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Sample records for adversely affect vascular

  1. Determinants of Adverse Events in Vascular Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; McDonald, Kathryn; Morton, John; Dalman, Ron L; Bech, Fritz R

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient safety is a national priority. Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) monitor potential adverse events during hospital stays. Surgical specialty PSI benchmarks do not exist, which are needed to account for differences in the range of procedures performed, reasons for the procedure, and differences in patient characteristics. A comprehensive profile of adverse events in vascular surgery was created. Study Design The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was queried for 8 vascular procedures using ICD-9-CM codes from 2005–2009. Factors associated with PSI development were evaluated in univariate and multivariate analyses. Results A total of 1,412,703 patients underwent a vascular procedure and 5.2% developed a PSI. PSIs were more frequent in female, non-white patients with public payers (p<.01). Patients at mid and low volume hospitals had greater odds of developing a PSI (Odds Ratio [OR], 1.17; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.10–1.23 and OR, 1.69; CI, 1.53–1.87). Amputations had highest PSI risk-adjusted rate (RAR) and carotid endarterectomy and endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair had lower RAR (p<.0001). PSI RAR increased linearly by severity of patient indication: claudicants (OR, 0.40, CI, 0.35–0.46), rest pain patients (OR, 0.78, CI 0.69–0.90), ulcer (OR: 1.20, CI: 1.07–1.34) and gangrene patients (OR:1.85, CI: 1.66–2.06). Conclusions Patient safety events in vascular surgery were high and varied by procedure, with amputations and open AAA having substantially more potential adverse events. PSIs were associated with black race, public payer, and procedure indication. It is important to note the overall higher rates of PSIs occurring in vascular patients and appropriately adjust benchmarks for this surgical specialty. PMID:22425449

  2. Fingolimod-Associated Peripheral Vascular Adverse Effects.

    PubMed

    Russo, Margherita; Guarneri, Claudio; Mazzon, Emanuela; Sessa, Edoardo; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2015-10-01

    Fingolimod is the first oral disease-modifying drug approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. The drug is usually well tolerated, and common adverse effects include bradycardia, headache, influenza, diarrhea, back pain, increased liver enzyme levels, and cough. Fingolimod is thought to provide therapeutic benefit by preventing normal lymphocyte egress from lymphoid tissues, thus reducing the infiltration of autoaggressive lymphocytes into the central nervous system. However, because the drug acts on different sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors, it may induce several biological effects by influencing endothelial cell-cell adhesion, angiogenesis, vascular development, and cardiovascular function. We describe a patient with multiple sclerosis who, after 3 weeks of fingolimod administration, developed purplish blotches over the dorsal surface of the distal phalanges of the second and fifth digits and the middle phalanx of the fourth ray, itching, and edema on his left hand, without other evident clinical manifestations. When fingolimod therapy was discontinued, the clinical picture regressed within a few days but reappeared after a rechallenge test. Physicians should be aware of unexpected peripheral vascular adverse effects due to fingolimod use, and patients with vascular-based acropathies should be carefully screened and monitored when taking this drug. PMID:26349949

  3. Adverse Outcome Pathways for Embryonic Vascular Disruption and Alternative Methods to Identify Chemical Vascular Disruptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse prenatal outcomes. We used information from genetic mouse models linked to phenotypic outcomes and a vascular toxicity knowledge base to construct an embryonic vascular disrupt...

  4. Adverse Outcome Pathway for Embryonic Vascular Disruption and Alternative Methods to Identify Chemical Vascular Disruptors During Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse prenatal outcomes. We used information from genetic mouse models linked to phenotypic outcomes and a vascular toxicity knowledge base to construct an embryonic vascular disrupt...

  5. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype. PMID:26919895

  6. Constructing, Quantifying, and Validating an Adverse Outcome Pathway for Vascular Developmental Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Constructing, Quantifying, and Validating an Adverse Outcome Pathway for Vascular Developmental Toxicity The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) for embryonic vascular disruption1 leading to a range of adverse prenatal outcomes was recently entered into the AOP wiki and accepted as par...

  7. Are nilotinib-associated vascular adverse events an under-estimated problem?

    PubMed

    Stève-Dumont, Marie; Baldin, Bernadette; Legros, Laurence; Thyss, Antoine; Re, Daniel; Rocher, Fanny; Ajmia, Florian; Spreux, Anne; Drici, Milou-Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Vascular adverse events have been reported with nilotinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor prescribed for chronic myeloid leukaemia. However, few data specify their incidence, or whether they occur in predisposed patients. Hence, we prospectively studied 30 consecutive patients to assess the frequency of such adverse reactions and determine whether the patients presenting with these adverse events bear predisposing factors. From 3 to 73 months after nilotinib initiation, 10 of the 30 patients experienced vascular events. Three patients of these 10 were devoid of any patent cardiovascular risk factor, except for age. This study points out an occurrence more frequent than expected of vascular adverse events associated with nilotinib (> 30% vs. < 1% in summary of product characteristics), and particularly of vascular events of late onset in patients with no pre-existing risk factors. PMID:25619238

  8. FACTORS ADVERSELY AFFECTING AMPHIBIAN POPULATIONS IN THE US

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors known or suspected to be adversely affecting native amphibian populations in the US were identified using information from species accounts written in a standardized format by multiple authors in a forthcoming book. Specific adverse factors were identified for 53 (58%) of...

  9. Adversity before Conception Will Affect Adult Progeny in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shachar-Dadon, Alice; Schulkin, Jay; Leshem, Micah

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated whether adversity in a female, before she conceives, will influence the affective and social behavior of her progeny. Virgin female rats were either undisturbed (controls) or exposed to varied, unpredictable, stressors for 7 days (preconceptual stress [PCS]) and then either mated immediately after the end of the stress…

  10. An Overview of Vascular Adverse Events Associated With Facial Soft Tissue Fillers: Recognition, Prevention, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Ferneini, Elie M; Ferneini, Antoine M

    2016-08-01

    Minimally invasive facial cosmetic surgery procedures have seen an exponential increase in numbers over the past decade. The most commonly performed procedures are neuromodulator and soft tissue filler procedures. Although soft tissue fillers have a high safety and predictability profile, these procedures recently have been associated with serious and dire adverse events. This article will discuss some of the vascular complications associated with facial soft tissue fillers. Management and prevention of these adverse events also will be discussed. PMID:27067061

  11. Adverse Perinatal Outcome in Subsequent Pregnancy after Stillbirth by Placental Vascular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Monari, Francesca; Pedrielli, Giulia; Vergani, Patrizia; Pozzi, Elisa; Mecacci, Federico; Serena, Caterina; Neri, Isabella; Facchinetti, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate outcome in the pregnancy following a stillbirth (SB) by a placental vascular disorders. Study Design A prospective, observational, multicenter study was conducted in woman with a history of stillbirth (> 22 weeks) between 2005 and June 2013, in 3 Italian University Hospitals. Causes of SB were previously identified after extensive investigations. Pregnant women were enrolled within the first trimester. The main outcome was “adverse neonatal outcome”, including perinatal death, fetal growth restriction, early preterm birth <33+6 weeks, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, intracranial hemorrhage or respiratory distress. Results Out of 364 index pregnancies, 320 women (87.9%) had a subsequent pregnancy during the study period. Forty-seven had an early pregnancy loss. Out of 273 babies, 67 (24.5%) had an adverse perinatal outcome, including 1 SB and 1 early neonatal death (3.7/1000). Women who had a SB related to placental vascular disorders (39.6%), were at higher risk of an adverse neonatal outcome compared with women whose SB was unexplained or resulted from other causes (Adj. OR = 2.1, 95%CI: 1.2–3.8). Moreover, also obesity independently predicts an adverse perinatal outcome (Adj OR = 2.1, 95%CI: 1.1–4.3). Conclusion When previous SB is related to placental vascular disorders there is a high risk for adverse neonatal outcomes in the subsequent pregnancy. Maternal obesity is an additional risk factor. PMID:27228078

  12. Association Between Vascular Access Dysfunction and Subsequent Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Te-Hui; Tseng, Chien-Tzu; Lin, Wei-Hung; Chao, Jo-Yen; Wang, Wei-Ming; Li, Chung-Yi; Wang, Ming-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association between dialysis vascular access dysfunction and the risk of developing major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in hemodialysis patients is unclear and has not yet been investigated. We analyzed data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan to quantify this association. Adopting a case–control design nested within a cohort of patients who received hemodialysis from 2001 to 2010, we identified 9711 incident cases of MACE during the stage of stable maintenance dialysis and 19,422 randomly selected controls matched to cases on age, gender, and duration of dialysis. Events of vascular access dysfunction in the 6-month period before the date of MACE onset (ie, index date) for cases and before index dates for controls were evaluated retrospectively. The presence of vascular access dysfunction was associated with a 1.385-fold higher odds of developing MACE as estimated from the logistic regression analysis. This represents a significantly increased adjusted odds ratio (OR) at 1.268 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.186–1.355) after adjustment for comorbidities and calendar years of initiating dialysis. We also noted a significant exposure–response trend (P < 0.001) between the frequency of vascular access dysfunction and MACE, with the greatest risk (adjusted OR = 1.840, 95% CI = 1.549–2.186) noted in patients with ≥3 vascular access events. We concluded that dialysis vascular access dysfunction was significantly associated with an increased risk of MACE. Hence, vascular access failure can be an early sign for MACE in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. Active monitoring and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors and related diseases, not merely managing vascular access dysfunction, would be required to reduce the risk of MACE. PMID:26131808

  13. Hindlimb unweighting affects rat vascular capacitance function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, S. L.; Tamhidi, L.; Berkowitz, D. E.; Shoukas, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    Microgravity is associated with an impaired stroke volume and, therefore, cardiac output response to orthostatic stress. We hypothesized that a decreased venous filling pressure due to increased venous compliance may be an important contributing factor in this response. We used a constant flow, constant right atrial pressure cardiopulmonary bypass procedure to measure total systemic vascular compliance (C(T)), arterial compliance (C(A)), and venous compliance (C(V)) in seven control and seven 21-day hindlimb unweighted (HLU) rats. These compliance values were calculated under baseline conditions and during an infusion of 0.2 microg*kg(-1)*min(-1) norepinephrine (NE). The change in reservoir volume, which reflects changes in unstressed vascular volume (DeltaV(0)) that occurred upon infusion of NE, was also measured. C(T) and C(V) were larger in HLU rats both at baseline and during the NE infusion (P < 0.05). Infusion of NE decreased C(T) and C(V) by 20% in both HLU and control rats (P < 0.01). C(A) was also significantly decreased in both groups of rats by NE (P < 0.01), but values of C(A) were similar between HLU and control rats both at baseline and during the NE infusion. Additionally, the NE-induced DeltaV(0) was attenuated by 53% in HLU rats compared with control rats (P < 0.05). The larger C(V) and attenuated DeltaV(0) in HLU rats could contribute to a decreased filling pressure during orthostasis and thus may partially underlie the mechanism leading to the exaggerated fall in stroke volume and cardiac output seen in astronauts during an orthostatic stress after exposure to microgravity.

  14. Adversity before conception will affect adult progeny in rats.

    PubMed

    Shachar-Dadon, Alice; Schulkin, Jay; Leshem, Micah

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated whether adversity in a female, before she conceives, will influence the affective and social behavior of her progeny. Virgin female rats were either undisturbed (controls) or exposed to varied, unpredictable, stressors for 7 days (preconceptual stress [PCS]) and then either mated immediately after the end of the stress (PCS0) or 2 weeks after the stress ended (PCS2). Their offspring were raised undisturbed until tested in adulthood. PCS offspring showed reduced social interaction; in the acoustic startle test, PCS males were less fearful, whereas PCS females were more fearful; in the shuttle task, PCS0 males avoided shock better; and in the elevated maze, PCS0 females were more active and anxious. The 2-week interval between stress and mating assuaged the effects on offspring activity and shock avoidance but not the changes in social behavior and fear in male and female offspring. Hence, PCS to the dam, even well before pregnancy, influences affective and social behavior in her adult offspring, depending on how long before conception it occurred, the behavior tested, and sex. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:19209986

  15. The synthetic progestin megestrol acetate adversely affects zebrafish reproduction.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian; Wang, Qiangwei; Wang, Xianfeng; Li, Yonggang; Wen, Sheng; Liu, Shan; Ying, Guangguo; Guo, Yongyong; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2014-05-01

    Synthetic progestins contaminate the aquatic ecosystem, and may cause adverse health effects on aquatic organisms. Megestrol acetate (MTA) is present in the aquatic environment, but its possible effects on fish reproduction are unknown. In the present study, we investigated the endocrine disruption and impact of MTA on fish reproduction. After a pre-exposure period of 14 days, reproductively mature zebrafish (Danio rerio) (F0) were exposed to MTA at environmental concentrations (33, 100, 333, and 666 ng/L) for 21 days. Egg production was decreased in F0 fish exposed to MTA, with a significant decrease at 666 ng/L. The exposure significantly decreased the circulating concentrations of estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) in female fish or 11-keto testosterone (11-KT) in male fish. MTA exposure significantly downregulated the transcription of certain genes along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. MTA did not affect early embryonic development or hatching success in the F1 generation. The present study showed that MTA is a potent endocrine disruptor in fish, and short-term exposure to MTA could significantly affect reproduction in fish and negatively impact the fish population. PMID:24647012

  16. Factors affecting the development of adverse drug reactions (Review article)

    PubMed Central

    Alomar, Muaed Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To discuss the effect of certain factors on the occurrence of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs). Data Sources A systematic review of the literature in the period between 1991 and 2012 was made based on PubMed, the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, EMBASE and IDIS. Key words used were: medication error, adverse drug reaction, iatrogenic disease factors, ambulatory care, primary health care, side effects and treatment hazards. Summary Many factors play a crucial role in the occurrence of ADRs, some of these are patient related, drug related or socially related factors. Age for instance has a very critical impact on the occurrence of ADRs, both very young and very old patients are more vulnerable to these reactions than other age groups. Alcohol intake also has a crucial impact on ADRs. Other factors are gender, race, pregnancy, breast feeding, kidney problems, liver function, drug dose and frequency and many other factors. The effect of these factors on ADRs is well documented in the medical literature. Taking these factors into consideration during medical evaluation enables medical practitioners to choose the best drug regimen. Conclusion Many factors affect the occurrence of ADRs. Some of these factors can be changed like smoking or alcohol intake others cannot be changed like age, presence of other diseases or genetic factors. Understanding the different effects of these factors on ADRs enables healthcare professionals to choose the most appropriate medication for that particular patient. It also helps the healthcare professionals to give the best advice to patients. Pharmacogenomics is the most recent science which emphasizes the genetic predisposition of ADRs. This innovative science provides a new perspective in dealing with the decision making process of drug selection. PMID:24648818

  17. Does Ramadan Fasting Adversely Affect Cognitive Function in Young Females?

    PubMed Central

    Ghayour Najafabadi, Mahboubeh; Rahbar Nikoukar, Laya; Memari, Amir; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Beygi, Sara

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of Ramadan fasting on cognitive function in 17 female athletes. Data were obtained from participants of two fasting (n = 9) and nonfasting (n = 8) groups at three periods of the study (before Ramadan, at the third week in Ramadan, and after Ramadan). Digit span test (DST) and Stroop color test were employed to assess short-term memory and inhibition/cognitive flexibility at each time point. There were no significant changes for DST and Stroop task 1 in both groups, whereas Stroop task 2 and task 3 showed significant improvements in Ramadan condition (p < 0.05). Interference indices did not change significantly across the study except in post-Ramadan period of fasting group (p < 0.05). Group × week interaction was significant only for error numbers (p < 0.05). Athletes in nonfasting showed a significant decrease in number of errors in Ramadan compared to baseline (p < 0.05). The results suggest that Ramadan fasting may not adversely affect cognitive function in female athletes. PMID:26697263

  18. Combustion-derived nanoparticulate induces the adverse vascular effects of diesel exhaust inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Nicholas L.; Miller, Mark R.; Lucking, Andrew J.; Beveridge, Jon; Flint, Laura; Boere, A. John F.; Fokkens, Paul H.; Boon, Nicholas A.; Sandstrom, Thomas; Blomberg, Anders; Duffin, Rodger; Donaldson, Ken; Hadoke, Patrick W.F.; Cassee, Flemming R.; Newby, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Aim Exposure to road traffic and air pollution may be a trigger of acute myocardial infarction, but the individual pollutants responsible for this effect have not been established. We assess the role of combustion-derived-nanoparticles in mediating the adverse cardiovascular effects of air pollution. Methods and results To determine the in vivo effects of inhalation of diesel exhaust components, 16 healthy volunteers were exposed to (i) dilute diesel exhaust, (ii) pure carbon nanoparticulate, (iii) filtered diesel exhaust, or (iv) filtered air, in a randomized double blind cross-over study. Following each exposure, forearm blood flow was measured during intra-brachial bradykinin, acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside, and verapamil infusions. Compared with filtered air, inhalation of diesel exhaust increased systolic blood pressure (145 ± 4 vs. 133 ± 3 mmHg, P< 0.05) and attenuated vasodilatation to bradykinin (P= 0.005), acetylcholine (P= 0.008), and sodium nitroprusside (P< 0.001). Exposure to pure carbon nanoparticulate or filtered exhaust had no effect on endothelium-dependent or -independent vasodilatation. To determine the direct vascular effects of nanoparticulate, isolated rat aortic rings (n= 6–9 per group) were assessed in vitro by wire myography and exposed to diesel exhaust particulate, pure carbon nanoparticulate and vehicle. Compared with vehicle, diesel exhaust particulate (but not pure carbon nanoparticulate) attenuated both acetylcholine (P< 0.001) and sodium-nitroprusside (P= 0.019)-induced vasorelaxation. These effects were partially attributable to both soluble and insoluble components of the particulate. Conclusion Combustion-derived nanoparticulate appears to predominately mediate the adverse vascular effects of diesel exhaust inhalation. This provides a rationale for testing environmental health interventions targeted at reducing traffic-derived particulate emissions. PMID:21753226

  19. 47 CFR 73.4157 - Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service. 73.4157 Section 73.4157 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....4157 Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service. See Public Notice, FCC...

  20. 47 CFR 73.4157 - Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service. 73.4157 Section 73.4157 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....4157 Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service. See Public Notice, FCC...

  1. 47 CFR 73.4157 - Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service. 73.4157 Section 73.4157 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....4157 Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service. See Public Notice, FCC...

  2. 47 CFR 73.4157 - Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service. 73.4157 Section 73.4157 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....4157 Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service. See Public Notice, FCC...

  3. 47 CFR 73.4157 - Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service. 73.4157 Section 73.4157 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION....4157 Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service. See Public Notice, FCC...

  4. Missing Out: Excessive Absenteeism Adversely Affects Elementary Reading Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hockert, Christine; Harrington, Sonja; Vaughn, Debra; Kelly, Kirk; Gooden, John

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to answer the question "Does excessive absenteeism affect student academic achievement?" During the 2002-2003 academic year, 188 students attending grades 3 through 5 at an urban Tennessee elementary school with a high poverty level participated in the study. Demographic data were gathered to provide descriptive statistics…

  5. Root-Zone Glyphosate Exposure Adversely Affects Two Ditch Species

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Lyndsay E.; Koontz, Melissa B.; Pezeshki, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Glyphosate, one of the most applied herbicides globally, has been extensively studied for its effects on non-target organisms. In the field, following precipitation, glyphosate runs off into agricultural ditches where it infiltrates into the soil and thus may encounter the roots of vegetation. These edge-of-field ditches share many characteristics with wetlands, including the ability to reduce loads of anthropogenic chemicals through uptake, transformation, and retention. Different species within the ditches may have a differential sensitivity to exposure of the root zone to glyphosate, contributing to patterns of abundance of ruderal species. The present laboratory experiment investigated whether two species commonly found in agricultural ditches in southcentral United States were affected by root zone glyphosate in a dose-dependent manner, with the objective of identifying a sublethal concentration threshold. The root zone of individuals of Polygonum hydropiperoides and Panicum hemitomon were exposed to four concentrations of glyphosate. Leaf chlorophyll content was measured, and the ratio of aboveground biomass to belowground biomass and survival were quantified. The findings from this study showed that root zone glyphosate exposure negatively affected both species including dose-dependent reductions in chlorophyll content. P. hydropiperdoides showed the greatest negative response, with decreased belowground biomass allocation and total mortality at the highest concentrations tested. PMID:24833234

  6. Urban sprawl and you: how sprawl adversely affects worker health.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Mary; Fitzgerald, Sheila

    2004-06-01

    Urban sprawl, once thought of as just an environmental issue, is currently gaining momentum as an emerging public health issue worthy of research and political attention. Characteristics seen in sprawling communities include increasing traffic volumes; inadequate public transportation; pedestrian unfriendly streets; and the division of businesses, shops, and homes. These characteristics can affect health in many ways. Greater air pollution contributes to higher asthma and other lung disorder rates. An increased dependence on the automobile encourages a more sedentary lifestyle and can potentially contribute to obesity. The increased danger and stress of long commutes can lead to more accidents, anxiety, and social isolation. Occupational health nurses can become involved by promoting physical activity in the workplace, creating programs for injury prevention and stress management, becoming involved in political smart growth measures, and educating and encouraging colleagues to become active in addressing this issue. PMID:15219110

  7. Obesity Adversely Affects Survival in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Robert R.; Matsumoto, Martha E.; Burch, Patrick A.; Kim, George P.; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Reid-Lombardo, Kaye; Bamlet, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Higher body-mass index (BMI) has been implicated as a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer, but its effect on survival has not been thoroughly investigated. We assessed the association of BMI with survival in a sample of pancreatic cancer patients and utilized epidemiologic and clinical information to understand the contribution of diabetes and hyperglycemia. Methods A survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards by usual adult BMI was performed on 1,861 unselected patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma; analyses were adjusted for covariates that included clinical stage, age, and sex. Secondary analyses incorporated self reported diabetes and fasting blood glucose in the survival model. Results BMI as a continuous variable was inversely associated with survival from pancreatic adenocarcinoma [hazard ratio 1.019 for each increased unit of BMI (kg/m2), p < 0.001] after adjustment for age, stage, and sex. In analysis by National Institutes of Health BMI category, BMI of 30–34.99 kg/m2 (HR 1.14, 95% confidence interval 0.98–1.33), 35–39.99 kg/m2 (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.08–1.62), and ≥40 (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.26–2.04) were associated with decreased survival compared to normal BMI of 18,5–24.99 kg/m2 (overall trend test p<0.001). Fasting blood glucose and diabetes did not affect the results. Conclusions Higher BMI is associated with decreased survival in pancreatic cancer. Although the mechanism of this association remains undetermined, diabetes and hyperglycemia do not appear to account for the observed association. PMID:20665496

  8. PDMS content affects in vitro hemocompatibility of synthetic vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Dario; Losi, Paola; Briganti, Enrica; Sbrana, Silverio; Kull, Silvia; Martinelli, Ilaria; Soldani, Giorgio

    2007-06-01

    An unsolved problem when employing small-diameter vascular grafts for aorto-coronary by-pass and peripheral reconstruction is the early thrombotic occlusion. The PEtU-PDMS is a new elastomeric material, composed of poly(ether)urethane and polydimethylsiloxane, synthesized to realize grafts with improved hemocompatibility characteristics. In order to investigate the effect of PDMS content on hemocompatibility, three different percentages of PDMS containing grafts (10, 25 and 40) were evaluated. Grafts realized with Estane 5714-F1 and silicone medical grade tubes were used as references. The hemocompatibility was investigated by an in vitro circuit in which human anticoagulated blood was circulated into grafts by a peristaltic pump modified to obtain a passive flow. For each experiment, 40 cm length graft was closed into a circular loop and put in rotation for 2 h at 37 degrees C. At the end of the experiments different parameters regarding platelet adhesion and activation were evaluated: circulating platelets count, beta-thromboglobulin release, platelet CD62P expression and amount of monocyte-platelet conjugates. PEtU-PDMS grafts with 25 and 40% of PDMS induced the lowest platelet adhesion, plasma level of beta-TG and amount of monocyte-platelet conjugates. No significative variations were observed in CD62P expression. In conclusion, PDMS content significatively affects blood-graft surface interaction, in fact higher PDMS percentage containing grafts showed the best in vitro hemocompatibility. PMID:17268875

  9. Grape polyphenols do not affect vascular function in healthy men.

    PubMed

    van Mierlo, Linda A J; Zock, Peter L; van der Knaap, Henk C M; Draijer, Richard

    2010-10-01

    Data suggest that polyphenol-rich products may improve endothelial function and other cardiovascular health risk factors. Grape and wine contain high amounts of polyphenols, but effects of these polyphenols have hardly been investigated in isolation in randomized controlled studies. Our objective in this study was to test the chronic effect of polyphenol-rich solids derived from either a wine grape mix or grape seed on flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Blood pressure and other vascular function measures, platelet function, and blood lipids were secondary outcomes. Thirty-five healthy males were randomized in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study consisting of three 2-wk intervention periods separated by 1-wk washout periods. The test products, containing 800 mg of polyphenols, were consumed as capsules. At the end of each intervention period, effects were measured after consumption of a low-fat breakfast (~751 kJ, 25% fat) and a high-fat lunch (~3136 kJ, 78% fat). After the low-fat breakfast, the treatments did not significantly affect FMD. The absolute difference after the wine grape solid treatment was -0.4% (95% CI = -1.8 to 0.9; P = 0.77) and after grape seed solids, 0.2% (95% CI = -1.2 to 1.5; P = 0.94) compared with after the placebo treatment. FMD effects after the high-fat lunch and effects on secondary outcomes also showed no consistent differences between both of the grape solids and placebo treatment. In conclusion, consumption of grape polyphenols has no major impact on FMD in healthy men. Future studies should address whether grape polyphenols can improve FMD and other cardiovascular health risk factors in populations with increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:20702747

  10. Systematic Review of the Risk of Adverse Outcomes Associated with Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Inhibitors for the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Faruque, Labib Imran; Lin, Meng; Battistella, Marisa; Wiebe, Natasha; Reiman, Tony; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Thomas, Chandra; Tonelli, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    Background Anti-angiogenic therapy targeted at vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is now used to treat several types of cancer. We did a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to summarize the adverse effects of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors (VEGFi), focusing on those with vascular pathogenesis. Methods and Findings We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library until April 19, 2012 to identify parallel RCTs comparing a VEGFi with a control among adults with any cancer. We pooled the risk of mortality, vascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, and thromboembolism), hypertension and new proteinuria using random-effects models and calculated unadjusted relative risk (RR). We also did meta-regression and assessed publication bias. We retrieved 83 comparisons from 72 studies (n = 38,078) on 11 different VEGFi from 7901 identified citations. The risk of mortality was significantly lower among VEGFi recipients than controls (pooled RR 0.96, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.94 to 0.98, I2 = 0%, tau2 = 0; risk difference 2%). Compared to controls, VEGFi recipients had significantly higher risk of myocardial infarction (MI) (RR 3.54, 95% CI 1.61 to 7.80, I2 = 0%, tau2 = 0), arterial thrombotic events (RR 1.80, 95% CI 1.24 to 2.59, I2 = 0%, tau2 = 0); hypertension (RR 3.46, 95% CI 2.89 to 4.15, I2 = 58%, tau2 = 0.16), and new proteinuria (RR 2.51, 95% CI 1.60 to 3.94, I2 = 87%, tau2 = 0.65). The absolute risk difference was 0.8% for MI, 1% for arterial thrombotic events, 15% for hypertension and 12% for new proteinuria. Meta-regression did not suggest any statistically significant modifiers of the association between VEGFi treatment and any of the vascular events. Limitations include heterogeneity across the trials. Conclusions VEGFi increases the risk of MI, hypertension, arterial thromboembolism and proteinuria. The absolute magnitude of the excess risk appears

  11. Adverse effects of stromal vascular fraction during regenerative treatment of the intervertebral disc: observations in a goat model.

    PubMed

    Detiger, Suzanne E L; Helder, Marco N; Smit, Theodoor H; Hoogendoorn, Roel J W

    2015-09-01

    Stromal vascular fraction (SVF), an adipose tissue-derived heterogeneous cell mixture containing, among others, multipotent adipose stromal cells (ASCs) and erythrocytes, has proved beneficial for a wide range of applications in regenerative medicine. We sought to establish intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration by injecting SVF intradiscally during a one-step surgical procedure in an enzymatically (Chondroitinase ABC; cABC) induced goat model of disc degeneration. Unexpectedly, we observed a severe inflammatory response that has not been described before, including massive lymphocyte infiltration, neovascularisation and endplate destruction. A second study investigated two main suspects for these adverse effects: cABC and erythrocytes within SVF. The same destructive response was observed in healthy goat discs injected with SVF, thereby eliminating cABC as a cause. Density gradient removal of erythrocytes and ASCs purified by culturing did not lead to adverse effects. Following these observations, we incorporated an extra washing step in the SVF harvesting protocol. In a third study, we applied this protocol in a one-step procedure to a goat herniation model, in which no adverse responses were observed either. However, upon intradiscal injection of an identically processed SVF mixture into our goat IVD degeneration model during a fourth study, the adverse effects surprisingly occurred again. Despite our quest for the responsible agent, we eventually could not identify the mechanism through which the observed destructive responses occurred. Although we cannot exclude that the adverse effects are species-dependent or model-specific, we advertise caution with the clinical application of autologous SVF injections into the IVD until the responsible agent(s) are identified. PMID:25682272

  12. Adverse vascular effects of homocysteine are modulated by endothelium-derived relaxing factor and related oxides of nitrogen.

    PubMed Central

    Stamler, J S; Osborne, J A; Jaraki, O; Rabbani, L E; Mullins, M; Singel, D; Loscalzo, J

    1993-01-01

    Elevated levels of homocysteine are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. The reactivity of the sulfhydryl group of homocysteine has been implicated in molecular mechanisms underlying this increased risk. There is also increasingly compelling evidence that thiols react in the presence of nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) to form S-nitrosothiols, compounds with potent vasodilatory and antiplatelet effects. We, therefore, hypothesized that S-nitrosation of homocysteine would confer these beneficial bioactivities to the thiol, and at the same time attenuate its pathogenicity. We found that prolonged (> 3 h) exposure of endothelial cells to homocysteine results in impaired EDRF responses. By contrast, brief (15 min) exposure of endothelial cells, stimulated to secrete EDRF, to homocysteine results in the formation of S-NO-homocysteine, a potent antiplatelet agent and vasodilator. In contrast to homocysteine, S-NO-homocysteine does not support H2O2 generation and does not undergo conversion to homocysteine thiolactone, reaction products believed to contribute to endothelial toxicity. These results suggest that the normal endothelium modulates the potential, adverse effects of homocysteine by releasing EDRF and forming the adduct S-NO-homocysteine. The adverse vascular properties of homocysteine may result from an inability to sustain S-NO formation owing to a progressive imbalance between the production of NO by progressively dysfunctional endothelial cells and the levels of homocysteine. PMID:8380812

  13. 41 CFR 102-78.40 - What responsibilities do Federal agencies have when an undertaking adversely affects a historic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... guidance on the protection of historic and cultural properties in 36 CFR part 800. ... Federal agencies have when an undertaking adversely affects a historic or cultural property? 102-78.40...-78.40 What responsibilities do Federal agencies have when an undertaking adversely affects a...

  14. 50 CFR 402.45 - Alternative consultation on FIFRA actions that are not likely to adversely affect listed species...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... that are not likely to adversely affect listed species or critical habitat. 402.45 Section 402.45... habitat. (a) Consultation obligations for FIFRA actions that are not likely to adversely affect listed species or critical habitat when alternative consultation agreement is in effect. If EPA and the...

  15. 50 CFR 402.45 - Alternative consultation on FIFRA actions that are not likely to adversely affect listed species...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... that are not likely to adversely affect listed species or critical habitat. 402.45 Section 402.45... habitat. (a) Consultation obligations for FIFRA actions that are not likely to adversely affect listed species or critical habitat when alternative consultation agreement is in effect. If EPA and the...

  16. 50 CFR 402.45 - Alternative consultation on FIFRA actions that are not likely to adversely affect listed species...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... that are not likely to adversely affect listed species or critical habitat. 402.45 Section 402.45... habitat. (a) Consultation obligations for FIFRA actions that are not likely to adversely affect listed species or critical habitat when alternative consultation agreement is in effect. If EPA and the...

  17. Genetic polymorphisms affect efficacy and adverse drug reactions of DMARDs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling Ling; Yang, Sen; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Xue Jun

    2014-11-01

    Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biological agents are critical in preventing the severe complications of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the outcome of treatment with these drugs in RA patients is quite variable and unpredictable. Drug-metabolizing enzymes (dihydrofolate reductase, cytochrome P450 enzymes, N-acetyltransferases, etc.), drug transporters (ATP-binding cassette transporters), and drug targets (tumor necrosis factor-α receptors) are coded for by variant alleles. These gene polymorphisms may influence the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and side effects of medicines. The cause for differences in efficacy and adverse drug reactions may be genetic variation in drug metabolism among individuals. Polymorphisms in drug transporter genes may change the distribution and excretion of medicines, and the sensitivity of the targets to drugs is strongly influenced by genetic variations. In this article, we review the genetic polymorphisms that affect the efficacy of DMARDs or the occurrence of adverse drug reactions associated with DMARDs in RA. PMID:25144752

  18. Family Adversity and Autonomic Reactivity Association With Immune Changes in HIV-Affected School Children

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Melanie; Wara, Diane; Saxton, Katherine; Truskier, Mary; Chesney, Margaret; Boyce, W. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore whether primary school entry is associated with changes in immune system parameters in HIV-affected children. HIV-affected children are vulnerable to psychosocial stressors, regardless of their own HIV serological status. Methods Data from 38 HIV+ and 29 HIV− children born to seropositive women were obtained before and after school entry. Measures included family adversity questionnaires, autonomic nervous system (ANS) reactivity (based on mean arterial responses to challenge tasks), and enumerative and functional changes in peripheral blood immune parameters. Results In comparison to children who were HIV−, children who were HIV+ at baseline had fewer CD4+ T lymphocytes (M = 916 vs. 1206 cells/mm3 × 103; F = 7.8, p = .007), more CD8+ cells (M = 1046 vs. 720 cells/mm3 ×103; F = 7.98, p = .006), and diminished NK cell cytotoxicity (M =−.29 vs. .41; F = 8.87, p = .004). School entry was associated with changes in immune parameters, but HIV status was not associated with the magnitude of changes. Changes in immune parameters following school entry were associated with family stress and pre school entry ANS reactivity. Highly ANS reactive children had either the greatest increase in CD8+ cells following school entry or the greatest decrease, depending upon reported levels of family adversity (B = 215.35; t = 3.74, p < .001). Changes in functional immune assays were significantly associated with the interactions between HIV status and ANS reactivity. Conclusions These results suggest that autonomic reactivity is associated with increased immunological sensitivity to adverse or challenging social contexts among children affected by HIV. PMID:23766380

  19. Heart rate variables in the Vascular Quality Initiative are not reliable predictors of adverse cardiac outcomes or mortality after major elective vascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Scali, Salvatore; Bertges, Daniel; Neal, Daniel; Patel, Virendra; Eldrup-Jorgensen, Jens; Cronenwett, Jack; Beck, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Objective Heart rate (HR) parameters are known indicators of cardiovascular complications after cardiac surgery, but there is little evidence of their role in predicting outcome after major vascular surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether arrival HR (AHR) and highest intraoperative HR are associated with mortality or major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) after elective vascular surgery in the Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI). Methods Patients undergoing elective lower extremity bypass (LEB), aortofemoral bypass (AFB), and open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in the VQI were analyzed. MACE was defined as any postoperative myocardial infarction, dysrhythmia, or congestive heart failure. Controlled HR was defined as AHR <75 beats/min on operating room arrival. Delta HR (DHR) was defined as highest intraoperative HR – AHR Procedure-specific MACE models were derived for risk stratification, and generalized estimating equations were used to account for clustering of center effects. HR, beta-blocker exposure, cardiac risk, and their interactions were explored to determine association with MACE or 30-day mortality. A Bonferroni correction with P < .004 was used to declare significance. Results There were 13,291 patients reviewed (LEB, n = 8155 [62%]; AFB, n = 2629 [18%]; open AAA, n = 2629 [20%]). Rates of any preoperative beta-blocker exposure were as follows: LEB, 66.5% (n = 5412); AFB, 57% (n = 1342); and open AAA, 74.2% (n = 1949). AHR and DHR outcome association was variable across patients and procedures. AHR <75 beats/min was associated with increased postoperative myocardial infarction risk for LEB patients across all risk strata (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–1.9; P = .03), whereas AHR<75 beats/min was associated with decreased dysrhythmia risk (OR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.28–0.63; P = .0001) and 30-day death (OR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.33–0.77; P = .001) in patients at moderate and high cardiac risk. These HR

  20. 42 CFR 137.435 - Will an appeal adversely affect the Indian Tribe's rights in other compact, funding negotiations...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rights in other compact, funding negotiations, or construction project agreement? 137.435 Section 137.435... another compact, funding agreement, or construction project agreement. ... appeal adversely affect the Indian Tribe's rights in other compact, funding negotiations, or...

  1. Complex treatment of trophic affections with vascular patients using monochromatic red light and hyperbaric oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babkina, Zinaida M.; Vasilyev, Mikhail V.; Zakharov, Vyacheslav P.; Nikolayev, Viktor V.; Babkin, Vasily I.; Samoday, Valery G.; Zon, Boris A.; Pakhomov, Gennady V.; Naskidashvili, Vasily I.; Kumin, Anatoly A.

    1996-11-01

    Monochromatic red light irradiation therapy of trophic skin affections with vascular patients permits to receive positive results with small wounds. A combination of monochromatic red light and hyperbaric oxygenation is most perspective when conducting a complex therapy of trophic wounds not more than 40 mm2 and allows to diminish time of treatment almost two times.

  2. Cannula implantation into the lateral ventricle does not adversely affect recognition or spatial working memory.

    PubMed

    Seyer, Benjamin; Pham, Vi; Albiston, Anthony L; Chai, Siew Yeen

    2016-08-15

    Indwelling cannulas are often used to deliver pharmacological agents into the lateral ventricles of the brain to study their effects on memory and learning, yet little is known about the possible adverse effects of the cannulation itself. In this study, the effect of implanting an indwelling cannula into the right lateral ventricle was examined with respect to cognitive function and tissue damage in rats. Specifically, the cannula passed through sections of the primary motor (M1) and somatosensory hind limb (S1HL) cortices. One week following implantation, rats were impaired on the rotarod task, implying a deficit in fine motor control, likely caused by the passage of the cannula through the aforementioned cortical regions. Importantly, neither spatial working nor recognition memory was adversely affected. Histological examination showed immune cell activation only in the area immediately surrounding the cannulation site and not spreading to other brain regions. Both GFAP and CD-11b mRNA expression was elevated in the area immediately surrounding the cannulation site, but not in the contralateral hemisphere or the hippocampus. Neither of the inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α or IL-6, were upregulated in any region. These results show that cannulation into the lateral ventricle does not impair cognition and indicates that nootropic agents delivered via this method are enhancing normal memory rather than rescuing deficits caused by the surgery procedure. PMID:27345383

  3. Dietary restriction does not adversely affect bone geometry and mechanics in rapidly growing male wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Jennifer; Lamothe, Jeremy M; Zernicke, Ronald F; Auer, Roland N; Reimer, Raylene A

    2005-02-01

    The present study assessed the effects of dietary restriction on tibial and vertebral mechanical and geometrical properties in 2-mo-old male Wistar rats. Two-month-old male Wistar rats were randomized to the ad libitum (n=8) or the 35% diet-restricted (DR) feeding group (n=9) for 5 mo. Tibiae and L6 vertebrae were dissected out for microcomputed tomography (microCT) scanning and subsequently fractured in biomechanical testing to determine geometrical and mechanical properties. The DR group had significantly lower mean tibial length, mass, area, and cross-sectional moment of inertia, as well as vertebral energy to maximal load. After adjustment for body mass, however, DR tibial mean maximal load and stiffness, and DR vertebral area, height, volume, and maximal load were significantly greater, relative to ad libitum means. No significant differences were found between the DR and ad libitum mineral ash fractions. Because the material properties of the tibiae between the two groups were not significantly different, presumably the material integrity of the bones was not adversely affected as a consequence of DR. The similar material characteristics were consistent with mineral ash fractions that were not different between the two groups. Vertebral maximal load and stiffness were not significant between the DR and ad libitum animals. Importantly, we show that a level of dietary restriction (35%) that is less severe than many studies (40%), and without micronutrient compensation does not adversely affect tibial and vertebral mechanical properties in young growing male rats when normalized for body mass. PMID:15585686

  4. Factors Affecting the Timing of Signal Detection of Adverse Drug Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Masayuki; Imai, Shungo; Uehara, Keiko; Maruyama, Junya; Shimizu, Mikiko; Mochizuki, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting the timing of signal detection by comparing variations in reporting time of known and unknown ADRs after initial drug release in the USA. Data on adverse event reactions (AERs) submitted to U.S. FDA was used. Six ADRs associated with 6 drugs (rosuvastatin, aripiprazole, teriparatide, telithromycin, exenatide, varenicline) were investigated: Changes in the proportional reporting ratio, reporting odds ratio, and information component as indexes of signal detection were followed every 3 months after each drugs release, and the time for detection of signals was investigated. The time for the detection of signal to be detected after drug release in the USA was 2-10 months for known ADRs and 19-44 months for unknown ones. The median lag time for known and unknown ADRs was 99.0-122.5 days and 185.5-306.0 days, respectively. When the FDA released advisory information on rare but potentially serious health risks of an unknown ADR, the time lag to report from the onset of ADRs to the FDA was shorter. This study suggested that one factor affecting signal detection time is whether an ADR was known or unknown at release. PMID:26641634

  5. Sexually Dimorphic Responses to Early Adversity: Implications for Affective Problems and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Pfaff, Donald

    2014-01-01

    During gestation, development proceeds at a pace that is unmatched by any other stage of the lifecycle. For these reason the human fetus is particularly susceptible not only to organizing influences, but also to pathogenic disorganizing influences. Growing evidence suggests that exposure to prenatal adversity leads to neurological changes that underlie lifetime risks for mental illness. Beginning early in gestation, males and females show differential developmental trajectories and responses to stress. It is likely that sex-dependent organization of neural circuits during the fetal period influences differential vulnerability to mental health problems. We consider in this review evidence that sexually dimorphic responses to early life stress are linked to two developmental disorders: affective problems (greater female prevalence) and autism spectrum disorder (greater male prevalence). Recent prospective studies illustrating the neurodevelopmental consequences of fetal exposure to stress and stress hormones for males and females are considered here. Plausible biological mechanisms including the role of the sexually differentiated placenta are discussed. We consider in this review evidence that sexually dimorphic responses to early life stress are linked to two sets of developmental disorders: affective problems (greater female prevalence) and autism spectrum disorders (greater male prevalence). PMID:25038479

  6. 42 CFR 137.445 - Will an immediate reassumption appeal adversely affect the Self-Governance Tribe's rights in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... affect the Self-Governance Tribe's rights in other self-governance negotiations? 137.445 Section 137.445..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Appeals Appeals of An Immediate Reassumption of A Self-Governance Program § 137.445 Will an immediate reassumption appeal adversely affect...

  7. 42 CFR 137.445 - Will an immediate reassumption appeal adversely affect the Self-Governance Tribe's rights in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... affect the Self-Governance Tribe's rights in other self-governance negotiations? 137.445 Section 137.445..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Appeals Appeals of An Immediate Reassumption of A Self-Governance Program § 137.445 Will an immediate reassumption appeal adversely affect...

  8. 42 CFR 137.445 - Will an immediate reassumption appeal adversely affect the Self-Governance Tribe's rights in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... affect the Self-Governance Tribe's rights in other self-governance negotiations? 137.445 Section 137.445..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Appeals Appeals of An Immediate Reassumption of A Self-Governance Program § 137.445 Will an immediate reassumption appeal adversely affect...

  9. 42 CFR 137.445 - Will an immediate reassumption appeal adversely affect the Self-Governance Tribe's rights in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... affect the Self-Governance Tribe's rights in other self-governance negotiations? 137.445 Section 137.445..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Appeals Appeals of An Immediate Reassumption of A Self-Governance Program § 137.445 Will an immediate reassumption appeal adversely affect...

  10. 42 CFR 137.445 - Will an immediate reassumption appeal adversely affect the Self-Governance Tribe's rights in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... affect the Self-Governance Tribe's rights in other self-governance negotiations? 137.445 Section 137.445..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Appeals Appeals of An Immediate Reassumption of A Self-Governance Program § 137.445 Will an immediate reassumption appeal adversely affect...

  11. Early Life in a Barren Environment Adversely Affects Spatial Cognition in Laying Hens (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Tahamtani, Fernanda M.; Nordgreen, Janicke; Nordquist, Rebecca E.; Janczak, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial cognition in vertebrates is adversely affected by a lack of environmental complexity during early life. However, to our knowledge, no previous studies have tested the effect of early exposure to varying degrees of environmental complexity on specific components of spatial cognition in chickens. There are two main rearing systems for laying hens in the EU: aviaries and cages. These two systems differ from one another in environmental complexity. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that rearing in a barren cage environment relative to a complex aviary environment causes long-lasting deficits in the ability to perform spatial tasks. For this purpose, 24 white Dekalb laying hens, half of which had been reared in an aviary system and the other half in a conventional cage system, were tested in a holeboard task. Birds from both treatment groups learnt the task; however, the cage-reared hens required more time to locate rewards and had poorer levels of working memory. The latter finding supports the hypothesis that rearing in a barren environment causes long-term impairment of short-term memory in chickens. PMID:26664932

  12. Exposing physicians to reduced residency work hours did not adversely affect patient outcomes after residency.

    PubMed

    Jena, Anupam B; Schoemaker, Lena; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2014-10-01

    In 2003, work hours for physicians-in-training (residents) were capped by regulation at eighty hours per week, leading to the hotly debated but unexplored issue of whether physicians today are less well trained as a result of these work-hour reforms. Using a unique database of nearly all hospitalizations in Florida during 2000-09 that were linked to detailed information on the medical training history of the physician of record for each hospitalization, we studied whether hospital mortality and patients' length-of-stay varied according to the number of years a physician was exposed to the 2003 duty-hour regulations during his or her residency. We examined this database of practicing Florida physicians, using a difference-in-differences analysis that compared trends in outcomes of junior physicians (those with one-year post-residency experience) pre- and post-2003 to a control group of senior physicians (those with ten or more years of post-residency experience) who were not exposed to these reforms during their residency. We found that the duty-hour reforms did not adversely affect hospital mortality and length-of-stay of patients cared for by new attending physicians who were partly or fully exposed to reduced duty hours during their own residency. However, assessment of the impact of the duty-hour reforms on other clinical outcomes is needed. PMID:25288430

  13. Delay of Treatment Initiation Does Not Adversely Affect Survival Outcome in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Tae-Kyung; Han, Wonshik; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Kim, Jisun; Lee, Jun Woo; Kim, Min Kyoon; Lee, Eunshin; Kim, Jongjin; Noh, Dong-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies examining the relationship between time to treatment and survival outcome in breast cancer have shown inconsistent results. The aim of this study was to analyze the overall impact of delay of treatment initiation on patient survival and to determine whether certain subgroups require more prompt initiation of treatment. Materials and Methods This study is a retrospective analysis of stage I-III patients who were treated in a single tertiary institution between 2005 and 2008. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression model were used to evaluate the impact of interval between diagnosis and treatment initiation in breast cancer and various subgroups. Results A total of 1,702 patients were included. Factors associated with longer delay of treatment initiation were diagnosis at another hospital, medical comorbidities, and procedures performed before admission for surgery. An interval between diagnosis and treatment initiation as a continuous variable or with a cutoff value of 15, 30, 45, and 60 days had no impact on disease-free survival (DFS). Subgroup analyses for hormone-responsiveness, triple-negative breast cancer, young age, clinical stage, and type of initial treatment showed no significant association between longer delay of treatment initiation and DFS. Conclusion Our results show that an interval between diagnosis and treatment initiation of 60 days or shorter does not appear to adversely affect DFS in breast cancer. PMID:26511801

  14. Neonicotinoid clothianidin adversely affects insect immunity and promotes replication of a viral pathogen in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Di Prisco, Gennaro; Cavaliere, Valeria; Annoscia, Desiderato; Varricchio, Paola; Caprio, Emilio; Nazzi, Francesco; Gargiulo, Giuseppe; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2013-11-12

    Large-scale losses of honey bee colonies represent a poorly understood problem of global importance. Both biotic and abiotic factors are involved in this phenomenon that is often associated with high loads of parasites and pathogens. A stronger impact of pathogens in honey bees exposed to neonicotinoid insecticides has been reported, but the causal link between insecticide exposure and the possible immune alteration of honey bees remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin negatively modulates NF-κB immune signaling in insects and adversely affects honey bee antiviral defenses controlled by this transcription factor. We have identified in insects a negative modulator of NF-κB activation, which is a leucine-rich repeat protein. Exposure to clothianidin, by enhancing the transcription of the gene encoding this inhibitor, reduces immune defenses and promotes the replication of the deformed wing virus in honey bees bearing covert infections. This honey bee immunosuppression is similarly induced by a different neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, but not by the organophosphate chlorpyriphos, which does not affect NF-κB signaling. The occurrence at sublethal doses of this insecticide-induced viral proliferation suggests that the studied neonicotinoids might have a negative effect at the field level. Our experiments uncover a further level of regulation of the immune response in insects and set the stage for studies on neural modulation of immunity in animals. Furthermore, this study has implications for the conservation of bees, as it will contribute to the definition of more appropriate guidelines for testing chronic or sublethal effects of pesticides used in agriculture. PMID:24145453

  15. The KEEPS-Cognitive and Affective Study: Baseline Associations between Vascular Risk Factors and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Wharton, Whitney; Gleason, Carey E.; Dowling, N. Maritza; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Brinton, Eliot A.; Santoro, M. Nanette; Neal-Perry, Genevieve; Taylor, Hugh; Naftolin, Frederick; Lobo, Rogerio; Merriam, George; Manson, JoAnn E.; Cedars, Marcelle; Miller, Virginia M.; Black, Dennis M.; Budoff, Matthew; Hodis, Howard N.; Harman, Mitchell; Asthana, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background Midlife vascular risk factors influence later cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The decrease in serum estradiol levels during menopause has been associated with cognitive impairment and increased vascular risk, such as high blood pressure (BP), which independently contribute to cognitive dysfunction and AD. Methods We describe the extent to which vascular risk factors relate to cognition in healthy, middle–aged, recently postmenopausal women enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Cognitive and Affective Study (KEEPS-Cog) at baseline. KEEPS-Cog is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group design, clinical trial, investigating the efficacy of low-dose, transdermal 17β-estradiol and oral conjugated equine estrogen on cognition. Results The KEEPS-Cog cohort (N=662) is healthy and free of cognitive dysfunction. Higher systolic BP was related to poorer performance in auditory working memory and attention (unadjusted p=0.004; adjusted p=0.10). This relationship was not associated with endogenous hormone levels. Conclusions Lower BP early in menopause may positively affect cognitive domains known to be associated with AD. PMID:24430001

  16. Probabilities of adverse weather affecting transport in Europe: climatology and scenarios up to the 2050s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajda, A.; Tuomenvirta, H.; Jokinen, P.; Luomaranta, A.; Makkonen, L.; Tikanmäki, M.; Groenemeijer, P.; Saarikivi, P.; Michaelides, S.; Papadakis, M.; Tymvios, F.; Athanasatos, S.

    2012-04-01

    This paper provides the first comprehensive climatology of the adverse and extreme weather events affecting the European transport system by estimating the frequency (or probability) of phenomena for the present climate (1971-2000) and an overview of the projected changes in some of these extremes in the future climate until the 2050s. The research was carried out within the framework of the EWENT Project that addresses the European Union (EU) policies and strategies related to climate change, with a particular focus on extreme weather impacts on the EU transportation system. This project is funded by the Seventh Framework Programme (Transports, call ID FPT7-TPT-2008-RTD-1). The analyzed phenomena are wind, snow, blizzards, heavy precipitation, cold spells and heat waves. In addition, reduced visibility conditions determined by fog and dust events, small-scale phenomena affecting the transport system, such as thunderstorms, lightning, large hail and tornadoes and events damaging infrastructure of the transport system, have been considered. Frequency and probability analysis of past and present ex¬tremes were performed using observational and atmospheric reanalysis data. Future changes in the probability of severe events were assessed based on six regional climate model simulations produced in the FP6 ENSEMBLES project (http://www.ensembles-eu.org/). To facilitate the assessment of impacts and consequences of extreme phenomena on a continental level, the WP2 Deliverable introduces a regionalization of the European extreme phenomena, defining the climate zones with similarities in extreme phenomena. The projected changes as well as large natural variability in weather extremes on the transportation network will have impacts of both signs. The decline of extreme cold and snowfall over most of the continent implies a positive impact on road, rail, inland water and air transportation, e.g., by reducing snow removal. However, even with a general decreasing trend in

  17. Effects of estradiol on uterine perfusion in anesthetized cyclic mares affected with uterine vascular elastosis.

    PubMed

    Esteller-Vico, A; Liu, I K M; Vaughan, B; Steffey, E P; Brosnan, R J

    2016-01-01

    Uterine vascular elastosis in mares is characterized by degeneration of uterine vasculature through thickening of the elastin layers. Factors commonly associated with this degeneration include age, parity, and chronic uterine endometritis. Affected mares have also been shown to exhibit decreases in uterine blood flow and perfusion of the uterus. Due to the increased thickness of the elastin layers, we hypothesize that vasodilatation of the uterine vasculature is also impaired. To test the functionality of these vessels, we evaluated the vasodilatory effects of estradiol on the uterine vascular bed in mares with normal vasculature and mares with severe elastosis. Both groups were tested in estrus and diestrus. Fluorescent microspheres were used to determine basal blood perfusion, followed by the intravenous administration of 1.0 μg/kg of 17β-estradiol. After 90 min, perfusion was measured once again to determine the vascular response to estradiol. Control mares in estrus displayed a significant increase in total uterine blood flow after the administration of estradiol when compared to baseline levels. No other group had a significant increase in total blood flow and perfusion after estradiol administration. The administration of estradiol in control mares induced regional increases in perfusion in the uterine horns and uterine body during estrus and only in the uterine horns during diestrus. Mares affected by elastosis exhibited no regional differences in perfusion levels post-estradiol administration. The difference in the vasodilatory response induced by estradiol between reproductively healthy mares and mares affected with elastosis indicates that the functionality of the affected vessels is compromised. PMID:26642749

  18. 41 CFR 102-78.40 - What responsibilities do Federal agencies have when an undertaking adversely affects a historic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... guidance on the protection of historic and cultural properties in 36 CFR part 800. ... Federal agencies have when an undertaking adversely affects a historic or cultural property? 102-78.40... (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 78-HISTORIC PRESERVATION Historic Preservation §...

  19. 25 CFR 900.244 - Will an Indian tribe or tribal organization's retrocession adversely affect funding available for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Will an Indian tribe or tribal organization's retrocession adversely affect funding available for the retroceded program? 900.244 Section 900.244 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, AND INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CONTRACTS UNDER THE...

  20. 50 CFR 402.45 - Alternative consultation on FIFRA actions that are not likely to adversely affect listed species...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED Counterpart Regulations Governing Actions by the U.S... that are not likely to adversely affect listed species or critical habitat. 402.45 Section...

  1. 50 CFR 402.45 - Alternative consultation on FIFRA actions that are not likely to adversely affect listed species...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED Counterpart Regulations Governing Actions by the U.S... that are not likely to adversely affect listed species or critical habitat. 402.45 Section...

  2. Exposure to serotonin adversely affects oligodendrocyte development and myelination in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lir-Wan; Bhatt, Abhay; Tien, Lu-Tai; Zheng, Baoying; Simpson, Kimberly L; Lin, Rick C S; Cai, Zhengwei; Kumar, Praveen; Pang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    patterns of contactin-associated protein (Caspr) clustering were observed at the sites of Node of Ranvier, suggesting that 5-HT exposure may affect other axon-derived factors for myelination. In summary, this is the first study to demonstrate that manipulation of serotonin levels affects OL development and myelination, which may contribute to altered neural connectivity noted in SSRIs-treated animals. The current in vitro study demonstrated that exposure to high level of serotonin (5-HT) led to aberrant oligodendrocyte (OL) development, cell injury, and myelination deficit. We propose that elevated extracellular serotonin levels in the fetal brain, such as upon the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy, may adversely affect OL development and/or myelination, thus contributing to altered neural connectivity seen in Autism Spectrum Disorders. OPC = oligodendrocyte progenitor cell. PMID:25382136

  3. Short-Term Exposure to Ozone Does Not Impair Vascular Function or Affect Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Barath, Stefan; Langrish, Jeremy P.; Blomberg, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution exposure is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, yet the role of individual pollutants remains unclear. In particular, there is uncertainty regarding the acute effect of ozone exposure on cardiovascular disease. In these studies, we aimed to determine the effect of ozone exposure on vascular function, fibrinolysis, and the autonomic regulation of the heart. Thirty-six healthy men were exposed to ozone (300 ppb) and filtered air for 75min on two occasions in randomized double-blind crossover studies. Bilateral forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured using forearm venous occlusion plethysmography before and during intra-arterial infusions of vasodilators 2–4 and 6–8h after each exposure. Heart rhythm and heart rate variability (HRV) were monitored during and 24h after exposure. Compared with filtered air, ozone exposure did not alter heart rate, blood pressure, or resting FBF at either 2 or 6h. There was a dose-dependent increase in FBF with all vasodilators that was similar after both exposures at 2–4h. Ozone exposure did not impair vasomotor or fibrinolytic function at 6–8h but rather increased vasodilatation to acetylcholine (p = .015) and sodium nitroprusside (p = .005). Ozone did not affect measures of HRV during or after the exposure. Our findings do not support a direct rapid effect of ozone on vascular function or cardiac autonomic control although we cannot exclude an effect of chronic exposure or an interaction between ozone and alternative air pollutants that may be responsible for the adverse cardiovascular health effects attributed to ozone. PMID:23872581

  4. Host tree phenology affects vascular epiphytes at the physiological, demographic and community level

    PubMed Central

    Einzmann, Helena J. R.; Beyschlag, Joachim; Hofhansl, Florian; Wanek, Wolfgang; Zotz, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The processes that govern diverse tropical plant communities have rarely been studied in life forms other than trees. Structurally dependent vascular epiphytes, a major part of tropical biodiversity, grow in a three-dimensional matrix defined by their hosts, but trees differ in their architecture, bark structure/chemistry and leaf phenology. We hypothesized that the resulting seasonal differences in microclimatic conditions in evergreen vs. deciduous trees would affect epiphytes at different levels, from organ physiology to community structure. We studied the influence of tree leaf phenology on vascular epiphytes on the Island of Barro Colorado, Panama. Five tree species were selected, which were deciduous, semi-deciduous or evergreen. The crowns of drought-deciduous trees, characterized by sunnier and drier microclimates, hosted fewer individuals and less diverse epiphyte assemblages. Differences were also observed at a functional level, e.g. epiphyte assemblages in deciduous trees had larger proportions of Crassulacean acid metabolism species and individuals. At the population level a drier microclimate was associated with lower individual growth and survival in a xerophytic fern. Some species also showed, as expected, lower specific leaf area and higher δ13C values when growing in deciduous trees compared with evergreen trees. As hypothesized, host tree leaf phenology influences vascular epiphytes at different levels. Our results suggest a cascading effect of tree composition and associated differences in tree phenology on the diversity and functioning of epiphyte communities in tropical lowland forests. PMID:25392188

  5. Dietary blueberry supplementation affects growth but not vascularization of neural transplants

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Lauren M; Small, Brent J; Bickford, Paula C; Umphlet, Claudia D; Moore, Alfred B; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte E

    2009-01-01

    Transplantation of neural tissue has been attempted as a treatment method for neurodegenerative disorders. Grafted neurons survive to a lesser extent into middle-aged or aged hosts, and survival rates of < 10% of grafted neurons is common. Antioxidant diets, such as blueberry, can exert powerful effects on developing neurons and blood vessels in vitro, but studies are lacking that examine the effects of these diets on transplanted tissues. In this study, we examined the effects of a blueberry diet on survival, growth, and vascularization of fetal hippocampal tissue to the anterior chamber of the eye of young or middle-aged female rats. Previous work from our group showed significant increase in neuronal survival and development with blueberry diet in grafts. However, the effects of antioxidant diet on vascular development in grafts have not been explored previously. The age of the host affected individual vessel morphology in that aged hosts contained grafts with thick, undeveloped walls, and wider lumen. The blood–brain barrier also appeared to be affected by the age of the host. The blueberry diet did not affect vessel morphology or density of vessel-associated protein markers but gave rise to significantly increased growth capacity, cytoarchitecture, and the final size of hippocampal grafts. PMID:18285804

  6. Correlation of adverse effects of cisplatin administration in patients affected by solid tumours: A retrospective evaluation

    PubMed Central

    ASTOLFI, LAURA; GHISELLI, SARA; GUARAN, VALERIA; CHICCA, MILVIA; SIMONI, EDI; OLIVETTO, ELENA; LELLI, GIORGIO; MARTINI, ALESSANDRO

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is the most common antineoplastic drug used for the therapy of solid tumours. To date, researchers have focused on the dosage to be administered for each specific tumour, mainly considering the local adverse effects. The aim of this study was to correlate the severity of the adverse effects with: i) the dosage of cisplatin; ii) the specific site of the tumour; iii) the association with other drugs; and iv) the symptoms. We analysed data from 123 patients with 11 different tumour classes undergoing therapy from 2007 to 2008 at St. Anna Hospital (Ferrara, Italy), using the Spearman non-parametric correlation index. Even though significant correlations were found among the variables, the overall results showed that the main factor influencing the severity of the adverse effects was the dosage of cisplatin administered. PMID:23404427

  7. Severe Affective and Behavioural Dysregulation Is Associated with Significant Psychosocial Adversity and Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jucksch, Viola; Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Lenz, Klaus; Goth, Kirstin; Dopfner, Manfred; Poustka, Fritz; Freitag, Christine M.; Lehmkuhl, Gerd; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Holtmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recently, a highly heritable behavioral phenotype of simultaneous deviance on the Anxious/Depressed, Attention Problems, and Aggressive Behavior syndrome scales has been identified on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL-Dysregulation Profile, CBCL-DP). This study aims to investigate psychosocial adversity and impairment of the CBCL-DP.…

  8. Development affects in vitro vascular tone and calcium sensitivity in ovine cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Greg G; Osol, George J; Longo, Lawrence D

    2004-01-01

    We have shown recently that development from neonatal to adult life affects cerebrovascular tone of mouse cerebral arteries through endothelium-derived vasodilatory mechanisms. The current study tested the hypothesis that development from fetal to adult life affects cerebral artery vascular smooth muscle (VSM) [Ca2+]i sensitivity and tone through a mechanism partially dependent upon endothelium-dependent signalling. In pressurized resistance sized cerebral arteries (∼150 μm) from preterm (95 ± 2 days gestation (95 d)) and near-term (140 ± 2 days gestation (140 d)) fetuses, and non-pregnant adults, we measured vascular diameter (μm) and [Ca2+]i (nm) as a function of intravascular pressure. We repeated these studies in the presence of inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS; with l-NAME), cyclo-oxygenase (COX; with indomethacin) and endothelium removal (E–). Cerebrovasculature tone (E+) was greater in arteries from 95 d fetuses and adults compared to 140 d sheep. Ca2+ sensitivity was similar in 95 d fetuses and adults, but much lower in 140 d fetuses. Removal of endothelium resulted in a reduction in lumen diameter as a function of pressure (greater tone) in all treatment groups. [Ca2+]i sensitivity differences among groups were magnified after E–. NOS inhibition decreased diameter as a function of pressure in each age group, with a significant increase in [Ca2+]i to pressure ratio only in the 140 d fetuses. Indomethacin increased tone and increased [Ca2+]i in the 140 d fetuses, but not the other age groups. Development from near-term to adulthood uncovered an interaction between NOS- and COX-sensitive substances that functioned to modulate artery diameter but not [Ca2+]i. This study suggests that development is associated with significant alterations in cerebral vascular smooth muscle (VSM), endothelium, NOS and COX responses to intravascular pressure. We speculate that these changes have important implications in the regulation of cerebral blood flow in

  9. Composition of PM Affects Acute Vascular Inflammatory and Coagulative Markers - The RAPTES Project

    PubMed Central

    Strak, Maciej; Hoek, Gerard; Godri, Krystal J.; Gosens, Ilse; Mudway, Ian S.; van Oerle, René; Spronk, Henri M. H.; Cassee, Flemming R.; Lebret, Erik; Kelly, Frank J.; Harrison, Roy M.; Brunekreef, Bert; Steenhof, Maaike; Janssen, Nicole A. H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) has been associated with adverse cardiovascular effects in epidemiological studies. Current knowledge of independent effects of individual PM characteristics remains limited. Methods Using a semi-experimental design we investigated which PM characteristics were consistently associated with blood biomarkers believed to be predictive of the risk of cardiovascular events. We exposed healthy adult volunteers at 5 different locations chosen to provide PM exposure contrasts with reduced correlations among PM characteristics. Each of the 31 volunteers was exposed for 5 h, exercising intermittently, 3–7 times at different sites from March to October 2009. Extensive on-site exposure characterization included measurements of PM mass and number concentration, elemental- (EC) and organic carbon (OC), trace metals, sulfate, nitrate, and PM oxidative potential (OP). Before and 2 h and 18 h after exposure we measured acute vascular blood biomarkers - C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, platelet counts, von Willebrand Factor, and tissue plasminogen activator/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 complex. We used two-pollutant models to assess which PM characteristics were most consistently associated with the measured biomarkers. Results and Conclusion We found OC, nitrate and sulfate to be most consistently associated with different biomarkers of acute cardiovascular risk. Associations with PM mass concentrations and OP were less consistent, whereas other measured components of the air pollution mixture, including PNC, EC, trace metals and NO2, were not associated with the biomarkers after adjusting for other pollutants. PMID:23516583

  10. 30 CFR 285.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 285.816 Section 285.816 Mineral Resources..., pipeline, or facility? If environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or...

