Science.gov

Sample records for adverse tissue response

  1. Adverse responses to local anaesthetics.

    PubMed

    Fisher, M M; Graham, R

    1984-11-01

    Progressive challenge was used to investigate twenty-seven patients with a history of an adverse response to local anaesthesia. True allergy was detected in only one patient. The method does not exclude reactions to additives and preservatives in local anaesthetics. If preservative-free local anaesthetics are used for subsequent exposure in patients with no response to progressive challenge, subsequent exposure is safe. The possibility that some of these patients may be reacting to preservatives in the solutions cannot be excluded by such testing. Where possible preservative-free local anaesthetic preparations should be used for subsequent anaesthesia.

  2. Adverse response to neuroleptics in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Nevins, D B

    1977-01-01

    Negative therapeutic reactions to neuroleptics in schizophrenic patients are examined from the psychoanalytic perspective through case examples. Intrapsychic changes resulting from this medication, ordinarily considered beneficial, are shown, in some cases, to be disruptive of schizophrenic functioning and organization and potentially to endanger the continuation of medication itself. Changes are described which effect defenses, object relations, psychotic restitution, use of external reality, body image and cognition, and the symbolic significance of medication. Alterations in narcissistic ego states and disruption in preconscious processes, superimposed upon defective ego functioning, are used as explanatory concepts. These interact with transference based responses; in some cases, important psychodynamic issues emerge amenable to transference interpretations. Further study of intrapsychic changes may be useful in delineating a previously inexplicable response, understanding symptom formation, recognizing shifts in the patient-psychotherapist relationship, and forestalling premature cessation of medication.

  3. Adverse event reporting and developments in radiation biology after normal tissue injury: International Atomic Energy Agency consultation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yuhchyau . E-mail: Yuhchyau_chen@urmc.rochester.edu; Trotti, Andy; Coleman, C. Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Mirimanoff, Rene O.; Hay, John; O'Brien, Peter C.; El-Gueddari, Brahim; Salvajoli, Joao V.; Jeremic, Branislav

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Recent research has enhanced our understanding of radiation injury at the molecular-cellular and tissue levels; significant strides have occurred in standardization of adverse event reporting in clinical trials. In response, the International Atomic Energy Agency, through its Division of Human Health and its section for Applied Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy, organized a consultation meeting in Atlanta (October 2, 2004) to discuss developments in radiobiology, normal tissue reactions, and adverse event reporting. Methods and Materials: Representatives from cooperative groups of African Radiation Oncology Group, Curriculo Radioterapeutica Ibero Latino Americana, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, and Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group held the meeting discussion. Results: Representatives of major radiotherapy groups/organizations and prominent leaders in radiotherapy discussed current understanding of normal tissue radiobiologic effects, the design and implementation of future clinical and translational projects for normal tissue injury, and the standardization of adverse-event reporting worldwide. Conclusions: The consensus was to adopt NCI comprehensive adverse event reporting terminology and grading system (CTCAE v3.0) as the new standard for all cooperative group trials. Future plans included the implementation of coordinated research projects focusing on normal tissue biomarkers and data collection methods.

  4. An upside to adversity?: moderate cumulative lifetime adversity is associated with resilient responses in the face of controlled stressors.

    PubMed

    Seery, Mark D; Leo, Raphael J; Lupien, Shannon P; Kondrak, Cheryl L; Almonte, Jessica L

    2013-07-01

    Despite common findings suggesting that lack of negative life events should be optimal, recent work has revealed a curvilinear pattern, such that some cumulative lifetime adversity is instead associated with optimal well-being. This work, however, is limited in that responses to specific stressors as they occurred were not assessed, thereby precluding investigation of resilience. The current research addressed this critical gap by directly testing the relationship between adversity history and resilience to stressors. Specifically, we used a multimethod approach across two studies to assess responses to controlled laboratory stressors (respectively requiring passive endurance and active instrumental performance). Results revealed hypothesized U-shaped relationships: Relative to a history of either no adversity or nonextreme high adversity, a moderate number of adverse life events was associated with less negative responses to pain and more positive psychophysiological responses while taking a test. These results provide novel evidence in support of adversity-derived propensity for resilience that generalizes across stressors.

  5. Loneliness, eudaimonia, and the human conserved transcriptional response to adversity

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Levine, Morgan E.; Arevalo, Jesusa M. G.; Ma, Jeffrey; Weir, David R.; Crimmins, Eileen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic social adversity activates a conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA) marked by increased expression of pro-inflammatory genes and decreased expression of antiviral- and antibody-related genes. Recent findings suggest that some psychological resilience factors may help buffer CTRA activation, but the relative impact of resilience and adversity factors remains poorly understood. Here we examined the relative strength of CTRA association for the two best-established psychological correlates of CTRA gene expression – the risk factor of perceived social isolation (loneliness) and the resilience factor of eudaimonic well-being (purpose and meaning in life). Methods Peripheral blood samples and validated measures of loneliness and eudaimonic well-being were analyzed in 108 community-dwelling older adults participating in the longitudinal US Health and Retirement Study (56% female, mean age 73). Mixed effect linear model analyses quantified the strength of association between CTRA gene expression and measures of loneliness and eudaimonic well-being in separate and joint analyses. Results As in previous studies, separate analyses found CTRA gene expression to be up-regulated in association with loneliness and down-regulated in association with eudaimonic well-being. In joint analyses, effects of loneliness were completely abrogated whereas eudaimonic well-being continued to associate with CTRA down-regulation. Similar eudaimonia-dominant effects were observed for positive and negative affect, optimism and pessimism, and anxiety symptoms. All results were independent of demographic and behavioral health risk factors. Conclusions Eudaimonic well-being may have the potential to compensate for the adverse impact of loneliness on CTRA gene expression. Findings suggest a novel approach to targeting the health risks associated with social isolation by promoting purpose and meaning in life. PMID:26246388

  6. Tissue response: biomaterials, dental implants, and compromised osseous tissue.

    PubMed

    Babu RS, Arvind; Ogle, Orrett

    2015-04-01

    Tissue response represents an important feature in biocompatibility in implant procedures. This review article highlights the fundamental characteristics of tissue response after the implant procedure. This article also highlights the tissue response in compromised osseous conditions. Understanding the histologic events after dental implants in normal and abnormal bone reinforces the concept of case selection in dental implants.

  7. Channel shutdown: a response of hippocampal neurons to adverse environments.

    PubMed

    Somjen, G G; Faas, G C; Vreugdenhil, M; Wadman, W J

    1993-12-31

    Stretch-activated ion channels have been discovered in the membrane of many types of cells, but their presence in neurons is uncertain. We used freshly dissociated rat hippocampal neurons to study the effect of hypotonic swelling but, surprisingly, the isolated neurons did not swell. Voltage-dependent whole-cell membrane currents mediated by K+, Na+ and Ca2+ were rapidly and reversibly suppressed during sudden exposure to strongly hypo-osmotic, hyper-osmotic or glucose deficient solutions. The amplitudes of the sustained components of K+ and Ca2+ currents were more depressed than transient currents, but the rate of decay of transient K+ current greatly accelerated. The voltage dependence of activation and of steady state inactivation of residual K+ and Ca2+ currents were not shifted. The current holding membrane potential at -70 mV and therefore the conductance at that voltage were unchanged or somewhat decreased. Capacitive (charging) membrane current was not affected. Changes in tail current suggested moderate loss of cytosolic K+ in some but not in all cells. We conclude that channel shutdown is a uniform response of neuron somata and proximal dendrites to various adverse environments. Hypothetically we propose that swelling was prevented in anisosmotic conditions because membrane water permeability decreased.

  8. Diagnosis and Treatment of Adverse Local Tissue Reactions at the Head-Neck Junction.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Herbert J

    2016-07-01

    Modular junctions in total hip arthroplasty are susceptible to mechanically assisted crevice corrosion, leading to the release of metal wear debris. Adverse local tissue reactions result from an immune-mediated biological reaction to this debris and can have a profound effect on the surrounding periarticular soft tissue envelope. Patients often present with pain or muscle weakness and demonstrate elevated serum cobalt and chromium levels. Serum inflammatory markers and synovial fluid tests help distinguish these reactions from deep infection in the majority of cases; however, the presence of amorphous material or fragmented cells can lead to difficulty in some cases. Advanced cross-sectional imaging is essential in establishing the diagnosis. Early revision surgery is generally the treatment of choice for symptomatic adverse local tissue reaction from corrosion at the modular head-neck junction. The existing stem is retained, and a new ceramic head is placed on the existing trunnion whenever possible. This strategy generally leads to short-term improvement of symptoms with reliable clinical outcomes; however, longer term results are presently lacking.

  9. Social Involvement Modulates the Response to Novel and Adverse Life Events in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Colnaghi, Luca; Clemenza, Kelly; Groleau, Sarah E.; Weiss, Shira; Snyder, Anna M.; Lopez-Rosas, Mariana; Levine, Amir A.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological findings suggest that social involvement plays a major role in establishing resilience to adversity, however, the neurobiology by which social involvement confers protection is not well understood. Hypothesizing that social involvement confers resilience by changing the way adverse life events are encoded, we designed a series of behavioral tests in mice that utilize the presence or absence of conspecific cage mates in measuring response to novel and adverse events. We found that the presence of cage mates increased movement after exposure to a novel environment, increased time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze, and decreased freezing time after a foot shock as well as expedited fear extinction, therefore significantly changing the response to adversity. This is a first description of a mouse model for the effects of social involvement on adverse life events. Understanding how social involvement provides resilience to adversity may contribute to the future treatment and prevention of mental and physical illness. PMID:27632422

  10. Functional brown adipose tissue limits cardiomyocyte injury and adverse remodeling in catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Thoonen, Robrecht; Ernande, Laura; Cheng, Juan; Nagasaka, Yasuko; Yao, Vincent; Miranda-Bezerra, Alexandre; Chen, Chan; Chao, Wei; Panagia, Marcello; Sosnovik, David E.; Puppala, Dheeraj; Armoundas, Antonis A.; Hindle, Allyson; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle

    2015-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has well recognized thermogenic properties mediated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1); more recently, BAT has been demonstrated to modulate cardiovascular risk factors. To investigate whether BAT also affects myocardial injury and remodeling, UCP1-deficient (UCP1−/−) mice, which have dysfunctional BAT, were subjected to catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy. At baseline, there were no differences in echocardiographic parameters, plasma cardiac troponin I (cTnI) or myocardial fibrosis between wild-type (WT) and UCP1−/− mice. Isoproterenol infusion increased cTnI and myocardial fibrosis and induced left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy in both WT and UCP1−/− mice. UCP1−/− mice also demonstrated exaggerated myocardial injury, fibrosis, and adverse remodeling, as well as decreased survival. Transplantation of WT BAT to UCP1−/− mice prevented the isoproterenol-induced cTnI increase and improved survival, whereas UCP1−/− BAT transplanted to either UCP1−/− or WT mice had no effect on cTnI release. After 3 days of isoproterenol treatment, phosphorylated AKT and ERK were lower in the LV's of UCP1−/− mice than in those of WT mice. Activation of BAT was also noted in a model of chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy, and was correlated to LV dysfunction. Deficiency in UCP1, and accompanying BAT dysfunction, increases cardiomyocyte injury and adverse LV remodeling, and decreases survival in a mouse model of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy. Myocardial injury and decreased survival are rescued by transplantation of functional BAT to UCP1−/− mice, suggesting a systemic cardioprotective role of functional BAT. BAT is also activated in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25968336

  11. Tissue response to peritoneal implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picha, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    Peritoneal implants were fabricated from poly 2-OH, ethyl methacrylate (HEMA), polyetherurethane (polytetramethylene glycol 1000 MW, 1,4 methylene disocynate, and ethyl diamine), and untreated and sputter treated polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). The sputter treated PTFE implants were produced by an 8 cm diameter argon ion source. The treated samples consisted of ion beam sputter polished samples, sputter etched samples (to produce a microscopic surface cone texture) and surface pitted samples (produced by ion beam sputtering to result in 50 microns wide by 100 microns deep square pits). These materials were implanted in rats for periods ranging from 30 minutes to 14 days. The results were evaluated with regard to cell type and attachment kinetics onto the different materials. Scanning electron microscopy and histological sections were also evaluated. In general the smooth hydrophobic surfaces attracted less cells than the ion etched PTFE or the HEMA samples. The ion etching was observed to enhance cell attachment, multinucleated giant cell (MNGC) formation, cell to cell contact, and fibrous capsule formation. The cell responsed in the case of ion etched PTFE to an altered surface morphology. However, equally interesting was the similar attachment kinetics of HEMA verses the ion etched PTFE. However, HEMA resulted in a markedly different response with no MNGC's formation, minimal to no capsule formation, and sample coverage by a uniform cell layer.

  12. Ingestion of gallium phosphide nanowires has no adverse effect on Drosophila tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolfsson, Karl; Schneider, Martina; Hammarin, Greger; Häcker, Udo; Prinz, Christelle N.

    2013-07-01

    Engineered nanoparticles have been under increasing scrutiny in recent years. High aspect ratio nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes and nanowires have raised safety concerns due to their geometrical similarity to asbestos fibers. III-V epitaxial semiconductor nanowires are expected to be utilized in devices such as LEDs and solar cells and will thus be available to the public. In addition, clean-room staff fabricating and characterizing the nanowires are at risk of exposure, emphasizing the importance of investigating their possible toxicity. Here we investigated the effects of gallium phosphide nanowires on the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila larvae and/or adults were exposed to gallium phosphide nanowires by ingestion with food. The toxicity and tissue interaction of the nanowires was evaluated by investigating tissue distribution, activation of immune response, genome-wide gene expression, life span, fecundity and somatic mutation rates. Our results show that gallium phosphide nanowires applied through the diet are not taken up into Drosophila tissues, do not elicit a measurable immune response or changes in genome-wide gene expression and do not significantly affect life span or somatic mutation rate.

  13. Ingestion of gallium phosphide nanowires has no adverse effect on Drosophila tissue function.

    PubMed

    Adolfsson, Karl; Schneider, Martina; Hammarin, Greger; Häcker, Udo; Prinz, Christelle N

    2013-07-19

    Engineered nanoparticles have been under increasing scrutiny in recent years. High aspect ratio nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes and nanowires have raised safety concerns due to their geometrical similarity to asbestos fibers. III-V epitaxial semiconductor nanowires are expected to be utilized in devices such as LEDs and solar cells and will thus be available to the public. In addition, clean-room staff fabricating and characterizing the nanowires are at risk of exposure, emphasizing the importance of investigating their possible toxicity. Here we investigated the effects of gallium phosphide nanowires on the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila larvae and/or adults were exposed to gallium phosphide nanowires by ingestion with food. The toxicity and tissue interaction of the nanowires was evaluated by investigating tissue distribution, activation of immune response, genome-wide gene expression, life span, fecundity and somatic mutation rates. Our results show that gallium phosphide nanowires applied through the diet are not taken up into Drosophila tissues, do not elicit a measurable immune response or changes in genome-wide gene expression and do not significantly affect life span or somatic mutation rate.

  14. Adverse Events in Connective Tissue Disease–Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Rennie L.; Gabler, Nicole B.; Praestgaard, Amy; Merkel, Peter A.; Kawut, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients with connective tissue disease (CTD)–associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) have a poorer prognosis compared to those with idiopathic PAH, but little is known about the differences in treatment-related adverse events (AEs) and serious adverse events (SAEs) between these groups. This study was undertaken to characterize these differences. Methods Individual patient-level data from 10 randomized controlled trials of therapies for PAH were obtained from the US Food and Drug Administration. Patients diagnosed as having either CTD-associated PAH or idiopathic PAH were included. A treatment-by-diagnosis interaction term was used to examine whether the effect of treatment on occurrence of AEs differed between patients with CTD-associated PAH and those with idiopathic PAH. Studies were pooled using fixed-effect models. Results The study sample included 2,370 participants: 716 with CTD-associated PAH and 1,654 with idiopathic PAH. In the active treatment group compared to the placebo group, the risk of AEs was higher among patients with CTD-associated PAH than among those with idiopathic PAH (odds ratio [OR] 1.57, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.00–2.47 versus OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.69–1.26; P for interaction = 0.061), but there was no difference in the risk of SAEs in analyses adjusted for age, race, sex, hemodynamic findings, and laboratory values. Despite the higher occurrence of AEs in patients with CTD-associated PAH assigned to active therapy compared to those receiving placebo, the risk of drug discontinuation due to an AE was similar to that in patients with idiopathic PAH assigned to active therapy (P for interaction = 0.27). Conclusion Patients with CTD-associated PAH experienced more treatment-related AEs compared to those with idiopathic PAH in therapeutic clinical trials. These findings suggest that the overall benefit of advanced therapies for PAH may be attenuated by the greater frequency of AEs. PMID:26016953

  15. Dynamic compressive response of bovine liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Pervin, Farhana; Chen, Weinong W; Weerasooriya, Tusit

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to experimentally determine the strain rate effects on the compressive stress-strain behavior of bovine liver tissues. Fresh liver tissues were used to make specimens for mechanical loading. Experiments at quasi-static strain rates were conducted at 0.01 and 0.1 s(-1). Intermediate-rate experiments were performed at 1, 10, and 100 s(-1). High strain rate (1000, 2000, and 3000 s(-1)) experiments were conducted using a Kolsky bar modified for soft material characterization. A hollow transmission bar with semi-conductor strain gages was used to sense the weak forces from the soft specimens. Quartz-crystal force transducers were used to monitor valid testing conditions on the tissue specimens. The experiment results show that the compressive stress-strain response of the liver tissue is non-linear and highly rate-sensitive, especially when the strain rate is in the Kolsky bar range. The tissue stiffens significantly with increasing strain rate. The responses from liver tissues along and perpendicular to the liver surface were consistent, indicating isotropic behavior.

  16. Regeneration, tissue injury and the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, James W; Brockes, Jeremy P

    2006-01-01

    The involvement of the immune system in the response to tissue injury has raised the possibility that it might influence tissue, organ or appendage regeneration following injury. One hypothesis that has been discussed is that inflammatory aspects may preclude the occurrence of regeneration, but there is also evidence for more positive roles of immune components. The vertebrate eye is an immunoprivileged site where inflammatory aspects are inhibited by several immunomodulatory mechanisms. In various newt species the ocular tissues such as the lens are regenerative and it has recently been shown that the response to local injury of the lens involves activation of antigen-presenting cells which traffic to the spleen and return to displace and engulf the lens, thereby inducing regeneration from the dorsal iris. The activation of thrombin from prothrombin in the dorsal iris is one aspect of the injury response that is important in the initiation of regeneration. The possible relationships between the immune response and the regenerative response are considered with respect to phylogenetic variation of regeneration in general, and lens regeneration in particular. PMID:17005015

  17. Baby on board: do responses to stress in the maternal brain mediate adverse pregnancy outcome?

    PubMed

    Douglas, Alison J

    2010-07-01

    Stress and adverse environmental surroundings result in suboptimal conditions in a pregnant mother such that she may experience poor pregnancy outcome including complete pregnancy failure and preterm labor. Furthermore her developing baby is at risk of adverse programming, which confers susceptibility to long term ill health. While some mechanisms at the feto-maternal interface underlying these conditions are understood, the underlying cause for their adverse adaptation is often not clear. Progesterone plays a key role at many levels, including control of neuroendocrine responses to stress, procuring the required immune balance and controlling placental and decidual function, and lack of progesterone can explain many of the unwanted consequences of stress. How stress that is perceived by the mother inhibits progesterone secretion and action is beginning to be investigated. This overview of maternal neuroendocrine responses to stress throughout pregnancy analyses how they interact to compromise progesterone secretion and precipitate undesirable effects in mother and offspring.

  18. Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronical epithelial cells exposed to zinc

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to zincJenna M. Currier1,2, Wan-Yun Cheng1, Rory Conolly1, Brian N. Chorley1Zinc is a ubiquitous contaminant of ambient air that presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung...

  19. An interaction between a neuropeptide Y gene polymorphism and early adversity modulates endocrine stress responses.

    PubMed

    Witt, Stephanie H; Buchmann, Arlette F; Blomeyer, Dorothea; Nieratschker, Vanessa; Treutlein, Jens; Esser, Günter; Schmidt, Martin H; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Wiedemann, Klaus; Rietschel, Marcella; Laucht, Manfred; Wüst, Stefan; Zimmermann, Ulrich S

    2011-08-01

    Interindividual variability in the regulation of the human stress system accounts for a part of the individual's liability to stress-related diseases. These differences are influenced by environmental and genetic factors. Early childhood adversity is a well-studied environmental factor affecting an individual's stress response which has been shown to be modulated by gene-environment interaction (GxE). Neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays a role in stress regulation and genetic variation in NPY may influence stress responses. In this study, we analyzed the association of a common variant in the NPY gene promoter, rs16147, with cortisol and ACTH responses to acute psychosocial stress in young adults from the Mannheim Study of Children at Risk (MARS), an ongoing epidemiological cohort study following the outcome of early adversity from birth into adulthood. We found evidence of a GxE interaction between rs16147 and early adversity significantly affecting HPA axis responses to acute psychosocial stress. These findings suggest that the neurobiological mechanisms linking early adverse experience and later neuroendocrine stress regulation are modulated by a gene variant whose functional relevance is documented by increasing convergent evidence from in vitro, animal and human studies.

  20. Cobalt to Chromium Ratio is Not a Key Marker for Adverse Local Tissue Reaction (ALTR) in Metal on Metal Hips.

    PubMed

    Fehring, Thomas K; Carter, Joshua L; Fehring, Keith A; Odum, Susan M; Griffin, William L

    2015-09-01

    The diagnosis of adverse local tissue reaction (ALTR) after metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty (MoMTHA) presents a significant challenge. No single biomarker is specific for ALTR. The purpose of this study was to determine if the ratio of cobalt to chromium ions is useful for diagnosing ALTR in MoMTHA. In 89 bearing-related revision THAs, preoperative cobalt and chromium ion levels were compared to an intraoperative soft tissue damage grading scale. The average cobalt to chromium ratio was 2.96 (0-20). There was no correlation between the tissue scale and the cobalt to chromium ratio (R=0.095; P=0.41). Many variables affecting ion production/excretion mitigate the use of the ion ratio. The cobalt to chromium ratio is not a predictive biomarker for ALTR in MoMTHA.

  1. Responses of Cardiac Tissue to Simulated Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tahimic, Candice; Steczina, Sonette; Terada, Masahiro; Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Goukassian, David; Globus, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Our current study aims to determine the molecular mechanisms that underlie these cardiac changes in response to spaceflight. The central hypothesis of our study is that long duration simulated weightlessness and subsequent recovery causes select and persistent changes in gene expression and oxidative defense-related pathways. In this study, we will first conduct general analyses of three-month old male and female animals, focusing on two key long-duration time points, (i.e. after 90 days of simulated weightlessness (HU) and after 90 days recovery from 90 days of HU. Both rat-specific gene arrays and qPCR will be performed focusing on genes already implicated in oxidative stress responses and cardiac disease. Gene expression analyses will be complemented by biochemical tests of frozen tissue lysates for select markers of oxidative damage.

  2. Fibrinolysis inhibitors adversely affect remodeling of tissues sealed with fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Lissy K; Vijayan Lal, Arthur; Uma Shankar, P R; Mohanty, Mira

    2003-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to determine if aprotinin and epsilon -amino caproic acid increases the quality of Fibrin glue. A rat model was used for tissues such as liver and skin while rabbits were used for application of glue in dura mater. Apposition of all the tissues, glued with fibrin was found to be good and remnants of the polymerized fibrin were seen even on the seventh day of application, though inhibitors were not incorporated with the glue. In skin, excessive amounts of fibrin remained as a result of addition of aprotinin and epsilon -amino caproic acid, as compared to the glue applied without any inhibitor. After dural sealing, the wound repair and new bone formation at craniotomy site progressed well in the fibrin glue applied area as compared to the commercially available glue that contained aprotinin. The adhesive strength of the glue without or with fibrinolysis inhibitors was found to be similar, after 1h grafts on rat back. The observations from this study suggests that the use of aprotinin with fibrin glue may not be required because, even liver tissue that is known to have high fibrinolytic activity was sealed and repaired well in the absence of plasminogen inhibitors. On the other hand, it was found that if inhibitors were added, nondegraded matrix remained in the tissue even after 15 days and affected migration of repair cells. Thus, the inhibition of fibrinolysis after fibrin glue application is found detrimental to wound healing.

  3. Assessment on the adverse effects of Aminoglycosides and Flouroquinolone on sperm parameters and male reproductive tissue: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Khaki, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic therapies used in treatment of many diseases have adverse effects on fertility. This review analyzes previous comparative studies that surveyed the effects of two common groups of antibiotics on male fertility. Objective: To evaluate histo-pathological effects of fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides on sperm parameters and male reproductive tissue. Materials and Methods: Articles about the effects of aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones on male infertility, sperm parameters, male reproductive tissue, and spermatogenesis in English and Persian languages published on Google Scholar and PubMed databases from January 2000 to December 2013 were assessed. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effects of aminoglycosides or fluoroquinolones on sperm parameters, artificial insemination, and male reproductive tract or RCTs comparing aminoglycosides vs. fluoroquinolones were eligible for inclusion. For ascertaining the reliability of study, data were extracted independently and in duplicate by two investigators. Results: Sperm viability was decreased significantly with streptomycin, gentamicin, and neomycin (p<0.001). Sperm motility was decreased significantly with gentamicin and neomycin (p<0.05). Total sperm count was significantly decreased with ofloxacin, gentamicin, streptomycin, and neomycin (p<0.022). There was significant decrease in post-thawing motility with low dose and high dose of ciprofloxacin. Testis weight was decreased with gentamicin and ofloxacin significantly (p<0.011). There was significant decrease in seminal vesicle weight with gentamicin, neomycin, and ofloxacin (p<0.022). Furthermore, changes in epididymis weight, percentage of total apoptotic cells, and diameter of seminiferous tubule were significant with all drugs including streptomycin, gentamicin, neomycin, and ofloxacin (p<0.05). Conclusion: Streptomycin has less negative effects on cell’s apoptosis and sperm parameters as compared to other drugs. Gentamicin

  4. Drug response in organoids generated from frozen primary tumor tissues

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Alex J.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-01-01

    Primary tumor organoids grown in three-dimensional culture provide an excellent platform for studying tumor progression, invasion, and drug response. However, organoid generation protocols require fresh tumor tissue, which limits organoid research and clinical use. This study investigates cellular morphology, viability, and drug response of organoids derived from frozen tissues. The results demonstrate that viable organoids can be grown from flash-frozen and thawed tissue and from bulk tissues slowly frozen in DMSO supplemented media. While the freezing process affects the basal metabolic rate of the cells, the optical metabolic imaging index correlates between organoids derived from fresh and frozen tissue and can be used to detect drug response of organoids grown from frozen tissues. The slow, DMSO frozen tissue yielded organoids with more accurate drug response than the flash frozen tissues, and thus bulk tissue should be preserved for subsequent organoid generation by slow freezing in DMSO supplemented media. PMID:26738962

  5. Drug response in organoids generated from frozen primary tumor tissues.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Alex J; Cook, Rebecca S; Sanders, Melinda E; Arteaga, Carlos L; Skala, Melissa C

    2016-01-07

    Primary tumor organoids grown in three-dimensional culture provide an excellent platform for studying tumor progression, invasion, and drug response. However, organoid generation protocols require fresh tumor tissue, which limits organoid research and clinical use. This study investigates cellular morphology, viability, and drug response of organoids derived from frozen tissues. The results demonstrate that viable organoids can be grown from flash-frozen and thawed tissue and from bulk tissues slowly frozen in DMSO supplemented media. While the freezing process affects the basal metabolic rate of the cells, the optical metabolic imaging index correlates between organoids derived from fresh and frozen tissue and can be used to detect drug response of organoids grown from frozen tissues. The slow, DMSO frozen tissue yielded organoids with more accurate drug response than the flash frozen tissues, and thus bulk tissue should be preserved for subsequent organoid generation by slow freezing in DMSO supplemented media.

  6. Mechanistic and dose considerations for supporting adverse pulmonary physiology in response to formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Chad M. Subramaniam, Ravi P.; Grafstroem, Roland C.

    2008-12-15

    Induction of airway hyperresponsiveness and asthma from formaldehyde inhalation exposure remains a debated and controversial issue. Yet, recent evidences on pulmonary biology and the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of formaldehyde lend support for such adverse effects. Specifically, altered thiol biology from accelerated enzymatic reduction of the endogenous bronchodilator S-nitrosoglutathione and pulmonary inflammation from involvement of Th2-mediated immune responses might serve as key events and cooperate in airway pathophysiology. Understanding what role these mechanisms play in various species and lifestages (e.g., child vs. adult) could be crucial for making more meaningful inter- and intra-species dosimetric extrapolations in human health risk assessment.

  7. Business oriented EU human cell and tissue product legislation will adversely impact Member States' health care systems.

    PubMed

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Vanderkelen, Alain; De Vos, Daniel; Draye, Jean-Pierre; Rose, Thomas; Ceulemans, Carl; Ectors, Nadine; Huys, Isabelle; Jennes, Serge; Verbeken, Gilbert

    2013-12-01

    The transplantation of conventional human cell and tissue grafts, such as heart valve replacements and skin for severely burnt patients, has saved many lives over the last decades. The late eighties saw the emergence of tissue engineering with the focus on the development of biological substitutes that restore or improve tissue function. In the nineties, at the height of the tissue engineering hype, industry incited policymakers to create a European regulatory environment, which would facilitate the emergence of a strong single market for tissue engineered products and their starting materials (human cells and tissues). In this paper we analyze the elaboration process of this new European Union (EU) human cell and tissue product regulatory regime-i.e. the EU Cell and Tissue Directives (EUCTDs) and the Advanced Therapy Medicinal Product (ATMP) Regulation and evaluate its impact on Member States' health care systems. We demonstrate that the successful lobbying on key areas of regulatory and policy processes by industry, in congruence with Europe's risk aversion and urge to promote growth and jobs, led to excessively business oriented legislation. Expensive industry oriented requirements were introduced and contentious social and ethical issues were excluded. We found indications that this new EU safety and health legislation will adversely impact Member States' health care systems; since 30 December 2012 (the end of the ATMP transitional period) there is a clear threat to the sustainability of some lifesaving and established ATMPs that were provided by public health institutions and small and medium-sized enterprises under the frame of the EUCTDs. In the light of the current economic crisis it is not clear how social security systems will cope with the inflation of costs associated with this new regulatory regime and how priorities will be set with regard to reimbursement decisions. We argue that the ATMP Regulation should urgently be revised to focus on delivering

  8. The Symmetry of Adverse Local Tissue Reactions in Patients with Bilateral Simultaneous and Sequential ASR Hip Replacement.

    PubMed

    Madanat, Rami; Hussey, Daniel K; Donahue, Gabrielle S; Potter, Hollis G; Wallace, Robert; Bragdon, Charles R; Muratoglu, Orhun K; Malchau, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether patients with bilateral metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements have symmetric adverse local tissue reactions (ALTRs) at follow-up. An MRI of both hips was performed at a mean time of six years after surgery in 43 patients. The prevalence and severity of ALTRs were found to be similar in simultaneous hips but differences were observed in sequential hips. The order and timing of sequential hip arthroplasties did not affect the severity of ALTRs. Thus, in addition to metal ion exposure from an earlier MoM implant other factors may also play a role in the progression of ALTRs. Bilateral implants should be given special consideration in risk stratification algorithms for management of patients with MoM hip arthroplasty.

  9. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor for prediction of placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes in high-risk women: AngioPred study

    PubMed Central

    Di Bartolomeo, Aurélie; Chauleur, Céline; Gris, Jean-Christophe; Chapelle, Céline; Noblot, Edouard; Laporte, Silvy

    2017-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to evaluate if the rate of tissue factor pathway inhibitor during pregnancy and following delivery could be a predictive factor for placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes in high-risk women. Methods This was a prospective multicentre cohort study of 200 patients at a high risk of occurrence or recurrence of placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes conducted between June 2008 and October 2010. Measurements of tissue factor pathway inhibitor resistance (normalized ratio) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity were performed for the last 72 patients at 20, 24, 28, 32, and 36 weeks of gestation and during the postpartum period. Results Overall, 15 patients presented a placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcome. There was no difference in normalized tissue factor pathway inhibitor ratios between patients with and without placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes during pregnancy and in the post-partum period. Patients with placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes had tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity rates that were significantly higher than those in patients without at as early as 24 weeks of gestation. The same results were observed following delivery. Conclusion Among high-risk women, the tissue factor pathway inhibitor activity of patients with gestational vascular complications is higher than that in other patients. Hence, these markers could augment a screening strategy that includes an analysis of angiogenic factors as well as clinical and ultrasound imaging with Doppler measurement of the uterine arteries. PMID:28328938

  10. Evidence Report: Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Sams, Clarence F.

    2013-01-01

    The Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response is identified by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Human Research Program (HRP) as a recognized risk to human health and performance in space. The HRP Program Requirements Document (PRD) defines these risks. This Evidence Report provides a summary of the evidence that has been used to identify and characterize this risk. It is known that human immune function is altered in- and post-flight, but it is unclear at present if such alterations lead to increased susceptibility to disease. Reactivation of latent viruses has been documented in crewmembers, although this reactivation has not been directly correlated with immune changes or with observed diseases. As described in this report, further research is required to better characterize the relationships between altered immune response and susceptibility to disease during and after spaceflight. This is particularly important for future deep-space exploration missions.

  11. Tissue Response to Base-Metal Dental Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    RESPONSE(BIOLOGY), *CASTING ALLOYS, *BASE METAL, * DENTAL PROSTHESES, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), COMPATIBILITY, NICKEL ALLOYS, BERYLLIUM, DENTISTRY, CANCER, HISTOLOGY, DENTAL IMPLANTOLOGY , COBALT ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS.

  12. The prevalence of adverse cardiometabolic responses to exercise training with evidence-based practice is low

    PubMed Central

    Dalleck, Lance C; Van Guilder, Gary P; Richardson, Tara B; Vella, Chantal A

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of individuals who experienced exercise-induced adverse cardiometabolic response (ACR), following an evidence-based, individualized, community exercise program. Methods Prevalence of ACR was retrospectively analyzed in 332 adults (190 women, 142 men) before and after a 14-week supervised community exercise program. ACR included an exercise training-induced increase in systolic blood pressure of ≥10 mmHg, increase in plasma triglycerides (TG) of >37.0 mg/dL (≥0.42 mmol/L), or decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) of >4.0 mg/dL (0.12 mmol/L). A second category of ACR was also defined – this was ACR that resulted in a metabolic syndrome component (ACR-risk) as a consequence of the adverse response. Results According to the above criteria, prevalence of ACR between baseline and post-program was systolic blood pressure (6.0%), TG (3.6%), and HDL-C (5.1%). The prevalence of ACR-risk was elevated TG (3.2%), impaired fasting blood glucose (2.7%), low HDL-C (2.2%), elevated waist circumference (1.3%), and elevated blood pressure (0.6%). Conclusion Evidence-based practice exercise programming may attenuate the prevalence of exercise training-induced ACR. Our findings provide important preliminary evidence needed for the vision of exercise prescription as a personalized form of preventative medicine to become a reality. PMID:25678806

  13. Phenotypic variation in xenobiotic metabolism and adverse environmental response: focus on sulfur-dependent detoxification pathways.

    PubMed

    McFadden, S A

    1996-07-17

    Proper bodily response to environmental toxicants presumably requires proper function of the xenobiotic (foreign chemical) detoxification pathways. Links between phenotypic variations in xenobiotic metabolism and adverse environmental response have long been sought. Metabolism of the drug S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine (SCMC) is polymorphous in the population, having a bimodal distribution of metabolites, 2.5% of the general population are thought to be nonmetabolizers. The researchers developing this data feel this implies a polymorphism in sulfoxidation of the amino acid cysteine to sulfate. While this interpretation is somewhat controversial, these metabolic differences reflected may have significant effects. Additionally, a significant number of individuals with environmental intolerance or chronic disease have impaired sulfation of phenolic xenobiotics. This impairment is demonstrated with the probe drug acetaminophen and is presumably due to starvation of the sulfotransferases for sulfate substrate. Reduced metabolism of SCMC has been found with increased frequency in individuals with several degenerative neurological and immunological conditions and drug intolerances, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, motor neuron disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and delayed food sensitivity. Impaired sulfation has been found in many of these conditions, and preliminary data suggests that it may be important in multiple chemical sensitivities and diet responsive autism. In addition, impaired sulfation may be relevant to intolerance of phenol, tyramine, and phenylic food constituents, and it may be a factor in the success of the Feingold diet. These studies indicate the need for the development of genetic and functional tests of xenobiotic metabolism as tools for further research in epidemiology and risk assessment.

  14. Sexually Dimorphic Responses to Early Adversity: Implications for Affective Problems and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Pfaff, Donald

    2014-01-01

    During gestation, development proceeds at a pace that is unmatched by any other stage of the lifecycle. For these reason the human fetus is particularly susceptible not only to organizing influences, but also to pathogenic disorganizing influences. Growing evidence suggests that exposure to prenatal adversity leads to neurological changes that underlie lifetime risks for mental illness. Beginning early in gestation, males and females show differential developmental trajectories and responses to stress. It is likely that sex-dependent organization of neural circuits during the fetal period influences differential vulnerability to mental health problems. We consider in this review evidence that sexually dimorphic responses to early life stress are linked to two developmental disorders: affective problems (greater female prevalence) and autism spectrum disorder (greater male prevalence). Recent prospective studies illustrating the neurodevelopmental consequences of fetal exposure to stress and stress hormones for males and females are considered here. Plausible biological mechanisms including the role of the sexually differentiated placenta are discussed. We consider in this review evidence that sexually dimorphic responses to early life stress are linked to two sets of developmental disorders: affective problems (greater female prevalence) and autism spectrum disorders (greater male prevalence). PMID:25038479

  15. Factors influencing adverse skin responses in rats receiving repeated subcutaneous injections and potential impact on neurobehavior

    PubMed Central

    Levoe, S. Nikki; Flannery, Brenna M.; Brignolo, Laurie; Imai, Denise M.; Koehne, Amanda; Austin, Adam T.; Bruun, Donald A.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated subcutaneous (s.c.) injection is a common route of administration in chronic studies of neuroactive compounds. However, in a pilot study we noted a significant incidence of skin abnormalities in adult male Long-Evans rats receiving daily s.c. injections of peanut oil (1.0 ml/kg) in the subscapular region for 21 d. Histopathological analyses of the lesions were consistent with a foreign body reaction. Subsequent studies were conducted to determine factors that influenced the incidence or severity of skin abnormalities, and whether these adverse skin reactions influenced a specific neurobehavioral outcome. Rats injected daily for 21 d with food grade peanut oil had an earlier onset and greater incidence of skin abnormalities relative to rats receiving an equal volume (1.0 ml/kg/d) of reagent grade peanut oil or triglyceride of coconut oil. Skin abnormalities in animals injected daily with peanut oil were increased in animals housed on corncob versus paper bedding. Comparison of animals obtained from different barrier facilities exposed to the same injection paradigm (reagent grade peanut oil, 1.0 ml/kg/d s.c.) revealed significant differences in the severity of skin abnormalities. However, animals from different barrier facilities did not perform differently in a Pavlovian fear conditioning task. Collectively, these data suggest that environmental factors influence the incidence and severity of skin abnormalities following repeated s.c. injections, but that these adverse skin responses do not significantly influence performance in at least one test of learning and memory. PMID:25705100

  16. Response to self antigen imprints regulatory memory in tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Gratz, Iris K.; Paw, Jonathan S.; Lee, Karen; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Abbas, Abul K.

    2012-01-01

    Immune homeostasis in tissues is achieved through a delicate balance between pathogenic T cell responses directed at tissue-specific antigens and the ability of the tissue to inhibit these responses. The mechanisms by which tissues and the immune system communicate to establish and maintain immune homeostasis are currently unknown. Clinical evidence suggests that chronic or repeated exposure to self antigen within tissues leads to an attenuation of pathologic autoimmune responses, possibly as a means to mitigate inflammatory damage and preserve function. Many human organ-specific autoimmune diseases are characterized by the initial presentation of the disease being the most severe, with subsequent flares being of lesser severity and duration1. In fact, these diseases often spontaneously resolve, despite persistent tissue autoantigen expression2. In the practice of antigen-specific immunotherapy (antigen-SIT), allergens or self antigens are repeatedly injected in the skin, with a diminution of the inflammatory response occurring after each successive exposure3. Although these findings suggest that tissues acquire the ability to attenuate autoimmune reactions upon repeated responses to antigens, the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Here we show that upon expression of self antigen in a peripheral tissue, thymus-derived regulatory T cells (Treg cells) become activated, proliferate and differentiate into more potent suppressors, which mediate resolution of organ-specific autoimmunity. After resolution of the inflammatory response, activated Treg cells are maintained in the target tissue and are primed to attenuate subsequent autoimmune reactions when antigen is re-expressed. Thus, Treg cells function to confer ‘regulatory memory’ to the target tissue. These findings provide a framework for understanding how Treg cells respond when exposed to self antigen in peripheral tissues and offer mechanistic insight into how tissues regulate autoimmunity. PMID

  17. Association between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in XRCC3 and Radiation-Induced Adverse Effects on Normal Tissue: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-Zhe; Han, Fu-Jun; Liu, Min; Xia, Cheng-Cheng; Shi, Wei-Yan; Dong, Li-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) protein plays an important role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. The relationship between XRCC3 polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced adverse effects on normal tissue remains inconclusive. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to elucidate the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and radiation-induced adverse effects on normal tissue. All eligible studies up to December 2014 were identified through a search of the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases. Seventeen studies involving 656 cases and 2193 controls were ultimately included in this meta-analysis. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced normal tissue adverse effects. We found that the XRCC3 p.Thr241Met (rs861539) polymorphism was significantly associated with early adverse effects induced by radiotherapy (OR = 1.99, 95%CI: 1.31-3.01, P = 0.001). A positive association lacking statistical significance with late adverse effects was also identified (OR = 1.28, 95%CI: 0.97-1.68, P = 0.08). In addition, the rs861539 polymorphism was significantly correlated with a higher risk of adverse effects induced by head and neck area irradiation (OR = 2.41, 95%CI: 1.49-3.89, p = 0.0003) and breast irradiation (OR = 1.41, 95%CI: 1.02-1.95, p = 0.04), whereas the correlation was not significant for lung irradiation or pelvic irradiation. Furthermore, XRCC3 rs1799794 polymorphism may have a protective effect against late adverse effects induced by radiotherapy (OR = 0.47, 95%CI: 0.26-0.86, P = 0.01). Well-designed large-scale clinical studies are required to further validate our results.

  18. Adaptive Redox Response of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells to Stimulation with Lipopolysaccharide Inflammagen: Mechanisms of Remodeling of Tissue Barriers in Sepsis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-08

    Mechanisms of Remodeling of Tissue Barriers in Sepsis Nikolai V. Gorbunov1*, Bradley R. Garrison1, Dennis P. McDaniel2, Min Zhai1, Pei-Jyun Liao1... sepsis [2, 5]. This problem leads to the searching for other potential mechanisms that could produce adverse effects on host metabolome resulting...understanding of the basic cellular mechanisms implicated in redox adaptive responses in 16 tissue barriers. This particular area of the molecular

  19. Dissecting Target Toxic Tissue and Tissue Specific Responses of Irinotecan in Rats Using Metabolomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yiran; Zhang, Pei; Wang, Jing; Chen, Jiaqing; Wang, Yong; Huang, Yin; Zhang, Zunjian; Xu, Fengguo

    2017-01-01

    As an anticancer agent, irinotecan (CPT-11) has been widely applied in clinical, especially in the treatment of colorectal cancer. However, its clinical use has long been limited by the side effects and potential tissue toxicity. To discriminate the target toxic tissues and dissect the specific response of target tissues after CPT-11 administration in rats, untargeted metabolomic study was conducted. First, differential metabolites between CPT-11 treated group and control group in each tissue were screened out. Then, based on fold changes of these differential metabolites, principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis were performed to visualize the degree and specificity of the influences of CPT-11 on the metabolic profiles of nine tissues. Using this step-wise method, ileum, jejunum, and liver were finally recognized as target toxic tissues. Furthermore, tissue specific responses of liver, ileum, and jejunum to CPT-11 were dissected and specific differential metabolites were screened out. Perturbations in Krebs cycle, amino acid, purine and bile acid metabolism were observed in target toxic tissues. In conclusion, our study put forward a new approach to dissect target toxic tissues and tissue specific responses of CPT-11 using metabolomics. PMID:28344557

  20. Global responses of Escherichia coli to adverse conditions determined by microarrays and FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moen, Birgitte; Janbu, Astrid Oust; Langsrud, Solveig; Langsrud, Oyvind; Hobman, Jon L; Constantinidou, Chrystala; Kohler, Achim; Rudi, Knut

    2009-06-01

    The global gene expression and biomolecular composition in an Escherichia coli model strain exposed to 10 adverse conditions (sodium chloride, ethanol, glycerol, hydrochloric and acetic acid, sodium hydroxide, heat (46 degrees C), and cold (15 degrees C), as well as ethidium bromide and the disinfectant benzalkonium chloride) were determined using DNA microarrays and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In total, approximately 40% of all investigated genes (1682/4279 genes) significantly changed expression, compared with a nonstressed control. There were, however, only 3 genes (ygaW (unknown function), rmf (encoding a ribosomal modification factor), and ghrA (encoding a glyoxylate/hydroxypyruvate reductase)) that significantly changed expression under all conditions (not including benzalkonium chloride). The FT-IR analysis showed an increase in unsaturated fatty acids during ethanol and cold exposure, and a decrease during acid and heat exposure. Cold conditions induced changes in the carbohydrate composition of the cell, possibly related to the upregulation of outer membrane genes (glgAP and rcsA). Although some covariance was observed between the 2 data sets, principle component analysis and regression analyses revealed that the gene expression and the biomolecular responses are not well correlated in stressed populations of E. coli, underlining the importance of multiple strategies to begin to understand the effect on the whole cell.

  1. Host Responses in Tissue Repair and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Jeremy S.; Lupher, Mark; Thannickal, Victor J.

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblasts accumulate in the spaces between organ structures and produce extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, including collagen I. They are the primary “effector” cells in tissue remodeling and fibrosis. Previously, leukocyte progenitors termed fibrocytes and myofibroblasts generated from epithelial cells through epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were considered the primary sources of ECM-producing myofibroblasts in injured tissues. However, genetic fate mapping experiments suggest that mesenchyme-derived cells, known as resident fibroblasts, and pericytes are the primary precursors of scar-forming myofibroblasts, whereas epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and myeloid leukocytes contribute to fibrogenesis predominantly by producing key fibrogenic cytokines and by promoting cell-to-cell communication. Numerous cytokines derived from T cells, macrophages, and other myeloid cell populations are important drivers of myofibroblast differentiation. Monocyte-derived cell populations are key regulators of the fibrotic process: They act as a brake on the processes driving fibrogenesis, and they dismantle and degrade established fibrosis. We discuss the origins, modes of activation, and fate of myofibroblasts in various important fibrotic diseases and describe how manipulation of macrophage activation could help ameliorate fibrosis. PMID:23092186

  2. Low Concentrations of Silver Nanoparticles in Biosolids Cause Adverse Ecosystem Responses under Realistic Field Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Colman, Benjamin P.; Arnaout, Christina L.; Anciaux, Sarah; Gunsch, Claudia K.; Hochella, Michael F.; Kim, Bojeong; Lowry, Gregory V.; McGill, Bonnie M.; Reinsch, Brian C.; Richardson, Curtis J.; Unrine, Jason M.; Wright, Justin P.; Yin, Liyan; Bernhardt, Emily S.

    2013-01-01

    A large fraction of engineered nanomaterials in consumer and commercial products will reach natural ecosystems. To date, research on the biological impacts of environmental nanomaterial exposures has largely focused on high-concentration exposures in mechanistic lab studies with single strains of model organisms. These results are difficult to extrapolate to ecosystems, where exposures will likely be at low-concentrations and which are inhabited by a diversity of organisms. Here we show adverse responses of plants and microorganisms in a replicated long-term terrestrial mesocosm field experiment following a single low dose of silver nanoparticles (0.14 mg Ag kg−1 soil) applied via a likely route of exposure, sewage biosolid application. While total aboveground plant biomass did not differ between treatments receiving biosolids, one plant species, Microstegium vimeneum, had 32 % less biomass in the Slurry+AgNP treatment relative to the Slurry only treatment. Microorganisms were also affected by AgNP treatment, which gave a significantly different community composition of bacteria in the Slurry+AgNPs as opposed to the Slurry treatment one day after addition as analyzed by T-RFLP analysis of 16S-rRNA genes. After eight days, N2O flux was 4.5 fold higher in the Slurry+AgNPs treatment than the Slurry treatment. After fifty days, community composition and N2O flux of the Slurry+AgNPs treatment converged with the Slurry. However, the soil microbial extracellular enzymes leucine amino peptidase and phosphatase had 52 and 27% lower activities, respectively, while microbial biomass was 35% lower than the Slurry. We also show that the magnitude of these responses was in all cases as large as or larger than the positive control, AgNO3, added at 4-fold the Ag concentration of the silver nanoparticles. PMID:23468930

  3. Erythropoietin-mediated tissue protection: reducing collateral damage from the primary injury response.

    PubMed

    Brines, M; Cerami, A

    2008-11-01

    In its classic hormonal role, erythropoietin (EPO) is produced by the kidney and regulates the number of erythrocytes within the circulation to provide adequate tissue oxygenation. EPO also mediates other effects directed towards optimizing oxygen delivery to tissues, e.g. modulating regional blood flow and reducing blood loss by promoting thrombosis within damaged vessels. Over the past 15 years, many unexpected nonhaematopoietic functions of EPO have been identified. In these more recently appreciated nonhormonal roles, locally-produced EPO signals through a different receptor isoform and is a major molecular component of the injury response, in which it counteracts the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Acutely, EPO prevents programmed cell death and reduces the development of secondary, pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced injury. Within a longer time frame, EPO provides trophic support to enable regeneration and healing. As the region immediately surrounding damage is typically relatively deficient in endogenous EPO, administration of recombinant EPO can provide increased tissue protection. However, effective use of EPO as therapy for tissue injury requires higher doses than for haematopoiesis, potentially triggering serious adverse effects. The identification of a tissue-protective receptor isoform has facilitated the engineering of nonhaematopoietic, tissue-protective EPO derivatives, e.g. carbamyl EPO, that avoid these complications. Recently, regions within the EPO molecule mediating tissue protection have been identified and this has enabled the development of potent tissue-protective peptides, including some mimicking EPO's tertiary structure but unrelated in primary sequence.

  4. Adverse cardiometabolic response to aerobic exercise training: Should this be a concern?

    PubMed Central

    Leifer, Eric S.; Church, Timothy S.; Earnest, Conrad P.; Fleg, Jerome L.; Hakkinen, Keijo; Karavirta, Laura; Kraus, William E.; Mikus, Catherine; Resnick, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    .36) for SBP. Conclusion Compared to control subjects, exercise subjects were not at an increased risk for meeting the AC thresholds for SBP, FI, TG, or HDL-C and significantly fewer exercise subjects met AC thresholds for FI, and HDL. Exercise subjects also had significantly more favorable mean changes in FI, TG, and HDL-C than control subjects. These findings do not support the concept that aerobic exercise training increases the risk of adverse changes in CV risk factors. and that, with respect to group responses PMID:26258860

  5. Developing a Gene Biomarker at the Tipping Point of Adaptive and Adverse Responses in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Currier, Jenna M.; Cheng, Wan-Yun; Menendez, Daniel; Conolly, Rory; Chorley, Brian N.

    2016-01-01

    Determining mechanism-based biomarkers that distinguish adaptive and adverse cellular processes is critical to understanding the health effects of environmental exposures. Shifting from in vivo, low-throughput toxicity studies to high-throughput screening (HTS) paradigms and risk assessment based on in vitro and in silico testing requires utilizing toxicity pathway information to distinguish adverse outcomes from recoverable adaptive events. Little work has focused on oxidative stresses in human airway for the purposes of predicting adverse responses. We hypothesize that early gene expression-mediated molecular changes could be used to delineate adaptive and adverse responses to environmentally-based perturbations. Here, we examined cellular responses of the tracheobronchial airway to zinc (Zn) exposure, a model oxidant. Airway derived BEAS-2B cells exposed to 2–10 μM Zn2+ elicited concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity. Normal, adaptive, and cytotoxic Zn2+ exposure conditions were determined with traditional apical endpoints, and differences in global gene expression around the tipping point of the responses were used to delineate underlying molecular mechanisms. Bioinformatic analyses of differentially expressed genes indicate early enrichment of stress signaling pathways, including those mediated by the transcription factors p53 and NRF2. After 4 h, 154 genes were differentially expressed (p < 0.01) between the adaptive and cytotoxic Zn2+ concentrations. Nearly 40% of the biomarker genes were related to the p53 signaling pathway with 30 genes identified as likely direct targets using a database of p53 ChIP-seq studies. Despite similar p53 activation profiles, these data revealed widespread dampening of p53 and NRF2-related genes as early as 4 h after exposure at higher, unrecoverable Zn2+ exposures. Thus, in our model early increased activation of stress response pathways indicated a recoverable adaptive event. Overall, this study highlights the

  6. FEEDING INFLUENCES ADIPOSE TISSUE RESPONSES TO EXERCISE IN OVERWEIGHT MEN.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Chih; Travers, Rebecca L; Walhin, Jean-Philippe; Gonzalez, Javier T; Koumanov, Francoise; Betts, James A; Thompson, Dylan

    2017-03-14

    Feeding profoundly affects metabolic responses to exercise in various tissues but the effect of feeding status on human adipose tissue responses to exercise has never been studied. Ten healthy overweight men aged 26 ± 5 years (mean ± SD) with a waist circumference of 105 ± 10 cm walked at 60% of maximum oxygen uptake under either FASTED or FED conditions in a randomised, counterbalanced design. Feeding comprised 648 ± 115 kcal 2 h before exercise. Blood samples were collected at regular intervals to examine changes in metabolic parameters and adipokine concentrations. Adipose tissue samples were obtained at baseline and one hour post-exercise to examine changes in adipose tissue mRNA expression and secretion of selected adipokines ex-vivo. Adipose tissue mRNA expression of PDK4, ATGL, HSL, FAT/CD36, GLUT4 and IRS2 in response to exercise were lower in FED compared to FASTED conditions (all p ≤ 0.05). Post-exercise adipose IRS2 protein was affected by feeding (p ≤ 0.05), but Akt2, AMPK, IRS1, GLUT4, PDK4 and HSL protein levels were not different. Feeding status did not impact serum and ex-vivo adipose secretion of IL-6, leptin or adiponectin in response to exercise. This is the first study to show that feeding prior to acute exercise affects post-exercise adipose tissue gene expression and we propose that feeding is likely to blunt long-term adipose tissue adaptation to regular exercise.

  7. Increased alpha-amylase response to an acute psychosocial stress challenge in healthy adults with childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Kuras, Yuliya I; McInnis, Christine M; Thoma, Myriam V; Chen, Xuejie; Hanlin, Luke; Gianferante, Danielle; Rohleder, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Childhood adversity is highly prevalent and linked to lasting psychological and physiological consequences. A potential mechanism for negative health outcomes is altered stress reactivity. While previous research has addressed associations of childhood adversity with stress system reactivity, sympathetic nervous system (SNS) stress reactivity is understudied. We therefore set out here to examining salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) reactivity in relation with childhood adversity. Forty-one healthy adult subjects (n = 24 male; n = 17 female) aged 18-34 years underwent the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Saliva for measurement of sAA was collected at three time points; before the TSST, immediately after, and 10 min post-TSST. We found that those with childhood trauma had a higher overall sAA response to the TSST, as seen in a repeated measures ANOVA (CTQ by time interaction: F(1.8,71.5) = 6.46, p = .01) and an independent samples t-test indicating higher sAA baseline to peak response (t = 3.22, p = .003). There was also a positive correlation between sAA reactivity and the CTQ subscales of childhood physical abuse (r = .46, p = .005) and emotional abuse (r = .37, p = .024). Healthy adults with low-to-moderate childhood adversity had a heightened sAA response immediately following the stressor. Higher SNS reactivity could be a link to negative health outcomes in adults with early adversity. Future research should address whether altered sAA reactivity is predictive of negative health outcomes in those with childhood adversity.

  8. Fetal tissue research: an ongoing story of professionally responsible success.

    PubMed

    Gelber, Shari E; McCullough, Laurence B; Chervenak, Frank A

    2015-12-01

    Therapies derived from fetal tissue research are some of the greatest success stories in medicine. Research using fetal tissue has allowed for development of vaccines for numerous diseases including polio, rubella, and measles. These vaccines have saved countless lives, improved quality of life, and decreased the need for induced abortion secondary to congenital infection. Research using cell lines derived from fetal tissue has assisted in better understanding disease pathogenesis and has served to produce human proteins as research reagents and therapies. Ongoing research points to the potential for fetal tissue to be used to cure debilitating diseases such as Parkinson disease. These scientific and medical advances are dependent on the use of fetal tissue from aborted fetuses. While the practice of induced abortion despite societal benefit may be theologically objectionable to some, these practices are professionally responsible. Federal regulations exist to discourage patients from being influenced by the societal benefit of fetal research in arriving at the decision to terminate as well as to prevent researchers from influencing a patient's decision. After a patient has chosen termination of pregnancy, it is consistent with professional responsibility to allow her to choose the disposition of the cadaveric fetal tissue. While some may view induced abortion and societal benefit from this practice as an ethical burden, the principle of justice makes it ethically obligatory to bear this ethical burden. The success story of cadaveric fetal tissue research and treatment should continue unhindered, to fulfill professional responsibility to current and future patients.

  9. Association between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in XRCC3 and Radiation-Induced Adverse Effects on Normal Tissue: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yu-Zhe; Han, Fu-Jun; Liu, Min; Xia, Cheng-Cheng; Shi, Wei-Yan; Dong, Li-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) protein plays an important role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. The relationship between XRCC3 polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced adverse effects on normal tissue remains inconclusive. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to elucidate the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and radiation-induced adverse effects on normal tissue. All eligible studies up to December 2014 were identified through a search of the PubMed, Embase and Web of Science databases. Seventeen studies involving 656 cases and 2193 controls were ultimately included in this meta-analysis. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate the association between XRCC3 polymorphisms and the risk of radiation-induced normal tissue adverse effects. We found that the XRCC3 p.Thr241Met (rs861539) polymorphism was significantly associated with early adverse effects induced by radiotherapy (OR = 1.99, 95%CI: 1.31–3.01, P = 0.001). A positive association lacking statistical significance with late adverse effects was also identified (OR = 1.28, 95%CI: 0.97–1.68, P = 0.08). In addition, the rs861539 polymorphism was significantly correlated with a higher risk of adverse effects induced by head and neck area irradiation (OR = 2.41, 95%CI: 1.49–3.89, p = 0.0003) and breast irradiation (OR = 1.41, 95%CI: 1.02–1.95, p = 0.04), whereas the correlation was not significant for lung irradiation or pelvic irradiation. Furthermore, XRCC3 rs1799794 polymorphism may have a protective effect against late adverse effects induced by radiotherapy (OR = 0.47, 95%CI: 0.26–0.86, P = 0.01). Well-designed large-scale clinical studies are required to further validate our results. PMID:26091483

  10. Healing responses following cryothermic and hyperthermic tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwin, Braden L.; Coad, James E.

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive, thermally ablative, interventional technologies have been changing the practice of medicine since before the turn of the 20th century. More recently, cryothermic and hyperthermic therapies have expanded in terms of their spectrum of thermal generators, modes for controlling and monitoring the treatment zone and both benign and malignant medical applications. The final tissue, and hence clinical outcome, of a thermal ablation is determined by the summation of direct primary (thermal) and secondary (apoptosis, ischemia, free radical, inflammation, wound healing, etc.) injury followed by possible cellular regeneration and scar formation. The initial thermal lesion can be broadly divided into two major zones of cellular death: 1) the complete ablation zone closer to the thermal source and 2) the peripheral transition zone with a decreasing gradient of cell death. While not applicable to cryotherapy, hyperthermic complete ablation zones are subdivided into two zones: 1) thermal or heat fixation and 2) coagulative necrosis. It is important to clearly differentiate these tissue zones because of their substantially different healing responses. Therefore, the development of clinically successful thermal therapies requires an understanding of tissue healing responses. The healing responses can be affected by a number of additional factors such as the tissue's anatomy, organ specific healing differences, blood supply, protein vs. lipid content, and other factors. Thus, effective biomedical instrument development requires both an understanding of thermal cell injury/death and the body's subsequent healing responses. This paper provides a general overview of the healing pathways that follow thermal tissue treatment.

  11. Dietary omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids compete in producing tissue compositions and tissue responses.

    PubMed

    Lands, Bill

    2014-11-01

    Serious food-related health disorders may be prevented by recognizing the molecular processes that connect the dietary intake of vitamin-like fatty acids to tissue accumulation of precursors of potent hormone-like compounds that cause harmful tissue responses. Conversion of dietary 18-carbon omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids to tissue 20- and 22-carbon highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) is catalyzed by promiscuous enzymes that allow different types of fatty acid to compete among each other for accumulation in tissue HUFA. As a result, food choices strongly influence the types of accumulated tissue HUFA. However, the conversion of tissue HUFA to active hormones and their receptor-mediated actions occurs with discriminating enzymes and receptors that give more intense responses for the omega-6 and omega-3 hormones. Undesired chronic health disorders, which are made worse by excessive omega-6 hormone actions, can be prevented by eating more omega-3 fats, less omega-6 fats, and fewer calories per meal.

  12. Tissue response to a supplement high in aluminum and silicon.

    PubMed

    Turner, K K; Nielsen, B D; O'Connor-Robison, C I; Nielsen, F H; Orth, M W

    2008-02-01

    The objective was to determine the effects of sodium zeolite A (SZA) on mineral metabolism and tissue mineral composition in calves. Twenty calves were placed on study at 3 days of age and were placed into one of two groups: SS, which received 0.05% BW SZA added to their milk replacer, and CO, which received only milk replacer. Blood samples were taken on days 0, 30, and 60 for mineral analysis. Urine and feces were collected on day 30 for mineral metabolism, and on day 60, the calves were euthanized, and samples were taken from numerous organs for mineral analyses. Aluminum retention was increased in the SS calves (p = 0.001). Silicon concentrations were increased in the aorta, spleen, lung, muscle, and kidney of the SS calves, and aluminum was increased in all SS tissues (p < 0.05). Calcium concentrations were increased in aorta, liver, muscle, and tendon; phosphorus concentrations were increased in aorta, but decreased in plasma; magnesium concentrations were increased in aorta, heart, kidney, liver, and pancreas, but decreased in plasma; and iron concentrations were decreased in kidney and liver (p < 0.05). The accumulation of tissue aluminum and therefore potential adverse consequences may preclude any benefits of using SZA as a dietary supplement.

  13. SURFACE CHEMISTRY INFLUENCE IMPLANT MEDIATED HOST TISSUE RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Shwetha; Bhattacharyya, Dhiman; Padukudru, Chandana; Timmons, Richard B.; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Implant-mediated fibrotic reactions are detrimental to the performance of encapsulated cells, implanted drug release devices and sensors. To improve the implant function and longevity, research has emphasized altering cellular responses. Although material surface functional groups have been shown to be potent in affecting cellular activity in vitro and short term in vivo responses, these groups appear to have little influence on long-term in vivo fibrotic reactions, possibly as a result of insufficient interactions between recruited host cells and functional groups on the implants. To maximize the influence of functionality on cells, and to mimic drug release microspheres, functionalized micron-sized particles were created and tested for their ability in modulating tissue responses to biomaterial implants. In this work, the surfaces of polypropylene particles were controllably coated with four different functional groups, specifically –OH, -NH2, -CFx and –COOH, using a radio frequency glow discharge plasma polymerization technique. The effect of these surface functionalities on host tissue responses were then evaluated using a mice subcutaneous implantation model. Major differences were observed in contrasting tissue response to the different chemistries. Surfaces with –OH and –NH2 surface groups induced the thickest fibrous capsule accompanied with the greatest cellular infiltration into the implants. In contrast, surfaces with –CFx and –COOH exhibited the least inflammatory/fibrotic responses and cellular infiltrations. The present results clearly demonstrate that, by increasing the available functionalized surface area and spatial distribution, the effect of surface chemistry on tissue reactivity can be substantially enhanced. PMID:18022841

  14. Fibrinogen adsorption and host tissue responses to plasma functionalized surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tang, L; Wu, Y; Timmons, R B

    1998-10-01

    The physical and chemical characteristics of material surfaces are thought to play important roles in biomaterial-mediated tissue responses. To understand the importance of discrete biomaterial chemical characteristics in modifying host tissue responses, we constructed surfaces bearing different functional groups using radio frequency glow discharge plasma polymerization. Surfaces evaluated included those having high concentrations of -OH, -NH2, -CF3, and siloxyl groups. These surfaces and polyethylene terephthalate controls were used to assess the importance of particular physicochemical characteristics in surface:protein:cell interactions both in vitro and in vivo. The results obtained show that surface functionalities do significantly affect both the adsorption and "denaturation" of adsorbed fibrinogen (which is an important mediator of inflammatory responses to biomaterial implants). In addition, these surfaces provoke different degrees of acute inflammatory responses. Interestingly, the amounts of "denatured" fibrinogen that spontaneously accumulate on the individual surfaces correlate closely with the extent of biomaterial-mediated inflammation. These results suggest that surfaces that tend to "irreversibly" bind fibrinogen prompt greater acute inflammatory responses. Unexpectedly, all test surfaces except those bearing a siloxyl group engender relatively similar biomaterial-mediated fibrotic responses. Thus surface functionalities alone may not be sufficient to affect subsequent fibrotic responses.

  15. Adverse reactions to sunscreen agents: epidemiology, responsible irritants and allergens, clinical characteristics, and management.

    PubMed

    Heurung, Ashley R; Raju, Srihari I; Warshaw, Erin M

    2014-01-01

    Sunscreen is a key component in the preventive measures recommended by dermatologists and public health campaigns aimed at reducing sunburn, early skin aging, and skin cancer. To maximize compliance, adverse reactions to sunscreens should be minimized. Although inactive ingredients cause many of these reactions, it is important for dermatologists to be aware of reactions to active ultraviolet filters. There are approximately 120 chemicals that can function as ultraviolet (UV) filters. This review focuses on the 36 most common filters in commercial and historical use. Of these, 16 are approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration. The benzophenones and dibenzoylmethanes are the most commonly implicated UV filters causing allergic and photoallergic contact dermatitis (PACD) reactions; benzophenone-3 is the leading allergen and photoallergen within this class. When clinically indicated, patch and photopatch testing should be performed to common UV filters.

  16. Adverse events in medical management--vigabatrin as a paradigm of forensic responsibility with novel therapy.

    PubMed

    Beran, R G

    2001-01-01

    The ethics of medical management are not always straightforward. There are many contributing factors: the condition treated; its effects on the patient; the required treatment; the effects of that treatment; and a cost/benefit ratio. Treatment of epilepsy with vigabatrin (VGB) exemplifies these problems. VGB has recently been reported to cause constricted visual fields. Formal testing of visual fields of patients attending an outpatient epilepsy service showed constriction with tunnel vision, even in patients who are asymptomatic. The ethical questions include: Should all reports of adverse events be subjected to tests of validity and subsequent quality assurance? Should treatment with VGB be stopped, risking recurrence of seizures? What are the legal consequences of continuing VGB? Does informed consent protect the doctor? After stopping VGB can the patient drive?

  17. Systemic inflammation regulates microglial responses to tissue damage in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gyoneva, Stefka; Davalos, Dimitrios; Biswas, Dipankar; Swanger, Sharon A.; Garnier-Amblard, Ethel; Loth, Francis; Akassoglou, Katerina; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the central nervous system, exist in either a “resting” state associated with physiological tissue surveillance or an “activated” state in neuroinflammation. We recently showed that ATP is the primary chemoattractor to tissue damage in vivo and elicits opposite effects on the motility of activated microglia in vitro through activation of adenosine A2A receptors. However, whether systemic inflammation affects microglial responses to tissue damage in vivo remains largely unknown. Using in vivo two-photon imaging of mice, we show that injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at levels that can produce both clear neuroinflammation and some features of sepsis significantly reduced the rate of microglial response to laser-induced ablation injury in vivo. Under pro-inflammatory conditions, microglial processes initially retracted from the ablation site, but subsequently moved toward and engulfed the damaged area. Analyzing the process dynamics in 3D cultures of primary microglia indicated that only A2A, but not A1 or A3 receptors, mediate process retraction in LPS-activated microglia. The A2A receptor antagonists caffeine and preladenant reduced adenosine-mediated process retraction in activated microglia in vitro. Finally, administration of preladenant before induction of laser ablation in vivo accelerated the microglial response to injury following systemic inflammation. The regulation of rapid microglial responses to sites of injury by A2A receptors could have implications for their ability to respond to the neuronal death occurring under conditions of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24807189

  18. Transgenic Zebrafish Reveal Tissue-Specific Differences in Estrogen Signaling in Response to Environmental Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki S.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ERs) in the larval heart compared with the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit tissue-specific effects similar to those of BPA and genistein, or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of ER genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: We observed selective patterns of ER activation in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue specificity in ER activation was due to differences in the expression of ER subtypes. ERα was expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 had the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activated the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero was associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves. Citation: Gorelick DA, Iwanowicz LR, Hung AL, Blazer VS, Halpern ME. 2014. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to

  19. Response of a tissue equivalent proportional counter to neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Robbins, D. E.; Gibbons, F.; Braby, L. A.

