Science.gov

Sample records for adverse working conditions

  1. Untold Stories of Fieldworkers Working Amid Adverse Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serekoane, Motsaathebe; Sharp, Carla; Skinner, Donald; Marais, Lochner

    2014-01-01

    Working in unfamiliar contexts and often alone, fieldworkers may face challenges for which their training and previous experience has not prepared them. While there is literature about the technical, ethical and moral aspects of fieldwork, there is little focusing on fieldworkers' actual experiences. Additionally, there is little constructive…

  2. Health Monitoring and Management for Manufacturing Workers in Adverse Working Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoya; Zhong, Miao; Wan, Jiafu; Yi, Minglun; Gao, Tiancheng

    2016-10-01

    In adverse working conditions, environmental parameters such as metallic dust, noise, and environmental temperature, directly affect the health condition of manufacturing workers. It is therefore important to implement health monitoring and management based on important physiological parameters (e.g., heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature). In recent years, new technologies, such as body area networks, cloud computing, and smart clothing, have allowed the improvement of the quality of services. In this article, we first give five-layer architecture for health monitoring and management of manufacturing workers. Then, we analyze the system implementation process, including environmental data processing, physical condition monitoring and system services and management, and present the corresponding algorithms. Finally, we carry out an evaluation and analysis from the perspective of insurance and compensation for manufacturing workers in adverse working conditions. The proposed scheme will contribute to the improvement of workplace conditions, realize health monitoring and management, and protect the interests of manufacturing workers.

  3. Adverse psychosocial working conditions and minor psychiatric disorders among bank workers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In most countries, the financial service sector has undergone great organizational changes in the past decades, with potential negative impact on bank workers' mental health. The aim of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of minor psychiatric disorders (MPD) among Brazilian bank workers and to investigate whether they are associated with an adverse psychosocial working environment. Methods A cross-sectional study of a random sample of 2,500 workers in a Brazilian state bank in 2008. The presence of MPD was determined by the General Health Questionnaire.(GHQ). Psychosocial work conditions were assessed by means of the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) and Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). The presence and magnitude of the independent associations between MPD and adverse psychosocial working conditions were determined by Prevalence Ratios, obtained by Poisson regression. Results From 2,337 eligible workers, 88% participated. The prevalence of MPD was greater among women (45% vs. 41%; p > 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, the prevalence of MPD was twice as high among bank workers exposed to high psychological demand and low control at work and under high effort and low reward working conditions. The lack of social support at work and the presence of over-commitment were also associated with higher prevalence of MPD. A negative interaction effect was found between over-commitment and effort-reward imbalance. Conclusion The prevalence of MPD is high among bank workers. The results reinforce the association between MPD and adverse psychosocial working conditions, assessed by the JCQ and ERI models. The direction of the interaction observed between over-commitment and ERI was contrary to what was expected. PMID:21062496

  4. The Formation of Teacher Work Teams under Adverse Conditions: Towards a More Realistic Scenario for Schools in Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintrop, Rick; Charles, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    Group formation studies are rare in the literature on teacher professional learning communities (PLCs). But they are needed to render realistic scenarios and design interventions for practitioners who work in schools where teachers encounter distress and social adversity. Under these conditions, we may need approaches to PLC development that are…

  5. The Relationship between Working Conditions and Adverse Health Symptoms of Employee in Solar Greenhouse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Xiu Feng; Cui, Xiu Min; Wang, Jian; Yu, Shi Xin

    2015-02-01

    To determine the correlation between the working environment and the health status of employees in solar greenhouse, 1171 employees were surveyed. The results show the 'Greenhouse diseases' are affected by many factors. Among general uncomforts, the morbidity of the bone and joint damage is the highest and closely related to labor time and age. Planting summer squash and wax gourd more easily cause skin pruritus. Asthma-related cough, eye disease, and skin pruritus are significantly correlated with the cultivation of wax gourd. The application of inorganic fertilizer and fertigation dramatically induce the bone and joint damage. The smell of covering film greatly influence skin pruritus. Personal protection is badly scanty and normative occupational health and safety need to be completed.

  6. Amplifying Learning through Sites of Pedagogical Practice: A Possible Effect of Working with Disciplinary Technologies in Schools Operating under Adverse Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Debra

    2005-01-01

    Schools located within communities experiencing high levels of social dislocation, educational disadvantage and student disengagement from learning are working under "adverse conditions". These schools face particular challenges when it comes to stabilising and sustaining wholeschool change aimed at improving students' learning outcomes.…

  7. Flight data recovery under adverse conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbauer, E. J.

    1981-11-01

    Methods for overcoming data loss, including bit dump, bit shift, forward and reverse readout, time displacement compensation (TDC), wideband TDC, and supersynchronization are discussed. Supersynchronization systems recognize acquisition of any one sync word as an in-sync condition and process accordingly. They open a window prior to the end of the subframe which enables the circuit to look for the next sync work up to 8 bits early. A feedback loop enables one shot timing methods to track the average bit rate automatically. A time duration equal to 70.7% of the average bit period is recommended. A digital bit averaging technique, in which the bit decision time is determined by the average of the two previous bits, gives excellent results. With forward and reverse processing, data are processed in the usual way through the engineering conversion process. Valid data, prior to the out of sync area, look normal. The computer then goes to the end of the subframe and processes data from this point backwards toward the sync loss area.

  8. Adverse health effects of high-effort/low-reward conditions.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, J

    1996-01-01

    In addition to the person-environment fit model (J. R. French, R. D. Caplan, & R. V. Harrison, 1982) and the demand-control model (R. A. Karasek & T. Theorell, 1990), a third theoretical concept is proposed to assess adverse health effects of stressful experience at work: the effort-reward imbalance model. The focus of this model is on reciprocity of exchange in occupational life where high-cost/low-gain conditions are considered particularly stressful. Variables measuring low reward in terms of low status control (e.g., lack of promotion prospects, job insecurity) in association with high extrinsic (e.g., work pressure) or intrinsic (personal coping pattern, e.g., high need for control) effort independently predict new cardiovascular events in a prospective study on blue-collar men. Furthermore, these variables partly explain prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, atherogenic lipids) in 2 independent studies. Studying adverse health effects of high-effort/low-reward conditions seems well justified, especially in view of recent developments of the labor market.

  9. Modelling speech intelligibility in adverse conditions.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    Jørgensen and Dau (J Acoust Soc Am 130:1475-1487, 2011) proposed the speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM) in an attempt to overcome the limitations of the classical speech transmission index (STI) and speech intelligibility index (SII) in conditions with nonlinearly processed speech. Instead of considering the reduction of the temporal modulation energy as the intelligibility metric, as assumed in the STI, the sEPSM applies the signal-to-noise ratio in the envelope domain (SNRenv). This metric was shown to be the key for predicting the intelligibility of reverberant speech as well as noisy speech processed by spectral subtraction. The key role of the SNRenv metric is further supported here by the ability of a short-term version of the sEPSM to predict speech masking release for different speech materials and modulated interferers. However, the sEPSM cannot account for speech subjected to phase jitter, a condition in which the spectral structure of the intelligibility of speech signal is strongly affected, while the broadband temporal envelope is kept largely intact. In contrast, the effects of this distortion can be predicted -successfully by the spectro-temporal modulation index (STMI) (Elhilali et al., Speech Commun 41:331-348, 2003), which assumes an explicit analysis of the spectral "ripple" structure of the speech signal. However, since the STMI applies the same decision metric as the STI, it fails to account for spectral subtraction. The results from this study suggest that the SNRenv might reflect a powerful decision metric, while some explicit across-frequency analysis seems crucial in some conditions. How such across-frequency analysis is "realized" in the auditory system remains unresolved.

  10. HEPA Filter Performance under Adverse Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Michael; Hogancamp, Kristina; Alderman, Steven; Waggoner, Charles

    2007-07-01

    This study involved challenging nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under a variety of conditions that can arise in Department of Energy (DOE) applications such as: low or high RH, controlled and uncontrolled challenge, and filters with physically damaged media or seals (i.e., leaks). Reported findings correlate filter function as measured by traditional differential pressure techniques in comparison with simultaneous instrumental determination of up and down stream PM concentrations. Additionally, emission rates and failure signatures will be discussed for filters that have either failed or exceeded their usable lifetime. Significant findings from this effort include the use of thermocouples up and down stream of the filter housing to detect the presence of moisture. Also demonstrated in the moisture challenge series of tests is the effect of repeated wetting of the filter. This produces a phenomenon referred to as transient failure before the tensile strength of the media weakens to the point of physical failure. An evaluation of the effect of particle size distribution of the challenge aerosol on loading capacity of filters is also included. Results for soot and two size distributions of KCl are reported. Loading capacities for filters ranged from approximately 70 g of soot to nearly 900 g for the larger particle size distribution of KCl. (authors)

  11. Management of Cattle Exposed to Adverse Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mader, Terry L; Griffin, Dee

    2015-07-01

    During periods of adverse weather, optimum conditions for animal comfort and performance are compromised. Use of alternative supplementation programs need to be considered for livestock challenged by adverse environmental conditions. Use of additional water for consumption and cooling, shade, and/or alternative management strategies need to be considered to help livestock cope with heat stress. For animals reared outside during winter, strategies that increase animal space and environmental buffers need to be used to minimize effects of mud, wet conditions, and windchill. There are ample opportunities for livestock producers to enhance animal welfare and minimize the impact of environmental stress.

  12. Word Learning under Adverse Listening Conditions: Context-Specific Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creel, Sarah C.; Aslin, Richard N.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of word learning have presented the items to listeners under ideal conditions. Here we ask how listeners learn new vocabulary items under adverse listening conditions. Would listeners form acoustically-specific representations that incorporated the noise, base their representations on noise-free language knowledge, or both? To…

  13. Quality of whey powders stored under adverse conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Whey protein concentrate powder (WPC) is exported by the U.S. and is included in emergency aid foods, but the bags sent overseas are usually stored without refrigeration and under elevated temperature and relative humidity (RH). The shelf life of WPC under adverse conditions must be known to preven...

  14. Teacher Working Conditions that Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leithwood, Ken; McAdie, Pat

    2007-01-01

    To advance understanding of the issues concerning teachers' working conditions, the Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario commissioned one of the authors to do an analytical review of literature on teachers' working conditions. This resulted in the publication, "Teacher Working Conditions That Matter: Evidence for Change." The…

  15. Extinction of CO2 Laser Radiation Under Adverse Weather Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    81-1280 B0 91,a 4 TITLE (and Subtitle) S TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED EXTINCTION OF CO2 LASER RADIATION UNDER FINAL Oct 78 Oct 81 ADVERSE WEATHER...CONDITIONS 6 PERFORMING O0G r_ r NUMBER 7. AUTHOR( s ) 8 CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER( s ) Dr. Vincent Chimelis ŝ PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10...number) Laser Propagation Rain Laser Extinction CO2 Lasers Adverse Weather Aerosol s - 20 RACT (Continue on reverse side If necessary and Identify by

  16. Perceived Work Conditions and Turnover Intentions: The Mediating Role of Meaning of Work.

    PubMed

    Arnoux-Nicolas, Caroline; Sovet, Laurent; Lhotellier, Lin; Di Fabio, Annamaria; Bernaud, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Perceived working conditions lead to various negative outcomes for employee behaviors, including turnover intentions. Although potential mediators for these relationships were previously identified, the importance of meaning of work has not yet been investigated. This study examines the role of this psychological resource as a mediator for the relationships between perceived working conditions and turnover intentions in a sample of 336 French workers from different job contexts. Results show that adverse working conditions were positively and significantly associated with turnover intentions. Meaning of work is negatively related to both perceived working conditions and turnover intentions. Mediation analyses for meaning of work demonstrated indirect effects of several adverse working conditions on turnover intentions. The role of meaning of work as a psychological resource for employees facing adverse working conditions is discussed, especially regarding its implications for research and practice within organizational contexts.

  17. Perceived Work Conditions and Turnover Intentions: The Mediating Role of Meaning of Work

    PubMed Central

    Arnoux-Nicolas, Caroline; Sovet, Laurent; Lhotellier, Lin; Di Fabio, Annamaria; Bernaud, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Perceived working conditions lead to various negative outcomes for employee behaviors, including turnover intentions. Although potential mediators for these relationships were previously identified, the importance of meaning of work has not yet been investigated. This study examines the role of this psychological resource as a mediator for the relationships between perceived working conditions and turnover intentions in a sample of 336 French workers from different job contexts. Results show that adverse working conditions were positively and significantly associated with turnover intentions. Meaning of work is negatively related to both perceived working conditions and turnover intentions. Mediation analyses for meaning of work demonstrated indirect effects of several adverse working conditions on turnover intentions. The role of meaning of work as a psychological resource for employees facing adverse working conditions is discussed, especially regarding its implications for research and practice within organizational contexts. PMID:27242616

  18. Perceptual Learning of Speech under Optimal and Adverse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xujin; Samuel, Arthur G.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have a remarkable ability to understand spoken language despite the large amount of variability in speech. Previous research has shown that listeners can use lexical information to guide their interpretation of atypical sounds in speech (Norris, McQueen, & Cutler, 2003). This kind of lexically induced perceptual learning enables people to adjust to the variations in utterances due to talker-specific characteristics, such as individual identity and dialect. The current study investigated perceptual learning in two optimal conditions: conversational speech (Experiment 1) vs. clear speech (Experiment 2), and three adverse conditions: noise (Experiment 3a) vs. two cognitive loads (Experiments 4a & 4b). Perceptual learning occurred in the two optimal conditions and in the two cognitive load conditions, but not in the noise condition. Furthermore, perceptual learning occurred only in the first of two sessions for each participant, and only for atypical /s/ sounds and not for atypical /f/ sounds. This pattern of learning and non-learning reflects a balance between flexibility and stability that the speech system must have to deal with speech variability in the diverse conditions that speech is encountered. PMID:23815478

  19. Assurance of Fault Management: Risk-Significant Adverse Condition Awareness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitz, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Fault Management (FM) systems are ranked high in risk-based assessment of criticality within flight software, emphasizing the importance of establishing highly competent domain expertise to provide assurance for NASA projects, especially as spaceflight systems continue to increase in complexity. Insight into specific characteristics of FM architectures seen embedded within safety- and mission-critical software systems analyzed by the NASA Independent Verification Validation (IVV) Program has been enhanced with an FM Technical Reference (TR) suite. Benefits are aimed beyond the IVV community to those that seek ways to efficiently and effectively provide software assurance to reduce the FM risk posture of NASA and other space missions. The identification of particular FM architectures, visibility, and associated IVV techniques provides a TR suite that enables greater assurance that critical software systems will adequately protect against faults and respond to adverse conditions. The role FM has with regard to overall asset protection of flight software systems is being addressed with the development of an adverse condition (AC) database encompassing flight software vulnerabilities.Identification of potential off-nominal conditions and analysis to determine how a system responds to these conditions are important aspects of hazard analysis and fault management. Understanding what ACs the mission may face, and ensuring they are prevented or addressed is the responsibility of the assurance team, which necessarily should have insight into ACs beyond those defined by the project itself. Research efforts sponsored by NASAs Office of Safety and Mission Assurance defined terminology, categorized data fields, and designed a baseline repository that centralizes and compiles a comprehensive listing of ACs and correlated data relevant across many NASA missions. This prototype tool helps projects improve analysis by tracking ACs, and allowing queries based on project, mission

  20. States Scrutinize Teacher Working Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Access to reliable technology. Help from classroom aides. Out-of-classroom duties. Planning time with colleagues. Administrator accessibility. All those working conditions and more play a vital part in whether good teachers feel sufficiently satisfied to stay in their schools. Now, policymakers are beginning to gather evidence on just how much…

  1. Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Kelley J.; Schneiderman, Jason S.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Whitmire, Alexandra M.; Picano, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA commitment to human space flight includes continuing to fly astronauts on the ISS until it is decommissioned as well as possibly returning astronauts to the moon or having astronauts venture to an asteroid or Mars. As missions leave low Earth orbit and explore deeper space, BHP supports and conducts research to enable a risk posture that considers the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders “acceptable given mitigations,” for pre-, in, and post-flight.The Human System Risk Board (HSRB) determines the risk of various mission scenarios using a likelihood (per person per year) by consequences matrix examining those risks across two categories—long term health and operational (within mission). Colors from a stoplight signal are used by HSRB and quickly provide a means of assessing overall perceived risk for a particular mission scenario. Risk associated with the current six month missions on the ISS are classified as “accepted with monitoring” while planetary missions, such as a mission to Mars, are recognized to be a “red” risk that requires mitigation to ensure mission success.Currently, the HSRB deems that the risk of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric outcomes requires mitigation for planetary missions owing to long duration isolation and radiation exposure (see Table 1). While limited research evidence exists from spaceflight, it is well known anecdotally that the shift from the two week shuttle missions to the six month ISS missions renders the psychological stressors of space as more salient over longer duration missions. Shuttle astronauts were expected just to tolerate any stressors that arose during their mission and were successful at doing so (Whitmire et al, 2013). While it is possible to deal with stressors such as social isolation and to live with incompatible crewmembers for two weeks on shuttle, “ignoring it” is much less likely to be a successful coping mechanism

  2. The Effect of Work Hours on Adverse Events and Errors in Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Olds, Danielle M.; Clarke, Sean P.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction We studied the relationship between registered nurses' extended work duration with adverse events and errors, including needlestick injuries, work-related injuries, patient falls with injury, nosocomial infections, and medication errors. Method Using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression, this secondary analysis of 11,516 registered nurses examined nurse characteristics, work hours, and adverse events and errors. Results All of the adverse event and error variables were significantly related to working more than 40 hours in the average week. Medication errors and needlestick injuries had the strongest and most consistent relationships with the work hour and voluntary overtime variables. Discussion This study confirms prior findings that increased work hours raise the likelihood of adverse events and errors in healthcare, and further found the same relationship with voluntary overtime. Impact on Industry Legislation has focused on mandatory overtime; however, this study demonstrated that voluntary overtime could also negatively impact nurse and patient safety. PMID:20497801

  3. 75 FR 8353 - Waiver of Filing Deadline Due to Adverse Weather Conditions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... COMMISSION Waiver of Filing Deadline Due to Adverse Weather Conditions February 16, 2010. AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Due to adverse weather conditions, the Federal Communications..., February 11, 2010. In recognition of the numerous closings and disruptions caused by the weather in...

  4. Work hardening and work conditioning interventions: do they affect disability?

    PubMed

    Lechner, D E

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the research on the effectiveness of work hardening and work conditioning programs. Twelve studies of work hardening and work conditioning programs in the United States and abroad were reviewed. One study produced convincing evidence in a randomized study that a work conditioning program was useful in producing a higher percentage of return to work and an earlier return to work in a group of patients off work for at least 2 months. Another study demonstrated that a work hardening program increased the rate of return to work by 52% in patients off work for greater than 4 months. Most of the other studies reviewed suggested positive results, but more carefully documented, randomized, and controlled studies are needed to support the efficacy of these programs and to determine the optimum and most cost-effective work hardening and work conditioning interventions.

  5. Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders: Evidence Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Kelley J.; Williams, Thomas J.; Schneiderman, Jason S.; Whitmire, Alexandra M.; Picano, James J.; Leveton, Lauren B.; Schmidt, Lacey L.; Shea, Camille

    2016-01-01

    In April 2010, President Obama declared a space pioneering goal for the United States in general and NASA in particular. "Fifty years after the creation of NASA, our goal is no longer just a destination to reach. Our goal is the capacity for people to work and learn and operate and live safely beyond the Earth for extended periods of time, ultimately in ways that are more sustainable and even indefinite." Thus NASA's Strategic Objective 1.1 emerged as "expand human presence into the solar system and to the surface of Mars to advance exploration, science, innovation, benefits to humanity, and international collaboration" (NASA 2015b). Any space flight, be it of long or short duration, occurs in an extreme environment that has unique stressors. Even with excellent selection methods, the potential for behavioral problems among space flight crews remain a threat to mission success. Assessment of factors that are related to behavioral health can help minimize the chances of distress and, thus, reduce the likelihood of adverse cognitive or behavioral conditions and psychiatric disorders arising within a crew. Similarly, countermeasures that focus on prevention and treatment can mitigate the cognitive or behavioral conditions that, should they arise, would impact mission success. Given the general consensus that longer duration, isolation, and confined missions have a greater risk for behavioral health ensuring crew behavioral health over the long term is essential. Risk, which within the context of this report is assessed with respect to behavioral health and performance, is addressed to deter development of cognitive and behavioral degradations or psychiatric conditions in space flight and analog populations, and to monitor, detect, and treat early risk factors, predictors and other contributing factors. Based on space flight and analog evidence, the average incidence rate of an adverse behavioral health event occurring during a space mission is relatively low for the

  6. Work-Family Conflict and Working Conditions in Western Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallie, Duncan; Russell, Helen

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the influence of working conditions on work-family conflict (WFC) among married/cohabiting employees across seven European countries. Using data from the European Social Survey, the paper first investigates the role of working conditions relative to household level characteristics in mediating work-family conflict at the…

  7. Sampling and Survey with AUVs in Adverse Weather Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    encompasses the graduate students’ projects topics: AUV High Level Software Control Architecture The Morpheus , the latest generation of AUV...control of the Mini AUV known as Morpheus . Therefore, a force sensor system has been designed, optimized, machined and tested that supports the thruster...the Morpheus AUV This report highlights important aspects of previous work with the Ocean Explorer (OEX) AUV docking system as a background

  8. Sampling and Survey with AUVs in Adverse Weather Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    encompasses the graduate students’ projects topics: AUV High Level Software Control Architecture The Morpheus , the latest generation of AUV...tunnel thrusters used in the positioning control of the Mini AUV known as Morpheus . Therefore, a force sensor system has been designed, optimized...Implementation of the Ocean Explorer AUV Dock for Use With the Morpheus AUV This report highlights important aspects of previous work with the Ocean Explorer

  9. Alternative luciferase for monitoring bacterial cells under adverse conditions.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Siouxsie; Ferguson, Kathryn; Stefanidou, Martha; Young, Douglas B; Robertson, Brian D

    2005-07-01

    The availability of cloned luciferase genes from fireflies (luc) and from bacteria (luxAB) has led to the widespread use of bioluminescence as a reporter to measure cell viability and gene expression. The most commonly occurring bioluminescence system in nature is the deep-sea imidazolopyrazine bioluminescence system. Coelenterazine is an imidazolopyrazine derivative which, when oxidized by an appropriate luciferase enzyme, produces carbon dioxide, coelenteramide, and light. The luciferase from the marine copepod Gaussia princeps (Gluc) has recently been cloned. We expressed the Gluc gene in Mycobacterium smegmatis using a shuttle vector and compared its performance with that of an existing luxAB reporter. In contrast to luxAB, the Gluc luciferase retained its luminescence output in the stationary phase of growth and exhibited enhanced stability during exposure to low pH, hydrogen peroxide, and high temperature. The work presented here demonstrated the utility of the copepod luciferase bioluminescent reporter as an alternative to bacterial luciferase, particularly for monitoring responses to environmental stress stimuli.

  10. Social work and adverse childhood experiences research: implications for practice and health policy.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Heather; Felitti, Vincent J; Anda, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Medical research on "adverse childhood experiences" (ACEs) reveals a compelling relationship between the extent of childhood adversity, adult health risk behaviors, and principal causes of death in the United States. This article provides a selective review of the ACE Study and related social science research to describe how effective social work practice that prevents ACEs and mobilizes resilience and recovery from childhood adversity could support the achievement of national health policy goals. This article applies a biopsychosocial perspective, with an emphasis on mind-body coping processes to demonstrate that social work responses to adverse childhood experiences may contribute to improvement in overall health. Consistent with this framework, the article sets forth prevention and intervention response strategies with individuals, families, communities, and the larger society. Economic research on human capital development is reviewed that suggests significant cost savings may result from effective implementation of these strategies.

  11. Fluorescence parameters of leaves of trees and shrubs during period of adverse weather conditions in Krasnoyarsk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavorueva, E. N.; Zavoruev, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of adverse weather conditions (AWC) on the fluorescence parameters of leaves Prinsepia sinensis, Amelanchier florida, Crataegus chlorocarca is obtained. However, significant changes in the fluorescence of the leaves of Acer negundo, Betula pendula under AWC were not observed.

  12. Bill E. Kunkle Interdisciplinary Beef Symposium: Animal welfare concerns for cattle exposed to adverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Mader, T L

    2014-12-01

    Increasing awareness of animal welfare has become a priority in food production systems involving animals. Under normal working environments, production practices are constantly evaluated to maintain optimum levels of animal well-being. However, during periods of adverse weather, optimum conditions for animal comfort, as well as animal performance, are often compromised. In the Midwest and Great Plains states, the heat waves of 1995, 1999, 2006, 2009, 2010, and 2013 were particularly difficult on animals reared in confinement, with documented cattle losses approaching 5,000 head each year. Additionally, during the summer of 2011, nearly 15,000 head of cattle across 5 states were lost as a result of heat stress. During prolonged periods of heat stress, lower conceptions rates are observed in livestock. In addition, animals reared in confinement buildings are often compromised because of limitations in ventilation systems. Under the opposite environmental spectrum, the winters of 1992 to 1993, 1996 to 1997, 1997 to 1998, 2006 to 2007, and 2008 to 2009 caused hardship for livestock producers, particularly for those rearing animals in an outdoor environment. During the winters of 1996 to 1997 and 2008 to 2009 up to 50% of the newborn calves were lost in many areas, with over 75,000 head of cattle lost in the northern plains states. Late fall and early winter snowstorms in 1992, 1997, 2006, and 2013 resulted in the loss of over 25,000 head of cattle each year in the Great Plains region of the United States. Economic losses from reduced performance of cattle experiencing severe environmental stress likely exceed losses associated with livestock death by 5- to 10-fold. Use of alternative supplementation programs may need to be considered for livestock challenged by adverse environmental conditions. Use of additional water for consumption and cooling, shade, and/or alternative management strategies need to be considered to help livestock cope with heat stress. For animals

  13. ACCEPT: Introduction of the Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Rodney A.; Santanu, Das; Janakiraman, Vijay Manikandan; Hosein, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of anomalies or adverse events is a challenging task, and there are a variety of methods which can be used to address the problem. In this paper, we introduce a generic framework developed in MATLAB (sup registered mark) called ACCEPT (Adverse Condition and Critical Event Prediction Toolbox). ACCEPT is an architectural framework designed to compare and contrast the performance of a variety of machine learning and early warning algorithms, and tests the capability of these algorithms to robustly predict the onset of adverse events in any time-series data generating systems or processes.

  14. [International reporting of adverse drug reactions. Final report of CIOMS ADR Working Group].

    PubMed

    Royer, R J; Benichou, C

    1991-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences, a working group composed of representatives of seven multinational pharmaceutical manufacturers and six regulatory authorities developed and implemented a standardized method for reporting post-approval adverse drug reactions (ADR). The method is based on a set of uniform definitions and procedures and a single reporting form, and has been demonstrated to be feasible and effective. Regulators and manufacturers, in establishing requirements and systems for reporting of adverse drug reactions, should consider adopting this method.

  15. Women and Working Conditions: Prospects for Improvement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seguret, Marie-Claire

    1983-01-01

    Women's difficult working conditions are due to factors such as the nature and form of women's employment, their reproductive role, and family responsibilities. The relative importance of these factors must be assessed in order to redress inequalities. (SK)

  16. Working conditions, work style, and job satisfaction among Albanian teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloep, Marion; Tarifa, Fatos

    1994-03-01

    For the first time in Albania, a large-scale study investigating teachers' working conditions was conducted. 349 teachers from many parts of the country and from all school levels answered an extensive questionnaire, providing a comprehensive description of their working situation. As data for parts of the study exist from the USA, Germany, Singapore, England, and Poland, results could be discussed in comparison to the conditions in these countries, showing that self-reported job satisfaction and engagement in effective classroom practices is relatively high among Albanian teachers, while the economic and physical conditions are bad. Stepwise regression analyses reveal that the items measuring professional autonomy account for a considerable part of the variance of the job satisfaction measure; while work efficiency is mainly predicted by items measuring social support and, again, professional autonomy.

  17. [Nursing workloads and working conditions: integrative review].

    PubMed

    Schmoeller, Roseli; Trindade, Letícia de Lima; Neis, Márcia Binder; Gelbcke, Francine Lima; de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires

    2011-06-01

    This study reviews theoretical production concerning workloads and working conditions for nurses. For that, an integrative review was carried out using scientific articles, theses and dissertations indexed in two Brazilian databases, Virtual Health Care Library (Biblioteca Virtual de Saúde) and Digital Database of Dissertations (Banco Digital de Teses), over the last ten years. From 132 identified studies, 27 were selected. Results indicate workloads as responsible for professional weariness, affecting the occurrence of work accidents and health problems. In order to adequate workloads studies indicate some strategies, such as having an adequate numbers of employees, continuing education, and better working conditions. The challenge is to continue research that reveal more precisely the relationships between workloads, working conditions, and health of the nursing team.

  18. The Type of Payment and Working Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Kyung Yong; Kim, Young Sun; Cho, Yoon Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background The type of payment is one of the important factors that has an effect on the health of employees, as a basic working condition. In the conventional research field of occupational safety and health, only the physical, chemical, biological, and ergonomic factors are treated as the main hazardous factors. Managerial factors and basic working conditions such as working hours and the type of payment are neglected. This paper aimed to investigate the association of the type of payment and the exposure to the various hazardous factors as an heuristic study. Methods The third Korean Working Conditions Survey (KWCS) by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute in 2011 was used for this study. Among the total sample of 50,032 economically active persons, 34,788 employees were considered for analysis. This study examined the relation between the three types of payment such as basic fixed salary and wage, piece rate, and extra payment for bad and dangerous working conditions and exposure to hazardous factors like vibration, noise, temperature, chemical contact, and working at very high speeds. Multivariate regression analysis was used to measure the effect of the type of payment on working hours exposed to hazards. Results The result showed that the proportion of employees with a basic fixed salary was 94.5%, the proportion with piece rates was 38.6%, and the proportion who received extra payment for hazardous working conditions was 11.7%. Conclusion The piece rate was associated with exposure to working with tight deadlines and stressful jobs. This study had some limitations because KWCS was a cross-sectional survey. PMID:26929840

  19. Adverse Pregnancy Conditions, Infertility, and Future Cardiovascular Risk: Implications for Mother and Child

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ki; Wei, Janet; Minissian, Margo; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2016-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy conditions in women are common and have been associated with adverse cardiovascular and metabolic outcomes such as myocardial infarction and stroke. As risk stratification in women is often suboptimal, recognition of non-traditional risk factors such as hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and premature delivery has become increasingly important. Additionally, such conditions may also increase the risk of cardiovascular disease in the children of afflicted women. In this review, we aim to highlight these conditions, along with infertility, and the association between such conditions and various cardiovascular outcomes and related maternal risk along with potential translation of risk to offspring. We will also discuss proposed mechanisms driving these associations as well as potential opportunities for screening and risk modification. PMID:26037616

  20. Risk of Performance Decrements and Adverse Health Outcomes Resulting from Sleep Loss, Circadian Desynchronization, and Work Overload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans-Flynn, Erin; Gregory, Kevin; Arsintescu, Lucia; Whitmire, Alexandra; Leveton, Lauren B.; Vessey, William

    2015-01-01

    Sleep loss, circadian desynchronization, and work overload occur to some extent for ground and flight crews, prior to and during spaceflight missions. Ground evidence indicates that such risk factors may lead to performance decrements and adverse health outcomes, which could potentially compromise mission objectives. Efforts are needed to identify the environmental and mission conditions that interfere with sleep and circadian alignment, as well as individual differences in vulnerability and resiliency to sleep loss and circadian desynchronization. Specifically, this report highlights a collection of new evidence to better characterize the risk and reveals new gaps in this risk.

  1. Effects of Alcohol-Induced Working Memory Decline on Alcohol Consumption and Adverse Consequences of Use

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, William V.; Day, Anne M.; Metrik, Jane; Leventhal, Adam M.; Kahler, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Alcohol use appears to decrease executive function acutely in a dose dependent manner, and lower baseline executive function appears to contribute to problematic alcohol use. However, no studies, to our knowledge, have examined the relationship between individual differences in working memory (a subcomponent of executive function) after alcohol consumption and drinking behaviors and consequences. Objectives The current study assessed the relationship between drinking behavior, alcohol-related consequences, and alcohol-induced changes in working memory (as assessed by Trails Making Test-B). Method Participants recruited from the community (n = 41), 57.3% male, mean age 39.2, took part in a three-session, within-subjects, repeated-measures design. Participants were administered a placebo, 0.4 g/kg, or 0.8 g/kg dose of alcohol. Working memory, past 30 day alcohol consumption, and consequences of alcohol use were measured at baseline; working memory was measured again after each beverage administration. Results Poorer working memory after alcohol administration (controlling for baseline working memory) was significantly associated with a greater number of drinks consumed per drinking day. Additionally, we observed a significant indirect relationship between the degree of alcohol-induced working memory decline and adverse consequences of alcohol use, which was mediated through greater average drinks per drinking day. Conclusions It is possible that greater individual susceptibility to alcohol-induced working memory decline may limit one’s ability to moderate alcohol consumption as evidenced by greater drinks per drinking day, and that this results in more adverse consequences of alcohol use. PMID:26407604

  2. Pay, Working Conditions, and Teacher Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanushek, Eric A.; Rivkin, Steven G.

    2007-01-01

    Eric Hanushek and Steven Rivkin examine how salary and working conditions affect the quality of instruction in the classroom. The wages of teachers relative to those of other college graduates have fallen steadily since 1940. Today, average wages differ little, however, between urban and suburban districts. In some metropolitan areas urban…

  3. Maternal Work Conditions and Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felfe, Christina; Hsin, Amy

    2012-01-01

    How do maternal work conditions, such as psychological stress and physical hazards, affect children's development? Combining data from the Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and the Occupational Information Network allows us to shed some light on this question. We employ various techniques including OLS with…

  4. [HYGIENIC ASSESSMENT OF WORKING CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYEES OF BROADCASTING CENTER].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, A V; Brusentsova, A V; Sokhoshko, I A; Rostikov, V P

    2015-01-01

    Hygienic assessment of working conditions of employees of the Omsk Regional Broadcasting Centre was performed on data of the analysis of materials of certification of workplaces. There were examined materials concerning 65 core profile workplaces, where 130 persons, including 35 women work. There was determined health risk for personnel in dependence on working conditions. The staff was noted to be exposed to the adverse impact of the following factors: chemical, physical (noise, general and local vibration, non-ionizing radiation, microclimate, lighting), severity and intensity ofwork. Class working conditions for 13,5% of workplaces on noise, 35.4% on non-ionizing radiation was assessed as a harmful of the first degree. Lightness indices at 78.5% of the workplaces did not meet the requirements of sanitary norms. At 7.7% of the workplaces levels of hardness of labor were assessed as harmful. The impact of such factors as biological, infrasound, ultrasound, ionizing radiation, aerosols with mainly fibrogenic action, was absent, their assessment was not carried out. Working conditions at 83.1% of workplaces were characterized as hazardous, including at 52.3% of the workplaces where there was established hazard class 3.1, at 30.7% of workplaces--Class 3.2. Among all the factors of occupational environment the largest contribution into the overall assessment of working conditions was made by the lightness factor (50.9%) and non-ionizing radiation (20.6%). The most harmful working conditions have been identified for workplaces of the operator of masthead antenna, engineer of radiocommunications, broadcasting and television, electromechanician of television (radiocommunication), (broadcasting), car driver.

  5. Causal Factors and Adverse Conditions of Aviation Accidents and Incidents Related to Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Evans, Joni K.; Sandifer, Carl E.; Jones, Sharon Monica

    2010-01-01

    The causal factors of accidents from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) database and incidents from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) database associated with loss of control (LOC) were examined for four types of operations (i.e., Federal Aviation Regulation Part 121, Part 135 Scheduled, Part 135 Nonscheduled, and Part 91) for the years 1988 to 2004. In-flight LOC is a serious aviation problem. Well over half of the LOC accidents included at least one fatality (80 percent in Part 121), and roughly half of all aviation fatalities in the studied time period occurred in conjunction with LOC. An adverse events table was updated to provide focus to the technology validation strategy of the Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) Project. The table contains three types of adverse conditions: failure, damage, and upset. Thirteen different adverse condition subtypes were gleaned from the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS), the FAA Accident and Incident database, and the NTSB database. The severity and frequency of the damage conditions, initial test conditions, and milestones references are also provided.

  6. Long working hours in Korea: results of the 2010 Working Conditions Survey.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungsun; Kwon, Oh Jun; Kim, Yangho

    2012-01-01

    Long working hours adversely affect workers' safety and health. In 2004, Korea passed legislation limiting the working week to 40 h, to improve quality-of-life and to increase business competitiveness. In the present study, we explored the characteristics of work in Korea and compared our data of the second Korean Working Conditions Survey (KWCS) with those of the first KWCS. We found that the average number of hours worked weekly has been reduced but the proportions of workers who work for more than 48 h per week has increased over the 4 yr between the two Korean surveys in all categories studied (male, female, employee, self-employed, and employer). We also found that self-employed and employers work much longer hours than do employees, who are protected by the Labor Standards Act. This was particularly true in the accommodation and food service sectors. In conclusion, Korean workers work longer than do workers of EU countries. The use of average figures masks differences in the numbers of working hours among those engaged in various types of employment, or in certain work sectors. Therefore, the Korean government should not simply monitor reductions in average weekly working hours, but should identify employees working for over 60 h weekly, and reduce their working time.

  7. Assessment of the State of the Art of Flight Control Technologies as Applicable to Adverse Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reveley, Mary s.; Briggs, Jeffrey L.; Leone, Karen M.; Kurtoglu, Tolga; Withrow, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    Literature from academia, industry, and other Government agencies was surveyed to assess the state of the art in current Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control (IRAC) aircraft technologies. Over 100 papers from 25 conferences from the time period 2004 to 2009 were reviewed. An assessment of the general state of the art in adaptive flight control is summarized first, followed by an assessment of the state of the art as applicable to 13 identified adverse conditions. Specific areas addressed in the general assessment include flight control when compensating for damage or reduced performance, retrofit software upgrades to flight controllers, flight control through engine response, and finally test and validation of new adaptive controllers. The state-of-the-art assessment applicable to the adverse conditions include technologies not specifically related to flight control, but may serve as inputs to a future flight control algorithm. This study illustrates existing gaps and opportunities for additional research by the NASA IRAC Project

  8. Maternal work conditions and child development

    PubMed Central

    Felfe, Christina; Hsin, Amy

    2016-01-01

    How do maternal work conditions, such as psychological stress and physical hazards, affect children's development? Combining data from the Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and the Occupational Information Network allows us to shed some light on this question. We employ various techniques including OLS with extensive controls, a value added approach and individual fixed effects in order to address potential endogeneity problems. Our results reveal that mothers’ exposure to work-related hazards negatively affects children's cognitive development and to work-related stress negatively affects children's behavioral development. While maternal time investments play a small but significant role in mediating these negative associations, paternal time investments neither reinforce nor compensate these associations. PMID:27642208

  9. Working conditions of Brazilian immigrants in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Eduardo Siqueira, C; Jansen, Tiago

    2012-06-01

    Brazilian immigration to Massachusetts and other states in the US grew significantly in the last two decades. There is a lack of data about the working conditions and health and safety hazards faced by Brazilian immigrant workers. We surveyed over 500 workers in Eastern Massachusetts through a community-based participatory research project to explore occupational and immigration factors that may represent a risk to the health of Brazilian immigrant workers, who mostly work in the construction, housecleaning, and food services segments of the state labor force. Our pilot study suggests that Brazilian immigrant workers are exposed to chemical, ergonomic, physical, and psychosocial job hazards and have experienced a variety of health symptoms that may be associated with these work environment exposures. Since most Brazilian workers have not received proper training to recognize the hazards, there is an urgent need for the implementation of culturally adequate training programs and enforcement of safety and health regulations to prevent occupational injuries and fatalities.

  10. Algorithms for contours depicting static electric fields during adverse weather conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.

    1991-01-01

    A flexible and functional analytical tool is developed for the study of electric fields during adverse weather conditions. This tool is designed for use by members of the Atmospheric Science Group as part of their overall effort to appraise environmental conditions during these situations. It is also used to illustrate approaches open to those interested in the study of the physics of ambient electric field phenomena. Computer resources of KSC are coordinated with original software to produce contour interpretations of electric field data available from a grid of field mills spanning the region. Three model algorithms are presented and examples are given illustrating the system design, flexibility, and utility.

  11. Working conditions and health in hairdressing salons.

    PubMed

    Leino, T; Kähkönen, E; Saarinen, L; Henriks-Eckerman, M L; Paakkulainen, H

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the working conditions in hairdressing salons and the influence of work factors on the workers' health. Twenty randomly sampled hairdressing salons in the Helsinki, Finland, metropolitan area were selected for the study. The study was performed during winter 1994-1995; it included a survey of the hairdressing chemicals in use, the measurement of physical and chemical working conditions, and a self-administered questionnaire of the work environment and health of the workers. The air temperature varied between 16-25 degrees C, air velocity 0.02-0.3 m/s, and relative humidity, 18-42 percent. The total dust concentration varied between 66-133 micrograms/m3. The concentration of volatile organic compounds was 84-465 micrograms/m3 and the peaks rose to 25-45 mg/m3. The highest concentration of ammonia detected was 3.5 mg/m3. The long-term concentrations of thioglycolates and persulfates were at their lowest below the detection limit, and at their highest 1.8 micrograms/m3 for thioglycolates and 4.7 micrograms/m3 for persulfates, respectively, and the peaks of persulfates, 30 micrograms/m3. Hairdressing chemicals, awkward work postures, and repetitive movements were the most frequent causes of discomfort and for some had caused a work-related disease. Good general ventilation decreased the health complaints caused by hairdressing chemicals, but caused discomfort as a result of drafts. On average, the physical and chemical working conditions in the hairdressing salons were satisfactory compared with the Finnish criterion for indoor climate. However, the frequent high peak concentrations of chemicals during dyeing, bleaching, permanenting, and aerosol spraying still pose a significant health problem. Although effective general ventilation alleviated the effects of the air pollutants, it could not completely solve the problem. Therefore, local exhaust ventilation is recommended at the mixing places for hairdressing chemicals and

  12. Some effects of adverse weather conditions on performance of airplane antiskid braking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.; Mccarty, J. L.; Tanner, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The performance of current antiskid braking systems operating under adverse weather conditions was analyzed in an effort to both identify the causes of locked-wheel skids which sometimes occur when the runway is slippery and to find possible solutions to this operational problem. This analysis was made possible by the quantitative test data provided by recently completed landing research programs using fully instrumented flight test airplanes and was further supported by tests performed at the Langley aircraft landing loads and traction facility. The antiskid system logic for brake control and for both touchdown and locked-wheel protection is described and its response behavior in adverse weather is discussed in detail with the aid of available data. The analysis indicates that the operational performance of the antiskid logic circuits is highly dependent upon wheel spin-up acceleration and can be adversely affected by certain pilot braking inputs when accelerations are low. Normal antiskid performance is assured if the tire-to-runway traction is sufficient to provide high wheel spin-up accelerations or if the system is provided a continuous, accurate ground speed reference. The design of antiskid systems is complicated by the necessity for tradeoffs between tire braking and cornering capabilities, both of which are necessary to provide safe operations in the presence of cross winds, particularly under slippery runway conditions.

  13. 20 CFR 655.1112 - Element II-What does “no adverse effect on wages and working conditions” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... What Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655... affect the wages and working conditions of registered nurses similarly employed.” (b) For purposes of...-1C nurses is not authorized. (c) Wages. To meet the requirement of no adverse effect on wages,...

  14. 20 CFR 655.1112 - Element II-What does “no adverse effect on wages and working conditions” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... What Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655... affect the wages and working conditions of registered nurses similarly employed.” (b) For purposes of...-1C nurses is not authorized. (c) Wages. To meet the requirement of no adverse effect on wages,...

  15. 20 CFR 655.1112 - Element II-What does “no adverse effect on wages and working conditions” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... What Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655... affect the wages and working conditions of registered nurses similarly employed.” (b) For purposes of...-1C nurses is not authorized. (c) Wages. To meet the requirement of no adverse effect on wages,...

  16. 20 CFR 655.1112 - Element II-What does “no adverse effect on wages and working conditions” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... What Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655... affect the wages and working conditions of registered nurses similarly employed.” (b) For purposes of...-1C nurses is not authorized. (c) Wages. To meet the requirement of no adverse effect on wages,...

  17. 20 CFR 655.1112 - Element II-What does “no adverse effect on wages and working conditions” mean?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... What Requirements Must a Facility Meet to Employ H-1C Nonimmigrant Workers as Registered Nurses? § 655... affect the wages and working conditions of registered nurses similarly employed.” (b) For purposes of...-1C nurses is not authorized. (c) Wages. To meet the requirement of no adverse effect on wages,...

  18. Significance of frailty for predicting adverse clinical outcomes in different patient groups with specific medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Ritt, Martin; Gaßmann, Karl-Günter; Sieber, Cornel Christian

    2016-10-01

    Frailty is a major health burden in an aging society. It constitutes a clinical state of reduced physiological reserves that is associated with a diminished ability to withstand internal and external stressors. Frail patients have an increased risk for adverse clinical outcomes, such as mortality, readmission to hospital, institutionalization and falls. Of further clinical interest, frailty might be at least in part reversible in some patients and subject to preventive strategies. In daily clinical practice older patients with a complex health status, who are mostly frail or at least at risk of developing frailty, are frequently cared for by geriatricians. Recently, clinicians and scientists from other medical disciplines, such as cardiology, pulmonology, gastroenterology, nephrology, endocrinology, rheumatology, surgery and critical care medicine also discovered frailty to be an interesting instrument for risk stratification of patients, including younger patients. In this review we highlight the results of recent studies that demonstrated the significance of frailty to predict adverse clinical outcomes in patients with specific medical conditions, such as cardiac, lung, liver and kidney diseases as well as diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, trauma patients, patients undergoing surgery and critically ill patients. Multiple studies in patients with the aforementioned specific medical conditions could be identified demonstrating a predictive role of frailty for several adverse clinical outcomes. The association between frailty and adverse clinical outcomes reported in these studies was in part independent of several major potential confounder factors, such as age, sex, race, comorbidities and disabilities and were also detected in younger patients.

  19. Working conditions of occupational therapists in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abu Tariah, Hashem Salman; Abu-Dahab, Sana M N; Hamed, Razan T; AlHeresh, Rawan A; Yousef, Huda Abed Arahim

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the working conditions and factors related to job satisfaction among Jordanian occupational therapists. A self-administered survey consisting of several questions about the participants' jobs was developed for this study. The inclusion criteria included occupational therapists who worked in the field of occupational therapy (OT) in Jordan and who had at least six months of experience. The survey was distributed to 120 occupational therapists in different OT settings. One hundred and one occupational therapists from different hospitals, centres, schools and universities responded to the survey. Salaries of the participants were low in comparison with the salaries of the rest of healthcare practitioners in Jordan. Chi-square analysis revealed significant relationship between participants' perceived job satisfaction and the administration of the setting, and between the choice of studying OT and the salary that the participant makes. Most occupational therapists in Jordan are young, have modest experience and work in general OT services in government-owned facilities or paediatric centres. A sense of dissatisfaction was obvious among the participants. Further studies are needed to explore reasons of work satisfaction and dissatisfaction among occupational therapists in Jordan.

  20. Diagnosis, prevention, and management of statin adverse effects and intolerance: Canadian Working Group Consensus update.

    PubMed

    Mancini, G B John; Tashakkor, A Yashar; Baker, Steven; Bergeron, Jean; Fitchett, David; Frohlich, Jiri; Genest, Jacques; Gupta, Milan; Hegele, Robert A; Ng, Dominic S; Pearson, Glen J; Pope, Janet

    2013-12-01

    The Proceedings of a Canadian Working Group Consensus Conference, first published in 2011, provided a summary of statin-associated adverse effects and intolerance and management suggestions. In this update, new clinical studies identified since then that provide further insight into effects on muscle, cognition, cataracts, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer are discussed. Of these, the arenas of greatest controversy pertain to purported effects on cognition and the emergence of diabetes during long-term therapy. Regarding cognition, the available evidence is not strongly supportive of a major adverse effect of statins. In contrast, the linkage between statin therapy and incident diabetes is more firm. However, this risk is more strongly associated with traditional risk factors for new-onset diabetes than with statin itself and any possible negative effect of new-onset diabetes during statin treatment is far outweighed by the cardiovascular risk reduction benefits. Additional studies are also discussed, which support the principle that systematic statin rechallenge, and lower or intermittent statin dosing strategies are the main methods for dealing with suspected statin intolerance at this time.

  1. LEARNING TO BE BAD: ADVERSE SOCIAL CONDITIONS, SOCIAL SCHEMAS, AND CRIME

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Ronald L.; Burt, Callie Harbin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we develop and test a new approach to explain the link between social factors and individual offending. We argue that seemingly disparate family, peer, and community conditions lead to crime because the lessons communicated by these events are similar and promote social schemas involving a hostile view of people and relationships, a preference for immediate rewards, and a cynical view of conventional norms. Further, we posit that these three schemas are interconnected and combine to form a criminogenic knowledge structure that gives rise to situational interpretations legitimating criminal behavior. Structural equation modeling with a sample of roughly 700 hundred African American teens provided strong support for the model. The findings indicated that persistent exposure to adverse conditions such as community crime, discrimination, harsh parenting, deviant peers and low neighborhood collective efficacy increased commitment to the three social schemas. The three schemas were highly intercorrelated and combined to form a latent construct that strongly predicted increases in crime. Further, in large measure the effect of the various adverse conditions on increases in crime was indirect through their impact on this latent construct. We discuss the extent to which the social schematic model presented in the paper might be used to integrate concepts and findings from several of the major theories of criminal behavior. PMID:21760641

  2. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber: Adverse operating conditions test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    Test hardware, facilities, and procedures are described along with results of electrically heated tube and channel tests conducted to determine adverse operating condition limits for convectively cooled chambers typical of Space Shuttle Orbit Manuevering Engine designs. Hot-start tests were conducted with corrosion resistant steel and nickel tubes with both monomethylhydrazine and 50-50 coolants. Helium ingestion, in both bubble and froth form, was studied in tubular test sections. Helium bubble ingestion and burn-out limits in rectangular channels were also investigated.

  3. [Physiological and hygienic characteristics of working conditions of workers in petrochemical enterprise].

    PubMed

    Setko, A G; Nazmeev, M A; Ponomareva, S G; Lutoshkina, A S; Vasil'eva, F F

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents results of a study of the functional state of major workers of the refinery "Gazprom Neftekhim Salavat" when exposed to hazardous working conditions. The results have shown adverse effects of chemical factors of working environment and the intensity of the labor process on the functional state of the body of workers that shows a violation of efficiency and adaptability of the their organism to the working conditions.

  4. Speech perception under adverse conditions: insights from behavioral, computational, and neuroscience research

    PubMed Central

    Guediche, Sara; Blumstein, Sheila E.; Fiez, Julie A.; Holt, Lori L.

    2014-01-01

    Adult speech perception reflects the long-term regularities of the native language, but it is also flexible such that it accommodates and adapts to adverse listening conditions and short-term deviations from native-language norms. The purpose of this article is to examine how the broader neuroscience literature can inform and advance research efforts in understanding the neural basis of flexibility and adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Specifically, we highlight the potential role of learning algorithms that rely on prediction error signals and discuss specific neural structures that are likely to contribute to such learning. To this end, we review behavioral studies, computational accounts, and neuroimaging findings related to adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Already, a few studies have alluded to a potential role of these mechanisms in adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Furthermore, we consider research topics in neuroscience that offer insight into how perception can be adaptively tuned to short-term deviations while balancing the need to maintain stability in the perception of learned long-term regularities. Consideration of the application and limitations of these algorithms in characterizing flexible speech perception under adverse conditions promises to inform theoretical models of speech. PMID:24427119

  5. Teacher Working Conditions Are Student Learning Conditions: A Report on the 2006 North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Eric; Emerick, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Governor Easley of North Carolina has made a sustained commitment to listening to educators and reforming schools to create the working conditions necessary for student and teacher success. With three iterations of the working conditions survey and about 150,000 responses to critical questions about their workplace, analyses have been consistent…

  6. Exposing physicians to reduced residency work hours did not adversely affect patient outcomes after residency.

    PubMed

    Jena, Anupam B; Schoemaker, Lena; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2014-10-01

    In 2003, work hours for physicians-in-training (residents) were capped by regulation at eighty hours per week, leading to the hotly debated but unexplored issue of whether physicians today are less well trained as a result of these work-hour reforms. Using a unique database of nearly all hospitalizations in Florida during 2000-09 that were linked to detailed information on the medical training history of the physician of record for each hospitalization, we studied whether hospital mortality and patients' length-of-stay varied according to the number of years a physician was exposed to the 2003 duty-hour regulations during his or her residency. We examined this database of practicing Florida physicians, using a difference-in-differences analysis that compared trends in outcomes of junior physicians (those with one-year post-residency experience) pre- and post-2003 to a control group of senior physicians (those with ten or more years of post-residency experience) who were not exposed to these reforms during their residency. We found that the duty-hour reforms did not adversely affect hospital mortality and length-of-stay of patients cared for by new attending physicians who were partly or fully exposed to reduced duty hours during their own residency. However, assessment of the impact of the duty-hour reforms on other clinical outcomes is needed.