  11. Does Maternal Prenatal Stress Adversely Affect the Child's Learning and Memory at Age Six?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutteling, Barbara M.; de Weerth, Carolina; Zandbelt, Noortje; Mulder, Eduard J. H.; Visser, Gerard H. A.; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2006-01-01

    Prenatal maternal stress has been shown to affect postnatal development in animals and humans. In animals, the morphology and function of the offspring's hippocampus is negatively affected by prenatal maternal stress. The present study prospectively investigated the influence of prenatal maternal stress on learning and memory of 112 children (50…

  12. Can aircraft noise less than or equal 115 to dBA adversely affect reproductive outcome in USAF women?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brubaker, P. A.

    1985-06-01

    It has been suggested, mainly through animal studies, that exposure to high noise levels may be associated with lower birth weight, reduced gestational length and other adverse reproductive outcomes. Few studies have been done on humans to show this association. The Air Force employs pregnant women in areas where there is a high potential for exposure to high noise levels. This study proposes a method to determine if there is an association between high frequency noise levels or = 115 dBA and adverse reproductive outcomes through a review of records and self-administered questionnaires in a case-comparison design. Prevelance rates will be calculated and a multiple logistic regression analysis computed for the independent variables that can affect reproduction.

  13. Adverse childhood experiences associate to reduced glutamate levels in the hippocampus of patients affected by mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Sara; Locatelli, Clara; Falini, Andrea; Colombo, Cristina; Benedetti, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) can possibly permanently alter the stress response system, affect the glutamatergic system and influence hippocampal volume in mood disorders. The aim of the study is to investigate the association between glutamate levels in the hippocampus, measured through single proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), and ACE in patients affected by mood disorders and healthy controls. Higher levels of early stress associate to reduced levels of Glx/Cr in the hippocampus in depressed patients but not in healthy controls. Exposure to stress during early life could lead to a hypofunctionality of the glutamatergic system in the hippocampus of depressed patients. Abnormalities of glutamatergic signaling could then possibly underpin the structural and functional abnormalities observed in patients affected by mood disorders. PMID:27449360

  14. Elevated depressive affect is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes among African Americans with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Michael J.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Wang, Xuelei; Brooks, Deborah H.; Charleston, Jeanne; Dowie, Donna; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Cooper, Lisa A.; Bruce, Marino A.; Kusek, John W.; Norris, Keith C.; Lash, James P.

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the impact of elevated depressive affect on health outcomes among participants with hypertensive chronic kidney disease in the African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) Cohort Study. Elevated depressive affect was defined by Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) thresholds of 11 or more, above 14, and by 5-Unit increments in the score. Cox regression analyses were used to relate cardiovascular death/hospitalization, doubling of serum creatinine/end-stage renal disease, overall hospitalization, and all-cause death to depressive affect evaluated at baseline, the most recent annual visit (time-varying), or average from baseline to the most recent visit (cumulative). Among 628 participants at baseline, 42% had BDI-II scores of 11 or more and 26% had a score above 14. During a 5-year follow-up, the cumulative incidence of cardiovascular death/hospitalization was significantly greater for participants with baseline BDI-II scores of 11 or more compared with those with scores <11. The baseline, time-varying, and cumulative elevated depressive affect were each associated with a significant higher risk of cardiovascular death/hospitalization, especially with a time-varying BDI-II score over 14 (adjusted HR 1.63) but not with the other outcomes. Thus, elevated depressive affect is associated with unfavorable cardiovascular outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease. PMID:21633409

  15. Water pollution by Cu and Pb can adversely affect mallard embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Kertész, Virág; Bakonyi, Gábor; Farkas, Beáta

    2006-09-01

    The effects of heavy metal pollutants on aquatic birds have been widely studied in ecotoxicological investigations; however, the predominant focus has been on the postnatal period of life. Limited information on the adverse effects of metals to bird eggs is available. The possible toxic effects of lead and copper were studied in mallard eggs. After the accidental severe heavy metal pollution of the Tisa river (Hungary) in March 2000, these metals were detected in the highest concentration in both the water and the sediment, reaching far beyond acceptable concentrations. Pb treatment (2.9 mg/L) significantly increased the rate of mortality after a single immersion of the eggs into polluted water for 30 min. The rate of dead embryos significantly increased after the combined exposure to Cu and Pb (0.86 and 2.9 mg/L, respectively) both in the single- (once for 30 min) and in the multiple- (10s daily during first trimester of incubation) immersion groups. It was concluded that elevated metal concentrations similar to those found in the Tisa river after the tailing dam failure may cause toxic effects (mortality and teratogenicity) upon exposure of mallard eggs. PMID:16678261

  16. Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 affects cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis and adverse cardiac remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Medzikovic, Lejla; Schumacher, Cees A.; Verkerk, Arie O.; van Deel, Elza D.; Wolswinkel, Rianne; van der Made, Ingeborg; Bleeker, Natascha; Cakici, Daniella; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M. G.; Meggouh, Farid; Creemers, Esther E.; Ann Remme, Carol; Baartscheer, Antonius; de Winter, Robbert J.; de Vries, Carlie J. M.; Arkenbout, E. Karin; de Waard, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    Distinct stressors may induce heart failure. As compensation, β-adrenergic stimulation enhances myocardial contractility by elevating cardiomyocyte intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). However, chronic β-adrenergic stimulation promotes adverse cardiac remodelling. Cardiac expression of nuclear receptor Nur77 is enhanced by β-adrenergic stimulation, but its role in cardiac remodelling is still unclear. We show high and rapid Nur77 upregulation in cardiomyocytes stimulated with β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Nur77 knockdown in culture resulted in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. Ventricular cardiomyocytes from Nur77-deficient (Nur77-KO) mice exhibited elevated diastolic and systolic [Ca2+]i and prolonged action potentials compared to wild type (WT). In vivo, these differences resulted in larger cardiomyocytes, increased expression of hypertrophic genes, and more cardiac fibrosis in Nur77-KO mice upon chronic isoproterenol stimulation. In line with the observed elevated [Ca2+]i, Ca2+-activated phosphatase calcineurin was more active in Nur77-KO mice compared to WT. In contrast, after cardiac pressure overload by aortic constriction, Nur77-KO mice exhibited attenuated remodelling compared to WT. Concluding, Nur77-deficiency results in significantly altered cardiac Ca2+ homeostasis and distinct remodelling outcome depending on the type of insult. Detailed knowledge on the role of Nur77 in maintaining cardiomyocyte Ca2+ homeostasis and the dual role Nur77 plays in cardiac remodelling will aid in developing personalized therapies against heart failure. PMID:26486271

  17. Coralline algal physiology is more adversely affected by elevated temperature than reduced pH.

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Elizondo, Román Manuel; Enríquez, Susana

    2016-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the physiological responses of coralline algae to ocean acidification (OA) and global warming, by exposing algal thalli of three species with contrasting photobiology and growth-form to reduced pH and elevated temperature. The analysis aimed to discern between direct and combined effects, while elucidating the role of light and photosynthesis inhibition in this response. We demonstrate the high sensitivity of coralline algae to photodamage under elevated temperature and its severe consequences on thallus photosynthesis and calcification rates. Moderate levels of light-stress, however, were maintained under reduced pH, resulting in no impact on algal photosynthesis, although moderate adverse effects on calcification rates were still observed. Accordingly, our results support the conclusion that global warming is a stronger threat to algal performance than OA, in particular in highly illuminated habitats such as coral reefs. We provide in this study a quantitative physiological model for the estimation of the impact of thermal-stress on coralline carbonate production, useful to foresee the impact of global warming on coralline contribution to reef carbon budgets, reef cementation, coral recruitment and the maintenance of reef biodiversity. This model, however, cannot yet account for the moderate physiological impact of low pH on coralline calcification. PMID:26740396

  18. Coralline algal physiology is more adversely affected by elevated temperature than reduced pH

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez-Elizondo, Román Manuel; Enríquez, Susana

    2016-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the physiological responses of coralline algae to ocean acidification (OA) and global warming, by exposing algal thalli of three species with contrasting photobiology and growth-form to reduced pH and elevated temperature. The analysis aimed to discern between direct and combined effects, while elucidating the role of light and photosynthesis inhibition in this response. We demonstrate the high sensitivity of coralline algae to photodamage under elevated temperature and its severe consequences on thallus photosynthesis and calcification rates. Moderate levels of light-stress, however, were maintained under reduced pH, resulting in no impact on algal photosynthesis, although moderate adverse effects on calcification rates were still observed. Accordingly, our results support the conclusion that global warming is a stronger threat to algal performance than OA, in particular in highly illuminated habitats such as coral reefs. We provide in this study a quantitative physiological model for the estimation of the impact of thermal-stress on coralline carbonate production, useful to foresee the impact of global warming on coralline contribution to reef carbon budgets, reef cementation, coral recruitment and the maintenance of reef biodiversity. This model, however, cannot yet account for the moderate physiological impact of low pH on coralline calcification. PMID:26740396

  19. Weight Reduction in Athletes May Adversely Affect the Phagocytic Function of Monocytes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kono, Ichiro; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Study of the monocyte phagocytic function in nine competitive athletes before and after a two-week weight reduction (through calorie restriction) program revealed that their pre-program phagocytic activity was higher than in sedentary controls but decreased significantly after the program. This suggests calorie restriction may affect the human…

  20. Characterization of vascular lesions in pigs affected by porcine circovirus type 2-systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Resendes, A R; Segalés, J

    2015-05-01

    Vascular lesions and their association with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) were evaluated in multiple organs from 10 pigs affected with PCV2-systemic disease (PCV2-SD). Animals had vascular lesions in multiple organs, consisting of lymphohistiocytic lymphangitis and/or phlebitis, mild to severe necrotizing arteritis, and thrombosis within splenic arterioles and choroid plexus capillaries. Variable amounts of PCV2 nucleic acid detected by in situ hybridization were present within endothelial cells, tunica media myocytes, and perivascular and/or intralesional inflammatory cell infiltrates. PCV2 nucleic acid was detected within endothelial cells of both lymphatic and blood vessels without lesions in the associated tissues. Necrotizing arteritis was principally present in lymph nodes and kidney and consisted of degeneration, necrosis, and pyknosis of myocytes, often with intracytoplasmic, brightly eosinophilic inclusion bodies that were strongly positive for PCV2 nucleic acid. Segmental or circumferential fibrinoid necrosis was mainly present in vessels of the lymph node, spleen, and choroid plexus and was variably associated with PCV2 nucleic acid. Severe lymphangitis associated with strong intralesional PCV2 labeling was frequently detected within the mesenteric and mediastinal lymph nodes and the lamina propria of the ileum. In most tissues, medium and large lymphatics and/or veins often had disruption of the intima and mild mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltration that was variably associated with PCV2 nucleic acid. The present study indicates that vasculitis is a frequent finding in natural cases of PCV2-SD and that PCV2 may have a direct cytopathic effect on tunica media myocytes of small- and medium-sized arteries as well as endothelium. PMID:24963088

  1. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... corrective action to BOEM within 30 days of the discovery of the adverse effect. (b) Take remedial action...

  2. 30 CFR 285.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 285.816 Section 285.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU...: (a) Submit a plan of corrective action to MMS within 30 days of the discovery of the adverse...

  3. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... corrective action to BOEM within 30 days of the discovery of the adverse effect. (b) Take remedial action...

  4. 30 CFR 585.816 - What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must I do if environmental or other conditions adversely affect a cable, pipeline, or facility? 585.816 Section 585.816 Mineral Resources BUREAU... corrective action to BOEM within 30 days of the discovery of the adverse effect. (b) Take remedial action...

  5. Chronic hypoxia in pregnancy affected vascular tone of renal interlobar arteries in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiaqi; Zhu, Zhoufeng; Xia, Shuixiu; Li, Na; Chen, Ningjing; Gao, Qinqin; Li, Lingjun; Zhou, Xiuwen; Li, Dawei; Zhu, Xiaolin; Tu, Qing; Li, Weisheng; Wu, Chonglong; Li, Jiayue; Zhong, Yuan; Li, Xiang; Mao, Caiping; Xu, Zhice

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia during pregnancy could affect development of fetuses as well as cardiovascular systems in the offspring. This study was the first to demonstrate the influence and related mechanisms of prenatal hypoxia (PH) on renal interlobar arteries (RIA) in the 5-month-old male rat offspring. Following chronic hypoxia during pregnancy, phenylephrine induced significantly higher pressor responses and greater vasoconstrictions in the offspring. Nitric oxide mediated vessel relaxation was altered in the RIA. Phenylephrine-stimulated free intracellular calcium was significantly higher in the RIA of the PH group. The activity and expression of L-type calcium channel (Cav1.2), not T-type calcium channel (Cav3.2), was up-regulated. The whole-cell currents of calcium channels and the currents of Cav1.2 were increased compared with the control. In addition, the whole-cell K(+) currents were decreased in the offspring exposed to prenatal hypoxia. Activity of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels and the expression of MaxiKα was decreased in the PH group. The results provide new information regarding the influence of prenatal hypoxia on the development of the renal vascular system, and possible underlying cellular and ion channel mechanisms involved. PMID:25983078

  6. Depressing Antidepressant: Fluoxetine Affects Serotonin Neurons Causing Adverse Reproductive Responses in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Campos, Bruno; Rivetti, Claudia; Kress, Timm; Barata, Carlos; Dircksen, Heinrich

    2016-06-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used antidepressants. As endocrine disruptive contaminants in the environment, SSRIs affect reproduction in aquatic organisms. In the water flea Daphnia magna, SSRIs increase offspring production in a food ration-dependent manner. At limiting food conditions, females exposed to SSRIs produce more but smaller offspring, which is a maladaptive life-history strategy. We asked whether increased serotonin levels in newly identified serotonin-neurons in the Daphnia brain mediate these effects. We provide strong evidence that exogenous SSRI fluoxetine selectively increases serotonin-immunoreactivity in identified brain neurons under limiting food conditions thereby leading to maladaptive offspring production. Fluoxetine increases serotonin-immunoreactivity at low food conditions to similar maximal levels as observed under high food conditions and concomitantly enhances offspring production. Sublethal amounts of the neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine known to specifically ablate serotonin-neurons markedly decrease serotonin-immunoreactivity and offspring production, strongly supporting the effect to be serotonin-specific by reversing the reproductive phenotype attained under fluoxetine. Thus, SSRIs impair serotonin-regulation of reproductive investment in a planktonic key organism causing inappropriately increased reproduction with potentially severe ecological impact. PMID:27128505

  7. Combining S-cone and luminance signals adversely affects discrimination of objects within backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Ben J.; Tsattalios, Konstantinos; Chakravarthi, Ramakrishna; Martinovic, Jasna

    2016-01-01

    The visual system processes objects embedded in complex scenes that vary in both luminance and colour. In such scenes, colour contributes to the segmentation of objects from backgrounds, but does it also affect perceptual organisation of object contours which are already defined by luminance signals, or are these processes unaffected by colour’s presence? We investigated if luminance and chromatic signals comparably sustain processing of objects embedded in backgrounds, by varying contrast along the luminance dimension and along the two cone-opponent colour directions. In the first experiment thresholds for object/non-object discrimination of Gaborised shapes were obtained in the presence and absence of background clutter. Contrast of the component Gabors was modulated along single colour/luminance dimensions or co-modulated along multiple dimensions simultaneously. Background clutter elevated discrimination thresholds only for combined S-(L + M) and L + M signals. The second experiment replicated and extended this finding by demonstrating that the effect was dependent on the presence of relatively high S-(L + M) contrast. These results indicate that S-(L + M) signals impair spatial vision when combined with luminance. Since S-(L + M) signals are characterised by relatively large receptive fields, this is likely to be due to an increase in the size of the integration field over which contour-defining information is summed. PMID:26856308

  8. Nutrient supplementation may adversely affect maternal oral health--a randomised controlled trial in rural Malawi.

    PubMed

    Harjunmaa, Ulla; Järnstedt, Jorma; Dewey, Kathryn G; Ashorn, Ulla; Maleta, Kenneth; Vosti, Stephen A; Ashorn, Per

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional supplementation during pregnancy is increasingly recommended especially in low-resource settings, but its oral health impacts have not been studied. Our aim was to examine whether supplementation with multiple micronutrients (MMN) or small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements affects dental caries development or periodontal health in a rural Malawian population. The study was embedded in a controlled iLiNS-DYAD trial that enrolled 1391 pregnant women <20 gestation weeks. Women were provided with one daily iron-folic acid capsule (IFA), one capsule with 18 micronutrients (MMN) or one sachet of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) containing protein, carbohydrates, essential fatty acids and 21 micronutrients. Oral examination of 1024 participants was conducted and panoramic X-ray taken within 6 weeks after delivery. The supplement groups were similar at baseline in average socio-economic, nutritional and health status. At the end of the intervention, the prevalence of caries was 56.7%, 69.1% and 63.3% (P = 0.004), and periodontitis 34.9%, 29.8% and 31.2% (P = 0.338) in the IFA, MMN and LNS groups, respectively. Compared with the IFA group, women in the MMN group had 0.60 (0.18-1.02) and in the LNS group 0.59 (0.17-1.01) higher mean number of caries lesions. In the absence of baseline oral health data, firm conclusions on causality cannot be drawn. However, although not confirmatory, the findings are consistent with a possibility that provision of MMN or LNS may have increased the caries incidence in this target population. Because of the potential public health impacts, further research on the association between gestational nutrient interventions and oral health in low-income settings is needed. PMID:26194850

  9. Obesity/hyperleptinemic phenotype adversely affects hippocampal plasticity: effects of dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Claudia A; Piroli, Gerardo G; Evans, Ashlie N; Macht, Victoria A; Wilson, Steven P; Scott, Karen A; Sakai, Randall R; Mott, David D; Reagan, Lawrence P

    2011-08-01

    Epidemiological studies estimate that greater than 60% of the adult US population may be categorized as either overweight or obese and there is a growing appreciation that obesity affects the functional integrity of the central nervous system (CNS). We recently developed a lentivirus (LV) vector that produces an insulin receptor (IR) antisense RNA sequence (IRAS) that when injected into the hypothalamus selectively decreases IR signaling in hypothalamus, resulting in increased body weight, peripheral adiposity and plasma leptin levels. To test the hypothesis that this obesity/hyperleptinemic phenotype would impair hippocampal synaptic transmission, we examined short term potentiation (STP) and long term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus of rats that received the LV-IRAS construct or the LV-Control construct in the hypothalamus (hypo-IRAS and hypo-Con, respectively). Stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals elicits STP that develops into LTP in the CA1 region of hypo-Con rats; conversely, hypo-IRAS rats exhibit STP that fails to develop into LTP. To more closely examine the potential role of hyperleptinemia in these electrophysiological deficits, hypo-IRAS were subjected to mild food restriction paradigms that would either: 1) prevent the development of the obesity phenotype; or 2) reverse an established obesity phenotype in hypo-IRAS rats. Both of these paradigms restored LTP in the CA1 region and reversed the decreases in the phosphorylated/total ratio of GluA1 Ser845 AMPA receptor subunit expression observed in the hippocampus of hypo-IRAS rats. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that obesity impairs hippocampal synaptic transmission and support the hypothesis that these deficits are mediated through the impairment of hippocampal leptin activity. PMID:21036186

  10. Pre-Analytical Parameters Affecting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Measurement in Plasma: Identifying Confounders

    PubMed Central

    Walz, Johanna M.; Boehringer, Daniel; Deissler, Heidrun L.; Faerber, Lothar; Goepfert, Jens C.; Heiduschka, Peter; Kleeberger, Susannah M.; Klettner, Alexa; Krohne, Tim U.; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Ziemssen, Focke; Stahl, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is intensively investigated in various medical fields. However, comparing VEGF-A measurements is difficult because sample acquisition and pre-analytic procedures differ between studies. We therefore investigated which variables act as confounders of VEGF-A measurements. Methods Following a standardized protocol, blood was taken at three clinical sites from six healthy participants (one male and one female participant at each center) twice one week apart. The following pre-analytical parameters were varied in order to analyze their impact on VEGF-A measurements: analyzing center, anticoagulant (EDTA vs. PECT / CTAD), cannula (butterfly vs. neonatal), type of centrifuge (swing-out vs. fixed-angle), time before and after centrifugation, filling level (completely filled vs. half-filled tubes) and analyzing method (ELISA vs. multiplex bead array). Additionally, intrapersonal variations over time and sex differences were explored. Statistical analysis was performed using a linear regression model. Results The following parameters were identified as statistically significant independent confounders of VEGF-A measurements: analyzing center, anticoagulant, centrifuge, analyzing method and sex of the proband. The following parameters were no significant confounders in our data set: intrapersonal variation over one week, cannula, time before and after centrifugation and filling level of collection tubes. Conclusion VEGF-A measurement results can be affected significantly by the identified pre-analytical parameters. We recommend the use of CTAD anticoagulant, a standardized type of centrifuge and one central laboratory using the same analyzing method for all samples. PMID:26730574

  11. Cybersickness provoked by head-mounted display affects cutaneous vascular tone, heart rate and reaction time.

    PubMed

    Nalivaiko, Eugene; Davis, Simon L; Blackmore, Karen L; Vakulin, Andrew; Nesbitt, Keith V

    2015-11-01

    Evidence from studies of provocative motion indicates that motion sickness is tightly linked to the disturbances of thermoregulation. The major aim of the current study was to determine whether provocative visual stimuli (immersion into the virtual reality simulating rides on a rollercoaster) affect skin temperature that reflects thermoregulatory cutaneous responses, and to test whether such stimuli alter cognitive functions. In 26 healthy young volunteers wearing head-mounted display (Oculus Rift), simulated rides consistently provoked vection and nausea, with a significant difference between the two versions of simulation software (Parrot Coaster and Helix). Basal finger temperature had bimodal distribution, with low-temperature group (n=8) having values of 23-29 °C, and high-temperature group (n=18) having values of 32-36 °C. Effects of cybersickness on finger temperature depended on the basal level of this variable: in subjects from former group it raised by 3-4 °C, while in most subjects from the latter group it either did not change or transiently reduced by 1.5-2 °C. There was no correlation between the magnitude of changes in the finger temperature and nausea score at the end of simulated ride. Provocative visual stimulation caused prolongation of simple reaction time by 20-50 ms; this increase closely correlated with the subjective rating of nausea. Lastly, in subjects who experienced pronounced nausea, heart rate was elevated. We conclude that cybersickness is associated with changes in cutaneous thermoregulatory vascular tone; this further supports the idea of a tight link between motion sickness and thermoregulation. Cybersickness-induced prolongation of reaction time raises obvious concerns regarding the safety of this technology. PMID:26340855

  12. Urine Injury Biomarkers and Risk of Adverse Outcomes in Recipients of Prevalent Kidney Transplants: The Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation Trial.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Nisha; Carpenter, Myra A; Weiner, Daniel E; Levey, Andrew S; Pfeffer, Marc; Kusek, John W; Cai, Jianwen; Hunsicker, Lawrence G; Park, Meyeon; Bennett, Michael; Liu, Kathleen D; Hsu, Chi-Yuan

    2016-07-01

    Recipients of kidney transplants (KTR) are at increased risk for cardiovascular events, graft failure, and death. It is unknown whether urine kidney injury biomarkers are associated with poor outcomes among KTRs. We conducted a post hoc analysis of the Folic Acid for Vascular Outcome Reduction in Transplantation (FAVORIT) Trial using a case-cohort study design, selecting participants with adjudicated cardiovascular events, graft failure, or death. Urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), IL-18, and liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) were measured in spot urine samples and standardized to urine creatinine concentration. We adjusted for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, eGFR, and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Patients had 291 cardiovascular events, 257 graft failure events, and 359 deaths. Each log increase in urine NGAL/creatinine independently associated with a 24% greater risk of cardiovascular events (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.24; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.06 to 1.45), a 40% greater risk of graft failure (aHR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.16 to 1.68), and a 44% greater risk of death (aHR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.26 to 1.65). Urine KIM-1/creatinine and IL-18/creatinine independently associated with greater risk of death (aHR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.61 and aHR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.49 per log increase, respectively) but not with risk of cardiovascular events or graft failure. Urine L-FABP did not associate with any study outcomes. In conclusion, among prevalent KTRs, higher urine NGAL, KIM-1, and IL-18 levels independently and differentially associated with greater risk of adverse outcomes. PMID:26538631

  13. The Cultivation of Bt Corn Producing Cry1Ac Toxins Does Not Adversely Affect Non-Target Arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanyan; Feng, Yanjie; Ge, Yang; Tetreau, Guillaume; Chen, Xiaowen; Dong, Xuehui; Shi, Wangpeng

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic corn producing Cry1Ac toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) provides effective control of Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée), and thus reduces insecticide applications. However, whether Bt corn exerts undesirable effects on non-target arthropods (NTAs) is still controversial. We conducted a 2-yr study in Shangzhuang Agricultural Experiment Station to assess the potential impact of Bt corn on field population density, biodiversity, community composition and structure of NTAs. On each sampling date, the total abundance, Shannon's diversity index, Pielou's evenness index and Simpson's diversity index were not significantly affected by Bt corn as compared to non-Bt corn. The “sampling dates” had a significant effect on these indices, but no clear tendencies related to “Bt corn” or “sampling dates X corn variety” interaction were recorded. Principal response curve analysis of variance indicated that Bt corn did not alter the distribution of NTAs communities. Bray-Curtis dissimilarity and distance analysis showed that Cry1Ac toxin exposure did not increase community dissimilarities between Bt and non-Bt corn plots and that the evolution of non-target arthropod community was similar on the two corn varieties. The cultivation of Bt corn failed to show any detrimental evidence on the density of non-target herbivores, predators and parasitoids. The composition of herbivores, predators and parasitoids was identical in Bt and non-Bt corn plots. Taken together, results from the present work support that Bt corn producing Cry1Ac toxins does not adversely affect NTAs. PMID:25437213

  14. Increased Fracture Collapse after Intertrochanteric Fractures Treated by the Dynamic Hip Screw Adversely Affects Walking Ability but Not Survival

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Christian; Gudushauri, Paata; Wong, Tak-Man; Lau, Tak-Wing; Pun, Terence; Leung, Frankie

    2016-01-01

    In osteoporotic hip fractures, fracture collapse is deliberately allowed by commonly used implants to improve dynamic contact and healing. The muscle lever arm is, however, compromised by shortening. We evaluated a cohort of 361 patients with AO/OTA 31.A1 or 31.A2 intertrochanteric fracture treated by the dynamic hip screw (DHS) who had a minimal follow-up of 3 months and an average follow-up of 14.6 months and long term survival data. The amount of fracture collapse and shortening due to sliding of the DHS was determined at the latest follow-up and graded as minimal (<1 cm), moderate (1-2 cm), or severe (>2 cm). With increased severity of collapse, more patients were unable to maintain their premorbid walking function (minimal collapse = 34.2%, moderate = 33.3%, severe = 62.8%, and p = 0.028). Based on ordinal regression of risk factors, increased fracture collapse was significantly and independently related to increasing age (p = 0.037), female sex (p = 0.024), A2 fracture class (p = 0.010), increased operative duration (p = 0.011), poor reduction quality (p = 0.000), and suboptimal tip-apex distance of >25 mm (p = 0.050). Patients who had better outcome in terms of walking function were independently predicted by younger age (p = 0.036), higher MMSE marks (p = 0.000), higher MBI marks (p = 0.010), better premorbid walking status (p = 0.000), less fracture collapse (p = 0.011), and optimal lag screw position in centre-centre or centre-inferior position (p = 0.020). According to Kaplan-Meier analysis, fracture collapse had no association with mortality from 2.4 to 7.6 years after surgery. In conclusion, increased fracture collapse after fixation of geriatric intertrochanteric fractures adversely affected walking but not survival. PMID:26955637

  15. Increased Fracture Collapse after Intertrochanteric Fractures Treated by the Dynamic Hip Screw Adversely Affects Walking Ability but Not Survival.

    PubMed

    Fang, Christian; Gudushauri, Paata; Wong, Tak-Man; Lau, Tak-Wing; Pun, Terence; Leung, Frankie

    2016-01-01

    In osteoporotic hip fractures, fracture collapse is deliberately allowed by commonly used implants to improve dynamic contact and healing. The muscle lever arm is, however, compromised by shortening. We evaluated a cohort of 361 patients with AO/OTA 31.A1 or 31.A2 intertrochanteric fracture treated by the dynamic hip screw (DHS) who had a minimal follow-up of 3 months and an average follow-up of 14.6 months and long term survival data. The amount of fracture collapse and shortening due to sliding of the DHS was determined at the latest follow-up and graded as minimal (<1 cm), moderate (1-2 cm), or severe (>2 cm). With increased severity of collapse, more patients were unable to maintain their premorbid walking function (minimal collapse = 34.2%, moderate = 33.3%, severe = 62.8%, and p = 0.028). Based on ordinal regression of risk factors, increased fracture collapse was significantly and independently related to increasing age (p = 0.037), female sex (p = 0.024), A2 fracture class (p = 0.010), increased operative duration (p = 0.011), poor reduction quality (p = 0.000), and suboptimal tip-apex distance of >25 mm (p = 0.050). Patients who had better outcome in terms of walking function were independently predicted by younger age (p = 0.036), higher MMSE marks (p = 0.000), higher MBI marks (p = 0.010), better premorbid walking status (p = 0.000), less fracture collapse (p = 0.011), and optimal lag screw position in centre-centre or centre-inferior position (p = 0.020). According to Kaplan-Meier analysis, fracture collapse had no association with mortality from 2.4 to 7.6 years after surgery. In conclusion, increased fracture collapse after fixation of geriatric intertrochanteric fractures adversely affected walking but not survival. PMID:26955637

  16. Neonatal and fetal exposure to trans-fatty acid retards early growth and adiposity while adversely affecting glucose in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Kylie; Sajadian, Soraya; Jenkins, Kurt A.; Wilson, Martha D.; Carr, J. Jeffery; Wagner, Janice D.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2010-01-01

    Industrially produced trans fatty acids (TFAs) consumed in western diets are incorporated into maternal and fetal tissues, and are passed linearly to offspring via breast milk. We hypothesized that TFA exposure in utero and during lactation in infants would promote obesity and poor glycemic control as compared to unmodified fatty acids. We further hypothesized that in utero exposure alone may program for these outcomes in adulthood. To test this hypothesis we fed female C57/BL6 mice identical western diets that differed only in cis- or trans-isomers of C18:1 and then aimed to determine whether maternal transfer of TFAs through pregnancy and lactation alters growth, body composition and glucose metabolism. Mice were unexposed, exposed during pregnancy, during lactation, or throughout pregnancy and lactation to TFA. Body weight and composition (by computed tomography), and glucose metabolism we assessed at weaning and adulthood. TFA exposure through breast milk caused significant early growth retardation (p<0.001) and higher fasting glucose (p=0.01) but insulin sensitivity was not different. Elevated plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 in mice consuming TFA-enriched milk (p=0.02) may contribute to later catch-up growth, leanness and preserved peripheral insulin sensitivity observed in these mice. Mice exposed to TFA in utero underwent rapid early neonatal growth with TFA-free breast milk and had significantly impaired insulin sensitivity (p<0.05) and greater abdominal fat (p=0.01). We conclude that very early catch-up growth resulted in impaired peripheral insulin sensitivity in this model of diet-related fetal and neonatal programming. TFA surprisingly retarded growth and adiposity while still adversely affecting glucose metabolism. PMID:20650350

  17. Extreme Air Pollution Conditions Adversely Affect Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance: The Air Pollution and Cardiometabolic Disease Study.

    PubMed

    Brook, Robert D; Sun, Zhichao; Brook, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Rao, Xiaoquan; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Sun, Qinghua; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports that fine particulate matter adversely affects cardiometabolic diseases particularly in susceptible individuals; however, health effects induced by the extreme concentrations within megacities in Asia are not well described. We enrolled 65 nonsmoking adults with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the Beijing metropolitan area into a panel study of 4 repeated visits across 4 seasons since 2012. Daily ambient fine particulate matter and personal black carbon levels ranged from 9.0 to 552.5 µg/m(3) and 0.2 to 24.5 µg/m(3), respectively, with extreme levels observed during January 2013. Cumulative fine particulate matter exposure windows across the prior 1 to 7 days were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure elevations ranging from 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.7) to 2.7 (0.6-4.8) mm Hg per SD increase (67.2 µg/m(3)), whereas cumulative black carbon exposure during the previous 2 to 5 days were significantly associated with ranges in elevations in diastolic blood pressure from 1.3 (0.0-2.5) to 1.7 (0.3-3.2) mm Hg per SD increase (3.6 µg/m(3)). Both black carbon and fine particulate matter were significantly associated with worsening insulin resistance (0.18 [0.01-0.36] and 0.22 [0.04-0.39] unit increase per SD increase of personal-level black carbon and 0.18 [0.02-0.34] and 0.22 [0.08-0.36] unit increase per SD increase of ambient fine particulate matter on lag days 4 and 5). These results provide important global public health warnings that air pollution may pose a risk to cardiometabolic health even at the extremely high concentrations faced by billions of people in the developing world today. PMID:26573709

  18. The Use of Vascular Closure Devices and Impact on Major Bleeding and Net Adverse Clinical Events (NACE) in Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty: A Sub-Analysis of the BRAVO study

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Brian; Singh, Vikas; Kini, Annapoorna; Mehran, Roxana; Jacobs, Evan; Knopf, David; Alfonso, Carlos E.; Martinez, Claudia A.; Martinezclark, Pedro; O’Neill, William; Heldman, Alan W.; Yu, Jennifer; Baber, Usman; Kovacic, Jason; Dangas, George; Sharma, Samin; Sartori, Samantha; Cohen, Mauricio G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the impact of suture-mediated vascular closure devices on net adverse clinical events (NACE) after balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV). Background Ischemic and bleeding complications are common following transfemoral BAV however; previous studies have been single center and limited by varying definitions of major bleeding. Methods The Effect of Bivalirudin on Aortic Valve Intervention Outcomes (BRAVO) study was a retrospective observational study conducted at two high-volume academic centers over a 6-year period designed to compare the effect of bivalirudin versus unfractionated heparin. This is a sub-analysis of 428 consecutive patients who underwent BAV (with 10-13 French sheaths) to compare the effect of hemostasis with vascular closure devices versus manual compression utilizing standardized definitions. NACE was defined as the composite of major bleeding and major adverse clinical events (MACE). All events were adjudicated by an independent clinical events committee who were blinded to antithrombin use. Results Pre-closure was performed in 269 (62.8%) of patients. While bivalirudin was used more frequently in those with pre-closure (60.6% vs. 37.7%, p<0.001), a history of prior BAV (11.1% vs. 3.6%, p=0.04) and peripheral vascular disease (30.7% vs. 19.7%, p=0.01) was more common in those not undergoing pre-closure (n=159, 37%). Other clinical and demographic features were well balanced between groups. Vascular closure was associated with a significant reduction in NACE (24.5% vs 10.0% p<0.001). Results remained significant after adjusting for baseline differences and bivalirudin use (OR 0.38, 95% CI: 0.21 - 0.68; p=0.001). Conclusions Our study suggests that suture-mediated vascular closure is associated with a substantial reduction in NACE after transfemoral BAV. Large randomized clinical trials should be conducted to confirm our results. PMID:23436434

  19. Regulatory RNAs controlling vascular (dys)function by affecting TGF-ß family signalling

    PubMed Central

    Kurakula, Kondababu; Goumans, Marie-Jose; ten Dijke, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Over the last few years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as master regulators of gene expression in cardiovascular biology and disease. miRNAs are small endogenous non-coding RNAs that usually bind to 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of their target mRNAs and inhibit mRNA stability or translation of their target genes. miRNAs play a dynamic role in the pathophysiology of many CVDs through their effects on target mRNAs in vascular cells. Recently, numerous miRNAs have been implicated in the regulation of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling pathway which plays crucial roles in diverse biological processes, and is involved in pathogenesis of many diseases including CVD. This review gives an overview of current literature on the role of miRNAs targeting TGF-β/BMP signalling in vascular cells, including endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. We also provide insight into how this miRNA-mediated regulation of TGF-β/BMP signalling might be used to harness CVD. PMID:26862319

  20. Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling affects both angiogenesis and osteogenesis during the development of scleral ossicles.

    PubMed

    Jabalee, James; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A

    2015-10-01

    Intramembranous ossification is a complex multi-step process which relies on extensive interactions among bone cells and surrounding tissues. The embryonic vasculature is essential in regulating endochondral ossification; however, its role during intramembranous ossification remains poorly understood, and in vivo studies are lacking. Previous research from our lab on the development of the intramembranous scleral ossicles has demonstrated an intriguing pattern of vascular development in which the areas of future osteogenesis remain avascular until after bone induction has occurred. Such avascular zones are located directly beneath each of the conjunctival papillae, epithelial structures which provide osteogenic signals to the underlying mesenchyme. Here we provide a high-resolution map of the developing vasculature from the time of ossicle induction to mineralization using a novel technique. We show that vegfa is expressed by the papillae and nearby mesenchymal tissue throughout HH 34-37, when vascular growth is taking place, and is down-regulated thereafter. Localized inhibition of Vegf results in expansion of the avascular zone surrounding the implanted papilla and mispatterning of the scleral ossicles. These results demonstrate that Vegf signaling could provide important insights into the complex relationship between bone and vasculature during intramembranous bone development. PMID:26210172

  1. Do social disadvantage and early family adversity affect the diurnal cortisol rhythm in infants? The Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Saridjan, Nathalie S; Huizink, Anja C; Koetsier, Jitske A; Jaddoe, Vincent W; Mackenbach, Johan P; Hofman, Albert; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Verhulst, Frank C; Tiemeier, Henning

    2010-02-01

    Dysregulation of diurnal cortisol secretion patterns may explain the link between adversities early in life and later mental health problems. However, few studies have investigated the influence of social disadvantage and family adversity on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis early in life. In 366 infants aged 12-20 months from the Generation R Study, a population-based cohort from fetal life onwards, parents collected saliva samples from their infant at 5 moments over the course of 1 day. The area under the curve (AUC), the cortisol awakening response (CAR) and the diurnal cortisol slope were calculated as different composite measures of the diurnal cortisol rhythm. Information about social disadvantage and early adversity was collected using prenatal and postnatal questionnaires. We found that older infants showed lower AUC levels; moreover, infants with a positive CAR were significantly older. Both the AUC and the CAR were related to indicators of social disadvantage and early adversity. Infants of low income families, in comparison to high income families, showed higher AUC levels and a positive CAR. Infants of mothers who smoked during pregnancy were also significantly more likely to show a positive CAR. Furthermore, infants of mothers experiencing parenting stress showed higher AUC levels. The results of our study show that effects of social disadvantage and early adversity on the diurnal cortisol rhythm are already observable in infants. This may reflect the influence of early negative life events on early maturation of the HPA axis. PMID:20006614

  2. Morbid obesity in liver transplant recipients adversely affects longterm graft and patient survival in a single-institution analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conzen, Kendra D; Vachharajani, Neeta; Collins, Kelly M; Anderson, Christopher D; Lin, Yiing; Wellen, Jason R; Shenoy, Surendra; Lowell, Jeffrey A; Doyle, M B Majella; Chapman, William C

    2015-01-01

    Objective The effects of obesity in liver transplantation remain controversial. Earlier institutional data demonstrated no significant difference in postoperative complications or 1-year mortality. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that obesity alone has minimal effect on longterm graft and overall survival. Methods A retrospective, single-institution analysis of outcomes in patients submitted to primary adult orthotopic liver transplantation was conducted using data for the period from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2012. Recipients were divided into six groups by pre-transplant body mass index (BMI), comprising those with BMIs of <18.0 kg/m2, 18.0–24.9 kg/m2, 25.0–29.9 kg/m2, 30.0–35.0 kg/m2, 35.1–40.0 kg/m2 and >40 kg/m2, respectively. Pre- and post-transplant parameters were compared. A P-value of <0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. Independent predictors of patient and graft survival were determined using multivariate analysis. Results A total of 785 patients met the study inclusion criteria. A BMI of >35 kg/m2 was associated with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) cirrhosis (P < 0.0001), higher Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, and longer wait times for transplant (P = 0.002). There were no differences in operative time, intensive care unit or hospital length of stay, or perioperative complications. Graft and patient survival at intervals up to 3 years were similar between groups. Compared with non-obese recipients, recipients with a BMI of >40 kg/m2 showed significantly reduced 5-year graft (49.0% versus 75.8%; P < 0.02) and patient (51.3% versus 78.8%; P < 0.01) survival. Conclusions Obesity increasingly impacts outcomes in liver transplantation. Although the present data are limited by the fact that they were sourced from a single institution, they suggest that morbid obesity adversely affects longterm outcomes despite providing similar short-term results. Further analysis is

  3. Minimum Pricing of Alcohol versus Volumetric Taxation: Which Policy Will Reduce Heavy Consumption without Adversely Affecting Light and Moderate Consumers?

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Vandenberg, Brian; Hollingsworth, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Background We estimate the effect on light, moderate and heavy consumers of alcohol from implementing a minimum unit price for alcohol (MUP) compared with a uniform volumetric tax. Methods We analyse scanner data from a panel survey of demographically representative households (n = 885) collected over a one-year period (24 Jan 2010–22 Jan 2011) in the state of Victoria, Australia, which includes detailed records of each household's off-trade alcohol purchasing. Findings The heaviest consumers (3% of the sample) currently purchase 20% of the total litres of alcohol (LALs), are more likely to purchase cask wine and full strength beer, and pay significantly less on average per standard drink compared to the lightest consumers (A$1.31 [95% CI 1.20–1.41] compared to $2.21 [95% CI 2.10–2.31]). Applying a MUP of A$1 per standard drink has a greater effect on reducing the mean annual volume of alcohol purchased by the heaviest consumers of wine (15.78 LALs [95% CI 14.86–16.69]) and beer (1.85 LALs [95% CI 1.64–2.05]) compared to a uniform volumetric tax (9.56 LALs [95% CI 9.10–10.01] and 0.49 LALs [95% CI 0.46–0.41], respectively). A MUP results in smaller increases in the annual cost for the heaviest consumers of wine ($393.60 [95% CI 374.19–413.00]) and beer ($108.26 [95% CI 94.76–121.75]), compared to a uniform volumetric tax ($552.46 [95% CI 530.55–574.36] and $163.92 [95% CI 152.79–175.03], respectively). Both a MUP and uniform volumetric tax have little effect on changing the annual cost of wine and beer for light and moderate consumers, and likewise little effect upon their purchasing. Conclusions While both a MUP and a uniform volumetric tax have potential to reduce heavy consumption of wine and beer without adversely affecting light and moderate consumers, a MUP offers the potential to achieve greater reductions in heavy consumption at a lower overall annual cost to consumers. PMID:24465368

  4. Identification of chemical components of combustion emissions that affect pro-atherosclerotic vascular responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Seilkop, Steven K.; Campen, Matthew J.; Lund, Amie K.; McDonald, Jacob D.; Mauderly, Joe L.

    2012-01-01

    Combustion emissions cause pro-atherosclerotic responses in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE/−) mice, but the causal components of these complex mixtures are unresolved. In studies previously reported, ApoE−/− mice were exposed by inhalation 6 h/day for 50 consecutive days to multiple dilutions of diesel or gasoline exhaust, wood smoke, or simulated “downwind” coal emissions. In this study, the analysis of the combined four-study database using the Multiple Additive Regression Trees (MART) data mining approach to determine putative causal exposure components regardless of combustion source is reported. Over 700 physical–chemical components were grouped into 45 predictor variables. Response variables measured in aorta included endothelin-1, vascular endothelin growth factor, three matrix metalloproteinases (3, 7, 9), metalloproteinase inhibitor 2, heme-oxygenase-1, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Two or three predictors typically explained most of the variation in response among the experimental groups. Overall, sulfur dioxide, ammonia, nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide were most highly predictive of responses, although their rankings differed among the responses. Consistent with the earlier finding that filtration of particles had little effect on responses, particulate components ranked third to seventh in predictive importance for the eight response variables. MART proved useful for identifying putative causal components, although the small number of pollution mixtures (4) can provide only suggestive evidence of causality. The potential independent causal contributions of these gases to the vascular responses, as well as possible interactions among them and other components of complex pollutant mixtures, warrant further evaluation. PMID:22486345

  5. Benefits of adversity?! How life history affects the behavioral profile of mice varying in serotonin transporter genotype

    PubMed Central

    Bodden, Carina; Richter, S. Helene; Schreiber, Rebecca S.; Kloke, Vanessa; Gerß, Joachim; Palme, Rupert; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Lewejohann, Lars; Kaiser, Sylvia; Sachser, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral profiles are influenced by both positive and negative experiences as well as the genetic disposition. Traditionally, accumulating adversity over lifetime is considered to predict increased anxiety-like behavior (“allostatic load”). The alternative “mismatch hypothesis” suggests increased levels of anxiety if the early environment differs from the later-life environment. Thus, there is a need for a whole-life history approach to gain a deeper understanding of how behavioral profiles are shaped. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of life history on the behavioral profile of mice varying in serotonin transporter (5-HTT) genotype, an established mouse model of increased anxiety-like behavior. For this purpose, mice grew up under either adverse or beneficial conditions during early phases of life. In adulthood, they were further subdivided so as to face a situation that either matched or mismatched the condition experienced so far, resulting in four different life histories. Subsequently, mice were tested for their anxiety-like and exploratory behavior. The main results were: (1) Life history profoundly modulated the behavioral profile. Surprisingly, mice that experienced early beneficial and later escapable adverse conditions showed less anxiety-like and more exploratory behavior compared to mice of other life histories. (2) Genotype significantly influenced the behavioral profile, with homozygous 5-HTT knockout mice displaying highest levels of anxiety-like and lowest levels of exploratory behavior. Our findings concerning life history indicate that the absence of adversity does not necessarily cause lower levels of anxiety than accumulating adversity. Rather, some adversity may be beneficial, particularly when following positive events. Altogether, we conclude that for an understanding of behavioral profiles, it is not sufficient to look at experiences during single phases of life, but the whole life history has to be considered

  6. Thyroid hormone affects both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells in rat arteries.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yin; Manio, Michael M; Leung, George P H; Xu, Aimin; Tang, Eva H C; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2015-01-15

    Hypothyroidism impairs endothelium-dependent dilatations, while hyperthyroidism augments the production of endothelial nitric oxide. Thus, experiments were designed to determine if thyroid hormone causes endothelium-dependent responses, or alleviates diabetic endothelial dysfunction. Isometric tension was measured in rings with or without endothelium of arteries from normal and diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats. Release of 6-keto prostaglandin F1α and thromboxane B2 were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and protein levels [endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), cyclooxygenases (COX)] by immunoblotting. Triiodothyronine (T3) caused concentration-dependent (3×10(-6)-3×10(-5)M) relaxations in mesenteric (pEC50, 4.96±0.19) and femoral (pEC50, 4.57±0.35) arteries without endothelium. In femoral arteries of rats with diabetes, 5-methylamino-2-[[(2S,3R,5R,8S,9S)-3,5,9-trimethyl-2-(1-oxo-(1H-pyrrol-2- -yl)propan-2-yl)-1,7-dioxaspiro-(5,5)undecan-8-yl]methyl]benzooxazole-4-carboxylic acid (A23187, 3×10(-7) to 10(-6)M) caused partly endothelium-dependent contractions. After chronic T3-treatment with (10μg/kg/day; four weeks), the contractions to A23187 of preparations with and without endothelium were comparable, the thromboxane B2-release was reduced (by 38.1±9.2%). The pEC50 of 9, 11-dideoxy-11α, 9α-epoxymethanoprostaglandin F2α (U46619, TP-receptor agonist) was increased in T3-treated diabetic rats compared with controls (8.53±0.06 vs 7.94±0.09). The protein expression of eNOS increased (by 228%) but that of COX-1 decreased (by 35%) after chronic T3 treatment. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells incubated for one week with T3 (10(-10)-10(-7)M) in the presence but not in the absence of interleukin-1β (1ng/ml), the expression of eNOS was increased compared to control. In conclusion, thyroid hormone acutely relaxes mesenteric and femoral vascular smooth muscle, but given chronically reduces the release of endothelium-derived vasoconstrictor

  7. Right ventricular diastolic function in dialysis patients could be affected by vascular access.

    PubMed

    Di Lullo, Luca; Floccari, Fulvio; Polito, Pasquale

    2011-01-01

    Tricuspid annular plane excursion (TAPSE) measurement in echocardiography is a measure of heart diastolic distensibility: a low TAPSE indicates reduced ventricular distensibility leading to diastolic dysfunction. It is a good prognostic index for cardiac mortality risk in congestive heart failure patients, adding significant prognostic information to the NYHA clinical classification. Our study was designed to evaluate the effect of a single hemodialysis (HD) session on diastolic function and TAPSE, focusing on the effects of vascular access typology. Twenty chronically uremic patients (age 51 ± 10 years, dialytic age 24 ± 8 months), without overt heart disease, underwent conventional two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography immediately before starting and 15 min after ending a mid-week HD session. Ten patients had distal radiocephalic arterovenous fistula (AVF), and 10 had permanent central venous catheters (CVC). The amount of fluid removed by HD was 2,706 ± 1,047 g/session. HD led to a reduction in TAPSE, left ventricle end-diastole volume, left ventricle end-systole volume, right ventricle end-diastole diameter, peak early transmitral flow velocity, and the ratio of early to late Doppler velocities of diastolic mitral flow. AVF patients showed greater right ventricle diameters versus CVC patients, while TAPSE appeared higher in the latter. Only the AVF patient group showed TAPSE values <15 mm. Our data confirm the effects of terminal uremia on right ventricle function (chamber dilation, impaired diastolic function), showing that these abnormalities are more frequent in AVF patients as opposed to CVC patients. It is reasonable to explain these clinical features as the effect of preload increase operated by AVF. PMID:21196771

  8. Vascular endothelial growth factor antagonism restores epithelial barrier dysfunction via affecting zonula occludens proteins

    PubMed Central

    YUKSEL, HASAN; YILMAZ, OZGE; KARAMAN, MERAL; FIRINCI, FATIH; TURKELI, AHMET; KANIK, ESRA TOPRAK; INAN, SEVINC

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial barrier dysfunction is important in the pathogenesis of asthma and allergic responses, and is therefore a therapeutic target. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of dexamethasone, a classic therapeutic agent, an anti-tumor necrosis factor agent (etanercept), which is used to treat difficult cases of asthma, and an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) agent (bevacizumab), which is an angiogenesis inhibitor, on zonula occludens (ZO) proteins in an experimental asthma model. The experimental model of asthma was developed using intraperitoneal (IP) and inhaled administration of ovalbumin in 38 BALB/c mice, which were divided into four groups. The control group (n=6) did not receive any treatment, while the four remaining groups (n=8 per group) received an IP injection of saline, etanercept, bevacizumab or dexamethasone, respectively. Occludin, claudin and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM) were immunohistochemically stained in the left middle lobe samples using an indirect avidin-peroxidase method, after which the staining was semiquantified with H-scores. Statistically significant differences were observed in the occludin, claudin and JAM H-scores among the four groups (P<0.001). In the untreated asthma, etanercept, bevacizumab and dexamethasone groups, the median H-scores for occludin were 93, 177, 280 and 198, respectively, while the H-scores for claudin were 82, 193.5, 274 and 202.5, respectively, and the median H-scores for JAM were 130, 210, 288 and 210, respectively. Pairwise comparisons revealed that all three ZO protein H-scores were significantly lower in the saline group when compared with each treatment group. However, the H-scores of the ZO proteins were not significantly different between the etanercept and dexamethasone groups. Furthermore, the bevacizumab group exhibited higher H-scores for all the proteins compared with the dexamethasone group. Therefore, antagonism of VEGF with bevacizumab restores the

  9. CT and MR imaging findings of systemic complications occurring during pregnancy and puerperal period, adversely affected by natural changes

    PubMed Central

    Himoto, Yuki; Kido, Aki; Moribata, Yusaku; Yamaoka, Toshihide; Okumura, Ryosuke; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic physiological and anatomical changes for delivery may adversely induce various specific non-obstetric complications during pregnancy and puerperal period. These complications can be fatal to both the mother and the fetus, thus a precise and early diagnosis ensued by an early treatment is essential. Along with ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have assumed an increasing role in the diagnosis. This article aims to discuss the pathophysiology of these complications, the indications for CT and MRI, and the imaging findings. PMID:26937442

  10. CT and MR imaging findings of systemic complications occurring during pregnancy and puerperal period, adversely affected by natural changes.

    PubMed

    Himoto, Yuki; Kido, Aki; Moribata, Yusaku; Yamaoka, Toshihide; Okumura, Ryosuke; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic physiological and anatomical changes for delivery may adversely induce various specific non-obstetric complications during pregnancy and puerperal period. These complications can be fatal to both the mother and the fetus, thus a precise and early diagnosis ensued by an early treatment is essential. Along with ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have assumed an increasing role in the diagnosis. This article aims to discuss the pathophysiology of these complications, the indications for CT and MRI, and the imaging findings. PMID:26937442

  11. Factors affecting the development of adverse drug reactions to β-blockers in hospitalized cardiac patient population

    PubMed Central

    Mugoša, Snežana; Djordjević, Nataša; Djukanović, Nina; Protić, Dragana; Bukumirić, Zoran; Radosavljević, Ivan; Bošković, Aneta; Todorović, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to undertake a study on the prevalence of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) poor metabolizer alleles (*3, *4, *5, and *6) on a Montenegrin population and its impact on developing adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of β-blockers in a hospitalized cardiac patient population. A prospective study was conducted in the Cardiology Center of the Clinical Center of Montenegro and included 138 patients who had received any β-blocker in their therapy. ADRs were collected using a specially designed questionnaire, based on the symptom list and any signs that could point to eventual ADRs. Data from patients’ medical charts, laboratory tests, and other available parameters were observed and combined with the data from the questionnaire. ADRs to β-blockers were observed in 15 (10.9%) patients. There was a statistically significant difference in the frequency of ADRs in relation to genetically determined enzymatic activity (P<0.001), with ADRs’ occurrence significantly correlating with slower CYP2D6 metabolism. Our study showed that the adverse reactions to β-blockers could be predicted by the length of hospitalization, CYP2D6 poor metabolizer phenotype, and the concomitant use of other CYP2D6-metabolizing drugs. Therefore, in hospitalized patients with polypharmacy CYP2D6 genotyping might be useful in detecting those at risk of ADRs. PMID:27536078

  12. SIRT1 reduces endothelial activation without affecting vascular function in ApoE-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Sokrates; Schäfer, Nicola; Breitenstein, Alexander; Besler, Christian; Winnik, Stephan; Lohmann, Christine; Heinrich, Kathrin; Brokopp, Chad E.; Handschin, Christoph; Landmesser, Ulf; Tanner, Felix C.; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Matter, Christian M.

    2010-01-01

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contributes to progression of atherosclerosis, at least in part by causing endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory activation. The class III histone deacetylase SIRT1 has been implicated in extension of lifespan. In the vasculature,SIRT1 gain-of-function using SIRT1 overexpression or activation has been shown to improve endothelial function in mice and rats via stimulation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS). However, the effects of SIRT1 loss-of-function on the endothelium in atherosclerosis remain to be characterized. Thus, we have investigated the endothelial effects of decreased endogenous SIRT1 in hypercholesterolemic ApoE-/- mice. We observed no difference in endothelial relaxation and eNOS (Ser1177) phosphorylation between 20-week old male atherosclerotic ApoE-/- SIRT1+/- and ApoE-/- SIRT1+/+ mice. However, SIRT1 prevented endothelial superoxide production, inhibited NF-κB signaling, and diminished expression of adhesion molecules. Treatment of young hypercholesterolemic ApoE-/- SIRT1+/- mice with lipopolysaccharide to boost NF-κB signaling led to a more pronounced endothelial expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 as compared to ApoE-/- SIRT1+/+ mice. In conclusion, endogenous SIRT1 diminishes endothelial activation in ApoE-/- mice, but does not affect endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. PMID:20606253

  13. Impaired Glucose Tolerance or Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus Diagnosed during Admission Adversely Affects Prognosis after Myocardial Infarction: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    George, Anish; Bhatia, Raghav T.; Buchanan, Gill L.; Whiteside, Anne; Moisey, Robert S.; Beer, Stephen F.; Chattopadhyay, Sudipta; Sathyapalan, Thozhukat; John, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prognostic effect of newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus (NDM) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) post myocardial infarction (MI). Research Design and Methods Retrospective cohort study of 768 patients without preexisting diabetes mellitus post-MI at one centre in Yorkshire between November 2005 and October 2008. Patients were categorised as normal glucose tolerance (NGT n = 337), IGT (n = 279) and NDM (n = 152) on pre- discharge oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Primary end-point was the first occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) including cardiovascular death, non-fatal MI, severe heart failure (HF) or non-haemorrhagic stroke. Secondary end-points were all cause mortality and individual components of MACE. Results Prevalence of NGT, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), IGT and NDM changed from 90%, 6%, 0% and 4% on fasting plasma glucose (FPG) to 43%, 1%, 36% and 20% respectively after OGTT. 102 deaths from all causes (79 as first events of which 46 were cardiovascular), 95 non fatal MI, 18 HF and 9 non haemorrhagic strokes occurred during 47.2 ± 9.4 months follow up. Event free survival was lower in IGT and NDM groups. IGT (HR 1.54, 95% CI: 1.06–2.24, p = 0.024) and NDM (HR 2.15, 95% CI: 1.42–3.24, p = 0.003) independently predicted MACE free survival. IGT and NDM also independently predicted incidence of MACE. NDM but not IGT increased the risk of secondary end-points. Conclusion Presence of IGT and NDM in patients presenting post-MI, identified using OGTT, is associated with increased incidence of MACE and is associated with adverse outcomes despite adequate secondary prevention. PMID:26571120

  14. Multiple dietary supplements do not affect metabolic and cardio-vascular health.

    PubMed

    Soare, Andreea; Weiss, Edward P; Holloszy, John O; Fontana, Luigi

    2014-02-01

    Dietary supplements are widely used for health purposes. However, little is known about the metabolic and cardiovascular effects of combinations of popular over-the-counter supplements, each of which has been shown to have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and pro-longevity properties in cell culture or animal studies. This study was a 6-month randomized, single-blind controlled trial, in which 56 non-obese (BMI 21.0-29.9 kg/m(2)) men and women, aged 38 to 55 yr, were assigned to a dietary supplement (SUP) group or control (CON) group, with a 6-month follow-up. The SUP group took 10 dietary supplements each day (100 mg of resveratrol, a complex of 800 mg each of green, black, and white tea extract, 250 mg of pomegranate extract, 650 mg of quercetin, 500 mg of acetyl-l-carnitine, 600 mg of lipoic acid, 900 mg of curcumin, 1 g of sesamin, 1.7 g of cinnamon bark extract, and 1.0 g fish oil). Both the SUP and CON groups took a daily multivitamin/mineral supplement. The main outcome measures were arterial stiffness, endothelial function, biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress, and cardiometabolic risk factors. Twenty-four weeks of daily supplementation with 10 dietary supplements did not affect arterial stiffness or endothelial function in nonobese individuals. These compounds also did not alter body fat measured by DEXA, blood pressure, plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, IGF-1, and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress. In summary, supplementation with a combination of popular dietary supplements has no cardiovascular or metabolic effects in non-obese relatively healthy individuals. PMID:24659610

  15. When the serotonin transporter gene meets adversity: the contribution of animal models to understanding epigenetic mechanisms in affective disorders and resilience.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Klaus-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Although converging epidemiological evidence links exposure to stressful life events with increased risk for affective spectrum disorders, there is extraordinary interindividual variability in vulnerability to adversity. The environmentally moderated penetrance of genetic variation is thought to play a major role in determining who will either develop disease or remain resilient. Research on genetic factors in the aetiology of disorders of emotion regulation has, nevertheless, been complicated by a mysterious discrepancy between high heritability estimates and a scarcity of replicable gene-disorder associations. One explanation for this incongruity is that at least some specific gene effects are conditional on environmental cues, i.e. gene-by-environment interaction (G × E) is present. For example, a remarkable number of studies reported an association of variation in the human serotonin (5-HT) transporter gene (SLC6A4, 5-HTT, SERT) with emotional and cognitive traits as well as increased risk for depression in interaction with psychosocial adversity. The results from investigations in non-human primate and mouse support the occurrence of G × E interaction by showing that variation of 5-HTT function is associated with a vulnerability to adversity across the lifespan leading to unfavourable outcomes resembling various neuropsychiatric disorders. The neural and molecular mechanisms by which environmental adversity in early life increases disease risk in adulthood are not known but may include epigenetic programming of gene expression during development. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and chromatin modification, are dynamic and reversible and may also provide targets for intervention strategies (see Bountra et al., Curr Top Behav Neurosci, 2011). Animal models amenable to genetic manipulation are useful in the identification of molecular mechanisms underlying epigenetic programming by adverse environments and individual differences in

  16. The type B brevetoxin (PbTx-3) adversely affects development, cardiovascular function, and survival in Medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Colman, Jamie R; Ramsdell, John S

    2003-01-01

    Brevetoxins are produced by the red tide dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. The toxins are lipophilic polyether toxins that elicit a myriad of effects depending on the route of exposure and the target organism. Brevetoxins are therefore broadly toxic to marine and estuarine animals. By mimicking the maternal route of exposure to the oocytes in finfish, we characterized the adverse effects of the type B brevetoxin brevetoxin-3 (PbTx-3) on embryonic fish development and survival. The Japanese rice fish, medaka (Oryzias latipes), was used as the experimental model in which individual eggs were exposed via microinjection to various known concentrations of PbTx-3 dissolved in an oil vehicle. Embryos injected with doses exceeding 1.0 ng/egg displayed tachycardia, hyperkinetic twitches in the form of sustained convulsions, spinal curvature, clumping of the erythrocytes, and decreased hatching success. Furthermore, fish dosed with toxin were often unable to hatch in the classic tail-first fashion and emerged head first, which resulted in partial hatches and death. We determined that the LD(50) (dose that is lethal to 50% of the fish) for an injected dose of PbTx-3 is 4.0 ng/egg. The results of this study complement previous studies of the developmental toxicity of the type A brevetoxin brevetoxin-1 (PbTx-1), by illustrating in vivo the differing affinities of the two congeners for cardiac sodium channels. Consequently, we observed differing cardiovascular responses in the embryos, wherein embryos exposed to PbTx-3 exhibited persistent tachycardia, whereas embryos exposed to PbTx-1 displayed bradycardia, the onset of which was delayed. PMID:14644667

  17. Lactate adversely affects the in vitro formation of endothelial cell tubular structures through the action of TGF-{beta}1

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Stephan A. . E-mail: leoni.kunz-schughart@oncoray.de; Gaumann, Andreas; Wondrak, Marit; Eckermann, Christoph; Schulte, Stephanie; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Wheatley, Denys N.; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A.

