduced structural ECM protein expression or cellular viability. These important subcellular-level dynamics could be visualized and quantified within human tissue by TPEF. PMID:26883567

  12. Autocrine effects of interleukin-6 mediate acute-phase proinflammatory and tissue-reparative transcriptional responses of canine bladder mucosa.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michael W; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Gookin, Jody L

    2011-02-01

    During early urinary tract infection (UTI) the interplay between invading bacteria and the urothelium elicits a mucosal response aimed at clearing infection. Unfortunately, the resultant inflammation and associated local tissue injury are responsible for patient symptoms. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine released during acute UTI, has both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects on other body systems. Within the urothelium, the IL-6 native-tissue origin, the target cell type(s), and ultimate effect of the cytokine on target cells are largely unknown. In the present study we modeled the UTI IL-6 response ex vivo using canine bladder mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers to determine the inflammatory and reparative role of IL-6. We demonstrated that uropathogenic Escherichia coli infection stimulates the synthesis of IL-6 by all urothelial cell layers, with the urothelial cells alone representing the only site of unequivocal IL-6 receptor expression. Autocrine effects of IL-6 were supported by the activation of urothelial STAT3 signaling and SOCS3 expression. Using exogenous IL-6, a microarray approach, and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (q-RT-PCR), 5 target genes (tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, matrix metallopeptidase 2, heparan sulfate d-glucosaminyl 3-O-sulfotransferase 3A1, and hyaluronan synthase 2) that have direct or indirect roles in promoting a proinflammatory state were identified. Two of these genes, heparan sulfate d-glucosaminyl 3-O-sulfotransferase 3A1 and hyaluronan synthase 2, are also potentially important mediators of wound repair via the production of glycosaminoglycan components. These findings suggest that IL-6 secretion during acute UTI may serve a dual biological role by initiating the inflammatory response while also repairing urothelial defenses. PMID:21115724

  13. Autocrine Effects of Interleukin-6 Mediate Acute-Phase Proinflammatory and Tissue-Reparative Transcriptional Responses of Canine Bladder Mucosa▿

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Michael W.; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Gookin, Jody L.

    2011-01-01

    During early urinary tract infection (UTI) the interplay between invading bacteria and the urothelium elicits a mucosal response aimed at clearing infection. Unfortunately, the resultant inflammation and associated local tissue injury are responsible for patient symptoms. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine released during acute UTI, has both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects on other body systems. Within the urothelium, the IL-6 native-tissue origin, the target cell type(s), and ultimate effect of the cytokine on target cells are largely unknown. In the present study we modeled the UTI IL-6 response ex vivo using canine bladder mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers to determine the inflammatory and reparative role of IL-6. We demonstrated that uropathogenic Escherichia coli infection stimulates the synthesis of IL-6 by all urothelial cell layers, with the urothelial cells alone representing the only site of unequivocal IL-6 receptor expression. Autocrine effects of IL-6 were supported by the activation of urothelial STAT3 signaling and SOCS3 expression. Using exogenous IL-6, a microarray approach, and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (q-RT-PCR), 5 target genes (tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1β, matrix metallopeptidase 2, heparan sulfate d-glucosaminyl 3-O-sulfotransferase 3A1, and hyaluronan synthase 2) that have direct or indirect roles in promoting a proinflammatory state were identified. Two of these genes, heparan sulfate d-glucosaminyl 3-O-sulfotransferase 3A1 and hyaluronan synthase 2, are also potentially important mediators of wound repair via the production of glycosaminoglycan components. These findings suggest that IL-6 secretion during acute UTI may serve a dual biological role by initiating the inflammatory response while also repairing urothelial defenses. PMID:21115724

  14. NEONATAL SYMPATHECTOMY COMPROMISES DEVELOPMENT OF RESPONSES OF ORNITHINE DECARBOXYLASE TO HORMONAL STIMULATION IN PERIPHERAL TISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The onset of sympathetic innervation has been shown to play a role in the development of postsynaptic reactivity to stimulation. n the current study, we examined whether this relationship extends to responses evoked by hormonal stimuli. ats denervated at birth by 6-hydroxydopamin...

  15. Response of Alamo switchgrass tissue chemistry and biomass to nitrogen fertilization in West Tennessee, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this research was to examine above- and belowground responses to nitrogen fertilization in 5-year old “Alamo” switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). A fertilizer experiment included spring and fall sampling of switchgrass grown under annual applications of 0, 67, and 202 kg N ha-1. Nitrogen ...

  16. Adverse antibiotic drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Bint, A J; Burtt, I

    1980-07-01

    There is enormous potential for drug interactions in patients who, today, often receive many drugs. Antibiotics are prominent amongst the groups of drugs commonly prescribed. Many interactions take place at the absorption stage. Antacids and antidiarrhoeal preparations, in particular, can delay and reduce the absorption of antibiotics such as tetracyclines and clindamycin, by combining with them in the gastrointestinal tract to form chelates or complexes. Other drugs can affect gastric motility, which in turn often controls the rate at which antibiotics are absorbed. Some broad spectrum antibiotics can alter the bacterial flora of the gut which may be related to malabsorption states. The potentiation of toxic side effects of one drug by another is a common type of interaction. Antibiotics which are implicated in this type of interaction are those which themselves possess some toxicity such as aminoglycosides, some cephalosporins, tetracyclines and colistin. Some of the most important adverse interactions with antibiotics are those which involve other drugs which have a low toxicity/efficacy ratio. These include anticoagulants such as warfarin, anticonvulsants such as phenytoin and phenobarbitone and oral antidiabetic drugs like tolbutamide. Risk of interaction arises when the metabolism of these drugs is inhibited by liver microsomal enzyme inhibitors such as some sulphonamides and chloramphenicol, or is enhanced by enzyme inducers such as rifampicin. PMID:6995091

  17. ADVERSE CUTANEOUS DRUG REACTION

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR. PMID:19967009

  18. Adverse events related to blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sandeep; Hemlata; Verma, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today's scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided. PMID:25535415

  19. Optimization of microwave-assisted extraction for six inorganic and organic arsenic species in chicken tissues using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenfeng; Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2015-09-01

    Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the parameters for microwave-assisted extraction of six major inorganic and organic arsenic species (As(III), As(V), dimethyl arsenic acid, monomethyl arsenic acid, p-arsanilic acid, and roxarsone) from chicken tissues, followed by detection using a high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry detection method, which allows the simultaneous analysis of both inorganic and organic arsenic species in the extract in a single run. Effects of extraction medium, solution pH, liquid-to-solid ratio, and the temperature and time of microwave-assisted extraction on the extraction of the targeted arsenic species were studied. The optimum microwave-assisted extraction conditions were: 100 mg of chicken tissue, extracted by 5 mL of 22% v/v methanol, 90 mmol/L (NH4 )2 HPO4 , and 0.07% v/v trifluoroacetic acid (with pH adjusted to 10.0 by ammonium hydroxide solution), ramping for 10 min to 71°C, and holding for 11 min. The method has good extraction performance for total arsenic in the spiked and nonspiked chicken tissues (104.0 ± 13.8% and 91.6 ± 7.8%, respectively), except for the ones with arsenic contents close to the quantitation limits. Limits of quantitation (S/N = 10) for As(III), As(V), dimethyl arsenic acid, monomethyl arsenic acid, p-arsanilic acid, and roxarsone in chicken tissues using this method were 0.012, 0.058, 0.039, 0.061, 0.102, and 0.240 mg/kg (dry weight), respectively. PMID:26106064

  20. Abiotic Stress Responsive Rice ASR1 and ASR3 Exhibit Different Tissue-Dependent Sugar and Hormone-Sensitivities

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Joungsu; Lee, Youn Hab; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Nahm, Baek Hie; Song, Sang Ik

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the six rice ASR genes is differentially regulated in a tissue-dependent manner according to environmental conditions and reproductive stages. OsASR1 and OsASR3 are the most abundant and are found in most tissues; they are enriched in the leaves and roots, respectively. Coexpression analysis of OsASR1 and OsASR3 and a comparison of the cis-acting elements upstream of OsASR1 and OsASR3 suggested that their expression is regulated in common by abiotic stresses but differently regulated by hormone and sugar signals. The results of quantitative real-time PCR analyses of OsASR1 and OsASR3 expression under various conditions further support this model. The expression of both OsASR1 and OsASR3 was induced by drought stress, which is a major regulator of the expression of all ASR genes in rice. In contrast, ABA is not a common regulator of the expression of these genes. OsASR1 transcription was highly induced by ABA, whereas OsASR3 transcription was strongly induced by GA. In addition, OsASR1 and OsASR3 expression was significantly induced by sucrose and sucrose/glucose treatments, respectively. The induction of gene expression in response to these specific hormone and sugar signals was primarily observed in the major target tissues of these genes (i.e., OsASR1 in leaves and OsASR3 in roots). Our data also showed that the overexpression of either OsASR1 or OsASR3 in transgenic rice plants increased their tolerance to drought and cold stress. Taken together, our results revealed that the transcriptional control of different rice ASR genes exhibit different tissue-dependent sugar and hormone-sensitivities. PMID:23620302