    2002-01-01

    The absorbed dose as a function of lineal energy was measured at the CERN-EC Reference-field Facility (CERF) using a 512-channel tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), and neutron dose equivalent response evaluated. Although there are some differences, the measured dose equivalent is in agreement with that measured by the 16-channel HANDI tissue equivalent counter. Comparison of TEPC measurements with those made by a silicon solid-state detector for low linear energy transfer particles produced by the same beam, is presented. The measurements show that about 4% of dose equivalent is delivered by particles heavier than protons generated in the conducting tissue equivalent plastic. c2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adaptive Responses to Tissue Injury: Role of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anupam; Bolisetty, Subhashini

    2013-01-01

    Tissue injury may result as a consequence of a physical, chemical, or biological insult. Such injury recruits an adaptive response to restore homeostasis and protect against further injury. One of the most prompt protective and adaptive responses by all tissues is the robust activation of the highly inducible, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and anti-apoptotic protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). HO-1, a microsomal enzyme, catalyzes the breakdown of pro-oxidant heme, which is released from heme proteins to equimolar quantities of iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin. Biliverdin is converted to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. The beneficial effects of HO-1 expression are not merely due to heme degradation but are also attributed to the cytoprotective properties of the byproducts of the reaction. Manipulation of this enzymatic system in a myriad of disease models has provided substantial evidence to support its role as a cytoprotective enzyme and is therefore an emerging therapeutic molecule. PMID:23874015

  1. The role of the monoamine oxidase A gene in moderating the response to adversity and associated antisocial behavior: a review

    PubMed Central

    Buades-Rotger, Macià; Gallardo-Pujol, David

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary factors are increasingly attracting the interest of behavioral scientists and practitioners. Our aim in the present article is to introduce some state-of-the-art topics in behavioral genetics, as well as selected findings in the field, in order to illustrate how genetic makeup can modulate the impact of environmental factors. We focus on the most-studied polymorphism to date for antisocial responses to adversity: the monoamine oxidase A gene. Advances, caveats, and promises of current research are reviewed. We also discuss implications for the use of genetic information in applied settings. PMID:25114607

  2. Leg tissue mass composition affects tibial acceleration response following impact.

    PubMed

    Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Burkhart, Timothy A; Andrews, David M

    2012-02-01

    To date, there has not been a direct examination of the effect that tissue composition (lean mass/muscle, fat mass, bone mineral content) differences between males and females has on how the tibia responds to impacts similar to those seen during running. To evaluate this, controlled heel impacts were imparted to 36 participants (6 M and 6 F in each of low, medium and high percent body fat [BF] groups) using a human pendulum. A skin-mounted accelerometer medial to the tibial tuberosity was used to determine the tibial response parameters (peak acceleration, acceleration slope and time to peak acceleration). There were no consistent effects of BF or specific tissue masses on the un-normalized tibial response parameters. However, females experienced 25% greater peak acceleration than males. When normalized to lean mass, wobbling mass, and bone mineral content, females experienced 50%, 62% and 70% greater peak acceleration, respectively, per gram of tissue than males. Higher magnitudes of lean mass and bone mass significantly contributed to decreased acceleration responses in general.

  3. Inflammatory Cytokines as Preclinical Markers of Adverse Responses to Chemical Stressors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: The in vivo cytokine response to chemical stressors is a promising mainstream tool used to assess potential systemic inflammation and immune function changes. Notably, new instrumentation and statistical analysis provide the selectivity and sensitivity to rapidly diff...

  4. Is prenatal childbirth preparation effective in decreasing adverse maternal and neonatal response to labor? A nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Hee; Nava-Ocampo, Alejandro A; Kim, Sun Kyung; Kim, Seo Hui; Kim, Yun Ju; Han, Jung Yeol; Ahn, Hyun Kyong; Ryu, Hyun Mee; Yang, Jae Hyug; Kim, Moon Young

    2008-04-01

    Sophrology, based on a combination of Western relaxation therapy and Eastern yoga and meditation might decrease maternal stress during labor. This study aimed to evaluate whether prenatal sophrologic childbirth preparation may decrease maternal and neonatal adverse response associated with delivery. In a nested case-control study, 69 nulliparous, singleton pregnant women who underwent an educational course of sophrologic childbirth preparation were compared to 69 nulliparous, singleton, age- and gestational age-matched pregnant women who did not receive any childbirth preparation. All babies were vaginally delivered. Groups were not different (P > 0.05) in the number of neonates born with meconium-stained amniotic fluid as well as in the number of babies with Apgar score < or = 7 at 1 and 5 minutes after birth. Duration of labor was not different between groups. The number of women requiring oxytocin and delivering babies with low pH blood levels tended to be lower in the group undergoing sophrologic childbirth preparation, i.e. 58.0% vs 72.5% (P = 0.07) and 1.4% vs 10.9% (P = 0.06), respectively. In conclusion, we were unable to confirm that prenatal sophrologic childbirth preparation has a definitive role in decreasing adverse maternal and fetal response to pain or in shortening labor. Prospective cohort studies with a larger sample size or randomized trials may help to clarify this gap.

  5. Transcriptome Analysis of B Cell Immune Functions in Periodontitis: Mucosal Tissue Responses to the Oral Microbiome in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S.; Novak, M. John; Orraca, Luis; Martinez, Janis Gonzalez; Cunningham, Larry L.; Thomas, Mark V.; Stromberg, Arnold; Pandruvada, Subramanya N.; Gonzalez, Octavio A.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has shown activation of T and B cells in gingival tissues in experimental models and in humans diagnosed with periodontitis. The results of this adaptive immune response are noted both locally and systemically with antigenic specificity for an array of oral bacteria, including periodontopathic species, e.g., Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. It has been recognized through epidemiological studies and clinical observations that the prevalence of periodontitis increases with age. This report describes our studies evaluating gingival tissue transcriptomes in humans and specifically exploiting the use of a non-human primate model of naturally occurring periodontitis to delineate gingival mucosal tissue gene expression profiles focusing on cells/genes critical for the development of humoral adaptive immune responses. Patterns of B cell and plasmacyte genes were altered in aging healthy gingival tissues. Substantial increases in a large number of genes reflecting antigen-dependent activation, B cell activation, B cell proliferation, and B cell differentiation/maturation were observed in periodontitis in adults and aged animals. Finally, evaluation of the relationship of these gene expression patterns with those of various tissue destructive molecules (MMP2, MMP9, CTSK, TNFα, and RANKL) showed a greater frequency of positive correlations in healthy tissues versus periodontitis tissues, with only MMP9 correlations similar between the two tissue types. These results are consistent with B cell response activities in healthy tissues potentially contributing to muting the effects of the tissue destructive biomolecules, whereas with periodontitis this relationship is adversely affected and enabling a progression of tissue destructive events. PMID:27486459

  6. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man - I. Gustatory tissues response during photon and neutron radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1982-08-01

    Quantitative radiation dose-response curves for normal gustatory tissue in man were studied. Taste function, expressed as taste loss, was evaluated in 84 patients who were given either photon or neutron radiotherapy for tumors in the head and neck region. Patients were treated to average tumor doses of 6600 cGy (photon) or 2200 cGy intervals for photon patients and 320-cGy intervals for neutron patients during radiotherapy. The dose-response curves for photons and neutrons were analyzed by fitting a four-parameter logistic equation to the data. Photon and neutron curves differed principally in their relative position along the dose axis. Comparison of the dose-response curves were made by determination of RBE. At 320 cGy, the lowest neutron dose at which taste measurements were made, RBE = 5.7. If this RBE is correct, then the therapeutic gain factor may be equal to or less than 1, indicating no biological advantage in using neutrons over photons for this normal tissue. These studies suggest measurements of taste function and evaluation of dose-response relationships may also be useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficacy of chemical modifiers of radiation response such as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and radioprotectors.

  7. The Confluence of Adverse Early Experience and Puberty on the Cortisol Awakening Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quevedo, Karina; Johnson, Anna E.; Loman, Michelle L.; LaFavor, Theresa L.; Gunnar, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Associations between early deprivation/neglect in the form of institutional care with the cortisol awakening response (CAR) were examined as a function of pubertal status among 12- and 13-year-old postinstitutionalized youth. CARs indexed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical reactivity. Postinstitutionalized youth were compared to youth adopted…

  8. Serum Response Factor in Muscle Tissues: From Development to Ageing

    PubMed Central

    Coletti, Dario; Daou, Nissrine; Hassani, Medhi; Li, Zhenlin; Parlakian, Ara

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle cells share various common characteristic features. During development the embryonic mesodermal layer contribute at different proportions to the formation of these tissues. At the functional level, contractility as well as its decline during ageing, are also common features. Cytoskeletal components of these tissues are characterized by various actin isoforms that govern through their status (polymerised versus monomeric) and their interaction with the myosins the contractile properties of these muscles. Finally, at the molecular level, a set of different transcription factors with the notable exception of Serum Response Factor SRF- which is commonly enriched in the 3 types of muscle- drive and maintain the differentiation of these cells (Myf5, MyoD, Myogenin for skeletal muscle; Nkx2.5, GATA4 for cardiomyocytes). In this review, we will focus on the transcription factor SRF and its role in the homeostasis of cardiac, smooth and skeletal muscle tissues as well as its behaviour during the age related remodelling process of these tissues with a specific emphasis on animal models and human data when available. PMID:27478561

  9. Injury Response of Resected Human Brain Tissue In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Verwer, Ronald W H; Sluiter, Arja A; Balesar, Rawien A; Baaijen, Johannes C; de Witt Hamer, Philip C; Speijer, Dave; Li, Yichen; Swaab, Dick F

    2015-07-01

    Brain injury affects a significant number of people each year. Organotypic cultures from resected normal neocortical tissue provide unique opportunities to study the cellular and neuropathological consequences of severe injury of adult human brain tissue in vitro. The in vitro injuries caused by resection (interruption of the circulation) and aggravated by the preparation of slices (severed neuronal and glial processes and blood vessels) reflect the reaction of human brain tissue to severe injury. We investigated this process using immunocytochemical markers, reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Essential features were rapid shrinkage of neurons, loss of neuronal marker expression and proliferation of reactive cells that expressed Nestin and Vimentin. Also, microglia generally responded strongly, whereas the response of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes appeared to be more variable. Importantly, some reactive cells also expressed both microglia and astrocytic markers, thus confounding their origin. Comparison with post-mortem human brain tissue obtained at rapid autopsies suggested that the reactive process is not a consequence of epilepsy.

  10. MiRNA profiling provides insights on adverse effects of Cr(VI) in the midgut tissues of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Swati; Pandey, Ashutosh; Chowdhuri, Debapratim Kar

    2015-01-01

    Cr(VI), a well-known environmental chemical, is reported to cause various adverse effects on exposed organisms including genomic instability and carcinogenesis. Despite available information on the underlying mechanism of Cr(VI) induced toxicity, studies regarding toxicity modulation by epigenetic mechanisms are limited. It was therefore, hypothesized that the global miRNA profiling in Cr(VI) exposed Drosophila, a genetically tractable model organism, will provide information about mis-regulated miRNAs along with their targeted genes and relevant processes. Third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster (Oregon R(+)) were exposed to 5.0-20.0 μg/ml of Cr(VI) for 24 and 48 h. Following miRNA profile analysis on an Agilent platform, 28 of the 36 differentially expressed miRNAs were found to be significantly mis-regulated targeting major biological processes viz., DNA damage repair, oxidation-reduction processes, development and differentiation. Down-regulation of mus309 and mus312 under DNA repair, acon to oxidation-reduction and pyd to stress activated MAPK cascade respectively belonging to these gene ontology classes concurrent with up-regulation of dme-miR-314-3p, dme-miR-79-3p and dme-miR-12-5p confirm their functional involvement against Cr(VI) exposure. These findings assume significance since majority of the target genes in Drosophila have functional homologues in humans. The study further recommends Drosophila as a model to explore the role of miRNAs in xenobiotic induced toxicity.

  11. Photoacoustic monitoring of tumor and normal tissue response to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Laurie J.; Seshadri, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a recognized characteristic of tumors that influences efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) is a relatively new imaging technique that exploits the optical characteristics of hemoglobin to provide information on tissue oxygenation. In the present study, PAI based measures of tumor oxygen saturation (%sO2) were compared to oxygen-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of longitudinal relaxation rate (R1 = 1/T1) and ex-vivo histology in patient derived xenograft (PDX) models of head and neck cancer. PAI was utilized to assess early changes (24 h) in %sO2 following RT and chemoRT (CRT) and to assess changes in salivary gland hemodynamics following radiation. A significant increase in tumor %sO2 and R1 was observed following oxygen inhalation. Good spatial correlation was observed between PAI, MRI and histology. An early increase in %sO2 after RT and CRT detected by PAI was associated with significant tumor growth inhibition. Twenty four hours after RT, PAI also detected loss of hemodynamic response to gustatory stimulation in murine salivary gland tissue suggestive of radiation-induced vascular damage. Our observations illustrate the utility of PAI in detecting tumor and normal tissue hemodynamic response to radiation in head and neck cancers. PMID:26883660

  12. The Effect of Prophylactic Antipyretic Administration on Post-Vaccination Adverse Reactions and Antibody Response in Children: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rashmi Ranjan; Panigrahi, Inusha; Naik, Sushree Samiksha

    2014-01-01

    Background Prophylactic antipyretic administration decreases the post-vaccination adverse reactions. Recent study finds that they may also decrease the antibody responses to several vaccine antigens. This systematic review aimed to assess the evidence for a relationship between prophylactic antipyretic administration, post-vaccination adverse events, and antibody response in children. Methods A systematic search of major databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE was carried out till March 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing prophylactic antipyretic treatment versus placebo post-vaccination in children ≤6 years of age were included. Two reviewers independently applied eligibility criteria, assessed the studies for methodological quality, and extracted data [PROSPERO registration: CRD42014009717]. Results Of 2579 citations retrieved, a total of 13 RCTs including 5077 children were included in the review. Prophylactic antipyretic administration significantly reduced the febrile reactions (≥38.0°C) after primary and booster vaccinations. Though there were statistically significant differences in the antibody responses between the two groups, the prophylactic PCM group had what would be considered protective levels of antibodies to all of the antigens given after the primary and booster vaccinations. No significant difference in the nasopharyngeal carriage rates (short-term and long-term) of H. influenzae or S. pneumoniae serotypes was found between the prophylactic and no prophylactic PCM group. There was a significant reduction in the local and systemic symptoms after primary, but not booster vaccinations. Conclusions Though prophylactic antipyretic administration leads to relief of the local and systemic symptoms after primary vaccinations, there is a reduction in antibody responses to some vaccine antigens without any effect on the nasopharyngeal carriage rates of S. pneumoniae & H. influenza serotypes. Future trials and surveillance programs

  13. Tissue responses against tissue-engineered cartilage consisting of chondrocytes encapsulated within non-absorbable hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Sanshiro; Fujihara, Yuko; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Asawa, Yukiyo; Komura, Makoto; Nagata, Satoru; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2013-01-01

    To disclose the influence of foreign body responses raised against a non-absorbable hydrogel consisting of tissue-engineered cartilage, we embedded human/canine chondrocytes within agarose and transplanted them into subcutaneous pockets in nude mice and donor beagles. One month after transplantation, cartilage formation was observed in the experiments using human chondrocytes in nude mice. No significant invasion of blood cells was noted in the areas where the cartilage was newly formed. Around the tissue-engineered cartilage, agarose fragments, a dense fibrous connective tissue and many macrophages were observed. On the other hand, no cartilage tissue was detected in the autologous transplantation of canine chondrocytes. Few surviving chondrocytes were observed in the agarose and no accumulation of blood cells was observed in the inner parts of the transplants. Localizations of IgG and complements were noted in areas of agarose, and also in the devitalized cells embedded within the agarose. Even if we had inhibited the proximity of the blood cells to the transplanted cells, the survival of the cells could not be secured. We suggest that these cytotoxic mechanisms seem to be associated not only with macrophages but also with soluble factors, including antibodies and complements.

  14. UVB and caffeine: inhibiting the DNA damage response to protect against the adverse effects of UVB.

    PubMed

    Kerzendorfer, Claudia; O'Driscoll, Mark

    2009-07-01

    The incidence of sunlight-induced skin cancer is increasing. Mouse studies indicate that caffeine, administered orally or topically, promotes apoptosis of UVB-irradiated keratinocytes. In this issue, Heffernan and colleagues identify the pathway targeted by caffeine and suggest that inhibition of this DNA damage response may offer a viable therapeutic option for nonmelanoma skin cancer. This potentially represents an important protective or therapeutic option from the most unlikely of sources: your daily coffee.

  15. Tissue engineering tools for modulation of the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Boehler, Ryan M.; Graham, John G.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds have emerged as a powerful tool within regenerative medicine. These materials are being designed to create environments that promote regeneration through a combination of: (i) scaffold architecture, (ii) the use of scaffolds as vehicles for transplanting progenitor cells, and/or (iii) localized delivery of inductive factors or genes encoding for these inductive factors. This review describes the techniques associated with each of these components. Additionally, the immune response is increasingly recognized as a factor influencing regeneration. The immune reaction to an implant begins with an acute response to the injury and innate recognition of foreign materials, with the subsequent chronic immune response involving specific recognition of antigens (e.g., transplanted cells) by the adaptive immune response, which can eventually lead to rejection of the implant. Thus, we also describe the impact of each component on the immune response, and strategies (e.g., material design, anti-inflammatory cytokine delivery, and immune cell recruitment/transplantation) to modulate, yet not eliminate, the local immune response in order to promote regeneration, which represents another important tool for regenerative medicine. PMID:21988690

  16. First Outbreak Response Using an Oral Cholera Vaccine in Africa: Vaccine Coverage, Acceptability and Surveillance of Adverse Events, Guinea, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Luquero, Francisco J.; Grout, Lise; Ciglenecki, Iza; Sakoba, Keita; Traore, Bala; Heile, Melat; Dialo, Alpha Amadou; Itama, Christian; Serafini, Micaela; Legros, Dominique; Grais, Rebecca F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite World Health Organization (WHO) prequalification of two safe and effective oral cholera vaccines (OCV), concerns about the acceptability, potential diversion of resources, cost and feasibility of implementing timely campaigns has discouraged their use. In 2012, the Ministry of Health of Guinea, with the support of Médecins Sans Frontières organized the first mass vaccination campaign using a two-dose OCV (Shanchol) as an additional control measure to respond to the on-going nationwide epidemic. Overall, 316,250 vaccines were delivered. Here, we present the results of vaccination coverage, acceptability and surveillance of adverse events. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a cross-sectional cluster survey and implemented adverse event surveillance. The study population included individuals older than 12 months, eligible for vaccination, and residing in the areas targeted for vaccination (Forécariah and Boffa, Guinea). Data sources were household interviews with verification by vaccination card and notifications of adverse events from surveillance at vaccination posts and health centres. In total 5,248 people were included in the survey, 3,993 in Boffa and 1,255 in Forécariah. Overall, 89.4% [95%CI:86.4–91.8%] and 87.7% [95%CI:84.2–90.6%] were vaccinated during the first round and 79.8% [95%CI:75.6–83.4%] and 82.9% [95%CI:76.6–87.7%] during the second round in Boffa and Forécariah respectively. The two dose vaccine coverage (including card and oral reporting) was 75.8% [95%CI: 71.2–75.9%] in Boffa and 75.9% [95%CI: 69.8–80.9%] in Forécariah respectively. Vaccination coverage was higher in children. The main reason for non-vaccination was absence. No severe adverse events were notified. Conclusions/Significance The well-accepted mass vaccination campaign reached high coverage in a remote area with a mobile population. Although OCV should not be foreseen as the long-term solution for global cholera control, they should be

  17. Tissue communication in a systemic immune response of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hairu; Hultmark, Dan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several signaling pathways, including the JAK/STAT and Toll pathways, are known to activate blood cells (hemocytes) in Drosophila melanogaster larvae. They are believed to regulate the immune response against infections by parasitoid wasps, such as Leptopilina boulardi, but how these pathways control the hemocytes is not well understood. Here, we discuss the recent discovery that both muscles and fat body take an active part in this response. Parasitoid wasp infection induces Upd2 and Upd3 secretion from hemocytes, leading to JAK/STAT activation mainly in hemocytes and in skeletal muscles. JAK/STAT activation in muscles, but not in hemocytes, is required for an efficient encapsulation of wasp eggs. This suggests that Upd2 and Upd3 are important cytokines, coordinating different tissues for the cellular immune response in Drosophila. In the fat body, Toll signaling initiates a systemic response in which hemocytes are mobilized and activated hemocytes (lamellocytes) are generated. However, the contribution of Toll signaling to the defense against wasps is limited, probably because the wasps inject inhibitors that prevent the activation of the Toll pathway. In conclusion, parasite infection induces a systemic response in Drosophila larvae involving major organ systems and probably the physiology of the entire organism. PMID:27116253

  18. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorelick, Daniel A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EED) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones, such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ER) in the larval heart compared to the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit similar tissue-specific effects as BPA and genistein or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: Selective patterns of ER activation were observed in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue-specificity in ER activation is due to differences in the expression of estrogen receptor subtypes. ERα is expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 has the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activate the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish has revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero is associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  19. Adverse Effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on CFTR Chloride Secretion and the Host Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Bruce A

    2017-01-25

    In the healthy lung the opportunistic pathogen, P. aeruginosa, is rapidly eliminated by mucociliary clearance, a process that is dependent on the activity of the CFTR anion channel that, in concert with a number of other transport proteins, regulates the volume and composition of the periciliary surface liquid. This fluid layer is essential to enable cilia to clear pathogens from the lungs. However, in cystic fibrosis (CF), mutations in the CFTR gene reduce Cl- and HCO3- secretion, thereby decreasing periciliary surface liquid volume and mucociliary clearance of bacteria. In CF this leads to persistent infection with the opportunistic pathogen, P. aeruginosa, which is the cause of reduced lung function and death in ~95% of CF patients. Others and we have conducted studies to elucidate the effects of P. aeruginosa on wild type and Phe508del-CFTR Cl- secretion as well as on the host immune response. These studies have demonstrated that Cif (CFTR Inhibitory Factor), a virulence factor secreted by P. aeruginosa, is associated with reduced lung function in CF, induces the ubiquitination and degradation of wt-CFTR as well as TAP1, which plays a key role in viral and bacterial antigen presentation, and inhibits the generation of host proresolving lipids. Cif also enhances the degradation of Phe508del-CFTR that has been rescued by ORKAMBI, a drug approved for CF patients homozygous for the PheF508del-CFTR mutation, thereby reducing drug efficacy. This review is based on the Hans Ussing Distinguished Lecture at the 2016 Experimental Biology Meeting given by the author.

  20. Tissue engineering of electrically responsive tissues using polyaniline based polymers: a review.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Taimoor H; Rai, Ranjana; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2014-11-01

    Conducting polymers have found numerous applications as biomaterial components serving to effectively deliver electrical signals from an external source to the seeded cells. Several cell types including cardiomyocytes, neurons, and osteoblasts respond to electrical signals by improving their functional outcomes. Although a wide variety of conducting polymers are available, polyaniline (PANI) has emerged as a popular choice due to its attractive properties such as ease of synthesis, tunable conductivity, environmental stability, and biocompatibility. PANI in its pure form has exhibited biocompatibility both in vitro and in vivo, and has been combined with a host of biodegradable polymers to form composites having a range of mechanical, electrical, and surface properties. Moreover, recent studies in literature report on the functionalization of polyaniline oligomers with end segments that make it biodegradable and improve its biocompatibility, two properties which make these materials highly desirable for applications in tissue engineering. This review will discuss the features and properties of PANI based composites that make them effective biomaterials, and it provides a comprehensive summary of studies where the use of PANI as a biomaterial component has enhanced cellular function and behavior. We also discuss recent studies utilizing functionalized PANI oligomers, and conclude that electroactive PANI and its derivatives show great promise in eliciting favorable responses from various cell lines that respond to electrical stimuli, and are therefore effective biomaterials for the engineering of electrically responsive biological tissues and organs.

  1. Adverse Husbandry of Maraena Whitefish Directs the Immune System to Increase Mobilization of Myeloid Cells and Proinflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Korytář, Tomáš; Nipkow, Mareen; Altmann, Simone; Goldammer, Tom; Köllner, Bernd; Rebl, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Adverse life circumstances evoke a common “conserved transcriptional response to adversity” (CTRA) in mammalian leukocytes. To investigate whether this pattern is preserved in lower vertebrates, maraena whitefish (Coregonus maraena) were exposed for 9 days to different stocking densities: ~10 kg/m3 (low density), ~33 kg/m3 (moderate), ~60 kg/m3 (elevated), and ~100 kg/m3 (high). Transcriptome profiling in the liver and kidney of individuals from each group suggested that crowding conditions activate stress-related signaling and effector pathways. Remarkably, about one-quarter of the genes differentially expressed under crowding conditions were involved in the activation of immune pathways such as acute-phase response and interleukin/TNF signaling attended by the simultaneous reduction of antiviral potency. Network analysis confirmed the complex interdigitation of immune- and stress-relevant pathways with interleukin-1 playing a central role. Antibody-based techniques revealed remarkable changes in the blood composition of whitefish and demonstrated the correlation between increasing stocking densities and elevated number of myeloid cells together with the increased phagocytic activity of peripheral blood leukocytes. In line with current studies in mammals, we conclude that crowding stress triggers in whitefish hallmarks of a CTRA, indicating that the stress-induced molecular mechanisms regulating the immune responses not only are conserved within mammals but were established earlier in evolution. PMID:28066440

  2. Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Kunz, Hawley; Sams, Clarence F.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the effect of space travel on the human immune system has proven to be extremely challenging. Limited opportunities for in-flight studies, varying mission durations, technical and logistical obstacles, small subject numbers, and a broad range of potential assays have contributed to this problem. Additionally, the inherent complexity of the immune system, with its vast array of cell populations, sub-populations, diverse regulatory molecules, and broad interactions with other physiological systems, makes determining precise variables to measure very difficult. There is also the challenge of determining the clinical significance of any observed immune alterations. Will such a change lead to disease, or is it a transient subclinical observation related to short-term stress? The effect of this problem may be observed by scanning publications associated with immunity and spaceflight, which began to appear during the 1970s. Although individually they are each valid studies, the comprehensive literature to date suffers from widely varying sampling methods and assay techniques, low subject counts, and sometimes a disparate focus on narrow aspects of immunity. The most clinically relevant data are derived from in-flight human studies, which have demonstrated altered cell-mediated immunity and reactivation of latent herpes viruses. Much more data are available from post-flight testing of humans, with clear evidence of altered cytokine production patterns, altered leukocyte distribution, continued latent viral reactivation, and evidence of dramatically altered virus-specific immunity. It is unknown if post-flight assessments relate to the in-flight condition or are a response to landing stress and readaptation. In-flight culture of cells has clearly demonstrated that immune cells are gravity-sensitive and display altered functional characteristics. It is unknown if these data are related to in vivo immune cell function or are an artifact of microgravity culture

  3. Parasites, nutrition, immune responses, and biology of metabolic tissues.

    PubMed

    Shea-Donohue, Terez; Qin, Bolin; Smith, Allen

    2017-02-24

    Nutritional immunology, immunometabolism, and identification of novel immunotherapeutic targets, are areas of active investigation in parasitology. There is a well-documented crosstalk among immune cells and cells in metabolically active tissues that is important for homeostasis. The numbers and function of these cells are altered by obesity leading to inflammation. A variety of helminths spend some part of their life cycle in the gastrointestinal tract and even entirely enteral nematode infections exert beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. The foundation of this review is the ability of enteric nematode infections to improve obesity-induced type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome, which are significant health issues in developed areas. It considers the impact of nutrition and specific nutritional deficiencies, which are occur in both undeveloped and developed areas, on the host's ability mount a protective immune response against parasitic nematodes. There are a number of proposed mechanisms by which parasitic nematodes can impact metabolism including effects gastrointestinal hormones, altering epithelial function, and changing the number and/or phenotype of immune cells in metabolic tissues. Nematodes can also exert their beneficial effects through Th2 cytokines that activate the transcription factor STAT6, which upregulates genes that regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Estradiol release kinetics determine tissue response in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Otto, Christiane; Kantner, Ingrid; Nubbemeyer, Reinhard; Schkoldow, Jenny; Fuchs, Iris; Krahl, Elisabeth; Vonk, Richardus; Schüler, Christiane; Fritzemeier, Karl-Heinrich; Erben, Reinhold G

    2012-04-01

    Estrogen replacement is an effective therapy of postmenopausal symptoms such as hot flushes, bone loss, and vaginal dryness. Undesired estrogen effects are the stimulation of uterine and mammary gland epithelial cell proliferation as well as hepatic estrogenicity. In this study, we examined the influence of different estradiol release kinetics on tissue responsivity in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Pulsed release kinetics was achieved by ip or sc administration of estradiol dissolved in physiological saline containing 10% ethanol (EtOH/NaCl) whereas continuous release kinetics was achieved by sc injection of estradiol dissolved in benzylbenzoate/ricinus oil (1+4, vol/vol). Initial 3-d experiments in OVX rats showed that pulsed ip estradiol administration had profoundly reduced stimulatory effects on the uterus and the liver compared with continuous release kinetics. On the other hand, both administration forms prevented severe vaginal atrophy. Based on these results, we compared the effects of pulsed (sc in EtOH/NaCl) vs. continuous (sc in benzylbenzoate/ricinus oil) estradiol release kinetics on bone, uterus, mammary gland, and liver in a 4-month study in OVX rats. Ovariectomy-induced bone loss was prevented by both administration regimes. However, pulsed estradiol resulted in lower uterine weight, reduced induction of hepatic gene expression, and reduced mammary epithelial hyperplasia relative to continuous estradiol exposure. We conclude that organ responsivity is influenced by different hormone release kinetics, a fact that might be exploited to reduce undesired estradiol effects in postmenopausal women.

  5. VNN1 overexpression is associated with poor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy and adverse prognosis in patients with rectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Chi-Yung; Zhang, Yimin; Song, Junlong; Lin, Shih-Chun; Sun, Shengrong; Chang, I-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer is prevalent worldwide and it is also the fourth most common cause of cancer mortality. For rectal cancer, neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by radical proctectomy is gold standard treatment for patients with stage II/III rectal cancer. By data mining a public dataset of rectal cancer transcriptome (GSE35452) from Gene Expression Omnibus, National Center of Biotechnology Information (GEO, NCBI), we identified that VNN1 was the most significantly upregulated gene among those related to nitrogen compound metabolic process (GO:0006807). Therefore, we analyzed the clinicopathological correlation and prognostic impact of VNN1 protein (pantetheinase), which encoded by VNN1 gene. Methods: VNN1 immunostaining was performed in 172 rectal adenocarcinomas treated with preoperative CCRT followed by surgery, which were bisected into high- and low-expression subgroups. Furthermore, statistical analyses were performed to correlate the relationship between VNN1 immunoreactivity and clinicopathological features, as well as three survival indices: disease-specific survival (DSS), local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and metastasis-free survival (MeFS). Results: High VNN1 immunoexpression was significantly associated with advanced pre-treatment and post-treatment disease and poor response to CCRT (all P ≤ .026). In addition, VNN1 overexpression was linked to adverse DSS, LRFS and MeFS in univariate analysis and served as an independent prognosticator indicating worse DSS and LRFS in multivariate analysis (all P ≤ .019). Conclusion: VNN1 may play a crucial role in rectal cancer progression and responsiveness to CCRT, and serve as a novel prognostic biomarker. Additional studies to clarify the molecular pathway are essential for developing potential VNN1-targeted therapies for rectal cancer. PMID:27830030

  6. Key tissue targets responsible for anthrax-toxin-induced lethality.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihui; Zhang, Yi; Moayeri, Mahtab; Liu, Jie; Crown, Devorah; Fattah, Rasem J; Wein, Alexander N; Yu, Zu-Xi; Finkel, Toren; Leppla, Stephen H

    2013-09-05

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax disease, is lethal owing to the actions of two exotoxins: anthrax lethal toxin (LT) and oedema toxin (ET). The key tissue targets responsible for the lethal effects of these toxins are unknown. Here we generated cell-type-specific anthrax toxin receptor capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2)-null mice and cell-type-specific CMG2-expressing mice and challenged them with the toxins. Our results show that lethality induced by LT and ET occurs through damage to distinct cell types; whereas targeting cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells is required for LT-induced mortality, ET-induced lethality occurs mainly through its action in hepatocytes. Notably, and in contradiction to what has been previously postulated, targeting of endothelial cells by either toxin does not seem to contribute significantly to lethality. Our findings demonstrate that B. anthracis has evolved to use LT and ET to induce host lethality by coordinately damaging two distinct vital systems.

  7. A normal tissue dose response model of dynamic repair processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Markus; Belka, Claus

    2006-01-01

    A model is presented for serial, critical element complication mechanisms for irradiated volumes from length scales of a few millimetres up to the entire organ. The central element of the model is the description of radiation complication as the failure of a dynamic repair process. The nature of the repair process is seen as reestablishing the structural organization of the tissue, rather than mere replenishment of lost cells. The interactions between the cells, such as migration, involved in the repair process are assumed to have finite ranges, which limits the repair capacity and is the defining property of a finite-sized reconstruction unit. Since the details of the repair processes are largely unknown, the development aims to make the most general assumptions about them. The model employs analogies and methods from thermodynamics and statistical physics. An explicit analytical form of the dose response of the reconstruction unit for total, partial and inhomogeneous irradiation is derived. The use of the model is demonstrated with data from animal spinal cord experiments and clinical data about heart, lung and rectum. The three-parameter model lends a new perspective to the equivalent uniform dose formalism and the established serial and parallel complication models. Its implications for dose optimization are discussed.

  8. Comparative soft and hard tissue responses to titanium and polymer healing abutments.

    PubMed

    Koutouzis, Theofilos; Richardson, Joseph; Lundgren, Tord

    2011-03-01

    Limited information exists regarding soft tissue and hard tissue responses to abutments with different material composition. The aim of this study is to evaluate soft and hard tissue responses to titanium and polymer healing abutments over a 3-month period. Sixteen patients were included in this prospective trial. Implants were provisionalized with either titanium or polymer healing abutments. Changes of marginal bone level and soft tissue dimensions were recorded at implant installation and at 3 months.

  9. Developing a gene biomarker at the tipping point of adaptive and adverse responses in human bronchial epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining mechanism-based biomarkers that distinguish adaptive and adverse cellular processes is critical to understanding the health effects of environmental exposures. Shifting from in vivo, low-throughput toxicity studies to high-throughput screening (HTS) paradigms and risk...

  10. Reduced aspirin responsiveness as assessed by impedance aggregometry is not associated with adverse outcome after cardiac surgery in a small low-risk cohort.

    PubMed

    Bolliger, Daniel; Filipovic, Miodrag; Matt, Peter; Tanaka, Kenichi A; Gregor, Michael; Zenklusen, Urs; Seeberger, Manfred D; Lurati Buse, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Reduced aspirin responsiveness (i.e. persistent high platelet reactivity in platelet function testing) might be associated with increased risk of myocardial ischemia and cardiac mortality in patients with coronary disease. However, the impact in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is unclear. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to evaluate the predictive value of reduced aspirin responsiveness on cardiac and thromboembolic events in patients undergoing elective isolated CABG surgery with aspirin intake until at least two days before surgery. We included 304 patients in this prospective single-center cohort study. Impedance platelet aggregometry (Multiplate®) was performed directly before and on the first day after surgery. Reduced aspirin responsiveness was defined as area under the curve in ASPItest (AUCASPI) ≥300 U. The primary outcome was a composite of all-cause mortality and/or major adverse cardiac or thromboembolic events within 1 year. Reduced aspirin responsiveness was found in 13 and 24% of patients pre and postoperatively, respectively. There was no difference in the outcomes between patients with normal and reduced aspirin responsiveness in the preoperative measurement (log-rank test, p = 0.540). Multivariate analysis including logistic EuroSCORE I and postoperative troponin T levels did not show any association of reduced aspirin responsiveness with adverse outcome (hazard ratio, 0.576; (95% CI 0.128-2.585; p = 0.471). Similarly, postoperative reduced aspirin responsiveness was not associated with adverse events. To conclude, reduced aspirin responsiveness as evaluated by Multiplate® platelet function analyzer was not associated with increased incidence of major adverse cardiac and thromboembolic events and mortality after CABG surgery.

  11. How tissue damage MET metabolism: Regulation of the systemic damage response

    PubMed Central

    Kashio, Soshiro; Obata, Fumiaki; Miura, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Living organisms experience tissue damage from both, the surrounding environment and from inside their bodies. Tissue repair/regeneration is triggered by local tissue injury to restore an injured, or lost, part of the body. Tissue damage results in a series of responses, not only locally but also systemically in distant tissues. In our recent publication, we established a “dual system” that induces spatiotemporal tissue damage simultaneously with gene manipulation in surrounding tissues. With this system, we demonstrated that appropriate regulation of methionine metabolism in the fat body is required for tissue repair in Drosophila wing discs, thus highlighting the importance of systemic damage response (SDR) in tissue repair. This “Extra View” aims to discuss our recent reports that propose methionine metabolism to be an essential part of SDR, together with related topics in several model organisms. PMID:27562340

  12. Cellular and Molecular Responses to Mechanical Expansion of Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Razzak, Muhammad Abdur; Hossain, Md. Sanower; Radzi, Zamri Bin; Yahya, Noor Azlin B.; Czernuszka, Jan; Rahman, Mohammad T.

    2016-01-01

    The increased use of tissue expander in the past decades and its potential market values in near future give enough reasons to sum up the consequences of tissue expansion. Furthermore, the patients have the right to know underlying mechanisms of adaptation of inserted biomimetic, its bioinspired materials and probable complications. The mechanical strains during tissue expansion are related to several biological phenomena. Tissue remodeling during the expansion is highly regulated and depends on the signal transduction. Any alteration may lead to tumor formation, necrosis and/or apoptosis. In this review, stretch induced cell proliferation, apoptosis, the roles of growth factors, stretch induced ion channels, and roles of second messengers are organized. It is expected that readers from any background can understand and make a decision about tissue expansion. PMID:27899897

  13. Genotype and neuropsychological response inhibition as resilience promoters for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder under conditions of psychosocial adversity.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Joel; Nikolas, Molly; Friderici, Karen; Park, Leeyoung; Zucker, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Whereas child personality, IQ, and family factors have been identified as enabling a resilient response to psychosocial adversity, more direct biological resilience factors have been less well delineated. This is particularly so for child attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which has received less attention from a resilience perspective than have associated externalizing disorders. Children from two independent samples were classified as resilient if they avoided developing ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), or conduct disorder (CD) in the face of family adversity. Two protective factors were examined for their potential relevance to prefrontal brain development: neuropsychological response inhibition, as assessed by the Stop task, and a composite catecholamine genotype risk score. Resilient children were characterized in both samples by more effective response inhibition, although the effect in the second sample was very small. Genotype was measured in Sample 1, and a composite high risk genotype index was developed by summing presence of risk across markers on three genes expressed in prefrontal cortex: dopamine transporter, dopamine D4 receptor, and noradrenergic alpha-2 receptor. Genotype was a reliable resilience indicator against development of ADHD and CD, but not ODD, in the face of psychosocial adversity. Results illustrate potential neurobiological protective factors related to development of prefrontal cortex that may enable children to avoid developing ADHD and CD in the presence of psychosocial adversity.

  14. Possession of ATM Sequence Variants as Predictor for Late Normal Tissue Responses in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Alice Y.; Fan, Grace; Atencio, David P.; Green, Sheryl; Formenti, Silvia C.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Iyengar, Preetha B.A.; Bernstein, Jonine L.; Stock, Richard G.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: The ATM gene product is a central component of cell cycle regulation and genomic surveillance. We hypothesized that DNA sequence alterations in ATM predict for adverse effects after external beam radiotherapy for early breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 131 patients with a minimum of 2 years follow-up who had undergone breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy were screened for sequence alterations in ATM using DNA from blood lymphocytes. Genetic variants were identified using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scoring schemes for skin and subcutaneous tissues were applied to quantify the radiation-induced effects. Results: Of the 131 patients, 51 possessed ATM sequence alterations located within exons or in short intron regions flanking each exon that encompass putative splice site regions. Of these 51 patients, 21 (41%) exhibited a minimum of a Grade 2 late radiation response. In contrast, of the 80 patients without an ATM sequence variation, only 18 (23%) had radiation-induced adverse responses, for an odds ratio of 2.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.2). Fifteen patients were heterozygous for the G{yields}A polymorphism at nucleotide 5557, which causes substitution of asparagine for aspartic acid at position 1853 of the ATM protein. Of these 15 patients, 8 (53%) exhibited a Grade 2-4 late response compared with 31 (27%) of the 116 patients without this alteration, for an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-9.4). Conclusion: Sequence variants located in the ATM gene, in particular the 5557 G{yields}A polymorphism, may predict for late adverse radiation responses in breast cancer patients.

  15. Mimicking brain tissues by doping scatterers into gelatin tissue phantoms and determination of chemical species responsible for NMPPAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Sudhir; Cullum, Brian M.

    2012-06-01

    It has been shown that non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS) has a great potential to be used as a high resolution surgical guidance technique during brain tumor surgery due to its ability of non-invasive or minimally invasive tumor differentiation. However, for experimental purposes associated with method validation, the use of real tissues is not always ideal because of issues such as availability, safety, storage, chemical doping, necessary control of size and shape, etc. To overcome these issues, tissue phantoms made from animal tissues and/or biochemical constituents, are often employed for such analyses. This work demonstrates the ability to develop and characterize gelatin based tissue phantoms with comparable optical and acoustic properties to real tissues by doping the phantoms with a scattering substance, 0.3 μm diameter Al2O3 particles. Using these phantoms, light scattering coefficients (μs) of 39 cm-1 have been generated, which are comparable to real brain tissue, thus making them a great alternative to real tissue for validation studies. In addition, this work also investigates the non-fluorescent species NAD+ found in the tissues, to evaluate its potential for being detected by NMPPAS. NMPPAS spectra of NAD+ shows a very promising beginning to determine other chemical species such as flavins, collagen, tryptophan, etc responsible for NMPPAS spectral signatures, associated with tumorogenesis.

  16. Effect-independent measures of tissue responses to fractionated irradiation.

    PubMed

    Thames, H D

    1984-01-01

    Tissue repair factors measure the sparing that can be achieved from dose fractionation in the absence of proliferation. Four repair factors are analysed in these terms: FR, Frec, the ratio of linear-quadratic survival model parameters beta/alpha, and the half-time T1/2 for intracellular repair processes. A desirable feature of any repair factor is that it be independent of the level of injury induced in the tissue (or its single-dose equivalent, D1), since the comparison of tissues on the basis of the factor would not be meaningful, if they were characterized by differing D1S. Theoretically, FR and Frec are increasing functions of D1, and thus depend on level of effect. This is confirmed by analysis of skin reactions after multifractionated radiation. By contrast, beta/alpha is effect-independent as a measure of repair capacity in skin, gut, and bone marrow, tissues for which it is reasonable to assume that survival of identifiable target cells is the primary determinant of the endpoint. For a functional endpoint not clearly connected with the depletion of a specific target-cell population (late fibrotic reactions in the kidney), there was an increase in beta/alpha with increased levels of injury, but this was statistically insignificant. Effect-independence is defined for T1/2 as independence from size of dose per fraction. T1/2 is independent of fraction size in skin, gut, and spinal cord, and is longer (1.5 hours) in the late-reacting tissues (lung and spinal cord) than in those that react acutely (T1/2 less than 1 hour), with skin as the exception (T1/2 approximately 1.3 hours). Therefore, early and late-responding normal tissues may be distinguished in terms of both repair capacity and repair kinetics: repair is slower in late-responding tissues, which are also more sensitive to changes in dose fractionation. If generally true, these results imply that the potential for a therapeutic gain from hyperfractionation to spare late effects differentially would be

  17. Bladder tissue passive response to monotonic and cyclic loading.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Elisabetta M; Perrini, Michela; Bignardi, Cristina; Audenino, Alberto L

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental passive mechanical properties of the bladder need to be known in order to design the most appropriate long-term surgical repair procedures and develop materials for bladder reconstruction. This study has focused on the bladder tissue viscoelastic behavior, providing a comprehensive analysis of the effects of fibers orientation, strain rate and loading history. Whole bladders harvested from one year old fat pigs (160 kg approximate weight) were dissected along the apex-to-base direction and samples were isolated from the lateral region of the wall, as well as along apex-to-base and transverse directions. Uniaxial monotonic (stress relaxation) and cyclic tests at different frequencies have been performed with the Bose Electroforce(®) 3200. Normalized stress relaxation functions have been interpolated using a second-order exponential series and loading and unloading stress-strain curves have been interpolated with a non-linear elastic model. The passive mechanical behavior of bladder tissue was shown to be heavily influenced by frequency and loading history, both in monotonic and cyclic tests. The anisotropy of the tissue was evident in monotonic and in cyclic tests as well, especially in tests performed on an exercised tissue and at high frequencies. In contrast, transverse and apex-to-base samples demonstrated an analogous relaxation behavior.

  18. Tissue response to a supplement high in aluminum and silicon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine the effects of sodium zeolite A (SZA) on mineral metabolism and tissue mineral composition in calves. Twenty calves were placed on study at three days of age, and were placed into one of two groups: SS, which received 0.05% BW SZA added to their milk replacer and CO, w...

  19. Trends in anti-D immune globulin for childhood immune thrombocytopenia: usage, response rates, and adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Long, Michelle; Kalish, Leslie A; Neufeld, Ellis J; Grace, Rachael F

    2012-03-01

    In 2010, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) added a black box warning to anti-D immune globulin (Rho(D) immune globulin, anti-D) for immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) to warn of the complications related to severe hemolysis. The objective of this retrospective medical record review was to examine recent trends in anti-D use to treat ITP and rates of adverse events in a single large pediatric hematology program. Over a 7-year period, 176 (35%) of 502 ITP patients at our center received anti-D. Anti-D was the second most commonly prescribed drug for ITP from 2003 to 2010 overall and was given first most frequently (41%). Sixty-four percent of patients responded to anti-D, but 36% had adverse effects, including five patients requiring hospitalization. From 2003 to 2010, the use of anti-D as an initial therapy for ITP significantly decreased (P < 0.001). This trend preceded the 2010 FDA black box warning. In our experience, anti-D was associated with a significant number of adverse effects when used as a treatment for ITP, although none were life-threatening. Despite recent guidelines suggesting anti-D therapy for initial treatment for ITP, anti-D therapy for ITP has significantly decreased over the past 7 years.

  20. Trends in anti-D immune globulin for childhood immune thrombocytopenia: Usage, response rates, and adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Long, Michelle; Kalish, Leslie A.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Grace, Rachael F.

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) added a black box warning to anti-D immune globulin (Rho(D) immune globulin, anti-D) for immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) to warn of the complications related to severe hemolysis. The objective of this retrospective medical record review was to examine recent trends in anti-D use to treat ITP and rates of adverse events in a single large pediatric hematology program. Over a 7-year period, 176 (35%) of 502 ITP patients at our center received anti-D. Anti-D was the second most commonly prescribed drug for ITP from 2003 to 2010 overall and was given first most frequently (41%). Sixty-four percent of patients responded to anti-D, but 36% had adverse effects, including five patients requiring hospitalization. From 2003 to 2010, the use of anti-D as an initial therapy for ITP significantly decreased (P < 0.001). This trend preceded the 2010 FDA black box warning. In our experience, anti-D was associated with a significant number of adverse effects when used as a treatment for ITP, although none were life-threatening. Despite recent guidelines suggesting anti-D therapy for initial treatment for ITP, anti-D therapy for ITP has significantly decreased over the past 7 years. PMID:22190130

  1. Dynamic gap junctional communication: a delimiting model for tissue responses.

    PubMed Central

    Christ, G J; Brink, P R; Ramanan, S V

    1994-01-01

    Gap junctions are aqueous intercellular channels formed by a diverse class of membrane-spanning proteins, known as connexins. These aqueous pores provide partial cytoplasmic continuity between cells in most tissues, and are freely permeable to a host of physiologically relevant second messenger molecules/ionic species (e.g., Ca2+, IP3, cAMP, cGMP). Despite the fact that these second messenger molecules/ionic species have been shown to alter junctional patency, there is no clear basis for understanding how dynamic and transient changes in the intracellular concentration of second messenger molecules might modulate the extent of intercellular communication among coupled cells. Thus, we have modified the tissue monolayer model of Ramanan and Brink (1990) to account for both the up-regulatory and down-regulatory effects on junctions by second messenger molecules that diffuse through gap junctions. We have chosen the vascular wall as our morphological correlate because of its anisotropy and large investment of gap junctions. The model allows us to illustrate the putative behavior of gap junctions under a variety of physiologically relevant conditions. The modeling studies demonstrated that transient alterations in intracellular second messenger concentrations are capable of producing 50-125% changes in the number of cells recruited into a functional syncytial unit, after activation of a single cell. Moreover, the model conditions required to demonstrate such physiologically relevant changes in intercellular diffusion among coupled cells are commonly observed in intact tissues and cultured cells. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:7811948

  2. Multiaxial mechanical response and constitutive modeling of esophageal tissues: Impact on esophageal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Gerhard; Schriefl, Andreas; Zeindlinger, Georg; Katzensteiner, Andreas; Ainödhofer, Herwig; Saxena, Amulya; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2013-12-01

    Congenital defects of the esophagus are relatively frequent, with 1 out of 2500 babies suffering from such a defect. A new method of treatment by implanting tissue engineered esophagi into newborns is currently being developed and tested using ovine esophagi. For the reconstruction of the biological function of native tissues with engineered esophagi, their cellular structure as well as their mechanical properties must be considered. Since very limited mechanical and structural data for the esophagus are available, the aim of this study was to investigate the multiaxial mechanical behavior of the ovine esophagus and the underlying microstructure. Therefore, uniaxial tensile, biaxial tensile and extension-inflation tests on esophagi were performed. The underlying microstructure was examined in stained histological sections through standard optical microscopy techniques. Moreover, the uniaxial ultimate tensile strength and residual deformations of the tissue were determined. Both the mucosa-submucosa and the muscle layers showed nonlinear and anisotropic mechanical behavior during uniaxial, biaxial and inflation testing. Cyclical inflation of the intact esophageal tube caused marked softening of the passive esophagi in the circumferential direction. The rupture strength of the mucosa-submucosa layer was much higher than that of the muscle layer. Overall, the ovine esophagus showed a heterogeneous and anisotropic behavior with different mechanical properties for the individual layers. The intact and layer-specific multiaxial properties were characterized using a well-known three-dimensional microstructurally based strain-energy function. This novel and complete set of data serves the basis for a better understanding of tissue remodeling in diseased esophagi and can be used to perform computer simulations of surgical interventions or medical-device applications.

  3. Computational methods for describing the laser-induced mechanical response of tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.; McGlaun, J.M.; Farnsworth, A.

    1994-02-01

    Detailed computational modeling of laser surgery requires treatment of the photoablation of human tissue by high intensity pulses of laser light and the subsequent thermomechanical response of the tissue. Three distinct physical regimes must be considered to accomplish this: (1) the immediate absorption of the laser pulse by the tissue and following tissue ablation, which is dependent upon tissue light absorption characteristics; (2) the near field thermal and mechanical response of the tissue to this laser pulse, and (3) the potential far field (and longer time) mechanical response of witness tissue. Both (2) and (3) are dependent upon accurate constitutive descriptions of the tissue. We will briefly review tissue absorptivity and mechanical behavior, with an emphasis on dynamic loads characteristic of the photoablation process. In this paper our focus will center on the requirements of numerical modeling and the uncertainties of mechanical tissue behavior under photoablation. We will also discuss potential contributions that computational simulations can make in the design of surgical protocols which utilize lasers, for example, in assessing the potential for collateral mechanical damage by laser pulses.

  4. Leg contracture in mice: an assay of normal tissue response

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, H.B.

    1984-07-01

    Leg contracture, defined as the difference in extensibility of the control and irradiated hind legs of mice, was found to correlate with single doses of radiation from about 20 to 80 Gy. The time of development of the early phase of the response coincided with that reported for the appearance of the acute skin response, and in some cases, partially reversed as this reaction healed. The contracture then progressed again at a moderate rate through 90 days, and then more slowly through one year. Skin contraction, measured by decrease in intertattoo distance, was assayed in the same mice. It followed the same time course as leg contracture, but had a different dose-response relationship. To determine the contribution of skin contraction to the overall leg contracture response, mice were sacrificed and the leg contracture measured before and after the removal of the skin of the leg. After doses of up to 30 Gy, little contracture remained from skinning the leg, indicating that skin contraction was largely responsible for leg contracture in this dose range. After doses of about 45 Gy and above, some contracture remained in the skinned legs, although less than in intact legs. There was little or no enhancement of either skin contraction or leg contracture by the hypoxic cell sensitizers metronidazole or misonidazole.

  5. The effect of micro-ECoG substrate footprint on the meningeal tissue response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schendel, Amelia A.; Nonte, Michael W.; Vokoun, Corinne; Richner, Thomas J.; Brodnick, Sarah K.; Atry, Farid; Frye, Seth; Bostrom, Paige; Pashaie, Ramin; Thongpang, Sanitta; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Williams, Justin C.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. There is great interest in designing implantable neural electrode arrays that maximize function while minimizing tissue effects and damage. Although it has been shown that substrate geometry plays a key role in the tissue response to intracortically implanted, penetrating neural interfaces, there has been minimal investigation into the effect of substrate footprint on the tissue response to surface electrode arrays. This study investigates the effect of micro-electrocorticography (micro-ECoG) device geometry on the longitudinal tissue response. Approach. The meningeal tissue response to two micro-ECoG devices with differing geometries was evaluated. The first device had each electrode site and trace individually insulated, with open regions in between, while the second device had a solid substrate, in which all 16 electrode sites were embedded in a continuous insulating sheet. These devices were implanted bilaterally in rats, beneath cranial windows, through which the meningeal tissue response was monitored for one month after implantation. Electrode site impedance spectra were also monitored during the implantation period. Main results. It was observed that collagenous scar tissue formed around both types of devices. However, the distribution of the tissue growth was different between the two array designs. The mesh devices experienced thick tissue growth between the device and the cranial window, and minimal tissue growth between the device and the brain, while the solid device showed the opposite effect, with thick tissue forming between the brain and the electrode sites. Significance. These data suggest that an open architecture device would be more ideal for neural recording applications, in which a low impedance path from the brain to the electrode sites is critical for maximum recording quality.

  6. A Finite-Element Method Model of Soft Tissue Response to Impulsive Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Palmeri, Mark L.; Sharma, Amy C.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Nightingale, Roger W.; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2010-01-01

    Several groups are studying acoustic radiation force and its ability to image the mechanical properties of tissue. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is one modality using standard diagnostic ultrasound scanners to generate localized, impulsive, acoustic radiation forces in tissue. The dynamic response of tissue is measured via conventional ultrasonic speckle-tracking methods and provides information about the mechanical properties of tissue. A finite-element method (FEM) model has been developed that simulates the dynamic response of tissues, with and without spherical inclusions, to an impulsive acoustic radiation force excitation from a linear array transducer. These FEM models were validated with calibrated phantoms. Shear wave speed, and therefore elasticity, dictates tissue relaxation following ARFI excitation, but Poisson’s ratio and density do not significantly alter tissue relaxation rates. Increased acoustic attenuation in tissue increases the relative amount of tissue displacement in the near field compared with the focal depth, but relaxation rates are not altered. Applications of this model include improving image quality, and distilling material and structural information from tissue’s dynamic response to ARFI excitation. Future work on these models includes incorporation of viscous material properties and modeling the ultrasonic tracking of displaced scatterers. PMID:16382621

  7. The skin tissue is adversely affected by TNF-alpha blockers in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis: a 5-year prospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Natalia P.; dos Reis Neto, Edgard Torres; Soares, Maria Roberta M. P.; Freitas, Daniele S.; Porro, Adriana; Ciconelli, Rozana M.; Pinheiro, Marcelo M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the incidence of and the main risk factors associated with cutaneous adverse events in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis following anti-TNF-α therapy. METHODS: A total of 257 patients with active arthritis who were taking TNF-α blockers, including 158 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 87 with ankylosing spondylitis and 12 with psoriatic arthritis, were enrolled in a 5-year prospective analysis. Patients with overlapping or other rheumatic diseases were excluded. Anthropometric, socioeconomic, demographic and clinical data were evaluated, including the Disease Activity Score-28, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index and Psoriasis Area Severity Index. Skin conditions were evaluated by two dermatology experts, and in doubtful cases, skin lesion biopsies were performed. Associations between adverse cutaneous events and clinical, demographic and epidemiological variables were determined using the chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors. The significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: After 60 months of follow-up, 71 adverse events (73.85/1000 patient-years) were observed, of which allergic and immune-mediated phenomena were the most frequent events, followed by infectious conditions involving bacterial (47.1%), parasitic (23.5%), fungal (20.6%) and viral (8.8%) agents. CONCLUSION: The skin is significantly affected by adverse reactions resulting from the use of TNF-α blockers, and the main risk factors for cutaneous events were advanced age, female sex, a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, disease activity and the use of infliximab. PMID:24141833

  8. Response to treatment and adverse events associated with use of recombinant activated factor VII in children: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, James D.; Ritchey, Arthur K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) is United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for patients with hemophilia with inhibitors or congenital factor VII deficiency. Initial reports of off-label use highlighted its efficacy, though newer reports have not repeated these findings. In both types of publication, though, secondary thromboses have been seen in adult patients. The data in children are less clear. Methods: This study analyzed all rFVIIa use at a large children’s hospital for characteristics and outcomes. Recipients of rFVIIa were identified retrospectively via the electronic medical record. Data on patient diagnosis, lab data, other treatments, adverse events, and outcomes were collected. Results: Over 33 months, 66 patient episodes were treated with a total of 606 doses (median = 2). The most common indication (36.4%) was gastrointestinal bleeding (24/66 patients). Only one patient received a dose for an approved labeled indication. For control of bleeding, 33.3% of courses were unsuccessful (19/57). Bleeding from multiple sites was associated with treatment failure. In 16.7% of patients (11/66), unexpected adverse thromboses developed within 1 week of completing a course of rFVIIa. Thromboses in both intra- and extra-corporeal sites were included if they compromised patient care. Conclusions: In the majority of cases reviewed, rFVIIa was successful in stopping or slowing serious bleeding episodes. It was least effective when a patient had diffuse bleeding at the time of administration. The thrombosis rate of 16.7% was higher than expected, though causality cannot be declared. Further investigation is needed to determine the risk–benefit ratio in children. PMID:28255432

  9. Tissue mercury concentrations and adrenocortical responses of female big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) near a contaminated river.

    PubMed

    Wada, Haruka; Yates, David E; Evers, David C; Taylor, Robert J; Hopkins, William A

    2010-10-01

    Much of the research on mercury (Hg) in wild vertebrates has focused on piscivores and other animals at high trophic levels. However, recent studies indicated that insectivorous terrestrial vertebrates may also be at risk. In the present study, we examined blood and fur Hg concentrations as well as the adrenocortical responses of insectivorous big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) near the Hg-contaminated South River, VA and a nearby reference area. Baseline glucocorticoids and adrenocortical responses to handling have been widely used to assess the influence of environmental stressors because plasma glucocorticoids rise in response to various physical, psychological, and physiological challenges. Female bats captured at the contaminated site had 2.6 times higher blood and fur Hg concentrations than those captured at the reference site (blood: 0.11 vs. 0.04 μg/g wet weight; fur: 28.0 vs. 10.9 μg/g fresh weight). Fur Hg concentrations at the contaminated site were higher than most wild omnivorous and carnivorous mammals reported in the literature. Although fur and blood Hg concentrations were tightly correlated, fur Hg concentrations averaged 260 times higher than concentrations in blood. This suggests that fur may be an important depuration route for bats, just as it is in other mammals. Despite the high Hg concentrations in bat tissue, we did not observe any site difference in adrenocortical responses. Our results suggest that the bats at the contaminated site were exposed to Hg concentrations below those causing adverse effects on their adrenal axis.

  10. Early tissue response to transscleral neodymium: YAG cyclophotocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Blasini, M; Simmons, R; Shields, M B

    1990-06-01

    Transscleral cyclophotocoagulation was performed with a neodymium: YAG laser on five patients 24-72 hr before enucleation for a blind, painful eye. The thermal mode at 20 ms and a maximum offset between aiming and therapeutic beams were kept constant. Variable parameters evaluated were energy levels between 2 and 8 J and distance from the limbus of 0.5-3.0 mm. Because of the underlying distortion in three of the eyes, meaningful interpretation by light microscopic evaluation was possible only in the other two. This suggested that the early histologic hallmark of the procedure is similar to that previously observed in human autopsy eyes with ciliary epithelial damage and elevation from underlying tissue. In addition, fibrin and scant inflammatory cells were seen in the space between ciliary epithelium and stroma. Minimal damage was observed in the ciliary muscle. These findings suggest that direct damage to the ciliary epithelium is the most likely mechanism of reduced aqueous production by this cyclodestructive procedure. The findings also support the concept that an anterior placement of approximately 1.0-1.5 mm posterior to the limbus is most likely to damage the ciliary epithelium of the pars plicata.

  11. Materials approaches for modulating neural tissue responses to implanted microelectrodes through mechanical and biochemical means

    PubMed Central

    Sommakia, Salah; Lee, Heui C.; Gaire, Janak; Otto, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Implantable intracortical microelectrodes face an uphill struggle for widespread clinical use. Their potential for treating a wide range of traumatic and degenerative neural disease is hampered by their unreliability in chronic settings. A major factor in this decline in chronic performance is a reactive response of brain tissue, which aims to isolate the implanted device from the rest of the healthy tissue. In this review we present a discussion of materials approaches aimed at modulating the reactive tissue response through mechanical and biochemical means. Benefits and challenges associated with these approaches are analyzed, and the importance of multimodal solutions tested in emerging animal models are presented. PMID:25530703

  12. Tissue-specific autophagy responses to aging and stress in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chapin, Hannah C.; Okada, Megan; Merz, Alexey J.; Miller, Dana L.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular function relies on a balance between protein synthesis and breakdown. Macromolecular breakdown through autophagy is broadly required for cellular and tissue development, function, and recovery from stress. While Caenorhabditis elegans is frequently used to explore cellular responses to development and stress, the most common assays for autophagy in this system lack tissue-level resolution. Different tissues within an organism have unique functional characteristics and likely vary in their reliance on autophagy under different conditions. To generate a tissue-specific map of autophagy in C. elegans we used a dual fluorescent protein (dFP) tag that releases monomeric fluorescent protein (mFP) upon arrival at the lysosome. Tissue-specific expression of dFP::LGG-1 revealed autophagic flux in all tissues, but mFP accumulation was most dramatic in the intestine. We also observed variable responses to stress: starvation increased autophagic mFP release in all tissues, whereas anoxia primarily increased intestinal autophagic flux. We observed autophagic flux with tagged LGG-1, LGG-2, and two autophagic cargo reporters: a soluble cytoplasmic protein, and mitochondrial TOMM-7. Finally, an increase in mFP in older worms was consistent with an age-dependent shift in proteostasis. These novel measures of autophagic flux in C. elegans reveal heterogeneity in autophagic response across tissues during stress and aging. PMID:26142908

  13. Tissue-specific autophagy responses to aging and stress in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Chapin, Hannah C; Okada, Megan; Merz, Alexey J; Miller, Dana L

    2015-06-01

    Cellular function relies on a balance between protein synthesis and breakdown. Macromolecular breakdown through autophagy is broadly required for cellular and tissue development, function, and recovery from stress. While Caenorhabditis elegans is frequently used to explore cellular responses to development and stress, the most common assays for autophagy in this system lack tissue-level resolution. Different tissues within an organism have unique functional characteristics and likely vary in their reliance on autophagy under different conditions. To generate a tissue-specific map of autophagy in C. elegans we used a dual fluorescent protein (dFP) tag that releases monomeric fluorescent protein (mFP) upon arrival at the lysosome. Tissue-specific expression of dFP::LGG-1 revealed autophagic flux in all tissues, but mFP accumulation was most dramatic in the intestine. We also observed variable responses to stress: starvation increased autophagic mFP release in all tissues, whereas anoxia primarily increased intestinal autophagic flux. We observed autophagic flux with tagged LGG-1, LGG-2, and two autophagic cargo reporters: a soluble cytoplasmic protein, and mitochondrial TOMM-7. Finally, an increase in mFP in older worms was consistent with an age-dependent shift in proteostasis. These novel measures of autophagic flux in C. elegans reveal heterogeneity in autophagic response across tissues during stress and aging.

  14. Postprandial Responses to Lipid and Carbohydrate Ingestion in Repeated Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Biopsies in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Dordevic, Aimee L; Pendergast, Felicity J; Morgan, Han; Villas-Boas, Silas; Caldow, Marissa K; Larsen, Amy E; Sinclair, Andrew J; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-07-01

    Adipose tissue is a primary site of meta-inflammation. Diet composition influences adipose tissue metabolism and a single meal can drive an inflammatory response in postprandial period. This study aimed to examine the effect lipid and carbohydrate ingestion compared with a non-caloric placebo on adipose tissue response. Thirty-three healthy adults (age 24.5 ± 3.3 year (mean ± standard deviation (SD)); body mass index (BMI) 24.1 ± 3.2 kg/m2, were randomised into one of three parallel beverage groups; placebo (water), carbohydrate (maltodextrin) or lipid (dairy-cream). Subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue biopsies and serum samples were collected prior to (0 h), as well as 2 h and 4 h after consumption of the beverage. Adipose tissue gene expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) increased in all three groups, without an increase in circulating TNF-α. Serum leptin (0.6-fold, p = 0.03) and adipose tissue leptin gene expression levels (0.6-fold, p = 0.001) decreased in the hours following the placebo beverage, but not the nutrient beverages. Despite increased inflammatory cytokine gene expression in adipose tissue with all beverages, suggesting a confounding effect of the repeated biopsy method, differences in metabolic responses of adipose tissue and circulating adipokines to ingestion of lipid and carbohydrate beverages were observed.

  15. Mechanical response tissue analyzer for estimating bone strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Steele, Charles; Mauriello, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    One of the major concerns for extended space flight is weakness of the long bones of the legs, composed primarily of cortical bone, that functions to provide mechanical support. The strength of cortical bone is due to its complex structure, described simplistically as cylinders of parallel osteons composed of layers of mineralized collagen. The reduced mechanical stresses during space flight or immobilization of bone on Earth reduces the mineral content, and changes the components of its matrix and structure so that its strength is reduced. Currently, the established clinical measures of bone strength are indirect. The measures are based on determinations of mineral density by means of radiography, photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computer tomography. While the mineral content of bone is essential to its strength, there is growing awareness of the limitations of the measurement as the sole predictor of fracture risk in metabolic bone diseases, especially limitations of the measurement as the sole predictor of fracture risk in metabolic bone diseases, especially osteoporosis. Other experimental methods in clinical trials that more directly evaluate the physical properties of bone, and do not require exposure to radiation, include ultrasound, acoustic emission, and low-frequency mechanical vibration. The last method can be considered a direct measure of the functional capacity of a long bone since it quantifies the mechanical response to a stimulus delivered directly to the bone. A low frequency vibration induces a response (impedance) curve with a minimum at the resonant frequency, that a few investigators use for the evaluation of the bone. An alternative approach, the method under consideration, is to use the response curve as the basis for determination of the bone bending stiffness EI (E is the intrinsic material property and I is the cross-sectional moment of inertia) and mass, fundamental mechanical properties of bone.