    2007-07-15

    When lactate accumulation in a tumor microenvironment reaches an average concentration of 10-20 mM, it tends to reflect a high degree of malignancy. However, the hypothesis that tumor-derived lactate has a number of partially adverse biological effects on malignant and tumor-associated host cells requires further evidence. The present study attempted to evaluate the impact of lactate on the process of angiogenesis, in particular on the formation of tubular structures. The endothelial cell (EC) network in desmoplastic breast tumors is primarily located in areas of reactive fibroblastic stroma. We employed a fibroblast-endothelial cell co-culture model as in vitro angiogenesis system normally producing florid in vitro tubule formation to analyze this situation. In contrast to previous studies, we found that lactate significantly reduces EC network formation in a dose-dependent manner as quantified by semi-automated morphometric analyses following immunohistochemical staining. The decrease in CD31-positive tubular structures and the number of intersections was independent of VEGF supplementation and became more pronounced in the presence of protons. The number of cells, primarily of the fibroblast population, was reduced but cell loss could not be attributed to a decrease in proliferative activity or pronounced apoptotic cell death. Treatment with 10 mM lactate was accompanied by enhanced mRNA expression and release of TGF-{beta}1, which also shows anti-angiogenic activity in the model. Both TGF-{beta}1 and lactate induced myofibroblastic differentiation adjacent to the EC tubular structures. The lactate response on the EC network was diminished by TGF-{beta}1 neutralization, indicating a causal relationship between lactate and TGF-{beta}1 in the finely tuned processes of vessel formation and maturation which may also occur in vivo within tumor tissue.

  18. A Computational Study on the Effects of Dynamic Roughness Application to Separated Transitional Flows Affected by Adverse Pressure Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campitelli, Gennaro

    The study of transitional flows is considered crucial for many practical engineering applications. In fact, a comprehensive understanding of the laminar-turbulent transition phenomenon often helps to improve the overall performance of apparatuses such as airfoils, wind turbines, hulls and turbomachinery blades. In addition to understanding and prediction of transitional flows, active research continues in the area of boundary layer control, which includes control of phenomena such as flow separation and transition. For instance, optimum geometrical shaping may be followed by the adoption on the wall-surface of riblets to adjust pressure gradient and reduce drag. Further "flow control" may also be acquired by introducing active devices able to modify the flow field in order to accomplish a desired aerodynamic task. Such flow manipulation is often achieved by using time-dependent forcing mechanisms which promote natural instabilities amplifying the control effectiveness. Localized energy inputs such as Lorentz-force actuator, piezoelectric flaps and synthetic jets all produce a consistent boundary layer mixing enhancement with lift increase and drag abatement. The current numerical study attempts to demonstrate the efficacy of dynamic roughness (DR) on altering separated-reattached transitional flows under adverse pressure gradient. It has already been proven how DR, acting on the boundary sublayer perturbation, is able to suppress (partially or completely) the typical leading edge separation for an airfoil at different angles of attack. This makes DR particularly suitable for separated flow control applications where the shear layer reattaches presenting the characteristic laminar separation bubble. A numerical sensitivity study has been conducted with an efficient orthogonal design taking into account four different control parameters on three levels (actuation frequency, humps height, rows displacement, synchronization) to provide an optimum DR setup which limits

  19. The skin tissue is adversely affected by TNF-alpha blockers in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis: a 5-year prospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Natalia P.; dos Reis Neto, Edgard Torres; Soares, Maria Roberta M. P.; Freitas, Daniele S.; Porro, Adriana; Ciconelli, Rozana M.; Pinheiro, Marcelo M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the incidence of and the main risk factors associated with cutaneous adverse events in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis following anti-TNF-α therapy. METHODS: A total of 257 patients with active arthritis who were taking TNF-α blockers, including 158 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 87 with ankylosing spondylitis and 12 with psoriatic arthritis, were enrolled in a 5-year prospective analysis. Patients with overlapping or other rheumatic diseases were excluded. Anthropometric, socioeconomic, demographic and clinical data were evaluated, including the Disease Activity Score-28, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index and Psoriasis Area Severity Index. Skin conditions were evaluated by two dermatology experts, and in doubtful cases, skin lesion biopsies were performed. Associations between adverse cutaneous events and clinical, demographic and epidemiological variables were determined using the chi-square test, and logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors. The significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: After 60 months of follow-up, 71 adverse events (73.85/1000 patient-years) were observed, of which allergic and immune-mediated phenomena were the most frequent events, followed by infectious conditions involving bacterial (47.1%), parasitic (23.5%), fungal (20.6%) and viral (8.8%) agents. CONCLUSION: The skin is significantly affected by adverse reactions resulting from the use of TNF-α blockers, and the main risk factors for cutaneous events were advanced age, female sex, a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, disease activity and the use of infliximab. PMID:24141833

  20. Task-Oriented and Bottle Feeding Adversely Affect the Quality of Mother-Infant Interactions Following Abnormal Newborn Screens

    PubMed Central

    Tluczek, Audrey; Clark, Roseanne; McKechnie, Anne Chevalier; Orland, Kate Murphy; Brown, Roger L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Examine effects of newborn screening (NBS) and neonatal diagnosis on the quality of mother-infant interactions in the context of feeding. Methods Study compared the quality of mother-infant feeding interactions among four groups of infants classified by severity of NBS and diagnostic results: cystic fibrosis (CF), congenital hypothyroidism, heterozygote CF carrier, and healthy with normal NBS. The Parent-Child Early Relational Assessment and a task-oriented item measured the quality of feeding interactions for 130 dyads, infant ages 3–19 weeks (M=9.19, SD=3.28). The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory measured maternal depression and anxiety. Results Composite Indicator Structure Equation Modeling showed that infant diagnostic status and, to a lesser extent, maternal education predicted feeding method. Mothers of infants with CF were most likely to bottle feed, which was associated with more task-oriented maternal behavior than breastfeeding. Mothers with low task-oriented behavior showed more sensitivity and responsiveness to infant cues, as well as less negative affect and behavior in their interactions with their infants than mothers with high task-oriented scores. Mothers of infants with CF were significantly more likely to have clinically significant anxiety and depression than the other groups. However, maternal psychological profile did not predict feeding method or interaction quality. Conclusions Mothers in the CF group were the least likely to breastfeed. Research is needed to explicate long-term effects of feeding methods on quality of mother-child relationship and ways to promote continued breastfeeding following a neonatal CF diagnosis. PMID:20495477

  1. Vascular permeability, vascular hyperpermeability and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Janice A.; Benjamin, Laura; Zeng, Huiyan; Dvorak, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    The vascular system has the critical function of supplying tissues with nutrients and clearing waste products. To accomplish these goals, the vasculature must be sufficiently permeable to allow the free, bidirectional passage of small molecules and gases and, to a lesser extent, of plasma proteins. Physiologists and many vascular biologists differ as to the definition of vascular permeability and the proper methodology for its measurement. We review these conflicting views, finding that both provide useful but complementary information. Vascular permeability by any measure is dramatically increased in acute and chronic inflammation, cancer, and wound healing. This hyperpermeability is mediated by acute or chronic exposure to vascular permeabilizing agents, particularly vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF, VEGF-A). We demonstrate that three distinctly different types of vascular permeability can be distinguished, based on the different types of microvessels involved, the composition of the extravasate, and the anatomic pathways by which molecules of different size cross-vascular endothelium. These are the basal vascular permeability (BVP) of normal tissues, the acute vascular hyperpermeability (AVH) that occurs in response to a single, brief exposure to VEGF-A or other vascular permeabilizing agents, and the chronic vascular hyperpermeability (CVH) that characterizes pathological angiogenesis. Finally, we list the numerous (at least 25) gene products that different authors have found to affect vascular permeability in variously engineered mice and classify them with respect to their participation, as far as possible, in BVP, AVH and CVH. Further work will be required to elucidate the signaling pathways by which each of these molecules, and others likely to be discovered, mediate the different types of vascular permeability. PMID:18293091

  2. Genetically-induced Estrogen Receptor Alpha mRNA (Esr1) Overexpression Does Not Adversely Affect Fertility or Penile Development in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heath, John; Abdelmageed, Yazeed; Braden, Tim D.; Williams, Carol S.; Williams, John W.; Paulose, Tessie; Hernandez-Ochoa, Isabel; Gupta, Rupesh; Flaws, Jodi A.; Goyal, Hari O.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we reported that estrogen receptor alpha mRNA (Esr1) or protein (ESR1) overexpression resulting from neonatal exposure to estrogens in rats was associated with infertility and mal-developed penis characterized by reduced length and weight and abnormal accumulation of fat cells. The objective of this study was to determine if mutant male mice overexpressing Esr1 are naturally infertile or have reduced fertility and/or develop abnormal penis. The fertility parameters, including fertility and fecundity indices, numbers of days from the day of cohabitation to the day of delivery, and numbers of pups per female, were not altered from controls, as a result of Esr1 overexpression. Likewise, penile morphology, including the length, weight, and diameter and os penis development, was not altered from controls. Conversely, weights of the seminal vesicles and bulbospongiosus and levator ani (BS/LA) muscles were significantly (P < 0.05) lower as compared to controls; however, the weight of the testis, the morphology of the testis and epididymis, and the plasma and testicular testosterone concentration were not different from controls. Hence, the genetically-induced Esr1 overexpression alone, without an exogenous estrogen exposure during the neonatal period, is unable to adversely affect the development of the penis as well as other male reproductive organs, except limited, but significant, reductions in weights of the seminal vesicles and BS/LA muscles. PMID:20930192

  3. High fat diet enriched with saturated, but not monounsaturated fatty acids adversely affects femur, and both diets increase calcium absorption in older female mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Dellatore, Peter; Douard, Veronique; Qin, Ling; Watford, Malcolm; Ferraris, Ronaldo P; Lin, Tiao; Shapses, Sue A

    2016-07-01

    Diet induced obesity has been shown to reduce bone mineral density (BMD) and Ca absorption. However, previous experiments have not examined the effect of high fat diet (HFD) in the absence of obesity or addressed the type of dietary fatty acids. The primary objective of this study was to determine the effects of different types of high fat feeding, without obesity, on fractional calcium absorption (FCA) and bone health. It was hypothesized that dietary fat would increase FCA and reduce BMD. Mature 8-month-old female C57BL/6J mice were fed one of three diets: a HFD (45% fat) enriched either with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) or with saturated fatty acids (SFAs), and a normal fat diet (NFD; 10% fat). Food consumption was controlled to achieve a similar body weight gain in all groups. After 8wk, total body bone mineral content and BMD as well as femur total and cortical volumetric BMD were lower in SFA compared with NFD groups (P<.05). In contrast, femoral trabecular bone was not affected by the SFAs, whereas MUFAs increased trabecular volume fraction and thickness. The rise over time in FCA was greater in mice fed HFD than NFD and final FCA was higher with HFD (P<.05). Intestinal calbindin-D9k gene and hepatic cytochrome P450 2r1 protein levels were higher with the MUFA than the NFD diet (P<.05). In conclusion, HFDs elevated FCA overtime; however, an adverse effect of HFD on bone was only observed in the SFA group, while MUFAs show neutral or beneficial effects. PMID:27262536

  4. The factors affecting outcome after non-vascular bone grafting and internal fixation for nonunion of the scaphoid.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, C; Cutler, L; Nuttall, D; Simison, A J M; Trail, I A; Stanley, J K

    2007-05-01

    This study identified variables which influence the outcome of surgical management on 126 ununited scaphoid fractures managed by internal fixation and non-vascular bone grafting. The site of fracture was defined by a new method: the ratio of the length of the proximal fragment to the sum of the lengths of both fragments, calculated using specific views in the plain radiographs. Bone healing occurred in 71% (89) of cases. Only the site of nonunion (p = 1 x 10(-6)) and the delay to surgery (p = 0.001) remained significant on multivariate analysis. The effect of surgical delay on the probability of union increased as the fracture site moved proximally. A prediction model was produced by stepwise logistic regression analysis, enabling the surgeon to predict the success of surgery where the site of the nonunion and delay to surgery is known. PMID:17540748

  5. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  6. Vascular tracers alter hemodynamics and airway pressure in anesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Albertine, K.H.; Staub, N.C.

    1986-11-01

    The technique of vascular labeling was developed to mark sites of increased microvascular permeability. We used the vascular labeling technique in anesthetized sheep and found that hemodynamics and airway pressure were adversely affected by intraarterial infusions of two vascular tracers. Monastral blue (nine sheep) immediately caused systemic arterial hypotension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and bronchoconstriction. All three physiological responses were partially blocked by a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin) but not by an H1-antihistamine (chlorpheniramine). Colloidal gold (nine sheep) caused immediate, but less dramatic, pulmonary arterial hypertension which was not attenuated by the blocking agents. We conclude that these two vascular tracers caused detrimental physiological side effects in sheep at the usual doses used to label injured microvessels in other species.

  7. The peptide semax affects the expression of genes related to the immune and vascular systems in rat brain focal ischemia: genome-wide transcriptional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The nootropic neuroprotective peptide Semax (Met-Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro) has proved efficient in the therapy of brain stroke; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its action remain obscure. Our genome-wide study was designed to investigate the response of the transcriptome of ischemized rat brain cortex tissues to the action of Semax in vivo. Results The gene-expression alteration caused by the action of the peptide Semax was compared with the gene expression of the “ischemia” group animals at 3 and 24 h after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). The peptide predominantly enhanced the expression of genes related to the immune system. Three hours after pMCAO, Semax influenced the expression of some genes that affect the activity of immune cells, and, 24 h after pMCAO, the action of Semax on the immune response increased considerably. The genes implicated in this response represented over 50% of the total number of genes that exhibited Semax-induced altered expression. Among the immune-response genes, the expression of which was modulated by Semax, genes that encode immunoglobulins and chemokines formed the most notable groups. In response to Semax administration, 24 genes related to the vascular system exhibited altered expression 3 h after pMCAO, whereas 12 genes were changed 24 h after pMCAO. These genes are associated with such processes as the development and migration of endothelial tissue, the migration of smooth muscle cells, hematopoiesis, and vasculogenesis. Conclusions Semax affects several biological processes involved in the function of various systems. The immune response is the process most markedly affected by the drug. Semax altered the expression of genes that modulate the amount and mobility of immune cells and enhanced the expression of genes that encode chemokines and immunoglobulins. In conditions of rat brain focal ischemia, Semax influenced the expression of genes that promote the formation and

  8. Vaccenic acid and trans fatty acid isomers from partially hydrogenated oil both adversely affect LDL cholesterol: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence of the adverse effects of industrially-produced trans fatty acids (iTFA) on risk of cardiovascular disease is consistent and well documented in the scientific literature; however, the cardiovascular effects of naturally-occurring TFA synthesized in ruminant animals (rTFA), such as vaccenic ...

  9. Implications of Vascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Barodka, Viachaslau M.; Joshi, Brijen L.; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Hogue, Charles W.; Nyhan, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Chronological age is a well established risk factor for the development of cardiovascular diseases. The changes that accumulate in the vasculature with age, though, are highly variable. It is now increasingly recognized that indices of vascular health are more reliable than age per se in predicting adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The variation in the accrual of these age-related vascular changes is a function of multiple genetic and environmental factors. In this review, we highlight some of the pathophysiological mechanisms that characterize the vascular aging phenotype. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the key outcome studies that address the value of these vascular health indices in general and discuss potential effects on perioperative cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:21474663

  10. Proepileptic Influence of a Focal Vascular Lesion Affecting Entorhinal Cortex-CA3 Connections After Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Giuseppe; Baldelli, Enrica; Longo, Daniela; Contri, Miranda Baccarani; Guerrini, Uliano; Sironi, Luigi; Gelosa, Paolo; Zini, Isabella; Ragsdale, David S.; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    In limbic seizures, neuronal excitation is conveyed from the entorhinal cortex directly to CA1 and subicular regions. This phenomenon is associated with a reduced ability of CA3 to respond to entorhinal cortex inputs. Here, we describe a lesion that destroys the perforant path in CA3 after status epilepticus (SE) induced by pilocarpine injection in 8-week-old rats. Using magnetic resonance imaging, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural analyses, we determined that this lesion develops after 30 minutes of SE and is characterized by microhemorrhages and ischemia. After a longer period of SE, the lesion invariably involves the upper blade of the dentate gyrus. Adult rats treated with subcutaneous diazepam (20 mg kg−1 for 3 days) did not develop the dentate gyrus lesion and had less frequent spontaneous recurrent seizures (p < 0.01). Young (3-week-old) rats rarely (20%) developed the CA3 lesion, and their spontaneous seizures were delayed (p < 0.01). To investigate the role of the damaged CA3 in seizure activity, we reinduced SE in adult and young epileptic rats. Using FosB/ΔFosB markers, we found induction of FosB/ΔFosB immunopositivity in CA3 neurons of young but not in adult rats. These experiments indicate that SE can produce a focal lesion in the perforant path that may affect the roles of the hippocampus in epileptic rats. PMID:18596544

  11. Incretin-Based Therapy for Prevention of Diabetic Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic vascular complications are the most common cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with numbers of affected individuals steadily increasing. Diabetic vascular complications can be divided into two categories: macrovascular andmicrovascular complications. Macrovascular complications include coronary artery diseaseand cerebrovascular disease, while microvascular complications include retinopathy and chronic kidney disease. These complications result from metabolic abnormalities, including hyperglycemia, elevated levels of free fatty acids, and insulin resistance. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to mediate the adverse effects of these metabolic disorders on vascular tissues, including stimulation of protein kinase C signaling and activation of the polyol pathway by oxidative stress and inflammation. Additionally, the loss of tissue-specific insulin signaling induced by hyperglycemia and toxic metabolites can induce cellular dysfunction and both macro- and microvascular complications characteristic of diabetes. Despite these insights, few therapeutic methods are available for the management of diabetic complications. Recently, incretin-based therapeutic agents, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, have been reported to elicit vasotropic actions, suggesting a potential for effecting an actual reduction in diabetic vascular complications. The present review will summarize the relationship between multiple adverse biological mechanisms in diabetes and putative incretin-based therapeutic interventions intended to prevent diabetic vascular complications. PMID:26881236

  12. The Vascular Depression Hypothesis: Mechanisms Linking Vascular Disease with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Warren D.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Vascular Depression’ hypothesis posits that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. This hypothesis stimulated much research that has improved our understanding of the complex relationships between late-life depression (LLD), vascular risk factors, and cognition. Succinctly, there are well-established relationships between late-life depression, vascular risk factors, and cerebral hyperintensities, the radiological hallmark of vascular depression. Cognitive dysfunction is common in late-life depression, particularly executive dysfunction, a finding predictive of poor antidepressant response. Over time, progression of hyperintensities and cognitive deficits predicts a poor course of depression and may reflect underlying worsening of vascular disease. This work laid the foundation for examining the mechanisms by which vascular disease influences brain circuits and influences the development and course of depression. We review data testing the vascular depression hypothesis with a focus on identifying potential underlying vascular mechanisms. We propose a disconnection hypothesis, wherein focal vascular damage and white matter lesion location is a crucial factor influencing neural connectivity that contributes to clinical symptomatology. We also propose inflammatory and hypoperfusion hypotheses, concepts that link underlying vascular processes with adverse effects on brain function that influence the development of depression. Testing such hypotheses will not only inform the relationship between vascular disease and depression but also provide guidance on the potential repurposing of pharmacological agents that may improve late-life depression outcomes. PMID:23439482

  13. Myocardial performance index is sensitive to changes in cardiac contractility, but is also affected by vascular load condition.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Kazunori; Kawada, Toru; Zheng, Can; Li, Meihua; Shishido, Toshiaki; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial performance index (MPI), or Tei index, is measured by Doppler echocardiography in clinical practice. MPI has been shown to be useful in evaluating left ventricular (LV) performance and predicting prognosis in cardiac patients. However, the effects of LV load and contractile states on MPI remain to be thoroughly investigated. In 14 anesthetized dogs, we obtained LV pressure-volume relationship with use of sonomicrometry and catheter-tip manometry. MPI was determined from the time derivative of LV volume and pressure. LV end-systolic pressure-volume ratio (Ees'), effective arterial elastance (Ea) and LV end-diastolic volume (Ved) were used as indices of LV contractility, afterload and preload, respectively. Hemodynamic conditions were varied over wide ranges [heart rate (HR), 66-192 bpm; mean arterial pressure, 71-177 mmHg] by infusing cardiovascular agents, by inducing ischemic heart failure and by electrical atrial pacing. Multiple linear regression analysis of pooled data (66 data sets) indicated that MPI (0.6-1.8) significantly correlated with Ees' [1.5-17.5 mmHg · ml(-1), p<0.0001, standard partial regression coefficient (β) =-0.66], Ea (3.6-21.9 mmHg · ml(-1), p<0.001, β = 0.4) and Ved (11-100 ml, p<0.0001, β = -0.69). MPI directly correlated with the time constant of isovolumic relaxation (19-66 ms, p<0.05), but not with HR or LV diastolic-stiffness (all p>0.1). Theoretical analysis also indicated that MPI decreases following the increases in LV contractility and in preload, while it increases in response to an increase in LV afterload. We conclude that MPI sensitively detects changes in LV contractility. However, MPI is also affected by changes in LV afterload and preload. PMID:24109782

  14. Warfarin and Vascular Calcification.

    PubMed

    Poterucha, Timothy J; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2016-06-01

    The vitamin K antagonist, warfarin, is the most commonly prescribed oral anticoagulant. Use of warfarin is associated with an increase in systemic calcification, including in the coronary and peripheral vasculature. This increase in vascular calcification is due to inhibition of the enzyme matrix gamma-carboxyglutamate Gla protein (MGP). MGP is a vitamin K-dependent protein that ordinarily prevents systemic calcification by scavenging calcium phosphate in the tissues. Warfarin-induced systemic calcification can result in adverse clinical effects. In this review article, we highlight some of the key translational and clinical studies that associate warfarin with vascular calcification. PMID:26714212

  15. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  16. High d(+)-fructose diet adversely affects testicular weight gain in weaning rats─protection by moderate d(+)-glucose diet.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Katsumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    The use of high D(+)-fructose corn syrup has increased over the past several decades in the developed countries, while overweight and obesity rates and the related diseases have risen dramatically. However, we found that feeding a high D(+)-fructose diet (80% D(+)-fructose as part of the diet) to weaning rats for 21 days led to reduced food intake (50% less, P < 0.0001) and thus delayed the weight gains in the body (40% less, P < 0.0001) and testes (40% less, P < 0.0001) compared to the no D(+)-fructose diet. We also challenged a minimum requirement of dietary D(+)-glucose for preventing the adverse effects of D(+)-fructose, such as lower food intake and reduction of body weight and testicular weight; the minimum requirement of D(+)-glucose was ≈23% of the diet. This glucose amount may be the minimum requirement of exogenous glucose for reducing weight gain. PMID:23935370

  17. Migration, neighborhoods, and networks: approaches to understanding how urban environmental conditions affect syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Egan, James E; Frye, Victoria; Kurtz, Steven P; Latkin, Carl; Chen, Minxing; Tobin, Karin; Yang, Cui; Koblin, Beryl A

    2011-04-01

    Adopting socioecological, intersectionality, and lifecourse theoretical frameworks may enhance our understanding of the production of syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM). From this perspective, we present preliminary data from three related studies that suggest ways in which social contexts may influence the health of MSM. The first study, using cross-sectional data, looked at migration of MSM to the gay resort area of South Florida, and found that amount of time lived in the area was associated with risk behaviors and HIV infection. The second study, using qualitative interviews, observed complex interactions between neighborhood-level social environments and individual-level racial and sexual identity among MSM in New York City. The third study, using egocentric network analysis with a sample of African American MSM in Baltimore, found that sexual partners were more likely to be found through face-to-face means than the Internet. They also observed that those who co-resided with a sex partner had larger networks of people to depend on for social and financial support, but had the same size sexual networks as those who did not live with a partner. Overall, these findings suggest the need for further investigation into the role of macro-level social forces on the emotional, behavioral, and physical health of urban MSM. PMID:21369730

  18. Trans-generational exposure to low levels of rhodamine B does not adversely affect litter size or liver function in murine mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Ainslie L K; Fletcher, Janice M; Moore, Lynette; Byers, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    MPS IIIA is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the sulphamidase gene, resulting in the accumulation of heparan sulphate glycosaminoglycans (HS GAGs). Symptoms predominantly manifest in the CNS and there is no current therapy that effectively addresses neuropathology in MPS IIIA patients. Recent studies in MPS IIIA mice have shown that rhodamine B substrate deprivation therapy (SDT) (also termed substrate reduction therapy/SRT) inhibits GAG biosynthesis and, improves both somatic and CNS disease pathology. Acute overexposure to high doses of rhodamine B results in liver toxicity and is detrimental to reproductive ability. However, the long-term effects of decreasing GAG synthesis, at the low dose sufficient to alter neurological function are unknown. A trans-generational study was therefore initiated to evaluate the continuous exposure of rhodamine B treatment in MPS IIIA mice over 4 generations, including treatment during pregnancy. No alterations in litter size, liver histology or liver function were observed. Overall, there are no long-term issues with the administration of rhodamine B at the low dose tested and no adverse effects were noted during pregnancy in mice. PMID:20650670

  19. Rock Glacier Outflows May Adversely Affect Lakes: Lessons from the Past and Present of Two Neighboring Water Bodies in a Crystalline-Rock Watershed

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that rock glaciers are one of the most common geomorphological expressions of mountain permafrost, the impacts of their solute fluxes on lakes still remain largely obscure. We examined water and sediment chemistry, and biota of two neighboring water bodies with and without a rock glacier in their catchments in the European Alps. Paleolimnological techniques were applied to track long-term temporal trends in the ecotoxicological state of the water bodies and to establish their baseline conditions. We show that the active rock glacier in the mineralized catchment of Lake Rasass (RAS) represents a potent source of acid rock drainage that results in enormous concentrations of metals in water, sediment, and biota of RAS. The incidence of morphological abnormalities in the RAS population of Pseudodiamesa nivosa, a chironomid midge, is as high as that recorded in chironomid populations inhabiting sites heavily contaminated by trace metals of anthropogenic origin. The incidence of morphological deformities in P. nivosa of ∼70% persisted in RAS during the last 2.5 millennia and was ∼40% in the early Holocene. The formation of RAS at the toe of the rock glacier most probably began at the onset of acidic drainage in the freshly deglaciated area. The present adverse conditions are not unprecedented in the lake’s history and cannot be associated exclusively with enhanced thawing of the rock glacier in recent years. PMID:24804777

  20. Rock glacier outflows may adversely affect lakes: lessons from the past and present of two neighboring water bodies in a crystalline-rock watershed.

    PubMed

    Ilyashuk, Boris P; Ilyashuk, Elena A; Psenner, Roland; Tessadri, Richard; Koinig, Karin A

    2014-06-01

    Despite the fact that rock glaciers are one of the most common geomorphological expressions of mountain permafrost, the impacts of their solute fluxes on lakes still remain largely obscure. We examined water and sediment chemistry, and biota of two neighboring water bodies with and without a rock glacier in their catchments in the European Alps. Paleolimnological techniques were applied to track long-term temporal trends in the ecotoxicological state of the water bodies and to establish their baseline conditions. We show that the active rock glacier in the mineralized catchment of Lake Rasass (RAS) represents a potent source of acid rock drainage that results in enormous concentrations of metals in water, sediment, and biota of RAS. The incidence of morphological abnormalities in the RAS population of Pseudodiamesa nivosa, a chironomid midge, is as high as that recorded in chironomid populations inhabiting sites heavily contaminated by trace metals of anthropogenic origin. The incidence of morphological deformities in P. nivosa of ∼70% persisted in RAS during the last 2.5 millennia and was ∼40% in the early Holocene. The formation of RAS at the toe of the rock glacier most probably began at the onset of acidic drainage in the freshly deglaciated area. The present adverse conditions are not unprecedented in the lake's history and cannot be associated exclusively with enhanced thawing of the rock glacier in recent years. PMID:24804777

  1. Plasmid load adversely affects growth and gluconic acid secretion ability of mineral phosphate-solubilizing rhizospheric bacterium Enterobacter asburiae PSI3 under P limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Archana, G; Naresh Kumar, G

    2011-01-20

    Effect of the metabolic load caused by the presence of plasmids on mineral phosphate-solubilizing (MPS) Enterobacter asburiae PSI3, was monitored with four plasmid cloning vectors and one native plasmid, varying in size, nature of the replicon, copy number and antibiotic resistance genes. Except for one plasmid, the presence of all other plasmids in E. asburiae PSI3 resulted in the loss of the MPS phenotype as reflected by the failure to bring about a drop in pH and release soluble P when grown in media containing rock phosphate (RP) as the sole P source. When 100 μM soluble P was supplemented along with RP, the adverse effects of plasmids on MPS phenotype and on growth parameters was reduced for some plasmid bearing derivatives, as monitored in terms of specific growth rates, glucose consumed, gluconic acids yields and P released. When 10 mM of soluble P as the only P source, was added to the medium all transformants showed growth and pH drop comparable with native strain. It may be concluded that different plasmids impose, to varying extents, a metabolic load in the phosphate-solubilizing bacterium E. asburiae PSI3 and results in diminishing its growth and P-solubilizing ability in P deficient conditions. PMID:20171856

  2. Migration, Neighborhoods, and Networks: Approaches to Understanding How Urban Environmental Conditions Affect Syndemic Adverse Health Outcomes Among Gay, Bisexual and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Egan, James E.; Kurtz, Steven P.; Latkin, Carl; Chen, Minxing; Tobin, Karin; Yang, Cui; Koblin, Beryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Adopting socioecological, intersectionality, and lifecourse theoretical frameworks may enhance our understanding of the production of syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM). From this perspective, we present preliminary data from three related studies that suggest ways in which social contexts may influence the health of MSM. The first study, using cross-sectional data, looked at migration of MSM to the gay resort area of South Florida, and found that amount of time lived in the area was associated with risk behaviors and HIV infection. The second study, using qualitative interviews, observed complex interactions between neighborhood-level social environments and individual-level racial and sexual identity among MSM in New York City. The third study, using egocentric network analysis with a sample of African American MSM in Baltimore, found that sexual partners were more likely to be found through face-to-face means than the Internet. They also observed that those who co-resided with a sex partner had larger networks of people to depend on for social and financial support, but had the same size sexual networks as those who did not live with a partner. Overall, these findings suggest the need for further investigation into the role of macro-level social forces on the emotional, behavioral, and physical health of urban MSM. PMID:21369730

  3. Acute over-the-counter pharmacological intervention does not adversely affect behavioral outcome following diffuse traumatic brain injury in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jordan L; Rowe, Rachel K; O'Hara, Bruce F; Adelson, P David; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2014-09-01

    Following mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), patients may self-treat symptoms of concussion, including post-traumatic headache, taking over-the-counter (OTC) analgesics. Administering one dose of OTC analgesics immediately following experimental brain injury mimics the at-home treated population of concussed patients and may accelerate the understanding of the relationship between brain injury and OTC pharmacological intervention. In the current study, we investigate the effect of acute administration of OTC analgesics on neurological function and cortical cytokine levels after experimental diffuse TBI in the mouse. Adult, male C57BL/6 mice were injured using a midline fluid percussion (mFPI) injury model of concussion (6-10 min righting reflex time for brain-injured mice). Experimental groups included mFPI paired with either ibuprofen (60 mg/kg, i.p.; n = 16), acetaminophen (40 mg/kg, i.p.; n = 9), or vehicle (15% ethanol (v/v) in 0.9% saline; n = 13) and sham injury paired OTC medicine or vehicle (n = 7-10 per group). At 24 h after injury, functional outcome was assessed using the rotarod task and a modified neurological severity score. Following behavior assessment, cortical cytokine levels were measured by multiplex ELISA at 24 h post-injury. To evaluate efficacy on acute inflammation, cortical cytokine levels were measured also at 6 h post-injury. In the diffuse brain-injured mouse, immediate pharmacological intervention did not attenuate or exacerbate TBI-induced functional deficits. Cortical cytokine levels were affected by injury, time, or their interaction. However, levels were not affected by treatment at 6 or 24 h post-injury. These data indicate that acute administration of OTC analgesics did not exacerbate or attenuate brain-injury deficits which may inform clinical recommendations for the at-home treated mildly concussed patient. PMID:24760409

  4. Vascular quality of care pilot study: how admission to a vascular surgery service affects evidence-based pharmacologic risk factor modification in patients with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Steenhof, Naomi; Le Piane, Francesca; Leblanc, Kori; Eisenberg, Naomi R; Kwan, Yvonne; Malmberg, Christine; Papadopoulos, Alexandra; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) guidelines recommend aggressive risk factor modification to improve cardiovascular outcomes. Recommended pharmacologic therapies include antiplatelets, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors (statins). Purpose We studied the degree to which patient admission to a vascular surgery service increased the use of these therapies. Patients and methods The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of 150 patients with PAD admitted to the vascular surgery service at a large Canadian tertiary care hospital. The use of recommended pharmacologic therapies at the time of admission and discharge were compared. A multidisciplinary clinical team established criteria by which patients were deemed ineligible to receive any of the recommended therapies. Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) were considered an alternative to ACE inhibitors. Results Prior to hospital admission, 64% of patients were on antiplatelet therapy, 67% were on an ACE inhibitor or ARB, and 71% were on a statin. At the time of discharge, 91% of patients were on an antiplatelet (or not, with an acceptable reason), 77% were on an ACE inhibitor or an ARB (or not, with an acceptable reason), and 85% were on a statin (or not, with an acceptable reason). While new prescriptions were largely responsible for improved guideline adherence with antiplatelets and statins, most of the apparent improvement in ACE inhibitor and ARB use was the result of identifying an acceptable reason for not having them prescribed. Conclusion This hypothesis generating pilot study supports the findings of others that there is suboptimal prescription of pharmacologic risk reduction therapies in the PAD population. Admission to a vascular service increases these rates. Nevertheless, some patients are still not receiving evidence-based treatment at discharge even after consideration of acceptable reasons. Strategies are needed to improve PAD guideline

  5. The effects of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinole treatment on gonadal micro-vascularization and affected fertility examined by SEM and 3D-morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlbacher, K. M. T.; Minnich, B.

    2015-10-01

    The present study focuses on the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on the reproductive system in nude rats with special emphasis on how Δ9-THC impacts the vascularization of testes which in turn indirectly influences fertility. Basically, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) causes not only negative (psychoactive) effects in the human body as cannabinole administration in medical use (dose-dependent) offers multiple new treatment opportunities such as pain relief or containment of various cancers. Concerning the reproductive system it strongly influences CB-receptors along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis resulting in reduced plasma testosterone levels. There is also altered sperm quality parameters reported such as sperm motility or sperm count. On the other hand Δ9-THC effects endothelial growth factors (VEGF, Ang-1 etc.) respectively acts on their specific receptors which in turn modify angiogenesis and vascularization of tissues and organs (e.g. tumorous tissues). This leads to new therapeutical strategies in the suppression of various cancers by inhibiting (neo-)vascularization and in turn famishment of tumorous tissues (lack of nutrition supply). Here we studied the micro-vascularization of gonads in a long-term THC-treated nude rat model by vascular corrosion casting, SEM and 3D-morphometry.

  6. Early pregnancy vitamin D status and risk for adverse maternal and infant outcomes in a bi-ethnic cohort: the Behaviors Affecting Baby and You (B.A.B.Y.) Study.

    PubMed

    Nobles, Carrie J; Markenson, Glenn; Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-12-28

    Vitamin D deficiency is common during pregnancy and higher in Hispanic as compared with non-Hispanic white women. However, the association between vitamin D deficiency and adverse pregnancy outcomes remains unclear and may vary across ethnic groups, in part because of genetic variation in the metabolism of vitamin D. Few studies have included Hispanic women. Therefore, we investigated this association among 237 participants in the Behaviors Affecting Baby and You Study, a randomised trial of an exercise intervention among ethnically diverse prenatal care patients in Massachusetts. Baseline serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was measured at 15·2 (sd 4·7) weeks' gestation. Information on adverse pregnancy outcomes was abstracted from medical records. Mean 25(OH)D was 30·4 (sd 12·0) ng/ml; 53·2 % of participants had insufficient (<30 ng/ml) and 20·7 % had deficient (<20 ng/ml) 25(OH)D levels. After adjusting for month of blood draw, gestational age at blood draw, gestational age at delivery, age, BMI and Hispanic ethnicity, women with insufficient and deficient vitamin D had infants with birth weights 139·74 (se 69·16) g (P=0·045) and 175·52 (se 89·45) g (P=0·051) lower compared with women with sufficient vitamin D levels (≥30 ng/ml). Each 1 ng/ml increase in 25(OH)D was associated with an increased risk for gestational diabetes mellitus among Hispanic women only (relative risk 1·07; 95 % CI 1·03, 1·11) in multivariable analysis. We did not observe statistically significant associations between maternal vitamin D status and other pregnancy outcomes. Our findings provide further support for an adverse impact of vitamin D deficiency on birth weight in Hispanic women. PMID:26507186

  7. Vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. PMID:27301603

  8. Low dietary protein intake during pregnancy differentially affects mitochondrial copy number in stromal vascular cells from subcutaneous versus visceral adipose tissue in the offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study examined the influence of protein intake during pregnancy on mitochondrial metabolism in stromal vascular cells from subcutaneous (SVSu) and visceral (SVVi) adipose tissue of offspring fed a high fat diet. Obese-prone Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets containing either 8% or 20% p...

  9. Vascular Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Abel; Buchanan, Edward P.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are divided into two main groups: tumors and malformations. Vascular tumors are a large and complex group of lesions, especially for clinicians with none or little experience in this field. In the past, these lesions caused a great deal of confusion because many appear analogous to the naked eye. Thankfully, recent advances in diagnostic techniques have helped the medical community to enhance our comprehension, accurately label, diagnose, and treat these lesions. In this article, we will review the most frequent vascular tumors and provide the reader with the tools to properly label, diagnose, and manage these complex lesions. PMID:25045329

  10. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol Smoking Obesity Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  11. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  12. Sirtuin Inhibition Adversely Affects Porcine Oocyte Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Ma, Rujun; Hu, Jin; Ding, Xiaolin; Xu, Yinxue

    2015-01-01

    Sirtuins have been implicated in diverse biological processes, including oxidative stress, energy metabolism, cell migration, and aging. Here, we employed Sirtuin inhibitors, nicotinamide (NAM) and Sirtinol, to investigate their effects on porcine oocyte maturation respectively. The rate of polar body extrusion in porcine oocytes decreased after treatment with NAM and Sirtinol, accompanied with the failure of cumulus cell expansion. We further found that NAM and Sirtinol significantly disrupted oocyte polarity, and inhibited the formation of actin cap and cortical granule-free domain (CGFD). Moreover, the abnormal spindles and misaligned chromosomes were readily detected during porcine oocyte maturation after treatment with NAM and Sirtinol. Together, these results suggest that Sirtuins are involved in cortical polarity and spindle organization in porcine oocytes. PMID:26176547

  13. Glucocorticoids, Osteocytes, and Skeletal Fragility: The Role of Bone Vascularity

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid administration is required for many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, but use of these drugs is associated with skeletal side effects including bone loss, fractures, and osteonecrosis. Fractures often occur without a reduction in bone mineral density, strongly suggesting that glucocorticoid excess adversely affects other aspects of bone strength. Although the primary effects of glucocorticoid excess on the skeleton are directly on bone cells, a vascular connection between these cells and the loss of bone strength appears likely. This review examines this connection and how it may explain the greater decline in bone strength than loss of bone mass that occurs with glucocorticoid excess. PMID:19591965

  14. Potassium Channels and Uterine Vascular Adaptation to Pregnancy and Chronic Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ronghui; Xiao, DaLiao; Zhang, Lubo

    2014-01-01

    During a normal course of pregnancy, uterine vascular tone is significantly decreased resulting in a striking increase in uterine blood flow, which is essential for fetal development and fetal growth. Chronic hypoxia during gestation may adversely affect the normal adaptation of uterine vascular tone and increase the risk of preeclampsia and fetal intrauterine growth restriction. In this review, we present evidence that the regulation of K+ channels is an important mechanism in the adaptation of uterine vascular tone to pregnancy and hypoxia. There are four types of K+ channels identified in arterial smooth muscle cells: 1) voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels, 2) Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) channels, 3) inward rectifier K+ (KIR) channels, and 4) ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels. Pregnancy differentially augments the expression and activity of K+ channels via downregulation of protein kinase C signaling in uterine and other vascular beds, leading to decreased uterine vascular tone and increased uterine blood flow. Sex steroid hormones play an important role in the pregnancy-mediated alteration of K+ channels in the uterine vasculature. In addition, chronic hypoxia alters uterine vascular K+ channels expression and activities via modulation of steroid hormones/receptors-mediated signaling, resulting in increased uterine vascular tone during pregnancy. PMID:24063385

  15. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  16. Biologics in dermatology: adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Pandhi, Deepika; Khurana, Ananta

    2015-12-01

    Biologics are a group of drugs that precisely affect certain specific steps in the immune response and are an extremely useful group when used in an appropriate setting. However, their use can often be a double-edged sword. Careful patient selection and thorough knowledge of adverse effects is a key to their successful use in various disorders. The initial enthusiasm has gradually given way to a more cautious approach wherein a balance is sought between clinical usefulness and expected side effects. The adverse effects of the biologics most commonly used in dermatology have been carefully listed for ready reference. The plausible causes of the adverse reactions are succinctly outlined along with their incriminating factor(s). Besides, in brief, the attention has been focused on their management. The content should provide an essential didactic content for educating the practitioner. PMID:26147909

  17. Adverse effects of drugs on the immature kidney.

    PubMed

    Guignard, J P; Gouyon, J B

    1988-01-01

    The immature kidney may be adversely affected by a variety of vasoactive or diuretic drugs, either administered to the mother during pregnancy, or to the neonate. Inhibitors of the angiotensin-converting enzyme administered to the hypertensive pregnant woman can severely and sometimes definitely impair renal function in the fetus, leading to postnatal anuria. Pathogenesis involves interference with the renin-angiotensin system and the prostaglandins. Beta-adrenergic agents administered during labor depress glomerular filtration rate transiently. Tolazoline, an alpha-adrenergic blocking agent useful in the treatment of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate induces intense renal vasoconstriction with consequent hypoperfusion. Indomethacin, a prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor used for the pharmacological closure of a patent ductus arteriosus, also increases renal vascular resistance, and decreases urine output. Furosemide, the drug most often used in oliguric neonates, may also adversely affect the newborn infant. Its use has been associated with an increase in the incidence of patent ductus arteriosus, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis and secondary hyperparathyroidism. These observations demonstrate that the proper use of drugs requires that the therapeutic endpoint be clearly defined and the predictable side effects be anticipated. PMID:2901276

  18. Palmitic acid increases pro-oxidant adaptor protein p66Shc expression and affects vascularization factors in angiogenic mononuclear cells: Action of resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Favre, Julie; Yildirim, Cansu; Leyen, Thomas A; Chen, Weena J Y; van Genugten, Renate E; van Golen, Larissa W; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan-Jesus; Musters, Rene; Baggen, Josefien; Fontijn, Ruud; van der Pouw Kraan, Tineke; Serné, Erik; Koolwijk, Pieter; Diamant, Michaela; Horrevoets, Anton J G

    2015-12-01

    A defect in neo-vascularization process involving circulating angiogenic mononuclear cells (CACs) dysfunction is associated with diabetes. We showed that oxidative stress was elevated in CACs cultured from blood of individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and diabetes. We then assessed the action of palmitic acid (PA), a deregulated and increased NEFA in metabolic disorders, focusing on its oxidant potential. We observed that the phyto-polyphenol resveratrol normalized oxidative stress both in CACs isolated from MetS patients or treated with PA. Resveratrol further decreased the deleterious action of PA on gene expression of vascularization factors (TNFα, VEGF-A, SDF1α, PECAM-1, VEGFR2, Tie2 and CXCR4) and improved CAC motility. Particularly, resveratrol abolished the PA-induced over-expression of the pro-oxidant protein p66Shc. Neither KLF2 nor SIRT1, previously shown in resveratrol and p66Shc action, was directly involved. Silencing p66Shc normalized PA action on VEGF-A and TNFα specifically, without abolishing the PA-induced oxidative stress, which suggests a deleterious role of p66Shc independently of any major modulation of the cellular oxidative status in a high NEFA levels context. Besides showing that resveratrol reverses PA-induced harmful effects on human CAC function, certainly through profound cellular modifications, we establish p66Shc as a major therapeutic target in metabolic disorders, independent from glycemic control. PMID:26254104

  19. US and MRI features in venous vascular malformation of the abdominal wall. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, F.; Maira, A.; Tarantino, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are classified as vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Venous vascular malformations are the most common type of vascular malformation. They may be isolated or multiple and they rarely affect the trunk. The authors report a rare case of isolated venous vascular malformation of the abdominal wall with an emphasis on the related MRI and ultrasound (US) features. PMID:23450707

  20. Vascular health late after Kawasaki disease: implications for accelerated atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Yiu-Fai

    2014-11-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD), an acute vasculitis that primarily affects young children, is the most common acquired paediatric cardiovascular disease in developed countries. While sequelae of arterial inflammation in the acute phase of KD are well documented, its late effects on vascular health are increasingly unveiled. Late vascular dysfunction is characterized by structural alterations and functional impairment in term of arterial stiffening and endothelial dysfunction and shown to involve both coronary and systemic arteries. Further evidence suggests that continuous low grade inflammation and ongoing active remodeling of coronary arterial lesions occur late after acute illness and may play a role in structural and functional alterations of the arteries. Potential importance of genetic modulation on vascular health late after KD is implicated by associations between mannose binding lectin and inflammatory gene polymorphisms with severity of peripheral arterial stiffening and carotid intima-media thickening. The changes in cholesterol and lipoproteins levels late after KD further appear similar to those proposed to be atherogenic. While data on adverse vascular health are less controversial in patients with persistent or regressed coronary arterial aneurysms, data appear conflicting in individuals with no coronary arterial involvements or only transient coronary ectasia. Notwithstanding, concerns have been raised with regard to predisposition of KD in childhood to accelerated atherosclerosis in adulthood. Until further evidence-based data are available, however, it remains important to assess and monitor cardiovascular risk factors and to promote cardiovascular health in children with a history of KD in the long term. PMID:25550701

  1. The Competitive Interplay between Allosteric HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor BI/D and LEDGF/p75 during the Early Stage of HIV-1 Replication Adversely Affects Inhibitor Potency.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Serrao, Erik; Hoyte, Ashley; Larue, Ross C; Slaughter, Alison; Sharma, Amit; Plumb, Matthew R; Kessl, Jacques J; Fuchs, James R; Bushman, Frederic D; Engelman, Alan N; Griffin, Patrick R; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2016-05-20

    Allosteric HIV-1 integrase inhibitors (ALLINIs) have recently emerged as a promising class of antiretroviral agents and are currently in clinical trials. In infected cells, ALLINIs potently inhibit viral replication by impairing virus particle maturation but surprisingly exhibit a reduced EC50 for inhibiting HIV-1 integration in target cells. To better understand the reduced antiviral activity of ALLINIs during the early stage of HIV-1 replication, we investigated the competitive interplay between a potent representative ALLINI, BI/D, and LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 integrase. While the principal binding sites of BI/D and LEDGF/p75 overlap at the integrase catalytic core domain dimer interface, we show that the inhibitor and the cellular cofactor induce markedly different multimerization patterns of full-length integrase. LEDGF/p75 stabilizes an integrase tetramer through the additional interactions with the integrase N-terminal domain, whereas BI/D induces protein-protein interactions in C-terminal segments that lead to aberrant, higher-order integrase multimerization. We demonstrate that LEDGF/p75 binds HIV-1 integrase with significantly higher affinity than BI/D and that the cellular protein is able to reverse the inhibitor induced aberrant, higher-order integrase multimerization in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Consistent with these observations, alterations of the cellular levels of LEDGF/p75 markedly affected BI/D EC50 values during the early steps of HIV-1 replication. Furthermore, genome-wide sequencing of HIV-1 integration sites in infected cells demonstrate that LEDGF/p75-dependent integration site selection is adversely affected by BI/D treatment. Taken together, our studies elucidate structural and mechanistic details of the interplay between LEDGF/p75 and BI/D during the early stage of HIV-1 replication. PMID:26910179

  2. Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mohamad Anas; Aljabri, Badr; Al-Omran, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Two distinct terms are used to describe vascular thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) depending on which structure is predominantly affected: venous TOS (due to subclavian vein compression) and arterial TOS (due to subclavian artery compression). Although the venous and arterial subtypes of TOS affect only 3% and <1% of all TOS patients respectively, the diagnostic and management approaches to venous and arterial TOS have undergone considerable evolution due to the recent emergence of minimally invasive endovascular techniques such as catheter-directed arterial and venous thrombolysis, and balloon angioplasty. In this review, we discuss the anatomical factors, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical presentation of vascular TOS patients. In addition, we use the most up to date observational evidence available to provide a contemporary approach to the diagnosis and management of venous TOS and arterial TOS patients. PMID:27568153

  3. Adverse antibiotic drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Bint, A J; Burtt, I

    1980-07-01

    There is enormous potential for drug interactions in patients who, today, often receive many drugs. Antibiotics are prominent amongst the groups of drugs commonly prescribed. Many interactions take place at the absorption stage. Antacids and antidiarrhoeal preparations, in particular, can delay and reduce the absorption of antibiotics such as tetracyclines and clindamycin, by combining with them in the gastrointestinal tract to form chelates or complexes. Other drugs can affect gastric motility, which in turn often controls the rate at which antibiotics are absorbed. Some broad spectrum antibiotics can alter the bacterial flora of the gut which may be related to malabsorption states. The potentiation of toxic side effects of one drug by another is a common type of interaction. Antibiotics which are implicated in this type of interaction are those which themselves possess some toxicity such as aminoglycosides, some cephalosporins, tetracyclines and colistin. Some of the most important adverse interactions with antibiotics are those which involve other drugs which have a low toxicity/efficacy ratio. These include anticoagulants such as warfarin, anticonvulsants such as phenytoin and phenobarbitone and oral antidiabetic drugs like tolbutamide. Risk of interaction arises when the metabolism of these drugs is inhibited by liver microsomal enzyme inhibitors such as some sulphonamides and chloramphenicol, or is enhanced by enzyme inducers such as rifampicin. PMID:6995091

  4. [Vascular parkinsonism].

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, H

    1997-01-01

    Critchley speculated that multiple vascular lesions of the basal ganglia must have an etiological connection to the symptoms of so-called vascular parkinsonism (VP), but without neuropathological confirmation. Some had doubts about its existence because of the lack of the pathologically confirmed case with adequate clinical correlation. At present, VP is characterized clinically by the short-stepped or frozen gait, lead-pipe rigidity, the symmetry of findings, absence of resting tremor, and negative response to levodopa in elderly patients with cerebrovascular lesions on CT/MRI. Pseudobulbar palsies, pyramidal tract findings, and/or multi-infarct dementia coexist in some of the cases. Most of clinically suspected VP patients have cerebral white matter lesions as well as basal ganglia lesions. PMID:9014431

  5. Fetal origin of vascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Pitale, Shailesh; Sahasrabuddhe, Anagha

    2011-01-01

    Aging is increasingly regarded as an independent risk factor for development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension and their complications (e.g. MI and Stroke). It is well known that vascular disease evolve over decades with progressive accumulation of cellular and extracellular materials and many inflammatory processes. Metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes are conventionally recognized as risk factors for development of coronary vascular disease (CVD). These conditions are known to accelerate ageing process in general and vascular ageing in particular. Adverse events during intrauterine life may programme organ growth and favour disease later in life, popularly known as, ‘Barker's Hypothesis’. The notion of fetal programming implies that during critical periods of prenatal growth, changes in the hormonal and nutritional milieu of the conceptus may alter the full expression of the fetal genome, leading to permanent effects on a range of physiological. PMID:22145131

  6. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eui Seok; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR. PMID:25667739

  7. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Blei, Francine

    2015-04-01

    Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies encompass entities with a vascular anomaly as the predominant feature vs those syndromes with predominant somatic overgrowth and a vascular anomaly as a more minor component. The focus of this article is to categorize these syndromes phenotypically, including updated clinical criteria, radiologic features, evaluation, management issues, pathophysiology, and genetic information. A literature review was conducted in PubMed using key words "overgrowth syndromes and vascular anomalies" as well as specific literature reviews for each entity and supportive genetic information (e.g., somatic mosaicism). Additional searches in OMIM and Gene Reviews were conducted for each syndrome. Disease entities were categorized by predominant clinical features, known genetic information, and putative affected signaling pathway. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular anomalies are a heterogeneous group of disorders, often with variable clinical expression, due to germline or somatic mutations. Overgrowth can be focal (e.g., macrocephaly) or generalized, often asymmetrically (and/or mosaically) distributed. All germ layers may be affected, and the abnormalities may be progressive. Patients with overgrowth syndromes may be at an increased risk for malignancies. Practitioners should be attentive to patients having syndromes with overgrowth and vascular defects. These patients require proactive evaluation, referral to appropriate specialists, and in some cases, early monitoring for potential malignancies. Progress in identifying vascular anomaly-related overgrowth syndromes and their genetic etiology has been robust in the past decade and is contributing to genetically based prenatal diagnosis and new therapies targeting the putative causative genetic mutations. PMID:25937473

  8. Knock-down of pantothenate kinase 2 severely affects the development of the nervous and vascular system in zebrafish, providing new insights into PKAN disease.