  1. RNA-Seq Analysis of the Host Response to Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft Tissue Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Rebecca A.; Bruno, Vincent M.; Burns, Drusilla L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), which are primarily self-limiting. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the host transcriptome during a S. aureus SSTI to provide insight on the protective mechanisms that thwart these infections. We utilized a murine SSTI model in which one ear is epicutaneously challenged while the other is not. We then harvested these infected and uninfected ears, as well as ears from naïve mice, at one, four, and seven days post-challenge, and performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) using the Illumina platform. RNA-seq data demonstrated a robust response at the site of infection. Comparison of gene expression profiles between infected ears and the non-infected ears of challenged mice defined the local response to infection, while comparisons of expression profiles of non-infected ears from challenged mice to ears of naïve mice revealed changes in gene expression levels away from the site indicative of a systemic response. Over 1000 genes exhibited increased expression locally at all tested time points. The local response was more robust than the systemic response. Through evaluation of the RNA-seq data using the Upstream Regulator Analytic as part of the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software package, we found that changes in the activation and inhibition of regulatory pathways happen first locally, and lag behind systemically. The activated pathways are highly similar at all three time points during SSTI, suggesting a stable global response over time. Transcript increases and pathway activation involve pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, chemotaxis, cell signaling, keratins, and TH1/TH17 cytokines. Transcript decreases and pathway inhibition demonstrate that metabolic genes and anti-inflammatory pathways are repressed. These data provide insight on the host responses that may aid in resolution of this self-limited S. aureus infection, and may shed light on potential immune correlates of

  2. RNA-Seq Analysis of the Host Response to Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft Tissue Infection in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Brady, Rebecca A; Bruno, Vincent M; Burns, Drusilla L

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), which are primarily self-limiting. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the host transcriptome during a S. aureus SSTI to provide insight on the protective mechanisms that thwart these infections. We utilized a murine SSTI model in which one ear is epicutaneously challenged while the other is not. We then harvested these infected and uninfected ears, as well as ears from naïve mice, at one, four, and seven days post-challenge, and performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) using the Illumina platform. RNA-seq data demonstrated a robust response at the site of infection. Comparison of gene expression profiles between infected ears and the non-infected ears of challenged mice defined the local response to infection, while comparisons of expression profiles of non-infected ears from challenged mice to ears of naïve mice revealed changes in gene expression levels away from the site indicative of a systemic response. Over 1000 genes exhibited increased expression locally at all tested time points. The local response was more robust than the systemic response. Through evaluation of the RNA-seq data using the Upstream Regulator Analytic as part of the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software package, we found that changes in the activation and inhibition of regulatory pathways happen first locally, and lag behind systemically. The activated pathways are highly similar at all three time points during SSTI, suggesting a stable global response over time. Transcript increases and pathway activation involve pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, chemotaxis, cell signaling, keratins, and TH1/TH17 cytokines. Transcript decreases and pathway inhibition demonstrate that metabolic genes and anti-inflammatory pathways are repressed. These data provide insight on the host responses that may aid in resolution of this self-limited S. aureus infection, and may shed light on potential immune correlates of

  3. Characterization of Transgenic Gfrp Knock-In Mice: Implications for Tetrahydrobiopterin in Modulation of Normal Tissue Radiation Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rupak; Pawar, Snehalata A.; Fu, Qiang; Gupta, Prem K.; Berbée, Maaike; Garg, Sarita; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Wang, Wenze; Biju, Prabath G.; Krager, Kimberly J.; Boerma, Marjan; Ghosh, Sanchita P.; Cheema, Amrita K.; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The free radical scavenger and nitric oxide synthase cofactor, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), plays a well-documented role in many disorders associated with oxidative stress, including normal tissue radiation responses. Radiation exposure is associated with decreased BH4 levels, while BH4 supplementation attenuates aspects of radiation toxicity. The endogenous synthesis of BH4 is catalyzed by the enzyme guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH1), which is regulated by the inhibitory GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). We here report and characterize a novel, Cre-Lox-driven, transgenic mouse model that overexpresses Gfrp. Results: Compared to control littermates, transgenic mice exhibited high transgene copy numbers, increased Gfrp mRNA and GFRP expression, enhanced GFRP–GTPCH1 interaction, reduced BH4 levels, and low glutathione (GSH) levels and differential mitochondrial bioenergetic profiles. After exposure to total body irradiation, transgenic mice showed decreased BH4/7,8-dihydrobiopterin ratios, increased vascular oxidative stress, and reduced white blood cell counts compared with controls. Innovation and Conclusion: This novel Gfrp knock-in transgenic mouse model allows elucidation of the role of GFRP in the regulation of BH4 biosynthesis. This model is a valuable tool to study the involvement of BH4 in whole body and tissue-specific radiation responses and other conditions associated with oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1436–1446. PMID:23521531

  4. Investigation of the soluble metals in tissue as biological response pattern to environmental pollutants (Gammarus fossarum example).

    PubMed

    Filipović Marijić, Vlatka; Dragun, Zrinka; Sertić Perić, Mirela; Matoničkin Kepčija, Renata; Gulin, Vesna; Velki, Mirna; Ečimović, Sandra; Hackenberger, Branimir K; Erk, Marijana

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, Gammarus fossarum was used to investigate the bioaccumulation and toxic effects of aquatic pollutants in the real environmental conditions. The novelty of the study is the evaluation of soluble tissue metal concentrations in gammarids as indicators in early assessment of metal exposure. In the Sutla River, industrially/rurally/agriculturally influenced catchment in North-Western Croatia, physico-chemical water properties pointed to disturbed ecological status, which was reflected on population scale as more than 50 times lower gammarid density compared to the reference location, Črnomerec Stream. Significantly higher levels of soluble toxic metals (Al, As, Cd, Pb, Sb, Sn, Sr) were observed in gammarids from the Sutla River compared to the reference site and reflected the data on higher total dissolved metal levels in the river water at that site. The soluble metal estimates were supplemented with the common multibiomarker approach, which showed significant biological responses for decreased acetylcholinesterase activity and increased total soluble protein concentrations, confirming stressed environmental conditions for biota in the Sutla River. Biomarker of metal exposure, metallothionein, was not induced and therefore, toxic effect of metals was not confirmed on molecular level. Comparable between-site pattern of soluble toxic metals in gammarids and total dissolved metal levels in water suggests that prior to biomarker response and observed toxic impact, soluble metals in tissue might be used as early warning signs of metal impact in the aquatic environment and improve the assessment of water quality. PMID:27060638

  5. Exposure to fine airborne particulate matter induces macrophage infiltration, unfolded protein response, and lipid deposition in white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Roberto; Zheng, Ze; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Sun, Qinghua; Zhang, Kezhong

    2013-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have suggested a link between exposure to ambient air-pollution and susceptibility to metabolic disorders such as Type II diabetes mellitus. Previously, we provided evidence that both short- and long-term exposure to concentrated ambient particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm (PM2.5) induces multiple abnormalities associated with the pathogenesis of Type II diabetes mellitus, including insulin resistance, visceral adipose inflammation, brown adipose mitochondrial adipose changes, and hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In this report, we show that chronic inhalation exposure to PM2.5 (10 months exposure) induces macrophage infiltration and Unfolded Protein Response (UPR), an intracellular stress signaling that regulates cell metabolism and survival, in mouse white adipose tissue in vivo. Gene expression studies suggested that PM2.5 exposure induces two distinct UPR signaling pathways mediated through the UPR transducer inositol-requiring 1α (IRE1α): 1) ER-associated Degradation (ERAD) of unfolded or misfolded proteins, and 2) Regulated IRE1-dependent Decay (RIDD) of mRNAs. Along with the induction of the UPR pathways and macrophage infiltration, expression of genes involved in lipogenesis, adipocyte differentiation, and lipid droplet formation was increased in the adipose tissue of the mice exposed to PM2.5. In vitro study confirmed that PM2.5 can trigger phosphorylation of the UPR transducer IRE1α and activation of macrophages. These results provide novel insights into PM2.5-triggered cell stress response in adipose tissue and increase our understanding of pathophysiological effects of particulate air pollution on the development of metabolic disorders. PMID:23573366

  6. Amifostine Induces Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities in Normal Tissues and a Transplantable Tumor That Can Affect Radiation Response

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, David J. Murley, Jeffrey S.; Kataoka, Yasushi; Baker, Kenneth L.; Kunnavakkam, Rangesh; Coleman, Mitchell C.; Spitz, Douglas R.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether amifostine can induce elevated manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in murine tissues and a transplantable SA-NH tumor, resulting in a delayed tumor cell radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: SA-NH tumor-bearing C3H mice were treated with a single 400 mg/kg or three daily 50 mg/kg doses of amifostine administered intraperitoneally. At selected time intervals after the last injection, the heart, liver, lung, pancreas, small intestine, spleen, and SA-NH tumor were removed and analyzed for SOD2, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzymatic activity. The effect of elevated SOD2 enzymatic activity on the radiation response of SA-NH cells was determined. Results: SOD2 activity was significantly elevated in selected tissues and a tumor 24 h after amifostine treatment. Catalase and GPx activities remained unchanged except for significant elevations in the spleen. GPx was also elevated in the pancreas. SA-NH tumor cells exhibited a twofold elevation in SOD2 activity and a 27% elevation in radiation resistance. Amifostine administered in three daily fractions of 50 mg/kg each also resulted in significant elevations of these antioxidant enzymes. Conclusions: Amifostine can induce a delayed radioprotective effect that correlates with elevated levels of SOD2 activity in SA-NH tumor. If limited to normal tissues, this delayed radioprotective effect offers an additional potential for overall radiation protection. However, amifostine-induced elevation of SOD2 activity in tumors could have an unanticipated deleterious effect on tumor responses to fractionated radiation therapy, given that the radioprotector is administered daily just before each 2-Gy fractionated dose.

