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  1. Adverse Psychosexual Impact Related to the Treatment of Genital Warts and Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Campaner, Adriana Bittencourt; Vespa Junior, Nelson; Giraldo, Paulo César; Leal Passos, Mauro Romero

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare the psychosexual impact related to the treatment of genital warts and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in women. Methods. 75 patients presenting with HPV-induced genital lesions, belonging to one of two patient groups, were included in the study: 29 individuals with genital warts (GWs) and 46 individuals with CIN grades 2 or 3 (CIN 2/3). Initially, medical charts of each woman were examined for extraction of data on the type of HPV-induced infection and treatment administered. Subjects were interviewed to collect sociodemographic data as well as personal, gynecologic, obstetric, and sexual history. After this initial anamnesis, the Sexual Quotient-Female Version (SQ-F) questionnaire was applied to assess sexual function. After application of the questionnaire, patients answered specific questions produced by the researchers, aimed at assessing the impact of the disease and its treatment on their sexual lives. Results. It is noteworthy that patients with CIN 2/3 had statistically similar classification of sexual quotient to patients with GWs (P = 0.115). However, patients with GWs more frequently gave positive answers to the specific questions compared to patients with CIN 2/3. Conclusion. Based on these findings, it is clear that GWs have a greater impact on sexual behavior compared to CIN 2/3. PMID:26316956

  2. Impact of schizophrenia and schizophrenia treatment-related adverse events on quality of life: direct utility elicitation

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Andrew; Wild, Diane; Lees, Michael; Reaney, Matthew; Dursun, Serdar; Parry, David; Mukherjee, Jayanti

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine the impact of schizophrenia, its treatment and treatment-related adverse events related to antipsychotics, on quality of life from the perspective of schizophrenia patients and laypersons. Methods Health state descriptions for stable schizophrenia, extra pyramidal symptoms (EPS), hyperprolactinemia, diabetes, weight gain and relapse were developed based on a review of the literature and expert opinion. The quality of life impact of each health state was elicited using a time trade-off instrument administered by interview to 49 stable schizophrenia patients and 75 laypersons. Regression techniques were employed to examine the importance of subject characteristics on health-related utility scores. Results Patients and laypersons completed the interview in similar times. Stable schizophrenia had the highest mean utility (0.87 and 0.92 for laypersons and patients respectively), while relapse (0.48 and 0.60) had the lowest mean utility. Of the treatment-related adverse events, EPS had the lowest mean utility (0.57 and 0.72, respectively). Age, gender and PANSS score did not influence the utility results independently of health state. On average, patient utilities are 0.077 points higher than utilities derived from laypersons, although the ranking was similar between the two groups. Conclusion Events associated with schizophrenia and treatment of schizophrenia can bring about a significant detriment in patient quality of life, with relapse having the largest negative impact. Results indicate that patients with stable schizophrenia are less willing to trade years of life to avoid schizophrenia-related symptoms compared to laypersons. Both sets of respondents showed equal ability to complete the questionnaire. PMID:19040721

  3. Modeling dropout from adverse event data: impact of dosing regimens across pregabalin trials in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Lalovic, Bojan; Hutmacher, Matt; Frame, Bill; Miller, Raymond

    2011-05-01

    Dizziness represents a major determinant of dropout in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder with pregabalin. Titration (dose escalation) regimens based on clinical judgment were implemented to mitigate this adverse event and reduce patient dropout across clinical trials. Dropout is an important treatment failure endpoint, which can be analyzed using time-to-event models that incorporate daily dosing or other time-varying information. A parametric discrete-time dropout model with daily dizziness severity score as a covariate afforded a systematic, model-based assessment of titration dosing strategies, with model predictions evaluated against corresponding nonparametric estimates. A Gompertz hazard function adequately described the decreasing dropout hazard over time for individuals with severe or moderate dizziness and a lower, constant hazard for individuals reporting no dizziness or mild dizziness. Predictive performance of the model was adequate based on external validation with an independent trial and other goodness-of-fit criteria. Prospective simulations highlight the utility of this approach in reducing dropout based on examination of untested titration scenarios for future generalized anxiety disorder or other trials.

  4. Impact of age, sex and route of administration on adverse events after opioid treatment in the emergency department: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Daoust, Raoul; Paquet, Jean; Lavigne, Gilles; Piette, Éric; Chauny, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy of opioids for acute pain relief in the emergency department (ED) is well recognized, but treatment with opioids is associated with adverse events ranging from minor discomforts to life-threatening events. OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of age, sex and route of administration on the incidence of adverse events due to opioid administration in the ED. METHODS: Real-time archived data were analyzed retrospectively in a tertiary care urban hospital. All consecutive patients (≥16 years of age) who were assigned to an ED bed and received an opioid between March 2008 and December 2012 were included. Adverse events were defined as: nausea/vomiting (minor); systolic blood pressure (SBP) <90 mmHg, oxygen saturation (Sat) <92% and respiration rate <10 breaths/min (major) within 2 h of the first opioid doses. RESULTS: In the study period, 31,742 patients were treated with opioids. The mean (± SD) age was 55.8±20.5 years, and 53% were female. The overall incidence of adverse events was 12.0% (95% CI 11.6% to 12.4%): 5.9% (95% CI 5.6% to 6.2%) experienced nausea/vomiting, 2.4% (95% CI 2.2% to 2.6%) SBP <90 mmHg, 4.7% (95% CI 4.5% to 4.9%) Sat that dropped to <92% and 0.09% respiration rate <10 breaths/min. After controlling for confounding factors, these adverse events were associated with: female sex (more nausea/vomiting, more SBP <90 mmHg, less Sat <92%); age ≥65 years (less nausea/vomiting, more SBP <90 mmHg, more Sat <92%); and route of administration (intravenous > subcutaneous > oral). CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of adverse events associated with opioid administration in the ED is generally low and is associated with age, sex and route of administration. PMID:25664538

  5. Reducing Adverse Impact: One City's Efforts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt, Jeff

    Following a workshop on "Innovations in Employment Testing that Improve Validity and Reduce Adverse Impact," the City of Louisville (Kentucky) implemented a strategy to develop a comprehensive testing and recruiting program for police recruits. To improve candidate expectations and preparation, the following activities were undertaken:…

  6. The neurobiological Correlates of Childhood Adversity and Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Tyrka, Audrey R.; Burgers, Darcy E.; Philip, Noah S.; Price, Lawrence H.; Carpenter, Linda L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This paper provides an overview of research on the neurobiological correlates of childhood adversity and a selective review of treatment implications. Method Findings from a broad array of human and animal studies of early adversity were reviewed. Results Topics reviewed include neuroendocrine, neurotrophic, neuroimaging, and cognitive effects of adversity, as well as genetic and epigenetic influences. Effects of early life stress on treatment outcome are considered, and development of treatments designed to address the neurobiological abnormalities is discussed. Conclusion Early adversity is associated with abnormalities of several neurobiological systems that are implicated in the development of psychopathology and other medical conditions. Early life stress negatively impacts treatment outcome and individuals may require treatments that are specific to this condition. PMID:23662634

  7. Mitigation of adverse environmental and unavoidable impacts

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This portion of the Energy Vision 2020 draft report is a broad scope discussion of the mitigation of adverse environmental and unavoidable impacts. TVA will mitigate site specific environmental impacts from the construction and operation of new power facilities through a combination of planning, pollution prevention, and environmental controls. However, one of the most important mitigative measures associated with Energy Vision 2020 is the multi-attribute tradeoff method used for the evaluation. This method allowed proposed strategies to be reformated in order to reduce potential impacts.

  8. Adverse weather impacts on arable cropping systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Damages due to extreme or adverse weather strongly depend on crop type, crop stage, soil conditions and management. The impact is largest during the sensitive periods of the farming calendar, and requires a modelling approach to capture the interactions between the crop, its environment and the occurrence of the meteorological event. The hypothesis is that extreme and adverse weather events can be quantified and subsequently incorporated in current crop models. Since crop development is driven by thermal time and photoperiod, a regional crop model was used to examine the likely frequency, magnitude and impacts of frost, drought, heat stress and waterlogging in relation to the cropping season and crop sensitive stages. Risk profiles and associated return levels were obtained by fitting generalized extreme value distributions to block maxima for air humidity, water balance and temperature variables. The risk profiles were subsequently confronted with yields and yield losses for the major arable crops in Belgium, notably winter wheat, winter barley, winter oilseed rape, sugar beet, potato and maize at the field (farm records) to regional scale (statistics). The average daily vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and reference evapotranspiration (ET0) during the growing season is significantly lower (p < 0.001) and has a higher variability before 1988 than after 1988. Distribution patterns of VPD and ET0 have relevant impacts on crop yields. The response to rising temperatures depends on the crop's capability to condition its microenvironment. Crops short of water close their stomata, lose their evaporative cooling potential and ultimately become susceptible to heat stress. Effects of heat stress therefore have to be combined with moisture availability such as the precipitation deficit or the soil water balance. Risks of combined heat and moisture deficit stress appear during the summer. These risks are subsequently related to crop damage. The methodology of defining

  9. The Impact of Inherited Thrombophilia Types and Low Molecular Weight Heparin Treatment on Pregnancy Complications in Women with Previous Adverse Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Aracic, Nada; Roje, Damir; Jakus, Ivana Alujevic; Bakotin, Marinela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the distribution of births and spontaneous abortions, first-trimester abortion (FTA) and mid-trimester abortion (MTA), in untreated (n=128) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) treated pregnancies (n=50) of the same women with inherited thrombophilias and adverse pregnancy outcome (APO) in previous pregnancies. We particularly investigated the impact of LMWH on reducing the pregnancy complications in two thrombophilia types, "Conventional" and "Novel". Materials and Methods 50 women with inherited thrombophilia (26 Conventional and 24 Novel) and APO in previous pregnancies were included in the study. Conventional group included factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin G20210A (PT) mutations and antithrombin (AT), protein S (PS), and protein C (PC) deficiency, while the Novel group included methylentetrahydrofolate-reductase (MTHFR), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) polymorphism. APO was defined as one of the following: preterm birth (PTB), fetal growth restriction (FGR), preeclampsia (PE), intrauterine fetal death (IUFD), placental abruption (PA) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Results There was no difference in distribution of births and spontaneous abortions between Conventional and Novel thrombophilia in untreated pregnancies (χ2=2.7; p=0.100) and LMWH treated pregnancies (χ2=0.442; p=0.506). In untreaed pregnancies thrombophilia type did not have any impact on the frequency of FTA and MTA (χ2=0.14; p=0.711). In birth-ended pregnancies LMWH treatement reduced the incidence of IUFD (p=0.011) in Conventional and FGR, IUFD, and PTB in Novel thrombophilia group. Conclusion The equal impact of two thrombophilia types on the pregnancy outcomes and a more favorable effect of LMWH therapy on pregnancy complications in Novel thrombophilia group point the need for Novel thrombophilias screening and the future studies on this issue should be recommended. PMID:27401656

  10. Regular treatment with formoterol for chronic asthma: serious adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Christopher J; Cates, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiological evidence has suggested a link between beta2-agonists and increases in asthma mortality. There has been much debate about possible causal links for this association, and whether regular (daily) long-acting beta2-agonists are safe. Objectives The aim of this review is to assess the risk of fatal and non-fatal serious adverse events in trials that randomised patients with chronic asthma to regular formoterol versus placebo or regular short-acting beta2-agonists. Search methods We identified trials using the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials. We checked websites of clinical trial registers for unpublished trial data and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) submissions in relation to formoterol. The date of the most recent search was January 2012. Selection criteria We included controlled, parallel design clinical trials on patients of any age and severity of asthma if they randomised patients to treatment with regular formoterol and were of at least 12 weeks’ duration. Concomitant use of inhaled corticosteroids was allowed, as long as this was not part of the randomised treatment regimen. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion in the review. One author extracted outcome data and the second author checked them. We sought unpublished data on mortality and serious adverse events. Main results The review includes 22 studies (8032 participants) comparing regular formoterol to placebo and salbutamol. Non-fatal serious adverse event data could be obtained for all participants from published studies comparing formoterol and placebo but only 80% of those comparing formoterol with salbutamol or terbutaline. Three deaths occurred on regular formoterol and none on placebo; this difference was not statistically significant. It was not possible to assess disease-specific mortality in view of the small number of deaths. Non-fatal serious adverse events were significantly increased when