    PubMed

    Zizioli, Daniela; Tiso, Natascia; Guglielmi, Adele; Saraceno, Claudia; Busolin, Giorgia; Giuliani, Roberta; Khatri, Deepak; Monti, Eugenio; Borsani, Giuseppe; Argenton, Francesco; Finazzi, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Pantothenate Kinase Associated Neurodegeneration (PKAN) is an autosomal recessive disorder with mutations in the pantothenate kinase 2 gene (PANK2), encoding an essential enzyme for Coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. The molecular connection between defects in this enzyme and the neurodegenerative phenotype observed in PKAN patients is still poorly understood. We exploited the zebrafish model to study the role played by the pank2 gene during embryonic development and get new insight into PKAN pathogenesis. The zebrafish orthologue of hPANK2 lies on chromosome 13, is a maternal gene expressed in all development stages and, in adult animals, is highly abundant in CNS, dorsal aorta and caudal vein. The injection of a splice-inhibiting morpholino induced a clear phenotype with perturbed brain morphology and hydrocephalus; edema was present in the heart region and caudal plexus, where hemorrhages with reduction of blood circulation velocity were detected. We characterized the CNS phenotype by studying the expression pattern of wnt1 and neurog1 neural markers and by use of the Tg(neurod:EGFP/sox10:dsRed) transgenic line. The results evidenced that downregulation of pank2 severely impairs neuronal development, particularly in the anterior part of CNS (telencephalon). Whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis of the endothelial markers cadherin-5 and fli1a, and use of Tg(fli1a:EGFP/gata1a:dsRed) transgenic line, confirmed the essential role of pank2 in the formation of the vascular system. The specificity of the morpholino-induced phenotype was proved by the restoration of a normal development in a high percentage of embryos co-injected with pank2 mRNA. Also, addition of pantethine or CoA, but not of vitamin B5, to pank2 morpholino-injected embryos rescued the phenotype with high efficiency. The zebrafish model indicates the relevance of pank2 activity and CoA homeostasis for normal neuronal development and functioning and provides evidence of an unsuspected role for this

  9. Knock-down of pantothenate kinase 2 severely affects the development of the nervous and vascular system in zebrafish, providing new insights into PKAN disease

    PubMed Central

    Zizioli, Daniela; Tiso, Natascia; Guglielmi, Adele; Saraceno, Claudia; Busolin, Giorgia; Giuliani, Roberta; Khatri, Deepak; Monti, Eugenio; Borsani, Giuseppe; Argenton, Francesco; Finazzi, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Pantothenate Kinase Associated Neurodegeneration (PKAN) is an autosomal recessive disorder with mutations in the pantothenate kinase 2 gene (PANK2), encoding an essential enzyme for Coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. The molecular connection between defects in this enzyme and the neurodegenerative phenotype observed in PKAN patients is still poorly understood. We exploited the zebrafish model to study the role played by the pank2 gene during embryonic development and get new insight into PKAN pathogenesis. The zebrafish orthologue of hPANK2 lies on chromosome 13, is a maternal gene expressed in all development stages and, in adult animals, is highly abundant in CNS, dorsal aorta and caudal vein. The injection of a splice-inhibiting morpholino induced a clear phenotype with perturbed brain morphology and hydrocephalus; edema was present in the heart region and caudal plexus, where hemorrhages with reduction of blood circulation velocity were detected. We characterized the CNS phenotype by studying the expression pattern of wnt1 and neurog1 neural markers and by use of the Tg(neurod:EGFP/sox10:dsRed) transgenic line. The results evidenced that downregulation of pank2 severely impairs neuronal development, particularly in the anterior part of CNS (telencephalon). Whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis of the endothelial markers cadherin-5 and fli1a, and use of Tg(fli1a:EGFP/gata1a:dsRed) transgenic line, confirmed the essential role of pank2 in the formation of the vascular system. The specificity of the morpholino-induced phenotype was proved by the restoration of a normal development in a high percentage of embryos co-injected with pank2 mRNA. Also, addition of pantethine or CoA, but not of vitamin B5, to pank2 morpholino-injected embryos rescued the phenotype with high efficiency. The zebrafish model indicates the relevance of pank2 activity and CoA homeostasis for normal neuronal development and functioning and provides evidence of an unsuspected role for this

  10. Urbanicity, social adversity and psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Andreas; Deserno, Lorenz; Reininghaus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in research on geographical variation in the incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses. In this paper, we review the evidence on variation in incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses in terms of place, as well as the individual- and area-level factors that account for this variation. We further review findings on potential mechanisms that link adverse urban environment and psychosis. There is evidence from earlier and more recent studies that urbanicity is associated with an increased incidence of schizophrenia and non-affective psychosis. In addition, considerable variation in incidence across neighbourhoods has been observed for these disorders. Findings suggest it is unlikely that social drift alone can fully account for geographical variation in incidence. Evidence further suggests that the impact of adverse social contexts – indexed by area-level exposures such as population density, social fragmentation and deprivation – on risk of psychosis is explained (confounding) or modified (interaction) by environmental exposures at the individual level (i.e., cannabis use, social adversity, exclusion and discrimination). On a neurobiological level, several studies suggest a close link between social adversity, isolation and stress on the one hand, and monoamine dysfunction on the other, which resembles findings in schizophrenia patients. However, studies directly assessing correlations between urban stress or discrimination and neurobiological alterations in schizophrenia are lacking to date. PMID:24096775

  11. Reduction of homocysteine in elderly with heart failure improved vascular function and blood pressure control but did not affect inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Sven E; Edvinsson, Marie-Louise; Edvinsson, Lars

    2005-11-01

    We have previously shown that hyperhomocysteinaemia is common in elderly heart failure patients, and is associated with endothelial dysfunction, impaired vasodilatory capacity and a low-grade inflammation. In the present study we examined if supplementation with B6, B12 and folate could normalize the hyperhomocysteinaemia and if so, in turn, would improve the associated parameters. This was an open study without placebo control on heart failure patients with plasma homocysteine > 15 microM. Measurements of cutaneous vascular reactivity, blood pressure, inflammatory activity and endothelial function were performed before and after intervention with intra-individual comparisons. The treatment reduced homocysteine to near normal values and enhanced the hyperaemic response to acetylcholine related to the response to heat. The mean arterial blood pressure and pulse rate was reduced. There was no effect on inflammatory activity, plasma levels of von Willebrand factor, subjective health quality or the hyperaemic responses to sodium nitroprusside or local warming. Hyperhomocysteinaemia in heart failure patients is multifactorial in origin. Folate deficiency, inflammatory activity and reduced renal function could be contributing. It is suggested that supplementation with B-vitamins can improve the vasodilatory capacity and reduce the blood pressure but additional studies are required to confirm this. PMID:16236143

  12. The Ketogenic Diet Alters the Hypoxic Response and Affects Expression of Proteins Associated with Angiogenesis, Invasive Potential and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Eric C.; Curley, Kara L.; Liu, Qingwei; Turner, Gregory H.; Charlton, Julie A.; Preul, Mark C.; Scheck, Adrienne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The successful treatment of malignant gliomas remains a challenge despite the current standard of care, which consists of surgery, radiation and temozolomide. Advances in the survival of brain cancer patients require the design of new therapeutic approaches that take advantage of common phenotypes such as the altered metabolism found in cancer cells. It has therefore been postulated that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate, adequate protein ketogenic diet (KD) may be useful in the treatment of brain tumors. We have demonstrated that the KD enhances survival and potentiates standard therapy in a mouse model of malignant glioma, yet the mechanisms are not fully understood. Methods To explore the effects of the KD on various aspects of tumor growth and progression, we used the immunocompetent, syngeneic GL261-Luc2 mouse model of malignant glioma. Results Tumors from animals maintained on KD showed reduced expression of the hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrase 9, hypoxia inducible factor 1-alpha, and decreased activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Additionally, tumors from animals maintained on KD had reduced tumor microvasculature and decreased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and vimentin. Peritumoral edema was significantly reduced in animals fed the KD and protein analyses showed altered expression of zona occludens-1 and aquaporin-4. Conclusions The KD directly or indirectly alters the expression of several proteins involved in malignant progression and may be a useful tool for the treatment of gliomas. PMID:26083629

  13. Vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D; Vakhapova, Veronika; Grinberg, Lea T

    2012-01-01

    The epidemic grow of dementia causes great concern for the society. It is customary to consider Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia (VaD). This dichotomous view of a neurodegenerative disease as opposed to brain damage caused by extrinsic factors led to separate lines of research in these two entities. Indeed, accumulated data suggest that the two disorders have additive effects and probably interact; however it is still unknown to what degree. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have shown “vascular” risk factors to be associated with AD. Therefore, a clear distinction between AD and VaD cannot be made in most cases, and is furthermore unhelpful. In the absence of efficacious treatment for the neurodegenerative process, special attention must be given to vascular component, even in patients with presumed mixed pathology. Symptomatic treatment of VaD and AD are similar, although the former is less effective. For prevention of dementia it is important to treat aggressively all factors, even in stroke survivors who do not show evidence of cognitive decline,. In this review, we will give a clinical and pathological picture of the processes leading to VaD and discuss it interaction with AD. PMID:22575403

  14. Vascular dysregulation in normal-tension glaucoma is not affected by structure and function of the microcirculation or macrocirculation at rest: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bossuyt, Jelle; Vandekerckhove, Gwendolijn; De Backer, Tine L M; Van de Velde, Sandrien; Azermai, Majda; Stevens, Anna-Maria; Kestelyn, Philippe; Raemdonck, Tia; Segers, Patrick; Vanmolkot, Floris; Van Bortel, Luc M

    2015-01-01

    In normal-tension glaucoma (NTG), optic nerve damage occurs despite a normal intraocular pressure. Studies implicating systemic blood pressure or, more recently, arterial stiffness in the pathophysiology of NTG have produced conflicting results. Our aim was to investigate whether NTG is associated with alterations in the macrocirculation or microcirculation, cardiac function, and peripheral and central hemodynamics. Thirty patients with NTG (mean age 65 years, range 46-79) and 33 healthy subjects (mean age 67 years, range 42-79) matched for age and sex were included in the study. Exclusion criteria (for both cases and controls) were history of cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, severe hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia. Aortic stiffness was measured using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), central hemodynamics using carotid artery applanation tonometry, and diameter, stiffness, and intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid and femoral artery using echo-tracking. Total peripheral resistance index (TPRI) was derived from mean arterial pressure and cardiac index, measured using ultrasound. There were no statistically significant differences in arterial structure nor function between NTG patients and age and sex-matched controls. NTG versus controls, respectively: brachial blood pressure 126 ± 15/77 ± 8 versus 127 ± 16/76 ± 7 mm Hg, P = 0.81; carotid-femoral PWV 9.8 ± 2.1 versus 10.1 ± 1.9 m/s, P = 0.60; TPRI 1833 ± 609 versus 1779 ± 602 dyne.s/cm5/m2, P = 0.79; and carotid IMT 0.65 ± 0.14 versus 0.68 ± 0.13 mm, P = 0.39. This study could not show an association of NTG with altered IMT, arterial stiffness, total peripheral resistance, cardiac output, and peripheral or central hemodynamics at rest. Although the majority of these NTG patients do exhibit symptoms of vascular dysregulation, in the present study this was not translated into alterations in the microcirculation or macrocirculation at rest. PMID:25590850

  15. Managing adverse effects of glaucoma medications

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic, progressive disease in which retinal ganglion cells disappear and subsequent, gradual reductions in the visual field ensues. Glaucoma eye drops have hypotensive effects and like all other medications are associated with adverse effects. Adverse reactions may either result from the main agent or from preservatives used in the drug vehicle. The preservative benzalkonium chloride, is one such compound that causes frequent adverse reactions such as superficial punctate keratitis, corneal erosion, conjunctival allergy, and conjunctival injection. Adverse reactions related to main hypotensive agents have been divided into those affecting the eye and those affecting the entire body. In particular, β-blockers frequently cause systematic adverse reactions, including bradycardia, decrease in blood pressure, irregular pulse and asthma attacks. Prostaglandin analogs have distinctive local adverse reactions, including eyelash bristling/lengthening, eyelid pigmentation, iris pigmentation, and upper eyelid deepening. No systemic adverse reactions have been linked to prostaglandin analog eye drop usage. These adverse reactions may be minimized when they are detected early and prevented by reducing the number of different eye drops used (via fixed combination eye drops), reducing the number of times eye drops are administered, using benzalkonium chloride-free eye drops, using lower concentration eye drops, and providing proper drop instillation training. Additionally, a one-time topical medication can be given to patients to allow observation of any adverse reactions, thereafter the preparation of a topical medication with the fewest known adverse reactions can be prescribed. This does require precise patient monitoring and inquiries about patient symptoms following medication use. PMID:24872675

  16. Administration of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist affects corpus luteum vascular stability and development and induces luteal apoptosis in a rat model of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Leopoldina; Irusta, Griselda; Abramovich, Dalhia; Tesone, Marta; Parborell, Fernanda

    2011-03-30

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) is a complication of ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins followed by the administration of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) to trigger the final steps of oocyte maturation. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs are thought to be effective in preventing this complication and a clinical trial has found a lower incidence of OHSS in patients treated with these molecules. Our aim was to analyze the in vivo effect of a GnRH-I agonist on corpus luteum development and regression, ANGPT-1, ANGPT-2 and Tie-2 protein expression and luteal blood vessel stabilization, the expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and the cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and cell proliferation, in ovaries from an OHSS rat model. To this end immature female Sprague-Dawley rats were hyperstimulated and treated with a GnRH-I agonist from the start of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) administration until the day of hCG injection for 5 consecutive days. Blood and tissue samples were collected 48h after hCG injection. Vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF levels were evaluated in the peritoneal fluid by ELISA. Serum progesterone and estradiol were measured by RIA. Histological features of sectioned ovaries were assessed in hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained slides. Luteal blood vessel stability, cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed by immunohistochemistry for SMCA, PCNA, and TUNEL, respectively. P450scc, StAR, FLK-1, ANGPT-1, ANGPT-2, Tie-2 and PCNA protein levels were evaluated by Western blot from dissected corpora lutea (CL). The treatment with the GnRH-I agonist significantly decreased serum progesterone and estradiol levels as well as P450scc and StAR protein expression in the untreated OHSS group. In addition, the agonist significantly decreased the number of CL in the OHSS group, as compared with the untreated OHSS group. In the OHSS group, the area of periendothelial cells in the

  17. Vascular risk levels affect the predictive value of platelet reactivity for the occurrence of MACE in patients on clopidogrel. Systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data.

    PubMed

    Reny, Jean-Luc; Fontana, Pierre; Hochholzer, Willibald; Neumann, Franz Josef; Ten Berg, Jurriën; Janssen, Paul W; Geisler, Tobias; Gawaz, Meinrad; Marcucci, Rossella; Gori, Anna-Maria; Cuisset, Thomas; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Berdagué, Philippe; Gurbel, Paul A; Yong, Gerald; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Aradi, Dániel; Beigel, Roy; Campo, Gianluca; Combescure, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Prior studies have shown an association between high on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity (PR) and the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). However, large intervention trials on PR-tailored treatments have been neutral. The role and usefulness of PR with regard to levels of cardiovascular risk are unclear. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data on MACE outcomes (acute coronary syndromes (ACS), ischaemic strokes, and vascular deaths) in relation to PR and its interaction with cardiovascular risk levels. PR was determined using ADP-induced light transmission aggregometry with a primary concentration of 20 µM ADP. Thirteen prospective studies totaled 6,478 clopidogrel-treated patients who experienced 421 MACE (6.5 %) during a median follow-up of 12 months. The strength of the association between the risk of MACE and PR increased significantly (p=0.04) with the number of risk factors present (age> 75 years, ACS at inclusion, diabetes, and hypertension). No association was detected in patients with no risk factor (p=0.48). In patients presenting one risk factor, only high-PR was associated with an increased risk of MACE (HR 3.2, p=0.001). In patients presenting ≥ 2 risk factors, the increase of risk started from medium-PR (medium-PR: HR=2.9, p=0.0004; high-PR: HR=3.7, p=0.0003). PR allowed the reclassification of 44 % of the total population to a different risk level for the outcome of MACE, mostly in intermediate or high risk patients. In conclusion, the magnitude of the association between PR and MACE risk is strongly dependent on the level of cardiovascular risk faced by patients on clopidogrel. PMID:26607655

  18. Adverse reactions to sulfites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William H.; Purchase, Emerson C.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfites are widely used as preservatives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In the United States more than 250 cases of sulfite-related adverse reactions, including anaphylactic shock, asthmatic attacks, urticaria and angioedema, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, seizures and death, have been reported, including 6 deaths allegedly associated with restaurant food containing sulfites. In Canada 10 sulfite-related adverse reactions have been documented, and 1 death suspected to be sulfite-related has occurred. The exact mechanism of sulfite-induced reactions is unknown. Practising physicians should be aware of the clinical manifestations of sulfite-related adverse reactions as well as which foods and pharmaceuticals contain sulfites. Cases should be reported to health officials and proper advice given to the victims to prevent further exposure to sulfites. The food industry, including beer and wine manufacturers, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider using alternative preservatives. In the interim, they should list any sulfites in their products. PMID:4052897

  19. Exercise hypertension: an adverse prognosis?

    PubMed

    Smith, Ryan G; Rubin, Stanley A; Ellestad, Myrvin H

    2009-01-01

    We sought to clarify the prognostic importance of an "exaggerated" or "hypertensive" systolic blood pressure response to exercise during an exercise test. Studies evaluating the prognosis for cardiovascular events and cardiovascular mortality in those with hypertension during exercise testing were systematically reviewed. Fourteen studies were identified. Six studies were of healthy volunteers or hypertensives. Eight studies were in subjects with known or suspected heart disease. Without established heart disease, exercise hypertension predicted cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death. However, two of the six studies included a multivariate analysis; both demonstrated no independent association. Studies in subjects with known or suspected heart disease demonstrated that exercise hypertension predicted fewer cardiac events and lesser mortality or, after multivariate adjustment, no associated risk. In a healthy population, a higher exercise blood pressure may indicate hypertension or prehypertension, instead of normal vascular function, and an associated long-term adverse prognosis. In a population with a high burden of heart disease, the highest risk subjects with the most extensive cardiac disease may not be capable of generating pressure or workload to allow the manifestation of exercise systolic hypertension. By comparison, therefore, those with exercise hypertension have a better prognosis. PMID:20409979

  20. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  1. Vascular Disorders of the Cerebellum in Children.

    PubMed

    De Leacy, Reade A; Berenstein, Alejandro; Naidich, Thomas P

    2016-08-01

    Key differences exist in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of vascular lesions of the cerebellum in children versus adults. An understanding of these differences and an appreciation of the distinct imaging features of these lesions aid in distinguishing normal vascular variations from pathology, in predicting lesion etiology, and in directing effective treatment strategies. This paper reviews the embryogenesis of the normal vascular system of the cerebellum and brainstem and then discusses the clinical and imaging features of the common vascular lesions affecting these structures in the pediatric population. PMID:27423802

  2. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease. PMID:26442438

  3. Major vascular injuries complicating knee arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bancu, Serban; Muresan, Mircea; Sala, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Starting with a case report, we made a detailed review of the literature, with the purpose of identifying and analyzing the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion following knee arthroscopy and the method of vascular repair. A PubMed literature search was undertaken to locate all reported cases of major vascular iatrogenic injuries during arthroscopic knee procedures. We identified 39 papers which report a total of 62 cases of major iatrogenic popliteal lesions after knee arthroscopy, between 1985 and 2014. The type of arthroscopic intervention performed, the type of iatrogenic vascular lesion encountered, the time passed until its discovery and treatment, the method of vascular reconstruction, and the postoperative course are presented. Postarthroscopy vascular complications are infrequent but potentially disastrous for the condition of the affected inferior limb. An early diagnosis and reintervention are mandatory for a good postoperative outcome. PMID:26240627

  4. A Review of Vascular Anomalies: Genetics and Common Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Killion, Elizabeth; Mohan, Kriti; Lee, Edward I.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular tumors and malformations are unique in that affected cells exhibit disrupted angiogenesis. The current treatment options often yield suboptimal results. New insight into the genetics and molecular basis of vascular anomalies may pave the way for potential development of targeted therapy. The authors review the genetic and molecular basis of vascular anomalies and common associated syndromes. PMID:25045331

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor coordinates islet innervation via vascular scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Rachel B.; Cai, Qing; Hong, Ji-Young; Plank, Jennifer L.; Aamodt, Kristie; Prasad, Nripesh; Aramandla, Radhika; Dai, Chunhua; Levy, Shawn E.; Pozzi, Ambra; Labosky, Patricia A.; Wright, Christopher V. E.; Brissova, Marcela; Powers, Alvin C.

    2014-01-01

    Neurovascular alignment is a common anatomical feature of organs, but the mechanisms leading to this arrangement are incompletely understood. Here, we show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling profoundly affects both vascularization and innervation of the pancreatic islet. In mature islets, nerves are closely associated with capillaries, but the islet vascularization process during embryonic organogenesis significantly precedes islet innervation. Although a simple neuronal meshwork interconnects the developing islet clusters as they begin to form at E14.5, the substantial ingrowth of nerve fibers into islets occurs postnatally, when islet vascularization is already complete. Using genetic mouse models, we demonstrate that VEGF regulates islet innervation indirectly through its effects on intra-islet endothelial cells. Our data indicate that formation of a VEGF-directed, intra-islet vascular plexus is required for development of islet innervation, and that VEGF-induced islet hypervascularization leads to increased nerve fiber ingrowth. Transcriptome analysis of hypervascularized islets revealed an increased expression of extracellular matrix components and axon guidance molecules, with these transcripts being enriched in the islet-derived endothelial cell population. We propose a mechanism for coordinated neurovascular development within pancreatic islets, in which endocrine cell-derived VEGF directs the patterning of intra-islet capillaries during embryogenesis, forming a scaffold for the postnatal ingrowth of essential autonomic nerve fibers. PMID:24574008

  6. Inflammation in the Vascular Bed

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Rene; May, James M.

    2008-01-01

    Despite decreases in atherosclerotic coronary vascular disease over the last several decades, atherosclerosis remains a major cause of mortality in developed nations. One possible contributor to this residual risk is oxidant stress, which is generated by the inflammatory response of atherosclerosis. Although there is a wealth of in vitro, cellular, and animal data supporting a protective role for antioxidant vitamins and nutrients in the atherosclerotic process, the best clinical trials have been negative. This may be due to the fact that antioxidant therapies are applied “too little and too late.” This review considers the role of vitamin C, or ascorbic acid in preventing the earliest inflammatory changes in atherosclerosis. It focuses on the three major vascular cell types involved in atherosclerosis: endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. Ascorbate chemistry, recycling, and function are described for these cell types, with emphasis on whether and how the vitamin might affect the inflammatory process. For endothelial cells, ascorbate helps to prevent endothelial dysfunction, stimulates type IV collagen synthesis, and enhances cell proliferation. For vascular smooth muscle cells, ascorbate inhibits dedifferentiation, recruitment, and proliferation in areas of vascular damage. For macrophages, ascorbate decreases oxidant stress related to their activation, decreases uptake and degradation of oxidized LDL in some studies, and enhances several aspects of their function. Although further studies of ascorbate function in these cell types and in novel animal models are needed, available evidence generally supports a salutary role for this vitamin in ameliorating the earliest stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:18582947

  7. [Adverse reaction of pseudoephedrine].

    PubMed

    López Lois, G; Gómez Carrasco, J A; García de Frías, E

    2005-04-01

    We present a case of a 7 years old girl who developed an episode of myoclonic movements and tremors after being medicated with a not well quantified amount of a pseudoephedrine/antihistamine combination. We want to highlight the potential toxicity of pseudoephedrine, usually administered as part of cold-syrup preparations which are used for symptomatic treatment of upper respiratory tract cough and congestion associated with the common cold and allergic rhinitis. Although these products are generally considered to be safe either by physicians and parents, we can't underestimate the potential adverse events and toxic effects that can occur when administering these medications. PMID:15826569

  8. Screening for adverse events.

    PubMed

    Karson, A S; Bates, D W

    1999-02-01

    Adverse events (AEs) in medical patients are common, costly, and often preventable. Development of quality improvement programs to decrease the number and impact of AEs demands effective methods for screening for AEs on a routine basis. Here we describe the impact, types, and potential causes of AEs and review various techniques for identifying AEs. We evaluate the use of generic screening criteria in detail and describe a recent study of the sensitivity and specificity of individual generic screening criteria and combinations of these criteria. In general, the most sensitive screens were the least specific and no small sub-set of screens identified a large percentage of adverse events. Combinations of screens that were limited to administrative data were the least expensive, but none were particularly sensitive, although in practice they might be effective since routine screening is currently rarely done. As computer systems increase in sophistication sensitivity will improve. We also discuss recent studies that suggest that programs that screen for and identify AEs can be useful in reducing AE rates. While tools for identifying AEs have strengths and weaknesses, they can play an important role in organizations' quality improvement portfolios. PMID:10468381

  9. Adverse Drug Reactions of the Lower Extremities.

    PubMed

    Adigun, Chris G

    2016-07-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are a common cause of dermatologic consultation, involving 2 to 3 per 100 medical inpatients in the United States. Female patients are 1.3 to 1.5 times more likely to develop ADRs, except in children less than 3 years of age, among whom boys are more often affected. Certain drugs are more frequent causes, including aminopenicillins, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. Chemotherapeutic agents commonly cause adverse reactions to the skin and nails, with certain agents causing particular patterns of reactions. ADRs can involve any area of the skin; the appendages, including hair and nails; as well as mucosa. PMID:27215159

  10. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Xiangyuan; Ren, Meixia; An, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruoxin; Yan, Shunying; Situ, Haiteng; He, Xinjie; Chen, Yequn; Tan, Xuerui; Xiao, Qingzhong; Tucker, Arthur T.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Ye, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic variant and CHD

  11. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Ng, Fu Liang; Chan, Kenneth; Pu, Xiangyuan; Poston, Robin N; Ren, Meixia; An, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruoxin; Wu, Jingchun; Yan, Shunying; Situ, Haiteng; He, Xinjie; Chen, Yequn; Tan, Xuerui; Xiao, Qingzhong; Tucker, Arthur T; Caulfield, Mark J; Ye, Shu

    2016-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic variant and CHD

  12. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  13. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... branch of medicine that focuses on the cardiovascular system. ... Circulatory system; Vascular system; Cardiovascular system ... to diagnose, monitor or treat diseases of the circulatory and vascular system include: Cardiac CT for calcium scoring Cardiac MRI ...

  14. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Annual Meeting Events Calendar Vascular Medicine Events Job Bank Professional Practice Position Statements PAD Awareness Vascular Related ... for a new job? Try the SVM Job Bank . Browse the jobs or sign up for job ...

  15. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/007459.htm Heart and vascular services To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood vessels (arteries and veins). Heart and vascular services refers to the branch of medicine that focuses ...

  16. ISMP Adverse Drug Reactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA’s MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:24421544

  17. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions. PMID:25458866

  18. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds: Biodegradation, drug delivery and vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Tesfamariam, Belay

    2016-05-01

    The metallic stents with durable polymers have been effective in reducing the need for revascularization, but the permanent presence of the metal and polymer have been associated with persistent inflammation, hypersensitivity reactions and incidence of thrombosis. Recent innovations of bioresorbable polymers are in development which could serve as temporary scaffolds that degrade into molecules and eventually resorb overtime, and leave the artery free of any permanent prosthetic constraints. The transient scaffolding has the advantages of restoring blood vessel to natural state, improve vasomotor tone and increase lumen enlargement because of expansive remodeling following completion of polymer resorption. The success of bioresorbable vascular scaffolds will depend on the degradation timeline, such that the elastic recoil of the blood vessel and negative remodeling which could potentially lead to restenosis are prevented. Bioresorbable scaffolds with bulky backbone and thick struts could lead to prolonged biodegradation, alter blood flow dynamics and increase thrombogenicity. The development of bioresorbable scaffolds is challenging because of the complexity of finding an ideal balance of polymer biodegradation and controlled drug release over time, such that the fractional drug released achieves optimal inhibitory concentration until the blood vessel remodels to a stable set point. This review discusses the various types of biodegradable materials, factors affecting biodegradation, drug release kinetics, vascular biocompatibility, adaptive vascular remodeling, and challenges in the development of bioresorbable scaffolds to treat vascular restenosis. PMID:27001225

  19. Vascular restoration therapy and bioresorbable vascular scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunbing; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of minimally invasive intervention technologies for vascular restoration therapy from early-stage balloon angioplasty in 1970s, metallic bare metal stent and metallic drug-eluting stent technologies in 1990s and 2000s, to bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) technology in large-scale development in recent years. The history, the current stage, the challenges and the future of BVS development are discussed in detail as the best available approach for vascular restoration therapy. The criteria of materials selection, design and processing principles of BVS, and the corresponding clinical trial results are also summarized in this article. PMID:26816624

  20. Vascular Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Hera; Goldie, Lauren C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of human stem and progenitor cells is critically important for the development and optimization of regenerative medicine strategies. For vascular regeneration studies, specifically, a true “vascular stem cell” population has not yet been identified. However, a number of cell types that exist endogenously, or can be generated or propagated ex vivo, function as vascular precursor cells and can participate in and/or promote vascular regeneration. Herein, we provide an overview of what is known about the regulation of their differentiation specifically toward a vascular endothelial cell phenotype. PMID:22866199

  1. Adverse childhood experiences and health anxiety in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Sarah J; McMillan, Katherine A; Wright, Kristi D; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2014-03-01

    Childhood experiences are thought to predispose a person to the development of health anxiety later in life. However, there is a lack of research investigating the influence of specific adverse experiences (e.g., childhood abuse, household dysfunction) on this condition. The current study examined the cumulative influence of multiple types of childhood adversities on health anxiety in adulthood. Adults 18-59 years of age (N=264) completed a battery of measures to assess adverse childhood experiences, health anxiety, and associated constructs (i.e., negative affect and trait anxiety). Significant associations were observed between adverse childhood experiences, health anxiety, and associated constructs. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicted that adverse childhood experiences were predictive of health anxiety in adulthood; however, the unique contribution of these experience were no longer significant following the inclusion of the other variables of interest. Subsequently, mediation analyses indicated that both negative affect and trait anxiety independently mediated the relationship between adverse childhood experiences and health anxiety in adulthood. Increased exposure to adverse childhood experiences is associated with higher levels of health anxiety in adulthood; this relationship is mediated through negative affect and trait anxiety. Findings support the long-term negative impact of cumulative adverse childhood experiences and emphasize the importance of addressing negative affect and trait anxiety in efforts to prevent and treat health anxiety. PMID:24011493

  2. ADVERSE CUTANEOUS DRUG REACTION

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR. PMID:19967009

  3. The adverse health effects of chronic cannabis use.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wayne; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the most probable of the adverse health effects of regular cannabis use sustained over years, as indicated by epidemiological studies that have established an association between cannabis use and adverse outcomes; ruled out reverse causation; and controlled for plausible alternative explanations. We have also focused on adverse outcomes for which there is good evidence of biological plausibility. The focus is on those adverse health effects of greatest potential public health significance--those that are most likely to occur and to affect a substantial proportion of regular cannabis users. These most probable adverse effects of regular use include a dependence syndrome, impaired respiratory function, cardiovascular disease, adverse effects on adolescent psychosocial development and mental health, and residual cognitive impairment. PMID:23836598

  4. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Krakowski, Andrew C; Naheedy, John H; Kruk, Peter G; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2015-12-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  5. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  6. Clinical pharmacology and vascular risk.

    PubMed

    Silvestrelli, G; Corea, F; Micheli, S; Lanari, A

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment and several drugs of abuse have been associated with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). However, there is a paucity of data on the independent risk of vascular disease (VD) associated with pharmacological treatment and no controlled trials demonstrating a reduction in risk with abstinence. Information about IHD and CVD-related drug abuse is mainly limited to epidemiological studies focused on urban populations. The potential link between some pharmacological treatments (estrogen, some oncologic drugs and some atypical antipsychotics) and cerebrovascular adverse events was analyzed, but disagreement about an association persists. Drugs of abuse, including cocaine, amphetamines and heroin, have been associated with an increased vascular risk. These drugs can cause abrupt changes in blood pressure, vasculitic-type changes, lead to embolization caused by infective endocarditis, and hemostatic and hematologic abnormalities that can result in increased blood viscosity and platelet aggregation. Long-term treatment strategies based on medication, psychological support, and outreach programs play an important role in treatment of drug dependency. In these last years public interest in risk factors for VD has been constantly increasing and the successful identification and management of pharmacological treatment and drug abuse can be challenging. One of the major public health issues for the future will be to focus more on new vascular risk factor recognition and management. The objective of this chapter is to review the relevance of IHD and CVD associated with various pharmacological treatments and drug abuse with focusing on ischemic disease. This chapter reports the clinical evidence of this association and analyzes the experimental role of new drugs as a growing risk factor of VD with the hypothetical new association. In conclusion, in this chapter great attention is paid to evaluating the scientific and real

  7. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  8. Vascular and amyloid pathologies are independent predictors of cognitive decline in normal elderly

    PubMed Central

    Lesnick, Timothy G.; Przybelski, Scott A.; Knopman, David S.; Preboske, Greg M.; Kantarci, Kejal; Raman, Mekala R.; Machulda, Mary M.; Mielke, Michelle M.; Lowe, Val J.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Rocca, Walter A.; Roberts, Rosebud O.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford R.

    2015-01-01

    both vascular and amyloid pathologies, the effect of both pathologies on cognition was additive and not synergistic. For a 79-year-old subject, the predicted annual rate of global z-score decline was −0.02 if on neither pathway, −0.07 if on the vascular pathway, −0.08 if on the amyloid pathway and −0.13 if on both pathways. The main conclusions of this study were: (i) amyloid and vascular pathologies seem to be at least partly independent processes that both affect longitudinal cognitive trajectories adversely and are major drivers of cognitive decline in the elderly; and (ii) cognitive reserve seems to offset the deleterious effect of both pathologies on the cognitive trajectories. PMID:25595145

  9. Preparation and features of polycaprolactone vascular grafts with the incorporated vascular endothelial growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevostyanova, V. V.; Khodyrevskaya, Y. I.; Glushkova, T. V.; Antonova, L. V.; Kudryavtseva, Y. A.; Barbarash, O. L.; Barbarash, L. S.

    2015-10-01

    The development of tissue-engineered small-diameter vascular grafts is an urgent issue in cardiovascular surgery. In this study, we assessed how the incorporation of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) affects morphological and mechanical properties of polycaprolactone (PCL) vascular grafts along with its release kinetics. Vascular grafts were prepared using two-phase electrospinning. In pursuing our aims, we performed scanning electron microscopy, mechanical testing, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results demonstrated the preservation of a highly porous structure and improvement of PCL/VEGF scaffold mechanical properties as compared to PCL grafts. A prolonged VEGF release testifies the use of this construct as a scaffold for tissue-engineered vascular grafts.

  10. Preparation and features of polycaprolactone vascular grafts with the incorporated vascular endothelial growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Sevostyanova, V. V. Khodyrevskaya, Y. I.; Glushkova, T. V.; Antonova, L. V.; Kudryavtseva, Y. A.; Barbarash, O. L.; Barbarash, L. S.

    2015-10-27

    The development of tissue-engineered small-diameter vascular grafts is an urgent issue in cardiovascular surgery. In this study, we assessed how the incorporation of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) affects morphological and mechanical properties of polycaprolactone (PCL) vascular grafts along with its release kinetics. Vascular grafts were prepared using two-phase electrospinning. In pursuing our aims, we performed scanning electron microscopy, mechanical testing, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results demonstrated the preservation of a highly porous structure and improvement of PCL/VEGF scaffold mechanical properties as compared to PCL grafts. A prolonged VEGF release testifies the use of this construct as a scaffold for tissue-engineered vascular grafts.

  11. Does Aldosterone Play a Significant Role for Regulation of Vascular Tone?

    PubMed

    Lyngsø, Kristina S; Assersen, Kasper; Dalgaard, Emil G; Skott, Ole; Jensen, Boye L; Hansen, Pernille B L

    2016-07-01

    Besides the well-known renal effects of aldosterone, the hormone is now known to have direct vascular effects. Clinical observations underline substantial adverse effects of aldosterone on cardiovascular function. The source of systemic circulating aldosterone is the adrenal gland zona glomerulosa cells through stimulus-secretion coupling involving depolarization, opening of L- and T-type calcium channels and aldosterone synthase activation. Local formation and release in peripheral tissues such as perivascular fat is recognized. Where does aldosterone affect the vasculature? Mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) are present in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, and MR-independent pathways are also involved. The vascular effects of aldosterone are complex, both concentration and temporal and spatial aspects are relevant. The acute response includes vasodilation through endothelial nitric oxide formation and vasoconstrictor effects through endothelial-contracting cyclooxygenase-derived factors and a changed calcium handling. The response to aldosterone can change within the same blood vessels depending on the exposure time and status of the endothelium. Chronic responses involve changed levels of reactive oxygen radicals, endothelial Na-influx and smooth muscle calcium channel expression. Furthermore, perivascular cells for example mast cells have also been suggested to participate in the chronic response. Moreover, the vascular effect of aldosterone depends on the status of the endothelium which is likely the cause of the very different responses to aldosterone and MR treatment observed in human studies going from increased to decreased flow depending on whether the patient had prior cardiovascular disease with endothelial dysfunction or not. A preponderance of constrictor versus dilator responses to aldosterone could therefore be involved in the detrimental vascular actions of the hormone in the setting of endothelial dysfunction and contribute to explain

  12. Characterization of the adverse effects of nicotine on placental development: in vivo and in vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, A. C.; Salomon, A.; Soares, M. J.; Garnier, V.; Raha, S.; Sergent, F.; Nicholson, C. J.; Feige, J. J.; Benharouga, M.

    2013-01-01

    In utero exposure to nicotine is associated with increased risk of numerous adverse fetal and neonatal outcomes, which suggests that it acts directly to affect placental development and the establishment of the fetomaternal circulation (FC). This study used both in vivo [Wistar rats treated with 1 mg/kg nicotine from 2 wk prior to mating until gestational day (GD) 15] and in vitro (RCHO-1 cell line; treated with 10−9 to 10−3M nicotine) models to examine the effects of nicotine on these pathways. At GD 15, control and treated placentas were examined for the impact of nicotine on 1) trophoblast invasion, proliferation, and degree of hypoxia, 2) labyrinth vascularization, 3) expression of key genes of placental development, and 4) expression of placental angiogenic factors. The RCHO-1 cell line was used to determine the direct effects of nicotine on trophoblast differentiation. Our in vivo experiments show that nicotine inhibits trophoblast interstitial invasion, increases placental hypoxia, downregulates labyrinth vascularization as well as key transcription factors Hand1 and GCM1, and decreases local and circulating EG-VEGF, a key placental angiogenic factor. The in vitro experiments confirmed the inhibitory effects of nicotine on the trophoblast migration, invasion, and differentiation processes and demonstrated that those effects are most likely due to a dysregulation in the expression of nicotine receptors and a decrease in MMP9 activity. Taken together, these data suggest that adverse effects of maternal smoking on pregnancy outcome are due in part to direct and endocrine effects of nicotine on the main processes of placental development and establishment of FC. PMID:24368670

  13. HYPOCHLORITE-SERUM REACTION PRODUCTS INHIBIT PORCINE VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELL GROWTH IN CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro toxicity studies were initiated in order to determine if chlorination affects vascular endothelial cells. Twelfth to twentieth passage porcine aortic vascular endothelial cells (PAE) were grown to confluency and replated in the presence of complete media (Eagle's minimum...

  14. [Vascular factors in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Mottet, B; Aptel, F; Geiser, M; Romanet, J P; Chiquet, C

    2015-12-01

    The exact pathophysiology of glaucoma is not fully understood. Understanding of the vascular pathophysiology of glaucoma requires: knowing the techniques for measuring ocular blood flow and characterizing the topography of vascular disease and the mechanisms involved in this neuropathy. A decreased mean ocular perfusion pressure and a loss of vascular autoregulation are implicated in glaucomatous disease. Early decrease in ocular blood flow has been identified in primary open-angle glaucoma and normal pressure glaucoma, contributing to the progression of optic neuropathy. The vascular damage associated with glaucoma is present in various vascular territories within the eye (from the ophthalmic artery to the retina) and is characterized by a decrease in basal blood flow associated with a dysfunction of vasoregulation. PMID:26597554

  15. Estrogen, vascular estrogen receptor and hormone therapy in postmenopausal vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Raouf A

    2013-12-15

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject's age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  16. Estrogen, Vascular Estrogen Receptor and Hormone Therapy in Postmenopausal Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Raouf A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is less common in premenopausal women than men of the same age or postmenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of estrogen. Estrogen activates estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and GPR30 in endothelium and vascular smooth muscle (VSM), which trigger downstream signaling pathways and lead to genomic and non-genomic vascular effects such as vasodilation, decreased VSM contraction and growth and reduced vascular remodeling. However, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), such as the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) and Heart and Estrogen/progestin Replacement Study (HERS), have shown little vascular benefits and even adverse events with menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), likely due to factors related to the MHT used, ER profile, and RCT design. Some MHT forms, dose, combinations or route of administration may have inadequate vascular effects. Age-related changes in ER amount, distribution, integrity and post-ER signaling could alter the vascular response to MHT. The subject’s age, preexisting CVD, and hormone environment could also reduce the effects of MHT. Further evaluation of natural and synthetic estrogens, phytoestrogens, and selective estrogen-receptor modulators (SERMs), and the design of appropriate MHT combinations, dose, route and 'timing' could improve the effectiveness of conventional MHT and provide alternative therapies in the peri-menopausal period. Targeting ER using specific ER agonists, localized MHT delivery, and activation of specific post-ER signaling pathways could counter age-related changes in ER. Examination of the hormone environment and conditions associated with hormone imbalance such as polycystic ovary syndrome may reveal the causes of abnormal hormone-receptor interactions. Consideration of these factors in new RCTs such as the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study (KEEPS) could enhance the vascular benefits of estrogen in postmenopausal CVD. PMID:24099797

  17. Preoperative optimization of the vascular surgery patient.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Henry T; Purcell, Seth T; Bush, Ruth L

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that patients who suffer from peripheral (noncardiac) vascular disease often have coexisting atherosclerotic diseases of the heart. This may leave the patients susceptible to major adverse cardiac events, including death, myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and pulmonary edema, during the perioperative time period, in addition to the many other complications they may sustain as they undergo vascular surgery procedures, regardless of whether the procedure is performed as an open or endovascular modality. As these patients are at particularly high risk, up to 16% in published studies, for postoperative cardiac complications, many proposals and algorithms for perioperative optimization have been suggested and studied in the literature. Moreover, in patients with recent coronary stents, the risk of non-cardiac surgery on adverse cardiac events is incremental in the first 6 months following stent implantation. Just as postoperative management of patients is vital to the outcome of a patient, preoperative assessment and optimization may reduce, and possibly completely alleviate, the risks of major postoperative complications, as well as assist in the decision-making process regarding the appropriate surgical and anesthetic management. This review article addresses several tools and therapies that treating physicians may employ to medically optimize a patient before they undergo noncardiac vascular surgery. PMID:26170688

  18. HDL in children with CKD promotes endothelial dysfunction and an abnormal vascular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Shroff, Rukshana; Speer, Thimoteus; Colin, Sophie; Charakida, Marietta; Zewinger, Stephen; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Hettrich, Inga; Rohrer, Lucia; O'Neill, Francis; McLoughlin, Eve; Long, David; Shanahan, Catherine M; Landmesser, Ulf; Fliser, Danilo; Deanfield, John E

    2014-11-01

    Endothelial dysfunction begins in early CKD and contributes to cardiovascular mortality. HDL is considered antiatherogenic, but may have adverse vascular effects in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and inflammatory conditions. The effect of renal failure on HDL properties is unknown. We studied the endothelial effects of HDL isolated from 82 children with CKD stages 2-5 (HDL(CKD)), who were free of underlying inflammatory diseases, diabetes, or active infections. Compared with HDL from healthy children, HDL(CKD) strongly inhibited nitric oxide production, promoted superoxide production, and increased vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human aortic endothelial cells, and reduced cholesterol efflux from macrophages. The effects on endothelial cells correlated with CKD grade, with the most profound changes induced by HDL from patients on dialysis, and partial recovery observed with HDL isolated after kidney transplantation. Furthermore, the in vitro effects on endothelial cells associated with increased aortic pulse wave velocity, carotid intima-media thickness, and circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction in patients. Symmetric dimethylarginine levels were increased in serum and fractions of HDL from children with CKD. In a longitudinal follow-up of eight children undergoing kidney transplantation, HDL-induced production of endothelial nitric oxide, superoxide, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in vitro improved significantly at 3 months after transplantation, but did not reach normal levels. These results suggest that in children with CKD without concomitant disease affecting HDL function, HDL dysfunction begins in early CKD, progressing as renal function declines, and is partially reversed after kidney transplantation. PMID:24854267

  19. Vascular Complications of Cancer Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Alan C; Touyz, Rhian M; Lang, Ninian N

    2016-07-01

    Development of new anticancer drugs has resulted in improved mortality rates and 5-year survival rates in patients with cancer. However, many of the modern chemotherapies are associated with cardiovascular toxicities that increase cardiovascular risk in cancer patients, including hypertension, thrombosis, heart failure, cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmias. These limitations restrict treatment options and might negatively affect the management of cancer. The cardiotoxic effects of older chemotherapeutic drugs such as alkylating agents, antimetabolites, and anticancer antibiotics have been known for a while. The newer agents, such as the antiangiogenic drugs that inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor signalling are also associated with cardiovascular pathology, especially hypertension, thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, and proteinuria. Exact mechanisms by which vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors cause these complications are unclear but impaired endothelial function, vascular and renal damage, oxidative stress, and thrombosis might be important. With increasing use of modern chemotherapies and prolonged survival of cancer patients, the incidence of cardiovascular disease in this patient population will continue to increase. Accordingly, careful assessment and management of cardiovascular risk factors in cancer patients by oncologists and cardiologists working together is essential for optimal care so that prolonged cancer survival is not at the expense of increased cardiovascular events. PMID:26968393

  20. Pregnancy and vascular liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, Julien; Durand, François; de Raucourt, Emmanuelle; Ceccaldi, Pierre-François; Plessier, Aurélie; Valla, Dominique; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2015-03-01

    Vascular disorders of the liver frequently affect women of childbearing age. Pregnancy and the postpartum are prothrombotic states. Pregnancy seems to be a trigger for Budd-Chiari syndrome in patients with an underlying prothrombotic disorder. Whether pregnancy is a risk factor for other vascular liver disorders is unknown. In women with a known vascular liver disorder and a desire for pregnancy, stabilisation of the liver disease, including the use of a portal decompressive procedure when indicated, should be reached prior to conception. The presence of esophageal varices should be screened and adequate prophylaxis of bleeding applied in a manner similar to what is recommended for patients with cirrhosis. Most women likely benefit from anticoagulation during pregnancy and the postpartum. Labor and delivery are best managed by a multidisciplinary team with experience in this situation. Assisted vaginal delivery is the preferred mode of delivery. Although the risk of miscarriage and premature birth is heightened, current management of these diseases makes it very likely to see the birth of a live baby when pregnancy reaches 20 weeks of gestation. PMID:25941432

  1. Pregnancy and Vascular Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, Julien; Durand, François; de Raucourt, Emmanuelle; Ceccaldi, Pierre-François; Plessier, Aurélie; Valla, Dominique; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Vascular disorders of the liver frequently affect women of childbearing age. Pregnancy and the postpartum are prothrombotic states. Pregnancy seems to be a trigger for Budd–Chiari syndrome in patients with an underlying prothrombotic disorder. Whether pregnancy is a risk factor for other vascular liver disorders is unknown. In women with a known vascular liver disorder and a desire for pregnancy, stabilisation of the liver disease, including the use of a portal decompressive procedure when indicated, should be reached prior to conception. The presence of esophageal varices should be screened and adequate prophylaxis of bleeding applied in a manner similar to what is recommended for patients with cirrhosis. Most women likely benefit from anticoagulation during pregnancy and the postpartum. Labor and delivery are best managed by a multidisciplinary team with experience in this situation. Assisted vaginal delivery is the preferred mode of delivery. Although the risk of miscarriage and premature birth is heightened, current management of these diseases makes it very likely to see the birth of a live baby when pregnancy reaches 20 weeks of gestation. PMID:25941432

  2. Adverse possession of subsurface minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, P.N.

    1983-01-01

    Concepts applicable to adverse possession of subsurface minerals are generally the same as those that apply to adverse possession of all real estate. However, special requirements must be satisfied in order to perfect title to subsurface minerals by adverse possession, particularly when there has been a severance of the true title between surface and subsurface minerals. In those jurisdictions where senior and junior grants came from the state or commonwealth covering the same or some of the same land and in those areas where descriptions of land were vague or not carefully drawn, adverse possession serves to solidify land and mineral ownership. There may be some public, social, and economic justification in rewarding, with good title, those who take possession and use real estate for its intended use, including the extraction of subsurface minerals. 96 refernces.

  3. Delivery of Polymeric Nanoparticles to Target Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Agyare, Edward; Kandimalla, Karunyna

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in nanotechnology have paved the way for the early detection, prevention and treatment of various diseases such as vascular disorders and cancer. These advances have provided novel approaches or modalities of incorporating or adsorbing therapeutic, biosensor and targeting agents into/on nanoparticles. With significant progress, nanomedicine for vascular therapy has shown significant advantages over traditional medicine because of its ability to selectively target the disease site and reduce adverse side effects. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to vascular endothelial cells or the vascular wall provides an effective and more efficient way for early detection and/or treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis and Cerebrovascular Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA). Clinical applications of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers in areas such as vascular graft, implantable drug delivery, stent devices and tissue engineering scaffolds have advanced the candidature of polymers as potential nano-carriers for vascular-targeted delivery of diagnostic agents and drugs. This review focuses on the basic aspects of the vasculature and its associated diseases and relates them to polymeric nanoparticle-based strategies for targeting therapeutic agents to diseased vascular site. PMID:26069867

  4. Links between ectopic fat and vascular disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soo; Meigs, James B

    2014-09-01

    The average of overweight individual can have differential fat depots in target organs or specific compartments of the body. This ectopic fat distribution may be more of a predictive factor for cardiovascular risk than obesity. Abdominal visceral obesity, a representative ectopic fat, is robustly associated with insulin resistance and cardiovascular risk. Fat depots in the liver and muscle tissue cause adverse cardiometabolic risk by affecting glucose and lipid metabolism. Pericardial fat and perivascular fat affect coronary atherosclerosis, cardiac function, and hemodynamics. Fat around the neck is associated with systemic vascular resistance. Fat around the kidney may increase blood pressure and induce albuminuria. Fat accumulation in or around the pancreas alters glucose metabolism, conferring cardiovascular risk. Ectopic fat may act as an active endocrine and paracrine organ that releases various bioactive mediators that influence insulin resistance, glucose and lipid metabolism, coagulation, and inflammation, which all contribute to cardiovascular risk. Because both obese and apparently lean individuals can have ectopic fat, regional fat distribution may play an important role in the development of cardiovascular diseases in both nonobese and obese people. PMID:25035342

  5. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  6. Arginase and vascular aging

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Lakshmi; Christianson, David W.; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E.

    2008-01-01

    Vascular and associated ventricular stiffness is one of the hallmarks of the aging cardiovascular system. Both an increase in reactive oxygen species production and a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability contribute to the endothelial dysfunction that underlies this vascular stiffness, independent of other age-related vascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis. The activation/upregulation of arginase appears to be an important contributor to age-related endothelial dysfunction by a mechanism that involves substrate (l-arginine) limitation for NO synthase (NOS) 3 and therefore NO synthesis. Not only does this lead to impaired NO production but also it contributes to the enhanced production of reactive oxygen species by NOS. Although arginase abundance is increased in vascular aging models, it appears that posttranslational modification by S-nitrosylation of the enzyme enhances its activity as well. The S-nitrosylation is mediated by the induction of NOS2 in the endothelium. Furthermore, arginase activation contributes to aging-related vascular changes by mechanisms that are not directly related to changes in NO signaling, including polyamine-dependent vascular smooth muscle proliferation and collagen synthesis. Taken together, arginase may represent an as yet elusive target for the modification of age-related vascular and ventricular stiffness contributing to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:18719233

  7. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  8. The science of evaluation of adverse events associated with vaccination.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Neal A

    2002-07-01

    All vaccines cause some adverse events; serious adverse events are rare. Causal associations between a vaccine and an adverse event rarely can be determined by specific tests such as identifying a vaccine agent in the affected tissue of patients. In the absence of such data, epidemiologic studies can be used to determine if the risk of the disorder is increased in vaccinated compared to unvaccinated individuals. Common mistakes include assuming a causal relationship based on a temporal association only or a series of affected patients. Careful studies have demonstrated that many hypothesized causal associations between vaccines and adverse events were not substantiated. False assumptions regarding causality are likely to occur for illnesses without a carefully defined etiology or pathogenesis. PMID:12199617

  9. Parents' Psychiatric Issues May Adversely Affect Some Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... attempted suicide, or who had struggled with antisocial personality disorder or marijuana abuse, were found to face ... and mood disorders, schizophrenia, anxiety, Alzheimer's-related dementia, personality disorders, substance abuse and attempted suicide. Parental histories ...

  10. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  11. Vascular Access for Hemodialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... short-term use. [ Top ] What is an arteriovenous fistula? An AV fistula is a connection, made by a vascular surgeon, ... vessel surgery. The surgeon usually places an AV fistula in the forearm or upper arm. An AV ...

  12. Women and Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Patient information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Women and Vascular Disease Early Warning Symptom for ... major public health issue, the Society of Interventional Radiology recommends greater screening efforts by the medical community ...

  13. Diversity in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Karen; Kalata, Emily A; Hingorani, Anil P

    2012-12-01

    A growing body of literature in vascular surgery demonstrates disparities in the type of health care that racial/ethnic minorities receive in the United States. Numerous recommendations, including those of the Institute of Medicine, have been set forth, which identify increasing the number of minority health professionals as a key strategy to eliminating health disparities. The purpose of this study is to compare the racial/ethnic distribution of the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) membership, the SVS leadership, vascular surgery trainees, and medical students. The results demonstrate that the racial/ethnic distribution of the SVS membership reflects a considerable lack of diversity with a paucity of diversity among the SVS leadership. An increasing rate of racial/ethnic diversity among vascular surgery trainees may indicate that the SVS will see an improvement in diversity in the future. PMID:23182481

  14. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  15. Neuropsychiatric Adverse Effects of Amphetamine and Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Harro, Jaanus

    2015-01-01

    Administration of amphetamine and methamphetamine can elicit psychiatric adverse effects at acute administration, binge use, withdrawal, and chronic use. Most troublesome of these are psychotic states and aggressive behavior, but a large variety of undesirable changes in cognition and affect can be induced. Adverse effects occur more frequently with higher dosages and long-term use. They can subside over time but some persist long-term. Multiple alterations in the gray and white matter of the brain assessed as changes in tissue volume or metabolism, or at molecular level, have been associated with amphetamine and methamphetamine use and the psychiatric adverse effects, but further studies are required to clarify their causal role, specificity, and relationship with preceding states and traits and comorbidities. The latter include other substance use disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and antisocial personality disorder. Amphetamine- and methamphetamine-related psychosis is similar to schizophrenia in terms of symptomatology and pathogenesis, and these two disorders share predisposing genetic factors. PMID:26070758

  16. Vascular structures in dermoscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Ayhan, Erhan; Ucmak, Derya; Akkurt, ZeynepMeltem

    2015-01-01

    Dermoscopy is an aiding method in the visualization of the epidermis and dermis. It is usually used to diagnose melanocytic lesions. In recent years, dermoscopy has increasingly been used to diagnose non-melanocytic lesions. Certain vascular structures, their patterns of arrangement and additional criteria may demonstrate lesion-specific characteristics. In this review, vascular structures and their arrangements are discussed separately in the light of conflicting views and an overview of recent literature. PMID:26375224

  17. Vascular Effects of Histamine.

    PubMed

    Ebeigbe, Anthony B; Talabi, Olufunke O

    2014-01-01

    Four subtypes of receptors (H1, H2, H3 and H4) mediate the actions of histamine. In the vascular wall, the effects of histamine are mediated via H1 and H2 receptors and the actions are modulated by H3 receptor subtype located on presynaptic neurones. Alterations in vascular responses to histamine are associated with experimental as well as a human form of hypertension, suggesting a role for histanine in cardiovascular regulation. PMID:26196559

  18. [Zaidemberg's vascularized radial graft].

    PubMed

    Saint-Cast, Y

    2010-12-01

    In 1991, Carlos Zaidemberg described a new technique to repair scaphoid non-unions with a vascularized bone graft harvested from the radial styloid process. An anatomic study based on 30 dissections after colorized latex injection established the constancy of the radial styloid process's artery, while showing that its origin, course and length were subject to variations. In a retrospective series of 38 cases over a period of 10 years, the vascularized bone graft was indicated for: (1) scaphoid non-union with the presence of avascular changes of the proximal fragment (23 cases); (2) failed prior reconstruction with bone graft and internal fixation (nine cases); (3) degenerative styloid-scaphoid arthritis (three cases); (4) fracture on Preiser dystrophy (three cases). The five steps of the simplified operative technique without dissection of the vascular pedicle include: (1) longitudinal dorso-radial approach, identification of the periosteal portion of the radial styloid process artery; (2) incision of the first and second compartments, longitudinal arthrotomy under the second compartment; (3) styloidectomy and transversal resection of the scaphoid non-union and sclerotic bone; (4) elevation of the vascularized bone graft; (5) transversal and radial insertion of the vascularized bone graft, osteosynthesis by two or three K-wire touching the scaphoid's radial edge. Scaphoid union was obtained in 33 cases out of 38. The only postoperative complications were two transient radial paresthesia. The standardized surgical procedure using vascularized bone graft harvested from the radial styloid process provides an efficient scaphoid reconstruction. PMID:21087882

  19. Vascular Effects of Estrogenic Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reslan, Ossama M.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2011-01-01

    an appropriate MHT dose, route of administration, and estrogen/progestin combination could maximize the vascular benefits of MHT and minimize other adverse effects, especially if given within a reasonably short time after menopause to women that seek MHT for the relief of menopausal symptoms. PMID:21864249

  20. Environmental vascular risk factors: new perspectives for stroke prevention.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Pacheco, Oscar; Román, Gustavo C

    2007-11-15

    Despite intensive evaluation of acute stroke patients, perhaps only half of the attributable stroke risk is usually identified. In addition to traditional and non-traditional vascular risk factors-including most recently homocysteine, inflammation, and alterations of coagulation-a number of environmental risk factors for stroke have been identified in the last decade. In this update we review the following: lower education and poor socioeconomic status (probable surrogates for exposure to traditional high-risk behaviors such as smoking, poor nutrition, lack of prenatal control, absence of preventive medical and dental care, and non-compliance of treatment of conditions such as hypertension); depression, stress and affective disorders; obstructive sleep apnea; passive smoking and environmental pollution; infections, in particular periodontal diseases that increase C-reactive protein (CRP); raised body mass index (obesity); exercise, and diet. The possible role of high-fructose corn syrup in the epidemic of obesity in the USA is reviewed. Protective diets include higher consumption of fish, olive oil, grains, fruits and vegetables (Mediterranean diet), as well as probiotic bacteria in yogurt and dairy products. Careful attention should be given to the patient's environment looking for modifiable factors. The effects of clean environmental air and water, adequate diet and appropriate nutrition, healthy teeth, exercise, and refreshing sleep in the prevention of stroke and cardiovascular disease appear to be quite compelling. Although some of these modifiable risk factors lack evidence-based information, judicious clinical sense should be used to counteract the potentially damaging effects of adverse environmental vascular risk factors. PMID:17655871

  1. Antioxidants and vascular health.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Alessandra; Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Doldo, Elena; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common products of normal aerobic cellular metabolism, but high levels of ROS lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage. Increased production of ROS favors vascular dysfunction, inducing altered vascular permeability and inflammation, accompanied by the loss of vascular modulatory function, the imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction, and the aberrant expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Inflammatory stimuli promote oxidative stress generated from the increased activity of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, particularly of the Nox4 isoform, with the consequent impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Vascular dysfunction due to the increase in Nox4 activity and ROS overproduction leads to the progression of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and neurological disorders. Considerable research into the development of effective antioxidant therapies using natural derivatives or new synthetic molecules has been conducted. Antioxidants may prevent cellular damage by reducing ROS overproduction or interfering in reactions that involve ROS. Vitamin E and ascorbic acid are well known as natural antioxidants that counteract lipid peroxidative damage by scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, thus restoring vascular function. Recently, preliminary studies on natural antioxidants such as goji berries, thymus, rosemary, green tea ginseng, and garlic have been conducted for their efficacy in preventing vascular damage. N-acetyl-cysteine and propionyl-L-carnitine are synthetic compounds that regulate ROS production by replacing endogenous antioxidants in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of oxidative stress-induced vascular dysfunction as well as the beneficial effects of antioxidant therapies. PMID:26585821

  2. Molecular mechanisms for vascular complications of targeted cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Srila; Miller, Kenneth B; Jaffe, Iris Z

    2016-10-01

    Molecularly targeted anti-cancer therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment by improving both quality of life and survival in cancer patients. However, many of these drugs are associated with cardiovascular toxicities that are sometimes dose-limiting. Moreover, the long-term cardiovascular consequences of these drugs, some of which are used chronically, are not yet known. Although the scope and mechanisms of the cardiac toxicities are better defined, the mechanisms for vascular toxicities are only beginning to be elucidated. This review summarizes what is known about the vascular adverse events associated with three classes of novel anti-cancer therapies: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors, breakpoint cluster-Abelson (BCR-ABL) kinase inhibitors used to treat chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) and immunomodulatory agents (IMiDs) used in myeloma therapeutics. Three of the best described vascular toxicities are reviewed including hypertension, increased risk of acute cardiovascular ischaemic events and arteriovenous thrombosis. The available data regarding the mechanism by which each therapy causes vascular complication are summarized. When data are limited, potential mechanisms are inferred from the known effects of inhibiting each target on vascular cell function and disease. Enhanced understanding of the molecular mechanisms of vascular side effects of targeted cancer therapy is necessary to effectively manage cancer patients and to design safer targeted cancer therapies for the future. PMID:27612952

  3. Bioenergetic disruption of human micro-vascular endothelial cells by antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Elmorsy, Ekramy; Smith, Paul A

    2015-05-01

    Antipsychotics (APs) are widely used medications, however these are not without side effects such as disruption of blood brain barrier function (BBB). To investigate this further we have studied the chronic effects of the typical APs, chlorpromazine (CPZ) and haloperidol (HAL) and the atypical APs, risperidone (RIS) and clozapine (CLZ), on the bioenergetics of human micro-vascular endothelial cells (HBVECs) of the BBB. Alamar blue (AB) and ATP assays showed that these APs impair bioenergenesis in HBVECs in a concentration and time dependent manner. However since these effects were incomplete they suggest a population of cell bioenergetically heterogeneous, an idea supported by the bistable nature by which APs affected the mitochondrial transmembrane potential. CPZ, HAL and CLZ inhibited the activity of mitochondrial complexes I and III. Our data demonstrates that at therapeutic concentrations, APs can impair the bioenergetic status of HBVECs, an action that help explains the adverse side effects of these drugs when used clinically. PMID:25824037

  4. Adversity and advancing nursing knowledge.

    PubMed

    Reed, Pamela G

    2008-04-01

    This column reports the theme of adversity addressed in reference to theoretical and metatheoretical considerations for advancing nursing knowledge. The development and content of three classic nursing theories are presented by Neuman representatives, and by theorists King and Roy. Topics for continued dialogue are identified as derived from the interface between philosophy of science issues and these theories. PMID:18378823

  5. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Hallucinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, C.L.; Dube, S.R.; Felitti, V.J.; Anda, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: Little information is available about the contribution of multiple adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to the likelihood of reporting hallucinations. We used data from the ACE study to assess this relationship. Methods:: We conducted a survey about childhood abuse and household dysfunction while growing up, with questions about health…

  6. Placental Features of Late-Onset Adverse Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Lucy E.; Wareing, Mark; Greenwood, Susan L.; Jones, Rebecca L.; Sibley, Colin P.; Johnstone, Edward D.; Heazell, Alexander E. P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Currently, no investigations reliably identify placental dysfunction in late pregnancy. To facilitate the development of such investigations we aimed to identify placental features that differ between normal and adverse outcome in late pregnancy in a group of pregnancies with reduced fetal movement. Methods Following third trimester presentation with reduced fetal movement (N = 100), placental structure ex vivo was measured. Placental function was then assessed in terms of (i) chorionic plate artery agonist responses and length-tension characteristics using wire myography and (ii) production and release of placentally derived hormones (by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme linked immunosorbant assay of villous tissue and explant conditioned culture medium). Results Placentas from pregnancies ending in adverse outcome (N = 23) were ~25% smaller in weight, volume, length, width and disc area (all p<0.0001) compared with those from normal outcome pregnancies. Villous and trophoblast areas were unchanged, but villous vascularity was reduced (median (interquartile range): adverse outcome 10 (10–12) vessels/mm2 vs. normal outcome 13 (12–15), p = 0.002). Adverse outcome pregnancy placental arteries were relatively insensitive to nitric oxide donated by sodium nitroprusside compared to normal outcome pregnancy placental arteries (50% Effective Concentration 30 (19–50) nM vs. 12 (6–24), p = 0.02). Adverse outcome pregnancy placental tissue contained less human chorionic gonadotrophin (20 (11–50) vs. 55 (24–102) mIU/mg, p = 0.007) and human placental lactogen (11 (6–14) vs. 27 (9–50) mg/mg, p = 0.006) and released more soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (21 (13–29) vs. 5 (2–15) ng/mg, p = 0.01) compared with normal outcome pregnancy placental tissue. Conclusion These data provide a description of the placental phenotype of adverse outcome in late pregnancy. Antenatal tests that accurately reflect elements of this phenotype may

  7. Assessment of Vascular Injuries and Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baghi, Iraj; Herfatkar, Mohammad Rasool; Shokrgozar, Leila; Poor-Rasuli, Zahra; Aghajani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Trauma is the third leading cause of death. In this regard, vascular injury plays a leading role in of morbidity and mortality rates. Objectives: The present study aimed to assess the prevalence of vascular injuries and results of vascular reconstruction at a referral hospital in northern Iran. Patients and Methods: A retrospective observational study assessed 88 consecutive patients with vascular injury admitted to Poursina Hospital, Rasht in northern Iran, from October 2007 to October 2009. All study information was collected retrospectively from hospital charts. Results: Most of the affected patients (87/88) were male with a mean age of 29.12 ± 11.20 years. The mechanism of injury in 39.8% was blunt trauma and penetrating trauma in the rest. Of the 53 injured by penetrating trauma (60.2%), the most common cause was stabbing (94.3%). The most common cause of blunt trauma was road traffic accidents (93.1%). The most common mechanism for vascular injuries in upper extremities was penetrating trauma (86.0%) and in lower extremities was blunt trauma (60.0%). Fasciotomy was performed in 16 patients (18.2%) mostly in the lower extremities. Major amputation was required in 10% of the patients. In upper extremities, the most common type of revascularization was end to end anastomosis, followed by inter-position graft. The most common type of reconstruction in the lower extremity was bypass graft. All patients who underwent major amputation were admitted to the center with a delay of more than 6 hours after injury. Conclusions: Major vascular injuries in our center occurred in young men, frequently because of stab wounds. Popliteal injuries mostly caused by motor vehicle accidents was the second most common arterial injury, followed by combined ulnar and radial injuries. Vascular reconstruction in the first hours after trauma may prevent many unnecessary and preventable amputation procedures. PMID:26839869

  8. The estrogenic burden on vascular risk in male-to-female transsexuals.

    PubMed

    Lioudaki, Eirini; Ganotakis, Emmanuel S; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Nair, Devi R