  7. Adverse Childhood Experiences, Support, and the Perception of Ability to Work in Adults with Disability

    PubMed Central

    Eslinger, Jessica G.; Zimmerman, Lindsey; Scaccia, Jamie; Lai, Betty S.; Lewis, Catrin; Alisic, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and support on self-reported work inability of adults reporting disability. Participants Adults (ages 18–64) who participated in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System in 2009 or 2010 and who reported having a disability (n = 13,009). Design and Main Outcome Measures The study used a retrospective cohort design with work inability as the main outcome. ACE categories included abuse (sexual, physical, emotional) and family dysfunction (domestic violence, incarceration, mental illness, substance abuse, divorce). Support included functional (perceived emotional/social support) and structural (living with another adult) support. Logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounders (age, sex and race) and to evaluate whether there was an independent effect of ACEs on work inability after adding other important predictors (support, education, health) to the model. Results ACEs were highly prevalent with almost 75% of the sample reporting at least one ACE category and over 25% having a high ACE burden (4 or more categories). ACEs were strongly associated with functional support. Participants experiencing a high ACE burden had a higher adjusted odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence interval] of 1.9 [1.5–2.4] of work inability (reference: zero ACEs). Good functional support (adjusted OR 0.52 [0.42–0.63]) and structural support (adjusted OR 0.48 [0.41–0.56]) were protective against work inability. After adding education and health to the model, ACEs no longer appeared to have an independent effect. Structural support remained highly protective, but functional support only appeared to be protective in those with good physical health. Conclusions ACEs are highly prevalent in working-age US adults with a disability, particularly young adults. ACEs are associated with decreased support, lower educational attainment and worse adult health. Health care providers are encouraged to screen

  8. Wear of novel ceramic-on-ceramic bearings under adverse and clinically relevant hip simulator conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Jennings, Louise M; Begand, Sabine; Oberbach, Thomas; Delfosse, Daniel; Fisher, John

    2013-11-01

    Further development of ceramic materials for total hip replacement aim to increase fracture toughness and further reduce the incidence of bearing fracture. Edge loading due to translational mal positioning (microseparation) has replicated stripe wear, wear rates, and bimodal wear debris observed on retrievals. This method has replicated the fracture of early zirconia ceramic-on-ceramic bearings. This has shown the necessity of introducing microseparation conditions to the gait cycle when assessing the tribological performance of new hip replacement bearings. Two novel ceramic matrix composite materials, zirconia-toughened alumina (ZTA) and alumina-toughened zirconia (ATZ), were developed by Mathys Orthopädie GmbH. In this study, ATZ-on-ATZ and ZTA-on-ZTA bearing combinations were tested and compared with alumina-on-alumina (Al2O3-on-Al2O3) bearings under adverse microseparation and edge loading conditions using the Leeds II physiological anatomical hip joint simulator. The wear rate (±95% confidence limit) of ZTA-on-ZTA was 0.14 ± 0.10 mm(3)/million cycles and that of ATZ-on-ATZ was 0.06 ± 0.004 mm(3)/million cycles compared with a wear rate of 0.74 ± 1.73 mm(3)/million cycles for Al2O3-on-Al2O3 bearings. Stripe wear was evident on all bearing combinations; however, the stripe formed on the ATZ and ZTA femoral heads was thinner and shallower that that formed on the Al2O3 heads. Posttest phase composition measurements for both ATZ and ZTA materials showed no significant change in the monoclinic zirconia content. ATZ-on-ATZ and ZTA-on-ZTA showed superior wear resistance properties when compared with Al2O3-on-Al2O3 under adverse edge loading conditions.

  9. A Ground-Based Array to Observe Geospace Electrodynamics During Adverse Space Weather Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Eccles, J. V.; Rice, D.

    2004-05-01

    Geomagnetic Storms occur with surprising frequency and create adverse space weather conditions. During these periods, our knowledge and ability to specify or forecast in adequate detail for user needs is negligible. Neither experimental observations nor theoretical developments have made a significant new impact on the problem for over two decades. Although we can now map Total Electron Content (TEC) in the ionosphere over a continent with sufficient resolution to see coherent long-lived structures, these do not provide constraints on the geospace electrodynamics that is at the heart of our lack of understanding. We present arguments for the need of a continental deployment of ground-based sensors to stepwise advance our understanding of the geospace electrodynamics when it is most adverse from a space weather perspective and also most frustrating from an understanding of Magnetosphere-Ionosphere coupling. That a continental-scale deployment is more productive at addressing the problem than a realizable global distribution is shown. Each measurement is discussed from the point-of-view of either providing new knowledge or becoming a key for future real-time specification and forecasting for user applications. An example of a storm database from one mid-latitude station for the 31 March 2002 is used as a conceptual point in a ground-based array. The presentation focuses on scientific questions that have eluded a quantitative solution for over three decades and view a ground-based array as an "IGY" type of catalyst for answering these questions.

  10. Determination and representation of electric charge distributions associated with adverse weather conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rompala, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Algorithms are presented for determining the size and location of electric charges which model storm systems and lightning strikes. The analysis utilizes readings from a grid of ground level field mills and geometric constraints on parameters to arrive at a representative set of charges. This set is used to generate three dimensional graphical depictions of the set as well as contour maps of the ground level electrical environment over the grid. The composite, analytic and graphic package is demonstrated and evaluated using controlled input data and archived data from a storm system. The results demonstrate the packages utility as: an operational tool in appraising adverse weather conditions; a research tool in studies of topics such as storm structure, storm dynamics, and lightning; and a tool in designing and evaluating grid systems.

  11. Probiotics production and alternative encapsulation methodologies to improve their viabilities under adverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Coghetto, Chaline Caren; Brinques, Graziela Brusch; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    2016-12-01

    Probiotic products are dietary supplements containing live microorganisms producing beneficial health effects on the host by improving intestinal balance and nutrient absorption. Among probiotic microorganisms, those classified as lactic acid bacteria are of major importance to the food and feed industries. Probiotic cells can be produced using alternative carbon and nitrogen sources, such as agroindustrial residues, at the same time contributing to reduce process costs. On the other hand, the survival of probiotic cells in formulated food products, as well as in the host gut, is an essential nutritional aspect concerning health benefits. Therefore, several cell microencapsulation techniques have been investigated as a way to improve cell viability and survival under adverse environmental conditions, such as the gastrointestinal milieu of hosts. In this review, different aspects of probiotic cells and technologies of their related products are discussed, including formulation of culture media, and aspects of cell microencapsulation techniques required to improve their survival in the host.

  12. Cost-sharing, physician utilization, and adverse selection among Medicare beneficiaries with chronic health conditions.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Geoffrey

    2015-02-01

    Pooled data from the 2007, 2009, and 2011/2012 California Health Interview Surveys were used to compare the number of self-reported annual physician visits among 36,808 Medicare beneficiaries ≥65 in insurance groups with differential cost-sharing. Adjusted for adverse selection and a set of health covariates, Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) only beneficiaries had similar physician utilization compared with HMO enrollees but fewer visits compared with those with supplemental (1.04, p = .001) and Medicaid (1.55, p = .003) coverage. FFS only beneficiaries in very good or excellent health had fewer visits compared with those of similar health status with supplemental (1.30, p = .001) or Medicaid coverage (2.15, p = .002). For subpopulations with several chronic conditions, FFS only beneficiaries also had fewer visits compared with beneficiaries with supplemental or Medicaid coverage. Observed differences in utilization may reflect efficient and necessary physician utilization among those with chronic health needs.

  13. Functions of Nitric Oxide (NO) in Roots during Development and under Adverse Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2015-01-01

    The free radical molecule, nitric oxide (NO), is present in the principal organs of plants, where it plays an important role in a wide range of physiological functions. Root growth and development are highly regulated by both internal and external factors such as nutrient availability, hormones, pattern formation, cell polarity and cell cycle control. The presence of NO in roots has opened up new areas of research on the role of NO, including root architecture, nutrient acquisition, microorganism interactions and the response mechanisms to adverse environmental conditions, among others. Additionally, the exogenous application of NO throughout the roots has the potential to counteract specific damages caused by certain stresses. This review aims to provide an up-to-date perspective on NO functions in the roots of higher plants. PMID:27135326

  14. 20 CFR 627.315 - Benefits and working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Benefits and working conditions. 627.315... Benefits and Working Conditions § 627.315 Benefits and working conditions. (a) In the development and... surroundings or under working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to the...

  15. Global responses of Escherichia coli to adverse conditions determined by microarrays and FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moen, Birgitte; Janbu, Astrid Oust; Langsrud, Solveig; Langsrud, Oyvind; Hobman, Jon L; Constantinidou, Chrystala; Kohler, Achim; Rudi, Knut

    2009-06-01

    The global gene expression and biomolecular composition in an Escherichia coli model strain exposed to 10 adverse conditions (sodium chloride, ethanol, glycerol, hydrochloric and acetic acid, sodium hydroxide, heat (46 degrees C), and cold (15 degrees C), as well as ethidium bromide and the disinfectant benzalkonium chloride) were determined using DNA microarrays and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In total, approximately 40% of all investigated genes (1682/4279 genes) significantly changed expression, compared with a nonstressed control. There were, however, only 3 genes (ygaW (unknown function), rmf (encoding a ribosomal modification factor), and ghrA (encoding a glyoxylate/hydroxypyruvate reductase)) that significantly changed expression under all conditions (not including benzalkonium chloride). The FT-IR analysis showed an increase in unsaturated fatty acids during ethanol and cold exposure, and a decrease during acid and heat exposure. Cold conditions induced changes in the carbohydrate composition of the cell, possibly related to the upregulation of outer membrane genes (glgAP and rcsA). Although some covariance was observed between the 2 data sets, principle component analysis and regression analyses revealed that the gene expression and the biomolecular responses are not well correlated in stressed populations of E. coli, underlining the importance of multiple strategies to begin to understand the effect on the whole cell.

  16. Chosen risk level during car-following in adverse weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Hjelkrem, Odd André; Ryeng, Eirin Olaussen

    2016-10-01

    This study examines how precipitation, light conditions and surface conditions affect the drivers' risk perception. An indicator CRI (Chosen Risk Index) is defined, which describes the chosen risk level for drivers in a car-following situation. The dataset contains about 70 000 observations of driver behaviour and weather status on a rural road. Based on the theory of risk homeostasis and an assumption that driving behaviour in situations with daylight, dry road and no precipitation reflects drivers' target level of risk, generalised linear models (GLM) were estimated for cars and trucks separately to reveal the effect of adverse weather conditions on risk perception. The analyses show that both car and truck drivers perceive the highest risk when driving on snow covered roads. For car drivers, a snow covered road in combination with moderate rain or light snow are the factors which lowers the CRI the most. For trucks, snow cover and partially covered roads significantly lowers the CRI, while precipitation did not seem to impose any higher risk. Interaction effects were found for car drivers only.

  17. Conditions for Apprentices' Learning Activities at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmann, Gerhard; Mulder, Regina H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how apprentices' learning activities at work can be fostered. This is a crucial issue as learning at work enhances apprentices' competence development and prepares them for professional development on the job. Therefore, we conducted a study with 70 apprentices in the German dual system and examined the…

  18. Adverse childhood experiences and mental health, chronic medical conditions, and development in young children

    PubMed Central

    Kerker, Bonnie D.; Zhang, Jinjin; Nadeem, Erum; Stein, Ruth E. K.; Hurlburt, Michael S.; Heneghan, Amy; Landsverk, John; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the relationships between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and mental health, chronic medical conditions and social development among young children in the child welfare system. Methods This was a cross-sectional study, using a nationally representative sample of children investigated by child welfare (National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being II) from 2008–2009. Our analysis included caregiver interviews and caseworker reports about children age 18–71 months who were not in out-of-home care (N=912). We examined the associations between ACEs and mental health (measured by the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL)), reported chronic medical conditions, and social development (measured by the Vineland Socialization Scale), in bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results Nearly all children (98.1%) were reported to have had an ACE in their lifetime; the average number of ACEs was 3.6. For every additional reported ACE there was a 32% increased odds of having a problem score on the CBCL (Odds Ratio (OR)=1.32, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.14, 1.53), and a 21% increased odds of having a chronic medical condition (OR=1.21, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.40). Among children 36–71 months, for every additional reported ACE there was a 77% increased odds of a low Vineland Socialization score (OR=1.77, 95% CI: 1.12, 2.78). Conclusion and Relevance ACEs were associated with poor early childhood mental health and chronic medical conditions, and, among children age 3–5, social development. Efforts are needed to examine whether providing early intervention to families with multiple stressors mitigates the impact of ACEs on children’s outcomes. PMID:26183001

  19. Combined effects of working environmental conditions in VDT work.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Sasaki, H; Saito, T; Hosokawa, T; Kurasaki, M; Saito, K

    2001-04-15

    The combined effects of city noise and luminance of the computer display were evaluated from the changes in lymphocytes and mental activities of participants. Healthy male students were tested under the following four experimental conditions: (1) a calculating task on a video display terminal (VDT) with luminance of 90 cd m(-2) without city noise; (2) a calculating task on a VDT with luminance of 20 cd m(-2) without city noise; (3) a calculating task on a VDT with luminance of 90 cd m(-2) with city noise of 70 dB(A); and (4) a calculating task on a VDT with luminance of 20 cd m(-2) with city noise of 70 dB(A). A visual reaction test (VRT) was performed, and critical flicker fusion frequency (CFF), heart rate (HR), numbers of circulating white blood cells (WBCs), lymphocyte subsets and subjective symptoms of fatigue were measured (1) before; (2) just after; and (3) 30 min after each 60 min test. Subjective symptoms of fatigue significantly increased just after experiments conducted under the two noisy conditions. VRT and CFF showed significant changes in the case of the high-luminance display with noise. WBCs and neutrophils showed significant increases in the two quiet conditions. These results suggested that high luminance with noise had the most effect on subjective fatigue and mental activities.

  20. The Working Conditions Program Assessment: Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Gerald T.; Birmingham, Kathryn M.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the Working Connections Program, a program funded by Microsoft Corporation and administered by American Association of Community Colleges. Describes the program as being created to assist community colleges in the development and implementation of information technology (IT) programs that are designed to train skilled IT workers. (NB)

  1. Work, health, and welfare: the association between working conditions, welfare states, and self-reported general health in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bambra, Clare; Lunau, Thorsten; Van der Wel, Kjetil A; Eikemo, Terje A; Dragano, Nico

    2014-01-01

    This article is the first to examine the association between self-reported general health and a wide range of working conditions at the European level and by type of welfare state regime. Data for 21,705 men and women ages 16 to 60 from 27 European countries were obtained from the 2010 European Working Conditions Survey. The influence of individual-level sociodemographic, physical, and psychosocial working conditions and of the organization of work were assessed in multilevel logistic regression analyses, with additional stratification by welfare state regime type (Anglo-Saxon, Bismarckian, Eastern European, Scandinavian, and Southern). At the European level, we found that "not good" general health was more likely to be reported by workers more exposed to hazardous working conditions. Most notably, tiring working positions, job strain, and temporary job contracts were strongly associated with a higher likelihood of reporting "not good" health. Analysis by welfare state regime found that only tiring or painful working conditions were consistently associated with worse self-reported health in all regimes. There was no evidence that the Scandinavian welfare regime protected against the adverse health effects of poor working conditions. The article concludes by examining the implications for comparative occupational health research.

  2. Health surveillance under adverse ergonomics conditions--validity of a screening method adapted for the occupational health service.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Dirk; Gustafsson, Ewa; Rolander, Bo; Arvidsson, Inger; Nordander, Catarina

    2015-01-01

    A new health surveillance protocol for work-related upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders has been validated by comparing the results with a reference protocol. The studied protocol, Health Surveillance in Adverse Ergonomics Conditions (HECO), is a new version of the reference protocol modified for application in the Occupational Health Service (OHS). The HECO protocol contains both a screening part and a diagnosing part. Sixty-three employees were examined. The screening in HECO did not miss any diagnosis found when using the reference protocol, but in comparison to the reference protocol considerable time savings could be achieved. Fair to good agreement between the protocols was obtained for one or more diagnoses in neck/shoulders (86%, k = 0.62) and elbow/hands (84%, k = 0.49). Therefore, the results obtained using the HECO protocol can be compared with a reference material collected with the reference protocol, and thus provide information of the magnitude of disorders in an examined work group. Practitioner Summary: The HECO protocol is a relatively simple physical examination protocol for identification of musculoskeletal disorders in the neck and upper extremities. The protocol is a reliable and cost-effective tool for the OHS to use for occupational health surveillance in order to detect workplaces at high risk for developing musculoskeletal disorders.

  3. International reporting on adverse drug reactions: the CIOMS project. CIOMS ADR Working Group.

    PubMed

    Faich, G A; Castle, W; Bankowski, Z

    1990-04-01

    A method for standardized postapproval adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting has been developed and implemented by seven multinational pharmaceutical manufacturers and six regulatory authorities. This is based on a set of uniform definitions, procedures and a single reporting form, and has been demonstrated to be useful and effective. When regulators and manufacturers develop requirements and systems for ADR reporting they should consider adapting this method.

  4. Pathways from childhood abuse and other adversities to adult health risks: The role of adult socioeconomic conditions.

    PubMed

    Font, Sarah A; Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), including child abuse, have been linked with poor health outcomes in adulthood. The mechanisms that explain these relations are less understood. This study assesses whether associations of ACEs and health risks are mediated by adult socioeconomic conditions, and whether these pathways are different for maltreatment than for other types of adversities. Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2012 survey (N=29,229), we employ structural equation modeling to (1) estimate associations of the number and type of ACEs with five health risks-depression, obesity, tobacco use, binge drinking, and self-reported sub-optimal health; and (2) assess whether adult socioeconomic conditions-marriage, divorce and separation, educational attainment, income and insurance status-mediate those associations. Findings suggest both direct and indirect associations between ACEs and health risks. At high numbers of ACEs, 15-20% of the association between number of ACEs and adult health risks was attributable to socioeconomic conditions. Associations of three ACEs (exposure to domestic violence, parental divorce, and residing with a person who was incarcerated) with health risks were nearly entirely explained by socioeconomic conditions in adulthood. However, child physical, emotional, and sexual abuse were significantly associated with several adult health risks, beyond the effects of other adversities, and socioeconomic conditions explained only a small portion of these associations. These findings suggest that the pathways to poor adult health differ by types of ACEs, and that childhood abuse is more likely than other adversities to have a direct impact.

  5. Contact mechanics of modular metal-on-polyethylene total hip replacement under adverse edge loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xijin; Li, Junyan; Wang, Ling; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth; Fisher, John

    2014-10-17

    Edge loading can negatively impact the biomechanics and long-term performance of hip replacements. Although edge loading has been widely investigated for hard-on-hard articulations, limited work has been conducted for hard-on-soft combinations. The aim of the present study was to investigate edge loading and its effect on the contact mechanics of a modular metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) total hip replacement (THR). A three-dimensional finite element model was developed based on a modular MoP bearing. Different cup inclination angles and head lateral microseparation were modelled and their effect on the contact mechanics of the modular MoP hip replacement were examined. The results showed that lateral microseparation caused loading of the head on the rim of the cup, which produced substantial increases in the maximum von Mises stress in the polyethylene liner and the maximum contact pressure on both the articulating surface and backside surface of the liner. Plastic deformation of the liner was observed under both standard conditions and microseparation conditions, however, the maximum equivalent plastic strain in the liner under microseparation conditions of 2000 µm was predicted to be approximately six times that under standard conditions. The study has indicated that correct positioning the components to avoid edge loading is likely to be important clinically even for hard-on-soft bearings for THR.

  6. Pathways from Childhood Abuse and Other Adversities to Adult Health Risks: The Role of Adult Socioeconomic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), including child abuse, have been linked with poor health outcomes in adulthood. The mechanisms that explain these relations are less understood. This study assesses whether associations of ACEs and health risks are mediated by adult socioeconomic conditions, and whether these pathways are different for maltreatment than for other types of adversities. Using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 2012 survey (N=29,229), we employ structural equation modeling to (1) estimate associations of the number and type of ACEs with five health risks – depression, obesity, tobacco use, binge drinking, and self-reported sub-optimal health; and (2) assess whether adult socioeconomic conditions— marriage, divorce and separation, educational attainment, income and insurance status—mediate those associations. Findings suggest both direct and indirect associations between ACEs and health risks. At high numbers of ACEs, 15–20% of the association between number of ACEs and adult health risks was attributable to socioeconomic conditions. Associations of three ACEs (exposure to domestic violence, parental divorce, and residing with a person who was incarcerated) with health risks were nearly entirely explained by socioeconomic conditions in adulthood. However, child physical, emotional and sexual abuse were significantly associated with several adult health risks, beyond the effects of other adversities, and socioeconomic conditions explained only a small portion of these associations. These findings suggest that the pathways to poor adult health differ by types of ACEs, and that childhood abuse is more likely than other adversities to have a direct impact. PMID:26059537

  7. Working Conditions in the Industrial Nations: What Lies Ahead?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spyropoulos, Georges

    1984-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, traditional concepts of working conditions and of work have been challenged in industrialized nations. The improvement of working conditions has become a basic issue, affected by the economic situation, technological advances, social climate, labor relations, and individual behavior. (Author/SK)

  8. [Characteristics of working conditions at metallurgy-related plants].

    PubMed

    Egorova, A M

    2008-01-01

    Working conditions at more versus less advanced technology steel plants of the Volgograd Region are analyzed. The working conditions at the less advanced technology plants are referred to as a very high occupational risk. It is necessary to work out measures to lower the poor impact of microclimate, dust, noise, to improve illumination, and to regulate labor at steel plants.

  9. Reciprocal relations between effort-reward imbalance at work and adverse health: a three-wave panel survey.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Akihito; de Jonge, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Siegrist's [1996. Adverse health effects of high-effort/low-reward conditions. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 1, 27-41.] Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) Model assumes that ERI at one point in time influences health at a later point in time. Empirical cross-sectional and longitudinal findings have supported the influence of ERI on adverse health. However, the ERI model does not explicitly take into account that the relation between ERI and adverse health may be also explained by reversed causal relations, or even reciprocal (bi-directional) relations in which ERI and health mutually influence each other. The present 3-wave panel study among 211 Japanese male blue-collar workers in one construction machinery company examined reciprocal relations between ERI and adverse health (i.e., psychological distress and physical complaints) with a 1-year time-lag per wave. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling (Amos 7.0J). Results showed cross-lagged and causally dominant effects of ERI on both psychological distress and physical complaints after 1 year for both Time 1-Time 2 and Time 2-Time 3. In addition, cross-lagged effects of psychological distress on ERI were found after 1 year for both Time 1-Time 2 and Time 2-Time 3. These findings suggest that (perceived) ERI and employee health influence each other reciprocally rather than uni-directionally, and underline the importance of studying reversed causal effects in the relation between ERI and employee health.

  10. Potential Climate Change Health Risks from Increases in Heat Waves: Abnormal Birth Outcomes and Adverse Maternal Health Conditions.

    PubMed

    Cil, Gulcan; Cameron, Trudy Ann

    2017-02-23

    We investigate the risks presented by heat waves for adverse health conditions for babies and expectant mothers when these mothers have been exposed to heat waves during gestation or during the period just prior to conception. Rather than just birth weight and gestational age, we focus on less common metrics such as abnormal conditions in the newborn (fetal distress, reliance on a ventilator, and meconium aspiration) and adverse health conditions in the mother (pregnancy-related hypertension, uterine bleeding during pregnancy, eclampsia, and incompetent cervix). We use monthly panel data for over 3,000 U.S. counties, constructed from the confidential version of the U.S. Natality Files for 1989-2008. Our models control for sociodemographic factors and include county, month, and state-by-year fixed effects to control for unobserved spatial and timewise heterogeneity in the data. Even within the United States, where there is widespread access to air conditioning, heat waves increase the fraction of babies with abnormal conditions related to maternal stress, as well as the fraction of mothers who experience pregnancy-related adverse health conditions. The scope for these risks in developing countries is likely to be even greater.

  11. Multicriteria ranking of workplaces regarding working conditions in a mining company.

    PubMed

    Bogdanović, Dejan; Stanković, Vladimir; Urošević, Snežana; Stojanović, Miloš

    2016-12-01

    Ranking of workplaces with respect to working conditions is very significant for each company. It indicates the positions where employees are most exposed to adverse effects resulting from the working environment, which endangers their health. This article presents the results obtained for 12 different production workplaces in the copper mining and smelting complex RTB Bor - 'Veliki Krivelj' open pit, based on six parameters measured regularly which defined the following working environment conditions: air temperature, light, noise, dustiness, chemical hazards and vibrations. The ranking of workplaces has been performed by PROMETHEE/GAIA. Additional optimization of workplaces is done by PROMETHEE V with the given limits related to maximum permitted values for working environment parameters. The obtained results indicate that the most difficult workplace is on the excavation location (excavator operator). This method can be successfully used for solving similar kinds of problems, in order to improve working conditions.

  12. Assessment of the relationship between physical working conditions and different levels of work ability.

    PubMed

    Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Ghaffari, Mostafa; Abdi, Alireza; Mirzamohammadi, Elham; Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Rahimpour, Farzaneh; Fazlalizadeh, Maryam; Mohammadi, Saber

    2014-04-20

    Early leaving of workplace by work forces is one of the fundamental problems worldwide. Maintenance and enhancement of employees work ability are important for raising productivity. This study investigated the relationship between work ability index and physical working conditions and was carried out in 2013 on 641 workers at a manufacturing plant in Tehran. Work ability was assessed by the questionnaire of work ability index and the participants were classified into four work ability groups of poor, moderate, good, and excellent. Physical working conditions were evaluated by the MUSIC-Norrtalje questionnaire and the participants were classified into two groups with proper and poor physical working conditions. The mean score of work ability questionnaire was 42.40; and 2.5% (16 persons), 9.2% (59 persons), 38.2% (245 persons), and 50.1% (321 persons) of the participants were in poor, moderate, good, and excellent work ability groups, respectively. The mean score of physical working conditions questionnaire was 20.06. The results of logistic regression analysis showed that even after adjusting the confounding variables, a significant correlation existed between work ability and physical working conditions (p < 0.05). According to the results of this study, there may be a correlation between physical working conditions such as awkward postures, repetitive movements, load lifting, exposure to whole body vibration and so on with work ability. Therefore it seems that enhancement of the quality of physical working conditions may increase work ability.

  13. Risk of Performance Decrements and Adverse Health Outcomes Resulting from Sleep Loss, Circadian Desynchronization, and Work Overload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn-Evans, Erin; Gregory, Kevin; Arsintescu, Lucia; Whitmire, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Sleep loss, circadian desynchronization, and work overload occur to some extent for ground and flight crews, prior to and during spaceflight missions. Ground evidence indicates that such risk factors may lead to performance decrements and adverse health outcomes, which could potentially compromise mission objectives. Efforts are needed to identify the environmental and mission conditions that interfere with sleep and circadian alignment, as well as individual differences in vulnerability and resiliency to sleep loss and circadian desynchronization. Specifically, this report highlights a collection of new evidence to better characterize the risk and reveals new gaps in this risk as follows: Sleep loss is apparent during spaceflight. Astronauts consistently average less sleep during spaceflight relative to on the ground. The causes of this sleep loss remain unknown, however ground-based evidence suggests that the sleep duration of astronauts is likely to lead to performance impairment and short and long-term health consequences. Further research is needed in this area in order to develop screening tools to assess individual astronaut sleep need in order to quantify the magnitude of sleep loss during spaceflight; current and planned efforts in BHP's research portfolio address this need. In addition, it is still unclear whether the conditions of spaceflight environment lead to sleep loss or whether other factors, such as work overload lead to the reduced sleep duration. Future data mining efforts and continued data collection on the ISS will help to further characterize factors contributing to sleep loss. Sleep inertia has not been evaluated during spaceflight. Ground-based studies confirm that it takes two to four hours to achieve optimal performance after waking from a sleep episode. Sleep inertia has been associated with increased accidents and reduced performance in operational environments. Sleep inertia poses considerable risk during spaceflight when emergency

  14. 33 CFR 142.7 - Reports of unsafe working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... working conditions. (a) Any person may report a possible violation of any regulation in this subchapter or any other hazardous or unsafe working condition on any unit engaged in OCS activities to an Officer in... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reports of unsafe...

  15. Adverse childhood experiences, depression and mental health barriers to work among low-income women.

    PubMed

    Cambron, Christopher; Gringeri, Christina; Vogel-Ferguson, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has connected childhood abuse to decreased physical and mental health for low-income women in Utah. Further, mental health has established a link to employment problems. This study conducted a secondary analysis of data collected from individuals accessing public assistance to investigate the relationships among retrospective self-reports of childhood emotional, physical and sexual abuse and prospective indicators of mental health and mental health barriers to work. Logistic regression models found strong relationships between childhood abuse and increased odds of depression and mental health barriers to work. Path models highlight the relative importance of depression for those reporting mental health as the biggest barrier to work. Recommendations for social workers, public health professionals, and program administrators are provided.

  16. [Work condition of electricians servicing railway shunting and maneuvering yards].

    PubMed

    Talivanova, R V; Elizarov, B B; Kudrin, V A; Ovechkina, Zh V

    1995-01-01

    The article represents main occupational hazards and work conditions of such railway occupation as electromechanic and electromounter of shunting yards of railway stations. Complete hygienic evaluation of the occupational activities is given for individuals working at Moskovskaya, Oktjabrskaya and Sevemaya railroads. Health state of the workers was studied according to transitory disablement materials, the morbidity and its structure were analyzed. The authors outline some suggestions to improve the work conditions and decrease the morbidity.

  17. Adverse Events of Massage Therapy in Pain-Related Conditions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ping; Gao, Ningyang; Wu, Junyi; Xu, Shifen

    2014-01-01

    Pain-related massage, important in traditional Eastern medicine, is increasingly used in the Western world. So the widening acceptance demands continual safety assessment. This review is an evaluation of the frequency and severity of adverse events (AEs) reported mainly for pain-related massage between 2003 and 2013. Relevant all-languages reports in 6 databases were identified and assessed by two coauthors. During the 11-year period, 40 reports of 138 AEs were associated with massage. Author, year of publication, country of occurrence, participant related (age, sex) or number of patients affected, the details of manual therapy, and clinician type were extracted. Disc herniation, soft tissue trauma, neurologic compromise, spinal cord injury, dissection of the vertebral arteries, and others were the main complications of massage. Spinal manipulation in massage has repeatedly been associated with serious AEs especially. Clearly, massage therapies are not totally devoid of risks. But the incidence of such events is low. PMID:25197310

  18. Exposure to life adversity in high school and later work participation: a longitudinal population-based study.

    PubMed

    Strøm, Ida Frugård; Thoresen, Siri; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Hjemdal, Ole Kristian; Lien, Lars; Dyb, Grete

    2013-12-01

    This paper investigates whether exposure to violence, sexual abuse, or bullying is associated with later work participation and whether high school completion has a potential mediating role. Self-reported junior high school questionnaire data were linked for eight consecutive years to prospective registry data for the demographics, educational progress, employment activity, and social benefits of 11,874 individuals. Ordinal regression analysis showed that violence and/or bullying at 15 years of age predicted negative work participation outcomes eight years later, independent of high school completion and other relevant factors. Although increasing educational level may have some preventive effect, these results indicate that prevention efforts should be initiated at an early age and should target adverse life experiences.

  19. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? If environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility so as to endanger the safety or the environment, you must: (a) Submit a plan...

  20. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? If environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility so as to endanger the safety or the environment, you must: (a) Submit a plan...

  1. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? If environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility so as to endanger the safety or the environment, you must: (a) Submit a plan...

  2. Human factors issues for resolving adverse effects of human work underload and workload transitions in complex human-machine systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, T.G.

    1995-10-01

    A workshop was conducted whose specific purpose was to build on earlier work of the United States National Research Council, United States Federal government agencies, and the larger human factors community to: (1) clarify human factors issues pertaining to degraded performance in advanced human-machine systems (e.g., nuclear production, transportation, aerospace) due to human work underload and workload transition, and (2) develop strategies for resolving these issues. Recent history demonstrates that: (1) humans often react adversely to their diminishing roles in advanced human-machine systems, and therefore (2) new allocation models and strategies are required if humans are to be willing and able to assume diminishing and shifting roles assigned to them in these systems, and are to accept new technologies making up these systems. Problems associated with theses diminishing and shifting human roles are characterized as work underload and workload transitions. The workshop affirmed that: (1) work underload and workload transition are issues that will have to be addressed by designers of advanced human-machine systems, especially those relying on automation, if cost, performance, safety, and operator acceptability are to be optimized, (2) human machine allocation models, standards, and guidelines which go beyond simple capability approaches will be needed to preclude or seriously diminish the work underload and workload transition problems, and (3) the 16 workload definition, measurement, situational awareness, and trust issues identified during the workshop, need resolution if these models, standards, and guidelines are to be achieved.

  3. North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey Interim Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Eric; Emerick, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Since 2002, North Carolina, under the leadership of Governor Mike Easley and the North Carolina Professional Teaching Standards Commission, has worked to improve understanding of a critical factor in student learning and teacher retention: the conditions under which teachers work. In 2006, 66 percent (more than 75,000) school-based licensed…

  4. Women's Learning in Contract Work: Practicing Contradictions in Boundaryless Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenwick, Tara

    2008-01-01

    The general rise in contractors, particularly among knowledge workers negotiating "boundaryless" employment conditions, has generated interest in the nature and forms of contract work. This article explores the learning of contract workers as they negotiate these conditions, with a focus on women. Drawing from a qualitative study of…

  5. [Evaluation of work conditions for teachers of medical schools].

    PubMed

    Tregubova, E S; Nekhoroshev, A S

    2011-01-01

    Complex sanitary hygienic and sociologic evaluation of high school factors enabled to assign work conditions of medical institute lecturers according to P 2.2.2006 - to 05 for jeopardy and to 2 degree 3 class for hardiness and intensity of work, to define psychosocial risks as main hazards. The authors specified and suggested prophylactic system aimed to increase work efficiency of medical institute lecturers.

  6. Teachers' Perceptions of Their Working Conditions: How Predictive of Policy-Relevant Outcomes? Working Paper 33

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladd, Helen F.

    2009-01-01

    This quantitative study uses data from North Carolina to examine the extent to which survey based perceptions of working conditions are predictive of policy-relevant outcomes, independent of other school characteristics such as the demographic mix of the school's students. Working conditions emerge as highly predictive of teachers' stated…

  7. Physiological and genetic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana anthocyanin biosynthesis mutants under chronic adverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Misyura, Maksym; Colasanti, Joseph; Rothstein, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Anthocyanin production is a characteristic response of flowering plants to unfavourable environmental conditions. The potential roles of flavonoids and anthocyanins in plant growth were investigated by growing Arabidopsis thaliana anthocyanin production mutants (transparent testa) under limiting nitrogen and high light conditions. Inability to produce kaempferol or subsequent intermediate compounds by some transparent testa lines was correlated with less biomass accumulation in mature plants compared with wild-type control plants under all growth conditions tested. However, under both limiting nitrogen and high light chronic stress conditions, mutant lines defective in later steps of the anthocyanin production pathway produced the same or more biomass than wild-type plants. No difference in senescence between transparent testa and wild-type plants was found using chlorophyll catabolism and SAG12 expression measurements, and no mutants were impaired in the ability to remobilize nutrients from the vegetative to reproductive tissues. Moreover, the absence of anthocyanin and/or upstream flavonoids does not affect the ability of plants to respond to limiting nitrogen by reducing photosynthetic capacity. These results support a role for kaempferol and quercetin accumulation in normal plant growth and development. Further, the absence of anthocyanins has no effect on plant growth under the chronic stress conditions tested.

  8. Physiological and genetic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana anthocyanin biosynthesis mutants under chronic adverse environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Anthocyanin production is a characteristic response of flowering plants to unfavourable environmental conditions. The potential roles of flavonoids and anthocyanins in plant growth were investigated by growing Arabidopsis thaliana anthocyanin production mutants (transparent testa) under limiting nitrogen and high light conditions. Inability to produce kaempferol or subsequent intermediate compounds by some transparent testa lines was correlated with less biomass accumulation in mature plants compared with wild-type control plants under all growth conditions tested. However, under both limiting nitrogen and high light chronic stress conditions, mutant lines defective in later steps of the anthocyanin production pathway produced the same or more biomass than wild-type plants. No difference in senescence between transparent testa and wild-type plants was found using chlorophyll catabolism and SAG12 expression measurements, and no mutants were impaired in the ability to remobilize nutrients from the vegetative to reproductive tissues. Moreover, the absence of anthocyanin and/or upstream flavonoids does not affect the ability of plants to respond to limiting nitrogen by reducing photosynthetic capacity. These results support a role for kaempferol and quercetin accumulation in normal plant growth and development. Further, the absence of anthocyanins has no effect on plant growth under the chronic stress conditions tested. PMID:23162120

  9. Adverse foraging conditions may impact body mass and survival of a high Arctic seabird

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harding, A.M.A.; Welcker, J.; Steen, H.; Hamer, K.C.; Kitaysky, A.S.; Fort, J.; Talbot, S.L.; Cornick, L.A.; Karnovsky, N.J.; Gabrielsen, G.W.; Gremillet, D.

    2011-01-01

    Tradeoffs between current reproduction and future survival are widely recognized, but may only occur when food is limited: when foraging conditions are favorable, parents may be able to reproduce without compromising their own survival. We investigated these tradeoffs in the little auk (Alle alle), a small seabird with a single-egg clutch. During 2005-2007, we examined the relationship between body mass and survival of birds breeding under contrasting foraging conditions at two Arctic colonies. We used corticosterone levels of breeding adults as a physiological indicator of the foraging conditions they encountered during each reproductive season. We found that when foraging conditions were relatively poor (as reflected in elevated levels of corticosterone), parents ended the reproductive season with low body mass and suffered increased post-breeding mortality. A positive relationship between body mass and post-breeding survival was found in one study year; light birds incurred higher survival costs than heavy birds. The results of this study suggest that reproducing under poor foraging conditions may affect the post-breeding survival of long-lived little auks. They also have important demographic implications because even a small change in adult survival may have a large effect on populations of long-lived species. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  10. The research on the optimum working conditions of photoconductive antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Dai, Yang; Zhang, Like; Yang, Lei; Yan, Zhijin; Chen, Suguo; Hou, Lei

    2015-11-01

    The photoconductive antenna (PCA) is one of the most common devices to generate terahertz (THz) wave, whose radiation efficiency is largely determined by the working conditions. In order to improve the power of THz wave, the influence of pump laser and bias voltage on the intensity of the THz wave radiated by PCA was studied through experiment and the optimum working conditions of PCA was obtained through the theoretical analysis, these are the maximum safe voltage and saturated laser energy. Only under the optimum conditions can the signal-to-noise ratio(SNR)of THz wave radiated by PCA be the highest and the PCA would not breakdown.

  11. Use of a driving simulator to assess performance under adverse weather conditions in adults with albinism.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Gwen M; Summers, C Gail; Ward, Nicholas; Bhargava, Esha; Rakauskas, Michael E; Holleschau, Ann M

    2012-04-01

    Participants with albinism have reduced vision and nystagmus with reduced foveation times. This prospective study evaluated driving in 12 participants with albinism and 12 matched controls. Participants drove a vehicle simulator through a virtual rural course in sunny and foggy conditions. Under sunny conditions, participants with albinism showed a narrower preferred minimum safety boundary during car-following tasks than did controls, but there was no difference under foggy conditions. Their driving did not differ significantly from that of controls when approaching a stop sign or when choosing gap size between oncoming vehicles when crossing an intersection. However, when compared to control drivers, participants with albinism had a decreased minimum safety boundary for car-following that should be included in counseling regarding driving safety.

  12. [Complex hygienic evaluation of working conditions and environmental protection at glass works].

    PubMed

    Bakhritdinov, Sh S; Akhmadaliev, R U

    2011-01-01

    The working conditions and sanitary-and-hygienic state of the Kvarts glass works in the town of Kuvasai were studied. Harmful industrial factors were shown to influence on the incidence of disease with temporary disability; atmospheric emission of pollutants and discharge of sewage were calculated. The results of the analysis were assessed in the hygienic point and necessary recommendations to improve working conditions and the environment.

  13. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, including, but not limited to, earthquake, excessive..., earthquake, excessive wind, flood, hurricane, tornado, volcanic eruption, and wildfire. To be eligible for a... limited to, an earthquake, flood, hurricane, tidal surge, tornado, and volcanic eruption....

  14. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... limited to, earthquake, excessive wind, flood, hurricane, tidal surge, tornado, volcanic eruption, and... limited to, earthquake, excessive wind, flood, hurricane, tornado, volcanic eruption, and wildfire. To be... loss condition as determined by the Deputy Administrator including, but not limited to, an...

  15. 7 CFR 760.203 - Eligible losses, adverse weather, and other loss conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... condition, as determined by the Deputy Administrator, including, but not limited to, earthquake, excessive..., earthquake, excessive wind, flood, hurricane, tornado, volcanic eruption, and wildfire. To be eligible for a... determined by the Deputy Administrator including, but not limited to, an earthquake, flood, hurricane,...

  16. Mexican-origin parents' work conditions and adolescents' adjustment.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Lorey A; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Crouter, Ann

    2015-06-01

    Mexican-origin parents' work experiences are a distal extrafamilial context for adolescents' adjustment. This 2-wave multiinformant study examined the prospective mechanisms linking parents' work conditions (i.e., self-direction, work pressure, workplace discrimination) to adolescents' adjustment (i.e., educational expectations, depressive symptoms, risky behavior) across the transition to high school drawing on work socialization and spillover models. We examined the indirect effects of parental work conditions on adolescent adjustment through parents' psychological functioning (i.e., depressive symptoms, role overload) and aspects of the parent-adolescent relationship (i.e., parental solicitation, parent-adolescent conflict), as well as moderation by adolescent gender. Participants were 246 predominantly immigrant, Mexican-origin, 2-parent families who participated in home interviews when adolescents were approximately 13 and 15 years of age. Results supported the positive impact of fathers' occupational self-direction on all 3 aspects of adolescents' adjustment through decreased father-adolescent conflict, after controlling for family socioeconomic status and earner status, and underemployment. Parental work pressure and discrimination were indirectly linked to adolescents' adjustment, with different mechanisms emerging for mothers and fathers. Adolescents' gender moderated the associations between fathers' self-direction and girls' depressive symptoms, and fathers' experiences of discrimination and boys' risk behavior. Results suggest that Mexican-origin mothers' and fathers' perceptions of work conditions have important implications for multiple domains of adolescents' adjustment across the transition to high school.

  17. Mexican-Origin Parents’ Work Conditions and Adolescents’ Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Lorey A.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Crouter, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Mexican-origin parents’ work experiences are a distal extra-familial context for adolescents’ adjustment. This two-wave multi-informant study examined the prospective mechanisms linking parents’ work conditions (i.e., self-direction, work pressure, workplace discrimination) to adolescents’ adjustment (i.e., educational expectations, depressive symptoms, risky behavior) across the transition to high school drawing on work socialization and spillover models. We examined the indirect effects of parental work conditions on adolescent adjustment through parents’ psychological functioning (i.e., depressive symptoms, role overload) and aspects of the parent-adolescent relationship (i.e., parental solicitation, parent-adolescent conflict), as well as moderation by adolescent gender. Participants were 246 predominantly immigrant, Mexican-origin, two-parent families who participated in home interviews when adolescents were approximately 13 and 15 years of age. Results supported the positive impact of fathers’ occupational self-direction on all three aspects of adolescents’ adjustment through decreased father-adolescent conflict, after controlling for family socioeconomic status and earner status, and underemployment. Parental work pressure and discrimination were indirectly linked to adolescents’ adjustment, with different mechanisms emerging for mothers and fathers. Adolescents’ gender moderated the associations between fathers’ self-direction and girls’ depressive symptoms, and fathers’ experiences of discrimination and boys’ risk behavior. Results suggest that Mexican-origin mothers’ and fathers’ perceptions of work conditions have important implications for multiple domains of adolescents’ adjustment across the transition to high school. PMID:25938710

  18. Comparison of Infrared and Millimeter-Wave Imager Performance in Adverse Weather Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    area, which were used as inputs to Acquire, are different than the Johnson criteria default value of 0.75 and the target area used by Wikner † in his MMW...target is 3 × 3 m. 5 2.3 Weather Analysis Method for MMW Systems The results of this section are taken from Wikner [3]. His assumptions are in table...Science and Technology Division, Arlington, VA (1979). 3. D. Wikner , Prediction of 94 GHz Radiometer Performance in Various Environ- mental Condition

  19. Psychosomatic symptoms and stressful working conditions among Palestinian nurses: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Jaradat, Yousef; Nijem, Khaldoun; Lien, Lars; Stigum, Hein; Bjertness, Espen; Bast-Pettersen, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Background: High levels of perceived stressful working conditions have been found to have an adverse effect on physical and mental health. Objectives: To examine the associations between self-reported stressful working conditions and Psychosomatic Symptoms (PSS), and to investigate possible gender differences. Methods: The present cross-sectional study comprises 430 nurses employed in Hebron district, Palestine. Self-reported stressful working conditions were recorded, and a Psychosomatic Symptoms Check list was used to assess prevalence of PSS. Findings: Median score on the psychosomatic symptom checklist for the group was 11, (range 1–21). Women reported more symptoms than men, with medians 11.6 and 10.0, respectively (p = .0001). PSS were associated with more self-reported stressful working conditions for both men (p < .0001) and women (p < .0001). The association was strongest among men. Conclusions: PSS were associated with high self-reported stressful working conditions, and this association was strongest among the men. PMID:27160155

  20. Adverse listening conditions and memory load drive a common α oscillatory network.

    PubMed

    Obleser, Jonas; Wöstmann, Malte; Hellbernd, Nele; Wilsch, Anna; Maess, Burkhard

    2012-09-05

    How does acoustic degradation affect the neural mechanisms of working memory? Enhanced alpha oscillations (8-13 Hz) during retention of items in working memory are often interpreted to reflect increased demands on storage and inhibition. We hypothesized that auditory signal degradation poses an additional challenge to human listeners partly because it draws on the same neural mechanisms. In an adapted Sternberg paradigm, auditory memory load and acoustic degradation were parametrically varied and the magnetoencephalographic response was analyzed in the time-frequency domain. Notably, during the stimulus-free delay interval, alpha power monotonically increased at central-parietal sensors as functions of memory load (higher alpha power with more memory load) and of acoustic degradation (also higher alpha power with more severe acoustic degradation). This alpha effect was superadditive when highest load was combined with most severe degradation. Moreover, alpha oscillatory dynamics during stimulus-free delay were predictive of response times to the probe item. Source localization of alpha power during stimulus-free delay indicated that alpha generators in right parietal, cingulate, supramarginal, and superior temporal cortex were sensitive to combined memory load and acoustic degradation. In summary, both challenges of memory load and acoustic degradation increase activity in a common alpha-frequency network. The results set the stage for future studies on how chronic or acute degradations of sensory input affect mechanisms of executive control.

  1. A study of different indicators of Maillard reaction with whey proteins and different carbohydrates under adverse storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Graciela E; Naranjo, Gabriela B; Malec, Laura S

    2017-01-15

    This study examined different indicators of each stage of Maillard reaction under adverse storage conditions in a system with whey proteins and lactose or glucose. The analysis of lysine loss by the o-phthaldialdehyde method can be considered a good indicator of the early stage, showing considerable differences in reactivity when systems with mono and disaccharides were analyzed. Capillary electrophoresis proved to be a sensitive method for evaluating the extent of glycosylation of the native proteins, providing valuable information when the loss of lysine was not significant. The estimation of the Amadori compound from the determination of total 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde would have correlate well with reactive lysine content if the advanced stages of the reaction had not been reached. For assessing the occurrence of the intermediate and final stages, the measurement of free 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde and color, proved not to be suitable for storage conditions.

  2. Active imaging systems to see through adverse conditions: Light-scattering based models and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riviere, Nicolas; Ceolato, Romain; Hespel, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    Onera, the French aerospace lab, develops and models active imaging systems to understand the relevant physical phenomena affecting these systems performance. As a consequence, efforts have been done on the propagation of a pulse through the atmosphere and on target geometries and surface properties. These imaging systems must operate at night in all ambient illumination and weather conditions in order to perform strategic surveillance for various worldwide operations. We have implemented codes for 2D and 3D laser imaging systems. As we aim to image a scene in the presence of rain, snow, fog or haze, we introduce such light-scattering effects in our numerical models and compare simulated images with measurements provided by commercial laser scanners.

  3. [Work conditions and occupational morbidity on mining industry enterprises].

    PubMed

    Golovkova, N P; Chebotarev, A G; Leskina, L M

    2006-01-01

    The authors analysed contemporary work conditions on metallurgic mining industry enterprises, revealed intensity of main occupational hazards, summarized results of workplaces certification at these enterprises. The article covers parameters, structure of occupational morbidity among workers engaged into underground winning of ores, ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgy, aluminium plants since 2002 till 2006. Materials on workplaces certification are compared with results of periodic medical examinations in separate industrial entities. The authors outlined major directions of research in occupational medicine for healthy and safe work conditions.

  4. Phase Distribution Phenomena for Simulated Microgravity Conditions: Experimental Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Maneesh; Bonetto, Fabian J.; Lahey, R. T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the work accomplished at Rensselaer to study phase distribution phenomenon under simulated microgravity conditions. Our group at Rensselaer has been able to develop sophisticated analytical models to predict phase distribution in two-phase flows under a variety of conditions. These models are based on physics and data obtained from carefully controlled experiments that are being conducted here. These experiments also serve to verify the models developed.

  5. Phase Distribution Phenomena for Simulated Microgravity Conditions: Experimental Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Maneesh; Bonetto, Fabian J.; Lahey, R. T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the work accomplished at Rensselaer to study phase distribution phenomenon under simulated microgravity conditions. Our group at Rensselaer has been able to develop sophisticated analytical models to predict phase distribution in two-phase flows under variety of conditions. These models are based on physics and data obtained from carefully controlled experiments that are being conducted here. These experiments also serve to verify the models developed.

  6. Thermodynamic performance analysis of ramjet engine at wide working conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Min; Yan, Li; Tang, Jing-feng; Huang, Wei; Chen, Xiao-qian

    2017-03-01

    Although ramjet has the advantages of high-speed flying and higher specific impulse, the performance parameters will decline seriously with the increase of flight Mach number and flight height. Therefore, the investigation on the thermodynamic performance of ramjet is very crucial for broadening the working range. In the current study, a typical ramjet model has been employed to investigate the performance characteristics at wide working conditions. First of all, the compression characteristic analysis is carried out based on the Brayton cycle. The obtained results show that the specific cross-section area (A2 and A5) and the air-fuel ratio (f) have a great influence on the ramjet performance indexes. Secondly, the thermodynamic calculation process of ramjet is given from the view of the pneumatic thermal analysis. Then, the variable trends of the ramjet performance indexes with the flow conditions, the air-fuel ratio (f), the specific cross-sectional area (A2 and A5) under the fixed operating condition, equipotential dynamic pressure condition and variable dynamic pressure condition have been discussed. Finally, the optimum value of the specific cross-sectional area (A5) and the air-fuel ratio (f) of the ramjet model at a fixed work condition (Ma=3.5, H=12 km) are obtained.

  7. Blind spots and adverse conditions of care: screening migrants for tuberculosis in France and Germany.

    PubMed

    Kehr, Janina

    2012-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that declined significantly throughout the 20(th) century. Large-scale TB screening of entire populations in France and Germany has thus been replaced by active screening of risk-groups, particularly migrants. The article engages with its problems and practices on three levels: by looking at the way information on migrants as an at-risk group is produced through disease surveillance data; by analysing how such at-risk group data influence local screening practices; and by showing which political and medical problems arise in the field. I overturn the discussion about screening and surveillance of migrants as a risk-group by showing that it is not the stigmatisation of migrants through disease risk that is most at stake, but the invisibility of the most vulnerable among them in disease surveillance data and the way restrictive national immigration policies interfere with and subvert local screening and treatment practices targeting them. The aim of my article is to promote a pragmatic sociology of screening, while paying attention to the practical complexities, political conditions and medical ambivalences of screening and follow-up care, especially when the migrant groups concerned are socially, politically and medically vulnerable.