  16. Interactions among COX-2, GPIIIa and P2Y1 variants are associated with aspirin responsiveness and adverse events in patients with ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xingyang; Han, Zhao; Zhou, Qiang; Lin, Jing; Wang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effect of gene variants and their interactions on response to aspirin and clinical adverse outcomes after an acute ischemic stroke (IS) is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of aspirin-relevant gene variants and their interactions with clinical adverse outcomes in IS patients taking aspirin. Methods: A total of 14 variants from six genes encoding COX enzymes (COX-1, COX-2), platelet membrane receptors (TXAS1, P2Y1, P2Y12) and glycoprotein receptor (GPIIIa) were examined in 850 acute IS patients. Gene–gene interactions were analyzed using generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) analysis. All patients were followed up for 1 year after admission. Primary outcome was a composite of recurrent ischemic stroke (RIS), myocardial infarction (MI) and death. Results: The primary outcome occurred in 112 (13.5%) patients (81 RIS, 16 MI and 15 deaths). There were no significant differences in the frequencies of the genotypes of the 14 variants between the patients with and without primary outcome using single-locus analytical approach. However, there was significant gene–gene interaction among rs20417, rs1371097 and rs2317676. The high-risk interactive genotypes of rs20417, rs1371097 and rs2317676 were independently associated with primary adverse outcome of RIS, MI, and death after acute IS. Conclusion: The three-loci interactions are associated with sensitivity of IS patients to aspirin and aspirin-induced adverse clinical events. The combinatorial analysis used in this study may be helpful to elucidate complex genetic risk of aspirin resistance (AR). Clinical trial registration: The study described here is registered at http://www.chictr.org/ (unique identifier: ChiCTR-OCH-14004724). PMID:28344655

  17. 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel Evidence Review for: The Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) met for a site visit in Houston, TX on February 3-4, 2014. The SRP reviewed the new Evidence Report for the Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response (from here on referred to as the 2013 Immune Evidence Report), as well as the Research Plan for this Risk that is in the current version of the Human Research Program’s (HRP) Integrated Research Plan (IRP).

  18. Bone tissue response to plasma-nitrided titanium implant surfaces

    PubMed Central

    FERRAZ, Emanuela Prado; SVERZUT, Alexander Tadeu; FREITAS, Gileade Pereira; SÁ, Juliana Carvalho; ALVES, Clodomiro; BELOTI, Marcio Mateus; ROSA, Adalberto Luiz

    2015-01-01

    A current goal of dental implant research is the development of titanium (Ti) surfaces to improve osseointegration. Plasma nitriding treatments generate surfaces that favor osteoblast differentiation, a key event to the process of osteogenesis. Based on this, it is possible to hypothesize that plasma-nitrided Ti implants may positively impact osseointegration. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo bone response to Ti surfaces modified by plasma-nitriding treatments. Material and Methods Surface treatments consisted of 20% N2 and 80% H2, 450°C and 1.5 mbar during 1 h for planar and 3 h for hollow cathode. Untreated surface was used as control. Ten implants of each surface were placed into rabbit tibiae and 6 weeks post-implantation they were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Results Bone formation was observed in contact with all implants without statistically significant differences among the evaluated surfaces in terms of bone-to-implant contact, bone area between threads, and bone area within the mirror area. Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma nitriding treatments generate Ti implants that induce similar bone response to the untreated ones. Thus, as these treatments improve the physico-chemical properties of Ti without affecting its biocompatibility, they could be combined with modifications that favor bone formation in order to develop new implant surfaces. PMID:25760262

  19. Early genetic responses in rat vascular tissue after simulated diving.

    PubMed

    Eftedal, Ingrid; Jørgensen, Arve; Røsbjørgen, Ragnhild; Flatberg, Arnar; Brubakk, Alf O

    2012-12-18

    Diving causes a transient reduction of vascular function, but the mechanisms behind this are largely unknown. The aim of this study was therefore to analyze genetic reactions that may be involved in acute changes of vascular function in divers. Rats were exposed to 709 kPa of hyperbaric air (149 kPa Po(2)) for 50 min followed by postdive monitoring of vascular bubble formation and full genome microarray analysis of the aorta from diving rats (n = 8) and unexposed controls (n = 9). Upregulation of 23 genes was observed 1 h after simulated diving. The differential gene expression was characteristic of cellular responses to oxidative stress, with functions of upregulated genes including activation and fine-tuning of stress-responsive transcription, cytokine/cytokine receptor signaling, molecular chaperoning, and coagulation. By qRT-PCR, we verified increased transcription of neuron-derived orphan receptor-1 (Nr4a3), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (Serpine1), cytokine TWEAK receptor FN14 (Tnfrsf12a), transcription factor class E basic helix-loop-helix protein 40 (Bhlhe40), and adrenomedullin (Adm). Hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF1 subunit HIF1-α was stabilized in the aorta 1 h after diving, and after 4 h there was a fivefold increase in total protein levels of the procoagulant plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI1) in blood plasma from diving rats. The study did not have sufficient power for individual assessment of effects of hyperoxia and decompression-induced bubbles on postdive gene expression. However, differential gene expression in rats without venous bubbles was similar to that of all the diving rats, indicating that elevated Po(2) instigated the observed genetic reactions.

  20. Biological response of tissues with macrophagic activity to titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Daniel G; Tasat, Deborah R; Evelson, Pablo; Guglielmotti, María B; Cabrini, Rómulo L

    2008-03-15

    The titanium dioxide layer is composed mainly of anatase and rutile. This layer is prone to break, releasing particles to the milieu. Therefore, corrosion may cause implant failure and body contamination. We have previously shown that commercial anatase-titanium dioxide (TiO(2)-anatase) is deposited in organs with macrophagic activity, transported in the blood by phagocytic-mononuclear cells, and induces an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we evaluated the effects of rutile-titanium dioxide (TiO(2)-rutile). Male Wistar rats were injected i.p. with a suspension of TiO(2)-rutile powder at a dose of 1.60 g/100 g b.w. Six months postinjection, the presence of Ti was assessed in serum, blood cells, liver, spleen, and lung. Titanium was found in phagocytic mononuclear cells, serum, and in the parenchyma of all the organs tested. TiO(2)-rutile generated a rise in the percentage of reactive cells, which was smaller than that observed when TiO(2)-anatase was employed in a previous study. Although TiO(2)-rutile provoked an augmentation of ROS, it failed to induce damage to membrane lipids, possibly due to an adaptive response. The present study reveals that TiO(2)-rutile is less bioreactive than TiO(2)-anatase.

  1. The role of acetone in the [omim][BF4]-mediated adverse effects on tissues of mussels, human lymphocytes and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tsarpali, Vasiliki; Goutas, Andreas; Karyda, Anna; Efthimiou, Ioanna; Antonopoulou, Maria; Drosopoulou, Elena; Vlastos, Dimitrios; Konstantinou, Ioannis; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope; Dailianis, Stefanos

    2017-03-24

    The present study investigated [omim][BF4]-mediated adverse effects on biological models widely used in toxicological studies. Specifically, mussels of the genus Mytilus, human lymphocytes and fruit flies of the species Drosophila melanogaster, were exposed to [omim][BF4] at concentrations ranging from micro- to milligrams per liter, with or without the presence of acetone as a carrier solvent and thereafter [omim][BF4]-mediated adverse effects were analyzed appropriately (stress indices, such as lipid peroxidation byproducts, acetylcholinesterase/AChE activity and micronucleus/MN formation frequency, in mussel gills, Cytokinesis Block Micronucleus/CBMN assay and SMART test in human lymphocytes and fruit flies respectively). LC-MS-TOF analysis was also performed for elucidating [omim][BF4] mode of action in the presence of the carrier solvent. The results showed the toxic potential of [omim][BF4], as well as acetone's ability to attenuate [omim][BF4]-mediated toxicity in almost all cases, probably due to the significant effect of acetone on the hydrophilic-lipophilic character and the viscosity of [omim][BF4], as well as its interaction and permeability on the cell membranes. The slight involvement of acetone in the attenuation of [omim][BF4]-mediated genotoxic effects on D. melanogaster could be due to species feeding experimental conditions, thus favoring the induction of antioxidant defense system against the [omim][BF4]-mediated effects in all cases.

  2. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF MICROARRAY DATA IDENTIFIES COMMON RESPONSES TO CALORIC RESTRICTION AMONG MOUSE TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Swindell, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Caloric restriction has been extensively investigated as an intervention that both extends lifespan and delays age-related disease in mammals. In mice, much interest has centered on evaluating gene expression changes induced by caloric restriction (CR) in particular tissue types, but the overall systemic effect of CR among multiple tissues has been examined less extensively. This study presents a comparative analysis of microarray datasets that have collectively examined the effects of CR in ten different tissue types (liver, heart, muscle, hypothalamus, hippocampus, white adipose tissue, colon, kidney, lung, cochlea). Using novel methods for comparative analysis of microarray data, detailed comparisons of the effects of CR among tissues are provided, and 28 genes for which expression response to CR is most shared among tissues are identified. These genes characterize common responses to CR, which consist of both activation and inhibition of stress-response pathways. With respect to liver tissue, transcriptional effects of CR exhibited surprisingly little overlap with those of aging, and a variable degree of overlap with the potential CR-mimetic drug resveratrol. These analyses shed light on the systemic transcriptional activity associated with CR diets, and also illustrate new approaches for comparative analysis of microarray datasets in the context of aging biology. PMID:18155270

  3. Are Ambient Ultrafine, Accumulation Mode, and Fine Particles Associated with Adverse Cardiac Responses in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    PubMed Central

    Zareba, Wojciech; Beckett, William; Hopke, Philip K; Oakes, David; Frampton, Mark W; Bisognano, John; Chalupa, David; Bausch, Jan; O’Shea, Karen; Wang, Yungang; Utell, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mechanisms underlying previously reported air pollution and cardiovascular (CV) morbidity associations remain poorly understood. Objectives: We examined associations between markers of pathways thought to underlie these air pollution and CV associations and ambient particle concentrations in postinfarction patients. Methods: We studied 76 patients, from June 2006 to November 2009, who participated in a 10-week cardiac rehabilitation program following a recent (within 3 months) myocardial infarction or unstable angina. Ambient ultrafine particle (UFP; 10–100 nm), accumulation mode particle (AMP; 100–500 nm), and fine particle concentrations (PM2.5; ≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter) were monitored continuously. Continuous Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings were made before and during supervised, graded, twice weekly, exercise sessions. A venous blood sample was collected and blood pressure was measured before sessions. Results: Using mixed effects models, we observed adverse changes in rMSSD [square root of the mean of the sum of the squared differences between adjacent normal-to-normal (NN) intervals], SDNN (standard deviation of all NN beat intervals), TpTe (time from peak to end of T-wave), heart rate turbulence, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen associated with interquartile range increases in UFP, AMP, and PM2.5 at 1 or more lag times within the previous 5 days. Exposures were not associated with MeanNN, heart-rate–corrected QT interval duration (QTc), deceleration capacity, and white blood cell count was not associated with UFP, AMP, and PM2.5 at any lag time. Conclusions: In cardiac rehabilitation patients, particles were associated with subclinical decreases in parasympathetic modulation, prolongation of late repolarization duration, increased blood pressure, and systemic inflammation. It is possible that such changes could increase the risk of CV events in this susceptible population. PMID

  4. Olfactory responses of banana weevil predators to volatiles from banana pseudostem tissue and synthetic pheromone.

    PubMed

    Tinzaara, W; Gold, C S; Dicke, M; van Huis, A

    2005-07-01

    As a response to attack by herbivores, plants can emit a variety of volatile substances that attract natural enemies of these insect pests. Predators of the banana weevil, Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) such as Dactylosternum abdominale (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae) and Pheidole megacephala (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), are normally found in association with weevil-infested rotten pseudostems and harvested stumps. We investigated whether these predators are attracted to such environments in response to volatiles produced by the host plant, by the weevil, or by the weevil plant complex. We evaluated predator responses towards volatiles from banana pseudostem tissue (synomones) and the synthetic banana weevil aggregation pheromone Cosmolure+ in a two-choice olfactometer. The beetle D. abdominale was attracted to fermenting banana pseudostem tissue and Cosmolure+, whereas the ant P. megacephala was attracted only to fermented pseudostem tissue. Both predators were attracted to banana pseudostem tissue that had been damaged by weevil larvae irrespective of weevil presence. Adding pheromone did not enhance predator response to volatiles from pseudostem tissue fed on by weevils. The numbers of both predators recovered with pseudostem traps in the field from banana mats with a pheromone trap were similar to those in pseudostem traps at different distance ranges from the pheromone. Our study shows that the generalist predators D. abdominale and P. megacephala use volatiles from fermented banana pseudostem tissue as the major chemical cue when searching for prey.

  5. Planarian regeneration involves distinct stem cell responses to wounds and tissue absence.

    PubMed

    Wenemoser, Danielle; Reddien, Peter W

    2010-08-15

    Regeneration requires signaling from a wound site for detection of the wound and a mechanism that determines the nature of the injury to specify the appropriate regenerative response. Wound signals and tissue responses to wounds that elicit regeneration remain poorly understood. Planarians are able to regenerate from essentially any type of injury and present a novel system for the study of wound responses in regeneration initiation. Newly developed molecular and cellular tools now enable study of regeneration initiation using the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. Planarian regeneration requires adult stem cells called neoblasts and amputation triggers two peaks in neoblast mitoses early in regeneration. We demonstrate that the first mitotic peak is a body-wide response to any injury and that a second, local, neoblast response is induced only when injury results in missing tissue. This second response was characterized by recruitment of neoblasts to wounds, even in areas that lack neoblasts in the intact animal. Subsequently, these neoblasts were induced to divide and differentiate near the wound, leading to formation of new tissue. We conclude that there exist two functionally distinct signaling phases of the stem cell wound response that distinguish between simple injury and situations that require the regeneration of missing tissue.

  6. The role of membrane ERα signaling in bone and other major estrogen responsive tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, K. L.; Farman, H.; Henning, P.; Lionikaite, V.; Movérare-Skrtic, S.; Wu, J.; Ryberg, H.; Koskela, A.; Gustafsson, J.-Å.; Tuukkanen, J.; Levin, E. R.; Ohlsson, C.; Lagerquist, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) signaling leads to cellular responses in several tissues and in addition to nuclear ERα-mediated effects, membrane ERα (mERα) signaling may be of importance. To elucidate the significance, in vivo, of mERα signaling in multiple estrogen-responsive tissues, we have used female mice lacking the ability to localize ERα to the membrane due to a point mutation in the palmitoylation site (C451A), so called Nuclear-Only-ER (NOER) mice. Interestingly, the role of mERα signaling for the estrogen response was highly tissue-dependent, with trabecular bone in the axial skeleton being strongly dependent (>80% reduction in estrogen response in NOER mice), cortical and trabecular bone in long bones, as well as uterus and thymus being partly dependent (40–70% reduction in estrogen response in NOER mice) and effects on liver weight and total body fat mass being essentially independent of mERα (<35% reduction in estrogen response in NOER mice). In conclusion, mERα signaling is important for the estrogenic response in female mice in a tissue-dependent manner. Increased knowledge regarding membrane initiated ERα actions may provide means to develop new selective estrogen receptor modulators with improved profiles. PMID:27388455

  7. B-cell depletion inhibits arthritis in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model, but does not adversely affect humoral responses in a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccination model.

    PubMed

    Dunussi-Joannopoulos, Kyri; Hancock, Gerald E; Kunz, Arthur; Hegen, Martin; Zhou, Xiaochuan X; Sheppard, Barbara J; Lamothe, Jennifer; Li, Evelyn; Ma, Hak-Ling; Hamann, Philip R; Damle, Nitin K; Collins, Mary

    2005-10-01

    We report the development of a mouse B cell-depleting immunoconjugate (anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody [mAb] conjugated to calicheamicin) and its in vivo use to characterize the kinetics of CD22+ B-cell depletion and reconstitution in murine primary and secondary lymphoid tissues. The effect of B-cell depletion was further studied in a murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model and a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccination model. Our results show that (1) the immunoconjugate has B-cell-specific in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity; (2) B-cell reconstitution starts in the bone marrow and spleen around day 30 after depletion and is completed in all tissues tested by day 50; (3) B-cell depletion inhibits the development of clinical and histologic arthritis in the CIA model; (4) depletion of type II collagen antibody levels is not necessary for clinical and histologic prevention of CIA; and (5) B-cell depletion does not adversely affect memory antibody responses after challenge nor clearance of infectious virus from lungs in the RSV vaccination model. These results demonstrate for the first time that only B-cell reduction but not type II collagen antibody levels correlate with the prevention of arthritis and represent key insights into the role of CD22-targeted B-cell depletion in mouse autoimmunity and vaccination models.

  8. Immune Responses to Tissue-Restricted Nonmajor Histocompatibility Complex Antigens in Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Bharat, Ankit

    2017-01-01

    Chronic diseases that result in end-stage organ damage cause inflammation, which can reveal sequestered self-antigens (SAgs) in that organ and trigger autoimmunity. The thymus gland deletes self-reactive T-cells against ubiquitously expressed SAgs, while regulatory mechanisms in the periphery control immune responses to tissue-restricted SAgs. It is now established that T-cells reactive to SAgs present in certain organs (e.g., lungs, pancreas, and intestine) are incompletely eliminated, and the dysregulation of peripheral immuneregulation can generate immune responses to SAgs. Therefore, chronic diseases can activate self-reactive lymphocytes, inducing tissue-restricted autoimmunity. During organ transplantation, donor lymphocytes are tested against recipient serum (i.e., cross-matching) to detect antibodies (Abs) against donor human leukocyte antigens, which has been shown to reduce Ab-mediated hyperacute rejection. However, primary allograft dysfunction and rejection still occur frequently. Because donor lymphocytes do not express tissue-restricted SAgs, preexisting Abs against SAgs are undetectable during conventional cross-matching. Preexisting and de novo immune responses to tissue-restricted SAgs (i.e., autoimmunity) play a major role in rejection. In this review, we discuss the evidence that supports autoimmunity as a contributor to rejection. Testing for preexisting and de novo immune responses to tissue-restricted SAgs and treatment based on immune responses after organ transplantation may improve short- and long-term outcomes after transplantation. PMID:28164137

  9. Th1-skewed tissue responses to a mycolyl glycolipid in mycobacteria-infected rhesus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Hattori, Yuki; Komori, Takaya; Nakamura, Takashi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Sugita, Masahiko

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Glucose monomycolate (GMM) is a marker glycolipid for active tuberculosis. •Tissue responses to GMM involved up-regulation of Th1-attracting chemokines. •Th1-skewed local responses were mounted at the GMM-injected tissue. -- Abstract: Trehalose 6,6′-dimycolate (TDM) is a major glycolipid of the cell wall of mycobacteria with remarkable adjuvant functions. To avoid detection by the host innate immune system, invading mycobacteria down-regulate the expression of TDM by utilizing host-derived glucose as a competitive substrate for their mycolyltransferases; however, this enzymatic reaction results in the concomitant biosynthesis of glucose monomycolate (GMM) which is recognized by the acquired immune system. GMM-specific, CD1-restricted T cell responses have been detected in the peripheral blood of infected human subjects and monkeys as well as in secondary lymphoid organs of small animals, such as guinea pigs and human CD1-transgenic mice. Nevertheless, it remains to be determined how tissues respond at the site where GMM is produced. Here we found that rhesus macaques vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guerin mounted a chemokine response in GMM-challenged skin that was favorable for recruiting T helper (Th)1 T cells. Indeed, the expression of interferon-γ, but not Th2 or Th17 cytokines, was prominent in the GMM-injected tissue. The GMM-elicited tissue response was also associated with the expression of monocyte/macrophage-attracting CC chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL4 and CCL8. Furthermore, the skin response to GMM involved the up-regulated expression of granulysin and perforin. Given that GMM is produced primarily by pathogenic mycobacteria proliferating within the host, the Th1-skewed tissue response to GMM may function efficiently at the site of infection.

  10. A Review of the Responses of Two- and Three-Dimensional Engineered Tissues to Electric Fields

    PubMed Central

    Hronik-Tupaj, Marie

    2012-01-01

    The application of external biophysical signals is one approach to tissue engineering that is explored less often than more traditional additions of exogenous biochemical and chemical factors to direct cell and tissue outcomes. The study of bioelectromagnetism and the field of electrotherapeutics have evolved over the years, and we review biocompatible electric stimulation devices and their successful application to tissue growth. Specifically, information on capacitively coupled alternating current, inductively coupled alternating current, and direct current devices is described. Cell and tissue responses from the application of these devices, including two- and three-dimensional in vitro studies and in vivo studies, are reviewed with regard to cell proliferation, adhesion, differentiation, morphology, and migration and tissue function. The current understanding of cellular mechanisms related to electric stimulation is detailed. The advantages of electric stimulation are compared with those pf other techniques, and areas in which electric fields are used as an adjuvant therapy for healing and regeneration are discussed. PMID:22046979

  11. A review of the responses of two- and three-dimensional engineered tissues to electric fields.

    PubMed

    Hronik-Tupaj, Marie; Kaplan, David L

    2012-06-01

    The application of external biophysical signals is one approach to tissue engineering that is explored less often than more traditional additions of exogenous biochemical and chemical factors to direct cell and tissue outcomes. The study of bioelectromagnetism and the field of electrotherapeutics have evolved over the years, and we review biocompatible electric stimulation devices and their successful application to tissue growth. Specifically, information on capacitively coupled alternating current, inductively coupled alternating current, and direct current devices is described. Cell and tissue responses from the application of these devices, including two- and three-dimensional in vitro studies and in vivo studies, are reviewed with regard to cell proliferation, adhesion, differentiation, morphology, and migration and tissue function. The current understanding of cellular mechanisms related to electric stimulation is detailed. The advantages of electric stimulation are compared with those pf other techniques, and areas in which electric fields are used as an adjuvant therapy for healing and regeneration are discussed.

  12. The Alpha/Beta Interferon Response Controls Tissue Tropism and Pathogenicity of Poliovirus

    PubMed Central

    Ida-Hosonuma, Miki; Iwasaki, Takuya; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Nagata, Noriyo; Sato, Yuko; Sata, Tetsutaro; Yoneyama, Mitsutoshi; Fujita, Takashi; Taya, Choji; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Koike, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Poliovirus selectively replicates in neurons in the spinal cord and brainstem, although poliovirus receptor (PVR) expression is observed in both the target and nontarget tissues in humans and transgenic mice expressing human PVR (PVR-transgenic mice). We assessed the role of alpha/beta interferon (IFN) in determining tissue tropism by comparing the pathogenesis of the virulent Mahoney strain in PVR-transgenic mice and PVR-transgenic mice deficient in the alpha/beta IFN receptor gene (PVR-transgenic/Ifnar knockout mice). PVR-transgenic/Ifnar knockout mice showed increased susceptibility to poliovirus. After intravenous inoculation, severe lesions positive for the poliovirus antigen were detected in the liver, spleen, and pancreas in addition to the central nervous system. These results suggest that the alpha/beta IFN system plays an important role in determining tissue tropism by protecting nontarget tissues that are potentially susceptible to infection. We subsequently examined the expression of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in the PVR-transgenic mice. In the nontarget tissues, ISGs were expressed even in the noninfected state, and the expression level increased soon after poliovirus infection. On the contrary, in the target tissues, ISG expression was low in the noninfected state and sufficient response after poliovirus infection was not observed. The results suggest that the unequal IFN response is one of the important determinants for the differential susceptibility of tissues to poliovirus. We consider that poliovirus replication was observed in the nontarget tissues of PVR-transgenic/Ifnar knockout mice because the IFN response was null in all tissues. PMID:15767446

  13. Chronic intracortical microelectrode arrays induce non-uniform, depth-related tissue responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolley, Andrew J.; Desai, Himanshi A.; Otto, Kevin J.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Brain-implanted microelectrode arrays show promise as future clinical devices. However, biological responses to various designs, compositions and locations of these implants have not been fully characterized, and may impact the long-term functionality of these devices. In order to improve our understanding of the tissue conditions at the interface of chronic brain-implanted microdevices, we proposed utilizing advanced histology and microscopy techniques to image implanted devices and surrounding tissue intact within brain slices. We then proposed utilizing these methods to examine whether depth within the cerebral cortex affected tissue conditions around implants. Approach. Histological data was collected from rodent brain slices containing intact, intracortical microdevices four weeks after implantation surgery. Thick tissue sections containing the chronic implants were processed with fluorescent antibody labels, and imaged in an optical clearing solution using laser confocal microscopy. Main Results. Tissue surrounding microdevices exhibited two major depth-related phenomena: a non-uniform microglial coating along the device length and a dense mass of cells surrounding the implant in cerebral cortical layers I and II. Detailed views of the monocyte-derived immune cells improve our understanding of the close and complex association that immune cells have with chronic brain implants, and illuminated a possible relationship between cortical depth and the intensity of a chronic monocyte response around penetrating microdevices. The dense mass of cells contained vimentin, a protein not typically expressed highly in CNS cells, evidence that non-CNS cells likely descended down the face of the penetrating devices from the pial surface. Significance. Image data of highly non-uniform and depth-dependent biological responses along a device provides novel insight into the complexity of the tissue response to penetrating brain-implanted microdevices. The presented

  14. Chronic Tissue Response to Untethered Microelectrode Implants in the Rat Brain and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    ERSEN, Ali; ELKABES, Stella; FREEDMAN, David S.; SAHIN, Mesut

    2015-01-01

    Objective Microelectrodes implanted in the central nervous system (CNS) often fail in long term implants due to the immunological tissue response caused by tethering forces of the connecting wires. In addition to the tethering effect, there is a mechanical stress that occurs at the device-tissue interface simply because the microelectrode is a rigid body floating in soft tissue and it cannot reshape itself to comply with changes in the surrounding tissue. In the current study we evaluated the scar tissue formation to tetherless devices with two significantly different geometries in the rat brain and spinal cord in order to investigate the effects of device geometry. Approach One of the implant geometries resembled the wireless, floating microstimulators that we are currently developing in our laboratory and the other was a (shank only) Michigan probe for comparison. Both electrodes were implanted into either the cervical spinal cord or the motor cortices, one on each side. Main Results The most pronounced astroglial and microglial reactions occurred within 20 μm from the device and decreased sharply at larger distances. Both cell types displayed the morphology of non-activated cells past the 100 μm perimeter. Even though the aspect ratios of the implants were different, the astroglial and microglial responses to both microelectrode types were very mild in the brain, stronger and yet limited in the spinal cord. Significance These observations confirm previous reports and further suggest that tethering may be responsible for most of the tissue response in chronic implants and that the electrode size has a smaller contribution with floating electrodes. The electrode size may be playing primarily an amplifying role to the tethering forces in the brain whereas the size itself may induce chronic response in the spinal cord where the movement of surrounding tissues is more significant. PMID:25605679

  15. Tissue repair response as a function of dose in thioacetamide hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Mangipudy, R S; Chanda, S; Mehendale, H M

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to establish a dose-response relationship for thioacetamide (TA), where tissue regeneration as well as liver injury were two simultaneous but opposing responses. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intraperitioneally with a 12-fold dose range of TA, and both liver injury and tissue repair were measured. Liver injury was assessed by serum enzyme elevations. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation did not show any dose response over a 12-fold dose range up to 24 hr. A dramatic ALT elevation was evident after 24 hr and only for the highest dose (600 mg/kg). Tissue regeneration response was measured by 3H-thymidine (3H-T) incorporation into hepatocellular DNA and by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) procedure during a time course (6, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 hr). Tissue regeneration, as indicated by 3H-T incorporation, peaked at 36 hr after administration of a low dose of TA (50 mg/kg). With increasing doses, a greater but delayed stimulation of cell division was observed until a threshold was reached (300 mg/kg). Above the tissue repair threshold (600 mg/kg), because stimulated tissue repair as revealed by 3H-T incorporation in hepatonuclear DNA was significantly delayed and attenuated, injury assessed by serum enzyme elevations was remarkably accelerated, indicating unrestrained progression of injury leading to animal death. These findings suggest that, in addition to the magnitude of tissue repair response, the time at which this occurs is critical in restraining the progression of injury, thereby determining the ultimate outcome of toxicity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 3. C Figure 3. D Figure 3. E Figure 3. F Figure 4. Figure 5. Figure 6. A Figure 6. B Figure 6. C Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 7. C Figure 7. D Figure 7. E Figure 7. F PMID:7768227

  16. Chronic tissue response to untethered microelectrode implants in the rat brain and spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersen, Ali; Elkabes, Stella; Freedman, David S.; Sahin, Mesut

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Microelectrodes implanted in the central nervous system (CNS) often fail in long term implants due to the immunological tissue response caused by tethering forces of the connecting wires. In addition to the tethering effect, there is a mechanical stress that occurs at the device-tissue interface simply because the microelectrode is a rigid body floating in soft tissue and it cannot reshape itself to comply with changes in the surrounding tissue. In the current study we evaluated the scar tissue formation to tetherless devices with two significantly different geometries in the rat brain and spinal cord in order to investigate the effects of device geometry. Approach. One of the implant geometries resembled the wireless, floating microstimulators that we are currently developing in our laboratory and the other was a (shank only) Michigan probe for comparison. Both electrodes were implanted into either the cervical spinal cord or the motor cortices, one on each side. Main results. The most pronounced astroglial and microglial reactions occurred within 20 μm from the device and decreased sharply at larger distances. Both cell types displayed the morphology of non-activated cells past the 100 μm perimeter. Even though the aspect ratios of the implants were different, the astroglial and microglial responses to both microelectrode types were very mild in the brain, stronger and yet limited in the spinal cord. Significance. These observations confirm previous reports and further suggest that tethering may be responsible for most of the tissue response in chronic implants and that the electrode size has a smaller contribution with floating electrodes. The electrode size may be playing primarily an amplifying role to the tethering forces in the brain whereas the size itself may induce chronic response in the spinal cord where the movement of surrounding tissues is more significant.

  17. Carcinoma cells misuse the host tissue damage response to invade the brain.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Han-Ning; van Rossum, Denise; Sieger, Dirk; Siam, Laila; Klemm, Florian; Bleckmann, Annalen; Bayerlová, Michaela; Farhat, Katja; Scheffel, Jörg; Schulz, Matthias; Dehghani, Faramarz; Stadelmann, Christine; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Binder, Claudia; Pukrop, Tobias

    2013-08-01

    The metastatic colonization of the brain by carcinoma cells is still barely understood, in particular when considering interactions with the host tissue. The colonization comes with a substantial destruction of the surrounding host tissue. This leads to activation of damage responses by resident innate immune cells to protect, repair, and organize the wound healing, but may distract from tumoricidal actions. We recently demonstrated that microglia, innate immune cells of the CNS, assist carcinoma cell invasion. Here we report that this is a fatal side effect of a physiological damage response of the brain tissue. In a brain slice coculture model, contact with both benign and malignant epithelial cells induced a response by microglia and astrocytes comparable to that seen at the interface of human cerebral metastases. While the glial damage response intended to protect the brain from intrusion of benign epithelial cells by inducing apoptosis, it proved ineffective against various malignant cell types. They did not undergo apoptosis and actually exploited the local tissue reaction to invade instead. Gene expression and functional analyses revealed that the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) and WNT signaling were involved in this process. Furthermore, CXCR4-regulated microglia were recruited to sites of brain injury in a zebrafish model and CXCR4 was expressed in human stroke patients, suggesting a conserved role in damage responses to various types of brain injuries. Together, our findings point to a detrimental misuse of the glial damage response program by carcinoma cells resistant to glia-induced apoptosis.

  18. Genetic Background Modulates lncRNA-Coordinated Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, Jonathan; Huang, Yurong; Nguyen, David H.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as key regulators of diverse cell functions and processes. However, the relevance of lncRNAs in the cell and tissue response to ionizing radiation has not yet been characterized. Here we used microarray profiling to determine lncRNA and mRNA expression in mammary glands of BALB/c and SPRET/EiJ mice after low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) exposure. We found that unirradiated mammary tissues of these strains differed significantly in baseline expressions of 290 lncRNAs. LDIR exposure (10 cGy) induced a significant change in the expression of many lncRNAs. The vast majority of lncRNAs identified to be differentially expressed aftermore » LDIR in either BALB/c or SPRET/EiJ had a significantly correlated expression pattern with at least one LDIR responsive mRNA. Functional analysis revealed that the response to LDIR in BALB/c mice is highly dynamic with enrichment for genes involved in tissue injury, inflammatory responses, and mammary gland development at 2, 4, and 8 weeks after LDIR, respectively. Our study demonstrates that genetic background strongly influences the expression of lncRNAs and their response to radiation and that lncRNAs may coordinate the tissue response to LDIR exposure via regulation of coding mRNAs.« less

  19. Early redox, Src family kinase, and calcium signaling integrate wound responses and tissue regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sa Kan; Freisinger, Christina M; LeBert, Danny C; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2012-10-15

    Tissue injury can lead to scar formation or tissue regeneration. How regenerative animals sense initial tissue injury and transform wound signals into regenerative growth is an unresolved question. Previously, we found that the Src family kinase (SFK) Lyn functions as a redox sensor in leukocytes that detects H(2)O(2) at wounds in zebrafish larvae. In this paper, using zebrafish larval tail fins as a model, we find that wounding rapidly activated SFK and calcium signaling in epithelia. The immediate SFK and calcium signaling in epithelia was important for late epimorphic regeneration of amputated fins. Wound-induced activation of SFKs in epithelia was dependent on injury-generated H(2)O(2). A SFK member, Fynb, was responsible for fin regeneration. This work provides a new link between early wound responses and late regeneration and suggests that redox, SFK, and calcium signaling are immediate "wound signals" that integrate early wound responses and late epimorphic regeneration.

  20. Monomethylarsonous Acid (MMAIII) Has an Adverse Effect on the Innate Immune Response of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Notch, Emily G.; Goodale, Britton C.; Barnaby, Roxanna; Coutermarsh, Bonita; Berwin, Brent; Taylor, Vivien F.; Jackson, Brian P.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is the number one contaminant of concern with regard to human health according to the World Health Organization. Epidemiological studies on Asian and South American populations have linked arsenic exposure with an increased incidence of lung disease, including pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, both of which are associated with bacterial infection. However, little is known about the effects of low dose arsenic exposure, or the contributions of organic arsenic to the innate immune response to bacterial infection. This study examined the effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) induced cytokine secretion by human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) by inorganic sodium arsenite (iAsIII) and two major metabolites, monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII) and dimethylarsenic acid (DMAV), at concentrations relevant to the U.S. population. Neither iAsIII nor DMAV altered P. aeruginosa induced cytokine secretion. By contrast, MMAIII increased P. aeruginosa induced secretion of IL-8, IL-6 and CXCL2. A combination of iAsIII, MMAIII and DMAV (10 pbb total) reduced IL-8 and CXCL1 secretion. These data demonstrate for the first time that exposure to MMAIII alone, and a combination of iAsIII, MMAIII and DMAV at levels relevant to the U.S. may have negative effects on the innate immune response of human bronchial epithelial cells to P. aeruginosa. PMID:26554712

  1. Novel Bioceramic Urethral Bulking Agents Elicit Improved Host Tissue Responses in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Mann-Gow, Travis K.; King, Benjamin J.; El-Ghannam, Ahmed; Knabe-Ducheyne, Christine; Kida, Masatoshi; Dall, Ole M.; Krhut, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To test the physical properties and host response to the bioceramic particles, silica-calcium phosphate (SCPC10) and Cristobalite, in a rat animal model and compare their biocompatibility to the current clinically utilized urethral bulking materials. Material and Methods. The novel bulking materials, SCPC10 and Cristobalite, were suspended in hyaluronic acid sodium salt and injected into the mid urethra of a rat. Additional animals were injected with bulking materials currently in clinical use. Physiological response was assessed using voiding trials, and host tissue response was evaluated using hard tissue histology and immunohistochemical analysis. Distant organs were evaluated for the presence of particles or their components. Results. Histological analysis of the urethral tissue five months after injection showed that both SCPC10 and Cristobalite induced a more robust fibroblastic and histiocytic reaction, promoting integration and encapsulation of the particle aggregates, leading to a larger bulking effect. Concentrations of Ca, Na, Si, and P ions in the experimental groups were comparable to control animals. Conclusions. This side-by-side examination of urethral bulking agents using a rat animal model and hard tissue histology techniques compared two newly developed bioactive ceramic particles to three of the currently used bulking agents. The local host tissue response and bulking effects of bioceramic particles were superior while also possessing a comparable safety profile. PMID:27688751

  2. Tissue responsiveness to estradiol and genistein in the sea bass liver and scale.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Patrícia I S; Estêvão, M Dulce; Andrade, André; Santos, Soraia; Power, Deborah M

    2016-04-01

    As in mammals, estrogens in fish are essential for reproduction but also important regulators of mineral homeostasis. Fish scales are a non-conventional target tissue responsive to estradiol and constitute a good model to study mineralized tissues effects and mechanisms of action of estrogenic compounds, including phytoestrogens. The responsiveness to estradiol and the phytoestrogen genistein, was compared between the scales and the liver, a classical estrogenic target, in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Injection with estradiol and genistein significantly increased circulating vitellogenin (for both compounds) and mineral levels (estradiol only) and genistein also significantly increased scale enzymatic activities suggesting it increased mineral turnover. The repertoire, abundance and estrogenic regulation of nuclear estrogen receptors (ESR1, 2a and 2b) and membrane G-protein receptors (GPER and GPER-like) were different between liver and scales, which presumably explains the tissue-specific changes detected in estrogen-responsive gene expression. In scales changes in gene expression mainly consisted of small rapid increases, while in liver strong, sustained increases/decreases in gene expression occurred. Similar but not overlapping gene expression changes were observed in response to both estradiol and genistein. This study demonstrates for the first time the expression of membrane estrogen receptors in scales and that estrogens and phytoestrogens, to which fish may be exposed in the wild or in aquaculture, both affect liver and mineralized tissues in a tissue-specific manner.

  3. Novel Bioceramic Urethral Bulking Agents Elicit Improved Host Tissue Responses in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Mann-Gow, Travis K; King, Benjamin J; El-Ghannam, Ahmed; Knabe-Ducheyne, Christine; Kida, Masatoshi; Dall, Ole M; Krhut, Jan; Zvara, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To test the physical properties and host response to the bioceramic particles, silica-calcium phosphate (SCPC10) and Cristobalite, in a rat animal model and compare their biocompatibility to the current clinically utilized urethral bulking materials. Material and Methods. The novel bulking materials, SCPC10 and Cristobalite, were suspended in hyaluronic acid sodium salt and injected into the mid urethra of a rat. Additional animals were injected with bulking materials currently in clinical use. Physiological response was assessed using voiding trials, and host tissue response was evaluated using hard tissue histology and immunohistochemical analysis. Distant organs were evaluated for the presence of particles or their components. Results. Histological analysis of the urethral tissue five months after injection showed that both SCPC10 and Cristobalite induced a more robust fibroblastic and histiocytic reaction, promoting integration and encapsulation of the particle aggregates, leading to a larger bulking effect. Concentrations of Ca, Na, Si, and P ions in the experimental groups were comparable to control animals. Conclusions. This side-by-side examination of urethral bulking agents using a rat animal model and hard tissue histology techniques compared two newly developed bioactive ceramic particles to three of the currently used bulking agents. The local host tissue response and bulking effects of bioceramic particles were superior while also possessing a comparable safety profile.

  4. Metabolic profiling of the tissue-specific responses in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis towards Vibrio harveyi challenge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Ji, Chenglong; Zhao, Jianmin; Wang, Qing; Li, Fei; Wu, Huifeng

    2014-08-01

    Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is a marine aquaculture shellfish distributing widely along the coast in north China. In this work, we studied the differential metabolic responses induced by Vibrio harveyi in digestive gland and gill tissues from M. galloprovincialis using NMR-based metabolomics. The differential metabolic responses in the two tissue types were detected, except the similarly altered taurine and betaine. These metabolic responses suggested that V. harveyi mainly induced osmotic disruption and reduced energy demand via the metabolic pathways of glucose synthesis and ATP/AMP conversion in mussel digestive gland. In mussel gill tissues, V. harveyi basically caused osmotic stress and possible reduced energy demand as shown by the elevated phosphocholine that is involved in one of the metabolic pathways of ATP synthesis from ADP and phosphocholine. The altered mRNA expression levels of related genes (superoxide dismutase with copper and zinc, heat shock protein 90, defensin and lysozyme) suggested that V. harveyi induced clear oxidative and immune stresses in both digestive gland and gill tissues. However, the mRNA expression levels of both lysozyme and defensin in digestive gland were more significantly up-regulated than those in gill from V. harveyi-challenged mussel M. galloprovincialis, meaning that the immune organ, digestive gland, was more sensitive than gill. Overall, our results indicated that V. harveyi could induce tissue-specific metabolic responses in mussel M. galloprovincialis.

  5. Influence of resveratrol release on the tissue response to mechanically adaptive cortical implants

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jessica K.; Jorfi, Mehdi; Buchanan, Kelly L.; Park, Daniel J.; Foster, E. Johan; Tyler, Dustin J.; Rowan, Stuart J.; Weder, Christoph; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    The stability and longevity of recordings obtained from intracortical microelectrodes continues to remain an area of concern for neural interfacing applications. The limited longevity of microelectrode performance has been associated with the integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) and the neuroinflammatory response to the microelectrode. Here, we report the investigation of an additive approach that targets both mechanical and chemical factors believed to contribute to chronic BBB instability and the neuroinflammatory response associated with implanted intracortical microelectrodes. The implants investigated were based on a mechanically adaptive, compliant nanocomposite (NC), which reduces the tissue response and tissue strain. This material was doped with various concentrations of the antioxidant resveratrol with the objective of local and rapid delivery. In vitro analysis of resveratrol release, antioxidant activity, and cytotoxicity suggested that a resveratrol content of 0.01% was optimal for in vivo assessment. Thus, probes made from the neat NC reference and probes containing resveratrol (NC Res) were implanted into the cortical tissue of rats for up to sixteen weeks. Histochemical analysis suggested that at three days post-implantation, neither materials nor therapeutic approaches (independently or in combination) could alter the initial wound healing response. However, at two weeks post-implantation, the NC Res implant showed a reduction in activated microglia/macrophages and improvement in neuron density at the tissue-implant interface when compared to the neat NC reference. However, sixteen weeks post-implantation, when the antioxidant was exhausted, NC Res and the neat NC reference exhibited similar tissue responses. The data show that NC Res provides short-term, short-lived benefits due to the antioxidant release, and a long-term reduction in neuroinflammation on account of is mechanical adaptive, compliant nature. Together, these results

  6. Stem cell-based microphysiological osteochondral system to model tissue response to interleukin-1β.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hang; Lozito, Thomas P; Alexander, Peter G; Gottardi, Riccardo; Tuan, Rocky S

    2014-07-07

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative disease of the articular joint that involves both bone and cartilage degenerative changes. An engineered osteochondral tissue within physiological conditions will be of significant utility in understanding the pathogenesis of OA and testing the efficacy of potential disease-modifying OA drugs (DMOADs). In this study, a multichamber bioreactor was fabricated and fitted into a microfluidic base. When the osteochondral construct is inserted, two chambers are formed on either side of the construct (top, chondral; bottom, osseous) that is supplied by different medium streams. These medium conduits are critical to create tissue-specific microenvironments in which chondral and osseous tissues will develop and mature. Human bone marrow stem cell (hBMSCs)-derived constructs were fabricated in situ and cultured within the bioreactor and induced to undergo spatially defined chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation for 4 weeks in tissue-specific media. We observed tissue specific gene expression and matrix production as well as a basophilic interface suggesting a developing tidemark. Introduction of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) to either the chondral or osseous medium stream induced stronger degradative responses locally as well as in the opposing tissue type. For example, IL-1β treatment of the osseous compartment resulted in a strong catabolic response in the chondral layer as indicated by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity, and tissue-specific gene expression. This induction was greater than that seen with IL-1β application to the chondral component directly, indicative of active biochemical communication between the two tissue layers and supporting the osteochondral nature of OA. The microtissue culture system developed here offers novel capabilities for investigating the physiology of osteochondral tissue and pathogenic mechanisms of OA and serving as a high-throughput platform to test potential

  7. Controlled release strategies for modulating immune responses to promote tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Courtney M; Park, Jonghyuck; Shea, Lonnie D

    2015-12-10

    Advances in the field of tissue engineering have enhanced the potential of regenerative medicine, yet the efficacy of these strategies remains incomplete, and is limited by the innate and adaptive immune responses. The immune response associated with injury or disease combined with that mounted to biomaterials, transplanted cells, proteins, and gene therapies vectors can contribute to the inability to fully restore tissue function. Blocking immune responses such as with anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive agents are either ineffective, as the immune response contributes significantly to regeneration, or have significant side effects. This review describes targeted strategies to modulate the immune response in order to limit tissue damage following injury, promote an anti-inflammatory environment that leads to regeneration, and induce antigen (Ag)-specific tolerance that can target degenerative diseases that destroy tissues and promote engraftment of transplanted cells. Focusing on targeted immuno-modulation, we describe local delivery techniques to sites of inflammation as well as systemic approaches that preferentially target subsets of immune populations.

  8. Stress response of bovine artery and rat brain tissue due to combined translational shear and fixed unconfined compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Lauren

    During trauma resulting from impacts and blast waves, sinusoidal waves permeate the brain and cranial arterial tissue, both non-homogeneous biological tissues with high fluid contents. The experimental shear stress response to sinusoidal translational shear deformation at 1 Hz and 25% strain amplitude and either 0% or 33% compression is compared for rat brain tissue and bovine aortic tissue. Both tissues exhibit Mullins effect in shear. Harmonic wavelet decomposition, a novel application to the mechanical response of these tissues, shows significant 1 Hz and 3 Hz components. The 3 Hz component magnitude in brain tissue, which is much larger than in aortic tissue, may correlate to interstitial fluid induced drag forces that decrease on subsequent cycles perhaps because of damage resulting in easier fluid movement. The fluid may cause the quasiperiodic, viscoelastic behavior of brain tissue. The mechanical response differences under impact may cause shear damage between arterial and brain connections.

  9. Response functions for computing absorbed dose to skeletal tissues from photon irradiation.

    PubMed

    Eckerman, K F; Bolch, W E; Zankl, M; Petoussi-Henss, N

    2007-01-01

    The calculation of absorbed dose in skeletal tissues at radiogenic risk has been a difficult problem because the relevant structures cannot be represented in conventional geometric terms nor can they be visualised in the tomographic image data used to define the computational models of the human body. The active marrow, the tissue of concern in leukaemia induction, is present within the spongiosa regions of trabecular bone, whereas the osteoprogenitor cells at risk for bone cancer induction are considered to be within the soft tissues adjacent to the mineral surfaces. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommends averaging the absorbed energy over the active marrow within the spongiosa and over the soft tissues within 10 microm of the mineral surface for leukaemia and bone cancer induction, respectively. In its forthcoming recommendation, it is expected that the latter guidance will be changed to include soft tissues within 50 microm of the mineral surfaces. To address the computational problems, the skeleton of the proposed ICRP reference computational phantom has been subdivided to identify those voxels associated with cortical shell, spongiosa and the medullary cavity of the long bones. It is further proposed that the Monte Carlo calculations with these phantoms compute the energy deposition in the skeletal target tissues as the product of the particle fluence in the skeletal subdivisions and applicable fluence-to-dose-response functions. This paper outlines the development of such response functions for photons.

  10. The Tissue Implant Response Surrounding Subcutaneous TCP, HA, And ALCAP Bioceramics.

    PubMed

    Butler, K R; Benghuzzi, Hamed; Tucci, Michelle; Puckett, A D

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to quantify and further elucidate the tissue-implant response in the fibrous tissue surrounding tricalcium phosphate (TCP), hydroxyapatite (HA), and aluminum calcium phosphate (ALCAP) implants when implanted subcutaneously. Sixteen animals in four experimental groups (n = 4/group) were implanted with one implant each: Group I (control, TCP), Group II (HA), and Group III (ALCAP). At 90 days post-implantation, the fibrous tissue surrounding the implants was harvested. Sections of stained fibrous tissue were evaluated for the presence of macrophages, fibrocytes, neutrophils, vascularity and thickness for all three groups using semi-automated quantitative methods. The analysis indicated Group III demonstrated a significantly higher number of neutrophils but fewer macrophages and blood vessels per high power field and had a substantially thinner fibrous tissue capsule thickness compared to Groups I and II (alpha=0.05). Group II elicited a greater response of fibroblasts compared to Groups I and III suggesting HA may provide a slightly higher degree of stability to the implant. In total, these findings suggest both TCP and HA behave similarly in vivo when compared to ALCAP and may be better choices for subcutaneous soft-tissue application compared to ALCAP.

  11. Multi-responsive hydrogels for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, Jennifer M.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-responsive hydrogels, or ‘intelligent’ hydrogels that respond to more than one environmental stimulus, have demonstrated great utility as a regenerative biomaterial in recent years. They are structured biocompatible materials that provide specific and distinct responses to varied physiological or externally applied stimuli. As evidenced by a burgeoning number of investigators, multi-responsive hydrogels are endowed with tunable, controllable and even biomimetic behavior well-suited for drug delivery and tissue engineering or regenerative growth applications. This article encompasses recent developments and challenges regarding supramolecular, layer-by-layer assembled and covalently cross-linked multi-responsive hydrogel networks and their application to drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:26816625

  12. Sympathetic denervation impairs responses of brown adipose tissue to VMH stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Minokoshi, Y.; Saito, M.; Shimazu, T.

    1986-11-01

    Effects of unilateral surgical denervation of the interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) on its thermogenic and lipogenic responses to electrical stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) nucleus were studied in anesthetized rats. The rapid rise in IBAT temperature in response to VMH stimulation was greatly suppressed in the denervated IBAT, whereas the temperature response was not impaired in the contralateral innervated IBAT in the same animals. Similarly, the increased rates of conversion of (/sup 14/C) glucose and (/sup 3/H)H/sub 2/O to fatty acids and glyceride glycerol in vivo in IBAT after VMH stimulation were almost completely inhibited by sympathetic denervation. These results indicate clearly that the increases in lipogenic and thermogenic activities in IBAT in response to VMH stimulation are mediated by the sympathetic nerve supply of this tissue.

  13. Caffeine intake during pregnancy and adverse birth outcomes: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Darren C; Thatcher, Natalie J; Ye, Jin; Garrard, Lucy; Keogh, Georgina; King, Laura G; Cade, Janet E

    2014-10-01

    Caffeine is commonly consumed during pregnancy, crosses the placenta, with fetal serum concentrations similar to the mother's, but studies of birth outcome show conflicting findings. We systematically searched Medline and Embase for relevant publications. We conducted meta-analysis of dose-response curves for associations between caffeine intake and spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, preterm delivery, low birth weight and small for gestational age (SGA) infants. Meta-analyses included 60 unique publications from 53 cohort and case-control studies. An increment of 100 g caffeine was associated with a 14 % (95 % CI 10-19 %) increase in risk of spontaneous abortion, 19 % (5-35 %) stillbirth, 2 % (-2 to 6 %) preterm delivery, 7 % (1-12 %) low birth weight, and 10 % (95 % CI 6-14 %) SGA. There was substantial heterogeneity in all models, partly explained by adjustment for smoking and previous obstetric history, but not by prospective assessment of caffeine intake. There was evidence of small-study effects such as publication bias. Greater caffeine intake is associated with an increase in spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, low birth weight, and SGA, but not preterm delivery. There is no identifiable threshold below which the associations are not apparent, but the size of the associations are generally modest within the range of usual intake and are potentially explained by bias in study design or publication. There is therefore insufficient evidence to support further reductions in the maximum recommended intake of caffeine, but maintenance of current recommendations is a wise precaution.

  14. Dose convolution filter: Incorporating spatial dose information into tissue response modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yimei; Joiner, Michael; Zhao Bo; Liao Yixiang; Burmeister, Jay

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: A model is introduced to integrate biological factors such as cell migration and bystander effects into physical dose distributions, and to incorporate spatial dose information in plan analysis and optimization. Methods: The model consists of a dose convolution filter (DCF) with single parameter {sigma}. Tissue response is calculated by an existing NTCP model with DCF-applied dose distribution as input. The authors determined {sigma} of rat spinal cord from published data. The authors also simulated the GRID technique, in which an open field is collimated into many pencil beams. Results: After applying the DCF, the NTCP model successfully fits the rat spinal cord data with a predicted value of {sigma}=2.6{+-}0.5 mm, consistent with 2 mm migration distances of remyelinating cells. Moreover, it enables the appropriate prediction of a high relative seriality for spinal cord. The model also predicts the sparing of normal tissues by the GRID technique when the size of each pencil beam becomes comparable to {sigma}. Conclusions: The DCF model incorporates spatial dose information and offers an improved way to estimate tissue response from complex radiotherapy dose distributions. It does not alter the prediction of tissue response in large homogenous fields, but successfully predicts increased tissue tolerance in small or highly nonuniform fields.

  15. Teratogen-mediated inhibition of target tissue response to Shh signaling.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M K; Porter, J A; Young, K E; Beachy, P A

    1998-06-05

    Veratrum alkaloids and distal inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis have been studied for more than 30 years as potent teratogens capable of inducing cyclopia and other birth defects. Here, it is shown that these compounds specifically block the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway. These teratogens did not prevent the sterol modification of Shh during autoprocessing but rather inhibited the response of target tissues to Shh, possibly acting through the sterol sensing domain within the Patched protein regulator of Shh response.

  16. An isothermal flowmeter with improved frequency response for measuring tissue blood flow.

    PubMed

    Olshausen, K; Gross, R; Kirchheim, H

    1976-11-30

    An isothermal flowmeter with improved frequency response for measuring tissue blood flow was developed using thermistors. Direct heating of the thermistors allows a simple construction of small (0.5 mm outer diameter) capillary probes which do not require any additional heating coil. The changes of a feedback current necessary to keep the thermistor at a constant increment above tissue temperature indicate tissue blood flow; a second thermistor compensates variations of tissue temperature. The dynamic performance of the device shows a low-pass characteristic with a cut-off frequency higher than 5 Hz. For low flow rates the output signal was found to be proportional to the flow; for higher flow rates a linearization was necessary. Since tissue temperature can be recorded continuously, intermittent quantitative in-vivo calibration seems possibly by evaluation of "heater off" curves in the perfused and non-perfused tissue. As the flowmeter is insensitive to tissue temperature, it can be used for long-term recordings.

  17. Effects of steroids and lubricants on electrical impedance and tissue response following cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Christie Qi; Tykocinski, Michael; Stathopoulos, Dimitra; Cowan, Robert

    2007-09-01

    The present study examined the effects of steroids and lubricants on electrical impedance and tissue response following cochlear implantation in animal models. Guinea pigs were implanted following either no treatment, or intrascalar injection with dexamethasone, triamcinolone, sodium hyaluronate or saline. Cats were implanted following either no treatment, or intrascalar injection with dexamethasone, triamcinolone or a mixture of triamcinolone with sodium hyaluronate. In guinea pigs, impedance changes and intracochlear tissue response were less for the hyaluronate and saline groups. In cats, impedance in the dexamethasone group increased similar to non-treated cats. Impedance of triamcinolone treated cats remained low for about two months after implantation, before increasing to levels similar to the other groups. Significant fibrous tissue growth was observed histologically. The results of the present study indicate that a single intracochlear application of hyaluronate or triamcinolone may postpone, but will ultimately not prevent the rise in impedance following cochlear implantation.

  18. Response of plant nutrient stoichiometry to fertilization varied with plant tissues in a tropical forest

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Qifeng; Zou, Bi; Li, Yingwen; Chen, Yao; Zhang, Weixin; Mao, Rong; Ding, Yongzhen; Wang, Jun; Lu, Xiankai; Li, Xiaobo; Tang, Jianwu; Li, Zhian; Wang, Faming

    2015-01-01

    Plant N:P ratios are widely used as indices of nutrient limitation in terrestrial ecosystems, but the response of these metrics in different plant tissues to altered N and P availability and their interactions remains largely unclear. We evaluated changes in N and P concentrations, N:P ratios of new leaves (<1 yr), older leaves (>1 yr), stems and mixed fine roots of seven species after 3-years of an N and P addition experiment in a tropical forest. Nitrogen addition only increased fine root N concentrations. P addition increased P concentrations among all tissues. The N × P interaction reduced leaf and stem P concentrations, suggesting a negative effect of N addition on P concentrations under P addition. The reliability of using nutrient ratios as indices of soil nutrient availability varied with tissues: the stoichiometric metrics of stems and older leaves were more responsive indicators of changed soil nutrient availability than those of new leaves and fine roots. However, leaf N:P ratios can be a useful indicator of inter-specific variation in plant response to nutrients availability. This study suggests that older leaf is a better choice than other tissues in the assessment of soil nutrient status and predicting plant response to altered nutrients using nutrients ratios. PMID:26416169

  19. Thermodynamic response of soft biological tissues to pulsed infrared-laser irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, V; Nishioka, N S; Mikić, B B

    1996-01-01

    The physical mechanisms that achieve tissue removal through the delivery of short pulses of high-intensity infrared laser radiation, in a process known as laser ablation, remain obscure. The thermodynamic response of biological tissue to pulsed infrared laser irradiation was investigated by measuring and analyzing the stress transients generated by Q-sw Er:YSGG (lambda = 2.79 microns) and TEA CO2 (lambda = 10.6 microns) laser irradiation of porcine dermis using thin-film piezoelectric transducers. For radiant exposures that do not produce material removal, the stress transients are consistent with thermal expansion of the tissue samples. The temporal structure of the stress transients generated at the threshold radiant exposure for ablation indicates that the onset of material removal is delayed with respect to irradiation. Once material removal is achieved, the magnitude of the peak compressive stress and its variation with radiant exposure are consistent with a model that considers this process as an explosive event occurring after the laser pulse. This mechanism is different from ArF- and KrF-excimer laser ablation where absorption of ultraviolet radiation by the collagenous tissue matrix leads to tissue decomposition during irradiation and results in material removal via rapid surface vaporization. It appears that under the conditions examined in this study, explosive boiling of tissue water is the process that mediates the ablation event. This study provides evidence that the dynamics and mechanism of tissue ablation processes can be altered by targeting tissue water rather than the tissue structural matrix. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:8744336

  20. Spectral and fluorescence imaging of immune system and tissue response to an immunogenic agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Se-woon; Acharya, Abhinav; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2009-05-01

    Imaging of immune system and tissue response to immunogenic agents can be important to the development of new biomaterials. Additionally, quantitative functional imaging can be useful for testing and evaluation of methods to alter or control the immune system response to implanted materials. In this preliminary study, we employ spectral imaging and fluorescence imaging to measure immune system and tissue response to implanted immunogenic agents. Poly (D,L lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) with a 50:50 composition was used to create immunogenic microparticles (MPs). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) encapsulated in the MPs was used to provoke a tissue immune response in mice and encapsulated fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was used to fluorescently label the MPs for imaging. Control MPs did not contain LPS. The MPs were delivered at 50 particles/μL in a total volume of 20μL by subcutaneous injection in the skin of a nude mouse in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber preparation. Cultured immune cells from a mouse leukemic monocyte macrophage cell line were exogenously labeled with the fluorescent dye DiD in solution at a concentration of 8000cells/μL. Immediately after window chamber surgery and implantation of the MPs, 100μL of the fluorescent macrophage solution was administered via the tail vein. Fluorescence imaging was used to track MPs and macrophages while spectral imaging was used for imaging and measurement of hemoglobin saturation in the tissue microvasculature. Imaging was performed periodically over about three days. The spectral and fluorescence imaging combination enabled detailed observations of the macrophage response and functional effects on the tissue.

  1. Linking the response of endocrine regulated genes to adverse effects on sex differentiation improves comprehension of aromatase inhibition in a Fish Sexual Development Test.

    PubMed

    Muth-Köhne, Elke; Westphal-Settele, Kathi; Brückner, Jasmin; Konradi, Sabine; Schiller, Viktoria; Schäfers, Christoph; Teigeler, Matthias; Fenske, Martina

    2016-07-01

    The Fish Sexual Development Test (FSDT) is a non-reproductive test to assess adverse effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals. With the present study it was intended to evaluate whether gene expression endpoints would serve as predictive markers of endocrine disruption in a FSDT. For proof-of-concept, a FSDT according to the OECD TG 234 was conducted with the non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor fadrozole (test concentrations: 10μg/L, 32μg/L, 100μg/L) using zebrafish (Danio rerio). Gene expression analyses using quantitative RT-PCR were included at 48h, 96h, 28days and 63days post fertilization (hpf, dpf). The selection of genes aimed at finding molecular endpoints which could be directly linked to the adverse apical effects of aromatase inhibition. The most prominent effects of fadrozole exposure on the sexual development of zebrafish were a complete sex ratio shift towards males and an acceleration of gonad maturation already at low fadrozole concentrations (10μg/L). Due to the specific inhibition of the aromatase enzyme (Cyp19) by fadrozole and thus, the conversion of C19-androgens to C18-estrogens, the steroid hormone balance controlling the sex ratio of zebrafish was altered. The resulting key event is the regulation of directly estrogen-responsive genes. Subsequently, gene expression of vitellogenin 1 (vtg1) and of the aromatase cyp19a1b isoform (cyp19a1b), were down-regulated upon fadrozole treatment compared to controls. For example, mRNA levels of vtg1 were down-regulated compared to the controls as early as 48 hpf and 96 hpf. Further regulated genes cumulated in pathways suggested to be controlled by endocrine mechanisms, like the steroid and terpenoid synthesis pathway (e.g. mevalonate (diphospho) decarboxylase (mvd), lanosterol synthase (2,3-oxidosqualene-lanosterol cyclase; lss), methylsterol monooxygenase 1 (sc4mol)) and in lipid transport/metabolic processes (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (star), apolipoprotein Eb (apoEb)). Taken together

  2. Characterization of feline TRIM genes: molecular cloning, expression in tissues, and response to type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Koba, Ryota; Kokaji, Chika; Fujisaki, Gentoku; Oguma, Keisuke; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2013-05-15

    Members of the tripartite motif (TRIM) protein family in mammals are responsible for various cellular processes. Previous studies have revealed that several TRIM proteins were induced by interferons (IFN) and that these proteins were involved in innate immune response against retroviral infection. Although retroviral infection is prevalent in domestic cats, the expression profiles and roles of feline TRIM genes against these viral infections are not well understood. In the present study, we examined tissue expression and IFN inducibility of nine feline TRIM genes. In addition, the complete coding sequences of six cloned TRIM genes were determined, and their structures were analyzed. Nine TRIM genes were expressed in feline tissues and five were up-regulated by type I IFN. The predicted amino acid sequence of six feline TRIM proteins showed high sequence similarities to other mammalian TRIM proteins, and suggest that feline TRIM genes are potentially involved in antiviral reactivity in IFN-mediated immune response.

  3. Tissue healing response following hyperthermic vapor ablation in the porcine longissimus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grantham, John T.; Grisez, Brian T.; Famoso, Justin; Hoey, Michael; Dixon, Chris; Coad, James E.

    2015-03-01

    As the use of hyperthermic ablation technologies has increased, so too has the need to understand their effects on tissue and their healing responses. This study was designed to characterize tissue injury and healing following hyperthermic vapor ablation in the in vivo porcine longissimus muscle model. The individual ablations were performed using the NxThera Vapor Delivery System (NxThera Inc., Minneapolis, MN). To assess the vapor ablation's evolution, the swine were euthanized post-treatment on Day 0, Day 3, Day 7, Day 14, Day 28, Day 45 and Day 90. Triphenyltetrazolium chloride viability staining (TTC staining) was used to macroscopically assess the extent of each vapor ablation within the tissue. The ablation associated healing responses were then histologically evaluated for acute inflammation, chronic inflammation, foreign body reaction and fibrosis. Two zones of tissue injury were initially identified in the ablations: 1) a central zone of complete coagulative necrosis and 2) an outer "transition zone" of viable and non-viable cells. The ablations initially increased in size from Day 0 to Day 7 and then progressively decreased in size though Day 45. The initial Day 3 healing changes originated in the transition zone with minimal acute and chronic inflammation. As time progressed, granulation tissue began to form by Day 7 and peaked around Day 14. Collagen formation, deposition and remodeling began in the adjacent healthy tissue by Day 28, replaced the ablation site by Day 45 and reorganized by Day 90. In conclusion, this vapor ablation technology provided a non-desiccating form of hyperthermic ablation that resulted in coagulative necrosis without a central thermally/heat-fixed tissue component, followed a classical wound healing pathway, and healed with minimal associated inflammation.

  4. Numerical investigation of thermal response of laser-irradiated biological tissue phantoms embedded with gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, Akshay; Kumar, Sumit; Srivastava, Atul

    2016-10-01

    The work presented in this paper focuses on numerically investigating the thermal response of gold nanoshells-embedded biological tissue phantoms with potential applications into photo-thermal therapy wherein the interest is in destroying the cancerous cells with minimum damage to the surrounding healthy cells. The tissue phantom has been irradiated with a pico-second laser. Radiative transfer equation (RTE) has been employed to model the light-tissue interaction using discrete ordinate method (DOM). For determining the temperature distribution inside the tissue phantom, the RTE has been solved in combination with a generalized non-Fourier heat conduction model namely the dual phase lag bio-heat transfer model. The numerical code comprising the coupled RTE-bio-heat transfer equation, developed as a part of the current work, has been benchmarked against the experimental as well as the numerical results available in the literature. It has been demonstrated that the temperature of the optical inhomogeneity inside the biological tissue phantom embedded with gold nanoshells is relatively higher than that of the baseline case (no nanoshells) for the same laser power and operation time. The study clearly underlines the impact of nanoshell concentration and its size on the thermal response of the biological tissue sample. The comparative study concerned with the size and concentration of nanoshells showed that 60nm nanoshells with concentration of 5×10(15)mm(-3) result into the temperature levels that are optimum for the irreversible destruction of cancer infected cells in the context of photo-thermal therapy. To the best of the knowledge of the authors, the present study is one of the first attempts to quantify the influence of gold nanoshells on the temperature distributions inside the biological tissue phantoms upon laser irradiation using the dual phase lag heat conduction model.

  5. Early tissue response to citric acid-based micro- and nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eun Ji; Qiu, Hongjin; Kodali, Pradeep; Yang, Scott; Sprague, Stuart M.; Hwong, James; Koh, Jason; Ameer, Guillermo A.

    2010-01-01

    Composites based on calcium phosphates and biodegradable polymers are desirable for orthopaedic applications due to their potential to mimic bone. Herein, we describe the fabrication, characterization, and in vivo response of novel citric acid-based microcomposites and nanocomposites. Poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) (POC) was mixed with increasing amounts of HA nanoparticles or microparticles (up to 60 wt%), and the morphology and mechanical properties of the resulting composites were assessed. To investigate tissue response, nanocomposites, microcomposites, POC, and poly(L-lactide) (PLL) were implanted in osteochondral defects in rabbits and harvested at 6 weeks for histological evaluation. SEM confirmed increased surface roughness of microcomposites relative to nanocomposites. The mechanical properties of both types of composites increased with increasing amounts of HA (8–328 MPa), although nanocomposites with 60 wt.% HA displayed the highest strength and stiffness. Based on tissue-implant interfacial assessments, all implants integrated well with the surrounding bone and cartilage with no evidence of inflammation. Both nanocomposites and microcomposites supported bone remodeling; however, nanocomposites induced more trabecular bone formation at the tissue-implant interface. The mechanical properties of citric acid-based composites are within the range of human trabecular bone (1–1524 MPa, 211±78 MPa mean modulus) and tissue response was dependent on the size and content of HA, providing new perspectives of design and fabrication criteria for orthopaedic devices such as interference screws and fixation pins. PMID:20949482

  6. Digital Image Analysis for Morphometric Evaluation of Tissue Response after Implanting Alloplastic Vascular Prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zippel, Roland; Hoene, Andreas; Walschus, Uwe; Jarchow, Raymond; Ueberrueck, Torsten; Patrzyk, Maciej; Schlosser, Michael; Wilhelm, Lutz

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the suitability of digital image analysis, using the KS400 software system, for the morphometric evaluation of the tissue response after prosthesis implantation in an animal model. Twenty-four female pigs aged 10 weeks were implanted with infrarenal Dacron® prostheses for 14, 21, 28, and 116 days. Following the explantation and investigation of the neointima region, the expression of beta-1-integrin, the proliferation rate by means of Ki-67 positive cells, and the intima thickness were evaluated as exemplary parameters of the tissue response after implantation. Frozen tissue sections were immunohistochemically stained and subsequently examined using computer-aided image analysis. A maximum expression of 32.9% was observed for beta-1-integrin 14 days after implantation, gradually declining over time to 9.8% after 116 days. The proliferation rate was found to be 19% on day 14, increasing to 39% on day 21 with a subsequent gradual decline to 5% after 116 days. The intima thickness increased from 189.9 [mu]m on day 14 to 1228.0 [mu]m on day 116. In conclusion, digital image analysis was found to be an efficient and reproducible method for the morphometric evaluation of a peri-prosthetic tissue response.