  11. Childhood adversity impacts on brain subcortical structures relevant to depression.

    PubMed

    Frodl, Thomas; Janowitz, Deborah; Schmaal, Lianne; Tozzi, Leonardo; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Stein, Dan J; Veltman, Dick J; Wittfeld, Katharina; van Erp, Theo G M; Jahanshad, Neda; Block, Andrea; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Völzke, Henry; Lagopoulos, Jim; Hatton, Sean N; Hickie, Ian B; Frey, Eva Maria; Carballedo, Angela; Brooks, Samantha J; Vuletic, Daniella; Uhlmann, Anne; Veer, Ilya M; Walter, Henrik; Schnell, Knut; Grotegerd, Dominik; Arolt, Volker; Kugel, Harald; Schramm, Elisabeth; Konrad, Carsten; Zurowski, Bartosz; Baune, Bernhard T; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Thompson, Paul M; Hibar, Derrek P; Dannlowski, Udo; Grabe, Hans J

    2017-03-01

    Childhood adversity plays an important role for development of major depressive disorder (MDD). There are differences in subcortical brain structures between patients with MDD and healthy controls, but the specific impact of childhood adversity on such structures in MDD remains unclear. Thus, aim of the present study was to investigate whether childhood adversity is associated with subcortical volumes and how it interacts with a diagnosis of MDD and sex. Within the ENIGMA-MDD network, nine university partner sites, which assessed childhood adversity and magnetic resonance imaging in patients with MDD and controls, took part in the current joint mega-analysis. In this largest effort world-wide to identify subcortical brain structure differences related to childhood adversity, 3036 participants were analyzed for subcortical brain volumes using FreeSurfer. A significant interaction was evident between childhood adversity, MDD diagnosis, sex, and region. Increased exposure to childhood adversity was associated with smaller caudate volumes in females independent of MDD. All subcategories of childhood adversity were negatively associated with caudate volumes in females - in particular emotional neglect and physical neglect (independently from age, ICV, imaging site and MDD diagnosis). There was no interaction effect between childhood adversity and MDD diagnosis on subcortical brain volumes. Childhood adversity is one of the contributors to brain structural abnormalities. It is associated with subcortical brain abnormalities that are relevant to psychiatric disorders such as depression.

  12. Managing nonteratogenic adverse reactions to isotretinoin treatment for acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Bridget K; Ritsema, Tamara S

    2015-07-01

    Isotretinoin is the strongest, most effective oral treatment for patients with severe acne vulgaris, with remission rates of 89% and higher. Because of its potency, isotretinoin causes many adverse reactions. This article reviews common and severe adverse reactions to isotretinoin and how providers can best manage these reactions. Because of inconclusive research on the correlation between isotretinoin and depression and irritable bowel syndrome, providers should ask patients about symptoms monthly. Prescribing micronized isotretinoin and starting at the lowest dose with gradual upward titration also can help reduce the incidence of adverse reactions.

  13. Adverse effects of orthodontic treatment: A clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Talic, Nabeel F.

    2011-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment is associated with a number of adverse effects, such as root resorption, pain, pulpal changes, periodontal disease, and temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Orthodontists should be aware of these effects and associated risk factors. Risk factors linked to root resorption include the duration of treatment, length, and shape of the root, trauma history, habits, and genetic predisposition. PMID:24151415

  14. Stimulant Treatment over Five Years: Adherence, Effectiveness, and Adverse Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charach, Alice; Ickowicz, Abel; Schachar, Russell

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of adherence and medication status on effectiveness and adverse effects of stimulant use in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) over 5 years. Method: Seventy-nine of 91 participants in a 12-month randomized controlled trial of methylphenidate and parent groups enrolled in a follow-up…

  15. Hypogonadism secondary to hyperprolactinaemia: successful treatment but adverse consequences.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, R P; Bujawansa, S; Qureshi, Z; Rimmer, M; Heald, A

    2012-05-01

    It is accepted that care must be taken in initiating testosterone replacement in hypogonadal individuals with historically low androgen levels. However less is reported about the influence of restoration of normal endogenous testosterone production on behaviour.Here we report how the adverse sequelae of successful treatment of hypogonadism secondary to hyperprolactinaemia, manifesting as irritability and low threshold to aggression, were managed through a joint approach between psychiatrist and physician.

  16. Regular treatment with salmeterol for chronic asthma: serious adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Christopher J; Cates, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiological evidence has suggested a link between beta2-agonists and increases in asthma mortality. There has been much debate about possible causal links for this association, and whether regular (daily) long-acting beta2-agonists are safe. Objectives The aim of this review is to assess the risk of fatal and non-fatal serious adverse events in trials that randomised patients with chronic asthma to regular salmeterol versus placebo or regular short-acting beta2-agonists. Search methods We identified trials using the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of trials. We checked websites of clinical trial registers for unpublished trial data and FDA submissions in relation to salmeterol. The date of the most recent search was August 2011. Selection criteria We included controlled parallel design clinical trials on patients of any age and severity of asthma if they randomised patients to treatment with regular salmeterol and were of at least 12 weeks’ duration. Concomitant use of inhaled corticosteroids was allowed, as long as this was not part of the randomised treatment regimen. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently selected trials for inclusion in the review. One author extracted outcome data and the second checked them. We sought unpublished data on mortality and serious adverse events. Main results The review includes 26 trials comparing salmeterol to placebo and eight trials comparing with salbutamol. These included 62,815 participants with asthma (including 2,599 children). In six trials (2,766 patients), no serious adverse event data could be obtained. All-cause mortality was higher with regular salmeterol than placebo but the increase was not significant (Peto odds ratio (OR) 1.33 (95% CI 0.85 to 2.08)). Non-fatal serious adverse events were significantly increased when regular salmeterol was compared with placebo (OR 1.15 95% CI 1.02 to 1.29). One extra serious adverse event occurred over 28 weeks for every 188 people

  17. Adverse reactions to snake antivenom, and their prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    de Silva, H Asita; Ryan, Nicole M; de Silva, H Janaka

    2016-03-01

    Antivenom is the mainstay of treatment of snakebite envenoming. However, adverse reactions to snake antivenom that is available are common in many parts of the world where snakebite is prevalent. Both acute (anaphylactic or pyrogenic) and delayed (serum sickness type) reactions occur. Acute reactions are usually mild but severe systemic anaphylaxis may develop, often within an hour or so of exposure to antivenom. Serum sickness after antivenom has a delayed onset between 5 and 14 days after its administration. Ultimately, the prevention reactions will depend mainly on improving the quality of antivenom. Until these overdue improvements take place, doctors will have to depend on pharmacological prophylaxis, where the search for the best prophylactic agent is still on-going, as well as careful observation of patients receiving antivenom in preparation for prompt management of acute as well as delayed reactions when they occur.

  18. SSAIS: A Program to Assess Adverse Impact in Multistage Selection Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Corte, Wilfried

    2004-01-01

    The article describes a Windows program to estimate the expected value and sampling distribution function of the adverse impact ratio for general multistage selections. The results of the program can also be used to predict the risk that a future selection decision will result in an outcome that reflects the presence of adverse impact. The method…

  19. Negative affect predicts adults' ratings of the current, but not childhood, impact of adverse childhood events.

    PubMed

    LaNoue, Marianna; Graeber, David A; Helitzer, Deborah L; Fawcett, Jan

    2013-10-01

    Adverse childhood events (ACE's) have been empirically related to a wide range of negative health and mental health outcomes. However, not all individuals who experience ACE's follow a trajectory of poor outcomes, and not all individuals perceive the impact of ACE's as necessarily negative. The purpose of this study was to investigate positive and negative affect as predictors of adults' ratings of both the childhood and adult impact of their childhood adversity. Self-report data on ACE experiences, including number, severity, and 'impact' were collected from 158 community members recruited on the basis of having adverse childhood experiences. Results indicated that, regardless of event severity and number of different types of adverse events experienced, high levels of negative affect were the strongest predictor of whether the adult impact of the adverse childhood events was rated as negative. All individuals rated the childhood impact of events the same. Implications are discussed.

  20. Evidence for Adverse Phonatory Change Following an Inhaled Combination Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Elizabeth; Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Voice problems are reported as a frequent side effect of inhaled combination (IC) treatments. The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate whether IC treatments are detrimental to phonation. We hypothesized that IC treatment would significantly increase phonation threshold pressure (PTP) and perceived phonatory effort (PPE),…

  1. The impact of adverse events on health care costs for older adults undergoing nonelective abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Jonathan G.; Davis, Philip J.B.; Levy, Adrian R.; Molinari, Michele; Johnson, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative complications have been identified as an important and potentially preventable cause of increased hospital costs. While older adults are at increased risk of experiencing complications and other adverse events, very little research has specifically examined how these events impact inpatient costs. We sought to examine the association between postoperative complications, hospital mortality and loss of independence and direct inpatient health care costs in patients 70 years or older who underwent nonelective abdominal surgery. Methods We prospectively enrolled consecutive patients 70 years or older who underwent nonelective abdominal surgery between July 1, 2011, and Sept. 30, 2012. Detailed patient-level data were collected regarding demographics, diagnosis, treatment and outcomes. Patient-level resource tracking was used to calculate direct hospital costs (2012 $CDN). We examined the association between complications, hospital mortality and loss of independence cost using multiple linear regression. Results During the study period 212 patients underwent surgery. Overall, 51.9% of patients experienced a nonfatal complication (32.5% minor and 19.4% major), 6.6% died in hospital and 22.6% experienced a loss of independence. On multivariate analysis nonfatal complications (p < 0.001), hospital mortality (p = 0.021) and loss of independence at discharge (p < 0.001) were independently associated with health care costs. These adverse events respectively accounted for 30%, 4% and 10% of the total costs of hospital care. Conclusion Adverse events were common after abdominal surgery in older adults and accounted for 44% of overall costs. This represents a substantial opportunity for better patient outcomes and cost savings with quality improvement strategies tailored to the needs of this high-risk surgical population. PMID:26999476

  2. [Changes of menstruation patterns and adverse effects during the treatment of LNG-IUS for symptomatic adenomyosis].