  8. Statement on the Status and Working Conditions of Contingent Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmquist, Mike; Doe, Sue; McDonald, James; Newman, Beatrice Mendez; Samuels, Robert; Schell, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the authors call for an approach that, in recognizing the economic realities facing most institutions, attempts to put aside objections that funding is simply not available to support an expansion of the current tenure system. In calling for the changes in faculty working conditions, the authors recognize that change will…

  9. 26 CFR 1.132-5 - Working condition fringes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... driver and all passengers of a qualified nonpersonal use vehicle. However, a working condition fringe... passengers of a qualified nonpersonal use vehicle described in § 1.274-5(k)(2)(ii)(L) or (P). (i) (j... employee are— (A) A threat of death or kidnapping of, or serious bodily harm to, the employee or...

  10. 33 CFR 142.7 - Reports of unsafe working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reports of unsafe working conditions. 142.7 Section 142.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES WORKPLACE SAFETY AND HEALTH General § 142.7 Reports of...

  11. Exploring Conditions for Transformative Learning in Work-Integrated Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRae, Norah

    2015-01-01

    A qualitative study was undertaken that explored the conditions for transformative learning in cooperative education as a form of work-integrated learning (WIL), towards the development of a theoretical model. Four case studies were analyzed based on interviews with WIL students, supervisors and their co-op coordinator. The findings revealed that…

  12. Gender, Jobs and Working Conditions in the European Union.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Colette; Burchell, Brendan

    Trends in gender, jobs, and working conditions in the European Union (EU) were examined. In 2000, representative samples of approximately 1,500 workers in each of the EU member states (500 in Luxembourg) were surveyed. To identify trends, the survey findings were compared with those of similar surveys conducted in 1991 and 1996. The comparison…

  13. Teacher Working Conditions are Student Learning Conditions. A Report to Mike Easley on the 2004 North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Center for Teaching Quality (The), University of North Carolina, 2004

    2004-01-01

    For virtually any business or organization, the conditions in which employees work drive their satisfaction and productivity. Yet, while business often focuses on employee satisfaction, many schools often struggle to address critical working conditions -- isolating teachers in classrooms with closed doors, denying them basic materials to do their…

  14. Health, work and working conditions: a review of the European economic literature.

    PubMed

    Barnay, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Economists have traditionally been very cautious when studying the interaction between employment and health because of the two-way causal relationship between these two variables: health status influences the probability of being employed and, at the same time, working affects the health status. Because these two variables are determined simultaneously, researchers control endogeneity skews (e.g., reverse causality, omitted variables) when conducting empirical analysis. With these caveats in mind, the literature finds that a favourable work environment and high job security lead to better health conditions. Being employed with appropriate working conditions plays a protective role on physical health and psychiatric disorders. By contrast, non-employment and retirement are generally worse for mental health than employment, and overemployment has a negative effect on health. These findings stress the importance of employment and of adequate working conditions for the health of workers. In this context, it is a concern that a significant proportion of European workers (29 %) would like to work fewer hours because unwanted long hours are likely to signal a poor level of job satisfaction and inadequate working conditions, with detrimental effects on health. Thus, in Europe, labour-market policy has increasingly paid attention to job sustainability and job satisfaction. The literature clearly invites employers to take better account of the worker preferences when setting the number of hours worked. Overall, a specific "flexicurity" (combination of high employment protection, job satisfaction and active labour-market policies) is likely to have a positive effect on health.

  15. [From 1878 to 2006 - working in hyperbaric conditions during tunnelling].

    PubMed

    Le Péchon, Jean-Claude

    2006-01-01

    To review the impact of Paul Bert's researches on hyperbaric work in tunnelling, the status of the industry in 1878 is described. Mostly based on the application of Triger's machine it was used to mine coal below the water table or to dig foundations for bridges in rivers or close to rivers. The results and conclusions obtained by Paul Bert which are applicable in that particular field are listed. The major steps of research or remarkable achievements in construction between 1878 and 2006 are presented as well as the evolution of decompression tables. Improvement in safety and conditions of caisson workers has been continuous until the technical revolution resulting from the introduction and the development of tunnelling boring machines (TBM) in the late 80's. TBM technology has resulted in major changes in tunnel construction. Hyperbaric interventions have also changed completely since human operators no longer work in pressurized conditions. Only occasional inspections and repairs are carried out under pressure. Present performance in hyperbaric conditions are reported, and high pressures reached in the 2000's using saturation technology are described. The future of hyperbaric works is also discussed whether for very high pressure, or complete replacement of caisson workers in TBMs. These descriptions show that Paul Bert provides us with very clear directions to improve safety in hyperbaric conditions and that none of his recommendations were mistaken, most being still relevant.

  16. Structural Brain Network Reorganization and Social Cognition Related to Adverse Perinatal Condition from Infancy to Early Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Fischi-Gomez, Elda; Batalle, Dafnis; Borradori-Tolsa, Cristina; Eixarch, Elisenda; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Gratacós, Eduard; Hüppi, Petra S.

    2016-01-01

    Adverse conditions during fetal life have been associated to both structural and functional changes in neurodevelopment from the neonatal period to adolescence. In this study, connectomics was used to assess the evolution of brain networks from infancy to early adolescence. Brain network reorganization over time in subjects who had suffered adverse perinatal conditions is characterized and related to neurodevelopment and cognition. Three cohorts of prematurely born infants and children (between 28 and 35 weeks of gestational age), including individuals with a birth weight appropriated for gestational age and with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), were evaluated at 1, 6, and 10 years of age, respectively. A common developmental trajectory of brain networks was identified in both control and IUGR groups: network efficiencies of the fractional anisotropy (FA)-weighted and normalized connectomes increase with age, which can be related to maturation and myelination of fiber connections while the number of connections decreases, which can be associated to an axonal pruning process and reorganization. Comparing subjects with or without IUGR, a similar pattern of network differences between groups was observed in the three developmental stages, mainly characterized by IUGR group having reduced brain network efficiencies in binary and FA-weighted connectomes and increased efficiencies in the connectome normalized by its total connection strength (FA). Associations between brain networks and neurobehavioral impairments were also evaluated showing a relationship between different network metrics and specific social cognition-related scores, as well as a higher risk of inattention/hyperactivity and/or executive functional disorders in IUGR children. PMID:28008304

  17. [The National Survey on Working Conditions: data for reflection].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann Verdejo, M; Maqueda Blasco, J; Almodóvar Molina, A; de la Orden Rivera, M V

    1996-01-01

    This work presents some data of relevance from the National Survey on Working Conditions, carried out in Spain in 1993. A cross-section survey was undertaken on a representative sample of the industry and services sectors (3,148 workers), both through an individual interview which took place at their places of work, and a questionnaire. The study revealed that preventive activities are few and far between. Only 11.8% of the companies carried out surveys into the risk of occupational accidents and/or illnesses. This datum contrasts with the high incidence among workers of exposure to the risk of accidents (59%), noise (33%) or the inhaling of chemical substances (32%). Furthermore, approximately 50% of workers spend at least a quarter of their work time in a static posture or making repetitive hand-arm movements. It is estimated that 60% are exposed to high work rates or repetitive tasks of short duration. Where the question of morbidity is concerned, 60% of workers suffer from posture problems associated with their work. In this study, a comparison is made between these findings per activity sector, together with a detailed analysis of morbidity. Finally, it should be borne in mind, that the subjectivity in the responses and answers, which is inherent to any qualitative survey, should not be regarded as a negative aspect. The way in which the worker perceives and experiences his or her work environment, provides essential information for the preventionists.

  18. Psychosocial Working Conditions and Cognitive Complaints among Swedish Employees

    PubMed Central

    Stenfors, Cecilia U. D.; Magnusson Hanson, Linda; Oxenstierna, Gabriel; Theorell, Töres; Nilsson, Lars-Göran

    2013-01-01

    Background Cognitive complaints involving problems with concentration, memory, decision-making and thinking are relatively common in the work force. The sensitivity of both subjective and objective cognitive functioning to common psychiatric conditions, stress levels and to cognitive load makes it plausible that psychosocial working conditions play a role in cognitive complaints. Thus, this study aimed to test the associations between psychosocial work factors and cognitive complaints in nationally representative samples of the Swedish work force. Cross-sectional (n = 9751) and prospective (n = 3644; two time points two years apart) sequential multiple regression analyses were run, adjusting for general confounders, depressive- and sleeping problems. Additional prospective analyses were run adjusting for baseline cognitive complaints. Cross-sectional results High quantitative demands, information and communication technology (ICT) demands, underqualification and conflicts were positively associated with cognitive complaints, while social support, good resources at work and overqualification were negatively associated with cognitive complaints in all models. Skill discretion and decision authority were weakly associated with cognitive complaints. Conflicts were more strongly associated with cognitive complaints in women than in men, after adjustment for general confounders. Prospective results Quantitative job demands, ICT demands and underqualification were positively associated with future cognitive complaints in all models, including when adjusted for baseline cognitive complaints. Decision authority was weakly positively associated with future cognitive complaints, only after adjustment for depressive- and sleeping problems respectively. Social support was negatively associated with future cognitive complaints after adjustment for general confounders and baseline cognitive complaints. Skill discretion and resources were negatively associated with future

  19. Psychosocial work conditions and quality of life among primary health care employees: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Workers in Primary Health Care are often exposed to stressful conditions at work. This study investigated the association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among Primary Health Care workers. Methods This cross-sectional study included all 797 Primary Health Care workers of a medium-sized city, Brazil: doctors, nurses, nursing technicians and nursing assistants, dentists, oral health technicians, and auxiliary oral hygienists, and community health workers. Data were collected by interviews. Quality of life was assessed using the WHOQOL-BREF; general quality of life, as well as the physical, psychological, social and environmental domains were considered, with scores from 0 to 100. Higher scores indicate a better quality of life. Poor quality of life was defined by the lowest quartiles of the WHOQOL score distributions for each of the domains. Adverse psychosocial work conditions were investigated by the Effort-Reward Imbalance model. Associations were verified using multiple logistic regression. Results Poor quality of life was observed in 117 (15.4%) workers. Workers with imbalanced effort-reward (high effort/low reward) had an increased probability of general poor quality of life (OR = 1.91; 1.07–3.42), and in the physical (OR = 1.62; 1.02–2.66), and environmental (OR = 2.39; 1.37–4.16) domains; those with low effort/low reward demonstrated a greater probability of poor quality of life in the social domain (OR = 1.82; 1.00–3.30). Workers with overcommitment at work had an increased likelihood of poor quality of life in the physical (OR = 1.55, 1.06–2.26) and environmental (OR = 1.69; 1.08–2.65) domains. These associations were independent of individual characteristics, job characteristics, lifestyle, perception of general health, or psychological and biological functions. Conclusions There is an association between adverse psychosocial work conditions and poor quality of life among

  20. Risk and resilience: health inequalities, working conditions and sickness benefit arrangements: an analysis of the 2010 European Working Conditions survey.

    PubMed

    van der Wel, Kjetil A; Bambra, Clare; Dragano, Nico; Eikemo, Terje A; Lunau, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    In this article we ask whether the level of sickness benefit provision protects the health of employees, particularly those who are most exposed to hazardous working conditions or who have a little education. The study uses the European Working Condition Survey that includes information on 20,626 individuals from 28 countries. Health was measured by self-reported mental wellbeing and self-rated general health. Country-level sickness benefit provision was constructed using spending data from Eurostat. Group-specific associations were fitted using cross-level interaction terms between sickness benefit provision and physical and psychosocial working conditions respectively, as well as those with little education. The mental wellbeing of employees exposed to psychosocial job strain and physical hazards, or who had little education, was better in countries that offer more generous sickness benefit. These results were found in both men and women and were robust to the inclusion of GDP and country fixed effects. In the analyses of self-reported general health, few group-specific associations were found. This article concludes that generous sickness benefit provision may strengthen employee's resilience against mental health risks at work and risks associated with little education. Consequently, in countries with a generous provision of sickness benefit, social inequalities in mental health are smaller.

  1. The Cpx system of Escherichia coli, a strategic signaling pathway for confronting adverse conditions and for settling biofilm communities?

    PubMed

    Dorel, Corinne; Lejeune, Philippe; Rodrigue, Agnès

    2006-05-01

    Amongst the thirty or so two-component systems known in Escherichia coli, the Cpx system has been described as being a stress response system the main function of which is to respond to damage to the cell envelope via activation of proteases and folding catalysts. Nevertheless, the size of the Cpx regulon (several dozens of target genes) and the diversity of the physiological functions associated with it (resistance to hostile conditions, mobility, adherence factors, metabolism, etc.) indicate that the role of Cpx in cell physiology is undoubtedly more complex. The range of cellular functions affected by activation of the Cpx pathway corresponds quite closely to the description of the physiological state of cells grown in biofilms. We suggest that Cpx is a strategic signaling pathway for facing adverse conditions and for settling biofilm communities. Current knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of the CpxR response (transcriptional and post-transcriptional) and the interactions between CpxR and the other bacterial regulatory systems are presented.

  2. Reported respiratory symptoms and adverse home conditions after 9/11 among residents living near the World Trade Center.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shao; Jones, Rena; Reibman, Joan; Bowers, James; Fitzgerald, Edward F; Hwang, Syni-An

    2007-05-01

    This study investigated whether self-reported damage, dust, and odors in homes near the World Trade Center (WTC) after September 11, 2001, were related to increased rates of respiratory symptoms among residents and if multiple sources of exposure were associated with greater health risk. We mailed questionnaires to homes within 1.5 km of the WTC site (affected area) and in upper Manhattan (control area). Surveys asked about respiratory symptoms, unplanned medical visits, physician diagnoses, medication use, and conditions in the home after 9/11. Adverse home conditions were associated with new-onset (i.e., began after 9/11) and persistent (i.e., remained 1 year after 9/11) upper and lower respiratory symptoms in the affected area (Cumulative Incidence Ratios [CIRs] 1.20-1.71). Residents reporting longer duration of dust/odors or multiple sources of exposure had greater risk for symptoms compared to those reporting shorter duration and fewer sources. These data suggest that WTC-related contamination in the home after 9/11 was associated with new and persistent respiratory symptoms among residents living near the site. While we cannot eliminate potential biases related to self-reported data, we took strategies to minimize their impact, and the observed effects are biologically plausible.

  3. [Shift Work among Men and Women on the Threshold to Higher Working Age - Working Conditions and Health Status].

    PubMed

    Leser, C; Tisch, A; Tophoven, S

    2016-11-01

    Background: The number of older employees in shift and night work has increased significantly in recent years. Furthermore, the proportion of women in shift and night work has increased markedly. This is due to the aging workforce and the expansion of shift work in the tertiary sector. Previous research shows that shift work is often associated with health risks. Against this background, the aim of the present study is to examine the situation of working men and women on the threshold to higher working age with regard to the relationship between shift work and physical health. Methods: We employed data from the study "lidA - leben in der Arbeit" German Cohort Study on Work, Age and Health, a survey of the German baby boom cohorts born in 1959 and 1965 (n=5 637). Linear regression models are used to study the effect of shift work - with and without night work - and of further work exposures on the baby boomers' physical health status. The models control for sleep and health-related behaviour and are stratified by gender. Among women, also the scope of work was taken into account. Results: The results show that male shift workers are burdened by their on average lower occupational status and by physical exposure; female shift workers additionally suffer from high personal effort and low rewards and female part-time shift workers also from overcommitment. Conclusion: Working conditions of shift workers are strongly characterised by work stress. In order to preserve aging shift workers' work ability, some organisational measures seem necessary. In this context, occupational safety and health management as well as opportunities for recovery and encouraging leadership should be considered.

  4. [Participation to improve working conditions: evidence and experience].

    PubMed

    García, Ana M; Boix, Pere; G Benavides, Fernando; Gadea, Rafael; Rodrigo, Fernando; Serra, Consol

    2016-11-01

    Participation of stakeholders is a key requirement for the success of public health programmes. Working and employment conditions are major determinants for people's health and wellbeing, and workplaces are ideal environments to implement programmes with a very direct level of participation. In Spain, the main regulatory framework for occupational health and safety, Law 31/1995, establishes the principles of "efficiency, coordination and participation" as a necessary basis for workers' health protection. This same Law establishes the role of the health and safety workers' representative, responsible for occupational risk prevention, and the occupational health and safety committee, a body with equal representation and the same objectives at the heart of the company. Among recent experiences of participation in occupational health, participatory ergonomics programmes have stood out. The aim of these programmes is to improve working conditions with a view to reducing musculoskeletal disorders, which is a very common and highly prevalent work-related injury in Spain. This study describes the characteristics and results of some experiences of participatory ergonomics carried out recently in Spain, from which relevant learning can be extrapolated about processes, facilitators and barriers in order to extend such programmes to other areas of occupational and public health.

  5. The role of interprofessional working in the Pathways to Work Condition Management Programmes.

    PubMed

    Pittam, Gail; Secker, Jenny; Ford, Fiona

    2010-11-01

    Condition Management Programmes (CMPs) were established in seven pilot sites in the UK as one strand of the Incapacity Benefit Pathways to Work programme, an initiative that exemplifies interprofessional working beyond traditional healthcare boundaries. The qualitative evaluation of the pilot sites employed a realistic evaluation approach and used focus group discussions and telephone interviews to examine stakeholders' perceptions of interprofessional working and its impact on service provision and practice. Although teething problems were experienced in establishing the interprofessional working necessary for success, a shared commitment to the CMP ethos enabled these to be largely overcome. Outstanding issues raised by participants concerned the boundaries around the CMPs' new ways of working, in particular around treatment versus self-management and around the combined health and work focus of the pilots. One of the recommendations from a recent review of the health of Britain's working population was for a drive to promote the understanding of the positive relationship between health and work. The experiences of the staff involved in the CMP pilots provides a useful insight into the benefits and difficulties experienced in relation to interprofessional working between different professional groups in this area.

  6. Academics in a New Work Environment: The Impact of New Public Management on Work Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Rui; Carvalho, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    New public management (NPM) approaches have informed policy in the public sector in advanced countries in the last decade. Some authors suggest that the main objective of NPM at the organisational level is to change the traditional way professionals are regulated. This study examines the impact of NPM on the working conditions of Portuguese higher…

  7. The mediating and moderating effects of workplace social capital on the associations between adverse work characteristics and psychological distress among Japanese workers.

    PubMed

    Oshio, Takashi; Inoue, Akiomi; Tsutsumi, Akizumi

    2014-01-01

    Our current study investigated how workplace social capital (WSC) mediates and moderates the associations between adverse work characteristics and psychological distress among Japanese workers. We collected cross-sectional data (N=9,350) from a baseline survey of an occupational Japanese cohort study. We focused on individual WSC and considered job demands/control, effort/reward, and two types (i.e., procedural and interactional) of organizational justice as work-characteristic variables. We defined psychological distress as a score of ≥5 on the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6 scale). Multivariate logistic regression analyses predicted a binary variable of psychological distress by individual WSC and adverse work characteristics, adjusting for individual-level covariates. Individual WSC mediated the associations between adverse work characteristics and psychological distress in almost all model specifications. Additionally, individual WSC moderated the associations of psychological distress with high job demands, high effort, and low interactional justice when we used a high WSC cutoff point. In contrast, individual WSC did not moderate such interactions with low job control, reward, or procedural justice. We concluded that individual WSC mediated the associations between adverse work characteristics and psychological distress among Japanese workers while selectively moderating their associations at high levels of WSC.

  8. Clinical profiles of adverse drug reactions spontaneously reported at a single Korean hospital dedicated to children with complex chronic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bomi; Kim, Sunwha Zara; Lee, Jin; Jung, Ae Hee; Jung, Sun-Hoi; Hahn, Hyeon-Joo; Kang, Hye Ryun

    2017-01-01

    Children with complex chronic conditions (CCC) are presumed to be vulnerable to adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The clinical profiles of ADRs in CCC are not well known. Herein, we aim to describe the ADR profiles in CCC with regard to typical presentations and vulnerable groups. We accessed the ADR yearly reports at a tertiary children's hospital whose practice is mainly dedicated to CCC and descriptively analyzed their clinical profiles according to the presence of a complex chronic condition, ADR severity, and age groups. A total of 1841 cases were analyzed, among which 1258 (68.3%) were mild, 493 (26.8%) moderate, and 90 (4.9%) cases were severe. A total of 1581 (85.9%) cases of complex chronic condition were reported. The proportion of CCC in each severity group increased as the ADR becomes more severe. In CCC, ADRs were most frequently reported by nurses in the adolescent group and in cases where the symptoms involved the gastrointestinal system. The class of antineoplastic and immunomodulating drugs was the most commonly suspected of causing an ADR, followed by one of the antibiotics. When we focus on the trend across the age groups, the ratio of severe-to-total ADRs decreased with older age. Among severe cases, the ratio of off-label prescription-related cases was the highest in the infant/toddler group and decreased as the groups aged. In conclusion, ADRs of CCCs admitted to a tertiary children’s hospital have a unique profile. These groups are vulnerable to ADRs and thus they should be monitored closely, especially when they are infants or toddlers, so that severe ADRs can be identified and treated immediately. PMID:28199420

  9. Baseline activity predicts working memory load of preceding task condition.

    PubMed

    Pyka, Martin; Hahn, Tim; Heider, Dominik; Krug, Axel; Sommer, Jens; Kircher, Tilo; Jansen, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    The conceptual notion of the so-called resting state of the brain has been recently challenged by studies indicating a continuing effect of cognitive processes on subsequent rest. In particular, activity in posterior parietal and medial prefrontal areas has been found to be modulated by preceding experimental conditions. In this study, we investigated which brain areas show working memory dependent patterns in subsequent baseline periods and how specific they are for the preceding experimental condition. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, 94 subjects performed a letter-version of the n-back task with the conditions 0-back and 2-back followed by a low-level baseline in which subjects had to passively observe the letters appearing. In a univariate analysis, 2-back served as control condition while 0-back, baseline after 0-back and baseline after 2-back were modeled as regressors to test for activity changes between both baseline conditions. Additionally, we tested, using Gaussian process classifiers, the recognition of task condition from functional images acquired during baseline. Besides the expected activity changes in the precuneus and medial prefrontal cortex, we found differential activity in the thalamus, putamen, and postcentral gyrus that were affected by the preceding task. The multivariate analysis revealed that images of the subsequent baseline block contain task related patterns that yield a recognition rate of 70%. The results suggest that the influence of a cognitive task on subsequent baseline is strong and specific for some areas but not restricted to areas of the so-called default mode network.

  10. The associations between psychosocial working conditions and changes in common mental disorders: a follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Common mental disorders (CMD) are prevalent in working populations and have adverse consequences for employee well-being and work ability, even leading to early retirement. Several studies report associations between psychosocial working conditions and CMD. However, there is a lack of longitudinal research within a broad framework of psychosocial working conditions and improvement in CMD. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between several psychosocial working conditions and deteriorating and improving CMD among ageing employees over a five-to-six-year follow-up period. Methods The study is based on the Helsinki Health Study baseline survey in 2001–2002 and a follow-up in 2007 (N = 4340, response rate 83%) conducted among 40-60-year-old female and male employees. The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) was used to measure common mental disorders. Psychosocial working conditions were measured in terms of job strain, organisational justice, work-family interface, social support and workplace bullying. The covariates included sociodemographic and health factors. Results Following adjustment for all the covariates, family-to-work (OR 1.41, 95% Cl 1.04-1.91) and work-to-family conflicts (OR 1.99, 95% Cl 1.42-2.78) and workplace bullying (OR 1.40, 95% Cl 1.09-1.79) were associated with deterioration, and family-to-work conflicts (OR 1.65, 95% Cl 1.66-2.34) and social support (OR 1.47, 95% Cl 1.07-2.00) with improvement in CMD. Conclusions Adverse psychosocial working conditions contribute to poor mental health among employees. Preventing workplace bullying, promoting social support and achieving a better balance between work and family may help employees to maintain their mental health. PMID:24916716

  11. Bad Jobs, Bad Health? How Work and Working Conditions Contribute to Health Disparities.

    PubMed

    Burgard, Sarah A; Lin, Katherine Y

    2013-08-01

    In this review, we touch on a broad array of ways that work is linked to health and health disparities for individuals and societies. First focusing on the health of individuals, we discuss the health differences between those who do and do not work for pay, and review key positive and negative exposures that can generate health disparities among the employed. These include both psychosocial factors like the benefits of a high status job or the burden of perceived job insecurity, as well as physical exposures to dangerous working conditions like asbestos or rotating shift work. We also provide a discussion of the ways differential exposure to these aspects of work contributes to social disparities in health within and across generations. Analytic complexities in assessing the link between work and health for individuals, such as health selection, are also discussed. We then touch on several contextual level associations between work and the health of populations, discussing the importance of the occupational structure in a given society, the policy environment that prevails there, and the oscillations of the macroeconomy for generating societal disparities in health. We close with a discussion of four areas and associated recommendations that draw on this corpus of knowledge but would push the research on work, health and inequality toward even greater scholarly and policy relevance.

  12. Bad Jobs, Bad Health? How Work and Working Conditions Contribute to Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Burgard, Sarah A.; Lin, Katherine Y.

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we touch on a broad array of ways that work is linked to health and health disparities for individuals and societies. First focusing on the health of individuals, we discuss the health differences between those who do and do not work for pay, and review key positive and negative exposures that can generate health disparities among the employed. These include both psychosocial factors like the benefits of a high status job or the burden of perceived job insecurity, as well as physical exposures to dangerous working conditions like asbestos or rotating shift work. We also provide a discussion of the ways differential exposure to these aspects of work contributes to social disparities in health within and across generations. Analytic complexities in assessing the link between work and health for individuals, such as health selection, are also discussed. We then touch on several contextual level associations between work and the health of populations, discussing the importance of the occupational structure in a given society, the policy environment that prevails there, and the oscillations of the macroeconomy for generating societal disparities in health. We close with a discussion of four areas and associated recommendations that draw on this corpus of knowledge but would push the research on work, health and inequality toward even greater scholarly and policy relevance. PMID:24187340

  13. Ground experiments for finding principles and working out methods for preventing adverse effects of weightlessness on the human organism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakurin, L. I.; Gregoryev, A. I.; Mikhailov, V. M.; Tishler, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    A comparative assessment of the effectiveness of different prophylactic procedures to prevent the adverse effects of weightlessness is presented. It is concluded that: physical training is most effective but no single method by itself produces the full effect, and an adjustment of regimes to one another enhances the effect. The approved complex of prophylactic procedures affected basic changes occurring in hypokinesia: deficit of muscular activity, no or reduced BP hydrostatic component, reduced volume of blood circulation, reduced hydration level, and the application of various prophylactic complexes during 49 day antiorthostatic hypodynamia eliminated or reduced the adverse effects of weightlessness in simulation.

  14. Effects of respirators under heat/work conditions

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.; Dukes-Dobos, F.; Smith, R.

    1984-06-01

    Physiological responses and perceived strain of five unacclimatized male subjects were studied. The subjects were exposed to heat during an exercise task and were evaluated while wearing half and full facepiece, cartridge-type, air-purifying respirators, and without a respirator. The exercise consisted of walking on a treadmill for a period of 1 hour in a controlled environmental chamber at each of two different energy expenditure levels (200 and 400 kcal/hr)(approx. = 58 and 116 Watts) and two different heat exposures (air temperatures of 25/sup 0/C and 43.3./sup 0/C). The results indicated that wearing a full facepiece respirator imposed significant physiological strain added to that caused by the heat and workloads used in the study. Five of the six physiological measures show this increased physiological strain: (1) heart rate; (2) minute ventilation; (3) oxygen consumption; (4) energy expenditure; and (5) oral temperature. There was no detectable effect on sweat rate. Although subjective ratings indicated more discomfort with increasing physiological strain, the observed correlations between such measures were low (T/sub b/ < .60). The net consequence of the significant effects indicates that workers' tolerance to moderate or high levels of work under hot conditions while wearing a respirator is reduced. The reduction is more pronounced when wearing a full mask than when wearing a half mask. Changes in respirator design which minimize respiratory dead space are suggested to alleviate this problem. Otherwise, prevention of excessive physiological strain from respirator use when working at moderate or higher levels at hot job sites could necessitate more rest breaks or limiting work time under such conditions.

  15. Does the Size of the Effect of Adverse Events at High Ages on Daily-Life Physical Functioning Depend on the Economic Conditions Around Birth?

    PubMed

    Scholte, Robert; van den Berg, Gerard J; Lindeboom, Maarten; Deeg, Dorly J H

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers determinants of physical functional limitations in daily-life activities at high ages. Specifically, we quantify the extent to which the impact of adverse life events on this outcome is larger in case of exposure to adverse economic conditions early in life. Adverse life events include bereavement, severe illness in the family, and the onset of chronic diseases. We use a longitudinal data set of individuals born in the first decades of the 20th century. The business cycle around birth is used as an indicator of economic conditions early in life. We find that the extent to which functional limitations suffer from the onset of chronic diseases is larger if the individual was born in a recession. The long-run effect of economic conditions early in life on functional limitations at high ages runs primarily via this life event. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Integration of iconic gestures and speech in left superior temporal areas boosts speech comprehension under adverse listening conditions.

    PubMed

    Holle, Henning; Obleser, Jonas; Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann; Gunter, Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    Iconic gestures are spontaneous hand movements that illustrate certain contents of speech and, as such, are an important part of face-to-face communication. This experiment targets the brain bases of how iconic gestures and speech are integrated during comprehension. Areas of integration were identified on the basis of two classic properties of multimodal integration, bimodal enhancement and inverse effectiveness (i.e., greater enhancement for unimodally least effective stimuli). Participants underwent fMRI while being presented with videos of gesture-supported sentences as well as their unimodal components, which allowed us to identify areas showing bimodal enhancement. Additionally, we manipulated the signal-to-noise ratio of speech (either moderate or good) to probe for integration areas exhibiting the inverse effectiveness property. Bimodal enhancement was found at the posterior end of the superior temporal sulcus and adjacent superior temporal gyrus (pSTS/STG) in both hemispheres, indicating that the integration of iconic gestures and speech takes place in these areas. Furthermore, we found that the left pSTS/STG specifically showed a pattern of inverse effectiveness, i.e., the neural enhancement for bimodal stimulation was greater under adverse listening conditions. This indicates that activity in this area is boosted when an iconic gesture accompanies an utterance that is otherwise difficult to comprehend. The neural response paralleled the behavioral data observed. The present data extends results from previous gesture-speech integration studies in showing that pSTS/STG plays a key role in the facilitation of speech comprehension through simultaneous gestural input.

  17. Health and working conditions in carpenter's workshops in Armenia (Colombia).

    PubMed

    Gómeez, Milena E; Sanchez, Juan F; Cardona, Angélica M; Pioquinto, Jaime F; Torres, Paula; Sanchez, Deisy; Camargo, Lina M; Castañeda, René A; Villamizar, Rafael H; Cremades, Lázaro V

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a study of the health and working conditions in 10 carpenter's workshops in the municipality of Armenia (Colombia). In these workshops, all the most exposed workers to wood dust were surveyed at the areas of sanding, brushing, immunization and painting (workers with the highest risk to get chronic respiratory disease). They were 177 workers. The use of hard and soft woods for furniture was detected. Besides, some pesticides, volatile organic solvents, synthetic epoxy resins glues and paintings, were used for finishes, which increases the risk of acquiring some neurological diseases and damage to the nervous system. Occurrence of cancer in nostrils mainly due to the use of hardwoods is an additional risk. With regard to the basic lighting conditions, it was found that half of workshops had deficiencies in special carving areas, because they were below the minimum allowable lighting limit level (500 lux). With relation to noise, all the workshops exceeded the permissible maximum limit value (85 dBA). With respect to the occurrence of occupational events, no data were found in the companies, or analysis of employee absenteeism due to the exposure to particulate matter.

  18. [Working conditions, living conditions and physical health problems declared among penitentiary administration personnel in France].

    PubMed

    Goldberg, P; Landre, M F; David, S; Goldberg, M; Dassa, S; Marne, M J

    1996-06-01

    A cross-sectional epidemiological survey was conducted among prison staff in France to investigate the relationships between working conditions and health. The sample included men and women 20 to 64 years old belonging to all categories of prison personnel: prison guards, administrative staff, socioeducational workers, technicians, health care workers, and managers (n = 4587, response rate 45.7%). A mailed self-administered questionnaire was used to assess sociodemographic characteristics, working conditions, and physical and mental disorders. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the effects of working conditions and social relationships on health of prison staff. However, the results reported here only concern 17 health disorders: body mass index, sick leave, medication use, accidents, digestive disorders, lower extremities and back disorders, hypertension, hemorrhoids, arthritis, skin disorders, urinary infections, chronic bronchitis, cholesterol, gastric ulcer, respiratory infections, ocular disorders. The living non professional conditions mostly associated with health disorders were financial difficulties (OR: 1.9 for digestive disorders, 1.8 for gastric ulcer, 1.7 for medication use) and irregularity of meals (OR = 1.5 for digestive disorders, and hypertension). In the occupational environment, the factors most associated with health disorders are seniority (OR = 4.2 for arthritis, 2.3 for cholesterol) and constraints (OR = 1.7 for lower extremities disorders). In spite of some limits associated to this kind of study, relationships between occupational and non occupational factors and physical health conditions were observed; the results also pointed out the protective role of the social relationships for health conditions.

  19. [Hygienic assessment of working conditions and functional resistance in electric power station workers].

    PubMed

    Terekhov, I A

    2007-01-01

    The exceeding maximum permissible levels, the parameters of electromagnetic fields and radiations, an electrostatic field, noise, and vibration are the leading adverse factors of the industrial environment for basic professional groups of Stavropol district electric power station workers. According to the degree of harmfulness and hazard, the working conditions are referred to as Class 3 ("hazardous") in 93.7% of the personnel. The significant tension of adaptive mechanisms is typical of most patients (76.3%). Based on the multivariate analysis of the results of a psychophysiological follow-up, the authors have developed a procedure for the integral evaluation of the functional state of the workers' organism, which may be used in the sociohygienic monitoring system in the electric power system of Russia.

  20. Associations of job strain and working overtime with adverse health behaviors and obesity: evidence from the Whitehall II Study, Helsinki Health Study, and the Japanese Civil Servants Study.

    PubMed

    Lallukka, Tea; Lahelma, Eero; Rahkonen, Ossi; Roos, Eva; Laaksonen, Elina; Martikainen, Pekka; Head, Jenny; Brunner, Eric; Mosdol, Annhild; Marmot, Michael; Sekine, Michikazu; Nasermoaddeli, Ali; Kagamimori, Sadanobu

    2008-04-01

    Adverse health behaviors and obesity are key determinants of major chronic diseases. Evidence on work-related determinants of these behavioral risk factors is inconclusive, and comparative studies are especially lacking. We aimed to examine the associations between job strain, working overtime, adverse health behaviors, and obesity among 45-60-year-old white-collar employees of the Whitehall II Study from London (n=3,397), Helsinki Health Study (n=6,070), and the Japanese Civil Servants Study (n=2,213). Comparable data from all three cohorts were pooled, and logistic regression analysis was used, stratified by cohort and sex. Models were adjusted for age, occupational class, and marital status. Outcomes were unhealthy food habits, physical inactivity, heavy drinking, smoking, and obesity. In London, men reporting passive work were more likely to be physically inactive. A similar association was repeated among women in Helsinki. Additionally, high job strain was associated with physical inactivity among men in London and women in Helsinki. In London, women reporting passive work were less likely to be heavy drinkers and smokers. In Japan, men working overtime reported less smoking, whereas those with high job strain were more likely to smoke. Among men in Helsinki the association between working overtime and non-smoking was also suggested, but it reached statistical significance in the age-adjusted model only. Obesity was associated with working overtime among women in London. In conclusion, job strain and working overtime had some, albeit mostly weak and inconsistent, associations with adverse health behaviors and obesity in these middle-aged white-collar employee cohorts from Britain, Finland, and Japan.

  1. Working conditions and fatigue in professional truck drivers at Israeli ports

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh-Ehrlich, S; Friedman, L; Richter, E

    2005-01-01

    Background: Trucks represent 6% of all vehicles, but truck crashes account for 20% of road deaths in Israel, even though travel distances are usually short (<200 km) and overnight travel is uncommon. Objective: To determine occupational and individual predictors of fatigue, falling asleep at the wheel, and involvement in crashes with injuries and deaths in truck drivers. Setting and methods: We carried out field interviews of 160 port truck drivers regarding driver characteristics, workplace and driving conditions, employer-employee relations, medical conditions, sleep quality and fatigue, falling asleep at the wheel, and involvement in road crashes. Results: One day before interview, 38.1% of the drivers had worked more than the 12 hour legal limit. More than 30% reported falling asleep at the wheel recently, and 13% had prior involvement in a sleep related crash. Sixty seven (41.9%) drivers said that their employer forced them to work beyond the legal 12 hour daily limit. Involvement in a crash with casualties was associated with poor sleep quality (adjusted OR = 2.9; p = 0.042) and frequent difficulty finding parking when tired (OR = 3.7; p = 0.049). Self assessment of fatigue underestimated fatigue from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Questionnaire. However fatigue occurred in many drivers without sleep problems and many crashes occurred without fatigue. Conclusions: Prevention requires measures to reduce work stresses, screening drivers, speed control, and modal shifts. The work risks and adverse outcomes of truck drivers in large countries with long overnight journeys occur in a small country with small distances, relatively short work journeys, and little overnight travel. PMID:15805441

  2. The Association Between Mid-Life Socioeconomic Position and Health After Retirement—Exploring the Role of Working Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Vanessa; Andel, Ross; Nilsen, Charlotta

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the role of working conditions in the association between socioeconomic position and health after retirement age using over 20 years follow-up. Method: Two Swedish nationally representative Level of Living Surveys (total N = 1,131) were used. Ordered logistic regression was used to assess the association between socioeconomic position and health (self-rated health, psychological distress, musculoskeletal pain, circulatory problems, physical and cognitive impairment). The role of physical and psychological working conditions was also assessed. Results: Lower socioeconomic position was associated with more adverse physical, but not psychological, working conditions. Physical working conditions partially explained the differences in physical impairment and musculoskeletal pain in old age attributed to socioeconomic position, but not differences in self-rated health, circulatory problems, psychological distress, and cognitive impairment. Socioeconomic position was a stronger correlate of health than psychological working conditions alone. Discussion: Improving physical working conditions may be important for reducing the influence of socioeconomic position on health after retirement. PMID:23872823

  3. 26 CFR 1.132-5T - Working condition fringe-1985 through 1988 (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Working condition fringe-1985 through 1988....132-5T Working condition fringe—1985 through 1988 (temporary). (a) In general—(1) Definition. Gross income does not include the value of a working condition fringe. The term “working condition...

  4. Does the home environment and the sex of the child modify the adverse effects of prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos on child working memory?

    PubMed

    Horton, Megan K; Kahn, Linda G; Perera, Frederica; Barr, Dana Boyd; Rauh, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos (CPF), an organophosphorus insecticide, has long been associated with delayed neurocognitive development and most recently with decrements in working memory at age 7. In the current paper, we expanded the previous work on CPF to investigate how additional biological and social environmental factors might create or explain differential neurodevelopmental susceptibility, focusing on main and moderating effects of the quality of the home environment (HOME) and child sex. We evaluate how the quality of the home environment (specifically, parental nurturance and environmental stimulation) and child sex interact with the adverse effects of prenatal CPF exposure on working memory at child age 7years. We did not observe a remediating effect of a high quality home environment (either parental nurturance or environmental stimulation) on the adverse effects of prenatal CPF exposure on working memory. However, we detected a borderline significant interaction between prenatal exposure to CPF and child sex (B (95% CI) for interaction term=-1.714 (-3.753 to 0.326)) suggesting males experience a greater decrement in working memory than females following prenatal CPF exposure. In addition, we detected a borderline interaction between parental nurturance and child sex (B (95% CI) for interaction term=1.490 (-0.518 to 3.499)) suggesting that, in terms of working memory, males benefit more from a nurturing environment than females. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation into factors that may inform an intervention strategy to reduce or reverse the cognitive deficits resulting from prenatal CPF exposure.

  5. Effect of economic recession on psychosocial working conditions by workers' nationality

    PubMed Central

    Torá, Isabel; Martínez, José Miguel; Benavides, Fernando G.; Leveque, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several publications have documented the effects of economic recessions on health. However, little is known about how economic recessions influence working conditions, especially among vulnerable workers. Objective: To explore the effects of 2008 economic crisis on the prevalence of adverse psychosocial working conditions among Spanish and foreign national workers. Methods: Data come from the 2007 and 2011 Spanish Working Conditions Surveys. Survey year, sociodemographic, and occupational information were independent variables and psychosocial factors exposures were dependent variables. Analyses were stratified by nationality (Spanish versus foreign). Prevalence and adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) of psychological job demands, job control, job social support, physical demands and perceived job insecurity were estimated using Poisson regression. Results: The Spanish population had higher risk of psychological and physical job demand (aPR = 1.07, 95% CI = [1.04–1.10] and aPR = 1.05, 95% CI = [1.01–1.09], respectively) in 2011 compared to 2007. Among both Spanish and foreign national workers, greater aPR were found for job loss in 2011 compared to 2007 (aPR = 2.47, 95% CI = [2.34–2.60]; aPR = 2.44, 95% CI = [2.15–2.77], respectively). Conclusion: The 2008 economic crisis was associated with a significant increase in physical demands in Spanish workers and increased job insecurity for both Spanish and foreign workers. PMID:26743788

  6. Working environment conditions in rural areas according to psychosocial indices.

    PubMed

    Thelin, A G

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study psychosocial working environment factors among farmers and other people living in rural areas. The study was carried out as a cross-section investigation. All persons visiting local occupational health service centres for a health check up have been asked to answer an inquiry which was based on the Karasek-Theorell questionnaire on job strain. Five extra items on worry about the future were added. The questionnaire was completed by over 3,800 persons. Three of four indices showed significant difference with respect to sex. Women experienced less stimulance at work, authority over work and had a greater fear of the future. Farmers had a significantly higher index for psychological demands, stimulance at work as well as authority over work than other occupational groups. The index for authority over work was very high in comparison with presented results for different occupations in other studies. With respect to worry about the future, the farmers had a significantly higher index than nearly all the other occupational groups. The low risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) among farmers reported in other studies can probably be related to good psychosocial working environment as measured by the indices in this study as well as other known life style factors.

  7. The Condition of Work Readiness in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeFebvre, Mary

    2013-01-01

    ACT has issued a series of reports concerning the role of skills in today's job market and the growing importance they play in predicting workplace success. This is the third report in the series. This report highlights the levels of work readiness for various subgroups of an estimated 4 million ACT WorkKeys® examinees in the United States and…

  8. 29 CFR 1960.30 - Abatement of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Abatement of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions. 1960... unhealthful working conditions. (a) The agency shall ensure the prompt abatement of unsafe and unhealthful conditions. Where a Notice of an Unsafe or Unhealthful Working Condition has been issued, abatement shall...

  9. Risk of Adverse Health Outcomes & Decrements in Performance due to Inflight Medical Conditions: ExMC Pharmacy Research Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonsen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element of NASA's Human Research Program is charged with identifying medical capabilities that can address the challenges of prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease and injuries that could occur during exploration missions beyond Earth's orbit. Faced with the obstacle of access to in-flight medical care, and limitations of vehicle space, time, and communications; it is necessary to prioritize what medical consumables are manifested for the flight, and which medical conditions are addressed. Studies of astronaut health establish the incidence of common and high risk medical conditions that require medical intervention during long-duration exploration missions. In 2000, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) convened a committee of experts, Committee on Creating a Vision for Space Medicine during Travel beyond Earth Orbit, to examine the issues surrounding astronaut health and safety for long duration space missions. Two themes run throughout the committee's final report: (1) that not enough is known about the risks to human health during long-duration missions beyond Earth's orbit or about what can effectively mitigate those risks to enable humans to travel and work safely in the environment of deep space and (2) that everything reasonable should be done to gain the necessary information before humans are sent on missions of space exploration (IOM, 2001). Although several spaceflight focused pharmaceutical research studies have been conducted, few have provided sufficient data regarding medication usage or potency changes during spaceflight. The Du pharmaceutical stability study assessed medications flown on space shuttles to and from the International Space Station (ISS) from 2006 until 2008; of which some medications were still viable beyond their expiration dates (Du et al, 2011). However, as with many spaceflight studies, the small 'n' associated with this study limits the ability to draw strong conclusions from it

  10. "Cross'd with Adversity": The Education of Socially Disadvantaged Children in Secondary Schools. Working Paper 27.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schools Council Research and Development Project in Compensatory Education, Swansea (Wales).

    This report sponsored by the Schools Council, Great Britain is that of a "Working Party" set up to consider the education of the socially disadvantaged in secondary schools. Contents include: background to educational deprivation; recognition of deprivation in schools; an account of practice in some schools; case histories; curriculum…

  11. On the working conditions of a two-pan balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carvalho, Carlos R.

    2016-07-01

    In this article we address the assumptions concerning the equilibrium of rigid bodies, commonly used in textbooks, that can lead to completely wrong conclusions. In particular, we show that in an idealised world, where frictions and deformations don’t occur, a steelyard or two-pan balance would not work. This apparent contradiction, that one needs imperfections to make things work, doesn’t appear in textbooks because the corresponding topics are presented in the equilibrium configuration, where the imperfections’ role is no longer necessary. At the end, taking the two-pan balance as example, we show that to avoid of working with imperfections, one must deal with a device whose design has a subtle difference from that one we are used to think about.

  12. 76 FR 24575 - General Working Conditions in Shipyard Employment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... powered industrial trucks, cranes, and vessel systems. Several stakeholders said that vessel systems, in... subcontractors work side-by-side and often on the same vessel system at the same time. The combination of these.... communication systems. Lifeboats Sec. 1915.86...... Sec. 1915.96. Medical services and first Sec....

  13. Does the home environment and the sex of the child modify the adverse effects of prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos on child working memory?

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Megan K.; Kahn, Linda G.; Perera, Frederica; Barr, Dana Boyd; Rauh, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos (CPF), an organophosphorus insecticide, has long been associated with delayed neurocognitive development and most recently with decrements in working memory at age 7. In the current paper, we expanded the previous work on CPF to investigate how additional biological and social environmental factors might create or explain differential neurodevelopmental susceptibility, focusing on main and moderating effects of the quality of the home environment (HOME) and child sex. We evaluate how the quality of the home environment (specifically, parental nurturance and environmental stimulation) and child sex interact with the adverse effects of prenatal CPF exposure on working memory at child age 7 years. We did not observe a remediating effect of a high quality home environment (either parental nurturance or environmental stimulation) on the adverse effects of prenatal CPF exposure on working memory. However, we detected a borderline significant interaction between prenatal exposure to CPF and child sex (B (95% CI) for interaction term = −1.714 (−3.753 to 0.326)) suggesting males experience a greater decrement in working memory than females following prenatal CPF exposure. In addition, we detected a borderline interaction between parental nurturance and child sex (B (95% CI) for interaction term = 1.490 (−0.518 to 3.499)) suggesting that, in terms of working memory, males benefit more from a nurturing environment than females. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation into factors that may inform an intervention strategy to reduce or reverse the cognitive deficits resulting from prenatal CPF exposure. PMID:22824009

  14. Does "Out of work" get into the womb? Exploring the relationship between unemployment and adverse birth outcomes.

    PubMed

    Scharber, Helen

    2014-09-01

    This study uses Texas vital records from 1994 to 2003 to examine the relationship between self-reported maternal unemployment and birth outcomes, including birthweight and infant mortality. In the preferred specification, a sample containing 1,344, 605 sibling births to 604,649 mothers was used. Regression results indicated that within the same women, being unemployed was associated with lower average birthweights and higher rates of infant mortality than being engaged in market work, especially when unemployment preceded market work, and a range of hypothesized mediators did little to attenuate these relationships. Interaction models revealed that the poor average birth outcomes related to unemployment were driven by observations with at least one other indicator of health complication, such as presence of a medical risk factor. These results confirm that the relationship between unemployment and mother-child health varies across individuals, although further research is needed to understand the causal linkages connecting unemployment, health risks, and birth outcomes.

  15. 26 CFR 1.132-5 - Working condition fringes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Further that the employee drives the vehicle 6,000 miles for his employer's business and 2,000 miles for... condition fringe, miles accumulated on the vehicle by all employees of the employer during the period in...,000 additional miles on the vehicle (while the employee is not in the automobile). In this case,...

  16. Relationships between Working Conditions and Special Educators' Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bettini, Elizabeth A.; Crockett, Jean B.; Brownell, Mary T.; Merrill, Kristen L.

    2016-01-01

    Students with disabilities (SWDs) depend upon special education teachers (SETs) to provide effective instruction. SETs, in turn, depend upon school leaders to provide conditions necessary to learn and engage in effective instructional practices for students with the most significant learning needs. A promising body of research indicates that…

  17. Arizona Teacher Working Conditions: Designing Schools for Educator and Student Success. Results of the 2006 Phase-In Teacher Working Conditions Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Eric; Emerick, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Many schools across the country face persistent teacher working condition challenges that are closely related to high teacher turnover rates and chronic difficulties in recruiting and retaining teachers. Center for Teaching Quality (CTQ) research examining working conditions survey results in both North Carolina and South Carolina demonstrates…

  18. Working conditions and mental health: Results from the CARESUN study.

    PubMed

    Feola, Daniela; Pedata, Paola; D'Ancicco, Francesco; Santalucia, Laura; Sannolo, Nicola; Ascione, Eduardo; Nienhaus, Albert; Magliano, Lorenza; Lamberti, Monica

    2016-05-03

    The authors conducted a work-related stress surveillance study in 2013 on 6,558 public-sector employees in Italy, examining how they perceived their jobs, via the Job Content Questionnaire, and their mental health status, via the General Health Questionnaire 12 (GHQ-12). Of the 2,094 employees completing the questionnaires, 60% were male, 52% had a medium-level education, and 76% had a medium-level job. Three hundred and eighty-five employees (18%) had a GHQ-12 score >3 and were classified as GHQ-12 cases: these were more often female (54%), medium-to-highly educated (54%), and had more often reported health problems over the previous year (51%). Thus, GHQ-12 cases represented a significant percentage of the examined population, indicating that work-related stress surveillance programs are needed for the planning of psychosocial interventions aimed at the reintegration of individuals with mental health problems.

  19. [Nurses' work in Peru: origin and social conditions].

    PubMed

    Barba, M C; de Martos, M V; da Fonseca, R M

    2000-07-01

    The study aimed at reviewing the history of the genesis and social formation of nurses work in Peru in order to understand it according to women's social situation in the context of a masculine society organized under capitalism. Thus, nursing formation was influenced by the Nightingale School and the exercise of the Peruvian nurses was characterized by the reproduction of social functions that are historically feminine, with a knowledge and practice subordinated to medical knowledge, that is mainly directed by a masculine ideology.

  20. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis and related conditions in the work environment.

    PubMed

    Zacharisen, Michael C; Fink, Jordan N

    2011-11-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis can occur from a wide variety of occupational exposures. Although uncommon and difficult to recognize, through a detailed work exposure history, physical examination, radiography, pulmonary function studies, and selected laboratory studies using sera and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, workers can be identified early to effect avoidance of the antigen and institute pharmacologic therapy, if necessary. A lung biopsy may be necessary to rule out other interstitial lung diseases. Despite the varied organic antigen triggers, the presentation is similar with acute, subacute, or chronic forms. Systemic corticosteroids are the only reliable pharmacologic treatment but do not alter the long-term outcome.

  1. 77 FR 18 - General Working Conditions in Shipyard Employment; Approval of Information Collection Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1915 RIN 1218-AB50 General Working Conditions in... information requirements contained in the General Working Conditions Standard under the Paperwork Reduction...- 2222. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: OSHA published a final rule for General Working Conditions in...

  2. 29 CFR 1960.28 - Employee reports of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions. (a) The purpose of employee reports is to inform agencies of the existence of, or potential for, unsafe or unhealthful working conditions. A report under... to assure prompt analysis and response to reports of unsafe or unhealthful working conditions...

  3. [Hygienic characteristics of work conditions for main occupations in asbestos cement production of Ukraine].

    PubMed

    Kundiev, Iu I; Cherniuk, V I; Karakashian, A N; Kucheruk, T K; Martynovskaia, T Iu; Demetskaia, A V; Sal'nikova, N A; Chuĭ, T S; Piatnitsa-Gorpinchenko, N K

    2008-01-01

    Studies covered of work conditions for main occupations in asbestos cement production of Ukraine. Studies covered work conditions and occupational features of workers engaged into main occupations in asbestos cement enterprises of Ukraine. Parameters presented characterize ambient air state, microclimate conditions, levels of noise and vibration, work intensity and hardness.