  7. Associations between inflammatory and immune response genes and adverse respiratory outcomes following exposure to outdoor air pollution: a HuGE systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vawda, Seema; Mansour, Rafif; Takeda, Andrea; Funnell, Paula; Kerry, Sally; Mudway, Ian; Jamaludin, Jeenath; Shaheen, Seif; Griffiths, Chris; Walton, Robert

    2014-02-15

    Variants of inflammatory and immune response genes have been associated with adverse respiratory outcomes following exposure to air pollution. However, the genes involved and their associations are not well characterized, and there has been no systematic review. Thus, we conducted a review following the guidelines of the Human Genome Epidemiology Network. Six observational studies and 2 intervention studies with 14,903 participants were included (2001-2010). Six studies showed at least 1 significant gene-pollutant interaction. Meta-analysis was not possible due to variations in genes, pollutants, exposure estimates, and reported outcomes. The most commonly studied genes were tumor necrosis factor α (TNFA) (n = 6) and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) (n = 3). TNFA -308G>A modified the action of ozone and nitrogen dioxide on lung function, asthma risk, and symptoms; however, the direction of association varied between studies. The TLR4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs1927911, rs10759931, and rs6478317 modified the association of particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide with asthma. The transforming growth factor β1 (TGFB1) polymorphism -509C>T also modified the association of pollutants with asthma. This review indicates that genes controlling innate immune recognition of foreign material (TLR4) and the subsequent inflammatory response (TGFB1, TLR4) modify the associations of exposure to air pollution with respiratory function. The associations observed have biological plausibility; however, larger studies with improved reporting are needed to confirm these findings.

  8. Telemedicine to Promote Patient Safety: Use of Phone-Based Interactive Voice-Response System to Reduce Adverse Safety Events in Pre-dialysis CKD.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Shoshana; Fink, Jeffery C

    2017-01-01

    CKD patients have several features conferring on them a high risk of adverse safety events, which are defined as incidents with unintended harm related to processes of care or medications. These characteristics include impaired kidney function, polypharmacy, and frequent health system encounters. The consequences of such events in CKD can include new or prolonged hospitalization, accelerated kidney function loss, acute kidney injury, ESRD, and death. Health information technology administered via telemedicine presents opportunities for CKD patients to remotely communicate safety-related findings to providers for the purpose of improving their care. However, many CKD patients have limitations that hinder their use of telemedicine and access to the broad capabilities of health information technology. In this review, we summarize previous assessments of the pre-dialysis CKD populations' proficiency in using telemedicine modalities and describe the use of interactive voice-response system to gauge the safety phenotype of the CKD patient. We discuss the potential for expanded interactive voice-response system use in CKD to address the safety threats inherent to this population.

  9. Tissue Specificity of the Heat-Shock Response in Maize 1

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Pam; Ho, Tuan-Hua David; Hauptmann, Randal M.

    1984-01-01

    The tissue specificity of the heat-shock response in maize was investigated. The ability to synthesize heat shock proteins (hsp) at 40°C, as well as the intensity and duration of that synthesis, was analyzed in coleoptiles, scutella, green and etiolated leaves, suspension-cultured cells, germinating pollen grains, and primary root sections at different stages of development. One-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of extracted proteins revealed that most of the tissues synthesized the typical set of 10 hsp, but that the exact characteristics of the response depended upon the tissue type. While elongating portions of the primary root exhibited a strong heat shock response, the more mature portions showed a reduced ability to synthesize hsp. Leaves, whether green or etiolated, excised or intact, constitutively synthesized a low level of hsp at 25°C, and high levels could be induced at 40°C. Suspension-cultures of Black Mexican sweet corn synthesized, besides the typical set of hsp, two additional polypeptides. In contrast to all the other tissues, germinating pollen grains could not be induced to synthesize the typical set of hsp but did synthesize two new polypeptides of 92 and 56 kD molecular weight. The heat shock response was transient for most of the tissues which synthesized the standard set of hsp. Hsp synthesis was detected up to 2 to 3 hours, but not at 10 hours of continuous 40°C treatment. The exception was suspension cultured cells, in which hsp synthesis showed only a slight reduction after 10 hours at 40°C. Tissue-specific differences in the heat-shock response suggest that there are differences in the way a given tissue is able to adapt to high temperature. We have confirmed the previous suggestion that maize hsp do not accumulate in substantial quantities. Using two-dimensional gel analysis, hsp could be detected by autoradiography but not by sensitive silver staining techniques. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6

  10. The B-3 Ethylene Response Factor MtERF1-1 Mediates Resistance to a Subset of Root Pathogens in Medicago truncatula without Adversely Affecting Symbiosis with Rhizobia1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jonathan P.; Lichtenzveig, Judith; Gleason, Cynthia; Oliver, Richard P.; Singh, Karam B.

    2010-01-01

    The fungal necrotrophic pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is a significant constraint to a range of crops as diverse as cereals, canola, and legumes. Despite wide-ranging germplasm screens in many of these crops, no strong genetic resistance has been identified, suggesting that alternative strategies to improve resistance are required. In this study, we characterize moderate resistance to R. solani anastomosis group 8 identified in Medicago truncatula. The activity of the ethylene- and jasmonate-responsive GCC box promoter element was associated with moderate resistance, as was the induction of the B-3 subgroup of ethylene response transcription factors (ERFs). Genes of the B-1 subgroup showed no significant response to R. solani infection. Overexpression of a B-3 ERF, MtERF1-1, in Medicago roots increased resistance to R. solani as well as an oomycete root pathogen, Phytophthora medicaginis, but not root knot nematode. These results indicate that targeting specific regulators of ethylene defense may enhance resistance to an important subset of root pathogens. We also demonstrate that overexpression of MtERF1-1 enhances disease resistance without apparent impact on nodulation in the A17 background, while overexpression in sickle reduced the hypernodulation phenotype. This suggests that under normal regulation of nodulation, enhanced resistance to root diseases can be uncoupled from symbiotic plant-microbe interactions in the same tissue and that ethylene/ERF regulation of nodule number is distinct from the defenses regulated by B-3 ERFs. Furthermore, unlike the stunted phenotype previously described for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ubiquitously overexpressing B-3 ERFs, overexpression of MtERF1-1 in M. truncatula roots did not show adverse effects on plant development. PMID:20713618

  11. Comparative tissue transcriptomics reveal prompt inter-organ communication in response to local bacterial kidney infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mucosal infections elicit inflammatory responses via regulated signaling pathways. Infection outcome depends strongly on early events occurring immediately when bacteria start interacting with cells in the mucosal membrane. Hitherto reported transcription profiles on host-pathogen interactions are strongly biased towards in vitro studies. To detail the local in vivo genetic response to infection, we here profiled host gene expression in a recent experimental model that assures high spatial and temporal control of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) infection within the kidney of a live rat. Results Transcriptional profiling of tissue biopsies from UPEC-infected kidney tissue revealed 59 differentially expressed genes 8 h post-infection. Their relevance for the infection process was supported by a Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. Early differential expression at 3 h and 5 h post-infection was of low statistical significance, which correlated to the low degree of infection. Comparative transcriptomics analysis of the 8 h data set and online available studies of early local infection and inflammation defined a core of 80 genes constituting a "General tissue response to early local bacterial infections". Among these, 25% were annotated as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) regulated. Subsequent experimental analyses confirmed a systemic increase of IFN-γ in rats with an ongoing local kidney infection, correlating to splenic, rather than renal Ifng induction and suggested this inter-organ communication to be mediated by interleukin (IL)-23. The use of comparative transcriptomics allowed expansion of the statistical data handling, whereby relevant data could also be extracted from the 5 h data set. Out of the 31 differentially expressed core genes, some represented specific 5 h responses, illustrating the value of comparative transcriptomics when studying the dynamic nature of gene regulation in response to infections. Conclusion Our hypothesis-free approach identified

  12. Examining the role of nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoreticular tissue (NALT) in mouse responses to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Cisney, Emily D; Fernandez, Stefan; Hall, Shannan I; Krietz, Gale A; Ulrich, Robert G

    2012-08-01

    The nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoreticular tissues (NALT) found in humans, rodents, and other mammals, contribute to immunity in the nasal sinuses(1-3). The NALT are two parallel bell-shaped structures located in the nasal passages above the hard palate, and are usually considered to be secondary components of the mucosal-associated lymphoid system(4-6). Located within the NALT are discrete compartments of B and T lymphocytes interspersed with antigen-presenting dendritic cells(4,7,8). These cells are surrounded by an epithelial cell layer intercalated with M-cells that are responsible for antigen retrieval from the mucosal surfaces of the air passages(9,10). Naive lymphocytes circulating through the NALT are poised to respond to first encounters with respiratory pathogens(7). While NALT disappear in humans by the age of two years, the Waldeyer's Ring and similarly structured lymphatic organs continue to persist throughout life(6). In contrast to humans, mice retain NALT throughout life, thus providing a convenient animal model for the study of immune responses originating within the nasal sinuses(11). Cultures of single-cell suspensions of NALT are not practical due to low yields of mononuclear cells. However, NALT biology can be examined by ex vivo culturing of the intact organ, and this method has the additional advantage of maintaining the natural tissue structure. For in vivo studies, genetic knockout models presenting defects limited to NALT are not currently available due to a poor understanding of the developmental pathway. For example, while lymphotoxin-α knockout mice have atrophied NALT, the Peyer's patches, peripheral lymph nodes, follicular dendritic cells and other lymphoid tissues are also altered in these genetically manipulated mice(12,13). As an alternative to gene knockout mice, surgical ablation permanently eliminates NALT from the nasal passage without affecting other tissues. The resulting mouse model has been used to establish

  13. Methods of Assessing Human Tendon Metabolism and Tissue Properties in Response to Changes in Mechanical Loading.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, S Peter

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a number of methodological developments have improved the opportunities to study human tendon. Microdialysis enables sampling of interstitial fluid in the peritendon tissue, while sampling of human tendon biopsies allows direct analysis of tendon tissue for gene- and protein expression as well as protein synthesis rate. Further the (14)C bomb-pulse method has provided data on long-term tissue turnover in human tendon. Non-invasive techniques allow measurement of tendon metabolism (positron emission tomography (PET)), tendon morphology (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)), and tendon mechanical properties (ultrasonography combined with force measurement during movement). Finally, 3D cell cultures of human tendon cells provide the opportunity to investigate cell-matrix interactions in response to various interventions.

  14. Effects of dopaminergic genes, prenatal adversities, and their interaction on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and neural correlates of response inhibition

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, Dennis; Hartman, Catharina A.; van Rooij, Daan; Franke, Barbara; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Faraone, Stephen V.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often accompanied by impaired response inhibition; both have been associated with aberrant dopamine signalling. Given that prenatal exposure to alcohol or smoking is known to affect dopamine-rich brain regions, we hypothesized that individuals carrying the ADHD risk alleles of the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) and dopamine transporter (DAT1) genes may be especially sensitive to their effects. Methods Functional MRI data, information on prenatal adversities and genetic data were available for 239 adolescents and young adults participating in the multicentre ADHD cohort study NeuroIMAGE (average age 17.3 yr). We analyzed the effects of DRD4 and DAT1, prenatal exposure to alcohol and smoking and their interactions on ADHD severity, response inhibition and neural activity. Results We found no significant gene × environment interaction effects. We did find that the DRD4 7-repeat allele was associated with less superior frontal and parietal brain activity and with greater activity in the frontal pole and occipital cortex. Prenatal exposure to smoking was also associated with lower superior frontal activity, but with greater activity in the parietal lobe. Further, those exposed to alcohol had more activity in the lateral orbitofrontal cortex, and the DAT1 risk variant was associated with lower cerebellar activity. Limitations Retrospective reports of maternal substance use and the cross-sectional study design restrict causal inference. Conclusion While we found no evidence of gene × environment interactions, the risk factors under investigation influenced activity of brain regions associated with response inhibition, suggesting they may add to problems with inhibiting behaviour. PMID:28234207

  15. Characterization of TLR-induced inflammatory responses in COPD and control lung tissue explants

    PubMed Central

    Pomerenke, Anna; Lea, Simon R; Herrick, Sarah; Lindsay, Mark A; Singh, Dave

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Viruses are a common cause of exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). They activate toll-like receptors (TLRs) 3, 7, and 8, leading to a pro-inflammatory response. We have characterized the responses of TLR3 and TLR7/8 in lung tissue explants from COPD patients and control smokers. Methods We prepared lung whole tissue explants (WTEs) from patients undergoing surgery for confirmed or suspected lung cancer. In order to mimic the conditions of viral infection, we used poly(I:C) for TLR3 stimulation and R848 for TLR7/8 stimulation. These TLR ligands were used alone and in combination. The effects of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) neutralization and dexamethasone on TLR responses were examined. Inflammatory cytokine release was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and gene expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results WTEs from COPD patients released higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared with WTEs from smokers. Activation of multiple TLRs led to a greater than additive release of TNFα and CCL5. TNFα neutralization and dexamethasone treatment decreased cytokine release. Conclusion This WTE model shows an enhanced response of COPD compared with controls, suggesting an increased response to viral infection. There was amplification of innate immune responses with multiple TLR stimulation. PMID:27729782

  16. Effects of endopeptidase inhibition on the contraction-relaxation response of isolated human vaginal tissue.

    PubMed

    Rahardjo, Harrina E; Uckert, Stefan; Taher, Akmal; Sonnenberg, Joachim E; Kauffels, Wolfgang; Rahardjo, Djoko; Kuczyk, Markus A

    2013-04-01

    INTRODUCTION.: Vasoactive peptides, such as bradykinin, C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), and endothelin 1 (ET-1), are assumed to be involved in the control of female genital vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle. Tissue levels of said peptides are controlled by the activity of endopeptidase enzymes. Theoretically, in female genital tissues, inhibiting the degradation of bradykinin, CNP, and VIP, or the conversion of Big ET-1 into ET-1 should result in an enhancement in smooth muscle relaxation and, thus, an improvement in sexual response. AIM.: Elucidate the effects of the endopeptidase inhibitor KC 12615 on the contraction/relaxation response of isolated human vaginal smooth muscle to Big ET-1, bradykinin, CNP, or VIP. METHODS.: Tissue bath experiments were carried out to ascertain the responses of human vaginal tissue challenged by ET-1 (0.1 μM) to increasing concentrations of bradykinin, CNP, and VIP (0.01 μM, 0.1 μM, and 1 μM, respectively). The effects were also evaluated following preexposure to KC 12615 (10 μM, for 20 minutes). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES.: Measure the effects of KC 12615 on the relaxation of isolated human vaginal smooth muscle brought about by bradykinin, CNP, or VIP and the contraction mediated by Big ET-1. RESULTS.: The tension induced by ET-1 was reversed by bradykinin, CNP, or VIP (-25 ± 6.6%, -13.3 ± 2.2%, and -17.6 ± 10%, respectively). Big ET-1 induced contraction of the vaginal tissue. Preexposure of the tissue to KC 12615 increased the relaxation exerted by bradykinin, CNP, or VIP (to -39.2 ± 5.8%, -40.7 ± 7.3%, and -44.6 ± 19%, respectively). The contraction induced by Big ET-1 was attenuated in the presence of KC 12615 (to approximately 25% of the initial response). CONCLUSION.: Inhibition of endopeptidase activity can antagonize the contraction of human vaginal tissue induced by Big ET-1 and increase the relaxation induced by vasoactive endogenous

  17. Rat subcutaneous tissue response to MTA Fillapex® and Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Marques, Nádia Carolina Teixeira; Lourenço Neto, Natalino; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Rodini, Camila de Oliveira; Duarte, Marco Antônio Hungaro; Oliveira, Thais Marchini

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of rat subcutaneous tissue to MTA Fillapex® (Angelus), an experimental root canal filling material based on Portland cement and propylene glycol (PCPG), and a zinc oxide, eugenol and iodoform (ZOEI) paste. These materials were placed in polyethylene tubes and implanted into the dorsal connective tissue of Wistar rats for 7 and 15 days. The specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and evaluated regarding inflammatory reaction parameters by optical microscopy. The intensity of inflammatory response against the sealers was analyzed by two blinded and previously calibrated examiners for all experimental periods (kappa=0.96). The histological evaluation showed that all materials caused a moderate inflammatory reaction at 7 days, which subsided with time. A greater inflammatory reaction was observed at 7 days in the tubes filled with ZOEI paste. Tubes filled with MTA Fillapex presented some giant cells, macrophages and lymphocytes after 7 days. At 15 days, the presence of fibroblasts and collagen fibers was observed indicating normal tissue healing. The tubes filled with PCPG showed similar results to those observed in MTA Fillapex. At 15 days, the inflammatory reaction was almost absent at the tissue, with several collagen fibers indicating normal tissue healing. Data were analyzed by the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was found only between PCPG at 15 days and ZOEI at 7 days groups. No significant differences were observed among the other groups/periods (p>0.05). MTA Fillapex and Portland cement added with propylene glycol had greater tissue compatibility than the PCPG paste.

  18. The physical response of soft musculoskeletal tissues to short-pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dark, Marta Lyselle

    An experimental study was performed to determine the physical properties of knee meniscus using a low energy laser technique. Following irradiation by a 10 ns laser pulse, tissue undergoes thermoelastic expansion in response to laser-induced stresses. The stresses evolve, propagating through the tissue. If they exceed the material's strength, ablation occurs-the material ruptures. Below ablation threshold, the material remains in an expanded state until thermal relaxation occurs. We use numerical methods to solve the 3-D thermoelastic wave equation for a hydrated sample. In addition to thermoelastic expansion, expansion due to the formation of cavitation bubbles within the tissue was modeled. Cavitation occurs when tensile stresses rupture fluid. The laser-induced response of a gelatin phantom was measured with a Michelson interferometer and compared with predictions. Using gelatin as a tissue model provided a consistent experimental model of meniscus. Meniscus, like all biological tissue, is highly heterogeneous. By adapting the time dependent numerical solution of the wave equation, the measurement of physical properties of a hydrated sample became possible. The thermoelastic model depends on sound speed, Poisson's ratio, thermal expansion coefficient, and optical penetration depth. Once the behavior of gelatin was understood, human knee meniscus was studied. The thermoelastic model and experiment, allows measurement of physical properties of meniscus. Also, a numerical model of cavitation based on Rayleigh's equations was developed. By comparing experiment and theory in menicus and water, we determined properties important to cavitation: threshold pressure, bubble density, surface tension and nucleation size. Finally, histology was compared with experiment. The presence and amount of cavitation displacement was correlated with the condition of meniscus. Physical properties can be used to diagnose degenerative cartilage. This research has increased understanding

  19. SU-E-J-31: Biodynamic Imaging of Cancer Tissue and Response to Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nolte, D; Turek, J; Childress, M; An, R; Merrill, D; Matei, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure intracellular motions inside three-dimensional living cancer tissue samples to establish a novel set of biodynamic biomarkers that assess tissue proliferative activity and sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy. Methods: Biodynamic imaging (BDI) uses digital holography with low-coherence low-intensity light illumination to construct 3D holograms from depths up to a millimeter deep inside cancer tissue models that include multicellular tumor spheroids and ex vivo cancer biopsies from canine non-Hodgkins lymphoma and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) mouse explants. Intracellular motions modulate the holographic intensity with frequencies related to the Doppler effect caused by the motions of a wide variety of intracellular components. These motions are affected by applied therapeutic agents, and BDI produces unique fingerprints of the action of specific drugs on the motions in specific cell types. In this study, chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin for canine lymphoma and oxoplatin for ovarian) are applied to the living tissue models and monitored over 10 hours by BDI. Results: Multicellular spheroids and patient biopsies are categorized as either sensitive or insensitive to applied therapeutics depending on the intracellular Doppler signatures of chemotherapy response. For both lymphoma and EOC there is strong specificity to the two types of sensitivities, with sensitive cell lines and biopsies exhibiting a global cessation of proliferation and strong suppression of metabolic activity, while insensitive cell lines and biopsies show moderate activation of Doppler frequencies associated with membrane processes and possible membrane trafficking. Conclusion: This work supports the hypothesis that biodynamic biomarkers from three-dimensional living tumor tissue, that includes tissue heterogeneity and measured within 24 hours of surgery, is predictive of near-term patient response to therapy. Future work will correlate biodynamic biomarkers with

  20. Tissue specific responses to cadmium-based quantum dots in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Thiago Lopes; Gomes, Tânia; Mestre, Nélia C; Cardoso, Cátia; Bebianno, Maria João

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, Cd-based quantum dots (QDs) have generated interest from the life sciences community due to their potential applications in nanomedicine, biology and electronics. However, these engineered nanomaterials can be released into the marine environment, where their environmental health hazards remain unclear. This study investigated the tissue-specific responses related to alterations in the antioxidant defense system induced by CdTe QDs, in comparison with its dissolved counterpart, using the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Mussels were exposed to CdTe QDs and dissolved Cd for 14 days at 10 μgCd L(-1) and biomarkers of oxidative stress [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidases (total, Se-independent and Se-dependent GPx) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities] were analyzed along with Cd accumulation in the gills and digestive gland of mussels. Results show that both Cd forms changed mussels' antioxidant responses with distinct modes of action (MoA). There were tissue- and time-dependent differences in the biochemical responses to each Cd form, wherein QDs are more pro-oxidant when compared to dissolved Cd. The gills are the main tissue affected by QDs, with effects related to the increase of SOD, GST and GPx activities, while those of dissolved Cd was associated to the increase of CAT activity, Cd accumulation and exposure time. Digestive gland is a main tissue for accumulation of both Cd forms, but changes in antioxidant enzyme activities are smaller than in gills. A multivariate analysis revealed that the antioxidant patterns are tissue dependent, indicating nano-specific effects possibly associated to oxidative stress and changes in redox homeostasis.

  1. Soft-Tissue Abnormalities Associated with Treatment-Resistant and Treatment-Responsive Clubfoot

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Daniel K.; Gurnett, Christina A.; Aferol, Hyuliya; Siegel, Marilyn J.; Commean, Paul K.; Dobbs, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Clubfoot treatment commonly fails and often results in impaired quality of life. An understanding of the soft-tissue abnormalities associated with both treatment-responsive and treatment-resistant clubfoot is important to improving the diagnosis of clubfoot, the prognosis for patients, and treatment. Methods: Twenty patients with clubfoot treated with the Ponseti method were recruited for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of their lower extremities. Among these were seven patients (six unilateral cases) with treatment-responsive clubfoot and thirteen patients (five unilateral cases) with treatment-resistant clubfoot. Demographic information and physical examination findings were recorded. A descriptive analysis of the soft-tissue abnormalities was performed for both patient cohorts. For the patients with unilateral clubfoot, we calculated the percentage difference in cross-sectional area between the affected limb and the unaffected limb in terms of muscle, subcutaneous fat, intracompartment fat, and total area. With use of the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, we compared inter-leg differences in cross-sectional areas and the intracompartment adiposity index (IAI) between treatment-responsive and treatment-resistant groups. The IAI characterizes the cross-sectional area of fat within a muscle compartment. Results: Extensive soft-tissue abnormalities were more present in patients with treatment-resistant clubfoot than in patients with treatment-responsive clubfoot. Treatment-resistant clubfoot abnormalities included excess epimysial fat and intramuscular fat replacement as well as unique patterns of hypoplasia in specific muscle groups that were present within a subset of patients. Among the unilateral cases, treatment-resistant clubfoot was associated with a significantly greater difference in muscle area between the affected and unaffected limb (−47.8%) compared with treatment-responsive clubfoot (−26.6%) (p = 0.02), a significantly greater difference in

  2. Bystander and Adaptive Responses in Tissue Models exposed to Low Radiation Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. Prise

    2007-01-02

    The overall goal is characterization of 3D tissue models that can be used for investigation of the mechanisms underlying radiation-induced bystander effect at low doses (20 cGy or less) of low LET ionizing radiation, using a unique focused soft X-ray microprobe that had been upgraded to provide a range of focused soft X-ray energies, some sufficient to penetrate 3D models (Ref DE-FG02-01ER63236). The proposed studies will include an examination of whether the passage of a single electron track can trigger bystander responses in the 3D tissue models and, if so, whether the response is altered by increased or decreased levels of oxidative stress. Our existing multi-photon/confocal in-depth microscopy techniques will be used to develop assays for damage induced within intact 3D tissue models. The working hypothesis is that organization of cells into tissues, particularly involving more than one cell type, alters expression of the radiation-induced bystander effect compared to that seen in isolated single cell types in monolayer.

  3. Ownership and human tissue - the legal conundrum: A response to Jordaan's critique.

    PubMed

    Mahomed, S; Nöthling-Slabbert, M; Pepper, M S

    2017-02-27

    The debate over whether there should be a property or non-property approach with regard to human tissue is only the tip of the iceberg, because the issues involved are very complex, reflecting profound considerations on the nature of the self and the structuring of society; the balance of power between the citizen, the government and commercial interests; and human beings' perceptions of themselves and their bodies. This article responds to a publication by Donrich Jordaan titled 'Social justice and research using human biological material: A response to Mahomed, Nöthling-Slabbert and Pepper' in the July 2016 SAMJ. The original article to which Jordaan's critique refers and that provides the source for his response appeared in the South African Journal of Bioethics and Law in 2013, titled 'The legal position on the classification of human tissue in South Africa: Can tissues be owned?'. It is our contention that Jordaan's critique is based on a misinterpretation of the issues raised relating to the ownership of human tissue, an issue extensively debated in the academic sphere for many years. Jordaan's critique focuses on selected aspects of the original article and draws unjustifiable inferences from these. The purpose of this article is to contextualise Jordaan's critique and reaffirm the validity of the arguments made in the original article in 2013. There are, however, certain aspects of Jordaan's critique that we as authors of the original article acknowledge and appreciate in the spirit of academic discourse.

  4. Tumor Cell Response to Synchrotron Microbeam Radiation Therapy Differs Markedly From Cells in Normal Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, Robin L.; Rothkamm, Kai; Restall, Christina M.; Cann, Leonie; Ruwanpura, Saleela; Meachem, Sarah; Yagi, Naoto; Svalbe, Imants; Lewis, Robert A.; Williams, Bryan R.G.; Rogers, Peter A.W.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: High-dose synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) can be effective at destroying tumors in animal models while causing very little damage to normal tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular processes behind this observation of potential clinical importance. Methods and Materials: MRT was performed using a lattice of 25 {mu}m-wide, planar, polychromatic, kilovoltage X-ray microbeams, with 200-{mu}m peak separation. Inoculated EMT-6.5 tumor and normal mouse skin tissues were harvested at defined intervals post-MRT. Immunohistochemical detection of {gamma}-H2AX allowed precise localization of irradiated cells, which were also assessed for proliferation and apoptosis. Results: MRT significantly reduced tumor cell proliferation by 24 h post-irradiation (p = 0.002). An unexpected finding was that within 24 h of MRT, peak and valley irradiated zones were indistinguishable in tumors because of extensive cell migration between the zones. This was not seen in MRT-treated normal skin, which appeared to undergo a coordinated repair response. MRT elicited an increase in median survival times of EMT-6.5 and 67NR tumor-inoculated mice similar to that achieved with conventional radiotherapy, while causing markedly less normal tissue damage. Conclusions: This study provides evidence of a differential response at a cellular level between normal and tumor tissues after synchrotron MRT.

  5. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  6. [Repetitive strain injuries. Forearm pain caused by tissue responses to repetitive strain].

    PubMed

    Sorgatz, H

    2002-10-01

    According to the National Research Council, painful work-related upper limb disorders are caused by different pathophysiological mechanisms, one of which is repetitive strain injury (RSI). Forearm pain, tenderness, and paresthesias are thought to result from a continual risk of exceeding limits of "cumulative trauma load tolerance" (CTLT, cf. NRC 2001) in soft tissue by thousands of high-frequency, repetitive movements. On the other hand, repetitive painful stimulations also produce neuroplastic changes in the spinal and supraspinal nociceptive systems. Thus, repetitive motor and nociceptive impulses become part of the same motor programs, which are also responsible for high-frequency movements and tissue damage. In this way RSI pain may be felt as a task-related response, even after all injuries are completely healed. Consequences of this neuroplastic CTLT model for RSI prevention and therapy are discussed.

  7. Response of tobacco tissue cultures growing in contact with lunar fines.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.; Walkinshaw, C. H.; Laseter, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    During the quarantine periods following each Apollo mission to the moon, various biological systems were placed in the presence of lunar material to determine if pathogenic agents were present. Although no detrimental effects resulted, various responses by the several plant systems tested were noted. One such response was the increased pigmentation observed in the callus tissue cultures of tobacco. Further investigations revealed that these tissues grown in the presence of lunar material resulted in as much as a 35% increase in total pigments while differences in fatty acid and sterol concentrations were also noted when compared to the controls. It is believed that these changes brought about by the lunar material can be attributed to a change in the nutritional environment caused by its dissolution.

  8. Soft tissue response to mandibular advancement using 3D CBCT scanning.

    PubMed

    Almeida, R C; Cevidanes, L H S; Carvalho, F A R; Motta, A T; Almeida, M A O; Styner, M; Turvey, T; Proffit, W R; Phillips, C

    2011-04-01

    This prospective longitudinal study assessed the 3D soft tissue changes following mandibular advancement surgery. Cranial base registration was performed for superimposition of virtual models built from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) volumes. Displacements at the soft and hard tissue chin (n = 20), lower incisors and lower lip (n = 21) were computed for presurgery to splint removal (4-6-week surgical outcome), presurgery to 1 year postsurgery (1-year surgical outcome), and splint removal to 1 year postsurgery (postsurgical adaptation). Qualitative evaluations of color maps illustrated the surgical changes and postsurgical adaptations, but only the lower lip showed statistically significant postsurgical adaptations. Soft and hard tissue chin changes were significantly correlated for each of the intervals evaluated: presurgery to splint removal (r = 0.92), presurgery to 1 year postsurgery (r = 0.86), and splint removal to 1 year postsurgery (r = 0.77). A statistically significant correlation between lower incisor and lower lip was found only between presurgery and 1 year postsurgery (r = 0.55). At 1 year after surgery, 31% of the lower lip changes were explained by changes in the lower incisor position while 73% of the soft tissue chin changes were explained by the hard chin. This study suggests that 3D soft tissue response to mandibular advancement surgery is markedly variable.

  9. Subacute Tissue Response to 3D Graphene Oxide Scaffolds Implanted in the Injured Rat Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    López-Dolado, Elisa; González-Mayorga, Ankor; Portolés, María Teresa; Feito, María José; Ferrer, María Luisa; Del Monte, Francisco; Gutiérrez, María Concepción; Serrano, María Concepción

    2015-08-26

    The increasing prevalence and high sanitary costs of lesions affecting the central nervous system (CNS) at the spinal cord are encouraging experts in different fields to explore new avenues for neural repair. In this context, graphene and its derivatives are attracting significant attention, although their toxicity and performance in the CNS in vivo remains unclear. Here, the subacute tissue response to 3D flexible and porous scaffolds composed of partially reduced graphene oxide is investigated when implanted in the injured rat spinal cord. The interest of these structures as potentially useful platforms for CNS regeneration mainly relies on their mechanical compliance with neural tissues, adequate biocompatibility with neural cells in vitro and versatility to carry topographical and biological guidance cues. Early tissue responses are thoroughly investigated locally (spinal cord at C6 level) and in the major organs (i.e., kidney, liver, lung, and spleen). The absence of local and systemic toxic responses, along with the positive signs found at the lesion site (e.g., filler effect, soft interface for no additional scaring, preservation of cell populations at the perilesional area, presence of M2 macrophages), encourages further investigation of these materials as promising components of more efficient material-based platforms for CNS repair.

  10. Tissue Dimensionality Influences the Functional Response of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Killing of Targets

    PubMed Central

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F. M.; de Boer, Rob J.; Beltman, Joost B.

    2017-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing of virus infections and tumors occurs over a wide range of conditions. The spatial environments in which CTLs encounter target cells vary from narrow vessels, to two-dimensional epithelial tissues, to densely populated 3-dimensional (3D) T cell areas within lymphoid tissues. How such spatial environments alter the functional response of CTL-mediated killing, i.e., how the killing efficiency depends on cell densities, is unclear. In this study, we perform cellular Potts model simulations in different spatial configurations to investigate how the dimensionality of the space affects the functional response of CTL-mediated killing. Irrespective of the spatial configuration, the function with separate saturation constants for CTL and for target cell densities that we previously proposed can in all cases describe the response, demonstrating its generality. However, the tissue dimensionality determines at which cell densities the killing rate starts to saturate. We show that saturation in a fully 3D environment is stronger than in a “flat” 3D environment, which is largely due to accompanying differences in the CTL–target encounter rates. PMID:28123385

  11. Soft tissue response to a new austenitic stainless steel with a negligible nickel content.

    PubMed

    Tschon, M; Fini, M; Giavaresi, G; Borsari, V; Lenger, H; Bernauer, J; Chiesa, R; Cigada, A; Chiusoli, L; Giardino, R

    2005-10-01

    This study evaluates the soft tissue response to a new austenitic stainless steel with a low nickel content (P558) in comparison with a conventional stainless steel (SSt)and a titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). Previous findings showed its in vitro biocompatibility by culturing P558 with healthy and osteoporotic osteoblasts and its in vivo effectiveness as bone implant material. Regarding its use as a material in osteosynthesis,P558 biocompatibility when implanted in soft tissues, as subcutis and muscle, was assessed. Disks and rods of these metals were implanted in rat subcutis and in rabbit muscle, respectively. Four and twelve weeks post surgery implants with surrounding tissue were retrieved for histologic and histomorphometric analysis: fibrous capsule thickness and new vessel formation were measured. Around all implanted materials, light microscopy highlighted a reactive and fibrous capsule formation coupled with ongoing neoangiogenesis both in rats and in rabbits. Histomorphometric measurements revealed a stronger inflammatory response,in terms of capsule thickness,surrounding SSt implants (9.8% Ni content) both in rat subcutis and in rabbit muscle independently of shape and site of implantation. A progressive decrease in capsule thickness around P558 (<0.02% Ni content) and Ti6Al4V, respectively, was seen. Regarding new vessel density, the data showed a different response dependent on the site of implantation. However,in the light of the previous and present studies, P558 is a good material, instead of titanium alloys, in orthopedic research.

  12. Tissue Dimensionality Influences the Functional Response of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Killing of Targets.

    PubMed

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J; Beltman, Joost B

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing of virus infections and tumors occurs over a wide range of conditions. The spatial environments in which CTLs encounter target cells vary from narrow vessels, to two-dimensional epithelial tissues, to densely populated 3-dimensional (3D) T cell areas within lymphoid tissues. How such spatial environments alter the functional response of CTL-mediated killing, i.e., how the killing efficiency depends on cell densities, is unclear. In this study, we perform cellular Potts model simulations in different spatial configurations to investigate how the dimensionality of the space affects the functional response of CTL-mediated killing. Irrespective of the spatial configuration, the function with separate saturation constants for CTL and for target cell densities that we previously proposed can in all cases describe the response, demonstrating its generality. However, the tissue dimensionality determines at which cell densities the killing rate starts to saturate. We show that saturation in a fully 3D environment is stronger than in a "flat" 3D environment, which is largely due to accompanying differences in the CTL-target encounter rates.

  13. Liver but not adipose tissue is responsive to the pattern of enteral feeding

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Yolanda F.; Lundblad, Tammy M.; Ford, Eric A.; House, Lawrence M.; McGuinness, Owen P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nutritional support is an important aspect of medical care, providing calories to patients with compromised nutrient intake. Metabolism has a diurnal pattern, responding to the light cycle and food intake, which in turn can drive changes in liver and adipose tissue metabolism. In this study, we assessed the response of liver and white adipose tissue (WAT) to different feeding patterns under nutritional support (total enteral nutrition or TEN). Mice received continuous isocaloric TEN for 10 days or equal calories of chow once a day (Ch). TEN was given either at a constant (CN, same infusion rate during 24 h) or variable rate (VN, 80% of calories fed at night, 20% at day). Hepatic lipogenesis and carbohydrate‐responsive element‐binding protein (ChREBP) expression increased in parallel with the diurnal feeding pattern. Relative to Ch, both patterns of enteral feeding increased adiposity. This increase was not associated with enhanced lipogenic gene expression in WAT; moreover, lipogenesis was unaffected by the feeding pattern. Surprisingly, leptin and adiponectin expression increased. Moreover, nutritional support markedly increased hepatic and adipose FGF21 expression in CN and VN, despite being considered a fasting hormone. In summary, liver but not WAT, respond to the pattern of feeding. While hepatic lipid metabolism adapts to the pattern of nutrient availability, WAT does not. Moreover, sustained delivery of nutrients in an isocaloric diet can cause adiposity without the proinflammatory state observed in hypercaloric feeding. Thus, the liver but not adipose tissue is responsive to the pattern of feeding behavior. PMID:24744913

  14. 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel Research Plan Review for: The Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Immune Risk Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) participated in a meeting with representatives from the Human Research Program (HRP) Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) Element and HRP management on February 3-4, 2014 in Houston, TX to review the updated Research Plan for the Risk of Crew Adverse Health Event Due to Altered Immune Response in the HRP Integrated Research Plan. The SRP is impressed with the work the immune discipline has done since the 2012 SRP review and agrees with the new wording of the Gaps, no longer questions, now statements. The SRP also likes the addition of adding targets for closing the Gaps, but it is not clear how they got to some of the interim stages (interval percentages). A major concern that the SRP has mentioned since the initial 2009 SRP meeting is that there is still not enough emphasis on the interdisciplinary aspect of the immune risk associated with other risks (i.e., nutrition, radiation, etc.). The SRP recommends that a "translational SRP" or advisory group be developed that is composed of members from all of the HRP SRPs. The SRP also thinks that the immune discipline should consider a more systems biology approach. Lastly, the SRP is concerned that the risks observed in research from low Earth orbit (LEO) missions may not accurately reflect all the risks of longer duration flight beyond LEO. Also, there does not seem to be a concern for immune responses that may occur when someone is in space longer than six months, for example, a Mars mission would take three years. The absence of disease in past and current flight scenarios does not mean the risk may not be there in future flight settings.

  15. Metabolic and adaptive immune responses induced in mice infected with tissue-dwelling nematode Trichinella zimbabwensis

    PubMed Central

    Onkoba, N.; Chimbari, M.J.; Kamau, J.M.; Mukaratirwa, S.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-dwelling helminths are known to induce intestinal and systemic inflammation accompanied with host compensatory mechanisms to counter balance nutritional and metabolic deficiencies. The metabolic and immune responses of the host depend on parasite species and tissues affected by the parasite. This study investigated metabolic and immuno-inflammatory responses of mice infected with tissue-dwelling larvae of Trichinella zimbabwensis and explored the relationship between infection, metabolic parameters and Th1/Th17 immune responses. Sixty (60) female BALB/c mice aged between 6 to 8 weeks old were randomly assigned into T. zimbabwensis-infected and control groups. Levels of Th1 (interferon-γ) and Th17 (interleukin-17) cytokines, insulin and blood glucose were determined as well as measurements of body weight, food and water intake. Results showed that during the enteric phase of infection, insulin and IFN-γ levels were significantly higher in the Trichinella infected group accompanied with a reduction in the trends of food intake and weight loss compared with the control group. During systemic larval migration, trends in food and water intake were significantly altered and this was attributed to compensatory feeding resulting in weight gain, reduced insulin levels and increased IL-17 levels. Larval migration also induced a Th1/Th17 derived inflammatory response. It was concluded that T. zimbabwensis alters metabolic parameters by instigating host compensatory feeding. Furthermore, we showed for the first time that non-encapsulated T. zimbabwensis parasite plays a role in immunomodulating host Th1/Th17 type responses during chronic infection. PMID:27882304

  16. Tissue Platinum Concentration and Tumor Response in Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eric S.; Lee, J. Jack; He, Guangan; Chow, Chi-Wan; Fujimoto, Junya; Kalhor, Neda; Swisher, Stephen G.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Stewart, David J.; Siddik, Zahid H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Platinum resistance is a major limitation in the treatment of advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Reduced intracellular drug accumulation is one of the most consistently identified features of platinum-resistant cell lines, but clinical data are limited. We assessed the effects of tissue platinum concentrations on response and survival in NSCLC. Patients and Methods We measured total platinum concentrations by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry in 44 archived fresh-frozen NSCLC specimens from patients who underwent surgical resection after neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. Tissue platinum concentration was correlated with percent reduction in tumor size on post- versus prechemotherapy computed tomography scans. The relationship between tissue platinum concentration and survival was assessed by univariate and multicovariate Cox proportional hazards regression model analysis and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results Tissue platinum concentration correlated significantly with percent reduction in tumor size (P < .001). The same correlations were seen with cisplatin, carboplatin, and all histology subgroups. Furthermore, there was no significant impact of potential variables such as number of cycles and time lapse from last chemotherapy on platinum concentration. Patients with higher platinum concentration had longer time to recurrence (P = .034), progression-free survival (P = .018), and overall survival (P = .005) in the multicovariate Cox model analysis after adjusting for number of cycles. Conclusion This clinical study established a relationship between tissue platinum concentration and response in NSCLC. It suggests that reduced platinum accumulation might be an important mechanism of platinum resistance in the clinical setting. Further studies investigating factors that modulate intracellular platinum concentration are warranted. PMID:22891266

  17. Degradation behavior of, and tissue response to photo-crosslinked poly(trimethylene carbonate) networks.

    PubMed

    Rongen, Jan J; van Bochove, Bas; Hannink, Gerjon; Grijpma, Dirk W; Buma, Pieter

    2016-11-01

    Photo-crosslinked networks prepared from three-armed methacrylate functionalized PTMC oligomers (PTMC-tMA macromers) are attractive materials for developing an anatomically correct meniscus scaffold. In this study, we evaluated cell specific biocompatibility, in vitro and in vivo degradation behavior of, and tissue response to, such PTMC networks. By evaluating PTMC networks prepared from PTMC-tMA macromers of different molecular weights, we were able to assess the effect of macromer molecular weight on the degradation rate of the PTMC network obtained after photo-crosslinking. Three photo-crosslinked networks with different crosslinking densities were prepared using PTMC-tMA macromers with molecular weights 13.3, 17.8, and 26.7 kg/mol. Good cell biocompatibility was demonstrated in a proliferation assay with synovium derived cells. PTMC networks degraded slowly, but statistically significant, both in vitro as well as subcutaneously in rats. Networks prepared from macromers with higher molecular weights demonstrated increased degradation rates compared to networks prepared from initial macromers of lowest molecular weight. The degradation process took place via surface erosion. The PTMC networks showed good tissue tolerance during subcutaneous implantation, to which the tissue response was characterized by the presence of fibrous tissue and encapsulation of the implants. Concluding, we developed cell and tissue biocompatible, photo-crosslinked PTMC networks using PTMC-tMA macromers with relatively high molecular weights. These photo-crosslinked PTMC networks slowly degrade by a surface erosion process. Increasing the crosslinking density of these networks decreases the rate of surface degradation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2823-2832, 2016.

  18. Zika Virus Infects Early- and Midgestation Human Maternal Decidual Tissues, Inducing Distinct Innate Tissue Responses in the Maternal-Fetal Interface.

    PubMed

    Weisblum, Yiska; Oiknine-Djian, Esther; Vorontsov, Olesya M; Haimov-Kochman, Ronit; Zakay-Rones, Zichria; Meir, Karen; Shveiky, David; Elgavish, Sharona; Nevo, Yuval; Roseman, Moshe; Bronstein, Michal; Stockheim, David; From, Ido; Eisenberg, Iris; Lewkowicz, Aya A; Yagel, Simcha; Panet, Amos; Wolf, Dana G

    2017-02-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has emerged as a cause of congenital brain anomalies and a range of placenta-related abnormalities, highlighting the need to unveil the modes of maternal-fetal transmission. The most likely route of vertical ZIKV transmission is via the placenta. The earliest events of ZIKV transmission in the maternal decidua, representing the maternal uterine aspect of the chimeric placenta, have remained unexplored. Here, we show that ZIKV replicates in first-trimester human maternal-decidual tissues grown ex vivo as three-dimensional (3D) organ cultures. An efficient viral spread in the decidual tissues was demonstrated by the rapid upsurge and continued increase of tissue-associated ZIKV load and titers of infectious cell-free virus progeny, released from the infected tissues. Notably, maternal decidual tissues obtained at midgestation remained similarly susceptible to ZIKV, whereas fetus-derived chorionic villi demonstrated reduced ZIKV replication with increasing gestational age. A genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed that ZIKV substantially upregulated the decidual tissue innate immune responses. Further comparison of the innate tissue response patterns following parallel infections with ZIKV and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) revealed that unlike HCMV, ZIKV did not induce immune cell activation or trafficking responses in the maternal-fetal interface but rather upregulated placental apoptosis and cell death molecular functions. The data identify the maternal uterine aspect of the human placenta as a likely site of ZIKV transmission to the fetus and further reveal distinct patterns of innate tissue responses to ZIKV. Our unique experimental model and findings could further serve to study the initial stages of congenital ZIKV transmission and pathogenesis and evaluate the effect of new therapeutic interventions.

  19. Monosaccharide-Responsive Phenylboronate-Polyol Cell Scaffolds for Cell Sheet and Tissue Engineering Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Rachamalla Maheedhar; Srivastava, Akshay; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Analyte-responsive smart polymeric materials are of great interest and have been actively investigated in the field of regenerative medicine. Phenylboronate containing copolymers form gels with polyols under alkaline conditions. Monosaccharides, by virtue of their higher affinity towards boronate, can displace polyols and solubilize such gels. In the present study, we investigate the possibility of utilizing phenylboronate-polyol interactions at physiological pH in order to develop monosaccharide-responsive degradable scaffold materials for systems dealing with cells and tissues. Amine assisted phenylboronate-polyol interactions were employed to develop novel hydrogel and cryogel scaffolds at neutral pH. The scaffolds displayed monosaccharide inducible gel-sol phase transformability. In vitro cell culture studies demonstrated the ability of scaffolds to support cell adhesion, viability and proliferation. Fructose induced gel degradation is used to recover cells cultured on the hydrogels. The cryogels displayed open macroporous structure and superior mechanical properties. These novel phase transformable phenylboronate-polyol based scaffolds displayed a great potential for various cell sheet and tissue engineering applications. Their monosaccharide responsiveness at physiological pH is very useful and can be utilized in the fields of cell immobilization, spheroid culture, saccharide recognition and analyte-responsive drug delivery. PMID:24167587

  20. The response of tissue-equivalent proportional counters to heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjoo, Hooshang; Khvostunov, Igor K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a theoretical model for the response of a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) irradiated with charged particles. Heavy ions and iron ions in particular constitute a significant part of radiation in space. TEPCs are used for all space shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) missions to estimate the dose and radiation quality (in terms of lineal energy) inside spacecraft. The response of the tissue-equivalent proportional counters shows distortions at the wall/cavity interface. In this paper, we present microdosimetric investigation using Monte Carlo track structure calculations to simulate the response of a TEPC to charged particles of various LET (1 MeV protons, 2.4 MeV alpha particles, 46 MeV/nucleon 20Ne, 55 MeV/nucleon 20Ne, 45 MeV/nucleon 40Ar, and 1.05 GeV/nucleon 56Fe). Data are presented for energy lost and energy absorbed in the counter cavity and wall. The model calculations are in good agreement with the results of Rademacher et al. (Radiat. Res. 149, 387-389, 1998), including the study of the interface between the wall and the sensitive region of the counter. It is shown that the anomalous response observed at large event sizes in the experiment is due to an enhanced entry of secondary electrons from the wall into the gas cavity.

  1. GATA transcription factors as tissue-specific master regulators for induced responses.

    PubMed

    Block, Dena Hs; Shapira, Michael

    2015-01-01

    GATA transcription factors play important roles in directing developmental genetic programs and cell differentiation, and are conserved in animals, plants and fungi. C. elegans has 11 GATA-type transcription factors that orchestrate development of the gut, epidermis and vulva. However, the expression of certain GATA proteins persists into adulthood, where their function is less understood. Accumulating evidence demonstrates contributions of 2 terminal differentiation GATA transcription factors, ELT-2 and ELT-3, to epithelial immune responses in the adult intestine and epidermis (hypodermis), respectively. Involvement in other stress responses has also been documented. We recently showed that ELT-2 acted as a tissue-specific master regulator, cooperating with 2 transcription factors activated by the p38 pathway, ATF-7 and SKN-1, to control immune responses in the adult C. elegans intestine. Here, we discuss the broader implications of these findings for understanding the involvement of GATA transcription factors in adult stress responses, and draw parallels between ELT-2 and ELT-3 to speculate that the latter may fulfill similar tissue-specific functions in the epidermis.

  2. Cellular-mediated immune responses in the liver tissue of patients with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Punsawadl, Chuchard; Setthapramote, Chayanee; Viriyavejakul, Parnpen

    2014-09-01

    The immune responses against Plasmodiumfalciparum malaria infections are complex and poorly understood. No published studies have yet reported the lymphocyte subsets involved in the human liver tissue of P. falciparum malaria patients. To understand the cellular-mediated immune responses in the liver during malaria infection, we determined the numbers of the various lymphocyte subsets in tissue samples obtained at autopsy from patients who died with P. falciparum malaria infection. All the liver tissue specimens had been stored at the Department of Tropical Pathology, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Thailand. On the basis of total bilirubin (TB) levels prior to death, patients were divided into 2 groups: those with hyperbilirubinemia [total bilirubin (TB) > or =51.3 micromol/l) (n = 9)] and those without hyperbilirubinemia (TB < 51.3 micromol/l) (n = 12). Normal liver specimens (n = 10) were used as controls. An immunohistochemistry method was used to analyze the types and numbers of lymphocytes (T and B lymphocytes), and Kupffer cells, using specific antibodies against CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD20+, and CD68+. Our findings reveal the numbers of T lymphocytes (CD3+ T-cells) and their subsets (CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells) were significantly greater in the portal tracts and sinusoids of liver tissue obtained from P. falciparum malaria cases with hyperbilirubinemia than those without hyperbilirubinemia or controls. CD8+ T-cells were the major lymphocyte subset in the liver tissue of patients with severe falciparum malaria. A significant positive correlation was seen between the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells and the liver enzyme levels among P. falciparum malaria patients. The number of CD68+ cells (Kupffer cells) was significantly greater in the liver sinusoids of P. falciparum malaria cases with hyperbilirubinemia than those without hyperbilirubinemia. These findings suggest T-cells, especially CD8+ T-cells and Kupffer cells are an important part of the

  3. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  4. Structure-function relationships in radiation-induced cell and tissue lesions: special references to the contributions of scanning electron microscopy and hematopoietic tissue responses

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.

    1987-03-01

    Contributions of scanning electron microscopy to the field of radiation biology are briefly reviewed and presented in terms of an overall goal to identify and characterize the structural features of radiation-induced lesions in vital cell and tissue targets. In the context of lesion production, the major radiation-elicited response sequences, the types and nature of measured end points, and governing temporal and radiobiological parameters are discussed and illustrated by using results derived from both in vitro cell systems and in vivo studies that measured tissue responses from various organ systems (respiratory, digestive, circulatory, and central nervous systems). Work in our laboratory on the nature of early and late hematopathologic tissue responses (aplastic anemia and myeloid leukemia) induced by protracted radiation exposure and the bridging effect of repair processes relative to the expression of these pathologies is highlighted.

  5. Identification of biomarkers responsive to chronic exposure to pharmaceuticals in target tissues of Carcinus maenas.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Martínez, G V; Del Valls, T A; Martín-Díaz, M L

    2013-01-01

    A 28-day bioassay was performed with Carcinus maenas to evaluate chronic effects caused by exposure to caffeine and ibuprofen (0.1-50 μg L(-1)) in sea water. Lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) was evaluated in hemolymph applying the neutral red retention assay (NRRA); several biomarkers including ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD), dibenzylfluorescein dealkylase (DBF), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and DNA damage were studied in gill, hepatopancreas, muscle and gonad tissues. In crabs exposed to environmental concentrations of the drugs, retention time was reduced by 50%. EROD and DBFOD activities were induced by caffeine in muscle and hepatopancreas tissues (p < 0.05); GST activity was activated by ibuprofen in gill, hepatopancreas and muscle at the highest concentrations tested (p < 0.05). All tissues showed GPX activity and LPO induction (p < 0.05). Crabs exposed to caffeine and ibuprofen showed evidence of DNA damage mainly in hepatopancreas tissues (p < 0.05). Environmental concentrations of pharmaceuticals induce LMS and the biochemical responses studied in this crab. This methodology is a suitable technique for assessing pharmaceutical toxicity in the marine environment.

  6. Drosophila tissues with different metamorphic responses to ecdysone express different ecdysone receptor isoforms.

    PubMed

    Talbot, W S; Swyryd, E A; Hogness, D S

    1993-07-02

    In D. melanogaster a pulse of the steroid hormone ecdysone triggers the larval-to-adult metamorphosis, a complex process in which this hormone induces imaginal tissues to generate adult structures and larval tissues to degenerate. We show that the EcR gene encodes three ecdysone receptor isoforms (EcR-A, EcR-B1, and EcR-B2) that have common DNA- and hormone-binding domains but different N-terminal regions. We have used isoform-specific monoclonal antibodies to show that at the onset of metamorphosis different ecdysone target tissues express different isoform combinations in a manner consistent with the proposition that the different metamorphic responses of these tissues require different combinations of the EcR isoforms. We have also determined temporal developmental profiles of the EcR isoforms and their mRNAs in whole animals, showing that different isoforms predominate at different developmental stages that are marked by a pulse of ecdysone.

  7. Characterization of Chinese giant salamander iridovirus tissue tropism and inflammatory response after infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Fan, Yuding; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Wenzhi; Ma, Jie; Meng, Yan; Xie, Congxin; Zeng, Lingbing

    2015-06-03

    The Chinese giant salamander iridovirus (GSIV), belonging to the genus Ranavirus in the family Iridoviridae, causes severe hemorrhagic lesions and nearly 100% mortality in naturally infected Chinese giant salamanders Andrias davidiamus. However, the replication and distribution of the virus has not been well characterized in vivo. Using in situ hybridization, the expression of the GSIV major capsid protein (MCP) was detected in the cytoplasm of cells of the spleen, kidney, liver and gut tissues. MCP expression in the spleen and kidney appeared to fluctuate significantly during the acute phase of infection. Using an immunofluorescence assay, GSIV antigens were abundant in the spleen and kidney tissues but appeared to be at relatively low levels in the liver and gut. Additionally, there were significant changes in the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in different tissues in response to infection with GSIV. The expression of MIF, TNF-α and IL-1β had significantly increased in the spleen at 3 d post-infection; this correlated with a decrease in virus replication in the spleen. These results suggest that the spleen and kidney are the major target tissues of GSIV, and the increased expression of MIF, TNF‑α and IL-1β may contribute to a reduction of virus replication in the spleen.

  8. Specific intra-tissue responses to manganese in the floating lamina of Trapa natans L.

    PubMed

    Baldisserotto, C; Ferroni, L; Medici, V; Pagnoni, A; Pellizzari, M; Fasulo, M P; Fagioli, F; Bonora, A; Pancaldi, S

    2004-09-01

    Plant tolerance to heavy metals requires morpho-physiological mechanisms that are still poorly understood, especially in hydrophytes. This study focuses on the young floating lamina of the rhyzophyte Trapa natans exposed for 10 d to 130 microM Mn. The lamina has the ability to bioaccumulate Mn (> 3000 microg g(-1)). X-ray microanalysis of Mn cellular distribution revealed accumulation in the upper epidermis, in the first palisade layer, and in the idioblasts of the spongy tissue, which were shown with electron microscopy to contain osmiophilic vacuolar deposits, also observed to a minor extent in the control leaves. On the basis of biochemical and histochemical tests, these deposits were attributed to phenolic compounds that were probably able to chelate Mn. Net photosynthesis, photosynthetic pigments, room temperature microspectrofluorimetric analyses, and ultrastructural studies of plastids were performed to evaluate the status of the photosynthetic apparatus. A greater development of thylakoid membranes was observed in plastids of the second palisade and spongy tissue, which, however, did not accumulate Mn. Only the spongy tissue experienced inadequate assembly of PS II, but this did not significantly influence the photosynthetic yield of the whole lamina. It was concluded that T. natans can optimise productivity in the presence of Mn by means of specific intra-tissue responses within the framework of the floating lamina.

  9. Biomimeticity in tissue engineering scaffolds through synthetic peptide modifications-altering chemistry for enhanced biological response.

    PubMed

    Sreejalekshmi, Kumaran G; Nair, Prabha D

    2011-02-01

    Biomimetic and bioactive biomaterials are desirable as tissue engineering scaffolds by virtue of their capability to mimic natural environments of the extracellular matrix. Biomimeticity has been achieved by the incorporation of synthetic short peptide sequences into suitable materials either by surface modification or by bulk incorporation. Research in this area has identified several novel synthetic peptide segments, some of them with cell-specific interactions, which may serve as potential candidates for use in explicit tissue applications. This review focuses on the developments and prospective directions of incorporating short synthetic peptide sequences onto scaffolds for tissue engineering, with emphasis on the chemistry of peptide immobilization and subsequent cell responses toward modified scaffolds. The article provides a decision-tree-type flow chart indicating the most probable cellular events on a given peptide-modified scaffold along with the consolidated list of synthetic peptide sequences, supports as well as cell types used in various tissue engineering studies, and aims to serve as a quick reference guide to peptide chemists and material scientists interested in the field.

  10. Metabolic responses to dietary leucine restriction involve remodeling of adipose tissue and enhanced hepatic insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Wanders, Desiree; Stone, Kirsten P; Dille, Kelly; Simon, Jacob; Pierse, Alicia; Gettys, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Dietary leucine was incrementally restricted to test whether limiting this essential amino acid (EAA) would fully reproduce the beneficial responses produced by dietary methionine restriction. Restricting leucine by 85% increased energy intake and expenditure within 5 to 7 days of its introduction and reduced overall accumulation of adipose tissue. Leucine restriction (LR) also improved glucose tolerance, increased hepatic release of fibroblast growth factor 21 into the blood stream, and enhanced insulin-dependent activation of Akt in liver. However, LR had no effect on hepatic lipid levels and failed to lower lipogenic gene expression in the liver. LR did affect remodeling of white and brown adipose tissues, increasing expression of both thermogenic and lipogenic genes. These findings illustrate that dietary LR reproduces many but not all of the physiological responses of methionine restriction. The primary differences occur in the liver, where methionine and LR cause opposite effects on tissue lipid levels and expression of lipogenic genes. Altogether, these findings suggest that the sensing systems which detect and respond to dietary restriction of EAAs act through mechanisms that both leucine and methionine are able to engage, and in the case of hepatic lipid metabolism, may be unique to specific EAAs such as methionine.

  11. Cellular Proteomes Drive Tissue-Specific Regulation of the Heat Shock Response

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Grant, Christopher E.; Plagens, Rosemary N.; Barrett, Lindsey N.; Guisbert, Karen S. Kim; Guisbert, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The heat shock response (HSR) is a cellular stress response that senses protein misfolding and restores protein folding homeostasis, or proteostasis. We previously identified an HSR regulatory network in Caenorhabditis elegans consisting of highly conserved genes that have important cellular roles in maintaining proteostasis. Unexpectedly, the effects of these genes on the HSR are distinctly tissue-specific. Here, we explore this apparent discrepancy and find that muscle-specific regulation of the HSR by the TRiC/CCT chaperonin is not driven by an enrichment of TRiC/CCT in muscle, but rather by the levels of one of its most abundant substrates, actin. Knockdown of actin subunits reduces induction of the HSR in muscle upon TRiC/CCT knockdown; conversely, overexpression of an actin subunit sensitizes the intestine so that it induces the HSR upon TRiC/CCT knockdown. Similarly, intestine-specific HSR regulation by the signal recognition particle (SRP), a component of the secretory pathway, is driven by the vitellogenins, some of the most abundant secretory proteins. Together, these data indicate that the specific protein folding requirements from the unique cellular proteomes sensitizes each tissue to disruption of distinct subsets of the proteostasis network. These findings are relevant for tissue-specific, HSR-associated human diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, we characterize organismal phenotypes of actin overexpression including a shortened lifespan, supporting a recent hypothesis that maintenance of the actin cytoskeleton is an important factor for longevity. PMID:28143946

  12. In vivo tissue response and durability of five novel synthetic polymers in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Sahin, E; Cingi, C; Eskiizmir, G; Altintoprak, N; Calli, A; Calli, C; Yilgör, I; Yilgör, E

    2016-04-01

    Alloplastic materials are frequently used in facial plastic surgeries such as rhinoplasty and nasal reconstruction. Unfortunately, the ideal alloplastic material has not been found. This experimental study evaluates the tissue response and durability of five novel polymers developed as an alloplastic material. In this experimental study involving a tertiary university hospital, six subcuticular pockets were formed at the back of 10 rabbits for the implantation of each polymer and sham group. Each pocket was excised with its adjacent tissue after three months, and collected for histopathological examination. Semi-quantitative examination including neovascularisation, inflammation, fibrosis, abscess formation, multinucleated foreign body giant cells was performed, and integrity of polymer was evaluated. A statistical comparison was performed. No statically significant difference was detected in neovascularisation, inflammation, fibrosis, abscess formation and multinucleated foreign body giant cells when a paired comparison between sham and polymer II, III and IV groups was performed individually. Nevertheless, the degree of fibrosis was less than sham group in polymer I (p = .027) and V (p = .018), although the other variables were almost similar. The integrity of polymers III (9 intact, 1 fragmented) and IV (8 intact, 2 absent) was better than the other polymers. These novel synthetic polymers could be considered as good candidates for clinical applicability. All polymers provided satisfactory results in terms of tissue response; however, fibrovascular integration was higher in polymers II, III and IV. In addition, the durability of polymer III and IV was better than the others.

  13. Cardiac tissue enriched factors serum response factor and GATA-4 are mutual coregulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belaguli, N. S.; Sepulveda, J. L.; Nigam, V.; Charron, F.; Nemer, M.; Schwartz, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Combinatorial interaction among cardiac tissue-restricted enriched transcription factors may facilitate the expression of cardiac tissue-restricted genes. Here we show that the MADS box factor serum response factor (SRF) cooperates with the zinc finger protein GATA-4 to synergistically activate numerous myogenic and nonmyogenic serum response element (SRE)-dependent promoters in CV1 fibroblasts. In the absence of GATA binding sites, synergistic activation depends on binding of SRF to the proximal CArG box sequence in the cardiac and skeletal alpha-actin promoter. GATA-4's C-terminal activation domain is obligatory for synergistic coactivation with SRF, and its N-terminal domain and first zinc finger are inhibitory. SRF and GATA-4 physically associate both in vivo and in vitro through their MADS box and the second zinc finger domains as determined by protein A pullout assays and by in vivo one-hybrid transfection assays using Gal4 fusion proteins. Other cardiovascular tissue-restricted GATA factors, such as GATA-5 and GATA-6, were equivalent to GATA-4 in coactivating SRE-dependent targets. Thus, interaction between the MADS box and C4 zinc finger proteins, a novel regulatory paradigm, mediates activation of SRF-dependent gene expression.

  14. METABOLIC RESPONSES TO DIETARY LEUCINE RESTRICTION INVOLVE REMODELING OF ADIPOSE TISSUE AND ENHANCED HEPATIC INSULIN SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Wanders, Desiree; Stone, Kirsten P.; Dille, Kelly; Simon, Jacob; Pierse, Alicia; Gettys, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary leucine was incrementally restricted to test whether limiting this essential amino acid (EAA) would fully reproduce the beneficial responses produced by dietary methionine restriction. Restricting leucine by 85% increased energy intake and expenditure within five to seven days of its introduction and reduced overall accumulation of adipose tissue. Leucine restriction (LR) also improved glucose tolerance, increased hepatic release of FGF21 into the blood stream, and enhanced insulin-dependent activation of Akt in liver. However, LR had no effect on hepatic lipid levels and failed to lower lipogenic gene expression in the liver. LR did affect remodeling of white and brown adipose tissue, increasing expression of both thermogenic and lipogenic genes. These findings illustrate that dietary LR reproduces many but not all of the physiological responses of methionine restriction. The primary differences occur in the liver, where methionine and leucine restriction cause opposite effects on tissue lipid levels and expression of lipogenic genes. Together these findings suggest that the sensing systems which detect and respond to dietary restriction of EAAs act through mechanisms that both leucine and methionine are able to engage, and in the case of hepatic lipid metabolism, may be unique to specific EAAs such as methionine. PMID:26643647

  15. Brain Tissue Responses to Neural Implants Impact Signal Sensitivity and Intervention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Implantable biosensors are valuable scientific tools for basic neuroscience research and clinical applications. Neurotechnologies provide direct readouts of neurological signal and neurochemical processes. These tools are generally most valuable when performance capacities extend over months and years to facilitate the study of memory, plasticity, and behavior or to monitor patients’ conditions. These needs have generated a variety of device designs from microelectrodes for fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) and electrophysiology to microdialysis probes for sampling and detecting various neurochemicals. Regardless of the technology used, the breaching of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) to insert devices triggers a cascade of biochemical pathways resulting in complex molecular and cellular responses to implanted devices. Molecular and cellular changes in the microenvironment surrounding an implant include the introduction of mechanical strain, activation of glial cells, loss of perfusion, secondary metabolic injury, and neuronal degeneration. Changes to the tissue microenvironment surrounding the device can dramatically impact electrochemical and electrophysiological signal sensitivity and stability over time. This review summarizes the magnitude, variability, and time course of the dynamic molecular and cellular level neural tissue responses induced by state-of-the-art implantable devices. Studies show that insertion injuries and foreign body response can impact signal quality across all implanted central nervous system (CNS) sensors to varying degrees over both acute (seconds to minutes) and chronic periods (weeks to months). Understanding the underlying biological processes behind the brain tissue response to the devices at the cellular and molecular level leads to a variety of intervention strategies for improving signal sensitivity and longevity. PMID:25546652

  16. Dietary response of sympatric deer to fire using stable isotope analysis of liver tissue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, W. David; Zimmerman, T.J.; Leslie, David M.; Jenks, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon (??13C) and nitrogen (??15N) isotopes in biological samples from large herbivores identify photosynthetic pathways (C3 vs. C4) of plants they consumed and can elucidate potential nutritional characteristics of dietary selection. Because large herbivores consume a diversity of forage types, ??13C and ??15N in their tissue can index ingested and assimilated diets through time. We assessed ??13C and ??15N in metabolically active liver tissue of sympatric mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and white-tailed deer (O. virginianus) to identify dietary disparity resulting from use of burned and unburned areas in a largely forested landscape. Interspecific variation in dietary disparity of deer was documented 2-3 years post-fire in response to lag-time effects of vegetative response to burning and seasonal (i.e., summer, winter) differences in forage type. Liver ??13C for mule deer were lower during winter and higher during summer 2 years post-fire on burned habitat compared to unburned habitat suggesting different forages were consumed by mule deer in response to fire. Liver ??15N for both species were higher on burned than unburned habitat during winter and summer suggesting deer consumed more nutritious forage on burned habitat during both seasons 2 and 3 years post-fire. Unlike traditional methods of dietary assessment that do not measure uptake of carbon and nitrogen from dietary components, analyses of stable isotopes in liver or similar tissue elucidated ??13C and ??15N assimilation from seasonal dietary components and resulting differences in the foraging ecology of sympatric species in response to fire.