    PubMed

    Li, L; Leng, J H; Zhang, J J; Jia, S Z; Li, X Y; Shi, J H; Dai, Y; Zhang, J R; Li, T; Xu, X X; Liu, Z Z; You, S S; Chang, X Y; Lang, J H

    2016-09-25

    Objective: To investigate the changes of mestruation patterns and adverse effects during the treatment of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system(LNG-IUS)for symptomatic adenomyosis in a prospective cohort study. Methods: From December, 2006 to December, 2014, patients of symptomatic adenomyosis diagnosed by transvaginal ultrasound in Peking Union Medical College Hospital were given LNG-IUS. Before and after placement of IUS, all patients' parameters were recorded, including carrying status of IUS, symptoms and scores of dysmenorrhea, menstruation scores, biochemical indicators, physical parameters, menstruation patterns and adverse effects. Risk factors for changes of menstruation patterns and adverse effects, and their impact on treatment effects were analyzed. Results: Totally 1 100 cases met inclusion criteria, with median age 36 years(range 20-44 years), median follow-up 35 months(range 1 -108 months). During follow-up changes of menstruation patterns increased significantly with amenorrhea and shortened-menstruation being the most common manifestations. On 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months after the placement of LNG-IUS, 0, 5.8%(43/744), 6.9%(47/682), 10.1%(60/595), 17.3%(87/502), 27.2%(104/383)and 29.6%(82/277)patients achieved amenorrhea respectively(P<0.01). Total and subclassification of adverse effects decreased significantly(P<0.01). Within 12 months and >12 months after placement, abdominal pain and body weight increasing ≥5 kg/year were the most common adverse effects. Changes of menstruation patterns, total and subclassifications of adverse effects were neither dependent on patient parameters, treatment modes and treatment effects, nor could predict future LNG-IUS carrying status(all P> 0.05). After taking out of LNG-IUS, most changes of menstruation and adverse effects disappeared. Conclusions: During the treatment of LNG-IUS for symptomatic adenomyosis, changes of menstruation patterns increase gradually with amenorrhea and shortened

  3. Impact of early life adversity on EMG stress reactivity of the trapezius muscle

    PubMed Central

    Luijcks, Rosan; Vossen, Catherine J.; Roggeveen, Suzanne; van Os, Jim; Hermens, Hermie J.; Lousberg, Richel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Human and animal research indicates that exposure to early life adversity increases stress sensitivity later in life. While behavioral markers of adversity-induced stress sensitivity have been suggested, physiological markers remain to be elucidated. It is known that trapezius muscle activity increases during stressful situations. The present study examined to what degree early life adverse events experienced during early childhood (0–11 years) and adolescence (12–17 years) moderate experimentally induced electromyographic (EMG) stress activity of the trapezius muscles, in an experimental setting. In a general population sample (n = 115), an anticipatory stress effect was generated by presenting a single unpredictable and uncontrollable electrical painful stimulus at t = 3 minutes. Subjects were unaware of the precise moment of stimulus delivery and its intensity level. Linear and nonlinear time courses in EMG activity were modeled using multilevel analysis. The study protocol included 2 experimental sessions (t = 0 and t = 6 months) allowing for examination of reliability. Results show that EMG stress reactivity during the stress paradigm was consistently stronger in people with higher levels of early life adverse events; early childhood adversity had a stronger moderating effect than adolescent adversity. The impact of early life adversity on EMG stress reactivity may represent a reliable facet that can be used in both clinical and nonclinical studies. PMID:27684800

  4. Impact of childhood adversities on the short-term course of illness in psychotic spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Schalinski, Inga; Fischer, Yolanda; Rockstroh, Brigitte

    2015-08-30

    Accumulating evidence indicates an impact of childhood adversities on the severity and course of mental disorders, whereas this impact on psychotic disorders remains to be specified. Effects of childhood adversities on comorbidity, on symptom severity of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and global functioning across four months (upon admission, 1 and 4 months after initial assessment), as well as the course of illness (measured by the remission rate, number of re-hospitalizations and dropout rate) were evaluated in 62 inpatients with psychotic spectrum disorders. Adverse experiences (of at least 1 type) were reported by 73% of patients. Patients with higher overall level of childhood adversities (n=33) exhibited more co-morbid disorders, especially alcohol/substance abuse and dependency, and higher dropout rates than patients with a lower levels of adverse experiences (n=29), together with higher levels of positive symptoms and symptoms of excitement and disorganization. Emotional and physical neglect were particularly related to symptom severity. Results suggest that psychological stress in childhood affects the symptom severity and, additionally, a more unfavorable course of disorder in patients diagnosed with psychoses. This impact calls for its consideration in diagnostic assessment and psychiatric care.

  5. On the impact of adverse pressure gradient on the supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian-Cheng; Wang, Zhen-Guo; Zhao, Yu-Xin

    2016-11-01

    By employing the particle image velocimetry, the mean and turbulent characteristics of a Mach 2.95 turbulent boundary layer are experimentally investigated without the impact of curvature. The physical mechanism with which the streamwise adverse pressure gradient affects the supersonic boundary layer is revealed. The data are compared to that of the concave boundary layer with similar streamwise distributions of wall static pressure to clarify the separate impacts of the adverse pressure gradient and the concave curvature. The logarithmic law is observed to be well preserved for both of the cases. The dip below the logarithmic law is not observed in present investigation. Theoretical analysis indicates that it could be the result of compromise between the opposite impacts of the compression wave and the increased turbulent intensity. Compared to the zero pressure gradient boundary layer, the principal strain rate and the turbulent intensities are increased by the adverse pressure gradient. The shear layer formed due the hairpin packets could be sharpened by the compression wave, which leads to higher principal strain rate and the associated turbulent level. Due to the additional impact of the centrifugal instability brought by the concave wall, even higher turbulent intensities than that of the adverse pressure gradient case are introduced. The existence of velocity modes within the zero pressure gradient boundary layer suggests that the large scale motions are statistically well organized. The generation of new velocity modes due to the adverse pressure gradient indicates that the turbulent structure is changed by the adverse pressure gradient, through which more turbulence production that cannot be effectively predicted by the Reynolds-stress transport equations could be brought.

  6. The Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse and Other Forms of Childhood Adversity on Adulthood Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Betty

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the independent impact of child sexual abuse on five dimensions of adulthood parenting after controlling for other forms of childhood adversity in a predominantly African-American sample of mothers receiving public assistance (N = 483). An analysis of data previously collected as part of the Illinois Families Study Child…

  7. 25 CFR 170.109 - How do the Secretaries prevent discrimination or adverse impacts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How do the Secretaries prevent discrimination or adverse impacts? 170.109 Section 170.109 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND... Consultation, Collaboration, Coordination § 170.109 How do the Secretaries prevent discrimination or...

  8. 25 CFR 170.110 - How can State and local governments prevent discrimination or adverse impacts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How can State and local governments prevent discrimination or adverse impacts? 170.110 Section 170.110 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Eligibility Consultation, Collaboration, Coordination § 170.110 How can State and local governments...

  9. The Risk of Adverse Impact in Selections Based on a Test with Known Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Corte, Wilfried; Lievens, Filip

    2005-01-01

    The authors derive the exact sampling distribution function of the adverse impact (AI) ratio for single-stage, top-down selections using tests with known effect sizes. Subsequently, it is shown how this distribution function can be used to determine the risk that a future selection decision on the basis of such tests will result in an outcome that…

  10. Multidisciplinary Treatments, Patient Characteristics, Context of Care, and Adverse Incidents in Older, Hospitalized Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shever, Leah L.; Titler, Marita G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that contribute to adverse incidents by creating a model that included patient characteristics, clinical conditions, nursing unit context of care variables, medical treatments, pharmaceutical treatments, and nursing treatments. Data were abstracted from electronic, administrative, and clinical data repositories. The sample included older adults hospitalized during a four-year period at one, academic medical facility in the Midwestern United States who were at risk for falling. Relational databases were built and a multistep, statistical model building analytic process was used. Total registered nurse (RN) hours per patient day (HPPD) and HPPDs dropping below the nursing unit average were significant explanatory variables for experiencing an adverse incident. The number of medical and pharmaceutical treatments that a patient received during hospitalization as well as many specific nursing treatments (e.g., restraint use, neurological monitoring) were also contributors to experiencing an adverse incident. PMID:22530112

  11. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy decreases the rate of adverse pregnancy outcome: a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    SANT’ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi; de CAMPOS, Marinele R.; PASSANEZI, Selma Campos; de REZENDE, Maria Lúcia Rubo; GREGHI, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; PASSANEZI, Euloir

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical treatment of periodontal disease during the second trimester of gestation on adverse pregnancy outcomes. Material and Methods Pregnant patients during the 1st and 2nd trimesters at antenatal care in a Public Health Center were divided into 2 groups: NIG – "no intervention" (n=17) or IG- "intervention" (n=16). IG patients were submitted to a non-surgical periodontal treatment performed by a single periodontist consisting of scaling and root planning (SRP), professional prophylaxis (PROPH) and oral hygiene instruction (OHI). NIG received PROPH and OHI during pregnancy and were referred for treatment after delivery. Periodontal evaluation was performed by a single trained examiner, blinded to periodontal treatment, according to probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), plaque index (PI) and sulcular bleeding index (SBI) at baseline and 35 gestational weeks-28 days post-partum. Primary adverse pregnancy outcomes were preterm birth (<37 weeks), low birth weight (<2.5 kg), late abortion (14-24 weeks) or abortion (<14 weeks). The results obtained were statistically evaluated according to OR, unpaired t test and paired t test at 5% significance level. Results No significant differences were observed between groups at baseline examination. Periodontal treatment resulted in stabilization of CAL and PI (p>0.05) at IG and worsening of all periodontal parameters at NIG (p<0.0001), except for PI. Significant differences in periodontal conditions of IG and NIG were observed at 2nd examination (p<0.001). The rate of adverse pregnancy outcomes was 47.05% in NIG and 6.25% in IG. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy was associated to a decreased risk of developing adverse pregnancy outcomes [OR=13.50; CI: 1.47-123.45; p=0.02]. Conclusions Periodontal treatment during the second trimester of gestation contributes to decrease adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:21552714

  12. ADVERSE PRE- AND POSTNATAL EVENTS REPORTED TO FDA IN ASSOCIATION WITH MATERNAL ATENOLOL TREATMENT IN PREGNANCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atenolol is a beta-adrenoreceptor blocker used for treatment of hypertension in pregnancy. This study evaluates the reporting frequency of adverse pre- and postnatal outcomes in a series of 70 cases of maternal exposure during gestation, derived from 140 reports to FDA with Ateno...

  13. Shattering world assumptions: A prospective view of the impact of adverse events on world assumptions.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Eric R; Boals, Adriel

    2016-05-01

    Shattered Assumptions theory (Janoff-Bulman, 1992) posits that experiencing a traumatic event has the potential to diminish the degree of optimism in the assumptions of the world (assumptive world), which could lead to the development of posttraumatic stress disorder. Prior research assessed the assumptive world with a measure that was recently reported to have poor psychometric properties (Kaler et al., 2008). The current study had 3 aims: (a) to assess the psychometric properties of a recently developed measure of the assumptive world, (b) to retrospectively examine how prior adverse events affected the optimism of the assumptive world, and (c) to measure the impact of an intervening adverse event. An 8-week prospective design with a college sample (N = 882 at Time 1 and N = 511 at Time 2) was used to assess the study objectives. We split adverse events into those that were objectively or subjectively traumatic in nature. The new measure exhibited adequate psychometric properties. The report of a prior objective or subjective trauma at Time 1 was related to a less optimistic assumptive world. Furthermore, participants who experienced an intervening objectively traumatic event evidenced a decrease in optimistic views of the world compared with those who did not experience an intervening adverse event. We found support for Shattered Assumptions theory retrospectively and prospectively using a reliable measure of the assumptive world. We discuss future assessments of the measure of the assumptive world and clinical implications to help rebuild the assumptive world with current therapies. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. ADVERSE IMPACTS OF WASTE WATER TREATMENT ­ A CASE STUDY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Industrial metal plating processes coat materials with metals, such as chromium, copper and nickel. After the plating process, excess metals are rinsed off and the rinse water is collected and then treated to remove metals prior to discharge of the rinse water into rivers. This waste water is typica...

  15. Adverse reactions after community treatment of onchocerciasis with ivermectin in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Zea-Flores, R; Richards, F O; González-Peralta, C; Castro Ramirez, J; Zea-Flores, G; Collins, R C; Cupp, E

    1992-01-01

    Male and female residents on a Guatemalan coffee plantation where Onchocerca volvulus infections were hyperendemic were offered oral ivermectin (100-200 micrograms/kg) as part of a community-wide treatment programme for onchocerciasis. Forty-five persons were treated and then questioned daily for 28 d about changes in their health. Those with complaints were monitored until all signs and symptoms had resolved. Sixty-seven percent complained of some adverse event after treatment; 60% developed observable adverse reactions attributed clinically to ivermectin. No reaction was life-threatening; the most common were oedema (53%) and fever (47%). Expulsion of intestinal helminths was reported by 38%. Almost all reactions began 24-48 h after treatment; their mean duration was 5 d, despite treatment with acetaminophen and antihistamines. Three patients had oedematous changes lasting over 2 weeks. Incidence, but not severity, of reactions was related to the pretreatment density of microfilariae in skin.