  7. Tissue-overlapping response of half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) to thermostressing based on transcriptome profiles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Wang, Yamei; Liang, Sijie; Lin, Genmei; Chen, Songlin; Yang, Guanpin

    2016-07-15

    Thermal stress, encountered frequently in aquaculture, affects diverse physiological processes and behavior of fish; however, the mechanism underlying these effects may vary among species. Half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis) widely inhabits Asian coastal waters and has been intensively cultured in China. In this study, the transcriptomes of three tissues (gill, liver and muscle) of half-smooth tongue sole stressed at temperatures up to 35°C were profiled and compared with those of the fish living at a normal temperature of 25°C. Of 105,228 transcripts, 23,213 were annotated in GO terms, and 718, 1236 and 561 were found to express differentially in gill, liver and muscle from control, respectively. Of the differentially expressed genes, 119 were shared by all three tissues. Tissue-overlapping transcripts and the pathways and functions they defined may underline the primary response of fish to thermostressing. High temperature may cause directly protein mis-folding and hypoxia. Cells suffering thermostress either survive hypoxia or are eliminated by immune system. High temperature may have interacted indirectly through HSPs with HIF-1 and JAKs/STATs signaling pathways. The former up-regulates the expression of hypoxia inducible genes while the later up-regulates the expression of genes associating with insulin and NOD-like receptors signaling pathways. Insulin pathway functions to sustain homeostasis of sugar and lipids, aiding to survive cells, while NOD-like receptors signaling pathway strengthens immune, apoptotic and inflammatory responses, helping to survive cells. These understandings may help improve our culturing practice, the culture performance of half-smooth tongue sole and its breeding. PMID:27066996

  8. Mucosal delivery switches the response to an adjuvanted tuberculosis vaccine from systemic TH1 to tissue-resident TH17 responses without impacting the protective efficacy.

    PubMed

    Orr, Mark T; Beebe, Elyse A; Hudson, Thomas E; Argilla, David; Huang, Po-Wei D; Reese, Valerie A; Fox, Christopher B; Reed, Steven G; Coler, Rhea N

    2015-11-27

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the leading causes of infectious disease death despite widespread usage of the BCG vaccine. A number of new TB vaccines have moved into clinical evaluation to replace or boost the BCG vaccine including ID93+GLA-SE, an adjuvanted subunit vaccine. The vast majority of new TB vaccines in trials are delivered parenterally even though intranasal delivery can augment lung-resident immunity and protective efficacy in small animal models. Parenteral immunization with the adjuvanted subunit vaccine ID93+GLA-SE elicits robust TH1 immunity and protection against aerosolized Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice and guinea pigs. Here we describe the immunogenicity and efficacy of this vaccine when delivered intranasally. Intranasal delivery switches the CD4 T cell response from a TH1 to a TH17 dominated tissue-resident response with increased frequencies of ID93-specific cells in both the lung tissue and at the lung surface. Surprisingly these changes do not affect the protective efficacy of ID93+GLA-SE. Unlike intramuscular immunization, ID93+GLA does not require the squalene-based oil-in-water emulsion SE to elicit protective CD4 T cells when delivered intranasally. Finally we demonstrate that TNF and the IL-17 receptor are dispensable for the efficacy of the intranasal vaccine suggesting an alternative mechanism of protection. PMID:26541135

  9. CCR6 mediates dendritic cell localization, lymphocyte homeostasis, and immune responses in mucosal tissue.

    PubMed

    Cook, D N; Prosser, D M; Forster, R; Zhang, J; Kuklin, N A; Abbondanzo, S J; Niu, X D; Chen, S C; Manfra, D J; Wiekowski, M T; Sullivan, L M; Smith, S R; Greenberg, H B; Narula, S K; Lipp, M; Lira, S A

    2000-05-01

    Chemokine-directed migration of leukocyte subsets may contribute to the qualitative differences between systemic and mucosal immunity. Here, we demonstrate that in mice lacking the chemokine receptor CCR6, dendritic cells expressing CD11c and CD11b are absent from the subepithelial dome of Peyer's patches. These mice also have an impaired humoral immune response to orally administered antigen and to the enteropathic virus rotavirus. In addition, CCR6(-/-) mice have a 2-fold to 15-fold increase in cells of select T lymphocyte populations within the mucosa, including CD4+ and CD8+ alphabeta-TCR T cells. By contrast, systemic immune responses to subcutaneous antigens in CCR6(-/-) mice are normal. These findings demonstrate that CCR6 is a mucosa-specific regulator of humoral immunity and lymphocyte homeostasis in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:10843382

  10. Reconstruction of conjunctival epithelium-like tissue using a temperature-responsive culture dish

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qinke; Zhu, Mengyu; Chen, Junzhao; Shao, Chunyi; Yan, Chenxi; Wang, Zi; Fan, Xianqun; Gu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the feasibility of engineering conjunctival epithelial cell sheets on a temperature-responsive culture dish for ocular surface reconstruction. Methods Rabbit conjunctival epithelial cells (rCjECs) were cultured in DMEM/F-12 (1:1) medium. The morphology and phenotype of the rCjECs were confirmed with phalloidin staining, periodic acid–Schiff (PAS) staining, and immunocytochemistry. The rCjECs cultured on a temperature-responsive culture dish for 10 days produced confluent conjunctival epithelial cell sheets. Then, the phenotype, structure, and function of the conjunctival epithelial cell sheets were examined. Results The conjunctival epithelial cells were compact, uniform, and cobblestone shape. All cultured conjunctival epithelial cells were harvested as intact cell sheets by reducing the culture temperature to 20 °C. Conjunctival epithelial cells were stratified in four to five cell layers similar to the conjunctival epithelium. CCK-8 analysis, 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) staining, and the live and dead viability assay confirmed that viable proliferation cells were retained in the cell sheets. Immunohistochemistry for CK4, CK19, and MUC5AC showed the cell sheets still maintained characteristics of the conjunctival epithelium. Conclusions A temperature-responsive culture dish enables fabrication of viable conjunctival epithelial cell sheets with goblet cells and proliferative cells. Conjunctival epithelial cell sheets will be promising for reconstruction of the conjunctival epithelium. PMID:26396489

  11. Exploring diazepam's effect on hemodynamic responses of mouse brain tissue by optical spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a simple duel-optical spectroscopic imaging apparatus capable of simultaneously determining relative changes in brain oxy-and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations was used following administration of the anxiolytic compound diazepam in mice with strong dominant (Dom) and submissive (Sub) behavioral traits. Three month old mice (n = 30) were anesthetized and after 10 min of baseline imaging, diazepam (1.5 mg/kg) was administered and measurements were taken for 80 min. The mouse head was illuminated by white light based LED's and diffused reflected light passing through different channels, consisting of a bandpass filter and a CCD camera, respectively, was collected and analyzed to measure the hemodynamic response. This work's major findings are threefold: first, Dom and Sub animals showed statistically significant differences in hemodynamic response to diazepam administration. Secondly, diazepam was found to more strongly affect the Sub group. Thirdly, different time-series profiles were observed post-injection, which can serve as a possible marker for the groups' differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the effects of an anxiolytic drug on brain hemodynamic responses in mice using diffused light optical imaging. PMID:25071958

  12. Chitinase 3-like 1 regulates cellular and tissue responses via IL-13 receptor α2.

    PubMed

    He, Chuan Hua; Lee, Chun Geun; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Lee, Chang-Min; Zhou, Yang; Ahangari, Farida; Ma, Bing; Herzog, Erica L; Rosenberg, Stephen A; Li, Yue; Nour, Adel M; Parikh, Chirag R; Schmidt, Insa; Modis, Yorgo; Cantley, Lloyd; Elias, Jack A

    2013-08-29

    Members of the 18 glycosyl hydrolase (GH 18) gene family have been conserved over species and time and are dysregulated in inflammatory, infectious, remodeling, and neoplastic disorders. This is particularly striking for the prototypic chitinase-like protein chitinase 3-like 1 (Chi3l1), which plays a critical role in antipathogen responses where it augments bacterial killing while stimulating disease tolerance by controlling cell death, inflammation, and remodeling. However, receptors that mediate the effects of GH 18 moieties have not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that Chi3l1 binds to interleukin-13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2) and that Chi3l1, IL-13Rα2, and IL-13 are in a multimeric complex. We also demonstrate that Chi3l1 activates macrophage mitogen-activated protein kinase, protein kinase B/AKT, and Wnt/β-catenin signaling and regulates oxidant injury, apoptosis, pyroptosis, inflammasome activation, antibacterial responses, melanoma metastasis, and TGF-β1 production via IL-13Rα2-dependent mechanisms. Thus, IL-13Rα2 is a GH 18 receptor that plays a critical role in Chi3l1 effector responses. PMID:23972995

  13. Tissue-Specific Regulation of Gibberellin Signaling Fine-Tunes Arabidopsis Iron-Deficiency Responses.

    PubMed

    Wild, Michael; Davière, Jean-Michel; Regnault, Thomas; Sakvarelidze-Achard, Lali; Carrera, Esther; Lopez Diaz, Isabel; Cayrel, Anne; Dubeaux, Guillaume; Vert, Grégory; Achard, Patrick