  17. Modeling the NF-κB mediated inflammatory response predicts cytokine waves in tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Waves propagating in "excitable media" is a reliable way to transmit signals in space. A fascinating example where living cells comprise such a medium is Dictyostelium D. which propagates waves of chemoattractant to attract distant cells. While neutrophils chemotax in a similar fashion as Dictyostelium D., it is unclear if chemoattractant waves exist in mammalian tissues and what mechanisms could propagate them. Results We propose that chemoattractant cytokine waves may naturally develop as a result of NF-κB response. Using a heuristic mathematical model of NF-κB-like circuits coupled in space we show that the known characteristics of NF-κB response favor cytokine waves. Conclusions While the propagating wave of cytokines is generally beneficial for inflammation resolution, our model predicts that there exist special conditions that can cause chronic inflammation and re-occurrence of acute inflammatory response. PMID:21771307

  18. In vivo imaging of tissue eosinophilia and eosinopoietic responses to schistosome worms and eggs

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Stephen J.; Smith, Steven J.; Lim, K.C.; Zhang, Hongbing; Purchio, Anthony F.; McKerrow, James H.; West, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Using a sensitive transgenic reporter mouse system and in vivo biophotonic imaging techniques, we present a dynamic analysis of eosinophil responses to schistosome infection. Use of this methodology provided previously unattainable detail on the spatial and temporal distribution of tissue eosinophilia and eosinopoietic responses to schistosome worms and eggs. Dramatic hepatic and intestinal eosinophilia in response to the deposition of schistosome eggs, with accompanying eosinopoiesis in the bone marrow, was observed between weeks 8 and 10 p.i., with subsequent downregulation evident by week 11. Contrary to expectations, we also demonstrate that schistosome parasites themselves induce significant intestinal eosinophilia and eosinopoiesis in the bone marrow at very early stages during prepatent infection. PMID:15950229

  19. Response functions for computing absorbed dose to skeletal tissues from neutron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bahadori, Amir A; Johnson, Perry; Jokisch, Derek W; Eckerman, Keith F; Bolch, Wesley E

    2011-11-07

    Spongiosa in the adult human skeleton consists of three tissues-active marrow (AM), inactive marrow (IM) and trabecularized mineral bone (TB). AM is considered to be the target tissue for assessment of both long-term leukemia risk and acute marrow toxicity following radiation exposure. The total shallow marrow (TM(50)), defined as all tissues lying within the first 50 µm of the bone surfaces, is considered to be the radiation target tissue of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. For irradiation by sources external to the body, kerma to homogeneous spongiosa has been used as a surrogate for absorbed dose to both of these tissues, as direct dose calculations are not possible using computational phantoms with homogenized spongiosa. Recent micro-CT imaging of a 40 year old male cadaver has allowed for the accurate modeling of the fine microscopic structure of spongiosa in many regions of the adult skeleton (Hough et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 2309-46). This microstructure, along with associated masses and tissue compositions, was used to compute specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values for protons originating in axial and appendicular bone sites (Jokisch et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 6857-72). These proton SAFs, bone masses, tissue compositions and proton production cross sections, were subsequently used to construct neutron dose-response functions (DRFs) for both AM and TM(50) targets in each bone of the reference adult male. Kerma conditions were assumed for other resultant charged particles. For comparison, AM, TM(50) and spongiosa kerma coefficients were also calculated. At low incident neutron energies, AM kerma coefficients for neutrons correlate well with values of the AM DRF, while total marrow (TM) kerma coefficients correlate well with values of the TM(50) DRF. At high incident neutron energies, all kerma coefficients and DRFs tend to converge as charged-particle equilibrium is established across the bone site. In the range of 10 eV to 100 Me

  20. Isoliquiritigenin Attenuates Adipose Tissue Inflammation in vitro and Adipose Tissue Fibrosis through Inhibition of Innate Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yasuharu; Nagai, Yoshinori; Honda, Hiroe; Okamoto, Naoki; Yamamoto, Seiji; Hamashima, Takeru; Ishii, Yoko; Tanaka, Miyako; Suganami, Takayoshi; Sasahara, Masakiyo; Miyake, Kensuke; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ILG) is a flavonoid derived from Glycyrrhiza uralensis and potently suppresses NLRP3 inflammasome activation resulting in the improvement of diet-induced adipose tissue inflammation. However, whether ILG affects other pathways besides the inflammasome in adipose tissue inflammation is unknown. We here show that ILG suppresses adipose tissue inflammation by affecting the paracrine loop containing saturated fatty acids and TNF-α by using a co-culture composed of adipocytes and macrophages. ILG suppressed inflammatory changes induced by the co-culture through inhibition of NF-κB activation. This effect was independent of either inhibition of inflammasome activation or activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. Moreover, ILG suppressed TNF-α-induced activation of adipocytes, coincident with inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation. Additionally, TNF-α-mediated inhibition of Akt phosphorylation under insulin signaling was alleviated by ILG in adipocytes. ILG suppressed palmitic acid-induced activation of macrophages, with decreasing the level of phosphorylated Jnk expression. Intriguingly, ILG improved high fat diet-induced fibrosis in adipose tissue in vivo. Finally, ILG inhibited TLR4- or Mincle-stimulated expression of fibrosis-related genes in stromal vascular fraction from obese adipose tissue and macrophages in vitro. Thus, ILG can suppress adipose tissue inflammation by both inflammasome-dependent and -independent manners and attenuate adipose tissue fibrosis by targeting innate immune sensors. PMID:26975571

  1. Thalidomide in multiple myeloma: lack of response of soft-tissue plasmacytomas.

    PubMed

    Bladé, J; Perales, M; Rosiñol, L; Tuset, M; Montoto, S; Esteve, J; Cobo, F; Villela, L; Rafel, M; Nomdedeu, B; Montserrat, E

    2001-05-01

    Thalidomide is active in patients with refractory myeloma. Seventeen patients (nine men/eight women, median age 73 years) with multiple myeloma (MM) were treated with thalidomide. Fifteen patients had refractory disease and two untested relapse. The median dose of thalidomide was 500 mg (range, 200-800 mg). Nine of the 17 patients (53%) responded. The response rate was significantly higher in patients with no extramedullary disease than in those with soft tissue masses (75% CI: 43-95% versus 0%; P = 0.01)). Of note, no decrease in the size of soft tissue plasmacytomas was observed in all the five patients who had extramedullary involvement. This data suggests that the mechanism of action and effectiveness of thalidomide might depend on the site of the tumour cells.

  2. Tissue response to experimental dental cements prepared from a modified powder glass composition.

    PubMed

    Boaventura, Juliana Maria Capelozza; Bertolini, Marcio José; Padovani, Gislaine Cristina; de Oliveira, Maria Rita Brancini; Zaghete, Maria Aparecida; de Oliveira Júnior, Osmir Batista; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2012-01-01

    The present work seeks to evaluate the biocompatibility of experimental glass ionomer cements (GIC) prepared from niobium-calcium fluoro-alumino-silicate glass powder and two commercial GICs. The GICs were implanted into the subcutaneous connective tissue of sixty rats. The rats were sacrificed during four varying time periods: 7, 15, 30, and 60 days and histopathological examinations were then performed. The Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to evaluate any significant differences between the materials. Additionally, multiple comparisons of the mean rank were also carried out using the Dunn test (p<0.05). No significant differences were observed that one GIC was superior to the other. The tissue response for all of the GICs tested was similar in all the periods examined.

  3. Dysfunctional Astrocytic and Synaptic Regulation of Hypothalamic Glutamatergic Transmission in a Mouse Model of Early-Life Adversity: Relevance to Neurosteroids and Programming of the Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Benjamin G.; Cunningham, Linda; Cooper, Michelle A.; Corteen, Nicole L.; Seifi, Mohsen; Swinny, Jerome D.; Lambert, Jeremy J.

    2013-01-01

    Adverse early-life experiences, such as poor maternal care, program an abnormal stress response that may involve an altered balance between excitatory and inhibitory signals. Here, we explored how early-life stress (ELS) affects excitatory and inhibitory transmission in corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF)-expressing dorsal-medial (mpd) neurons of the neonatal mouse hypothalamus. We report that ELS associates with enhanced excitatory glutamatergic transmission that is manifested as an increased frequency of synaptic events and increased extrasynaptic conductance, with the latter associated with dysfunctional astrocytic regulation of glutamate levels. The neurosteroid 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one (5α3α-THPROG) is an endogenous, positive modulator of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) that is abundant during brain development and rises rapidly during acute stress, thereby enhancing inhibition to curtail stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis. In control mpd neurons, 5α3α-THPROG potently suppressed neuronal discharge, but this action was greatly compromised by prior ELS exposure. This neurosteroid insensitivity did not primarily result from perturbations of GABAergic inhibition, but rather arose functionally from the increased excitatory drive onto mpd neurons. Previous reports indicated that mice (dams) lacking the GABAAR δ subunit (δ0/0) exhibit altered maternal behavior. Intriguingly, δ0/0 offspring showed some hallmarks of abnormal maternal care that were further exacerbated by ELS. Moreover, in common with ELS, mpd neurons of δ0/0 pups exhibited increased synaptic and extrasynaptic glutamatergic transmission and consequently a blunted neurosteroid suppression of neuronal firing. This study reveals that increased synaptic and tonic glutamatergic transmission may be a common maladaptation to ELS, leading to enhanced excitation of CRF-releasing neurons, and identifies neurosteroids as putative early regulators of the stress

  4. Differences in leucocyte-endothelium interactions between normal and adenocarcinoma bearing tissues in response to radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, N. Z.; Ross, B. A.; Gulledge, C.; Klitzman, B.; Dodge, R.; Dewhirst, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the interaction between leucocytes and endothelial cells in tumour tissues is greatly diminished compared with normal tissues under several induced inflammatory conditions. Radiation has been reported to cause release of inflammatory mediators and to promote neutrophil adhesions to cultured endothelial monolayers. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that radiation would cause increased leucocyte rolling and adhesion in both tumour and normal tissues. We examined these two parameters in response to 6 Gy of gamma-radiation in mammary adenocarcinomas implanted into rat skinfold window chambers as well as normal (i.e. non-tumour-bearing) preparations. Leucocyte rolling and adhesion were measured in terms of flux of rolling leucocytes (F(rolling)) and density of adhering leucocytes (D(adhering)) in microvessels. F(rolling) and D(adhering) were measured in two groups of preparations: irradiated and control. In normal preparations, F(rolling) and D(adhering) were both increased significantly by radiation. In contrast, in adenocarcinoma-bearing preparations, F(rolling) and D(adhering) were either unchanged (in the tumour centre) or reduced (in tumour periphery and the normal tissue surrounding the tumour) by radiation. Radiation did not cause changes in haemodynamics in these preparations, thus the observed changes in leucocyte rolling and adhesion could not be accounted for by haemodynamic factors. These results indicate that: (1) in normal preparations, radiation could cause inflammation as manifested by increased leucocyte rolling and adhesion; and (2) in tumour-bearing preparations, radiation caused changes in the vascular surface properties such that they became less adhesive to leucocytes. Such differences in radiation response may have important implications for radiation therapy and provide new insights into the unique features of tumours. Images Figure 2 PMID:8180019

  5. Tissue- and environmental response-specific expression of 10 PP2C transcripts in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, S; Koga, R; Bohnert, H J; Fukuhara, T

    1999-03-01

    Ten transcripts (Mpc1-10) homologous to protein phosphatases of the 2C family have been isolated from the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (common ice plant). Transcripts range in size from 1.6 to 2.6 kb, and encode proteins whose catalytic domains are between 24% and 62% identical to that of the Arabidopsis PP2C, ABI1. Transcript expression is tissue specific. Two isoforms are present only in roots (Mpc1 and Mpc5), three in young leaves (Mpc6, 8 and 9), two in old leaves (Mpc6 and Mpc8), and two in post-flowering leaves (Mpc8 and Mpc9). Mpc2 is strongly expressed in roots and also in seeds, meristematic tissues and mature flowers. Mpc3 is specific for leaf meristems, and Mpc4 is found in root and leaf meristems. Mpc7 is restricted to meristematic tissues. Mpc10 is only present in mature flowers. Mpc2 (in roots and leaves), Mpc5 (in roots) and Mpc8 (weakly in leaves) are induced by salinity stress and drought conditions with different kinetics in different tissues, but other Mpcs are downregulated by stress. Cold stress (4 degrees C) leads to a decline in Mpc5 and Mp6, but low temperature provoked a long-term (days) increase in Mpc2 levels in leaves and a transient increase (less than 24 h) in roots. Four full-length transcripts have been obtained. In each case, after over-expression in E. coli, the isolated proteins exhibited (Mg2+-dependent, okadeic acid-insensitive) protein phosphatase activity, although activity against 32P-phosphocasein varied among different PP2Cs. Determination of tissue developmental and stress response specificity of PP2C will facilitate functional studies of signal-transducing enzymes in this halophytic organism.

  6. The thermodynamic response of soft biological tissues to pulsed ultraviolet laser irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, V; Nishioka, N S; Mikić, B B

    1995-01-01

    The physical mechanisms that enable short pulses of high-intensity ultraviolet laser radiation to remove tissue, in a process known as laser ablation, remain obscure. The thermodynamic response of biological tissue to pulsed laser irradiation was investigated by measuring and subsequently analyzing the stress transients generated by pulsed argon fluorine (ArF, lambda = 193 nm) and krypton fluorine (KrF, lambda = 248 nm) excimer laser irradiation of porcine dermis using thin-film piezoelectric transducers. For radiant exposures that do not cause material removal, the stress transients are consistent with rapid thermal expansion of the tissue. At the threshold radiant exposure for ablation, the peak stress amplitude generated by 248 nm irradiation is more than an order of magnitude larger than that produced by 193 nm irradiation. For radiant exposures where material removal is achieved, the temporal structure of the stress transient indicates that the onset of material removal occurs during irradiation. In this regime, the variation of the peak compressive stress with radiant exposure is consistent with laser-induced rapid surface vaporization. For 193 nm irradiation, ionization of the ablated material occurs at even greater radiant exposures and is accompanied by a change in the variation of peak stress with radiant exposure consistent with a plasma-mediated ablation process. These results suggest that absorption of ultraviolet laser radiation by the extracellular matrix of tissue leads to decomposition of tissue on the time scale of the laser pulse. The difference in volumetric energy density at ablation threshold between the two wavelengths indicates that the larger stresses generated by 248 nm irradiation may facilitate the onset of material removal. However, once material removal is achieved, the stress measurements demonstrate that energy not directly responsible for target decomposition contributes to increasing the specific energy of the plume (and plasma

  7. Multi-scale mechanical response of freeze-dried collagen scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Offeddu, Giovanni S; Ashworth, Jennifer C; Cameron, Ruth E; Oyen, Michelle L

    2015-02-01

    Tissue engineering has grown in the past two decades as a promising solution to unresolved clinical problems such as osteoarthritis. The mechanical response of tissue engineering scaffolds is one of the factors determining their use in applications such as cartilage and bone repair. The relationship between the structural and intrinsic mechanical properties of the scaffolds was the object of this study, with the ultimate aim of understanding the stiffness of the substrate that adhered cells experience, and its link to the bulk mechanical properties. Freeze-dried type I collagen porous scaffolds made with varying slurry concentrations and pore sizes were tested in a viscoelastic framework by macroindentation. Membranes made up of stacks of pore walls were indented using colloidal probe atomic force microscopy. It was found that the bulk scaffold mechanical response varied with collagen concentration in the slurry consistent with previous studies on these materials. Hydration of the scaffolds resulted in a more compliant response, yet lesser viscoelastic relaxation. Indentation of the membranes suggested that the material making up the pore walls remains unchanged between conditions, so that the stiffness of the scaffolds at the scale of seeded cells is unchanged; rather, it is suggested that thicker pore walls or more of these result in the increased moduli for the greater slurry concentration conditions.

  8. Gene Expression Profile Analysis as a Prognostic Indicator of Normal Tissue Response to Simulated Space Radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, Michael; Stivers, David N.

    2004-01-01

    This project was funded as a pilot project to determine the feasibility of using gene expression profiles to characterize the response of human cells to exposure to particulate radiations such as those encountered in the spaceflight environment. We proposed to use microarray technology to examine the gene expression patterns of a bank of well-characterized human fibroblast cell cultures. These fibroblast cultures were derived from breast or head and neck cancer patients who exhibited normal, minimal, or severe normal tissue reactions following low LET radiation exposure via radiotherapy. Furthermore, determination of SF2 values from fibroblasts cultured from these individuals were predictive of risk for severe late reactions. We hypothesized that by determining the expression of thousands of genes we could identify gene expression patterns that reflect how normal tissues respond to high Z and energy (HZE) particles, that is, that there are molecular signatures for HZE exposures. We also hypothesized that individuals who are intrinsically radiosensitive may elicit a unique response. Because this was funded as a pilot project we focused our initial studies on logistics and appropriate experimental design, and then to test our hypothesis that there is a unique molecular response to specific particles, in this case C and Fe, for primary human skin fibroblasts.

  9. Eosinophils and IL-4 Support Nematode Growth Coincident with an Innate Response to Tissue Injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Beiting, Daniel P; Gebreselassie, Nebiat G; Gagliardo, Lucille F; Ruyechan, Maura C; Lee, Nancy A; Lee, James J; Appleton, Judith A

    2015-12-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the functions of eosinophils extend beyond host defense and allergy to metabolism and tissue regeneration. These influences have strong potential to be relevant in worm infections in which eosinophils are prominent and parasites rely on the host for nutrients to support growth or reproduction. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the observation that eosinophils promote growth of Trichinella spiralis larvae in skeletal muscle. Our results indicate that IL-4 and eosinophils are necessary for normal larval growth and that eosinophils from IL-4 competent mice are sufficient to support growth. The eosinophil-mediated effect operates in the absence of adaptive immunity. Following invasion by newborn larvae, host gene expression in skeletal muscle was compatible with a regenerative response and a shift in the source of energy in infected tissue. The presence of eosinophils suppressed local inflammation while also influencing nutrient homeostasis in muscle. Redistribution of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and phosphorylation of Akt were observed in nurse cells, consistent with enhancement of glucose uptake and glycogen storage by larvae that is known to occur. The data are consistent with a mechanism in which eosinophils promote larval growth by an IL-4 dependent mechanism that limits local interferon-driven responses that otherwise alter nutrient metabolism in infected muscle. Our findings document a novel interaction between parasite and host in which worms have evolved a strategy to co-opt an innate host cell response in a way that facilitates their growth.

  10. Eosinophils and IL-4 Support Nematode Growth Coincident with an Innate Response to Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lu; Beiting, Daniel P.; Gebreselassie, Nebiat G.; Gagliardo, Lucille F.; Ruyechan, Maura C.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.; Appleton, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the functions of eosinophils extend beyond host defense and allergy to metabolism and tissue regeneration. These influences have strong potential to be relevant in worm infections in which eosinophils are prominent and parasites rely on the host for nutrients to support growth or reproduction. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying the observation that eosinophils promote growth of Trichinella spiralis larvae in skeletal muscle. Our results indicate that IL-4 and eosinophils are necessary for normal larval growth and that eosinophils from IL-4 competent mice are sufficient to support growth. The eosinophil-mediated effect operates in the absence of adaptive immunity. Following invasion by newborn larvae, host gene expression in skeletal muscle was compatible with a regenerative response and a shift in the source of energy in infected tissue. The presence of eosinophils suppressed local inflammation while also influencing nutrient homeostasis in muscle. Redistribution of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and phosphorylation of Akt were observed in nurse cells, consistent with enhancement of glucose uptake and glycogen storage by larvae that is known to occur. The data are consistent with a mechanism in which eosinophils promote larval growth by an IL-4 dependent mechanism that limits local interferon-driven responses that otherwise alter nutrient metabolism in infected muscle. Our findings document a novel interaction between parasite and host in which worms have evolved a strategy to co-opt an innate host cell response in a way that facilitates their growth. PMID:26720604

  11. Antibody response of autogenous splenic tissue implanted in the abdominal cavity of mice.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Sérgio I; Rezende, Alice B; Teixeira, Francisco M; Ferreira, Ana Paula; Alves, Márcio M J; Jamel, Nelson; Assis, Raimunda V C; Teixeira, Henrique C

    2005-12-01

    There is still controversy about the immunologic function of autotransplanted splenic tissue. In this study, splenic autotransplantation was performed in the abdominal cavity of mice, and the plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay was used to investigate the frequency of antibody-forming cells in response to sheep red blood cell (SRBC) immunization. BALB/c mice were divided into four groups according to the location of the autogenous graft: intraomental (IO), free peritoneal splenosis (FPS), retroperitoneal (RP), and nongrafted control (CT). Thirty days after surgery the mice were immunized intraperitoneally with SRBCs, and 4 days later splenic immunoglobulin M anti-SRBC-secreting cells were determined by counting the number of PFCs. All the immunized mice showed increased numbers of PFCs that were about 2 logs higher than those in the the nonimmunized controls (P < 0.005). The frequencies of anti-SRBC-producing cells in the tissues grafted in various sites of the abdominal cavity (IO, FPS, RP), in the normal spleen from nonoperated controls (CT), or in the sham-operated control group (SCT) were not notably different (5582 +/- 2475 PFC/10(7) cells for IO; 4849 +/- 1856 for FPS; 6604 +/- 2903 for RP; 5940 +/- 5029 for CT; and 6172 +/- 2203 for SCT). Similar histology with small architectural variations was observed in all implants; less white pulp was involved, and there was more congestion in the red pulp, with extensive sinusoids and reticular fiber proliferation. This study shows that the T cell-dependent antibody response in implanted splenic tissues is as efficient as in the intact spleen, with no difference between the graft sites studied. This immune response does not depend on the slight architectural variations observed in the splenic implants.

  12. [Physical model of the plant tissue response to exposure to the microwave electromagnetic field].

    PubMed

    Kalinin, L G; Boshkova, I L

    2003-01-01

    A hypothesis was suggested to explain the effect of biostimulation of seeds exposed to microwave electromagnetic field. It was shown that the assumption on the determining influence of the microwave field on the transport properties of the conducting system of a plant satisfactorily explains the phenomena observed in germinating seeds and growing plants. A physical model of the response of a plant cell to a microwave field is presented, which served as a basis for the method of calculating the maximum possible time of exposure of plant tissue.

  13. An essential role for TH2-type response in limiting acute tissue damage during experimental helminth infection.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Helminths induce potent Th2-type immune responses that can lead to worm expulsion, but it remains undetermined whether components of this response can enhance the wound healing responses elicited as these large multi-cellular parasites traffic thru vital tissues. We used a model of helminth infecti...

  14. Targeting the finite-deformation response of wavy biological tissues with bio-inspired material architectures.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenqiong; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    2013-12-01

    The Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm driven by a homogenized-based model is employed to target the response of three types of heart-valve chordae tendineae with different stiffening characteristics due to different degrees of waviness of collagen fibril/fiber bundles. First, geometric and material parameters are identified through an extensive parametric study that produce excellent agreement of the simulated response based on simplified unit cell architectures with the actual response of the complex biological tissue. These include amplitude and wavelength of the crimped chordae microstructure, elastic moduli of the constituent phases, and degree of microstructural refinement of the stiff phase at fixed volume fraction whose role in the stiffening response is elucidated. The study also reveals potential non-uniqueness of bio-inspired wavy microstructures in attaining the targeted response of certain chordae tendineae crimp configurations. The homogenization-based Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm, whose predictions are validated through the parametric study, is then shown to be an excellent tool in identifying optimal unit cell architectures in the design space that exhibits very steep gradients. Finally, defect criticality of optimal unit cell architectures is investigated in order to assess their feasibility in replacing actual biological tendons with stiffening characteristics.

  15. Stomatal responses to changes in vapor pressure deficit reflect tissue-specific differences in hydraulic conductance.

    PubMed

    Ocheltree, T W; Nippert, J B; Prasad, P V V

    2014-01-01

    The vapor pressure deficit (D) of the atmosphere can negatively affect plant growth as plants reduce stomatal conductance to water vapor (g(wv)) in response to increasing D, limiting the ability of plants to assimilate carbon. The sensitivity of g(wv) to changes in D varies among species and has been correlated with the hydraulic conductance of leaves (K(leaf) ), but the hydraulic conductance of other tissues has also been implicated in plant responses to changing D. Among the 19 grass species, we found that K(leaf) was correlated with the hydraulic conductance of large longitudinal veins (K(lv), r(2) = 0.81), but was not related to K(root) (r(2) = 0.01). Stomatal sensitivity to D was correlated with K(leaf) relative to total leaf area (r(2) = 0.50), and did not differ between C3 and C4 species. Transpiration (E) increased in response to D, but 8 of the 19 plants showed a decline in E at high D, indicative of an 'apparent feedforward' response. For these individuals, E began to decline at lower values of D in plants with low K(root) (r(2) = 0.72). These results show the significance of both leaf and root hydraulic conductance as drivers of plant responses to evaporative demand.

  16. Global Gene Expression Responses to Low- or High-Dose Radiation in a Human Three-Dimensional Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Mezentsev, Alexandre; Amundson, Sally A.

    2011-01-01

    Accumulating data suggest that the biological responses to high and low doses of radiation are qualitatively different, necessitating the direct study of low-dose responses to better understand potential risks. Most such studies have used two-dimensional culture systems, which may not fully represent responses in three-dimensional tissues. To gain insight into low-dose responses in tissue, we have profiled global gene expression in EPI-200, a three-dimensional tissue model that imitates the structure and function of human epidermis, at 4, 16 and 24 h after exposure to high (2.5 Gy) and low (0.1 Gy) doses of low-LET protons. The most significant gene ontology groups among genes altered in expression were consistent with effects observed at the tissue level, where the low dose was associated with recovery and tissue repair, while the high dose resulted in loss of structural integrity and terminal differentiation. Network analysis of the significantly responding genes suggested that TP53 dominated the response to 2.5 Gy, while HNF4A, a novel transcription factor not previously associated with radiation response, was most prominent in the low-dose response. HNF4A protein levels and phosphorylation were found to increase in tissues and cells after low- but not high-dose irradiation. PMID:21486161

  17. Tissue response to five commercially available peritoneal adhesion barriers-A systematic histological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Volker H; Mamilos, Andreas; Schmitt, Christine; Neitzer-Planck, Constanze N E; Rajab, Taufiek K; Hollemann, David; Wagner, Willi; Krämer, Bernhard; Hierlemann, Helmut; James Kirkpatrick, C; Brochhausen, Christoph

    2017-03-06

    Separating wounded serosa by physical barriers is the only clinically approved adjunct for postoperative adhesion prevention. Since the optimal adhesion barrier has not been found, it is essential to improve our pathogenic understanding of adhesion formation and to compare the effects of different barrier materials on tissue and cells. Wistar rats underwent standardized peritoneal damage and were treated either with Seprafilm, Adept, Intercoat, Spraygel, SupraSeal or remained untreated as a control. 14 days postoperatively, the lesions were explanted and histomorphologically analyzed using the European ISO score to evaluate material implants. Striking differences between the material groups were present regarding the inflammation, fibrosis, and foreign body reaction. According to the ISO score, Intercoat and Spraygel were considered as nonirritating to tissue. Adept, Seprafilm, and SupraSeal were assessed as mild-irritating materials. Interestingly, the most effective material in adhesion prevention revealed moderate inflammation accompanied by minor fibrosis. The degree of inflammation to barrier materials does not predict the efficacy in the prevention of adhesions. Histopathological investigations are crucial to improve our understanding of the cellular mechanisms during adhesion formation and elucidate the tissue response to material approaches used in adhesion prevention. This will lead to improved antiadhesive strategies and the development of functional barrier biomaterials. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017.

  18. Complex responses to Si quantum dots accumulation in carp liver tissue: Beyond oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Serban, Andreea Iren; Stanca, Loredana; Sima, Cornelia; Staicu, Andrea Cristina; Zarnescu, Otilia; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2015-09-05

    The use of quantum dots (QDs) in biomedical applications is limited due to their inherent toxicity caused by the heavy metal core of the particles. Consequently, silicon-based QDs are expected to display diminished toxicity. We investigated the in vivo effects induced by Si/SiO2 QDs intraperitoneally injected in crucian carp liver. The QDs contained a crystalline Si core encased in a SiO2 shell, with a size between 2.75 and 11.25nm and possess intrinsic fluorescence (Ex 325nm/Em ∼690nm). Tissue fluorescence microscopy analysis revealed the presence of QDs in the liver for at least 2weeks after injection. Although protein and lipid oxidative stress markers showed the onset of oxidative stress, the hepatic tissue exhibited significant antioxidant adaptations (increase of antioxidant enzymes, recovery of glutathione levels), sustained by the activation of Hsp30 and Hsp70 chaperoning proteins. The increased activity of cyclooxigenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) support the idea that Si/SiO2 QDs have a potential to induce inflammatory response, a scenario also indicated by the profile of Hsp60 and Hsp90 heat shock proteins. MMPs profile and the recovery of oxidative stress markers suggested a tissue remodelation phase after 3weeks from QDs administration.

  19. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches to enhance the functional response to skeletal muscle injury.

    PubMed

    Sicari, Brian M; Dearth, Christopher L; Badylak, Stephen F

    2014-01-01

    The well-recognized ability of skeletal muscle for functional and structural regeneration following injury is severely compromised in degenerative diseases and in volumetric muscle loss. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies to support muscle reconstruction have typically been cell-centric with approaches that involve the exogenous delivery of cells with myogenic potential. These strategies have been limited by poor cell viability and engraftment into host tissue. Alternative approaches have involved the use of biomaterial scaffolds as substrates or delivery vehicles for exogenous myogenic progenitor cells. Acellular biomaterial scaffolds composed of mammalian extracellular matrix (ECM) have also been used as an inductive niche to promote the recruitment and differentiation of endogenous myogenic progenitor cells. An acellular approach, which activates or utilizes endogenous cell sources, obviates the need for exogenous cell administration and provides an advantage for clinical translation. The present review examines the state of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine therapies directed at augmenting the skeletal muscle response to injury and presents the pros and cons of each with respect to clinical translation.

  20. [Response of immune system and lymphoid tissue of respiratory and gastrointestinal organs to space flight factors].

    PubMed

    Sapin, M R; Erofeeva, L M; Grigorenko, D E

    1999-01-01

    The studies demonstrated that gamma-radiation drastically enhanced destructive processes and suppressed the mitotic activity of lymphocytes in the thymus and spleen. This resulted in the altered morphological picture of immune organs: the inversion of layers occurred in the thymus, the splenic white pulp increased by three times, lymphoid nodules with germinating centers disappeared, the marginal area became thinner. Following gamma-radiation, restorative processes in the thymus and spleen were noticeable just on day 3 and 7, respectively. However, the cell composition of murine immune organs failed to achieve control values by day 60 after exposure. Examining the responses of respiratory and digestive lymphoid tissue to acetaldehyde and drinking water organisms indicated that as the concentration of an acting agent and the time of exposure increased, there was lymphocytopoietic inhibition in the lymphoid formations whereas its small doses activated a local immune response.

  1. Effects of glyphosate on hepatic tissue evaluating melanomacrophages and erythrocytes responses in neotropical anuran Leptodactylus latinasus.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Iglesias, Juan Manuel; Franco-Belussi, Lilian; Moreno, Liliana; Tripole, Susana; de Oliveira, Classius; Natale, Guillermo Sebastián

    2016-05-01

    Glyphosate (GLY) is the most used herbicide worldwide and its effects on anurans are well known. Pollutants can cause physiological and morphological effects. Therefore, this study evaluated the effects of GLY on hepatic melanomacrophages as a response to environmental stressors. Three treatments were exposed to different concentrations of pure GLY (100, 1000, and 10,000 μg g(-1), respectively), and there was also a control group. After the experimental time, liver and blood were analyzed. Melanomacrophages (MMCs) were located between the hepatocyte cordons, close to sinusoids. GLY increased the melanin area in MMCs of Leptodactylus latinasus exposed since lowest concentration until highest concentration. GLY also changed the occurrence of hepatic catabolism pigments into melanomacrophages and erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities; therefore, it can interfere with the hepatic metabolism. In conclusion, GLY promotes alterations in the hepatic tissue and erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities. Furthermore, MMCs may be useful as morphological responses of GLY effects.

  2. Development of an Ex Vivo Tissue Platform To Study the Human Lung Response to Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Joseph G.; Winchell, Caylin G.; Kurten, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes human Q fever, an acute debilitating flu-like illness that can also present as chronic endocarditis. Disease typically occurs following inhalation of contaminated aerosols, resulting in an initial pulmonary infection. In human cells, C. burnetii generates a replication niche termed the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) by directing fusion with autophagosomes and lysosomes. C. burnetii requires this lysosomal environment for replication and uses a Dot/Icm type IV secretion system to generate the large PV. However, we do not understand how C. burnetii evades the intracellular immune surveillance that triggers an inflammatory response. We recently characterized human alveolar macrophage (hAM) infection in vitro and found that avirulent C. burnetii triggers sustained interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production. Here, we evaluated infection of ex vivo human lung tissue, defining a valuable approach for characterizing C. burnetii interactions with a human host. Within whole lung tissue, C. burnetii preferentially replicated in hAMs. Additionally, IL-1β production correlated with formation of an apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain (ASC)-dependent inflammasome in response to infection. We also assessed potential activation of a human-specific noncanonical inflammasome and found that caspase-4 and caspase-5 are processed during infection. Interestingly, although inflammasome activation is closely linked to pyroptosis, lytic cell death did not occur following C. burnetii-triggered inflammasome activation, indicating an atypical response after intracellular detection. Together, these studies provide a novel platform for studying the human innate immune response to C. burnetii. PMID:26902725

  3. Development of an inhalable, stimuli-responsive particulate system for delivery to deep lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Yasmine; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Tammam, Salma; Lamprecht, Alf; Ali, Mohamed Ehab; Schmidt, Annette; Sollazzo, Silvio; Mathur, Sanjay

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer, the deadliest solid tumor among all types of cancer, remains difficult to treat. This is a result of unavoidable exposure to carcinogens, poor diagnosis, the lack of targeted drug delivery platforms and limitations associated with delivery of drug to deep lung tissues. Development of a non-invasive, patient-convenient formula for the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics to cancer in deep lung tissue is the aim of this study. The formulation consisted of inhalable polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/maltodextrin (MD)-based microparticles (MPs) encapsulating chitosan (CS) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with either drug only or drug and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Drug release from CS NPs was enhanced with the aid of MNPs by a factor of 1.7 in response to external magnetic field. Preferential toxicity by CS NPs was shown towards tumor cells (A549) in comparison to cultured fibroblasts (L929). The prepared spray freeze dried (SFD) powders for CS NPs and CS MNPs were of the same size at ∼6μm. They had a fine particle fraction (FPF≤5.2μm) of 40-42% w/w and mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 5-6μm as determined by the Next Generation Impactor (NGI). SFD-MPs of CS MNPs possess higher MMAD due to the high density associated with encapsulated MNPs. The developed formulation demonstrates several capabilities including tissue targeting, controlled drug release, and the possible imaging and diagnostic values (due to its MNPs content) and therefore represents an improved therapeutic platform for drug delivery to cancer in deep lung tissue.

  4. Epidermal Homeostasis and Radiation Responses in a Multiscale Tissue Modeling Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2013-01-01

    The surface of skin is lined with several thin layers of epithelial cells that are maintained throughout life time by a small population of stem cells. High dose radiation exposures could injure and deplete the underlying proliferative cells and induce cutaneous radiation syndrome. In this work we propose a multiscale computational model for skin epidermal dynamics that links phenomena occurring at the subcellular, cellular, and tissue levels of organization, to simulate the experimental data of the radiation response of swine epidermis, which is closely similar to human epidermis. Incorporating experimentally measured histological and cell kinetic parameters, we obtain results of population kinetics and proliferation indexes comparable to observations in unirradiated and acutely irradiated swine experiments. At the sub-cellular level, several recently published Wnt signaling controlled cell-cycle models are applied and the roles of key components and parameters are analyzed. Based on our simulation results, we demonstrate that a moderate increase of proliferation rate for the survival proliferative cells is sufficient to fully repopulate the area denuded by high dose radiation, as long as the integrity of underlying basement membrane is maintained. Our work highlights the importance of considering proliferation kinetics as well as the spatial organization of tissues when conducting in vivo investigations of radiation responses. This integrated model allow us to test the validity of several basic biological rules at the cellular level and sub-cellular mechanisms by qualitatively comparing simulation results with published research, and enhance our understanding of the pathophysiological effects of ionizing radiation on skin.

  5. Augmentation of sarcolemmal Ca by anionic amphiphile: contractile response of three ventricular tissues.

    PubMed

    Langer, G A; Rich, T L

    1986-02-01

    The anionic amphiphile dodecyl sulfate was used at the concentration of 100 microM, below the concentration at which membrane permeability is compromised. In rat myocardial tissue culture dodecyl sulfate induced a large increase in Ca uptake in the intact cells, of which 84% was distributed in a rapidly exchangeable (t1/2 less than 18 s) and 16% in a slowly exchangeable (t1/2 = 17 min) compartment. Dodecyl sulfate induced a large increase in Ca bound to isolated sarcolemmal membrane of these cells. This increase in membrane binding and the distribution in whole cells is consistent with insertion of dodecyl sulfate in the sarcolemma (SL) with subsequent Ca binding to its anionic head group. With perfusate extracellular calcium concentration ([Ca]o) equal to 1 mM, dodecyl sulfate produced greater than 60% increase in active force in ventricular tissue from adult rabbit and neonatal rat but virtually no increase in adult rat ventricle. Preperfusion with 0.1 mM [Ca]o or 10(-6) M ryanodine markedly increased the relative response of adult rat ventricle to dodecyl sulfate. After a quiescent period in rabbit ventricle, dodecyl sulfate caused a progressive increase of force of each beat compared with control; i.e., the treppe response was increased at each successive beat. This did not occur in adult rat ventricle. These results further clarify the different quantitative role of SL-bound versus sarcotubular Ca in the hearts of different species.

  6. Acute molecular mechanisms responsive to feeding and meal constitution in mesenteric adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Carl; Yoshioka, Mayumi; St-Amand, Jonny

    2010-02-01

    To identify the acute effects of feeding on mesenteric fat, we have performed a transcriptomic study in the mesenteric adipose tissue after low-fat (LF) and high-fat (HF) meal ingestion. After fasting, one group of mice was killed and the others were fed ad libitum with HF or LF meal, and killed 3 h after the ingestion. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was performed, generating approximately 150,000 tags/sample. The results were confirmed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Transcripts involved in lipid biosynthesis were upregulated only by LF meal, whereas intracellular lipid catabolism was repressed by feeding. Apoptotic genes were downregulated, whereas antiapoptosis and proteolysis were upregulated by feeding. The expression levels of genes coding for adiponectin and ribosomal proteins were decreased by HF meal, as well as transcripts involved in mRNA processing, cytoskeleton, and extracellular matrix. Several other fat-responsive genes were identified, including diverse uncharacterized transcripts. These results revealed that mesenteric adipose tissue transcriptome was responsive to food intake and was affected differently according to meal constitution. The identification of uncharacterized transcripts regulated by LF and HF meals is a first step toward further understanding the early mechanisms of diet-induced obesity as well as discovering new therapeutic targets for obesity-related diseases.

  7. Bioluminescence imaging for assessment of immune responses following implantation of engineered heart tissue (EHT).

    PubMed

    Conradi, Lenard; Pahrmann, Christiane; Schmidt, Stephanie; Deuse, Tobias; Hansen, Arne; Eder, Alexandra; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Robbins, Robert C; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Schrepfer, Sonja

    2011-06-01

    Various techniques of cardiac tissue engineering have been pursued in the past decades including scaffolding strategies using either native or bioartificial scaffold materials, entrapment of cardiac myocytes in hydrogels such as fibrin or collagen and stacking of myocyte monolayers. These concepts aim at restoration of compromised cardiac function (e.g. after myocardial infarction) or as experimental models (e.g. predictive toxicology and substance screening or disease modelling). Precise monitoring of cell survival after implantation of engineered heart tissue (EHT) has now become possible using in-vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) techniques. Here we describe the generation of fibrin-based EHT from a transgenic rat strain with ubiquitous expression of firefly luciferase (ROSA/luciferase-LEW Tg; ). Implantation is performed into the greater omentum of different rat strains to assess immune responses of the recipient organism following EHT implantation. Comparison of results generated by BLI and the Enzyme Linked Immuno Spot Technique (ELISPOT) confirm the usability of BLI for the assessment of immune responses.

  8. Studies on the response of ewes to live chlamydiae adapted to chicken embryos or tissue culture.

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, V M; Ata, F A; Storz, J

    1976-01-01

    Ewes infected before gestation with chicken embryo or tissue culture adapted chlamydial strain B-577 were challenge inoculated with the homologous strain at four to 18 weeks of gestation. The ewes responsed with group specific complement fixing antibody titers of 1:8 to 1:256 by the second week after initial infection. A secondary antibody response in the surviving challenge inoculated ewes occurred at the time of lambing and reached titers of 1:32 to 1:256 by the second week after parturition. Group specific complement fixing antibodies did not appear to play a significant role in resistance to chlamydial infection. Ewes infected with the chicken embryo adapted strain B-577 excreted chlamydiae in their feces 60 days after inoculation. However, chlamydiae were not recovered from feces of ewes infected with the tissue culture adapted strain B-577. Placentas of ewes challenge inoculated by the intravenous route were consistently infected. Chlamydiae were recovered from placentas, some fetuses and lambs. In two instances when challenge inoculation was given by the intramuscular route, infection was detected only by the direct fluorescent antibody method. PMID:1000377

  9. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low dose/low LET radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Munira A Kadhim

    2010-03-05

    To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e., less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these “non-targeted” responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander responses in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/H and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition on two non-targeted radiation responses in these models; the bystander effect and genomic instability, which we believe are closely related. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to doses approaching a single electron traversal. Using conventional X-ray and γ-ray sources, novel dish separation and targeted irradiation approaches, we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various bystander conditions at doses down to a few electron tracks. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for bystander targeted studies. Mechanistic studies of instability and the bystander response in different cell lineages will focus initially on the role of cytokines which have been shown to be involved in bystander signaling and the initiation of instability. These studies also aim

  10. In vivo response-based identification of direct hormone target cell populations using high-density tissue arrays.

    PubMed

    LeBaron, M J; Ahonen, T J; Nevalainen, M T; Rui, H

    2007-03-01

    To identify cell populations directly responsive to prolactin (PRL), GH, erythropoietin, or granulocyte-colony stimulating factor within the physiological setting of an intact mammal, we combined in situ detection of hormone-activated signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)-5 in rats with high-throughput tissue array analysis using cutting-edge matrix assembly (CEMA). Inducible activation of Stat5a/b, as judged by levels of nuclear-localized, phosphoTyr694/699-Stat5a/b, served as an immediate and sensitive in situ marker of receptor signaling in rat tissues after injection into male and female rats of a single, receptor-saturating dose of hormone for maximal receptor activation. CEMA tissue arrays facilitated analysis of most tissues, including architecturally complex, thin-walled, and stratified tissues such as gut and skin. In 40 tissues analyzed, 35 PRL-responsive and 32 GH-responsive cell types were detected, of which 22 cell types were responsive to both hormones. Interestingly, PRL but not GH activated Stat5 in nearly all of the endocrine glands. In mammary glands, PRL activated Stat5 in a majority of luminal epithelial cells but not myoepithelial cells, stromal fibroblasts, or adipocytes, whereas GH activated Stat5 in a significant fraction of myoepithelial cells, fibroblasts, and adipocytes but only in a minority of luminal cells. Finally, the organism-wide screening revealed a yet-to-be identified erythropoietin-responsive cell type in connective tissue. CEMA tissue arrays provide cost-effective in situ analysis of large numbers of tissues. Biomarker-based identification of cell populations responsive to individual hormones may shed new light on endocrine disease as well as improve understanding of effects and side effects of hormones and drugs.

  11. Fibroblast Response to Lanthanoid Metal Ion Stimulation: Potential Contribution to Fibrotic Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, William; Perone, Patricia; Walker, Kyle; Bhagavathula, Narasimharao; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; DaSilva, Marissa; Dame, Michael K.; Varani, James

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare each of the 14 naturally occurring lanthanoid metal ions for ability to stimulate pro-fibrotic responses in human dermal fibroblasts. When fibroblasts were exposed to individual lanthanoids over the concentration range of 1–100 μM, increased proliferation was observed with each of the agents as compared with control cells that were already proliferating rapidly in a growth factor-enriched culture medium. Dose-response differences were observed among the individual metal ions. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 levels were also increased in response to lanthanoid exposure but type I procollagen production was not. A dose–response relationship between induction of proliferation and increased MMP-1 was observed. Non-lanthanoid transition metal ions (aluminum, copper, cobalt, iron, magnesium, manganese, nickel, and zinc) were examined in the same assays; there was little stimulation with any of these metals. When epidermal keratinocytes were examined in place of dermal fibroblasts, there was no growth stimulation with any of the lanthanoids. Several of the lanthanoid metals inhibited keratinocyte proliferation at higher concentrations (50–100 μM). PMID:21484406

  12. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype.

  13. Effects of Coralliophila violacea on tissue loss in the scleractinian corals Porites spp. depend on host response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymundo, L.; Work, Thierry M.; Miller, R.L.; Lozada-Misa, P.L.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated interactions between the corallivorous gastropod Coralliophila violacea and its preferred hosts Porites spp. Our objectives were to experimentally determine whether tissue loss could progress in Porites during or after Coralliophila predation on corals with and without tissue loss and to histologically document snail predation. In 64% of feeding scars, tissue regenerated within 3 wk, leaving no trace of predation. However, in roughly 28% of scars, lesions progressed to subacute tissue loss resembling white syndrome. In feeding experiments, scars from snails previously fed diseased tissue developed progressive tissue loss twice as frequently as scars from snails previously fed healthy tissue. Scars from previously healthy-fed snails were 3 times as likely to heal as those from previously diseased-fed snails. Histology revealed marked differences in host responses to snails; P. cylindrica manifested a robust inflammatory response with fewer secondary colonizing organisms such as algae, sponges, and helminths, whereas P. rus showed no evident inflammation and more secondary colonization. We conclude that lesion progression associated with Coralliophila may be associated with secondary colonization of coral tissues damaged by predator-induced trauma and necrosis. Importantly, variation at the cellular level should be considered when explaining interspecific differences in host responses in corals impacted by phenomena such as predation.

  14. Reverse engineering adverse outcome pathways.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Edward J; Chipman, J Kevin; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or incompletely characterized, mechanisms of action. The application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) can be used to overcome these limitations. This approach was used to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows (FHM, Pimephales promelas). Gene expression changes in FHM ovaries in response to seven different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions, were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. Potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide were examined using two mutual information-based methods to infer gene regulatory networks and potential AOPs. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict network paths from stressor to adverse outcome as candidate AOPs. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment, thus leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biological processes, biomarkers, or alternative endpoints that can be used to monitor an AOP. Finally, the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology were identified and a road map for the utilization of these tools presented.

  15. Modeling the response of normal and ischemic cardiac tissue to electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Sunil Mani

    Heart disease, the leading cause of death worldwide, is often caused by ventricular fibrillation. A common treatment for this lethal arrhythmia is defibrillation: a strong electrical shock that resets the heart to its normal rhythm. To design better defibrillators, we need a better understanding of both fibrillation and defibrillation. Fundamental mysteries remain regarding the mechanism of how the heart responds to a shock, particularly anodal shocks and the resultant hyperpolarization. Virtual anodes play critical roles in defibrillation, and one cannot build better defibrillators until these mechanisms are understood. We are using mathematical modeling to numerically simulate observed phenomena, and are exploring fundamental mechanisms responsible for the heart's electrical behavior. Such simulations clarify mechanisms and identify key parameters. We investigate how systolic tissue responds to an anodal shock and how refractory tissue reacts to hyperpolarization by studying the dip in the anodal strength-interval curve. This dip is due to electrotonic interaction between regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization following a shock. The dominance of the electrotonic mechanism over calcium interactions implies the importance of the spatial distribution of virtual electrodes. We also investigate the response of localized ischemic tissue to an anodal shock by modeling a regional elevation of extracellular potassium concentration. This heterogeneity leads to action potential instability, 2:1 conduction block (alternans), and reflection-like reentry at the boarder of the normal and ischemic regions. This kind of reflection (reentry) occurs due to the delay between proximal and distal segments to re-excite the proximal segment. Our numerical simulations are based on the bidomain model, the state-of-the-art mathematical description of how cardiac tissue responds to shocks. The dynamic LuoRudy model describes the active properties of the membrane. To model ischemia

  16. Cruzipain induces autoimmune response against skeletal muscle and tissue damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Giordanengo, L; Fretes, R; Díaz, H; Cano, R; Bacile, A; Vottero-Cima, E; Gea, S

    2000-09-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate whether cruzipain, a major Trypanosoma cruzi antigen, is able to induce in mice an autoimmune response and skeletal muscle damage. We demonstrate that immunization with cruzipain triggers immunoglobulin G antibody binding to a 210-kDa antigen from a syngeneic skeletal muscle extract. The absorption of immune sera with purified myosin completely eliminated this reactivity, confirming that the protein identified is really myosin. We also found that spleen cells from immunized mice proliferated in response to a skeletal muscle extract rich in myosin and to purified myosin. Cells from control mice did not proliferate against any of the antigens tested. In addition, we observed an increase in plasma creatine kinase activity, a biochemical marker of muscle damage. Histological studies showed inflammatory infiltrates and myopathic changes in skeletal muscle of immunized animals. Electromyographic studies of these mice revealed changes such as are found in inflammatory or necrotic myopathy. Altogether, our results suggest that this experimental model provides strong evidence for a pathogenic role of anticruzipain immune response in the development of muscle tissue damage.

  17. Image-guided genomic analysis of tissue response to laser-induced thermal stress

    PubMed Central

    Mackanos, Mark A.; Helms, Mike; Kalish, Flora; Contag, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    The cytoprotective response to thermal injury is characterized by transcriptional activation of “heat shock proteins” (hsp) and proinflammatory proteins. Expression of these proteins may predict cellular survival. Microarray analyses were performed to identify spatially distinct gene expression patterns responding to thermal injury. Laser injury zones were identified by expression of a transgene reporter comprised of the 70 kD hsp gene and the firefly luciferase coding sequence. Zones included the laser spot, the surrounding region where hsp70-luc expression was increased, and a region adjacent to the surrounding region. A total of 145 genes were up-regulated in the laser irradiated region, while 69 were up-regulated in the adjacent region. At 7 hours the chemokine Cxcl3 was the highest expressed gene in the laser spot (24 fold) and adjacent region (32 fold). Chemokines were the most common up-regulated genes identified. Microarray gene expression was successfully validated using qRT- polymerase chain reaction for selected genes of interest. The early response genes are likely involved in cytoprotection and initiation of the healing response. Their regulatory elements will benefit creating the next generation reporter mice and controlling expression of therapeutic proteins. The identified genes serve as drug development targets that may prevent acute tissue damage and accelerate healing. PMID:21639585

  18. Mating-responsive genes in reproductive tissues of female Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Paul D.; Kapelnikov, Anat; Heifetz, Yael; Bender, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Male-derived accessory gland proteins that are transferred to females during mating have profound effects on female reproductive physiology including increased ovulation, mating inhibition, and effects on sperm utilization and storage. The extreme rates of evolution seen in accessory gland proteins may be driven by sperm competition and sexual conflict, processes that may ultimately drive complex interactions between female- and male-derived molecules and sperm. However, little is known of how gene expression in female reproductive tissues changes in response to the presence of male molecules and sperm. To characterize this response, we conducted parallel genomic and proteomic analyses of gene expression in the reproductive tract of 3-day-old unmated and mated female Drosophila melanogaster. Using DNA microarrays, we identified 539 transcripts that are differentially expressed in unmated vs. mated females and revealed a striking peak in differential expression at 6 h postmating and a marked shift from primarily down-regulated to primarily up-regulated transcripts within 3 h after mating. Combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analyses, we identified 84 differentially expressed proteins at 3 h postmating, including proteins that appeared to undergo posttranslational modification. Together, our observations define transcriptional and translational response to mating within the female reproductive tract and suggest a bimodal model of postmating gene expression initially correlated with mating and the final stages of female reproductive tract maturation and later with the declining presence of male reproductive molecules and with sperm maintenance and utilization. PMID:16798875

  19. Image-guided genomic analysis of tissue response to laser-induced thermal stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackanos, Mark A.; Helms, Mike; Kalish, Flora; Contag, Christopher H.

    2011-05-01

    The cytoprotective response to thermal injury is characterized by transcriptional activation of ``heat shock proteins'' (hsp) and proinflammatory proteins. Expression of these proteins may predict cellular survival. Microarray analyses were performed to identify spatially distinct gene expression patterns responding to thermal injury. Laser injury zones were identified by expression of a transgene reporter comprised of the 70 kD hsp gene and the firefly luciferase coding sequence. Zones included the laser spot, the surrounding region where hsp70-luc expression was increased, and a region adjacent to the surrounding region. A total of 145 genes were up-regulated in the laser irradiated region, while 69 were up-regulated in the adjacent region. At 7 hours the chemokine Cxcl3 was the highest expressed gene in the laser spot (24 fold) and adjacent region (32 fold). Chemokines were the most common up-regulated genes identified. Microarray gene expression was successfully validated using qRT- polymerase chain reaction for selected genes of interest. The early response genes are likely involved in cytoprotection and initiation of the healing response. Their regulatory elements will benefit creating the next generation reporter mice and controlling expression of therapeutic proteins. The identified genes serve as drug development targets that may prevent acute tissue damage and accelerate healing.

  20. The nuclear lamina is mechano-responsive to ECM elasticity in mature tissue

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Joe; Discher, Dennis E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT How cells respond to physical cues in order to meet and withstand the physical demands of their immediate surroundings has been of great interest for many years, with current research efforts focused on mechanisms that transduce signals into gene expression. Pathways that mechano-regulate the entry of transcription factors into the cell nucleus are emerging, and our most recent studies show that the mechanical properties of the nucleus itself are actively controlled in response to the elasticity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in both mature and developing tissue. In this Commentary, we review the mechano-responsive properties of nuclei as determined by the intermediate filament lamin proteins that line the inside of the nuclear envelope and that also impact upon transcription factor entry and broader epigenetic mechanisms. We summarize the signaling pathways that regulate lamin levels and cell-fate decisions in response to a combination of ECM mechanics and molecular cues. We will also discuss recent work that highlights the importance of nuclear mechanics in niche anchorage and cell motility during development, hematopoietic differentiation and cancer metastasis, as well as emphasizing a role for nuclear mechanics in protecting chromatin from stress-induced damage. PMID:24963133

  1. Interrogating the viscoelastic properties of tissue using viscoelastic response (VISR) ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzo, Mallory Renee

    Affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 newborn males, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic disorders in humans. Boys with DMD suffer progressive loss of muscle strength and function, leading to wheelchair dependence, cardiac and respiratory compromise, and death during young adulthood. There are currently no treatments that can halt or reverse the disease progression, and translating prospective treatments into clinical trials has been delayed by inadequate outcome measures. Current outcome measures, such as functional and muscle strength assessments, lack sensitivity to individual muscles, require subjective effort of the child, and are impacted by normal childhood growth and development. The goal of this research is to develop Viscoelastic Response (VisR) ultrasound which can be used to delineate compositional changes in muscle associated with DMD. In VisR, acoustic radiation force (ARF) is used to produce small, localized displacements within the muscle. Using conventional ultrasound to track the motion, the displacement response of the tissue can be evaluated against a mechanical model. In order to develop signal processing techniques and assess mechanical models, finite element method simulations are used to model the response of a viscoelastic material to ARF excitations. Results are then presented demonstrating VisR differentiation of viscoelastic changes with progressive dystrophic degeneration in a dog model of DMD. Finally, clinical feasibility of VisR imaging is demonstrated in two boys with DMD.

  2. The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

    2012-12-01

    Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1α, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, TNF α, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

  3. Changes in Tissue Oxygen Saturation in Response to Different Calf Compression Sleeves

    PubMed Central

    Dermont, T.; Morizot, L.; Bouhaddi, M.; Ménétrier, A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. The purpose was to examine the changes in tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) in response to the application of different commercially available calf compression sleeves. Methods. Eight subjects came to the laboratory to complete a session in seated position including 10 min of quiet rest followed by 3 min measuring calf StO2 without compression sleeves and then alternating of 3 min of passive rest and 3 min measuring StO2 with calf compression sleeves. A total of 15 different commercially available compression sleeves were studied in a randomized order. Calf StO2 was recorded using near-infrared spectroscopy. Results. StO2 was significantly increased with all compression sleeves (p < 0.05) compared with no compression (from +6.9% for the least effective to +22.6% for the most effective). Large differences were observed between compression sleeves (p < 0.05). StO2 was positively correlated with compression pressure (p < 0.05; r = 0.84). Conclusion. This study shows that wearing compression sleeves from various brands differently affects tissue oxygen saturation. Differences were linked to the compression pressure: higher compression pressures were associated with higher StO2. PMID:26464899

  4. Real-time 2D Imaging of Thermal and Mechanical Tissue Response to Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2010-03-01

    An integrated system capable of performing high frame-rate two-dimensional (2D) temperature imaging in realtime is has been developed. The system consists of a SonixRP ultrasound scanner and a custom built data processing unit connected with Gigabit Ethernet (GbE). The SonixRP scanner which serves as the frontend of the integrated system allows us to have flexibilities of controlling the beam sequence and accessing the radio frequency (RF) data in realtime through its research interface. The RF data is then streamlined to the backend of the system through GbE, where the data is processed using a 2D temperature estimation algorithm running in a general purpose graphics processing unit (GPU). Using this system, we have developed a 2D high frame-rate imaging mode, M2D, for imaging the mechanical and thermal tissue response to subtherapeutic HIFU beams. In this paper, we present results from imaging subtherapetic HIFU beams in vitro porcine heart before and after lesion formation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of tissue parameter changes due to HIFU-induced lesions.

  5. Antioxidant response and histopathological changes in brain tissue of pigeon exposed to avermectin.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; You, Tian-Zi; Zhu, Wen-Jun; Qu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Ci; Zhao, Bing; Xu, Shi-Wen; Li, Shu

    2013-10-01

    Avermectins (AVMs) are the active components of some insecticidal and nematicidal products used in agriculture and veterinary medicine for the prevention of parasitic diseases. Residues of AVM drugs or their metabolites in livestock feces have toxic effects on non-target aquatic and terrestrial organisms. In this study, oxidative stress responses and pathological changes on pigeon brain tissues and serum after subchronic exposure to AVM for 30, 60 and 90 days were investigated. The decrease in antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase, SOD and glutathione peroxidase, GSH-Px) activities and increase in methane dicarboxylic aldehyde content in a dose-time-dependent manner in the brain and serum of pigeon were observed. The protein carbonyl content, an indicator of protein oxidation, and DNA-protein crosslink coefficient were significantly augmented with dose-time-dependent properties. The microscopic structures of the cerebrum, cerebellum and optic lobe altered obviously, the severity of which increased with the concentration of AVM and exposure time. The results imply that AVM could induce oxidative damage to the brain tissue and serum of pigeon. The information presented in this study is helpful to understand the mechanism of AVM-induced oxidative stress in birds.

  6. Design and characterization of fibrin-based acoustically responsive scaffolds for tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Moncion, Alexander; Arlotta, Keith J.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Putnam, Andrew J.; Franceschi, Renny T.; Fabiilli, Mario L.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogel scaffolds are used in tissue engineering as a delivery vehicle for regenerative growth factors (GFs). Spatiotemporal patterns of GF signaling are critical for tissue regeneration, yet most scaffolds afford limited control of GF release, especially after implantation. We previously demonstrated that acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) can control GF release from a fibrin scaffold doped with a perfluorocarbon emulsion. This study investigates properties of the acoustically responsive scaffold (ARS) critical for further translation. At 2.5 MHz, ADV and inertial cavitation thresholds ranged from 1.5 – 3.0 MPa and 2.0 – 7.0 MPa peak rarefactional pressure, respectively, for ARSs of varying compositions. Viability of C3H10T1/2 cells, encapsulated in the ARS, did not decrease significantly for pressures below 4 MPa. ARSs with perfluorohexane emulsions displayed higher stability versus perfluoropentane emulsions, while surrogate payload release was minimal without ultrasound. These results enable the selection of ARS compositions and acoustic parameters needed for optimized spatiotemporal control. PMID:26526782

  7. Tissue response and biodegradation of composite scaffolds prepared from Thai silk fibroin, gelatin and hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Tungtasana, Hathairat; Shuangshoti, Somruetai; Shuangshoti, Shanop; Kanokpanont, Sorada; Kaplan, David L; Bunaprasert, Tanom; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn

    2010-12-01

    This work aimed to investigate tissue responses and biodegradation, both in vitro and in vivo, of four types of Bombyx mori Thai silk fibroin based-scaffolds. Thai silk fibroin (SF), conjugated gelatin/Thai silk fibroin (CGSF), hydroxyapatite/Thai silk fibroin (SF4), and hydroxyapatite/conjugated gelatin/Thai silk fibroin (CGSF4) scaffolds were fabricated using salt-porogen leaching, dehydrothermal/chemical crosslinking and an alternate soaking technique for mineralization. In vitro biodegradation in collagenase showed that CGSF scaffolds had the slowest biodegradability, due to the double crosslinking by dehydrothermal and chemical treatments. The hydroxyapatite deposited from alternate soaking separated from the surface of the protein scaffolds when immersed in collagenase. From in vivo biodegradation studies, all scaffolds could still be observed after 12 weeks of implantation in subcutaneous tissue of Wistar rats and also following ISO10993-6: Biological evaluation of medical devices. At 2 and 4 weeks of implantation the four types of Thai silk fibroin based-scaffolds were classified as "non-irritant" to "slight-irritant", compared to Gelfoam(®) (control samples). These natural Thai silk fibroin-based scaffolds may provide suitable biomaterials for clinical applications.

  8. Redox-responsive degradable PEG cryogels as potential cell scaffolds in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Dispinar, Tugba; Van Camp, Wim; De Cock, Liesbeth J; De Geest, Bruno G; Du Prez, Filip E

    2012-03-01

    A Michael addition strategy involving the reaction between a maleimide double bond and amine groups is investigated for the synthesis of cryogels at subzero temperature. Low-molecular-weight PEG-based building blocks with amine end groups and disulfide-containing building blocks with maleimide end groups are combined to synthesize redox-responsive PEG cryogels. The cryogels exhibit an interconnected macroporous morphology, a high compressive modulus and gelation yields of around 95%. While the cryogels are stable under physiological conditions, complete dissolution of the cryogels into water-soluble products is obtained in the presence of a reducing agent (glutathione) in the medium. Cell seeding experiments and toxicologic analysis demonstrate their potential as scaffolds in tissue engineering.

  9. [The effect of tibial transphyseal reinforcement on the growth and response of leg tissues].

    PubMed

    Popkov, D A; Kononovich, N A; Shutov, R B

    2014-07-01

    Transphyseal reinforcement of right intact tibia performed with thin steel rods in six mongrel dogs at the age of six months. Contralateral segment served as control. The leg growth and blood supply studied under the created conditions for the next six months. Radiographic, physiologic (surface thermometry, photoplethysmography), and statistical methods used for studying. The significant effect of transphyseally inserted rods on the leg longitudinal growth and blood supply has not been revealed. The changes in natural shape-formation oftibial proximal and distal meta-epiphyses observed influenced by the transphyseal rods in the experiment. In order to evaluate the tissue response and the degree of the functional activity of leg bone meta-epiphyseal zones the most informative areas considered to be the following: the area of medial malleolus in the early period of physiological growth completion, and the area of the tibial lateral condyle--at the late stage.

  10. PACAP is essential for the adaptive thermogenic response of brown adipose tissue to cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Diané, Abdoulaye; Nikolic, Nikolina; Rudecki, Alexander P; King, Shannon M; Bowie, Drew J; Gray, Sarah L

    2014-09-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a widely distributed neuropeptide that acts as a neurotransmitter, neuromodulator, neurotropic factor, neuroprotectant, secretagogue, and neurohormone. Owing to its pleiotropic biological actions, knockout of Pacap (Adcyap1) has been shown to induce several abnormalities in mice such as impaired thermoregulation. However, the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. A previous report has shown that cold-exposed Pacap null mice cannot supply appropriate levels of norepinephrine (NE) to brown adipocytes. Therefore, we hypothesized that exogenous NE would rescue the impaired thermogenic response of Pacap null mice during cold exposure. We compared the adaptive thermogenic capacity of Pacap(-/-) to Pacap(+/+) mice in response to NE when housed at room temperature (24 °C) and after a 3.5-week cold exposure (4 °C). Biochemical parameters, expression of thermogenic genes, and morphological properties of brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) were also characterized. Results showed that there was a significant effect of temperature, but no effect of genotype, on the resting metabolic rate in conscious, unrestrained mice. However, the normal cold-induced increase in the basal metabolic rate and NE-induced increase in thermogenesis were severely blunted in cold-exposed Pacap(-/-) mice. These changes were associated with altered substrate utilization, reduced β3-adrenergic receptor (β3-Ar (Adrb3)) and hormone-sensitive lipase (Hsl (Lipe)) gene expression, and increased fibroblast growth factor 2 (Fgf2) gene expression in BAT. Interestingly, Pacap(-/-) mice had depleted WAT depots, associated with upregulated uncoupling protein 1 expression in inguinal WATs. These results suggest that the impairment of adaptive thermogenesis in Pacap null mice cannot be rescued by exogenous NE perhaps in part due to decreased β3-Ar-mediated BAT activation.

  11. Robust principal component analysis and clustering methods for automated classification of tissue response to ARFI excitation.

    PubMed

    Mauldin, F William; Zhu, Hongtu T; Behler, Russell H; Nichols, Timothy C; Gallippi, Caterina M

    2008-02-01

    We introduce a new method for automatic classification of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) displacement profiles using what have been termed "robust" methods for principal component analysis (PCA) and clustering. Unlike classical approaches, the robust methods are less sensitive to high variance outlier profiles and require no a priori information regarding expected tissue response to ARFI excitation. We first validate our methods using synthetic data with additive noise and/or outlier curves. Second, the robust techniques are applied to classifying ARFI displacement profiles acquired in an atherosclerotic familial hypercholesterolemic (FH) pig iliac artery in vivo. The in-vivo classification results are compared with parametric ARFI images showing peak induced displacement and time to 67% recovery and to spatially correlated immunohistochemistry. Our results support that robust techniques outperform conventional PCA and clustering approaches to classification when ARFI data are inclusive of low to relatively high noise levels (up to 5 dB average signal-to-noise [SNR] to amplitude) but no outliers: for example, 99.53% correct for robust techniques vs. 97.75% correct for the classical approach. The robust techniques also perform better than conventional approaches when ARFI data are inclusive of moderately high noise levels (10 dB average SNR to amplitude) in addition to a high concentration of outlier displacement profiles (10% outlier content): for example, 99.87% correct for robust techniques vs. 33.33% correct for the classical approach. This work suggests that automatic identification of tissue structures exhibiting similar displacement responses to ARFI excitation is possible, even in the context of outlier profiles. Moreover, this work represents an important first step toward automatic correlation of ARFI data to spatially matched immunohistochemistry.

  12. Ovine chlamydial abortion: characterization of the inflammatory immune response in placental tissues.

    PubMed

    Buxton, D; Anderson, I E; Longbottom, D; Livingstone, M; Wattegedera, S; Entrican, G

    2002-01-01

    Ovine chlamydial abortion is a serious cause of fetal mortality in several sheep-rearing countries. The causal agent, Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci), does not generally induce clinical signs in the ewe other than abortion; this is associated with macroscopically visible damage in the placenta, which may be inflamed and thickened. To investigate the nature of the placental inflammation, seven pregnant sheep were inoculated subcutaneously at 70 days' gestation with C. abortus (strain S 26/3). A further five pregnant sheep received control inoculum by the same route at the same stage of pregnancy. Three of the infected ewes produced stillborn lambs and four produced live lambs. Lesions characteristic of chlamydial infection were present in all placentas except for two from one ewe that gave birth to twins. Histopathological examination of placental tissues from aborted fetuses showed a mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate with vasculitis and thrombosis in the mesenchyme of the intercotyledonary membranes. Cells expressing the macrophage-associated molecule CD 14 were found to be numerous, as were cells expressing major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules. Many cells expressing messenger RNA (mRNA) encoding for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were demonstrated, but few cells expressing interferon gamma mRNA and none expressing interleukin-4 mRNA were detected. The fetal immune response included small numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ cells, gamma delta T cells and B cells. It is concluded that abortion is the result of several factors, including destruction of tissue by C. abortus, vascular thrombosis, and an inflammatory response by the fetus. Production of TNF-alpha by fetal macrophages expressing MHC II molecules may be of considerable significance in the pathogenesis of abortion.

  13. Optical coherence tomography microangiography for monitoring the response of vascular perfusion to external pressure on human skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Hequn; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-05-01

    Characterization of the relationship between external pressure and blood flow is important in the examination of pressure-induced disturbance in tissue microcirculation. Optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based microangiography is a promising imaging technique, capable of providing the noninvasive extraction of functional vessels within the skin tissue with capillary-scale resolution. Here, we present a feasibility study of OCT microangiography (OMAG) to evaluate changes in blood perfusion in response to externally applied pressure on human skin tissue in vivo. External force is loaded normal to the tissue surface at the nailfold region of a healthy human volunteer. An incremental force is applied step by step and then followed by an immediate release. Skin perfusion events including baseline are continuously imaged by OMAG, allowing for visualization and quantification of the capillary perfusion in the nailfold tissue. The tissue strain maps are simultaneously evaluated through the available OCT structural images to assess the relationship of the microcirculation response to the applied pressure. The results indicate that the perfusion progressively decreases with the constant increase of pressure. Reactive hyperemia occurs right after the removal of the pressure. The perfusion returns to the baseline level after a few minutes. These findings suggest that OMAG may have great potential for quantitatively assessing tissue microcirculation in the locally pressed tissue in vivo.

  14. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells acquire bone cell-like responsiveness to fluid shear stress on osteogenic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, Marlene; Helder, Marco N; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Semeins, Cornelis M; Wuisman, Paul I J M; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2005-01-01

    To engineer bone tissue, mechanosensitive cells are needed that are able to perform bone cell-specific functions, such as (re)modeling of bone tissue. In vivo, local bone mass and architecture are affected by mechanical loading, which is thought to provoke a cellular response via loading-induced flow of interstitial fluid. Adipose tissue is an easily accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells for bone tissue engineering, and is available in abundant amounts compared with bone marrow. We studied whether adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) are responsive to mechanical loading by pulsating fluid flow (PFF) on osteogenic stimulation in vitro. We found that ATMSCs show a bone cell-like response to fluid shear stress as a result of PFF after the stimulation of osteogenic differentiation by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. PFF increased nitric oxide production, as well as upregulated cyclooxygenase-2, but not cyclooxygenase-1, gene expression in osteogenically stimulated AT-MSCs. These data suggest that AT-MSCs acquire bone cell-like responsiveness to pulsating fluid shear stress on 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-induced osteogenic differentiation. ATMSCs might be able to perform bone cell-specific functions during bone (re)modeling in vivo and, therefore, provide a promising new tool for bone tissue engineering.