  16. The Adverse Effect of Hypertension in the Treatment of Thyroid Cancer with Multi-Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ancker, Ole Vincent; Wehland, Markus; Bauer, Johann; Infanger, Manfred; Grimm, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of thyroid cancer has promising prospects, mostly through the use of surgical or radioactive iodine therapy. However, some thyroid cancers, such as progressive radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid carcinoma, are not remediable with conventional types of treatment. In these cases, a treatment regimen with multi-kinase inhibitors is advisable. Unfortunately, clinical trials have shown a large number of patients, treated with multi-kinase inhibitors, being adversely affected by hypertension. This means that treatment of thyroid cancer with multi-kinase inhibitors prolongs progression-free and overall survival of patients, but a large number of patients experience hypertension as an adverse effect of the treatment. Whether the prolonged lifetime is sufficient to develop sequelae from hypertension is unclear, but late-stage cancer patients often have additional diseases, which can be complicated by the presence of hypertension. Since the exact mechanisms of the rise of hypertension in these patients are still unknown, the only available strategy is treating the symptoms. More studies determining the pathogenesis of hypertension as a side effect to cancer treatment as well as outcomes of dose management of cancer drugs are necessary to improve future therapy options for hypertension as an adverse effect to cancer therapy with multi-kinase inhibitors. PMID:28335429

  17. The psychological impact of chronic environmental adversity: Responding to prolonged drought.

    PubMed

    Stain, Helen J; Kelly, Brian; Carr, Vaughan J; Lewin, Terry J; Fitzgerald, Michael; Fragar, Lyn

    2011-12-01

    The health effects of chronic environmental adversity have received insufficient attention, particularly those associated with the psychological impact of drought. Resilience or adaptive response to drought has received even less attention than vulnerability factors. This research examined factors associated with drought impact in rural and remote Australian communities. In 2008 postal surveys were completed by 302 adults (mean age 53 years; 57% female, 77% married) living in rural areas of prolonged drought exposure. Outcome measures were: (i) psychological distress (Kessler 10) and (ii) an index of concern or worry about drought. A range of predictor variables were assessed: adaptability (hopefulness, neuroticism), other adverse events, personal support and community connectedness, and sense of place, as a measure of connection to the local environment. Predictors of drought related worry differed from those associated with psychological distress levels. The former included socio-economic factors (living on a farm [Odds Ratio, OR 3.09], current employment [OR 3.64]), personal psychological characteristics (neuroticism [OR 1.29]), and greater connection with the environment (sense of place [OR 1.05]). On the other hand, psychological distress was associated chiefly with personal factors, such as higher neuroticism [OR 1.92], lower levels of hopefulness [OR 0.28], and lower perceived social support and community connectedness [OR 0.39]. Practical financial, employment and family factors were identified as important elements of drought impact, as to a lesser extent was sense of place, reflecting a confrontation with the consequences of chronic environmental degradation, while personal hopefulness may help mitigate the psychological impact of such adversity.

  18. Impact of Adverse Events Following Immunization in Viet Nam in 2013 on chronic hepatitis B infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Wiesen, Eric; Diorditsa, Sergey; Toda, Kohei; Duong, Thi Hong; Nguyen, Lien Huong; Nguyen, Van Cuong; Nguyen, Tran Hien

    2016-02-03

    Adverse Events Following Immunization in Viet Nam in 2013 led to substantial reductions in hepatitis B vaccination coverage (both the birth dose and the three-dose series). In order to estimate the impact of the reduction in vaccination coverage on hepatitis B transmission and future mortality, a widely-used mathematical model was applied to the data from Viet Nam. Using the model, we estimated the number of chronic infections and deaths that are expected to occur in the birth cohort in 2013 and the number of excessive infections and deaths attributable to the drop in immunization coverage in 2013. An excess of 90,137 chronic infections and 17,456 future deaths were estimated to occur in the 2013 birth cohort due to the drop in vaccination coverage. This analysis highlights the importance of maintaining high vaccination coverage and swiftly responding to reported Adverse Events Following Immunization in order to regain consumer confidence in the hepatitis B vaccine.

  19. Diversity and intensity of adverse events in the treatment of hypertension with barnidipine.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, J W; Beudeker, H J; Nishi, M

    1998-01-01

    Calcium antagonists (CaAs) are divided into three structural classes, typically represented by verapamil, diltiazem and nifedipine. As a group, the principal (type I) adverse effects of these drugs relate to the pharmacological action of calcium channel blockade, namely vasodilation, and include dizziness, flushing, palpitations and peripheral oedema. The clinical safety of the new dihydropyridine CaA, barnidipine, has been assessed in more than 12 clinical trials, including 2041 patients who have been treated with one or more doses of barnidipine (dose of up to 50 mg). Adverse events with barnidipine are of mild to moderate intensity, most commonly of type I, occurring in the early phase of treatment. The incidence of serious adverse events and the rate of withdrawals are low. Hence, barnidipine is likely to be well tolerated in general clinical use.

  20. Persistent constipation and abdominal adverse events with newer treatments for constipation

    PubMed Central

    Sonu, Irene; Triadafilopoulos, George; Gardner, Jerry D

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical trials of several new treatments for opioid-induced constipation (OIC), chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C) have focused on differences between subjects relieved of constipation with placebo and active treatment. Patients and clinicians however, are more interested in the probability these treatments provide actual relief of constipation and its associated symptoms. Methods We searched the medical literature using MEDLINE and Cochrane central register of controlled trials. Randomised, placebo-controlled trials that examined the use of methylnaltrexone, naloxegol, lubiprostone, prucalopride or linaclotide in adults with OIC, CIC and IBS-C were eligible for inclusion. The primary efficacy measure was relief of constipation. Adverse event data for abdominal symptoms were also analysed. Key results and findings 25 publications were included in our analyses. The proportion of constipated individuals with active treatment was significantly lower than the proportion with placebo; however, in 15 of these 20 trials analysed, a majority of patients remained constipated with active treatment. Analyses of adverse event data revealed that the percentage of participants who experienced abdominal pain, diarrhoea and flatulence with active treatment was higher than that with placebo in the majority of trials analysed. Conclusions Newer pharmacological treatments for constipation are superior to placebo in relieving constipation, but many patients receiving active treatment may remain constipated. In addition, all 5 of the treatments studied are accompanied by no change or a possible increase in the prevalence of abdominal symptoms, such as abdominal pain, diarrhoea and flatulence. PMID:27486521

  1. Adverse Reactions Due to Directly Observed Treatment Strategy Therapy in Chinese Tuberculosis Patients: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiaozhen; Tang, Shaowen; Xia, Yinyin; Wang, Xiaomeng; Yuan, Yanli; Hu, Daiyu; Liu, Feiying; Wu, Shanshan; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Zhirong; Tu, Dehua; Chen, Yixin; Deng, Peiyuan; Ma, Yu; Chen, Ru; Zhan, Siyan

    2013-01-01

    Background More than 1 million tuberculosis (TB) patients are receiving directly observed treatment strategy (DOTS) therapy in China every year. As to the profile of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) due to DOTS therapy, no consensus has been reached. There is no report regarding ADRs due to DOTS therapy with a large Chinese TB population. This study aimed to determine the incidence and prognosis of ADRs due to DOTS therapy, and to evaluate their impact on anti-TB treatment in China. Methods A prospective population-based cohort study was performed during 2007–2008. Sputum smear positive pulmonary TB patients who received DOTS therapy were included and followed up for six to nine months in 52 counties of four regions in China. The suspected ADRs were recorded and reviewed by Chinese State Food and Drug Administration. Results A total of 4304 TB patients were included in this study. 649 patients (15.08%) showed at least one ADR and 766 cases in total were detected. The incidence (count) of ADR based on affected organ was: liver dysfunction 6.34% (273), gastrointestinal disorders 3.74% (161), arthralgia 2.51% (108), allergic reactions 2.35% (101), neurological system disorders 2.04% (88), renal impairment 0.07% (3) and others 0.05% (2). Most cases of ADRs (95%) had a good clinical outcome, while two with hepatotoxicity and one with renal impairment died. Compared with patients without ADRs, patients with ADRs were more likely to have positive smear test results at the end of the intensive phase (adjusted OR, 2.00; 95%CI, 1.44–2.78) and unsuccessful anti-TB outcomes (adjusted OR, 2.58; 95%CI, 1.43–4.68). Conclusions The incidence of ADRs due to DOTS therapy was 15.08%. Those ADRs had a substantial impact on TB control in China. This highlighted the importance of developing strategies to ameliorate ADRs both to improve the quality of patient care and to control TB safely. PMID:23750225

  2. Mother-offspring dialogue in early pregnancy: impact of adverse environment on pregnancy maintenance and neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Alison J

    2011-07-01

    The mother-offspring dialogue begins even before implantation and is essential to signal pregnancy, establish robust contact, and maintain embryo growth and development. Any circumstance that disrupts the dialogue risks pregnancy problems. A new look at how stress impacts on pregnancy involves its adverse effects on the key pregnancy hormones of progesterone and prolactin. These effects have far-reaching consequences on pregnancy maintenance, maternal anxiety and embryo programming. This review focuses on early pregnancy and how stress might compromise the multi-layer, two-way communication between mother and embryo.

  3. Assessing planetary and regional nitrogen boundaries related to food security and adverse environmental impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Wim; Kros, Hans; Kroeze, Carolien; Seitzinger, Sybil

    2014-05-01

    In this presentation, we first discuss the concept of -, governance interest in- and criticism on planetary boundaries, specifically with respect to the nitrogen (N) cycle. We then systematically evaluate the criticism and argue that planetary N boundaries need to include both the benefits and adverse impacts of reactive N (Nr) and the spatial variability of Nr impacts, in terms of shortage and surplus, being main arguments for not deriving such boundaries. Next, we present an holistic approach for an updated planetary N boundary by considering the need to: (i) avoid adverse impacts of elevated Nr emissions to water, air and soils, and (ii) feed the world population in an adequate way. The derivation of a planetary N boundary, in terms of anthropogenic fixation of di-nitrogen (N2) by growing legumes and production of N fertilizer, is illustrated by (i) identification of multiple threat N indicators and setting critical limits for them, (ii) back calculating critical N losses from critical limits for N indicators, while accounting for the spatial variability of indicators and their exceedance and (iii) back calculating critical N fixation rates from critical N losses. The derivation of the needed planetary N fixation is assessed from the global population, the recommended dietary N consumption per capita and the N use efficiency in the complete chain from N fixation to N consumption. Results of example applications show that the previously suggested planetary N boundary of 25% of the current value is too low in view of needed N fixation and also unnecessary in view of most environmental impacts. We also illustrate the impacts of changes in the N use efficiency on planetary boundaries in terms of critical N fixation rates.

  4. Adverse reaction to irrigation with povidone-iodine after deep-impacted, lower third molar extraction.

    PubMed

    Sammartino, G; Tia, M; Tete, S; Perillo, L; Trosino, O

    2012-01-01

    Povidone-iodine is most commonly used worldwide because of its germicidal activity, relatively low irritancy or toxicity and low cost. Frequently, povidone-iodine is used as a topical antiseptic for treating and preventing wound infection. In rare cases skin irritation or iododerma-like eruption could represent possible adverse effects due to the oxidative effects of iodine and allergic hypersensitivity reaction. In this report we describe a case of a massive adverse reaction to the irrigation of surgical wound dehiscence with 10 percent povidone-iodine solution after deep-impacted, lower third molar extraction. This reaction was related to a central neurotrophic reflex involving three trigeminal branches and probably due to peripheral chemical insult of mandible nerve. This adverse reaction determined a severe edema and diffuse skin lesions, involving the whole left side of the face mimicking an iododerma-like eruption. These violent symptoms were solved after 60 days. Furthermore, we report a small permanent skin scar in the zygomatic area and transient alterations of facial sensitivity on the affected side which completely disappeared in 6 months.