  4. Demand-specific work ability, poor health and working conditions in middle-aged full-time employees.

    PubMed

    Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten; Thielen, Karsten; Nygaard, Else; Thorsen, Sannie Vester; Diderichsen, Finn

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the prevalence of reduced demand-specific work ability, its association with age, gender, education, poor health, and working conditions, and the interaction between poor health and working conditions regarding reduced demand-specific work ability. We used cross-sectional questionnaire data from 3381 full-time employees responding to questions about vocational education, job demands and social support (working conditions), musculoskeletal pain (MSP) and major depression (MD) (poor health) and seven questions about difficulty managing different job demands (reduced demand-specific work ability). Reduced demand-specific work ability varied from 9% to 19% among the 46-year old and from 11% to 21% among the 56-year old. Age was associated with two, gender with four, and education with all measures of reduced demand-specific work ability. MSP was associated with four and MD was associated with six measures of reduced demand-specific work ability. We found no interaction between working conditions and poor health regarding reduced demand-specific work ability.

  5. Work situation operative model MOST: linking diagnosis and intervention to improve work conditions.

    PubMed

    Morales, Karen Lange; García-Acosta, Gabriel; Urueña-Télleze, William; Pérez, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the model "Work Situation Operative Model" - MOST (after its Spanish acronym). It offers a comprehensive, systemic approach to analysing work stations and/or work processes, serving also as a framework for pursuing various ergonomic and occupational health and safety goals. Originally produced for a food sector company, the model has been extended and successfully applied in several industries in Colombia and Ecuador, including cement, oil, and paper industries. Based on a systemic understanding of work systems and tasks, the model not only allows different, commonly-used methods and tools for evaluating or assessing the risk of muscular-sketetal disorders to be included, but also supports occupational risk management strategies. Hence, one of its more important contributions relies on providing meaningful information that is useful for improving the work station and/or work process through design and re-design, by focusing on the interactions between all system elements.

  6. The longitudinal study of rat hippocampus influenced by stress: early adverse experience enhances hippocampal vulnerability and working memory deficit in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fengkui; Li, Lei; Shi, Mei; Li, Zhenzi; Zhou, Jinghua; Chen, Li

    2013-06-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that early adverse experience is related to learning disabilities in adults, but the neurobiological mechanisms have not yet been identified. We used longitudinal animal experiments to test the hypothesis that early life stress enhances hippocampal vulnerability and working memory deficit in adult rats. The expression of Synaptophysin (SYN) and apoptosis (Apo) in hippocampal CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions were examined to evaluate the effects of environmental factors on the hippocampus. The working memory errors via radial 8-arm maze were studied to evaluate the long-term effect of early stress on rats' spatial learning ability. Our results indicated that chronic restraint stress in early life and forced cold water swimming stress in adulthood reduced SYN expression and increased Apo levels in rat hippocampus, but the hippocampal damage tended to recover when rats returned to a non-stress environment. In addition, when the rats were exposed to forced cold water swimming stress during adulthood, SYN expression (CA3 and DG regions) and Apo levels (CA3 region) in rat hippocampus showed statistical difference between early restraint stress group and non-early restraint stress group (rats exposed to stress in adulthood only). One month after the two groups of rats returned to non-stress environment, this difference of SYN expression (CA3 and DG regions) and working memory deficit between the two groups was still statistically significant. Our study findings suggested that early adverse experience enhances hippocampal vulnerability and working memory deficit in adult rats, and reduces structural plasticity of hippocampus.

  7. Work and Family: Flexible Working Arrangements = Le Travail et la Famille: Conditions de Travail Flexibles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Women's Directorate, Toronto.

    Working in partnership with the Ontario Women's Directorate, Camco Inc. has taken a planned approach in determining appropriate workplace initiatives to help its employees address the issue of balancing paid work and family responsibilities. Camco surveyed employees to identify their needs and determine what kinds of programs would best respond to…

  8. Intergranular fracture of gamma titanium aluminides under hot working conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Seetharaman, V.; Semiatin, S.L.

    1998-07-01

    A comparative study of the hot workability of a near gamma titanium aluminide alloy Ti-49.5Al-2.5Nb-1.1Mn in the cast and wrought conditions was performed. Tension tests conducted on coarse grain, cast material, and fine grain wrought material revealed a pronounced variation in both fracture/peak stress and ductility with temperature and strain rate. Brittle, intergranular fracture occurring at high strain rates was found to be controlled by wedge crack nucleation, whereas the ductile fracture observed at low strain rates was controlled by the growth of wedge cracks and cavities. Dynamic recrystallization was shown to be the main restorative mechanism to accommodate grain boundary sliding and thereby control the crack growth rates. The ductile-to-brittle (DB) transition was found to be determined by the critical values of a grain size-based stress intensity factor given by the product of the peak/fracture stress and the square root of grain size. A processing map for the near gamma titanium aluminides was constructed based on the comparative analysis of the hot tension and compression test results.

  9. Extreme Air Pollution Conditions Adversely Affect Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance: The Air Pollution and Cardiometabolic Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Brook, Robert D; Sun, Zhichao; Brook, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Rao, Xiaoquan; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Sun, Qinghua; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports that fine particulate matter adversely affects cardiometabolic diseases particularly in susceptible individuals; however, health effects induced by the extreme concentrations within megacities in Asia are not well described. We enrolled 65 nonsmoking adults with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the Beijing metropolitan area into a panel study of 4 repeated visits across 4 seasons since 2012. Daily ambient fine particulate matter and personal black carbon levels ranged from 9.0 to 552.5 µg/m(3) and 0.2 to 24.5 µg/m(3), respectively, with extreme levels observed during January 2013. Cumulative fine particulate matter exposure windows across the prior 1 to 7 days were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure elevations ranging from 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.7) to 2.7 (0.6-4.8) mm Hg per SD increase (67.2 µg/m(3)), whereas cumulative black carbon exposure during the previous 2 to 5 days were significantly associated with ranges in elevations in diastolic blood pressure from 1.3 (0.0-2.5) to 1.7 (0.3-3.2) mm Hg per SD increase (3.6 µg/m(3)). Both black carbon and fine particulate matter were significantly associated with worsening insulin resistance (0.18 [0.01-0.36] and 0.22 [0.04-0.39] unit increase per SD increase of personal-level black carbon and 0.18 [0.02-0.34] and 0.22 [0.08-0.36] unit increase per SD increase of ambient fine particulate matter on lag days 4 and 5). These results provide important global public health warnings that air pollution may pose a risk to cardiometabolic health even at the extremely high concentrations faced by billions of people in the developing world today.

  10. Antagonistic pleiotropy at the human IL6 promoter confers genetic resilience to the pro-inflammatory effects of adverse social conditions in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Cole, Steven W; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Manu, Kavya; Telzer, Eva H; Kiang, Lisa; Bower, Julienne E; Irwin, Michael R; Fuligni, Andrew J

    2011-07-01

    The authors tested the evolutionary genetic hypothesis that the functional form of an asymmetrically risky Gene × Environment interaction will differ as a function of age-related antagonistic pleiotropy (i.e., show opposite effects in young vs. old individuals). Previous studies have identified a polymorphism in the human IL6 promoter (rs1800795; IL6-74 G/C) that interacts with adverse socioenvironmental conditions to promote chronic inflammation in older adults (elevated C-reactive protein). This study identifies a protective effect of the same polymorphism in 17- to 19-year-old adolescents confronting socioeconomic adversity. Over 60% of the environmental risk contribution to the IL6 × Socioeconomic Status interaction could be accounted for by interpersonal stress and adult role burden. Thus, the IL6-174G allele does not represent an undifferentiated risk factor but instead sensitizes inflammatory biology to socioenvironmental conditions, conferring either genetic vulnerability or resilience depending on the developmental "somatic environment" that interacts with social conditions to influence gene expression.

  11. Sleep complaints in middle-aged women and men: the contribution of working conditions and work-family conflicts.

    PubMed

    Lallukka, Tea; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahelma, Eero; Arber, Sara

    2010-09-01

    This study aimed to examine how physical working conditions, psychosocial working conditions and work-family conflicts are associated with sleep complaints, and whether health behaviours explain these associations. We used pooled postal questionnaire surveys collected in 2001-2002 among 40-60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki (n = 5819, response rate 66%). Participants were classified as having sleep complaints if they reported sleep complaints at least once a week on average (24% of women and 20% of men). Independent variables included environmental work exposures, physical workload, computer work, Karasek's job strain and work-family conflicts. Age, marital status, occupational class, work arrangements, health behaviours and obesity were adjusted for. Most working conditions were associated strongly with sleep complaints after adjustment for age only. After adjustment for work-family conflicts, the associations somewhat attenuated. Work-family conflicts were also associated strongly with women's [odds ratio (OR) 5.90; confidence interval (CI) 4.16-8.38] and men's sleep (OR 2.56; CI 1.34-4.87). The associations remained robust even after controlling for unhealthy behaviours, obesity, health status, depression and medications. Physically strenuous working conditions, psychosocial job strain and work-family conflicts may increase sleep complaints. Efforts to support employees to cope with psychosocial stress and reach a better balance between paid work and family life might reduce sleep complaints. Sleep complaints need to be taken into account in worksite health promotion and occupational health care in order to reduce the burden of poor sleep.

  12. [The changes in mental working capacity of operators during 24-hour shift work conditions].

    PubMed

    Kal'nysh, V V; Shvets', A V; Ieshchenko, O I

    2011-01-01

    Psychophysiological peculiarities of influence of a 24-hour shift work on the efficiency of operators have been discussed. It was shown that servicemen operators develop significant fatigue as a result of 24 hrs duty services. The informative psychophysiological characteristics which can be reliable indicators of fatigue level are highlighted. Individual psychophysiological indicators of fatigue level, according to different mechanisms of its development, have been proposed. The hypothesis about the existence of several compensatory mechanisms for maintenance of long duty operators' working capacity has been formulated.

  13. Participation and influence of migrant workers on working conditions: a qualitative approach.

    PubMed

    López-Jacob, María J; Safont, Eva Canaleta; García, Ana M; Garí, Aitana; Agudelo-Suárez, Andrés; Gil, Angel; Benavides, Fernando G

    2010-01-01

    Workers participation in the management of employment and working conditions is an important determinant of both positive and negative effects of work on human health. Through a qualitative approach, this study analyzes the degree of control and influence that migrant workers in different Spanish cities have over their own working conditions (Immigration, Work, and Health [ITSAL] Project). Results showed that migrant workers had little influence on employment and working conditions. Immigrant workers are mostly interested in issues such as salaries, hiring, and hours of work. Fear of dismissal makes immigrant workers reluctant to demand improved working conditions. We received limited information about immigrant workers' understanding of their rights and their perceptions of the possibilities to influence working conditions through trade union activity. Informal social networks play an essential role in disseminating information on workers' rights, although the effect is not always positive. Unions need to increase attention to and adapt measures for this particularly vulnerable group of workers.

  14. Women's Work Conditions and Marital Adjustment in Two-Earner Couples: A Structural Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, Heather A.; Galambos, Nancy L.

    1992-01-01

    Evaluated structural model of women's work conditions, women's stress, and marital adjustment using path analysis. Findings from 86 2-earner couples with adolescents indicated support for spillover model in which women's work stress and global stress mediated link between their work conditions and their perceptions of marital adjustment.…

  15. Early-Life Adversity Interacts with FKBP5 Genotypes: Altered Working Memory and Cardiac Stress Reactivity in the Oklahoma Family Health Patterns Project.

    PubMed

    Lovallo, William R; Enoch, Mary-Anne; Acheson, Ashley; Cohoon, Andrew J; Sorocco, Kristen H; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Vincent, Andrea S; Goldman, David

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to stress during critical periods of development can have adverse effects on adult health behaviors, and genetic vulnerabilities may enhance these stress effects. We carried out an exploratory examination of psychological, physiological, and behavioral characteristics of 252 healthy young adults for the impact of early-life adversity (ELA) in relation to the G-to-A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs9296158, of the FKBP5 gene. FKBP5 is a molecular cochaperone that contributes to the functional status of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and to the quality of corticosteroid signaling. FKBP5 expression is upregulated by cortisol exposure during stressful episodes, with greater upregulation seen in A-allele carriers. As such, FKBP5 expression and GR function may be environmentally sensitive in A-allele carriers and therefore suitable for the study of gene-by-environment (G × E) interactions. Compared with FKBP5, GG homozygotes (N=118), A-allele carriers (N = 132) without psychiatric morbidity had progressively worse performance on the Stroop color-word task with increasing levels of ELA exposure (Genotype × ELA, F=5.14, P=0.007), indicating a G × E interaction on working memory in early adulthood. In addition, heart rate response to mental stress was diminished overall in AA/AG-allele carriers (F=5.15, P=0.024). Diminished working memory and attenuated autonomic responses to stress are both associated with risk for alcoholism and other substance use disorders. The present data suggest that FKBP5 in the GR pathway may be a point of vulnerability to ELA, as seen in this group of non-traumatized young adults. FKBP5 is accordingly a potential target for more extensive studies of the impact of ELA on health and health behaviors in adulthood.

  16. Working conditions and major weight gain-a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Roos, Eira; Lallukka, Tea; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahelma, Eero; Laaksonen, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the associations of working conditions with major weight gain. Three different groups of work-related factors were examined: (i) work arrangements, (ii) physical working conditions, and (iii) psychosocial working conditions. The data are based on the Helsinki Health Study (HHS) questionnaire surveys. A baseline mail survey was made among middle-aged employees of the City of Helsinki in 2000-2002. A follow-up survey was made in 2007. Regression analyses with odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. During the 5- to 7-year follow-up, 26% of women and 24% of men gained in weight 5 kg or more. Working conditions were mostly unassociated with weight gain. However, nighttime shift work, physical threat at work, and hazardous exposures at work were moderately associated with weight gain. More attention should be devoted to the prevention of weight gain in general and among risk groups in particular.

  17. Foliar photochemical processes and carbon metabolism under favourable and adverse winter conditions in a Mediterranean mixed forest, Catalonia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, D.; Chang, C. T.; Peñuelas, J.; Gracia, C.; Sabaté, S.

    2014-06-01

    Evergreen trees in the Mediterranean region must cope with a wide range of environmental stresses from summer drought to winter cold. The mildness of Mediterranean winters can periodically lead to favourable environmental conditions above the threshold for a positive carbon balance, benefitting evergreen woody species more than deciduous ones. The comparatively lower solar energy input in winter decreases the foliar light saturation point. This leads to a higher susceptibility to photoinhibitory stress especially when chilly (< 12 °C) or freezing temperatures (< 0 °C) coincide with clear skies and relatively high solar irradiances. Nonetheless, the advantage of evergreen species that are able to photosynthesize all year round where a significant fraction can be attributed to winter months, compensates for the lower carbon uptake during spring and summer in comparison to deciduous species. We investigated the ecophysiological behaviour of three co-occurring mature evergreen tree species (Quercus ilex L., Pinus halepensis Mill., and Arbutus unedo L.) during a period of mild winter conditions and their responses to a sudden cold period. The state of the photosynthetic machinery in both periods was thus tested by estimating the foliar photosynthetic potential with CO2 response curves in parallel with chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. The studied evergreen tree species benefited strongly from mild winter conditions by exhibiting extraordinarily high photosynthetic potentials similar to those under spring conditions. A sudden period of frost, however, negatively affected the photosynthetic apparatus, leading to significant decreases in key physiological parameters such as the maximum carboxylation velocity (Vc, max), the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (Jmax), and the optimal fluorometric quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm). This change persisted for several weeks after the cold period despite the recovery of the temperature to the conditions

  18. Foliar photochemical processes and carbon metabolism under favourable and adverse winter conditions in a Mediterranean mixed forest, Catalonia (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperlich, D.; Chang, C. T.; Peñuelas, J.; Gracia, C.; Sabaté, S.

    2014-10-01

    Evergreen trees in the Mediterranean region must cope with a wide range of environmental stresses from summer drought to winter cold. The mildness of Mediterranean winters can periodically lead to favourable environmental conditions above the threshold for a positive carbon balance, benefitting evergreen woody species more than deciduous ones. The comparatively lower solar energy input in winter decreases the foliar light saturation point. This leads to a higher susceptibility to photoinhibitory stress especially when chilly (< 12 °C) or freezing temperatures (< 0 °C) coincide with clear skies and relatively high solar irradiances. Nonetheless, the advantage of evergreen species that are able to photosynthesize all year round where a significant fraction can be attributed to winter months, compensates for the lower carbon uptake during spring and summer in comparison to deciduous species. We investigated the ecophysiological behaviour of three co-occurring mature evergreen tree species (Quercus ilex L., Pinus halepensis Mill., and Arbutus unedo L.). Therefore, we collected twigs from the field during a period of mild winter conditions and after a sudden cold period. After both periods, the state of the photosynthetic machinery was tested in the laboratory by estimating the foliar photosynthetic potential with CO2 response curves in parallel with chlorophyll fluorescence measurements. The studied evergreen tree species benefited strongly from mild winter conditions by exhibiting extraordinarily high photosynthetic potentials. A sudden period of frost, however, negatively affected the photosynthetic apparatus, leading to significant decreases in key physiological parameters such as the maximum carboxylation velocity (Vc, max), the maximum photosynthetic electron transport rate (Jmax), and the optimal fluorometric quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm). The responses of Vc, max and Jmax were highly species specific, with Q. ilex exhibiting the highest and P

  19. Modeling the effect of adverse environmental conditions and clothing on temperature rise in a human body exposed to radio frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Moore, Stephen M; McIntosh, Robert L; Iskra, Steve; Wood, Andrew W

    2015-02-01

    This study considers the computationally determined thermal profile of a fully clothed, finely discretized, heterogeneous human body model, subject to the maximum allowable reference level for a 1-GHz radio frequency electromagnetic field for a worker, and also subject to adverse environmental conditions, including high humidity and high ambient temperature. An initial observation is that while electromagnetic fields at the occupational safety limit will contribute an additional thermal load to the tissues, and subsequently, cause an elevated temperature, the magnitude of this effect is far outweighed by that due to the conditions including the ambient temperature, relative humidity, and the type of clothing worn. It is envisaged that the computational modeling approach outlined in this paper will be suitably modified in future studies to evaluate the thermal response of a body at elevated metabolic rates, and for different body shapes and sizes including children and pregnant women.

  20. Industrial working conditions and the treatment of child workers in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Arkan, Gülcihan; Sohbet, Rabia

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine working conditions for children working at industry descriptive study was conducted between May and June 2010 and included 249 workers 18 years at a Kahramanmaras industry site. Study data demonstrated that 33.3% of the children were 18 working in a mechanics store, 82.3% were working 9 to 12 hours a day, 68.7% were earning a Turkish Liras, and only 22 were using annual leave. These children started working under the age entered into the work force and quit school. Also, it was found that working conditions were was instituted in many workplaces.

  1. Chronic neck and shoulder pain, age, and working conditions: longitudinal results from a large random sample in France

    PubMed Central

    Cassou, B; Derriennic, F; Monfort, C; Norton, J; Touranchet, A

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To analyse the effects of age and occupational factors on both the incidence and the disappearance of chronic neck and shoulder pain after a five year follow up period. Methods: A prospective longitudinal investigation (ESTEV) was carried out in 1990 and 1995 in seven regions of France. A random sample of male and female workers born in 1938, 1943, 1948, and 1953 was selected from the occupational physicians' files. In 1990, 21 378 subjects were interviewed (88% of those contacted), and 87% were interviewed again in 1995. Chronic neck and shoulder pain satisfying specific criteria, and psychosocial working conditions were investigated by a structured self administered questionnaire and a clinical examination. Results: Prevalence (men 7.8%, women 14.8% in 1990) and incidence (men 7.3%, women 12.5% for the period 1990–95) of chronic neck and shoulder pain increased with age, and were more frequent among women than men in every birth cohort. The disappearance rate of chronic neck and shoulder pain decreased with age. Some adverse working conditions (repetitive work under time constraints, awkward work for men, repetitive work for women) contributed to the development of these disorders, independently of age. Psychosocial factors seemed to play a role in both the development and disappearance of chronic neck and shoulder pain. Data did not show specific interactions between age and working conditions. Conclusions: The aging of the workforce appears to contribute to the widespread concern about chronic neck and shoulder pain. A better understanding of work activity regulation of older workers can open up new preventive prospects. PMID:12151610

  2. [Work process and working conditions in poultry processing plants: report of a survey on occupational health surveillance].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Paulo Antonio Barros; Mendes, Jussara Maria Rosa

    2014-12-01

    This article presents the report of a survey on health surveillance activities performed in poultry processing plants in the south of Brazil. It aims to contribute to an understanding of the work process developed, the growth of the sector, the organization of labor and the confrontation with the economic model of this sector, which has been exposing employees to working conditions that undermine their health. The working conditions identified are considered largely incompatible with health and human dignity. The study supports interinstitutional intervention, especially with the Public Ministry of Labor, criticizes the weak implementation of specific government interventions in health conditions in the industry and introduces the new Regulatory Standard 36 as a positive perspective for the near future.

  3. One-against-All Weighted Dynamic Time Warping for Language-Independent and Speaker-Dependent Speech Recognition in Adverse Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianglilan; Sun, Jiping; Luo, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Considering personal privacy and difficulty of obtaining training material for many seldom used English words and (often non-English) names, language-independent (LI) with lightweight speaker-dependent (SD) automatic speech recognition (ASR) is a promising option to solve the problem. The dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm is the state-of-the-art algorithm for small foot-print SD ASR applications with limited storage space and small vocabulary, such as voice dialing on mobile devices, menu-driven recognition, and voice control on vehicles and robotics. Even though we have successfully developed two fast and accurate DTW variations for clean speech data, speech recognition for adverse conditions is still a big challenge. In order to improve recognition accuracy in noisy environment and bad recording conditions such as too high or low volume, we introduce a novel one-against-all weighted DTW (OAWDTW). This method defines a one-against-all index (OAI) for each time frame of training data and applies the OAIs to the core DTW process. Given two speech signals, OAWDTW tunes their final alignment score by using OAI in the DTW process. Our method achieves better accuracies than DTW and merge-weighted DTW (MWDTW), as 6.97% relative reduction of error rate (RRER) compared with DTW and 15.91% RRER compared with MWDTW are observed in our extensive experiments on one representative SD dataset of four speakers' recordings. To the best of our knowledge, OAWDTW approach is the first weighted DTW specially designed for speech data in adverse conditions. PMID:24520317

  4. One-against-all weighted dynamic time warping for language-independent and speaker-dependent speech recognition in adverse conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianglilan; Sun, Jiping; Luo, Zhigang

    2014-01-01

    Considering personal privacy and difficulty of obtaining training material for many seldom used English words and (often non-English) names, language-independent (LI) with lightweight speaker-dependent (SD) automatic speech recognition (ASR) is a promising option to solve the problem. The dynamic time warping (DTW) algorithm is the state-of-the-art algorithm for small foot-print SD ASR applications with limited storage space and small vocabulary, such as voice dialing on mobile devices, menu-driven recognition, and voice control on vehicles and robotics. Even though we have successfully developed two fast and accurate DTW variations for clean speech data, speech recognition for adverse conditions is still a big challenge. In order to improve recognition accuracy in noisy environment and bad recording conditions such as too high or low volume, we introduce a novel one-against-all weighted DTW (OAWDTW). This method defines a one-against-all index (OAI) for each time frame of training data and applies the OAIs to the core DTW process. Given two speech signals, OAWDTW tunes their final alignment score by using OAI in the DTW process. Our method achieves better accuracies than DTW and merge-weighted DTW (MWDTW), as 6.97% relative reduction of error rate (RRER) compared with DTW and 15.91% RRER compared with MWDTW are observed in our extensive experiments on one representative SD dataset of four speakers' recordings. To the best of our knowledge, OAWDTW approach is the first weighted DTW specially designed for speech data in adverse conditions.

  5. Work Conditions and Health and Well-Being of Latina Hotel Housekeepers.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Chin; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Sönmez, Sevil

    2016-06-01

    Hotel housekeepers are exposed to a plethora of disproportionately high work-induced hazards that can lead to adverse health consequences. Latina hotel housekeepers are rendered particularly vulnerable to elevated occupational hazards and resultant health strains due to their socioeconomic status, immigration status, language barriers, and lack of access to healthcare services. The findings from the 27 interviews with Latina hotel housekeepers indicated that the interviewees were exposed to physical, chemical, and social hazards in the workplace and suffered musculoskeletal injuries. In terms of psychological wellness, the time pressure of cleaning rooms quickly and work-related stress stemming from workplace mistreatment emerged as major work-related stressors. Recommendations are made for the introduction of multilevel interventions designed to prevent work-related injuries and illnesses and to promote healthier workplaces.

  6. Effect of femoral head size on the wear of metal on metal bearings in total hip replacements under adverse edge-loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Hajjar, Mazen; Fisher, John; Williams, Sophie; Tipper, Joanne L; Jennings, Louise M

    2013-02-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) bearings have shown low-wear rates under standard hip simulator conditions; however, retrieval studies have shown large variations in wear rates and mechanisms. High-wear in vivo has caused catastrophic complications and has been associated with steep cup-inclination angle (rotational malpositioning). However, increasing the cup-inclination angle in vitro has not replicated the increases in wear to the same extent as those observed in retrievals. Clinically relevant wear rates, patterns, and particles were observed in vitro for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings when microseparation (translational malpositioning) conditions were introduced into the gait cycle. In the present study, 28 and 36-mm MoM bearings were investigated under adverse conditions. Increasing the cup angle from 45° to 65° resulted in a significant increase in the wear rate of the 28 mm bearings. However, for the 36 mm bearings, head-rim contact did not occur under the steep cup-angle condition, and the wear rate did not increase. The introduction of microseparation to the gait cycle significantly increased the wear rate of the MoM bearings. Cup angle and head size did not influence the wear rate under microseparation conditions. This study indicated that high-in vivo wear rates were associated with edge loading due to rotational malpositioning such as high-cup-inclination angle and translational malpositioning that could occur due to several surgical factors. Translational malpositioning had a more dominant effect on the wear rate. Preclinical simulation testing should be undertaken with translational and rotational malpositioning conditions as well as standard walking cycle conditions defined by the ISO standard.

  7. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar...

  8. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar...

  9. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar...

  10. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar...

  11. 29 CFR 1620.18 - Jobs performed under similar working conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jobs performed under similar working conditions. 1620.18... THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.18 Jobs performed under similar working conditions. (a) In general. In order for the equal pay standard to apply, the jobs are required to be performed under similar...

  12. Final Report on the Mississippi Project CLEAR Voice Teacher Working Conditions Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Barnett; Fuller, Ed

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the state of Mississippi conducted a web-based survey of all school-based licensed educators in which they were asked to share their perceptions of the state of teacher working conditions in Mississippi. This report of the Mississippi Teacher Working Conditions Survey, Project CLEAR Voice (Cultivate Learning Environments to Accelerate…

  13. 20 CFR 633.305 - General benefits and working conditions for program participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General benefits and working conditions for program participants. 633.305 Section 633.305 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION... § 633.305 General benefits and working conditions for program participants. (a) Payments for...

  14. How Much Do School Principals Matter When It Comes to Teacher Working Conditions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhauser, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Teacher turnover is a challenge for U.S. public schools. Research suggests that teachers' perceptions of their school working conditions influence their leaving decisions. Related research suggests that principals may be in the best position to influence school working conditions. Using 4 years of panel data constructed from the North Carolina…

  15. 20 CFR 633.305 - General benefits and working conditions for program participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false General benefits and working conditions for program participants. 633.305 Section 633.305 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION... § 633.305 General benefits and working conditions for program participants. (a) Payments for...

  16. Teachers' Perceptions of Their Working Conditions: How Predictive of Planned and Actual Teacher Movement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladd, Helen F.

    2011-01-01

    This quantitative study examines the relationship between teachers' perceptions of their working conditions and their intended and actual departures from schools. Based on rich administrative data for North Carolina combined with a 2006 statewide survey administered to all teachers in the state, the study documents that working conditions are…

  17. A Study of Leadership Strategies and Their Impact on Teacher Working Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbalm, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Throughout this study, the researcher sought to find the key strategies needed to improve school culture and working conditions. These findings were measured by the 2010 and 2012 North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey (NC TWCS) data, as well as staff focus-group dialogue at three selected schools. The participant groups consisted of an…

  18. Working Conditions and Mental Health of Nursing Staff in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Mawn, Barbara; Gore, Rebecca

    2016-07-01

    Nursing staff in nursing homes suffer from poor mental health, probably associated with stressful working conditions. Working conditions may distribute differently among nursing assistants, licensed practical nurses, and registered nurses due to their different levels in the organizational hierarchy. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the association between working conditions and mental health among different nursing groups, and examine the potential moderating effect of job group on this association. Self-administered questionnaires were collected with 1,129 nursing staff in 15 for-profit non-unionized nursing homes. Working conditions included both physical and psychosocial domains. Multivariate linear regression modeling found that mental health was associated with different working conditions in different nursing groups: physical safety (β = 2.37, p < 0.05) and work-family conflict (β = -2.44, p < 0.01) in NAs; work-family conflict (β = -4.17, p < 0.01) in LPNs; and physical demands (β = 10.54, p < 0.05) in RNs. Job group did not moderate the association between working conditions and mental health. Future workplace interventions to improve mental health should reach to nursing staff at different levels and consider tailored working condition interventions in different nursing groups.

  19. Mental Health of Elementary Schoolteachers in Southern Brazil: Working Conditions and Health Consequences.

    PubMed

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Bonow, Clarice Alves; de Almeida, Marlise Capa Verde; Rocha, Laurelize Pereira; Borges, Anelise Miritz

    2015-01-01

    The mental health of educators is a growing problem in many countries. This study sought to identify self-reported stressful working conditions of elementary schoolteachers and the biopsychosocial consequences of those working conditions and then identify working conditions that promote well-being for teachers in the workplace. Exploratory study was done with 37 teachers. Data collection was performed using a structured interview with a questionnaire. Results show that stressful working conditions are related to inadequate salary, an excessive number of activities, and having to take work home. Biopsychosocial consequences include anxiety, stress, and sleep disorders. There was a statistically significant association between inadequate salary and anxiety (p = 0.01) and between an excessive number of activities and stress (p = 0.01). Teachers reported that a good relationship among colleagues is a working condition that promotes well-being in the workplace. The identification of stressful working conditions for teachers, the biopsychosocial consequences, and working conditions that promote well-being in the workplace are relevant to determining actions that improve the work environment and, consequently, the health of teachers.

  20. Mental Health of Elementary Schoolteachers in Southern Brazil: Working Conditions and Health Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Bonow, Clarice Alves; de Almeida, Marlise Capa Verde; Rocha, Laurelize Pereira; Borges, Anelise Miritz

    2015-01-01

    The mental health of educators is a growing problem in many countries. This study sought to identify self-reported stressful working conditions of elementary schoolteachers and the biopsychosocial consequences of those working conditions and then identify working conditions that promote well-being for teachers in the workplace. Exploratory study was done with 37 teachers. Data collection was performed using a structured interview with a questionnaire. Results show that stressful working conditions are related to inadequate salary, an excessive number of activities, and having to take work home. Biopsychosocial consequences include anxiety, stress, and sleep disorders. There was a statistically significant association between inadequate salary and anxiety (p = 0.01) and between an excessive number of activities and stress (p = 0.01). Teachers reported that a good relationship among colleagues is a working condition that promotes well-being in the workplace. The identification of stressful working conditions for teachers, the biopsychosocial consequences, and working conditions that promote well-being in the workplace are relevant to determining actions that improve the work environment and, consequently, the health of teachers. PMID:26366433

  1. Working in a hot environment; perspiration loss; a drink for persons working under hot conditions, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatzel, H.

    1978-01-01

    Losses of various nutrients through sweat of persons working under hot conditions were considered. On the basis of these considerations a supplemental drink was formulated consisting of 1 liter of water per hour containing salt, potassium chloride, iron, thiamine and ascorbic acid.

  2. Nurse overtime, working conditions, and the presence of mandatory nurse overtime regulations.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Heui

    2012-05-01

    Although more states have regulated mandatory nurse overtime, limited research has examined the impact of these regulations on the actual time nurses work and their working conditions. The purpose of this study was to compare nurse overtime and working conditions between states with and states without regulations limiting mandatory nurse overtime. Data were collected from registered nurses working in hospitals located in states with and without mandatory nurse overtime regulations; the final sample consisted of 219 nurses. No difference was found in overtime worked between nurses who worked in states with regulations or without. Those nurses working in states with regulations cared for more patients per shift and experienced more chronic nursing shortages on their nursing units than those working in states without regulation. Continuous efforts are needed to improve the implementation of regulations to reduce nurse mandatory overtime and long work hours.

  3. Flight in Adverse Environmental Condition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    to 0) exposed. llaysia A)OO. During MS approach in poor visibilityt thundeatorms and heavy rain Aircraft undershot And came to rest 1000 water * before...It calcul des avions I Is rafalt, tiles oot slot-s ith utillis Pour trotrwer dts vs~turs d"Intensiti do ratsle I PoatUt des bn. Devuls Son appart -ion...mean wind Is rather difficult. Using earth fixed sensors, a temporal *vraging Is performed for each measuring point. Out the question for the right

  4. Work-Family Balance and Energy: A Day-Level Study on Recovery Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz-Vergel, Ana Isabel; Demerouti, Evangelia; Moreno-Jimenez, Bernardo; Mayo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines whether daily recovery inhibiting and enhancing conditions predict day-levels of work-family conflict (WFC), work-family facilitation (WFF), exhaustion and vigor. Forty-nine individuals from various professional backgrounds in Spain provided questionnaire and daily survey measures over a period of five working days.…

  5. [Reasons for privileges for hard and hazardous work conditions in railway transport].

    PubMed

    Boiarchuk, I F; Elizarov, B B; Dorfman, A A

    1995-01-01

    Many railway occupations have special work conditions which considerably depend on peculiarities of work and therefore could not undergo hygienic regulation. The article gives examples of such occupations connected mostly with personal risk in railway traffic, marked work hardness, etc. Reasonable privileges and compensations are established for those occupations.

  6. Physicians' working conditions and job satisfaction: does hospital ownership in Germany make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Mache, Stefanie; Vitzthum, Karin; Nienhaus, Albert; Klapp, Burghard F; Groneberg, David A

    2009-01-01

    Background A growing number of German hospitals have been privatized with the intention of increasing cost effectiveness and improving the quality of health care. Numerous studies investigated what possible qualitative and economic consequences these changes issues might have on patient care. However, little is known about how this privatization trend relates to physicians' working conditions and job satisfaction. It was anticipated that different working conditions would be associated with different types of hospital ownership. To that end, this study's purpose is to compare how physicians, working for both public and privatized hospitals, rate their respective psychosocial working conditions and job satisfaction. Methods The study was designed as a cross-sectional comparison using questionnaire data from 203 physicians working at German hospitals of different ownership types (private for-profit, public and private nonprofit). Results The present study shows that several aspects of physicians' perceived working conditions differ significantly depending on hospital ownership. However, results also indicated that physicians' job satisfaction does not vary between different types of hospital ownership. Finally, it was demonstrated that job demands and resources are associated with job satisfaction, while type of ownership is not. Conclusion This study represents one of a few studies that investigate the effect of hospital ownership on physicians work situation and demonstrated that the type of ownership is a potential factor accounting for differences in working conditions. The findings provide an informative basis to find solutions improving physicians' work at German hospitals. PMID:19678932

  7. Perceived unfairness in working conditions: The case of public health services in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The focus on the determinants of the quality of health services in low-income countries is increasing. Health workers' motivation has emerged as a topic of substantial interest in this context. The main objective of this article is to explore health workers' experience of working conditions, linked to motivation to work. Working conditions have been pointed out as a key factor in ensuring a motivated and well performing staff. The empirical focus is on rural public health services in Tanzania. The study aims to situate the results in a broader historical context in order to enhance our understanding of the health worker discourse on working conditions. Methods The study has a qualitative study design to elicit detailed information on health workers' experience of their working conditions. The data comprise focus group discussions (FGDs) and in-depth interviews (IDIs) with administrators, clinicians and nursing staff in the public health services in a rural district in Tanzania. The study has an ethnographic backdrop based on earlier long-term fieldwork in the same part of Tanzania. Results The article provides insights into health workers' understanding and assessment of their working conditions. An experience of unsatisfactory working conditions as well as a perceived lack of fundamental fairness dominated the FGDs and IDIs. Informants reported unfairness with reference to factors such as salary, promotion, recognition of work experience, allocation of allowances and access to training as well as to human resource management. The study also revealed that many health workers lack information or knowledge about factors that influence their working conditions. Conclusions The article calls for attention to the importance of locating the discourse of unfairness related to working conditions in a broader historical/political context. Tanzanian history has been characterised by an ambiguous and shifting landscape of state regulation, economic reforms

  8. Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 cell surface hydrophobicity and survival of the cells under adverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Shakirova, Laisana; Grube, Mara; Gavare, Marita; Auzina, Lilija; Zikmanis, Peteris

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 and the survival of these cells were examined in response to varied cultivation conditions and adverse environmental conditions. An inverse linear relationship (P < 0.01) was detected between the CSH of intact L. acidophilus La5 and B. lactis Bb12 and survival of cells subjected to subsequent freezing/thawing, long-term storage or exposure to mineral and bile acids. The observed relationships were supported by significant correlations between the CSH and changes in composition of the cell envelopes (proteins, lipids and carbohydrates) of L. acidophilus La5 and B. lactis Bb12 examined using FT-IR spectroscopy and conventional biochemical analysis methods. The results also suggest that the estimates of hydrophobicity, being a generalized characteristic of cell surfaces, are important parameters to predict the ability of intact probiotic bacteria to endure extreme environments and therefore should be monitored during cultivation. A defined balance of cell components, which can be characterized by the reduced CSH values, apparently helps to ensure the resistance, improved viability and hence the overall probiotic properties of bacteria.

  9. The financial repercussions of new work-limiting health conditions for older workers.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, Jody; Stapleton, David C

    2012-01-01

    This analysis used propensity score matching to construct a comparison sample that is observationally similar at baseline interview to older workers who later experience the onset of a medical condition that limits their ability to work. Using these matched onset and comparison samples, we studied trajectories in earnings and income around onset of the work limitation. Earnings two years after onset for the work-limitation group were 50% lower and poverty rates were nearly double. Income from unemployment insurance, workers' compensation, and retirement and disability benefits offset only a small amount of the earnings declines, resulting in decreased overall household income after onset of the work-limiting condition.

  10. [Arduous working conditions for beginners: when workplace prevention becomes an economic risk].

    PubMed

    Latil, François

    2015-01-01

    The French law of 20.01.2014 recently instituted an arduous working conditions allowance. This innovated legislation is designed to improve the status of workers subject to arduous working conditions either by allowing lighter work schedules or job reclassification or early retirement. The impact of arduous working conditions on health has been clearly established, but no consensual solution has yet been proposed. Life expectancy without disability can differ by as much as 9 years between higher executives and manual workers, but the proposed solutions comprise a multitude of perverse effects. Workers may benefit from maintaining their arduous working conditions in order to preserve their right to early retirement. Companies do not necessarily have the desire or the resources to invest in prevention, which is the only consensually accepted effective measure, if they are also required to finance both training and retirement. In particular, management of the arduous working conditions allowance is very complex and entirely financed by companies. Consequently, company productivity can be impacted, leading to transfers of company headquarters, outsourcing to interim workers, replacement of jobs by automation. Unemployment could be the big winner of this conflict. Politically, arduous working conditions allowance appears to be very difficult to put into practice and can be considered to be more a promise by the government to the left and to the trade unions.

  11. Hospital nurses' working conditions in relation to motivation and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Toode, Kristi; Routasalo, Pirkko; Helminen, Mika; Suominen, Tarja

    2015-03-01

    There is a lack of empirical knowledge about nurses' perceptions of their workplace characteristics and conditions, such as level of autonomy and decision authority, work climate, teamwork, skill exploitation and learning opportunities, and their work motivation in relation to practice outputs such as patient safety. Such knowledge is needed particularly in countries, such as Estonia, where hospital systems for preventing errors and improving patient safety are in the early stages of development. This article reports the findings from a cross-sectional survey of hospital nurses in Estonia that was aimed at determining their perceptions of workplace characteristics, working conditions, work motivation and patient safety, and at exploring the relationship between these. Results suggest that perceptions of personal control over their work can affect nurses' motivation, and that perceptions of work satisfaction might be relevant to patient safety improvement work.

  12. [Working conditions of traditional birth attendants: some characteristics of rural home situations].

    PubMed

    Bessa, L F

    1999-09-01

    This is a study of qualitative and dialectical approach, which subject is to analyze the working conditions of the traditional birth attendants, in a reproductive perspective of work, and for this reason, economically undervalued. The analysis has been constructed having as central category the work, under marxist and feminist premises. Obtained results permit us to state these traditional birth attendants do their work in material and financial poor conditions, related to transportation, access, and still, working environment. The analysis of this practice has given us a possibility to present a discussion on some traits of the traditional birth attendant's work, which is characterized as a reproductive work, economically undervalued, autonomous and eminently feminine. It still configures as a social practice of popular health, legitimated by the community. In the rural domestic obstetrics practice, unequal relations were in evidence since men and women play different roles in the same occupation, being women's responsability the reproduction of the feminine role.

  13. Technical characteristics and working conditions of long-term orbiting Salyut-type space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The technical characteristics and working conditions of the Salyut-type orbiting space stations which affect the selection of preliminary versions of scientific programs and the selection of plans in conjunction with space shuttle operations are presented.

  14. Dependency in autonomous caring--night nurses' working conditions for caring in nursing.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Christine; Fagerberg, Ingegerd; Asp, Margareta

    2010-06-01

    Few research studies have focused on nurses' working conditions for caring provided at night, and these studies have mainly described nurses' work in hospital settings, not in a municipal, social-care context. In Swedish municipal care, nurses have responsibility for hundreds of older people in need of care. This working condition compromises caring encounters; instead the nurses' caring is mainly mediated through care staff (or relatives). In considering that caring based on caring encounters is fundamental to ethical nursing practice questions leads to the aim: to explore Swedish municipal night nurses' experiences of their working conditions for caring in nursing. All municipal night-duty nurses (n = 7) in a medium-sized community in Sweden participated in interviews, while six of them also wrote diaries. Thematic content analysis has been used in analysing the data. The findings revealed that the nurses experienced their working conditions for caring in nursing in the themes of Dependency in the Organisation and Other Staff, Vocational Responsibility, Deficiency in Conditions for Caring and Autonomous Caring. The findings illustrate privileged, as well as, poor working conditions for caring in nursing. The nurses' role as consultants emerge as their main function. The consultant function implies that nurses do not participate in ordinary bed-side caring, which makes it easier for them to find time for caring in situations that arise when nurses' skills, expertise and authority are called upon. Conversely the consultancy function entails short-term solution of complex caring problems, which can signify deficient caring due to prevailing working conditions. The findings also point to nurses' possible problems in fulfilling their own and vocational demands for ethics in the practice of caring in nursing related to existing working conditions.

  15. [A comprehensive assessment of the working conditions for workers in vibration-hazardous jobs].

    PubMed

    Balichieva, D V

    1992-01-01

    Comprehensive evaluation of work conditions of workers of different occupational groups (bulldozer, excavator and boring machine operators, embroideresses) helped create a new parameter of occupation harmfulness evaluation: mean arithmetic value and root-mean-square digression. The main parameters of transitory disablement morbidity were found connected with the integral parameter of harmful environmental factors, which helped define the morbidity increase per 1 harmfulness grade for men and women and predict the morbidity levels of workers depending on their work conditions.

  16. 20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... working conditions of participants in activities under title I of WIA? 667.274 Section 667.274 Employees... and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities under title I of... working conditions of employees are equally applicable to working conditions of participants engaged...

  17. 20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... working conditions of participants in activities under title I of WIA? 667.274 Section 667.274 Employees... and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities under title I of... working conditions of employees are equally applicable to working conditions of participants engaged...

  18. Relationship between work-related accidents and hot weather conditions in Tuscany (central Italy).

    PubMed

    Morabito, Marco; Cecchi, Lorenzo; Crisci, Alfonso; Modesti, Pietro Amedeo; Orlandini, Simone

    2006-07-01

    Nowadays, no studies have been published on the relationship between meteorological conditions and work-related mortality and morbidity in Italy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between hot weather conditions and hospital admissions due to work-related accidents in Tuscany (central Italy) over the period 1998-2003. Apparent temperature (AT) values were calculated to evaluate human weather discomfort due to hot conditions and then tested for work accident differences using non-parametric procedures. Present findings showed that hot weather conditions might represent a risk factor for work-related accidents in Italy during summer. In particular early warming days during June, characterized by heat discomfort, are less tolerated by workers than warming days of the following summer months. The peak of work-related accidents occurred on days characterized by high, but not extreme, thermal conditions. Workers maybe change their behaviour when heat stress increases, reducing risks by adopting preventive measures. Results suggested that days with an average daytime AT value ranged between 24.8 degrees C and 27.5 degrees C were at the highest risk of work-related accidents. In conclusion, present findings might represent the first step for the development of a watch/warning system for workers that might be used by employers for planning work activities.

  19. Combination of process and vibration data for improved condition monitoring of industrial systems working under variable operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Cárcel, C.; Jaramillo, V. H.; Mba, D.; Ottewill, J. R.; Cao, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The detection and diagnosis of faults in industrial processes is a very active field of research due to the reduction in maintenance costs achieved by the implementation of process monitoring algorithms such as Principal Component Analysis, Partial Least Squares or more recently Canonical Variate Analysis (CVA). Typically the condition of rotating machinery is monitored separately using vibration analysis or other specific techniques. Conventional vibration-based condition monitoring techniques are based on the tracking of key features observed in the measured signal. Typically steady-state loading conditions are required to ensure consistency between measurements. In this paper, a technique based on merging process and vibration data is proposed with the objective of improving the detection of mechanical faults in industrial systems working under variable operating conditions. The capabilities of CVA for detection and diagnosis of faults were tested using experimental data acquired from a compressor test rig where different process faults were introduced. Results suggest that the combination of process and vibration data can effectively improve the detectability of mechanical faults in systems working under variable operating conditions.

  20. Working Conditions of Foreign Language Teachers: Results from a Pilot Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Gomez, Coral; Albright, Jeremy J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has consistently shown that teacher working conditions are highly predictive of faculty turnover and student performance. However, very little work investigates specifically the experiences of foreign-language instructors. This paper reports results from a pilot survey of language teachers in public and private schools from across…

  1. Employees' Intentions to Retire Early: A Case of Planned Behavior and Anticipated Work Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dam, Karen; van der Vorst, Janine D. M.; van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the early retirement intentions of 346 older Dutch employees by extending the theory of planned behavior with anticipated work conditions. The results showed that employees who felt a pressure from their spouse to retire early had a strong intention to leave the work force before the official retirement age, that is 65.…

  2. 20 CFR 655.732 - What is the second LCA requirement, regarding working conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What is the second LCA requirement, regarding... Visas in Specialty Occupations § 655.732 What is the second LCA requirement, regarding working... working conditions requirement. The second LCA requirement shall be satisfied when the employer...

  3. 20 CFR 655.732 - What is the second LCA requirement, regarding working conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is the second LCA requirement, regarding... Visas in Specialty Occupations § 655.732 What is the second LCA requirement, regarding working... working conditions requirement. The second LCA requirement shall be satisfied when the employer...

  4. 20 CFR 655.732 - What is the second LCA requirement, regarding working conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What is the second LCA requirement, regarding... Visas in Specialty Occupations § 655.732 What is the second LCA requirement, regarding working... working conditions requirement. The second LCA requirement shall be satisfied when the employer...

  5. 20 CFR 655.732 - What is the second LCA requirement, regarding working conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What is the second LCA requirement, regarding... Visas in Specialty Occupations § 655.732 What is the second LCA requirement, regarding working... working conditions requirement. The second LCA requirement shall be satisfied when the employer...

  6. The Views of New Teachers at Private Teaching Institutions about Working Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Kursad; Altinkurt, Yahya

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of the research was to determine the views of teachers about working conditions working at private teaching institutions for 5 years or less. The research was designed as a phenomenology model. The data were collected by focus group interview technique of qualitative research method. 10 teachers from private teaching institutions…

  7. Financial Measures Project: Measuring Financial Conditions of Colleges and Universities, 1978 Working Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coldren, Sharon L., Ed.

    Papers are presented from a 1978 working conference on measuring financial conditions of colleges and universities. Contents include the following: "The Federal Government's Interest in the Development of Financial Measures" by M. Chandler; "Improving the Conceptual Framework for Measuring Financial Condition Using Institutional…

  8. Personality Development at Work: Workplace Conditions, Personality Changes, and the Corresponsive Principle

    PubMed Central

    Le, Kimdy; Donnellan, M. Brent; Conger, Rand

    2013-01-01

    Objective Investigations concerning adult personality development have increasingly focused on factors that are associated with apparent personality trait changes. The current study contributes to this literature by replicating and extending previous research concerning personality trait development in young adulthood and perceptions of workplace conditions. Method Analyses were based on up to 442 individuals who participated in the ongoing Family Transitions Project (e.g., Conger & Conger, 2002). The current analyses included personality trait data from 1994 and 2003, high-school grades and SES indicators from 1994, and reports about work conditions in 2001, 2003, and 2005. Results Personality attributes were prospectively associated with work conditions and income. Findings also support the corresponsive principle of personality development (e.g. Roberts, Caspi, & Moffitt, 2003): Traits that were prospectively associated with particular workplace conditions often seemed to be accentuated by those conditions. Conclusions Personality traits are prospectively associated with perceptions of the workplace. Workplace conditions are also associated with trait development. PMID:23336723

  9. Association among Working Hours, Occupational Stress, and Presenteeism among Wage Workers: Results from the Second Korean Working Conditions Survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the present study was to identify the association between presenteeism and long working hours, shiftwork, and occupational stress using representative national survey data on Korean workers. Methods We analyzed data from the second Korean Working Conditions Survey (KWCS), which was conducted in 2010, in which a total of 6,220 wage workers were analyzed. The study population included the economically active population aged above 15 years, and living in the Republic of Korea. We used the chi-squared test and multivariate logistic regression to test the statistical association between presenteeism and working hours, shiftwork, and occupational stress. Results Approximately 19% of the workers experienced presenteeism during the previous 12 months. Women had higher rates of presenteeism than men. We found a statistically significant dose–response relationship between working hours and presenteeism. Shift workers had a slightly higher rate of presenteeism than non-shift workers, but the difference was not statistically significant. Occupational stress, such as high job demand, lack of rewards, and inadequate social support, had a significant association with presenteeism. Conclusions The present study suggests that long working hours and occupational stress are significantly related to presenteeism. PMID:24661575

  10. Associations between childhood adversity, adult stressful life events, and past-year drug use disorders in the National Epidemiological Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).

    PubMed

    Myers, Bronwyn; McLaughlin, Katie A; Wang, Shuai; Blanco, Carlos; Stein, Dan J

    2014-12-01

    Stress sensitization, whereby CA lowers tolerance to later stressors, has been proposed as a potential mechanism explaining the association between exposure to childhood adversities (CA) and drug use disorders in adulthood. However, this mechanism remains untested. This paper begins to address this gap through exploring associations between CA exposure and stressful events in adulthood for predicting drug use disorders. We used data drawn from Wave 2 of the U.S. National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (n = 34,653) to explore whether the association between past-year stressful life events and the 12-month prevalence of disordered cannabis, stimulant, and opiate use varied by the number of types of CA that an individual was exposed to. Past-year stressful life events were associated with an increased risk of cannabis, stimulant, and opiate use disorders among men and women. Exposure to CA was associated with increased risk for disordered cannabis use among men and women and opiate use among men only. Finally, we found significant associations between exposure to CA and past-year stressful life events in predicting disordered drug use, but only for women in relation to disordered stimulant and opiate use. Findings are suggestive of possible stress sensitization effects in predicting disordered stimulant and opiate use among women. Implications of these findings for the prevention and treatment of drug use disorders and for future research are discussed.

  11. Associations between childhood adversity, adult stressful life events, and past-year drug use disorders in the National Epidemiological Study of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC)

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Bronwyn; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Wang, Shuai; Blanco, Carlos; Stein, Dan J.