    2016-04-18

    Iron is an essential element for most living organisms. Plants acquire iron from the rhizosphere and have evolved different biochemical and developmental responses to adapt to a low-iron environment. In Arabidopsis, FIT encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that activates the expression of iron-uptake genes in root epidermis upon iron deficiency. Here, we report that the gibberellin (GA)-signaling DELLA repressors contribute substantially in the adaptive responses to iron-deficient conditions. When iron availability decreases, DELLAs accumulate in the root meristem, thereby restraining root growth, while being progressively excluded from epidermal cells in the root differentiation zone. Such DELLA exclusion from the site of iron acquisition relieves FIT from DELLA-dependent inhibition and therefore promotes iron uptake. Consistent with this mechanism, expression of a non-GA-degradable DELLA mutant protein in root epidermis interferes with iron acquisition. Hence, spatial distribution of DELLAs in roots is essential to fine-tune the adaptive responses to iron availability. PMID:27093087

  14. Unconventional Human T Cells Accumulate at the Site of Infection in Response to Microbial Ligands and Induce Local Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Anna Rita; Kift-Morgan, Ann; Lopez-Anton, Melisa; Friberg, Ida M.; Zhang, Jingjing; Brook, Amy C.; Roberts, Gareth W.; Donovan, Kieron L.; Colmont, Chantal S.; Toleman, Mark A.; Bowen, Timothy; Johnson, David W.; Topley, Nicholas; Moser, Bernhard; Fraser, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial responsiveness and function of unconventional human T cells are poorly understood, with only limited access to relevant specimens from sites of infection. Peritonitis is a common and serious complication in individuals with end-stage kidney disease receiving peritoneal dialysis. By analyzing local and systemic immune responses in peritoneal dialysis patients presenting with acute bacterial peritonitis and monitoring individuals before and during defined infectious episodes, our data show that Vγ9/Vδ2+ γδ T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells accumulate at the site of infection with organisms producing (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate and vitamin B2, respectively. Such unconventional human T cells are major producers of IFN-γ and TNF-α in response to these ligands that are shared by many microbial pathogens and affect the cells lining the peritoneal cavity by triggering local inflammation and inducing tissue remodeling with consequences for peritoneal membrane integrity. Our data uncover a crucial role for Vγ9/Vδ2 T cells and mucosal-associated invariant T cells in bacterial infection and suggest that they represent a useful predictive marker for important clinical outcomes, which may inform future stratification and patient management. These findings are likely to be applicable to other acute infections where local activation of unconventional T cells contributes to the antimicrobial inflammatory response. PMID:27527598

  15. A zebrafish larval model reveals early tissue-specific innate immune responses to Mucor circinelloides

    PubMed Central

    Voelz, Kerstin; Gratacap, Remi L.; Wheeler, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mucormycosis is an emerging fungal infection that is clinically difficult to manage, with increasing incidence and extremely high mortality rates. Individuals with diabetes, suppressed immunity or traumatic injury are at increased risk of developing disease. These individuals often present with defects in phagocytic effector cell function. Research using mammalian models and phagocytic effector cell lines has attempted to decipher the importance of the innate immune system in host defence against mucormycosis. However, these model systems have not been satisfactory for direct analysis of the interaction between innate immune effector cells and infectious sporangiospores in vivo. Here, we report the first real-time in vivo analysis of the early innate immune response to mucormycete infection using a whole-animal zebrafish larval model system. We identified differential host susceptibility, dependent on the site of infection (hindbrain ventricle and swim bladder), as well as differential functions of the two major phagocyte effector cell types in response to viable and non-viable spores. Larval susceptibility to mucormycete spore infection was increased upon immunosuppressant treatment. We showed for the first time that macrophages and neutrophils were readily recruited in vivo to the site of infection in an intact host and that spore phagocytosis can be observed in real-time in vivo. While exploring innate immune effector recruitment dynamics, we discovered the formation of phagocyte clusters in response to fungal spores that potentially play a role in fungal spore dissemination. Spores failed to activate pro-inflammatory gene expression by 6 h post-infection in both infection models. After 24 h, induction of a pro-inflammatory response was observed only in hindbrain ventricle infections. Only a weak pro-inflammatory response was initiated after spore injection into the swim bladder during the same time frame. In the future, the zebrafish larva as a live

  16. A zebrafish larval model reveals early tissue-specific innate immune responses to Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Voelz, Kerstin; Gratacap, Remi L; Wheeler, Robert T

    2015-11-01

    Mucormycosis is an emerging fungal infection that is clinically difficult to manage, with increasing incidence and extremely high mortality rates. Individuals with diabetes, suppressed immunity or traumatic injury are at increased risk of developing disease. These individuals often present with defects in phagocytic effector cell function. Research using mammalian models and phagocytic effector cell lines has attempted to decipher the importance of the innate immune system in host defence against mucormycosis. However, these model systems have not been satisfactory for direct analysis of the interaction between innate immune effector cells and infectious sporangiospores in vivo. Here, we report the first real-time in vivo analysis of the early innate immune response to mucormycete infection using a whole-animal zebrafish larval model system. We identified differential host susceptibility, dependent on the site of infection (hindbrain ventricle and swim bladder), as well as differential functions of the two major phagocyte effector cell types in response to viable and non-viable spores. Larval susceptibility to mucormycete spore infection was increased upon immunosuppressant treatment. We showed for the first time that macrophages and neutrophils were readily recruited in vivo to the site of infection in an intact host and that spore phagocytosis can be observed in real-time in vivo. While exploring innate immune effector recruitment dynamics, we discovered the formation of phagocyte clusters in response to fungal spores that potentially play a role in fungal spore dissemination. Spores failed to activate pro-inflammatory gene expression by 6 h post-infection in both infection models. After 24 h, induction of a pro-inflammatory response was observed only in hindbrain ventricle infections. Only a weak pro-inflammatory response was initiated after spore injection into the swim bladder during the same time frame. In the future, the zebrafish larva as a live whole

  17. Proteomic response of Trichoderma aggressivum f. europaeum to Agaricus bisporus tissue and mushroom compost.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Matt; Grogan, Helen; Kavanagh, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    A cellular proteomic analysis was performed on Trichoderma aggressivum f. europaeum. Thirty-four individual protein spots were excised from 2-D electropherograms and analysed by ESI-Trap Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS). Searches of the NCBInr and SwissProt protein databases identified functions for 31 of these proteins based on sequence homology. A differential expression study was performed on the intracellular fraction of T. aggressivum f. europaeum grown in media containing Agaricus bisporus tissue and Phase 3 mushroom compost compared to a control medium. Differential expression was observed for seven proteins, three of which were upregulated in both treatments, two were down regulated in both treatments and two showed qualitatively different regulation under the two treatments. No proteins directly relating to fungal cell wall degradation or other mycoparasitic activity were observed. Functions of differentially produced intracellular proteins included oxidative stress tolerance, cytoskeletal structure, and cell longevity. Differential production of these proteins may contribute to the growth of T. aggressivum in mushroom compost and its virulence toward A. bisporus. PMID:25209637

  18. Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Azzam, Edouard I

    2013-01-16

    The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

  19. Tissue specific response of Miscanthus×giganteus to dilute acid pretreatment for enhancing cellulose digestibility.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhe; Zhang, Xun; Ling, Zhe; Sun, Run-Cang; Xu, Feng

    2016-12-10

    The recalcitrance in grasses varies according to cell type and tissue. In this study, dilute acid pretreatment was performed on Miscanthus×giganteus internodes that include rind and pith regions which showing heterogeneous structural and chemical changes. Pretreatment on pith effectively hydrolyzed 73.33% hemicelluloses and separated cohesive cell walls from the compound middle lamella due to lignin migration. Lignin droplets with an average diameter of 49.5±29.3nm were concurrently coalesced on wall surface, that in turn exposed more microfibrils deep in walls to be enzymatically hydrolyzed reaching 82.55%. By contrast, the rind with a relatively intergrated cell structure was covered by larger lignin droplets (101.2±44.1nm) and filled with inaccessible microfibrils limiting enzymatic sacchrification (31.50%). Taken together, the cellulose digestibility of biomass was not majorly influenced by cellulose crystallinity, while it was strongly correlated with the positive effects of hemicelluloses degradation, lignin redistribution, cellulose exposure and loosening cell wall structure. PMID:27577916

  20. Response of endophytic bacterial communities in banana tissue culture plantlets to Fusarium wilt pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jie; Wang, Zifeng; Zhou, Shining

    2008-04-01

    Endophytic bacteria reside within plant hosts without having pathogenic effects, and various endophytes have been found to functionally benefit plant disease suppressive ability. In this study, the influence of banana plant stress on the endophytic bacterial communities, which was achieved by infection with the wilt pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense, was examined by cultivation-independent denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA directly amplified from plant tissue DNA. Community analysis clearly demonstrated increased bacterial diversity in pathogen-infected plantlets compared to that in control plantlets. By sequencing, bands most similar to species of Bacillus and Pseudomonas showed high density in the pathogen-treated pattern. In vitro screening of the isolates for antagonistic activity against Fusarium wilt pathogen acquired three strains of endophytic bacteria which were found to match those species that obviously increased in the pathogen infection process; moreover, the most inhibitive strain could also interiorly colonize plantlets and perform antagonism. The evidence obtained from this work showed that antagonistic endophytic bacteria could be induced by the appearance of a host fungal pathogen and further be an ideal biological control agent to use in banana Fusarium wilt disease protection. PMID:18497482