  15. Biophysical mechanisms responsible for pulsed low-level laser excitation of neural tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jonathon; Kao, Chris; Konrad, Peter; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Jansen, E. Duco

    2006-02-01

    Background/Objective: The traditional method of stimulating neural activity has been based on electrical methods and remains the gold standard to date despite inherent limitations. We have previously shown a new paradigm to in vivo neural activation based on pulsed infrared light, which provides a contact-free, spatially selective, artifact-free method without incurring tissue damage that may have significant advantages over electrical stimulation in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The goal of this study was to investigate the physical mechanism of this phenomenon, which we propose is a photo-thermal effect from transient tissue temperature changes resulting in direct or indirect activation of transmembrane ion channels causing propagation of the action potential. Methods: Rat sciatic nerve preparation was stimulated in vivo with the Holmium:YAG laser (2.12μm), Free Electron Laser (2.1μm), Alexandrite laser (690nm), and the prototype for a solid state commercial laser nerve stimulator built by Aculight (1.87μm) to determine contributions of photobiological responses from laser tissue interactions, including temperature, pressure, electric field, and photochemistry, underlying the biophysical mechanism of stimulation. Single point temperature measurements were made with a microthermocouple adjacent to the excitation site, while an infrared camera was used for 2-D radiometry of the irradiated surface. Displacement from laser-induced pressure waves or thermoelastic expansion was measured using a PS-OCT system. Results: Results exclude a direct photochemical, electric field, or pressure wave effect as the mechanism of optical stimulation. Measurements show relative small contributions from thermoelastic expansion (300 nm) with the laser parameters used for nerve stimulation. The maximum change in tissue temperature is about 9°C (average increase of 3.66 °C) at stimulation threshold radiant exposures. Conclusion: Neural activation with pulsed

  16. Stimulus-responsive hydrogels made from biosynthetic fibrinogen conjugates for tissue engineering: structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Frisman, Ilya; Shachaf, Yonatan; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2011-06-07

    Nanostructured hydrogels based on "smart" polymer conjugates of poloxamers and protein molecules were developed in order to form stimulus-responsive materials with bioactive properties for 3-D cell culture. Functionalized Pluronic F127 was covalently attached to a fibrinopeptide backbone and cross-linked into a structurally versatile and mechanically stable polymer network endowed with bioactivity and temperature-responsive structural features. Small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy combined with rheology were used to characterize the structural and mechanical features of this biosynthetic conjugate, both in solution and in hydrogel form. The temperature at which the chemical cross-linking of F127-fibrinopeptide conjugates was initiated had a profound influence on the mechanical properties of the thermo-responsive hydrogel. The analysis of the scattering data revealed modification in the structure of the protein backbone resulting from increases in ambient temperature, whereas the structure of the polymer was not affected by ambient temperature. The hydrogel cross-linking temperature also had a major influence on the modulus of the hydrogel, which was rationally correlated to the molecular structure of the polymer network. The hydrogel structure exhibited a small mesh size when cross-linked at low temperatures and a larger mesh size when cross-linked at higher temperatures. The mesh size was nicely correlated to the mechanical properties of the hydrogels at the respective cross-linking temperatures. The schematic charts that model this material's behavior help to illustrate the relationship that exists between the molecular structure, the cross-linking temperature, and the temperature-responsive features for this class of protein-polymer conjugates. The precise control over structural and mechanical properties that can be achieved with this bioactive hydrogel material is essential in designing a tissue-engineering scaffold for clinical

  17. Responsiveness of genes to manipulation of transcription factors in ES cells is associated with histone modifications and tissue specificity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In addition to determining static states of gene expression (high vs. low), it is important to characterize their dynamic status. For example, genes with H3K27me3 chromatin marks are not only suppressed but also poised for activation. However, the responsiveness of genes to perturbations has never been studied systematically. To distinguish gene responses to specific factors from responsiveness in general, it is necessary to analyze gene expression profiles of cells responding to a large variety of disturbances, and such databases did not exist before. Results We estimated the responsiveness of all genes in mouse ES cells using our recently published database on expression change after controlled induction of 53 transcription factors (TFs) and other genes. Responsive genes (N = 4746), which were readily upregulated or downregulated depending on the kind of perturbation, mostly have regulatory functions and a propensity to become tissue-specific upon differentiation. Tissue-specific expression was evaluated on the basis of published (GNF) and our new data for 15 organs and tissues. Non-responsive genes (N = 9562), which did not change their expression much following any perturbation, were enriched in housekeeping functions. We found that TF-responsiveness in ES cells is the best predictor known for tissue-specificity in gene expression. Among genes with CpG islands, high responsiveness is associated with H3K27me3 chromatin marks, and low responsiveness is associated with H3K36me3 chromatin, stronger tri-methylation of H3K4, binding of E2F1, and GABP binding motifs in promoters. Conclusions We thus propose the responsiveness of expression to perturbations as a new way to define the dynamic status of genes, which brings new insights into mechanisms of regulation of gene expression and tissue specificity. PMID:21306619

  18. Bone Response to Surface-Modified Titanium Implants: Studies on the Early Tissue Response to Implants with Different Surface Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Larsson Wexell, C.; Thomsen, P.; Aronsson, B.-O.; Tengvall, P.; Rodahl, M.; Lausmaa, J.; Kasemo, B.; Ericson, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of experimental studies, the bone formation around systematically modified titanium implants is analyzed. In the present study, three different surface modifications were prepared and evaluated. Glow-discharge cleaning and oxidizing resulted in a highly stoichiometric TiO2 surface, while a glow-discharge treatment in nitrogen gas resulted in implants with essentially a surface of titanium nitride, covered with a very thin titanium oxide. Finally, hydrogen peroxide treatment of implants resulted in an almost stoichiometric TiO2, rich in hydroxyl groups on the surface. Machined commercially pure titanium implants served as controls. Scanning Auger Electron Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy revealed no significant differences in oxide thickness or surface roughness parameters, but differences in the surface chemical composition and apparent topography were observed. After surface preparation, the implants were inserted in cortical bone of rabbits and evaluated after 1, 3, and 6 weeks. Light microscopic evaluation of the tissue response showed that all implants were in contact with bone and had a large proportion of newly formed bone within the threads after 6 weeks. There were no morphological differences between the four groups. Our study shows that a high degree of bone contact and bone formation can be achieved with titanium implants of different surface composition and topography. PMID:24174936

  19. PREDICTING THE RISKS OF NEUROTOXIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS BASED ON TARGET TISSUE DOSE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative exposure-dose-response models relate the external exposure of a substance to the dose in the target tissue, and then relate the target tissue dose to production of adverse outcomes. We developed exposure-dose-response models to describe the affects of acute exposure...

  20. The Circulatory and Metabolic Responses to Hypoxia in Humans – With Special Reference to Adipose Tissue Physiology and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Heinonen, Ilkka H. A.; Boushel, Robert; Kalliokoski, Kari K.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue metabolism and circulation play an important role in human health. It is well-known that adipose tissue mass is increased in response to excess caloric intake leading to obesity and further to local hypoxia and inflammatory signaling. Acute exercise increases blood supply to adipose tissue and mobilization of fat stores for energy. However, acute exercise during systemic hypoxia reduces subcutaneous blood flow in healthy young subjects, but the response in overweight or obese subjects remains to be investigated. Emerging evidence also indicates that exercise training during hypoxic exposure may provide additive benefits with respect to many traditional cardiovascular risk factors as compared to exercise performed in normoxia, but unfavorable effects of hypoxia have also been documented. These topics will be covered in this brief review dealing with hypoxia and adipose tissue physiology. PMID:27621722

  1. Effects of the Variation in Brain Tissue Mechanical Properties on the Intracranial Response of a 6-Year-Old Child.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shihai; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiangnan; Ruan, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue mechanical properties are of importance to investigate child head injury using finite element (FE) method. However, these properties used in child head FE model normally vary in a large range in published literatures because of the insufficient child cadaver experiments. In this work, a head FE model with detailed anatomical structures is developed from the computed tomography (CT) data of a 6-year-old healthy child head. The effects of brain tissue mechanical properties on traumatic brain response are also analyzed by reconstruction of a head impact on engine hood according to Euro-NCAP testing regulation using FE method. The result showed that the variations of brain tissue mechanical parameters in linear viscoelastic constitutive model had different influences on the intracranial response. Furthermore, the opposite trend was obtained in the predicted shear stress and shear strain of brain tissues caused by the variations of mentioned parameters.

  2. Effects of the Variation in Brain Tissue Mechanical Properties on the Intracranial Response of a 6-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Shihai; Li, Haiyan; Li, Xiangnan; Ruan, Jesse

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue mechanical properties are of importance to investigate child head injury using finite element (FE) method. However, these properties used in child head FE model normally vary in a large range in published literatures because of the insufficient child cadaver experiments. In this work, a head FE model with detailed anatomical structures is developed from the computed tomography (CT) data of a 6-year-old healthy child head. The effects of brain tissue mechanical properties on traumatic brain response are also analyzed by reconstruction of a head impact on engine hood according to Euro-NCAP testing regulation using FE method. The result showed that the variations of brain tissue mechanical parameters in linear viscoelastic constitutive model had different influences on the intracranial response. Furthermore, the opposite trend was obtained in the predicted shear stress and shear strain of brain tissues caused by the variations of mentioned parameters. PMID:26495031

  3. Simulated Response of a Tissue-equivalent Proportional Counter on the Surface of Mars.

    PubMed

    Northum, Jeremy D; Guetersloh, Stephen B; Braby, Leslie A; Ford, John R

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainties persist regarding the assessment of the carcinogenic risk associated with galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposure during a mission to Mars. The GCR spectrum peaks in the range of 300(-1) MeV n to 700 MeV n(-1) and is comprised of elemental ions from H to Ni. While Fe ions represent only 0.03% of the GCR spectrum in terms of particle abundance, they are responsible for nearly 30% of the dose equivalent in free space. Because of this, radiation biology studies focusing on understanding the biological effects of GCR exposure generally use Fe ions. Acting as a thin shield, the Martian atmosphere alters the GCR spectrum in a manner that significantly reduces the importance of Fe ions. Additionally, albedo particles emanating from the regolith complicate the radiation environment. The present study uses the Monte Carlo code FLUKA to simulate the response of a tissue-equivalent proportional counter on the surface of Mars to produce dosimetry quantities and microdosimetry distributions. The dose equivalent rate on the surface of Mars was found to be 0.18 Sv y(-1) with an average quality factor of 2.9 and a dose mean lineal energy of 18.4 keV μm(-1). Additionally, albedo neutrons were found to account for 25% of the dose equivalent. It is anticipated that these data will provide relevant starting points for use in future risk assessment and mission planning studies.

  4. Prospective, longitudinal study of plastic bronchitis cast pathology and responsiveness to tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Heath, Lauren; Ling, Shelley; Racz, Jennifer; Mane, Gerta; Schmidt, Lindsay; Myers, Jeffrey L; Tsai, Wan C; Caruthers, Regine L; Hirsch, Jennifer C; Stringer, Kathleen A

    2011-12-01

    Plastic bronchitis (PB) is a rare disease that often occurs in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) who have undergone staged single-ventricle palliation. It is characterized by the formation of rubbery "casts" in the airways. PB treatment frequently includes inhaled tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, the efficacy of tPA to reduce cast burden is unknown. This is further complicated by our lack of knowledge of cast composition. We obtained spontaneously expectorated PB casts from children (n = 4) with CHD and one adult patient with idiopathic PB. Pathological assessment was made from paraffin-preserved samples. Casts were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or tPA. Cast response to tPA was assessed by changes in cast weight and the production of fibrin D-dimer. Independent of dose, tPA reduced cast weight compared with PBS-treatment (P = 0.001) and increased D-dimer levels. Histological staining showed that PB casts from all patients were composed of fibrin and contained notable numbers of lymphocytes. Cast composition did not change over time. Collectively, these data support that in our PB patients, casts are composed of fibrin and are responsive to tPA treatment. This makes inhaled tPA a potentially viable option for symptomatic relief of PB while we work to unravel the complexity of PB pathogenesis.

  5. Dose-Dependent Response of Tissue-Engineered Intervertebral Discs to Dynamic Unconfined Compressive Loading

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Katherine D.; Mozia, Robert I.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the limitations of current surgical methods in the treatment of degenerative disc disease, tissue-engineered intervertebral discs (TE-IVDs) have become an important target. This study investigated the biochemical and mechanical responses of composite TE-IVDs to dynamic unconfined compression. TE-IVDs were manufactured by floating an injection molded alginate nucleus pulposus (NP) in a type I collagen annulus fibrosus (AF) that was allowed to contract for 2 weeks before loading. The discs were mechanically stimulated at a range of strain amplitude (1–10%) for 2 weeks with a duty cycle of 1 h on–1 h off–1 h on before being evaluated for their biochemical and mechanical properties. Mechanical loading increased all properties in a dose-dependent manner. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) increased between 2.8 and 2.2 fold in the AF and NP regions, respectively, whereas the hydroxyproline content increased between 1.2 and 1.8 fold. The discs also experienced a 2-fold increase in the equilibrium modulus and a 4.3-fold increase in the instantaneous modulus. Full effects for all properties were seen by 5% strain amplitude. These data suggest that dynamic loading increases the functionality of our TE-IVDs with region-dependent responses using a method that may be scaled up to larger disc models to expedite maturation for implantation. PMID:25277703

  6. Adipose tissue-derived stem cell response to the differently processed 316L stainless steel substrates.

    PubMed

    Faghihi, Shahab; Zia, Sonia; Taha, Masoumeh Fakhr

    2012-12-01

    Stainless steel (SS) is one of the most applicable materials in fabrication of cardiac implants. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of atomic structure of polycrystalline stainless steel on the response of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Samples are prepared from differently processed extruded rod and rolled sheet of 316L SS having different crystallographic structure. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated (200) and (111) orientations with distinct volume fractions in the specimens. Morphology and ADSCs behavior including adhesion, proliferation and differentiation are assessed. The expression of cardiac specific protein (cardiac troponin I) and genes of differentiating cardiomyocytes is analyzed by immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. The number of attached and grown cells on the rod sample is higher than the sheet sample also the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of ADSCs grown on the samples demonstrates higher cell density and spreading pattern on the surface of rod sample. In differentiated ADSCs on the rod sample the expression of all genes except ANF are detectable, while on the sheet sample only the MEF2C and β-MHC are expressed. This study shows that the cellular response is influenced by the crystal structure of the substrate therefore; the skill to alter the structure of substrate may lend itself to engineer a biomaterial which could be suitable for differentiation of stem cells into a definite lineage.

  7. Acetylbritannilactone Modulates MicroRNA-155-Mediated Inflammatory Response in Ischemic Cerebral Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ya; Zhang, Xiangjian; Dong, Lipeng; Zhao, Jingru; Zhang, Cong; Zhu, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory responses play a critical role in ischemic brain injury. MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) induces the expression of inflammatory cytokines, and acetylbritannilactone (ABL) exerts potent antiinflammatory actions by inhibiting expression of inflammation-related genes. However, the functions of miR-155 and the actual relationship between ABL and miR-155 in ischemia-induced cerebral inflammation remain unclear. In this study, cerebral ischemia of wild-type (WT) and miR-155−/− mice was induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). pAd-miR-155 was injected into the lateral cerebral ventricle 24 h before MCAO to induce miR-155 overexpression. MCAO mice and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-treated BV2 cells were used to examine the effects of ABL and miR-155 overexpression or deletion on the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. We demonstrated that ABL treatment significantly reduced neurological deficits and cerebral infarct volume by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression in ischemic cerebral tissue and OGD-treated BV2 cells. Mechanistic studies suggested that the observed decrease in TNF-α and IL-1β expression was attributable to the ABL-induced suppression of the expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). We further found that miR-155 promoted TNF-α and IL-1β expression by upregulating TLR4 and downregulating the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), while ABL exerted an inhibitory effect on miR-155-mediated gene expression. In conclusion, miR-155 mediates inflammatory responses in ischemic cerebral tissue by modulating TLR4/MyD88 and SOCS1 expression, and ABL exerts its antiinflammatory action by suppressing miR-155 expression, suggesting a novel miR-155-based therapy for ischemic stroke. PMID:25811992

  8. Degradation characteristics, cell viability and host tissue responses of PDLLA-based scaffold with PRGD and β-TCP nanoparticles incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jiling; Xiong, Feng; Li, Binbin; Chen, Heping; Yin, Yixia; Dai, Honglian; Li, Shipu

    2016-01-01

    This study is aimed to evaluate the degradation characteristics, cell viability and host tissue responses of PDLLA/PRGD/β-TCP (PRT) composite nerve scaffold, which was fabricated by poly(d, l-lactic acid) (PDLLA), RGD peptide(Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Tyr, GRGDY, abbreviated as RGD) modified poly-{(lactic acid)-co-[(glycolic acid)-alt-(l-lysine)]}(PRGD) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). The scaffolds’ in vitro degradation behaviors were investigated in detail by analysing changes in weight loss, pH and morphology. Then, the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl) -2,5-diphenyl-2 -H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and cell live/dead assay were carried out to assess their cell viability. Moreover, in vivo degradation patterns and host inflammation responses were monitored by subcutaneous implantation of PRT scaffold in rats. Our data showed that, among the tested scaffolds, the PRT scaffold had the best buffering capacity (pH = 6.1–6.3) and fastest degradation rate (12.4%, 8 weeks) during in vitro study, which was contributed by the incorporation of β-TCP nanoparticles. After in vitro and in vivo degradation, the high porosity structure of PRT could be observed using scanning electron microscopy. Meanwhile, the PRT scaffold could significantly promote cell survival. In the PRT scaffold implantation region, less inflammatory cells (especially for neutrophil and lymphocyte) could be detected. These results indicated that the PRT composite scaffold had a good biodegradable property; it could improve cells survival and reduced the adverse host tissue inflammation responses. PMID:27252885

  9. Dynamic culture induces a cell type-dependent response impacting on the thickness of engineered connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Guillaume Marceau; Gauvin, Robert; Proulx, Maryse; Vallée, Maud; Fradette, Julie

    2013-04-01

    Mesenchymal cells are central to connective tissue homeostasis and are widely used for tissue-engineering applications. Dermal fibroblasts and adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) allow successful tissue reconstruction by the self-assembly approach of tissue engineering. This method leads to the production of multilayered tissues, devoid of exogenous biomaterials, that can be used as stromal compartments for skin or vesical reconstruction. These tissues are formed by combining cell sheets, generated through cell stimulation with ascorbic acid, which favours the cell-derived production/organization of matrix components. Since media motion can impact on cell behaviour, we investigated the effect of dynamic culture on mesenchymal cells during tissue reconstruction, using the self-assembly method. Tissues produced using ASCs in the presence of a wave-like movement were nearly twice thicker than under standard conditions, while no difference was observed for tissues produced from dermal fibroblasts. The increased matrix deposition was not correlated with an increased proliferation of ASCs, or by higher transcript levels of fibronectin or collagens I and III. A 30% increase of type V collagen mRNA was observed. Interestingly, tissues engineered from dermal fibroblasts featured a four-fold higher level of MMP-1 transcripts under dynamic conditions. Mechanical properties were similar for tissues reconstructed using dynamic or static conditions. Finally, cell sheets produced using ASCs under dynamic conditions could readily be manipulated, resulting in a 2 week reduction of the production time (from 5 to 3 weeks). Our results describe a distinctive property of ASCs' response to media motion, indicating that their culture under dynamic conditions leads to optimized tissue engineering.

  10. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low

    SciTech Connect

    Kadhim, Munira A

    2012-08-22

    The above studies will provide fundamental mechanistic information relating genetic predisposition to important low dose phenomena, and will aid in the development of Department of Energy policy, as well as radiation risk policy for the public and the workplace. We believe the proposed studies accurately reflect the goals of the DOE low dose program. To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e. less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these "non-targeted responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation with a focus on the induction of genomic instability (GI) in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/CaH and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition in these models on genomic instability. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to the dose of 10mGy (0.01Gy) X-rays. Using conventional X-ray and we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various conditions at a range of doses down to the very low dose of 0.01Gy. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for such studies. Mechanistic studies of instability in different cell

  11. Human recombinant RNASET2-induced inflammatory response and connective tissue remodeling in the medicinal leech.

    PubMed

    Baranzini, Nicolò; Pedrini, Edoardo; Girardello, Rossana; Tettamanti, Gianluca; de Eguileor, Magda; Taramelli, Roberto; Acquati, Francesco; Grimaldi, Annalisa

    2017-01-09

    In recent years, several studies have demonstrated that the RNASET2 gene is involved in the control of tumorigenicity in ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, a role in establishing a functional cross-talk between cancer cells and the surrounding tumor microenvironment has been unveiled for this gene, based on its ability to act as an inducer of the innate immune response. Although several studies have reported on the molecular features of RNASET2, the details on the mechanisms by which this evolutionarily conserved ribonuclease regulates the immune system are still poorly defined. In the effort to clarify this aspect, we report here the effect of recombinant human RNASET2 injection and its role in regulating the innate immune response after bacterial challenge in an invertebrate model, the medicinal leech. We found that recombinant RNASET2 injection induces fibroplasias, connective tissue remodeling and the recruitment of numerous infiltrating cells expressing the specific macrophage markers CD68 and HmAIF1. The RNASET2-mediated chemotactic activity for macrophages has been further confirmed by using a consolidated experimental approach based on injection of the Matrigel biomatrice (MG) supplemented with recombinant RNASET2 in the leech body wall. One week after injection, a large number of CD68(+) and HmAIF-1(+) macrophages massively infiltrated MG sponges. Finally, in leeches challenged with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or with the environmental bacteria pathogen Micrococcus nishinomiyaensis, numerous macrophages migrating to the site of inoculation expressed high levels of endogenous RNASET2. Taken together, these results suggest that RNASET2 is likely involved in the initial phase of the inflammatory response in leeches.

  12. Transcriptomic response of Manduca sexta immune tissues to parasitization by the bracovirus associated wasp Cotesia congregata.

    PubMed

    Chevignon, Germain; Cambier, Sébastien; Da Silva, Corinne; Poulain, Julie; Drezen, Jean-Michel; Huguet, Elisabeth; Moreau, Sébastien J M

    2015-07-01

    During oviposition, Cotesia congregata parasitoid wasps inject into their host, Manduca sexta, some biological factors such as venom, ovarian fluid and a symbiotic polydnavirus (PDV) named Cotesia congregata bracovirus (CcBV). During parasitism, complex interactions occur between wasp-derived factors and host targets that lead to important modifications in host physiology. In particular, the immune response leading to wasp egg encapsulation is inhibited allowing wasp survival. To date, the regulation of host genes during the interaction had only been studied for a limited number of genes. In this study, we analysed the global impact of parasitism on host gene regulation 24 h post oviposition by high throughput 454 transcriptomic analyses of two tissues known to be involved in the host immune response (hemocytes and fat body). To identify specific effects of parasitism on host transcription at this time point, transcriptomes were obtained from non-treated and parasitized larvae, and also from larvae injected with heat-killed bacteria and double stimulated larvae that were parasitized prior to bacterial challenge. Results showed that, immune challenge by bacteria leads to induction of certain antimicrobial peptide (AMP) genes in M. sexta larvae whether they were parasitized or not prior to bacterial challenge. These results show that at 24 h post oviposition pathways leading to expression of AMP genes are not all inactivated suggesting wasps are in an antiseptic environment. In contrast, at this time point genes involved in phenoloxidase activation and cellular immune responses were globally down-regulated after parasitism in accordance with the observed inhibition of wasp egg encapsulation.

  13. Tissue contaminants and associated transcriptional response in trout liver from high elevation lakes of Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, P.W.; Aluru, N.; Black, R.W.; Vijayan, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    The consistent cold temperatures and large amount of precipitation in the Olympic and Cascade ranges of Washington State are thought to enhance atmospheric deposition of contaminants. However, little is known about contaminant levels in organisms residing in these remote high elevation lakes. We measured total mercury and 28 organochlorine compounds in trout collected from 14 remote lakes in the Olympic, Mt. Rainer, and North Cascades National Parks. Mercury was detected in trout from all lakes sampled (15 to 262 ??g/kg ww), while two organochlorines, total polychlorinated biphenyls (tPCB) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), were also detected in these fish tissues (<25 ??g/kg ww). In sediments, organochlorine levels were below detection, while median total and methyl mercury were 30.4 and 0.34 ??g/ kg dry weight (ww), respectively. Using fish from two lakes, representing different contaminant loading levels (Wilcox lake: high; Skymo lake: low), we examined transcriptional response in the liver using a custom-made low-density targeted rainbow trout cDNA microarray. We detected significant differences in liver transcriptional response, including significant changes in metabolic, endocrine, and immune-related genes, in fish collected from Wilcox Lake compared to Skymo Lake. Overall, our results suggest that local urban areas contribute to the observed contaminant patterns in these high elevation lakes, while the transcriptional changes point to a biological response associated with exposure to these contaminants in fish. Specifically, the gene expression pattern leads us to hypothesize a role for mercury in disrupting the metabolic and reproductive pathways in fish from high elevation lakes in western Washington. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  14. Tissue viability imaging: microvascular response to vasoactive drugs induced by iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Henricson, Joakim; Nilsson, Anders; Tesselaar, Erik; Nilsson, Gert; Sjöberg, Folke

    2009-09-01

    When one is studying the physiology of the cutaneous microcirculation there is a need for relevant non-invasive and versatile techniques. In this study we used a new optical device, the tissue viability imager (TiVi), to map changes in cutaneous microvascular concentrations of red blood cells during iontophoresis of vasoactive substances (noradrenaline (NA) and phenylephrine (Phe) for vasoconstriction and acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) for vasodilatation). We aimed to present data both individually and pooled, using a four-variable logistic dose response model that is commonly used in similar in vitro vascular studies. The accuracy of the TiVi was also investigated by calculating the coefficient of variation and comparing it with similar tests previously done using laser Doppler imaging. Tests were also performed using the TiVi and LDPI simultaneously to further compare the two methods. Results showed that the TiVi is capable of quantifying vascular responses to iontophorised noradrenaline and phenylephrine without the need to increase background flow first. Fitting the TiVi data to the dose response model resulted in ED(50)-values with narrow confidence intervals and acceptable r(2) values. Mean ED(50)-values for the TiVi did not differ significantly from similar values obtained using laser Doppler. Results further seem to suggest that when the blood perfusion increases during vasodilatation in skin the initial phase relies mainly on an increase in red blood cell concentration whereas the further perfusion increase is due to an increase in red blood cell velocity.

  15. Immunological response to tissue-engineered cartilage derived from auricular chondrocytes and a PLLA scaffold in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Yuko; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2010-02-01

    The immune response against biomaterials in tissue-engineered constructs could potentially worsen the outcome of tissue regeneration, but immunological reactions between host and donor in tissue-engineered constructs remain to be clarified. In the present study, we syngenically transplanted tissue-engineered cartilage constructs consisting of C57BL/6 mice auricular chondrocytes and poly-l-lactic acid scaffolds (MW:200,000) into EGFP transgenic mice of C57BL/6 background, and evaluated the response by the localization of donor-derived and host-derived cells, the latter of which were distinguished by the presence of EGFP. While donor-derived cells constituted the areas of regenerated cartilage, host-derived cells were increased in number for the initial two weeks, and then decreased and excluded to non-cartilage areas thereafter. Furthermore, EGFP positivity was mostly co-localized with that of F4/80, suggesting most of the host-derived cells in the tissue-engineered constructs could be macrophages. Immunohistochemical staining of the tissue-engineered cartilage constructs revealed expression of factors related to immune privilege in chondrocytes, such as macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), fas ligand (FasL) and others. Co-culture of chondrocytes and macrophages in vitro increased the expression of MIF and FasL in the chondrocytes, suggesting that chondrocytes in tissue-engineered cartilage constructs could regulate the actions of host-derived macrophages by expressing factors related to immune privilege.

  16. The adult brain tissue response to hollow fiber membranes of varying surface architecture with or without cotransplanted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning

    A variety of biomaterials have been chronically implanted into the central nervous system (CNS) for repair or therapeutic purposes. Regardless of the application, chronic implantation of materials into the CNS induces injury and elicits a wound healing response, eventually leading to the formation of a dense extracellular matrix (ECM)-rich scar tissue that is associated with the segregation of implanted materials from the surrounding normal tissue. Often this reaction results in impaired performance of indwelling CNS devices. In order to enhance the performance of biomaterial-based implantable devices in the CNS, this thesis investigated whether adult brain tissue response to implanted biomaterials could be manipulated by changing biomaterial surface properties or further by utilizing the biology of co-transplanted cells. Specifically, the adult rat brain tissue response to chronically implanted poly(acrylonitrile-vinylchloride) (PAN-PVC) hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) of varying surface architecture were examined temporally at 2, 4, and 12 weeks postimplantation. Significant differences were discovered in the brain tissue response to the PAN-PVC HFMs of varying surface architecture at 4 and 12 weeks. To extend this work, whether the soluble factors derived from a co-transplanted cellular component further affect the brain tissue response to an implanted HFM in a significant way was critically exploited. The cells used were astrocytes, whose ability to influence scar formation process following CNS injury by physical contact with the host tissue had been documented in the literature. Data indicated for the first time that astrocyte-derived soluble factors ameliorate the adult brain tissue reactivity toward HFM implants in an age-dependent manner. While immature astrocytes secreted soluble factors that suppressed the brain tissue reactivity around the implants, mature astrocytes secreted factors that enhanced the gliotic response. These findings prove the feasibility

  17. Rat subcutaneous tissue response to calcium silicate containing different arsenic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    MINOTTI, Paloma Gagliardi; ORDINOLA-ZAPATA, Ronald; MIDENA, Raquel Zanin; MARCIANO, Marina Angélica; CAVENAGO, Bruno Cavalini; BRAMANTE, Clovis Monteiro; GARCIA, Roberto Brandão; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Hungaro; de MORAES, Ivaldo Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the response of rat subcutaneous tissue in implanted polyethylene tubes that were filled with GMTA Angelus and Portland cements containing different arsenic concentrations. Material and Methods Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was utilized to obtain the values of the arsenic concentration in the materials. Thirty-six rats were divided into 3 groups of 12 animals for each experimental period. Each animal received two implants of polyethylene tubes filled with different test cements and the lateral of the tubes was used as a control group. After 15, 30 and 60 days of implantation, the animals were killed and the specimens were prepared for descriptive and morphometric analysis considering: inflammatory cells, collagen fibers, fibroblasts, blood vessels and other components. The results were analyzed utilizing the Kuskal-Wallis test and the Dunn´s Multiple test for comparison (p<0.05). Results The materials showed, according to atomic absorption spectrophotometry, the following doses of arsenic: GMTA Angelus: 5.01 mg/kg, WPC Irajazinho: 0.69 mg/kg, GPC Minetti: 18.46 mg/kg and GPC Votoran: 10.76 mg/kg. In a 60-day periods, all specimens displayed a neoformation of connective tissue with a structure of fibrocellular aspect (capsule). Control groups and MTA Angelus produced the lower amount of inflammatory reaction and GPC Minetti, the highest reaction. Conclusions There was no direct relationship between the concentration of arsenic present in the composition of the materials and the intensity of the inflammatory reactions. Higher values, as 18.46 mg/kg of arsenic in the cement, produce characteristics of severe inflammation reaction at the 60-day period. The best results were found in MTA angelus. PMID:25075671

  18. In vivo corrosion behaviour of magnesium alloy in association with surrounding tissue response in rats.

    PubMed

    Miura, Chieko; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Imai, Yoshimichi; Mukai, Toshiji; Yamamoto, Akiko; Sano, Yuya; Ikeo, Naoko; Isozaki, Shuji; Takahashi, Toru; Oikawa, Miho; Kumamoto, Hiroyuki; Tachi, Masahiro

    2016-03-07

    Biodegradable magnesium (Mg) alloys are the most promising candidates for osteosynthesis devices. However, their in vivo corrosion behaviour has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of the physiological environment surrounding Mg alloys on their corrosion behaviour. A Mg-1.0Al alloy with a fine-grained structure was formed into plates using titanium (Ti) as a control. These plates were implanted into the subperiosteum in the head, subcutaneous tissue of the back, and in the muscle of the femur of rats for 1, 2 and 4 weeks. The volumes of the remaining Mg alloy and of the insoluble salt deposition and gas cavities around the Mg alloy were determined by microtomography, and the volume losses were calculated. Then, the tissue response around the plates in each implantation site was examined histopathologically, and its relation to the respective volume loss was analyzed. These analyses determined that the Mg alloy was corroded fastest in the head, at an intermediate level in the back, and slowest in the femur. The insoluble salt deposition at the Mg alloy surface had no influence on the volume loss. Gas cavities formed around the Mg alloy at all implantation sites and decreased after 4 weeks. Histopathological examination revealed that the Mg alloy exhibited good biocompatibility, as was seen with Ti. In addition, vascularized fibrous capsules formed around the plates and became mature with time. Notably, the volume loss in the different anatomical locations correlated with capsule thickness. Together, our results suggest that, to facilitate the successful clinical application of Mg alloys, it will be necessary to further comprehend their interactions with specific in vivo environments.

  19. Intact brown adipose tissue thermogenesis is required for restorative sleep responses after sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Szentirmai, Éva; Kapás, Levente

    2014-03-01

    Metabolic signals related to feeding and body temperature regulation have profound effects on vigilance. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a key effector organ in the regulation of metabolism in several species, including rats and mice. Significant amounts of active BAT are also present throughout adulthood in humans. The metabolic activity of BAT is due to the tissue-specific presence of the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1). To test the involvement of BAT thermogenesis in sleep regulation, we investigated the effects of two sleep-promoting stimuli in UCP-1-deficient mice. Sleep deprivation by gentle handling increased UCP-1 mRNA expression in BAT and elicited rebound increases in non-rapid-eye-movement sleep and rapid-eye-movement sleep accompanied by elevated slow-wave activity of the electroencephalogram. The rebound sleep increases were significantly attenuated, by ~ 35-45%, in UCP-1-knockout (KO) mice. Wild-type (WT) mice with capsaicin-induced sensory denervation of the interscapular BAT pads showed similar impairments in restorative sleep responses after sleep deprivation, suggesting a role of neuronal sleep-promoting signaling from the BAT. Exposure of WT mice to 35 °C ambient temperature for 5 days led to increased sleep and body temperature and suppressed feeding and energy expenditure. Sleep increases in the warm environment were significantly suppressed, by ~ 50%, in UCP-1-KO animals while their food intake and energy expenditure did not differ from those of the WTs. These results suggest that the metabolic activity of the BAT plays a role in generating a metabolic environment that is permissive for optimal sleep. Impaired BAT function may be a common underlying cause of sleep insufficiency and metabolic disorders.

  20. Transcriptional responses of Paxillus involutus and Betula pendula during formation of ectomycorrhizal root tissue.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Tomas; Le Quéré, Antoine; Ahren, Dag; Söderström, Bengt; Erlandsson, Rikard; Lundeberg, Joakim; Uhlén, Mathias; Tunlid, Anders

    2004-02-01

    In order to obtain information on genes specifically expressed in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, 3,555 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were analyzed from a cDNA library constructed from ectomycorrhiza formed between the basidiomycete Paxillus involutus and birch (Betula pendula). cDNA libraries from saprophytically growing fungus (3,964 ESTs) and from axenic plants (2,532 ESTs) were analyzed in parallel. By clustering all the EST obtained, a nonredundant set of 2,284 unique transcripts of either fungal or plant origin were identified. The expression pattern of these genes was analyzed using cDNA microarrays. The analyses showed that the plant and fungus responded to the symbiosis by altering the expression levels of a number of enzymes involved in carbon metabolism. Several plant transcripts with sequence similarities to genes encoding enzymes in the tricarboxylic cycle and electron transport chain were down regulated as compared with the levels in free-living roots. In the fungal partner, a number of genes encoding enzymes in the lipid and secondary metabolism were down regulated in mycorrhiza as compared with the saprophytically growing mycelium. A substantial number of the ESTs analyzed displayed significant sequence similarities to proteins involved in biotic stress responses, but only a few of them showed differential expression in the mycorrhizal tissue, including plant and fungal metallothioneins and a plant defensin homologue. Several of the genes that were differentially expressed in the mycorrhizal root tissue displayed sequence similarity to genes that are known to regulate growth and development of plant roots and fungal hyphae, including transcription factors and Rho-like GTPases.

  1. Of flies, mice, and men: evolutionarily conserved tissue damage responses and aging.

    PubMed

    Neves, Joana; Demaria, Marco; Campisi, Judith; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-01-12

    Studies in flies, mice, and human models have provided a conceptual framework for how paracrine interactions between damaged cells and the surrounding tissue control tissue repair. These studies have amassed evidence for an evolutionarily conserved secretory program that regulates tissue homeostasis. This program coordinates cell survival and proliferation during tissue regeneration and repair in young animals. By virtue of chronic engagement, however, it also contributes to the age-related decline of tissue homeostasis leading to degeneration, metabolic dysfunction, and cancer. Here, we review recent studies that shed light on the nature and regulation of this evolutionarily conserved secretory program.

  2. Tissue Culture as a Source of Replicates in Nonmodel Plants: Variation in Cold Response in Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea

    PubMed Central

    Kenta, Tanaka; Edwards, Jessica E. M.; Butlin, Roger K.; Burke, Terry; Quick, W. Paul; Urwin, Peter; Davey, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    While genotype–environment interaction is increasingly receiving attention by ecologists and evolutionary biologists, such studies need genetically homogeneous replicates—a challenging hurdle in outcrossing plants. This could be potentially overcome by using tissue culture techniques. However, plants regenerated from tissue culture may show aberrant phenotypes and “somaclonal” variation. Here, we examined somaclonal variation due to tissue culturing using the response to cold treatment of photosynthetic efficiency (chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for Fv/Fm, Fv′/Fm′, and ΦPSII, representing maximum efficiency of photosynthesis for dark- and light-adapted leaves, and the actual electron transport operating efficiency, respectively, which are reliable indicators of photoinhibition and damage to the photosynthetic electron transport system). We compared this to variation among half-sibling seedlings from three different families of Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea. Somaclonal variation was limited, and we could detect within-family variation in change in chlorophyll fluorescence due to cold shock successfully with the help of tissue-culture derived replicates. Icelandic and Norwegian families exhibited higher chlorophyll fluorescence, suggesting higher performance after cold shock, than a Swedish family. Although the main effect of tissue culture on Fv/Fm, Fv′/Fm′, and ΦPSII was small, there were significant interactions between tissue culture and family, suggesting that the effect of tissue culture is genotype-specific. Tissue-cultured plantlets were less affected by cold treatment than seedlings, but to a different extent in each family. These interactive effects, however, were comparable to, or much smaller than the single effect of family. These results suggest that tissue culture is a useful method for obtaining genetically homogenous replicates for studying genotype–environment interaction related to adaptively-relevant phenotypes, such

  3. Tissue Culture as a Source of Replicates in Nonmodel Plants: Variation in Cold Response in Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea.

    PubMed

    Kenta, Tanaka; Edwards, Jessica E M; Butlin, Roger K; Burke, Terry; Quick, W Paul; Urwin, Peter; Davey, Matthew P

    2016-12-07

    While genotype-environment interaction is increasingly receiving attention by ecologists and evolutionary biologists, such studies need genetically homogeneous replicates-a challenging hurdle in outcrossing plants. This could be potentially overcome by using tissue culture techniques. However, plants regenerated from tissue culture may show aberrant phenotypes and "somaclonal" variation. Here, we examined somaclonal variation due to tissue culturing using the response to cold treatment of photosynthetic efficiency (chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', and ΦPSII, representing maximum efficiency of photosynthesis for dark- and light-adapted leaves, and the actual electron transport operating efficiency, respectively, which are reliable indicators of photoinhibition and damage to the photosynthetic electron transport system). We compared this to variation among half-sibling seedlings from three different families of Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea Somaclonal variation was limited, and we could detect within-family variation in change in chlorophyll fluorescence due to cold shock successfully with the help of tissue-culture derived replicates. Icelandic and Norwegian families exhibited higher chlorophyll fluorescence, suggesting higher performance after cold shock, than a Swedish family. Although the main effect of tissue culture on Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', and ΦPSII was small, there were significant interactions between tissue culture and family, suggesting that the effect of tissue culture is genotype-specific. Tissue-cultured plantlets were less affected by cold treatment than seedlings, but to a different extent in each family. These interactive effects, however, were comparable to, or much smaller than the single effect of family. These results suggest that tissue culture is a useful method for obtaining genetically homogenous replicates for studying genotype-environment interaction related to adaptively-relevant phenotypes, such as cold response, in

  4. An integrated proteomics analysis of bone tissues in response to mechanical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Bone cells can sense physical forces and convert mechanical stimulation conditions into biochemical signals that lead to expression of mechanically sensitive genes and proteins. However, it is still poorly understood how genes and proteins in bone cells are orchestrated to respond to mechanical stimulations. In this research, we applied integrated proteomics, statistical, and network biology techniques to study proteome-level changes to bone tissue cells in response to two different conditions, normal loading and fatigue loading. We harvested ulna midshafts and isolated proteins from the control, loaded, and fatigue loaded Rats. Using a label-free liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experimental proteomics technique, we derived a comprehensive list of 1,058 proteins that are differentially expressed among normal loading, fatigue loading, and controls. By carefully developing protein selection filters and statistical models, we were able to identify 42 proteins representing 21 Rat genes that were significantly associated with bone cells' response to quantitative changes between normal loading and fatigue loading conditions. We further applied network biology techniques by building a fatigue loading activated protein-protein interaction subnetwork involving 9 of the human-homolog counterpart of the 21 rat genes in a large connected network component. Our study shows that the combination of decreased anti-apoptotic factor, Raf1, and increased pro-apoptotic factor, PDCD8, results in significant increase in the number of apoptotic osteocytes following fatigue loading. We believe controlling osteoblast differentiation/proliferation and osteocyte apoptosis could be promising directions for developing future therapeutic solutions for related bone diseases. PMID:22784626

  5. Characterization of a novel rice metallothionein gene promoter: its tissue specificity and heavy metal responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Juan; Wang, Yun; Yu, Shi-Shi; Liu, Jin-Yuan

    2010-10-01

    The rice (Oryza sativa L.) metallothionein gene OsMT-I-4b has previously been identified as a type I MT gene. To elucidate the regulatory mechanism involved in its tissue specificity and abiotic induction, we isolated a 1 730 bp fragment of the OsMT-I-4b promoter region. Histochemical β-glucuronidase (GUS) staining indicated a precise spacial and temporal expression pattern in transgenic Arabidopsis. Higher GUS activity was detected in the roots and the buds of flower stigmas, and relatively lower GUS staining in the shoots was restricted to the trichomes and hydathodes of leaves. No activity was observed in the stems and seeds. Additionally, in the root of transgenic plants, the promoter activity was highly upregulated by various environmental signals, such as abscisic acid, drought, dark, and heavy metals including Cu²(+) , Zn²(+) , Pb²(+) and Al³(+) . Slight induction was observed in transgenic seedlings under salinity stress, or when treated with Co²(+) and Cd²(+) . Promoter analysis of 5'-deletions revealed that the region -583/-1 was sufficient to drive strong GUS expression in the roots but not in the shoots. Furthermore, deletion analysis indicated important promoter regions containing different metal-responsive cis-elements that were responsible for responding to different heavy metals. Collectively, these findings provided important insight into the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of the OsMT-I-4b promoter, and the results also gave us some implications for the potential application of this promoter in plant genetic engineering.

  6. The WFDC1 gene: role in wound response and tissue homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ressler, Steven J; Rowley, David R

    2011-10-01

    The present evaluates the key features of the WFDC1 [WAP (whey acidic protein) four disulfide core 1] gene that encodes ps20 (20 kDa prostate stromal protein), a member of the WAP family. ps20 was first characterized as a growth inhibitory activity that was secreted by fetal urogenital sinus mesenchymal cells. Purified ps20 exhibited several activities that centre on cell adhesion, migration and proliferation. The WFDC1 gene was cloned, contained seven exons, and was mapped to chromosome 16q24, suggesting that it may function as a tumour suppressor; however, direct evidence of this has not emerged. In vivo, ps20 stimulated angiogenesis, although expression of WFDC1/ps20 was down-regulated in the reactive stroma tumour microenvironment in prostate cancer. WFDC1 expression is differential in other cancers and inflammatory conditions. Recent studies point to a role in viral infectivity. Although mechanisms of action are not fully understood, WFDC1/ps20 is emerging as a secreted matricellular protein that probably affects response to micro-organisms and tissue repair homoeostasis.

  7. Degenerative Tissue Responses to Space-like Radiation Doses in a Rodent Model of Simulated Microgravity.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Parimal; Akel, Nisreen; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Gaddy, Dana; Griffin, Robert J; Yadlapalli, Jai Shankar K; Dobretsov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    This study examines acute and degenerative tissue responses to space-like radiation doses in a rodent model of simulated microgravity. We have studied four groups of rats, control (CON), irradiated (IR), irradiated and hindlimb suspended (IR-HLS), and suspended (HLS) that were maintained for two weeks. IR and IR+HLS groups were exposed to five sessions of X-ray irradiation (1.2 Gy each, at 3-4 days intervals). Body weights, soleus muscle weights, and hindlimb bone mineral density (BMD) were measured. Results show that compared to CON animals, IR, HLS, and IR+HLS group reduced the body weight gain significantly. IR-associated growth retardation appeared to be closely linked to acute and transient post-IR 'anorexia' (a decrease in food intake). HLS but not IR induced major changes in the musculoskeletal system, consisting in decreases in soleus muscle mass and bone mineral density of distal femur and proximal tibia. Additional dosimetric studies showed that the effect of IR on weight is detectable at 0.3 Gy X-ray doses, while no threshold dose for the IR-produced decrease in food intake could be observed. This study suggests that space flight-associated anorexia and musculoskeletal degenerative changes may be driven by different, radiation- and microgravity-associated (respectively) mechanisms.

  8. TISSUE FACTOR EXPRESSION BY MYELOID CELLS CONTRIBUTES TO PROTECTIVE IMMUNE RESPONSE AGAINST Mycobacterium tuberculosis INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Tripathi, Deepak; Tucker, Torry; Paidipally, Padmaja; Cheekatla, Satyanarayana; Welch, Elwyn; Raghunath, Anjana; Jeffers, Ann; Tvinnereim, Amy R.; Schechter, Melissa E; Andrade, Bruno B; Mackman, Nizel; Idell, Steven; Vankayalapati, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Tissue Factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that plays an essential role in hemostasis by activating coagulation. TF is also expressed by monocytes/macrophages as part of the innate immune response to infections. In the current study, we determined the role of TF expressed by myeloid cells during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection by using mice lacking the TF gene in myeloid cells (TFΔ) and human monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs). We found that during M. tb infection, a deficiency of TF in myeloid cells was associated with reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, enhanced arginase 1 (Arg1) expression, enhanced IL-10 production and reduced apoptosis in infected macrophages, which augmented M. tb growth. Our results demonstrate that a deficiency of TF in myeloid cells promotes M2 like phenotype in M .tb infected macrophages. A deficiency in TF expression by myeloid cells was also associated with reduced fibrin deposition and increased matrix metalloproteases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 mediated inflammation in M. tb infected lungs. Our studies demonstrate that TF expressed by myeloid cells has newly recognized abilities to polarize macrophages and to regulate M. tb growth. PMID:26471500

  9. The Role of Adverse Event Reporting in the FDA Response to a Multistate Outbreak of Liver Disease Associated with a Dietary Supplement

    PubMed Central

    DeBeck, Heidi J.; LeBlanc, Pamela; Mogen, Kathryn M.; Wolpert, Beverly J.; Sabo, Jonathan L.; Salter, Monique; Seelman, Sharon L.; Lance, Susan E.; Monahan, Caitlin; Steigman, David S.; Gensheimer, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Liver disease is a potential complication from using dietary supplements. This study investigated an outbreak of non-viral liver disease associated with the use of OxyELITE ProTM, a dietary supplement used for weight loss and/or muscle building. Methods Illness details were ascertained from MedWatch reports submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) describing consumers who ingested OxyELITE Pro alone or in combination with other dietary supplements. FDA's Forensic Chemistry Center analyzed samples of OxyELITE Pro. Results From February 2012 to February 2014, FDA received 114 reports of adverse events of all kinds involving consumers who ingested OxyELITE Pro. The onset of illness for the first report was December 2010 and for the last report was January 2014. Thirty-three states, two foreign nations, and Puerto Rico submitted reports. Fifty-five of the reports (48%) described liver disease in the absence of viral infection, gallbladder disease, autoimmune disease, or other known causes of liver damage. A total of 33 (60%) of these patients were hospitalized, and three underwent liver transplantation. In early 2013, OxyELITE Pro products entered the market with a formulation distinct from products sold previously. The new formulation replaced 1,3-dimethylamylamine with aegeline. However, the manufacturer failed to submit to FDA a required “new dietary ingredient” notice for the use of aegeline in OxyELITE Pro products. Laboratory analysis identified no drugs, poisons, pharmaceuticals, toxic metals, usnic acid, N-Nitroso-fenfluramine, pyrrolizidine alkaloids, aristocholic acid, or phenethylamines in the products. Conclusions Vigilant surveillance is required for adverse events linked to the use of dietary supplements. PMID:26327730

  10. Proteome changes in banana fruit peel tissue in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lina; Song, Jun; Forney, Charles; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Fillmore, Sherry; Zhang, ZhaoQi

    2016-01-01

    Banana (Musa AAA group) is one of the most consumed fruits in the world due to its flavor and nutritional value. As a typical climacteric fruit, banana responds to ethylene treatment, which induces rapid changes of color, flavor (aroma and taste), sweetness and nutritional composition. It has also been reported that ripening bananas at temperatures above 24 °C inhibits chlorophyll breakdown and color formation but increases the rate of senescence. To gain fundamental knowledge about the effects of high temperature and ethylene on banana ripening, a quantitative proteomic study employing multiplex peptide stable isotope dimethyl labeling was conducted. In this study, green (immature) untreated banana fruit were subjected to treatment with 10 μL L−1 of ethylene for 24 h. After ethylene treatment, treated and untreated fruit were stored at 20 or 30 °C for 24 h. Fruit peel tissues were then sampled after 0 and 1 day of storage, and peel color and chlorophyll fluorescence were evaluated. Quantitative proteomic analysis was conducted on the fruit peels after 1 day of storage. In total, 413 common proteins were identified and quantified from two biological replicates. Among these proteins, 91 changed significantly in response to ethylene and high-temperature treatments. Cluster analysis on these 91 proteins identified 7 groups of changed proteins. Ethylene treatment and storage at 20 °C induced 40 proteins that are correlated with pathogen resistance, cell wall metabolism, ethylene biosynthesis, allergens and ribosomal proteins, and it repressed 36 proteins that are associated with fatty acid and lipid metabolism, redox–oxidative responses, and protein biosynthesis and modification. Ethylene treatment and storage at 30 °C induced 32 proteins, which were mainly similar to those in group 1 but also included 8 proteins in group 3 (identified as chitinase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 1, cysteine synthase, villin-2, leucine-transfer RNA ligase, CP47

  11. CONV--convolution for responses to a finite diameter photon beam incident on multi-layered tissues.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Jacques, S L; Zheng, L

    1997-11-01

    A convolution program (CONV) solving responses to a collimated finite diameter photon beam perpendicularly incident on a multi-layered tissue has been coded in ANSI Standard C, hence, the program can be executed on various computers. The program, employing an extended trapezoidal rule for integration, convolves the responses to an infinitely narrow photon beam computed by a companion program (MCML). Dynamic data allocation is used for CONV as well as MCML, therefore, the number of tissue layers and grid elements of the grid system can be varied at run time. The potential error due to not scoring the first photon-tissue interactions separately is illustrated. The program, including the source code, has been in the public domain since 1992 and can be downloaded from the web site at http:(/)/biomed.tamu.edu/-lw.

  12. Expression, tissue localization and synergy of antimicrobial peptides and proteins in the immune response of the oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Paulina; de Lorgeril, Julien; Gueguen, Yannick; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine; Bachère, Evelyne

    2012-07-01

    Diverse families of antimicrobial peptides and proteins have been described in oysters. We investigated here how antimicrobials are involved in the immune response against a pathogenic strain of Vibrio splendidus. Oyster antimicrobials were shown to display a wide variety of expression profiles in hemocyte populations and tissues. Oyster defensins are constitutively expressed in specific tissues such as mantle (Cg-Defm) or hemocytes (Cg-Defhs), while Cg-BPI is inducible and Cg-Prp appears down-regulated in hemocytes upon infection. The migratory behavior of hemocytes that express the different antimicrobials was found to be involved in the oyster response to a pathogenic Vibrio infection. Indeed, it contributes to colocalize several antimicrobials that were shown here to have synergistic activities. We propose that such a synergy, which was evidenced both within and between families of antimicrobials, might compensate for the low concentration of antimicrobials in oyster tissues.

  13. Bioprinted 3D Primary Liver Tissues Allow Assessment of Organ-Level Response to Clinical Drug Induced Toxicity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Juergen; Robbins, Justin B.; Crogan-Grundy, Candace; Presnell, Sharon C.; Singer, Thomas; Roth, Adrian B.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling clinically relevant tissue responses using cell models poses a significant challenge for drug development, in particular for drug induced liver injury (DILI). This is mainly because existing liver models lack longevity and tissue-level complexity which limits their utility in predictive toxicology. In this study, we established and characterized novel bioprinted human liver tissue mimetics comprised of patient-derived hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells in a defined architecture. Scaffold-free assembly of different cell types in an in vivo-relevant architecture allowed for histologic analysis that revealed distinct intercellular hepatocyte junctions, CD31+ endothelial networks, and desmin positive, smooth muscle actin negative quiescent stellates. Unlike what was seen in 2D hepatocyte cultures, the tissues maintained levels of ATP, Albumin as well as expression and drug-induced enzyme activity of Cytochrome P450s over 4 weeks in culture. To assess the ability of the 3D liver cultures to model tissue-level DILI, dose responses of Trovafloxacin, a drug whose hepatotoxic potential could not be assessed by standard pre-clinical models, were compared to the structurally related non-toxic drug Levofloxacin. Trovafloxacin induced significant, dose-dependent toxicity at clinically relevant doses (≤ 4uM). Interestingly, Trovafloxacin toxicity was observed without lipopolysaccharide stimulation and in the absence of resident macrophages in contrast to earlier reports. Together, these results demonstrate that 3D bioprinted liver tissues can both effectively model DILI and distinguish between highly related compounds with differential profile. Thus, the combination of patient-derived primary cells with bioprinting technology here for the first time demonstrates superior performance in terms of mimicking human drug response in a known target organ at the tissue level. PMID:27387377

  14. Connective tissue responses to some heavy metals. II. Lead: histology and ultrastructure.

    PubMed Central

    Ellender, G.; Ham, K. N.

    1987-01-01

    Lead loaded ion exchange resin beads implanted into the loose connective tissue of the rat pinna induced local lesions which differed widely from those of the control (sodium loaded) beads (Ellender & Ham 1987). These lesions were characterized by changes in the granulation tissue and the approximating connective tissue. Granulation tissue contained mononuclear phagocytes in various guises, and some cells with intranuclear inclusion bodies. The matrix of the granulation tissue contained collagen fibrils having a wide range of diameters suggestive of altered collagen biosynthesis. Foci of collagen mineralization occurred in zones of combined trauma and lead impregnation. Once mineralized they became enveloped by giant cells and epithelioid cells. Lead in damaged tissues is thought to modify the protective mechanism of calcification inhibition and the biosynthesis of the matrix. Images Fig. 6 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 PMID:3040063

  15. Effect of insertion speed on tissue response and insertion mechanics of a chronically implanted silicon-based neural probe.

    PubMed

    Welkenhuysen, M; Andrei, A; Ameye, L; Eberle, W; Nuttin, B

    2011-11-01

    In this study, the effect of insertion speed on long-term tissue response and insertion mechanics was investigated. A dummy silicon parylene-coated probe was used in this context and implanted in the rat brain at 10 μm/s (n = 6) or 100 μm/s (n = 6) to a depth of 9 mm. The insertion mechanics were assessed by the dimpling distance, and the force at the point of penetration, at the end of the insertion phase, and after a 3-min rest period in the brain. After 6 weeks, the tissue response was evaluated by estimating the amount of gliosis, inflammation, and neuronal cell loss with immunohistochemistry. No difference in dimpling, penetration force, or the force after a 3-min rest period in the brain was observed. However, the force at the end of the insertion phase was significantly higher when inserting the probes at 100 μm/s compared to 10 μm/s. Furthermore, an expected tissue response was seen with an increase of glial and microglial reactivity around the probe. This reaction was similar along the entire length of the probe. However, evidence for a neuronal kill zone was observed only in the most superficial part of the implant. In this region, the lesion size was also greatest. Comparison of the tissue response between insertion speeds showed no differences.

  16. The biocontrol endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 induces systemic defense responses in aerial tissues upon colonization of olive roots.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Lama Cabanás, Carmen; Schilirò, Elisabetta; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, a native olive root endophyte and effective biocontrol agent (BCA) against Verticillium wilt of olive, is able to trigger a broad range of defense responses in root tissues of this woody plant. In order to elucidate whether strain PICF7 also induces systemic defense responses in above-ground organs, aerial tissues of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after root bacterization with this endophytic BCA. A suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library, enriched in up-regulated genes, was generated. This strategy enabled the identification of 376 ESTs (99 contigs and 277 singlets), many of them related to response to different stresses. Five ESTs, involved in defense responses, were selected to carry out time-course quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments aiming to: (1) validate the induction of these genes, and (2) shed light on their expression pattern along time (from 1 to 15 days). Induction of olive genes potentially coding for lipoxygenase 2, catalase, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase, and phenylananine ammonia-lyase was thus confirmed at some time points. Computational analysis also revealed that different transcription factors were up-regulated in olive aerial tissues (i.e., JERF, bHLH, WRKY), as previously reported for roots. Results confirmed that root colonization by this endophytic bacterium does not only trigger defense responses in this organ but also mounts a wide array of systemic defense responses in distant tissues (stems, leaves). This sheds light on how olive plants respond to the "non-hostile" colonization by a bacterial endophyte and how induced defense response can contribute to the biocontrol activity of strain PICF7.

  17. The biocontrol endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 induces systemic defense responses in aerial tissues upon colonization of olive roots

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Lama Cabanás, Carmen; Schilirò, Elisabetta; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, a native olive root endophyte and effective biocontrol agent (BCA) against Verticillium wilt of olive, is able to trigger a broad range of defense responses in root tissues of this woody plant. In order to elucidate whether strain PICF7 also induces systemic defense responses in above-ground organs, aerial tissues of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after root bacterization with this endophytic BCA. A suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library, enriched in up-regulated genes, was generated. This strategy enabled the identification of 376 ESTs (99 contigs and 277 singlets), many of them related to response to different stresses. Five ESTs, involved in defense responses, were selected to carry out time-course quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments aiming to: (1) validate the induction of these genes, and (2) shed light on their expression pattern along time (from 1 to 15 days). Induction of olive genes potentially coding for lipoxygenase 2, catalase, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase, and phenylananine ammonia-lyase was thus confirmed at some time points. Computational analysis also revealed that different transcription factors were up-regulated in olive aerial tissues (i.e., JERF, bHLH, WRKY), as previously reported for roots. Results confirmed that root colonization by this endophytic bacterium does not only trigger defense responses in this organ but also mounts a wide array of systemic defense responses in distant tissues (stems, leaves). This sheds light on how olive plants respond to the “non-hostile” colonization by a bacterial endophyte and how induced defense response can contribute to the biocontrol activity of strain PICF7. PMID:25250017

  18. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  19. Prebiotics modulate immune responses in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue of chickens.

    PubMed

    Janardhana, Vijaya; Broadway, Mary M; Bruce, Matthew P; Lowenthal, John W; Geier, Mark S; Hughes, Robert J; Bean, Andrew G D

    2009-07-01

    The recent European Union ban on the prophylactic use of in-feed antibiotics has escalated the search for alternatives for use within the poultry industry. When evaluating the efficacy of potential antibiotic alternatives on bird health and productivity, it is important to analyze the competence of the immune cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), because it is routinely involved in the surveillance of colonizing microbes as well as in interacting with the ingested feed antigens. Therefore, we studied the effect of the prebiotics mannan-oligosaccharide (MOS) and fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) on the phenotypic and functional competence of immune cells in cecal tonsil (CT), which is a major GALT. Day-old Cobb 500 male broilers were randomized to 4 groups. Control chickens were fed the basal diet only. Chickens in experimental groups received 0.05 g/kg zinc bacitracin or 5 g/kg of either FOS or MOS in addition to basal diet. At the end of 25 d, our comparison of the experimental groups with controls revealed that the addition of prebiotics to diet resulted in a significant reduction in the proportion of B cells and in mitogen responsiveness of lymphocytes in CT. Furthermore, FOS treatment significantly enhanced the IgM and IgG antibody titers in plasma. These findings emphasize the need for the analyses of the gut immune function following treatment with novel feed additives. The knowledge obtained from such analyses may aid in understanding the mechanisms underlying the immune competence of the birds, which needs consideration when selecting and optimizing new feed additives instead of antibiotics for poultry production.

  20. Tissue-expressed B7x Affects the Immune Response and Outcome to Lethal Pulmonary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hofmeyer, Kimberly A; Scandiuzzi, Lisa; Ghosh, Kaya; Pirofski, Liise-Anne; Zang, Xingxing

    2012-01-01

    B7x (B7-H4 or B7S1), a member of the B7 family, inhibits in vitro T cell proliferation and cytokine production by binding to an unidentified receptor on activated T cells, but its in vivo function remains largely unclear. We show that B7x protein was expressed in epithelial cells of the lung, but not in lymphoid tissues. To investigate the role of B7x in the lung, we determined the susceptibility of B7x deficient (B7x−/−) mice to a lethal pulmonary infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. B7x−/−, but not B7-H3 deficient, mice were significantly more resistant to S. pneumoniae pulmonary infection than their wild-type (Wt) counterparts. B7x−/− mice had significantly lower bacterial burdens and levels of inflammatory cytokines in lungs as early as 12 hours post-infection. They also had milder immunopathology that was localized in alveolar spaces, while Wt mice had severe inflammation that was perivascular. Control of infection in B7x−/− mice was associated with a marked increase in activated CD4 and CD8 T cells and fewer neutrophils in lungs, whereas the susceptible Wt mice had the opposite cellular profile. In B7x−/−Rag1−/− mice that lack T cells, reduction in bacterial burden was no longer observed. Control of S. pneumoniae and the increased survival observed was specific to the lung, as systemically infected B7x−/− mice were not resistant to infection. These data indicate that lung-expressed B7x negatively regulates T cells and that in its absence, in B7x−/− mice, an enhanced T cell response contributed to reduced lethality in a pulmonary infection model with S. pneumoniae. PMID:22855708

  1. Emission of Hydrogen Sulfide by Leaf Tissue in Response to l-Cysteine 1

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Jiro; Schmidt, Ahlert; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Filner, Philip

    1982-01-01

    Leaf discs and detached leaves exposed to l-cysteine emitted a volatile sulfur compound which was proven by gas chromatography to be H2S. This phenomenon was demonstrated in all nine species tested (Cucumis sativus, Cucurbita pepo, Nicotiana tabacum, Coleus blumei, Beta vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris, Medicago sativa, Hordeum vulgare, and Gossypium hirsutum). The emission of volatile sulfur by cucumber leaves occurred in the dark at a similar rate to that in the light. The emission of leaf discs reached the maximal rate, more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, 2 to 4 hours after starting exposure to l-cysteine; then it decreased. In the case of detached leaves, the maximum occurred 5 to 10 h after starting exposure. The average emission rate of H2S during the first 4 hours from leaf discs of cucurbits in response to 10 millimolar l-cysteine, was usually more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, i.e. 0.24 micromoles per hour per square decimeter. Leaf discs exposed to 1 millimolar l-cysteine emitted only 2% as much as did the discs exposed to 10 millimolar l-cysteine. The emission from leaf discs and from detached leaves lasted for at least 5 and 15 hours, respectively. However, several hours after the maximal emission, injury of the leaves, manifested as chlorosis, was evident. H2S emission was a specific consequence of exposure to l-cysteine; neither d-cysteine nor l-cystine elicited H2S emission. Aminooxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate dependent enzymes, inhibited the emission. In a cell free system from cucumber leaves, H2S formation and its release occurred in response to l-cysteine. Feeding experiments with [35S]l-cysteine showed that most of the sulfur in H2S was derived from sulfur in the l-cysteine supplied and that the H2S emitted for 9 hours accounted for 7 to 10% of l-cysteine taken up. 35S-labeled SO32− and SO42− were found in the tissue extract in addition to internal soluble S2−. These findings

  2. Role of elasticity on the Rheological Response of the Uterus Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi Khorasani, Nariman; Piroozram, Parastoo

    2015-11-01

    N. Khorasani and P. piroozram Department of Mechanical Engineering, Payame Noor University, 19395-3697, Tehran, Iran, The effect of uterus tissue viscoelasticity on its internal pressure is explored. The tissue of the uterus is presented by a linear viscoelastic model with two major time constants. A proper user defined function is developed and incorporated in the simulation software, to represent the model. The geometry of the uterus is separately modeled. It is found that viscoelasticity of the tissue which can be controlled and altered by change the concentration can directly affect its internal pressure. It is also observed that the pressure decreases as the moisture of the tissue is increased. The study is repeated for several practical conditions and parameters pertaining to the viscoelasticity of the tissue are evaluated.

  3. Mechanistic and quantitative studies of bystander response in 3D tissues for low-dose radiation risk estimations

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, Sally A.

    2013-06-12

    We have used the MatTek 3-dimensional human skin model to study the gene expression response of a 3D model to low and high dose low LET radiation, and to study the radiation bystander effect as a function of distance from the site of irradiation with either alpha particles or low LET protons. We have found response pathways that appear to be specific for low dose exposures, that could not have been predicted from high dose studies. We also report the time and distance dependent expression of a large number of genes in bystander tissue. the bystander response in 3D tissues showed many similarities to that described previously in 2D cultured cells, but also showed some differences.

  4. Cloning changes the response to obesity of innate immune factors in blood, liver, and adipose tissues in domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Rødgaard, Tina; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Stagsted, Jan; Heegaard, Peter M H

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of cloned pigs as porcine obesity models reflecting obesity-associated changes in innate immune factor gene expression profiles. Liver and adipose tissue expression of 43 innate immune genes as well as serum concentrations of six immune factors were analyzed in lean and diet-induced obese cloned domestic pigs and compared to normal domestic pigs (obese and lean). The number of genes affected by obesity was lower in cloned animals than in control animals. All genes affected by obesity in adipose tissues of clones were downregulated; both upregulation and downregulation were observed in the controls. Cloning resulted in a less differentiated adipose tissue expression pattern. Finally, the serum concentrations of two acute-phase proteins (APPs), haptoglobin (HP) and orosomucoid (ORM), were increased in obese clones as compared to obese controls as well as lean clones and controls. Generally, the variation in phenotype between individual pigs was not reduced in cloned siblings as compared to normal siblings. Therefore, we conclude that cloning limits both the number of genes responding to obesity as well as the degree of tissue-differentiated gene expression, concomitantly with an increase in APP serum concentrations only seen in cloned, obese pigs. This may suggest that the APP response seen in obese, cloned pigs is a consequence of the characteristic skewed gene response to obesity in cloned pigs, as described in this work. This should be taken into consideration when using cloned animals as models for innate responses to obesity.

  5. Tissue concentration of heparin, not administered dose, correlates with the biological response of injured arteries in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lovich, Mark A.; Edelman, Elazer R.