    2010-01-01

    Transsexualism refers to individuals that identify themselves as members of the opposite gender and who strive to acquire the physical appearance and psychosocial role compatible with that gender. Gender reassignment therapy is applied through hormonal treatment ± surgical intervention in addition to psychological support. Hormone treatment for male-to-female transsexuals includes estrogen supplementation ± suppression of androgen secretion or action. Sex hormones are important determinants of the metabolic profile. The impact on cardiovascular disease appears to be gender-related but overall evidence remains conflicting. Gender reassignment therapy has been associated with elevated triglyceride concentrations, often accompanied by an increase in high density lipoprotein levels, reduced circulating homocysteine (Hcy), uric acid and creatinine levels as well as an adverse effect on glycemic control. Markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and endothelial function are also affected in various ways, while alterations in hemostatic and fibrinolytic factors favor thrombosis (arterial and/or venous). Male-to-female transsexuals may be adversely affected by both estrogen administration and androgen deprivation, as reported in prostate cancer. Therefore, vascular risk factor screening and potential intervention may be required prior to and during gender reassignment therapy (both hormone and surgical). PMID:21128891

  9. Building Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hojae; Puranik, Amey S.; Gauvin, Robert; Edalat, Faramarz; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda; Peppas, Nicholas A.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Only a few engineered tissues—skin, cartilage, bladder—have achieved clinical success, and biomaterials designed to replace more complex organs are still far from commercial availability. This gap exists in part because biomaterials lack a vascular network to transfer the oxygen and nutrients necessary for survival and integration after transplantation. Thus, generation of a functional vasculature is essential to the clinical success of engineered tissue constructs and remains a key challenge for regenerative medicine. In this Perspective, we discuss recent advances in vascularization of biomaterials through the use of biochemical modification, exogenous cells, or microengineering technology. PMID:23152325

  10. Abnormalities of vascular structure and function in pediatric hypertension.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Elaine M

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is associated with adverse cardiovascular (CV) events in adults. Measures of vascular structure and function, including increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and elevated arterial stiffness predict hard CV events in adulthood. Newer data suggest that abnormalities in target organ damage are occurring in adolescents and young adults with high blood pressure. In this review, we discuss the techniques for measuring vascular dysfunction in young people and the evidence linking blood pressure levels to this type of target organ damage. PMID:26275663

  11. Glucocorticoid excess induces superoxide production in vascular endothelial cells and elicits vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Iuchi, Takahiko; Akaike, Masashi; Mitsui, Takao; Ohshima, Yasushi; Shintani, Yasumi; Azuma, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2003-01-10

    Glucocorticoid (GC) excess often elicits serious adverse effects on the vascular system, such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, and effective prophylaxis for these complications is limited. We sought to reveal the mechanism underlying GC-induced vascular complications. Responses in forearm blood flow to reactive hyperemia in 20 GC-treated patients were significantly decreased to 43+/-8.9% (mean+/-SEM) from the values obtained before GC therapy (130+/-14%). An administration of vitamin C almost normalized blood flow responses. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), production of hydrogen peroxide was increased up to 166.5+/-3.3% of control values by 10(-7) mol/L dexamethasone (DEX) treatment (P<0.01). Concomitant with DEX-induced hydrogen peroxide production, intracellular amounts of peroxynitrite significantly increased and those of nitric oxide (NO) decreased, respectively (P<0.01). Immunoblotting analysis using anti-nitrotyrosine antibody showed that peroxynitrite formation was increased in DEX-treated HUVECs. Using inhibitors against metabolic pathways for generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we identified that the major production sources of ROS by DEX treatment were mitochondrial electron transport chain, NAD(P)H oxidase, and xanthine oxidase. These findings suggest that GC excess causes overproduction of ROS and thereby perturbs NO availability in the vascular endothelium, leading to vascular complications in patients with GC excess. PMID:12522124

  12. Cardiovascular adverse effects of phenytoin.

    PubMed

    Guldiken, B; Rémi, J; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2016-05-01

    Phenytoin is an established drug in the treatment of acute repetitive seizures and status epilepticus. One of its main advantages over benzodiazepines is the less sedative effect. However, the possibility of cardiovascular adverse effects with the intravenous use of phenytoin cause a reluctance to its usage, and this has lead to a search for safer anticonvulsant drugs. In this study, we aimed to review the studies which evaluated the safety of phenytoin with respect to cardiovascular adverse effects. The original clinical trials and case reports listed in PUBMED in English language between the years of 1946-2014 were evaluated. As the key words, "phenytoin, diphenylhydantoin, epilepsy, seizure, cardiac toxicity, asystole, arrhythmia, respiratory arrest, hypotension, death" were used. Thirty-two clinical trials and ten case reports were identified. In the case reports, a rapid infusion rate (>50 mg/min) of phenytoin appeared as the major cause of increased mortality. In contrast, no serious cardiovascular adverse effects leading to death were met in the clinical trials which applied the recommended infusion rate and dosages. An infusion rate of 50 mg/min was reported to be safe for young patients. For old patients and patients with a cardiovascular co-morbidity, a slower infusion rate was recommended with a careful follow-up of heart rhythm and blood pressure. No cardiovascular adverse effect was reported in oral phenytoin overdoses except one case with a very high serum phenytoin level and hypoalbuminemia. Phenytoin is an effective and well tolerated drug in the treatment of epilepsy. Intravenous phenytoin is safe when given at recommended infusion rates and doses. PMID:26645393

  13. [Adverse events of psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Koichiro; Kikuchi, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The authors discuss adverse events which are often missed but clinicians should pay attention to in order to preserve patients'quality of life(QOL). Among mood stabilizers, lithium may cause a urinary volume increase, hyperparathyroidism, and serum calcium elevation; sodium valproate possibly increases androgenic hormone levels and the risk of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) as well as hypothyroidism. Moreover, in addition to teratogenesis, it has been reported that fetal exposure to a higher dose of valproate is associated with a lower intelligence quotient and higher incidence of autism spectrum disorders in children. Antidepressants with a higher affinity for serotonin transporters might induce gastrointestinal bleeding, and some antidepressants cause sexual dysfunction more frequently than others. Activation syndrome is still a key side effect which should be noted. Regarding the adverse events of antipsychotics, subjective side effects unpleasant to patients such as dysphoria and a lower subjective well-being should not be overlooked. We clinicians have to cope with adverse events worsening the QOL of patients with psychiatric disorders and, therefore, we need to adopt appropriate counter-measures. PMID:24864567

  14. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  15. Pharmacogenetics of idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Pirmohamed, Munir

    2010-01-01

    Idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions are unpredictable and thought to have an underlying genetic etiology. With the completion of the human genome and HapMap projects, together with the rapid advances in genotyping technologies, we have unprecedented capabilities in identifying genetic predisposing factors for these relatively rare, but serious, reactions. The main roadblock to this is the lack of sufficient numbers of well-characterized samples from patients with such reactions. This is now beginning to be solved through the formation of international consortia, including developing novel ways of identifying and recruiting patients affected by these reactions, both prospectively and retrospectively. This has been led by the research on abacavir hypersensitivity - its association with HLA-B*5701 forms the gold standard of how we need to identify associations and implement them in clinical practice. Strong genetic predisposing factors have also been identified for hypersensitivity reactions such as are associated with carbamazepine, allopurinol, flucloxacillin, and statin-induced myopathy. However, for most other idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions, the genetic effect sizes have been low to moderate, although this may partly be due to the fact that only small numbers have been investigated and limited genotyping strategies have been utilized. It may also indicate that genetic predisposition will be dependent on multiple genes, with complex interactions with environmental factors. Irrespective of the strength of the genetic associations identified with individual idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions, it is important to undertake functional investigations to provide insights into the mechanism(s) of how the drug interacts with the gene variant to lead to a phenotype, which can take a multitude of clinical forms with variable severity. Such investigations will be essential in preventing the burden caused by idiosyncratic reactions, both in healthcare and in industry

  16. Six-year trajectories of post-traumatic stress and severe psychological distress symptoms and associations with timing of trauma exposure, ongoing adversity and sense of injustice: a latent transition analysis of a community cohort in conflict-affected Timor-Leste

    PubMed Central

    Rees, S; Steel, Z; Tam, N; Soares, Z; Soares, C; Silove, DM

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify the 6-year trajectories of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and psychological distress symptoms, and examine for associations with timing of trauma exposure, ongoing adversity and with the sense of injustice in conflict-affected Timor-Leste. Setting A whole-of-household survey was conducted in 2004 and 2010 in Dili, the capital of Timor-Leste. Participants 1022 adults were followed up over 6 years (retention rate 84.5%). Interviews were conducted by field workers applying measures of traumatic events (TEs), ongoing adversity, a sense of injustice, PTS symptoms and psychological distress. Results Latent transition analysis supported a 3-class longitudinal model (psychological distress, comorbid symptoms and low symptoms). We derived 4 composite trajectories comprising recovery (20.8%), a persisting morbidity trajectory (7.2%), an incident trajectory (37.2%) and a low-symptom trajectory (34.7%). Compared with the low-symptom trajectory, the persistent and incident trajectories reported greater stress arising from poverty and family conflict, higher TE exposure for 2 historical periods, and a sense of injustice for 2 historical periods. The persistent trajectory was unique in reporting greater TE exposure in the Indonesian occupation, whereas the incident trajectory reported greater TE exposure during the later internal conflict that occurred between baseline and follow-up. Compared with the low-symptom trajectory, the incident trajectory reported a greater sense of injustice relating to the periods of the Indonesian occupation and independence. The persistent trajectory was characterised by a sense of injustice relating to the internal conflict and contemporary times. The recovery trajectory was characterised by the absence of these risk factors, the only difference from the low-symptom trajectory being that the former reported a sense of injustice for the period surrounding independence. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the timing

  17. Thyroid Hormone and Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism affect the cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism is known to be associated with enhanced atherosclerosis and ischemic heart diseases. The accelerated atherosclerosis in the hypothyroid state has been traditionally ascribed to atherogenic lipid profile, diastolic hypertension, and impaired endothelial function. However, recent studies indicate that thyroid hormone has direct anti-atherosclerotic effects, such as production of nitric oxide and suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation. These data suggest that thyroid hormone inhibits atherogenesis through direct effects on the vasculature as well as modification of risk factors for atherosclerosis. This review summarizes the basic and clinical studies on the role of thyroid hormone in vascular remodeling. The possible application of thyroid hormone mimetics to the therapy of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis is also discussed. PMID:26558400

  18. Arterial stiffness, as monitored by cardio–ankle vascular index, is affected by obstructive sleep apnea, blood glucose control, and body weight – a case with 8 years follow up

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Shirai, Kohji

    2016-01-01

    The cardio–ankle vascular index (CAVI) is an indicator of arterial stiffness from the heart to the ankles. The CAVI increases as arteriosclerosis progresses, but it can be decreased by appropriate treatment. There are several risk factors for coronary artery disease, however, the degree of stress caused by each separate risk factor to arteries cannot be assessed. CAVI increases with age and according to the severity of atherosclerosis. We found that CAVI also changes in response to the control of risk factors, which may be associated with the functional stiffness of arteries. CAVI can be a useful indicator of risk control for coronary artery disease. We followed a patient aged 71 years who had diabetes mellitus and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by measuring CAVI for 8 years from age 63. He underwent coronary artery bypass grafting due to angina pectoris when he was 63 years old. Before coronary artery bypass grafting, CAVI was 11.8 on the right and 11.5 on the left. Three years later he was found to have OSA and received treatment with continuous positive airway pressure. There was a marked improvement in CAVI after continuous positive airway pressure (age 68; right 10.4, left 10.2). However, following a gradual increase in body weight and worsening of diabetes mellitus, CAVI showed an increasing trend. CAVI decreased with biguanides treatment, but increased again with an increase in body weight. In conclusion, CAVI responded to the patient’s conditions including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and OSA. CAVI is not only a marker of arterial stiffness, but can also be a useful indicator of physiological status; it may be effective in total risk control for coronary artery disease. PMID:27563259

  19. Arterial stiffness, as monitored by cardio-ankle vascular index, is affected by obstructive sleep apnea, blood glucose control, and body weight - a case with 8 years follow up.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Tomoyuki; Shirai, Kohji

    2016-01-01

    The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is an indicator of arterial stiffness from the heart to the ankles. The CAVI increases as arteriosclerosis progresses, but it can be decreased by appropriate treatment. There are several risk factors for coronary artery disease, however, the degree of stress caused by each separate risk factor to arteries cannot be assessed. CAVI increases with age and according to the severity of atherosclerosis. We found that CAVI also changes in response to the control of risk factors, which may be associated with the functional stiffness of arteries. CAVI can be a useful indicator of risk control for coronary artery disease. We followed a patient aged 71 years who had diabetes mellitus and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by measuring CAVI for 8 years from age 63. He underwent coronary artery bypass grafting due to angina pectoris when he was 63 years old. Before coronary artery bypass grafting, CAVI was 11.8 on the right and 11.5 on the left. Three years later he was found to have OSA and received treatment with continuous positive airway pressure. There was a marked improvement in CAVI after continuous positive airway pressure (age 68; right 10.4, left 10.2). However, following a gradual increase in body weight and worsening of diabetes mellitus, CAVI showed an increasing trend. CAVI decreased with biguanides treatment, but increased again with an increase in body weight. In conclusion, CAVI responded to the patient's conditions including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and OSA. CAVI is not only a marker of arterial stiffness, but can also be a useful indicator of physiological status; it may be effective in total risk control for coronary artery disease. PMID:27563259

  20. 15 CFR 970.701 - Significant adverse environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... under a license of scale-model mining systems which simulate commercial recovery could adversely affect... setting of instruments; (7) Sampling by box core, small diameter core or grab sampler, to determine seabed... mining tests under exploration licenses will be extremely small. (ii) Blanketing of benthic fauna...

  1. 15 CFR 970.701 - Significant adverse environmental effects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... under a license of scale-model mining systems which simulate commercial recovery could adversely affect... setting of instruments; (7) Sampling by box core, small diameter core or grab sampler, to determine seabed... mining tests under exploration licenses will be extremely small. (ii) Blanketing of benthic fauna...

  2. Detecting Adverse Events Using Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Bates, David W.; Evans, R. Scott; Murff, Harvey; Stetson, Peter D.; Pizziferri, Lisa; Hripcsak, George

    2003-01-01

    Context: Although patient safety is a major problem, most health care organizations rely on spontaneous reporting, which detects only a small minority of adverse events. As a result, problems with safety have remained hidden. Chart review can detect adverse events in research settings, but it is too expensive for routine use. Information technology techniques can detect some adverse events in a timely and cost-effective way, in some cases early enough to prevent patient harm. Objective: To review methodologies of detecting adverse events using information technology, reports of studies that used these techniques to detect adverse events, and study results for specific types of adverse events. Design: Structured review. Methodology: English-language studies that reported using information technology to detect adverse events were identified using standard techniques. Only studies that contained original data were included. Main Outcome Measures: Adverse events, with specific focus on nosocomial infections, adverse drug events, and injurious falls. Results: Tools such as event monitoring and natural language processing can inexpensively detect certain types of adverse events in clinical databases. These approaches already work well for some types of adverse events, including adverse drug events and nosocomial infections, and are in routine use in a few hospitals. In addition, it appears likely that these techniques will be adaptable in ways that allow detection of a broad array of adverse events, especially as more medical information becomes computerized. Conclusion: Computerized detection of adverse events will soon be practical on a widespread basis. PMID:12595401

  3. Cutaneous Adverse Effects of Neurologic Medications.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, Eman; Nunneley, Chloe E; Hsu, Sylvia; Kass, Joseph S

    2016-03-01

    Life-threatening and benign drug reactions occur frequently in the skin, affecting 8 % of the general population and 2-3 % of all hospitalized patients, emphasizing the need for physicians to effectively recognize and manage patients with drug-induced eruptions. Neurologic medications represent a vast array of drug classes with cutaneous side effects. Approximately 7 % of the United States (US) adult population is affected by adult-onset neurological disorders, reflecting a large number of patients on neurologic drug therapies. This review elucidates the cutaneous reactions associated with medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat the following neurologic pathologies: Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, epilepsy, Huntington disease, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, and pseudobulbar affect. A search of the literature was performed using the specific FDA-approved drug or drug classes in combination with the terms 'dermatologic,' 'cutaneous,' 'skin,' or 'rash.' Both PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were utilized, with side effects ranging from those cited in randomized controlled trials to case reports. It behooves neurologists, dermatologists, and primary care physicians to be aware of the recorded cutaneous adverse reactions and their severity for proper management and potential need to withdraw the offending medication. PMID:26914914

  4. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    PubMed

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects. PMID:27357302

  5. Adverse Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Arumugham, Shyam Sundar; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment commonly used for depression and other major psychiatric disorders. We discuss potential adverse effects (AEs) associated with ECT and strategies for their prevention and management. Common acute AEs include headache, nausea, myalgia, and confusion; these are self-limiting and are managed symptomatically. Serious but uncommon AEs include cardiovascular, pulmonary, and cerebrovascular events; these may be minimized with screening for risk factors and by physiologic monitoring. Although most cognitive AEs of ECT are short-lasting, troublesome retrograde amnesia may rarely persist. Modifications of and improvements in treatment techniques minimize cognitive and other AEs. PMID:27514303

  6. Bioabsorbable zinc ion induced biphasic cellular responses in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Bioabsorbable metal zinc (Zn) is a promising new generation of implantable scaffold for cardiovascular and orthopedic applications. In cardiovascular stent applications, zinc ion (Zn2+) will be gradually released into the surrounding vascular tissues from such Zn-containing scaffolds after implantation. However, the interactions between vascular cells and Zn2+ are still largely unknown. We explored the short-term effects of extracellular Zn2+ on human smooth muscle cells (SMCs) up to 24 h, and an interesting biphasic effect of Zn2+ was observed. Lower concentrations (<80 μM) of Zn2+ had no adverse effects on cell viability but promoted cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell proliferation, cell migration, and enhanced the expression of F-actin and vinculin. Cells treated with such lower concentrations of Zn2+ displayed an elongated shape compared to controls without any treatment. In contrast, cells treated with higher Zn2+ concentrations (80–120 μM) had opposite cellular responses and behaviors. Gene expression profiles revealed that the most affected functional genes were related to angiogenesis, inflammation, cell adhesion, vessel tone, and platelet aggregation. Results indicated that Zn has interesting concentration-dependent biphasic effects on SMCs with low concentrations being beneficial to cellular functions. PMID:27248371

  7. Bioabsorbable zinc ion induced biphasic cellular responses in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Bioabsorbable metal zinc (Zn) is a promising new generation of implantable scaffold for cardiovascular and orthopedic applications. In cardiovascular stent applications, zinc ion (Zn(2+)) will be gradually released into the surrounding vascular tissues from such Zn-containing scaffolds after implantation. However, the interactions between vascular cells and Zn(2+) are still largely unknown. We explored the short-term effects of extracellular Zn(2+) on human smooth muscle cells (SMCs) up to 24 h, and an interesting biphasic effect of Zn(2+) was observed. Lower concentrations (<80 μM) of Zn(2+) had no adverse effects on cell viability but promoted cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell proliferation, cell migration, and enhanced the expression of F-actin and vinculin. Cells treated with such lower concentrations of Zn(2+) displayed an elongated shape compared to controls without any treatment. In contrast, cells treated with higher Zn(2+) concentrations (80-120 μM) had opposite cellular responses and behaviors. Gene expression profiles revealed that the most affected functional genes were related to angiogenesis, inflammation, cell adhesion, vessel tone, and platelet aggregation. Results indicated that Zn has interesting concentration-dependent biphasic effects on SMCs with low concentrations being beneficial to cellular functions. PMID:27248371

  8. Vascular cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, Philip B; Counts, Scott E; Nyenhuis, David

    2016-05-01

    Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment are receiving heightened attention as potentially modifiable factors for dementias of later life. These factors have now been linked not only to vascular cognitive disorders but also Alzheimer's disease. In this chapter we review 3 related topics that address vascular contributions to cognitive impairment: 1. vascular pathogenesis and mechanisms; 2. neuropsychological and neuroimaging phenotypic manifestations of cerebrovascular disease; and 3. prospects for prevention of cognitive impairment of later life based on cardiovascular and stroke risk modification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26704177

  9. Spiral CT: vascular applications.

    PubMed

    Rankin, S C

    1998-08-01

    Recent technical advances in CT have renewed interest in the development of CT angiography (CTA). CT angiography is a minimally invasive method of visualising the vascular system and is becoming an alternative to conventional arteriography in some situations. Spiral technology allows a volume of data to be obtained on a single breath-hold with no respiratory misregistration. Fast machines with second or subsecond acquisition times mean the images are obtained while there are high circulating levels of contrast medium giving peak vascular opacification from a peripheral intravenous injection. Accurate timing will ensure either the arterial or venous phase is imaged. Multiple overlapping axial images can be obtained from the data set with no increase in radiation dose to the patient and from these scans computer generated multiplanar and 3D images are obtained which can be viewed from numerous angles. CT angiography can be performed more quickly, less invasively and at reduced cost compared to conventional angiography. PMID:9717621

  10. Vascular trauma historical notes.

    PubMed

    Rich, Norman M

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a brief historical review of treatment of vascular trauma. Although methods for ligation came into use in the second century, this knowledge was lost during the Dark Ages and did not come back until the Renaissance. Many advances in vascular surgery occurred during the Balkan Wars, World War I, and World War II, although without antibiotics and blood banking, the philosophy of life over limb still ruled. Documenting and repairing both arteries and veins became more common during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. Increased documentation has revealed that the current conflicts have resulted in more arterial injuries than in previous wars, likely because of improved body armor, improvised explosive device attacks, tourniquet use, and improved medical evacuation time. This brief review emphasizes the great value of mentorship and the legacy of the management of arterial and venous injuries to be passed on. PMID:21502112

  11. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  12. Adverse events to monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Brian A

    2013-01-01

    Fifteen monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently registered and approved for the treatment of a range of different cancers. These mAbs are specific for a limited number of targets (9 in all). Four of these molecules are indeed directed against the B-lymphocyte antigen CD20; 3 against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 or ErbB2), 2 against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and 1 each against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD30, CD52, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily, member 11 (TNFSF11, best known as RANKL), and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4). Collectively, the mAbs provoke a wide variety of systemic and cutaneous adverse events including the full range of true hypersensitivities: Type I immediate reactions (anaphylaxis, urticaria); Type II reactions (immune thrombocytopenia, neutopenia, hemolytic anemia); Type III responses (vasculitis, serum sickness; some pulmonary adverse events); and Type IV delayed mucocutaneous reactions as well as infusion reactions/cytokine release syndrome (IRs/CRS), tumor lysis syndrome (TLS), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and cardiac events. Although the term “hypersensitivity” is widely used, no common definition has been adopted within and between disciplines and the requirement of an immunological basis for a true hypersensitivity reaction is sometimes overlooked. Consequently, some drug-induced adverse events are sometimes incorrectly described as “hypersensitivities” while others that should be described are not. PMID:24251081

  13. Vinpocetine Attenuates the Osteoblastic Differentiation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yun-Yun; Sun, Lin; Chen, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Na; Yi, Peng-Fei; Song, Min; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yu-Zhong; Liang, Qiu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active process of osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, its definite mechanism remains unknown. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been demonstrated to inhibit the high glucose-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; however, it remains unknown whether vinpocetine can affect the osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. We hereby investigated the effect of vinpocetine on vascular calcification using a beta-glycerophosphate-induced cell model. Our results showed that vinpocetine significantly reduced the osteoblast-like phenotypes of vascular smooth muscle cells including ALP activity, osteocalcin, collagen type I, Runx2 and BMP-2 expression as well as the formation of mineralized nodule. Vinpocetine, binding to translocation protein, induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase and Akt and thus inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B into the nucleus. Silencing of translocator protein significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of vinpocetine on osteoblastic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Taken together, vinpocetine may be a promising candidate for the clinical therapy of vascular calcification. PMID:27589055

  14. The Role of Notch in the Cardiovascular System: Potential Adverse Effects of Investigational Notch Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Paola; Mele, Donato; Caliceti, Cristiana; Pannella, Micaela; Fortini, Cinzia; Clementz, Anthony George; Morelli, Marco Bruno; Aquila, Giorgio; Ameri, Pietro; Ferrari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Targeting the Notch pathway is a new promising therapeutic approach for cancer patients. Inhibition of Notch is effective in the oncology setting because it causes a reduction of highly proliferative tumor cells and it inhibits survival of cancer stem cells, which are considered responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Additionally, since Delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4)-activated Notch signaling is a major modulator of angiogenesis, anti-Dll4 agents are being investigated to reduce vascularization of the tumor. Notch plays a major role in the heart during the development and, after birth, in response to cardiac damage. Therefore, agents used to inhibit Notch in the tumors (gamma secretase inhibitors and anti-Dll4 agents) could potentially affect myocardial repair. The past experience with trastuzumab and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors used for cancer therapy demonstrates that the possible cardiotoxicity of agents targeting shared pathways between cancer and heart and the vasculature should be considered. To date, Notch inhibition in cancer patients has resulted only in mild gastrointestinal toxicity. Little is known about the potential long-term cardiotoxicity associated to Notch inhibition in cancer patients. In this review, we will focus on mechanisms through which inhibition of Notch signaling could lead to cardiomyocytes and endothelial dysfunctions. These adverse effects could contrast with the benefits of therapeutic responses in cancer cells during times of increased cardiac stress and/or in the presence of cardiovascular risk factor. PMID:25629006

  15. Update on Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ayesha; Kalaria, Raj N; Corbett, Anne; Ballard, Clive

    2016-09-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a major contributor to the dementia syndrome and is described as having problems with reasoning, planning, judgment, and memory caused by impaired blood flow to the brain and damage to the blood vessels resulting from events such as stroke. There are a variety of etiologies that contribute to the development of vascular cognitive impairment and VaD, and these are often associated with other dementia-related pathologies such as Alzheimer disease. The diagnosis of VaD is difficult due to the number and types of lesions and their locations in the brain. Factors that increase the risk of vascular diseases such as stroke, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking also raise the risk of VaD. Therefore, controlling these risk factors can help lower the chances of developing VaD. This update describes the subtypes of VaD, with details of their complex presentation, associated pathological lesions, and issues with diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. PMID:27502303

  16. Pulmonary vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Liechty, Kenneth W; Flake, Alan W

    2008-02-01

    Pulmonary vascular malformations have historically been diagnosed in a wide range of age groups, but the extensive use of prenatal imaging studies has resulted in the majority of lesions being diagnosed in utero. Among this group of lesions, bronchopulmonary sequestrations (BPS), hybrid lesions with both congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) and BPS, aberrant systemic vascular anastomoses, and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM), are the most common. The biologic behavior of these lesions and the subsequent therapy is, in large part, determined by the age of the patient at diagnosis. In the fetus, large BPS or hybrid lesions can result in fetal hydrops and in utero fetal demise. In the perinatal period, pulmonary hypoplasia from the mass effect or air trapping within the cystic component of hybrid lesions can result in life-threatening respiratory distress. In the postnatal period, communication of the lesion with the aero-digestive system can result in recurrent pneumonia. Alternatively, increased pulmonary blood flow from the systemic arterial supply can result in hemorrhage, hemoptysis, or high output cardiac failure. In addition, there have been several reports of malignant degeneration. Finally, the broad spectrum encompassed by these lesions makes classification and subsequent communication of the lesions confusing and difficult. This paper will review the components of these lesions, their associated anomalies, the diagnosis and natural history, and finally, current concepts in the management of pulmonary vascular malformations. PMID:18158137

  17. Vascular Cambium Development

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Blomster, Tiina; Helariutta, Ykä; Mähönen, Ari Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Secondary phloem and xylem tissues are produced through the activity of vascular cambium, the cylindrical secondary meristem which arises among the primary plant tissues. Most dicotyledonous species undergo secondary development, among them Arabidopsis. Despite its small size and herbaceous nature, Arabidopsis displays prominent secondary growth in several organs, including the root, hypocotyl and shoot. Together with the vast genetic resources and molecular research methods available for it, this has made Arabidopsis a versatile and accessible model organism for studying cambial development and wood formation. In this review, we discuss and compare the development and function of the vascular cambium in the Arabidopsis root, hypocotyl, and shoot. We describe the current understanding of the molecular regulation of vascular cambium and compare it to the function of primary meristems. We conclude with a look at the future prospects of cambium research, including opportunities provided by phenotyping and modelling approaches, complemented by studies of natural variation and comparative genetic studies in perennial and woody plant species. PMID:26078728

  18. Adverse drug reactions in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Ferner, R E

    2015-03-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) - that is, unintended and harmful responses to medicines - are important to dermatologists because many present with cutaneous signs and because dermatological treatments can cause serious ADRs. The detection of ADRs to new drugs is often delayed because they have a long latency or are rare or unexpected. This means that ADRs to newer agents emerge only slowly after marketing. ADRs are part of the differential diagnosis of unusual rashes. A good drug history that includes details of drug dose, time-course of the reaction and factors that may make the patient more susceptible, will help. For example, Stevens-Johnson syndrome with abacavir is much commoner in patients with HLA-B*5701, and has a characteristic time course. Newer agents have brought newer reactions; for example, acneiform rashes associated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors such as erlotinib. Older systemic agents used to treat skin disease, including corticosteroids and methotrexate, cause important ADRs. The adverse effects of newer biological agents used in dermatology are becoming clearer; for example, hypersensitivity reactions or loss of efficacy from antibody formation and progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy due to reactivation of latent JC (John Cunningham) virus infections during efalizumab treatment. Unusual or serious harm from medicines, including ADRs, medication errors and overdose, should be reported. The UK Yellow Card scheme is online, and patients can report their own ADRs. PMID:25622648

  19. [Recipients adverse reactions: guidance supports].

    PubMed

    Bazin, A

    2010-12-01

    Since 1994, adverse effects of transfusion transmitted to the French haemovigilance network are registered on "e-fit", the database of the French agency for the safety of health products (Afssaps). In order to improve their analysis, guidance supports have been made by Afssaps working groups. Each support deals with a blood transfusion side effect and is composed of five parts including pathophysiological mechanisms, diagnostic criteria, management recommendations, etiologic investigations and rules of filing the notification form on e-fit. The major characteristics of sheets published or soon-to-be published are presented: transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection, non-haemolytic febrile reaction, allergic reaction, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, hypotensive transfusion reaction, alloimmunization, erythrocyte incompatibility reaction and hemosiderosis. These new supports give relevant guidelines allowing a better analysis and evaluation of recipients' adverse reactions, particularly their diagnosis, gravity and accountability. They could also initiate studies in European and international haemovigilance and transfusion networks. PMID:21051267

  20. Adverse effects of plasma transfusion.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Suchitra; Vyas, Girish N

    2012-05-01

    Plasma utilization has increased over the past two decades, and there is a growing concern that many plasma transfusions are inappropriate. Plasma transfusion is not without risk, and certain complications are more likely with plasma than other blood components. Clinical and laboratory investigations of the patients suffering reactions after infusion of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) define the etiology and pathogenesis of the panoply of adverse effects. We review here the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of the risks associated with plasma transfusion. Risks commonly associated with FFP include: 1) transfusion-related acute lung injury, 2) transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and 3) allergic and/or anaphylactic reactions. Other less common risks include 1) transmission of infections, 2) febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions, 3) red blood cell alloimmunization, and 4) hemolytic transfusion reactions. The effects of pathogen inactivation or reduction methods on these risks are also discussed. Fortunately, a majority of the adverse effects are not lethal and are adequately treated in clinical practice. PMID:22578374

  1. Exercise and Vascular Function – How Much is too Much?

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Matthew J.; Gutterman, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is a powerful therapy for preventing the onset and slowing the progression of cardiovascular disease. Increased shear stress during exercise improves vascular homeostasis by both decreasing reactive oxygen species and increasing nitric oxide bioavailability in the endothelium. While these observations are well accepted as they apply to individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease, less is known about how exercise, especially intense exercise, affects vascular function in healthy individuals. This review highlights examples of how vascular function can paradoxically be impaired in otherwise healthy individuals by extreme levels of exercise, with a focus on the causative role that reactive oxygen species play in this impairment. PMID:24873760

  2. "Adversative Conjunction": The Poetics of Linguistic Opposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallerstein, Nicholas

    1992-01-01

    The general use of adversative conjunction in (primarily) English and U.S. poetry is outlined. The contention is that the adversative is not merely a grammatical convenience but sometimes a highly functional tool of rhetorical strategy. (36 references) (LB)

  3. Infrared thermal imaging for detection of peripheral vascular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bagavathiappan, S.; Saravanan, T.; Philip, John; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, Baldev; Karunanithi, R.; Panicker, T. M. R.; Korath, M. Paul; Jagadeesan, K.

    2009-01-01

    Body temperature is a very useful parameter for diagnosing diseases. There is a definite correlation between body temperature and diseases. We have used Infrared Thermography to study noninvasive diagnosis of peripheral vascular diseases. Temperature gradients are observed in the affected regions of patients with vascular disorders, which indicate abnormal blood flow in the affected region. Thermal imaging results are well correlated with the clinical findings. Certain areas on the affected limbs show increased temperature profiles, probably due to inflammation and underlying venous flow changes. In general the temperature contrast in the affected regions is about 0.7 to 1° C above the normal regions, due to sluggish blood circulation. The results suggest that the thermal imaging technique is an effective technique for detecting small temperature changes in the human body due to vascular disorders. PMID:20126565

  4. Validation of a housekeeping gene for use in bovine vascular gene expression studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposure of ungulate vasculature to ergot alkaloids while grazing endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum)-infected tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) affects vasoactivity and causes vasoconstriction. Bovine vascular gene expression as affected by exposure to ergot alkaloids in tall fescue is largely un...

  5. Retinal vascular changes are a marker for cerebral vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk. PMID:26008809

  6. Fiber optics in adverse environments

    SciTech Connect

    Lyous, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation effects in optical fibers are considered, taking into account recent progress in the investigation of radiation resistant optical fibers, radiation damage in optical fibers, radiation-induced transient absorption in optical fibers, X-ray-induced transient attenuation at low temperatures in polymer clad silica (PCS) fibers, optical fiber composition and radiation hardness, the response of irradiated optical waveguides at low temperatures, and the effect of ionizing radiation on fiber-optic waveguides. Other topics explored are related to environmental effects on components of fiber optic systems, and radiation detection systems using optical fibers. Fiber optic systems in adverse environments are also discussed, giving attention to the survivability of Army fiber optics systems, space application of fiber optics systems, fiber optic wavelength multiplexing for civil aviation applications, a new fiber optic data bus topology, fiber optics for aircraft engine/inlet control, and application of fiber optics in high voltage substations.

  7. Genetic Pathways of Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Marion A. Hofmann; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Arterial calcification of the aorta, coronary, carotid and peripheral arteries becomes more prevalent with age. Genomewide association studies have identified regions of the genome linked to vascular calcification, and these same regions are linked to myocardial infarction risk. The 9p21 region linked to vascular disease and inflammation also associates with vascular calcification. In addition to these common variants, rare genetic defects can serve as primary triggers of accelerated and premature calcification. Infancy-associated calcific disorders are caused by loss of function mutations in ENPP1 an enzyme that produces extracellular pyrophosphate. Adult onset vascular calcification is linked to mutations NTE5, another enzyme that regulates extracellular phosphate metabolism. Common conditions that secondarily enhance vascular calcification include atherosclerosis, metabolic dysfunction, diabetes, and impaired renal clearance. Oxidative stress and vascular inflammation, along with biophysical properties, converge with these predisposing factors to promote soft tissue mineralization. Vascular calcification is accompanied by an osteogenic profile, and this osteogenic conversion is seen within the vascular smooth muscle itself as well as the matrix. Herein we will review the genetic causes of medial calcification in the smooth muscle layer, focusing on recent discoveries of gene mutations that regulate extracellular matrix phosphate production and the role of S100 proteins as promoters of vascular calcification. PMID:23040839

  8. [How Treatable is Vascular Dementia?].

    PubMed

    Mori, Etsuro

    2016-04-01

    Vascular dementia is an umbrella term, encompassing the pathological changes in the brain due to cerebrovascular disease that result in dementia. Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia, after Alzheimer's disease. In this paper, I outline the concept of vascular dementia, the key aspects of the disease that are yet to be clarified, and the current status of clinical trials. Assessing these factors, I discuss how treatable vascular dementia presently is. Use of the term'vascular dementia'is riddled with uncertainties regarding disease classification, and non-standardized diagnostic criteria. There are difficulties in determining the exact relationship between cerebrovascular pathology and cognitive impairment. The comorbid effects of Alzheimer's pathology in some individuals also present an obstacle to reliable clinical diagnosis, and hinder research into effective management approaches. Vascular dementia is preventable and treatable, as there are established primary and secondary prevention measures for the causative cerebrovascular diseases, such as vascular risk factor intervention, antiplatelet therapy, and anticoagulation, amongst others. However, unlike Alzheimer's disease, there are no established symptomatic treatments for vascular dementia. Clinical trials of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine indicate that they produce small cognitive benefits in patients with vascular dementia, though the exact clinical significance of these is uncertain. Data are insufficient to support the widespread use of these drugs in vascular dementia. Rehabilitation and physical and cognitive exercise may be beneficial, but evidence of cognitive benefit and relief of neuropsychiatric symptoms due to exercise is lacking. PMID:27056862

  9. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate. PMID:3302664

  10. Macrophages in Vascular Inflammation: Origins and Functions.

    PubMed

    Decano, Julius L; Mattson, Peter C; Aikawa, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Macrophages influence various processes of cardiovascular inflammation. Whether they are of embryonic or post-natal hematopoietic origin, their balance in differential activation may direct the course of inflammation. Accelerated macrophage activation and accumulation through a pro-inflammatory signaling pathway may result in extensive tissue damage, adverse repair, and worsened clinical outcomes. Attenuation of such a mechanism and/or promotion of the anti-inflammatory macrophage activation may lead to early resolution of inflammation. Elucidating multiple novel mechanisms of monocyte and macrophage activation leads to a better understanding of their roles in vascular inflammation. In turn, this begets better therapeutic target identification and biomarker discovery. Combined with increasingly sensitive and specific imaging techniques, we continue to push back early detection and monitoring to provide us with a greater window for disease modification. The potential success of cytokine-targeted therapy will be solid proof of the inflammatory hypothesis of atherothrombosis. PMID:27125207

  11. Inflammation and Vascular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Daniel I.

    2014-01-01

    The invited special lecture at the 76th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society focused on the central role of inflammation in vascular injury and repair. Early studies pioneered the concept that mechanical injury, such as balloon angioplasty and endovascular stent deployment, elicits an inflammatory response from the vessel wall. This hypothesis was developed and substantiated at a time when the prevailing dogma viewed restenosis following angioplasty as a primarily proliferative smooth muscle cell disease. Antibody targeting of Mac-1 reduced leukocyte accumulation and limited neointimal formation following balloon injury or stent implantation. Genetic absence of Mac-1 resulted in diminished leukocyte accumulation and neointimal thickening after carotid artery injury in mice. In the course of those studies, our laboratory made fundamental discoveries regarding the mechanism of leukocyte recruitment at sites of vascular injury and identified platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ibα, a component of the GPIb-IX-V complex, as the previously unknown platelet counter-receptor for Mac-1. Follow-on studies have focused extensively on the structure, function, and signaling of the leukocyte integrin Mac-1. The binding site for GPIbα in Mac-1 has been mapped and subsequently showed that leukocyte engagement of platelet GPIbα via Mac-1 is critical not only for the biological response to vascular injury, but also for thrombosis, vasculitis, glomerulonephritis, and multiple sclerosis, thereby advancing the hypothesis that virtually all inflammation is platelet-dependent. Furthermore, ligand engagement of Mac-1 initiates a novel gene program that promotes inflammation by activating NFκB and downregulating the expression of the forkhead transcription factor Foxp1 that controls monocyte differentiation. Small molecule inhibitors of Mac-1 function have been pursued, including targeting of Mac-1-GPIbα binding or the downstream tyrosine kinase spleen tyrosine kinase

  12. Adverse events in healthcare: learning from mistakes.

    PubMed

    Rafter, N; Hickey, A; Condell, S; Conroy, R; O'Connor, P; Vaughan, D; Williams, D

    2015-04-01

    Large national reviews of patient charts estimate that approximately 10% of hospital admissions are associated with an adverse event (defined as an injury resulting in prolonged hospitalization, disability or death, caused by healthcare management). Apart from having a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality, adverse events also result in increased healthcare costs due to longer hospital stays. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of adverse events are preventable. Through identifying the nature and rate of adverse events, initiatives to improve care can be developed. A variety of methods exist to gather adverse event data both retrospectively and prospectively but these do not necessarily capture the same events and there is variability in the definition of an adverse event. For example, hospital incident reporting collects only a very small fraction of the adverse events found in retrospective chart reviews. Until there are systematic methods to identify adverse events, progress in patient safety cannot be reliably measured. This review aims to discuss the need for a safety culture that can learn from adverse events, describe ways to measure adverse events, and comment on why current adverse event monitoring is unable to demonstrate trends in patient safety. PMID:25078411

  13. Abdominal Vascular Catastrophes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manpreet; Koyfman, Alex; Martinez, Joseph P

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal vascular catastrophes are among the most challenging and time sensitive for emergency practitioners to recognize. Mesenteric ischemia remains a highly lethal entity for which the history and physical examination can be misleading. Laboratory tests are often unhelpful, and appropriate imaging must be quickly obtained. A multidisciplinary approach is required to have a positive impact on mortality rates. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm likewise may present in a cryptic fashion. A specific type of ruptured aneurysm, the aortoenteric fistula, often masquerades as the more common routine gastrointestinal bleed. The astute clinician recognizes that this is a more lethal variant of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. PMID:27133247

  14. Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland: Safe vascular access 2016.

    PubMed

    Bodenham Chair, A; Babu, S; Bennett, J; Binks, R; Fee, P; Fox, B; Johnston, A J; Klein, A A; Langton, J A; Mclure, H; Tighe, S Q M

    2016-05-01

    Safe vascular access is integral to anaesthetic and critical care practice, but procedures are a frequent source of patient adverse events. Ensuring safe and effective approaches to vascular catheter insertion should be a priority for all practitioners. New technology such as ultrasound and other imaging has increased the number of tools available. This guidance was created using review of current practice and literature, as well as expert opinion. The result is a consensus document which provides practical advice on the safe insertion and removal of vascular access devices. PMID:26888253

  15. Late biological effects of heavy charged particles: Cataracts, vascular injury and life shortening in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, E. J.; Jose, J. G.; Barker, M. E.; Alpen, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    Risks associated with extended habitation in a space environment, particularly hazards to space workers that might result from exposure to high energy heavy ion particles (HZE), were studied. Biological effects of HZE were investigated in mice to assess their potential adverse health hazards. The potential effects of HZE particles on the crystalline lens of the eye and the carcinogenic effects and blood vessel (vascular) damage from radiation were evaluated by a risk assessment. Animal experiments to evaluate dose response relationships for tumor induction/promotion and for vascular injury were introduced. Cataract productions and preliminary results on cacinogenic and vascular effects are presented for perspective.

  16. Dyslipidemia Induced by Drugs Used for the Prevention and Treatment of Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Athyros, Vasilios G; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2011-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is a major vascular risk factor. Interestingly, several agents used for the prevention and treatment of vascular diseases have an adverse effect on the lipid profile. In addition, agents belonging to the same class (e.g. beta blockers) can have significantly different actions on lipid levels. We summarize the effects of drugs used for the prevention and treatment of vascular diseases on the lipid profile. These effects should be considered when selecting a specific agent, particularly in high-risk patients. PMID:21769302

  17. Medical management of vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Trenor, Cameron C

    2016-03-01

    We have entered an exciting era in the care of patients with vascular anomalies. These disorders require multidisciplinary care and coordination and dedicated centers have emerged to address this need. Vascular tumors have been treated with medical therapies for many years, while malformations have been historically treated with endovascular and operative procedures. The recent serendipitous discoveries of propranolol and sirolimus for vascular anomalies have revolutionized this field. In particular, sirolimus responses are challenging the dogma that vascular malformations are not biologically active. While initially explored for lymphatic anomalies, sirolimus is now being used broadly throughout the spectrum of vascular anomalies. Whether medical therapies are reserved for refractory patients or used first line is currently dependent on the experience and availability of alternative therapies at each institution. On the horizon, we anticipate new drugs targeting genes and pathways involved in vascular anomalies to be developed. Also, combinations of medications and protocols combining medical and procedural approaches are in development for refractory patients. PMID:27607327

  18. The pathobiology of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment defines alterations in cognition, ranging from subtle deficits to full-blown dementia, attributable to cerebrovascular causes. Often coexisting with Alzheimer’s disease, mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. Central to the disease mechanism is the crucial role that cerebral blood vessels play in brain health, not only for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, but also for the trophic signaling that links inextricably the well being of neurons and glia to that of cerebrovascular cells. This review will examine how vascular damage disrupts these vital homeostatic interactions, focusing on the hemispheric white matter, a region at heightened risk for vascular damage, and on the interplay between vascular factors and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, preventative and therapeutic prospects will be examined, highlighting the importance of midlife vascular risk factor control in the prevention of late-life dementia. PMID:24267647

  19. Life adversity is associated with smoking relapse after a quit attempt.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Andrine; Olson, Leif; Nakajima, Motohiro; Schulberg, Lauren; al'Absi, Mustafa

    2016-09-01

    Multiple cross-sectional studies have linked adverse childhood events and adult adversities to current smoking, lifetime smoking, and former smoking. To date, however, there have been no direct observational studies assessing the influence of adversities on smoking relapse. We prospectively followed 123 participants, 86 of whom were habitual smokers, from pre-quit ad libitum smoking to four weeks post-quit. Thirty-seven non-smokers were also tested in parallel as a comparison group. Subjects provided biological samples for confirmation of abstinence status and self-report history of adversities such as abuse, neglect, family dysfunction, incarceration, and child-parent separation. They also completed mood and smoking withdrawal symptom measures. The results indicated that within non-smokers and smokers who relapsed within the first month of a quit attempt, but not abstainers, females had significantly higher adversity scores than males. Cigarette craving, which was independent from depressive affect, increased for low adversity participants, but not those with no adversity nor high adversity. These results demonstrate that sex and relapse status interact to predict adversity and that craving for nicotine may be an important additional mediator of relapse. These results add further support to the previous cross-sectional evidence of an adversity and smoking relationship. Further studies to clarify how adversity complicates smoking cessation and impacts smoking behaviors are warranted. PMID:27100471

  20. Functional behavior and gene expression of magnetic nanoparticle-loaded primary endothelial cells for targeting vascular stents

    PubMed Central

    Tuj Zohra, Fatema; Medved, Mikhail; Lazareva, Nina; Polyak, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Aim To assess functional competence and gene expression of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-loaded primary endothelial cells (ECs) as potential cell-based therapy vectors. Materials & methods A quantitative tube formation, nitric oxide and adhesion assays were conducted to assess functional potency of the MNP-loaded ECs. A quantitative real-time PCR was used to profile genes in both MNP-loaded at static conditions and in vitro targeted ECs. Results Functional behavior of MNP-loaded and unloaded cells was comparable. MNPs induce expression of genes involved in EC growth and survival, while repress genes involved in coagulation. Conclusion MNPs do not adversely affect cellular function. Gene expression indicates that targeting MNP-loaded ECs to vascular stents may potentially stimulate re-endothelialization of an implant and attenuate neointimal hyperplasia. PMID:25996117

  1. The impact on students of adverse experiences during medical school.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Tim J; Gill, Denzil J; Fitzjohn, Julie; Palmer, Claire L; Mulder, Roger T

    2006-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the consequences for, and coping method used by, medical students who experienced adverse experiences during their training. A nationwide questionnaire based census of all current medical students in New Zealand. The response rate was 83% (1384/1660). Two-thirds of students had at least one adverse experience, with humiliation being the most common and having the greatest adverse impact. Unwanted sexual advances, unfair treatment on the basis of gender or race had a lesser impact for most students. Most students took several hours or several days to get over an adverse episode and most commonly they then avoided that person or department. Around one half sought help. Only one-quarter felt it motivated their learning while one-sixth felt it made them consider leaving medical school. The most common perpetrators were senior doctors or nurses. Unwanted sexual advances were most common from other students or from patients. Humiliation is the experience that affected students the most and had a significant adverse effect on learning. There is a disturbing rate of unacceptable practice within medical schools, not all of which is from doctors. PMID:16707293

  2. Radiation-associated atypical vascular lesions: vascular lesions with endothelial cell atypia presenting in the radiation port of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Tschen, Jaime A; MacFarlane, Deborah F

    2014-01-01

    Atypical vascular lesions are an uncommon adverse sequela to the radiotherapy of tumors. Many characteristics are shared between atypical vascular lesions caused by radiation port and well-differentiated radiation-induced angiosarcomas. The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical literature using PubMed, searching the terms acquired, atypical, benign, lymphangioma, lymphangioendothelioma, lymphangiomatous, lesion, papules, progressive, and vascular. Patient reports and previous reviews of the subject were critically assessed and the salient features are presented. Atypical vascular lesions associated with the radiation port present as clinically innocuous flesh-colored to erythematous papules or plaques. The condition presents within the radiation field, approximately 3 years after initial treatment. While the exact me chanism remains to be elucidated, growing evidence supports an association between radiation-associated atypical vascular lesions and radiation-induced angiosarcomas. Atypical vascular lesions within a radiation port are suggested to be in a state of morphologic continuum, which may progress into the more aggressive, malignant angiosarcoma. The authors recommend consideration for biopsy of new skin lesions within or adjacent to radiation. While it is clear that atypical vascular lesions caused by radiation are not equivalent to angiosarcoma, growing evidence supports that radiation-associated atypical vascular lesions may progress to angiosarcoma in some patients; therefore, the authors recommend excision of the lesion with margins depending on clinical judgment and the lesion encountered. PMID:25823080

  3. MicroRNAs in vascular tissue engineering and post-ischemic neovascularization☆

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Massimo; Saif, Jaimy; Rajakaruna, Cha; Brooks, Marcus; Angelini, Gianni D.; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-01-01

    Increasing numbers of paediatric patients with congenital heart defects are surviving to adulthood, albeit with continuing clinical needs. Hence, there is still scope for revolutionary new strategies to correct vascular anatomical defects. Adult patients are also surviving longer with the adverse consequences of ischemic vascular disease, especially after acute coronary syndromes brought on by plaque erosion and rupture. Vascular tissue engineering and therapeutic angiogenesis provide new hope for these patients. Both approaches have shown promise in laboratory studies, but have not yet been able to deliver clear evidence of clinical success. More research into biomaterials, molecular medicine and cell and molecular therapies is necessary. This review article focuses on the new opportunities offered by targeting microRNAs for the improved production and greater empowerment of vascular cells for use in vascular tissue engineering or for increasing blood perfusion of ischemic tissues by amplifying the resident microvascular network. PMID:25980937

  4. MicroRNAs in vascular tissue engineering and post-ischemic neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Massimo; Saif, Jaimy; Rajakaruna, Cha; Brooks, Marcus; Angelini, Gianni D; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-07-01

    Increasing numbers of paediatric patients with congenital heart defects are surviving to adulthood, albeit with continuing clinical needs. Hence, there is still scope for revolutionary new strategies to correct vascular anatomical defects. Adult patients are also surviving longer with the adverse consequences of ischemic vascular disease, especially after acute coronary syndromes brought on by plaque erosion and rupture. Vascular tissue engineering and therapeutic angiogenesis provide new hope for these patients. Both approaches have shown promise in laboratory studies, but have not yet been able to deliver clear evidence of clinical success. More research into biomaterials, molecular medicine and cell and molecular therapies is necessary. This review article focuses on the new opportunities offered by targeting microRNAs for the improved production and greater empowerment of vascular cells for use in vascular tissue engineering or for increasing blood perfusion of ischemic tissues by amplifying the resident microvascular network. PMID:25980937

  5. CSF biomarkers in neurodegenerative and vascular dementias.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Franc; Schmitz, Matthias; Ferrer, Isidro; Zerr, Inga

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases with abnormal protein aggregates such as Alzheimer's disease, tauopathies, synucleinopathies, and prionopathies, together with vascular encephalopathies, are cause of cognitive impairment and dementia. Identification of reliable biomarkers in biological fluids, particularly in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), is of extreme importance in optimizing the precise early clinical diagnosis of distinct entities and predicting the outcome in particular settings. In addition, the study of CSF biomarkers is useful to identify and monitor the underlying pathological processes developing in the central nervous system of affected individuals. Evidence suggests that levels of key CSF molecules correlate, in some circumstances, with prediction, disease progression, and severity of cognitive decline. Correlation of CSF markers and underlying pathological molecular substrates in brain is an exciting field for further study. However, while some dementias such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have accurate CSF biomarkers, other disease types such as dementia with Lewy bodies, vascular dementia, and frontotemporal dementia lack reliable biomarkers for their specific clinical diagnosis. PMID:27016008

  6. Vascular trauma in civilian practice.

    PubMed Central

    Golledge, J.; Scriven, M. W.; Fligelstone, L. J.; Lane, I. F.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular trauma is associated with major morbidity and mortality, but little is known about its incidence or nature in Britain. A retrospective study of 36 patients requiring operative intervention for vascular trauma under one vascular surgeon over a 6-year period was undertaken. Twenty-four patients suffered iatrogenic trauma (median age 61 years); including cardiological intervention (19), radiological intervention (2), varicose vein surgery (1), umbilical vein catherisation (1) and isolated hyperthermic limb perfusion (1). There were 23 arterial and three venous injuries. Twelve patients had accidental trauma (median age 23 years). Three of the ten patients with blunt trauma were referred for vascular assessment before orthopaedic intervention, two after an on-table angiogram and five only after an initial orthopaedic procedure (range of delay 6 h to 10 days). Injuries were arterial in nine, venous in two and combined in one. Angiography was obtained in six patients, and in two patients with multiple upper limb fractures identified the site of injury when clinical localisation was difficult. A variety of vascular techniques were used to treat the injuries. Two patients died postoperatively and one underwent major limb amputation. Thirty-two (89%) remain free of vascular sequelae after a median follow-up of 48 months (range 3-72 months). Vascular trauma is uncommon in the United Kingdom. To repair the injuries a limited repertoire of vascular surgery techniques is needed. Therefore, vascular surgical assessment should be sought at an early stage to prevent major limb loss. PMID:8540659

  7. [Vascular vertigo syndromes].