  1. In-house coordination project for organ and tissue procurement: social responsibility and promising results 1

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Vanessa Silva e; Moura, Luciana Carvalho; Martins, Luciana Ribeiro; dos Santos, Roberta Cristina Cardoso; Schirmer, Janine; Roza, Bartira de Aguiar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: to report the results of evaluation regarding changes in the number of potential donor referrals, actual donors, and conversion rates after the implementation of an in-house organ and tissue donation for transplantation coordination project. Methods: epidemiological study, both retrospective and transversal, was performed with organ donation data from the Secretariat of Health for the State and the in-house organ donation coordination project of a beneficent hospital. The data was compared using nonparametric statistical Mann-Whitney test, and the Student's t-test, considering a significance level of 5% (p <0.05). Results: there were statistically significant differences (p < 0.05), before and after the implementation of the project on the number of potential donor notification/month (3.05 - 4.7 ), number of actual donor/month (0.78 to 1.60) and rate of conversion ( 24.7 to 34.8 %). The hospitals 1, 2, 7 and 8 had significant results in potential donor, actual donor or conversion rate. Conclusion: the presence of an in-house coordinator is promising and beneficial, the specialist is important to change the indicators of efficiency, which consequently reduces the waiting lists for organ transplants. PMID:27463111

  2. Differential Response of Heat Shock Proteins to Uphill and Downhill Exercise in Heart, Skeletal Muscle, Lung and Kidney Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lollo, Pablo C. B.; Moura, Carolina S.; Morato, Priscila N.; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Running on a horizontal plane is known to increase the concentration of the stress biomarker heat-shock protein (HSP), but no comparison of the expression of HSP70 has yet been established between the uphill (predominantly concentric) and downhill (predominantly eccentric) muscle contractions exercise. The objective of the study was to investigate the relationships between eccentric and concentric contractions on the HSP70 response of the lung, kidney, gastrocnemius, soleus and heart. Twenty-four male Wistar weanling rats were divided into four groups: non-exercised and three different grades of treadmill exercise groups: horizontal, uphill (+7%) and downhill (-7% of inclination). At the optimal time-point of six hours after the exercise, serum uric acid, creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined by standard methods and HSP70 by the Western blot analysis. HSP70 responds differently to different types of running. For kidney, heart, soleus and gastrocnemius, the HSP70 expression increased, 230, 180, 150 and 120% respectively of the reference (horizontal). When the contraction was concentric (uphill) and compared to downhill the increase in response of HSP70 was greater in 80% for kidney, 75% for gastrocnemius, 60% for soleus and 280% for the heart. Uric acid was about 50% higher (0.64 ± 0.03 mg·dL−1) in the uphill group as compared to the horizontal or downhill groups. Similarly, the activities of serum CK and LDH were both 100% greater for both the uphill and downhill groups as compared to the horizontal group (2383 ± 253 and 647.00 ± 73 U/L, respectively). The responsiveness of HSP70 appeared to be quite different depending on the type of tissue, suggesting that the impact of exercise was not restricted to the muscles, but extended to the kidney tissue. The uphill exercise increases HSP70 beyond the eccentric type and the horizontal running was a lower HSP70 responsive stimulus. Key Points Exercise can induce increases in HSP70 in

  3. Monitoring tissue inflammation and responses to drug treatments in early stages of mice bone fracture using 50 MHz ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Chu; Lin, Yi-Hsun; Wang, Shyh-Hau; Lin, Shih-Ping; Shung, K Kirk; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Bone fracture induces moderate inflammatory responses that are regulated by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) or 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) for initiating tissue repair and bone formation. Only a handful of non-invasive techniques focus on monitoring acute inflammation of injured bone currently exists. In the current study, we monitored in vivo inflammation levels during the initial 2 weeks of the inflammatory stage after mouse bone fracture utilizing 50 MHz ultrasound. The acquired ultrasonic images were correlated well with histological examinations. After the bone fracture in the tibia, dynamic changes in the soft tissue at the medial-posterior compartment near the fracture site were monitored by ultrasound on the days of 0, 2, 4, 7, and 14. The corresponding echogenicity increased on the 2nd, 4th, and 7th day, and subsequently declined to basal levels after the 14th day. An increase of cell death was identified by the positive staining of deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and was consistent with ultrasound measurements. The increases of both COX-2 and Leukotriene B4 receptor 1 (BLT1, 5-LO-relative receptor), which are regulators for tissue inflammation, in the immunohistochemistry staining revealed their involvement in bone fracture injury. Monitoring the inflammatory response to various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) treatments was investigated by treating injured mice with a daily oral intake of aspirin (Asp), indomethacin (IND), and a selective COX-2 inhibitor (SC-236). The Asp treatment significantly reduced fracture-increased echogenicity (hyperechogenicity, p<0.05) in ultrasound images as well as inhibited cell death, and expression of COX-2 and BLT1. In contrast, treatment with IND or SC-236 did not reduce the hyperechogenicity, as confirmed by cell death (TUNEL) and expression levels of COX-2 or BLT1. Taken together, the current study reports the feasibility of a non-invasive ultrasound method capable of monitoring post

  4. Synchronous changes in coral chromatophore tissue density and skeletal banding as an adaptive response to environmental change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardisana, R. N.; Miller, C. A.; Sivaguru, M.; Fouke, B. W.

    2013-12-01

    Corals are a key reservoir of biodiversity in coastal, shallow water tropical marine environments, and density banding in their aragonite skeletons is used as a sensitive record of paleoclimate. Therefore, the cellular response of corals to environmental change and its expression in skeletal structure is of significant importance. Chromatophores, pigment-bearing cells within the ectoderm of hermatypic corals, serve to both enhance the photosynthetic activity of zooxanthellae symbionts, as well as protect the coral animal from harmful UV radiation. Yet connections have not previously been drawn between chromatophore tissue density and the development of skeletal density bands. A histological analysis of the coral Montastrea faveolata has therefore been conducted across a bathymetric gradient of 1-20 m on the southern Caribbean island of Curaçao. A combination of field and laboratory photography, serial block face imaging (SBFI), two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM), and 3D image analysis has been applied to test whether M. faveolata adapts to increasing water depth and decreasing photosynthetically active radiation by shifting toward a more heterotrophic lifestyle (decreasing zooxanthellae tissue density, increasing mucocyte tissue density, and decreasing chromatophores density). This study is among the first to collect and evaluate histological data in the spatial context of an entire unprocessed coral polyp. TPLSM was used to optically thin section unprocessed tissue biopsies with quantitative image analysis to yield a nanometer-scale three-dimensional map of the quantity and distribution of the symbionts (zooxanthellae) and a host fluorescent pigments (chromatophores), which is thought to have photoprotective properties, within the context of an entire coral polyp. Preliminary results have offered new insight regarding the three-dimensional distribution and abundance of chromatophores and have identified: (1) M. faveolata tissue collected from 8M SWD do

  5. Phylogenetic analysis and tissue distribution of elasmobranch glucose transporters and their response to feeding.

    PubMed

    Deck, Courtney A; LeMoine, Christophe M R; Walsh, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Elasmobranch diets consist of high quantities of protein and lipids, but very low levels of carbohydrates including glucose. Reflecting this diet, most tissues use lipids and ketone bodies as their main metabolic fuel. However, the rectal gland has been shown to be dependent on glucose as a fuel, so we hypothesized that glucose transporters (GLUTs) would be present and upregulated in the gland during times of activation (e.g. following a meal). In this study, we searched for and identified putative class I GLUTs in three elasmobranchs and a holocephalan using transcriptomes, and used these to reconstruct a Bayesian phylogeny. We determined that each of the four species possessed three of the four class I GLUT sequences, but the identities of the isoforms present in each species differed between the elasmobranchs (GLUT1, 3 and 4) and the holocephalan (GLUT1, 2 and 3). We then used qPCR to measure mRNA levels of these GLUTs in the rectal gland, liver, intestine, and muscle of fed and starved spiny dogfish (Squalus suckleyi). The rectal gland data showed higher mRNA levels of GLUT4 in the starved relative to the fed fish. In the muscle, both GLUT1 and 4 were significantly elevated at 24 h post-feeding, as was the case for GLUT4 in the liver. In the intestine on the other hand, GLUT4 was significantly elevated by 6 h post-feeding, remaining elevated through 48 h. We suggest that GLUT4 has taken on the role of GLUT2 in elasmobranchs as the expression patterns observed in the liver and intestine are representative of GLUT2 in other vertebrates. PMID:26873951

  6. Responses of the Insulin Signaling Pathways in the Brown Adipose Tissue of Rats following Cold Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofei; Wahl, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The insulin signaling pathway is critical for the control of blood glucose levels. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has also been implicated as important in glucose homeostasis. The effect of short-term cold exposure on this pathway in BAT has not been explored. We evaluated the effect of 4 hours of cold exposure on the insulin pathway in the BAT of rats. Whole genomic microarray chips were used to examine the transcripts of the pathway in BAT of rats exposed to 4°C and 22°C for 4 hours. The 4 most significantly altered pathways following 4 hours of cold exposure were the insulin signaling pathway, protein kinase A, PI3K/AKT and ERK/MAPK signaling. The insulin signaling pathway was the most affected. In the documented 142 genes of the insulin pathway, 42 transcripts (29.6%) responded significantly to this cold exposure with the least false discovery rate (Benjamini-Hochberg Multiple Testing: −log10 (p-value)  = 7.18). Twenty-seven genes (64%) were up-regulated, including the insulin receptor (Insr), insulin substrates 1 and 2 (Irs1 and Irs2). Fifteen transcripts (36%) were down-regulated. Multiple transcripts of the primary target and secondary effector targets for the insulin signaling were also up-regulated, including those for carbohydrate metabolism. Using western blotting, we demonstrated that the cold induced higher Irs2, Irs1, and Akt-p protein levels in the BAT than in the BAT of controls maintained at room temperature, and higher Akt-p protein level in the muscle. Conclusion: this study demonstrated that 4 hours of cold exposure stimulated the insulin signaling pathway in the BAT and muscle of overnight fasted rats. This raises the possibility that acute cold stimulation may have potential to improve glucose clearance and insulin sensitivity. PMID:24915042