  5. Periodontal Treatment Reduces Risk of Adverse Respiratory Events in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of periodontal diseases has been associated with benefit outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, no population-based cohort study has been conducted. We evaluated this relationship by retrospective cohort study using a large population data. Using the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 5562 COPD patients with periodontal diseases who had received periodontal treatment as the treatment group. The comparison group was selected at a 1:1 ratio matched by the propensity score estimated with age, sex, date of COPD diagnosis and periodontal treatment, and comorbidities. Both groups were followed up for 5 years to compare risks of acute exacerbation, pneumonia, and acute respiratory failure. The incidence rates of adverse respiratory events were significantly lower in the treatment group than in the comparison group: 3.79 versus 4.21 per 100 person-years for emergency room visits, 2.75 versus 3.65 per 100 person-years for hospitalizations, and 0.66 versus 0.75 per 100 person-years for intensive care unit admissions. The treatment group also had a 37% reduced risk of deaths (1.81 vs 2.87 per 100 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.57 (95% confidence interval 0.52–0.62). Periodontal treatment for COPD patients could reduce the risk of adverse respiratory events and mortality. The adequate periodontal health care is important for COPD patients with periodontal diseases. PMID:27196497

  6. Managing adverse events associated with vismodegib in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fife, Kate; Herd, Robert; Lalondrelle, Susan; Plummer, Ruth; Strong, Amy; Jones, Sarah; Lear, John T

    2017-01-01

    Basal cell carcinomas are the most common form of skin cancer. Some develop into advanced cases not suitable for standard therapy. Vismodegib is the first-in-class oral hedgehog pathway inhibitor (which is dysregulated in 90% of basal cell carcinomas), and has demonstrated efficacy for advanced disease in clinical trials. An UK expert panel met to discuss management strategies for adverse events associated with vismodegib (most commonly taste disturbances, muscle cramps and alopecia). Managing patient expectations and implementing treatment breaks were considered important strategies. Quinine was useful to alleviate muscle cramps. For taste disturbances, food swaps alongside dietician referral were suggested. The experts concluded that these common adverse events can be successfully managed to allow optimum treatment duration of vismodegib.

  7. Annual Research Review: Positive adjustment to adversity -Trajectories of minimal-impact resilience and emergent resilience

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, George A.; Diminich, Erica D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Research on resilience in the aftermath of potentially traumatic life events is still evolving. For decades researchers have documented resilience in children exposed to corrosive early environments, such as poverty or chronic maltreatment. Relatively more recently the study of resilience has migrated to the investigation of isolated and potentially traumatic life events (PTE) in adults. Methods In this article we first consider some of the key differences in the conceptualization of resilience following chronic adversity versus resilience following single-incident traumas, and then describe some of the misunderstandings that have developed about these constructs. To organize our discussion we introduce the terms emergent resilience and minimal-impact resilience to represent trajectories positive adjustment in these two domains, respectively. Results We focused in particular on minimal-impact resilience, and reviewed recent advances in statistical modeling of latent trajectories that have informed the most recent research on minimal-impact resilience in both children and adults and the variables that predict it, including demographic variables, exposure, past and current stressors, resources, personality, positive emotion, coping and appraisal, and flexibility in coping and emotion regulation. Conclusions The research on minimal impact resilience is nascent. Further research is warranted with implications for a multiple levels of analysis approach to elucidate the processes that may mitigate or modify the impact of a PTE at different developmental stages. PMID:23215790

  8. Cognitive predictors and age-based adverse impact among business executives.

    PubMed

    Klein, Rachael M; Dilchert, Stephan; Ones, Deniz S; Dages, Kelly D

    2015-09-01

    Age differences on measures of general mental ability and specific cognitive abilities were examined in 2 samples of job applicants to executive positions as well as a mix of executive/nonexecutive positions to determine which predictors might lead to age-based adverse impact in making selection and advancement decisions. Generalizability of the pattern of findings was also investigated in 2 samples from the general adult population. Age was negatively related to general mental ability, with older executives scoring lower than younger executives. For specific ability components, the direction and magnitude of age differences depended on the specific ability in question. Older executives scored higher on verbal ability, a measure most often associated with crystallized intelligence. This finding generalized across samples examined in this study. Also, consistent with findings that fluid abilities decline with age, older executives scored somewhat lower on figural reasoning than younger executives, and much lower on a letter series test of inductive reasoning. Other measures of inductive reasoning, such as Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, also showed similar age group mean differences across settings. Implications for employee selection and adverse impact on older job candidates are discussed.

  9. Defining "adverse environmental impact" and making paragraph 316(b) decisions: a fisheries management approach.

    PubMed

    Bailey, David E; Bulleit, Kristy A N

    2002-05-17

    The electric utility industry has developed an approach for decisionmaking that includes a definition of Adverse Environmental Impact (AEI) and an implementation process. The definition of AEI is based on lessons from fishery management science and analysis of the statutory term "adverse environmental impact" and is consistent with current natural resource management policy. The industry has proposed a definition focusing on "unacceptable risk to the population"s ability to sustain itself, to support reasonably anticipated commercial or recreational harvests, or to perform its normal ecological function." This definition focuses not on counting individual fish or eggs cropped by the various uses of a water body, but on preserving populations of aquatic organisms and their functions in the aquatic community. The definition recognizes that assessment of AEI should be site-specific and requires both a biological decision and a balancing of diverse societal values. The industry believes that the definition of AEI should be implemented in a process that will maximize the overall societal benefit of the paragraph 316(b) decision by considering the facility"s physical location, design, and operation, as well as the local biology. The approach considers effects on affected fish and shellfish populations and the benefits of any necessary best technology available (BTA) alternatives. This is accomplished through consideration of population impacts, which conversely allows consideration of the benefits of any necessary BTA modifications. This in turn allows selection of BTAs that will protect potentially affected populations in a cost-effective manner. The process also employs risk assessment with stakeholder participation, in accordance with EPA's Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment. The information and tools are now available to make informed decisions about site-specific impacts that will ensure protection of aquatic ecosystems and best serve the public interest.

  10. Potential adverse effects of amphetamine treatment on brain and behavior: a review.

    PubMed

    Berman, S M; Kuczenski, R; McCracken, J T; London, E D

    2009-02-01

    Amphetamine stimulants have been used medically since early in the twentieth century, but they have a high abuse potential and can be neurotoxic. Although they have long been used effectively to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents, amphetamines are now being prescribed increasingly as maintenance therapy for ADHD and narcolepsy in adults, considerably extending the period of potential exposure. Effects of prolonged stimulant treatment have not been fully explored, and understanding such effects is a research priority. Because the pharmacokinetics of amphetamines differ between children and adults, reevaluation of the potential for adverse effects of chronic treatment of adults is essential. Despite information on the effects of stimulants in laboratory animals, profound species differences in susceptibility to stimulant-induced neurotoxicity underscore the need for systematic studies of prolonged human exposure. Early amphetamine treatment has been linked to slowing in height and weight growth in some children. Because the number of prescriptions for amphetamines has increased several fold over the past decade, an amphetamine-containing formulation is the most commonly prescribed stimulant in North America, and it is noteworthy that amphetamines are also the most abused prescription medications. Although early treatment does not increase risk for substance abuse, few studies have tracked the compliance and usage profiles of individuals who began amphetamine treatment as adults. Overall, there is concern about risk for slowed growth in young patients who are dosed continuously, and for substance abuse in patients first medicated in late adolescence or adulthood. Although most adult patients also use amphetamines effectively and safely, occasional case reports indicate that prescription use can produce marked psychological adverse events, including stimulant-induced psychosis. Assessments of central toxicity and adverse

  11. Impact of sample size on variation of adverse events and preventable adverse events: systematic review on epidemiology and contributing factors

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Astrid; Albers, Bernhard; Schrappe, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To perform a systematic review of the frequency of (preventable) adverse events (AE/PAE) and to analyse contributing factors, such as sample size, settings, type of events, terminology, methods of collecting data and characteristics of study populations. Review methods Search of Medline and Embase from 1995 to 2007. Included were original papers with data on the frequency of AE or PAE, explicit definition of study population and information about methods of assessment. Results were included with percentages of patients having one or more AE/PAE. Extracted data enclosed contributing factors. Data were abstracted and analysed by two researchers independently. Results 156 studies in 152 publications met our inclusion criteria. 144/156 studies reported AE, 55 PAE (43 both). Sample sizes ranged from 60 to 8 493 876 patients (median: 1361 patients). The reported results for AE varied from 0.1% to 65.4%, and for PAE from 0.1% to 33.9%. Variation clearly decreased with increasing sample size. Estimates did not differ according to setting, type of event or terminology. In studies with fewer than 1000 patients, chart review prevailed, whereas surveys with more than 100 000 patients were based mainly on administrative data. No effect of patient characteristics was found. Conclusions The funnel-shaped distribution of AE and PAE rates with sample size is a probable consequence of variation and can be taken as an indirect indicator of study validity. A contributing factor may be the method of data assessment. Further research is needed to explain the results when analysing data by types of event or terminology. PMID:20679137

  12. Phentermine/topiramate for weight reduction and treatment of adverse metabolic consequences in obesity.

    PubMed

    Bays, H E; Gadde, K M

    2011-12-01

    Phentermine hydrochloride is a noradrenergic sympathetic amine approved for decades by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) at doses as high as 37.5 mg/day for the short-term treatment of obesity. Topiramate is a sulfamate-substituted monosaccharide marketed since 1996, and approved by the FDA for seizure disorders at doses up to 400 mg/day and for the prevention of migraine headaches at doses up to 100 mg/day. Clinical trial data suggest topiramate promotes weight loss. The prescribing information of neither agent describes adverse drug interactions with the other. The controlled-release formulation of phentermine and topiramate at low, medium and full doses (with full dose containing 15 mg of phentermine hydrochloride and 92 mg of topiramate) promotes weight reduction, with clinical trial data supporting improvement in adiposopathic consequences leading to metabolic diseases. Reported adverse events with this combination agent are as expected, based upon knowledge of the individual components.

  13. Caregiver traumatization adversely impacts young children's mental representations on the MacArthur Story Stem Battery.

    PubMed

    Schechter, Daniel S; Zygmunt, Annette; Coates, Susan W; Davies, Mark; Trabka, Kimberly; McCaw, Jaime; Kolodji, Ann; Robinson, Joann

    2007-09-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of maternal exposure to family violence, maltreatment, and related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on young children's mental representations of self and caregivers. Participant mothers (n=24) and children (n=25) were recruited from a referred sample when they were 4-7 years old. Maternal report and child story stem narratives were used. Mother's experience of domestic violence and severity of violence-related PTSD symptoms robustly predicted more dysregulated aggression, attentional bias to danger and distress, as well as more avoidance of and withdrawal from conflicts presented in the children's story stems. Less narrative coherence was also noted. Traumatized mothers experience and symptoms prior to their child's turning 4 years old adversely affected their child's mental representations from 4-7 years.

  14. Surrogate species selection for assessing potential adverse environmental impacts of genetically engineered plants on non-target organisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most regulatory authorities require that developers of genetically engineered insect-resistant (GEIR) crops evaluate the potential for these crops to have adverse impacts on valued non-target organisms (NTOs), i.e., organisms not intended to be controlled by the trait. In many cases, impacts to NTOs...