    1999-01-01

    Drug activity is often studied in well controlled and characterized cellular environments in vitro. However, the biology of cells in culture is only a part of the tissue behavior in vivo. Quantitative studies of the dose response to drugs in vivo have been limited by the inability to reliably determine or predict the concentrations achieved in tissues. We developed a method to study the dose response of injured arteries to exogenous heparin in vivo by providing steady and predictable arterial levels of drug. Controlled-release devices were fabricated to direct heparin uniformly and at a steady rate to the adventitial surface of balloon-injured rat carotid arteries. We predicted the distribution of heparin throughout the arterial wall by using computational simulations of intravascular drug binding and transport, and we correlated these concentrations with the biologic response of the tissues. This allowed the estimation of the arterial concentration of heparin required to maximally inhibit intimal hyperplasia after injury in vivo, 0.3 mg/ml. This estimation of the required concentration of drug seen by a specific tissue is independent of the route of administration and holds for all forms of drug release. In this way we may now be able to evaluate the potential of widely disparate forms of drug release and to finally create some rigorous criteria by which to guide the development of particular delivery strategies for local diseases. PMID:10500138

  6. Adverse consequences of immunostimulation.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The therapeutic uses of immunostimulatory agents are generally in the treatments of infections or cancer. The traditional example of vaccination is one form of immunostimulation used in the prevention of pathogenic infections or cancer (e.g., human papillomavirus vaccine). Recombinant cytokines are increasingly used to stimulate immune system function. For example, interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) and interleukin (IL)-2 have been used to treat chronic hepatitis C virus infection and metastatic melanoma, respectively. In contrast, monoclonal antibodies are used to target malignant cells for elimination via antibody-dependent cytotoxicity mechanisms or apoptosis, including the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-CD56 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab used in the treatment of B-cell malignancies, and the anti-erb2 receptor antibody trastuzumab used in the treatment of breast cancer. Finally, immunostimulation may develop via modulation of pathways involved in immune system regulation. For example, the anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody TGN1412 was developed as an agonist of regulatory T-cells for treatment of T-cell-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases or leukemias. A panel was convened to discuss potential toxicities associated with immunostimulation. At the Immunotoxicology IV meeting in 2006, a panel, moderated by Dr. Robert House (Dynport Vaccine Co., Frederick, MD), included Drs. Gary Burleson (Burleson Research Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, NC), Kenneth Hastings (US FDA, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research [CDER], Rockville, MD), Barbara Mounho (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA), Rafael Ponce (ZymoGenetics, Inc., Seattle, WA), Mark Wing (Huntington Life Sciences, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom), Lauren Black (Navigators Consulting, Sparks, NV) and Anne Pilaro (US FDA, CDER, Rockville, MD). This paper reviews the major identified toxicities associated with immunostimulation, including the acute phase response, cell and tissue abnormalities/injury, cytokine

  7. Insulin response in individual tissues of control and gold thioglucose-obese mice in vivo with (1-/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose

    SciTech Connect

    Cooney, G.J.; Astbury, L.D.; Williams, P.F.; Caterson, I.D.

    1987-02-01

    The dose-response characteristics of several glucose-utilizing tissues (brain, heart, white adipose tissue, brown adipose tissue, and quadriceps muscle) to a single injection of insulin have been compared in control mice and mice made obese with a single injection of gold thioglucose (GTG). Tissue content of (1-/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose 6-phosphate and blood disappearance rate of (1-/sup 14/C)2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) were measured at nine different insulin doses and used to calculate rates of 2-DG uptake and phosphorylation in tissues from control and obese mice. The insulin sensitivity of tissues reflected in the ED50 of insulin response varied widely, and brown adipose tissue was the most insulin-sensitive tissue studied. In GTG-obese mice, heart, quadriceps, and brown adipose tissue were insulin resistant (demonstrated by increased ED50), whereas in white adipose tissue, 2-DG phosphorylation was more sensitive to insulin. Brain 2-DG phosphorylation was insulin independent in control and obese animals. The largest decrease in insulin sensitivity in GTG-obese mice was observed in brown adipose tissue. The loss of diet-induced thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue as a result of the hypothalamic lesion in GTG-obese mice could be a major cause of insulin resistance in brown adipose tissue. Because brown adipose tissue can make a major contribution to whole-body glucose utilization, insulin resistance in this tissue may have a significant effect on whole-animal glucose homeostasis in GTG-obese mice.

  8. Early Growth Response1and Fatty Acid Synthase Expression is Altered in Tumor Adjacent Prostate Tissue and Indicates Field Cancerization

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Anna C.; Trujillo, Kristina A.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Fleet, Trisha M.; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Severns, Virginia; Shah, Satyan K.; Davis, Michael S.; Smith, Anthony Y.; Griffith, Jeffrey K.; Fischer, Edgar G.; Bisoffi, Marco

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Field cancerization denotes the occurrence of molecular alterations in histologically normal tissues adjacent to tumors. In prostate cancer, identification of field cancerization has several potential clinical applications. However, prostate field cancerization remains ill defined. Our previous work has shown up-regulated mRNA of the transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR-1) and the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS) in tissues adjacent to prostate cancer. METHODS Immunofluorescence data were analyzed quantitatively by spectral imaging and linear unmixing to determine the protein expression levels of EGR-1 and FAS in human cancerous, histologically normal adjacent, and disease-free prostate tissues. RESULTS EGR-1 expression was elevated in both structurally intact tumor adjacent (1.6× on average) and in tumor (3.0× on average) tissues compared to disease-free tissues. In addition, the ratio of cytoplasmic versus nuclear EGR-1 expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent and tumor tissues. Similarly, FAS expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent (2.7× on average) and in tumor (2.5× on average) compared to disease-free tissues. CONCLUSIONS EGR-1 and FAS expression is similarly deregulated in tumor and structurally intact adjacent prostate tissues and defines field cancerization. In cases with high suspicion of prostate cancer but negative biopsy, identification of field cancerization could help clinicians target areas for repeat biopsy. Field cancerization at surgical margins on prostatectomy specimen should also be looked at as a predictor of cancer recurrence. EGR-1 and FAS could also serve as molecular targets for chemoprevention. PMID:22127986

  9. Adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Foley, Georgina

    2017-04-05

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article defined the different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and explored when they can occur. It emphasised the importance of being knowledgeable about medications, considering patient safety when patients are taking medications, being alert to the possibility of ADRs, and recognising and responding to suspected ADRs.

  10. Lymphoid tissue inducer cells: architects of CD4 immune responses in mice and men.

    PubMed

    Kim, M-Y; Kim, K-S; McConnell, F; Lane, P

    2009-07-01

    In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the multiple functions of the mouse lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells in: (i) the development of organized lymphoid tissue, (ii) the generation and maintenance of CD4-dependent immunity in adult lymphoid tissues; and (iii) the regulation of central tolerance in thymus. By contrast with mouse LTi cells, which have been well described, the human equivalent is only just beginning to be characterized. Human LTi-like cells expressing interleukin (IL)-22 have been identified recently and found to differentiate into natural killer (NK) cells. The relationship of LTi cells to NK cells is discussed in the light of several studies reporting a close relationship in the mouse between LTi cells and transcription factor retinoid-related orphan receptor gammat-dependent IL-22 producing NK cells in the gut. We also outline our data suggesting that these cells are present in adult human lymphoid tissues.

  11. Homeopathic mistletoe adverse reaction mimics nodal involvement in (18)F-FDG PET/CT performed for evaluation of response to chemotherapy in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Abreu, P; Sánchez, R; Mut, T; Balaguer, D; Latorre, I; Rodríguez, H

    Some patients use complementary medicine. We present a patient with Hodgkin's lymphoma, scanned with (18)F-FDG PET/CT for evaluation of response after chemotherapy, who was self-administering mistletoe as a homeopathic medicine product. The careful review of the images of the entire scan and patient collaboration in anamnesis were crucial to avoid a false positive result. A review of the published scientific data on the effects of mistletoe is also presented.

  12. Model neural prostheses with integrated microfluidics: a potential intervention strategy for controlling reactive cell and tissue responses.

    PubMed

    Retterer, Scott T; Smith, Karen L; Bjornsson, Christopher S; Neeves, Keith B; Spence, Andrew J H; Turner, James N; Shain, William; Isaacson, Michael S

    2004-11-01

    Model silicon intracortical probes with microfluidic channels were fabricated and tested to examine the feasibility of using diffusion-mediated delivery to deliver therapeutic agents into the volume of tissue exhibiting reactive responses to implanted devices. Three-dimensional probe structures with microfluidic channels were fabricated using surface micromachining and deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) techniques. In vitro functional tests of devices were performed using fluorescence microscopy to record the transient release of Texas Red labeled transferrin (TR-transferrin) and dextran (TR-dextran) from the microchannels into 1% w/v agarose gel. In vivo performance was characterized by inserting devices loaded with TR-transferrin into the premotor cortex of adult male rats. Brain sections were imaged using confocal microscopy. Diffusion of TR-transferrin into the extracellular space and uptake by cells up to 400 microm from the implantation site was observed in brain slices taken 1 h postinsertion. The reactive tissue volume, as indicated by the presence of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), was characterized using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. The reactive tissue volume extended 600, 800, and 400 microm radially from the implantation site at 1 h, 24 h, and 6 weeks following insertion, respectively. These results indicate that diffusion-mediated delivery can be part of an effective intervention strategy for the treatment of reactive tissue responses around chronically implanted intracortical probes.

  13. Differential adaptive responses to 1- or 2-day fasting in various mouse tissues revealed by quantitative PCR analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Junya; Kamata, Shotaro; Miura, Asumi; Nagata, Tomoko; Kainuma, Ryo; Ishii, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Dietary or caloric restriction confers various clinical benefits. Short-term fasting of mice is a common experimental procedure that may involve systemic metabolic remodeling, which may significantly affect experimental outputs. This study evaluated adaptive cellular responses after 1- or 2-day fasting in 13 mouse tissues by quantitative PCR using 15 marker primer sets for the activation of ubiquitin–proteasome (Atrogin-1 and MuRF1), autophagy–lysosome (LC3b, p62 and Lamp2), amino acid response (Asns, Trib3, Herpud1, xCT, and Chop), Nrf2-mediated antioxidant (HO-1 and Gsta1), and amino acid transport (Slc38a2, Slc7a5, and Slc7a1) systems. Differential activation profiles obtained in seven highly (thymus, liver, spleen, and small intestine) or mildly (stomach, kidney, and colon) atrophied tissues as well as in six non-atrophied tissues (brain, eye, lung, heart, skeletal muscle, and testis) suggested tissue-specific active metabolic remodeling. PMID:25973363

  14. Factors limiting the linearity of response of tissue equivalent proportional counters used in micro- and nano-dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, T. Z.

    2017-01-01

    Proportional counters filled with tissue equivalent gas mixtures are extremely useful instruments and are being used extensively as sensitive detectors for all types of radiations to measure the energy transferred to small tissue volumes. The linearity of their response is of primary importance. So the investigation and clarification of the physical phenomena taking place in the counter and of the limits within which useful results may be obtained would contribute to a more efficient use and a wider application of these counters. The linearity of response in the dose and in the gas gain has been determined. Linearity in the dose is limited by the total count rate effect, while linearity in the gas gain is limited by secondary processes occurring in the electron avalanche and by the self-induced space charge effect.

  15. Matricryptic sites control tissue injury responses in the cardiovascular system: relationships to pattern recognition receptor regulated events.

    PubMed

    Davis, George E

    2010-03-01

    This review addresses new concepts related to the importance of how cells within the cardiovascular system respond to matricryptic sites generated from the extracellular matrix (ECM) following tissue injury. A model is presented whereby matricryptic sites exposed from the ECM result in activation of multiple cell surface receptors including integrins, scavenger receptors, and toll-like receptors which together are hypothesized to coactivate downstream signaling pathways which alter cell behaviors following tissue injury. Of great interest are the relationships between matricryptic fragments of ECM called matricryptins and other stimuli that activate cells during injury states such as released components from cells (DNA, RNA, cytoskeletal components such as actin) or products from infectious agents in innate immunity responses. These types of cell activating molecules, which are composed of repeating molecular elements, are known to interact with pattern recognition receptors that (i) are expressed from cell surfaces, (ii) are released from cells following tissue injury, or (iii) circulate as components of plasma. Thus, cell recognition of matricryptic sites from the ECM appears to be an important component of a broad cell and tissue sensory system to detect and respond to environmental cues generated following varied types of tissue injury.

  16. Normal Liver Tissue Density Dose Response in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, Christopher C.; Stinauer, Michelle A.; Diot, Quentin; Westerly, David C.; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Miften, Moyed

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the temporal dose response of normal liver tissue for patients with liver metastases treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-nine noncontrast follow-up computed tomography (CT) scans of 34 patients who received SBRT between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed at a median of 8 months post-SBRT (range, 0.7-36 months). SBRT-induced normal liver tissue density changes in follow-up CT scans were evaluated at 2, 6, 10, 15, and 27 months. The dose distributions from planning CTs were mapped to follow-up CTs to relate the mean Hounsfield unit change ({Delta}HU) to dose received over the range 0-55 Gy in 3-5 fractions. An absolute density change of 7 HU was considered a significant radiographic change in normal liver tissue. Results: Increasing radiation dose was linearly correlated with lower post-SBRT liver tissue density (slope, -0.65 {Delta}HU/5 Gy). The threshold for significant change (-7 {Delta}HU) was observed in the range of 30-35 Gy. This effect did not vary significantly over the time intervals evaluated. Conclusions: SBRT induces a dose-dependent and relatively time-independent hypodense radiation reaction within normal liver tissue that is characterized by a decrease of >7 HU in liver density for doses >30-35 Gy.

  17. Arabidopsis thaliana NIP7;1 is involved in tissue arsenic distribution and tolerance in response to arsenate.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Emma R; Maathuis, Frans J M

    2016-03-01

    The Arabidopsis aquaglyceroporin NIP7;1 is involved in uptake and tolerance to the trivalent arsenic species arsenite. Here, we show that NIP7;1 is also involved in the response to pentavalent arsenate. Loss of function of NIP7;1 improved tolerance to arsenate and reduced arsenic levels in both the phloem and xylem, resulting in altered arsenic distribution between tissues. There was no clear correlation between growth and shoot arsenic concentration. This is the first report detailing the involvement of a NIP transporter in response to arsenate. The data suggest that these proteins are relevant targets for breeding and engineering arsenic tolerance in crops.

  18. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  19. Pulp tissue response to Portland cement associated with different radio pacifying agents on pulpotomy of human primary molars.

    PubMed

    Marques, N; Lourenço Neto, N; Fernandes, A P; Rodini, C; Hungaro Duarte, M; Rios, D; Machado, M A; Oliveira, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the response of Portland cement associated with different radio pacifying agents on pulp treatment of human primary teeth by clinical and radiographic exams and microscopic analysis. Thirty mandibular primary molars were randomly divided into the following groups: Group I - Portland cement; Group II - Portland cement with iodoform (Portland cement + CHI3 ); Group III - Portland cement with zirconium oxide (Portland cement + ZrO2 ); and treated by pulpotomy technique (removal of a portion of the pulp aiming to maintain the vitally of the remaining radicular pulp tissue using a therapeutic dressing). Clinical and radiographic evaluations were recorded at 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up. The teeth at the regular exfoliation period were extracted and processed for histological analysis. Data were tested using statistical analysis with a significance level of 5%. The microscopic findings were descriptively analysed. All treated teeth were clinically and radiographically successful at follow-up appointments. The microscopic analysis revealed positive response to pulp repair with hard tissue barrier formation and pulp calcification in the remaining roots of all available teeth. The findings of this study suggest that primary teeth pulp tissue exhibited satisfactory biological response to Portland cement associated with radio pacifying agents. However, further studies with long-term follow-up are needed to determine the safe clinical indication of this alternative material for pulp therapy of primary teeth.

  20. Material Tissue Interaction--From Toxicity to Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, G; Widbiller, M; Galler, K M

    2016-01-01

    The topic of material tissue interaction has gained increasing interest over recent decades from both the dental profession and the public. The primary goal initially was to avoid adverse reactions after the application of dental materials. New laboratory test methods have been developed, and currently premarket testing programs, which attempt to guarantee a basic level of patient safety, are legally required worldwide. The dentist is responsible for selecting the correct indication as well as the proper handling of any newly emerging risk. Apart from this phenomenon-oriented "inert materials concept," the "analytical concept" focuses primarily on analyzing the reasons for adverse reactions, and identifying their associated modifying factors, in order to prevent them or to develop new and more biocompatible materials. The "concept of bioactivity" involves addressing the possibility of positively influencing tissue by materials application, such as the generation of tertiary dentin or antibacterial effects. Finally, tissue regeneration may be supported and promoted by the use of various suitable materials (matrices/scaffolds) into which stem cells can migrate or be seeded, leading to cell differentiation and the generation of new tissue. These new dental materials must also fulfill additional requirements such as controlled degradability in order to be suitable for clinical use. Clearly, the field of material tissue interaction is complex and comprises a wide range of issues. To be successful as dentists in the future, practitioners should remain informed of these important new developments and have the argumentative competence to both properly advise and treat their patients.

  1. Adverse effects of reduced oxygen tension on the proliferative capacity of rat kidney and insulin-secreting cell lines involve DNA damage and stress responses

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Jianhua Jones, R. Huw; Tarry-Adkins, Jane; Smith, Noel H.; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2008-10-01

    Standard cell culture conditions do not reflect the physiological environment in terms of oxygen tension (20% vs 3%). The effects of lowering oxygen tension on cell proliferation in culture can be beneficial as well as detrimental depending on the cell line studied, but the molecular mechanism underlying such effects is not fully understood. We observed that the proliferative capacity of the rat cell lines NRK and INS-1 was inhibited when cultured under 3% oxygen as compared to 20% oxygen. Suppression of proliferation in NRK cells was accompanied by induction of DNA double strand breaks whereas in INS-1 cells it was accompanied by up-regulation of p53 and p27. Although Sirt1 was up-regulated in both cell lines by 3% oxygen the effects on antioxidant enzymes (MnSOD, CuZnSOD and catalase) were cell line specific. Marked up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was detected in both NRK and INS-1 cells when cultured in 3% oxygen. HO-1 expression can be readily induced by exposure to hydrogen peroxide in culture. These results suggest that reduced oxygen tension suppresses the proliferative capacity of these two cell lines through a stress response that is similar to an oxidative stress response but the molecular events that lead to the reduced cell proliferation are cell line specific.

  2. Exposure to residual concentrations of elements from a remediated coal fly ash spill does not adversely influence stress and immune responses of nestling tree swallows.

    PubMed

    Beck, Michelle L; Hopkins, William A; Hallagan, John J; Jackson, Brian P; Hawley, Dana M

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities often produce pollutants that can affect the physiology, growth and reproductive success of wildlife. Many metals and trace elements play important roles in physiological processes, and exposure to even moderately elevated concentrations of essential and non-essential elements could have subtle effects on physiology, particularly during development. We examined the effects of exposure to a number of elements from a coal fly ash spill that occurred in December 2008 and has since been remediated on the stress and immune responses of nestling tree swallows. We found that nestlings at the site of the spill had significantly greater blood concentrations of Cu, Hg, Se and Zn in 2011, but greater concentrations only of Se in 2012, in comparison to reference colonies. The concentrations of elements were below levels of significant toxicological concern in both years. In 2011, we found no relationship between exposure to elements associated with the spill and basal or stress-induced corticosterone concentrations in nestlings. In 2012, we found that Se exposure was not associated with cell-mediated immunity based on the response to phytohaemagglutinin injection. However, the bactericidal capacity of nestling plasma had a positive but weak association with blood Se concentrations, and this association was stronger at the spill site. Our results indicate that exposure to these low concentrations of elements had few effects on nestling endocrine and immune physiology. The long-term health consequences of low-level exposure to elements and of exposure to greater element concentrations in avian species require additional study.

  3. Adverse reactions to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan L; Nelson, Michael R; Hershey, Joyce N; Engler, Renata J M

    2003-06-01

    (The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.) Immunization healthcare is becoming increasingly complex as the number and types of vaccines have continued to expand. Like all prescription drugs, vaccines may be associated with adverse events. The majority of these reactions are self-limited and not associated with prolonged disability. The media, Internet and public advocacy groups have focused on potentially serious vaccine-associated adverse events with questions raised about causal linkages to increasing frequencies of diseases such as autism and asthma. Despite a lack of evidence of a causal relationship to a variety of vaccine safety concerns, including extensive reviews by the Institute of Medicine, questions regarding vaccine safety continue to threaten the success of immunization programs. Risk communication arid individual risk assessment is further challenged by the public health success of vaccine programs creating the perception that certain vaccines are no longer necessary or justified because of the rare reaction risk. There is a need for improved understanding of true vaccine contraindications and precautions as well as host factors and disease threat in order to develop a patient specific balanced risk communication intervention. When they occur, vaccine related adverse events must be treated, documented and reported through the VAERS system. The increasing complexity of vaccination health care has led the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to identify Vaccine Safety Assessment and Evaluation as a potential new specialty.

  4. The shock response and suitability of Synbone® as a tissue simulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Fitzmaurice, B. C.; Hameed, A.; Wood, D. C.; Gibson, M. C.; Painter, J.

    2017-01-01

    The applicability of various materials as human tissue analogues has been a topic of increasing interest in recent years. It allows for more cost-effective experiments to be carried out, but also avoids ethical issues that would arise from using real human tissue. Synbone®, a porous polyurethane material, is commonly used in ballistic experiments as a bone simulant, but until now has not been characterised in terms of its dynamic behaviour. Here, the Hugoniot equation-of-state (EOS) for Synbone® has been derived via a series of plate-impact experiments; highlighting the importance of the underlying material structure in terms of material collapse under high strain-rates. A compaction model was also used for a more extensive analysis of Synbone® and for further comparison of this material to solid polyurethane. This work - following on from previous in-house studies of other tissue analogues - has provided useful data for future simulation of this material. In addition, comparison to dynamic data for other tissue and simulant materials has highlighted the importance of considering tissue as non-monolithic; each layer of tissue should ideally be represented by its own simulant in ballistic experiments. The equation-of-state (EOS) of Synbone® was found to be Us = 0.33up + 0.97; up < 0.55 mm μs-1 and Us=13.87 up2-14.82 up+5.21 ; 0.55 >up<0.95 mm μs-1 , while the compaction Hugoniot curve tended towards the Hugoniot for polyurethane at higher pressures.

  5. Exposure to residual concentrations of elements from a remediated coal fly ash spill does not adversely influence stress and immune responses of nestling tree swallows

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Michelle L.; Hopkins, William A.; Hallagan, John J.; Jackson, Brian P.; Hawley, Dana M.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities often produce pollutants that can affect the physiology, growth and reproductive success of wildlife. Many metals and trace elements play important roles in physiological processes, and exposure to even moderately elevated concentrations of essential and non-essential elements could have subtle effects on physiology, particularly during development. We examined the effects of exposure to a number of elements from a coal fly ash spill that occurred in December 2008 and has since been remediated on the stress and immune responses of nestling tree swallows. We found that nestlings at the site of the spill had significantly greater blood concentrations of Cu, Hg, Se and Zn in 2011, but greater concentrations only of Se in 2012, in comparison to reference colonies. The concentrations of elements were below levels of significant toxicological concern in both years. In 2011, we found no relationship between exposure to elements associated with the spill and basal or stress-induced corticosterone concentrations in nestlings. In 2012, we found that Se exposure was not associated with cell-mediated immunity based on the response to phytohaemagglutinin injection. However, the bactericidal capacity of nestling plasma had a positive but weak association with blood Se concentrations, and this association was stronger at the spill site. Our results indicate that exposure to these low concentrations of elements had few effects on nestling endocrine and immune physiology. The long-term health consequences of low-level exposure to elements and of exposure to greater element concentrations in avian species require additional study. PMID:27293639

  6. Evaluation of Soft Tissue Sarcoma Response to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Beckett, Brooke R.; Tudorica, Alina; Meyer, Janelle M.; Afzal, Aneela; Chen, Yiyi; Mansoor, Atiya; Hayden, James B.; Doung, Yee-Cheen; Hung, Arthur Y.; Holtorf, Megan L.; Aston, Torrie J.; Ryan, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the utility of quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters in comparison with imaging tumor size for early prediction and evaluation of soft tissue sarcoma response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. In total, 20 patients with intermediate- to high-grade soft tissue sarcomas received either a phase I trial regimen of sorafenib + chemoradiotherapy (n = 8) or chemoradiotherapy only (n = 12), and underwent DCE-MRI at baseline, after 2 weeks of treatment with sorafenib or after the first chemotherapy cycle, and after therapy completion. MRI tumor size in the longest diameter (LD) was measured according to the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors) guidelines. Pharmacokinetic analyses of DCE-MRI data were performed using the Shutter-Speed model. After only 2 weeks of treatment with sorafenib or after 1 chemotherapy cycle, Ktrans (rate constant for plasma/interstitium contrast agent transfer) and its percent change were good early predictors of optimal versus suboptimal pathological response with univariate logistic regression C statistics values of 0.90 and 0.80, respectively, whereas RECIST LD percent change was only a fair predictor (C = 0.72). Post-therapy Ktrans, ve (extravascular and extracellular volume fraction), and kep (intravasation rate constant), not RECIST LD, were excellent (C > 0.90) markers of therapy response. Several DCE-MRI parameters before, during, and after therapy showed significant (P < .05) correlations with percent necrosis of resected tumor specimens. In conclusion, absolute values and percent changes of quantitative DCE-MRI parameters provide better early prediction and evaluation of the pathological response of soft tissue sarcoma to preoperative chemoradiotherapy than the conventional measurement of imaging tumor size change. PMID:28066805

  7. Effects of high carbohydrate and high fat diets on rat adipose tissue pyruvate dehydrogenase responses to concanavalin A and spermine.

    PubMed

    Begum, N; Tepperman, H M; Tepperman, J

    1982-11-01

    Rats were fed a high lard diet or a high glucose diet for 5-7 days. Basal and Concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated epididymal fat pad pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activities were decreased in fat diet-adapted rats compared to those fed the glucose diet. When adipocyte plasma membranes and mitochondria were coincubated with and without Con A, it was found that the lectin stimulation of PDH activity was lower in preparations from fat-fed rats. These results are comparable to our earlier observations with insulin on adipose tissue PDH. Spermine also stimulated PDH in whole adipose tissue pieces in both the absence and presence (0.5 mM) of medium glucose. The spermine stimulation of PDH in adipose tissue was decreased in fat-fed rats. In contrast to Con A, spermine failed to stimulate PDH in a cell-free system. This suggests that spermine activation of PDH in adipose tissue does not involve the generation of the second messenger responsible for the effects of insulin and Con A. The hypothesis was further substantiated by the findings that (1) the insulin and spermine effects were additive in whole adipose tissue and also in adipocytes, and (2) the spermine effect on fat cells was not significantly inhibited by protease inhibitors, which abolish the effects of insulin on fat cell PDH. The fat-induced decreases in response to Con A and spermine involve not only an adaptive change in the ability of the plasma membrane to generate the chemical modulator of PDH but are also related to postreceptor events.

  8. Responses of volatile compounds in inner tissues on refrigeration in full ripe tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 4-day storage of tomato fruit in refrigerator, a common consumer practice in kitchens, which is not recommended though, would significant suppress the volatile production in pericarp; however, little is reported on volatile profile in inner tissues. In this study, red “FL 47” tomato fruits were st...

  9. Soft tissue response to four dense ceramic materials and two clinically used biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Richardson, W C; Klawitter, J J; Sauer, B W; Pruitt, J R; Hulbert, S F

    1975-07-01

    Disk-shaped implants of spinel, alumina, mullite, zircon, a cast Co-Cr-Mo alloy, and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), were implanted in the paraspinalis muscle of 12 adult, male, white New Zealand rabbits. Prior to implantation the implants were characterized with respect to size and shape, weight and surface roughness. After periods of 1 month, 2 months, and 4 months, the rabbits were sacrificed and the tissue specimens were retrieved with the implants still intact. Histological examination of the tissues surrounding the implants along with changes in the size and shape, weight, and surface roughness of the implants were used as criteria for evaluating these materials for implant purposes. No surfaces degradation of any of the materials was detected using scanning electron microscopy. Fibrous tissue seemed to adhere to the UHMWPE implants more than any other material used in this study. Large amounts of fibrous tissue were also found to adhere to the cast Co-Cr-Mo alloy implants. The histological results indicated that within the limits of this investigation, the biocompatibility of the ceramic materials used in this study compared favorably with the clinically used Co-Cr-Mo alloy implants and the UHMWPE implants.

  10. Micro-/nano-engineered cellular responses for soft tissue engineering and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Tay, Chor Yong; Irvine, Scott Alexander; Boey, Freddy Y C; Tan, Lay Poh; Venkatraman, Subbu

    2011-05-23

    The development of biomedical devices and reconstruction of functional ex vivo tissues often requires the need to fabricate biomimetic surfaces with features of sub-micrometer precision. This can be achieved with the advancements in micro-/nano-engineering techniques, allowing researchers to manipulate a plethora of cellular behaviors at the cell-biomaterial interface. Systematic studies conducted on these 2D engineered surfaces have unraveled numerous novel findings that can potentially be integrated as part of the design consideration for future 2D and 3D biomaterials and will no doubt greatly benefit tissue engineering. In this review, recent developments detailing the use of micro-/nano-engineering techniques to direct cellular orientation and function pertinent to soft tissue engineering will be highlighted. Particularly, this article aims to provide valuable insights into distinctive cell interactions and reactions to controlled surfaces, which can be exploited to understand the mechanisms of cell growth on micro-/nano-engineered interfaces, and to harness this knowledge to optimize the performance of 3D artificial soft tissue grafts and biomedical applications.

  11. Peripharyngeal tissue deformation, stress distributions, and hyoid bone movement in response to mandibular advancement.

    PubMed

    Amatoury, Jason; Kairaitis, Kristina; Wheatley, John R; Bilston, Lynne E; Amis, Terence C

    2015-02-01

    Mandibular advancement (MA) increases upper airway (UA) patency and decreases collapsibility. Furthermore, MA displaces the hyoid bone in a cranial-anterior direction, which may contribute to MA-associated UA improvements via redistribution of peripharyngeal tissue stresses (extraluminal tissue pressure, ETP). In the present study, we examined effects of MA on ETP distributions, deformation of the peripharyngeal tissue surface (UA geometry), and hyoid bone position. We studied 13 supine, anesthetized, tracheostomized, spontaneously breathing adult male New Zealand White rabbits. Graded MA was applied from 0 to ∼4.5 mm. ETP was measured at six locations distributed throughout three UA regions: tongue, hyoid, and epiglottis. Axial computed tomography images of the UA (nasal choanae to glottis) were acquired and used to measure lumen geometry (UA length; regional cross-sectional area) and hyoid displacement. MA resulted in nonuniform decreases in ETP (greatest at tongue region), ranging from -0.11 (-0.15 to -0.06) to -0.82 (-1.09 to -0.54) cmH2O/mm MA [linear mixed-effects model slope (95% confidence interval)], across all sites. UA length decreased by -0.5 (-0.8 to -0.2) %/mm accompanied by nonuniform increases in cross-sectional area (greatest at hyoid region) ranging from 7.5 (3.6-11.4) to 18.7 (14.9-22.5) %/mm. The hyoid bone was displaced in a cranial-anterior direction by 0.42 (0.36-0.44) mm/mm MA. In summary, MA results in nonuniform changes in peripharyngeal tissue pressure distributions and lumen geometry. Displacement of the hyoid bone with MA may play a pivotal role in redistributing applied MA loads, thus modifying tissue stress/deformation distributions and determining resultant UA geometry outcomes.

  12. Effects of mercuric chloride on chemiluminescent response of phagocytes and tissue lysozyme activity in Tilapia, Oreochromis aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Low, K.W.; Sin, Y.M.

    1995-02-01

    Phagocytosis is an important defense mechanism against foreign pathogenic organisms. The cells involved are phagocytes which are comprised of peripheral blood monocytes (tissue macrophages) and polymorphonuclear (PMN) leucocytes. These cells can be activated by either particulate or soluble stimuli and undergo a respiratory burst from which several reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be formed. The reactive oxygen species and some hydrolases generated in the cells are the major antibacterial agents released during phagocytosis. Chemiluminescence (CL) is emitted, in vitro, from phagocytizing human PMN neutrophils. A similar CL response was also encountered in fish phagocytes. ROS was the causative agent of the CL emitted during in vitro phagocytosis. Phagocytic activity can be monitored by measuring the CL response of the phagocytes. Lysozyme is one of the potent hydrolases which are involved in the destruction of pathogens during phagocytosis. In fish, it was found predominantly in haematopoietic tissues, PMN leucocytes and moncytes. This enzyme has been shown to have antibacterial activity against several pathogens in fish. A combined oxidative and hydrolytic attack upon the engulfed pathogens allow phagocytes to kill infectious agents effectively. However, severe suppression or enhancement of these two functions caused by some exogenous factors may be detrimental to the host tissues. It has been reported that inorganic mercury could inhibit, in vitro, the respiratory burst and the microbicidal activities of human PMN leucocytes. It was also reported that increased in vitro release of lysozyme was found in mercury-treated human PMN leucocytes. However, such work has not been reported in fish. The aim of this research was to examine whether mercury could exert similar effects on the CL response in phagocytes and tissue lysozyme activity in fish after they were exposed to different concentrations of mercuric chloride over a period of 3 wks. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Tissue perfusion and oxygenation to monitor fluid responsiveness in critically ill, septic patients after initial resuscitation: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Klijn, Eva; van Velzen, Marit H N; Lima, Alexandre Pinto; Bakker, Jan; van Bommel, Jasper; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2015-12-01

    Fluid therapy after initial resuscitation in critically ill, septic patients may lead to harmful overloading and should therefore be guided by indicators of an increase in stroke volume (SV), i.e. fluid responsiveness. Our objective was to investigate whether tissue perfusion and oxygenation are able to monitor fluid responsiveness, even after initial resuscitation. Thirty-five critically ill, septic patients underwent infusion of 250 mL of colloids, after initial fluid resuscitation. Prior to and after fluid infusion, SV, cardiac output sublingual microcirculatory perfusion (SDF: sidestream dark field imaging) and skin perfusion and oxygenation (laser Doppler flowmetry and reflectance spectroscopy) were measured. Fluid responsiveness was defined by a ≥5 or 10% increase in SV upon fluids. In responders to fluids, SDF-derived microcirculatory and skin perfusion and oxygenation increased, but only the increase in cardiac output, mean arterial and pulse pressure, microvascular flow index and relative Hb concentration and oxygen saturation were able to monitor a SV increase. Our proof of principle study demonstrates that non-invasively assessed tissue perfusion and oxygenation is not inferior to invasive hemodynamic measurements in monitoring fluid responsiveness. However skin reflectance spectroscopy may be more helpful than sublingual SDF.

  14. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase suppresses the adverse phenotype of endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells and improves endocrine response in endocrine-sensitive cells.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Stephen; Barnfather, Peter; Hayes, Edd; Bramble, Pamela; Christensen, James; Nicholson, Robert I; Barrett-Lee, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Acquired resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer is a major clinical problem. Previous reports have demonstrated that cell models of acquired endocrine resistance have altered cell-matrix adhesion and a highly migratory phenotype, features which may impact on tumour spread in vivo. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase that regulates signalling pathways central to cell adhesion, migration and survival and its expression is frequently deregulated in breast cancer. In this study, we have used the novel FAK inhibitor PF573228 to address the role of FAK in the development of endocrine resistance. Whilst total-FAK expression was similar between endocrine-sensitive and endocrine-resistant MCF7 cells, FAK phosphorylation status (Y397 or Y861) was altered in resistance. PF573228 promoted a dose-dependent inhibition of FAK phosphorylation at Y397 but did not affect other FAK activation sites (pY407, pY576 and pY861). Endocrine-resistant cells were more sensitive to these inhibitory effects versus MCF7 (mean IC(50) for FAK pY397 inhibition: 0.43 μM, 0.05 μM and 0.13 μM for MCF7, TamR and FasR cells, respectively). Inhibition of FAK pY397 was associated with a reduction in TamR and FasR adhesion to, and migration over, matrix components. PF573228 as a single agent (0-1 μM) did not affect the growth of MCF7 cells or their endocrine-resistant counterparts. However, treatment of endocrine-sensitive cells with PF573228 and tamoxifen combined resulted in greater suppression of proliferation versus single agent treatment. Together these data suggest the importance of FAK in the process of endocrine resistance, particularly in the development of an aggressive, migratory cell phenotype and demonstrate the potential to improve endocrine response through combination treatment.

  15. Adverse reactions to drug additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1984-10-01

    There is a long list of additives used by the pharmaceutical industry. Most of the agents used have not been implicated in hypersensitivity reactions. Among those that have, only reactions to parabens and sulfites have been well established. Parabens have been shown to be responsible for rare immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions that occur after the use of local anesthetics. Sulfites, which are present in many drugs, including agents commonly used to treat asthma, have been shown to provoke severe asthmatic attacks in sensitive individuals. Recent studies indicate that additives do not play a significant role in "hyperactivity." The role of additives in urticaria is not well established and therefore the incidence of adverse reactions in this patient population is simply not known. In double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, reactions to tartrazine or additives other than sulfites, if they occur at all, are indeed quite rare for the asthmatic population, even for the aspirin-sensitive subpopulation.

  16. Visualizing the neutrophil response to sterile tissue injury in mouse dermis reveals a three-phase cascade of events.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lai Guan; Qin, Jim S; Roediger, Ben; Wang, Yilin; Jain, Rohit; Cavanagh, Lois L; Smith, Adrian L; Jones, Cheryl A; de Veer, Michael; Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Meeusen, Els N; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes traffic into sites of organ injury in which they may not only participate in tissue repair and pathogen clearance but may also contribute to collateral cell damage through the release of noxious mediators. The dynamics and mechanisms of neutrophil migration in the extravascular space toward loci of tissue damage are not well understood. Here, we have used intravital multi-photon microscopy to dissect the behavior of neutrophils in response to tissue injury in the dermis of mice. We found that, following confined physical injury, initially rare scouting neutrophils migrated in a directional manner toward the damage focus. This was followed by the attraction of waves of additional neutrophils, and finally stabilization of the neutrophil cluster around the injury. Although neutrophil migration in the steady state and during the scouting phase depended on pertussis toxin-sensitive signals, the amplification phase was sensitive to interference with the cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose pathway. We finally demonstrated that neutrophil scouts also transit through the non-inflamed dermis, suggesting immunosurveillance function by these cells. Together, our data unravel a three-step cascade of events that mediates the specific accumulation of neutrophils at sites of sterile tissue injury in the interstitial space.

  17. De Novo Transcriptome Analysis to Identify Anthocyanin Biosynthesis Genes Responsible for Tissue-Specific Pigmentation in Zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud.)

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jong Hwa; Kim, June-Sik; Kim, Seungill; Soh, Hye Yeon; Shin, Hosub; Jang, Hosung; Ryu, Ju Hyun; Kim, Ahyeong; Yun, Kil-Young; Kim, Shinje; Kim, Ki Sun; Choi, Doil; Huh, Jin Hoe

    2015-01-01

    Zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica Steud.) is commonly found in temperate climate regions and widely used for lawns, in part, owing to its uniform green color. However, some zoysiagrass cultivars accumulate red to purple pigments in their spike and stolon tissues, thereby decreasing the aesthetic value. Here we analyzed the anthocyanin contents of two zoysiagrass cultivars ‘Anyang-jungji’ (AJ) and ‘Greenzoa’ (GZ) that produce spikes and stolons with purple and green colors, respectively, and revealed that cyanidin and petunidin were primarily accumulated in the pigmented tissues. In parallel, we performed a de novo transcriptome assembly and identified differentially expressed genes between the two cultivars. We found that two anthocyanin biosynthesis genes encoding anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) and dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) were preferentially upregulated in the purple AJ spike upon pigmentation. Both ANS and DFR genes were also highly expressed in other zoysiagrass cultivars with purple spikes and stolons, but their expression levels were significantly low in the cultivars with green tissues. We observed that recombinant ZjDFR1 and ZjANS1 proteins successfully catalyze the conversions of dihydroflavonols into leucoanthocyanidins and leucoanthocyanidins into anthocyanidins, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that upregulation of ANS and DFR is responsible for tissue-specific anthocyanin biosynthesis and differential pigmentation in zoysiagrass. The present study also demonstrates the feasibility of a de novo transcriptome analysis to identify the key genes associated with specific traits, even in the absence of reference genome information. PMID:25905914

  18. Brown and white adipose tissues: intrinsic differences in gene expression and response to cold exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Rosell, Meritxell; Kaforou, Myrsini; Frontini, Andrea; Okolo, Anthony; Chan, Yi-Wah; Nikolopoulou, Evanthia; Millership, Steven; Fenech, Matthew E; MacIntyre, David; Turner, Jeremy O; Moore, Jonathan D; Blackburn, Edith; Gullick, William J; Cinti, Saverio; Montana, Giovanni; Parker, Malcolm G; Christian, Mark

    2014-04-15

    Brown adipocytes dissipate energy, whereas white adipocytes are an energy storage site. We explored the plasticity of different white adipose tissue depots in acquiring a brown phenotype by cold exposure. By comparing cold-induced genes in white fat to those enriched in brown compared with white fat, at thermoneutrality we defined a "brite" transcription signature. We identified the genes, pathways, and promoter regulatory motifs associated with "browning," as these represent novel targets for understanding this process. For example, neuregulin 4 was more highly expressed in brown adipose tissue and upregulated in white fat upon cold exposure, and cell studies showed that it is a neurite outgrowth-promoting adipokine, indicative of a role in increasing adipose tissue innervation in response to cold. A cell culture system that allows us to reproduce the differential properties of the discrete adipose depots was developed to study depot-specific differences at an in vitro level. The key transcriptional events underpinning white adipose tissue to brown transition are important, as they represent an attractive proposition to overcome the detrimental effects associated with metabolic disorders, including obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  19. Recognizing and reporting adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, L. M.; Colley, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Although physicians in practice are most likely to see patients with adverse drug reactions, they may fail to recognize an adverse effect or to attribute it to a drug effect and, when recognized, they may fail to report serious reactions to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To recognize and attribute an adverse event to a drug effect, physicians should review the patient's clinical course, looking at patient risk factors, the known adverse reactions to the suspected drug, and the likelihood of a causal relationship between the drug and the adverse event-based on the temporal relationship, response to stopping or restarting the drug, and whether other factors could explain the reaction. Once an adverse drug reaction has been identified, the patient should be informed and appropriate documentation made in the patient's medical record. Serious known reactions and all reactions to newly released drugs or those not previously known to occur (even if the certainty is low) should be reported to the FDA. PMID:1536067

  20. Intense THz pulses cause H2AX phosphorylation and activate DNA damage response in human skin tissue

    PubMed Central

    Titova, Lyubov V.; Ayesheshim, Ayesheshim K.; Golubov, Andrey; Fogen, Dawson; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Hegmann, Frank A.; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Recent emergence and growing use of terahertz (THz) radiation for medical imaging and public security screening raise questions on reasonable levels of exposure and health consequences of this form of electromagnetic radiation. In particular, picosecond-duration THz pulses have shown promise for novel diagnostic imaging techniques. However, the effects of THz pulses on human cells and tissues thus far remain largely unknown. We report on the investigation of the biological effects of pulsed THz radiation on artificial human skin tissues. We observe that exposure to intense THz pulses for ten minutes leads to a significant induction of H2AX phosphorylation, indicating that THz pulse irradiation may cause DNA damage in exposed skin tissue. At the same time, we find a THz-pulse-induced increase in the levels of several proteins responsible for cell-cycle regulation and tumor suppression, suggesting that DNA damage repair mechanisms are quickly activated. Furthermore, we find that the cellular response to pulsed THz radiation is significantly different from that induced by exposure to UVA (400 nm). PMID:23577291

  1. [Procedure adverse events: nursing care in central venous catheter fracture].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Juan, Eva; Maqueda-Palau, Mònica; Romero-Grilo, Cristina; Muñoz-Moles, Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    In a intensive care unit (ICU) there are many factors that can lead to the occurrence of adverse events. A high percentage of these events are associated with the administration of drugs. Diagnostic tests, such as computed tomography, is common in critically ill patients and technique can be performed with injection of contrast agent to enhance the visualization of soft tissue. The contrast is a medication and the nurse is responsible for its proper administration. The management of the critically ill patient is complex. ICU team and radiology shares responsibility for the care and safety of the patient safety during the transfer and performing tests with contrast. The World Health Organisation patient safety strategies, recommends analysing errors and learning from them. Therefore, it was decided to investigate the causes of the category E severity adverse events that occurred in a patient who was admitted to the ICU for septic shock of abdominal origin. An abdominal computed tomography was performed with contrast which was injected through a central venous catheter. The contrast did not appear in the image. What happened? Causal analysis helped to understand what triggered the event. A care plan and an algorithm were drafted to prevent it from happening again, with the following objectives: improving knowledge, skills and promoting positive attitudes towards patient safety, working at primary, secondary and tertiary care levels.

  2. Tissue response following CO2 laser application in apical surgery: light microscopic assessment in dogs.

    PubMed

    Friedman, S; Rotstein, I; Bab, I

    1992-01-01

    The potential advantages of CO2 laser in apical surgery have not been established histologically. Therefore, the long-term effects of CO2 laser on the apical and periapical tissues were examined histologically in dogs 6 months after apical surgery. Lased specimens and unlased controls showed periapical inflammatory and osteogenic reactions. Lased root surfaces revealed craters with a superficial charred layer closely associated with new cementum-like matrix. The subjacent dentin appeared tubule-free and eosinophilic. Lased bone trabeculae showed a charred layer with a deeper osteocyte-free zone. The charred layer was covered by new bone. Detached charred segments in the marrow space and periapical inflammatory infiltrate were intimately associated with multinucleated giant cells, some containing minute char particles. Such cells were absent from the root and trabecular char linings. In addition, the charred surfaces were free of hard tissue resorption. These results suggest that CO2 laser does not hinder healing when applied in apical surgery.

  3. [Tissue biomarkers of response to anti-PD-1 immunotherapies in melanoma].

    PubMed

    Adam, Julien; Tomasic, Gorana; Robert, Caroline

    2017-02-01

    Prognosis and treatment of advanced melanoma have been transformed by the success of immunotherapies, in particular agents targeting PD-1. PD-L1 expression assessed by immunohistochemistry in not an effective predictive biomarker to select patients in this tumor type, since significant clinical benefit was observed in the group of patients with negative tumors. The predictive value of PD-L1 testing to select patients for combination of anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA-4 agents is under evaluation. Other tissue biomarkers are emerging to identify sensitive tumors to anti-PD-1 agents. In particular, assessment of immune infiltrates in tumor tissue, mutational load and tumor neoantigens seem promising in melanoma.

  4. Metabolic and hemodynamic responses to exercise in subcutaneous adipose tissue and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Boschmann, M; Rosenbaum, M; Leibel, R L; Segal, K R

    2002-11-01

    This study evaluated the effect of standardized bicycle exercise on metabolism and blood flow in abdominal ( aSAT) and femoral subcutaneous adipose tissue ( fSAT) and skeletal muscle in eleven women and nine men. Using microdialysis, the respective tissues were perfused with Ringer's solution (+ 50 mM ethanol) and dialysate [ethanol], [glycerol], [lactate] and [pyruvate] were measured in order to estimate blood flow (ethanol dilution technique), lipolysis and glycolysis, respectively. At rest, blood flow tended to be higher in the respective tissues of women when compared to men. During exercise, blood flow was increased significantly in fSAT and muscle, but not in aSAT. Dialysate [glycerol] was increased two- to three-fold in aSAT and fSAT, similarly in men and women. However, in muscle, dialysate [glycerol] was increased five-fold in women and four-fold in men without reaching a steady state in women. Corrected for blood flow, the increase in lipolysis was greater in muscle than in fSAT, and greater in fSAT than in aSAT, and in muscle the increase was greater for women compared with men. Dialysate [lactate] and [lactate]/[pyruvate] ratio were much more increased in muscle compared with aSAT and fSAT. It is concluded that lipids stored in muscle are rather used than lipids stored in adipose tissue for fueling the energy metabolism of muscle during exercise. During exercise, lipid mobilization is much greater in women than in men.

  5. Oxidative stress in marine bivalves tissues in response to accumulation of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chelomin, V.P.; Belcheva, N.N.; Zakartsev, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    Using model aquarium experiments the authors have shown that the accumulation of heavy metals (copper and cadmium) by the tissues of marine bivalves (Mytilus edulis, Mizuhopecten yessoensis) is followed by a complex of alterations in the lipid matrix of some membrane organelles. It is supposed that the disturbance of balance of prooxidant and antioxidant processes is the main mechanism in heavy metal-inducible damage, of membranes. This possibility is supported by results of levels of conjugated dienes, malondialdehyde and Shiff`s bases, determined as indicators of lipid peroxidation in different tissues of molluscs, markedly increased with metal accumulation. Unlike to cadmium, the copper possess prooxidative activity, stimulating the peroxidation of membrane lipids directly. In spite of some distinctions the intracellular antioxidative systems (glutathione system and tocopherol) showed extreme sensitivity to the accumulation of both metals. It was demonstrated that the accumulation of these metals was followed by die changes of glutathione and tocopherol contents and the inhibition of glutathione-reductase. activity,, but it was not correlated with changes of Se-depending glutathioneperoxidase activity. As it results from kinetic data the most damages of glutathione system are revealed on this earliest stages of metal accumulation when metallothionein synthesis is on the low level. The amount of glutathione in the tissues was restored almost to their original level when metallothionein synthesis increases markedly. But, total amount of peroxides is retained on the high level for a long period of time. On the basis of results it is reasonable to assume that the accumulation of these metals by mollusc tissues does not proceed without leaving a trace. This process is a potential menace for increasing of destructive events in consequence of disturbance of balance of prooxidant and antioxidant processes.

  6. Inflammatory response in visceral fat tissue and liver is prenatally programmed: experimental research.

    PubMed

    Bezpalko, L; Gavrilyuk, O; Zayachkivska, O

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of developmental programming we analyzed the effects of maternal stress and food intake on physiological activity of adipose tissue and hepatocellular organization in the offsprings. The experiments were conducted in nonlinear female rats (n=20) and their male offsprings (n=28). During their pregnancy female rats were exposed to social and emotional stress using Pratt's model, and nutritional insults: high sugar diet (HSD) with chronic access to 30% solution of saccharose in drinking water ad libitum, high fat diet (HFD) containing 45% calories from fat or their combination - high sugar and high fat diet (HSFD). The effects of maternal stress and nutrition on severity of visceral fat and liver changes were then examined in offsprings, along with changes in serum levels of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines: IL-1b, IL-8 (in rats known as GRO/CINC-1), leptin and adiponectin, respectively. Maternal exposure to stress in combination with HSFD resulted in the most prominent changes in the offsprings: histological changes in the visceral fat tissue and liver with cell reorganization and signs of inflammation, 217% increase in IL-1β level, 99% increase in GRO/CINC-1 level, 79% increase in leptin level and 41% decrease in adiponectin level. The leptin/adiponectin index was elevated in all study groups and reached 158% in HSD group, 138% in HFD group and was two times higher in HSFD group vs control. The rat model used in this study provides novel insight into development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Expressed pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines may indicate early changes in liver and adipose tissue functioning and leptin/adiponectin index could be a novel non-invasive marker of metabolic-related liver alteration. Healthy nutrition and stress management during prenatal period may serve as a valid strategy to prevent liver and adipose tissue inflammation/alteration and metabolic disorders in adulthood.

  7. Modeling of the Laser-Induced Thermal Response, Ablation, and Fragmentation of Biological Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-27

    Most of our effo" .s thus far have been focused on the "hard" tissue problem, i.e., kidney stones, gallstones , calcified plaque. IDuring this first... gallstones , (3) modeling of laser-driven shock-induced fragmentation of kidney stones and gallstones , and (4) modeling of the above surface hydrodynamics, i.e... gallstones (Section 3); (3) modeling of aser-driven shock-induced fragmentation of kidney stones and gallstones (Section 4); and (4) modeling of the above

  8. Responses of estrogen sensitive tissues in female Wistar rats to pre- and postnatal isoflavone exposure.

    PubMed

    Hertrampf, T; Ledwig, C; Kulling, S; Molzberger, A; Möller, F J; Zierau, O; Vollmer, G; Moors, S; Degen, G H; Diel, P

    2009-12-15

    Effects of isoflavones on estrogen sensitive tissues are discussed controversially. This study was designed to investigate tissue specific effects of an isoflavone exposure through different periods of life in female Wistar rats and to compare the effects of genistein (GEN) to those of mixed dietary isoflavones, GEN and daidzein (DAI). One group received an isoflavone-free diet (IDD), another was fed an isoflavone-rich diet (IRD) and the third group an IDD supplemented with GEN (GEN(d)) prior to mating, throughout pregnancy and up to weaning. The offspring were kept on the respective diets during growth, puberty and adulthood. The weight of the uterus, the height of the uterine and vaginal epithelium, the bone mineral density of the tibia, and the expression of the estrogen sensitive gene CaBP9K in the liver were determined. At d21, the uterine weight, the uterine epithelium and the expression of CaBP9K in the liver were significantly stimulated in GEN(d) animals compared to IDD and IRD. Interestingly, bone mineral density was increased in GEN(d) and in IRD animals. Around puberty (d50) neither uterine wet weights nor trabecular bone density differed significantly among the isoflavone groups and the IDD control. At d80 no significant differences in uterine weight were observed among IDD, GEN(d) and IRD animals. However, bone mineral density was increased in GEN(d) and IRD animals. In summary, our results demonstrate that lifelong dietary exposure to isoflavones can affect estrogen sensitive tissues, apparently in a tissue selective manner. With respect to health risk and benefit our data indicate that an increased bone mineral density can be achieved by lifelong exposure to an IRD, which, in contrast to GEN supplementation, does not seem to stimulate the proliferation of the uterine epithelium.

  9. A Quiescent, Regeneration-Responsive Tissue Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cell Bone Marrow Niche Model via Magnetic Levitation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Emily Elizabeth Louise; Wheadon, Helen; Lewis, Natasha; Yang, Jingli; Mullin, Margaret; Hursthouse, Andrew; Stirling, David; Dalby, Matthew John; Berry, Catherine Cecilia

    2016-09-27

    The bone marrow niche represents a specialized environment that regulates mesenchymal stem cell quiescence and self-renewal, yet fosters stem cell migration and differentiation upon demand. An in vitro model that embodies these features would open up the ability to perform detailed study of stem cell behavior. In this paper we present a simple bone marrow-like niche model, which comprises of nanomagnetically levitated stem cells cultured as multicellular spheroids within a type I collagen gel. The stem cells maintained are nestin positive and remain quiescent until regenerative demand is placed upon them. In response to coculture wounding, they migrate and appropriately differentiate upon engraftment. This tissue engineered regeneration-responsive bone marrow-like niche model will allow for greater understanding of stem cell response to injury and also facilitate as a testing platform for drug candidates in a multiwell plate format.

  10. Histologic studies on osseointegration: soft tissues response to implant surfaces and components. A review.

    PubMed

    Piattelli, Adriano; Pontes, Ana Emilia Farias; Degidi, Marco; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2011-01-01

    It is important to clarify the potential response of different types of cells to different implant materials and topographies. Thus, in vitro studies are performed using cell cultures, in order to evaluate, among other characteristics, the morphology, orientation, proliferation and adhesion of the cells. Histology evaluation are performed in animals or humans to describe the physiological response to different surfaces.

  11. Gap junction proteins: master regulators of the planarian stem cell response to tissue maintenance and injury.

    PubMed

    Peiris, T Harshani; Oviedo, Néstor J

    2013-01-01

    Gap junction (GJ) proteins are crucial mediators of cell-cell communication during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration and disease. GJ proteins form plasma membrane channels that facilitate passage of small molecules across cells and modulate signaling pathways and cellular behavior in different tissues. These properties have been conserved throughout evolution, and in most invertebrates GJ proteins are known as innexins. Despite their critical relevance for physiology and disease, the mechanisms by which GJ proteins modulate cell behavior are poorly understood. This review summarizes findings from recent work that uses planarian flatworms as a paradigm to analyze GJ proteins in the complexity of the whole organism. The planarian model allows access to a large pool of adult somatic stem cells (known as neoblasts) that support physiological cell turnover and tissue regeneration. Innexin proteins are present in planarians and play a fundamental role in controlling neoblast behavior. We discuss the possibility that GJ proteins participate as cellular sensors that inform neoblasts about local and systemic physiological demands. We believe that functional analyses of GJ proteins will bring a complementary perspective to studies that focus on the temporal expression of genes. Finally, integrating functional studies along with molecular genetics and epigenetic approaches would expand our understanding of cellular regulation in vivo and greatly enhance the possibilities for rationally modulating stem cell behavior in their natural environment. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The communicating junctions, roles and dysfunctions.

  12. Hypoxia-like tissue injury and glial response contribute to Balo concentric lesion development

    PubMed Central

    Takai, Yoshiki; Misu, Tatsuro; Nishiyama, Shuhei; Ono, Hirohiko; Kuroda, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Ichiro; Saito, Ryuta; Kanamori, Masayuki; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Mugikura, Shunji; Watanabe, Mika; Fujihara, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To clarify the pathogenic factors and mechanisms underlying the development of concentric demyelinating lesions in Balo disease. Methods: We conducted serial clinical, MRI, and histopathologic assessments of concentric lesion formation in a case of relapsing Balo disease. Results: The patient experienced 2 attacks caused by left parietal and left frontal lesions in 5 years. In MRI findings from both episodes of expanding lesions, there were diffusion-restricted rings that antedated the appearance of gadolinium enhancement; subsequently, typical concentric T2 lesions appeared concurrently with the disappearance of this enhancement. Histopathologic examinations of biopsied brain tissues revealed definite concentric demyelinating layers typical of Balo disease with massive macrophage infiltration but preserved axons. Numerous hypertrophic astrocytes were observed beyond the edges of and within the demyelinating layers. The expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, a protein related to hypoxia-induced tissue preconditioning that contributes to survival and protection against further hypoxia-like injury, was upregulated primarily in glial cells located beyond the edge of the demyelinating layers but was also elevated in hypertrophic astrocytes on the inner sides of resected lesions and in oligodendrocytes in nondemyelinating layers. In addition, these astrocytes expressed CC motif chemokine 2 and/or interleukin-1β, which are inducible by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and potentially promote demyelination. Conclusions: Our study suggests that a unique interplay between hypoxia-induced tissue preconditioning and proinflammatory cytokines derived from glial cells may contribute to the development of concentric demyelinating lesions in Balo disease. PMID:27733565

  13. Pattern specification and immune response transcriptional signatures of pericardial and subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lau, Frank H; Deo, Rahul C; Mowrer, Gregory; Caplin, Joshua; Ahfeldt, Tim; Kaplan, Adam; Ptaszek, Leon; Walker, Jennifer D; Rosengard, Bruce R; Cowan, Chad A

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Recent studies suggest that pericardial adipose tissue (PCAT) secretes inflammatory factors that contribute to the development of CVD. To better characterize the role of PCAT in the pathogenesis of disease, we performed a large-scale unbiased analysis of the transcriptional differences between PCAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue, analysing 53 microarrays across 19 individuals. As it was unknown whether PCAT-secreted factors are produced by adipocytes or cells in the supporting stromal fraction, we also sought to identify differentially expressed genes in isolated pericardial adipocytes vs. isolated subcutaneous adipocytes. Using microarray analysis, we found that: 1) pericardial adipose tissue and isolated pericardial adipocytes both overexpress atherosclerosis-promoting chemokines and 2) pericardial and subcutaneous fat depots, as well as isolated pericardial adipocytes and subcutaneous adipocytes, express specific patterns of homeobox genes. In contrast, a core set of lipid processing genes showed no significant overlap with differentially expressed transcripts. These depot-specific homeobox signatures and transcriptional profiles strongly suggest different functional roles for the pericardial and subcutaneous adipose depots. Further characterization of these inter-depot differences should be a research priority.

  14. Dendroctonus armandi (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) cytochrome P450s display tissue specificity and responses to host terpenoids.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lulu; Ma, Mingyuan; Gao, Guanqun; Chen, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Bark beetles oxidize the defensive allelochemicals of their host trees both to detoxify them and convert them into components of their pheromone systems which were catalyzed by cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) and occur in different tissues of the insect. We study P450 genes in the Chinese white pine beetle (Dendroctonus armandi), and some bio-information analysis was done for the full-length deduced amino acid sequences. The tissue specificity of these P450 genes was determined in three tissues (antenna, gut and reproductive organs). Differential expression of the P450 genes was observed between sexes, and within these significant differences exposed to stimuli (α-pinene (1:1 racemic mix), (S)-(-)-α-pinene, (S)-(-)-β-pinene, (+)-3-carene, (±)-limonene and turpentine oil) at 24h. Increased expression of P450 genes suggested that they play a role in the detoxification of monoterpenes released by the host trees. The different transcript accumulation patterns of these bark beetle P450 genes provided insight into ecological interactions of D. armandi with its host pine.

  15. Computational Simulation of the Mechanical Response of Brain Tissue under Blast Loading

    PubMed Central

    Laksari, Kaveh; Assari, Soroush; Seibold, Benjamin; Sadeghipour, Keya; Darvish, Kurosh

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, numerical simulations of nonlinear wave propagation and shock formation in brain tissue have been presented and a new mechanism of injury for Blast-Induced Neurotrauma (BINT) is proposed. A quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) constitutive material model was used that encompasses the nonlinearity as well as the rate dependence of the tissue relevant to BINT modeling. A one-dimensional model was implemented using the discontinuous Galerkin -finite element method and studied with displacement-input and pressure-input boundary conditions. The model was validated against LS-DYNA finite element code and theoretical results for speci c conditions that resulted in shock wave formation. It was shown that a continuous wave can become a shock wave as it propagates in the QLV brain tissue when the initial changes in acceleration are beyond a certain limit. The high spatial gradient of stress and strain at the shock front cause large relative motions at the cellular scale at high temporal rates even when the maximum stresses and strains are relatively low. This gradient-induced local deformation may occur away from the boundary and is proposed as a contributing factor to the diffuse nature of BINT. PMID:25205088

  16. Computational simulation of the mechanical response of brain tissue under blast loading.

    PubMed

    Laksari, Kaveh; Assari, Soroush; Seibold, Benjamin; Sadeghipour, Keya; Darvish, Kurosh

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, numerical simulations of nonlinear wave propagation and shock formation in brain tissue have been presented and a new mechanism of injury for blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT) is proposed. A quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) constitutive material model was used that encompasses the nonlinearity as well as the rate dependence of the tissue relevant to BINT modeling. A one-dimensional model was implemented using the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method and studied with displacement- and pressure-input boundary conditions. The model was validated against LS-DYNA finite element code and theoretical results for specific conditions that resulted in shock wave formation. It was shown that a continuous wave can become a shock wave as it propagates in the QLV brain tissue when the initial changes in acceleration are beyond a certain limit. The high spatial gradient of stress and strain at the shock front cause large relative motions at the cellular scale at high temporal rates even when the maximum stresses and strains are relatively low. This gradient-induced local deformation may occur away from the boundary and is proposed as a contributing factor to the diffuse nature of BINT.

  17. Childhood adversity and frequent medical consultations.

    PubMed

    Fiddler, Maggie; Jackson, Judy; Kapur, Navneet; Wells, Adrian; Creed, Francis

    2004-01-01

    We assessed possible psychological mediators of the relationship between childhood adversity and frequent medical consultations among new outpatients at neurology, cardiology, and gastroenterology clinics. We assessed whether these differed in patients with and without organic disease that explained their symptoms. At first clinic visit we recorded Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS--anxiety and depression subscale scores), Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ--four subscales: consequences, cure, identity, timeline), Health Anxiety Questionnaire (total score), and Symptom Amplification Scale (total score). Subjects were divided into two groups according to whether they had experienced any type of childhood adversity using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Schedule. Outcome was the (log) number of medical consultations for 12 months before and 6 months after the index clinic visits. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine mediators; this was performed separately for patients with symptoms explained and not explained by organic disease. One-hundred and twenty-nine patients (61% response) were interviewed. Fifty-two (40.3%) had experienced childhood adversity; they made a median of 16 doctor visits compared with 10 for those without adversity (adjusted P=.026). IPQ identity score (number of symptoms attributed to the illness) and HAD depression scores were significantly associated with both childhood adversity and number of medical consultations and these variables acted as mediators between childhood adversity and frequency of consultation in the multiple regression analyses. This association was limited to patients with medically unexplained symptoms and was mediated by IPQ Identity Score (number of symptoms attributed to the patient's illness) and HAD depression score. Sexual abuse and overt neglect were the adversities most closely associated with frequent consultations. In patients with medically unexplained symptoms the association

  18. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  19. A serum response factor homologue is expressed in ectodermal tissues during development of the crustacean Artemia franciscana.

    PubMed

    Casero, M C; Sastre, L

    2000-09-01

    Complementary DNA clones have been isolated from the crustacean Artemia franciscana coding for a serum response factor (SRF)-homologue that is more than 96% identical to human and Drosophila melanogaster SRFs in their MADS boxes. The SRF homologue is expressed in ectodermal tissues, as determined by in situ hybridization experiments. A SRF-binding site has been identified in the promoter region of the Actin403 gene that is also expressed in ectodermal tissues, in accordance with its transcriptional regulation by the SRF homologue. The mRNA coding for A. franciscana SRF is present at similar levels in cryptobiotic encysted embryos and in developing nauplii. However, there is a significant increase in CArG-binding activity at the later developmental stage, indicating a postranscriptional regulation of SRF during A. franciscana embryonic development.

  20. Preliminary histological study of connective tissue response to Zinalco and stainless steel 316L implants after 120 days.

    PubMed

    Piña, C; Torres, C K; Guzmán, J

    1998-02-01

    Circular plates of Zinalco alloy (80 wt% Zn, 1.5 wt% Cu, 18.5 wt% Al) and stainless steel (SS) 316L were implanted in 12 female Wistar rats subcutaneously and intramuscularly to compare organism response, 120 days after implantation. The tissues surrounding the implants were analysed employing hematoxilin and eosin (H-E) and Gallego's trichromic techniques (GTT). Findings indicate that the reaction to Zinalco alloy was similar to the reaction to SS 316L. The Zn, Al and Cu concentrations in blood were measured, without evidence of any alteration due to implants. The presence and distribution of Zn, Al and Cu components of Zinalco alloy were detected in tissues by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis.

  1. The Small-RNA Profiles of Almond (Prunus dulcis Mill.) Reproductive Tissues in Response to Cold Stress.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Marzieh; Ghazanfari, Farahnaz; Fadaei, Adeleh; Ahmadi, Laleh; Shiran, Behrouz; Rabei, Mohammad; Fallahi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Spring frost is an important environmental stress that threatens the production of Prunus trees. However, little information is available regarding molecular response of these plants to the frost stress. Using high throughput sequencing, this study was conducted to identify differentially expressed miRNAs, both the conserved and the non-conserved ones, in the reproductive tissues of almond tolerant H genotype under cold stress. Analysis of 50 to 58 million raw reads led to identification of 174 unique conserved and 59 novel microRNAs (miRNAs). Differential expression pattern analysis showed that 50 miRNA families were expressed differentially in one or both of almond reproductive tissues (anther and ovary). Out of these 50 miRNA families, 12 and 15 displayed up-regulation and down-regulation, respectively. The distribution of conserved miRNA families indicated that miR482f harbor the highest number of members. Confirmation of miRNAs expression patterns by quantitative real- time PCR (qPCR) was performed in cold tolerant (H genotype) alongside a sensitive variety (Sh12 genotype). Our analysis revealed differential expression for 9 miRNAs in anther and 3 miRNAs in ovary between these two varieties. Target prediction of miRNAs followed by differential expression analysis resulted in identification of 83 target genes, mostly transcription factors. This study comprehensively catalogued expressed miRNAs under different temperatures in two reproductive tissues (anther and ovary). Results of current study and the previous RNA-seq study, which was conducted in the same tissues by our group, provide a unique opportunity to understand the molecular basis of responses of almond to cold stress. The results can also enhance the possibility for gene manipulation to develop cold tolerant plants.

  2. Insulin-resistant subjects have normal angiogenic response to aerobic exercise training in skeletal muscle, but not in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Walton, R Grace; Finlin, Brian S; Mula, Jyothi; Long, Douglas E; Zhu, Beibei; Fry, Christopher S; Westgate, Philip M; Lee, Jonah D; Bennett, Tamara; Kern, Philip A; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2015-06-01

    Reduced vessel density in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle is associated with obesity and may result in decreased perfusion, decreased oxygen consumption, and insulin resistance. In the presence of VEGFA, Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) and Angiopoietin-1 (Angpt1) are central determinants of angiogenesis, with greater Angpt2:Angpt1 ratios promoting angiogenesis. In skeletal muscle, exercise training stimulates angiogenesis and modulates transcription of VEGFA, Angpt1, and Angpt2. However, it remains unknown whether exercise training stimulates vessel growth in human adipose tissue, and it remains unknown whether adipose angiogenesis is mediated by angiopoietin signaling. We sought to determine whether insulin-resistant subjects would display an impaired angiogenic response to aerobic exercise training. Insulin-sensitive (IS, N = 12) and insulin-resistant (IR, N = 14) subjects had subcutaneous adipose and muscle (vastus lateralis) biopsies before and after 12 weeks of cycle ergometer training. In both tissues, we measured vessels and expression of pro-angiogenic genes. Exercise training did not increase insulin sensitivity in IR Subjects. In skeletal muscle, training resulted in increased vessels/muscle fiber and increased Angpt2:Angpt1 ratio in both IR and IS subjects. However, in adipose, exercise training only induced angiogenesis in IS subjects, likely due to chronic suppression of VEGFA expression in IR subjects. These results indicate that skeletal muscle of IR subjects exhibits a normal angiogenic response to exercise training. However, the same training regimen is insufficient to induce angiogenesis in adipose tissue of IR subjects, which may help to explain why we did not observe improved insulin sensitivity following aerobic training.