  7. Betulinic acid regulates generation of neuroinflammatory mediators responsible for tissue destruction in multiple sclerosis in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Blaževski, Jana; Petković, Filip; Momčilović, Miljana; Paschke, Reinhard; Kaluđerović, Goran N; Mostarica Stojković, Marija; Miljković, Djordje

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the influences of betulinic acid (BA), a triterpenoid isolated from birch bark, on neuroinflammatory mediators involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in vitro. Methods: Encephalitogenic T cells were prepared from draining lymph nodes and spinal cords of Dark Agouti rats 8 to 10 d after immunization with myelin basic protein (MBP) and complete Freund's adjuvant. Macrophages were isolated from the peritoneal cavity of adult untreated rats. Astrocytes were isolated from neonatal rat brains. The cells were cultured and then treated with different agents. IFN-γ, IL-17, iNOS and CXCL12 mRNA levels in the cells were analyzed with RT-PCR. iNOS and CXCL12 protein levels were detected using immunoblot. NO and ROS generation was measured using Griess reaction and flow cytometry, respectively. Results: In encephalitogenic T cells stimulated with MBP (10 μg/mL), addition of BA inhibited IL-17 and IFN-γ production in a dose-dependent manner. The estimated IC50 values for IL-17 and IFN γ were 11.2 and 63.8 μmol/L, respectively. When the macrophages were stimulated with LPS (10 ng/mL), addition of BA (50 μmol/L) significantly increased ROS generation, and suppressed NO generation. The astrocytes were stimulated with ConASn containing numerous inflammatory mediators, which mimicked the inflammatory milieu within CNS; addition of BA (50 μmol/L) significantly increased ROS generation, and blocked ConASn-induced increases in iNOS and CXCL12 mRNA levels, but did not affect iNOS and CXCL12 protein levels. Importantly, in both the macrophages and astrocytes, addition of BA (50 μmol/L) inhibited lipid peroxidation. Conclusion: Besides inhibiting encephalitogenic T cell cytokines and reducing NO generation, BA induces tissue-damaging ROS generation within CNS. PMID:23377550

  8. Brown Adipose Tissue Is Linked to a Distinct Thermoregulatory Response to Mild Cold in People.

    PubMed

    Chondronikola, Maria; Volpi, Elena; Børsheim, Elisabet; Chao, Tony; Porter, Craig; Annamalai, Palam; Yfanti, Christina; Labbe, Sebastien M; Hurren, Nicholas M; Malagaris, Ioannis; Cesani, Fernardo; Sidossis, Labros S

    2016-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in thermoregulation in rodents. Its role in temperature homeostasis in people is less studied. To this end, we recruited 18 men [8 subjects with no/minimal BAT activity (BAT-) and 10 with pronounced BAT activity (BAT+)]. Each volunteer participated in a 6 h, individualized, non-shivering cold exposure protocol. BAT was quantified using positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Body core and skin temperatures were measured using a telemetric pill and wireless thermistors, respectively. Core body temperature decreased during cold exposure in the BAT- group only (-0.34°C, 95% CI: -0.6 to -0.1, p = 0.03), while the cold-induced change in core temperature was significantly different between BAT+ and BAT- subjects (BAT+ vs. BAT-, 0.43°C, 95% CI: 0.20-0.65, p = 0.0014). BAT volume was associated with the cold-induced change in core temperature (p = 0.01) even after adjustment for age and adiposity. Compared to the BAT- group, BAT+ subjects tolerated a lower ambient temperature (BAT-: 20.6 ± 0.3°C vs. BAT+: 19.8 ± 0.3°C, p = 0.035) without shivering. The cold-induced change in core temperature (r = 0.79, p = 0.001) and supraclavicular temperature (r = 0.58, p = 0.014) correlated with BAT volume, suggesting that these non-invasive measures can be potentially used as surrogate markers of BAT when other methods to detect BAT are not available or their use is not warranted. These results demonstrate a physiologically significant role for BAT in thermoregulation in people. This trial has been registered with Clinaltrials.gov: NCT01791114 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01791114). PMID:27148068

  9. The application of POSS nanostructures in cartilage tissue engineering: the chondrocyte response to nanoscale geometry.

    PubMed

    Oseni, Adelola O; Butler, Peter E; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-11-01

    Despite extensive research into cartilage tissue engineering (CTE), there is still no scaffold ideal for clinical applications. Various synthetic and natural polymers have been investigated in vitro and in vivo, but none have reached widespread clinical use. The authors investigate the potential of POSS-PCU, a synthetic nanocomposite polymer, for use in CTE. POSS-PCU is modified with silsesquioxane nanostructures that improve its biological and physical properties. The ability of POSS-PCU to support the growth of ovine nasoseptal chondrocytes was evaluated against a polymer widely used in CTE, polycaprolactone (PCL). Scaffolds with varied concentrations of the POSS molecule were also synthesized to investigate their effect on chondrocyte growth. Chondrocytes were seeded onto scaffold disks (PCU negative control; POSS-PCU 2%, 4%, 6%, 8%; PCL). Cytocompatibilty was evaluated using cell viability, total DNA, collagen and GAG assays. Chondrocytes cultured on POSS-PCU (2% POSS) scaffolds had significantly higher viability than PCL scaffolds (p < 0.001). Total DNA, collagen and sGAG protein were also greater on POSS-PCU scaffolds compared with PCL (p > 0.05). POSS-PCU (6% and 8% POSS) had improved viability and proliferation over an 18 day culture period compared with 2% and 4% POSS-PCU (p < 0.0001). Increasing the percentage of POSS in the scaffolds increased the size of the pores found in the scaffolds (p < 0.05). POSS-PCU has excellent potential for use in CTE. It supports the growth of chondrocytes in vitro and the POSS modification significantly enhances the growth and proliferation of nasoseptal chondrocytes compared with traditional scaffolds such as PCL. PMID:23576328

  10. Phylogenetic analysis and tissue distribution of elasmobranch glucose transporters and their response to feeding

    PubMed Central

    Deck, Courtney A.; LeMoine, Christophe M. R.; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Elasmobranch diets consist of high quantities of protein and lipids, but very low levels of carbohydrates including glucose. Reflecting this diet, most tissues use lipids and ketone bodies as their main metabolic fuel. However, the rectal gland has been shown to be dependent on glucose as a fuel, so we hypothesized that glucose transporters (GLUTs) would be present and upregulated in the gland during times of activation (e.g. following a meal). In this study, we searched for and identified putative class I GLUTs in three elasmobranchs and a holocephalan using transcriptomes, and used these to reconstruct a Bayesian phylogeny. We determined that each of the four species possessed three of the four class I GLUT sequences, but the identities of the isoforms present in each species differed between the elasmobranchs (GLUT1, 3 and 4) and the holocephalan (GLUT1, 2 and 3). We then used qPCR to measure mRNA levels of these GLUTs in the rectal gland, liver, intestine, and muscle of fed and starved spiny dogfish (Squalus suckleyi). The rectal gland data showed higher mRNA levels of GLUT4 in the starved relative to the fed fish. In the muscle, both GLUT1 and 4 were significantly elevated at 24 h post-feeding, as was the case for GLUT4 in the liver. In the intestine on the other hand, GLUT4 was significantly elevated by 6 h post-feeding, remaining elevated through 48 h. We suggest that GLUT4 has taken on the role of GLUT2 in elasmobranchs as the expression patterns observed in the liver and intestine are representative of GLUT2 in other vertebrates. PMID:26873951

  11. Brown Adipose Tissue Is Linked to a Distinct Thermoregulatory Response to Mild Cold in People

    PubMed Central

    Chondronikola, Maria; Volpi, Elena; Børsheim, Elisabet; Chao, Tony; Porter, Craig; Annamalai, Palam; Yfanti, Christina; Labbe, Sebastien M.; Hurren, Nicholas M.; Malagaris, Ioannis; Cesani, Fernardo; Sidossis, Labros S.

    2016-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in thermoregulation in rodents. Its role in temperature homeostasis in people is less studied. To this end, we recruited 18 men [8 subjects with no/minimal BAT activity (BAT−) and 10 with pronounced BAT activity (BAT+)]. Each volunteer participated in a 6 h, individualized, non-shivering cold exposure protocol. BAT was quantified using positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Body core and skin temperatures were measured using a telemetric pill and wireless thermistors, respectively. Core body temperature decreased during cold exposure in the BAT− group only (−0.34°C, 95% CI: −0.6 to −0.1, p = 0.03), while the cold-induced change in core temperature was significantly different between BAT+ and BAT− subjects (BAT+ vs. BAT−, 0.43°C, 95% CI: 0.20–0.65, p = 0.0014). BAT volume was associated with the cold-induced change in core temperature (p = 0.01) even after adjustment for age and adiposity. Compared to the BAT− group, BAT+ subjects tolerated a lower ambient temperature (BAT−: 20.6 ± 0.3°C vs. BAT+: 19.8 ± 0.3°C, p = 0.035) without shivering. The cold-induced change in core temperature (r = 0.79, p = 0.001) and supraclavicular temperature (r = 0.58, p = 0.014) correlated with BAT volume, suggesting that these non-invasive measures can be potentially used as surrogate markers of BAT when other methods to detect BAT are not available or their use is not warranted. These results demonstrate a physiologically significant role for BAT in thermoregulation in people. This trial has been registered with Clinaltrials.gov: NCT01791114 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01791114). PMID:27148068

  12. Herbicide-induced experimental variegate porphyria in mice: tissue porphyrinogen accumulation and response to porphyrogenic drugs.