    PubMed

    Dieterich, M

    2002-12-01

    Ischemia,hemorrhages, and other vascular disorders can result in various central or peripheral vestibular syndromes with vertigo, oculomotor/balance disturbances, and nausea. The vascular vertigo syndromes listed in Table 1 can however be brought about by other causes such as demyelitizing focuses in multiple sclerosis or space-occupying lesions, so that not only localization of the damaged structure but also the various etiologies are decisive for the choice of therapy. Occasionally, combined functional disturbances of the peripheral and central vestibular system appear, such as an infarction of the inferior anterior cerebellar artery, which supplies the labyrinth and parts of the brainstem and cerebellum. In rare cases, a central lesion can have the same signs as a peripheral-vertibular disturbance: a lacunar infarct at the root entry zone of the eighth nerve can mimic a unilateral partial loss of labyrinth function as it occurs in vestibular neuritis, thus named "pseudoneuritis". Differential diagnosis between vestibular migraine, vestibular paroxysmia, transient ischemic brainstem attacks, and Meniere's disease is sometimes so difficult that only trial therapies such as prophylaxis with beta blockers, carbamazepine, thrombocyte aggregation inhibitors, antiplatelet drugs, or betahistin can clarify the issue. PMID:12486562

  8. Vascular Distribution of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered primarily occupational, novel nanotechnology innovation and application has led to widespread domestic use and intentional biomedical exposures. With these exciting advances, the breadth and depth of toxicological considerations must also be expanded. The vascular system interacts with every tissue in the body, striving to homeostasis. Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) have been reported to distribute in many different organs and tissues. However, these observations have tended to use approaches requiring tissue homogenization and/or gross organ analyses. These techniques, while effective in establishing presence, preclude an exact determination of where ENM are deposited within a tissue. It is necessary to identify this exact distribution and deposition of ENM throughout the cardiovascular system, with respect to vascular hemodynamics and in vivo/ in vitro ENM modifications taken into account if nanotechnology is to achieve its full potential. Distinct levels of the vasculature will first be described as individual compartments. Then the vasculature will be considered as a whole. These unique compartments and biophysical conditions will be discussed in terms of their propensity to favor ENM deposition. Understanding levels of the vasculature will also be discussed. Ultimately, future studies must verify the mechanisms speculated on and presented herein. PMID:24777845

  9. Pulmonary vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Mélot, C; Naeije, R

    2011-04-01

    Diseases of the pulmonary vasculature are a cause of increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) in pulmonary embolism, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), and pulmonary arterial hypertension or decreased PVR in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations on hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, portal hypertension, or cavopulmonary anastomosis. All these conditions are associated with a decrease in both arterial PO2 and PCO2. Gas exchange in pulmonary vascular diseases with increased PVR is characterized by a shift of ventilation and perfusion to high ventilation-perfusion ratios, a mild to moderate increase in perfusion to low ventilation-perfusion ratios, and an increased physiologic dead space. Hypoxemia in these patients is essentially explained by altered ventilation-perfusion matching amplified by a decreased mixed venous PO2 caused by a low cardiac output. Hypocapnia is accounted for by hyperventilation, which is essentially related to an increased chemosensitivity. A cardiac shunt on a patent foramen ovale may be a cause of severe hypoxemia in a proportion of patients with pulmonary hypertension and an increase in right atrial pressure. Gas exchange in pulmonary arteriovenous malformations is characterized by variable degree of pulmonary shunting and/or diffusion-perfusion imbalance. Hypocapnia is caused by an increased ventilation in relation to an increased pulmonary blood flow with direct peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation by shunted mixed venous blood flow. PMID:23737196

  10. Are MPNs vascular diseases?

    PubMed

    Finazzi, Guido; De Stefano, Valerio; Barbui, Tiziano

    2013-12-01

    A high risk of arterial and venous thrombosis is the hallmark of chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), particularly polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET). Clinical aspects, pathogenesis and management of thrombosis in MPN resemble those of other paradigmatic vascular diseases. The occurrence of venous thrombosis in atypical sites, such as the splanchnic district, and the involvement of plasmatic prothrombotic factors, including an acquired resistance to activated protein C, both link MPN to inherited thrombophilia. Anticoagulants are the drugs of choice for these complications. The pathogenic role of leukocytes and inflammation, and the high mortality rate from arterial occlusions are common features of MPN and atherosclerosis. The efficacy and safety of aspirin in reducing deaths and major thrombosis in PV have been demonstrated in a randomized clinical trial. Finally, the Virchow's triad of impaired blood cells, endothelium and blood flow is shared both by MPN and thrombosis in solid cancer. Phlebotomy and myelosuppressive agents are the current therapeutic options for correcting these abnormalities and reducing thrombosis in this special vascular disease represented by MPN. PMID:24037420

  11. Thyroid-Disrupting Chemicals: Interpreting Upstream Biomarkers of Adverse Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark D.; Crofton, Kevin M.; Rice, Deborah C.; Zoeller, R. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence in humans and in experimental animals for a relationship between exposure to specific environmental chemicals and perturbations in levels of critically important thyroid hormones (THs). Identification and proper interpretation of these relationships are required for accurate assessment of risk to public health. Objectives We review the role of TH in nervous system development and specific outcomes in adults, the impact of xenobiotics on thyroid signaling, the relationship between adverse outcomes of thyroid disruption and upstream causal biomarkers, and the societal implications of perturbations in thyroid signaling by xenobiotic chemicals. Data sources We drew on an extensive body of epidemiologic, toxicologic, and mechanistic studies. Data synthesis THs are critical for normal nervous system development, and decreased maternal TH levels are associated with adverse neuropsychological development in children. In adult humans, increased thyroid-stimulating hormone is associated with increased blood pressure and poorer blood lipid profiles, both risk factors for cardiovascular disease and death. These effects of thyroid suppression are observed even within the “normal” range for the population. Environmental chemicals may affect thyroid homeostasis by a number of mechanisms, and multiple chemicals have been identified that interfere with thyroid function by each of the identified mechanisms. Conclusions Individuals are potentially vulnerable to adverse effects as a consequence of exposure to thyroid-disrupting chemicals. Any degree of thyroid disruption that affects TH levels on a population basis should be considered a biomarker of adverse outcomes, which may have important societal outcomes. PMID:19654909

  12. Pretreatment Predictors of Adverse Radiation Effects After Radiosurgery for Arteriovenous Malformation

    SciTech Connect

    Hayhurst, Caroline; Monsalves, Eric; Prooijen, Monique van; Cusimano, Michael; Tsao, May; Menard, Cynthia; Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Schwartz, Michael; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To identify vascular and dosimetric predictors of symptomatic T2 signal change and adverse radiation effects after radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformation, in order to define and validate preexisting risk models. Methods and Materials: A total of 125 patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVM) were treated at our institution between 2005 and 2009. Eighty-five patients have at least 12 months of clinical and radiological follow-up. Any new-onset headaches, new or worsening seizures, or neurological deficit were considered adverse events. Follow-up magnetic resonance images were assessed for new onset T2 signal change and the volume calculated. Pretreatment characteristics and dosimetric variables were analyzed to identify predictors of adverse radiation effects. Results: There were 19 children and 66 adults in the study cohort, with a mean age of 34 (range 6-74). Twenty-three (27%) patients suffered adverse radiation effects (ARE), 9 patients with permanent neurological deficit (10.6%). Of these, 5 developed fixed visual field deficits. Target volume and 12 Gy volume were the most significant predictors of adverse radiation effects on univariate analysis (p < 0.001). Location and cortical eloquence were not significantly associated with the development of adverse events (p = 0.12). No additional vascular parameters were identified as predictive of ARE. There was a significant target volume threshold of 4 cm{sup 3}, above which the rate of ARE increased dramatically. Multivariate analysis target volume and the absence of prior hemorrhage are the only significant predictors of ARE. The volume of T2 signal change correlates to ARE, but only target volume is predictive of a higher volume of T2 signal change. Conclusions: Target volume and the absence of prior hemorrhage is the most accurate predictor of adverse radiation effects and complications after radiosurgery for AVMs. A high percentage of permanent visual field defects in this series suggest the

  13. OAE: The Ontology of Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A medical intervention is a medical procedure or application intended to relieve or prevent illness or injury. Examples of medical interventions include vaccination and drug administration. After a medical intervention, adverse events (AEs) may occur which lie outside the intended consequences of the intervention. The representation and analysis of AEs are critical to the improvement of public health. Description The Ontology of Adverse Events (OAE), previously named Adverse Event Ontology (AEO), is a community-driven ontology developed to standardize and integrate data relating to AEs arising subsequent to medical interventions, as well as to support computer-assisted reasoning. OAE has over 3,000 terms with unique identifiers, including terms imported from existing ontologies and more than 1,800 OAE-specific terms. In OAE, the term ‘adverse event’ denotes a pathological bodily process in a patient that occurs after a medical intervention. Causal adverse events are defined by OAE as those events that are causal consequences of a medical intervention. OAE represents various adverse events based on patient anatomic regions and clinical outcomes, including symptoms, signs, and abnormal processes. OAE has been used in the analysis of several different sorts of vaccine and drug adverse event data. For example, using the data extracted from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), OAE was used to analyse vaccine adverse events associated with the administrations of different types of influenza vaccines. OAE has also been used to represent and classify the vaccine adverse events cited in package inserts of FDA-licensed human vaccines in the USA. Conclusion OAE is a biomedical ontology that logically defines and classifies various adverse events occurring after medical interventions. OAE has successfully been applied in several adverse event studies. The OAE ontological framework provides a platform for systematic representation and analysis of

  14. Changing Medicine and Building Community: Maine’s Adverse Childhood Experiences Momentum

    PubMed Central

    Forstadt, Leslie; Cooper, Sally; Andrews, Sue Mackey

    2015-01-01

    Physicians are instrumental in community education, prevention, and intervention for adverse childhood experiences. In Maine, a statewide effort is focusing on education about adverse childhood experiences and ways that communities and physicians can approach childhood adversity. This article describes how education about adversity and resilience can positively change the practice of medicine and related fields. The Maine Resilience Building Network brings together ongoing programs, supports new ventures, and builds on existing resources to increase its impact. It exemplifies the collective impact model by increasing community knowledge, affecting medical practice, and improving lives. PMID:25902346

  15. 219 vascular fellows' perception of the future of vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Anil P; Ascher, Enrico; Marks, Natalie; Shiferson, Alexander; Puggioni, Alessandra; Tran, Victor; Patel, Nirav; Jacob, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to identify the fellows' concerns about the future of the field of vascular surgery, we conducted a survey consisting of 22 questions at an annual national meeting in March from 2004 to 2007. In order to obtain accurate data, all surveys were kept anonymous. The fellows were asked (1) what type of practice they anticipated they would be in, (2) what the new training paradigm for fellows should be, (3) to assess their expectation of the needed manpower with respect to the demand for vascular surgeons, (4) what were major threats to the future of vascular surgery, (5) whether they had heard of and were in favor of the American Board of Vascular Surgery (ABVS), (6) who should be able to obtain vascular privileges, and (7) about their interest in an association for vascular surgical trainees. Of 273 attendees, 219 (80%) completed the survey. Males made up 87% of those surveyed, and 60% were between the ages of 31 and 35 years. Second-year fellows made up 82% of those surveyed. Those expecting to join a private, academic, or mixed practice made up 35%, 28%, and 20% of the respondents, respectively, with 71% anticipating entering a 100% vascular practice. Forty percent felt that 5 years of general surgery with 2 years of vascular surgery should be the training paradigm, while 45% suggested 3 and 3 years, respectively. A majority, 79%, felt that future demand would exceed the available manpower, while 17% suggested that manpower would meet demand. The major challenges to the future of vascular surgery were felt to be competition from cardiology (82%) or radiology (30%) and lack of an independent board (29%). Seventeen percent were not aware of the ABVS, and only 2% were against it; 71% suggested that vascular privileges be restricted to board-certified vascular surgeons. Seventy-six percent were interested in forming an association for vascular trainees to address the issues of the future job market (67%), endovascular training during fellowship (56

  16. Vascular Complications of Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Joshua A; Creager, Mark A

    2016-05-27

    Over the last several decades, the global incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus has increased significantly. The raised incidence rate is projected to continue as greater numbers of persons adopt a Western lifestyle and diet. Patients with diabetes mellitus are at heightened risk of both adverse microvascular and cardiovascular events. Moreover, once cardiovascular disease develops, diabetes mellitus exacerbates progression and worsens outcomes. The medical management of patients with diabetes mellitus mandates comprehensive risk factor modification and antiplatelet therapy. Recent clinical trials of new medical therapies continue to inform the care of patients with diabetes mellitus to reduce both cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:27230641

  17. Radioiodine Treatment and Thyroid Hormone Suppression Therapy for Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: Adverse Effects Support the Trend toward Less Aggressive Treatment for Low-Risk Patients

    PubMed Central

    Klein Hesselink, E.N.; Links, T.P.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, the incidence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) has steadily increased, with especially a growing number of low-risk patients. Whereas DTC used to be treated rather aggressively, it is now acknowledged that aggressive treatment does not affect outcome for low-risk patients and that it can induce adverse effects. In this review an overview of the most clinically relevant adverse effects of radioiodine treatment and thyroid hormone suppression therapy (THST) is presented, and the trend toward less aggressive treatment for low-risk patients is outlined. Salivary gland dysfunction occurs in roughly 30% of patients, and is probably due to the concentration of radioiodine in the salivary glands by the sodium/iodide symporter. Beta radiation from radioiodine can result in sialoadenitis and eventually fibrosis and loss of salivary function. Furthermore, patients can experience bone marrow dysfunction following radioiodine treatment. Although this is in general subclinical and transient, patients that receive very high cumulative radioiodine doses may be at risk for more severe bone marrow dysfunction. THST can induce adverse cardiovascular effects in patients with DTC, such as diastolic and systolic dysfunction, and also adverse vascular and prothrombotic effects have been described. Finally, the effects of THST on bone formation and resorption are outlined; especially postmenopausal women with DTC on THST seem to be at risk of bone loss. In the past years, advances have been made in preventing low-risk patients from being overtreated. Improved biomarkers are still needed to further optimize risk stratification and personalize medicine. PMID:26279993

  18. Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wen-Hung; Wang, Chuang-Wei; Dao, Ro-Lan

    2016-07-01

    The clinical manifestations of drug eruptions can range from mild maculopapular exanthema to severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCAR), including drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) which are rare but occasionally fatal. Some pathogens may induce skin reactions mimicking SCAR. There are several models to explain the interaction of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), drug and T-cell receptor (TCR): (i) the "hapten/prohapten" theory; (ii) the "p-i concept"; (iii) the "altered peptide repertoire"; and (iv) the "altered TCR repertoire". The checkpoints of molecular mechanisms of SCAR include specific drug antigens interacting with the specific HLA loci (e.g. HLA-B*15:02 for carbamazepine-induced SJS/TEN and HLA-B*58:01 for allopurinol-induced SCAR), involvement of specific TCR, induction of T-cell-mediated responses (e.g. granulysin, Fas ligand, perforin/granzyme B and T-helper 1/2-associated cytokines) and cell death mechanism (e.g. miR-18a-5p-induced apoptosis; annexin A1 and formyl peptide receptor 1-induced necroptosis in keratinocytes). In addition to immune mechanism, metabolism has been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of SCAR, such as recent findings of strong association of CYP2C9*3 with phenytoin-induced SCAR and impaired renal function with allopurinol SCAR. With a better understanding of the mechanisms, effective therapeutics and prevention for SCAR can be improved. PMID:27154258

  19. Effects of Timing of Adversity on Adolescent and Young Adult Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Kiff, Cara J.; Cortes, Rebecca; Lengua, Lilana; Kosterman, Rick; Hawkins, J. David; Mason, W. Alex

    2012-01-01

    Effects of Timing of Adversity on Adolescent and Young Adult Adjustment Abstract Exposure to adversity during childhood and adolescence predicts adjustment across development. Further, adolescent adjustment problems persist into young adulthood. This study examined relations of contextual adversity with concurrent adolescent adjustment and prospective mental health and health outcomes in young adulthood. A longitudinal sample (N = 808) was followed from age 10 through 27. Perceptions of neighborhood in childhood predicted depression, alcohol use disorders, and HIV risk in young adulthood. Further, the timing of adversity was important in determining the type of problem experienced in adulthood. Youth adjustment predicted adult outcomes, and in some cases, mediated the relation between adversity and outcomes. These findings support the importance of adversity in predicting adjustment and elucidate factors that affect outcomes into young adulthood. PMID:22754271

  20. Effects of Timing of Adversity on Adolescent and Young Adult Adjustment.

    PubMed

    Kiff, Cara J; Cortes, Rebecca; Lengua, Lilana; Kosterman, Rick; Hawkins, J David; Mason, W Alex

    2012-06-01

    Effects of Timing of Adversity on Adolescent and Young Adult Adjustment Abstract Exposure to adversity during childhood and adolescence predicts adjustment across development. Further, adolescent adjustment problems persist into young adulthood. This study examined relations of contextual adversity with concurrent adolescent adjustment and prospective mental health and health outcomes in young adulthood. A longitudinal sample (N = 808) was followed from age 10 through 27. Perceptions of neighborhood in childhood predicted depression, alcohol use disorders, and HIV risk in young adulthood. Further, the timing of adversity was important in determining the type of problem experienced in adulthood. Youth adjustment predicted adult outcomes, and in some cases, mediated the relation between adversity and outcomes. These findings support the importance of adversity in predicting adjustment and elucidate factors that affect outcomes into young adulthood. PMID:22754271

  1. The multifactorial nature of microRNAs in vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Welten, S M J; Goossens, E A C; Quax, P H A; Nossent, A Y

    2016-05-01

    Vascular remodelling is a multifactorial process that involves both adaptive and maladaptive changes of the vessel wall through, among others, cell proliferation and migration, but also apoptosis and necrosis of the various cell types in the vessel wall. Vascular remodelling can be beneficial, e.g. during neovascularization after ischaemia, as well as pathological, e.g. during atherosclerosis and aneurysm formation. In recent years, it has become clear that microRNAs are able to target many genes that are involved in vascular remodelling processes and either can promote or inhibit structural changes of the vessel wall. Since many different processes of vascular remodelling are regulated by similar mechanisms and factors, both positive and negative vascular remodelling can be affected by the same microRNAs. A large number of microRNAs has been linked to various aspects of vascular remodelling and indeed, several of these microRNAs regulate multiple vascular remodelling processes, including both the adaptive processes angiogenesis and arteriogenesis as well as maladaptive processes of atherosclerosis, restenosis and aneurysm formation. Here, we discuss the multifactorial role of microRNAs and microRNA clusters that were reported to play a role in multiple forms of vascular remodelling and are clearly linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The microRNAs reviewed are miR-126, miR-155 and the microRNA gene clusters 17-92, 23/24/27, 143/145 and 14q32. Understanding the contribution of these microRNAs to the entire spectrum of vascular remodelling processes is important, especially as these microRNAs may have great potential as therapeutic targets for treatment of various CVDs. PMID:26912672

  2. [Banks of vascular homografts].

    PubMed

    Polvani, G L; Guarino, A; Pompilio, G; Parolari, A; Piccolo, G; Sala, A; Biglioli, P

    2001-01-01

    We define as Banking of the tissues all the procedures that include the finding, preparation, conservation and distribution of the homograft. The vascular homografts are taken and put into a solution of transportation at +4 degrees C and kept at this temperature till their arrival at the Bank. The following step is the dissection of the homograft which will have to be performed as quickly as possible at most 24 hours after the taking in conditions of maximum sterility. At the Italian Homograft Bank at Centro Cardiologico, the vascular homografts are kept at +4 degrees C for 96 hours on average with antibiotics. After a phase of sterilization at +4 degrees C the tissue is frozen according to a homogeneous and controlled thermic decrease and stored at -150 degrees C/-180 degrees C in fumes of liquid nitrogen till the moment of their employment allowing a long term conservation. The aim of all these procedures of cryopreservation is to keep the structural and functional integrity of cells and tissues. The thermic decrease of the tissues must occur so that to avoid all the damages of the cellular vitality and functionality and especially of the tissue structure in toto. In order to limitate these events some cryoprotector agents are employed because they reduce the concentration of the solutes, the cellular dehydration, the formation of micro-macro crystals. Another step to establish if the homograft is proper is the study of bacteriological and viral aspects. The viral screenings are performed on the donor's blood and the bacteriological tests are performed on the tissue and on the liquids. For each phase of the banking a series of information about the donor and about the tissues are recorded and filed both on paper and database so that to grant always a right conduct of the material. PMID:11552466

  3. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Echeverri, Darío; Montes, Félix R.; Cabrera, Mariana; Galán, Angélica; Prieto, Angélica

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial. PMID:21188209

  4. Vascular leg ulcers: histopathologic study of 293 patients.

    PubMed

    Misciali, Cosimo; Dika, Emi; Baraldi, Carlotta; Fanti, Pier Alessandro; Mirelli, Michele; Stella, Andrea; Bertoncelli, Marco; Patrizi, Annalisa

    2014-12-01

    Vascular leg ulcers remain a challenge for the modern health care, and a systematic pathological study on this kind of lesions has not been reported so far. A total of 293 consecutive white patients with chronic leg ulcers (present for a minimum of 6 months and up to several years) referred to the Wound Care Unit (Dermatology, University of Bologna) between March 2008 and June 2011. Thirty-four patients affected by other than vascular ulcers, neoplastic or inflammatory conditions, were excluded. The remaining 259 patients affected by vascular leg ulcers were enrolled in this study. Assessment of the patients general health, skin biopsy, and vascular Doppler of the lower limbs were performed to determine the etiology and to formulate an appropriate management plan, whereas 2 punch biopsies of 3 mm were performed on the border and on the bed of each ulcer. Doppler evaluation showed the presence of vascular hemodynamic impairment in 259 patients. Of these, 181 (69.9%) patients were affected by venous insufficiency, 58 (22.4%) by venous and arterial insufficiency, and 20 (7.7%) by arterial insufficiency. Histopathologic features revealed significant differences, thus, reflecting the clinicopathologic correlation with the underlying hemodynamic impairments. In conclusion, histopathologic and hemodynamic data correlation could provide the basis for future analysis of leg ulcers pathogenesis and may improve treatment protocols. We should underline that this observational study represents a single-institute experience and that larger series are needed to confirm our observations. PMID:25072681

  5. Vascular Effects of a Subchronic Inhalation Exposure to Concentrated Ambient Air Particles in Atherosclerosis Susceptible Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous studies have reported the adverse effects of particulate air pollution on cardiovascular function and disease. The causal physiochemical properties of particles and their mechanisms of action/injury remain unknown. This study examined the vascular effects in 15 wk old ma...

  6. [Acute adverse effects of dialysis].

    PubMed

    Opatrný, K

    2003-02-01

    Adverse reactions to dialyzers are a not very frequent, but because of the serious, sometimes fatal course, a dreaded complication of haemodialysis treatment. Most important among these reactions are hypersensitive reactions (anaphylactoid, reaction type A to dialyzer), which develop as a rule within the 10th minute of the procedure, and the reaction caused by the action of perfluorohydrocarbon which develop hours after onset or even completion of haemodialysis. Explanation of the development of hypersensitive reactions (HSR) by complement activation and formation of anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a during contact of blood with the bioincompatible dialysis membrane has been abandoned. Evidence of the etiological role of ethylene oxide (ETO) in the development of HSR influenced the selection of materials for the production of dialyzers and sterilization during manufacture, it emphasized the importance of rinsing of the dialyzer in the dialysis centre and led to the wide application of alternative methods of sterilization by gamma radiation and steam. HSR may be also caused by overproduction of bradykinin and inhibition of its degradation or degradation of its metabolites. Excessive bradykinin production caused by dialysis membranes with a negative charge is potentiated e.g. by a lower pH and increased plasma dilution in the initial stage of haemodialysis. Inhibition of bradykinin degradation develops during treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI). In prevention of HSR associated with bradykinin in addition to elimination of a combination of a negatively charged dialysis membrane and ACEI treatment a part is played also by rinsing of the dialyzer before haemodialysis with a bicarbonate solution and the modification of the membrane surface (implemented by the manufacturer) which reduces its negative charge. The first reaction to the dialyzer in conjunction with perfluorohydrocarbon (PF-5070), used in production of some dialyzers for testing the

  7. Vascular nitric oxide: Beyond eNOS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingzi; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan W S

    2015-10-01

    As the first discovered gaseous signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO) affects a number of cellular processes, including those involving vascular cells. This brief review summarizes the contribution of NO to the regulation of vascular tone and its sources in the blood vessel wall. NO regulates the degree of contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells mainly by stimulating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) to produce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), although cGMP-independent signaling [S-nitrosylation of target proteins, activation of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) or production of cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP)] also can be involved. In the blood vessel wall, NO is produced mainly from l-arginine by the enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) but it can also be released non-enzymatically from S-nitrosothiols or from nitrate/nitrite. Dysfunction in the production and/or the bioavailability of NO characterizes endothelial dysfunction, which is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. PMID:26499181

  8. Can We Clinically Recognize a Vascular Depression?

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Bela R.; Gschwandtner, Michael E.; Mauerhofer, Michaela; Löffler-Stastka, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The vascular depression (VD) hypothesis postulates that cerebrovascular disease may “predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate” a depressive syndrome in elderly patients. Clinical presentation of VD has been shown to differ to major depression in quantitative disability; however, as little research has been made toward qualitative phenomenological differences in the personality aspects of the symptom profile, clinical diagnosis remains a challenge. We attempted to identify differences in clinical presentation between depression patients (n = 50) with (n = 25) and without (n = 25) vascular disease using questionnaires to assess depression, affect regulation, object relations, aggressiveness, alexithymia, personality functioning, personality traits, and counter transference. We were able to show that patients with vascular dysfunction and depression exhibit significantly higher aggressive and auto-aggressive tendencies due to a lower tolerance threshold. These data indicate that VD is a separate clinical entity and secondly that the role of personality itself may be a component of the disease process. We propose an expanded threshold disease model incorporating personality functioning and mood changes. Such findings might also aid the development of a screening program, by serving as differential criteria, ameliorating the diagnostic procedure. PMID:25950684

  9. Ocular adverse effects after facial cosmetic procedures: a review of case reports.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Lucas H; Navajas, Samia V; Carneiro, Paula R; Söderberg, Stephanie A; Ferraz, Caroline A

    2015-06-01

    To review indexed literature concerning adverse ocular effects of the most common aesthetic facial procedures (light-emitting therapy, dermal fillers injection, and botulinum toxin). Literature search using three online databases - PubMed, SciELO, and Capes - selecting case reports, series of cases and reviews, with no language restriction, published in a period of the last twenty years (1995-2015). After reviewing 48 case reports and most recent reviews, the authors found the most common ocular adverse effects of dermal fillers were related to vascular occlusion; light-emitting therapy was associated with pigmented tissue damage leading to anterior uveitis and iris atrophy, and ptosis presented the higher relative risk associated with botulinum toxin. Even though ocular adverse effects are not very frequent, some of them can lead to permanent ocular dysfunction and visual impairment. Professionals involved in cosmetic procedures should be aware of the risks. PMID:25790150

  10. Estrogens and development of pulmonary hypertension - Interaction of estradiol metabolism and pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Tofovic, Stevan P.

    2010-01-01

    Severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by clustered proliferation of endothelial cells in the lumina of small size pulmonary arteries resulting in concentric obliteration of the lumina and formation of complex vascular structures known as plexiform lesions. This debilitating disease occurs more frequently in women, yet both animal studies in classical models of PAH and limited clinical data suggest protective effects of estrogens: the estrogen paradox in pulmonary hypertension. Little is known about the role of estrogens in PAH, but one line of evidence strongly suggests that the vascular protective effects of 17β-estradiol (estradiol; E2) are mediated largely by its downstream metabolites. Estradiol is metabolized to 2-hydroxyestradiol (2HE) by CYP1A1/CYP1B1, and 2HE is converted to 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME) by catechol-O-methyl transferase. 2ME is extensively metabolized to 2-methoxyestrone, a metabolite that lacks biologic activity but which may be converted back to 2ME. 2ME has no estrogenic activity and its effects are mediated by estrogen receptors-independent mechanism(s). Notably, in systemic and pulmonary vascular endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts 2ME exerts stronger anti-mitotic effects than E2 itself. E2 and 2ME, despite having similar effects on other cardiovascular cells, have opposing effects on endothelial cells; that is, in endothelial cells, E2 is pro-mitogenic, pro-angiogenic and anti- apoptotic, whereas 2ME is antimitogenic, anti-angiogenic and pro-apoptotic. This may have significant ramifications in severe PAH that involves uncontrolled proliferation of monoclonal, apoptosis resistant endothelial cells. Based on its cellular effects, 2ME should be expected to attenuate the progression of disease and provide protection in severe PAH. In contrast, E2, due to its mitogenic, angiogenic, and anti-apoptotic effects (otherwise desirable in normal, quiescent endothelial cells), may even adversely affect

  11. Strategic approaches to adverse outcome pathway development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are conceptual frameworks for organizing biological and toxicological knowledge in a manner that supports extrapolation of data pertaining to the initiation or early progression of toxicity to an apical adverse outcome that occurs at a level of org...

  12. Adverse Drug Reactions in Dental Practice

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Adverse reactions may occur with any of the medications prescribed or administered in dental practice. Most of these reactions are somewhat predictable based on the pharmacodynamic properties of the drug. Others, such as allergic and pseudoallergic reactions, are less common and unrelated to normal drug action. This article will review the most common adverse reactions that are unrelated to drug allergy. PMID:24697823

  13. Mechanisms of Vascular Calcification: The Pivotal Role of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification, abnormal mineralization of the vessel wall, is frequently associated with aging, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. Vascular calcification is a key risk factor for many adverse clinical outcomes, including ischemic cardiac events and subsequent cardiovascular mortality. Vascular calcification was long considered to be a passive degenerative process, but it is now recognized as an active and highly regulated process similar to bone formation. However, despite numerous studies on the pathogenesis of vascular calcification, the mechanisms driving this process remain poorly understood. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) play an important role in the regulation of cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. Recent studies show that PDK4 is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of various metabolic diseases. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the mechanisms of vascular calcification and describe the role of PDK4 in the osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells and development of vascular calcification. Further studies aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification will be critical for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26996423

  14. Mechanisms of Vascular Calcification: The Pivotal Role of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 4.

    PubMed

    Leem, Jaechan; Lee, In Kyu

    2016-03-01

    Vascular calcification, abnormal mineralization of the vessel wall, is frequently associated with aging, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. Vascular calcification is a key risk factor for many adverse clinical outcomes, including ischemic cardiac events and subsequent cardiovascular mortality. Vascular calcification was long considered to be a passive degenerative process, but it is now recognized as an active and highly regulated process similar to bone formation. However, despite numerous studies on the pathogenesis of vascular calcification, the mechanisms driving this process remain poorly understood. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDKs) play an important role in the regulation of cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. Recent studies show that PDK4 is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of various metabolic diseases. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the mechanisms of vascular calcification and describe the role of PDK4 in the osteogenic differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells and development of vascular calcification. Further studies aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification will be critical for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26996423

  15. Advancing and Translating Knowledge in Vascular Medicine.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Marc; Barton, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, physicians have depended on the use of written information to gain knowledge. Book printing and binding introduced by Gutenberg in the fifteenth century revolutionized and accelerated the distribution of information. Advancing medical knowledge and progress is not only linked to the scientific quality of a discovery determining it will be accepted by the peers but also by its communication and sharing of new findings with the medical community. All these factors determine whether new knowledge will advance and improve clinical practice, medical education, and ultimately, patient care, and human health. In the past decade medical publishing has witnessed a revolution with regard to the instant, online availability of published "open access" information, which can be accessed and printed from any computer connected to the internet. As an example, how language and availability of printed information may affect distribution of knowledge, we discuss the publication of the first results of balloon angioplasty in patients with peripheral vascular disease 40 years ago by Andreas Grüntzig, M.D. at the University of Zürich. Vascular Medicine, as part of Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine, will provide open access provided to all published content for sharing and distributing new and most up-to-date information on clinical practice and medical knowledge in vascular medicine. We anticipate that the ongoing transformation of scientific publishing through open access will further accelerate this process and make new knowledge available even faster. Immediate, unrestricted, and rapid access to the most current knowledge published will play a role in maintaining and advancing human vascular health across the globe. PMID:26664857

  16. Vascular toxicity of silver nanoparticles to developing zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiejun; Mahapatra, Cecon T; Mapes, Christopher D; Khlebnikova, Maria; Wei, Alexander; Sepúlveda, Marisol S

    2016-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs, 1-100 nm) can enter the environment and result in exposure to humans and other organisms leading to potential adverse health effects. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effects of early life exposure to polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated silver nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs, 50 nm), particularly with respect to vascular toxicity on zebrafish embryos and larvae (Danio rerio). Previously published data has suggested that PVP-AgNP exposure can inhibit the expression of genes within the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway, leading to delayed and abnormal vascular development. Here, we show that early acute exposure (0-12 h post-fertilization, hpf) of embryos to PVP-AgNPs at 1 mg/L or higher results in a transient, dose-dependent induction in VEGF-related gene expression that returns to baseline levels at hatching (72 hpf). Hatching results in normoxia, negating the effects of AgNPs on vascular development. Interestingly, increased gene transcription was not followed by the production of associated proteins within the VEGF pathway, which we attribute to NP-induced stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The impaired translation may be responsible for the observed delays in vascular development at later stages, and for smaller larvae size at hatching. Silver ion (Ag(+)) concentrations were < 0.001 mg/L at all times, with no significant effects on the VEGF pathway. We propose that PVP-AgNPs temporarily delay embryonic vascular development by interfering with oxygen diffusion into the egg, leading to hypoxic conditions and ER stress. PMID:27499207

  17. Vascular parkinsonism: Deconstructing a syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vizcarra, Joaquin A.; Lang, Anthony E.; Sethi, Kapil D; Espay, Alberto J.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive ambulatory impairment and abnormal white matter signal on neuroimaging come together under the diagnostic umbrella of vascular parkinsonism. A critical appraisal of the literature, however, suggests that (1) no abnormal structural imaging pattern is specific to vascular parkinsonism; (2) there is poor correlation between brain magnetic resonance imaging hyperintensities and microangiopathic brain disease and parkinsonism from available clinicopathologic data; (3) pure parkinsonism from vascular injury (“definite” vascular parkinsonism) consistently results from ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes involving the substantia nigra and/or nigrostriatal pathway but sparing the striatum itself, the cortex, and the intervening white matter; and (4) many cases reported as vascular parkinsonism may represent pseudovascular parkinsonism (e.g., Parkinson disease or another neurodegenerative parkinsonism such as progressive supranuclear palsy with non-specific neuroimaging signal abnormalities), vascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., akinetic mutism due to bilateral mesial frontal strokes or apathetic depression from bilateral striatal lacunar strokes), or pseudovascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., higher-level gait disorders, including normal pressure hydrocephalus with transependimal exudate). These syndromic designations are preferable over vascular parkinsonism until pathology or validated biomarkers confirm the underlying nature and relevance of the leukoaraiosis. PMID:25997420

  18. Vascular Injuries: Trends in Management

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Mohd Lateef; Ahangar, Ab Gani; Ganie, Farooq Ahmad; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Wani, Nasir-ud-din

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vascular injury presents a great challenge to the emergency resident because these injuries require urgent intervention to prevent loss of life or limb. Sometimes serious vascular injury presents with only subtle or occult signs or symptoms. The patient may present weeks or months after initial injury with symptoms of vascular insufficiency, embolization, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula etc. Although the majority of vascular injuries are caused by penetrating trauma from gunshot wounds, stabbing or blast injury, the possibility of vascular injury needs to be considered in patients presenting with displaced long bone fractures, crush injury, prolonged immobilization in a fixed position by tight casts or bandages and various invasive procedures. iatrogenic vascular injuries constitute about 10% of cases in most series; however the incidence is an increasing trend because more endovascular procedures such as angioplasty and cardiac catheterization are being performed routinely. Civilian trauma is more frequently seen in young males. However, it can occur at any age due to road accidents, firearms, bomb blasts and diagnostic procedures. Most of the time, civilian trauma causes less tissue damage. There is an epidemic of vascular injuries in Kashmir valley because of problems in law and order in the past two decades. This review deals with the topic in detail. PMID:24350103

  19. Adverse drug reactions and organ damage: The skin.

    PubMed

    Marzano, Angelo V; Borghi, Alessandro; Cugno, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions are frequent, affecting 2-3% of hospitalized patients and in one twentieth of them are potentially life-threatening. Almost any pharmacologic agent can induce skin reactions, and certain drug classes, such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and antiepileptics, have drug eruption rates ranging from 1% to 5%. Cutaneous drug reactions recognize several different pathomechanisms: some skin manifestations are immune-mediated like allergic reactions while others are the result of non immunological causes such as cumulative toxicity, photosensitivity, interaction with other drugs or different metabolic pathways. Cutaneous adverse drug reactions can be classified into two groups: common non-severe and rare life-threatening adverse drug reactions. Non-severe reactions are often exanthematous or urticarial whereas life-threatening reactions typically present with skin detachment or necrosis of large areas of the body and mucous membrane involvement, as in the Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis. Clinicians should carefully evaluate the signs and symptoms of all cutaneous adverse drug reactions thought to be due to drugs and immediately discontinue drugs that are not essential. Short cycles of systemic corticosteroids in combination with antihistamines may be necessary for widespread exanthematous rashes, while more aggressive corticosteroid regimens or intravenous immunoglobulins associated with supportive treatment should be used for patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis. PMID:26674736

  20. Nurses must report adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    There is renewed determination throughout the European Union (EU) to reduce the economic cost and high death rate associated with adverse drug reactions through better pharmacovigilance. Timely reporting and sharing of information concerning adverse drug reactions is vital to the success of this initiative. In the UK, the reporting of serious adverse drug reactions is facilitated by the Yellow Card Scheme, yet despite being well placed to monitor the effect of medicines on patients, nurses do not make full use of the scheme. This article sets out the impact of adverse drug reactions in the EU and argues that it is essential that nurses must be at the vanguard of adverse reaction reporting if the EU's pharmacovigilance initiative is to be a success. PMID:23905231

  1. Adulthood personality correlates of childhood adversity

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Charles S.; Johnson, Sheri L.; McCullough, Michael E.; Forster, Daniel E.; Joormann, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Childhood adversity has been linked to internalizing and externalizing disorders and personality disorders in adulthood. This study extends that research by examining several personality measures as correlates of childhood adversity. Method: In a college sample self-reports were collected of childhood adversity, several scales relating to personality, and current depression symptoms as a control variable. The personality-related scales were reduced to four latent variables, which we termed anger/aggression, extrinsic focus, agreeableness, and engagement. Results: Controlling for concurrent depressive symptoms and gender, higher levels of reported childhood adversity related to lower agreeableness and to higher anger/aggression and extrinsic focus. Conclusions: Findings suggest that early adversity is linked to personality variables relevant to the building of social connection. PMID:25484874

  2. Congenital Vascular Malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... types. The more primitive ones appear as thinwalled lakes in which venous blood collects and when they ... collection of grape-like clusters of these venous lakes. This type usually does not affect the venous ...

  3. Understanding adverse events: human factors.

    PubMed Central

    Reason, J

    1995-01-01

    (1) Human rather than technical failures now represent the greatest threat to complex and potentially hazardous systems. This includes healthcare systems. (2) Managing the human risks will never be 100% effective. Human fallibility can be moderated, but it cannot be eliminated. (3) Different error types have different underlying mechanisms, occur in different parts of the organisation, and require different methods of risk management. The basic distinctions are between: Slips, lapses, trips, and fumbles (execution failures) and mistakes (planning or problem solving failures). Mistakes are divided into rule based mistakes and knowledge based mistakes. Errors (information-handling problems) and violations (motivational problems) Active versus latent failures. Active failures are committed by those in direct contact with the patient, latent failures arise in organisational and managerial spheres and their adverse effects may take a long time to become evident. (4) Safety significant errors occur at all levels of the system, not just at the sharp end. Decisions made in the upper echelons of the organisation create the conditions in the workplace that subsequently promote individual errors and violations. Latent failures are present long before an accident and are hence prime candidates for principled risk management. (5) Measures that involve sanctions and exhortations (that is, moralistic measures directed to those at the sharp end) have only very limited effectiveness, especially so in the case of highly trained professionals. (6) Human factors problems are a product of a chain of causes in which the individual psychological factors (that is, momentary inattention, forgetting, etc) are the last and least manageable links. Attentional "capture" (preoccupation or distraction) is a necessary condition for the commission of slips and lapses. Yet, its occurrence is almost impossible to predict or control effectively. The same is true of the factors associated with

  4. Bacterial invasion of vascular cell types: vascular infectology and atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kozarov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    To portray the chronic inflammation in atherosclerosis, leukocytic cell types involved in the immune response to invading pathogens are often the focus. However, atherogenesis is a complex pathological deterioration of the arterial walls, where vascular cell types are participants with regards to deterioration and disease. Since other recent reviews have detailed the role of both the innate and adaptive immune response in atherosclerosis, herein we will summarize the latest developments regarding the association of bacteria with vascular cell types: infections as a risk factor for atherosclerosis; bacterial invasion of vascular cell types; the atherogenic sequelae of bacterial presence such as endothelial activation and blood clotting; and the identification of the species that are able to colonize this niche. The evidence of a polybacterial infectious component of the atheromatous lesions opens the doors for exploration of the new field of vascular infectology and for the study of atherosclerosis microbiome. PMID:22185451

  5. Vascular infections: exceeding the threshold.

    PubMed

    Cox, T R

    1995-12-01

    During fiscal year 1988, our hospital infection control practitioner identified a 400% increase in the incidence of vascular surgery nosocomial infections. The six graft and six amputation infections were validated as nosocomial against hospital definitions adopted from the Centers for Disease Control. Our Infection Control Committee mandated an audit of the infected vascular surgery patients using a case/control design to identify and examine associated variables that may need attention. The significant finding was microbial resistance to prophylactic antibiotics used during surgery (p > 0.0001, Fisher's exact). The use of vancomycin as a prophylactic antimicrobial agent for all major vascular cases was recommended to the surgeons. PMID:8775383

  6. Suitability of Exoseal Vascular Closure Device for Antegrade Femoral Artery Puncture Site Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelter, Christopher Liebl, Andrea; Poullos, Nektarios; Ruppert, Volker; Vorwerk, Dierk

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the efficacy and safety of the Exoseal vascular closure device for antegrade puncture of the femoral artery. Methods. In a prospective study from February 2011 to January 2012, a total of 93 consecutive patients received a total of 100 interventional procedures via an antegrade puncture of the femoral artery. An Exoseal vascular closure device (6F) was used for closure in all cases. Puncture technique, duration of manual compression, and use of compression bandages were documented. All patients were monitored by vascular ultrasound and color-coded duplex sonography of their respective femoral artery puncture site within 12 to 36 h after angiography to check for vascular complications. Results. In 100 antegrade interventional procedures, the Exoseal vascular closure device was applied successfully for closure of the femoral artery puncture site in 96 cases (96 of 100, 96.0 %). The vascular closure device could not be deployed in one case as a result of kinking of the vascular sheath introducer and in three cases because the bioabsorbable plug was not properly delivered to the extravascular space adjacent to the arterial puncture site, but instead fully removed with the delivery system (4.0 %). Twelve to 36 h after the procedure, vascular ultrasound revealed no complications at the femoral artery puncture site in 93 cases (93.0 %). Minor vascular complications were found in seven cases (7.0 %), with four cases (4.0 %) of pseudoaneurysm and three cases (3.0 %) of significant late bleeding, none of which required surgery. Conclusion. The Exoseal vascular closure device was safely used for antegrade puncture of the femoral artery, with a high rate of procedural success (96.0 %), a low rate of minor vascular complications (7.0 %), and no major adverse events.

  7. Vascular comorbidity is associated with more rapid disability progression in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Marrie, R.A.; Rudick, R.; Horwitz, R.; Cutter, G.; Tyry, T.; Campagnolo, D.; Vollmer, T.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Vascular comorbidity adversely influences health outcomes in several chronic conditions. Vascular comorbidities are common in multiple sclerosis (MS), but their impact on disease severity is unknown. Vascular comorbidities may contribute to the poorly understood heterogeneity in MS disease severity. Treatment of vascular comorbidities may represent an avenue for treating MS. Methods: A total of 8,983 patients with MS enrolled in the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis Registry participated in this cohort study. Time from symptom onset or diagnosis until ambulatory disability was compared for patients with or without vascular comorbidities to determine their impact on MS severity. Multivariable proportional hazards models were adjusted for sex, race, age at symptom onset, year of symptom onset, socioeconomic status, and region of residence. Results: Participants reporting one or more vascular comorbidities at diagnosis had an increased risk of ambulatory disability, and risk increased with the number of vascular conditions reported (hazard ratio [HR]/condition for early gait disability 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41–1.61). Vascular comorbidity at any time during the disease course also increased the risk of ambulatory disability (adjusted HR for unilateral walking assistance 1.54; 95% CI 1.44–1.65). The median time between diagnosis and need for ambulatory assistance was 18.8 years in patients without and 12.8 years in patients with vascular comorbidities. Conclusions: Vascular comorbidity, whether present at symptom onset, diagnosis, or later in the disease course, is associated with a substantially increased risk of disability progression in multiple sclerosis. The impact of treating vascular comorbidities on disease progression deserves investigation. GLOSSARY EDSS = Expanded Disability Status Scale; HR = hazard ratio; MS = multiple sclerosis; NARCOMS = North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis; PDDS

  8. Abdominopelvic vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Sriussadaporn, S

    2000-01-01

    The clinical records of 25 patients with 32 abdominopelvic vascular injuries were reviewed. Sixty per cent of patients sustained blunt trauma and 40 per cent sustained penetrating trauma. Nineteen patients (76%) were in shock on arrival, 2 of them underwent ER thoracotomy when they first arrived in the emergency room. Nine patients (36%) had signs of lower extremity ischemia. The Injury Severity Score (ISS) ranged from 16-50, mean 29 +/- 10.0. Nineteen patients (76%) had 35 associated injuries. Of the 32 injured vessels; 8 were external iliac artery, 5 were renal vein, 4 were abdominal aorta, 3 were common iliac artery, common iliac vein, external iliac vein and inferior vena cava, and 1 was superior mesenteric artery, superior mesenteric vein and median sacral artery. Treatments included: 13 lateral repair, 4 prosthetic grafting, 4 nephrectomy, 3 ligation, 3 reversed saphenous vein grafting, 2 end to end anastomosis, 1 internal iliac artery grafting, 1 intravascular shunt and packing and 1 perihepatic packing. Nine patients (36%) died. High mortality was observed in injuries to the abdominal aorta (75%), inferior vena cava (66.7%), common iliac vein (66.7%) and associated major pelvic fractures (50%). Factors significantly associated with mortality were the presence of shock on arrival, associated injuries and high Injury Severity Score. The author concludes that short prehospital time, effective resuscitation and proper surgical decision making are important for survival in these critically injured patients. PMID:10710864

  9. Autophagy in vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ryter, Stefan W; Lee, Seon-Jin; Smith, Akaya; Choi, Augustine M K

    2010-02-01

    Autophagy, or "self eating," refers to a regulated cellular process for the lysosomal-dependent turnover of organelles and proteins. During starvation or nutrient deficiency, autophagy promotes survival through the replenishment of metabolic precursors derived from the degradation of endogenous cellular components. Autophagy represents a general homeostatic and inducible adaptive response to environmental stress, including endoplasmic reticulum stress, hypoxia, oxidative stress, and exposure to pharmaceuticals and xenobiotics. Whereas elevated autophagy can be observed in dying cells, the functional relationships between autophagy and programmed cell death pathways remain incompletely understood. Preclinical studies have identified autophagy as a process that can be activated during vascular disorders, including ischemia-reperfusion injury of the heart and other organs, cardiomyopathy, myocardial injury, and atherosclerosis. The functional significance of autophagy in human cardiovascular disease pathogenesis remains incompletely understood, and potentially involves both adaptive and maladaptive outcomes, depending on model system. Although relatively few studies have been performed in the lung, our recent studies also implicate a role for autophagy in chronic lung disease. Manipulation of the signaling pathways that regulate autophagy could potentially provide a novel therapeutic strategy in the prevention or treatment of human disease. PMID:20160147

  10. Education in vascular access.

    PubMed

    Moist, Louise M; Lee, Timmy C; Lok, Charmaine E; Al-Jaishi, Ahmed; Xi, Wang; Campbell, Vern; Graham, Janet; Wilson, Barb; Vachharajani, Tushar J

    2013-01-01

    The successful creation and use of an arteriovenous vascular access (VA) requires a coordinated, educated multidisciplinary team to ensure an optimal VA for each patient. Patient education programs on VA are associated with increased arteriovenous VA use at dialysis initiation. Education should be tailored to patient goals and preferences with the understanding that experiential education from patient to patient is far more influential than that provided by the healthcare professional. VA education for the nephrologist should focus on addressing the systematic and patient-level barriers in achieving a functional VA, with specific components relating to VA creation, maturation, and cannulation that consider patient goals and preferences. A deficit in nursing skills in the area of assessment and cannulation can have devastating consequences for hemodialysis patients. Delivery of an integrated education program increases nurses' knowledge of VA and development of simulation programs or constructs to assist in cannulation of the VA will greatly facilitate the much needed skill transfer. Adequate VA surgical training and experience are critical to the creation and outcomes of VA. Simulations can benefit nephrologists, dialysis nurses surgeons, and interventionalists though aiding in surgical creation, understanding of the physiology and anatomy of a dysfunctional VA, and practicing cannulation techniques. All future educational initiatives must emphasize the importance of multidisciplinary care to attain successful VA outcomes. PMID:23432319

  11. Constructal vascularized structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetkin, Erdal

    2015-06-01

    Smart features such as self-healing and selfcooling require bathing the entire volume with a coolant or/and healing agent. Bathing the entire volume is an example of point to area (or volume) flows. Point to area flows cover all the distributing and collecting kinds of flows, i.e. inhaling and exhaling, mining, river deltas, energy distribution, distribution of products on the landscape and so on. The flow resistances of a point to area flow can be decreased by changing the design with the guidance of the constructal law, which is the law of the design evolution in time. In this paper, how the flow resistances (heat, fluid and stress) can be decreased by using the constructal law is shown with examples. First, the validity of two assumptions is surveyed: using temperature independent Hess-Murray rule and using constant diameter ducts where the duct discharges fluid along its edge. Then, point to area types of flows are explained by illustrating the results of two examples: fluid networks and heating an area. Last, how the structures should be vascularized for cooling and mechanical strength is documented. This paper shows that flow resistances can be decreased by morphing the shape freely without any restrictions or generic algorithms.

  12. Retina vascular network recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascini, Guido; Passerini, Giorgio; Puliti, Paolo; Zingaretti, Primo

    1993-09-01

    The analysis of morphological and structural modifications of the retina vascular network is an interesting investigation method in the study of diabetes and hypertension. Normally this analysis is carried out by qualitative evaluations, according to standardized criteria, though medical research attaches great importance to quantitative analysis of vessel color, shape and dimensions. The paper describes a system which automatically segments and recognizes the ocular fundus circulation and micro circulation network, and extracts a set of features related to morphometric aspects of vessels. For this class of images the classical segmentation methods seem weak. We propose a computer vision system in which segmentation and recognition phases are strictly connected. The system is hierarchically organized in four modules. Firstly the Image Enhancement Module (IEM) operates a set of custom image enhancements to remove blur and to prepare data for subsequent segmentation and recognition processes. Secondly the Papilla Border Analysis Module (PBAM) automatically recognizes number, position and local diameter of blood vessels departing from optical papilla. Then the Vessel Tracking Module (VTM) analyses vessels comparing the results of body and edge tracking and detects branches and crossings. Finally the Feature Extraction Module evaluates PBAM and VTM output data and extracts some numerical indexes. Used algorithms appear to be robust and have been successfully tested on various ocular fundus images.

  13. Myocardial postconditioning is lost in vascular nitrate tolerance.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Veronika; Murlasits, Zsolt; Aypar, Eda; Bencsik, Péter; Sárközy, Márta; Szénási, Gábor; Ferdinandy, Péter; Csont, Tamás

    2013-09-01

    Organic nitrates play an important role in the therapy of ischemic heart disease; however, their clinical application is limited by the development of vascular nitrate tolerance. We have previously shown attenuation of the cardioprotective effect of preconditioning in vascular nitrate tolerance. Here, we studied whether the development of vascular nitrate tolerance affects the infarct size, limiting effect of ischemic postconditioning (IPost) in the myocardium, and whether the activation of survival kinases plays a role in the molecular mechanism of postconditioning in the presence or absence of vascular nitrate tolerance. Male Wistar rats were treated with nitroglycerin/vehicle for 3 days to induce vascular nitrate tolerance. On the fourth day, isolated hearts were subjected to 30-minute coronary occlusion followed by 120-minute reperfusion with or without IPost. In nontolerant hearts, postconditioning significantly decreased infarct size as compared with ischemia/reperfusion; however, postconditioning failed to decrease infarct size in hearts of nitrate tolerant rats. Phosphorylation of ERK 1/2, Akt, or endothelial nitric oxide synthetase showed no significant differences between the groups at the 10th minute of reperfusion. Vascular nitrate tolerance interferes with the infarct size limiting effect of IPost. Activation of survival kinases is not crucial in the molecular mechanism of postconditioning, which remains unaffected in nitrate tolerance. PMID:23669719

  14. Infant birth weight and third trimester maternal plasma markers of vascular integrity: the MIREC study

    PubMed Central

    Kumarathasan, Premkumari; Vincent, Renaud; Bielecki, Agnieszka; Blais, Erica; Blank, Katrin; Das, Dharani; Karthikeyan, Subramanian; Cakmak, Sabit; Fisher, Mandy; Arbuckle, Tye; Fraser, William

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: There is paucity of information on mechanisms constituting adverse birth outcomes. We assessed here the relationship between vascular integrity and adverse birth effects. Methods and results: Third trimester maternal plasma (n = 144) from the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals Study (MIREC) was analysed for vascular, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers by HPLC-fluorescence, protein array and EIA method. Analysis of the <25th and >75th percentile birth weight subgroups revealed markers associated with birth weight (ETs, MMP-9, VEGF, and 8-isoPGF-2α) and gestational age (ET-1, MMP-2, and VEGF). Conclusions: Mechanistic insights into adverse birth outcome pathways can be achieved by integrating information on multiple biomarkers, physiology using systems biology approach. PMID:26900787

  15. Mismatch or allostatic load? Timing of life adversity differentially shapes gray matter volume and anxious temperament.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Manuel; Scharfenort, Robert; Schümann, Dirk; Schiele, Miriam A; Münsterkötter, Anna L; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina; Haaker, Jan; Kalisch, Raffael; Pauli, Paul; Reif, Andreas; Romanos, Marcel; Zwanzger, Peter; Lonsdorf, Tina B

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, adversity was defined as the accumulation of environmental events (allostatic load). Recently however, a mismatch between the early and the later (adult) environment (mismatch) has been hypothesized to be critical for disease development, a hypothesis that has not yet been tested explicitly in humans. We explored the impact of timing of life adversity (childhood and past year) on anxiety and depression levels (N = 833) and brain morphology (N = 129). Both remote (childhood) and proximal (recent) adversities were differentially mirrored in morphometric changes in areas critically involved in emotional processing (i.e. amygdala/hippocampus, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, respectively). The effect of adversity on affect acted in an additive way with no evidence for interactions (mismatch). Structural equation modeling demonstrated a direct effect of adversity on morphometric estimates and anxiety/depression without evidence of brain morphology functioning as a mediator. Our results highlight that adversity manifests as pronounced changes in brain morphometric and affective temperament even though these seem to represent distinct mechanistic pathways. A major goal of future studies should be to define critical time periods for the impact of adversity and strategies for intervening to prevent or reverse the effects of adverse childhood life experiences. PMID:26568620

  16. Mismatch or allostatic load? Timing of life adversity differentially shapes gray matter volume and anxious temperament

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Manuel; Scharfenort, Robert; Schümann, Dirk; Schiele, Miriam A.; Münsterkötter, Anna L.; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina; Haaker, Jan; Kalisch, Raffael; Pauli, Paul; Reif, Andreas; Romanos, Marcel; Zwanzger, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, adversity was defined as the accumulation of environmental events (allostatic load). Recently however, a mismatch between the early and the later (adult) environment (mismatch) has been hypothesized to be critical for disease development, a hypothesis that has not yet been tested explicitly in humans. We explored the impact of timing of life adversity (childhood and past year) on anxiety and depression levels (N = 833) and brain morphology (N = 129). Both remote (childhood) and proximal (recent) adversities were differentially mirrored in morphometric changes in areas critically involved in emotional processing (i.e. amygdala/hippocampus, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, respectively). The effect of adversity on affect acted in an additive way with no evidence for interactions (mismatch). Structural equation modeling demonstrated a direct effect of adversity on morphometric estimates and anxiety/depression without evidence of brain morphology functioning as a mediator. Our results highlight that adversity manifests as pronounced changes in brain morphometric and affective temperament even though these seem to represent distinct mechanistic pathways. A major goal of future studies should be to define critical time periods for the impact of adversity and strategies for intervening to prevent or reverse the effects of adverse childhood life experiences. PMID:26568620

  17. MicroRNA and vascular remodelling in acute vascular injury and pulmonary vascular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Robert A.; Hata, Akiko; MacLean, Margaret R.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular remodelling is an integral pathological process central to a number of cardiovascular diseases. The complex interplay between distinct cell populations in the vessel wall following vascular injury leads to inflammation, cellular dysfunction, pro-growth signals in the smooth muscle cell (SMC) compartment, and the acquisition of a synthetic phenotype. Although the signals for vascular remodelling are diverse in different pathological contexts, SMC proliferation and migration are consistently observed. It is therefore critical to elucidate key mechanisms central to these processes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding sequences of RNA that have the capacity to regulate many genes, pathways, and complex biological networks within cells, acting either alone or in concert with one another. In diseases such as cancer and cardiac disease, the role of miRNA in disease pathogenesis has been documented in detail. In contrast, despite a great deal of interest in miRNA, relatively few studies have directly assessed the role of miRNA in vascular remodelling. The potential for modulation of miRNA to achieve therapeutic benefits in this setting is attractive. Here, we focus on the role of miRNA in vascular inflammation and remodelling associated with acute vascular injury (vein graft disease, angioplasty restenosis, and in-stent restenosis) as well as in vascular remodelling associated with the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:22065733

  18. Vascular responses to compound 48/80 in rat mesenteric vascular beds.

    PubMed

    Jin, Honghua; Li, Zhen; Takatori, Shingo; Koyama, Toshihiro; Jin, Xin; Zamami, Yoshito; Kawasaki, Hiromu; Sun, Pengyuan

    2016-06-01

    A further investigation was performed on the vascular effect of endogenous histamine using the histamine releaser, compound 48/80, in rat mesenteric vascular beds with active tone. In preparations with intact endothelium, low concentrations of compound 48/80 (1.53 × 10(-5) - 3 × 1.53 × 10(-5) mg/mL) perfusion for 1 min only induced a small vasodilation. High concentrations of compound 48/80 (1.53 × 10(-4) - 3 × 1.53 × 10(-2) mg/mL) induced a biphasic vascular responses, an initial vasoconstriction followed a subsequent long-lasting vasodilation. The vasodilation induced by low concentrations of compound 48/80 and the vasoconstriction induced by high concentration of compound 48/80 was inhibited by olopatadine. However, cimetidine did not affect the responses induced by compound 48/80. Endothelium removal enlarged the compound 48/80-induced phase-2 vasoconstriction, while it attenuated the phase-3 vasodilation. Additionally, indomethacin and seratrodast significantly inhibited vasoconstriction but it did not affect the long-lasting vasodilation induced by high concentrations of compound 48/80. Ruthenium red inhibited the vasodilation induced by low concentrations and high concentrations of compound 48/80. These results suggest that the vasoconstriction induce by high concentrations of compound 48/80 is mediated by endogenous histamine released from mast cells. It is also suggested that thromboxane A2 released from mast cells is related to the vasoconstriction. PMID:26991394

  19. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF QUADRATS FOR MEASURING VASCULAR PLANT DIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quadrats are widely used for measuring characteristics of vascular plant communities. It is well recognized that quadrat size affects measurements of frequency and cover. The ability of quadrats of varying sizes to adequately measure diversity has not been established. An exha...

  20. VASCULAR PLANTS AS ENGINEERS OF OXYGEN IN AQUATIC SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of organisms on oxygen is one of the most dramatic examples of ecosystem engineering on Earth. In aquatic systems, which have much lower oxygen concentrations than the atmosphere, vascular aquatic plants can affect oxygen concentrations significantly not only on long t...

  1. Collateral Adverse Outcomes After Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Gundle, Kenneth; Hart, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Collateral adverse outcomes are the expected or unavoidable results of a procedure that is performed in a standard manner and typically experienced by the patient. Collateral adverse outcomes do not result from errors, nor are they rare. Collateral adverse outcomes occur as the direct result of a surgical procedure and must be accepted as a trade-off to attain the intended benefits of the surgical procedure. As such, collateral adverse outcomes do not fit into the traditional definition of a complication or adverse event. Examples of collateral adverse outcomes after lumbar spine arthrodesis include lumbar stiffness, postoperative psychological stress, postoperative pain, peri-incisional numbness, paraspinal muscle denervation, and adjacent-level degeneration. Ideally, a comparison of interventions for the treatment of a clinical condition should include information on both the negative consequences (expected and unexpected) and potential benefits of the treatment options. The objective evaluation and reporting of collateral adverse outcomes will provide surgeons with a more complete picture of invasive interventions and, thus, the improved ability to assess alternative treatment options. PMID:27049197

  2. Adverse event recording post hip fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Doody, K; Mohamed, K M S; Butler, A; Street, J; Lenehan, B

    2013-01-01

    Accurate recording of adverse events post hip fracture surgery is vital for planning and allocating resources. The purpose of this study was to compare adverse events recorded prospectively at point of care with adverse recorded by the Hospital In-Patient Enquiry (HIPE) System. The study examined a two month period from August to September 2011 at University Hospital Limerick. Out of a sample size of 39, there were 7 males (17.9%) and 32 females (82.1%) with an age range of between 53 and 98 years. The mean age was 80.5 years. 55 adverse events were recorded, in contrast to the HIPE record of 13 (23.6%) adverse events. The most common complications included constipation 10 (18.2%), anaemia 8 (14.5%), urinary retention 8 (14.50%), pneumonia 5 (9.1%) and delirium 5 (9.1%). Of the female cohort, 24 (68.8%) suffered an adverse event, while only 4 (57%) males suffered an adverse event. PMID:24579408

  3. Measuring Vascular Permeability In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Eelco F J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, in vivo vascular permeability measurements have provided significant insight into vascular functions in physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as the response to pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling, abnormality of tumor vasculature and its normalization, and delivery and efficacy of therapeutic agents. Different approaches for vascular permeability measurements have been established. Here, we describe and discuss a conventional 2D imaging method to measure vascular permeability, which was originally documented by Gerlowski and Jain in 1986 (Microvasc Res 31:288-305, 1986) and further developed by Yuan et al. in the early 1990s (Microvasc Res 45:269-289, 1993; Cancer Res 54:352-3356, 1994), and our recently developed 3D imaging method, which advances the approach originally described by Brown et al. in 2001 (Nat Med 7:864-868, 2001). PMID:27581015

  4. BMP signaling in vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Pardali, Evangelia; Sánchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; ten Dijke, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family that signal via type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors and intracellular Smad transcription factors. BMPs are multifunctional regulators of development and tissue homeostasis and they were initially characterized as inducers of bone regeneration. Genetic studies in humans and mice showed that perturbations in BMP signaling lead to various diseases, such as skeletal diseases, vascular diseases and cancer. Mutations in BMP type II receptor and BMP type I receptor/activin receptor-like kinase 1 have been linked to pulmonary arterial hypertension and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, respectively. BMPs have also been implicated in promoting vascular calcification and tumor angiogenesis. In this review we discuss the role of BMP signaling in vascular diseases and the value of BMP signaling as a vascular disease marker or a therapeutic target. PMID:22710160

  5. How to Prevent Vascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... or 911 immediately. @ 2016 Vascular Cures is a tax-exempt, nonprofit organization tax ID#: 94-2825216 as described in the Section ... 3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible. 555 Price Ave., Suite 180, Redwood City, ...

  6. Biomaterials for vascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Swathi; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in the USA. The limited availability of healthy autologous vessels for bypass grafting procedures has led to the fabrication of prosthetic vascular conduits. While synthetic polymers have been extensively studied as substitutes in vascular engineering, they fall short of meeting the biological challenges at the blood–material interface. Various tissue engineering strategies have emerged to address these flaws and increase long-term patency of vascular grafts. Vascular cell seeding of scaffolds and the design of bioactive polymers for in situ arterial regeneration have yielded promising results. This article describes the advances made in biomaterials design to generate suitable materials that not only match the mechanical properties of native vasculature, but also promote cell growth, facilitate extracellular matrix production and inhibit thrombogenicity. PMID:20017698

  7. Social media in vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Gates, Lindsay; Mitchell, Erica L; Muhs, Bart E

    2013-04-01

    There has been a tremendous growth in the use of social media to expand the visibility of various specialties in medicine. The purpose of this paper is to describe the latest updates on some current applications of social media in the practice of vascular surgery as well as existing limitations of use. This investigation demonstrates that the use of social networking sites appears to have a positive impact on vascular practice, as is evident through the incorporation of this technology at the Cleveland Clinic and by the Society for Vascular Surgery into their approach to patient care and physician communication. Overall, integration of social networking technology has current and future potential to be used to promote goals, patient awareness, recruitment for clinical trials, and professionalism within the specialty of vascular surgery. PMID:23321344

  8. Adverse childhood event experiences, fertility difficulties, and menstrual cycle characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Marni B.; Boynton-Jarrett, Renee D.; Harville, Emily W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increased childhood adversity may be affect adult fertility, however, the mechanism through which this occurs is unclear. Menstrual cycle abnormalities are predictive of fertility difficulties, and stress influences menstrual cycle characteristics. Here, we assesses whether adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with fertility difficulties and menstrual cycle dysregulation, offering a plausible mechanism for the link between lifetime stress and fertility. Methods From April 2012 – February 2014, 742 pregnant and non-pregnant women aged 18–45 years residing in southeastern Louisiana provided information on childhood adversity and reproductive history. Associations between ACEs and fertility difficulties and menstrual cycle patterns were evaluated. Results As the number of ACEs increased, risk of fertility difficulties and amenorrhea increased (RR = 1.09, 95% CI 1.05 – 1.13 and RR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.04 – 1.10, respectively), while fecundability decreased (FR = 0.97, 95% CI 0.95 – 1.00). Compared to women with no adversity, women in the high adversity group were more likely to experience both infertility and amenorrhea (RR = 2.75, 95% CI 1.45 – 5.21 and RR = 2.54, 95% CI 1.52 – 4.25, respectively), and reduced fecundability (FR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.56 – 1.00). Although similar patterns were seen for menstrual cycle irregularity, associations were diminished. Associations did not materially change following adjustment for age, BMI, race, education, smoking, and income. Results are constrained by the self-report nature of the study and the limited generalizability of the study population. Discussion To our knowledge, this is the first study to present evidence of a link between childhood stressors, menstrual cycle disruption, and fertility difficulties. The effect of childhood stress on fertility may be mediated through altered functioning of the HPA axis, acting to suppress fertility in response to less than optimal reproductive

  9. Learning from adverse incidents involving medical devices.

    PubMed

    Amoore, John; Ingram, Paula

    While an adverse event involving a medical device is often ascribed to either user error or device failure, the causes are typically multifactorial. A number of incidents involving medical devices are explored using this approach to investigate the various causes of the incident and the protective barriers that minimised or prevented adverse consequences. User factors, including mistakes, omissions and lack of training, conspired with background factors--device controls and device design, storage conditions, hidden device damage and physical layout of equipment when in use--to cause the adverse events. Protective barriers that prevented or minimised the consequences included staff vigilance, operating procedures and alarms. PMID:12715578

  10. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment Options of Infantile Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Li, Li; Zhang, Li-xin; Sun, Yu-juan; Ma, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To analyze the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of vascular anomalies, and determine which therapy is safe and effective. The data of vascular anomalies pediatric patients who arrived at Beijing children's Hospital from January 2001 to December 2014 were analyzed retrospectively, including the influence of gender, age, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment options, and outcomes. As to infantile hemangiomas, the outcomes of different treatments and their adverse reactions were compared. As to spider angioma and cutaneous capillary malformation, the treatment effect of 595 nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) is analyzed. A total number of 6459 cases of vascular anomalies were reclassified according to the 2014 ISSVA classification system. Among them, the gender ratio is 1:1.69, head-and-neck involved is 53.3%, the onset age within the first month is 72.4%, the age of initial encounter that younger than 6 months is 60.1%. The most common anomalies were infantile hemangiomas (42.6%), congenital hemangiomas (14.1%), and capillary malformations (29.9%). In treating infantile hemangiomas, laser shows the lowest adverse reactions rate significantly. Propranolol shows a higher improvement rate than laser, glucocorticoids, glucocorticoids plus laser, and shows no significant difference with propranolol plus laser both in improvement rate and adverse reactions rate. The total improvement rate of 595 nm PDL is 89.8% in treating spider angioma and 46.7% in treating cutaneous capillary malformation. The improvement rate and excellent rate of laser in treating cutaneous capillary malformation are growing synchronously by increasing the treatment times, and shows no significant difference among different parts of lesion that located in a body. Vascular anomalies possess a female predominance, and are mostly occurred in faces. Definite diagnosis is very important before treatment. In treating infantile hemangioma, propranolol is recommended as the first

  11. Uncertainty Comparison of Visual Sensing in Adverse Weather Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lo, Shi-Wei; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Chen, Lun-Chi; Tseng, Chien-Hao; Lin, Fang-Pang; Hsu, Ching-Han

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on flood-region detection using monitoring images. However, adverse weather affects the outcome of image segmentation methods. In this paper, we present an experimental comparison of an outdoor visual sensing system using region-growing methods with two different growing rules-namely, GrowCut and RegGro. For each growing rule, several tests on adverse weather and lens-stained scenes were performed, taking into account and analyzing different weather conditions with the outdoor visual sensing system. The influence of several weather conditions was analyzed, highlighting their effect on the outdoor visual sensing system with different growing rules. Furthermore, experimental errors and uncertainties obtained with the growing rules were compared. The segmentation accuracy of flood regions yielded by the GrowCut, RegGro, and hybrid methods was 75%, 85%, and 87.7%, respectively. PMID:27447642

  12. Uncertainty Comparison of Visual Sensing in Adverse Weather Conditions†

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Shi-Wei; Wu, Jyh-Horng; Chen, Lun-Chi; Tseng, Chien-Hao; Lin, Fang-Pang; Hsu, Ching-Han

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on flood-region detection using monitoring images. However, adverse weather affects the outcome of image segmentation methods. In this paper, we present an experimental comparison of an outdoor visual sensing system using region-growing methods with two different growing rules—namely, GrowCut and RegGro. For each growing rule, several tests on adverse weather and lens-stained scenes were performed, taking into account and analyzing different weather conditions with the outdoor visual sensing system. The influence of several weather conditions was analyzed, highlighting their effect on the outdoor visual sensing system with different growing rules. Furthermore, experimental errors and uncertainties obtained with the growing rules were compared. The segmentation accuracy of flood regions yielded by the GrowCut, RegGro, and hybrid methods was 75%, 85%, and 87.7%, respectively. PMID:27447642

  13. Chemical research on red pigments after adverse reactions to tattoo.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, A; Toniolo, C; Giulianelli, V; Serafini, M; Persechino, S

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the incidence of tattooing is on the rise compared to the past, especially among adolescents, and it leads to the urgency of monitoring the security status of tattooing centers, as well as to inform people about the risks of tattoo practice. In our clinical experience, 20% of tattooed patients presented adverse reactions, like allergic contact dermatitis, psoriasis with Koebner's phenomena and granulomatous reactions, with the latter most prevalent and most often related to red pigment. Adverse reactions to tattoo pigments, especially the red one, are well known and described in literature. Great attention has to be focused on the pigments used, especially for the presence of new substances, often not well known. For this reason, we decided to perform a study on 12 samples of red tattoo ink, obtained by patients affected by different cutaneous reactions in the site of tattoo, to analyze their chemical composition. PMID:26934738

  14. Vascular smooth muscle in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Winquist, R J; Webb, R C; Bohr, D F

    1982-06-01

    The cause of the elevated arterial pressure in most forms of hypertension is an increase in total peripheral resistance. This brief review is directed toward an assessment of recent investigations contributing information about the factors responsible for this increased vascular resistance. Structural abnormalities in the vasculature that characterize the hypertensive process are 1) changes in the vascular media, 2) rarefication of the resistance vessels, and 3) lesions of the intimal vascular surface. These abnormalities are mainly the result of an adaptive process and are secondary to the increase in wall stress and/or to pathological damage to cellular components in the vessel wall. Functional alterations in the vascular smooth muscle are described as changes in agonist-smooth muscle interaction or plasma membrane permeability. These types of changes appear to play a primary, initiating role in the elevation of vascular resistance of hypertension. These alterations are not the result of an increase in wall stress and they often precede the development of high blood pressure. The functional changes are initiated by abnormal function of neurogenic, humoral, and/or myogenic changes that alter vascular smooth muscle activity. PMID:6282652

  15. Adverse Effects of Wheat Gluten.

    PubMed

    Koning, Frits

    2015-01-01

    Man began to consume cereals approximately 10,000 years ago when hunter-gatherers settled in the fertile golden crescent in the Middle East. Gluten has been an integral part of the Western type of diet ever since, and wheat consumption is also common in the Middle East, parts of India and China as well as Australia and Africa. In fact, the food supply in the world heavily depends on the availability of cereal-based food products, with wheat being one of the largest crops in the world. Part of this is due to the unique properties of wheat gluten, which has a high nutritional value and is crucial for the preparation of high-quality dough. In the last 10 years, however, wheat and gluten have received much negative attention. Many believe that it is inherently bad for our health and try to avoid consumption of gluten-containing cereals; a gluten-low lifestyle so to speak. This is fueled by a series of popular publications like Wheat Belly; Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health. However, in reality, there is only one condition where gluten is definitively the culprit: celiac disease (CD), affecting approximately 1% of the population in the Western world. Here, I describe the complexity of the cereals from which gluten is derived, the special properties of gluten which make it so widely used in the food industry, the basis for its toxicity in CD patients and the potential for the development of safe gluten and alternatives to the gluten-free diet. PMID:26606684

  16. Induction of apoptosis by hemorrhagic snake venom in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Araki, S; Ishida, T; Yamamoto, T; Kaji, K; Hayashi, H

    1993-01-15

    Vascular degeneration appears to play crucial roles in producing many vascular malfunctions (1-3). In order to identify specific inducers of programmed death in vascular endothelial cells (VEC), examinations were made of the effects of substances that are known to affect the vascular system by using VEC in culture (4,5). We found that hemorrhagic snake venoms induced apoptotic cell death or programmed cell death of VEC. By contrast, neurotoxic snake venoms did not induce programmed cell death but caused necrosis at much higher doses of the venoms. No effect of hemorrhagic venom was observed with many types of cultured cells other than VEC. Thus, hemorrhagic snake venom appears to be a useful tool for studies of the molecular mechanisms of vascular apoptosis. The results also suggest a possible mechanism of action of hemorrhagic snake venom on the vascular system. PMID:8422240

  17. Vascular biology in altered gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradamante, Silvia; Maier, Janette A. M.; Duncker, Dirk J.