  15. Do Verbal Interactions with Infants during Electronic Media Exposure Mitigate Adverse Impacts on Their Language Development as Toddlers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Brockmeyer, Carolyn A.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Fierman, Arthur H.; Berkule-Silberman, Samantha B.; Tomopoulos, Suzy

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether verbal interactions between mothers and their 6-month-old infants during media exposure ("media verbal interactions") might have direct positive impacts, or mitigate any potential adverse impacts of media exposure, on language development at 14 months. For 253 low-income mother-infant dyads…

  16. Dermal fillers in aesthetics: an overview of adverse events and treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Funt, David; Pavicic, Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Background The ever-expanding range of dermal filler products for aesthetic soft tissue augmentation is of benefit for patients and physicians, but as indications and the number of procedures performed increase, the number of complications will likely also increase. Objective To describe potential adverse events associated with dermal fillers and to provide structured and clear guidance on their treatment and avoidance. Methods Reports of dermal filler complications in the medical literature were reviewed and, based on the publications retrieved and the authors’ extensive experience, recommendations for avoiding and managing complications are provided. Results Different dermal fillers have widely varying properties, associated risks, and injection requirements. All dermal fillers have the potential to cause complications. Most are related to volume and technique, though some are associated with the material itself. The majority of adverse reactions are mild and transient, such as bruising and trauma-related edema. Serious adverse events are rare, and most are avoidable with proper planning and technique. Conclusion For optimum outcomes, aesthetic physicians should have a detailed understanding of facial anatomy; the individual characteristics of available fillers; their indications, contraindications, benefits, and drawbacks; and ways to prevent and avoid potential complications. PMID:24363560

  17. Early Adverse Events and Attrition in SSRI Treatment: A Suicide Assessment Methodology Study (SAMS) Report

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Diane; Trivedi, Madhukar H.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Kurian, Benji; Zisook, Sidney; Kornstein, Susan G.; Friedman, Edward S.; Miyahara, Sachiko; Leuchter, Andrew F.; Fava, Maurizio; Rush, John

    2011-01-01

    Adverse events during selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment are frequent and may lead to premature treatment discontinuation. If attrition is associated with early worsening of side effects or the frequency, intensity, or burden of side effects, interventions to maximize retention could be focused on patients with these events. Outpatient participants (n=265) with nonpsychotic major depressive disorder entered an 8-week trial with an SSRI. At baseline and week 2, specific side effects were evaluated with the Systematic Assessment for Treatment Emergent Events – Systematic Inquiry, and at week 2 the Frequency, Intensity, and Burden of Side Effects Rating globally assessed side effects. Attrition was defined by those participants who left treatment after week 2 but before week 8. No specific week 2 side effect, either treatment emergent or with worsening intensity, was independently associated with attrition. Global ratings of side effect frequency, intensity, or burden at week 2 were also not associated with subsequent attrition. Neither global ratings nor specific side effects at week 2 were related to patient attrition during SSRI treatment. Other factors appear to contribute to patient decisions about continuing with treatment. PMID:20473060

  18. 25 CFR 170.110 - How can State and local governments prevent discrimination or adverse impacts?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and adverse effects on tribes and Native American populations. (b) Examples of adverse effects include... excessive access to culturally or religiously sensitive areas; (3) Negatively affecting natural resources, trust resources, tribal businesses, religious, and cultural sites; (4) Harming indigenous plants...

  19. Assessment of nitrogen ceilings for Dutch agricultural soils to avoid adverse environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    de Vries, W; Kros, H; Oenema, O; Erisman, J W

    2001-11-09

    In the Netherlands, high traffic density and intensive animal husbandry have led to high emissions of reactive nitrogen (N) into the environment. This leads to a series of environmental impacts, including: (1) nitrate (NO3) contamination of drinking water, (2) eutrophication of freshwater lakes, (3) acidification and biodiversity impacts on terrestrial ecosystems, (4) ozone and particle formation affecting human health, and (5) global climate change induced by emissions of N2O. Measures to control reactive N emissions were, up to now, directed towards those different environmental themes. Here we summarize the results of a study to analyse the agricultural N problem in the Netherlands in an integrated way, which means that all relevant aspects are taken into account simultaneously. A simple N balance model was developed, representing all crucial processes in the N chain, to calculate acceptable N inputs to the farm (so-called N ceiling) and to the soil surface (application in the field) by feed concentrates, organic manure, fertiliser, deposition, and N fixation. The N ceilings were calculated on the basis of critical limits for NO 3 concentrations in groundwater, N concentrations in surface water, and ammonia (NH3) emission targets related to the protection of biodiversity of natural areas. Results show that in most parts of the Netherlands, except the western and the northern part, the N ceilings are limited by NH 3 emissions, which are derived from critical N loads for nature areas, rather than limits for both ground- and surface water. On the national scale, the N ceiling ranges between 372 and 858 kton year(-1) depending on the choice of critical limits. The current N import is 848 kton year(-1). A decrease of nearly 60% is needed to reach the ceilings that are necessary to protect the environment against all adverse impacts of N pollution from agriculture.

  20. Risk of adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcomes after high technology infertility treatment: a comprehensive systematic review.

    PubMed

    Palomba, Stefano; Homburg, Roy; Santagni, Susanna; La Sala, Giovanni Battista; Orvieto, Raoul

    2016-11-04

    In the literature, there is growing evidence that subfertile patients who conceived after infertility treatments have an increased risk of pregnancy and perinatal complications and this is particularly true for patients who conceived through use of high technology infertility treatments. Moreover, high technology infertility treatments include many concomitant clinical and biological risk factors. This review aims to summarize in a systematic fashion the current evidence regarding the relative effect of the different procedures for high technology infertility treatments on the risk of adverse pregnancy and perinatal outcome. A literature search up to August 2016 was performed in IBSS, SocINDEX, Institute for Scientific Information, PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar and an evidence-based hierarchy was used to determine which articles to include and analyze. Data on prepregnancy maternal factors, low technology interventions, specific procedures for male factor, ovarian tissue/ovary and uterus transplantation, and chromosomal abnormalities and malformations of the offspring were excluded. The available evidences were analyzed assessing the level and the quality of evidence according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine guidelines and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system, respectively. Current review highlights that every single procedure of high technology infertility treatments can play a crucial role in increasing the risk of pregnancy and perinatal complications. Due to the suboptimal level and quality of the current evidence, further well-designed studies are needed.

  1. Methemoglobinemia and adverse events in Plasmodium vivax malaria patients associated with high doses of primaquine treatment.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Fonseca, Jaime; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Maestre, Amanda

    2009-02-01

    Primaquine (PQ) is recommended to prevent relapses in patients with Plasmodium vivax malaria infection. However, treatment with PQ causes methemoglobinemia. In this study, we measured the methemoglobin (MetHB) levels in three groups of subjects who received PQ treatment at 0.58, 0.83, or 1.17 mg/kg/d. A total of 112 subjects were studied. MetHB levels were detected at > or = 4% in 46-50% 1 day after PQ treatment in all three groups and 4-9% of subjects had MetHB levels > or = 4% 15 days after treatment. Only subjects receiving the highest doses of PQ had mild and brief adverse events, and 17% of them were associated with treatment. We conclude that when PQ is administered under certain conditions (i.e., normal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, in non-pregnant subjects and with a light meal), daily doses as high as 1.17 mg/kg do not represent a serious risk of high MetHB levels to patients.

  2. Treatment Needs and Adverse Events Related to Dental Treatment under General Anesthesia for Individuals with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rada, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with autism can be quite challenging to treat in a routine dental-office setting, especially when extensive dental treatment and disruptive behavioral issues exist. Individuals with autism may also be at higher risk for oral disease. Frequently, general anesthesia is the only method to facilitate completion of the needed dental…

  3. Impact of Different Childhood Adversities on 1-Year Outcomes of Psychotic Disorder in the Genetics and Psychosis Study.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Antonella; Murray, Robin M; David, Anthony S; Kolliakou, Anna; O'Connor, Jennifer; Di Forti, Marta; Dazzan, Paola; Mondelli, Valeria; Morgan, Craig; Fisher, Helen L

    2016-03-01

    While the role of childhood adversity in increasing the risk of psychosis has been extensively investigated, it is not clear what the impact of early adverse experiences is on the outcomes of psychotic disorders. Therefore, we investigated associations between childhood adversity and 1-year outcomes in 285 first-presentation psychosis patients. Exposure to childhood adversity prior to 17 years of age was assessed using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire. Data on illness course, symptom remission, length of psychiatric hospitalization, compliance with medication, employment, and relationship status were extracted from clinical records for the year following first contact with mental health services for psychosis. Seventy-one percent of patients reported exposure to at least 1 type of childhood adversity (physical abuse, sexual abuse, parental separation, parental death, disrupted family arrangements, or being taken into care). No robust associations were found between childhood adversity and illness course or remission. However, childhood physical abuse was associated with almost 3-fold increased odds of not being in a relationship at 1-year follow-up compared to patients who did not report such adverse experiences. There was also evidence of a significant association between parental separation in childhood and longer admissions to psychiatric wards during 1-year follow-up and 2-fold increased odds of noncompliance with medication compared to those not separated from their parents. Therefore, our findings suggest that there may be some specificity in the impact of childhood adversity on service use and social functioning among psychosis patients over the first year following presentation to mental health services.

  4. Diagnosis and Treatment of Adverse Local Tissue Reactions at the Head-Neck Junction.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Herbert J

    2016-07-01

    Modular junctions in total hip arthroplasty are susceptible to mechanically assisted crevice corrosion, leading to the release of metal wear debris. Adverse local tissue reactions result from an immune-mediated biological reaction to this debris and can have a profound effect on the surrounding periarticular soft tissue envelope. Patients often present with pain or muscle weakness and demonstrate elevated serum cobalt and chromium levels. Serum inflammatory markers and synovial fluid tests help distinguish these reactions from deep infection in the majority of cases; however, the presence of amorphous material or fragmented cells can lead to difficulty in some cases. Advanced cross-sectional imaging is essential in establishing the diagnosis. Early revision surgery is generally the treatment of choice for symptomatic adverse local tissue reaction from corrosion at the modular head-neck junction. The existing stem is retained, and a new ceramic head is placed on the existing trunnion whenever possible. This strategy generally leads to short-term improvement of symptoms with reliable clinical outcomes; however, longer term results are presently lacking.

  5. Impact of Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) Standardization on Carboplatin Dose and Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Justin; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; McKibbin, Trevor; Harvey, R. Donald

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND When using area under the concentration-time curve-based strategies for dosing carboplatin, accurate estimation of glomerular filtration rate is required for determining dose. Commonly, the Cockcroft–Gault equation is used, which is dependent on measurement of serum creatinine (SCr). Because analysis of SCr changed to an isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) standard, we sought to determine the impact of this assay change on carboplatin dosing and related toxicity. METHODS This was a single-center, retrospective chart review of adults treated with carboplatin between April 2008 and April 2010 divided into cohorts that initiated carboplatin before or after IDMS standardization. End points included grade 3 thrombocytopenia, decrease in platelet count, and hospitalization and were evaluated in cohorts based on concomitant chemotherapy. RESULTS The chart review identified 158 patients, with 63 patients in the pre-IDMS group and 95 patients in the post-IDMS group. Average SCr (pre 1.01 mg/dl vs post 0.86 mg/dl, p<0.001) and average carboplatin dose (pre 580 mg vs post 703 mg, p<0.001) were significantly different between the groups. The frequency of grade 3 thrombocytopenia was not statistically significant across three partner chemotherapy cohorts before and after IDMS implementation. CONCLUSION IDMS standardization led to an overall decrease in SCr with subsequent increase in carboplatin doses. However, no increase in recorded adverse events was observed, suggesting that the clinical relevance in toxicity from higher doses was minimal. PMID:27130286

  6. Adverse Impact of Sleep Restriction and Circadian Misalignment on Autonomic Function in Healthy Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Daniela; Carter, Jason R; Van Cauter, Eve; Leproult, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    Insufficient sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances have been each associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in epidemiological studies, but experimental evidence for a causal link is scarce. The present study compares the impact of circadian misalignment (CM) to circadian alignment (CA) on human autonomic function using a nonrandomized parallel group design to achieve the same total sleep time in both conditions. After baseline assessments (3 days with 10-hour bedtimes), 26 healthy young adults were assigned to sleep restriction (SR; eight 5-hour bedtimes) with either fixed nocturnal bedtimes (CA; n=13) or bedtimes delayed by 8.5 hours on 4 of the 8 days (CM; n=13). Daytime ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate (HR; CA, n=11; CM, n=10) and 24-hour urinary norepinephrine levels (CA, n=13; CM, n=13) were assessed at baseline and the end of SR. Nocturnal HR and HR variability were analyzed during sleep at baseline and during the fourth and seventh nights of SR (CA, n=8; CM, n=12). SR resulted in a significant increase in daytime HR in both groups, without changes in blood pressure. SR increased 24-hour urinary norepinephrine in the CM group (30±4 versus 21±2 μg), but not in the circadian alignment group (group×condition, P=0.005). In contrast to the lack of detectable impact of CM on daytime autonomic function, SR with CM elicited greater increases in nocturnal HR, as well as greater reductions in vagal indices of HR variability, than SR without CM (group×condition, P<0.05). In conclusion, SR and CM both result in impaired autonomic function that could lead, under chronic conditions, to enhanced cardiovascular risk.