    PubMed

    Krijt, J; Stranska, P; Maruna, P; Vokurka, M; Sanitrak, J

    1997-01-01

    Administration of oxadiazon or oxyfluorfen (1000 ppm in the diet) to male BALB/c mice for 9 days resulted in experimental porphyria, resembling the acute phase of human variegate porphyria. Urinary concentrations of 5-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen reached 1500 and 3000 mumol/L, respectively. Both herbicides caused a decrease of protoporphyrinogen oxidase activity in liver and kidney. Brain protoporphyrinogen oxidase activity was not altered. Liver and kidney porphyrin content increased to 11 and 17 nmol/g, respectively (control mice, 2 nmol/g). Over 50% of liver and kidney porphyrins were in the reduced (porphyrinogen) form. Bile of oxadiazon-treated mice contained 700 nmol/mL of protoporphyrinogen (control mice, 15 nmol/mL). Porphyrin content of the trigeminal nerve increased from 1 nmol/g in control animals to 11 nmol/g in oxadiazon-treated animals, suggesting a possible contribution of peripheral nerve porphyrins to porphyric neuropathy. Mice treated with 125 ppm of oxadiazon in the diet for 9 days excreted moderately elevated levels of porphobilinogen in urine (control mice, less than 50 mumol/L; treated mice, 330 mumol/L). Administration of phenobarbital or phenytoin (single injections on days 7, 8, and 9) increased the urinary porphobilinogen concentration to 3500 mumol/L. This response to porphyrogenic drugs resembles the response observed in human acute porphyrias. PMID:9431441

  13. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  14. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  15. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  16. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  17. 40 CFR 350.21 - Adverse health effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adverse health effects. 350.21 Section... RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET DISCLOSURES TO HEALTH PROFESSIONALS Trade Secrecy Claims § 350.21 Adverse health effects. The Governor or State emergency response commission shall identify...

  18. Low Dose Studies with Focused X-Rays in cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kathy Held; Kevin Prise; Barry Michael; Melvyn Folkard

    2002-12-14

    the relationship between high- and low-dose exposures. The targeting approach also allows us to study very clearly a newly recognized effect of radiation, the ''bystander effect'', which appears to dominate some low-dose responses and therefore may have a significant role in low-dose risk mechanisms. Our project also addresses the concept that the background of naturally occurring oxidative damage that takes place continually in cells due to byproducts of metabolism may play a role in low-dose radiation risk. This project therefore also examines how cells are damaged by treatments that modify the levels of oxidative damage, either alone or in combination with low-dose irradiation. In this project, we have used human and rodent cell lines and each set of experiments has been carried out on a single cell type. However, low-dose research has to extend into tissues because signaling between cells of different types is likely to influence the responses. Our studies have therefore also included microbeam experiments using a model tissue system that consists of an explant of a small piece of pig ureter grown in culture. The structure of this tissue is similar to that of epithelium and therefore it relates to the tissues in which carcinoma arises. Our studies have been able to measure bystander-induced changes in the cells growing out from the tissue fragment after it has been targeted with a few radiation tracks to mimic a low-dose exposure.

  19. Low Dose Studies with Focused X-rays in Cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Barry D. Michael; Kathryn Held; Kevin Prise

    2002-12-19

    of the relationship between high- and low-dose exposures. The targeting approach also allows us to study very clearly a newly recognized effect of radiation, the ''bystander effect'', which appears to dominate some low-dose responses and therefore may have a significant role in low-dose risk mechanisms. Our project also addresses the concept that the background of naturally occurring oxidative damage that takes place continually in cells due to byproducts of metabolism may play a role in treatments that modify the levels of oxidative damage, either alone or in combination with low-dose irradiation. In this project, we have used human and rodent cell lines and each set of experiments has been carried out on a single cell type. However, low-dose research has to extend into tissues because signaling between cells of different types is likely to influence the responses. Our studies have therefore also included microbeam experiments using a model tissue system that consists of an explant of a small piece of pig ureter grown in culture. The structure of this tissue is similar to that of epithelium and there it relates to the tissues in which carcinoma arises. Our studies have been able to measure bystander-induced changes in the cells growing out from the tissue fragment after it has been targeted with a few radiation tracks to mimic a low-dose exposure.

  20. Detection of secreted and temporarily inducible heat shock responsive proteins in mouse testicular tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaire, L.; Heinlein, U.A.O. )

    1991-01-01

    Temperature-induced effects on the synthesis of murine testicular proteins were investigated by one- and two-dimensional SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Newly synthesized proteins were monitored by incorporation of {sup 35}S-methionine and autoradiography. Three heat shock responsive proteins, which are differently affected by elevated temperatures, are described. These proteins represent special examples for how testicular cells respond to environmental stress. One of these proteins, HS136, is synthesized and secreted at 38{degree}C, whereas at lower, scrotal temperatures it is not detectable. HSID74 protein is synthesized at elevated temperatures, but only in prepuberal testis, not in adult. Synthesis of the third example, HSR28, is decreased within the seminiferous tubules, but only in those regions which bear cell associations of the elongation stage. These results indicate that the use of DNA probes of the heat shock-gene family might not be sufficient to describe the molecular reasons for impaired spermatogenesis following hyperthermia.

  1. In vivo tissue response following implantation of shape memory polyurethane foam in a porcine aneurysm model

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Clubb, Fred J.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Miller, Matthew W.; Fossum, Theresa W.; Hartman, Jonathan; Tuzun, Egemen; Singhal, Pooja; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral aneurysms treated by traditional endovascular methods using platinum coils have a tendency to be unstable, either due to chronic inflammation, compaction of coils, or growth of the aneurysm. We propose to use alternate filling methods for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms using polyurethane based shape memory polymer (SMP) foams. SMP polyurethane foams were surgically implanted in a porcine aneurysm model to determine biocompatibility, localized thrombogenicity, and their ability to serve as a stable filler material within an aneurysm. The degree of healing was evaluated via gross observation, histopathology and low vacuum scanning electron microscopy (LV-SEM) imaging after zero, thirty and ninety days. Clotting was initiated within the SMP foam at time zero (less than one hour exposure to blood prior to euthanization), partial healing was observed at thirty days, and almost complete healing had occurred at ninety days in vivo, with minimal inflammatory response. PMID:23650278

  2. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Response and Normal Tissue Regeneration After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To characterize changes in standardized uptake value (SUV) in positron emission tomography (PET) scans and determine the pace of normal tissue regeneration after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for solid tumor liver metastases. Methods and Materials: We reviewed records of patients with liver metastases treated with SBRT to {>=}40 Gy in 3-5 fractions. Evaluable patients had pretreatment PET and {>=}1 post-treatment PET. Each PET/CT scan was fused to the planning computed tomography (CT) scan. The maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) for each lesion and the total liver volume were measured on each PET/CT scan. Maximum SUV levels before and after SBRT were recorded. Results: Twenty-seven patients with 35 treated liver lesions were studied. The median follow-up was 15.7 months (range, 1.5-38.4 mo), with 5 PET scans per patient (range, 2-14). Exponential decay curve fitting (r=0.97) showed that SUV{sub max} declined to a plateau of 3.1 for controlled lesions at 5 months after SBRT. The estimated SUV{sub max} decay half-time was 2.0 months. The SUV{sub max} in controlled lesions fluctuated up to 4.2 during follow-up and later declined; this level is close to 2 standard deviations above the mean normal liver SUV{sub max} (4.01). A failure cutoff of SUV{sub max} {>=}6 is twice the calculated plateau SUV{sub max} of controlled lesions. Parenchymal liver volume decreased by 20% at 3-6 months and regenerated to a new baseline level approximately 10% below the pretreatment level at 12 months. Conclusions: Maximum SUV decreases over the first months after SBRT to plateau at 3.1, similar to the median SUV{sub max} of normal livers. Transient moderate increases in SUV{sub max} may be observed after SBRT. We propose a cutoff SUV{sub max} {>=}6, twice the baseline normal liver SUV{sub max}, to score local failure by PET criteria. Post-SBRT values between 4 and 6 would be suspicious for local tumor persistence or recurrence. The volume of normal liver reached nadir 3

  3. Emission of hydrogen sulfide by leaf tissue in response to L-cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, J.; Schmidt, A.; Wilson, L.G.; Filner, P.