    2014-01-01

    Stress sensitization, whereby CA lowers tolerance to later stressors, has been proposed as a potential mechanism explaining the association between exposure to childhood adversities (CA) and drug use disorders in adulthood. However this mechanism remains untested. This paper begins to address this gap through exploring associations between CA exposure and stressful events in adulthood for predicting drug use disorders. We used data drawn from Wave 2 of the U.S. National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (n=34,653) to explore whether the association between past-year stressful life events and the 12-month prevalence of disordered cannabis, stimulant and opiate use varied by the number of types of CA that an individual was exposed to. Past-year stressful life events were associated with an increased risk of cannabis, stimulant and opiate use disorders among men and women. Exposure to CA was associated with increased risk for disordered cannabis use among men and women and opiate use among men only. Finally, we found significant associations between exposure to CA and past year stressful life events in predicting disordered drug use, but only for women in relation to disordered stimulant and opiate use. Findings are suggestive of possible stress sensitization effects in predicting disordered stimulant and opiate use among women. Implications of these findings for the prevention and treatment of drug use disorders and for future research are discussed. PMID:25134042

  12. [Working conditions and morbidity rate in employers at the South-East railway transport].

    PubMed

    Kopeikin, N F; Miliaev, I A; Danilov, A V; Tikhomirov, M S

    2015-01-01

    In the article there are presented the results of the examination of working conditions atfactories of the South-Eastern Railway, which has lost its effectiveness due to the action of certain laws. The situation on labor conditions was shown to be not entirely safe. There is given an analysis of the morbidity due to the temporary disability and occupational disease rates in foot-plate staff workers. There was made an emphasis on working conditions and morbidity rate in foot-plate staff workers. There is posed a question about the inclusion of essential hypertension in foot-plate staff workers in the list of occupational diseases.

  13. U.S. Food System Working Conditions as an Issue of Food Safety.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Megan L; Smith, Katherine C; Pollack, Keshia M; Neff, Roni A; Rutkow, Lainie

    2017-02-01

    Food workers' health and hygiene are common pathways to foodborne disease outbreaks. Improving food system jobs is important to food safety because working conditions impact workers' health, hygiene, and safe food handling. Stakeholders from key industries have advanced working conditions as an issue of public safety in the United States. Yet, for the food industry, stakeholder engagement with this topic is seemingly limited. To understand this lack of action, we interviewed key informants from organizations recognized for their agenda-setting role on food-worker issues. Findings suggest that participants recognize the work standards/food safety connection, yet perceived barriers limit adoption of a food safety frame, including more pressing priorities (e.g., occupational safety); poor fit with organizational strategies and mission; and questionable utility, including potential negative consequences. Using these findings, we consider how public health advocates may connect food working conditions to food and public safety and elevate it to the public policy agenda.

  14. Working conditions, visual fatigue, and mental health among systems analysts in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, L; Debert-Ribeiro, M

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the association between working conditions and visual fatigue and mental health among systems analysts living in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out by a multidisciplinary team. It included: ergonomic analysis of work, individual and group interviews, and 553 self applied questionnaires in two enterprises. The comparison population numbered 136 workers in different occupations. Results: The study population mainly comprised young males. Among systems analysts, visual fatigue was associated with mental workload, inadequate equipment and workstation, low level of worker participation, being a woman, and subject's attitude of fascination by the computer. Nervousness and intellectual performance were associated with mental workload, inadequate equipment, work environment, and tools. Continuing education and leisure were protective factors. Work interfering in family life was associated with mental workload, difficulties with clients, strict deadlines, subject's attitude of fascination by the computer, and finding solutions of work problems outside work. Family support, satisfaction in life and work, and adequate work environment and tools were protective factors. Work interfering in personal life was associated with subject's attitude of fascination by the computer, strict deadlines, inadequate equipment, and high level of work participation. Satisfaction in life and work and continuing education were protective factors. The comparison population did not share common working factors with the systems analysts in the regression analysis. Conclusions: The main health effects of systems analysts' work were expressed by machine anthropomorphism, being very demanding, mental acceleration, mental absorption, and difficulty in dealing with emotions. PMID:14691269

  15. Work and Mental Complaints: Are Response Outcome Expectancies More Important Than Work Conditions and Number of Subjective Health Complaints?

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Tone Langjordet; Indahl, Aage; Eriksen, Hege Randi; Ihlebæk, Camilla; Tveito, Torill Helene

    2016-06-24

    Purpose Investigate the relative effect of response outcome expectancies, work conditions, and number of subjective health complaints (SHC) on anxiety and depression in Norwegian employees. Learned response outcome expectancies are important contributors to health. Individual differences in the expectancy to cope with workplace and general life demands may be important for how work conditions influence health. Method A survey was conducted among 1746 municipal employees (mean age 44.1, SD = 11.5, 81.5 % female), as part of a randomized controlled trial. This cross-sectional study used baseline data. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed. Outcome variables were anxiety and depression; response outcome expectancies, work conditions, and number of SHC were independent variables. Results A high number of SHC was a significant factor in explaining anxiety (OR 1.26), depression (OR 1.22) and comorbid anxiety and depression (OR 1.31). A high degree of no and/or negative response outcome expectancies was a significant factor in explaining depression (OR 1.19) and comorbid anxiety and depression (OR 1.28). The variance accounted for in the full models was 14 % for anxiety, 23 % for depression, and 41 % for comorbid anxiety and depression. Conclusion A high number of SHC, and a high degree of no and/or negative response outcome expectancies were associated with anxiety and depression. The strongest association was found for number of SHC. However, previous studies indicate that it may not be possible to prevent the occurrence of SHC. We suggest that workplace interventions targeting anxiety and depression could focus on influencing and altering employees' response outcome expectancies.

  16. Report of a Scientific Working Group on Serious Adverse Events following Mectizan(R) treatment of onchocerciasis in Loa loa endemic areas.

    PubMed

    2003-10-24

    The occurrence of Serious Adverse Experiences (SAEs) following Mectizan(R) treatment of onchocerciasis in Loa loa endemic areas has been increasingly reported over the past decade. These SAEs include a severely disabling, and potentially fatal, encephalopathy, which appears to correlate with a high load of L. loa microfilariae (> 30,000 mf/ml).Previous consultations organized by the Mectizan(R) Donation Program (MDP) in 1995 and 1999 have developed useful "case" definitions of encephalopathic SAEs following Mectizan(R) treatment and have summarized available evidence on its pathogenesis and optimal clinical management. At both meetings, the need for better understanding of the pathogenesis of the encephalopathy was emphasized, including the need for biological and autopsy specimens from the affected cases.Following a recommendation at the Joint Action Forum of the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control in December 2001, the MDP, on behalf of the Mectizan(R) Expert Committee, organized a Scientific Working Group on L. loa associated SAEs following Mectizan(R) treatment in May 2002. The present report includes the background, new evidence, conclusions and recommendations from that Scientific Working Group. The following points represent a summary of the present status:1. Although there are more and better quality clinical and epidemiological data on L. loa, the pathogenesis of the Mectizan(R)-related L. loa encephalopathy remains obscure.2. Very limited progress has been made in research on the pathogenesis of encephalopathy, because of the lack of specimens from cases, and the lack of animal models.3. There has been no particular breakthrough in terms of the medical management of patients with L. loa encephalopathy; however, a favorable outcome usually results from prompt general nursing and nutritional care which remain the major interventions.The main recommendations for future actions are as follows:1. Validate and update the mapping of L. loa with a

  17. Working conditions in mid-life and mental health in older ages.

    PubMed

    Wahrendorf, Morten; Blane, David; Bartley, Mel; Dragano, Nico; Siegrist, Johannes

    2013-03-01

    This article illustrates the importance of previous working conditions during mid-life (between 40 and 55) for mental health among older retired men and women (60 or older) across 13 European countries. We link information on health from the second wave (2006-2007) of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) with information on respondents' working life collected retrospectively in the SHARELIFE interview (2008-2009). To measure working conditions, we rely on core assumptions of existing theoretical models of work stress (the demand-control-support and the effort-reward imbalance model) and distinguish four types of unhealthy working conditions: (1) a stressful psychosocial work environment (as assessed by the two work stress models) (2) a disadvantaged occupational position throughout the whole period of mid-life, (3) experience of involuntary job loss, and (4) exposure to job instability. Health after labour market exit is measured using depressive symptoms, as measured by the EURO-D depression scale. Main results show that men and women who experienced psychosocial stress at work or had low occupational positions during mid-life had significantly higher probabilities of high depressive symptoms during retirement. Additionally, men with unstable working careers and an involuntary job loss were at higher risks to report high depressive symptoms in later life. These associations remain significant after controlling for workers' health and social position prior mid-life. These findings support the assumption that mental health of retirees who experienced poor working conditions during mid-life is impaired.

  18. Country-Specific Conditions for Work and Family Reconciliation: An Attempt at Quantification.

    PubMed

    Matysiak, Anna; Węziak-Białowolska, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    The country-specific conditions for work and family reconciliation (family policies, labour market structures and gender norms) are believed to influence tensions between paid employment and childbearing. So far there have been very few attempts to quantify these conditions into a single measure which would allow for comparisons across countries of the magnitude of the barriers that working parents encounter. Such a quantitative index could also facilitate a quantitative investigation of the association between the macro-level conditions for work and family reconciliation and fertility at the individual level. In this paper, we seek to fill this gap by proposing a quantitative index of country-specific conditions for work and family reconciliation, which may be used, for example, in a two-level regression framework. The index takes into account all three components of the conditions for work and family reconciliation. We also perform a series of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses which verify the robustness of our assumptions and which illustrate the range of the index volatility.

  19. Working conditions and effects of ISO 9000 in six furniture-making companies: implementation and processes.

    PubMed

    Karltun, J; Axelsson, J; Eklund, J

    1998-08-01

    What effects will the implementation of the quality standard ISO 9000 have regarding working conditions and competitive advantages? Which are the most important change process characteristics for assuring improved working conditions and other desired effects? These are the main questions behind this study of six furniture-making companies which implemented ISO 9000 during the period 1991-1994. The results show that customer requirement was the dominant goal to implement ISO 9000. Five of the six companies succeeded in gaining certification. The influence on working conditions was limited, but included better order and housekeeping, more positive attitudes towards discussing quality shortcomings, a few workplace improvements, work enrichment caused by additional tasks within the quality system and a better understanding of external customer demands. Among the negative effects were new, apparently meaningless, tasks for individual workers as well as more stress and more physically strenuous work. The effects on the companies included a decrease in external quality-related costs and improved delivery precision. The study confirms the importance for efficient change of the design of the change process, and identifies 'improvement methodology' as the most important process characteristic. Improved working conditions are enhanced by added relevant strategic goals and by a participative implementation process.

  20. Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?

    PubMed Central

    Mörelius, Evalotte; Gustafsson, Per A.; Ekberg, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout. Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments. Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) (n = 33) and nurses working in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP) (n = 14) using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person). Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once. Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient, poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores. Conclusion. When comparing these nurses with existing norm data for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses. Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health. PMID:23878734

  1. A Five Day Training Course for Migrant Health Project Personnel in the Surveillance of Health Hazards of Sanitation Conditions in the Working and Living Environments of Migrant Farmworkers (Albany, New York, October 5-10, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besinaiz, Carlos, Ed.; Aranda, Roberto, Ed.

    The course aims to train migrant health personnel to recognize and identify adverse sanitary conditions related to the migrant farmworkers' living and working environments, and to outline approaches for the presentation and alleviation of health hazards through the referral of recognized sanitary deficiencies and code violations to responsible…

  2. Organizational commitment, work environment conditions, and life satisfaction among Iranian nurses.

    PubMed

    Vanaki, Zohreh; Vagharseyyedin, Seyyed Abolfazl

    2009-12-01

    Employee commitment to the organization is a crucial issue in today's health-care market. In Iran, few studies have sought to evaluate the factors that contribute to forms of commitment. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between nurses' organizational commitment, work environment conditions, and life satisfaction. A cross-sectional design was utilized. Questionnaires were distributed to all the staff nurses who had permanent employment (with at least 2 years of experience in nursing) in the five hospitals affiliated to Birjand Medical Sciences University. Two hundred and fifty participants returned completed questionnaires. Most were female and married. The correlation of the total scores of nurses' affective organizational commitment and work environment conditions indicated a significant and positive relationship. Also, a statistically significant relationship was found between affective organizational commitment and life satisfaction. The implementation of a comprehensive program to improve the work conditions and life satisfaction of nurses could enhance their organizational commitment.

  3. Early Adverse Experiences and the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bick, Johanna; Nelson, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    Children exposed to various forms of adversity early in life are at increased risk for a broad range of developmental difficulties, affecting both cognitive and emotional adjustment. We review a growing body of evidence suggesting that exposure to adverse circumstances affects the developing brain in ways that increase risk for a myriad of problems. We focus on two forms of adversity, one in which children are exposed to childhood maltreatment in family environments, and another in which children are exposed to extreme psychosocial deprivation in contexts of institutional rearing. We discuss ways in which each of these experiences represent violations of species-expected caregiving conditions, thereby imposing challenges to the developing brain. We also review emerging data pointing to the effectiveness of early intervention in remediating neurodevelopmental consequences associated with maltreatment or institutional rearing. We conclude by discussing implications of this work for public health efforts and highlight important directions for the field. PMID:26334107

  4. Obesity/Overweight and the Role of Working Conditions: A Qualitative, Participatory Investigation.

    PubMed

    Nobrega, Suzanne; Champagne, Nicole; Abreu, Marlene; Goldstein-Gelb, Marcy; Montano, Mirna; Lopez, Isabel; Arevalo, Jonny; Bruce, Suezanne; Punnett, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The rising U.S. prevalence of obesity has generated significant concern and demonstrates striking socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities. Most interventions target individual behaviors, sometimes in combination with improving the physical environment in the community but rarely involving modifications of the work environment. With 3.6 million workers earning at or below the federal minimum wage, it is imperative to understand the impact of working conditions on health and weight for lower income workers. To investigate this question, a university-community partnership created a participatory research team and conducted eight focus groups, in English and Spanish, with people holding low-wage jobs in various industries. Analysis of transcripts identified four themes: physically demanding work (illnesses, injuries, leisure-time physical activity), psychosocial work stressors (high demands, low control, low social support, poor treatment), food environment at work (available food choices, kitchen equipment), and time pressure (scheduling, having multiple jobs and responsibilities). Physical and psychosocial features of work were identified as important antecedents for overweight. In particular, nontraditional work shifts and inflexible schedules limited participants' ability to adhere to public health recommendations for diet and physical activity. Workplace programs to address obesity in low-wage workers must include the effect of working conditions as a fundamental starting point.

  5. National working conditions surveys in Latin America: comparison of methodological characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Merino-Salazar, Pamela; Artazcoz, Lucía; Campos-Serna, Javier; Gimeno, David; Benavides, Fernando G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: High-quality and comparable data to monitor working conditions and health in Latin America are not currently available. In 2007, multiple Latin American countries started implementing national working conditions surveys. However, little is known about their methodological characteristics. Objective: To identify commonalities and differences in the methodologies of working conditions surveys (WCSs) conducted in Latin America through 2013. Methods: The study critically examined WCSs in Latin America between 2007 and 2013. Sampling design, data collection, and questionnaire content were compared. Results: Two types of surveys were identified: (1) surveys covering the entire working population and administered at the respondent's home and (2) surveys administered at the workplace. There was considerable overlap in the topics covered by the dimensions of employment and working conditions measured, but less overlap in terms of health outcomes, prevention resources, and activities. Conclusions: Although WCSs from Latin America are similar, there was heterogeneity across surveyed populations and location of the interview. Reducing differences in surveys between countries will increase comparability and allow for a more comprehensive understanding of occupational health in the region. PMID:26079314

  6. Job Burnout, Work Engagement and Self-reported Treatment for Health Conditions in South Africa.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Leon T; Pienaar, Jaco; Rothmann, Sebastiaan

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the study being reported here was to investigate the relationship of job burnout and work engagement with self-reported received treatment for health conditions (cardiovascular condition, high cholesterol, depression, diabetes, hypertension and irritable bowel syndrome), while controlling for age, gender, smoking and alcohol use. The sample comprised 7895 employees from a broad range of economic sectors in the South African working population. A cross-sectional survey design was used for the study. Structural equation modelling methods were implemented with a weighted least squares approach. The results showed that job burnout had a positive relationship with self-reported received treatment for depression, diabetes, hypertension and irritable bowel syndrome. Work engagement did not have any significant negative or positive relationships with the treatment for these health conditions. The results of this study make stakeholders aware of the relationship between job burnout, work engagement and self-reported treatment for health conditions. Evidence for increased reporting of treatment for ill-health conditions due to burnout was found. Therefore, attempts should be made to manage job burnout to prevent ill-health outcomes.

  7. Factors of working conditions and prolonged fatigue among teachers at public elementary and junior high schools.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Midori; Wada, Koji; Wang, Guoqin; Kawashima, Masatoshi; Yoshino, Yae; Sakaguchi, Hiroko; Ohta, Hiroshi; Miyaoka, Hitoshi; Aizawa, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged fatigue among elementary and junior high school teachers not only damages their health but also affects the quality of education. The aim of this study was to determine the factors of working conditions associated with prolonged fatigue among teachers at public elementary and junior high schools. We distributed a self-reported, anonymous questionnaire to 3,154 teachers (1,983 in elementary schools, 1,171 in junior high schools) working in public schools in a city in Japan. They were asked to assess 18 aspects of their working conditions using a seven-point Likert scale. Prolonged fatigue was measured using the Japanese version of the checklist individual strength questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the association between working conditions and prolonged fatigue. Gender, age, and school type were introduced as confounders. In all, 2,167 teachers participated in this study. Results showed that qualitative and quantitative workload (time pressure due to heavy workload, interruptions, physically demanding job, extra work at home), communication with colleagues (poor communication, lack of support), and career factors (underestimation of performance by the board of education or supervisors, occupational position not reflecting training, lack of prospects for work, job insecurity) were associated with prolonged fatigue.

  8. Adverse events after Japanese encephalitis vaccination: review of post-marketing surveillance data from Japan and the United States. The VAERS Working Group.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Pool, V; Tsai, T F; Chen, R T

    2000-07-01

    We determined the reporting rates for adverse events following the administration of inactivated mouse-brain derived Japanese encephalitis vaccine (JEV) based on post-marketing surveillance data from Japan and the United States. The rate of total adverse events per 100,000 doses was 2.8 in Japan and 15.0 in the United States. In Japan, 17 neurological disorders were reported from April 1996 to October 1998 for a rate of 0.2 per 100,000 doses. In the United States, no serious neurological adverse events temporally associated with JEV were reported from January 1993 to June 1999. Rates for systemic hypersensitivity reactions were 0.8 and 6.3 per 100,000 doses in Japan and the United States, respectively. Passively collected VAERS surveillance data indicate that characteristic hypersensitivity reactions with a delayed onset continue to occur among JEV recipients and that conservative recommendations limiting its use to travelers at high risk of infection with Japanese encephalitis are appropriate.

  9. Working conditions of Iranian hand-sewn shoe workers and associations with musculoskeletal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Dianat, Iman; Salimi, Arezou

    2014-01-01

    The working conditions and the prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms among 180 Iranian hand-sewn shoe workers were evaluated in this cross-sectional study. Data were collected using both questionnaire (for assessing musculoskeletal symptoms and associated risk factors) and direct observations of posture (by the Rapid Upper Limb Assessment [RULA] method). The prevalence and severity of symptoms was very high among the study population. The mean RULA grand score of 6.2 indicates that in most cases the workers' postures at their workstations need to be investigated and some changes are required immediately. Multiple logistic regression models indicated that the job experience, daily working hours, duration of continuous work without breaks, feeling pressure due to work and working postures were significantly associated with musculoskeletal symptoms of different body regions. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for hand-sewing tasks. These findings can help to better understand the working conditions of those jobs involving hand-sewing operation and highlight the potential for ergonomic interventions to reduce musculoskeletal symptoms among these working groups.

  10. Factors associated with pharmacists’ perceptions of their working conditions and safety and effectiveness of patient care

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Nicole W.; Lynd, Larry D.; Gastonguay, Louise; Li, Kathy; Nakagawa, Bob; Marra, Carlo A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent years, the role of pharmacists has changed, as have various provincial legislations, which now allow pharmacists to provide additional health services to patients. With these changes comes growing concern about how well the current pharmacy working environment is adapting and whether it may also be creating work-related stress that may contribute to potentially unsafe practices of patient care. Methods: To characterize the current working conditions of pharmacists in British Columbia, an online survey was developed and distributed to all College of Pharmacists of BC (CPBC) registrants by email. The survey consisted of questions on pharmacists’ demographics, practice setting and perceptions of workplace conditions. Responses were collected from October 1 to November 10, 2013. All data were summarized using descriptive statistics, and regression models were constructed to assess the association between various factors and pharmacists’ self-reported working conditions. Results: Twenty-three percent (1241/5300) of pharmacists registered with the CPBC responded, with 78% working in the community pharmacy setting (58% chain, 19% independent). Pharmacists mostly disagreed with the statements that they had enough time for breaks or lunches or to do their jobs, as well as enough staffing support. Pharmacists’ perceptions of their workplace environment were negatively associated with workplace-imposed advanced service quotas (for medication reviews, immunizations and prescription adaptations); being employed at chain store pharmacies, compared to independent pharmacies or hospitals/long-term care settings; and higher prescription volume. Discussion: Pharmacists working in chain community pharmacies who are required to meet monthly quotas for expanded services reported a substantial negative impact on their working conditions and perceived safety of patient care. Can Pharm J (Ott) 2016;149:xx-xx. PMID:26798374

  11. [Characteristics of autonomic regulations in miners working in hard conditions of coal mines].

    PubMed

    Perederiĭ, H S; Ivanov, V V

    2004-01-01

    72 miners aged from 30 till 40 years have been surveyed. It was established that to achieve socially acceptable results the miners use corresponding strategy doing their job. Under the influence of the work the functional states mediated not only by conditions of working environment but also by resistivity of the organism are developed. It is shown that highly productive, reliable and effective work is possible under adequate interactions of central and autonomic mechanisms of regulation. Alteration in these interactions, particularly, non-adequate centralization of management processes decreases physical capacity for work. Enhancement of sympathetic effects on periphery that leads to development of hypertensive reactions has been observed. Such alterations are accompanied by an increase in physiological cost of work and decreased productivity of labor.

  12. Individual and Flexible: Working Conditions in the Practice of Swedish Distance-Based Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindberg, J. Ola; Olofsson, Anders D.

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on the working conditions within Swedish ICT-supported distance-based teacher education. Data collected from teacher trainees are analyzed and discussed in relation to Swedish governmental policies concerning teacher education and distance education and theories emphasizing the importance of social aspects of education. The…

  13. Employment, Work Conditions, and the Home Environment in Single-Mother Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lleras, Christy

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of employment status and work conditions on the quality of the home environment provided by single mothers of preschool-age children. Multivariate analyses were conducted using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. The results indicate that employment status is not a significant predictor of the…

  14. Psychological States and Working Conditions Buffer Beginning Teachers' Intention to Leave the Job

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Neve, Debbie; Devos, Geert

    2017-01-01

    The high turnover rates of beginning teachers are an issue of continuing concern in education. However, little is known about the motivational process that encourages beginning teachers to stay in the teaching profession. This study investigated how working conditions (job insecurity, teacher autonomy, collective responsibility, reflective…

  15. Collegial Support and Novice Teachers' Perceptions of Working Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pogodzinski, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Using survey data gathered from novice teachers at the elementary and middle school level across 11 districts, this study examined variation in perceptions of working conditions related to workload and access to resources and further identified the association between these perceptions and the quality of support the novices received from their…

  16. The Impact of Principal Leadership on Working Conditions and Teacher Retention in North Carolina Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomon, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Research indicates that administrative leadership is the most important factor in determining the climate of a school, and there are specific leadership attributes such as improving working conditions that promote retention. This study seeks to identify leadership behaviors that positively affect quality teacher retention among two particular…

  17. Teacher Working Conditions: What Matters and Why. The Informed Educator Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Sherika; Protheroe, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    This "Informed Educator" looks at recent research on teacher opinions about their working conditions to address the question "what matters to teachers?" District and school leaders can use this information to strengthen their efforts to recruit and retain high-quality teachers and, in addition, better support teacher efforts to educate students.…

  18. 20 CFR 632.82 - Benefits and working conditions for participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Benefits and working conditions for participants. 632.82 Section 632.82 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Program Design and Management §...

  19. 20 CFR 632.82 - Benefits and working conditions for participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Benefits and working conditions for participants. 632.82 Section 632.82 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Program Design and Management §...

  20. 20 CFR 632.82 - Benefits and working conditions for participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Benefits and working conditions for participants. 632.82 Section 632.82 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Program Design and Management §...

  1. Working Conditions as Risk or Resiliency Factors for Teachers of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Susan Fread; Johns, Beverley H.; Mounsteven, Joyce; Olorunda, Olufunmilola

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study examined working conditions reported by special education teachers of students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) to identify factors common to teachers likely to leave their positions within the next 2 years and factors common to those likely to stay. Survey responses from an international sample of 776 teachers and…

  2. Impact of Teacher Perceptions of Their Working Conditions on Elementary School Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vause, Bonnie W.

    2012-01-01

    Reading and math proficiency is important for all students because education is a leading indicator of personal health and success and national prosperity. Improved student performance has also been linked to teacher satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of teacher perceptions of their working conditions on student…

  3. Good Job, Good Life? Working Conditions and Quality of Life in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drobnic, Sonja; Beham, Barbara; Prag, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Cross-national comparisons generally show large differences in life satisfaction of individuals within and between European countries. This paper addresses the question of whether and how job quality and working conditions contribute to the quality of life of employed populations in nine strategically selected EU countries: Finland, Sweden, the…

  4. Learning-Conducive Work: A Survey of Learning Conditions in Norwegian Workplaces. CEDEFOP Panorama Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skule, Sveinung; Reichborn, Anders N.; Leren, Iver Jan, Ed.

    In this report, learning conditions in Norwegian workplaces were examined to identify ways of making workplaces more conducive to learning. Data were collected through interviews in 11 firms and a questionnaire survey of 1,300 private sector and 200 public sector employees. Opportunities to learn through work varied widely. Older women with little…

  5. The Working Conditions and Induction Support of Early Career Special Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billingsley, Bonnie; Carlson, Elaine; Klein, Sheri

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a profile of early career special educators' (n= 1,153) working conditions, induction support, and career plans using data from the Study of Personnel Needs in Special Education (SPeNSE). The majority of respondents are Caucasion and female, and 80% are certified for their main assignments. Most respondents reported receiving…

  6. Situating Special Educators' Instructional Quality and Their Students' Outcomes within the Conditions Shaping Their Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bettini, Elizabeth; Park, Yujeong; Benedict, Amber; Kimerling, Jenna; Leite, Walter

    2016-01-01

    This investigation examined relationships among special education teachers' working conditions (e.g., classroom characteristics, administrative support), personal characteristics (e.g., experience, certification status, self-efficacy), instructional quality, and students with disabilities' reading achievement and behavioral outcomes. Data from the…

  7. Work Conditions and the Food Choice Coping Strategies of Employed Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Carol M.; Farrell, Tracy J.; Blake, Christine E.; Jastran, Margaret; Wethington, Elaine; Bisogni, Carole A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: How work conditions relate to parents' food choice coping strategies. Design: Pilot telephone survey. Setting: City in the northeastern United States (US). Participants: Black, white, and Hispanic employed mothers (25) and fathers (25) randomly recruited from low-/moderate-income zip codes; 78% of those reached and eligible…

  8. The Struggles of Women Industrial Workers To Improve Work Conditions in the Progressive Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Nancy J.

    1999-01-01

    Offers a lesson plan that addresses the working conditions endured by women in the Progressive Era and their struggles for womens rights in the workplace. Strives to demonstrate the similarities between the plights of the Progressive Era women to those of women workers in the 1990s. (CMK)

  9. Perceived Working Conditions and Personal Resources Predicting Mental Health Counselor Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Isabel A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the influence of counselor perceived working conditions, length of time in field, counselor gender, mindfulness attitudes, compassion satisfaction, emotion-focused coping, problem focused coping, and maladaptive coping on levels of burnout and compassion fatigue in a sample of 213 mental health counselors. Cross-sectional…

  10. Teacher Working Conditions in Charter Schools and Traditional Public Schools: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ni, Yongmei

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: Teachers affect student performance through their interaction with students in the context of the classrooms and schools where teaching and learning take place. Although it is widely assumed that supportive working conditions improve the quality of instruction and teachers' willingness to remain in a school, little is known…

  11. Relationships among employees' working conditions, mental health, and intention to leave in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Punnett, Laura; Gore, Rebecca

    2014-02-01

    Employee turnover is a large and expensive problem in the long-term care environment. Stated intention to leave is a reliable indicator of likely turnover, but actual predictors, especially for nursing assistants, have been incompletely investigated. This quantitative study identifies the relationships among employees' working conditions, mental health, and intention to leave. Self-administered questionnaires were collected with 1,589 employees in 18 for-profit nursing homes. A working condition index for the number of beneficial job features was constructed. Poisson regression modeling found that employees who reported four positive features were 77% less likely to state strong intention to leave (PR = 0.23, p < .001). The strength of relationship between working conditions and intention to leave was slightly mediated by employee mental health. Effective workplace intervention programs must address work organization features to reduce employee intention to leave. Healthy workplaces should build better interpersonal relationships, show respect for employee work, and involve employees in decision-making processes.

  12. International perspectives on psychosocial working conditions, mental health, and stress of dairy farm operators.

    PubMed

    Lunner Kolstrup, Christina; Kallioniemi, Marja; Lundqvist, Peter; Kymäläinen, Hanna-Riitta; Stallones, Lorann; Brumby, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Dairy farm operators-farmers, workers, and family members-are faced with many demands and stressors in their daily work and these appear to be shared across countries and cultures. Dairy operators experience high psychosocial demands with respect to a hard work and production ethos, economic influences, and social and environmental responsibility. Furthermore, both traditional and industrial farms are highly dependent on external conditions, such as weather, fluctuating markets, and regulations from government authorities. Possible external stressors include disease outbreaks, taxes related to dairy production, and recent negative societal attitudes to farming in general. Dairy farm operators may have very few or no opportunities to influence and control these external conditions, demands, and expectations. High work demands and expectations coupled with low control and lack of social support can lead to a poor psychosocial work environment, with increased stress levels, ill mental health, depression, and, in the worst cases, suicide. Internationally, farmers with ill mental health have different health service options depending on their location. Regardless of location, it is initially the responsibility of the individual farmer and farm family to handle mental health and stress, which can be of short- or long-term duration. This paper reviews the literature on the topics of psychosocial working conditions, mental health, stress, depression, and suicide among dairy farm operators, farm workers, and farm family members in an international perspective.

  13. [Conditions for going back to work on a part-time basis as a therapeutic objective].

    PubMed

    Manaouil, Cécile; Graser, Marie; Jardé, Olivier

    2003-07-12

    AFTER MEDICAL ASSESSMENT: In the general system, therapeutic part-time work is a temporary disposition which allows a progressive readaptation to work. In principle, when an employee goes back to work, daily sickness benefits stop being paid by the Social Security Service. The decision to go back to work on a part-time basis is conditioned by a preliminary medical estimation which justifies the fact that it is impossible for the patient to go on with his professional occupation on a full-time basis or which shows the need for a progressive resumption. THE ATTENDING PHYSICIAN: During the part-time resumption, he has to continue to fill-out the sick leave certificates and add the comment "part-time work resumption". After an industrial accident or an occupational disease (work stoppage/occupational disease), on the extension medical certificate, the doctor should check the "work resumption" box, and add "therapeutic part-time job". The doctor should not produce a final medical certificate but only extension certificates. A part-time work resumption cannot be prescribed after the consolidation date, which stops the payment of the daily sickness benefits granted for a work disease. THE ROLE OF THE EMPLOYER: In principle, the employer has to subject the employee to a work resumption medical consultation by the company doctor. If a medical control authorization from the Social Security and the ability certificate for the part-time work resumption provided by the company doctor are produced, the employee has to be employed on a part-time basis by the employer, excepting when this is not compatible with the firm's activity. CIVIL SERVICE: Part-time work resumption is a therapeutic part-time job (50% only), and cannot follow after an ordinary sick leave. Its allocation depends on the medial committee decision after a long sick leave, or the reform commission decision after an industrial accident or an occupational disease.

  14. The low temperature differential Stirling engine with working fluid operated on critical condition

    SciTech Connect

    Naso, V.; Dong, W.; Lucentini, M.; Capata, R.

    1998-07-01

    The research and development of low temperature differential Stirling engine has a great potential market since a lot of thermal energy at low temperature can supply it and the cost of this kind of engine is lower than general Stirling engine. The characteristics of low compression ratio and low differential temperature Stirling engine may be satisfied with working fluid compressed on critical conditions. By combining two phase heat transfer with forced convective flow in compression space and through the regenerator in the engine, a new heat transfer coefficient emerges capable of absorbing and releasing high heat fluxes without the corresponding low temperature increase. The current analysis focuses on the study of Stirling engines with working fluid compressed on critical conditions, thus at two-phase heat transfer in compression space and regenerator of the engine under forced convective flow conditions.

  15. The relationship between sleep and working memory in children with neurological conditions.

    PubMed

    McCann, Marie; Bayliss, Donna M; Pestell, Carmela; Hill, Catherine M; Bucks, Romola S

    2016-10-03

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether sleep problems might account for the increased working memory deficits observed in school-aged children with neurological conditions. A novel, transdiagnostic approach to the investigation was chosen, and sleep is treated as a process that can potentially account for working memory difficulties across a range of neurological conditions. Prevalence estimates of sleep problems are also examined. Archival data of 237 children aged 6 to 11 years were collected from a Western Australian statewide neuropsychological service for the period 26 July 2011 to 14 January 2014. Measures of parent-reported sleep quality, snoring, and daytime sleepiness were obtained, in addition to objective measures of verbal and spatial working memory, storage capacity, and processing speed. The results of the data analysis reveal that over one third of participants reported having clinically-significant levels of sleep problems and that poor sleep quality is significantly associated with verbal working memory difficulties. This association remains after partialling out the variance contributed to performance by storage capacity and processing speed, suggesting that sleep is impacting upon an executive component of working memory. No other significant associations are observed. The results suggest that poor sleep quality is associated with an executive component of verbal (rather than spatial) working memory in children with neurological conditions. This has implications for the biological mechanisms thought to underlie the relationship between sleep and cognition in children. The results also demonstrate the clinical utility of a transdiagnostic approach when investigating sleep and cognition in children with neurological conditions.

  16. Social responsibility and work conditions: building a reference label, Démarche T®.

    PubMed

    Biquand, Sylvain; Zittel, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is now considered in large and global companies and the recent publication of the ISO 26000 standard clarifies the targets. Based on our consultancy's experience for fifteen years in ergonomics mainly in French small and medium enterprises, we developed a label to coax and value efforts of companies in dealing with health and safety at the work place as required by ISO 26000 paragraph 6.4. The formal approach of ISO describes what should be achieved but gives no cue on how actual conditions of work should be improved. The label, called Démarche T (ie Process W where W stands for work) aims the management of work conditions as a process, giving visibility and credit to companies for their continuous involvement in the matter. We describe the items and processes that are part of our assessment. We first conduct an ergonomic diagnosis including the analysis of records on health, physical and psychological well-being, observations at the workplace and interviews with the workers. This diagnosis is followed by recommendations. The fulfillment of these is assessed yearly. Items under assessment include: - ergonomics, health and safety in the companies statements and their impact in actual project management; - relations with workers through the committee for health and safety; - actual results on health, safety and work conditions. On a local level, we give the companies passing the label a competitive edge in recruiting better candidates motivated by good work conditions, and help them fulfill ISO 26000 requirements, an increasingly decisive advantage to benefit from public regional and European support. Our paper describes the diagnosis and follow-up process.

  17. Drug switch because of treatment-related adverse side effects in endocrine adjuvant breast cancer therapy: how often and how often does it work?

    PubMed

    Güth, Uwe; Myrick, Mary Elizabeth; Schötzau, Andreas; Kilic, Nerbil; Schmid, Seraina Margaretha

    2011-10-01

    Therapy-related adverse side effects are a main reason for non-persistence to adjuvant endocrine breast cancer therapy. This study reports frequency of drug-related adverse side effects that were so severe that a modification of the therapy was necessary. We evaluated how many patients discontinued adjuvant endocrine therapy because of these side effects (non-persistence). Last, we analyzed how often a drug switch was undertaken for this reason and how often this measure led to the patient successfully continuing their endocrine therapy. Data concerning all postmenopausal breast cancer patients (≤ 80 years), who initiated endocrine adjuvant therapy between 1998 and 2008 in a Swiss breast center (n = 400), were analyzed. Out of these 400 women, 37 (9.3%) were defined as being non-persistent to the therapy; out of these, 24 (64.9%) because of therapy-related side effects. About 78 patients (19.5%) suffered from severe therapy-related side effects that made a modification of therapy necessary. Out of these 78 cases, 14 patients (17.9%) stopped the therapy without attempting a drug switch (non-persistence). In 64 patients (82.1%; 16% of all women who started endocrine therapy), a drug switch was undertaken. Out of these 64 cases, in 52 cases (81.3%) endocrine therapy was completed after therapy modification. Patients who reported one major adverse effect were more likely to continue the endocrine therapy after a drug switch (P = 0.048) compared with those who suffered from at least two different side effects. In 10 of the 64 cases (15.6%), modification of the therapy was not successful and the patients stopped the treatment prematurely (non-persistence) because of ongoing side effects. In cases when therapy-related side effects occur, a drug switch is a promising step to further improve persistence and, by doing so, the outcome of breast cancer patients.

  18. Genotype and neuropsychological response inhibition as resilience promoters for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder under conditions of psychosocial adversity.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Joel; Nikolas, Molly; Friderici, Karen; Park, Leeyoung; Zucker, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Whereas child personality, IQ, and family factors have been identified as enabling a resilient response to psychosocial adversity, more direct biological resilience factors have been less well delineated. This is particularly so for child attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which has received less attention from a resilience perspective than have associated externalizing disorders. Children from two independent samples were classified as resilient if they avoided developing ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), or conduct disorder (CD) in the face of family adversity. Two protective factors were examined for their potential relevance to prefrontal brain development: neuropsychological response inhibition, as assessed by the Stop task, and a composite catecholamine genotype risk score. Resilient children were characterized in both samples by more effective response inhibition, although the effect in the second sample was very small. Genotype was measured in Sample 1, and a composite high risk genotype index was developed by summing presence of risk across markers on three genes expressed in prefrontal cortex: dopamine transporter, dopamine D4 receptor, and noradrenergic alpha-2 receptor. Genotype was a reliable resilience indicator against development of ADHD and CD, but not ODD, in the face of psychosocial adversity. Results illustrate potential neurobiological protective factors related to development of prefrontal cortex that may enable children to avoid developing ADHD and CD in the presence of psychosocial adversity.

  19. [HYGIENIC ASSESSMENT OF WORKING CONDITIONS AND HEALTH OF EMPLOYEES OF THE "SIBERIAN LIFT CO., LTD."].

    PubMed

    Rodkin, V P; Usatov, A N

    2015-01-01

    There was carried out a hygienic assessment of the working conditions and health of employees of the "Siberian Lift Co., Ltd.". When studying occupational factors on workplaces intensity, the temperature radiation, natural and artificial lighting, and also the content of chemicals they were revealed to fail to answer to the hygienic specifications. It is established that in 82% of employees the class of working conditions was detected as admissible (2) and in 18%--harmful (3.1 and 3.2). Results of the performed periodic medical examination of employees of the "Siberian Lift Co., Ltd.". It is testified that 6.14% out of them are persistently unfit of the work with harmful and (or) dangerous substances and occupational factors also. 4.68% of employees demand an additional examination. 11,70% of workers need for out-patient examination and treatment. Sanatorium treatment is required for 1 (0.29%) the person. 4,68% of employees of the "Siberian Lift Co., Ltd." need dispensary supervision. There are suggested measures for the improvement of working conditions and health of the employees.

  20. Temperature dependence of the work function of caesiated materials under ion source conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, R.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-01

    The key parameter for the performance of negative hydrogen ion sources based on surface conversion is the work function of the converter surface. In order to enhance the negative ion yield caesium is introduced into the source which lowers the converter work function upon adsorption. However, the Cs layer is subject to background pressures of 10-7-10-6 mbar and to H2 or D2 low-temperature plasmas which can have a major impact on the resultant work function. In order to determine the work function of caesiated surfaces under ion source relevant conditions and to identify influencing parameters, systematic investigations are performed at the laboratory experiment ACCesS. It is confirmed, that the work function of a sample surface in a vacuum of 10-6 mbar is decreased upon the evaporation and adsorption of caesium. However, the adsorbed layer is determined by the formation of Cs compounds with residual gases from the background pressure leading to an increased work function by about 0.6 eV compared to pure Cs layers. Elevated surface temperatures are beneficial for cleaning and against degradation in absence of Cs evaporation, but no further enhancement of the work function can be achieved by temperatures up to 260 °C if a Cs flux onto the surface is already present. Thus, the minimally achievable work function of a stainless steel surface in ion source relevant vacuum conditions is 2.75 eV. The influence of the substrate material and plasma surface interaction will be investigated next.

  1. Creature comforts: personal communities, pets and the work of managing a long-term condition

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Helen L; Rogers, Anne; Kapadia, Dharmi; Pilgrim, Jack; Reeves, David; Vassilev, Ivaylo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To explore in the context of peoples’ personal social networks, the contribution that pets make to ‘the work’ associated with the management of long-term conditions. Method: Mixed methods survey with nested parallel qualitative study; 300 participants were drawn from diabetes and chronic heart disease registers of General Practices across Greater Manchester in the North West of England. Notions of ‘work’ were used to describe the illness and everyday activities associated with chronic illness. Results: Nineteen percent of participants identified at least one pet within their network. Pets contributed mostly to managing emotions (emotional work), to enhancing a sense of self identity (biographical work) and to a lesser extent practical tasks (everyday work). There were indicators that pets mediated relationships for people living with a long-term condition through very weak ties with others in domestic and community settings. Conclusion: The findings suggest that pets have unique qualities and are not simply substitutes for human relationships in long-term condition management. The study has potential implications for furthering a social contextual analysis of chronic illness, the understanding of relationships, and the meaning and the role of companion animals in long-term condition management. PMID:22777565

  2. The effects of extended work under sleep deprivation conditions on team-based performance.

    PubMed

    Pilcher, June J; Vander Wood, Melissa A; O'Connell, Kristina L

    2011-07-01

    Teamwork is becoming increasingly common in today's workplaces; however, little research has examined how well teams perform under sleep deprivation conditions. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of extended work under sleep deprivation conditions on team performance. A total of 24 participants were sleep deprived for 30 h and completed 16 h of sustained operations during the last portion of the sleep deprivation period. The participants completed the Wombat, a complex task including vigilance and cognitive components, with a partner in four 24-min testing sessions during the sustained operations period. The results indicated that team performance increased during the work period while, within each testing session, team performance on vigilance tasks remained stable and overall performance decreased. The current results suggest that performance on two-person teams results in improved performance but does not fully counteract the decreases in performance within each work period. Performance in two-person teams increased across an extended work shift under sleep deprivation conditions. However, vigilance performance remained stable while overall performance decreased when examining performance in 8-min segments. These results suggest that averaging team-based performance over a longer testing period may mask the negative effects of sleep deprivation. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Performance in two-person teams increased across an extended work shift under sleep deprivation conditions. However, vigilance performance remained stable while overall performance decreased when examining performance in 8-min segments. These results suggest that averaging team-based performance over a longer testing period may mask the negative effects of sleep deprivation.

  3. Psychosocial work conditions, social participation and social capital: a causal pathway investigated in a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Social capital is often claimed to be promoted by stable social structures such as low migration rates between neighbourhoods and social networks that remain stable over time. However, stable social structures may also inhibit the formation of social capital in the form of social networks and social participation. One example is psychosocial conditions at work, which may be determined by characteristics such as demand and control in the work situation. The study examines the active workforce subpopulation within the Swedish Malmö Shoulder Neck Study. A total of 7836 individuals aged 45-69 years, were interviewed at baseline between 1992 and 1994, and at a 1-year follow-up. Four groups of baseline psychosocial work conditions categories defined by the Karasek-Theorell model (jobstrain, passive, active, relaxed) were analysed according to 13 different social participation items during the past year reported at the 1-year follow-up. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals with the jobstrain group as a reference were estimated. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess differences in different aspects of social participation between the four psychosocial work conditions groups. The results show that the respondents within the active category in particular but also the relaxed category, have significantly higher participation in many of the 13 social participation items, even after multivariate adjustments. The results strongly suggest that psychosocial work conditions may be an important determinant of social capital measured as social participation, a finding of immediate public health relevance because of the well known positive association between social participation and health-related behaviours.

  4. New working conditions and consequences on activity of home healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Van De Weerdt, Corinne; Baratta, René

    2012-01-01

    Home healthcare is steadily growing in Europe. There are a number of reasons for this development: aging population, rising hospital costs, preference to stay in one's own home. Nevertheless, it has been known that home healthcare workers are frequently exposed to a variety of potentially serious occupational hazards. Furthermore, emotional labor is frequently high in this profession. This paper describes an ergonomic study conducted at a home healthcare service. The research focuses on analyzing working conditions of home healthcare aides and nurses, as well as the impacts of their work in terms of job satisfaction, well-being, emotions at work, relationships with the others and occupational stress. The study show that employee strategies are specifically centered around preserving the relationship between patients and workers and coping with the job demands. This paper also shows that home healthcare workers express emotions and conceal them from others. Finally, recommendations discussed with the manager and workers to improve working conditions in this sector led to practical proposals: for example, implementing certain equipment items better suited to difficult care, encouraging assistance between healthcare workers when operations require this through adequate organizational measures, extending work emotion-focused discussion groups with management involvement.

  5. [Conditions and motivations for the work of nurses and physicians in high complexity emergency services].

    PubMed

    Mendes, Antonio da Cruz Gouveia; de Araújo Júnior, José Luiz do Amaral Corrêa; Furtado, Betise Mery Alencar Souza Macau; Duarte, Petra Oliveira; da Silva, Ana Lúcia Andrade; Miranda, Gabriella Morais Duarte

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the motivations and conditions offered to the work of nurses and doctors in three high complexity emergency services of the city of Recife, Pernambuco. It is a descriptive transversal type study. It was interviewed 42 nurses and 84 doctors, of a total population of 97 nurses and 469 doctors. It was used a questionnaire prepared for this survey and the Scale of Values Related to Work. On the motivation assessment it was found that Professional Realization was the major motivational factor, and Prestige the less important factor.

  6. IS WORK-FAMILY CONFLICT A MULTILEVEL STRESSOR LINKING JOB CONDITIONS TO MENTAL HEALTH? EVIDENCE FROM THE WORK, FAMILY AND HEALTH NETWORK

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Kaduk, Anne; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Hammer, Leslie; Buxton, Orfeu M.; O’Donnell, Emily; Almeida, David; Fox, Kimberly; Tranby, Eric; Oakes, J. Michael; Casper, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Most research on the work conditions and family responsibilities associated with work-family conflict and other measures of mental health uses the individual employee as the unit of analysis. We argue that work conditions are both individual psychosocial assessments and objective characteristics of the proximal work environment, necessitating multilevel analyses of both individual- and team-level work conditions on mental health. Methodology/approach This study uses multilevel data on 748 high-tech professionals in 120 teams to investigate relationships between team- and individual-level job conditions, work-family conflict, and four mental health outcomes (job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, perceived stress, and psychological distress). Findings We find that work-to-family conflict is socially patterned across teams, as are job satisfaction and emotional exhaustion. Team-level job conditions predict team-level outcomes, while individuals’ perceptions of their job conditions are better predictors of individuals’ work-to-family conflict and mental health. Work-to-family conflict operates as a partial mediator between job demands and mental health outcomes. Practical implications Our findings suggest that organizational leaders concerned about presenteeism, sickness absences, and productivity would do well to focus on changing job conditions in ways that reduce job demands and work-to-family conflict in order to promote employees’ mental health. Originality/value of the chapter We show that both work-to-family conflict and job conditions can be fruitfully framed as team characteristics, shared appraisals held in common by team members. This challenges the framing of work-to-family conflict as a “private trouble” and provides support for work-to-family conflict as a structural mismatch grounded in the social and temporal organization of work. PMID:25866431

  7. Consumer demand as a driver of improved working conditions: the 'Ergo-Brand' proposition.

    PubMed

    Neumann, W Patrick; Dixon, Shane M; Nordvall, Anna-Carin

    2014-01-01

    This article develops and explores the 'Ergo-Brand' proposition, which posits that consumers may prefer to buy goods that are made under good working conditions (GWCs). This preference would enhance a differentiation strategy for companies, thereby fostering the application of ergonomics in production. This proposition is developed in the context of a narrative review of the literature on 'ethical consumerism'. This is supplemented with a survey study, conducted in both Canada and Sweden (n = 141) to explore this proposition. Results indicate that consumers would prefer goods made under GWCs, but not unconditionally as quality and price concerns were ranked higher. Access to information on the working conditions in production was seen as a barrier. Nevertheless, the Ergo-Brand concept may be a viable avenue in promoting attention towards ergonomics in companies - particularly if consumer habits are subject to intervention by advertising. Further research on this strategy is warranted.

  8. Evaluation of Different Light Conditions in the Working Environment for Handling Photosensitive and Thermolabile Compounds.

    PubMed

    Hernandez Duran, Tania; Ravela, Neel; Sanchez Rivero, Sandra; De Jesus Castro Sandoval, Teresita; Hoogmartens, Jos; Pendela, Murali

    2015-01-01

    Lighting in the working environment plays a significant role on the degree of degradation of photosensitive, thermolabile compounds and on working efficiency. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are semiconductor light emitting devices that are promising artificial light sources with easy modulation of light wave signals and are also known for low heat generation. Therefore, the effect of polychromatic LED light was tested in the working environment using the drug compounds montelukast, nifedipine, and clavulanic acid, which are known to be photosensitive or thermolabile. As a control, other lighting sources like a sodium lamp, a classic (incandescent, tungsten) lamp, and indirect sunlight were also used in this study. All the experiments were carried out with methanolic solutions at room temperature. An Acquity UPLC/MS/MS system was used for quantification of the main analytes and degradation products. Under the tested conditions, LED lighting proved to be more suitable for handling photosensitive and thermolabile compounds.

  9. The Health and Working Conditions of Women Employed in Child Care

    PubMed Central

    Linnan, Laura; Arandia, Gabriela; Bateman, Lori A.; Vaughn, Amber; Smith, Natalie; Ward, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    Over one million women are employed in child care and are among the lowest wage workers in the US. The health and working conditions of 674 child care workers (118 administrators and 556 staff) from 74 centers is described using baseline data from a larger intervention trial. Participants were 39.9 (±13.0) years old; 55.4% African American, 37.1% Caucasian, and 5.3% of Hispanic ethnicity. Seventy-six percent reported having an Associate’s degree or less; 42% were classified as at or below poverty (<$20,000); and exhibited many health risks such as excess weight, insufficient activity, poor diet, and inadequate sleep. We investigated potential differences by income and job category. Lower income participants were significantly more likely to be current smokers (19.9% vs. 11.7%), drink more sweetened beverages (1.9 vs. 1.5), and report higher depressive symptoms (15.5 vs. 12.6). Administrators worked more hours weekly compared to staff (46.4 vs. 40.6), are less active (100 vs. 126 min/week), more sedentary (501 vs. 477 min/day), and reported higher job demands (13.3 vs. 12.5). Given the numerous health issues and challenging work conditions, we hope our results serve as a call to action for addressing low wages and the work environment as a means of influencing the health and well-being of child care workers. PMID:28282940

  10. Experimental investigation on dependency of Terfenol-D transducers performance on working conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheykholeslami, M.; Hojjat, Y.; Cinquemani, S.; Tarabini, M.; Ghodsi, M.

    2016-04-01

    Performance and efficiency of magnetostrictive transducer are highly dependent on working conditions. Magnetic bias field and pre-stress of the magnetostrictive rod are two of the main factors affecting the transducer behavior. Unexpected changes may cause unpredictable behavior of the transducer and a dramatic loss of performances. This paper experimentally investigates the effect of different working conditions on quality factor, bandwidth, resonance of a Terfenol-D resonance transducer that works in its first mode of vibration. For this purpose, an experimental setup consisting of laser Doppler, power amplifier and current transducer has been used. A Terfenol-D resonance transducer that is capable of changing magnetic bias field and mechanical pre-stress has been designed and fabricated. Working frequency of the transducer is between 5000 Hz to 7000 Hz. Output parameters of the transducer are experimentally calculated using an equivalent electrical circuit model. Results of the study improves the knowledge in the field and gives suggestions to the design of resonance transducers.