  7. Treatment related toxicity in BRCA1-associated epithelial ovarian cancer – is DNA repairing impairment associated with more adverse events?

    PubMed Central

    Budryk, Magdalena; Nowara, Elżbieta; Starzyczny-Słota, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study The presence of BRCA germline mutations in patients with ovarian cancer has been shown to have predictive and prognostic significance, including increased platinum-sensitivity. The aim of the study was to evaluate if patients with BRCA1-associated ovarian cancer have more treatment related adverse events and, if so, does it have impact on chemotherapy outcomes. Material and methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of 172 patients with newly diagnosed epithelial ovarian cancer, treated in Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch between 2007 and 2013. Ninety-six of these patients have known BRCA mutation status – 21 patients were BRCA1(+) and 75 BRCA1(–). Analysed treatment related adverse events (AE’s) were: haematological toxicity, nausea/vomiting, neuropathy and mucositis. Results Grade 3–4 haematological AE’s were significantly more common among BRCA1(+) patients (OR = 3.86; 95% CI: 1.14–13.23; p = 0.02). There was no association between BRCA1 mutation status and neuropathy (p = 0.73) or nausea/vomiting (p = 0.91). Occurrence of above mentioned AE’s has no significant association with PFS (p = 0.75, 0.64, 0.97 respectively) and OS (p = 0.64, 0.69, 0.73 respectively). Conclusions Among patients with BRCA1-associated epithelial ovarian cancer we observed significantly more grade 3–4 haematological complications after chemotherapy. However, occurrence of AE’s did not correlate with better outcomes in this subgroup.

  8. Adverse effects of shock waves and strategies for improved treatment in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAteer, James A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Connors, Bret A.; Williams, James C.; Willis, Lynn R.

    2005-04-01

    Lithotripter SWs rupture blood vessels in the kidney. This acute trauma, accompanied by a fall in renal function, can lead to significant long-term effects such as profound scarring of the kidney cortex and renal papillaea permanent loss of functional renal mass. SWL has been linked to new-onset hypertension in some patients, and recent studies suggest that multiple lithotripsies can actually alter a patient's stone disease leading to formation of stones (brushite) that are harder to break. Cavitation and shear appear to play a role in stone breakage and tissue damage. Progress in understanding these mechanisms, and the renal response to SWs, has led to practical strategies to improve treatment. Slowing the SW-rate, or initiating treatment at low kV/power both improve stone breakage and reduce the number of potentially tissue-damaging SWs needed to achieve comminution. The observation that SWs cause transient vasoconstriction in the kidney has led to studies in pigs showing that a pre-conditioning dose of low-energy SWs significantly reduces trauma from subsequent high-energy SWs. Thus, SWs can induce adverse effects in the kidney, but what we have learned about the mechanisms of SW action suggests strategies that could make lithotripsy safer and more effective. [Work supported by NIH-DK43881, DK55674.

  9. Cutaneous Adverse Events Associated with Interferon-β Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kolb-Mäurer, Annette; Goebeler, Matthias; Mäurer, Mathias

    2015-07-02

    Interferons are widely used platform therapies as disease-modifying treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis. Although interferons are usually safe and well tolerated, they frequently cause dermatological side effects. Here, we present a multiple sclerosis (MS) patient treated with interferon-β who developed new-onset psoriasis. Both her MS as well as her psoriasis finally responded to treatment with fumarates. This case illustrates that interferons not only cause local but also systemic adverse events of the skin. These systemic side effects might indicate that the Th17/IL-17 axis plays a prominent role in the immunopathogenesis of this individual case and that the autoimmune process might be deteriorated by further administration of interferons. In conclusion, we think that neurologists should be aware of systemic cutaneous side effects and have a closer look on interferon-associated skin lesions. Detection of psoriasiform lesions might indicate that interferons are probably not beneficial in the individual situation. We suggest that skin lesions may serve as biomarkers to allocate MS patients to adequate disease-modifying drugs.

  10. Do Verbal Interactions with Infants During Electronic Media Exposure Mitigate Adverse Impacts on their Language Development as Toddlers?

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Brockmeyer, Carolyn A.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Fierman, Arthur H.; Berkule-Silberman, Samantha B.; Tomopoulos, Suzy

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether verbal interactions between mothers and their 6-month-old infants during media exposure (‘media verbal interactions’) might have direct positive impacts, or mitigate any potential adverse impacts of media exposure, on language development at 14 months. For 253 low-income mother–infant dyads participating in a longitudinal study, media exposure and media verbal interactions were assessed using 24-hour recall diaries. Additionally, general level of cognitive stimulation in the home [StimQ] was assessed at 6 months and language development [Preschool Language Scale-4] was assessed at 14 months. Results suggest that media verbal interactions play a role in the language development of infants from low-income, immigrant families. Evidence showed that media verbal interactions moderated adverse impacts of media exposure found on 14-month language development, with adverse associations found only in the absence the these interactions. Findings also suggest that media verbal interactions may have some direct positive impacts on language development, in that media verbal interactions during the co-viewing of media with educational content (but not other content) were predictive of 14-month language independently of overall level of cognitive stimulation in the home. PMID:21593996

  11. Do Verbal Interactions with Infants During Electronic Media Exposure Mitigate Adverse Impacts on their Language Development as Toddlers?

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Alan L; Brockmeyer, Carolyn A; Dreyer, Benard P; Fierman, Arthur H; Berkule-Silberman, Samantha B; Tomopoulos, Suzy

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether verbal interactions between mothers and their 6-month-old infants during media exposure ('media verbal interactions') might have direct positive impacts, or mitigate any potential adverse impacts of media exposure, on language development at 14 months. For 253 low-income mother-infant dyads participating in a longitudinal study, media exposure and media verbal interactions were assessed using 24-hour recall diaries. Additionally, general level of cognitive stimulation in the home [StimQ] was assessed at 6 months and language development [Preschool Language Scale-4] was assessed at 14 months. Results suggest that media verbal interactions play a role in the language development of infants from low-income, immigrant families. Evidence showed that media verbal interactions moderated adverse impacts of media exposure found on 14-month language development, with adverse associations found only in the absence the these interactions. Findings also suggest that media verbal interactions may have some direct positive impacts on language development, in that media verbal interactions during the co-viewing of media with educational content (but not other content) were predictive of 14-month language independently of overall level of cognitive stimulation in the home.

  12. Impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences on Psychotic-Like Symptoms and Stress Reactivity in Daily Life in Nonclinical Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ballespí, Sergi; Mitjavila, Mercè; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Kwapil, Thomas R.; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus

    2016-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in elucidating the association of different childhood adversities with psychosis-spectrum symptoms as well as the mechanistic processes involved. This study used experience sampling methodology to examine (i) associations of a range of childhood adversities with psychosis symptom domains in daily life; (ii) whether associations of abuse and neglect with symptoms are consistent across self-report and interview methods of trauma assessment; and (iii) the role of different adversities in moderating affective, psychotic-like, and paranoid reactivity to situational and social stressors. Method A total of 206 nonclinical young adults were administered self-report and interview measures to assess childhood abuse, neglect, bullying, losses, and general traumatic events. Participants received personal digital assistants that signaled them randomly eight times daily for one week to complete questionnaires about current experiences, including symptoms, affect, and stress. Results Self-reported and interview-based abuse and neglect were associated with psychotic-like and paranoid symptoms, whereas only self-reported neglect was associated with negative-like symptoms. Bullying was associated with psychotic-like symptoms. Losses and general traumatic events were not directly associated with any of the symptom domains. All the childhood adversities were associated with stress reactivity in daily life. Interpersonal adversities (abuse, neglect, bullying, and losses) moderated psychotic-like and/or paranoid reactivity to situational and social stressors, whereas general traumatic events moderated psychotic-like reactivity to situational stress. Also, different interpersonal adversities exacerbated psychotic-like and/or paranoid symptoms in response to distinct social stressors. Discussion The present study provides a unique examination of how childhood adversities impact the expression of spectrum symptoms in the real world and lends support

  13. Sex-specific impact of early-life adversity on chronic pain: a large population-based study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Keiko; Matsudaira, Ko; Tanaka, Eizaburo; Oka, Hiroyuki; Katsuhira, Junji; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2017-01-01

    Background Responses to early-life adversity may differ by sex. We investigated the sex-specific impact of early-life adversity on chronic pain, chronic multisite pain, and somatizing tendency with chronic pain. Methods We examined 4229 respondents aged 20–79 years who participated in the Pain Associated Cross-Sectional Epidemiological Survey in Japan. Outcomes were: 1) chronic pain prevalence, 2) multisite pain (≥3 sites) prevalence, and 3) multiple somatic symptoms (≥3 symptoms) among respondents with chronic pain related to the presence or absence of early-life adversity. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with 95% confidence intervals using a logistic regression model including age, smoking status, exercise routine, sleep time, body mass index, household expenditure, and the full distribution of scores on the Mental Health Inventory-5. We further adjusted for pain intensity when we analyzed the data for respondents with chronic pain. Results The prevalence of chronic pain was higher among respondents reporting the presence of early-life adversity compared with those reporting its absence, with multivariable ORs of 1.62 (1.22–2.15, p<0.01) in men and 1.47 (1.13–1.90, p<0.01) in women. Among women with chronic pain, early-life adversity was associated with multisite pain and multiple somatic symptoms; multivariable ORs were 1.78 (1.22–2.60, p<0.01) for multisite pain and 1.89 (1.27–2.83, p<0.01) for ≥3 somatic symptoms. No associations were observed between early-life adversity and chronic multisite pain or multiple somatic symptoms among men with chronic pain. Conclusion Early-life adversity may be linked to a higher prevalence of chronic pain among both sexes and to multisite pain and somatizing tendency among women with chronic pain. PMID:28243147

  14. Predictors of Spontaneous and Systematically Assessed Suicidal Adverse Events in the Treatment of SSRI Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Brent, David; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Greg; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Spirito, Anthony; Ritz, Louise; Vitiello, Benedetto; Iyengar, Satish; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Zelazny, Jamie; Onorato, Matthew; Kennard, Betsy; Mayes, Taryn; DeBar, Lynn; McCracken, James; Strober, Michael; Suddath, Robert; Leonard, Henrietta; Porta, Giovanna; Keller, Marty