    2005-10-01

    The physical environment of Endothelial Cells profoundly affects their gene expression, structure, function, growth differentiation and apoptosis. However, the mechanisms by which the genetic and local growth determinants driving morphogenesis are established and maintained remain unknown. Understanding how gravity affects vascular cells will offer new insights for novel therapeutical approaches for cardiovascular disease in general. In terms of tissue engineering and stem-cell therapy, significant future developments will depend on a profound understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of angiogenesis and of the biology of circulating Endothelial Precursor Cells. this MAP project has demonstrated how modelled microgravity influences endothelial proliferation and differentiation with the involvement of anti-angiogenic factors that may be responsible for the non-spontaneous formation of blood vessels.

  18. Adverse Outcome Pathways: From Definition to Application

    EPA Science Inventory

    A challenge for both human health and ecological toxicologists is the transparent application of mechanistic (e.g., molecular, biochemical, histological) data to risk assessments. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a conceptual framework designed to meet this need. Specifical...

  19. Adverse cutaneous drug eruptions: current understanding.

    PubMed

    Hoetzenecker, W; Nägeli, M; Mehra, E T; Jensen, A N; Saulite, I; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Guenova, E; Cozzio, A; French, L E

    2016-01-01

    Adverse cutaneous drug reactions are recognized as being major health problems worldwide causing considerable costs for health care systems. Most adverse cutaneous drug reactions follow a benign course; however, up to 2% of all adverse cutaneous drug eruptions are severe and life-threatening. These include acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Physicians should be aware of specific red flags to rapidly identify these severe cutaneous drug eruptions and initiate appropriate treatment. Besides significant progress in clinical classification and treatment, recent studies have greatly enhanced our understanding in the pathophysiology of adverse cutaneous drug reactions. Genetic susceptibilities to certain drugs have been identified in SJS/TEN patients, viral reactivation in DRESS has been elucidated, and the discovery of tissue resident memory T cells helps to better understand the recurrent site-specific inflammation in patients with fixed drug eruption. PMID:26553194

  20. Childhood adversities and psychosis: evidence, challenges, implications

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Craig; Gayer‐Anderson, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    There is a substantial body of research reporting evidence of associations between various forms of childhood adversity and psychosis, across the spectrum from experiences to disorder. This has been extended, more recently, to include studies of cumulative effects, of interactions with other factors, of specific effects, and of putative biological and psychological mechanisms. In this paper we evaluate this research and highlight the remaining methodological issues and gaps that temper, but do not dismiss, conclusions about the causal role of childhood adversity. We also consider the emerging work on cumulative, synergistic, and specific effects and on mechanisms; and discuss the broader implications of this line of research for our understanding of psychosis. We conclude that the current balance of evidence is that childhood adversities – particularly exposure to multiple adversities involving hostility and threat – do, in some people, contribute to the onset of psychotic experiences and psychotic disorders. PMID:27265690

  1. RACIAL RESIDENTIAL SEGREGATION AND ADVERSE BIRTH OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    INTRODUCTION. The disparity between black and white women's adverse birth outcomes has been subject to much investigation, yet the factors underlying its persistence remain elusive, which has encouraged research on neighborhood-level influences, including racial residential segr...

  2. Differentiation of Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells Contributes to Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wang, Aijun; Yuan, Falei; Yan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Bo; Chu, Julia S.; Helms, Jill A.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the de-differentiation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from contractile to proliferative/synthetic phenotype has an important role during vascular remodeling and diseases. Here we provide evidence that challenges this theory. We identify a new type of multipotent vascular stem cell (MVSC) in blood vessel wall. MVSCs express markers including Sox17, Sox10 and S100β, are cloneable, have telomerase activity, and can differentiate into neural cells and mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like cells that subsequently differentiate into SMCs. On the other hand, we use lineage tracing with smooth muscle myosin heavy chain as a marker to show that MVSCs and proliferative or synthetic SMCs do not arise from the de-differentiation of mature SMCs. Upon vascular injuries, MVSCs, instead of SMCs, become proliferative, and MVSCs can differentiate into SMCs and chondrogenic cells, thus contributing to vascular remodeling and neointimal hyperplasia. These findings support a new hypothesis that the differentiation of MVSCs, rather than the de-differentiation of SMCs, contributes to vascular remodeling and diseases. PMID:22673902

  3. Results of vascular resections during pancreatectomy from two European centres: an analysis of survival and disease-free survival explicative factors1

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, D. F.; Chapuis, F.; Mayer, A. D.; Bramhall, S. R.; Coldham, C.; Baulieux, J.; Buckels, J.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives The object of our study was to report on the experience with vascular resections at pancreatectomy in two European specialist hepatopancreatobiliary centres and evaluate outcome and prognostic factors. Patients and methods From 1989 to 2002, 45 patients (21 men, 24 women) underwent pancreatectomy for a pancreatic mass: Whipple's procedure (n=33), total pancreatectomy (n=10) or left splenopancreatectomy (n=2), along with a vascular resection, i.e. venous (n=39), arterial (n=1) or venous + arterial (n=5). Results Operative mortality was nil, postoperative mortality was 2.2% (n=1); 34 patients had an uneventful postoperative course. Reoperations were performed for portal vein thromobosis (n=1), pancreatic leak (n=1), gastric outlet syndrome (n=1) and gastrointestinal bleeding (n=1). In all, 43 patients had cancer on pathology examination, with retropancreatic invasion in 72% and lymph node extension in 62.8%. Resection was R0 in 21 cases. Vessel wall invasion was present in 13 cases and 19 had perivascular invasion. Disease-free survival (DFS) at 1, 2 and 3 years was 36.0%, 15.0% and 12.0%, respectively. Median DFS length was 8.7 months (95% CI: 7.2; 10.2). Overall survival rates were 56.6%, 28.9% and 19.2%, respectively. Median survival length was 14.2 months (95% CI: 9.8; 18.6). A multivariate analysis of prognostic variables identified tumour location (other than head of pancreas), neoadjuvant chemotherapy and advanced disease stage as adverse factors for DFS. Conclusion Survival and DFS rates of these patients are comparable to those without vascular resection. Tumour localization, tumour stage, neoadjuvant treatment and tumour recurrence are explanatory variables of survival. Tumour localization, tumour stage and neoadjuvant treatment were explanatory variables for DFS. However, the type and extent of vascular resections as well as vessel wall invasion does not affect survival and DFS. PMID:18333103

  4. Developing robust crop plants for sustaining growth and yield under adverse climatic changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural production and quality are expected to suffer from adverse changes in climatic conditions, including global warming, and this will affect worldwide human and animal food security. Global warming has been shown to negatively impact crop yield and therefore will affect sustainability of a...

  5. Inflammatory Cytokines in Vascular Dysfunction and Vascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Alexander H.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2009-01-01

    The vascular inflammatory response involves complex interaction between inflammatory cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages), endothelial cells (ECs), vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and extracellular matrix (ECM). Vascular injury is associated with increased expression of adhesion molecules by ECs and recruitment of inflammatory cells, growth factors, and cytokines, with consequent effects on ECs, VSMCs and ECM. Cytokines include tumor necrosis factors, interleukins, lymphokines, monokines, interferons, colony stimulating factors, and transforming growth factors. Cytokines are produced by macrophages, T cells and monocytes, as well as platelets, ECs and VSMCs. Circulating cytokines interact with specific receptors on various cell types and activate JAK-STAT, NF-κB, and Smad signaling pathways leading to an inflammatory response involving cell adhesion, permeability and apoptosis. Cytokines also interact with mitochondria to increasie the production of reactive oxygen species. Cytokine-induced activation of these pathways in ECs modifies the production/activity of vasodilatory mediators such as nitric oxide, prostacyclin, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, and bradykinin, as well as vasoconstrictive mediators such as endothelin and angiotensin II. Cytokines interact with VSMCs to activate Ca2+, protein kinase C, Rho-Kinase, and MAPK pathways, which promote cell growth and migration, and VSM reactivity. Cytokines also interact with integrins and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and modify ECM composition. Persistent increases in cytokines are associated with vascular dysfunction and vascular disease such as atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysm, varicose veins and hypertension. Genetic and pharmacological tools to decrease the production of cytokines or to diminish their effects using cytokine antagonists could provide new approaches in the management of inflammatory vascular disease. PMID:19413999

  6. Adverse effects of common medications on male fertility.

    PubMed

    Samplaski, Mary K; Nangia, Ajay K

    2015-07-01

    An increasing number of patients require long-term medication regimens at a young age, but the adverse effects of medications on male reproduction are often inadequately considered, recognized and investigated. Medications can affect male reproduction through central hormonal effects, direct gonadotoxic effects, effects on sperm function or on sexual function. For example, exogenous testosterone inhibits spermatogenesis through central suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal hormonal axis. 5α-reductase inhibitors can impair sexual function, decrease semen volume and negatively affect sperm parameters, depending on dose and treatment duration. α-Blockers might decrease seminal emission and cause retrograde ejaculation, depending on the receptor specificity and dose of the agent. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors seem to have variable effects based on the isoform inhibited and evidence is conflicting. Antihypertensive and psychotropic agents can affect sperm, sexual function and hormonal parameters. For antibiotics, the literature on effects on sperm and sperm function is limited and dated. Many chemotherapeutic agents have a direct gonadotoxic effect, depending on agents used, dosing and number of treatment cycles. Overall, many medications commonly used in urology can have effects on male fertility (mostly reversible) but conclusive evidence in humans is often limited. Men should be counselled appropriately about potential drug-related adverse effects on their fertility. PMID:26101108

  7. Pediatric Interventional Radiology: Vascular Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR) comprises a range of minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are performed using image guidance. PIR has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions. Over the years, technology has undergone dramatic and continuous evolution, making this speciality grow. In this review, the authors will discuss various vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients. It is challenging for the interventional radiologist to accomplish a successful interventional procedure. There are many vascular interventional radiology procedures which are being performed and have changed the way the diseases are managed. Some of the procedures are life saving and have become the treatment of choice in those patients. The future is indeed bright for the practice and practitioners of pediatric vascular and non-vascular interventions. As more and more of the procedures that are currently being performed in adults get gradually adapted for use in the pediatric population, it may be possible to perform safe and successful interventions in many of the pediatric vascular lesions that are otherwise being referred for surgery. PMID:26964551

  8. Vascular effect of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyodorov, Svyatoslav N.; Kopayeva, V. G.; Andreev, J. B.; Ponomarev, Gelii V.; Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Suchin, H. M.

    1996-01-01

    Vascular effect of PDT has been studied in patients with corneal vascularized leucomas (10 patients) and in patients with corneal neovascularized transplant (3 patients). For vascularized leucomas the method of photodynamic therapy consisted of the local injection of dimegin (deiteroporphyrin derivative) into the space of the newly-formed vessels under operating microscope (opton) with the microneedle (diameter 200 microns) and corneal irradiation by the operating microscope light. For corneal neovascularized transplant the injection of photogem (hematoporphyrin derivative) intravenously were made with subsequent irradiation by light of dye laser (5 hours after the injection) with light density of 150 mW/cm2 for 15 minutes. In all the cases at the time of irradiation the aggregated blood flow was appeared, followed by blood flow stasis. In postoperative period the vessels disintegrated into separate fragments which disappeared completely after 10 - 15 days. Taking into account the data of light microscopy, the disappearance of the vessels took place as a result of the vascular endothelium lisis along the vascular walls. Neovascularized cornea and newly-formed vessels in tumor stroms have much in common. The vessel alterations study presented in this paper, may serve to specify the mechanism of photodynamic destruction of neovascularized stroma of tumor.

  9. Interventions designed to prevent adverse programming outcomes resulting from exposure to maternal obesity during development

    PubMed Central

    Nathanielsz, PW; Ford, SP; Long, NM; Vega, CC; Reyes-Castro, LA; Zambrano, E

    2013-01-01

    Maternal obesity is a global epidemic affecting the developed and developing world. Human and animal studies indicate that maternal obesity programs development predisposing offspring to later-life chronic diseases. Several mechanisms act together to produce these adverse health problems. There is a need for effective interventions that prevent these outcomes and guide management in human pregnancy. We report here dietary and exercise intervention studies in both altricial and precocial species, rats and sheep, designed to prevent adverse offspring outcomes. Both interventions present exciting opportunities to at least in part prevent adverse metabolic and other outcomes in mother and offspring. PMID:24147928

  10. Development of pluripotent stem cells for vascular therapy

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Katharina S.; Miljan, Erik; Khoo, Amanda; Cooke, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterized by reduced limb blood flow due to arterial obstruction. Current treatment includes surgical or endovascular procedures, the failure of which may result in amputation of the affected limb. An emerging therapeutic approach is cell therapy to enhance angiogenesis and tissue survival. Small clinical trials of adult progenitor cell therapies have generated promising results, although large randomized clinical trials using well-defined cells have not been performed. Intriguing pre-clinical studies have been performed using vascular cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) or human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). In particular, hiPSC-derived vascular cells may be a superior approach for vascular regeneration. The regulatory roadmap to the clinic will be arduous, but achievable with further understanding of the reprogramming and differentiation processes; with meticulous attention to quality control; and perseverance. PMID:22387745

  11. Perinatal hypoxia increases susceptibility to high-altitude polycythemia and attendant pulmonary vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Julian, Colleen Glyde; Gonzales, Marcelino; Rodriguez, Armando; Bellido, Diva; Salmon, Carlos Salinas; Ladenburger, Anne; Reardon, Lindsay; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G

    2015-08-15

    Perinatal exposures exert a profound influence on physiological function, including developmental processes vital for efficient pulmonary gas transfer throughout the lifespan. We extend the concept of developmental programming to chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a debilitating syndrome marked by polycythemia, ventilatory impairment, and pulmonary hypertension that affects ∼10% of male high-altitude residents. We hypothesized that adverse perinatal oxygenation caused abnormalities of ventilatory and/or pulmonary vascular function that increased susceptibility to CMS in adulthood. Subjects were 67 male high-altitude (3,600-4,100 m) residents aged 18-25 yr with excessive erythrocytosis (EE, Hb concentration ≥18.3 g/dl), a preclinical form of CMS, and 66 controls identified from a community-based survey (n = 981). EE subjects not only had higher Hb concentrations and erythrocyte counts, but also lower alveolar ventilation, impaired pulmonary diffusion capacity, higher systolic pulmonary artery pressure, lower pulmonary artery acceleration time, and more frequent right ventricular hypertrophy, than controls. Compared with controls, EE subjects were more often born to mothers experiencing hypertensive complications of pregnancy and hypoxia during the perinatal period, with each increasing the risk of developing EE (odds ratio = 5.25, P = 0.05 and odds ratio = 6.44, P = 0.04, respectively) after other factors known to influence EE status were taken into account. Adverse perinatal oxygenation is associated with increased susceptibility to EE accompanied by modest abnormalities of the pulmonary circulation that are independent of increased blood viscosity. The association between perinatal hypoxia and EE may be due to disrupted alveolarization and microvascular development, leading to impaired gas exchange and/or pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26092986

  12. Perinatal hypoxia increases susceptibility to high-altitude polycythemia and attendant pulmonary vascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Marcelino; Rodriguez, Armando; Bellido, Diva; Salmon, Carlos Salinas; Ladenburger, Anne; Reardon, Lindsay; Vargas, Enrique; Moore, Lorna G.

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal exposures exert a profound influence on physiological function, including developmental processes vital for efficient pulmonary gas transfer throughout the lifespan. We extend the concept of developmental programming to chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a debilitating syndrome marked by polycythemia, ventilatory impairment, and pulmonary hypertension that affects ∼10% of male high-altitude residents. We hypothesized that adverse perinatal oxygenation caused abnormalities of ventilatory and/or pulmonary vascular function that increased susceptibility to CMS in adulthood. Subjects were 67 male high-altitude (3,600–4,100 m) residents aged 18–25 yr with excessive erythrocytosis (EE, Hb concentration ≥18.3 g/dl), a preclinical form of CMS, and 66 controls identified from a community-based survey (n = 981). EE subjects not only had higher Hb concentrations and erythrocyte counts, but also lower alveolar ventilation, impaired pulmonary diffusion capacity, higher systolic pulmonary artery pressure, lower pulmonary artery acceleration time, and more frequent right ventricular hypertrophy, than controls. Compared with controls, EE subjects were more often born to mothers experiencing hypertensive complications of pregnancy and hypoxia during the perinatal period, with each increasing the risk of developing EE (odds ratio = 5.25, P = 0.05 and odds ratio = 6.44, P = 0.04, respectively) after other factors known to influence EE status were taken into account. Adverse perinatal oxygenation is associated with increased susceptibility to EE accompanied by modest abnormalities of the pulmonary circulation that are independent of increased blood viscosity. The association between perinatal hypoxia and EE may be due to disrupted alveolarization and microvascular development, leading to impaired gas exchange and/or pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26092986

  13. Vascular disrupting activity of combretastatin analogues.

    PubMed

    Porcù, Elena; Salvador, Alessia; Primac, Irina; Mitola, Stefania; Ronca, Roberto; Ravelli, Cosetta; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Vedaldi, Daniela; Romagnoli, Romeo; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro

    2016-08-01

    Tubulin binding agents (TBAs) are drugs commonly used in cancer therapy as antimitotics. In the last years it has been described that TBAs, like combretastatin A-4 (CA-4), present also vascular disrupting activity and among its derivatives we identified three analogues endowed with potent microtubule depolymerizing activity, higher than that of the lead compound. In this paper we have investigated the anti-vascular activity of these derivatives. We tested the anti-angiogenic effects in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in vivo in chick chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM), and in a syngeneic tumor mouse model. The three molecules, compound 1: 1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-5-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole; compound 2: (1-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-5-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-1H-tetrazole, compound-3 (4-amino-2-p-tolylaminothiazol-5-yl)-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-methanone) showed a moderate effect on the growth of HUVEC cells at concentrations below 200nM. At lower concentrations (5-20nM), in particular compound 2, they induced inhibition of capillary tube formation, inhibition of endothelial cell migration and affected endothelial cell morphology as demonstrated by the alteration of the microfilaments network. Moreover, they also increased permeability of HUVEC cells in a time dependent manner. In addition, compounds 1 and 3, as well as the reference compound CA-4, inhibited VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and in addition compound 3 prevented the VEGF-induced phosphorylation of FAK. In CAM assay, both compounds 2 and 3 efficiently counteracted the strong angiogenic response induced by bFGF, even at the lowest concentration used (1pmol/egg). Moreover in a syngenic mouse model, compounds 1-3 after a single i.p. injection (30mg/kg), showed a stronger reduction of microvascular density. Altogether our results identified these derivatives as potential new vascular disrupting agents candidates. PMID:27235861

  14. Renal function trajectory over time and adverse clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sohel, Badrul Munir; Rumana, Nahid; Ohsawa, Masaki; Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; Kelly, Martina Ann; Al Mamun, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    The growing burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD), with its associated morbidity and mortality, is recognized as a major public health problem globally and causing substantial load on health care systems. The current framework for the definition and staging of CKD, based on eGFR levels or presence of kidney damage, is useful for clinical classification of patients, but identifies a huge number of people as having CKD which is too many to target for intervention. The ability to identify a subset of patients, at high risk for adverse outcomes, would be useful to inform clinical management. The current staging system applies static definitions of kidney function that fail to capture the dynamic nature of the kidney disease over time. Now-a-days, it is possible to capture multiple measurements of different laboratory test results for an individual including eGFR values. A new possibility for identifying individuals at higher risk of adverse outcomes is being explored through assessment and consideration of the rate of change in kidney function over time, and this approach will be feasible in the current context of digitalization of health record keeping system. On the basis of the existing evidence, this paper summarizes important findings that support the concept of dynamic changes in kidney function over time, and discusses how the magnitude of these changes affect the future adverse outcomes of kidney disease, particularly the End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD), CVD and mortality. PMID:26728745

  15. In vitro assessment of mouse fetal abdominal aortic vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Dilworth, Mark R.; Greenwood, Susan L.; Sibley, Colin P.; Wareing, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) affects 3–8% of human pregnancies. Mouse models have provided important etiological data on FGR; they permit the assessment of treatment strategies on the physiological function of both mother and her developing offspring. Our study aimed to 1) develop a method to assess vascular function in fetal mice and 2) as a proof of principle ascertain whether a high dose of sildenafil citrate (SC; Viagra) administered to the pregnant dam affected fetal vascular reactivity. We developed a wire myography methodology for evaluation of fetal vascular function in vitro using the placenta-specific insulin-like growth factor II (Igf2) knockout mouse (P0; a model of FGR). Vascular function was determined in abdominal aortas isolated from P0 and wild-type (WT) fetuses at embryonic day (E) 18.5 of gestation. A subset of dams received SC 0.8 mg/ml via drinking water from E12.5; data were compared with water-only controls. Using wire myography, we found that fetal aortic rings exhibited significant agonist-induced contraction, and endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation. Sex-specific alterations in reactivity were noted in both strains. Maternal treatment with SC significantly attenuated endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation of fetal aortic rings. Mouse fetal abdominal aortas reproducibly respond to vasoactive agents. Study of these vessels in mouse genetic models of pregnancy complications may 1) help to delineate early signs of abnormal vascular reactivity and 2) inform whether treatments given to the mother during pregnancy may impact upon fetal vascular function. PMID:25056105

  16. Redox regulation of vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Ashley, Euan A; Ali, Ziad A

    2016-01-01

    Vascular remodeling is a dynamic process of structural and functional changes in response to biochemical and biomechanical signals in a complex in vivo milieu. While inherently adaptive, dysregulation leads to maladaptive remodeling. Reactive oxygen species participate in homeostatic cell signaling in tightly regulated- and compartmentalized cellular circuits. It is well established that perturbations in oxidation-reduction (redox) homeostasis can lead to a state of oxidative-, and more recently, reductive stress. We provide an overview of the redox signaling in the vasculature and review the role of oxidative- and reductive stress in maladaptive vascular remodeling. Particular emphasis has been placed on essential processes that determine phenotype modulation, migration and fate of the main cell types in the vessel wall. Recent advances in systems biology and the translational opportunities they may provide to specifically target the redox pathways driving pathological vascular remodeling are discussed. PMID:26483132

  17. [Permanent vascular access for haemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Manafov, E N; Batrashov, V A; Sergeev, O G; Yudaev, S S

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a permanent vascular access (PVA) is the pledge of successful treatment of patients being on chronic haemodialysis (CD). Creation and maintenance of a functioning PVA is the priority task of vascular and endovascular surgeons, nephrologists and specialists of haemodialysis departments. According to the KDOQI guidelines, the most preferable type of PVA is a native arteriovenous fistula (AVF). As an alternative it is possible to use a synthetic prosthesis for creating an arteriovenous shunt (AVS) or implantation of a central venous catheter (CVC). Various complications of vascular accesses leading to their loss create the necessity of forming just another PVA, thus negatively influencing the life span and quality of life of this cohort of patients. Improving surgical technique and approaches to treatment, as well as carrying out dynamic monitoring of the condition of the created PVA make it possible to considerably decrease the incidence rate of such complications and to improve the quality of medical care rendered. PMID:26451410

  18. Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffolds for Coronary Revascularization.

    PubMed

    Kereiakes, Dean J; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Serruys, Patrick W; Stone, Gregg W

    2016-07-12

    Contemporary metallic drug-eluting stents are associated with very good 1-year outcomes but an ongoing risk of stent-related adverse events (thrombosis, myocardial infarction, restenosis) after 1 year. The pathogenesis of these very late events is likely related to the permanent presence of the metal stent frame or polymer. Bioresorbable scaffolds have been developed to provide drug delivery and mechanical support functions similar to metallic drug-eluting stents, followed by complete resorption with recovery of more normal vascular structure and function, potentially improving very late clinical outcomes. A first-generation bioresorbable scaffold has been demonstrated to be noninferior to a contemporary metallic drug-eluting stents for overall 1-year patient-oriented and device-oriented outcomes. Increased rates of scaffold thrombosis and target vessel-related myocardial infarction were noted that may be mitigated by improved patient and lesion selection, procedural technique, and device iteration. Large-scale, randomized, clinical trials are ongoing to determine the long-term relative efficacy and safety of bioresorbable scaffolds compared with current metallic drug-eluting stents. PMID:27400899

  19. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds—time to vanish?

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Diego; Cook, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The fully bioabsorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) has been developed to reduce late adverse events after coronary stenting such as device thrombosis. The device consists of polylactic acid, which is gradually absorbed within the first few years after its implantation. The initial experience with the device in low-risk patients presenting with simple lesions was satisfying and generated optimism among interventional cardiologists by promising better patient outcomes. However, the unrestricted use of the device in patients presenting with a higher baseline risk and more complex lesions came at the cost of alarmingly high rates of early device thrombosis. The performance of the device largely depends on an optimal implantation technique, which differs from that employed with metallic drug-eluting stents due to the device’s distinct physical propensity. Mid-term outcomes in large-scale randomized clinical trial were disappointing. Although its non-inferiority compared to metallic everolimus-eluting stents was formally met, there was a clear trend towards an increased occurrence of myocardial infarction and device thrombosis during the first year after device implantation. However, the BVS’s putative advantages are expected to manifest themselves at long-term, that is 3 to 5 years after the device has been implanted. Evidence pertaining to these long-term outcomes is eagerly awaited. PMID:27293872

  20. Key psychosocial challenges in vascularized composite allotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Kumnig, Martin; Jowsey-Gregoire, Sheila G

    2016-03-24

    Psychosocial factors are important elements in the assessment and follow-up care for vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) and require multidisciplinary evaluation protocols. This review will highlight differences between VCA with solid organ transplantation (SOT), provide information on the psychosocial selection of VCA candidates, ethical issues, psychological outcomes, and on the need for multicenter research. VCA is primarily a life-enhancing procedure to improve recipients' quality of life and psychological well-being and it represents a potential option to provide reproduction in case of penile or uterine transplantation. The risk benefit ratio is distinctly different than SOT with candidates desiring life enhancing outcomes including improved body image, return to occupations, restored touch, and for uterine transplant, pregnancy. The Chauvet Workgroup has been convened with membership from a number of transplant centers to address these issues and to call for multicenter research. A multicenter research network would share similar evaluation approaches so that meaningful research on psychosocial variables could inform the transplant community and patients about factors that increase risk of non-adherence and other adverse psychosocial and medical outcomes. PMID:27011907

  1. Key psychosocial challenges in vascularized composite allotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kumnig, Martin; Jowsey-Gregoire, Sheila G

    2016-01-01

    Psychosocial factors are important elements in the assessment and follow-up care for vascularized composite allotransplantation (VCA) and require multidisciplinary evaluation protocols. This review will highlight differences between VCA with solid organ transplantation (SOT), provide information on the psychosocial selection of VCA candidates, ethical issues, psychological outcomes, and on the need for multicenter research. VCA is primarily a life-enhancing procedure to improve recipients’ quality of life and psychological well-being and it represents a potential option to provide reproduction in case of penile or uterine transplantation. The risk benefit ratio is distinctly different than SOT with candidates desiring life enhancing outcomes including improved body image, return to occupations, restored touch, and for uterine transplant, pregnancy. The Chauvet Workgroup has been convened with membership from a number of transplant centers to address these issues and to call for multicenter research. A multicenter research network would share similar evaluation approaches so that meaningful research on psychosocial variables could inform the transplant community and patients about factors that increase risk of non-adherence and other adverse psychosocial and medical outcomes. PMID:27011907

  2. Regulation of thrombosis and vascular function by protein methionine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Sean X; Stevens, Jeff W; Lentz, Steven R

    2015-06-18

    Redox biology is fundamental to both normal cellular homeostasis and pathological states associated with excessive oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species function not only as signaling molecules but also as redox regulators of protein function. In the vascular system, redox reactions help regulate key physiologic responses such as cell adhesion, vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, angiogenesis, inflammatory gene expression, and apoptosis. During pathologic states, altered redox balance can cause vascular cell dysfunction and affect the equilibrium between procoagulant and anticoagulant systems, contributing to thrombotic vascular disease. This review focuses on the emerging role of a specific reversible redox reaction, protein methionine oxidation, in vascular disease and thrombosis. A growing number of cardiovascular and hemostatic proteins are recognized to undergo reversible methionine oxidation, in which methionine residues are posttranslationally oxidized to methionine sulfoxide. Protein methionine oxidation can be reversed by the action of stereospecific enzymes known as methionine sulfoxide reductases. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is a prototypical methionine redox sensor that responds to changes in the intracellular redox state via reversible oxidation of tandem methionine residues in its regulatory domain. Several other proteins with oxidation-sensitive methionine residues, including apolipoprotein A-I, thrombomodulin, and von Willebrand factor, may contribute to vascular disease and thrombosis. PMID:25900980

  3. Vascular calcification is dependent on plasma levels of pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Lomashvili, Koba A; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, Jose L; O'Neill, W Charles

    2014-06-01

    Plasma levels of pyrophosphate, an endogenous inhibitor of vascular calcification, are reduced in end-stage renal disease and correlate inversely with arterial calcification. However, it is not known whether the low plasma levels are directly pathogenic or are merely a marker of reduced tissue levels. This was tested in an animal model in which aortas were transplanted between normal mice and Enpp1(-/-) mice lacking ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase phosphodiesterase, the enzyme that synthesizes extracellular pyrophosphate. Enpp1(-/-) mice had very low plasma pyrophosphate and developed aortic calcification by 2 months that was greatly accelerated with a high-phosphate diet. Aortas of Enpp1(-/-) mice showed no further calcification after transplantation into wild-type mice fed a high-phosphate diet. Aorta allografts of wild-type mice calcified in Enpp1(-/-) mice but less so than the adjacent recipient Enpp1(-/-) aorta. Donor and recipient aortic calcium contents did not differ in transplants between wild-type and Enpp1(-/-) mice, demonstrating that transplantation per se did not affect calcification. Histology revealed medial calcification with no signs of rejection. Thus, normal levels of extracellular pyrophosphate are sufficient to prevent vascular calcification, and systemic Enpp1 deficiency is sufficient to produce vascular calcification despite normal vascular extracellular pyrophosphate production. This establishes an important role for circulating extracellular pyrophosphate in preventing vascular calcification. PMID:24717293

  4. Negative News: Cl- and HCO3- in the Vascular Wall.

    PubMed

    Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Matchkov, Vladimir V; Boedtkjer, Donna M B; Aalkjaer, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) are the most prevalent membrane-permeable anions in the intra- and extracellular spaces of the vascular wall. Outwardly directed electrochemical gradients for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) permit anion channel opening to depolarize vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells. Transporters and channels for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) also modify vascular contractility and structure independently of membrane potential. Transport of HCO3 (-) regulates intracellular pH and thereby modifies the activity of enzymes, ion channels, and receptors. There is also evidence that Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) transport proteins affect gene expression and protein trafficking. Considering the extensive implications of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) in the vascular wall, it is critical to understand how these ions are transported under physiological conditions and how disturbances in their transport can contribute to disease development. Recently, sensing mechanisms for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) have been identified in the vascular wall where they modify ion transport and vasomotor function, for instance, during metabolic disturbances. This review discusses current evidence that transport (e.g., via NKCC1, NBCn1, Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, volume-regulated anion channels, and CFTR) and sensing (e.g., via WNK and RPTPγ) of Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) influence cardiovascular health and disease. PMID:27511463

  5. Regulation of thrombosis and vascular function by protein methionine oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Sean X.; Stevens, Jeff W.

    2015-01-01

    Redox biology is fundamental to both normal cellular homeostasis and pathological states associated with excessive oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species function not only as signaling molecules but also as redox regulators of protein function. In the vascular system, redox reactions help regulate key physiologic responses such as cell adhesion, vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, angiogenesis, inflammatory gene expression, and apoptosis. During pathologic states, altered redox balance can cause vascular cell dysfunction and affect the equilibrium between procoagulant and anticoagulant systems, contributing to thrombotic vascular disease. This review focuses on the emerging role of a specific reversible redox reaction, protein methionine oxidation, in vascular disease and thrombosis. A growing number of cardiovascular and hemostatic proteins are recognized to undergo reversible methionine oxidation, in which methionine residues are posttranslationally oxidized to methionine sulfoxide. Protein methionine oxidation can be reversed by the action of stereospecific enzymes known as methionine sulfoxide reductases. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is a prototypical methionine redox sensor that responds to changes in the intracellular redox state via reversible oxidation of tandem methionine residues in its regulatory domain. Several other proteins with oxidation-sensitive methionine residues, including apolipoprotein A-I, thrombomodulin, and von Willebrand factor, may contribute to vascular disease and thrombosis. PMID:25900980

  6. Adverse events temporally associated with meningococcal vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Yergeau, A; Alain, L; Pless, R; Robert, Y

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of severe adverse events temporally associated with meningococcal vaccines administered as part of a mass vaccination program. DESIGN: Retrospective descriptive study of events reported to a passive provincial surveillance system. SETTING: The province of Quebec. PARTICIPANTS: The 1,198,751 individuals aged 6 months to 20 years who were vaccinated against meningococcal disease between Dec. 27, 1992, and Mar. 31, 1993. OUTCOME MEASURES: Total numbers and rates of severe adverse events, including allergic reactions, anaphylactic reactions, neurological events (other than abnormal crying and screaming) and other serious or unusual events. RESULTS: A total of 118 reports of severe adverse events were selected from the surveillance system. The most frequent were allergic reactions (9.2 per 100,000 doses). Few anaphylactic or neurologic reactions were reported (0.1 and 0.5 per 100,000 doses respectively). There were no reports of sequelae or of encephalopathy, meningitis or encephalitis. CONCLUSION: Meningococcal vaccines seem to be associated with fewer adverse events than have previously been reported. Existing surveillance programs are useful for determining the incidence of adverse events temporally associated with vaccines. PMID:8630839

  7. The complement system and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Regal, Jean F; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Burwick, Richard M

    2015-09-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the fetal allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  8. Vascular Injury in Orthopedic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Panagopoulos, George N; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Mantas, George; Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Sfyroeras, George S; Lazaris, Andreas; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2016-07-01

    Vascular injury in orthopedic trauma is challenging. The risk to life and limb can be high, and clinical signs initially can be subtle. Recognition and management should be a critical skill for every orthopedic surgeon. There are 5 types of vascular injury: intimal injury (flaps, disruptions, or subintimal/intramural hematomas), complete wall defects with pseudoaneurysms or hemorrhage, complete transections with hemorrhage or occlusion, arteriovenous fistulas, and spasm. Intimal defects and subintimal hematomas with possible secondary occlusion are most commonly associated with blunt trauma, whereas wall defects, complete transections, and arteriovenous fistulas usually occur with penetrating trauma. Spasm can occur after either blunt or penetrating trauma to an extremity and is more common in young patients. Clinical presentation of vascular injury may not be straightforward. Physical examination can be misleading or initially unimpressive; a normal pulse examination may be present in 5% to 15% of patients with vascular injury. Detection and treatment of vascular injuries should take place within the context of the overall resuscitation of the patient according to the established principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Advances in the field, made mostly during times of war, have made limb salvage the rule rather than the exception. Teamwork, familiarity with the often subtle signs of vascular injuries, a high index of suspicion, effective communication, appropriate use of imaging modalities, sound knowledge of relevant technique, and sequence of surgical repairs are among the essential factors that will lead to a successful outcome. This article provides a comprehensive literature review on a subject that generates significant controversy and confusion among clinicians involved in the care of trauma patients. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):249-259.]. PMID:27322172

  9. WOX4 and WOX14 act downstream of the PXY receptor kinase to regulate plant vascular proliferation independently of any role in vascular organisation

    PubMed Central

    Etchells, J. Peter; Provost, Claire M.; Mishra, Laxmi; Turner, Simon R.

    2013-01-01

    In plants, the cambium and procambium are meristems from which vascular tissue is derived. In contrast to most plant cells, stem cells within these tissues are thin and extremely long. They are particularly unusual as they divide down their long axis in a highly ordered manner, parallel to the tangential axis of the stem. CLAVATA3-LIKE/ESR-RELATED 41 (CLE41) and PHLOEM INTERCALATED WITH XYLEM (PXY) are a multifunctional ligand-receptor pair that regulate vascular cell division, vascular organisation and xylem differentiation in vascular tissue. A transcription factor gene, WUSCHEL HOMEOBOX RELATED 4 (WOX4) has been shown to act downstream of PXY. Here we show that WOX4 acts redundantly with WOX14 in the regulation of vascular cell division, but that these genes have no function in regulating vascular organisation. Furthermore, we identify an interaction between PXY and the receptor kinase ERECTA (ER) that affects the organisation of the vascular tissue but not the rate of cell division, suggesting that cell division and vascular organisation are genetically separable. Our observations also support a model whereby tissue organisation and cell division are integrated via PXY and ER signalling, which together coordinate development of different cell types that are essential for normal stem formation. PMID:23578929

  10. Vascular Wall-Resident Multipotent Stem Cells of Mesenchymal Nature within the Process of Vascular Remodeling: Cellular Basis, Clinical Relevance, and Implications for Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Until some years ago, the bone marrow and the endothelial cell compartment lining the vessel lumen (subendothelial space) were thought to be the only sources providing vascular progenitor cells. Now, the vessel wall, in particular, the vascular adventitia, has been established as a niche for different types of stem and progenitor cells with the capacity to differentiate into both vascular and nonvascular cells. Herein, vascular wall-resident multipotent stem cells of mesenchymal nature (VW-MPSCs) have gained importance because of their large range of differentiation in combination with their distribution throughout the postnatal organism which is related to their existence in the adventitial niche, respectively. In general, mesenchymal stem cells, also designated as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), contribute to the maintenance of organ integrity by their ability to replace defunct cells or secrete cytokines locally and thus support repair and healing processes of the affected tissues. This review will focus on the central role of VW-MPSCs within vascular reconstructing processes (vascular remodeling) which are absolute prerequisite to preserve the sensitive relationship between resilience and stability of the vessel wall. Further, a particular advantage for the therapeutic application of VW-MPSCs for improving vascular function or preventing vascular damage will be discussed. PMID:26880936

  11. Endothelial targeting of nanocarriers loaded with antioxidant enzymes for protection against vascular oxidative stress and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Elizabeth D.; Chorny, Michael; Greineder, Colin F.; Alferiev, Ivan; Levy, Robert J.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial-targeted delivery of antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD), is promising strategy for protecting organs and tissues from inflammation and oxidative stress. Here we describe Protective Antioxidant Carriers for Endothelial Targeting (PACkET), the first carriers capable of targeted endothelial delivery of both catalase and SOD. PACkET formed through controlled precipitation loaded ~30% enzyme and protected it from proteolytic degradation, whereas attachment of PECAM monoclonal antibodies to surface of the enzyme-loaded carriers, achieved without adversely affecting their stability and functionality, provided targeting. Isotope tracing and microscopy showed that PACkET exhibited specific endothelial binding and internalization in vitro. Endothelial targeting of PACkET was validated in vivo by specific (vs IgG-control) accumulation in the pulmonary vasculature after intravenous injection achieving 33% of injected dose at 30 min. Catalase loaded PACkET protects endothelial cells from killing by H2O2 and alleviated the pulmonary edema and leukocyte infiltration in mouse model of endotoxin-induced lung injury, whereas SOD-loaded PACkET mitigated cytokine-induced endothelial pro-inflammatory activation and endotoxin-induced lung inflammation. These studies indicate that PACkET offers a modular approach for vascular targeting of therapeutic enzymes. PMID:24480537

  12. Force sensing by the vascular protein von Willebrand factor is tuned by a strong intermonomer interaction.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jochen P; Mielke, Salomé; Löf, Achim; Obser, Tobias; Beer, Christof; Bruetzel, Linda K; Pippig, Diana A; Vanderlinden, Willem; Lipfert, Jan; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Benoit, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The large plasma glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF) senses hydrodynamic forces in the bloodstream and responds to elevated forces with abrupt elongation, thereby increasing its adhesiveness to platelets and collagen. Remarkably, forces on VWF are elevated at sites of vascular injury, where VWF's hemostatic potential is important to mediate platelet aggregation and to recruit platelets to the subendothelial layer. Adversely, elevated forces in stenosed vessels lead to an increased risk of VWF-mediated thrombosis. To dissect the remarkable force-sensing ability of VWF, we have performed atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force measurements on dimers, the smallest repeating subunits of VWF multimers. We have identified a strong intermonomer interaction that involves the D4 domain and critically depends on the presence of divalent ions, consistent with results from small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Dissociation of this strong interaction occurred at forces above [Formula: see text]50 pN and provided [Formula: see text]80 nm of additional length to the elongation of dimers. Corroborated by the static conformation of VWF, visualized by AFM imaging, we estimate that in VWF multimers approximately one-half of the constituent dimers are firmly closed via the strong intermonomer interaction. As firmly closed dimers markedly shorten VWF's effective length contributing to force sensing, they can be expected to tune VWF's sensitivity to hydrodynamic flow in the blood and to thereby significantly affect VWF's function in hemostasis and thrombosis. PMID:26787887

  13. Force sensing by the vascular protein von Willebrand factor is tuned by a strong intermonomer interaction

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jochen P.; Mielke, Salomé; Löf, Achim; Obser, Tobias; Beer, Christof; Bruetzel, Linda K.; Pippig, Diana A.; Vanderlinden, Willem; Lipfert, Jan; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Benoit, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The large plasma glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF) senses hydrodynamic forces in the bloodstream and responds to elevated forces with abrupt elongation, thereby increasing its adhesiveness to platelets and collagen. Remarkably, forces on VWF are elevated at sites of vascular injury, where VWF’s hemostatic potential is important to mediate platelet aggregation and to recruit platelets to the subendothelial layer. Adversely, elevated forces in stenosed vessels lead to an increased risk of VWF-mediated thrombosis. To dissect the remarkable force-sensing ability of VWF, we have performed atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force measurements on dimers, the smallest repeating subunits of VWF multimers. We have identified a strong intermonomer interaction that involves the D4 domain and critically depends on the presence of divalent ions, consistent with results from small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Dissociation of this strong interaction occurred at forces above ∼50 pN and provided ∼80 nm of additional length to the elongation of dimers. Corroborated by the static conformation of VWF, visualized by AFM imaging, we estimate that in VWF multimers approximately one-half of the constituent dimers are firmly closed via the strong intermonomer interaction. As firmly closed dimers markedly shorten VWF’s effective length contributing to force sensing, they can be expected to tune VWF’s sensitivity to hydrodynamic flow in the blood and to thereby significantly affect VWF’s function in hemostasis and thrombosis. PMID:26787887

  14. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area. PMID:25926569

  15. Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Unlike many neurodegenerative causes of cognitive impairment and dementia, vascular damage is preventable. Despite the heterogeneity of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and the complexity of its clinical presentations, the potential for limiting progression and changing the trajectory of damage makes it all the more important for physicians to be educated about the syndrome and to remain vigilant when taking care of patients. In this review, we outline an approach to patients with possible VCI, summarize current treatment and prevention guidelines, and provide an overview with case examples. PMID:26124978

  16. Genetic basis for vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Kirkorian, A Yasmine; Grossberg, Anna L; Püttgen, Katherine B

    2016-03-01

    The fundamental genetics of many isolated vascular anomalies and syndromes associated with vascular anomalies have been elucidated. The rate of discovery continues to increase, expanding our understanding of the underlying interconnected molecular pathways. This review summarizes genetic and clinical information on the following diagnoses: capillary malformation, venous malformation, lymphatic malformation, arteriovenous malformation, PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS), Proteus syndrome, SOLAMEN syndrome, Sturge-Weber syndrome, phakomatosis pigmentovascularis, congenital hemangioma, verrucous venous malformation, cutaneomucosal venous malformation, blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, capillary malformation-arteriovenous malformation syndrome, Parkes-Weber syndrome, and Maffucci syndrome. PMID:27607321

  17. Vascular Function in Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hisatsugu; Washida, Kazuo; Kowa, Hisatomo; Kanda, Fumio; Toda, Tatsushi

    2016-08-01

    We investigated vascular functioning in patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of either Alzheimer's disease (AD) or vascular dementia (VaD) and examined a possible relationship between vascular function and cognitive status. Twenty-seven patients with AD, 23 patients with VaD, and 26 healthy control patients underwent measurements of flow-mediated dilation (FMD), ankle-brachial index (ABI), cardioankle vascular index (CAVI), and intima-media thickness (IMT). The FMD was significantly lower in patients with AD or VaD compared to controls. There were no significant differences in ABI, CAVI, or IMT among the 3 groups. A significant correlation was found between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and FMD. Furthermore, a multiple regression analysis revealed that FMD was significantly predicted by MMSE scores. These results suggest that endothelial involvement plays a role in AD pathogenesis, and FMD may be more sensitive than other surrogate methods (ABI, CAVI, and IMT) for detecting early-stage atherosclerosis and/or cognitive decline. PMID:27284205

  18. Vascular risk and Aβ interact to reduce cortical thickness in AD vulnerable brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Bruce R.; Madison, Cindee M.; Wirth, Miranka; Marchant, Natalie L.; Kriger, Stephen; Mack, Wendy J.; Sanossian, Nerses; DeCarli, Charles; Chui, Helena C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Jagust, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to define whether vascular risk factors interact with β-amyloid (Aβ) in producing changes in brain structure that could underlie the increased risk of Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: Sixty-six cognitively normal and mildly impaired older individuals with a wide range of vascular risk factors were included in this study. The presence of Aβ was assessed using [11C]Pittsburgh compound B–PET imaging, and cortical thickness was measured using 3-tesla MRI. Vascular risk was measured with the Framingham Coronary Risk Profile Index. Results: Individuals with high levels of vascular risk factors have thinner frontotemporal cortex independent of Aβ. These frontotemporal regions are also affected in individuals with Aβ deposition, but the latter show additional thinning in parietal cortices. Aβ and vascular risk were found to interact in posterior (especially in parietal) brain regions, where Aβ has its greatest effect. In this way, the negative effect of Aβ in posterior regions is increased by the presence of vascular risk. Conclusion: Aβ and vascular risk interact to enhance cortical thinning in posterior brain regions that are particularly vulnerable to AD. These findings give insight concerning the mechanisms whereby vascular risk increases the likelihood of developing AD and supports the therapeutic intervention of controlling vascular risk for the prevention of AD. PMID:24907234

  19. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  20. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-11-26

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  1. Identifying Adverse Drug Events by Relational Learning

    PubMed Central

    Page, David; Costa, Vítor Santos; Natarajan, Sriraam; Barnard, Aubrey; Peissig, Peggy; Caldwell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry, consumer protection groups, users of medications and government oversight agencies are all strongly interested in identifying adverse reactions to drugs. While a clinical trial of a drug may use only a thousand patients, once a drug is released on the market it may be taken by millions of patients. As a result, in many cases adverse drug events (ADEs) are observed in the broader population that were not identified during clinical trials. Therefore, there is a need for continued, post-marketing surveillance of drugs to identify previously-unanticipated ADEs. This paper casts this problem as a reverse machine learning task, related to relational subgroup discovery and provides an initial evaluation of this approach based on experiments with an actual EMR/EHR and known adverse drug events. PMID:24955289

  2. Standardizing drug adverse event reporting data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liwei; Jiang, Guoqian; Li, Dingcheng; Liu, Hongfang

    2013-01-01

    Normalizing data in the Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS), an FDA database, would improve the mining capacity of AERS for drug safety signal detection. In this study, we aim to normalize AERS and build a publicly available normalized Adverse drug events (ADE) data source.he drug information in AERS is normalized to RxNorm, a standard terminology source for medication. Drug class information is then obtained from the National Drug File - Reference Terminology (NDF-RT). Adverse drug events (ADE) are aggregated through mapping with the PT (Preferred Term) and SOC (System Organ Class) codes of MedDRA. Our study yields an aggregated knowledge-enhanced AERS data mining set (AERS-DM). The AERS-DM could provide more perspectives to mine AERS database for drug safety signal detection and could be used by research community in the data mining field. PMID:23920875

  3. A revised inventory of Adverse Childhood Experiences.

    PubMed

    Finkelhor, David; Shattuck, Anne; Turner, Heather; Hamby, Sherry

    2015-10-01

    This study examines whether the items from the original Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) scale can be improved in their prediction of health outcomes by adding some additional widely recognized childhood adversities. The analyses come from the National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence 2014, a telephone survey conducted from August 2013 through April 2014 with a nationally representative sample of 1,949 children and adolescents aged 10-17 and their caregivers who were asked about adversities, physical health conditions and mental health symptoms. The addition of measures of peer victimization, peer isolation/rejection, and community violence exposure added significantly to the prediction of mental health symptoms, and the addition of a measure of low socioeconomic status (SES) added significantly to the prediction of physical health problems. A revised version of the ACES scale is proposed. PMID:26259971

  4. Adverse health consequences of the Iraq War.

    PubMed

    Levy, Barry S; Sidel, Victor W

    2013-03-16

    The adverse health consequences of the Iraq War (2003-11) were profound. We conclude that at least 116,903 Iraqi non-combatants and more than 4800 coalition military personnel died over the 8-year course. Many Iraqi civilians were injured or became ill because of damage to the health-supporting infrastructure of the country, and about 5 million were displaced. More than 31,000 US military personnel were injured and a substantial percentage of those deployed suffered post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and other neuropsychological disorders and their concomitant psychosocial problems. Many family members of military personnel had psychological problems. Further review of the adverse health consequences of this war could help to minimise the adverse health consequences of, and help to prevent, future wars. PMID:23499043

  5. Adverse events related to blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sandeep; Hemlata; Verma, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today's scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided. PMID:25535415

  6. Adverse obstetric and neonatal outcomes in women with mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Hoirisch-Clapauch, Silvia; Brenner, Benjamin; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2015-02-01

    The brain and the placenta synthesize identical peptides and proteins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, oxytocin, vascular endothelial growth factor, cortisol, and matrix metalloproteinases. Given the promiscuity between neurochemistry and the mechanism of placentation, it would be expected that mental disorders occurring during pregnancy would increase the risk of adverse obstetric and neonatal outcomes. Indeed, expectant mothers with anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia, or depressive disorders are at higher risk of preterm birth, low-birth-weight and small-for-gestational-age infants than controls. These mental illnesses are accompanied by a procoagulant phenotype and low activity of tissue plasminogen activator, which may contribute to placental insufficiency. Another risk factor for pregnancy complications is hyperemesis gravidarum, more common among women with eating disorders or anxiety disorders than in controls. Severe hyperemesis gravidarum is associated with dehydration, electrolyte imbalance and malnutrition, all of which may increase the risk of miscarriages, of low-birth-weight babies and preterm birth. This paper reviews some aspects of mental disorders that may influence pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. PMID:25903540

  7. Scaffold-Free Vascular Tissue Engineering Using Bioprinting

    PubMed Central

    Norotte, Cyrille; Marga, Francoise; Niklason, Laura; Forgacs, Gabor

    2009-01-01

    Current limitations of exogenous scaffolds or extracellular matrix based materials have underlined the need for alternative tissue-engineering solutions. Scaffolds may elicit adverse host responses and interfere with direct cell-cell interaction, as well as assembly and alignment of cell-produced ECM. Thus, fabrication techniques for production of scaffold-free engineered tissue constructs have recently emerged. Here we report on a fully biological self-assembly approach, which we implement through a rapid prototyping bioprinting method for scaffold-free small diameter vascular reconstruction. Various vascular cell types, including smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts, were aggregated into discrete units, either multicellular spheroids or cylinders of controllable diameter (300 to 500 μm). These were printed layer-by-layer concomitantly with agarose rods, used here as a molding template. The post-printing fusion of the discrete units resulted in single- and double-layered small diameter vascular tubes (OD ranging from 0.9 to 2.5 mm). A unique aspect of the method is the ability to engineer vessels of distinct shapes and hierarchical trees that combine tubes of distinct diameters. The technique is quick and easily scalable. PMID:19664819

  8. 40 CFR 230.76 - Actions affecting human use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Actions affecting human use. 230.76... Minimize Adverse Effects § 230.76 Actions affecting human use. Minimization of adverse effects on human use... aquatic areas; (c) Timing the discharge to avoid the seasons or periods when human recreational...

  9. 40 CFR 230.76 - Actions affecting human use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Actions affecting human use. 230.76... Minimize Adverse Effects § 230.76 Actions affecting human use. Minimization of adverse effects on human use... aquatic areas; (c) Timing the discharge to avoid the seasons or periods when human recreational...

  10. 40 CFR 230.76 - Actions affecting human use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Actions affecting human use. 230.76... Minimize Adverse Effects § 230.76 Actions affecting human use. Minimization of adverse effects on human use... aquatic areas; (c) Timing the discharge to avoid the seasons or periods when human recreational...

  11. 40 CFR 230.76 - Actions affecting human use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Actions affecting human use. 230.76... Minimize Adverse Effects § 230.76 Actions affecting human use. Minimization of adverse effects on human use... aquatic areas; (c) Timing the discharge to avoid the seasons or periods when human recreational...

  12. 40 CFR 230.76 - Actions affecting human use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Actions affecting human use. 230.76... Minimize Adverse Effects § 230.76 Actions affecting human use. Minimization of adverse effects on human use... aquatic areas; (c) Timing the discharge to avoid the seasons or periods when human recreational...

  13. Long-term cyclosporine treatment in non-transplanted rats and metabolic risk factors of vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Böhmer, Ana Elisa; Souza, Débora Guerini; Hansel, Gisele; Brum, Liz M B P; Portela, Luis Valmor; Souza, Diogo Onofre

    2010-04-15

    Cyclosporine (CsA) is an immunosuppressive agent frequently used in the clinic for prevention of allograft rejection and for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Despite its desired action on the immune system, CsA treatment may present serious adverse effects, which are masked by the concomitant use of other drugs. The search for effective immunosuppression protocols which does not affect the quality of life of patients is driving research to investigate the CsA involvement in vascular diseases, frequent in patients under immunosuppression. Thus, 45 non-transplanted Wistar rats were treated for 8 weeks with vehicle or 5 or 15 mg/kg CsA (n=15/group) by gavage administration to evaluate the specific influence of cyclosporine on the levels of risk factors (metabolic and inflammatory) of vascular disease and its mechanism of action. Therefore, serum insulin levels, glucose tolerance test, serum lipids profile, total homocysteine and fibrinogen levels were assessed. The biochemical alterations reported here suggest the development of a framework straight to diabetes. Glucose homeostasis was affected as indicated by decreased insulin levels and altered glucose tolerance test in CsA 15 mg/kg group compared to other groups. Serum insulin and total homocysteine levels presented a significant negative correlation (R=- 0.76, P<0.0001). Fibrinogen and serum lipids profiles were significantly increased in CsA 15 mg/kg group compared to other groups and correlated positively with total homocysteine levels. Considering the well-established correlation among insulin resistance, lipid and total homocysteine levels, hypercoagulability and atherosclerosis, we can assume that this protocol of long-term CsA treatment in non-transplanted rats alter biochemical parameters related to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk, mainly in CsA 15 mg/kg group. Insulin and tHcy serum levels appear to be central in this process. PMID:20188083

  14. [A new biological vascular prosthesis].

    PubMed

    Walter, M; Erasmi, H; Schmidt, R

    1991-01-01

    In an experimental study on sheeps a new biologic vascular graft was implanted, 30 x in carotidal, 30 x in aortal position. Only one early occlusion of the graft, due to technical reasons, could be observed. Without aneurysmatic degeneration all graft were in function at the time of harvesting the samples. Morphologically a "revitalisation" of the grafts could be proved. PMID:1788779

  15. Peripheral vascular imaging and intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D. ); Orron, D.E. )

    1990-01-01

    This reference addresses the entire clinical approach to the vascular system from the diagnosis of pathology to surgery or interventional radiological management. All diagnostic imaging modalities currently available are included with specific information on how to interpret various results. It features discussions of the latest therapeutic techniques, including laser angioplasty, intravascular stents, and transluminal embolization.

  16. Perioperative assessment in vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Flanigan, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: The use of ultrasound and computerized tomographic scanning in the diagnosis of vascular pathology; Ancillary techniques in diagnostic angiography; Pre-bypass operative arteriography; Perioperative assessment of in situ bypass grafts; and Early and late evaluation of postoperative carotid restenosis and occlusion.