  11. The Health and Working Conditions of Women Employed in Child Care.

    PubMed

    Linnan, Laura; Arandia, Gabriela; Bateman, Lori A; Vaughn, Amber; Smith, Natalie; Ward, Dianne

    2017-03-09

    Over one million women are employed in child care and are among the lowest wage workers in the US. The health and working conditions of 674 child care workers (118 administrators and 556 staff) from 74 centers is described using baseline data from a larger intervention trial. Participants were 39.9 (±13.0) years old; 55.4% African American, 37.1% Caucasian, and 5.3% of Hispanic ethnicity. Seventy-six percent reported having an Associate's degree or less; 42% were classified as at or below poverty (<$20,000); and exhibited many health risks such as excess weight, insufficient activity, poor diet, and inadequate sleep. We investigated potential differences by income and job category. Lower income participants were significantly more likely to be current smokers (19.9% vs. 11.7%), drink more sweetened beverages (1.9 vs. 1.5), and report higher depressive symptoms (15.5 vs. 12.6). Administrators worked more hours weekly compared to staff (46.4 vs. 40.6), are less active (100 vs. 126 min/week), more sedentary (501 vs. 477 min/day), and reported higher job demands (13.3 vs. 12.5). Given the numerous health issues and challenging work conditions, we hope our results serve as a call to action for addressing low wages and the work environment as a means of influencing the health and well-being of child care workers.

  12. Self rated health and working conditions of small-scale enterprisers in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Kristina; Vingård, Eva; Josephson, Malin

    2007-12-01

    This study was an investigation of prevalence and associations between self-rated health and working conditions for small-scale enterprisers in a county in Sweden. A postal questionnaire was answered by 340 male and 153 female small-scale enterprisers in different sectors, with a response rate of 66%. For comparative purposes, data from a population study of 1,699 employees in private companies was included in the analyses. Differences were tested by Chi(2)-test and associations were presented as odds ratios (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The frequency of health problems in male enterprisers was higher than in employees in the private sector, while the frequency of health problems in female enterprisers was equal to that of the control employees. The main findings highlighted that male enterprisers reported higher rate of health problems and female enterprisers equal rate compared with employees in the private sector. Enterprisers stated musculoskeletal pain (women 59%, men 56%) and mental health problems (women 47%, men 45%) as the most frequent health problems. Poor job satisfaction, reported by 17% of the females and 20% of the male enterprisers, revealed an OR of 10.42 (95% CI 5.78-18.77) for poor general health. For the enterprisers, the most frequent complaints, musculoskeletal pain and mental health problems, were associated with poor job satisfaction and poor physical work environment. An association between poor general health and working as an enterpriser remained after adjusting for working conditions, sex and age.

  13. Innovations in preventing and managing chronic conditions: what's working in the real world?

    PubMed

    Cassil, Alwyn

    2010-06-01

    Wellness and prevention strategies are fast becoming a standard feature of employer-based health benefits in hopes of countering rapidly rising health care costs that drive higher insurance premiums. At the same time, payers and health care providers are experimenting with how to improve care coordination for high-cost patients with multiple chronic conditions, an ongoing challenge in the fragmented U.S. health care system. Promoting health and wellness and improving the care of people with chronic conditions offer promise in helping to improve the value of health care and control costs, according to experts at a Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) conference titled, Innovations in Preventing and Managing Chronic Conditions: What's Working in the Real World? Panelists explored how effective employer-sponsored wellness and prevention initiatives focus on health improvement as a business strategy and foster work and community environments that help people lower risk factors--smoking, diet, lack of exercise--that lead to disease. Panelists also discussed various models--centered on strong primary care-to improve care for people with chronic conditions.

  14. Caregivers in older peoples' care: perception of quality of care, working conditions, competence and personal health.

    PubMed

    From, Ingrid; Nordström, Gun; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Johansson, Inger

    2013-09-01

    The aim was to describe and compare nursing assistants', enrolled nurses' and registered nurses' perceptions of quality of care, working conditions, competence and personal health in older peoples' care. Altogether 70 nursing assistants, 163 enrolled nurses and 198 registered nurses completed a questionnaire comprising Quality from the Patient's Perspective modified for caregivers, Creative Climate Questionnaire, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, items on education and competence and Health Index. The caregivers reported higher perceived reality of quality of care in medical-technical competence and physical-technical conditions than in identity-oriented approach and socio-cultural atmosphere. In subjective importance, the highest rating was assessed in one of the physical-technical items. The organisational climate was for three of the dimensions rather close/reached the value for a creative climate, for seven dimensions close to a stagnant climate. In perceived stress of conscience, there were low values. Nursing assistants had lower values than enrolled nurses and registered nurses. The caregivers reported highest values regarding previous education making them feel safe at work and lowest value on the item about education increasing the ability for a scientific attitude. Registered nurses could use knowledge in practice and to a higher degree than nursing assistants/enrolled nurses reported a need to gain knowledge, but the latter more often received education during working hours. The health index among caregivers was high, but registered nurses scored lower on emotional well-being than nursing assistants/enrolled nurses. The caregivers' different perceptions of quality of care and work climate need further attention. Although stress of conscience was low, it is important to acknowledge what affected the caregivers work in a negative way. Attention should be paid to the greater need for competence development among registered nurses during working hours.

  15. Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Annette M.

    2003-01-01

    Draws upon Maria Montessori's writings to examine work as a universal human tendency throughout life. Discusses the work of adaptation of the infant, work of "psycho-muscular organism" for the preschooler, work of the imagination for the elementary child, community work of the adolescent, and work of the adult. Asserts that…

  16. Burnout syndrome, working conditions, and health: a reality among public high school teachers in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Santana, Ângela Maria C; De Marchi, Dione; Junior, Luiz C G; Girondoli, Yassana M; Chiappeta, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the occurrence of Burnout Syndrome in 100 teachers of six public high schools and its correlation with working conditions in a southeast city of Brazil. Characterization of the sample occurred after application of a socio-demographic questionnaire. Evaluation of the working conditions was done by means of an Ergonomic Working Analysis. The presence of Burnout Syndrome was evaluated by means of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The sample presented the predominance of women, with an average age of 40.4 and the majority married with children. Roughly 50% had less than 10 years of service, and more than half of the teachers taught more than 18 classes per week. Hoarseness after work was principally reported among women, which required many days off for health treatment. Environmental conditions reflect inadequacy in relation to noise, light, humidity and temperature. Presence of pain in the upper limbs was especially high among women. Risk of musculoskeletal disorders in the upper limbs predominated as moderately important to significant. We also identified an average distance walked by teachers of 1.5 Km and an average of 4.2 Kg of school supplies carried between classes. The Burnout Syndrome presented a high score for depersonalization principally among men, but it has association with both sexes. Emotional exhaustion correlates with noise, depersonalization, and personal fulfillment, in addition to the high number of weekly lessons. It can be concluded that Burnout syndrome is present among teachers, principally in terms of depersonalization, deserving the attention of government officials and the schools, as well as the teachers themselves.

  17. Multi-parameter Optimization of a Thermoelectric Power Generator and Its Working Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.

    2017-01-01

    The global optimal working conditions and optimal couple design for thermoelectric (TE) generators with realistic thermal coupling between the heat reservoirs and the TE couple were studied in the current work. The heat fluxes enforced by the heat reservoirs at the hot and the cold junctions of the TE couple were used in combination with parameter normalization to obtain a single cubic algebraic equation relating the temperature differences between the TE couple junctions and between the heat reservoirs, through the electric load resistance ratio, the reservoir thermal conductance ratio, the reservoir thermal conductance to the TE couple thermal conductance ratio, the Thomson to Seebeck coefficient ratio, and the figure of merit ( Z) of the material based on the linear TE transport equations and their solutions. A broad reservoir thermal conductance ranging between 0.01 W/K and 100 W/K and TE element length ranging from 10-7 m to 10-3 m were explored to find the global optimal systems. The global optimal parameters related to the working conditions, i.e., reservoir thermal conductance ratio and electric load resistance ratio, and the optimal design parameter related to the TE couple were determined for a given TE material. These results demonstrated that the internal and external electric resistance, the thermal resistance between the reservoirs, the thermal resistance between the reservoir and the TE couple, and the optimal thermoelement length have to be well coordinated to obtain optimal power production.

  18. Korean Emotional Laborers' Job Stressors and Relievers: Focus on Work Conditions and Emotional Labor Properties

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Garam

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study aims to investigate job stressors and stress relievers for Korean emotional laborers, specifically focusing on the effects of work conditions and emotional labor properties. Emotional laborers are asked to hide or distort their real emotions in their interaction with clients. They are exposed to high levels of stress in the emotional labor process, which leads to serious mental health risks including burnout, depression, and even suicide impulse. Exploring job stressors and relieving factors would be the first step in seeking alternatives to protect emotional laborers from those mental health risks. Methods Using the third wave data of Korean Working Conditions Survey, logistic regression analysis was conducted for two purposes: to examine the relations of emotional labor and stress, and to find out job stressors and relievers for emotional laborers. Results The chances of stress arousal are 3.5 times higher for emotional laborers; emotional laborers experience double risk-burden for stress arousal. In addition to general job stressors, emotional laborers need to bear burdens related to emotional labor properties. The effect of social support at the workplace is not significant for stress relief, unlike common assumptions, whereas subjective satisfaction (wage satisfaction and work-life balance) is proven to have relieving effects on emotional laborers' job stress. Conclusion From the results, the importance of a balanced understanding of emotional labor for establishing effective policies for emotional laborer protection is stressed. PMID:26929847

  19. [Working conditions and occupational morbidity in workers of the Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, G G

    2009-01-01

    To create healthy and safe working conditions are constantly in the focus of attention at all governmental levels. To reduce deaths and traumatism from occupational accidents and diseases, by providing safe working conditions is one of the priorities of the demographic policy pursued by the Government of the Russian Federation. In the able-bodied population, the current mortality from natural causes (accidents, poisonings, and traumas, including occupation-related ones) exceeds that by 2.5 and 1.5 times in developed and developing countries, respectively. The worse conditions remain to be those in coal-mining and shipbuilding industries, ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgy, agriculture, tractor-building and agricultural engineering, building materials industry, road-building machinery, logging industry, power machine building, and civil engineering. On-going checks reveal low sanitary culture and industrial discipline, no package of sanitary-and-prophylactic measures, as well as poor knowledge about sanitary legislation requirements in the heads of small-scale business and private undertakings. In 2006, the Russian Federation notified 357 cases of occupational diseases among medical workers, of which there were 196 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis and 39 cases of viral hepatitis. Despite the fact that the cases of occupational diseases are annually on the decrease, these are being underdetected.

  20. The Role of Labor Unions in Creating Working Conditions That Promote Public Health.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Jenn; Paras, Claudia Alexandra; Greenwich, Howard; Hagopian, Amy

    2016-06-01

    We sought to portray how collective bargaining contracts promote public health, beyond their known effect on individual, family, and community well-being. In November 2014, we created an abstraction tool to identify health-related elements in 16 union contracts from industries in the Pacific Northwest. After enumerating the contract-protected benefits and working conditions, we interviewed union organizers and members to learn how these promoted health. Labor union contracts create higher wage and benefit standards, working hours limits, workplace hazards protections, and other factors. Unions also promote well-being by encouraging democratic participation and a sense of community among workers. Labor union contracts are largely underutilized, but a potentially fertile ground for public health innovation. Public health practitioners and labor unions would benefit by partnering to create sophisticated contracts to address social determinants of health.

  1. Mapping ergonomics application to improve SMEs working condition in industrially developing countries: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Hermawati, Setia; Lawson, Glyn; Sutarto, Auditya Purwandini

    2014-01-01

    In industrially developing countries (IDC), small and medium enterprises (SMEs) account for the highest proprotion of employment. Unfortunately, the working conditions in SMEs are often very poor and expose employees to a potentially wide range of health and safety risks. This paper presents a comprehensive review of 161 articles related to ergonomics application in SMEs, using Indonesia as a case study. The aim of this paper is to investigate the extent of ergonomics application and identify areas that can be improved to promote effective ergonomics for SMEs in IDC. The most urgent issue found is the need for adopting participatory approach in contrast to the commonly implemented top-down approach. Some good practices in ergonomics application were also revealed from the review, e.g. a multidisciplinary approach, unsophisticated and low-cost solutions, and recognising the importance of productivity. The review also found that more work is still required to achieve appropriate cross-cultural adaptation of ergonomics application.

  2. [Integrated tobacco production: health, labor, and working conditions of tobacco farmers in Southern Brazil].

    PubMed

    Riquinho, Deise Lisboa; Hennington, Élida Azevedo

    2016-12-22

    This study aimed to analyze the tobacco farming and marketing process in an integrated system and tobacco farmers' living and working conditions in Southern Brazil. A qualitative study was conducted from December 2010 to August 2011, with 31 semi-structured interviews with tobacco farmers and key informants, besides participant observation. The principal analytical reference was the ergological perspective. The integrated system allows the tobacco industry to control the amounts paid and the tobacco's quality. Tobacco growing features high cost of inputs, farmers' indebtedness, insufficient crop insurance, and intensive use of family labor. Accident and disease risks were associated with work in tobacco farming. According to the dynamic three-pole model proposed by ergology, dealing with these problems requires confronting the workers' knowledge with technical and scientific knowledge, linked with ethical and social responsibility.

  3. Fitness to work of astronauts in conditions of action of the extreme emotional factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisniakova, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    The theoretical model for the quantitative determination of influence of a level of emotional exertion on the success of human activity is presented. The learning curves of fixed words in the groups with a different level of the emotional exertion are analyzed. The obtained magnitudes of time constant T depending on a type of the emotional exertion are a quantitative measure of the emotional exertion. Time constants could also be of use for a prediction of the characteristic of fitness to work of an astronaut in conditions of extreme factors. The inverse of the sign of influencing on efficiency of activity of the man is detected. The paper offers a mathematical model of the relation between successful activity and motivations or the emotional exertion (Yerkes-Dodson law). Proposed models can serve by the theoretical basis of the quantitative characteristics of an estimation of activity of astronauts in conditions of the emotional factors at a phase of their selection.

  4. Phentolamine prevents the adverse effects of adenosine on glycolysis and mechanical function in isolated working rat hearts subjected to antecedent ischemia.

    PubMed

    Finegan, B A; Gandhi, M; Clanachan, A S

    2000-06-01

    Adenosine inhibits glycolysis from exogenous glucose, reduces proton production and enhances post-ischemic left ventricular minute work (LV work) following ischemia in isolated working rat hearts perfused with glucose and fatty acids. In hearts partially depleted of glycogen by antecedent ischemic stress (AIS)--two cycles of ischemia (10 min) and reperfusion (5 min)--adenosine stimulates rather than inhibits glycolysis, increases proton production and worsens recovery of post-ischemic LV work. We determined if the switch in adenosine effect on glycolysis and recovery of LV work following ischemia in hearts subject to AIS was due to the reduction in glycogen content per se or because of alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation. One series of hearts underwent a 35-min period of substrate-free Langendorff perfusion (substrate-free glycogen depletion; SFGD) and a second series of hearts was subjected to AIS. Both series of hearts had a similar glycogen content (approximately 70 micromol/g dry wt) prior to drug treatment. In SFGD hearts perfused aerobically, adenosine (500 microM) inhibited glycolysis from exogenous glucose and reduced proton production. In SFGD hearts reperfused after prolonged ischemia, adenosine exerted similar effects on glucose metabolism and enhanced recovery of post-ischemic LV work (87.2 +/- 2.2% of preischemic values) relative to untreated hearts (25.9 +/- 13.3% of preischemic values). In AIS hearts perfused aerobically or subject to ischemia and reperfusion, phentolamine (1 microM) given in combination with adenosine, prevented adenosine-induced stimulation of glycolysis from exogenous glucose and reduced calculated proton production from glucose. Recoveries of post-ischemic LV work in AIS hearts for untreated, adenosine, phentolamine and adenosine/phentolamine groups were 34.4 +/- 11.4%, 8.6 +/- 3.9%, 16.3 +/- 13.5% and 73.2 +/- 13.1% respectively, of preischemic values. Glycogen depletion in the absence of ischemia does not switch the effect of

  5. Expatriates' Multiple Fears, from Terrorism to Working Conditions: Development of a Model.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Gabriele; Montani, Francesco; Fiz-Perez, Javier; Arcangeli, Giulio; Mucci, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Companies' internationalization appears to be fundamental in the current globalized and competitive environment and seems important not only for organizational success, but also for societal development and sustainability. On one hand, global business increases the demand for managers for international assignment. On the other hand, emergent fears, such as terrorism, seem to be developing around the world, enhancing the risk of expatriates' potential health problems. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between the emergent concept of fear of expatriation with further workplace fears (economic crisis and dangerous working conditions) and with mental health problems. The study uses a quantitative design. Self-reported data were collected from 265 Italian expatriate workers assigned to both Italian and worldwide projects. Structural equation model analyses showed that fear of expatriation mediates the relationship of mental health with fear of economic crisis and with perceived dangerous working conditions. As expected, in addition to fear, worries of expatriation are also related to further fears. Although, the study is based on self-reports and the cross-sectional study design limits the possibility of making causal inferences, the new constructs introduced add to previous research.

  6. Expatriates’ Multiple Fears, from Terrorism to Working Conditions: Development of a Model

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi, Gabriele; Montani, Francesco; Fiz-Perez, Javier; Arcangeli, Giulio; Mucci, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Companies’ internationalization appears to be fundamental in the current globalized and competitive environment and seems important not only for organizational success, but also for societal development and sustainability. On one hand, global business increases the demand for managers for international assignment. On the other hand, emergent fears, such as terrorism, seem to be developing around the world, enhancing the risk of expatriates’ potential health problems. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between the emergent concept of fear of expatriation with further workplace fears (economic crisis and dangerous working conditions) and with mental health problems. The study uses a quantitative design. Self-reported data were collected from 265 Italian expatriate workers assigned to both Italian and worldwide projects. Structural equation model analyses showed that fear of expatriation mediates the relationship of mental health with fear of economic crisis and with perceived dangerous working conditions. As expected, in addition to fear, worries of expatriation are also related to further fears. Although, the study is based on self-reports and the cross-sectional study design limits the possibility of making causal inferences, the new constructs introduced add to previous research. PMID:27790173

  7. When incentives work too well: locally implemented pay for performance (P4P) and adverse sanctions towards home birth in Tanzania - a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite limited evidence of its effectiveness, performance-based payments (P4P) are seen by leading policymakers as a potential solution to the slow progress in reaching Millennium Development Goal 5: improved maternal health. This paper offers insights into two of the aspects that are lacking in the current literature on P4P, namely what strategies health workers employ to reach set targets, and how the intervention plays out when implemented by local government as part of a national programme that does not receive donor funding. Methods A total of 28 in-depth interviews (IDIs) with 25 individuals were conducted in Mvomero district over a period of 15 months in 2010 and 2011, both before and after P4P payments. Seven facilities, including six dispensaries and one health centre, were covered. Informants included 17 nurses, three clinical officers, two medical attendants, one lab technician and two district health administrators. Results Health workers reported a number of strategies to increase the number of deliveries at their facility, including health education and cooperation with traditional health providers. The staff at all facilities also reported that they had told the women that they would be sanctioned if they gave birth at home, such as being fined or denied clinical cards and/or vaccinations for their babies. There is a great uncertainty in relation to the potential health impacts of the behavioural changes that have come with P4P, as the reported strategies may increase the numbers, but not necessarily the quality. Contrary to the design of the P4P programme, payments were not based on performance. We argue that this was due in part to a lack of resources within the District Administration, and in part as a result of egalitarian fairness principles. Conclusions Our results suggest that particular attention should be paid to adverse effects when using external rewards for improved health outcomes, and secondly, that P4P may take on a

  8. Tensions between work and home: job quality and working conditions in the institutional contexts of Germany and Spain.

    PubMed

    Drobnič, Sonja; Guillén Rodríguez, Ana M

    2011-01-01

    Good jobs can generate capabilities that allow employees to avoid tensions between work and family/home. Following the conceptual framework of Amartya Sen, we examine how job-related demands and resources are related to the level of interference, as well as satisfaction with managing work and home in Spanish and German employees, using three different large-scale European surveys: European Quality of Life Survey and two waves of the European Social Survey. We find that long working hours systematically increase tensions between work and home, as do time pressure, job-related stress, and working hard. Job control or autonomy at work, which is hypothesized to expand individuals' capabilities and agency, tends to increase work–home interference rather than alleviate it. Family responsibilities and household demands do not seem relevant to the tensions employees experience at the work–home interface. This also holds true for women, which is a surprising result in view of the “double burden” hypothesis. Employed mothers in Germany and Spain are a select group of women, as combining employment with raising children in conservative–corporatist and conservative–familialist states may be particularly problematic. Thus while the institutional contexts of Germany and Spain curtail women's ability to reconcile employment and parenthood, the mothers (and fathers) who are employed do not experience significantly higher levels of work–family/home tensions than nonparents.

  9. Personal exposure, behavior, and work site conditions as determinants of blood lead among bridge painters.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ema G; Virji, M Abbas; McClean, Michael D; Weinberg, Janice; Woskie, Susan; Pepper, Lewis D

    2010-02-01

    Bridge painters are exposed to lead during several job tasks performed during the workday, such as sanding, scraping, and blasting. After the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard was passed in 1993 to control lead exposures among construction workers including bridge painters, this study was conducted among 84 bridge painters in the New England area to determine the significant predictors of blood lead levels. Lead was measured in personal air and hand wipe samples that were collected during the 2-week study period and in blood samples that were collected at the beginning and at the end of the study period. The personal air and hand wipe data as well as personal behaviors (i.e., smoking, washing, wearing a respirator) and work site conditions were analyzed as potential determinants of blood lead levels using linear mixed effects models. Our results show that the mean air lead levels over the 2-week period were the most predictive exposure measure of blood lead levels. Other individual-level significant predictors of blood lead levels included months worked on bridge painting crews, education, and personal hygiene index. Of the site-level variables investigated, having a containment facility on site was a significant predictor of blood lead levels. Our results also indicate that hand wipe lead levels were significantly associated with higher blood lead levels at the end of the study period compared with the beginning of the study period. Similarly, smoking on site and respirator fit testing were significantly associated with higher blood lead levels at the end of the study period. This study shows that several individual-level and site-level factors are associated with blood lead levels among bridge painters, including lead exposure through inhalation and possible hand-to-mouth contact, personal behaviors such as smoking on site, respirator fit testing, and work site conditions such as the use of better containment facilities. Accordingly

  10. [Trade unionism, working conditions and health: the perspective of educational professionals in Rio de Janeiro].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Kátia Reis; de Brito, Jussara Cruz

    2012-02-01

    The scope of this paper is to analyze and interpret the problems and prospects of trade union activity, in order to achieve changes in the workplace and promote health in schools by means of the experience of the Training Program in Health, Gender and Work in Public Schools. In order to conduct this research we staged interviews with union leaders and education professionals. In our analysis we concentrated on the report of a specific case, namely the State Union of Education Professionals in Rio de Janeiro (SEPE-RJ). We perceived that, after the training program, the campaign began to focus not only on the defense of certain rights that are traditionally present on the union agenda. The concept of health broadens the union concept of working conditions; it also allows workers in schools to be the protagonists of movements for change. We note, moreover, the sense of renewal that the theme "work"--in its relation to health--has given to trade union militancy.

  11. Comparison of working efficiency of terrestrial laser scanner in day and night conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arslan, A. E.; Kalkan, K.

    2013-10-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning is a popular and widely used technique to scan existing objects, document historical sites and items, and remodel them if and when needed. Their ability to collect thousands of point data per second makes them an invaluable tool in many areas from engineering to historical reconstruction. There are many scanners in the market with different technical specifications. One main technical specification of laser scanners is range and illumination. In this study, it is tested to be determined the optimal working times of a laser scanner and the scanners consistency with its specifications sheet. In order to conduct this work, series of GNSS measurements in Istanbul Technical University have been carried out, connected to the national reference network, to determine precise positions of target points and the scanner, which makes possible to define a precise distance between the scanner and targets. Those ground surveys has been used for calibration and registration purposes. Two different scan campaigns conducted at 12 am and 11 pm to compare working efficiency of laser scanner in different illumination conditions and targets are measured with a handheld spectro-radiometer in order to determine their reflective characteristics. The obtained results are compared and their accuracies have been analysed.

  12. Pedagogical Staff in Children's Day Care Centres in Germany--Links between Working Conditions, Job Satisfaction, Commitment and Work-Related Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreyer, Inge; Krause, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates links between staff working conditions in children's day care centres ("Kindertageseinrichtungen"--known as "Kitas" in Germany), job satisfaction, commitment and perceived stress at work. Data are based on the nationwide, representative questionnaire survey AQUA ("Arbeitsplatz und Qualität in…

  13. Undocumented migrants in Canada: a scope literature review on health, access to services, and working conditions.

    PubMed

    Magalhaes, Lilian; Carrasco, Christine; Gastaldo, Denise

    2010-02-01

    It is estimated that there are 30-40 million undocumented workers worldwide. Although undocumented migration has become an issue of high international relevance, it has been strikingly understudied in Canada, especially with respect to its impact on health. The purpose of this study is to explore the concept of undocumentedness in Canada through a scoping review of peer-reviewed and grey literature written in English, French, Portuguese and Spanish between 2002 and 2008. The specific aims are to: (i) summarize and disseminate current academic and community-based findings on the health, service access and working conditions of undocumented migrants in Canada; (ii) examine the sources and use of evidence; (iii) identify significant gaps in existing knowledge; (iv) set recommendations for policy and research, including considerations on transnationalism, ethics, interdisciplinary approaches, gender differences, resilience, and impact on the children of non-status parents.

  14. Undocumented Migrants in Canada: A scope literature review on health, access to services, and working conditions

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Christine; Gastaldo, Denise

    2011-01-01

    It is estimated that there are 30 to 40 million undocumented workers worldwide. Although undocumented migration has become an issue of high international relevance, it has been strikingly understudied in Canada, especially with respect to its impact on health. The purpose of this study is to explore the concept of undocumentedness in Canada through a scoping review of peer-reviewed and grey literature written in English, French, Portuguese and Spanish between 2002 and 2008. The specific aims are to: i) summarize and disseminate current academic and community-based findings on the health, service access and working conditions of undocumented migrants in Canada; ii) examine the sources and use of evidence; iii) identify significant gaps in existing knowledge; iv) set recommendations for policy and research, including considerations on transnationalism, ethics, interdisciplinary approaches, gender differences, resilience, and impact on the children of non-status parents. PMID:19657739

  15. Inferior frontal gyrus preserves working memory and emotional learning under conditions of impaired noradrenergic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Benjamin; Androsch, Lucas; Jahn, Ralph T.; Alich, Therese; Striepens, Nadine; Markett, Sebastian; Maier, Wolfgang; Hurlemann, René

    2013-01-01

    Compensation has been widely applied to explain neuroimaging findings in neuropsychiatric patients. Functional compensation is often invoked when patients display equal performance and increased neural activity in comparison to healthy controls. According to the compensatory hypothesis increased activity allows the brain to maintain cognitive performance despite underlying neuropathological changes. Due to methodological and pathology-related issues, however, the functional relevance of the increased activity and the specific brain regions involved in the compensatory response remain unclear. An experimental approach that allows a transient induction of compensatory responses in the healthy brain could help to overcome these issues. To this end we used the non-selective beta-blocker propranolol to pharmacologically induce sub-optimal noradrenergic signaling in healthy participants. In two independent functional MRI (fMRI) experiments participants received either placebo or propranolol before they underwent a cognitive challenge (Experiment 1: working memory; Experiment 2: emotional learning: Pavlovian fear conditioning). In Experiment 1 propranolol had no effects on working memory performance, but evoked stronger activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). In Experiment 2 propranolol produced no effects on emotional memory formation, but evoked stronger activity in the right IFG. The present finding that sub-optimal beta-adrenergic signaling did not disrupt performance and concomitantly increased IFG activity is consistent with, and extends, current perspectives on functional compensation. Together, our findings suggest that under conditions of impaired noradrenergic signaling, heightened activity in brain regions located within the cognitive control network, particularly the IFG, may reflect compensatory operations subserving the maintenance of behavioral performance. PMID:24381546

  16. Migration, Neighborhoods, and Networks: Approaches to Understanding How Urban Environmental Conditions Affect Syndemic Adverse Health Outcomes Among Gay, Bisexual and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Egan, James E.; Kurtz, Steven P.; Latkin, Carl; Chen, Minxing; Tobin, Karin; Yang, Cui; Koblin, Beryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Adopting socioecological, intersectionality, and lifecourse theoretical frameworks may enhance our understanding of the production of syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM). From this perspective, we present preliminary data from three related studies that suggest ways in which social contexts may influence the health of MSM. The first study, using cross-sectional data, looked at migration of MSM to the gay resort area of South Florida, and found that amount of time lived in the area was associated with risk behaviors and HIV infection. The second study, using qualitative interviews, observed complex interactions between neighborhood-level social environments and individual-level racial and sexual identity among MSM in New York City. The third study, using egocentric network analysis with a sample of African American MSM in Baltimore, found that sexual partners were more likely to be found through face-to-face means than the Internet. They also observed that those who co-resided with a sex partner had larger networks of people to depend on for social and financial support, but had the same size sexual networks as those who did not live with a partner. Overall, these findings suggest the need for further investigation into the role of macro-level social forces on the emotional, behavioral, and physical health of urban MSM. PMID:21369730

  17. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  18. [Cancer and work conditions: improving scientific knowledge for new preventive strategies].

    PubMed

    Vogel, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the issue of occupational cancer is discussed by studying the correlation between work conditions and health-related social disparity.Without aiming to furnish a review of the pertinent scientific literature in this field, some matters for discussion will be advanced to initiate scientific and political debate. Keeping in mind the major socio-health disparities still present in European countries, the objective is to address the issue of knowledge generation pertinent to occupational cancer in a complex scenario with numerous obstacles posed both by employers and by the issue of differing methodological approaches, which require cooperation between various disciplines such as epidemiology, toxicology, statistics, and sociology of health. Such cooperation cannot be effective unless both the political and the scientific aspects are addressed in the investigative process and the decisive role of mobilization of the workforce is acknowledged. Finally, the article discusses the particular condition of women, highly underestimated in the scientific literature concerning health issues in the workplace. We have observed that albeit current understanding in this field is insufficient, intervention strategies and prevention policies are inadequate even when measured against this knowledge base. In order for prevention to be effective, public policies on industry, territorial health, environmental protection, and the workplace must be integrated, figures able to act as prime movers in the change process need to be identified, and replacement of carcinogenic substances and production processes must be favoured.

  19. Brush seal leakage performance with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlile, Julie A.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    1992-01-01

    The leakage performance of a brush seal with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions was studied. The leakage results are included for air, helium, and carbon dioxide at several bristle/rotor interferences. Also, the effects of packing a lubricant into the bristles and also of reversing the pressure drop across the seal were studied. Results were compared to that of an annular seal at similar operating conditions. In order to generalize the results, they were correlated using corresponding state theory. The brush seal tested had a bore diameter of 3.792 cm (1.4930 in), a fence height of 0.0635 cm (0.025 in), and 1800 bristles/cm circumference (4500 bristles/in circumference). Various bristle/rotor radial interferences were achieved by using a tapered rotor. The brush seal reduced the leakage in comparison to the annular seal, up to 9.5 times. Reversing the pressure drop across the brush seal produced leakage rates approx. the same as that of the annular seal. Addition of a lubricant reduced the leakage by 2.5 times. The air and carbon dioxide data were successfully correlated using corresponding state theory. However, the helium data followed a different curve than the air and carbon dioxide data.

  20. Brush seal leakage performance with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlile, Julie A.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    1992-01-01

    The leakage performance of a brush seal with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions was studied. The leakage results included for air, helium, and carbon dioxide at several bristle/rotor interferences. Also, the effects of packing a lubricant into the bristles and also of reversing the pressure drop across the seal were studied. Results were compared to that of an annular seal at similar operating conditions. In order to generalize the results, they were correlated using corresponding state theory. The brush seal tested had a bore diameter of 3.792 cm (1.4930 in.), a fence height of 0.0635 cm (0.025 in.), and 1800 bristles/cm circumference (4500 bristles/in. circumference). Various bristle/rotor radial interferences were achieved by using a tapered rotor. The brush seal reduced the leakage in comparison to the annular seal, up to 9.5 times. Reversing the pressure drop across the brush seal produced leakage rates approximately the same as that of the annular seal. Addition of a lubricant reduced the leakage by 2.5 times. The air and carbon dioxide data were successfully correlated using corresponding state theory. However, the helium data followed a different curve than the air and carbon dioxide data.

  1. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  2. Dynamics of brain activity underlying working memory for music in a naturalistic condition.

    PubMed

    Burunat, Iballa; Alluri, Vinoo; Toiviainen, Petri; Numminen, Jussi; Brattico, Elvira

    2014-08-01

    We aimed at determining the functional neuroanatomy of working memory (WM) recognition of musical motifs that occurs while listening to music by adopting a non-standard procedure. Western tonal music provides naturally occurring repetition and variation of motifs. These serve as WM triggers, thus allowing us to study the phenomenon of motif tracking within real music. Adopting a modern tango as stimulus, a behavioural test helped to identify the stimulus motifs and build a time-course regressor of WM neural responses. This regressor was then correlated with the participants' (musicians') functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal obtained during a continuous listening condition. In order to fine-tune the identification of WM processes in the brain, the variance accounted for by the sensory processing of a set of the stimulus' acoustic features was pruned from participants' neurovascular responses to music. Motivic repetitions activated prefrontal and motor cortical areas, basal ganglia, medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures, and cerebellum. The findings suggest that WM processing of motifs while listening to music emerges from the integration of neural activity distributed over cognitive, motor and limbic subsystems. The recruitment of the hippocampus stands as a novel finding in auditory WM. Effective connectivity and agglomerative hierarchical clustering analyses indicate that the hippocampal connectivity is modulated by motif repetitions, showing strong connections with WM-relevant areas (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex - dlPFC, supplementary motor area - SMA, and cerebellum), which supports the role of the hippocampus in the encoding of the musical motifs in WM, and may evidence long-term memory (LTM) formation, enabled by the use of a realistic listening condition.

  3. Wear of surface-engineered metal-on-metal bearings for hip prostheses under adverse conditions with the head loading on the rim of the cup.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Ian; Williams, Sophie; Isaac, Graham; Hatto, Peter; Ingham, Eileen; Fisher, John

    2013-04-01

    Clinical studies have found high wear rates, elevated ion levels and high revision rates of large-diameter metal-on-metal surface replacement bearings in some patients, which have been associated with edge loading of the head on the rim of the cup. We have simulated increased wear and ion levels in metal-on-metal bearings in vitro by introducing variations in translational and rotational positioning of the components, which reproduces stripe wear on the femoral head, cup rim wear and clinically relevant large as well as small wear particles. There is interest in technologies such as surface engineering, which might reduce metal wear and the release of wear particles and ions. Reduced wear with surface-engineered surface replacements compared to metal-on-metal controls has been reported under standard walking conditions with correctly aligned and concentric components. In this in vitro study, the wear of chromium nitride surface-engineered metal-on-metal bearings under conditions of microseparation associated with translational and rotational malpositioning of the components was investigated and the results were compared with a previously reported study of metal-on-metal bearings under the same conditions. Simulations were conducted using our unique hip simulation microseparation methodologies, which reproduce accelerated wear in metal-on-metal bearings and have previously been clinically validated with ceramic-on-ceramic bearings. Four of the six surface-engineered bearings had evidence of head contact on the rim of the cup, which produced stripe wear on the femoral head. Four of the six surface-engineered bearings (two without stripe and two with stripe wear) had lower wear than the previously reported high wearing metal-on-metal bearings. At 2 million cycles, two of the surface-engineered bearings had substantially increased wear rates, four times higher than the high wear rates previously reported for metal-on-metal bearings under the same conditions. There was

  4. FEM analysis of deepwater drilling risers under the operability and hang-off working conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei; Gao, Feng; Bai, Yong

    2009-06-01

    In recent years, numerous exploration activities of oil and gas industry have been conducted in ultra deep water. The global offshore industry is building systems today for drilling in even deeper water, progressively using new technologies, and significantly extending existing technologies. This is the general trend in the offshore oil and gas industry. So the technology of ultra-deepwater risers, which is the main tool in drilling oil, is more and more standard. This paper manly focuses on the global analysis of the drilling risers. And it is divided into two parts, operability analysis and hang-off analysis that are used to check the design of the riser. In this paper, the rotation angle and stress of the riser in the drilling mode are calculated to determine the operability envelop. The number of the buoyancy modules has been determined and according to the API standard, all the worked out values have been checked out. From all the above, it is concluded that the operability envelop is relatively small under harsh condition and the number of the buoyancy modules is a little large. And above all, the design of this riser is successful.

  5. Real-time thermal imaging of solid oxide fuel cell cathode activity in working condition.

    PubMed

    Montanini, Roberto; Quattrocchi, Antonino; Piccolo, Sebastiano A; Amato, Alessandra; Trocino, Stefano; Zignani, Sabrina C; Faro, Massimiliano Lo; Squadrito, Gaetano

    2016-09-01

    Electrochemical methods such as voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are effective for quantifying solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operational performance, but not for identifying and monitoring the chemical processes that occur on the electrodes' surface, which are thought to be strictly related to the SOFCs' efficiency. Because of their high operating temperature, mechanical failure or cathode delamination is a common shortcoming of SOFCs that severely affects their reliability. Infrared thermography may provide a powerful tool for probing in situ SOFC electrode processes and the materials' structural integrity, but, due to the typical design of pellet-type cells, a complete optical access to the electrode surface is usually prevented. In this paper, a specially designed SOFC is introduced, which allows temperature distribution to be measured over all the cathode area while still preserving the electrochemical performance of the device. Infrared images recorded under different working conditions are then processed by means of a dedicated image processing algorithm for quantitative data analysis. Results reported in the paper highlight the effectiveness of infrared thermal imaging in detecting the onset of cell failure during normal operation and in monitoring cathode activity when the cell is fed with different types of fuels.

  6. [Working ability between air and trimix breathing gas under 8 ATA air condition].

    PubMed

    Shibayama, M; Kosugi, S; Mohri, M; Yamamura, I; Oda, S; Kimura, A; Takeuchi, J; Mano, Y

    1990-04-01

    Pneumatic caisson work in Japan has come into operation since 1924. Afterward, this technique of compressed air work has been widely utilized in the construction of foundation basements, shafts of the bottom tunnel shields for subway and so forth. While using this technique of compressed air work means that workers have to be exposed to hyperbaric environment, this technique has risks of not only decompression sickness (DCS) but also toxicity of poisonous gas and/or oxygen deficiency. However, this technique is independent of city construction work and the operation of compressed air work higher than 5ATA (4.0 kg/cm2G) is actually been planning recently. Accordingly unmanned caisson work is considered as a better technique for such higher pressurized work, even though workers must enter into hyperbaric working fields for maintenance or repair of unmanned operated machinery and materials. This research is to establish the safe work under hyperbaric air environment at 8ATA.

  7. [History of mandatory (set by decree) preliminary and periodic medical examinations of workers in hazardous work conditions].

    PubMed

    Retnev, V M

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with over a hunderd years history of foundation and pregress in organization and process of mandatory preliminary and periodic medical examinations of workers exposed to hazardous work conditions.

  8. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  9. Jadwin Dam Condition Report. Dam, Outlet Works & Spillway Periodic Inspection Report Number 4. Lackawaxen River Basin, Dyberry Creek, Pennsylvania.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    AD-A098 782 ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICTE PHILADELPHIA PA FIG 13/13 JADAI N DAM CONDITION REPORT. DA, OUTLET WORKS & SPILLWAY PERIO-ETC (U) UNCLASSIFIED...HUJREALI f ANDARD, 1961, L -GOVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUtiON UNLIMITED. LACKAWAXEN RIVER BASIN * DYBERRY CREEK, PENNSYLVANIA DClJADWIN DAM DTIC ELECTE...MAY 1 2 1981fl CONDITION REFORT E DAM , OUTLET WORKS a SPILLWAY - PERIODIC INSPECTION REPORT NO. 4 NOVEMBER 1980 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY 0. PHILADELPHIA

  10. Examining factors involved in stress-related working memory impairments: Independent or conditional effects?

    PubMed

    Banks, Jonathan B; Tartar, Jaime L; Tamayo, Brittney A

    2015-12-01

    A large and growing body of research demonstrates the impact of psychological stress on working memory. However, the typical study approach tests the effects of a single biological or psychological factor on changes in working memory. The current study attempted to move beyond the standard single-factor assessment by examining the impact of 2 possible factors in stress-related working memory impairments. To this end, 60 participants completed a working memory task before and after either a psychological stressor writing task or a control writing task and completed measures of both cortisol and mind wandering. We also included a measure of state anxiety to examine the direct and indirect effect on working memory. We found that mind wandering mediated the relationship between state anxiety and working memory at the baseline measurement. This indirect relationship was moderated by cortisol, such that the impact of mind wandering on working memory increased as cortisol levels increased. No overall working memory impairment was observed following the stress manipulation, but increases in state anxiety and mind wandering were observed. State anxiety and mind wandering independently mediated the relationship between change in working memory and threat perception. The indirect paths resulted in opposing effects on working memory. Combined, the findings from this study suggest that cortisol enhances the impact of mind wandering on working memory, that state anxiety may not always result in stress-related working memory impairments, and that high working memory performance can protect against mind wandering.

  11. "It's Not Like a Normal 9 to 5!": The Learning Journeys of Media Production Apprentices in Distributed Working Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahiff, Ann; Guile, David

    2016-01-01

    An apprenticeship in media production in England is at the centre of this case study exploration. The context is exemplified by the organisation of the process of production around project teams and the development of project-based working cultures. Given these developments, the working conditions and learning opportunities presented to…

  12. Associations of Caregiver Stress with Working Conditions, Caregiving Practices, and Child Behaviour in Home-Based Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusby, Julie C.; Jones, Laura Backen; Crowley, Ryann; Smolkowski, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Home-based child caregivers face unique stressors related to the nature of their work. One hundred and fifty-five home-based child care providers in Oregon, USA, participated in this cross-sectional correlational study. We investigated associations between indicators of caregiver stress and child care working conditions, the quality of caregiver…

  13. Development and validation of a web-based questionnaire for surveying the health and working conditions of high-performance marine craft populations

    PubMed Central

    de Alwis, Manudul Pahansen; Lo Martire, Riccardo; Äng, Björn O; Garme, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Background High-performance marine craft crews are susceptible to various adverse health conditions caused by multiple interactive factors. However, there are limited epidemiological data available for assessment of working conditions at sea. Although questionnaire surveys are widely used for identifying exposures, outcomes and associated risks with high accuracy levels, until now, no validated epidemiological tool exists for surveying occupational health and performance in these populations. Aim To develop and validate a web-based questionnaire for epidemiological assessment of occupational and individual risk exposure pertinent to the musculoskeletal health conditions and performance in high-performance marine craft populations. Method A questionnaire for investigating the association between work-related exposure, performance and health was initially developed by a consensus panel under four subdomains, viz. demography, lifestyle, work exposure and health and systematically validated by expert raters for content relevance and simplicity in three consecutive stages, each iteratively followed by a consensus panel revision. The item content validity index (I-CVI) was determined as the proportion of experts giving a rating of 3 or 4. The scale content validity index (S-CVI/Ave) was computed by averaging the I-CVIs for the assessment of the questionnaire as a tool. Finally, the questionnaire was pilot tested. Results The S-CVI/Ave increased from 0.89 to 0.96 for relevance and from 0.76 to 0.94 for simplicity, resulting in 36 items in the final questionnaire. The pilot test confirmed the feasibility of the questionnaire. Conclusions The present study shows that the web-based questionnaire fulfils previously published validity acceptance criteria and is therefore considered valid and feasible for the empirical surveying of epidemiological aspects among high-performance marine craft crews and similar populations. PMID:27324717

  14. Total approach is a must for small and medium enterprises to attain sustainable working conditions and environment, with special reference to Bali, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Manuaba, Adnyana

    2006-01-01

    Attention and assistance to enhance the role of small and medium scale enterprises (SMEs) by the government is more emphasized due to the success of SMEs in earning significant amount of foreign currency when Indonesia had to face economical crisis in 1997. This policy has been highly recognized again since the bombing tragedy in 2002; with the excellent evidence to show how important SMEs is in helping and maintaining the economic development of Bali. But in the implementation the assistance needs to be remanaged again in a more proper and appropriate way to attain the ultimate goals. The three economic potentials, agriculture in broad sense, tourism and SMEs (cottage industry included), must be developed in harmony, interdependence, support and complementary each other, if possible as synergist to obtain sustainable development of Bali. While assistance to SMEs must be done in a more coordinated way among the government technical offices, universities, NGOs, banking, and other social community institutions. By doing so, there would be no duplication or gap, nor creation of new disadvantageous problems. It could be in form of ergonomics, occupational health and safety impacts and problems in particular, and in adverse working conditions and environment in general. Therefore it is a must at this moment to carry out total approach in helping SMEs, by integrating the effort to improve their working conditions and environment, built-in within the effort to enhance SMEs'quality of life through economic assistance. In this process a total approach through SHIP approach and Appropriate Technology intervention must be done wisely and timely. By so doing, SMEs'sustainable working conditions and environment shall be attained.

  15. Monitoring of Working Conditions and the Nature of Their Influence on Health of Students and Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinichenko, Mikhail V.; Kirillov, Andrey V.; Frolova, Elena V.; Kaurova, Olga V.; Makushkin, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research is conditioned by the need to win the competition struggle by certain organizations and area in general. Education has recently become very popular for the training of highly professional staff. However, achieving this goal is possible by means of creation of favorable working and learning conditions, maintaining…

  16. "Dangerous Work": Improving Conditions for Faculty of Color in the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, John S.; Jackson-Boothby, Adam; Haberler, Zachary; Walker, Laurencia

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative investigation of the experiences of faculty of color at community colleges identifies current conditions for this population and suggests potentials for ameliorating conditions that inhibit their job satisfaction. We argue that the current conditions for faculty of color, based upon their expressed experiences at the community…

  17. Factors conditioning the return to work of upper limb amputees in Asturias, Spain.

    PubMed

    Fernández, A; Isusi, I; Gómez, M

    2000-08-01

    Reintegration into a social and work environment, as the final objective rehabilitation therapy, is one of the greatest challenges faced in this speciality. The aim of this study was to analyse the reintegration into the workforce of 43 upperlimb amputees in Asturias, Spain (1,100,000 inhabitants) whose amputations were as a result of accidents at work. For this purpose various factors related to their return to work were studied. The most important factor was the year in which the amputation was carried out, since reintegration was more likely to occur in those amputees whose accident at work took place before the 1980s.

  18. Ergonomic analysis of the work conditions of porters and owners of the Supply Center of Campinas, SP.

    PubMed

    Vedovato, Tatiana Giovanelli; Monteiro, Maria Inës; Masson, Valéria Aparecida

    2012-01-01

    Transforming work conditions is part of the ergonomic action that should help to improve work situations that brings risks to the workers health. six workers were observed in different locations of the supply center (Central Free Market, Free Market 2, Flowers Market and Permanent Shed 4). During the observation of workers to the Ergonomic Analysis of Work - AET (Rohmert and Landau) was performed. The workers were divided into two groups: porters and owners. The porters were the most susceptible to the risks of work and minor accidents with sharp wood from boxes or even risk of traffic accidents as pedestrians. However, regarding the use of mental ability for negotiations, use of computers and organizing and planning the establishment of work, the owners were the ones that most time played these activities. The ergonomics advocates work that can be transformed and that favors employee and employer. It is, therefore, intended to redefine the strategies that are embedded into the organizational structure of work.

  19. 48 CFR 52.236-3 - Site Investigation and Conditions Affecting the Work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of... power, and roads; (3) uncertainties of weather, river stages, tides, or similar physical conditions...

  20. 48 CFR 52.236-3 - Site Investigation and Conditions Affecting the Work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of... power, and roads; (3) uncertainties of weather, river stages, tides, or similar physical conditions...

  1. 48 CFR 52.236-3 - Site Investigation and Conditions Affecting the Work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of... power, and roads; (3) uncertainties of weather, river stages, tides, or similar physical conditions...

  2. Tinkering with Material Resources: Operating under Ambiguous Conditions in Rock Construction Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styhre, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Ethnographic studies of, for instance, laboratory work show that practices never reach a full closure but are always open to contingencies and ambiguities, making it possible to accommodate new empirical findings. The aim of the paper is to demonstrate that this is true also for less "high-brow" work in, for example, the…

  3. The Intellectual Work Management as an Essential Condition for Creativity Development of Higher Education Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerzhanov, Yerlan T.; Adilova, Valentina Kh.; Shakaman, Yrysgul B.; Shaimardanov, Rafis Kh.

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the methodological basis of creating effective system for intellectual work management at the higher education institution. The study of the intellectual work management is caused by the need of today's complicated socio-economic, organizational and educational systems to obtain reliably reproducible repercussions from future…

  4. Does Working Memory Training Transfer? A Meta-Analysis Including Training Conditions as Moderators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwaighofer, Matthias; Fischer, Frank; Bühner, Markus

    2015-01-01

    A meta-analysis was undertaken to reexamine near- and far-transfer effects following working-memory training and to consider potential moderators more systematically. Forty-seven studies with 65 group comparisons were included in the meta-analysis. Results showed near-transfer effects to short-term and working-memory skills that were sustained at…

  5. What's so Important about Teachers' Working Conditions? The Fatal Flaw in North American Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bascia, Nina; Rottmann, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    Teaching conditions have been an enduring concern for North American teachers for over a century. This paper explores this phenomenon by tracing how teaching conditions have been understood by decision makers and in educational research over time. It draws on historical research on the formation of mass public education systems to consider why the…

  6. Influence of electrical current variance and thermal resistances on optimum working conditions and geometry for thermoelectric energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Miguel; Reid, Rachel; Ohara, Brandon; Lee, Hohyun

    2013-05-01

    Recent reports on enhanced thermoelectric figure of merits based on nanoscale effects have revived interest in potential applications of thermoelectric modules for waste heat recovery and distributed power generation. However, studies of optimized working conditions have not been thoroughly investigated. The majority of the previous studies on optimum load resistance for maximum power output or maximum efficiency assume temperatures at the ends of thermoelectric materials are known and constant. In reality, temperature should be determined by the energy conservation equations, which are functions of the load resistance, as well as the thermal resistances of the heat source, heat sink, and contact pads. This work exploits a numerical method to determine the actual temperature of thermoelectric materials, and optimum working conditions for thermoelectric energy harvesting are presented. The proposed model considers the effect of thermal resistances between a thermoelectric module and heat reservoirs, and the electrical current variation with respect to load resistance. The optimum condition for load resistance ratio was observed to occur at larger values than those obtained from traditional optimization work. Additionally, optimum geometry for a thermoelectric module is suggested for energy harvesting methods, where forced convection or oversized heat sinks cannot be used. Experimental results obtained from a commercial thermoelectric module are also presented to validate the proposed model. This work forms a basis to predict optimum working conditions in various thermoelectric energy harvesting applications.

  7. The Role of Sleep Disturbances in the Longitudinal Relationship Between Psychosocial Working Conditions, Measured by Work Demands and Support, and Depression

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.; Chungkham, Holendro Singh; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn; Westerlund, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Because work demands and lack of social support seem to be prospectively linked to sleep problems, and sleep problems are linked to depression, sleep problems may play a role in the relationship between these work characteristics and depressive symptoms. In order to shed more light on this relationship, the current study investigated whether disturbed sleep is a mediator in the longitudinal relationships between work demands, social support, and depression. Design: Longitudinal cohort study with repeated survey measures on four occasions. Setting: Swedish workforce. Participants: 2,017 working participants from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health in 2006, 2008, 2010, and 2012. Measurements and results: Work demands (four items) and social support (six items) were assessed with the Demand Control Questionnaire, disturbed sleep (four items) with the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire, and depressive symptoms with a brief subscale (six items) from the Symptom Checklist. Autoregressive longitudinal mediation models using structural equation modeling were tested. The work characteristics, and disturbed sleep, were found to be separately associated with depressive symptoms in subsequent waves. However, only demands were found to be longitudinally related to subsequent disturbed sleep. The longitudinal autoregressive models supported a weak mediating role of disturbed sleep in the relationship between demands and depressive symptoms (standardized beta 0.008, P < 0.001), but not between support and depressive symptoms. Conclusions: These results indicate that higher demands at work might cause an increase in depressive symptoms, in part, by increasing disturbed sleep, although the mediated effect was relatively small compared to the total effect. Citation: Magnusson Hanson LL, Chungkham HS, Åkerstedt T, Westerlund H. The role of sleep disturbances in the longitudinal relationship between psychosocial working conditions, measured by work

  8. Gender inequalities in occupational health related to the unequal distribution of working and employment conditions: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Gender inequalities exist in work life, but little is known about their presence in relation to factors examined in occupation health settings. The aim of this study was to identify and summarize the working and employment conditions described as determinants of gender inequalities in occupational health in studies related to occupational health published between 1999 and 2010. Methods A systematic literature review was undertaken of studies available in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Sociological Abstracts, LILACS, EconLit and CINAHL between 1999 and 2010. Epidemiologic studies were selected by applying a set of inclusion criteria to the title, abstract, and complete text. The quality of the studies was also assessed. Selected studies were qualitatively analysed, resulting in a compilation of all differences between women and men in the prevalence of exposure to working and employment conditions and work-related health problems as outcomes. Results Most of the 30 studies included were conducted in Europe (n=19) and had a cross-sectional design (n=24). The most common topic analysed was related to the exposure to work-related psychosocial hazards (n=8). Employed women had more job insecurity, lower control, worse contractual working conditions and poorer self-perceived physical and mental health than men did. Conversely, employed men had a higher degree of physically demanding work, lower support, higher levels of effort-reward imbalance, higher job status, were more exposed to noise and worked longer hours than women did. Conclusions This systematic review has identified a set of working and employment conditions as determinants of gender inequalities in occupational health from the occupational health literature. These results may be useful to policy makers seeking to reduce gender inequalities in occupational health, and to researchers wishing to analyse these determinants in greater depth. PMID:23915121

  9. Behavior data of battery and battery pack SOC estimation under different working conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Wang, Yujie; Yang, Duo; Chen, Zonghai

    2016-12-01

    This article provides the dataset of operating conditions of battery behavior. The constant current condition and the dynamic stress test (DST) condition were carried out to analyze the battery discharging and charging features. The datasets were achieved at room temperature, in April, 2016. The shared data contributes to clarify the battery pack state-of-charge (SOC) and the battery inconsistency, which is also shown in the article of "An on-line estimation of battery pack parameters and state-of-charge using dual filters based on pack model" (X. Zhang, Y. Wang, D. Yang, et al., 2016) [1].