  3. The Small-RNA Profiles of Almond (Prunus dulcis Mill.) Reproductive Tissues in Response to Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Shiran, Behrouz; Rabei, Mohammad; Fallahi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Spring frost is an important environmental stress that threatens the production of Prunus trees. However, little information is available regarding molecular response of these plants to the frost stress. Using high throughput sequencing, this study was conducted to identify differentially expressed miRNAs, both the conserved and the non-conserved ones, in the reproductive tissues of almond tolerant H genotype under cold stress. Analysis of 50 to 58 million raw reads led to identification of 174 unique conserved and 59 novel microRNAs (miRNAs). Differential expression pattern analysis showed that 50 miRNA families were expressed differentially in one or both of almond reproductive tissues (anther and ovary). Out of these 50 miRNA families, 12 and 15 displayed up-regulation and down-regulation, respectively. The distribution of conserved miRNA families indicated that miR482f harbor the highest number of members. Confirmation of miRNAs expression patterns by quantitative real- time PCR (qPCR) was performed in cold tolerant (H genotype) alongside a sensitive variety (Sh12 genotype). Our analysis revealed differential expression for 9 miRNAs in anther and 3 miRNAs in ovary between these two varieties. Target prediction of miRNAs followed by differential expression analysis resulted in identification of 83 target genes, mostly transcription factors. This study comprehensively catalogued expressed miRNAs under different temperatures in two reproductive tissues (anther and ovary). Results of current study and the previous RNA-seq study, which was conducted in the same tissues by our group, provide a unique opportunity to understand the molecular basis of responses of almond to cold stress. The results can also enhance the possibility for gene manipulation to develop cold tolerant plants. PMID:27253370

  4. Fat Tissue Accretion in Children and Adolescents: Interplay between Food Responsiveness, Gender, and the Home Availability of Snacks

    PubMed Central

    De Decker, Annelies; Verbeken, Sandra; Sioen, Isabelle; Moens, Ellen; Braet, Caroline; De Henauw, Stefaan

    2017-01-01

    The appetitive trait “food responsiveness” is assumed to be a risk factor for adiposity gain primarily in obesogenic environments. So far, the reported results are inconsistent in school-aged children, possibly because these studies did not take into account important moderators such as gender and the food-environment. In order to better inform caregivers, clinicians and the developers of targeted obesity-prevention interventions on the conditions in which food responsiveness precedes adiposity gain, the current study investigated if this relationship is stronger in girls and in children exposed to a higher home availability of energy-dense snacks. Age- and sex-independent Fat and Lean Mass Index z-scores were computed based on air-displacement plethysmography at baseline and after 2 years in a community sample of 129 children (48.8% boys) aged 7.5–14 years at baseline. Parents reported at baseline on children's food responsiveness and the home availability of energy-dense snacks. Food responsiveness was a significant predictor of increases in Fat Mass Index z-scores over 2 years in girls but not boys. The home availability of energy-dense snacks did not significantly moderate the relation of food responsiveness with Fat Mass Index z-score changes. The results suggest that food responsiveness precedes accelerated fat tissue accretion in girls, and may inform targeted obesity-prevention interventions. Further, future research should investigate to which food-environmental parameters children high in food responsiveness mainly respond. PMID:28101078

  5. Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

    2005-07-01

    Lack of accurate data for epidemiological studies of low dose radiation effects necessitates development of dosimetric models allowing prediction of cancer risks for different organs. The objective of this work is to develop a model of the radiation response of human bronchiolar tissue with single cell resolution. The computer model describes epithelial tissue as an ensemble of individual cells, with the geometry of a human bronchiole and the properties of different cell types are taken into account. The model simulates the tissue kinetics and radiation exposure in four dimensions: three spatial dimensions and a temporal dimension. The bronchiole is modeled as a regular hollow cylinder with the epithelial cells of three different types (basal, secretory, and ciliated) lining its interior. For the purposes of assessment of radiation damage to the cells only the nuclei of the cells have been modeled. Subroutines describing cellular kinetics have been developed to simulate cell turnover in a normal epithelial tissue. Monte Carlo subroutines have been developed to simulate exposure to alpha particles; the GEANT4 toolkit has been used to simulate exposure to low LET radiation. Each hit cell is provided with a record of energy deposition, and this record is passed to the progeny if the cell survives. The model output provides data on the number of basal progenitor cells in different phases of a cell life-cycle and secretory to ciliated cell ratio after several generations of cell proliferation. The model calculates labeling and mitotic indices and estimates the average cell turnover time for the bronchiolar tissue. Microdosimetric calculations are performed for cells traversed by ionizing particles. The model will be used to assess the accumulation of damage in cells due to protracted low level radiation exposure. The model output may provide directions for the future experimental design.

  6. GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN MOUSE BLADDER TISSUE IN RESPONSE TO INORGANIC ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic human exposures to high arsenic concentrations are associated with lung, skin, and bladder cancer. Considerable controversy exists concerning arsenic mode of action and low dose extrapolation. This investigation was designed to identify dose-response changes in gene expre...

  7. Influence of Egr-1 in cardiac tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in response to glucose variations.

    PubMed

    Bastianelli, Daniela; Siciliano, Camilla; Puca, Rosa; Coccia, Andrea; Murdoch, Colin; Bordin, Antonella; Mangino, Giorgio; Pompilio, Giulio; Calogero, Antonella; De Falco, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent a promising cell population for cell therapy and regenerative medicine applications. However, how variations in glucose are perceived by MSC pool is still unclear. Since, glucose metabolism is cell type and tissue dependent, this must be considered when MSCs are derived from alternative sources such as the heart. The zinc finger transcription factor Egr-1 is an important early response gene, likely to play a key role in the glucose-induced response. Our aim was to investigate how short-term changes in in vitro glucose concentrations affect multipotent cardiac tissue-derived MSCs (cMSCs) in a mouse model of Egr-1 KO (Egr-1(-/-)). Results showed that loss of Egr-1 does not significantly influence cMSC proliferation. In contrast, responses to glucose variations were observed in wt but not in Egr-1(-/-) cMSCs by clonogenic assay. Phenotype analysis by RT-PCR showed that cMSCs Egr-1(-/-) lost the ability to regulate the glucose transporters GLUT-1 and GLUT-4 and, as expected, the Egr-1 target genes VEGF, TGF β -1, and p300. Acetylated protein levels of H3 histone were impaired in Egr-1(-/-) compared to wt cMSCs. We propose that Egr-1 acts as immediate glucose biological sensor in cMSCs after a short period of stimuli, likely inducing epigenetic modifications.

  8. Phosphoprotein network analysis of white adipose tissues unveils deregulated pathways in response to high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Asfa, Alli Shaik; Qiu, Beiying; Wee, Sheena; Choi, Hyungwon; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Despite efforts in the last decade, signaling aberrations associated with obesity remain poorly understood. To dissect molecular mechanisms that define this complex metabolic disorder, we carried out global phosphoproteomic analysis of white adipose tissue (WAT) from mice fed on low-fat diet (LFD) and high-fat diet (HFD). We quantified phosphorylation levels on 7696 peptides, and found significant differential phosphorylation levels in 282 phosphosites from 191 proteins, including various insulin-responsive proteins and metabolic enzymes involved in lipid homeostasis in response to high-fat feeding. Kinase-substrate prediction and integrated network analysis of the altered phosphoproteins revealed underlying signaling modulations during HFD-induced obesity, and suggested deregulation of lipogenic and lipolytic pathways. Mutation of the differentially-regulated novel phosphosite on cytoplasmic acetyl-coA forming enzyme ACSS2 (S263A) upon HFD-induced obesity led to accumulation of serum triglycerides and reduced insulin-responsive AKT phosphorylation as compared to wild type ACSS2, thus highlighting its role in obesity. Altogether, our study presents a comprehensive map of adipose tissue phosphoproteome in obesity and reveals many previously unknown candidate phosphorylation sites for future functional investigation. PMID:27180971

  9. Carbohydrate-responsive gene expression in the adipose tissue of rats.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Kartik; Harrell, Amanda; Kang, Ping; Singhal, Rohit; Ronis, Martin J J; Badger, Thomas M

    2010-01-01

    Although obesity is often associated with high-fat diets, it can develop from a variety of meal patterns. Excessive intake of simple carbohydrates is one consistent eating behavior leading to obesity. However, the impact of overconsumption of diets with high carbohydrate to fat ratios (C/F) on body composition and global adipose tissue gene expression remains unclear. We used total enteral nutrition to evaluate the effects of caloric intake and C/F on body weight gain and development of obesity. Female Sprague Dawley rats were fed diets with either low C/F or high C/F (HC) (reflecting a 19.5-fold increase in C/F) at two levels of caloric intake: 187 or 220 kcal/kg(3/4) x d (15% excess) for 4 wk. At the end of the study period, rats fed HC diets had about 20% higher body weight at either caloric intake compared with rats fed low C/F diets (P < 0.05). Body composition (assessed by nuclear magnetic resonance, computerized tomography, and adipose tissue weights) revealed higher percent fat mass (P < 0.05) in HC rats. Obesity was associated with increased serum resistin, leptin, fasting hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance after an oral glucose challenge (P < 0.05). Microarray analyses of adipose tissues revealed HC diets led to changes in 270 and 464 transcripts at 187 and 220 kcal/kg(3/4) x d intakes. Genes regulating glucose transport, glycolysis, fatty acid and triglyceride biosynthesis, desaturation and elongation, adipogenesis, and adipokines were affected by HC diets. These results suggest that C/F and interactions with excessive caloric intake per se may regulate body composition and play important roles in the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  10. Tissue Responses to Postoperative Laser Therapy in Diabetic Rats Submitted to Excisional Wounds

    PubMed Central

    de Loura Santana, Cristiano; de Fátima Teixeira Silva, Daniela; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Prates, Renato Araujo; Souza, Amanda Pires; Gomes, Mariana Teixeira; de Azevedo Sampaio, Brunna Pileggi; Shibuya, Josiane Ferraretto; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; França, Cristiane Miranda

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study about low-level laser therapy biomodulation on a full-thickness burn model we showed that single and fractionated dose regimens increased wound healing and leukocyte influx similarly when compared with untreated control. In order to verify if this finding would be similar in an impaired wound model, we investigated the effect of single and multiple irradiations on wound closure rate, type of inflammatory infiltrate, myofibroblasts, collagen deposition, and optical retardation of collagen in diabetic rats. Female Wistar rats in the same estrous cycle had diabetes induced with streptozotocin and an 8-mm excisional wound performed with a punch. The experimental groups were: control group – untreated ulcer; single-dose group – ulcer submitted to single dose of diode laser therapy (λ = 660 ± 2 nm; P = 30 mW; energy density: 4 J/cm2) and fractionated-dose group – ulcer submitted to 1 J/cm2 laser therapy on Days 1, 3, 8, and 10. The ulcers were photographed on the experimental days and after euthanasia tissue samples were routinely processed for histological and immunohistochemistry analyses. Independently of the energy density, laser therapy accelerated wound closure by approximately 40% in the first three days in comparison to the control group. Laser therapy increased acute inflammatory infiltrate until Day 3. Both laser groups exhibited more myofibroblasts and better collagen organization than the control group. The findings demonstrate that low-level laser therapy in the immediate postoperative period can enhance the tissue repair process in a diabetes model. Similar effects were achieved with laser therapy applied a single time with an energy density of 4 J/cm2 and applied four times with an energy density of 1 J/cm2. The application of laser therapy in the inflammatory phase was the most important factor to the enhancement of the tissue repair process. PMID:25909480

  11. Tissue responses to postoperative laser therapy in diabetic rats submitted to excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    de Loura Santana, Cristiano; Silva, Daniela de Fátima Teixeira; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Prates, Renato Araujo; Souza, Amanda Pires; Gomes, Mariana Teixeira; de Azevedo Sampaio, Brunna Pileggi; Shibuya, Josiane Ferraretto; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; França, Cristiane Miranda

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study about low-level laser therapy biomodulation on a full-thickness burn model we showed that single and fractionated dose regimens increased wound healing and leukocyte influx similarly when compared with untreated control. In order to verify if this finding would be similar in an impaired wound model, we investigated the effect of single and multiple irradiations on wound closure rate, type of inflammatory infiltrate, myofibroblasts, collagen deposition, and optical retardation of collagen in diabetic rats. Female Wistar rats in the same estrous cycle had diabetes induced with streptozotocin and an 8-mm excisional wound performed with a punch. The experimental groups were: control group--untreated ulcer; single-dose group--ulcer submitted to single dose of diode laser therapy (λ = 660 ± 2 nm; P = 30 mW; energy density: 4 J/cm2) and fractionated-dose group--ulcer submitted to 1 J/cm2 laser therapy on Days 1, 3, 8, and 10. The ulcers were photographed on the experimental days and after euthanasia tissue samples were routinely processed for histological and immunohistochemistry analyses. Independently of the energy density, laser therapy accelerated wound closure by approximately 40% in the first three days in comparison to the control group. Laser therapy increased acute inflammatory infiltrate until Day 3. Both laser groups exhibited more myofibroblasts and better collagen organization than the control group. The findings demonstrate that low-level laser therapy in the immediate postoperative period can enhance the tissue repair process in a diabetes model. Similar effects were achieved with laser therapy applied a single time with an energy density of 4 J/cm2 and applied four times with an energy density of 1 J/cm2. The application of laser therapy in the inflammatory phase was the most important factor to the enhancement of the tissue repair process.

  12. Study of Hind Limb Tissue Gas Phase Formation in Response to Suspended Adynamia and Hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Bruce D.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that reduced joint/muscle activity (hypo kinesia) as well as reduced or null loading of limbs (adynamia) in gravity would result in reduced decompression-induced gas phase and symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS). Finding a correlation between the two phenomena would correspond to the proposed reduction in tissue gas phase formation in astronauts undergoing decompression during extravehicular activity (EVA) in microgravity. The observation may further explain the reported low incidence of DCS in space.

  13. Evaluation of prostatic optical properties and tissue response to photodynamic therapy in a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Sugandh D.; Chen, Qun; Schultz, Daniel; Wilson, Brian C.; Patterson, Michael S.; Hetzel, Fred W.; Cerny, Joseph C.

    1994-03-01

    A new modality of interstitial therapy to treat prostate cancer using photodynamic principles has been studied in a canine model. The effect of interstitial application of monochromatic light from an argon pumped dye laser at 630 nm was studied in a canine model. No significant hyperthermia was seen during the treatment. A concentric zone around the treatment fiber was seen during the treatment. A concentric zone around the treatment fiber was seen in PDT treated dogs and the maximum size was 18 mm. The data suggests that PDT may be clinically applicable in achieving tissue necrosis using interstitial light application in a solid organ like prostate.

  14. Adverse reactions of Achilles tendon xanthomas in three hypercholesterolemic patients after treatment intensification with niacin and bile acid sequestrants.

    PubMed

    Lakey, Wanda C; Greyshock, Nicole; Guyton, John R

    2013-01-01

    Multiple cholesterol-reducing therapies have been shown to induce the regression of tendon xanthoma in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. We present 3 cases of adverse reactions in Achilles tendon xanthomas after the addition of niacin and bile acid sequestrants to ongoing statin therapy. Reduction in tendon dimensions and marked softening of xanthomas were interpreted as cholesterol removal from heavily infiltrated tissue sites. In 2 cases, changes in the xanthomas occurred despite only minor lipoprotein improvements, raising the possibility of direct drug effects in cholesterol-infiltrated tissue. Intriguingly, recent studies have described niacin receptor-mediated effects in macrophages. In summary, although adverse reactions in Achilles tendon xanthomas appear to be infrequent, clinicians should be aware of this phenomenon in their patients after intensifying lipid treatments, especially with the use of niacin in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. Xanthoma responses may provide clues to new pharmacologic effects in cholesterol-infiltrated tissues.

  15. Kidney injury molecule-1 is up-regulated in renal epithelial cells in response to oxalate in vitro and in renal tissues in response to hyperoxaluria in vivo.

    PubMed

    Khandrika, Lakshmipathi; Koul, Sweaty; Meacham, Randall B; Koul, Hari K

    2012-01-01

    Oxalate is a metabolic end product excreted by the kidney. Mild increases in urinary oxalate are most commonly associated with Nephrolithiasis. Chronically high levels of urinary oxalate, as seen in patients with primary hyperoxaluria, are driving factor for recurrent renal stones, and ultimately lead to renal failure, calcification of soft tissue and premature death. In previous studies others and we have demonstrated that high levels of oxalate promote injury of renal epithelial cells. However, methods to monitor oxalate induced renal injury are limited. In the present study we evaluated changes in expression of Kidney Injury Molecule-1 (KIM-1) in response to oxalate in human renal cells (HK2 cells) in culture and in renal tissue and urine samples in hyperoxaluric animals which mimic in vitro and in vivo models of hyper-oxaluria. Results presented, herein demonstrate that oxalate exposure resulted in increased expression of KIM-1 m RNA as well as protein in HK2 cells. These effects were rapid and concentration dependent. Using in vivo models of hyperoxaluria we observed elevated expression of KIM-1 in renal tissues of hyperoxaluric rats as compared to normal controls. The increase in KIM-1 was both at protein and mRNA level, suggesting transcriptional activation of KIM-1 in response to oxalate exposure. Interestingly, in addition to increased KIM-1 expression, we observed increased levels of the ectodomain of KIM-1 in urine collected from hyperoxaluric rats. To the best of our knowledge our studies are the first direct demonstration of regulation of KIM-1 in response to oxalate exposure in renal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that detection of KIM-1 over-expression and measurement of the ectodomain of KIM-1 in urine may hold promise as a marker to monitor oxalate nephrotoxicity in hyperoxaluria.

  16. System Model Network for Adipose Tissue Signatures Related to Weight Changes in Response to Calorie Restriction and Subsequent Weight Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Montastier, Emilie; Villa-Vialaneix, Nathalie; Caspar-Bauguil, Sylvie; Hlavaty, Petr; Tvrzicka, Eva; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Saris, Wim H. M.; Langin, Dominique; Kunesova, Marie; Viguerie, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Nutrigenomics investigates relationships between nutrients and all genome-encoded molecular entities. This holistic approach requires systems biology to scrutinize the effects of diet on tissue biology. To decipher the adipose tissue (AT) response to diet induced weight changes we focused on key molecular (lipids and transcripts) AT species during a longitudinal dietary intervention. To obtain a systems model, a network approach was used to combine all sets of variables (bio-clinical, fatty acids and mRNA levels) and get an overview of their interactions. AT fatty acids and mRNA levels were quantified in 135 obese women at baseline, after an 8-week low calorie diet (LCD) and after 6 months of ad libitum weight maintenance diet (WMD). After LCD, individuals were stratified a posteriori according to weight change during WMD. A 3 steps approach was used to infer a global model involving the 3 sets of variables. It consisted in inferring intra-omic networks with sparse partial correlations and inter-omic networks with regularized canonical correlation analysis and finally combining the obtained omic-specific network in a single global model. The resulting networks were analyzed using node clustering, systematic important node extraction and cluster comparisons. Overall, AT showed both constant and phase-specific biological signatures in response to dietary intervention. AT from women regaining weight displayed growth factors, angiogenesis and proliferation signaling signatures, suggesting unfavorable tissue hyperplasia. By contrast, after LCD a strong positive relationship between AT myristoleic acid (a fatty acid with low AT level) content and de novo lipogenesis mRNAs was found. This relationship was also observed, after WMD, in the group of women that continued to lose weight. This original system biology approach provides novel insight in the AT response to weight control by highlighting the central role of myristoleic acid that may account for the beneficial

  17. Metabolic activity of brown, "beige," and white adipose tissues in response to chronic adrenergic stimulation in male mice.

    PubMed

    Labbé, Sébastien M; Caron, Alexandre; Chechi, Kanta; Laplante, Mathieu; Lecomte, Roger; Richard, Denis

    2016-07-01

    Classical brown adipocytes such as those found in interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) represent energy-burning cells, which have been postulated to play a pivotal role in energy metabolism. Brown adipocytes can also be found in white adipose tissue (WAT) depots [e.g., inguinal WAT (iWAT)] following adrenergic stimulation, and they have been referred to as "beige" adipocytes. Whether the presence of these adipocytes, which gives iWAT a beige appearance, can confer a white depot with some thermogenic activity remains to be seen. In consequence, we designed the present study to investigate the metabolic activity of iBAT, iWAT, and epididymal white depots in mice. Mice were either 1) kept at thermoneutrality (30°C), 2) kept at 30°C and treated daily for 14 days with an adrenergic agonist [CL-316,243 (CL)], or 3) housed at 10°C for 14 days. Metabolic activity was assessed using positron emission tomography imaging with fluoro-[(18)F]deoxyglucose (glucose uptake), fluoro-[(18)F]thiaheptadecanoic acid (fatty acid uptake), and [(11)C]acetate (oxidative activity). In each group, substrate uptakes and oxidative activity were measured in anesthetized mice in response to acute CL. Our results revealed iBAT as a major site of metabolic activity, which exhibited enhanced glucose and nonesterified fatty acid uptakes and oxidative activity in response to chronic cold and CL. On the other hand, beige adipose tissue failed to exhibit appreciable increase in oxidative activity in response to chronic cold and CL. Altogether, our results suggest that the contribution of beige fat to acute-CL-induced metabolic activity is low compared with that of iBAT, even after sustained adrenergic stimulation.

  18. Polarized Raman anisotropic response of collagen in tendon: towards 3D orientation mapping of collagen in tissues.

    PubMed

    Galvis, Leonardo; Dunlop, John W C; Duda, Georg; Fratzl, Peter; Masic, Admir

    2013-01-01

    In this study, polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS) was used to characterize the anisotropic response of the amide I band of collagen as a basis for evaluating three-dimensional collagen fibril orientation in tissues. Firstly, the response was investigated theoretically by applying classical Raman theory to collagen-like peptide crystal structures. The theoretical methodology was then tested experimentally, by measuring amide I intensity anisotropy in rat tail as a function of the orientation of the incident laser polarization. For the theoretical study, several collagen-like triple-helical peptide crystal structures obtained from the Protein Data Bank were rotated "in plane" and "out of plane" to evaluate the role of molecular orientation on the intensity of the amide I band. Collagen-like peptides exhibit a sinusoidal anisotropic response when rotated "in plane" with respect to the polarized incident laser. Maximal intensity was obtained when the polarization of the incident light is perpendicular to the molecule and minimal when parallel. In the case of "out of plane" rotation of the molecular structure a decreased anisotropic response was observed, becoming completely isotropic when the structure was perpendicular to the plane of observation. The theoretical Raman response of collagen was compared to that of alpha helical protein fragments. In contrast to collagen, alpha helices have a maximal signal when incident light is parallel to the molecule and minimal when perpendicular. For out-of-plane molecular orientations alpha-helix structures display a decreased average intensity. Results obtained from experiments on rat tail tendon are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions, thus demonstrating the high potential of PRS for experimental evaluation of the three-dimensional orientation of collagen fibers in biological tissues.

  19. Disentangling linear and nonlinear brain responses to evoked deep tissue pain

    PubMed Central

    Loggia, Marco L.; Edwards, Robert R.; Kim, Jieun; Vangel, Mark G.; Wasan, Ajay; Gollub, Randy L.; Harris, Richard E.; Park, Kyungmo; Napadow, Vitaly

    2012-01-01

    Pain stimuli evoke widespread responses in the brain. However, our understanding of the physiological significance underlying heterogeneous response within different pain-activated and -deactivated regions is still limited. Using functional MRI, we evaluated brain responses to a wide range of stimulus intensity levels (1 innocuous, 7 painful) in order to estimate region-specific stimulus-response functions, which we hypothesized could illuminate that region’s functional relationship to pain. Linear and nonlinear brain responses to pain were estimated through independent Legendre polynomial transformations of pain ratings within a general linear model. This approach identified at least five different, regionally-specific activity profiles in the brain. Linearly increasing (e.g., primary somatosensory/motor cortex, insulae) and intensity-independent (e.g., secondary somatosensory cortex) activation was noted in traditional pain processing areas, potentially reflecting sensory encoding and all-or-none salience responses, respectively. Multiple activity profiles were seen in areas of the default mode network (DMN): intensity-independent deactivation (e.g., posterior cingulate cortex), linearly decreasing (e.g., contralateral inferior parietal lobule), and quadratic (U-shaped; e.g., medial prefrontal cortex). The latter observation suggests that: 1) different DMN subregions exhibit functional heterogeneity and 2) some DMN subregions respond in a percept-related manner to pain, suggesting closer linkage between the DMN and pain processing than previously thought. Future studies should apply a similar approach using innocuous stimuli of multiple intensities in order to evaluate whether the response profiles reported here can also be generalized to nonpainful somatosensory processing. PMID:22883925

  20. Enterotoxemia in the goat: the humoral response and local tissue reaction following vaccination with two different bacterin-toxoids.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, T E; Butler, D G; Bell, J A

    1983-04-01

    A vaccination trial involving 72 goats was designed to compare the epsilon antitoxin titres and local reactions at the injection sites, of two commercial enterotoxemia vaccines. Three dosage regimens were used for each vaccine (12 goats per group). Although no significant differences were noted in humoral immune response between the two vaccines (P = 0.05), one vaccine regime resulted in low titres (P = 0.05) on two occasions. Local tissue reactions at injection sites persisted for six months in 53% of the goats regardless of vaccine used or dosage administered. No immunological basis for the reported differences in vaccine efficacy between sheep and goats was observed in this trial.

  1. Pilot Study: Unique Response of Bone Tissue During an Investigation of Radio-Adaptive Effects in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibonga, J. D.; Iwaniec, U.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: We obtained bone tissue to evaluate the collateral effects of experiments designed to investigate molecular mechanisms of radio-adaptation in a mouse model. Radio-adaptation describes a process by which the prior exposure to low dose radiation can protect against the toxic effect of a subsequent high dose exposure. In the radio-adaptation experiments, C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to either a Sham or a priming Low Dose (5 cGy) of Cs-137 gamma rays before being exposed to either a Sham or High Dose (6 Gy) 24 hours later. ANALYSIS: Bone tissue were obtained from two experiments where mice were sacrificed at 3 days (n=3/group, 12 total) and at 14 days (n=6/group, 24 total) following high dose exposure. Tissues were analyzed to 1) evaluate a radio-adaptive response in bone tissue and 2) describe cellular and microstructural effects for two skeletal sites with different rates of bone turnover. One tibia and one lumbar vertebrae (LV2), collected at the 3-day time-point, were analyzed by bone histomorphometry and micro-CT to evaluate the cellular response and any evidence of microarchitectural impact. Likewise, tibia and LV2, collected at the 14-day time-point, were analyzed by micro-CT alone to evaluate resulting changes to bone structure and microarchitecture. The data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA to evaluate the effects of the priming low dose radiation, of the high dose radiation, and of any interaction between the priming low and high doses of radiation. Bone histomorphometry was performed in the cancellous bone (aka trabecular bone) compartments of the proximal tibial metaphysis and of LV2. RESULTS: Cellular Response @ 3 Days The priming Low Dose radiation decreased osteoblast-covered bone perimeter in the proximal tibia and the total cell density in the bone marrow in the LV2. High Dose radiation, regardless of prior exposure to priming dose, dramatically reduced total cell density in bone marrow of both the long bone and vertebra. However, in the proximal

  2. Plant species differ in early seedling growth and tissue nutrient responses to arbuscular and ectomycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Holste, Ellen K; Kobe, Richard K; Gehring, Catherine A

    2017-04-01

    Experiments with plant species that can host both arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) are important to separating the roles of fungal type and plant species and understanding the influence of the types of symbioses on plant growth and nutrient acquisition. We examined the effects of mycorrhizal fungal type on the growth and tissue nutrient content of two tree species (Eucalyptus grandis and Quercus costaricensis) grown under four nutrient treatments (combinations of low versus high nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) with different N:P ratios) in the greenhouse. Trees were inoculated with unidentified field mixtures of AMF or EMF species cultivated on root fragments of AMF- or EMF-specific bait plants. In E. grandis, inoculation with both AMF and EMF positively affected belowground plant dry weight and negatively affected aboveground dry weight, while only inoculation with AMF increased tissue nutrient content. Conversely, Q. costaricensis dry weight and nutrient content did not differ significantly among inoculation treatments, potentially due to its dependence on cotyledon reserves for growth. Mineral nutrition of both tree species differed with the ratio of N to P applied while growth did not. Our results demonstrate that both tree species' characteristics and the soil nutrient environment can affect how AMF and EMF interact with their host plants. This research highlights the importance of mycorrhizal fungal-tree-soil interactions during early seedling growth and suggests that differences between AMF and EMF associations may be crucial to understanding forest ecosystem functioning.

  3. Time-resolved study of the mechanical response of tissue phantoms to nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G; Camacho-López, Santiago; Aguilar, Guillermo

    2011-11-01

    We present a time-resolved study of the interaction of nanosecond laser pulses with tissue phantoms. When a laser pulse interacts with a material, optical energy is absorbed by a combination of linear (heat generation and thermoelastic expansion) and nonlinear absorption (expanding plasma), according to both the laser light irradiance and material properties. The objective is to elucidate the contribution of linear and nonlinear optical absorption to bubble formation. Depending on the local temperatures and pressures reached, both interactions may lead to the formation of bubbles. We discuss three experimental approaches: piezoelectric sensors, time-resolved shadowgraphy, and time-resolved interferometry, to follow the formation of bubbles and measure the pressure originated by 6 ns laser pulses interacting with tissue phantoms. We studied the bubble formation and pressure transients for varying linear optical absorption and for radiant exposures above and below threshold for bubble formation. We report a rapid decay (of 2 orders of magnitude) of the laser-induced mechanical pressure measured (by time-resolved shadowgraphy) very close to the irradiation spot and beyond 1 mm from the irradiation site (by the piezoelectric sensor). Through time-resolved interferometry measurements, we determined that bubble formation can occur at marginal temperature increments as low as 3°C.

  4. Tissue-specific induction of Hsp90 mRNA and plasma cortisol response in chinook salmon following heat shock, seawater challenge, and handling challenge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palmisano, Aldo N.; Winton, J.R.; Dickhoff, Walton W.

    2000-01-01

    In studying the whole-body response of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to various stressors, we found that 5-hour exposure to elevated temperature (mean 21.6??C; + 10.6??C over ambient) induced a marked increase in Hsp90 messenger RNA accumulation in heart, brain, gill, muscle, liver, kidney, and tail fin tissues. The most vital tissues (heart, brain, gill, and muscle) showed the greatest Hsp90-mRNA response, with heart tissue increasing approximately 35-fold, Heat shock induced no increase in plasma cortisol. In contrast, a standard handling challenge induced high plasma cortisol levels, but no elevation in Hsp90 mRNA in any tissue, clearly separating the physiological and cellular stress responses. We saw no increase either in tissue Hsp90 mRNA levels or in plasma cortisol concentrations after exposing the fish to seawater overnight.

  5. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  6. Physiological response of cardiac tissue to bisphenol a: alterations in ventricular pressure and contractility

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Daina; Chandra, Akhil; Jaimes, Rafael; Sarvazyan, Narine; Kay, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Biomonitoring studies have indicated that humans are routinely exposed to bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical that is commonly used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Epidemiological studies have shown that BPA exposure in humans is associated with cardiovascular disease; however, the direct effects of BPA on cardiac physiology are largely unknown. Previously, we have shown that BPA exposure slows atrioventricular electrical conduction, decreases epicardial conduction velocity, and prolongs action potential duration in excised rat hearts. In the present study, we tested if BPA exposure also adversely affects cardiac contractile performance. We examined the impact of BPA exposure level, sex, and pacing rate on cardiac contractile function in excised rat hearts. Hearts were retrogradely perfused at constant pressure and exposed to 10−9-10−4 M BPA. Left ventricular developed pressure and contractility were measured during sinus rhythm and during pacing (5, 6.5, and 9 Hz). Ca2+ transients were imaged from whole hearts and from neonatal rat cardiomyocyte layers. During sinus rhythm in female hearts, BPA exposure decreased left ventricular developed pressure and inotropy in a dose-dependent manner. The reduced contractile performance was exacerbated at higher pacing rates. BPA-induced effects on contractile performance were also observed in male hearts, albeit to a lesser extent. Exposure to BPA altered Ca2+ handling within whole hearts (reduced diastolic and systolic Ca2+ transient potentiation) and neonatal cardiomyocytes (reduced Ca2+ transient amplitude and prolonged Ca2+ transient release time). In conclusion, BPA exposure significantly impaired cardiac performance in a dose-dependent manner, having a major negative impact upon electrical conduction, intracellular Ca2+ handing, and ventricular contractility. PMID:25980024

  7. Efficient evaluation of the material response of tissues reinforced by statistically oriented fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashlamoun, Kotaybah; Grillo, Alfio; Federico, Salvatore

    2016-10-01

    For several classes of soft biological tissues, modelling complexity is in part due to the arrangement of the collagen fibres. In general, the arrangement of the fibres can be described by defining, at each point in the tissue, the structure tensor (i.e. the tensor product of the unit vector of the local fibre arrangement by itself) and a probability distribution of orientation. In this approach, assuming that the fibres do not interact with each other, the overall contribution of the collagen fibres to a given mechanical property of the tissue can be estimated by means of an averaging integral of the constitutive function describing the mechanical property at study over the set of all possible directions in space. Except for the particular case of fibre constitutive functions that are polynomial in the transversely isotropic invariants of the deformation, the averaging integral cannot be evaluated directly, in a single calculation because, in general, the integrand depends both on deformation and on fibre orientation in a non-separable way. The problem is thus, in a sense, analogous to that of solving the integral of a function of two variables, which cannot be split up into the product of two functions, each depending only on one of the variables. Although numerical schemes can be used to evaluate the integral at each deformation increment, this is computationally expensive. With the purpose of containing computational costs, this work proposes approximation methods that are based on the direct integrability of polynomial functions and that do not require the step-by-step evaluation of the averaging integrals. Three different methods are proposed: (a) a Taylor expansion of the fibre constitutive function in the transversely isotropic invariants of the deformation; (b) a Taylor expansion of the fibre constitutive function in the structure tensor; (c) for the case of a fibre constitutive function having a polynomial argument, an approximation in which the

  8. Fat mass- and obesity-associated gene Fto affects the dietary response in mouse white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Ronkainen, Justiina; Huusko, Tuija J; Soininen, Raija; Mondini, Eleonora; Cinti, Francesca; Mäkelä, Kari A; Kovalainen, Miia; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Sebert, Sylvain; Savolainen, Markku J; Salonurmi, Tuire

    2015-03-18

    Common variants of human fat mass- and obesity-associated gene Fto have been linked with higher body mass index, but the biological explanation for the link has remained obscure. Recent findings suggest that these variants affect the homeobox protein IRX3. Here we report that FTO has a role in white adipose tissue which modifies its response to high-fat feeding. Wild type and Fto-deficient mice were exposed to standard or high-fat diet for 16 weeks after which metabolism, behavior and white adipose tissue morphology were analyzed together with adipokine levels and relative expression of genes regulating white adipose tissue adipogenesis and Irx3. Our results indicate that Fto deficiency increases the expression of genes related to adipogenesis preventing adipocytes from becoming hypertrophic after high-fat diet. In addition, we report a novel finding of increased Irx3 expression in Fto-deficient mice after high-fat feeding indicating a complex link between FTO, IRX3 and fat metabolism.

  9. On the characterization of the heterogeneous mechanical response of human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Forte, Antonio E; Gentleman, Stephen M; Dini, Daniele

    2016-12-08

    The mechanical characterization of brain tissue is a complex task that scientists have tried to accomplish for over 50 years. The results in the literature often differ by orders of magnitude because of the lack of a standard testing protocol. Different testing conditions (including humidity, temperature, strain rate), the methodology adopted, and the variety of the species analysed are all potential sources of discrepancies in the measurements. In this work, we present a rigorous experimental investigation on the mechanical properties of human brain, covering both grey and white matter. The influence of testing conditions is also shown and thoroughly discussed. The material characterization performed is finally adopted to provide inputs to a mathematical formulation suitable for numerical simulations of brain deformation during surgical procedures.

  10. Strategies for optimizing the response of cancer and normal tissues to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Moding, Everett J.; Kastan, Michael B.; Kirsch, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 50% of all patients with cancer receive radiation therapy at some point during the course of their treatment, and the majority of these patients are treated with curative intent. Despite recent advances in the planning of radiation treatment and the delivery of image-guided radiation therapy, acute toxicity and potential long-term side effects often limit the ability to deliver a sufficient dose of radiation to control tumours locally. In the past two decades, a better understanding of the hallmarks of cancer and the discovery of specific signalling pathways by which cells respond to radiation have provided new opportunities to design molecularly targeted therapies to increase the therapeutic window of radiation therapy. Here, we review efforts to develop approaches that could improve outcomes with radiation therapy by increasing the probability of tumour cure or by decreasing normal tissue toxicity. PMID:23812271

  11. Puerarin protects brain tissue against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by inhibiting the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feng; Wang, Liang; Liu, Panpan; Hu, Weiwei; Zhu, Xiangdong; Shen, Hong; Yao, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Puerarin, a traditional Chinese medicine, exerts a powerful neuroprotective effect in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury, but its mechanism is unknown. Here, we established rat models of middle cerebral artery ischemia/reperfusion injury using the suture method. Puerarin (100 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 30 minutes before middle cerebral artery occlusion and 8 hours after reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, we found that puerarin significantly improved neurological deficit, reduced infarct size and brain water content, and notably diminished the expression of Toll-like receptor-4, myeloid differentiation factor 88, nuclear factor kappa B and tumor necrosis factor-α in the ischemic region. These data indicate that puerarin exerts an anti-inflammatory protective effect on brain tissue with ischemia/reperfusion damage by downregulating the expression of multiple inflammatory factors. PMID:25657724

  12. Photodynamic therapy in prostate cancer: optical dosimetry and response of normal tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Shetty, Sugandh D.; Heads, Larry; Bolin, Frank; Wilson, Brian C.; Patterson, Michael S.; Sirls, Larry T., II; Schultz, Daniel; Cerny, Joseph C.; Hetzel, Fred W.

    1993-06-01

    The present study explores the possibility of utilizing photodynamic therapy (PDT) in treating localized prostate carcinoma. Optical properties of ex vivo human prostatectomy specimens, and in vivo and ex vivo dog prostate glands were studied. The size of the PDT induced lesion in dog prostate was pathologically evaluated as a biological endpoint. The data indicate that the human normal and carcinoma prostate tissues have similar optical properties. The average effective attenuation depth is less in vivo than that of ex vivo. The PDT treatment generated a lesion size of up to 16 mm in diameter. The data suggest that PDT is a promising modality in prostate cancer treatment. Multiple fiber system may be required for clinical treatment.

  13. Non-damaging laser therapy of the macula: Titration algorithm and tissue response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel; Lavinsky, Daniel; Dalal, Roopa; Huie, Philip

    2014-02-01

    Retinal photocoagulation typically results in permanent scarring and scotomata, which limit its applicability to the macula, preclude treatments in the fovea, and restrict the retreatments. Non-damaging approaches to laser therapy have been tested in the past, but the lack of reliable titration and slow treatment paradigms limited their clinical use. We developed and tested a titration algorithm for sub-visible and non-damaging treatments of the retina with pulses sufficiently short to be used with pattern laser scanning. The algorithm based on Arrhenius model of tissue damage optimizes the power and duration for every energy level, relative to the threshold of lesion visibility established during titration (and defined as 100%). Experiments with pigmented rabbits established that lesions in the 50-75% energy range were invisible ophthalmoscopically, but detectable with Fluorescein Angiography and OCT, while at 30% energy there was only very minor damage to the RPE, which recovered within a few days. Patients with Diabetic Macular Edema (DME) and Central Serous Retinopathy (CSR) have been treated over the edematous areas at 30% energy, using 200μm spots with 0.25 diameter spacing. No signs of laser damage have been detected with any imaging modality. In CSR patients, subretinal fluid resolved within 45 days. In DME patients the edema decreased by approximately 150μm over 60 days. After 3-4 months some patients presented with recurrence of edema, and they responded well to retreatment with the same parameters, without any clinically visible damage. This pilot data indicates a possibility of effective and repeatable macular laser therapy below the tissue damage threshold.

  14. Tissue-based multiphoton analysis of actomyosin and structural responses in human trabecular meshwork

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jose M.; Ko, Minhee K.; Pouw, Andrew; Tan, James C. H.

    2016-01-01

    The contractile trabecular meshwork (TM) modulates aqueous humor outflow resistance and intraocular pressure. The primary goal was to visualize and quantify human TM contractile state by analyzing actin polymerization (F-actin) by 2-photon excitation fluorescence imaging (TPEF) in situ. A secondary goal was to ascertain if structural extracellular matrix (ECM) configuration changed with contractility. Viable ex vivo human TM was incubated with latrunculin-A (Lat-A) or vehicle prior to Alexa-568-phalloidin labeling and TPEF. Quantitative image analysis was applied to 2-dimensional (2D) optical sections and 3D image reconstructions. After Lat-A exposure, (a) the F-actin network reorganized as aggregates; (b) F-actin-associated fluorescence intensity was reduced by 48.6% (mean; p = 0.007; n = 8); (c) F-actin 3D distribution was reduced by 68.9% (p = 0.040); (d) ECM pore cross-sectional area and volume were larger by 36% (p = 0.032) and 65% (p = 0.059) respectively and pores appeared more interconnected; (e) expression of type I collagen and elastin, key TM structural ECM proteins, were unaltered (p = 0.54); and (f) tissue viability was unchanged (p = 0.39) relative to vehicle controls. Thus Lat-A-induced reduction of actomyosin contractility was associated with TM porous expansion without evidence of reduced structural ECM protein expression or cellular viability. These important subcellular-level dynamics could be visualized and quantified within human tissue by TPEF. PMID:26883567

  15. Adverse events related to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Sandeep; Hemlata; Verma, Anupam

    2014-09-01

    The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today's scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided.

  16. Response of Alamo switchgrass tissue chemistry and biomass to nitrogen fertilization in West Tennessee, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this research was to examine above- and belowground responses to nitrogen fertilization in 5-year old “Alamo” switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). A fertilizer experiment included spring and fall sampling of switchgrass grown under annual applications of 0, 67, and 202 kg N ha-1. Nitrogen ...

  17. A mathematical model representing cellular immune development and response to Salmonella of chicken intestinal tissue.

    PubMed

    Schokker, D; Bannink, A; Smits, M A; Rebel, J M J

    2013-08-07

    The aim of this study was to create a dynamic mathematical model of the development of the cellular branch of the intestinal immune system of poultry during the first 42 days of life and of its response towards an oral infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. The system elements were grouped in five important classes consisting of intra- and extracellular S. Enteritidis bacteria, macrophages, CD4+, and CD8+ cells. Twelve model variables were described by ordinary differential equations, including 50 parameters. Parameter values were estimated from literature or from own immunohistochemistry data. The model described the immune development in non-infected birds with an average R² of 0.87. The model showed less accuracy in reproducing the immune response to S. Enteritidis infection, with an average R² of 0.51, although model response did follow observed trends in time. Evaluation of the model against independent data derived from several infection trials showed strong/significant deviations from observed values. Nevertheless, it was shown that the model could be used to simulate the effect of varying input parameters on system elements response, such as the number of immune cells at hatch. Model simulations allowed one to study the sensitivity of the model outcome for varying model inputs. The initial number of immune cells at hatch was shown to have a profound impact on the predicted development in the number of systemic S. Enteritidis bacteria after infection. The theoretical contribution of this work is the identification of responses in system elements of the developing intestinal immune system of poultry obtaining a mathematical representation which allows one to explore the relationships between these elements under contrasting environmental conditions during different stages of intestinal development.

  18. A zebrafish larval model reveals early tissue-specific innate immune responses to Mucor circinelloides.

    PubMed

    Voelz, Kerstin; Gratacap, Remi L; Wheeler, Robert T

    2015-11-01

    Mucormycosis is an emerging fungal infection that is clinically difficult to manage, with increasing incidence and extremely high mortality rates. Individuals with diabetes, suppressed immunity or traumatic injury are at increased risk of developing disease. These individuals often present with defects in phagocytic effector cell function. Research using mammalian models and phagocytic effector cell lines has attempted to decipher the importance of the innate immune system in host defence against mucormycosis. However, these model systems have not been satisfactory for direct analysis of the interaction between innate immune effector cells and infectious sporangiospores in vivo. Here, we report the first real-time in vivo analysis of the early innate immune response to mucormycete infection using a whole-animal zebrafish larval model system. We identified differential host susceptibility, dependent on the site of infection (hindbrain ventricle and swim bladder), as well as differential functions of the two major phagocyte effector cell types in response to viable and non-viable spores. Larval susceptibility to mucormycete spore infection was increased upon immunosuppressant treatment. We showed for the first time that macrophages and neutrophils were readily recruited in vivo to the site of infection in an intact host and that spore phagocytosis can be observed in real-time in vivo. While exploring innate immune effector recruitment dynamics, we discovered the formation of phagocyte clusters in response to fungal spores that potentially play a role in fungal spore dissemination. Spores failed to activate pro-inflammatory gene expression by 6 h post-infection in both infection models. After 24 h, induction of a pro-inflammatory response was observed only in hindbrain ventricle infections. Only a weak pro-inflammatory response was initiated after spore injection into the swim bladder during the same time frame. In the future, the zebrafish larva as a live whole

  19. RNA-Seq Analysis of the Host Response to Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft Tissue Infection in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Brady, Rebecca A; Bruno, Vincent M; Burns, Drusilla L

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), which are primarily self-limiting. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the host transcriptome during a S. aureus SSTI to provide insight on the protective mechanisms that thwart these infections. We utilized a murine SSTI model in which one ear is epicutaneously challenged while the other is not. We then harvested these infected and uninfected ears, as well as ears from naïve mice, at one, four, and seven days post-challenge, and performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) using the Illumina platform. RNA-seq data demonstrated a robust response at the site of infection. Comparison of gene expression profiles between infected ears and the non-infected ears of challenged mice defined the local response to infection, while comparisons of expression profiles of non-infected ears from challenged mice to ears of naïve mice revealed changes in gene expression levels away from the site indicative of a systemic response. Over 1000 genes exhibited increased expression locally at all tested time points. The local response was more robust than the systemic response. Through evaluation of the RNA-seq data using the Upstream Regulator Analytic as part of the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software package, we found that changes in the activation and inhibition of regulatory pathways happen first locally, and lag behind systemically. The activated pathways are highly similar at all three time points during SSTI, suggesting a stable global response over time. Transcript increases and pathway activation involve pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, chemotaxis, cell signaling, keratins, and TH1/TH17 cytokines. Transcript decreases and pathway inhibition demonstrate that metabolic genes and anti-inflammatory pathways are repressed. These data provide insight on the host responses that may aid in resolution of this self-limited S. aureus infection, and may shed light on potential immune correlates of

  20. RNA-Seq Analysis of the Host Response to Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft Tissue Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Rebecca A.; Bruno, Vincent M.; Burns, Drusilla L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), which are primarily self-limiting. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the host transcriptome during a S. aureus SSTI to provide insight on the protective mechanisms that thwart these infections. We utilized a murine SSTI model in which one ear is epicutaneously challenged while the other is not. We then harvested these infected and uninfected ears, as well as ears from naïve mice, at one, four, and seven days post-challenge, and performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) using the Illumina platform. RNA-seq data demonstrated a robust response at the site of infection. Comparison of gene expression profiles between infected ears and the non-infected ears of challenged mice defined the local response to infection, while comparisons of expression profiles of non-infected ears from challenged mice to ears of naïve mice revealed changes in gene expression levels away from the site indicative of a systemic response. Over 1000 genes exhibited increased expression locally at all tested time points. The local response was more robust than the systemic response. Through evaluation of the RNA-seq data using the Upstream Regulator Analytic as part of the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software package, we found that changes in the activation and inhibition of regulatory pathways happen first locally, and lag behind systemically. The activated pathways are highly similar at all three time points during SSTI, suggesting a stable global response over time. Transcript increases and pathway activation involve pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, chemotaxis, cell signaling, keratins, and TH1/TH17 cytokines. Transcript decreases and pathway inhibition demonstrate that metabolic genes and anti-inflammatory pathways are repressed. These data provide insight on the host responses that may aid in resolution of this self-limited S. aureus infection, and may shed light on potential immune correlates of

  1. Distinguishing hazards and harms, adverse drug effects and adverse drug reactions : implications for drug development, clinical trials, pharmacovigilance, biomarkers, and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2013-03-01

    The terms 'adverse drug effects' and 'adverse drug reactions' are commonly used interchangeably, but they have different implications. Adverse drug reactions arise when a compound (e.g. a drug or metabolite, a contaminant or adulterant) is distributed in the same place as a body tissue (e.g. a receptor, enzyme, or ion channel), and the encounter results in an adverse effect (a physiological or pathological change), which results in a clinically appreciable adverse reaction. Both the adverse effect and the adverse reaction have manifestations by which they can be recognized: adverse effects are usually detected by laboratory tests (e.g. biochemical, haematological, immunological, radiological, pathological) or by clinical investigations (e.g. endoscopy, cardiac catheterization), and adverse reactions by their clinical manifestations (symptoms and/or signs). This distinction suggests five scenarios: (i) adverse reactions can result directly from adverse effects; (ii) adverse effects may not lead to appreciable adverse reactions; (iii) adverse reactions can occur without preceding adverse effects; (iv) adverse effects and reactions may be dissociated; and (v) adverse effects and reactions can together constitute syndromes. Defining an adverse drug reaction as "an appreciably harmful or unpleasant reaction, resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product" suggests a definition of an adverse drug effect: "a potentially harmful effect resulting from an intervention related to the use of a medicinal product, which constitutes a hazard and may or may not be associated with a clinically appreciable adverse reaction and/or an abnormal laboratory test or clinical investigation, as a marker of an adverse reaction."

  2. Anti-oxidative responses of zebrafish (Danio rerio) gill, liver and brain tissues upon acute cold shock.

    PubMed

    Wu, Su Mei; Liu, Jia-Hao; Shu, Li-Hsin; Chen, Ching Hsein

    2015-09-01

    The present study seeks to detect oxidative damage and to compare anti-oxidative responses among liver, gills and brain of adult zebrafish that were cooled from 28 °C (control) to 12 °C (treatment) for 0-24 h. The lipid peroxidation of liver, gill and brain tissues significantly increased at 1h after transfer, but reactive oxygen species in the treatment group increased significantly after 24 h as compared to the control. The fish were found to develop a cascading anti-oxidative mechanism beginning with an increase in Cu/Zn-SOD levels, followed by increased CAT and GPx mRNA expressions in the three tissue types. Both smtB and mt2 mRNAs increased in the hepatic and brain tissues following 1h of cold stress, but only smtB exhibited a significant increase in the gills at 1 h and 6 h after transfer to 12 °C. Furthermore, cellular apoptosis in the brain was not evident after cold shock, but liver and gills showed cellular apoptosis at 1-3 h, with another peak in the liver at 6 h after cold shock. The results suggest that the cold shock induced oxidative stress, and the enzymatic (SOD, GPx and CAT) and non-enzymatic (mt-2 and smt-B) mRNA expressions all play a role in the resulting anti-oxidation within 1-6 h of cold shock. A functional comparison showed that the brain had the most powerful antioxidant defense system of the three tissue types since it had the highest smtB mRNA expression and a lower level of cell apoptosis than the liver and gills after exposure to cold stress.

  3. Optimization of microwave-assisted extraction for six inorganic and organic arsenic species in chicken tissues using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenfeng; Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2015-09-01

    Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the parameters for microwave-assisted extraction of six major inorganic and organic arsenic species (As(III), As(V), dimethyl arsenic acid, monomethyl arsenic acid, p-arsanilic acid, and roxarsone) from chicken tissues, followed by detection using a high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry detection method, which allows the simultaneous analysis of both inorganic and organic arsenic species in the extract in a single run. Effects of extraction medium, solution pH, liquid-to-solid ratio, and the temperature and time of microwave-assisted extraction on the extraction of the targeted arsenic species were studied. The optimum microwave-assisted extraction conditions were: 100 mg of chicken tissue, extracted by 5 mL of 22% v/v methanol, 90 mmol/L (NH4 )2 HPO4 , and 0.07% v/v trifluoroacetic acid (with pH adjusted to 10.0 by ammonium hydroxide solution), ramping for 10 min to 71°C, and holding for 11 min. The method has good extraction performance for total arsenic in the spiked and nonspiked chicken tissues (104.0 ± 13.8% and 91.6 ± 7.8%, respectively), except for the ones with arsenic contents close to the quantitation limits. Limits of quantitation (S/N = 10) for As(III), As(V), dimethyl arsenic acid, monomethyl arsenic acid, p-arsanilic acid, and roxarsone in chicken tissues using this method were 0.012, 0.058, 0.039, 0.061, 0.102, and 0.240 mg/kg (dry weight), respectively.

  4. Mucosal delivery switches the response to an adjuvanted tuberculosis vaccine from systemic TH1 to tissue-resident TH17 responses without impacting the protective efficacy§

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Mark T.; Beebe, Elyse A.; Hudson, Thomas; Argilla, David; Huang, Po-Wei D.; Reese, Valerie A.; Fox, Christopher B.; Reed, Steven G.; Coler, Rhea N.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the leading causes of infectious disease death despite widespread usage of the BCG vaccine. A number of new TB vaccines have moved into clinical evaluation to replace or boost the BCG vaccine including ID93+GLA-SE, an adjuvanted subunit vaccine. The vast majority of new TB vaccines in trials are delivered parenterally even though intranasal delivery can augment lung-resident immunity and protective efficacy in small animal models. Parenteral immunization with the adjuvanted subunit vaccine ID93+GLA-SE elicits robust TH1 immunity and protection against aerosolized Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice and guinea pigs. Here we describe the immunogenicity and efficacy of this vaccine when delivered intranasally. Intranasal delivery switches the CD4 T cell response from a TH1 to a TH17 dominated tissue-resident response with increased frequencies of ID93-specific cells in both the lung tissue and at the lung surface. Surprisingly these changes do not affect the protective efficacy of ID93+GLA-SE. Unlike intramuscular immunization, ID93+GLA does not require the squalene-based oil-in-water emulsion SE to elicit protective CD4 T cells when delivered intranasally. Finally we demonstrate that TNF and the IL-17 receptor are dispensable for the efficacy of the intranasal vaccine suggesting an alternative mechanism of protection. PMID:26541135

  5. Super-paramagnetic responsive silk fibroin/chitosan/magnetite scaffolds with tunable pore structures for bone tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Aliramaji, Shamsa; Zamanian, Ali; Mozafari, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising approach in repairing damaged tissues. During the last few years, magnetic nanoparticles have been of great interest in this field of study due to their controlled responsive characteristics in specific external magnetic fields. In this study, after synthesizing iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles through a reverse coprecipitation method, silk fibroin/chitosan-based magnetic scaffolds were prepared using different amounts of magnetite nanoparticles (0, 0.5, 1 and 2%) by freeze-casting method. The physicochemical activity of the scaffolds was monitored in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution to determine the biodegradation and swelling behaviors. The stability of the magnetite nanoparticles in the fabricated scaffolds was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Moreover, the cellular activity of the magnetic scaffolds was examined under a static magnetic field. The results showed that the lamellar structured scaffolds having MNPs in the walls could not affect the final structure and deteriorate the biological characteristics of the scaffolds, while the ability of magnetic responsivity was added to the scaffolds. This study warrants further pre-clinical and clinical evaluations.

  6. Distinct response of fat and gastrointestinal tissue to glucose in gestational diabetes mellitus and polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vejrazkova, D; Lischkova, O; Vankova, M; Stanicka, S; Vrbikova, J; Lukasova, P; Vcelak, J; Vacinova, G; Bendlova, B

    2016-12-16

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are distinct pathologies with impaired insulin sensitivity as a common feature. The aim of this study was to evaluate the response of fat tissue adipokines and gastrointestinal incretins to glucose load in patients diagnosed with one of the two disorders and to compare it with healthy controls. Oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) was performed in 77 lean young women: 22 had positive history of GDM, 19 were PCOS patients, and 36 were healthy controls. Hormones were evaluated in fasting and in 60 min intervals during the 3 hour oGTT using Bio-Plex ProHuman Diabetes 10-Plex Assay for C-peptide, ghrelin, GIP, GLP1, glucagon, insulin, leptin, total PAI1, resistin, visfatin and Bio-Plex ProHuman Diabetes Adipsin and Adiponectin Assays (Bio-Rad). Despite lean body composition, both PCOS and GDM women were more insulin resistant than controls. Significant postchallenge differences between the GDM and PCOS groups were observed in secretion of adipsin, leptin, glucagon, visfatin, ghrelin, GIP, and also GLP1 with higher levels in GDM. Conversely, PCOS was associated with the highest resistin, C-peptide, and PAI1 levels. Our data suggest that decreased insulin sensitivity observed in lean women with GDM and PCOS is associated with distinct hormonal response of fat and gastrointestinal tissue to glucose load.

  7. Characterization of the Transcriptome and Gene Expression of Brain Tissue in Sevenband Grouper (Hyporthodus septemfasciatus) in Response to NNV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Oh; Kim, Jae-Ok; Kim, Wi-Sik; Oh, Myung-Joo

    2017-01-01

    Grouper is one of the favorite sea food resources in Southeast Asia. However, the outbreaks of the viral nervous necrosis (VNN) disease due to nervous necrosis virus (NNV) infection have caused mass mortality of grouper larvae. Many aqua-farms have suffered substantial financial loss due to the occurrence of VNN. To better understand the infection mechanism of NNV, we performed the transcriptome analysis of sevenband grouper brain tissue, the main target of NNV infection. After artificial NNV challenge, transcriptome of brain tissues of sevenband grouper was subjected to next generation sequencing (NGS) using an Illumina Hi-seq 2500 system. Both mRNAs from pooled samples of mock and NNV-infected sevenband grouper brains were sequenced. Clean reads of mock and NNV-infected samples were de novo assembled and obtained 104,348 unigenes. In addition, 628 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in response to NNV infection were identified. This result could provide critical information not only for the identification of genes involved in NNV infection, but for the understanding of the response of sevenband groupers to NNV infection. PMID:28098800

  8. Characterization of the Transcriptome and Gene Expression of Brain Tissue in Sevenband Grouper (Hyporthodus septemfasciatus) in Response to NNV Infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Oh; Kim, Jae-Ok; Kim, Wi-Sik; Oh, Myung-Joo

    2017-01-13

    Grouper is one of the favorite sea food resources in Southeast Asia. However, the outbreaks of the viral nervous necrosis (VNN) disease due to nervous necrosis virus (NNV) infection have caused mass mortality of grouper larvae. Many aqua-farms have suffered substantial financial loss due to the occurrence of VNN. To better understand the infection mechanism of NNV, we performed the transcriptome analysis of sevenband grouper brain tissue, the main target of NNV infection. After artificial NNV challenge, transcriptome of brain tissues of sevenband grouper was subjected to next generation sequencing (NGS) using an Illumina Hi-seq 2500 system. Both mRNAs from pooled samples of mock and NNV-infected sevenband grouper brains were sequenced. Clean reads of mock and NNV-infected samples were de novo assembled and obtained 104,348 unigenes. In addition, 628 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in response to NNV infection were identified. This result could provide critical information not only for the identification of genes involved in NNV infection, but for the understanding of the response of sevenband groupers to NNV infection.

  9. Characterization of Transgenic Gfrp Knock-In Mice: Implications for Tetrahydrobiopterin in Modulation of Normal Tissue Radiation Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rupak; Pawar, Snehalata A.; Fu, Qiang; Gupta, Prem K.; Berbée, Maaike; Garg, Sarita; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Wang, Wenze; Biju, Prabath G.; Krager, Kimberly J.; Boerma, Marjan; Ghosh, Sanchita P.; Cheema, Amrita K.; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The free radical scavenger and nitric oxide synthase cofactor, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), plays a well-documented role in many disorders associated with oxidative stress, including normal tissue radiation responses. Radiation exposure is associated with decreased BH4 levels, while BH4 supplementation attenuates aspects of radiation toxicity. The endogenous synthesis of BH4 is catalyzed by the enzyme guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH1), which is regulated by the inhibitory GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein (GFRP). We here report and characterize a novel, Cre-Lox-driven, transgenic mouse model that overexpresses Gfrp. Results: Compared to control littermates, transgenic mice exhibited high transgene copy numbers, increased Gfrp mRNA and GFRP expression, enhanced GFRP–GTPCH1 interaction, reduced BH4 levels, and low glutathione (GSH) levels and differential mitochondrial bioenergetic profiles. After exposure to total body irradiation, transgenic mice showed decreased BH4/7,8-dihydrobiopterin ratios, increased vascular oxidative stress, and reduced white blood cell counts compared with controls. Innovation and Conclusion: This novel Gfrp knock-in transgenic mouse model allows elucidation of the role of GFRP in the regulation of BH4 biosynthesis. This model is a valuable tool to study the involvement of BH4 in whole body and tissue-specific radiation responses and other conditions associated with oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1436–1446. PMID:23521531

  10. Is It Adverse, Nonadverse, Adaptive, or Artifact?

    PubMed

    Pandiri, Arun R; Kerlin, Roy L; Mann, Peter C; Everds, Nancy E; Sharma, Alok K; Myers, L Peyton; Steinbach, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    One of the principal challenges facing a toxicologic pathologist is to determine and differentiate a true adverse effect from a nonadverse or an adaptive response. Recent publications from the Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) and the European STP provide guidance for determining and communicating adversity in nonclinical toxicology studies. In order to provide a forum to inform and engage in a discussion on this important topic, a continuing education (CE) course was held during the 2016 STP Annual meeting in San Diego, CA. The lectures at this course provided guidance on determining and communicating adversity using case studies involving both clinical pathology and anatomic pathology. In addition, one talk also focused on data quality, study design, and interpretation of artifacts that could hinder the determination of adversity. The CE course ended with a talk on understanding adversity in preclinical studies and engaging the regulatory agencies in the decision-making process. This manuscript is designed to provide brief summaries of all the talks in this well-received CE course.

  11. Telithromycin: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Telithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic that has been marketed since the early 2000s. It has not been shown to be more effective against any bacteria than other macrolide antibiotics. Its antibacterial activity is in no way remarkable. In early 2014, we reviewed its adverse effect profile using data from periodic safety update reports, drug regulatory agencies, and detailed published case reports. In addition to the adverse effect profile telithromycin shares with the other macrolides, it provokes several specific adverse effects: visual disturbances due to impaired accommodation; taste and smell disorders; severe liver damage; worsening of myasthenia gravis; rhabdomyolysis; and loss of consciousness. Prolongation of the QT interval with standard oral doses is a worrisome adverse effect. In practice, it is better not to use telithromycin as it exposes patients to disproportionate, serious adverse effects. When treatment with a macrolide antibiotic appears necessary, it is prudent to choose a different macrolide, such as spiramycin or azithromycin, which have fewer adverse effects.

  12. Amifostine Induces Antioxidant Enzymatic Activities in Normal Tissues and a Transplantable Tumor That Can Affect Radiation Response

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, David J. Murley, Jeffrey S.; Kataoka, Yasushi; Baker, Kenneth L.; Kunnavakkam, Rangesh; Coleman, Mitchell C.; Spitz, Douglas R.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether amifostine can induce elevated manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in murine tissues and a transplantable SA-NH tumor, resulting in a delayed tumor cell radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: SA-NH tumor-bearing C3H mice were treated with a single 400 mg/kg or three daily 50 mg/kg doses of amifostine administered intraperitoneally. At selected time intervals after the last injection, the heart, liver, lung, pancreas, small intestine, spleen, and SA-NH tumor were removed and analyzed for SOD2, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzymatic activity. The effect of elevated SOD2 enzymatic activity on the radiation response of SA-NH cells was determined. Results: SOD2 activity was significantly elevated in selected tissues and a tumor 24 h after amifostine treatment. Catalase and GPx activities remained unchanged except for significant elevations in the spleen. GPx was also elevated in the pancreas. SA-NH tumor cells exhibited a twofold elevation in SOD2 activity and a 27% elevation in radiation resistance. Amifostine administered in three daily fractions of 50 mg/kg each also resulted in significant elevations of these antioxidant enzymes. Conclusions: Amifostine can induce a delayed radioprotective effect that correlates with elevated levels of SOD2 activity in SA-NH tumor. If limited to normal tissues, this delayed radioprotective effect offers an additional potential for overall radiation protection. However, amifostine-induced elevation of SOD2 activity in tumors could have an unanticipated deleterious effect on tumor responses to fractionated radiation therapy, given that the radioprotector is administered daily just before each 2-Gy fractionated dose.

  13. Childhood Adversities and Adult Cardiometabolic Health: Does the Quantity, Timing, and Type of Adversity Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Esther M.; Montez, Jennifer Karas; Sheehan, Connor McDevitt; Guenewald, Tara L.; Seeman, Teresa E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adverse events in childhood can indelibly influence adult health. While evidence for this association has mounted, a fundamental set of questions about how to operationalize adverse events has been understudied. Method We used data from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States to examine how quantity, timing, and types of adverse events in childhood are associated with adult cardiometabolic health. Results The best-fitting specification of quantity of events was a linear measure reflecting a dose–response relationship. Timing of event mattered less than repeated exposure to events. Regarding the type of event, academic interruptions and sexual/physical abuse were most important. Adverse childhood events elevated the risk of diabetes and obesity similarly for men and women but had a greater impact on women’s risk of heart disease. Discussion Findings demonstrate the insights that can be gleaned about the early-life origins of adult health by examining operationalization of childhood exposures. PMID:25903978

  14. The effects of ochratoxin/aluminosilicate interaction on the tissues and humoral immune response of broilers.

    PubMed

    Santin, Elizabeth; Paulillo, Antonio C; Maiorka, Paulo C; Alessi, Antonio C; Krabbe, Everton L; Maiorka, Alex

    2002-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of dietary ochratoxin, in the presence or absence of aluminosilicate, on the histology of the bursa of Fabricius, liver and kidneys, and on the humoral immune response of broilers vaccinated against Newcastle disease virus. The exposure of birds to 2 p.p.m. ochratoxin, in the presence or absence of aluminosilicate, reduced their humoral immune response and the number of mitotic cells in the bursa. The relative weight of the livers of the birds exposed to this toxin was increased and, microscopically, there was hepatocyte vacuolation and megalocytosis with accompanying hyperplasia of the biliary epithelium. The kidneys showed hypertrophy of the renal proximal tubular epithelium, with thickening of the glomerular basement membrane. Aluminosilicate did not ameliorate the deleterious effects of the ochratoxin.

  15. IgG Responses to Tissue-Associated Antigens as Biomarkers of Immunological Treatment Efficacy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    sipuleucel - T , Provenge, Dendreon) for patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer. Many other agents have demonstrated benefit in large clinical trials...and approval is anticipated in the case of a monoclonal antibody targeting a T -cell checkpoint inhibitor targeting CTLA-4 (ipilimumab, Bristol-Myers...response has been associated with clinical benefit. The situation is more difficult for broadly active immune modulating agents such as T -cell checkpoint

  16. Wound Trauma Mediated Inflammatory Signaling Attenuates a Tissue Regenerative Response in MRL/MpJ Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    done-iodine solution for skin disinfection ). The Betadine solution from the prep area was wiped off using 3 series of sponge gauzes containing 70...standard surgical biopsy punch (Acuderm, Inc, Ft. Lau- derdale, FL) immediately following thermal injury. Ear- hole diameter size was determined using a 7X...appears to be a dimin- ished cytokine response to injury [1,31,32]. On the other hand , cytokines introduced into the fetal environment evoke heightened

  17. Exploring diazepam’s effect on hemodynamic responses of mouse brain tissue by optical spectroscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abookasis, David; Shochat, Ariel; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a simple duel-optical spectroscopic imaging apparatus capable of simultaneously determining relative changes in brain oxy-and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations was used following administration of the anxiolytic compound diazepam in mice with strong dominant (Dom) and submissive (Sub) behavioral traits. Three month old mice (n = 30) were anesthetized and after 10 min of baseline imaging, diazepam (1.5 mg/kg) was administered and measurements were taken for 80 min. The mouse head was illuminated by white light based LED's and diffused reflected light passing through different channels, consisting of a bandpass filter and a CCD camera, respectively, was collected and analyzed to measure the hemodynamic response. This work’s major findings are threefold: first, Dom and Sub animals showed statistically significant differences in hemodynamic response to diazepam administration. Secondly, diazepam was found to more strongly affect the Sub group. Thirdly, different time-series profiles were observed post-injection, which can serve as a possible marker for the groups’ differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the effects of an anxiolytic drug on brain hemodynamic responses in mice using diffused light optical imaging. PMID:25071958

  18. Tissue-Specific Regulation of Gibberellin Signaling Fine-Tunes Arabidopsis Iron-Deficiency Responses.

    PubMed

    Wild, Michael; Davière, Jean-Michel; Regnault, Thomas; Sakvarelidze-Achard, Lali; Carrera, Esther; Lopez Diaz, Isabel; Cayrel, Anne; Dubeaux, Guillaume; Vert, Grégory; Achard, Patrick

    2016-04-18

    Iron is an essential element for most living organisms. Plants acquire iron from the rhizosphere and have evolved different biochemical and de