  17. The relationships of vascular plants.

    PubMed Central

    Kenrick, P

    2000-01-01

    Recent phylogenetic research indicates that vascular plants evolved from bryophyte-like ancestors and that this involved extensive modifications to the life cycle. These conclusions are supported by a range of systematic data, including gene sequences, as well as evidence from comparative morphology and the fossil record. Within vascular plants, there is compelling evidence for two major clades, which have been termed lycophytes (clubmosses) and euphyllophytes (seed plants, ferns, horsetails). The implications of recent phylogenetic work are discussed with reference to life cycle evolution and the interpretation of stratigraphic inconsistencies in the early fossil record of land plants. Life cycles are shown to have passed through an isomorphic phase in the early stages of vascular plant evolution. Thus, the gametophyte generation of all living vascular plants is the product of massive morphological reduction. Phylogenetic research corroborates earlier suggestions of a major representational bias in the early fossil record. Mega-fossils document a sequence of appearance of groups that is at odds with that predicted by cladogram topology. It is argued here that the pattern of appearance and diversification of plant megafossils owes more to changing geological conditions than to rapid biological diversification. PMID:10905613

  18. Vascular basis of mucosal color

    PubMed Central

    Kleinheinz, Johannes; Büchter, André; Fillies, Thomas; Joos, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Background Besides the color of the teeth the color of the alveolar gingiva plays a crucial role in esthetic rehabilitation in dento-alveolar treatment. Whereas nowadays the color of the teeth can be determined exactly and individually, the specific influence of the red color of the gingiva on treatment has not been assessed yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the vascularization as the basis for gingival esthetics. Methods Standardized photographs of defined areas of the alveolar gingiva in operated and non-operated patients were taken and assigned to groups with same characteristics after color comparisons. In addition, histologic and immunohistologic analyses of gingival specimens were performed for qualitative and quantitative assessment of vessels and vascularization. Finally, colors and number of vessels were correlated. Results Our results demonstrated three different constellations of colors of the alveolar gingiva in healthy patients. The operated patients could not be grouped because of disparate depiction. There was a clear correlation between color and vessel number in the alveolar gingiva. Conclusion Our investigations revealed the connections between vascularization and gingival color. Recommendations for specific change or even selection of colors based on the results cannot be given, but the importance of vascularly based incision lines was demonstrated. PMID:16270929

  19. Overgrowth syndromes with vascular malformations.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Solveig L; Hook, Kristen P

    2016-03-01

    This review provides a clinically-oriented summary of the most commonly encountered overgrowth syndromes associated with vascular malformations. This manuscript will outline morphologic features, clinical evaluation and management of this complex group of patients. Recent genetic advances have aided in classification and help to explain overlapping clinical features in many cases. PMID:27607325

  20. Emotion Dysregulation Mediates the Relationship between Lifetime Cumulative Adversity and Depressive Symptomatology

    PubMed Central

    Abravanel, Benjamin T.; Sinha, Rajita

    2014-01-01

    Repeated exposure to stressful events across the lifespan, referred to as cumulative adversity, is a potent risk factor for depression. Research indicates that cumulative adversity detrimentally affects emotion regulation processes, which may represent a pathway linking cumulative adversity to vulnerability to depression. However, empirical evidence that emotion dysregulation mediates the relationship between cumulative adversity and depression is limited, particularly in adult populations. We examined the direct and indirect effects of cumulative adversity on depressive symptomatology in a large community sample of adults (n = 745) who were further characterized by risk status: never-depressed (n = 638) and “at-risk” remitted mood-disordered (n = 107). All participants completed the Cumulative Adversity Inventory (CAI), the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Bootstrapped confidence intervals were computed to estimate the indirect effect of emotion dysregulation on the relationship between cumulative adversity and depressive symptomatology and to test whether this indirect effect was moderated by risk status. Emotion dysregulation partially and significantly mediated the relationship between cumulative adversity and depressive symptomatology independent of risk status. Overall, cumulative adversity and emotion dysregulation accounted for 50% of the variance in depressive symptomatology. These findings support the hypothesis that disruption of adaptive emotion regulation processes associated with repeated exposure to stressful life events represents an intrapersonal mechanism linking the experience of adverse events to depression. Our results support the utility of interventions that simultaneously emphasize stress reduction and emotion regulation to treat and prevent depressive vulnerability and pathology. PMID:25528603

  1. Hepatic drug metabolism and adverse hepatic drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, F

    1975-01-01

    Drugs and other chemicals are usually metabolized in the liver in the drug-metabolizing enzyme system. The metabolites sometimes bind with cellular macromolecules and injure the cell directly or serve as new antigens to create immunologic injury in a delayed fashion. The immediate or toxic injury is dose-dependent, predictable and zonal in the liver lobule, usually in the central region. Carbon tetrachloride intoxication and acetaminophen overdose are examples of injury resulting from microsomal metabolism. Other injuries related to microsomal metabolism are those produced by vinyl chloride in polymerization plant workers and by methotrexate in psoriatics or leukemic children. Most adverse drug reactions affecting the liver and producing jaundice are unpredictable, delayed in onset, and only hypothetically related to microsomal metabolism in some instances. The two main types are cholestasis and viral-hepatitis-like. The former may be in a pure form, in which case it may be partly dose-dependent, or in a form mixed with hepatitis. Many drugs produce cholestasis in a small percentage of persons, and because the reaction is benign, albeit prolonged at times, such drugs continue to be used. The viral-hepatitis-like reaction involves few drugs and affects few persons, but can be fatal. The recognition that chronic hepatitis can be caused by drugs such as oxyphenisatin, alpha-methyldopa, and isoniazid has added a new dimension to the clinical problem of adverse drug reactions, which may extend to widely used and commonly available agents like aspirin. PMID:171822

  2. [Analgesics in geriatric patients. Adverse side effects and interactions].

    PubMed

    Gosch, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Pain is a widespread symptom in clinical practice. Older adults and chronically ill patients are particularly affected. In multimorbid geriatric patients, pharmacological pain treatment is an extension of a previously existing multimedication. Besides the efficacy of pain treatment, drug side effects and drug-drug interactions have to be taken into account to minimize the health risk for these patients. Apart from the number of prescriptions, the age-related pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes significantly increase the risk among older adults. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) is widespread but NSAIDs have the highest risk of adverse drug reactions and drug interactions. In particular, the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, renal and coagulation systems are affected. Apart from the known toxic effect on the liver (in high doses), paracetamol (acetaminophen) has similar risks although to a lesser degree. According to current data, metamizol is actually better than its reputation suggests. The risk of potential drug interactions seems to be low. Apart from the risk of sedation in combination with other drugs, tramadol and other opioids can induce the serotonin syndrome. Among older adults, especially in the case of polypharmacy, an individualized approach should be considered instead of sticking to the pain management recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) in order to minimize drug-drug interactions and adverse drug reactions. PMID:26152872

  3. Maternal Serum Analytes as Predictors of Fetal Growth Restriction with Different Degrees of Placental Vascular Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Matthew J; Rochelson, Burton; Vohra, Nidhi

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal levels of maternal serum analytes have been associated with fetal growth restriction (FGR) and preeclampsia secondary to placental vascular dysfunction. Accurately identifying the FGR fetuses at highest risk for adverse outcomes remains challenging. Placental function can be assessed by Doppler analysis of the maternal and fetal circulation. Although the combination of multiple abnormal maternal serum analytes and abnormal Doppler findings is strongly associated with adverse outcomes, the predictive value remains too low to be used as a screening test in a low-risk population. Stratification of cases based on the severity of Doppler abnormalities may improve predictive models. PMID:27235917

  4. The adverse outcome pathway knowledge base

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid advancement of the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework has been paralleled by the development of tools to store, analyse, and explore AOPs. The AOP Knowledge Base (AOP-KB) project has brought three independently developed platforms (Effectopedia, AOP-Wiki, and AOP-X...

  5. Adverse Effects of Psychotropic Medications on Sleep.

    PubMed

    Doghramji, Karl; Jangro, William C

    2016-09-01

    Psychotropic medications such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, stimulants, and benzodiazepines are widely prescribed. Most of these medications are thought to exert their effects through modulation of various monoamines as well as interactions with receptors such as histamine and muscarinic cholinergic receptors. Through these interactions, psychotropics can also have a significant impact on sleep physiology, resulting in both beneficial and adverse effects on sleep. PMID:27514301

  6. Resilience in the Face of Adversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Jerry

    2001-01-01

    "Resilience" is the capacity for moving ahead under adverse circumstances. School superintendents are advised to stay upbeat and mindful of "both-and" opportunities; stay focused on what they care about; remain flexible and tolerant of ambiguity; be proactive, not reactive; and apply resilience-conserving strategies during tough times. (MLH)

  7. Adverse effects of fillers and their histopathology.

    PubMed

    Haneke, Eckart

    2014-12-01

    Injectable fillers nowadays represent a pillar in facial rejuvenation and make a significant contribution to the success of the treatment. Despite their obvious benefits, a wide range of possible complications such as immediate, late, delayed, temporary, or irreversible adverse effects have to be respected. Differentiating the various filler materials, these effects are assigned to histopathology findings and currently available treatment options. PMID:25536126

  8. Helping Student Teachers Avoid Adverse Legal Actions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peach, Larry; Reddick, Thomas L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses five areas of the school environment lending themselves to the possibility of teacher and student teacher liability: negligence, malpractice, rights to privacy, field trips, and search of students and school property. Suggests specific guidelines for decreasing the possibility of adverse legal action. (NEC)

  9. Pharmacogenomics and adverse drug reactions in children

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Michael J.; Carleton, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a common and important complication of drug therapy in children. Over the past decade it has become increasingly apparent that genetically controlled variations in drug disposition and response are important determinants of adverse events for many important adverse events associated with drug therapy in children. While this research has been difficult to conduct over the past decade technical and ethical evolution has greatly facilitated the ability of investigators to conduct pharmacogenomic studies in children. Some of this research has already resulted in changes in public policy and clinical practice, for example in the case of codeine use by mothers and children. It is likely that the use of pharmacogenomics to enhance drug safety will first be realized among selected groups of children with high rates of drug use such as children with cancer, but it also likely that this research will be extended to other groups of children who have high rates of drug utilization and as well as providing insights into the mechanisms and pathophysiology of adverse drug reactions in children. PMID:24795743

  10. [Analysis of Spontaneously Reported Adverse Events].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Observational study is necessary for the evaluation of drug effectiveness in clinical practice. In recent years, the use of spontaneous reporting systems (SRS) for adverse drug reactions has increased and they have become an important resource for regulatory science. SRS, being the largest and most well-known databases worldwide, are one of the primary tools used for postmarketing surveillance and pharmacovigilance. To analyze SRS, the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) and the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report Database (JADER) are reviewed. Authorized pharmacovigilance algorithms were used for signal detection, including the reporting odds ratio. An SRS is a passive reporting database and is therefore subject to numerous sources of selection bias, including overreporting, underreporting, and a lack of a denominator. Despite the inherent limitations of spontaneous reporting, SRS databases are a rich resource and data mining index that provide powerful means of identifying potential associations between drugs and their adverse effects. Our results, which are based on the evaluation of SRS databases, provide essential knowledge that could improve our understanding of clinical issues. PMID:27040337

  11. Adverse outcome pathway (AOP) development and evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway provides a construct for assembling mechanistic information at different levels of biological organization in a form designed to support regulatory decision making. In particular, it frames the link between molecular and cellular events that can be mea...

  12. Reducing Adverse Impact: One City's Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt, Jeff

    Following a workshop on "Innovations in Employment Testing that Improve Validity and Reduce Adverse Impact," the City of Louisville (Kentucky) implemented a strategy to develop a comprehensive testing and recruiting program for police recruits. To improve candidate expectations and preparation, the following activities were undertaken: intense…

  13. Enduring psychobiological effects of childhood adversity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Ulrike

    2013-09-01

    This mini-review refers to recent findings on psychobiological long-term consequences of childhood trauma and adverse living conditions. The continuum of trauma-provoked aftermath reaches from healthy adaptation with high resilience, to severe maladjustment with co-occurring psychiatric and physical pathologies in children, adolescents and adults. There is increasing evidence of a strong interconnectivity between genetic dispositions, epigenetic processes, stress-related hormonal systems and immune parameters in all forms of (mal)-adjustment to adverse living conditions. Unfavorable constellations of these dispositions and systems, such as low cortisol levels and elevated markers of inflammation in maltreated children, seem to promote the (co)-occurrence of psychiatric and physical pathologies such as posttraumatic stress disorder, obesity, or diabetes. Although findings from prospective study designs support a deepened understanding of causal relations between adverse living conditions, including traumatic experiences, during childhood and its psychobiological effects, so far, little is known about the temporal coincidence of stress-sensitive developmental stages during childhood and adolescence and trauma consequences. Taken together, childhood adversity is a severe risk factor for the onset of psychobiological (mal)-adjustment, which has to be explained under consideration of diverse physiological systems and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence. PMID:23850228

  14. [Vascular reconstruction in visceral transplantation surgery].

    PubMed

    Olschewski, P; Seehofer, D; Öllinger, R; Pratschke, J

    2016-02-01

    Vascular reconstruction is obligatory in transplantation surgery. A differentiation is made between routine vascular reconstructions, which are required for all solid organ transplantations and special cases. Because of the shortage of organs it is often necessary to use organs with complex anatomical vascular prerequisites, which requires high vascular surgical expertise for individualized reconstruction. Non-routine reconstructions are often also necessary on the side of the recipient. This review article presents both the routine and exceptional types of reconstruction. PMID:26541451

  15. [Overview of the vascular interventional surgery robot].

    PubMed

    Li, Shenglin; Shen, Jie; Yan, Yonghua; Chen, Daguo

    2013-03-01

    In vascular invasive surgery procedures, because doctors suffered from a large number of X-ray radiation, and it is difficult to manipulate catheter, so vascular interventional robot has been rapidly developed. On the basis of analysis of vascular surgical intervention process, key technologies of vascular interventional surgical robots are provided. The image navigation system, the mechanical structure, control systems and force feedback are also analyzed. PMID:23777068

  16. Dealing with vascular conundrums with MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Angthong, Wirana; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a robust imaging modality for evaluation of vascular diseases. Technological advances have made MR imaging widely available for accurate and time-efficient vascular assessment. In this article the clinical usefulness of MR imaging techniques and their application are reviewed, using examples of vascular abnormalities commonly encountered in clinical practice, including abdominal, pelvic, and thoracic vessels. Common pitfalls and problem solving in interpretation of vascular findings in body MR imaging are also discussed. PMID:24889175

  17. Mapping and Quantification of Vascular Branching in Plants, Animals and Humans by VESGEN Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.; Vickerman, Mary B.; Keith, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    Humans face daunting challenges in the successful exploration and colonization of space, including adverse alterations in gravity and radiation. The Earth-determined biology of humans, animals and plants is significantly modified in such extraterrestrial environments. One physiological requirement shared by humans with larger plants and animals is a complex, highly branching vascular system that is dynamically responsive to cellular metabolism, immunological protection and specialized cellular/tissue function. The VESsel GENeration (VESGEN) Analysis has been developed as a mature beta version, pre-release research software for mapping and quantification of the fractal-based complexity of vascular branching. Alterations in vascular branching pattern can provide informative read-outs of altered vascular regulation. Originally developed for biomedical applications in angiogenesis, VESGEN 2D has provided novel insights into the cytokine, transgenic and therapeutic regulation of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and other microvascular remodeling phenomena. Vascular trees, networks and tree-network composites are mapped and quantified. Applications include disease progression from clinical ophthalmic images of the human retina; experimental regulation of vascular remodeling in the mouse retina; avian and mouse coronary vasculature, and other experimental models in vivo. We envision that altered branching in the leaves of plants studied on ISS such as Arabidopsis thaliana cans also be analyzed.

  18. Mapping and Quantification of Vascular Branching in Plants, Animals and Humans by VESGEN Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, P. A.; Vickerman, M. B.; Keith, P. A.

    2010-01-01

    Humans face daunting challenges in the successful exploration and colonization of space, including adverse alterations in gravity and radiation. The Earth-determined biology of plants, animals and humans is significantly modified in such extraterrestrial environments. One physiological requirement shared by larger plants and animals with humans is a complex, highly branching vascular system that is dynamically responsive to cellular metabolism, immunological protection and specialized cellular/tissue function. VESsel GENeration (VESGEN) Analysis has been developed as a mature beta version, pre-release research software for mapping and quantification of the fractal-based complexity of vascular branching. Alterations in vascular branching pattern can provide informative read-outs of altered vascular regulation. Originally developed for biomedical applications in angiogenesis, VESGEN 2D has provided novel insights into the cytokine, transgenic and therapeutic regulation of angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis and other microvascular remodeling phenomena. Vascular trees, networks and tree-network composites are mapped and quantified. Applications include disease progression from clinical ophthalmic images of the human retina; experimental regulation of vascular remodeling in the mouse retina; avian and mouse coronary vasculature, and other experimental models in vivo. We envision that altered branching in the leaves of plants studied on ISS such as Arabidopsis thaliana cans also be analyzed.

  19. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products mitigates vascular dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Yu, Manli; Zhang, Le; Cao, Qingxin; Song, Ying; Liu, Yuxiu; Gong, Jianbin

    2016-08-01

    Vascular dysfunction including vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction in hypertension often results in poor clinical outcomes and increased risk of vascular accidents. We investigate the effect of treatment with soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) on vascular dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Firstly, the aortic AGE/RAGE pathway was investigated in SHR. Secondly, SHR received intraperitoneal injections of sRAGE daily for 4 weeks. Effect of sRAGE against vascular dysfunction in SHR and underlying mechanism was investigated. SHR aortas exhibited enhanced activity of aldose reductase, reduced activity of glyoxalase 1, accumulation of methylglyoxal and AGE, and upregulated expression of RAGE. Treatment of SHR with sRAGE had no significant effect on blood pressure, but alleviated aortic hypertrophy and endothelial dysfunction. In vitro, treatment with sRAGE reversed the effect of incubation with AGE on proliferation of smooth muscle cells and endothelial function. Treatment of SHR with sRAGE abated oxidative stress, suppressed inflammation and NF-κB activation, improved the balance between Ang II and Ang-(1-7) through reducing angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and enhancing ACE2 expression, and upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) expression in aortas. In conclusion, treatment with sRAGE alleviated vascular adverse remodeling in SHR, possibly via suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation, improvement in RAS balance, and activation of PPAR-γ pathway. PMID:27426491

  20. Analysis of adverse events of sunitinib in patients treated for advanced renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cedrych, Ida; Jasiówka, Marek; Niemiec, Maciej; Skotnicki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of the metastatic stage of renal cell carcinoma is specific because classical chemotherapy is not applicable here. The treatment is mainly based on molecularly targeted drugs, including inhibitors of tyrosine kinases. In many cases the therapy takes many months, and patients often report to general practitioners due to adverse events. In this article, the effectiveness and side effects of one of these drugs are presented. The aim of the study was to analyse of the toxicity and safety of treatment with sunitinib malate in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma in the metastatic stage. Material and methods Adverse events were analyzed using retrospective analysis of data collected in a group of 39 patients treated in the Department of Systemic and Generalized Malignancies in the Cancer Center in Krakow, Poland. Results Toxicity of treatment affected 50% of patients. The most common side effects observed were hypertension, thrombocytopenia, stomatitis, diarrhea and weakness. Grade 3 serious adverse events according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4 affected up to 10% of patients. The most common serious adverse events were hypertension and fatigue. Conclusions Sunitinib malate is characterized by a particular type of toxicity. Knowledge of the types and range of adverse events of this drug is an important part of oncological and internal medicine care. PMID:27186181

  1. A longitudinal perspective on childhood adversities and onset risk of various psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ormel, Johan

    2015-06-01

    It is well-known that childhood adversities can have long-term effects on mental health, but a lot remains to be learned about the risk they bring about for a first onset of various psychiatric disorders, and how this risk develops over time. In the present study, which was based on a Dutch longitudinal population survey of adolescents TRAILS (N = 1,584), we investigated whether and how childhood adversities, as assessed with three different measures, affected the risk of developing an incident depressive, anxiety, or disruptive behavior in childhood and adolescence. In addition, we tested gender differences in any of the effects under study. The results indicated that depressive, anxiety and disruptive behavior disorders each had their own, characteristic, pattern of associations with childhood adversities across childhood and adolescence, which was maintained after adjustment for comorbid disorders. For depressive disorders, the overall pattern suggested a high excess risk of incidence during childhood, which decreased during adolescence. Anxiety disorders were characterized by a moderately increased incident risk during childhood, which remained approximately stable over time. Disruptive behavior disorders took an intermediate position. Of the three childhood adversities tested, an overall rating of the stressfulness of the childhood appeared to predict onset of psychiatric disorders best. To conclude, the risk of developing a psychiatric disorder after exposure to adversities early in life depends on the nature of the adversities, the nature of the outcome, and the time that has passed since the adversities without disorder onset. PMID:24723042

  2. Management of hemangiomas and other vascular tumors.

    PubMed

    Greene, Arin K

    2011-01-01

    Vascular tumors of childhood are typically benign. The 4 most common types are infantile hemangioma (IH), congenital hemangioma (CH), kaposiform hemangioendothelioma (KHE), and pyogenic granuloma (PG). Vascular tumors must be differentiated from vascular malformations. Although tumors and malformations may appear as raised, blue, red, or purple lesions, their management differs significantly. PMID:21095471

  3. Vascular factors in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boland, Robert A; Adams, Roger D

    2002-01-01

    An increase in hand and forearm volume was induced without hand movement in ten subjects who had carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). A tester, unaware of sides affected by CTS, performed the Volume Provocation Test (VPT) by inflating a sphygmomanometer cuff around the upper arm to 15 mm Hg less than diastolic pressure for four minutes. Pre- and post-test volumes, intensity of discomfort, and quality and distribution of produced symptoms were recorded. The VPT induced significant increases of segment volumes bilaterally (P1 tailed <0.05), but not more on the side of strongest symptoms compared to the less affected, or asymptomatic side (P1 tailed = 0.07). Mean discomfort on the side of strongest symptoms (5.4/10) was significantly higher (P1 tailed <0.01) than on the contralateral side (2.4/10). In 44% of the affected arms, some or all of the subjects' nocturnal symptoms were reproduced after volume increase, suggesting that CTS is a vascular phenomenon in these patients. PMID:11866348

  4. In utero origins of adult insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jennifer A; Regnault, Timothy R H

    2011-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome (or syndrome X) is a constellation of risk factors including insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and central obesity that predispose to the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in adult life. Insulin resistance is believed to be a critical pathophysiological event early in the disease process, impacting both skeletal muscle metabolic function and vascular responses. Adverse changes in insulin sensitivity have been found to originate in utero; for instance, prenatal events such as placental insufficiency/oxidative stress leading to altered fetal growth trajectories are associated with increased rates of metabolic syndrome in adult life. Such intrauterine insults result in reduced skeletal muscle mass in conjunction with altered insulin signaling, decreased oxidative fibers, and impaired mitochondrial function. These developmental disturbances set the stage for development of muscle triglyceride accumulation and depressed insulin sensitivity in childhood. Abnormalities of vascular structure and function arising from deprived intrauterine conditions that are exacerbated by insulin resistance account for the progression of hypertension from childhood to adulthood. Arterial changes initiated in utero include reduced endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and inflammation, events leading to endothelial dysfunction, and atherosclerosis that are present in those destined for metabolic syndrome. In addition, the hypertensive phenotype that is a hallmark of metabolic syndrome may also be traced to blunted kidney development and renin-angiotensin system activation in growth-restricted offspring. The summative impact of these intrauterine programmed changes in terms of influencing adult health and disease encompasses dietary and lifestyle factors introduced postnatally. Establishing novel therapeutic interventions aimed at preventing and/or reducing in utero

  5. Inactivation of thrombomodulin by ionizing radiation in a cell-free system: possible implications for radiation responses in vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Ross, Christopher C; MacLeod, Stewart L; Plaxco, Jason R; Froude, Jeffrey W; Fink, Louis M; Wang, Junru; Stites, Wesley E; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Normal tissue radiation injury is associated with loss of vascular thromboresistance, notably because of deficient levels of endothelial thrombomodulin (TM). TM is located on the luminal surface of most endothelial cells and has critical anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory functions. Chemical oxidation of a specific methionine residue (Met388) at the thrombin-binding site in TM reduces its main functional activity, i.e., the ability to activate protein C. We examined whether exposure to ionizing radiation affects TM in a similar manner. Full-length recombinant human TM, a construct of epidermal growth factor-like domains 4-6, which are involved in protein C activation, and a synthetic peptide containing the methionine of interest were exposed to gamma radiation in a cell-free system, i.e., a system not confounded by TM turnover or ectodomain shedding. The influence of radiation on functional activity was assessed with the protein C activation assay; formation of a TM-thrombin complex was assessed with surface plasmon resonance (Biacore), and oxidation of Met388 was assessed by HPLC and confirmed by mass spectroscopy. Exposure to radiation caused a dose-dependent reduction in protein C activation, impaired TM-thrombin complex formation, and oxidation of Met388. These results demonstrate that ionizing radiation adversely affects the TM molecule. Our findings may have relevance to normal tissue toxicity in clinical radiation therapy as well as to the development of radiation syndromes in the non-therapeutic radiation exposure setting. PMID:18363428

  6. β-Adrenergic receptor expression in vascular tumors.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Karen M; Chang, Kay W; Truong, Mai T; Kwok, Shirley; West, Rob B; Heerema-McKenney, Amy E

    2012-11-01

    Propranolol has recently emerged as an effective therapy for infantile hemangiomas causing regression. The β-adrenergic receptor (AR) antagonist is thought to cause vasoconstriction by its effect on nitric oxide, block angiogenesis by its effect on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and induce apoptosis. In a prior report, we identified expression of β2-AR (B2-AR) and its phosphorylated form (B2-ARP) in a case of infantile hemangioma that responded to propranolol treatment. We now explore the expression of βARs on a variety of vascular lesions utilizing a tissue microarray containing 141 lesions, including infantile hemangiomas, angiosarcomas, hemangiomas, hemangioendotheliomas, and various vascular malformations. The array was immunostained for B2-AR, B2-ARP, and β3-AR (B3-AR), and the results scored for the intensity of endothelial cell expression as negative, weak positive, or strong positive. All phases of infantile hemangiomas had strong expression of all three receptors, with the exception of only weak expression of B2-ARP in the proliferative phase infantile hemangioma. Strong expression of all three receptors was present in many hemangiomas, hemangioendotheliomas, and vascular malformations. Absent to weak expression of all three receptors was seen in glomus tumor, hobnail hemangioendothelioma, pyogenic granuloma, and reactive vascular proliferations. This is the first study to report β-AR expression in a variety of vascular lesions. Although immunohistochemical expression of the receptors does not necessarily indicate that similar pathways of responsiveness to β-blockade are present, it does raises the possibility that β-blockade could potentially affect apoptosis and decrease responsiveness to VEGF. Additional study is warranted, as therapeutic options are limited for some patients with these lesions. PMID:22743651

  7. Vascular diseases: aortitis, aortic aneurysms, and vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Ladich, Elena; Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Romero, Maria E; Virmani, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the aorta broadly include noninfectious and infectious aortitis, periaortitis, atherosclerosis, and inflammatory atherosclerotic aneurysms. Aortitis is uncommon but is increasingly recognized as an important cause of aortic aneurysms and dissections. Abdominal (AAA) and thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) have different pathologies and etiologies. AAAs are the most common type of aortic aneurysm, and the vast majority of these are atherosclerotic. The causes of TAA vary depending on the site of involvement, but medial degeneration is a common pathologic substrate, regardless of etiology, and genetic influences play a prominent role in TAA expression. Standardized classification schemes for inflammatory and degenerative diseases of the aorta have only recently been added to the pathology literature. A brief overview of the new histopathologic classifications for aortic inflammatory and degenerative diseases has recently been published by the Society for Cardiovascular Pathology and the Association for European Cardiovascular Pathology as a consensus document on the surgical pathology of the aorta. Vascular calcification is a highly regulated biologic process, and the mechanisms leading to vascular calcification are under investigation. Calcification may occur in the intima (atherosclerotic) or in the media secondary to metabolic disease. Rarely, vascular calcification may be associated with genetic disorders. PMID:27526100

  8. 21 CFR 606.170 - Adverse reaction file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adverse reaction file. 606.170 Section 606.170... Adverse reaction file. (a) Records shall be maintained of any reports of complaints of adverse reactions... thorough investigation of each reported adverse reaction shall be made. A written report of...

  9. 21 CFR 606.170 - Adverse reaction file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adverse reaction file. 606.170 Section 606.170... Adverse reaction file. (a) Records shall be maintained of any reports of complaints of adverse reactions... thorough investigation of each reported adverse reaction shall be made. A written report of...

  10. 21 CFR 606.170 - Adverse reaction file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adverse reaction file. 606.170 Section 606.170... Adverse reaction file. (a) Records shall be maintained of any reports of complaints of adverse reactions... thorough investigation of each reported adverse reaction shall be made. A written report of...

  11. Vascular corrosion casting: analyzing wall shear stress in the portal vein and vascular abnormalities in portal hypertensive and cirrhotic rodents.

    PubMed

    Van Steenkiste, Christophe; Trachet, Bram; Casteleyn, Christophe; van Loo, Denis; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Segers, Patrick; Geerts, Anja; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Colle, Isabelle

    2010-11-01

    Vascular corrosion casting is an established method of anatomical preparation that has recently been revived and has proven to be an excellent tool for detailed three-dimensional (3D) morphological examination of normal and pathological microcirculation. In addition, the geometry provided by vascular casts can be further used to calculate wall shear stress (WSS) in a vascular bed using computational techniques. In the first part of this study, the microvascular morphological changes associated with portal hypertension (PHT) and cirrhosis in vascular casts are described. The second part of this study consists of a quantitative analysis of the WSS in the portal vein in casts of different animal models of PHT and cirrhosis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Microvascular changes in the splanchnic, hepatic and pulmonary territory of portal hypertensive and cirrhotic mice are described in detail with stereomicroscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy. To our knowledge, our results are the first to report the vascular changes in the common bile duct ligation cirrhotic model. Calculating WSS using CFD methods is a feasible technique in PHT and cirrhosis, enabling the differentiation between different animal models. First, a dimensional analysis was performed, followed by a CFD calculation describing the spatial and temporal WSS distributions in the portal vein. WSS was significantly different between sham/cirrhotic/pure PHT animals with the highest values in the latter. Up till now, no techniques have been developed to quantify WSS in the portal vein in laboratory animals. This study showed for the first time that vascular casting has an important role not only in the morphological evaluation of animal models of PHT and cirrhosis, but also in defining the biological response of the portal vein wall to hemodynamic changes. CFD in 3D geometries can be used to describe the spatial and temporal variations in WSS in the portal vein and to better understand

  12. Where do we stand on vascular calcification?

    PubMed

    Boström, Kristina I

    2016-09-01

    Vascular disease, such as atherosclerosis and diabetic vasculopathy, is frequently complicated by vascular calcification. Previously believed to be an end-stage process of unregulated mineral precipitation, it is now well established to be a multi-faceted disease influenced by the characteristics of its vascular location, the origins of calcifying cells and numerous regulatory pathways. It reflects the fundamental plasticity of the vasculature that is gradually being revealed by progress in vascular and stem cell biology. This review provides a brief overview of where we stand in our understanding of vascular calcification, facing the challenge of translating this knowledge into viable preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27260939

  13. Tetrahydrobiopterin, Superoxide and Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2009-01-01

    (6R)-5,6,7,8-Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an endogenously produced pterin that is found widely distributed in mammalian tissues. BH4 works as a cofactor of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and nitric oxide synthases. In the vasculature a deficit of BH4 is implicated in the mechanisms of several diseases including atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetic vascular disease, and vascular complications from cigarette smoking and environmental pollution. These ill-effects are connected to the ability of BH4 to regulate reactive oxygen species levels in the endothelium. The possibility of using BH4 as a therapeutical agent in cardiovascular medicine is becoming more compelling and many biochemical and physiological aspects involved in this application are currently under investigation. This review summarizes our current understanding of BH4 reactivity and some aspects of cellular production and regulation. PMID:19628033

  14. A review on the vascular features of the hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, H; Chee, R

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant and the sporadic forms of hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome (HIES) are multi-system disorders. Although HIES patients may present with cold abscesses, the vascular features of HIES are not well recognized. The objective of this review is to characterize the nature and spectrum of vascular abnormalities in HIES patients. Vascular abnormalities in HIES patients were reviewed with Medline and Google Scholar-based searches. In brief, the searches combined terms related to HIES with the terms related to vasculature. Furthermore, reference lists from the original studies and review papers identified were screened. There were vascular abnormalities in 25 patients with HIES. These abnormalities were identified as aneurysms (coronary, aortic, carotid and cerebral), pseudoaneurysms, congenital patent ductus venosus, superior vena cava syndrome, vasculitides, vascular ectasia, thrombosis and others. They may be congenital or acquired, in the veins and arteries, affecting both sexes. These abnormalities can be seen in all subtypes of HIES. They could be also fatal in children and adults. Limited pathological investigations revealed the presence of vasculitis. Three of the patients were found to have overlap diseases. In this review, the spectrum of vascular abnormalities in HIES are documented and discussed in detail for the first time. They highlight a previously under-recognized and potentially devastating complication of these disorders. These vascular abnormalities constitute one of the major clinical characteristics in HIES. The presence of hypereosinophilia, vasculitis and defective angiogenesis in HIES may contribute to the formation of vascular abnormalities in HIES. PMID:19912258

  15. Association of Autoantibodies to Heat-Shock Protein 60 With Arterial Vascular Events in Patients With Antiphospholipid Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Dieudé, Mélanie; Correa, José A.; Neville, Carolyn; Pineau, Christian; Levine, Jerrold S.; Subang, Rebecca; Landolt-Marticorena, Carolina; Su, Jiandong; Kassis, Jeannine; Solymoss, Susan; Fortin, Paul R.; Rauch, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Objective Anti–heat shock protein 60 autoantibodies (anti-Hsp60) are associated with cardiovascular disease and are known to affect endothelial cells in vitro, and we have recently shown that anti-Hsp60 promote thrombosis in a murine model of arterial injury. Based on those findings, we undertook the present study to investigate the hypothesis that the presence of anti-Hsp60, alone or in combination with other thrombogenic risk factors, is associated with an elevated risk of vascular events. Methods The study population was derived from 3 ongoing cohort studies: 2 independent systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) registries and 1 cohort comprising SLE patients and non-SLE patients. Data from a total of 402 participants were captured; 199 of these participants had had confirmed vascular events (arterial vascular events in 102, venous vascular events in 76, and both arterial and venous vascular events in 21). Anti-Hsp60 were detected by enzyme-linked immunoassay, and association with vascular events was assessed by regression analysis. Results Multiple regression analysis revealed that arterial vascular events were associated with male sex, age, and hypertension. Analyses of the vascular events according to their origin showed an association of anti-Hsp60 with arterial vascular events (odds ratio 2.26 [95% confidence interval 1.13–4.52]), but not with venous vascular events. Anti-Hsp60 increased the risk of arterial vascular events (odds ratio 5.54 [95% confidence interval 1.89–16.25]) in antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)–positive, but not aPL-negative, individuals. Conclusion We demonstrate that anti-Hsp60 are associated with an increased risk of arterial vascular events, but not venous vascular events, in aPL-positive individuals. These data suggest that anti-Hsp60 may serve as a useful biomarker to distinguish risk of arterial and venous vascular events in patients with aPL. PMID:21506099

  16. Adverse events during intrahospital transport of critically ill patients: incidence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transport of critically ill patients for diagnostic or therapeutic procedures is at risk of complications. Adverse events during transport are common and may have significant consequences for the patient. The objective of the study was to collect prospectively adverse events that occurred during intrahospital transports of critically ill patients and to determine their risk factors. Methods This prospective, observational study of intrahospital transport of consecutively admitted patients with mechanical ventilation was conducted in a 38-bed intensive care unit in a university hospital from May 2009 to March 2010. Results Of 262 transports observed (184 patients), 120 (45.8%) were associated with adverse events. Risk factors were ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure >6 cmH2O, sedation before transport, and fluid loading for intrahospital transports. Within these intrahospital transports with adverse events, 68 (26% of all intrahospital transports) were associated with an adverse event affecting the patient. Identified risk factors were: positive end-expiratory pressure >6 cmH2O, and treatment modification before transport. In 44 cases (16.8% of all intrahospital transports), adverse event was considered serious for the patient. In our study, adverse events did not statistically increase ventilator-associated pneumonia, time spent on mechanical ventilation, or length of stay in the intensive care unit. Conclusions This study confirms that the intrahospital transports of critically ill patients leads to a significant number of adverse events. Although in our study adverse events have not had major consequences on the patient stay, efforts should be made to decrease their incidence. PMID:23587445

  17. Metoclopramide and renal vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Manara, A R; Bolsin, S; Monk, C R; Hartnell, G; Harris, R A

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the effect of i.v. metoclopramide on renal vascular resistance in nine healthy volunteers. Peak systolic and end-diastolic frequencies were measured using duplex Doppler ultrasound of a renal interlobar artery, before and after the administration of i.v. metoclopramide 10 mg, and the resistance index derived. There was no significant change in mean arterial pressure or resistance index following metoclopramide. PMID:1997046

  18. Lymphatic complications after vascular interventions

    PubMed Central

    Obara, Andrzej; Maruszynski, Marek; Witkowski, Adam; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Chmielak, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lymphorrhea due to classical and mini-invasive surgical interventions on femoral and popliteal arteries is a serious hindrance to patient treatment. Depending on the experience of a particular center, the incidence and frequency of this type of complication may constitute a serious clinical problem. While the level of lymphorrhea intensity and its duration result in certain foreseeable consequences, their treatment can be a time-consuming and multistep procedure. Aim To compare different types of vascular interventions with lymphorrhea occurrence. Material and methods The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of lymphatic complications based on the material collected between 2005 and 2012 at the Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery of the Military Institute of Medicine in Warsaw and in the Department of Interventional Cardiology and Angiology of the Institute of Cardiology in Anin, Warsaw, in 2009–2012. Results Maintaining due thoroughness when dissecting tissues and treating the cutting line in this area with ligatures and tissue puncture are the most reliable methods of minimizing the risk of lymphatic leakage after surgical procedures performed in a classical way. The lymphatic complication under analysis is far less likely to occur when procedures are performed as planned and an endovascular technique is used – statistical significance p < 0.05. Minimally invasive and fully percutaneous procedures performed via needle puncture, including the use of the fascial closure technique to close the femoral artery, eliminate the likelihood of the occurrence of this vascular complication – statistical significance was found with p value less than 0.05. Conclusions We concluded that in every case by minimizing the vascular approach we protected the patient against lymphatic complications. PMID:25337168

  19. Tbx1 regulates brain vascularization.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Sara; Martucciello, Stefania; Fulcoli, Filomena Gabriella; Bilio, Marchesa; Ferrentino, Rosa; Nusco, Edoardo; Illingworth, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor TBX1 is the major gene involved in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS). Using mouse models of these diseases, we have previously shown that TBX1 activates VEGFR3 in endothelial cells (EC), and that this interaction is critical for the development of the lymphatic vasculature. In this study, we show that TBX1 regulates brain angiogenesis. Using loss-of-function genetics and molecular approaches, we show that TBX1 regulates the VEGFR3 and DLL4 genes in brain ECs. In mice, loss of TBX1 causes global brain vascular defects, comprising brain vessel hyperplasia, enhanced angiogenic sprouting and vessel network disorganization. This phenotype is recapitulated in EC-specific Tbx1 conditional mutants and in an EC-only 3-dimensional cell culture system (matrigel), indicating that the brain vascular phenotype is cell autonomous. Furthermore, EC-specific conditional Tbx1 mutants have poorly perfused brain vessels and brain hypoxia, indicating that the expanded vascular network is functionally impaired. In EC-matrigel cultures, a Notch1 agonist is able to partially rescue microtubule hyperbranching induced by TBX1 knockdown. Thus, we have identified a novel transcriptional regulator of angiogenesis that exerts its effect in brain by negatively regulating angiogenesis through the DLL4/Notch1-VEGFR3 regulatory axis. Given the similarity of the phenotypic consequences of TBX1 mutation in humans and mice, this unexpected role of TBX1 in murine brain vascularization should stimulate clinicians to search for brain microvascular anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients and to evaluate whether some of the anatomical and functional brain anomalies in patients may have a microvascular origin. PMID:23945394

  20. [Jaboulay, vascular surgeon at Lyon].

    PubMed

    Bouchet, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    Mathieu Jaboulay was an excellent surgeon. He was the first to come up with the principles of vascular surgery as he made a surgical anastomosis between two arteries of a dog by an eversion circular suture. In 1902, he implemented a suture between an artery and a vein in an arteritis by obliteration. Jaboulay also tried the graft of an animal kidney on the crease of a human elbow in 1906. Jaboulay was an initiator for Alexis Carrel. PMID:20527332

  1. Glaucoma eye drops adverse skin reactions.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Carmen; Ambrifi, Marina; Frascani, Federica; Fazia, Gilda; Paolino, Giovanni; Lisi, Roberto; Calvieri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The term "Glaucoma" is used to describe a number of diseases of the eye characterized by a particular form of optic nerve damage that is often associated with high intraocular pressure (IOP). The open-angle glaucoma is the most common form that is also referred to as chronic glaucoma. This is described as an optic neuropathy with multifactorial nature in which there is a loss of characteristics of the optic nerve fibers. Therapeutic options for the treatment of this disease are different, you can take advantage of eye drops, laser therapy and conventional surgery or more combined treatments. Medicated eye drops are the most common way to treat glaucoma. Although eye drops are widely used, adverse reactions are not frequently observed and described. In particular, the adverse skin reactions are not frequently described in the literature, but often seen in dermatologic clinic, we reported their skin reactions and possible alternative treatments described in literature and their patent applications. PMID:25487259

  2. The European experience with vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Fingerhut, Abe; Leppäniemi, Ari K; Androulakis, George A; Archodovassilis, F; Bouillon, Bertil; Cavina, Enrico; Chaloner, Eddie; Chiarugi, Massimo; Davidovic, Lazar; Delgado-Millan, Miguel Angel; Goris, Jan; Gunnlaugsson, Gunnar H; Jover, Jose Maria; Konstandoulakis, Manoussos M; Kurtoglu, Mehmet; Lepäntalo, Mauri; Llort-Pont, Carme; Meneu-Diaz, Juan Carlos; Moreno-Gonzales, Enrique; Navarro-Soto, Salvador; Panoussis, P; Ryan, James M; Salenius, Juha P; Seccia, Massimo; Takolander, Rabbe; Taviloglu, Korhan; Tiesenhausen, Kurt; Torfason, Bjarni; Uranüs, Selman

    2002-02-01

    The rich and diverse heritage of the management of vascular injuries in the 45 independent European countries prevents the authors from revealing a uniform picture of the European experience, but some trends are clearly emerging. In countries with a low incidence of penetrating trauma and increasing use of interventional vascular procedures, the proportion of iatrogenic vascular trauma exceeds 40% of all vascular injuries, whereas on other parts of the continent, armed conflicts are still a major cause of vascular trauma. National vascular registries, mostly in the Scandinavian countries, produce useful, nationwide data about vascular trauma and its management but suffer still from inadequate data collection. Despite a relatively low incidence of vascular trauma in most European countries, the results are satisfactory, probably in most cases because of active and early management by surgeons on call, whether with vascular training or not, treating all kinds of vascular surgical emergencies. In some countries, attempts at developing a trauma and emergency surgical specialty, including expertise in the management of vascular injuries, are on their way. PMID:11905944

  3. [Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome].

    PubMed

    Frank, Michael

    2009-04-20

    Vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare inherited disease with an autosomal dominant trait. The mutation of the COL3A1 gene which encodes type III collagen, is responsible of early vascular (spontaneous arterial rupture or dissection), digestive (perforation) and obstetrical events (uterine and arterial rupture). Diagnosis of the disease is primarily clinical, especially in case of characteristic morphologic features. Diagnostic certainty is obtained by evidencing the mutation of the COL3A1 gene. Some arterial lesions are suggestive of the disease, as dissecting aneurysms of the internal carotid, of the iliac arteries, and of the anterior visceral aortic branches, fusiform aneurisms of the splenic artery, and the occurrence of a non traumatic direct carotid-cavernous fistula. The occurrence of a spontaneous peritonitis or of an extensive perineal tear after delivery should also draw physician's attention. Because of the unpredictability of arterial or organ rupture, any patient diagnosed with vascular type EDS presenting with an acute pain syndrome should be considered as a trauma situation and be investigated straightaway by CT-scan or MRI testing, in order to eliminate a life threatening complication. PMID:19462862

  4. Mechanotransduction in Embryonic Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Beth L.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of biochemical signals provides spatial and temporal cues that carefully orchestrate the complex process of vertebrate embryonic development. The embryonic vasculature develops not only in the context of these biochemical cues, but also in the context of the biomechanical forces imparted by blood flow. In the mature vasculature, different blood flow regimes induce distinct genetic programs, and significant progress has been made toward understanding how these forces are perceived by endothelial cells and transduced into biochemical signals. However, it cannot be assumed that paradigms that govern the mature vasculature are pertinent to the developing embryonic vasculature. The embryonic vasculature can respond to the mechanical forces of blood flow, and these responses are critical in vascular remodeling, certain aspects of sprouting angiogenesis, and maintenance of arterial-venous identity. Here, we review data regarding mechanistic aspects of endothelial cell mechanotransduction, with a focus on the response to shear stress, and elaborate upon the multifarious effects of shear stress on the embryonic vasculature. In addition, we discuss emerging predictive vascular growth models and highlight the prospect of combining signaling pathway information with computational modeling. We assert that correlation of precise measurements of hemodynamic parameters with effects on endothelial cell gene expression and cell behavior is required for fully understanding how blood flow-induced loading governs normal vascular development and shapes congenital cardiovascular abnormalities. PMID:22744845

  5. Mechanosensing at the Vascular Interface

    PubMed Central

    Tarbell, John M.; Simon, Scott I.; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.

    2015-01-01

    Mammals are endowed with a complex set of mechanisms that sense mechanical forces imparted by blood flow to endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells, and circulating blood cells to elicit biochemical responses through a process referred to as mechanotransduction. These biochemical responses are critical for a host of other responses, including regulation of blood pressure, control of vascular permeability for maintaining adequate perfusion of tissues, and control of leukocyte recruitment during immunosurveillance and inflammation. This review focuses on the role of the endothelial surface proteoglycan/glycoprotein layer—the glycocalyx (GCX)—that lines all blood vessel walls and is an agent in mechanotransduction and the modulation of blood cell interactions with the EC surface. We first discuss the biochemical composition and ultrastructure of the GCX, highlighting recent developments that reveal gaps in our understanding of the relationship between composition and spatial organization. We then consider the roles of the GCX in mechanotransduction and in vascular permeability control and review the prominent interaction of plasma borne sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P), which has been shown to regulate both the composition of the GCX and the endothelial junctions. Finally, we consider the association of GCX degradation with inflammation and vascular disease and end with a final section on future research directions. PMID:24905872

  6. Mechanosensing at the vascular interface.

    PubMed

    Tarbell, John M; Simon, Scott I; Curry, Fitz-Roy E

    2014-07-11

    Mammals are endowed with a complex set of mechanisms that sense mechanical forces imparted by blood flow to endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells, and circulating blood cells to elicit biochemical responses through a process referred to as mechanotransduction. These biochemical responses are critical for a host of other responses, including regulation of blood pressure, control of vascular permeability for maintaining adequate perfusion of tissues, and control of leukocyte recruitment during immunosurveillance and inflammation. This review focuses on the role of the endothelial surface proteoglycan/glycoprotein layer-the glycocalyx (GCX)-that lines all blood vessel walls and is an agent in mechanotransduction and the modulation of blood cell interactions with the EC surface. We first discuss the biochemical composition and ultrastructure of the GCX, highlighting recent developments that reveal gaps in our understanding of the relationship between composition and spatial organization. We then consider the roles of the GCX in mechanotransduction and in vascular permeability control and review the prominent interaction of plasma-borne sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P), which has been shown to regulate both the composition of the GCX and the endothelial junctions. Finally, we consider the association of GCX degradation with inflammation and vascular disease and end with a final section on future research directions. PMID:24905872

  7. Hierarchically nanotextured surfaces maintaining superhydrophobicity under severely adverse conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Tanmoy; Antonini, Carlo; Auf der Mauer, Matthias; Stamatopoulos, Christos; Tiwari, Manish K.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2014-07-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are highly desirable for a broad range of technologies and products affecting everyday life. Despite significant progress in recent years in understanding the principles of hydrophobicity, mostly inspired by surface designs found in nature, many man-made surfaces employ readily processable materials, ideal to demonstrate principles, but with little chance of survivability outside a very limited range of well-controlled environments. Here we focus on the rational development of robust, hierarchically nanostructured, environmentally friendly, metal-based (aluminum) superhydrophobic surfaces, which maintain their performance under severely adverse conditions. Based on their functionality, we superpose selected hydrophobic layers (i.e. self-assembled monolayers, thin films, or nanofibrous coatings) on hierarchically textured aluminum surfaces, collectively imparting high level robustness of superhydrophobicity under adverse conditions. These surfaces simultaneously exhibit chemical stability, mechanical durability and droplet impalement resistance. They impressively maintained their superhydrophobicity after exposure to severely adverse chemical environments like strong alkaline (pH ~ 9-10), acidic (pH ~ 2-3), and ionic solutions (3.5 weight% of sodium chloride), and could simultaneously resist water droplet impalement up to an impact velocity of 3.2 m s-1 as well as withstand standard mechanical durability tests.Superhydrophobic surfaces are highly desirable for a broad range of technologies and products affecting everyday life. Despite significant progress in recent years in understanding the principles of hydrophobicity, mostly inspired by surface designs found in nature, many man-made surfaces employ readily processable materials, ideal to demonstrate principles, but with little chance of survivability outside a very limited range of well-controlled environments. Here we focus on the rational development of robust, hierarchically

  8. Feasibilty of exterior vascular laser irradiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rong; Xie, Shusen; Li, Hui; Li, Buhong; Chen, Yanjiao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Chen, Huifang; Xia, Xiangnan; Lin, Aizhen

    1998-08-01

    In order to study the exterior vascular laser irradiation therapy for replacing the intravascular laser irradiation therapy, we measure the distribution of radiant fluence rate in exterior vascular laser irradiation in vivo and imitative intravascular laser irradiation. The result shows that the average radiant fluence rate of exterior vascular and intravascular is 1.11 and 10.81 respectively, which is ten times between them. In order to get the radiant fluence rate corresponding to the intravascular laser irradiation, we suggest that about 20 mW HeNe laser could be used in exterior vascular laser irradiation therapy, and the laser must irradiate on the vascular perpendicularly. The suitable patient with exposed vascular must be chosen, and the diameter of the irradiated vascular is about 6 mm. Our experiment result, especially the data measured in vivo, will be useful for the research of light transport in human tissue.

  9. Maintenance of permanent hemodialysis vascular access patency.

    PubMed

    Berkoben, M; Schwab, S J

    1995-02-01

    The morbidity and mortality of maintenance hemodialysis patients are in large part determined by the ability of the nephrologist, dialysis staff, and vascular surgeon to establish and maintain adequate vascular access. Primary arteriovenous fistulae are the preferred form of vascular access because they are the more likely to provide long-term complication-free access. In 1994, however, the majority of patients entering hemodialysis programs have vascular anatomy unsuitable for primary arteriovenous fistula creation. Synthetic fistulae are currently the more common form of vascular access. Unfortunately, this form of vascular access is more prone to thrombosis and infection. Thrombosis is the most common cause of vascular access loss. Venous stenoses account for the majority of thromboses but can be prospectively identified by performing routine measurements of venous dialysis pressure or urea recirculation. Prospective identification of venous stenoses followed by either angioplasty or surgical revision will improve fistula patency and enhance the quality of life of the hemodialysis population. PMID:7598559

  10. Anaphylactoid and adverse reactions to radiocontrast agents.

    PubMed

    Hagan, John B

    2004-08-01

    Over the past 75 years, radiocontrast agents have provided numerous diagnostic and therapeutic advances. The benefits of these agents must be weighed against the potential risks for each individual undergoing radiologic tests. This summary is intended to be a guide for the allergy and immunology specialist to direct him or her to the current literature regarding adverse reactions to traditional and less commonly used radiologic contrast agents. PMID:15242724

  11. An Ss Model with Adverse Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, Christopher L.; Leahy, John V.

    2004-01-01

    We present a model of the market for a used durable in which agents face fixed costs of adjustment, the magnitude of which depends on the degree of adverse selection in the secondary market. We find that, unlike typical models, the sS bands in our model contract as the variance of the shock increases. We also analyze a dynamic version of the model…

  12. Adverse effects of human immunoglobulin therapy.

    PubMed

    Stiehm, E Richard

    2013-07-01

    Human immunoglobulin (IG) is used for IgG replacement therapy in primary and secondary immunodeficiency, for prevention and treatment of certain infections, and as an immunomodulatory agent for autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. IG has a wide spectrum of antibodies to microbial and human antigens. Several high-titered IGs are also available enriched in antibodies to specific viruses or bacterial toxins. IG can be given intravenously (IGIV), intramuscularly (IGIM) or by subcutaneous infusions (SCIG). Local adverse reactions such as persistent pain, bruising, swelling and erythema are rare with IGIV infusions but common (75%) with SCIG infusions. By contrast, adverse systemic reactions are rare with SCIG infusions but common with IGIV infusions, occurring as often as 20% to 50% of patients and 5% to 15% of all IGIV infusions. Systemic adverse reactions can be immediate (60% of reactions) occurring within 6 hours of an infusion, delayed (40% of reactions) occurring 6 hours-1 week after an infusion, and late (less than 1% of reactions), occurring weeks and months after an infusion. Immediate systemic reactions such as head and body aches, chills and fever are usually mild and readily treatable. Immediate anaphylactic and anaphylactoid reactions are uncommon. The most common delayed systemic reaction is persistent headache. Less common but more serious delayed reactions include aseptic meningitis, renal failure, thromboembolism, and hemolytic reactions. Late reactions are uncommon but often severe, and include lung disease, enteritis, dermatologic disorders and infectious diseases. The types, incidence, causes, prevention, and management of these reactions are discussed. PMID:23835249

  13. Association of assisted reproductive technology with adverse pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jie, Zhang; Yiling, Ding; Ling, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background: More and more infertile patients have accepted the assisted reproductive technique (ART) therapy. Concerns have been raised over an increased risk of adverse maternal outcomes in ART populations as compared with natural conception (NC). Objective: The aim was to improve the ART in clinicial work and to reduce the incidence of pregnancy complications in ART group according to analyzing the reasons of high incidence of pregnancy complications in ART group, comparing the incidence of pregnancy complications in different controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) programs and evaluating the effects of ART which attribute to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this prospective population-based cohort study,3216 pregnant women with gestational age ≤12 weeks, regular antenatal examination,and ultrasound identification of intrauterine pregnancy were enrolled from January 2010 to June 2013. According to having ART history, the participantswere divided into two groups: ART group (contains fresh embryo transfer group or frozen-thawed embryo transfer group) and NC group. We compared the incidence of pregnancy complications between different groups and evaluated the factors which could affect the occurrence of these complications. Results: When compared to NC group, significantly increased rates of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (p<0.01), preeclampsia (PE) (p<0.01) and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) (p˂0.01) were observed in ART group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of birth defect between the two groups (p=0.07). Multiple pregnancies and Gonadotropin (Gn) were risk factors in GDM, PE, and ICP. The exogenous progesterone treatment had no effect on GDM, PE or ICP. Conclusion: ART increases the risk of adverse maternal complications such as GDM, PE and ICP. The dosages of Gn should be reduced to an extent and the number of embryo implantation should be controlled. Exogenous progesterone treatment is safe

  14. Constructal Law of Vascular Trees for Facilitation of Flow

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Mohammad S.; Shirani, Ebrahim; Salimpour, Mohammad Reza; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2014-01-01

    Diverse tree structures such as blood vessels, branches of a tree and river basins exist in nature. The constructal law states that the evolution of flow structures in nature has a tendency to facilitate flow. This study suggests a theoretical basis for evaluation of flow facilitation within vascular structure from the perspective of evolution. A novel evolution parameter (Ev) is proposed to quantify the flow capacity of vascular structures. Ev is defined as the ratio of the flow conductance of an evolving structure (configuration with imperfection) to the flow conductance of structure with least imperfection. Attaining higher Ev enables the structure to expedite flow circulation with less energy dissipation. For both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, the evolution parameter was developed as a function of geometrical shape factors in laminar and turbulent fully developed flows. It was found that the non-Newtonian or Newtonian behavior of fluid as well as flow behavior such as laminar or turbulent behavior affects the evolution parameter. Using measured vascular morphometric data of various organs and species, the evolution parameter was calculated. The evolution parameter of the tree structures in biological systems was found to be in the range of 0.95 to 1. The conclusion is that various organs in various species have high capacity to facilitate flow within their respective vascular structures. PMID:25551617

  15. Constructal law of vascular trees for facilitation of flow.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Mohammad S; Shirani, Ebrahim; Salimpour, Mohammad Reza; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2014-01-01

    Diverse tree structures such as blood vessels, branches of a tree and river basins exist in nature. The constructal law states that the evolution of flow structures in nature has a tendency to facilitate flow. This study suggests a theoretical basis for evaluation of flow facilitation within vascular structure from the perspective of evolution. A novel evolution parameter (Ev) is proposed to quantify the flow capacity of vascular structures. Ev is defined as the ratio of the flow conductance of an evolving structure (configuration with imperfection) to the flow conductance of structure with least imperfection. Attaining higher Ev enables the structure to expedite flow circulation with less energy dissipation. For both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, the evolution parameter was developed as a function of geometrical shape factors in laminar and turbulent fully developed flows. It was found that the non-Newtonian or Newtonian behavior of fluid as well as flow behavior such as laminar or turbulent behavior affects the evolution parameter. Using measured vascular morphometric data of various organs and species, the evolution parameter was calculated. The evolution parameter of the tree structures in biological systems was found to be in the range of 0.95 to 1. The conclusion is that various organs in various species have high capacity to facilitate flow within their respective vascular structures. PMID:25551617

  16. Placental Vascular Obstructive Lesions: Risk Factor for Developing Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Dix, Laure; Roth-Kleiner, Matthias; Osterheld, Maria-Chiara

    2010-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a severe neonatal disease affecting particularly preterm infants. Its exact pathogenesis still remains unknown. In this study, we have compared the prevalence of vascular obstructive lesions in placentae of premature newborns which developed NEC and of a control group. We further compared separately the findings of placentae of infants of less than 30 weeks of gestation, the age group in which NEC occurs most frequently. We found signs of fetal vascular obstructive lesions in 65% of the placentae of preterm patients developing NEC, compared to only 17% of the placentae of preterm patients in the control group. In the age groups below 30 weeks of gestation, 58.5% of placentae of later NEC patients presented such lesions compared to 24.5% in the control group. The significant difference between NEC and control group suggests a strong association between fetal vascular obstructive lesions and NEC. Therefore, we propose that fetal vascular obstructive lesions might be considered as a risk factor for the development of NEC in premature infants. PMID:21151528

  17. Critical roles of CD146 in zebrafish vascular development.

    PubMed

    Chan, Barden; Sinha, Sonia; Cho, Dan; Ramchandran, Ramani; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2005-01-01

    In this report, we use zebrafish as a model system to understand the importance of CD146 in vascular development. Endothelial-specific expression of CD146 was verified by whole-mount in situ hybridization. Suppression of CD146 protein expression by antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) resulted in poorly developed intersomitic vessels (ISVs). In CD146 morphants, we observed a lack of blood flow through the ISV region, despite that fluorescence microangiography showed that the ISVs were present. This finding suggests that the lumens of the developing ISVs may be too narrow for proper circulation. Additionally, remodeling of the caudal vein plexus into functional vascular tubes appeared to be affected. Suppression of CD146 protein expression resulted in a circulation shunt that caused the circulation to by-pass part of the caudal artery/vein system. The same vascular defects were recapitulated by using a second morpholino oligonucleotide. This morphant expressed a truncated CD146 protein with amino acids V32 to T57 at the N terminus deleted in an in-frame manner. This region, therefore, is likely to contain elements critical for CD146 function. This study provides the first in vivo functional assessment of CD146 in embryonic development by showing that knockdown of CD146 protein expression severely hinders vascular development in zebrafish. PMID:15580611

  18. Antibiotic treatment and resistance in chronic wounds of vascular origin

    PubMed Central

    TZANEVA, VALENTINA; MLADENOVA, IRENA; TODOROVA, GALINA; PETKOV, DIMITAR

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim The problem of antibiotic resistance is worldwide and affects many types of pathogens. This phenomenon has been growing for decades and nowadays we are faced with a wide range of worrisome pathogens that are becoming resistant and many pathogens that may soon be untreatable. The aim of this study was to determine the resistance and antibiotic treatment in chronic wounds of vascular origin. Methods We performed a cross sectional study on a sample of patients with chronic vascular wounds, hospitalized between October 2014 and August 2015, in the Clinic of Vascular Surgery in Trakia Hospital Stara Zagora. The statistical analysis of data was descriptive, considering the p value of ≤0.05, the threshold of statistical significance. Results In the group of 110 patients, the significantly most frequent chronic wound (p<0.001) was peripheral arteriopathy (47.3%, CI95%: 38.19–56.54). Among 159 strains, 30% of patients having multiple etiology, the species most frequently isolated were Staphylococcus aureus, E.coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis with a significant predominance (p<0.05) of the Gram negative (55.1%). The spectrum of strains resistance included the Beta-lactams (36.4%, p<0.001), Macrolides (20%), Tetracyclines (9.1%), Aminoglycosides (8.2%) and Fluoroquinolones (4.5%). Conclusions Gram negative microorganisms were the main isolates in patients with vascular chronic wound. Significantly predominant was the resistance to the beta-lactam antibiotics. PMID:27547055

  19. Atherosclerotic vascular disease in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Matthew H.; Mandl, Lisa A.; Costenbader, Karen; Fox, Ervin; Karlson, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    In the United States, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disproportionately affects African Americans. It has become a chronic disease with long-term morbidity including chronic renal disease, osteoporosis, cataracts, psychosocial impairment, and importantly, atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD). The latter (myocardial infarction, angina, peripheral vascular disease and stroke) are strikingly accelerated, occurring in subjects who are predominantly premenopausal women at an age when ASVD is rare or unusual. Although much is known about the biology, risk factors, and the prevention of atherosclerosis in normal individuals, little work has been done in SLE. In fact, ASVD in people with SLE may be a different disease. Approximately 1.5% of SLE patients per year will have a myocardial infarction or equivalent; about 0.5% of SLE patients per year will have a stroke. The risk factors for ASVD in SLE are based on small, retrospective, single center studies. These suggest that the risk factors known for the general population (i.e., smoking, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, high LDL cholesterol, etc.) are also observed in SLE. The best study of risk factors shows that even accounting for the known factors, SLE and/or its treatment (glucocorticoids) is by far the most important. Our current management of cardiovascular risk factors in SLE patients with ASVD is substandard and our adherence to national guidelines for prevention is substandard. It is not known whether improving either will prevent these disastrous outcomes. Very little is known about the risk factors in African Americans with SLE, although there is data to suggest that they may not be identical to those seen in Caucasian populations. The study of the best and most effective means to prevent ASVD in SLE and in African Americans with SLE and in African Americans with SLE should be a major priority. PMID:12392045

  20. Are PRO discharge screens associated with postdischarge adverse outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Wei, F.; Mark, D.; Hartz, A.; Campbell, C.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We evaluate whether patient outcomes may be affected by possible errors in care at discharge as assessed by Peer Review Organizations (PROs). DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. The three data sources for the study were (1) the generic screen results of a 3 percent random sample of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 years or older who were admitted to California hospitals between 1 July 1987 and 30 June 1988 (n = 20,136 patients); (2) the 1987 and 1988 California Medicare Provided Analysis and Review (MEDPAR) data files; and (3) the American Hospital Association (AHA) 1988 Annual Survey of Hospitals. STUDY DESIGN. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between the results of generic discharge administered by the PROs and two patient outcomes: mortality and readmission within 30 days. The analysis was adjusted for other patient characteristics recorded on the uniform discharge abstract. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Four discharge screens indicated an increased risk of an adverse outcome-absence of documentation of discharge planning, elevated temperature, abnormal pulse, and unaddressed abnormal test results at discharge. The other three discharge screens examined-abnormal blood pressure, IV fluids or drugs, and wound drainage before discharge-were unrelated to postdischarge adverse outcomes. CONCLUSIONS. Generic discharge screens based on inadequate discharge planning, abnormal pulse, increased temperature, or unaddressed abnormal tests may be important indicators of substandard care. Other discharge screens apparently do not detect errors in care associated with major consequences for patients. PMID:7649753