    1982-08-01

    Leaf discs and detached leaves exposed to L-cysteine emitted a volatile sulfur compound which was proven by gas chromatography to be H/sub 2/S. This phenomenon was demonstrated in all nine species tested (Cucumis sativus, Cucurbita pepo, Nicotiana tabacum, Coleus blumei, Beta vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris, Medicago sativa, Hordeum vulgare, and Gossypium hirsutum). The emission of volatile sulfur by cucumber leaves occurred in the dark at a similar rate to that in the light. The emission of leaf discs reached the maximal rate, more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, 2 to 4 hours after starting exposure to L-cysteine; then it decreased. In the case of detached leaves, the maximum occurred 5 to 10 h after starting exposure. The average emission rate of H/sub 2/S during the first 4 hours from leaf discs of cucurbits in response to 10 millimolar L-cysteine, was usually more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, i.e. 0.24 micromoles per hour per square decimeter. Leaf discs exposed to 1 millimolar L-cysteine emitted only 2% as much as did the discs exposed to 10 millimolar L-cysteine. The emission from leaf discs and from detached leaves lasted for at least 5 and 15 hours, respectively. However, several hours after the maximal emission, injury of the leaves, manifested as chlorosis, was evident. H/sub 2/S emission was a specific consequence of exposure to L-cysteine; neither D-cysteine nor L-cysteine elicited H/sub 2/S emission. Aminooxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate dependent enzymes, inhibited the emission. In a cell free system from cucumber leaves, H/sub 2/S formation and its release occurred in response to L-cysteine. Feeding experiments with (/sup 35/S)t-cysteine showed that most of the sulfur in H/sub 2/S was derived from sulfur in the L-cysteine supplied.

  4. Dihydroxyselenolane (DHS) supplementation improves survival following whole-body irradiation (WBI) by suppressing tissue-specific inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Kunwar, Amit; Verma, Prachi; Bhilwade, H N; Iwaoka, Michio; Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2016-09-01

    Dihydroxyselenolane (DHS), a simple water-soluble organoselenium compound, was evaluated for radioprotection in BALB/c mice after whole-body irradiation (WBI) (8Gy (60)Co, 1Gy/min), by monitoring 30-d post-irradiation survival and biochemical/histological changes in radiosensitive organs. Intraperitoneal administration of DHS at 2mg/kg for five consecutive days before irradiation and three times per week during the post-irradiation period showed maximum benefit (40% improvement in 30 d post-irradiation survival). DHS treatment, despite inducing expression of glutathione peroxidases (GPx1, GPx2, and GPx4) in spleen and intestine, did not protect against radiation-induced acute (10-day) haematopoietic and gastrointestinal toxicities. DHS treatment significantly reduced radiation-induced DNA damage in peripheral leukocytes and inflammatory responses in intestine, lung, and circulation. The anti-inflammatory effect of DHS was associated with reductions in lipid peroxidation, expression of pro-inflammatory genes such as Icam-1, Ccl-2, and iNos-2, and subsequent infiltration of inflammatory cells. Irradiated mice treated with DHS survived until day 30 post-irradiation and showed restoration of spleen cellularity and intestinal villi, but had moderately increased systemic and tissue-specific inflammatory responses. Another organoselenium compound, selenomethionine, evaluated in parallel with DHS at the same dose and treatment schedule, showed comparable radioprotective effects. The mechanism of radioprotection by DHS is mainly via suppression of inflammatory responses. PMID:27542713

  5. Mobilization of Circulating Vascular Progenitors in Cancer Patients Receiving External Beam Radiation in Response to Tissue Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, David S. Morgan, Scott C.; Birch, Paul E.; Yang, Lin; Halpenny, Michael J.; Gunanayagam, Angelo; Li Yuhua; Eapen, Libni

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Endothelial-like vascular progenitor cells (VPCs) are associated with the repair of ischemic tissue injury in several clinical settings. Because the endothelium is a principal target of radiation injury, VPCs may be important in limiting toxicity associated with radiotherapy (RT) in patients with cancer. Methods and Materials: We studied 30 patients undergoing RT for skin cancer (n = 5), head-and-neck cancer (n = 15), and prostate cancer (n = 10) prospectively, representing a wide range of irradiated mucosal volumes. Vascular progenitor cell levels were enumerated from peripheral blood at baseline, midway through RT, at the end of treatment, and 4 weeks after radiation. Acute toxicity was graded at each time point by use of the National Cancer Institute's Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0. Results: Significant increases in the proportion of CD34{sup +}/CD133{sup +} VPCs were observed after completion of RT, from 0.012% at baseline to 0.048% (p = 0.029), and the increase in this subpopulation was most marked in patients with Grade 2 peak toxicity or greater after RT (p = 0.034). Similarly, CD34{sup +}/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-positive VPCs were increased after the completion of radiation therapy in comparison to baseline (from 0.014% to 0.027%, p = 0.043), and there was a trend toward greater mobilization in patients with more significant toxicity (p = 0.08). The mobilization of CD34{sup +} hematopoietic stem cells did not increase after treatment (p = 0.58), and there was no relationship with toxicity. Conclusions: We suggest that VPCs may play an important role in reducing radiation-induced tissue damage. Interventions that increase baseline VPC levels or enhance their mobilization and recruitment in response to RT may prove useful in facilitating more rapid and complete tissue healing.

  6. Response of rodents to inhaled diluted diesel exhaust: biochemical and cytological changes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and in lung tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.F.; Pickrell, J.A.; Jones, R.K.; Sun, J.D.; Benson, J.M.; Mauderly, J.L.; McClellan, R.O.

    1988-10-01

    The effect of long-term (24 months) inhalation of diesel exhaust on the bronchoalveolar region of the respiratory tract of rodents was assessed by serial (every 6 months) analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and of lung tissue from F344/Crl rats and CD-1 mice (both sexes) exposed to diesel exhaust diluted to contain 0, 0.35, 3.5, or 7.0 mg soot/m3. The purpose of the study was twofold. One was to assess the potential health effects of inhaling diluted exhaust from light-duty diesel engines. The second was to determine the usefulness of BALF analysis in detecting the early stages in the development of nononcogenic lung disease and differentiating them from the normal repair processes. No biochemical or cytological changes in BALF or in lung tissue were noted in either species exposed to the lowest, and most environmentally relevant, concentration of diesel exhaust. In the two higher levels of exposure, a chronic inflammatory response was measured in both species by dose-dependent increases in inflammatory cells, cytoplasmic and lysosomal enzymes, and protein in BALF. Histologically, after 1 year of exposure, the rats had developed focal areas of fibrosis associated with the deposits of soot, while the mice, despite a higher lung burden of soot than the rats, had only a fine fibrillar thickening of an occasional alveolar septa in the high-level exposure group. Higher increases in BALF beta-glucuronidase activity and in hydroxyproline content accompanied the greater degree of fibrosis in the rat. BALF levels of glutathione (GSH) and glutathione reductase activity increased in a dose-dependent fashion and were higher in mice than in rats. Lung tissue GSH was depleted in a dose-dependent fashion in rats but was slightly increased in mice.

  7. Systems Analysis of the Dynamic Inflammatory Response to Tissue Damage Reveals Spatiotemporal Properties of the Wound Attractant Gradient.

    PubMed

    Weavers, Helen; Liepe, Juliane; Sim, Aaron; Wood, Will; Martin, Paul; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2016-08-01

    In the acute inflammatory phase following tissue damage, cells of the innate immune system are rapidly recruited to sites of injury by pro-inflammatory mediators released at the wound site. Although advances in live imaging allow us to directly visualize this process in vivo, the precise identity and properties of the primary immune damage attractants remain unclear, as it is currently impossible to directly observe and accurately measure these signals in tissues. Here, we demonstrate that detailed information about the attractant signals can be extracted directly from the in vivo behavior of the responding immune cells. By applying inference-based computational approaches to analyze the in vivo dynamics of the Drosophila inflammatory response, we gain new detailed insight into the spatiotemporal properties of the attractant gradient. In particular, we show that the wound attractant is released by wound margin cells, rather than by the wounded tissue per se, and that it diffuses away from this source at rates far slower than those of previously implicated signals such as H2O2 and ATP, ruling out these fast mediators as the primary chemoattractant. We then predict, and experimentally test, how competing attractant signals might interact in space and time to regulate multi-step cell navigation in the complex environment of a healing wound, revealing a period of receptor desensitization after initial exposure to the damage attractant. Extending our analysis to model much larger wounds, we uncover a dynamic behavioral change in the responding immune cells in vivo that is prognostic of whether a wound will subsequently heal or not. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27426513

  8. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  9. Regulation of Cellular Response Pattern to Phosphorus Ion is a New Target for the Design of Tissue-Engineered Blood Vessel.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Wang, Fangjuan; Zeng, Wen; Sun, Jun; Li, Li; Yang, Mingcan; Sun, Jiansen; Wu, Yangxiao; Zhao, Xiaohui; Zhu, Chuhong

    2015-05-01

    Regulation of cellular response pattern to phosphorus ion (PI) is a new target for the design of tissue-engineered materials. Changing cellular response pattern to high PI can maintain monocyte/macrophage survival in TEBV and the signal of increasing PI can be converted by klotho to the adenosine signals through the regulation of energy metabolism in monocytes/macrophages. PMID:25694105

  10. Regulatory T cells sequentially migrate from the site of tissue inflammation to the draining LN to suppress the alloimmune response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Schröppel, Bernd; Lal, Girdhari; Jakubzick, Claudia; Mao, Xia; Chen, Dan; Yin, Na; Jessberger, Rolf; Ochando, Jordi C.; Ding, Yaozhong; Bromberg, Jonathan S.

    2009-01-01

    To determine site and mechanism of suppression, regulatory T cell (Treg) migration and function were investigated in an islet allograft model. Treg first migrated from blood to the inflammed allografts, this depended on CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, and P- and E-selectin ligands, and was essential for suppression of alloimmunity. In the allograft, Treg were activated, upregulated effector molecules, migrated to the draining lymph nodes (dLN) in a CCR2, CCR5, and CCR7 fashion, and this movement was essential for optimal suppression. Treg inhibited dendritic cell migration in a TGFβ and IL-10 dependent fashion; and suppressed antigen specific T effector cell migration, accumulation, and proliferation in dLNs and allografts. These results showed that sequen