  10. [Finasteride adverse effects: An update].

    PubMed

    Carreño-Orellana, Néstor; Moll-Manzur, Catherina; Carrasco-Zuber, Juan Eduardo; Álvarez-Véliz, Sergio; Berroeta-Mauriziano, Daniela; Porras-Kusmanic, Ninoska

    2016-12-01

    Finasteride is a 5-α reductase inhibitor that is widely used in the management of benign prostate hyperplasia and male pattern hair loss. It is well known that these agents improve the quality of life in men suffering from these conditions. However, they are associated with some transient and even permanent adverse effects. The aim of this article is to clarify the controversies about the safety of finasteride by analyzing the evidence available in the literature.

  11. [Sociohygienic monitoring of the working conditions of workers at an aircraft engine factory].

    PubMed

    Usatov, A N; Demchenko, V G; Rod'kin, V P

    2011-01-01

    The authors have improved, modified, and introduced a sociohygienic monitoring model proposed by Yu. V. Erofeyev, V. V. Dalmatov, and D. V. Turchaninov (2007) in the P. I. Baranov engine association and proposed objective criteria for evaluating the work space.

  12. Training of astronauts in laboratory-aircraft under weightless conditions for work in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khrunov, Y. V.; Chekidra, I. F.; Kolosov, I. A.

    1975-01-01

    Analyses of occupational activities of astronauts in laboratory-aircraft flights simulating weightlessness conditions permit the development of training methods and optimization of the interaction of man with various spacecraft designs.

  13. 20 CFR 655.732 - What is the second LCA requirement, regarding working conditions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and as Fashion Models, and Requirements for Employers Seeking To Employ Nonimmigrants on H-1b1 and E-3... conditions? An employer seeking to employ H-1B nonimmigrants in specialty occupations or as fashion models...

  14. Children's Preference for Response Cost or Positive Reinforcement as Working Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattler, Howard E.

    1978-01-01

    Significant results favor positive reinforcement and high win ratio in producing shorter average times to complete a response. The 80 first- and third-grade subjects exhibited a preference for continuing the task under the positive reinforcement condition. (RL)

  15. Effect of de-industrialisation on working conditions and self reported health in a sample of manufacturing workers

    PubMed Central

    Ostry, A; Barroetavena, M; Hershler, R; Kelly, S; Demers, P; Teschke, K; Hertzman, D

    2002-01-01

    Design and Setting: This investigation is based on a sample of 3000 sawmill workers employed in 1979 (a year before the beginning de-industrialisation) and interviewed in 1998. The sample was obtained by random selection from an already gathered cohort of approximately 28 000 BC sawmill workers. Change in working conditions from 1979 to 1998 are described. Self reported health status, in 1998, was used as a dependent variable in logistic regression after controlling for confounders. Main results: Downsizing in BC sawmills eliminated 60% of workers between 1979 and 1998. Working conditions in 1998 were better for those who left the sawmill industry and obtained re-employment elsewhere. Workers who remained employed in restructuring sawmills were approximately 50% more likely to report poor health than those re-employed elsewhere. Conclusions: Working conditions and health status were better for workers who, under pressure of de-industrialisation, left the sawmill industry and obtained re-employment outside this sector. PMID:12080157

  16. [Sportsmanship and physical preparedness of junior physicians to work in extreme conditions].

    PubMed

    Timofeev, D A; Madzigon, L K

    2010-04-01

    Were examined characteristics of physical development and preparedness of physicians with different value of successfulness of activity in extreme conditions for the period of their first specialization in internship training. Was shown that to the end of study physiological resources of physicians decrease, it could have negative consequences on their activity in extreme conditions. Was made a conclusion that it's necessary to add lessons of physical preparedness, when the main attention would be paid to development of force qualities.

  17. Supervisors' attitudes and skills for active listening with regard to working conditions and psychological stress reactions among subordinate workers.

    PubMed

    Mineyama, Sachiko; Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Takao, Soshi; Nishiuchi, Kyoko; Kawakami, Norito

    2007-03-01

    We investigated whether supervisors' listening attitudes and skills were related to working conditions and psychological stress reactions among their subordinates. The subjects included 41 male supervisors and their immediate subordinates (n=203). The supervisors completed a short version of the Active Listening Attitude Scale (ALAS) consisting of two subscales: Listening Attitude and Listening Skill for Active Listening. The subordinates rated working conditions and their psychological stress reactions using selected scales of the Job Content Questionnaire and the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire. Those subordinates who worked under supervisors with a higher score of Listening Attitude and Listening Skill reported a more favorable psychological stress reaction than those who worked under supervisors with a lower score of Listening Attitude and Listening Skill. Those subordinates who worked under supervisors with a higher score of Listening Skill reported higher worksite support than those who worked under supervisors with a lower score of Listening Skill. Those subordinates who worked under supervisors with a higher score of Listening Attitude reported higher job control than those who worked under supervisors with a lower score of Listening Attitude. A supervisor's listening attitude and skill appeared to affect psychological stress reactions predominantly among male subordinates than among female subordinates. Psychological stress reactions were lower among younger subordinates who worked under supervisors with high listening skill, while no statistically difference was observed among older subordinates. These findings suggest that a supervisor's listening attitude and skill have an effect on working conditions and psychological stress reactions among subordinates and that the effects vary according to the subordinates' sex and age.

  18. Reverse engineering adverse outcome pathways.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Edward J; Chipman, J Kevin; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or incompletely characterized, mechanisms of action. The application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) can be used to overcome these limitations. This approach was used to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows (FHM, Pimephales promelas). Gene expression changes in FHM ovaries in response to seven different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions, were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. Potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide were examined using two mutual information-based methods to infer gene regulatory networks and potential AOPs. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict network paths from stressor to adverse outcome as candidate AOPs. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment, thus leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biological processes, biomarkers, or alternative endpoints that can be used to monitor an AOP. Finally, the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology were identified and a road map for the utilization of these tools presented.

  19. Advanced Fast Curing Adhesives for Adverse Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    set of battle damage repair adhesives include Belzona 2311 elastomer , Belzona 1221 super metal, and Belzona metal plug, which are very fast curing...resin, and dinonylphenol (10). Marine use A-788 Splash Zone epoxy- polyamide mastic from Z Spar, Los Angeles, CA was used for testing (11). The

  20. Migration status, work conditions and health utilization of female sex workers in three South African cities.

    PubMed

    Richter, Marlise; Chersich, Matthew F; Vearey, Jo; Sartorius, Benn; Temmerman, Marleen; Luchters, Stanley

    2014-02-01

    Intersections between migration and sex work are underexplored in southern Africa, a region with high internal and cross-border population mobility, and HIV prevalence. Sex work often constitutes an important livelihood activity for migrant women. In 2010, sex workers trained as interviewers conducted cross-sectional surveys with 1,653 female sex workers in Johannesburg (Hillbrow and Sandton), Rustenburg and Cape Town. Most (85.3%) sex workers were migrants (1396/1636): 39.0% (638/1636) internal and 46.3% (758/1636) cross-border. Cross-border migrants had higher education levels, predominately worked part-time, mainly at indoor venues, and earned more per client than other groups. They, however, had 41% lower health service contact (adjusted odds ratio = 0.59; 95% confidence interval = 0.40-0.86) and less frequent condom use than non-migrants. Police interaction was similar. Cross-border migrants appear more tenacious in certain aspects of sex work, but require increased health service contact. Migrant-sensitive, sex work-specific health care and health education are needed.

  1. Education requirements for nurses working with people with complex neurological conditions: nurses' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Baker, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Following a service evaluation methodology, this paper reports on registered nurses' (RNs) and healthcare assistants' (HCAs) perceptions about education and training requirements in order to work with people with complex neurological disabilities. A service evaluation was undertaken to meet the study aim using a non-probability, convenience method of sampling 368 nurses (n=110 RNs, n=258 HCAs) employed between October and November 2008 at one specialist hospital in south-west London in the U.K. The main results show that respondents were clear about the need to develop an education and training programme for RNs and HCAs working in this speciality area (91% of RNs and 94% of HCAs). A variety of topics were identified to be included within a work-based education and training programme, such as positively managing challenging behaviour, moving and handling, working with families. Adults with complex neurological needs have diverse needs and thus nurses working with this patient group require diverse education and training in order to deliver quality patient-focused nursing care.

  2. A static organization in a dynamic context--A qualitative study of changes in working conditions for Swedish engine officers.

    PubMed

    Lundh, Monica; Rydstedt, Leif W

    2016-07-01

    During the last decades the shipping industry has undergone rapid technical developments and experienced hard economic conditions and increased striving for profitability. This has led to reduced staffing and changes in task performance, which has been reported to increase workload for the remaining seafarers. The working conditions on board have a number of distinct and in many ways unique characteristics, which makes the job demands and resources for seafarers unique in several ways. The purpose of this study was to assess how engine room staff perceives how these major technical and organizational changes in the shipping industry have affected job demands as well as resources. The study compiled individual interviews and focus groups interviews with engine crew members where they were asked to elaborate on the psychosocial work environment and the major changes in the working conditions on board. Engine crew describes a work situation where they feel a lack of resources. The content of the work has changed, staffing has been reduced, new tasks are being added but the organization of the crew and the design of the work place remains unaltered.

  3. Work and Intellectual Aging: The Psychological Concommitants of Social-Organizational Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebok, George W.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Employed a cross-sectional comparison of 187 mid-level professional managers to assess the relationship of several work-related variables and perceived intellectual aging. Results supported the hypothesis that older managers would report more intellectual processing decline than younger managers, but that both young and old managers would see…

  4. Children's Auditory Working Memory Performance in Degraded Listening Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osman, Homira; Sullivan, Jessica R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to determine (a) whether school-age children with typical hearing demonstrate poorer auditory working memory performance in multitalker babble at degraded signal-to-noise ratios than in quiet; and (b) whether the amount of cognitive demand of the task contributed to differences in performance in noise. It…

  5. The Impact of Maternal Employment Serious Youth Crime: Does the Quality of Working Conditions Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ven, Thomas Vander; Cullen, Francis T.

    2004-01-01

    Social critics and the general public have for some time voiced a variety of concerns related to the increasing entrance of women into the paid labor market. A popular assumption has been that the children of working women are prone to criminal activity. The authors analyze data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), using multiple…

  6. Using Activity Theory to Understand How People Learn to Negotiate the Conditions of Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthen, Helena

    2008-01-01

    In a typical workplace in the United States, two knowledge-producing activity systems are in motion. Each produces knowledge about how to do the work of that workplace, but they are differently motivated: one toward productivity, and the other toward earning a living. The conflict between these two systems is addressed through the process of…

  7. Paying for Progress: Conditional Grants and the Desegregation of Southern Schools. NBER Working Paper No. 14869

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cascio, Elizabeth; Gordon, Nora; Lewis, Ethan; Reber, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines how a large conditional grants program influenced school desegregation in the American South. Exploiting newly collected archival data and quasi-experimental variation in potential per-pupil federal grants, we show that school districts with more at risk in 1966 were more likely to desegregate just enough to receive their…

  8. Student's Research Work as the Condition of Continuity of General and Professional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedishenkova, Marina V.; Efimova, Elena V.; Ryabova, Ekaterina V.

    2015-01-01

    The problem in question is necessitated by the contradictions between requirements of successive educational process of general and professional education and the absence of new mechanisms of providing the continuity of education which is effective under modern conditions. The aim of the article in question is to provide the potential of the…

  9. 48 CFR 52.236-3 - Site Investigation and Conditions Affecting the Work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... transportation, disposal, handling, and storage of materials; (2) the availability of labor, water, electric power, and roads; (3) uncertainties of weather, river stages, tides, or similar physical conditions at... satisfied itself as to the character, quality, and quantity of surface and subsurface materials or...

  10. New York City's First Conditional Cash Transfer Program: What Worked, What Didn't

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riccio, James; Miller, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of a long-term evaluation of Opportunity NYC--Family Rewards, an experimental, privately funded, conditional cash transfer (CCT) program to help families break the cycle of poverty. Family Rewards was the first comprehensive CCT program in a developed country. Launched in 2007 by New York City's Center for…

  11. Prevalence of Depressive Symptoms and Related Factors in Korean Employees: The Third Korean Working Conditions Survey (2011).

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Nam; Han, Mi Ah; Park, Jong; Ryu, So Yeon

    2016-04-14

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association between general working conditions and depressive symptoms among Korean employees. The target population of the study was native employees nationwide who were at least 15 years old, and 50,032 such individuals were enrolled in the study. Depressive symptoms was assessed using the WHO-5 wellbeing index. Associations between general characteristics, job-related characteristics, work environment, and depressive symptoms were tested using chi-square tests, t-tests, and multiple logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of depressive symptoms was 39% (40.7% in males and 36.5% in females). Multiple regression analysis revealed that male subjects, older subjects, subjects with higher education status, subjects with lower monthly income, current smokers, and frequent drinkers were more likely to have depressive symptoms. In addition, longer weekly work hours, occupation type (skilled, unskilled, operative, or economic sector), shift work, working to tight deadlines, exposure to stress at work, and hazard exposure were associated with depressive symptoms. This representative study will be a guide to help manage depression among Korean employees. We expect that further research will identify additional causal relationships between general or specific working conditions and depression.

  12. An Investigation of Elementary Teachers' and Principals' Perceptions of Teacher Working Conditions and Academic Achievement in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applewhite, Michael Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate elementary teachers' and principals' perceptions of working conditions and academic achievement in selected regions in North Carolina public schools. The participants in this study were North Carolina principals and elementary teachers from the north and south central school regions. These educators…

  13. The Relationship between Teachers' and Principals' Perceptions of the Working Conditions in North Carolina Elementary Schools and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizzelle, Sylvia Jean

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between teachers' and principals' perceptions on the North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey (TWC) and the influence this relationship had on student achievement. A quantitative research design using a Multiple Linear Regression investigated the relationship between teachers' and…

  14. Early Career Mathematics Teachers' General Pedagogical Knowledge and Skills: Do Teacher Education, Teaching Experience, and Working Conditions Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    König, Johannes; Blömeke, Sigrid; Kaiser, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We examined several facets of general pedagogical knowledge and skills of early career mathematics teachers, asking how they are associated with characteristics of teacher education, teaching experience, and working conditions. Declarative general pedagogical knowledge (GPK) was assessed via a paper-and-pencil test, while early career teachers'…

  15. WCPSS Teacher Working Conditions Survey Results: 2011-12. Data Trends. D&A Report No.12.13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halstead, Elizabeth O.

    2012-01-01

    During the spring of 2012, over 100,000 educators across the state took the North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions (TWC) survey. Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) teachers responded more positively to 46 of the 85 survey items in 2012 than did teachers statewide. On 14 items, WCPSS teachers' responses were less favorable than those of…

  16. First-Year Principals in Urban School Districts: How Actions and Working Conditions Relate to Outcomes. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhauser, Susan; Gates, Susan M.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Ikemoto, Gina Schuyler

    2012-01-01

    Principals new to their school face a variety of challenges that can influence their likelihood of improving their schools' performance and their likelihood of remaining the principal. Understanding the actions that principals take and the working conditions they face in the first year can inform efforts to promote school improvement and principal…

  17. Looking beyond School Walls: Examining the Impact of Superintendent Longevity on Teachers' Perceptions of Their Working Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Derrick D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if superintendent longevity significantly impacted teachers' perceptions of their working conditions. In addition, the study sought to determine if there were differences in perceptions among teachers whose superintendent was beginning (1 or fewer years in current position), emerging (between 2 to 6 years…

  18. Attracting and Retaining Teachers in Cambridgeshire: Working Conditions and Teachers Flows from a School Workforce Census Data Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bélanger, Julie; Broeks, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    This report explores the working conditions and flows of state-funded secondary school teachers in Cambridgeshire compared to a select number of other local authorities and to the English national landscape as a whole between 2010 and 2015. It also presents findings for different subjects, highlighting the situation for science, technology,…

  19. A Study of Child Care Professionals' Salaries, Benefits, and Working Conditions: Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community Child Care Council of Sonoma County, Santa Rosa, CA.

    Surveys were made of the salaries, benefits, and working conditions of child care professionals in Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma Counties. The centers sampled operated under a variety of auspices. Centers included nonprofit (without subsidized child care spaces), proprietary, public, and subsidized organizations. The survey instrument…

  20. Relationship Between Age, Tenure, and Disability Duration in Persons With Compensated Work-Related Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Besen, Elyssa; Young, Amanda E.; Gaines, Brittany; Pransky, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to examine the relationships among age, tenure, and the length of disability following a work-related injury/illness. Methods: This study utilized 361,754 administrative workers’ compensation claims. The relationships between age, tenure, and disability duration was estimated with random-effects models. Results: The age-disability duration relationship was stronger than the tenure-disability duration relationship. An interaction was observed between age and tenure. At younger ages, disability duration varied little based on tenure. In midlife, disability duration was greater for workers with lower tenure than for workers with higher tenure. At the oldest ages, disability duration increased as tenure increased. Conclusions: Findings indicate that age is a more important factor in disability duration than tenure; however, the relationship between age and disability duration varies based on tenure, suggesting that both age and tenure are important influences in the work-disability process. PMID:26645384

  1. Do Astronauts Havbe a Higher Rate of Orthopedic Shoulder Conditions Than a Cohort of Working Professionals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, M. S.; Murray, J. D.; Young, M.; Wear, M. L.; Van Baalen, M.; Tarver, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational surveillance of astronaut shoulder injuries began with operational concerns at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training. Orthopedic shoulder injury and surgery rates were calculated [1], but classifying the rates as normal, high or low was highly dependent on the comparison group. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify a population of working professionals and compare orthopedic shoulder consultation and surgery rates.

  2. Optimized working conditions for a thermoelectric generator as a topping cycle for gas turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady Knowles, C.; Lee, Hohyun

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a model for a theoretical maximum efficiency of a thermoelectric generator integrated with a Brayton-cycle engine. The thermoelectric cycle is presented in two configurations as a topping cycle and a preheating topping cycle. For the topping cycle configuration, the thermoelectric generator receives heat from a high-temperature heat source and produces electrical work before rejecting heat to a Brayton cycle. For the preheating topping cycle, the rejected heat from the thermoelectric generator partially heats the compressed working fluid of the Brayton cycle before a secondary heater delivers heat to the working fluid directly from the heat source. The thermoelectric topping cycle efficiency increases as the temperature difference between the hot- and cold-side increases; however, this limits the heat transfer possible to the Brayton cycle, which in turn reduces power generation from the Brayton cycle. This model identifies the optimum operating parameters of the thermoelectric and Brayton cycles to obtain the maximum thermal efficiency of the combined cycle. In both configurations, efficiency gains are larger at low-temperature Brayton cycles. Although a thermoelectric generator (TEG) topping cycle enhances efficiency for a low temperature turbine, efficiency cannot exceed a high temperature gas turbine. Using a TEG topping cycle is limited to cases when space or price for a high temperature turbine cannot be justified. A design to achieve the preheating thermoelectric topping cycle is also presented.

  3. The interrelationships between working conditions, job satisfaction, burnout and mental health among hospital physicians in Japan: a path analysis.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Yasuharu; Hayano, Keiko; Ozaki, Makiko; Bito, Seiji; Yanai, Haruo; Koizumi, Shunzo

    2009-04-01

    A growing number of physicians are leaving their hospitals because of painful working conditions in hospitals throughout Japan. We set out to analyze the interrelationships between working conditions, job satisfaction, burnout and mental health among Japanese physicians. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2007 for hospital physicians throughout Japan. A path analysis based on structural equation modeling was utilized for examining the interrelationships between work control, on-call duty volume, job satisfaction (the Japan Hospital Physicians Satisfaction Scale), burnout (the Japanese version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory) and mental health (the General Health Questionnaire). Of 336 physicians who received a solicitation E-mail, 236 participated in our study (response rate, 70%). Sixty physicians (25.4%) were women with a mean age of 41 yr. In the path analysis, burnout and poor mental health were related directly to job dissatisfaction and short sleeping time, while they were related indirectly to poor work control and heavy on-call duty. In the multi-group path analysis of both genders, sleeping time was related to job satisfaction more likely among female physicians but less among male physicians. Healthcare policy makers need to implement immediate, extensive and decisive measures to improve work condition and to reduce overwork among hospital physicians.

  4. Condition-Based Maintenance (CBM): A Working Partnership between Government, Industry, and Academia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    model for the 21 "t Century. iv Acknowledgements This project was funded under the direction and leadership of Mr. Robert Brown, G-3 Condition-Based...Management. Mason, OH: Thomson Customer Publishing, 2004, p. 2. [4] Ibid. [5] Adapted from D Wilson. "Value Engineering in Transportation." Achieving Value... Thomson Custom Publishing. 26 Exhibit 2: Delivering on Unique Skill Sets 1NPS NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA DECISION ANALYSIS TO SUPPORT

  5. Examination of Technetium Transport Through Soils Under Contrasting Redox Conditions: Batch and Column Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dozier, R.; Montgomery, D.; Wylie, E. M.; Dogan, M.; Moysey, S. M.; Powell, B. A.; Martinez, N. E.

    2015-12-01

    Experiments were performed under various reducing conditions to evaluate the transport behavior of technetium-99 (99Tc) in the presence of sandy clay loam soil from the Savannah River Site (SRS) and goethite, magnetite, and iron sulfide, which were selected for their increasing reducing potential. The experiments were conducted to investigate how redox reaction equilibria and rates affect the overall mobility of 99Tc as it transitions between the mobile Tc(VII) and immobile Tc(IV). Under oxygen-rich conditions, batch sorption isotherms measured for TcO4- across the concentration range 0.5 to 50 μg/L were linear with distribution coefficients (Kd) of 0.78 mL/g or lower, with decreasing sorption for goethite, magnetite, and iron sulfide, respectively. Addition of Na2S resulted in a marked increase in apparent 99Tc sorption to the solid phase, with Kd of 43 mL/g, 35 mL/g, and 29 mL/g, following the same mineral trend as previously. The increased Kd values are possibly due to reduction of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), resulting in the formation of TcO2(s). SRS soil batch sorption isotherms measured for TcO4- across the same concentration range were also linear, with Kd of 0.7 mL/g for unadjusted pH, 5.1 mL/g for pH of around 6, and 6.7 mL/g for pH of around 4. Kinetic batch sorption tests showed less than 10% 99Tc sorption in an oxidizing environment and greater than 95% sorption in a reducing environment, with both reactions occurring on the order of minutes. In contrast, desorption experiments initiated by transferring the samples from a reducing environment (0.1% H2(g)/99.9% N2(g)) to atmospheric conditions resulted in a slow desorption step on the order of days. Column experiments conducted with the SRS sands indicate a retardation factor of 1.17 for 99Tc under oxygen rich conditions. Additional column experiments are being conducted to evaluate 99Tc transport dependencies on transitions between oxygen rich and poor conditions.

  6. [Basic questionnaire and methodological criteria for Surveys on Working Conditions, Employment, and Health in Latin America and the Caribbean].

    PubMed

    Benavides, Fernando G; Merino-Salazar, Pamela; Cornelio, Cecilia; Assunção, Ada Avila; Agudelo-Suárez, Andrés A; Amable, Marcelo; Artazcoz, Lucía; Astete, Jonh; Barraza, Douglas; Berhó, Fabián; Milián, Lino Carmenate; Delclòs, George; Funcasta, Lorena; Gerke, Johanna; Gimeno, David; Itatí-Iñiguez, María José; Lima, Eduardo de Paula; Martínez-Iñigo, David; Medeiros, Adriane Mesquita de; Orta, Lida; Pinilla, Javier; Rodrigo, Fernando; Rojas, Marianela; Sabastizagal, Iselle; Vallebuona, Clelia; Vermeylen, Greet; Villalobos, Gloria H; Vives, Alejandra

    2016-10-10

    This article aimed to present a basic questionnaire and minimum methodological criteria for consideration in future Surveys on Working Conditions, Employment, and Health in Latin America and the Caribbean. A virtual and face-to-face consensus process was conducted with participation by a group of international experts who used the surveys available up until 2013 as the point of departure for defining the proposal. The final questionnaire included 77 questions grouped in six dimensions: socio-demographic characteristics of workers and companies; employment conditions; working conditions; health status; resources and preventive activities; and family characteristics. The minimum methodological criteria feature the interviewee's home as the place for the interview and aspects related to the quality of the fieldwork. These results can help improve the comparability of future surveys in Latin America and the Caribbean, which would in turn help improve information on workers' heath in the region.

  7. E-O Propagation, Signature and System Performance Under Adverse Meteorological Conditions Considering Out-of-Area Operations (La Propagation, la Signature et les performances des Systemes optroniques dans des Conditions Meteorologiques Defavorables, compte Tenu des Operations hors Zone)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    la temnp~ature tinctes. 11 y a donc d~doublement ; on parle encore d’une thermodynamique T (en K) et A l’humidit6 sp~cifique q zone de mirage. (en kg...A4pour les conditions de stratification CHN =-10-3 et CEN =1,2-10-3 (13) instable. Les variables thermodynamiques utilis~es sont La determination de z

  8. [Conditions and work process in the daily of the Family Health Program: coherency with health humanization principles].

    PubMed

    Trad, Leny Alves Bomfim; Rocha, Ana Angélica Ribeiro de Meneses E

    2011-03-01

    This study analyzes humanization at work in the context of the Family Health Program (FHP), inquiring: what is the role that infrastructure assumes in the construction of humanized work in the FHP? Does the course of staff work reveal coherency with health humanization principles? In order to find out answers to these questions, it was explored the perception of FHP' professionals about their work routine, considering concrete conditions whereby it occurs besides involved relationships, practices and products. It is a multiple case study, both qualitative and quantitative (with primacy of the first approach), developed through questionnaires and focal-groups with FHP' teams of selected areas. The results indicate that infrastructure fragilities and low investment in training of staffs are factors that contribute for the persistence of work conditions and practices that are far away from health humanization principles. Despite of the difficulties, it was evidenced, by the staffs, in general way, great engagement to their work and great sensibility to population needs and problems.

  9. Addressing the migration of health professionals: the role of working conditions and educational placements

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of the global health-worker shortage, which could undermine the Millennium Development Goal to halt and begin to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS. The current situation suggests that long-term solutions to shortages can only be found by addressing the problem from a global perspective; that is, to eliminate shortages through substantial investments in training and retaining health workers in developed and developing countries, and not through policies that do not work towards solving this underlying problem, such as ones that restrict migration. PMID:19922691

  10. Do Astronauts have a Higher Rate of Orthopedic Shoulder Conditions than a Cohort of Working Professionals?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Mitzi S.; Murray, Jocelyn D.; Young, Millenia; Wear, Mary L.; Tarver, W. J.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Occupational surveillance of astronaut shoulder injuries began with operational concerns at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training. NASA has implemented several occupational health initiatives during the past 20 years to decrease the number and severity of injuries, but the individual success rate is unknown. Orthopedic shoulder injury and surgery rates were calculated, but classifying the rates as normal, high or low was highly dependent on the comparison group. The purpose of this study was to identify a population of working professionals and compare orthopedic shoulder consultation and surgery rates.

  11. Working conditions in the engine department - A qualitative study among engine room personnel on board Swedish merchant ships.

    PubMed

    Lundh, Monica; Lützhöft, Margareta; Rydstedt, Leif; Dahlman, Joakim

    2011-01-01

    The specific problems associated with the work on board within the merchant fleet are well known and have over the years been a topic of discussion. The work conditions in the engine room (ER) are demanding due to, e.g. the thermal climate, noise and awkward working postures. The work in the engine control room (ECR) has over recent years undergone major changes, mainly due to the introduction of computers on board. In order to capture the impact these changes had implied, and also to investigate how the work situation has developed, a total of 20 engine officers and engine ratings were interviewed. The interviews were semi-structured and Grounded Theory was used for the data analysis. The aim of the present study was to describe how the engine crew perceive their work situation and working environment on board. Further, the aim was to identify areas for improvements which the engine crew consider especially important for a safe and effective work environment. The result of the study shows that the design of the ECR and ER is crucial for how different tasks are performed. Design which does not support operational procedures and how tasks are performed risk inducing inappropriate behaviour as the crew members' are compelled to find alternative ways to perform their tasks in order to get the job done. These types of behaviour can induce an increased risk of exposure to hazardous substances and the engine crew members becoming injured.

  12. Managing work–family conflict in the medical profession: working conditions and individual resources as related factors

    PubMed Central

    Mache, Stefanie; Bernburg, Monika; Vitzthum, Karin; Groneberg, David A; Klapp, Burghard F; Danzer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study developed and tested a research model that examined the effects of working conditions and individual resources on work–family conflict (WFC) using data collected from physicians working at German clinics. Material and methods This is a cross-sectional study of 727 physicians working in German hospitals. The work environment, WFC and individual resources were measured by the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire, the WFC Scale, the Brief Resilient Coping Scale and the Questionnaire for Self-efficacy, Optimism and Pessimism. Descriptive, correlation and linear regression analyses were applied. Results Clinical doctors working in German hospitals perceived high levels of WFC (mean=76). Sociodemographic differences were found for age, marital status and presence of children with regard to WFC. No significant gender differences were found. WFCs were positively related to high workloads and quantitative job demands. Job resources (eg, influence at work, social support) and personal resources (eg, resilient coping behaviour and self-efficacy) were negatively associated with physicians’ WFCs. Interaction terms suggest that job and personal resources buffer the effects of job demands on WFC. Conclusions In this study, WFC was prevalent among German clinicians. Factors of work organisation as well as factors of interpersonal relations at work were identified as significant predictors for WFC. Our results give a strong indication that both individual and organisational factors are related to WFC. Results may play an important role in optimising clinical care. Practical implications for physicians’ career planning and recommendations for future research are discussed. PMID:25941177

  13. Constitutive equations for commercial-purity aluminum deformed under hot-working conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Puchi, E.S. . School of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science)

    1995-01-01

    A rational analysis of a number of stress-strain curves for a commercial-purity aluminum has been carried out in order to derive a set of constitutive equations capable of describing the flow stress of the material in terms of the applied strain, rate of straining, and deformation temperature. Such an analysis combines the exponential saturation strain-hardening function earlier proposed by Voce (1948; 1955) with the exponential relationship developed from steady-state creep data at high stressed, and considers the existence of two different regimes of work-hardening. The proposed formalism requires only the use of seven material constants which include the temperature-dependent shear modulus, the activation energy for self-diffusion, one pre-exponential factor, and four stress sensitivity parameters of the strain rate. A satisfactory correlation has been obtained between the experimental values of the flow stress and those predicted for the model, which enables it to be used in conjunction with any algorithm based on finite differences methods or finite elements codes to simulate hot-working operations carried out in this material.

  14. Conditional Electrical Stimulation in Animal and Human Models for Neurogenic Bladder: Working Toward a Neuroprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Powell, C R

    2016-12-01

    Sacral neuromodulation has had a tremendous impact on the treatment of urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract symptoms for patients with neurologic conditions. This stimulation does not use real-time data from the body or input from the patient. Incorporating this is the goal of those pursuing a neuroprosthesis to enhance bladder function for these patients. Investigators have demonstrated the effectiveness of conditional (also called closed-loop) feedback in animal models as well as limited human studies. Dorsal genital nerve, pudendal nerve, S3 afferent nerve roots, S1 and S2 ganglia have all been used as targets for stimulation. Most of these have also been used as sources of afferent nerve information using sophisticated nerve electrode arrays and filtering algorithms to detect significant bladder events and even to estimate the fullness of the bladder. There are problems with afferent nerve sensing, however. Some of these include sensor migration and low signal to noise ratios. Implantable pressure sensors have also been investigated that have their own unique challenges, such as erosion and sensor drift. As technology improves, an intelligent neuroprosthesis with the ability to sense significant bladder events and stimulate as needed will evolve.

  15. The role of psychosocial working conditions on burnout and its core component emotional exhaustion – a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aims To analyze the association between psychosocial working conditions and burnout and its core component emotional exhaustion, a systematic literature review was undertaken including cohort studies, case–control studies, and randomized controlled trials. Methods The literature search in Medline and PsycInfo was based on a defined search string and strict exclusion and inclusion criteria. Evaluation of the 5,599 initially identified search hits by two independent reviewers and a detailed quality assessment resulted in six methodologically adequate cohort studies considering the relationship between psychosocial working conditions and burnout (one study) as well as the burnout core component emotional exhaustion (five studies). Results The results of our systematic review point to a relationship between psychosocial working conditions and the development of emotional exhaustion/burnout. Particularly high job demands seem to play a role in the development of emotional exhaustion. However, strong intercorrelations between workplace factors, as a matter of principle, make the identification of a single psychosocial workplace factor (being associated with an especially high or low risk of burnout) difficult. Conclusions Multidimensional approaches including reduction of work demands, enhancement of decision latitude and improving the social climate might be promising for preventing burnout and emotional exhaustion. However, methodologically adequate intervention studies are urgently needed to prove the effectiveness of workplace interventions. PMID:24628839

  16. Relationships of working conditions and individual characteristics to occupational injuries: a case-control study in coal miners.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Apurna Kumar; Bhattacherjee, Ashis; Chau, Nearkasen

    2004-11-01

    This study assessed the relationship of age, poor perception of working condition, poor safety environment, poor management and supervision, risk-taking behavior, emotional instability, negative job involvement, job dissatisfaction, job stress, and poor safety performance of workers to occupational injuries. This case-control study was conducted on 202 male coal miners with at least one occupational injury during a five-year period and 202 male controls with no occupational injury, matched on the job. A standardized questionnaire administered by individual interviewers was used. Data were analysed by the logistic regression method. For all workers combined, the factors with significant adjusted odds ratios (ORs) found were: 30-45 and >45 yr age groups (OR vs. <30 yr age group: 1.80, 95% CI 1.02-3.17 and 2.59, 1.38-4.85 respectively), poor perception of working conditions (1.61, CI 1.00-3.18), emotional instability (2.33, 1.04-5.22), job stress (1.83, 1.00-3.46) and poor safety performance of workers (3.10, 1.45-6.63). No significant interaction was found between these risk factors and the job. It was concluded that older age, poor perception of work conditions, poor work environment, and human behavioral factors played significant roles in occupational injuries. This information would help in implementing preventive programs to improve working conditions and management quality and to help the workers to develop positive psychological traits, but workers with negative traits such as emotional instability and older workers should be employed in less demanding jobs.

  17. Human ergology that promotes participatory approach to improving safety, health and working conditions at grassroots workplaces: achievements and actions.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Tsuyoshi

    2011-12-01

    Participatory approaches are increasingly applied to improve safety, health and working conditions of grassroots workplaces in Asia. The core concepts and methods in human ergology research such as promoting real work life studies, relying on positive efforts of local people (daily life-technology), promoting active participation of local people to identify practical solutions, and learning from local human networks to reach grassroots workplaces, have provided useful viewpoints to devise such participatory training programmes. This study was aimed to study and analyze how human ergology approaches were applied in the actual development and application of three typical participatory training programmes: WISH (Work Improvement for Safe Home) with home workers in Cambodia, WISCON (Work Improvement in Small Construction Sites) with construction workers in Thailand, and WARM (Work Adjustment for Recycling and Managing Waste) with waste collectors in Fiji. The results revealed that all the three programmes, in the course of their developments, commonly applied direct observation methods of the work of target workers before devising the training programmes, learned from existing local good examples and efforts, and emphasized local human networks for cooperation. These methods and approaches were repeatedly applied in grassroots workplaces by taking advantage of their the sustainability and impacts. It was concluded that human ergology approaches largely contributed to the developments and expansion of participatory training programmes and could continue to support the self-help initiatives of local people for promoting human-centred work.

  18. Influence of Hot-Working Conditions on High-Temperature Properties of a Heat-Resistant Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, John F; Freeman, J W

    1957-01-01

    The relationships between conditions of hot-working and properties at high temperatures and the influence of the hot-working on response to heat treatment were investigated for an alloy containing nominally 20 percent molybdenum, 2 percent tungsten, and 1 percent columbium. Commercially produced bar stock was solution-treated at 2,200 degrees F. to minimize prior-history effects and then rolled at temperatures of 2,200 degrees, 2,100 degrees, 2,000 degrees, 1,800 degrees, and 1,600 degrees F. Working was carried out at constant temperature and with incremental decreases in temperature simulating a falling temperature during hot-working. In addition, a few special repeated cyclic conditions involving a small reduction at high temperature followed by a small reduction at a low temperature were used to study the possibility of inducing very low strengths by the extensive precipitation accompanying such properties. Most of the rolling was done in open passes with a few check tests being made with closed passes. Heat treatments at both 2,050 degrees and 2,200 degrees F. subsequent to working were used to study the influence on response to heat treatment.

  19. Research of thermal deformation of a kinematic wave reducerwith a modified tooth profile during the work in low temperature conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, D. L.; Nikulin, P. A.

    2017-02-01

    In the conditions of the Extreme North working resource of mechanicaltools and machineelements is reduced because of bad weather conditions in this region. At a low temperature materials are exposed to deformation which is capable to break operability of the mechanism. In connection with the high requirements to the accuracy of a kinematic wave reducer, it is necessary to conduct a research for the purpose of comparison of value of thermal deformation and the appointed admission on a reducer detail. If value of thermal deformation is more admission, then it can lead to jamming of the mechanism. The research was conducted for a collected reducer and separately for not loaded driver gear.

  20. Changes in lung function after working with the shotcrete lining method under compressed air conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Kessel, R; Redl, M; Mauermayer, R; Praml, G J

    1989-01-01

    Shotcrete techniques under compressed air are increasingly applied in the construction of tunnels. Up to now little is known about the influence of shotcrete dusts on the function of the lung. The lung function of 30 miners working with shotcrete under compressed air (before and after one shift) was measured. They carried personal air samplers to assess the total dust exposure. Long term effects were studied on a second group of 29 individuals exposed to shotcrete dusts and compressed air for two years. A significant increase of airway resistance and a significant decrease of some flow-volume parameters were found after one workshift. These changes partially correlate close to the dust exposure. After two years exposure a significant decrease of mean expiratory flow (MEF)50 and MEF25 was found. These results point to damage in the small airways and emphasise the major role of the lung function test--including the flow-volume manoeuvre for the medical examination of the workers. Additionally, they should carry filter masks. Images PMID:2923823

  1. Changes in lung function after working with the shotcrete lining method under compressed air conditions.

    PubMed

    Kessel, R; Redl, M; Mauermayer, R; Praml, G J

    1989-02-01

    Shotcrete techniques under compressed air are increasingly applied in the construction of tunnels. Up to now little is known about the influence of shotcrete dusts on the function of the lung. The lung function of 30 miners working with shotcrete under compressed air (before and after one shift) was measured. They carried personal air samplers to assess the total dust exposure. Long term effects were studied on a second group of 29 individuals exposed to shotcrete dusts and compressed air for two years. A significant increase of airway resistance and a significant decrease of some flow-volume parameters were found after one workshift. These changes partially correlate close to the dust exposure. After two years exposure a significant decrease of mean expiratory flow (MEF)50 and MEF25 was found. These results point to damage in the small airways and emphasise the major role of the lung function test--including the flow-volume manoeuvre for the medical examination of the workers. Additionally, they should carry filter masks.

  2. Status report of advanced cladding modeling work to assess cladding performance under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    B.J. Merrill; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-09-01

    Scoping simulations performed using a severe accident code can be applied to investigate the influence of advanced materials on beyond design basis accident progression and to identify any existing code limitations. In 2012 an effort was initiated to develop a numerical capability for understanding the potential safety advantages that might be realized during severe accident conditions by replacing Zircaloy components in light water reactors (LWRs) with silicon carbide (SiC) components. To this end, a version of the MELCOR code, under development at the Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico (SNL/NM), was modified by replacing Zircaloy for SiC in the MELCOR reactor core oxidation and material properties routines. The modified version of MELCOR was benchmarked against available experimental data to ensure that present SiC oxidation theory in air and steam were correctly implemented in the code. Additional modifications have been implemented in the code in 2013 to improve the specificity in defining components fabricated from non-standard materials. An overview of these modifications and the status of their implementation are summarized below.

  3. First principles surface thermodynamics of industrial supported catalysts in working conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raybaud, P.; Costa, D.; Corral Valero, M.; Arrouvel, C.; Digne, M.; Sautet, P.; Toulhoat, H.

    2008-02-01

    Ever stronger environmental concerns prompt the research in the area of heterogeneous catalysis to play an ever more crucial role to produce ever cleaner fuel from the refining of petroleum effluents. The catalytic active phase is often used in a dispersed state over a porous oxide material. This paper is a review of recent progress brought by periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations in the area of two relevant industrial supported catalysts. We focus on two important supports used in the refining industry: anatase-TiO2 and γ-alumina. According to the various reaction conditions, the presence of H2O, H2 and H2S may change the surface states of the support. In particular, it is crucial to know and control the hydroxylation state depending on temperature and partial pressure of reactants (H2O, H2, H2S). The support effects on the catalytic active phases are presented for MoS2 particles, used in hydrodesulfurization catalysis, and for Pd particles, used in hydrogenation catalysis. It is shown how the wetting property and equilibrium morphology of the active phase depend on the support. A discussion on the impact for catalytic activities is provided.

  4. Interim housing conditions profile, Benton and Franklin Counties, Washington: BWIP Repository Project: Working draft

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, P.A.

    1987-11-01

    This report describes the housing stock and its availability in Benton and Franklin counties. Depending on the specific measures, data are presented for the entire MSA, for Benton and Franklin counties separately, for incorporated and unincorporated areas within the counties, and for specific incorporated areas. The most detailed data are available for the two counties and for the major cities of Kennewick and Richland in Benton County and Pasco in Franklin County. In 1986, 64 percent of the population of Benton County and 66 percent of the housing units were in Kennewick and Richland. Seventy-three percent of the population and 75 percent of the housing were in the incorporated area of Benton County. In Franklin County, Pasco accounted for 52 percent of the county's 1986 population and 57 percent of its housing. Fifty-nine percent of the population and 63 percent of the housing were in the incorporated areas of Franklin County. More detailed data are needed to fully describe the housing conditions in the jurisdictions described here. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

  5. Long-Term Sickness Absence Due to Mental Disorders Is Associated with Individual Features and Psychosocial Work Conditions

    PubMed Central

    da Silva-Junior, João Silvestre; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2014-01-01

    Aims Sickness absence is a socioeconomic global burden. In Brazil, mental disorders are the third leading cause of social security benefits payments. The aim of the present study was to compare factors associated with long-term sickness absence between workers who claimed social benefits due to mental disorders or by other causes. We investigated individual features and occupational characteristics. In addition, we evaluated psychosocial factors at work assessed by the Demand-Control-Support (DCS) and Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) models, and whether they were associated with long-term sickness absence due to mental disorders (LTSA-MD). Methods The present case-control study was conducted in São Paulo, Brazil. The sample (n = 385) included workers on sick leave for more than 15 days. Cases were the participants with disabling psychiatric illnesses, and controls were the ones with other disabling diseases. Interviews were conducted to assess individual features (sociodemographic data, health habits/lifestyle, health conditions) and occupational characteristics. The participants' perception of exposure to dimensions of the DCS and ERI models was also recorded. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to evaluate the association between independent variables and LTSA-MD. Results All the regression analyses showed that LTSA-MD was associated with female sex, self-reported white skin color, higher education level, high tobacco consumption, high alcohol intake, two or more comorbidities, exposure to violence at work, high job strain and low social support at work, effort-reward imbalance and high overcommitment to work. LTSA-MD was associated with separate and combined DCS and ERI stress models. Conclusions Individual features and work conditions were associated with LTSA-MD. Combined analysis of stress models showed that psychosocial factors at work were significantly associated with LTSA-MD. Resourceful use of this information may contribute to the

  6. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  7. [Long-term results of dental health examinations of employees of industrial enterprises with hazardous working conditions].

    PubMed

    Olesova, V N; Uiba, V V; Novozemtseva, T N; Remizova, A A; Olesov, E E

    2017-01-01

    The article analyzes the results of dental examination of employees with hazardous and normal working conditions in Atomenergomash enterprise with various dental care organization regimens and provides clear evidence of the effectiveness of serial attendances care in enterprise dental offices in terms of reduction in the dental treatment needs. Additional funding for departmental dental services was calculated by comparing the real cost of dental treatment and MHI tariffs allowing implementation of proposed dental care program.

  8. Relationship Between Socio-Demographic Features, Work-Related Conditions, and Level of Anxiety Among Turkish Primary Health Care Workers.

    PubMed

    Picakciefe, Metin; Turgut, Aynur; Igneci, Emel; Cayli, Fatih; Deveci, Artuner

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among Turkish primary health care workers' socio-demographic characteristics, working conditions, and anxiety. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 88 of 103 (85.4%) eligible health care workers from the city of Mugla participating. The participants' average age was 31 years, 85.2% were university graduates, 30.7% were nurses, and 64.8% had been working between 11 and 20 years at the time of the study; 93.6% worked 8 hours each day or less. State anxiety scores for males (p = .016), health care workers age 31 or older (p = .035), nurse participants (p = .043), and individuals who had worked 11 or more years (p = .044) were significantly higher than the rest of the sample; however, trait anxiety scores for participants who did not work overtime and were not scheduled for shift work were significantly higher (p = .033 and p = .004, respectively) than the rest of the sample. According to the logistic regression analysis, risk factors for anxiety included being male and older than 31 years.

  9. Work conditions and employees' self-set goals: goal processes enhance prediction of psychological distress and well-being.

    PubMed

    Pomaki, Georgia; Maes, Stan; Ter Doest, Laura

    2004-06-01

    Although previous theory and research suggest that employee well-being should be predicted by work conditions (viz., Karasek and colleagues' job demands-control-social support [J-DCS] model), other factors are also likely to be important. In this study, the authors consider correlates of employee psychological distress and well-being using a goal-focused approach grounded in Ford's (1992) motivational systems theory. Specifically, work conditions and midlevel work goal processes (WGP) were examined in a questionnaire study of health care employees. Regarding predictions derived from the J-DCS model, the authors found full support for the iso-strain, partial support for the nonlinearity, and no support for the buffer hypothesis. Of importance, however, WGP (i.e., cognitions and emotions involved in the pursuit of self-set work goals) explained variance in job satisfaction, burnout, depression, and somatic complaints, over and above that of the J-DCS model. This suggests that investigation of WGP can enhance our understanding of employee psychological distress and well-being.

  10. [Living conditions and life experiences of working-class groups in Rio de Janeiro: rethinking dengue control and popular mobilization].

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, R M; Valla, V V

    2001-01-01

    Using narratives of an experience with popular mobilization during the 1986-91 dengue epidemic in the city of Rio de Janeiro, the authors discuss the scientific research and technical counseling involving basic sanitation conditions for vulnerable social groups. They present research results on water distribution in the slums from the Leopoldina area of the city. The research stemmed from demands by community leaders at local forums discussing health conditions. Gathering, systematizing, and analyzing the data were based on what they call "shared knowledge construction", resulting by crossing accumulated scientific knowledge with popular knowledge produced as a result of living conditions and life experiences among working-class groups. Finally, the authors comment on the need for local health professionals to be aware of relationships between epidemic and endemic processes and protection of life.

  11. Solid-liquid work of adhesion of coarse-grained models of n-hexane on graphene layers derived from the conditional reversible work method

    SciTech Connect

    Ardham, Vikram Reddy; Leroy, Frédéric E-mail: f.leroy@theo.chemie.tu-darmstadt.de; Deichmann, Gregor; Vegt, Nico F. A. van der E-mail: f.leroy@theo.chemie.tu-darmstadt.de

    2015-12-28

    We address the question of how reducing the number of degrees of freedom modifies the interfacial thermodynamic properties of heterogeneous solid-liquid systems. We consider the example of n-hexane interacting with multi-layer graphene which we model both with fully atomistic and coarse-grained (CG) models. The CG models are obtained by means of the conditional reversible work (CRW) method. The interfacial thermodynamics of these models is characterized by the solid-liquid work of adhesion W{sub SL} calculated by means of the dry-surface methodology through molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the CRW potentials lead to values of W{sub SL} that are larger than the atomistic ones. Clear understanding of the relationship between the structure of n-hexane in the vicinity of the surface and W{sub SL} is elucidated through a detailed study of the energy and entropy components of W{sub SL}. We highlight the crucial role played by the solid-liquid energy fluctuations. Our approach suggests that CG potentials should be designed in such a way that they preserve the range of solid-liquid interaction energies, but also their fluctuations in order to preserve the reference atomistic value of W{sub SL}. Our study thus opens perspectives into deriving CG interaction potentials that preserve the thermodynamics of solid-liquid contacts and will find application in studies that intend to address materials driven by interfaces.

  12. Adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Foley, Georgina

    2017-04-05

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article defined the different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and explored when they can occur. It emphasised the importance of being knowledgeable about medications, considering patient safety when patients are taking medications, being alert to the possibility of ADRs, and recognising and responding to suspected ADRs.

  13. [Working conditions and common mental disorders among primary health care workers from Botucatu, São Paulo State].

    PubMed

    Braga, Ludmila Candida de; Carvalho, Lidia Raquel de; Binder, Maria Cecília Pereira

    2010-06-01

    Common mental disorders (CMD) present high prevalence among general populations and workers with important individual and social consequences. This cross-sectional and descriptive study explores the relationship between psychological job demands, job control degree and job support and prevalence of CMD among primary health care workers of Botucatu - SP. The data collection was carried out using an unidentified self-administered questionnaire, with emphasis on items relating to demand-control-support situation and occurrence of CMD (Self Reporting Questionnaire, SRQ-20). The data were stored using the software Excel / Office XP 2003, and the statistical analyses were performed in SAS system. It was evidenced that 42.6% of primary health care workers presented CMD. The observed association - high prevalence of CMD with high-strain job (Karasek model) and low prevalence of CMD with low-strain job - indicates that, in the studied city, primary health care work conditions are contributive factors to workers' illness. The survey reveals the need of interventions aiming at caring the workers and also gets better work conditions and increase social support at work.

  14. A Survey of Corrosion and Conditions of Corrosion Protection Systems in Civil Works Structures of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    hydraulic steel structures ( HSS ) throughout its 45 districts. Many of these structures suffer from the adverse effects of cor- rosion. Efforts to minimize...maintenance are crucial elements of the corrosion protection systems that will allow continued safe use of HSS . Many of the Corps’ HSS are aged beyond...the condition of HSS within select Corps districts, their current corrosion protection systems, the degree to which corrosion monitoring and

  15. Understanding adverse events: human factors.

    PubMed Central

    Reason, J

    1995-01-01

    (1) Human rather than technical failures now represent the greatest threat to complex and potentially hazardous systems. This includes healthcare systems. (2) Managing the human risks will never be 100% effective. Human fallibility can be moderated, but it cannot be eliminated. (3) Different error types have different underlying mechanisms, occur in different parts of the organisation, and require different methods of risk management. The basic distinctions are between: Slips, lapses, trips, and fumbles (execution failures) and mistakes (planning or problem solving failures). Mistakes are divided into rule based mistakes and knowledge based mistakes. Errors (information-handling problems) and violations (motivational problems) Active versus latent failures. Active failures are committed by those in direct contact with the patient, latent failures arise in organisational and managerial spheres and their adverse effects may take a long time to become evident. (4) Safety significant errors occur at all levels of the system, not just at the sharp end. Decisions made in the upper echelons of the organisation create the conditions in the workplace that subsequently promote individual errors and violations. Latent failures are present long before an accident and are hence prime candidates for principled risk management. (5) Measures that involve sanctions and exhortations (that is, moralistic measures directed to those at the sharp end) have only very limited effectiveness, especially so in the case of highly trained professionals. (6) Human factors problems are a product of a chain of causes in which the individual psychological factors (that is, momentary inattention, forgetting, etc) are the last and least manageable links. Attentional "capture" (preoccupation or distraction) is a necessary condition for the commission of slips and lapses. Yet, its occurrence is almost impossible to predict or control effectively. The same is true of the factors associated with

  16. Changes in working conditions and health among dairy farmers in southern Sweden. A 14-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Pinzke, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe and analyse the changes in working conditions and health among dairy farmers in Scania in southern Sweden during the period 1988-2002 by a repeat of a mail-in survey. Altogether, 83 % of the male and 90 % of the female dairy farmers reported some kind of symptoms in the musculoskeletal system during the 12 months prior to the 2002 questionnaire. This is an increase compared to the farmers in 1988. The highest significant changes were an increase of symptoms in the shoulder, neck and in the wrists/hands. The milkers reported most often incidental as well as persistent symptoms in the shoulders. The frequency of hip symptoms was significantly higher among those male milkers who had quit milking during the interim than for the active milkers in 1988. The milkers studied in 2002 had, on average, increased their working time per week, increased the number of cows milked as well as the use of more milking units. In 1988, almost all the milkers studied were working in tethering systems while in 2002 more than one quarter were working in loose-housing systems. The opinion among most of the farmers, both in 1988 and in 2002, regardless of age or sex, was that silage handling and the milking procedure were the most strenuous work operations. On the other hand, the milkers obtained their greatest pleasure from the actual milking job as well as from their work to promote the welfare of the animals. Unprofitability and great investment demands had a bearing on the retirement of milkers but, on the other hand, a high potential of the milkers could have continued 10-15 more years as dairy farmers if the work conditions had been better, e.g. associated with fewer health problems. Apart from the need for developing technical devices to facilitate the milking operation, further research is needed concerning the dairy farmers' well-being and quality of life, perceived stress, and leisure time activities and how these and similar factors

  17. Comparison of Working Conditions and Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Symptoms among Dairy Farmers in Southern Sweden over a 25-Year Period

    PubMed Central

    Pinzke, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Working conditions and the prevalence of perceived musculoskeletal symptoms (MSSs) among dairy farmers in 2013 were monitored by repeating a mail survey of dairy workers in Scania, southern Sweden, using the same method for collecting data on MSSs and working conditions employed in previous surveys conducted in 1988 and 2002. All dairy enterprises in Scania (total 419) were sent two copies of a questionnaire. One or more responses were received from 232 enterprises (55.4%), of which those from 247 dairy farmers (75% men and 25% women) in 199 enterprises are included in this study. The farmers had increased their weekly working hours in 2013 compared with 2002 (males x¯= 43.9, 40.7; females x¯= 37.9, 33.9). Each male milked on average 30 cows in 1988, 44 cows in 2002, and 86 cows in 2013. The corresponding numbers milked by female farmers were 29, 60, and 102, respectively. In 1988, almost all farmers used tethered systems, while in 2013, 54.4% of male and 66.1% of female farmers instead worked with loose-housing systems. Of the farmers who used loose-housing systems, 50.7% had a robotic milking system. In 2013, 79.0% of male and 88.5% of female farmers reported MSSs on some occasion, especially in the lower back, shoulders, and knees for men, and in the shoulders, lower back, and wrists/hands for women. However, there was no statistical change compared with the frequency of MSSs in 2002. In 2013, there was a tendency for younger dairy farmers (≤35 years) to report MSSs, especially in the shoulders, elbows, lower back, and feet, more frequently than younger farmers in 2002. The males who worked with robot milking systems in 2013 indicated less discomfort in the shoulders than men who worked with other systems. The corresponding females indicated fewer problems in the lower back in 2013. Various aspects of milking system design and technology have been improved to reduce the workload and prevent MSSs in dairy farmers. Nevertheless, more improvements are

  18. Working in hot conditions--a study of electrical utility workers in the northern territory of Australia.

    PubMed

    Brearley, Matt; Harrington, Phillip; Lee, Doug; Taylor, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Environmental conditions of Australia's Northern Territory are seasonally conducive to excessive body heat storage by outdoor workers. For electrical utility workers who periodically work at height, in confined space, and in proximity to live power sources, the impact of the climate may be considered a hazardous condition. Therefore, this study examined the physiological and fluid balance responses of 20 power network workers (31.5 years; 86.0 kg; 1.71 m; BMI 29.5) throughout work shifts in the Northern and Southern regions of the Northern Territory, Australia. Twenty male heat-acclimatized power network workers provided written informed consent to be monitored during maintenance of electrical infrastructure that included replacing power pole components and transformer and substation repairs in the Northern (n = 13) and Southern regions (n = 7) of the Northern Territory (mean wet-bulb globe temperatures of 32.0°C and 28.7°C, respectively). An ingestible telemetry pill provided measurement of gastrointestinal temperature (Tgi), that when combined with heart rate values, provided physiological strain index (PSI). Urine specific gravity, sweat rate, and level of dehydration were also determined. The Tgi values of this study were within the ISO9886 limit for monitored, heat-acclimatized workers, with a peak of 38.4°C. Mean PSI was 2.6, which represents overall low strain, with periods of moderate strain. Urinary analysis indicated that workers were dehydrated prior to and following the work shift, however the mean sweat rate of 0.44 L.h(-1) was matched by fluid consumption of 0.42 L.h(-1) to limit body mass loss to 0.1% during the shift. This study demonstrates that heat acclimatized electrical utility workers adhere to ISO9886 requirements when undertaking self-paced activity in hot conditions.

  19. Studies on electrolyte formulations to improve life of lead acid batteries working under partial state of charge conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, J. C.; Soria, M. L.; González, M.; García-Quismondo, E.; Muñoz, A.; Trinidad, F.

    For decades, valve regulated lead acid batteries with gel electrolyte have proved their excellent performance in deep cycling applications. However, their higher cost, when compared with flooded batteries, has limited their use in cost sensitive applications, such as automotive or PV installations. The use of flooded batteries in deep or partial state of charge working conditions leads to limited life due to premature capacity loss provoked by electrolyte stratification. Different electrolyte formulations have been tested, in order to achieve the best compromise between cost and life performance. Work carried out included electrochemical studies in order to determine the electrolyte stability and diffusional properties, and kinetic studies to check the processability of the electrolyte formulation. Finally, several 12 V batteries have been assembled and tested according to different ageing profiles.

  20. [Substantiation and assessment of the effectiveness of hygienic recommendations for healthier work conditions of operators at seismic-acoustic stations].

    PubMed

    Zvereva, G S; Kolganov, A V; Mukhin, V V; Lastkov, D O

    1991-01-01

    The labour conditions of seismic operators were studied as a sample of similar professions engaged in acoustic control services. Depending on the number of the sectors under control and the seismic activity in the area, the enthropy of the sounds controlled and the information volume were assessed within 2.2-2.62 and 1.29-1.81 bit/symbol, respectively. The physiological functions' analysis in dynamics for a shift and a week revealed the peculiar features of overstrain characteristic of the working hours in a shift, particularly towards the 3rd and 6th day of the week. The recommendations proposed were designed to reduce overstrain and improve the operators' functional state at work.

  1. Free markets and the marriage market: structural adjustment, gender relations, and working conditions among Dominican women workers.

    PubMed

    Safa, H I

    1999-02-01

    The relationship between economic conditions and marriage patterns in the Dominican Republic is analyzed using data collected in 1994 on women working in a free-trade zone. The author concludes that changes associated with structural adjustment appear to have contributed to a deterioration of the job market and a greater prevalence of female-headed households. It is shown that "structural adjustment increases the need for women to work, because of cuts in government programs, declining real wages, growing inflation, and a deterioration in male employment, which weakens the man's role as principal breadwinner and increases the importance and visibility of women's contribution to the household economy. This change in the gender composition of the labor force has encouraged some women to resist marriage and/or remarriage because the ¿marriage market' of eligible men willing and able to support a family has been reduced, contributing to greater marital instability."

  2. Childhood adversities and psychosis: evidence, challenges, implications

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Craig; Gayer‐Anderson, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    There is a substantial body of research reporting evidence of associations between various forms of childhood adversity and psychosis, across the spectrum from experiences to disorder. This has been extended, more recently, to include studies of cumulative effects, of interactions with other factors, of specific effects, and of putative biological and psychological mechanisms. In this paper we evaluate this research and highlight the remaining methodological issues and gaps that temper, but do not dismiss, conclusions about the causal role of childhood adversity. We also consider the emerging work on cumulative, synergistic, and specific effects and on mechanisms; and discuss the broader implications of this line of research for our understanding of psychosis. We conclude that the current balance of evidence is that childhood adversities – particularly exposure to multiple adversities involving hostility and threat – do, in some people, contribute to the onset of psychotic experiences and psychotic disorders. PMID:27265690

  3. Psychiatric care in restricted conditions for work migrants, refugees and asylum seekers: experience of the Open Clinic for Work Migrants and Refugees, Israel 2006.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Ido

    2009-01-01

    In the last few decades, the State of Israel has become a target for work migrants, refugees, asylum seekers and victims of human trafficking, as part of the trend of world immigration. Immigration is a process of loss and change with significant socio-psychological stress, with possible effects on the immigrants' mental health. The Physicians for Human Rights - Israel (PHR) Association operates a psychiatric clinic as part of the Open Clinic for Work Migrants and Refugees. This article will present major clinical issues regarding psychiatry and immigration in Israel according to the data collected at the clinic. Trauma and stress-related psychopathology was found to have a high prevalence in immigrant patients treated at the clinic; prevalence of PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) in immigrants was high (23%) and even higher in refugees (33%). Female immigrants are at higher risk for psychiatric hospitalization. The relative rate of African patients at the clinic is significantly higher than patients from other continents. A significant association was found between psychiatric hospitalization and suicide attempts. Immigrant patients present a combination of psychiatric, socio-economic and general medical conditions, which demands a holistic view of the patient. The evaluation of an immigrant patient must take into account the stress related to immigration, gender, culture of origin and the risk for suicide and hospitalization. Treatment recommendations include awareness of cultural diversities, acquiring information regarding the pre-immigration history, preferably using cultural consultants with background in the immigrants' culture and community. Decision-making about medication and diagnostic evaluation should be as inexpensive as possible. Basic human needs (food, shelter) and family support should be included in the decisions about treatment.

  4. [Research of working condition monitoring and analyzing system for rotating anode X-ray tube based on the vibration measurement].

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Weidong; Yan, Yong; Zhang, Shuai; Zu, Hefei; Chen, Weibin

    2011-01-01

    A non-invasive detecting and analyzing method which used to monitor the working condition of rotating anode X-ray was proposed. Based on the NI development environment, accelerometer, 24-bit high resolution data acquisition card and personal computer were connected to construct the system for collecting the vibration signal of X-ray tube. Results demonstrate that the system could acquire and store the vibration data of X-ray tube quickly and efficiently. The characteristics of vibration, were extracted and processed, which proposed a new approach to detect the malfunction of rotating anode X-ray early and effectively.

  5. The course of physical functional limitations and occupational conditions in a middle-aged working population in France

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Physical functional limitations (PFL) have mainly been studied in older populations. The aim of this study was to better understand the course of PFL and associations with occupational factors by gender in a middle-aged working population. Methods The data came from 16,950 workers in the ESTEV (Enquête Santé Travail et Vieillissement) cohort in France. PFL were assessed using the physical abilities section of the Nottingham Health Profile. Occupational conditions were measured with a self-administered questionnaire covering physical and psychosocial factors in 1990 and 1995. Multivariate analyses were used to assess the associations. Results The PFL appearance rate in 1995 was the same by gender (6.3%); the rate of PFL recovery was higher in men (23.9% versus 20.9%). Age was an independent factor of PFL at age 47 years or older in both genders after adjusting for confounding factors. The PFL appearance rate in 1995 was higher with physical occupational exposure in 1990, such as awkward work with a dose relation in both genders, while the PFL recovery rate decreased significantly only for men. Exposure to psychosocial occupational conditions, such as having the means to produce quality work in 1990, was significantly associated with a decreased PFL appearance rate in 1995 in both genders, and having high decision latitude in 1990 was associated with a decreased PFL appearance rate in 1995 only in men. Changes in exposure to occupational factors between 1990 and 1995 were associated with the PFL appearance and recovery rates in 1995 in both genders. Conclusions After five years, the course of PFL in this working population changed and was associated with physical and psychosocial occupational factors. Relationships were stronger for the PFL appearance rate in both genders and were weaker for recovery from PFL, mainly among women. PMID:22494385

  6. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  7. Adverse reactions to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan L; Nelson, Michael R; Hershey, Joyce N; Engler, Renata J M

    2003-06-01

    (The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.) Immunization healthcare is becoming increasingly complex as the number and types of vaccines have continued to expand. Like all prescription drugs, vaccines may be associated with adverse events. The majority of these reactions are self-limited and not associated with prolonged disability. The media, Internet and public advocacy groups have focused on potentially serious vaccine-associated adverse events with questions raised about causal linkages to increasing frequencies of diseases such as autism and asthma. Despite a lack of evidence of a causal relationship to a variety of vaccine safety concerns, including extensive reviews by the Institute of Medicine, questions regarding vaccine safety continue to threaten the success of immunization programs. Risk communication arid individual risk assessment is further challenged by the public health success of vaccine programs creating the perception that certain vaccines are no longer necessary or justified because of the rare reaction risk. There is a need for improved understanding of true vaccine contraindications and precautions as well as host factors and disease threat in order to develop a patient specific balanced risk communication intervention. When they occur, vaccine related adverse events must be treated, documented and reported through the VAERS system. The increasing complexity of vaccination health care has led the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to identify Vaccine Safety Assessment and Evaluation as a potential new specialty.

  8. No Longer Children: Case Studies of the Living and Working Conditions of the Youth Who Harvest America's Crops. Executive Summary. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguirre International, San Mateo, CA.

    This report examines the living and working conditions of adolescent migrant farmworkers. Interviews were conducted with 216 youth working during peak harvest time in six states, as well as with adult farmworkers, family members of working youth, and farm labor contractors. Most of the youth were 14-17 years old, although a few had begun work as…

  9. Transient inactivation of the medial prefrontal cortex impairs performance on a working memory-dependent conditional discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Urban, Kimberly R; Layfield, Dylan M; Griffin, Amy L

    2014-12-01

    The rodent medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been implicated in working memory function; lesions and inactivation of this region have been shown to result in impairments in spatial working memory (WM) tasks. Our laboratory has developed a tactile-visual conditional discrimination (CD) task, which uses floor insert cues to signal the correct goal-arm choice in a T maze. This task can be manipulated by altering the floor insert cues to be present throughout the trial (CDSTANDARD) or to be present only at the beginning of the trial (CDWM), thus making the task either WM-independent or WM-dependent, respectively. This ability to manipulate the working memory demand of the task while holding all other task features constant allows us to rule out the possibility that confounding performance variables contribute to the observed impairment. A previous study from our lab showed that mPFC inactivation did not impair performance on CDSTANDARD, confirming that mPFC inactivation does not induce sensorimotor or motivational deficits that could impact task performance. To examine whether mPFC inactivation impairs CDWM, the current study transiently inactivated the mPFC with bilateral microinfusions of muscimol immediately prior to testing on the CDWM task. As predicted, CDWM task performance was significantly impaired during the muscimol-infusion session compared with the control saline-infusion sessions. Together with our previous demonstration that the mPFC in not required for CDSTANDARD, these results not only confirm that the mPFC is crucial for working memory, but also set the stage for using the task-comparison approach to investigate corticolimbic interactions during working memory.

  10. Working Conditions and Lifestyle of Female Surgeons Affiliated to the Japan Neurosurgical Society: Findings of Individual and Institutional Surveys

    PubMed Central

    FUJIMAKI, Takamitsu; SHIBUI, Soichiro; KATO, Yoko; MATSUMURA, Akira; YAMASAKI, Mami; DATE, Isao; HONGO, Kazuhiro; KURODA, Satoshi; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori; NAKAO, Naoyuki; SAKURADA, Kaori; SHIMOKAWA, Shoko; KAYAMA, Takamasa

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the working conditions of female neurosurgeons in Japan, two surveys were conducted by The Japan Neurosurgical Society: one involving female neurosurgeons themselves and the other involving the chiefs of neurosurgical departments. The responses were received from 224 (43.8%) female neurosurgeons and 496 (61.2%) departmental chiefs. About half (50.2%) of the female neurosurgeons were married and 39.2% had children (average number of children, 1.27). Their work was full-time in 80.6% of cases; on average, they worked 51.9 h per week, had night duty 2.8 times per month, and had 5.7 days off per month. Many of them stated that they were satisfied with their job status, but about half of them reported difficulty in maintaining a correct work–life balance. Among the institutions surveyed, 29% had female neurosurgeons. The survey of departmental chiefs revealed that the proxies for maternity leave were not available at most institutions, and that there was only limited availability of night child care (41%) or sick child care (39%); female neurosurgeons did not appear to be well-informed of these support systems. These findings suggest that apart from systematic approaches already in place, female neurosurgeons would prefer to have more understanding from their peers and chiefs. PMID:27302300

  11. The Relationship Between Sociodemographic Characteristics, Work Conditions, and Level of "Mobbing" of Health Workers in Primary Health Care.

    PubMed

    Picakciefe, Metin; Acar, Gulcihan; Colak, Zehra; Kilic, Ibrahim

    2015-06-19

    Mobbing is a type of violence which occurs in workplaces and is classified under the community violence subgroup of interpersonal violence. The aim of this study is to examine health care workers who work in primary health care in the city of Mugla and to determine whether there is a relationship between sociodemographic characteristics, work conditions, and their level of mobbing. A cross-sectional analysis has been conducted in which 130 primary health care workers were selected. Of the 130, 119 health workers participated, yielding a response rate of 91.5%; 83.2% of health workers are female, 42.9% are midwives, 27.7% are nurses, and 14.3% are doctors. In all, 31.1% of health workers have faced with "mobbing" in the last 1 year, and the frequency of experiencing "mobbing" of those 48.6% of them is 1 to 3 times per year. A total of 70.3% of those who apply "mobbing" are senior health workers, and 91.9% are female. The frequency of encountering with "mobbing" was found significantly in married health workers, in those 16 years and above according to examined total working time, in those who have psychosocial reactions, and in those who have counterproductive behaviors. It has been discovered that primary health care workers have high prevalence of "mobbing" exposure. To avoid "mobbing" at workplace, authorities and responsibilities of all employees have to be clearly determined.

  12. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  13. Psychosocial Working Conditions, School Sense of Coherence and Subjective Health Complaints. A Multilevel Analysis of Ninth Grade Pupils in the Stockholm Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modin, Bitte; Ostberg, Viveca; Toivanen, Susanna; Sundell, Knut

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the psychosocial working conditions of 7930 Swedish 9th grade students, distributed over 475 classes and 130 schools, in relation to their subjective health using multilevel modeling. At the individual level, students with "strained" working conditions in school (i.e. those experiencing a high level of demands in…

  14. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate for... sheepherding) in the following States, and for Florida sugarcane work, shall be computed by adjusting the...

  15. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate for... sheepherding) in the following States, and for Florida sugarcane work, shall be computed by adjusting the...

  16. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate for... sheepherding) in the following States, and for Florida sugarcane work, shall be computed by adjusting the...

  17. 20 CFR 655.207 - Adverse effect rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... listed in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, and for Florida sugarcane work, the adverse effect rate for... sheepherding) in the following States, and for Florida sugarcane work, shall be computed by adjusting the...

  18. [Effect of working conditions and various social and living factors of the incidence of nervous system diseases with temporary disability among farmers].

    PubMed

    Kuptsov, V V

    1989-01-01

    It is pointed out that working and living conditions have essential impact on the incidence of nervous diseases causing temporary disability among farmers. The above conclusion has great practical significance since the necessity of carrying out a set of measures aimed at the sanitation of working and living conditions of farmers has been scientifically approved in order to reduce work losses due to nervous diseases.

  19. The contribution of working conditions and social support to the onset of depressive and anxiety disorders among male and female employees.

    PubMed

    Plaisier, Inger; de Bruijn, Jeanne G M; de Graaf, Ron; ten Have, Margreet; Beekman, Aartjan T F; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2007-01-01

    Poor working conditions may be an important source of stress and may therefore contribute to the development of depressive and anxiety disorders. Social support may act as a buffer and protect against the development of depression or anxiety in the face of poor working conditions. With longitudinal data from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS), the effect of working conditions and social support on the incidence of depressive and anxiety disorders was examined among 2646 working men and women, aged 18 through 65 years. Three dimensions of self reported working conditions were assessed: psychological demands, decision latitude and job security. Social support was assessed through validated scales for daily emotional support. About 10.5% of working women and 4.6% among working men developed an incident depressive and/or anxiety disorder over 2 years. Psychological demands predicted the incidence of depressive and anxiety disorders in both men and women (RR per score increase=2.29, 95% CI: 1.44-3.63), whereas decision latitude and job security did not. Social support protected against the incidence of depressive and anxiety disorders. This effect was stronger for men compared to women. Social support did not buffer the unfavorable mental effect of working conditions. Women were more likely to report low levels of decision latitude, whereas men reported higher psychological demands. Working conditions did not explain sex differences in the incidence of depressive and anxiety disorders.

  20. Cumulative early life adversity predicts longevity in wild baboons

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Jenny; Archie, Elizabeth A.; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    In humans and other animals, harsh circumstances in early life predict morbidity and mortality in adulthood. Multiple adverse conditions are thought to be especially toxic, but this hypothesis has rarely been tested in a prospective, longitudinal framework, especially in long-lived mammals. Here we use prospective data on 196 wild female baboons to show that cumulative early adversity predicts natural adult lifespan. Females who experience ≥3 sources of early adversity die a median of 10 years earlier than females who experience ≤1 adverse circumstances (median lifespan is 18.5 years). Females who experience the most adversity are also socially isolated in adulthood, suggesting that social processes partially explain the link between early adversity and adult survival. Our results provide powerful evidence for the developmental origins of health and disease and indicate that close ties between early adversity and survival arise even in the absence of health habit and health care-related explanations. PMID:27091302

  1. Cumulative early life adversity predicts longevity in wild baboons.

    PubMed

    Tung, Jenny; Archie, Elizabeth A; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C

    2016-04-19

    In humans and other animals, harsh circumstances in early life predict morbidity and mortality in adulthood. Multiple adverse conditions are thought to be especially toxic, but this hypothesis has rarely been tested in a prospective, longitudinal framework, especially in long-lived mammals. Here we use prospective data on 196 wild female baboons to show that cumulative early adversity predicts natural adult lifespan. Females who experience ≥3 sources of early adversity die a median of 10 years earlier than females who experience ≤1 adverse circumstances (median lifespan is 18.5 years). Females who experience the most adversity are also socially isolated in adulthood, suggesting that social processes partially explain the link between early adversity and adult survival. Our results provide powerful evidence for the developmental origins of health and disease and indicate that close ties between early adversity and survival arise even in the absence of health habit and health care-related explanations.

  2. Enduring psychobiological effects of childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-09-01

    This mini-review refers to recent findings on psychobiological long-term consequences of childhood trauma and adverse living conditions. The continuum of trauma-provoked aftermath reaches from healthy adaptation with high resilience, to severe maladjustment with co-occurring psychiatric and physical pathologies in children, adolescents and adults. There is increasing evidence of a strong interconnectivity between genetic dispositions, epigenetic processes, stress-related hormonal systems and immune parameters in all forms of (mal)-adjustment to adverse living conditions. Unfavorable constellations of these dispositions and systems, such as low cortisol levels and elevated markers of inflammation in maltreated children, seem to promote the (co)-occurrence of psychiatric and physical pathologies such as posttraumatic stress disorder, obesity, or diabetes. Although findings from prospective study designs support a deepened understanding of causal relations between adverse living conditions, including traumatic experiences, during childhood and its psychobiological effects, so far, little is known about the temporal coincidence of stress-sensitive developmental stages during childhood and adolescence and trauma consequences. Taken together, childhood adversity is a severe risk factor for the onset of psychobiological (mal)-adjustment, which has to be explained under consideration of diverse physiological systems and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence.

  3. Effectiveness of Workplace Interventions in Return-to-Work for Musculoskeletal, Pain-Related and Mental Health Conditions: An Update of the Evidence and Messages for Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Cullen, K L; Irvin, E; Collie, A; Clay, F; Gensby, U; Jennings, P A; Hogg-Johnson, S; Kristman, V; Laberge, M; McKenzie, D; Newnam, S; Palagyi, A; Ruseckaite, R; Sheppard, D M; Shourie, S; Steenstra, I; Van Eerd, D; Amick, B C

    2017-02-21

    Purpose The objective of this systematic review was to synthesize evidence on the effectiveness of workplace-based return-to-work (RTW) interventions and work disability management (DM) interventions that assist workers with musculoskeletal (MSK) and pain-related conditions and mental health (MH) conditions with RTW. Methods We followed a systematic review process developed by the Institute for Work & Health and an adapted best evidence synthesis that ranked evidence as strong, moderate, limited, or insufficient. Results Seven electronic databases were searched from January 1990 until April 2015, yielding 8898 non-duplicate references. Evidence from 36 medium and high quality studies were synthesized on 12 different intervention categories across three broad domains: health-focused, service coordination, and work modification interventions. There was strong evidence that duration away from work from both MSK or pain-related conditions and MH conditions were significantly reduced by multi-domain interventions encompassing at least two of the three domains. There was moderate evidence that these multi-domain interventions had a positive impact on cost outcomes. There was strong evidence that cognitive behavioural therapy interventions that do not also include workplace modifications or service coordination components are not effective in helping workers with MH conditions in RTW. Evidence for the effectiveness of other single-domain interventions was mixed, with some studies reporting positive effects and others reporting no effects on lost time and work functioning. Conclusions While there is substantial research literature focused on RTW, there are only a small number of quality workplace-based RTW intervention studies that involve workers with MSK or pain-related conditions and MH conditions. We recommend implementing multi-domain interventions (i.e. with healthcare provision, service coordination, and work accommodation components) to help reduce lost time for

  4. How do types of employment relate to health indicators? Findings from the Second European Survey on Working Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, F; Benach, J; Diez-Roux, A; Roman, C

    2000-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE—To investigate the associations of various types of employment with six self reported health indicators, taking into account the part played by demographic variables, individual working conditions and four ecological indicators at the country level.
DESIGN—Cross sectional survey (structured interview) of a sample of the active population of 15 European countries aged 15 years or over. Main independent variables were nine types of employment categorised as follows: small employers, full and part time permanent employees, full and part time fixed term employees, full and part time sole traders and full and part time temporary contracts. Main outcome measures were three self reported health related outcomes (job satisfaction, health related absenteeism, and stress) and three self reported health problems (overall fatigue, backache, and muscular pains). Logistic regression and multilevel models were used in the analyses.
SETTING—15 countries of the European Union.
PARTICIPANTS—15 146 employed persons aged 15 or over.
MAIN RESULTS—Precarious employment was consistently and positively associated with job dissatisfaction but negatively associated with absenteeism and stress (as compared with full time permanent workers). Fatigue, backache and muscular pains also tended to be positively associated with precarious employment, particularly with full time precarious employment. Small employers reported high percentages of stress and fatigue, but absenteeism was relatively low. Sole traders generally reported high percentages of all outcomes, except for absenteeism, which was low. For each type of employment (except temporary contracts), full time workers tended to report worse health outcomes than part time workers. Patterns were generally consistent across countries. Associations persisted after adjustment for individual level working conditions and were not modified by country level variables.
CONCLUSIONS—This study is the first to

  5. Deletion of glutamate delta-1 receptor in mouse leads to enhanced working memory and deficit in fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Roopali; Hillman, Brandon G; Gupta, Subhash C; Suryavanshi, Pratyush; Bhatt, Jay M; Pavuluri, Ratnamala; Stairs, Dustin J; Dravid, Shashank M

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate delta-1 (GluD1) receptors are expressed throughout the forebrain during development with high levels in the hippocampus during adulthood. We have recently shown that deletion of GluD1 receptor results in aberrant emotional and social behaviors such as hyperaggression and depression-like behaviors and social interaction deficits. Additionally, abnormal expression of synaptic proteins was observed in amygdala and prefrontal cortex of GluD1 knockout mice (GluD1 KO). However the role of GluD1 in learning and memory paradigms remains unknown. In the present study we evaluated GluD1 KO in learning and memory tests. In the eight-arm radial maze GluD1 KO mice committed fewer working memory errors compared to wildtype mice but had normal reference memory. Enhanced working memory in GluD1 KO was also evident by greater percent alternation in the spontaneous Y-maze test. No difference was observed in object recognition memory in the GluD1 KO mice. In the Morris water maze test GluD1 KO mice showed no difference in acquisition but had longer latency to find the platform in the reversal learning task. GluD1 KO mice showed a deficit in contextual and cue fear conditioning but had normal latent inhibition. The deficit in contextual fear conditioning was reversed by D-Cycloserine (DCS) treatment. GluD1 KO mice were also found to be more sensitive to foot-shock compared to wildtype. We further studied molecular changes in the hippocampus, where we found lower levels of GluA1, GluA2 and GluK2 subunits while a contrasting higher level of GluN2B in GluD1 KO. Additionally, we found higher postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) and lower glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) expression in GluD1 KO. We propose that GluD1 is crucial for normal functioning of synapses and absence of GluD1 leads to specific abnormalities in learning and memory. These findings provide novel insights into the role of GluD1 receptors in the central nervous system.

  6. Optimization of the cycle life performance of VRLA batteries, working under high rate, partial state of charge (HRPSOC) conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, M.; Trinidad, F.; Valenciano, J.; Sánchez, A.

    On hybrid vehicle applications, batteries must work in a rather low state of charge (SOC), in order to be able to recover as much of the regenerative braking energy as possible. Usually SOC values around 60% are used, which promotes the development of new unexpected failure modes not previously found, mainly associated with heavy sulphation of the negative plates. In order to try to optimise the cycle life performance to the point of making these batteries a real alternative for the application of hybrid vehicles, a series of tests have been undertaken, aimed to optimise the key parameters that from previous experience are known to determine life duration in high rate low state of charge (HRPSOC) conditions. Previous works have been focused on trying to determine the optimum composition of positive and negative active material, concerning paste density in the positive, and additives in negative. In order to overcome the deleterious effect of heavy sulphation in negative plates on cycle life, the use of conductivity enhancers additives such as graphite has been proposed. The objective of this project is to optimize the performance of the glass microfiber separators, in order to maintain a high degree of compression in the group, as well as to avoid acid stratification and development of short circuits along the battery life. To do this, different glass microfiber separators with inert additives, as well as different fiber composition have been tested. Results obtained up to now, indicate a remarkable good performance of the VRLA batteries with the new separators containing very fine fiberglass and silica fillers as an additive.

  7. Telithromycin: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Telithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic that has been marketed since the early 2000s. It has not been shown to be more effective against any bacteria than other macrolide antibiotics. Its antibacterial activity is in no way remarkable. In early 2014, we reviewed its adverse effect profile using data from periodic safety update reports, drug regulatory agencies, and detailed published case reports. In addition to the adverse effect profile telithromycin shares with the other macrolides, it provokes several specific adverse effects: visual disturbances due to impaired accommodation; taste and smell disorders; severe liver damage; worsening of myasthenia gravis; rhabdomyolysis; and loss of consciousness. Prolongation of the QT interval with standard oral doses is a worrisome adverse effect. In practice, it is better not to use telithromycin as it exposes patients to disproportionate, serious adverse effects. When treatment with a macrolide antibiotic appears necessary, it is prudent to choose a different macrolide, such as spiramycin or azithromycin, which have fewer adverse effects.

  8. An upside to adversity?: moderate cumulative lifetime adversity is associated with resilient responses in the face of controlled stressors.

    PubMed

    Seery, Mark D; Leo, Raphael J; Lupien, Shannon P; Kondrak, Cheryl L; Almonte, Jessica L

    2013-07-01

    Despite common findings suggesting that lack of negative life events should be optimal, recent work has revealed a curvilinear pattern, such that some cumulative lifetime adversity is instead associated with optimal well-being. This work, however, is limited in that responses to specific stressors as they occurred were not assessed, thereby precluding investigation of resilience. The current research addressed this critical gap by directly testing the relationship between adversity history and resilience to stressors. Specifically, we used a multimethod approach across two studies to assess responses to controlled laboratory stressors (respectively requiring passive endurance and active instrumental performance). Results revealed hypothesized U-shaped relationships: Relative to a history of either no adversity or nonextreme high adversity, a moderate number of adverse life events was associated with less negative responses to pain and more positive psychophysiological responses while taking a test. These results provide novel evidence in support of adversity-derived propensity for resilience that generalizes across stressors.

  9. Development of methods for predicting large crack growth in elastic-plastic work-hardening materials in fully plastic conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Hugh; Turner, C. E.; Fenner, R. T.; Curr, R. M.; Ivankovic, A.

    1995-01-01

    The objects of the first, exploratory, stage of the project were listed as: (1) to make a detailed and critical review of the Boundary Element method as already published and with regard to elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, to assess its potential for handling present concepts in two-dimensional and three-dimensional cases. To this was subsequently added the Finite Volume method and certain aspects of the Finite Element method for comparative purposes; (2) to assess the further steps needed to apply the methods so far developed to the general field, covering a practical range of geometries, work hardening materials, and composites: to consider their application under higher temperature conditions; (3) to re-assess the present stage of development of the energy dissipation rate, crack tip opening angle and J-integral models in relation to the possibilities of producing a unified technology with the previous two items; and (4) to report on the feasibility and promise of this combined approach and, if appropriate, make recommendations for the second stage aimed at developing a generalized crack growth technology for its application to real-life problems.

  10. Radionuclide release from spent fuel under geologic disposal conditions: An overview of experimental and theoretical work through 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, P.W.; Simonson, S.A.

    1988-04-01

    This report presents an overview of experimental and theoretical work on radionuclide release from spent fuel and uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) under geologic disposal conditions. The purpose of the report is to provide a source book of information that can be used to develop models that describe radionuclide release from spent fuel waste packages. Modeling activities of this nature will be conducted within the Waste Package Program (WPP) of the Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project (SRP). The topics discussed include experimental methods for investigating radionuclide release, how results have been reported from radionuclide release experiments, theoretical studies of UO/sub 2/ and actinide solubility, results of experimental studies of radionuclide release from spent fuel and UO/sub 2/ (i.e., the effects of different variables on radionuclide release), characteristics of spent fuel pertinent to radionuclide release, and status of modeling of radionuclide release from spent fuel. Appendix A presents tables of data from spent fuel radionuclide release experiments. These data have been digitized from graphs that appear in the literature. An annotated bibliography of literature on spent fuel characterization is provided in Appendix B.

  11. Should Student Employment Be Subsidized? Conditional Counterfactuals and the Outcomes of Work-Study Participation: Appendices A and B. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Clayton, Judith; Minaya, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    Student employment subsidies are one of the largest types of federal employment subsidies, and one of the oldest forms of student aid. Yet it is unclear whether they help or harm students' long term outcomes. This document contains the appendices to the report "Should Student Employment Be Subsidized? Conditional Counterfactuals and the…

  12. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  13. Blue Marsh Dam and Reservoir Condition Report. Dam, Outlet Works, Spillway and Bernville Protective Works. Periodic Inspection Report Number 2, September 1979. Schuylkill River Basin. Tulpehocken Creek, Pennsylvania.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    channel, possible cavities and steeply dipping open joints (in excess of 60 cy of solids were injected at the point of water loss in a few holes ). Due...inch diamter) drain hole in the bottom of the bonnet cover was recommended to prevent the accumulation of water at this location. Action accomplished...stop log lifting lug recesses contained water . A small drain hole should be drilled in each recess to relieve this condition. (c) An operational test

  14. Applying principles of self-management to facilitate workers to return to or remain at work with a chronic musculoskeletal condition.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Venerina; Jull, Gwendolen; Sheppard, Dianne M; Ellis, Niki

    2013-08-01

    It is incumbent on health care professionals to support patients with chronic musculoskeletal conditions to manage the impact of the condition on their life. Work is a positive health behaviour for which self-management skills are essential. In this paper, self-management is defined and the role of clinicians in promoting self-management for return to work is outlined with examples and tips on how the clinician can incorporate self-management into practice. The clinician is ideally placed to assist individuals with chronic musculoskeletal conditions manage to remain at work or return to work. This can be achieved through such activities as the promotion of the core self-management skills of problem-solving, decision making, resource utilisation, developing a cooperative partnership between clinician and patient and making an action plan.

  15. A multilevel study on the association of observer-assessed working conditions with depressive symptoms among female eldercare workers from 56 work units in 10 care homes in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Louise M; Jorgensen, Anette F B; Thomsen, Birthe L; Greiner, Birgit A; Rugulies, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Eldercare workers in Denmark have a higher prevalence of poor psychological health than other occupational groups. We examined the association between working conditions assessed by trained observers and depressive symptoms assessed by self-report in a study of female Danish eldercare workers. Methods Working conditions were observed based on action regulation theory and defined as (1) regulation requirements, a workplace resource providing opportunity for decision-making and skill development and (2) barriers for task completion. We examined the associations of individual and work unit averaged working conditions with depressive symptoms in a sample of 95 individually observed eldercare workers. Further, we examined the association of work unit averaged working conditions with depressive symptoms in a sample of 205 care workers, including both observed and non-observed individuals. We used regression models that allowed for correlations within work units and care homes and adjusted these models for demographics, job characteristics and stressful life events. Results Higher levels of regulation requirements were associated with lower depressive symptoms at the individual level (p=0.04), but not at the workplace level. Barriers were not associated with depressive symptoms at the individual level. At the workplace level, a higher number of qualitatively different barriers (p=0.04) and a higher number of barriers for equipment use (p=0.03) were associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms in the age and cohabitation adjusted model, however statistical significance was lost in the fully adjusted model. Conclusions Low level of regulation requirements was associated with a high level of depressive symptoms. The study highlights the importance of examining both individual and workplace levels of working conditions. PMID:26560058

  16. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting, and research needs: a joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-04-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error, or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilized due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices [EUDAMED]) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to "predicate" products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  17. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting and research needs. A joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-05-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycaemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycaemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilised due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices, EUDAMED) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to 'predicate' products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  18. Adverse Environments and Children's Creativity Development: Transforming the Notion of "Success in Adversity" in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Li; Tan, Mei; Liu, Zhengkui

    2015-01-01

    China has been undergoing great social change due to its new focus on urbanization and globalization. Such change has had a tremendous adverse impact on the living conditions of millions of young children, simultaneously generating new interest in children's creativity development. The intersection of these two issues has important implications…

  19. Cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, S; Allegra, A; Calapai, G; Musolino, C; Gangemi, S

    2015-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) used principally in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), myelodysplastic syndromes (MS) and amyloidosis. Adverse reactions related to lenalidomide include myelosuppression (mainly neutropenia but also thrombocytopenia), gastrointestinal problems, skin eruption, atrial fibrillation and asthenia, decreased peripheral blood stem cell yield during stem cell collection, venous thromboembolism, and secondary malignances. In this review we focused our attention on the cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

  20. Expert consensus on facilitators and barriers to return-to-work following surgery for non-traumatic upper extremity conditions: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Peters, S E; Johnston, V; Ross, M; Coppieters, M W

    2017-02-01

    This Delphi study aimed to reach consensus on important facilitators and barriers for return-to-work following surgery for non-traumatic upper extremity conditions. In Round 1, experts ( n = 42) listed 134 factors, which were appraised in Rounds 2 and 3. Consensus (⩾85% agreement) was achieved for 13 facilitators (high motivation to return-to-work; high self-efficacy for return-to-work and recovery; availability of modified/alternative duties; flexible return-to-work arrangements; positive coping skills; limited heavy work exertion; supportive return-to-work policies; supportive supervisor/management; no catastrophic thinking; no fear avoidance to return-to-work; no fear avoidance to pain/activity; return to meaningful work duties; high job satisfaction) and six barriers (mood disorder diagnosis; pain/symptoms at more than one musculoskeletal site; heavy upper extremity exertions at work; lack of flexible return-to-work arrangements; lack of support from supervisor/management; high level of pain catastrophizing). Future prognostic studies are required to validate these biopsychosocial factors to further improve return-to-work outcomes.

  1. Nature-based stress management course for individuals at risk of adverse health effects from work-related stress-effects on stress related symptoms, workability and sick leave.

    PubMed

    Sahlin, Eva; Ahlborg, Gunnar; Matuszczyk, Josefa Vega; Grahn, Patrik

    2014-06-01

    Sick leave due to stress-related disorders is increasing in Sweden after a period of decrease. To avoid that individuals living under heavy stress develop more severe stress-related disorders, different stress management interventions are offered. Self-assessed health, burnout-scores and well-being are commonly used as outcome measures. Few studies have used sick-leave to compare effects of stress interventions. A new approach is to use nature and garden in a multimodal stress management context. This study aimed to explore effects on burnout, work ability, stress-related health symptoms, and sick leave for 33 women participating in a 12-weeks nature based stress management course and to investigate how the nature/garden activities were experienced. A mixed method approach was used. Measures were taken at course start and three follow-ups. Results showed decreased burnout-scores and long-term sick leaves, and increased work ability; furthermore less stress-related symptoms were reported. Tools and strategies to better handle stress were achieved and were widely at use at all follow-ups. The garden and nature content played an important role for stress relief and for tools and strategies to develop. The results from this study points to beneficial effects of using garden activities and natural environments in a stress management intervention.

  2. Nature-Based Stress Management Course for Individuals at Risk of Adverse Health Effects from Work-Related Stress—Effects on Stress Related Symptoms, Workability and Sick Leave

    PubMed Central

    Sahlin, Eva; Ahlborg, Gunnar; Vega Matuszczyk, Josefa; Grahn, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Sick leave due to stress-related disorders is increasing in Sweden after a period of decrease. To avoid that individuals living under heavy stress develop more severe stress-related disorders, different stress management interventions are offered. Self-assessed health, burnout-scores and well-being are commonly used as outcome measures. Few studies have used sick-leave to compare effects of stress interventions. A new approach is to use nature and garden in a multimodal stress management context. This study aimed to explore effects on burnout, work ability, stress-related health symptoms, and sick leave for 33 women participating in a 12-weeks nature based stress management course and to investigate how the nature/garden activities were experienced. A mixed method approach was used. Measures were taken at course start and three follow-ups. Results showed decreased burnout-scores and long-term sick leaves, and increased work ability; furthermore less stress-related symptoms were reported. Tools and strategies to better handle stress were achieved and were widely at use at all follow-ups. The garden and nature content played an important role for stress relief and for tools and strategies to develop. The results from this study points to beneficial effects of using garden activities and natural environments in a stress management intervention. PMID:25003175

  3. [Shoes stitched, workers unstitched: a study on working and health conditions among women factory workers in the footwear industry in Franca, São Paulo State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Prazeres, Taísa Junqueira; Navarro, Vera Lucia

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to analyze associations between working conditions and health problems reported by women workers assigned to mechanical stitching in the footwear industry in Franca, São Paulo State, Brazil. The qualitative study's theory and methodology were based on historical and dialectical materialism and combined sociological and ethnographic research techniques. Data were collected with taped interviews, focusing on the workers' life and work stories, systematic observation of the work process, consultation of historical documents, and imagistic production. Analysis of the data revealed the effects of work in mechanical stitching on the health of women workers employed in the factory and at home, who experience precarious labor conditions involving workday intensification and extension, preset production targets, job insecurity, and unhealthy workplaces.

  4. [Work conditions and professional profiles of nutritionists who graduated from the Ouro Preto Federal University, Minas Gerais State, Brazil: 1994 - 2001].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Karla Meneses; Peres, Frederico; Waissmann, William

    2007-01-01

    The study presents the professional profiles and work conditions of nutritionists who graduated from the Ouro Preto Federal University, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, in their various spheres of action. A quanti-qualitative approach was adopted through questionnaires completed by all professionals graduating from this University between 1994 and 2001 (N=356), in addition to semi-structured interviews with fourteen professionals selected from the universe of the respondents (n=90). An analysis of these questionnaires showed that 67% of them work with Clinical Nutrition, 44% with Collective Nutrition, 14% with Education Programs and 11% with Social Nutrition. Most (57%) of the respondents expressed the desire to remain in the field where they were working. Among those wishing to move into a different area, 44.5% work with Collective Nutrition. Despite clearly precarious employment links, Clinical Nutrition is the field with the largest number of professionals satisfied with their work conditions. The findings of this study explore the work conditions of a group of nutritionists for whom job stability is not always the main factor for professional satisfaction.

  5. Adverse environments and children's creativity development: transforming the notion of "success in adversity" in China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li; Tan, Mei; Liu, Zhengkui

    2015-01-01

    China has been undergoing great social change due to its new focus on urbanization and globalization. Such change has had a tremendous adverse impact on the living conditions of millions of young children, simultaneously generating new interest in children's creativity development. The intersection of these two issues has important implications for China's future as it brings together one of China's core cultural values-"success in adversity"-the importance of creativity, and very real social and economic needs. "Success in adversity" reflects the strongly held belief that individuals who suffer adverse environments can rise to excellence and success through persistence, effort, and creativity. In this article, we briefly explore the historical sources of this belief and how it is closely related to the Chinese conception of creativity. We then present some studies on the creativity of some of China's migrant children. Findings show that while migrant children as a group may not generally exhibit higher creativity than their urban peers as hypothesized, indications of resilience and creative potential suggest that the notion of success in adversity may contribute to the positive development of China's migrant children more substantially when it is informed by research and augmented by research-supported policy.

  6. Beyond Main Effects Models of Adolescent Work Intensity, Family Closeness, and School Disengagement: Mediational and Conditional Hypotheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roisman, Glenn I.

    2002-01-01

    Interviewed adolescents in grades 9 through 12 to examine family closeness as either mediator or moderator of relationships between intense work and academic engagement. Found that for boys, the family closeness mediational model provided best fit for data; for girls, the moderator model fit best. Found girls were especially vulnerable to negative…

  7. Key Transition Issues for Youth with Disabilities and Chronic Health Conditions. Healthy & Ready To Work (HRTW) Policy Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulzinger, Rhoda

    This paper explains recent changes in the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program that affect adolescents with disabilities or chronic health problems. Changes include the SSI work incentives available to them, how they can maintain access to quality health care and benefits during their transition years, and key issues in transition planning.…

  8. Characteristics and Working Conditions of Moonlighting Teachers: Evidence from the 2011-2012 Schools and Staffing Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitchett, Paul G.; Heafner, Tina L.; Harden, Susan B.

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting, an employment practice where individuals work outside of their primary job, is popular within the public education sector. Using data from the National Center for Education Statistics Schools and Staffing Survey, this study examined both the characteristics and motivations of public school teachers across moonlighting categories.…

  9. The Relationship between Working Memory Capacity and L2 Oral Performance under Task-Based Careful Online Planning Condition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmadian, Mohammad Javad

    2012-01-01

    The study reported in this article aimed to investigate the way working memory capacity (WMC) interacts with careful online planning--a task-based implementation variable--to affect second language (L2) speech production. This issue is important to teachers, because it delves into one of the possible task-based implementation variables and thus…

  10. Boundary conditions at the ablative walls in two-temperature modelling of thermal plasmas with reactive working gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekker, Leonid; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new set of boundary conditions at ablative hot walls with thermionic electron emission for two-temperature thermal arc models in which the temperature of electrons can deviate from the temperature of heavy particles,~{{T}\\text{e}}\

  11. Working with Students in the Medication Era: Do We All Have to Know How to Diagnose and Treat Mental Conditions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alishio, Kip

    2005-01-01

    A marked increase in the number of college students on medications for depression, attention deficit disorder, and other conditions may have intimidated counselors and educators into believing that they all need to be medical experts. The widespread practice of medicalizing behavior and experience contrasts dramatically with the approach in which…

  12. What Makes Reform Work?--School-Based Conditions as Predictors of Teachers' Changing Practice after a National Curriculum Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramberg, Magnus R.

    2014-01-01

    Educational change initiatives, whether they involve the implementation of new policies or curriculum reforms, often fail to reach the level of teachers' classroom practices. In the search for explanations, numerous studies have either characterized teachers as resistant to change or focused on how schools' workplace conditions have failed to…

  13. Sexuality Issues for Youth with Disabilities and Chronic Health Conditions. Healthy & Ready To Work (HRTW) Policy Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapland, Ceci

    This policy paper addresses sexuality issues of youth with disabilities and chronic health conditions. The first section introduces the problem of teen pregnancy and pregnancy prevention. The second section provides definitions of disabilities including both visible and invisible disabilities. Risk factors for teen pregnancy are identified and…

  14. Homeworking: Home Office or Home Sweatshop? Report on Current Conditions of Homeworkers in Toronto's Garment Industry. NALL Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Roxana; Wong, Renita Yuk-Lin; Choi, Angela

    The current conditions of home workers in the garment industry in Toronto, Canada, were examined through in-depth telephone interviews with 30 Chinese-speaking immigrant women who were employed as home workers in 1999. The paper dicusses the formal training and informal learning experiences of immigrant woman who are garment workers. A comparison…

  15. Work-related self-efficacy as a moderator of the impact of a worksite stress management training intervention: Intrinsic work motivation as a higher order condition of effect.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Joda; Bond, Frank W; Flaxman, Paul E

    2017-01-01

    Employees with low levels of work-related self-efficacy may stand to benefit more from a worksite stress management training (SMT) intervention. However, this low work-related self-efficacy/enhanced SMT benefits effect may be conditional on employees also having high levels of intrinsic work motivation. In the present study, we examined this proposition by testing three-way, or higher order, interaction effects. One hundred and fifty-three U.K. government employees were randomly assigned to a SMT intervention group (n = 68), or to a waiting list control group (n = 85). The SMT group received three half-day training sessions spread over two and a half months. Findings indicated that there were significant overall reductions in psychological strain, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization in the SMT group, in comparison to the control group. Furthermore, there were significant higher order Group (SMT vs. control) × Time 1 Work-Related Self-Efficacy × Time 1 Intrinsic Work Motivation interactions, such that reductions in emotional exhaustion and depersonalization at certain time points were experienced only by those who had low baseline levels of work-related self-efficacy and high baseline levels of intrinsic work motivation. Implications for work-related self-efficacy theory and research and SMT research and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Work Orientation Attitudes of Rural Low-Income Residents of Three South Central Virginia Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durant, Thomas J., Jr.

    The study determined the relation between specific social factors and situational conditions of poverty and non-poverty heads of households and their orientation toward work. The major hypotheses tested was that respondents affected more by adverse social factors and situational conditions will develop less positive work orientations. Data were…

  17. Extrinsic High-Effort and Low-Reward Conditions at Work among Institutional Staff Caring for People with Intellectual Disabilities in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Tzong-Nan; Lin, Jin-Ding; Yen, Chia-Feng; Loh, Ching-Hui; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Jia-Ling; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chu, Cordia M.

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were to determine whether extrinsic high-effort/low-reward conditions at work are associated with personal characteristics and the organizational environments. A cross-sectional survey was conducted (76.7% response rate, N = 1243) by recruiting the staff caring for people with intellectual disabilities of Taiwan…

  18. Helping Teams Succeed: An Essay Review of "Groups That Work (and Those That Don't): Creating Conditions for Effective Teamwork."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kain, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    Teams are incompatible with the scientific management philosophy underlying traditional curricular and organizational theory. This article examines J. R. Hackman's book "Groups That Work (and Those That Don't): Creating Conditions for Effective Teamwork" (1990), as it illuminates the experience of teaching on a middle school…

  19. A Multiple Case Study Discovering Part-Time Faculties' Perceptions of Their Professional Needs, Working Conditions, Social Network, and Job Satisfaction at Three Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millner-Harlee, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    This study employed a multiple case study design to evaluate the perspectives of part-time faculties at three community colleges in the Northeast. The purpose of this study was to discover how needs, working conditions, and social networks influence the part-time faculties' job satisfaction. Maslow (1954), Bourdieu (1986), and Herzberg, Mausner,…

  20. Agreement Between the Association for Higher Education of Shoreline Community College and the Board of Trustees concerning Salary, Working Conditions, and Related College Policies 1973-74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoreline Community Coll., Seattle, WA.

    This document presents the agreement between the Association for Higher Education of Shoreline Community College and the Board of Trustees concerning salary, working conditions, and related college policies for the period from July 19, 1973 to June 30, 1974. The articles of the agreement cover initial placement of teaching faculty, salary…