    2013-01-01

    Objective The authors sought to identify predictors of self-harm adverse events in treatment-resistant, depressed adolescents during the first 12 weeks of treatment. Method Depressed adolescents (N=334) who had not responded to a previous trial with an SSRI antidepressant were randomized to a switch to either another SSRI or venlafaxine, with or without cognitive behavior therapy. Self-harm events, i.e., suicidal and non-suicidal self-injury adverse events were assessed by spontaneous report for the first 181 participants, and by systematic weekly assessment for the last 153 participants. Results Higher rates of suicidal (20.8% vs. 8.8%) and nonsuicidal self-injury (17.6% vs. 2.2%), but not serious adverse events (8.4% vs. 7.3%) were detected with systematic monitoring. Median time to a suicidal event was 3 weeks, predicted by high baseline suicidal ideation, family conflict, and drug and alcohol use. Median time to nonsuicidal self-injury was 2 weeks, predicted by previous history of nonsuicidal self-injury. While there were no main effects of treatment, venlafaxine treatment was associated with a higher rate of self-harm adverse events in those with higher suicidal ideation. Adjunctive use of benzodiazepines, while in a small number of participants (N=10) was associated with higher rate of both suicidal and nonsuicidal self-injury adverse events. Conclusions Since predictors of suicidal adverse events also predict poor response to treatment, and many of these events occurred early in treatment, improving the speed of response to depression, by targeting of family conflict, suicidal ideation, and drug use may help to reduce their incidence. The relationship of venlafaxine and of benzodiazepines to selfharm events requires further study and clinical caution. PMID:19223438

  15. Bioremediation of adverse impact of cadmium toxicity on Cassia italica Mill by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    PubMed Central

    Hashem, Abeer; Abd_Allah, E.F.; Alqarawi, A.A.; Egamberdieva, Dilfuza

    2015-01-01

    Cassia italica Mill is an important medicinal plant within the family Fabaceae. Pot experiment was conducted to evaluate cadmium stress induced changes in physiological and biochemical attributes in C. italica with and without arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Cadmium stressed plant showed reduced chlorophyll pigment and protein content while AMF inoculation enhanced the chlorophyll and protein content considerably. AMF also ameliorated the cadmium stress induced reduction in total chlorophyll and protein contents by 19.30% and 38.29%, respectively. Cadmium stress enhanced lipid peroxidation while AMF inoculation reduced lipid peroxidation considerably. Increase in proline and phenol content was observed due to cadmium stress and AMF inoculation caused a further increase in proline and phenol content ensuring better growth under stressed conditions. AMF alone also enhanced proline and phenol content. Activity of antioxidant enzymes enhanced under cadmium treatment and AMF inoculation further enhanced their activity thereby strengthening the antioxidant system. Enhanced activities of antioxidants and increased accumulation of osmolytes help plants to avoid damaging impact of oxidative damage. The research has shown that AMF inoculation mitigated the negative impact of stress by reducing the lipid peroxidation and enhancing the antioxidant activity. The present study strongly supports employing AMF as the biological mean for enhancing the cadmium stress tolerance of C. italica. PMID:26858537

  16. Iron Deficiency Anemia Coexists with Cancer Related Anemia and Adversely Impacts Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Kanuri, Giridhar; Sawhney, Ritica; Varghese, Jeeva; Britto, Madonna; Shet, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer related anemia (CRA) adversely affects patient Quality of Life (QoL) and overall survival. We prospectively studied the prevalence, etiology and the impact of anemia on QoL in 218 Indian cancer patients attending a tertiary referral hospital. The study used the sTfR/log Ferritin index to detect iron deficiency anemia and assessed patient QoL using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Anemia (FACT-An) tool, standardized for language. Mean patient age was 51±13 years and 60% were female. The prevalence of cancer related anemia in this setting was 64% (n = 139). As expected, plasma ferritin did not differ significantly between anemic (n = 121) and non-anemic cancer patients (n = 73). In contrast, plasma sTfR levels were significantly higher in anemic cancer patients compared to non-anemic cancer patients (31 nmol/L vs. 24 nmol/L, p = 0.002). Among anemic cancer patients, using the sTfR/log Ferritin index, we found that 60% (n = 83) had iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Interestingly, plasma sTfR levels were significantly higher in cancer patients with CRA+IDA (n = 83) compared with patients having CRA (n = 38) alone (39 nmol/L vs. 20 nmol/L, p<0.001). There was a significant linear correlation between Hb and QoL (Spearman ρ = 0.21; p = 0.001) and multivariate regression analysis revealed that every gram rise in Hb was accompanied by a 3.1 unit increase in the QoL score (95% CI = 0.19–5.33; p = 0.003). The high prevalence of anemia in cancer patients, a major portion of which is due to iron deficiency anemia, the availability of sensitive and specific biomarkers of iron status to detect IDA superimposed on anemia of inflammation, suggests an urgent need to diagnose and treat such patients. Despite the potential negative consequences of increasing metabolically available plasma iron in cancer, our clinical data suggest that detecting and treating IDA in anemic cancer patients will have important consequences to their QoL and overall survival. Clinical

  17. Bullous pemphigoid: corticosteroid treatment and adverse effects in long-term care patients.

    PubMed

    Spivey, Justin; Nye, Ann Marie

    2013-07-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common autoimmune bullous disease. It primarily presents in elderly patients older than 70 years of age. The presentation can vary with localized or generalized disease that variably affects mucosal tissue. Therapy primarily consists of administration of topical and systemic corticosteroids. Topical corticosteroids are effective with less adverse effects compared with systemic steroids. Other therapies, such as steroid-sparing agents and plasma exchanges, have been recommended and studied to some degree, but these require more evidence before they can be routinely recommended. A 68-year-old African-American female resident of a nursing facility develops a rash and is evaluated at a dermatology clinic. Since the resident has many medications and concomitant diseases, the physician at first suspected a drug rash. On subsequent visits, the resident undergoes multiple punch biopsies and is diagnosed with BP. Treatment is initiated with topical steroids, systemic steroids, and oral minocycline. On a follow-up visit, the resident is showing improvement of her BP. However, the resident's hypertension and hyperglycemia are now uncontrolled as a result of the discontinuation of hydrochlorothiazide and the initiation of steroid therapy. This case highlights the dangers of corticosteroids in patients, especially the elderly, who have multiple comorbidities.

  18. Adverse Late and Long-Term Treatment Effects in Adult Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Survivors.

    PubMed

    Mosesso, Kara

    2015-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become the standard of care for many malignant and nonmalignant hematologic diseases that don't respond to traditional therapy. There are two types: autologous transplantation (auto-HSCT), in which an individual's stem cells are collected, stored, and infused back into that person; and allogeneic transplantation (allo-HSCT), in which healthy donor stem cells are infused into a recipient whose bone marrow has been damaged or destroyed. There have been numerous advancements in this field, leading to marked increases in the number of transplants performed annually. This article--the first of several on cancer survivorship--focuses on the care of adult allo-HSCT survivors because of the greater complexity of their posttransplant course. The author summarizes potential adverse late and long-term treatment-related effects, with special focus on the evaluation and management of several cardiovascular disease risk factors that can occur either independently or concurrently as part of the metabolic syndrome. These risk factors are potentially modifiable with appropriate nursing interventions and lifestyle modifications.

  19. Adverse events in the intensive care unit: impact on mortality and length of stay in a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Roque, Keroulay Estebanez; Tonini, Teresa; Melo, Enirtes Caetano Prates

    2016-10-20

    This study sought to evaluate the occurrence of adverse events and their impacts on length of stay and mortality in an intensive care unit (ICU). This is a prospective study carried out in a teaching hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The cohort included 355 patients over 18 years of age admitted to the ICU between August 1, 2011 and July 31, 2012. The process we used to identify adverse events was adapted from the method proposed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. We used a logistical regression to analyze the association between adverse event occurrence and death, adjusted by case severity. We confirmed 324 adverse events in 115 patients admitted over the year we followed. The incidence rate was 9.3 adverse events per 100 patients-day and adverse event occurrence impacted on an increase in length of stay (19 days) and in mortality (OR = 2.047; 95%CI: 1.172-3.570). This study highlights the serious problem of adverse events in intensive care and the risk factors associated with adverse event incidence. Resumo: Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a ocorrência de eventos adversos e o impacto deles sobre o tempo de permanência e a mortalidade na unidade de terapia intensiva (UTI). Trata-se de um estudo prospectivo desenvolvido em um hospital de ensino do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. A coorte foi formada por 355 pacientes maiores de 18 anos, admitidos na UTI, no período de 1º de agosto de 2011 a 31 de julho de 2012. O processo de identificação de eventos adversos baseou-se em uma adaptação do método proposto pelo Institute for Healthcare Improvement. A regressão logística foi utilizada para analisar a associação entre a ocorrência de evento adverso e o óbito, ajustado pela gravidade do paciente. Confirmados 324 eventos adversos em 115 pacientes internados ao longo de um ano de seguimento. A taxa de incidência foi de 9,3 eventos adversos por 100 pacientes-dia, e a ocorrência de evento adverso impactou no aumento do tempo de internação (19

  20. Negative Effects of Psychological Treatments: An Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Negative Effects Questionnaire for Monitoring and Reporting Adverse and Unwanted Events

    PubMed Central

    Kottorp, Anders; Boettcher, Johanna; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2016-01-01

    Research conducted during the last decades has provided increasing evidence for the use of psychological treatments for a number of psychiatric disorders and somatic complaints. However, by focusing only on the positive outcomes, less attention has been given to the potential of negative effects. Despite indications of deterioration and other adverse and unwanted events during treatment, little is known about their occurrence and characteristics. Hence, in order to facilitate research of negative effects, a new instrument for monitoring and reporting their incidence and impact was developed using a consensus among researchers, self-reports by patients, and a literature review: the Negative Effects Questionnaire. Participants were recruited via a smartphone-delivered self-help treatment for social anxiety disorder and through the media (N = 653). An exploratory factor analysis was performed, resulting in a six-factor solution with 32 items, accounting for 57.64% of the variance. The derived factors were: symptoms, quality, dependency, stigma, hopelessness, and failure. Items related to unpleasant memories, stress, and anxiety were experienced by more than one-third of the participants. Further, increased or novel symptoms, as well as lack of quality in the treatment and therapeutic relationship rendered the highest self-reported negative impact. In addition, the findings were discussed in relation to prior research and other similar instruments of adverse and unwanted events, giving credence to the items that are included. The instrument is presently available in eleven different languages and can be freely downloaded and used from www.neqscale.com. PMID:27331907

  1. Negative Effects of Psychological Treatments: An Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Negative Effects Questionnaire for Monitoring and Reporting Adverse and Unwanted Events.

    PubMed

    Rozental, Alexander; Kottorp, Anders; Boettcher, Johanna; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2016-01-01

    Research conducted during the last decades has provided increasing evidence for the use of psychological treatments for a number of psychiatric disorders and somatic complaints. However, by focusing only on the positive outcomes, less attention has been given to the potential of negative effects. Despite indications of deterioration and other adverse and unwanted events during treatment, little is known about their occurrence and characteristics. Hence, in order to facilitate research of negative effects, a new instrument for monitoring and reporting their incidence and impact was developed using a consensus among researchers, self-reports by patients, and a literature review: the Negative Effects Questionnaire. Participants were recruited via a smartphone-delivered self-help treatment for social anxiety disorder and through the media (N = 653). An exploratory factor analysis was performed, resulting in a six-factor solution with 32 items, accounting for 57.64% of the variance. The derived factors were: symptoms, quality, dependency, stigma, hopelessness, and failure. Items related to unpleasant memories, stress, and anxiety were experienced by more than one-third of the participants. Further, increased or novel symptoms, as well as lack of quality in the treatment and therapeutic relationship rendered the highest self-reported negative impact. In addition, the findings were discussed in relation to prior research and other similar instruments of adverse and unwanted events, giving credence to the items that are included. The instrument is presently available in eleven different languages and can be freely downloaded and used from www.neqscale.com.

  2. [Mental health of children, adolescents and young adults--part 1: prevalence, illness persistence, adversities, service use, treatment delay and consequences].

    PubMed

    Lambert, M; Bock, T; Naber, D; Löwe, B; Schulte-Markwort, M; Schäfer, I; Gumz, A; Degkwitz, P; Schulte, B; König, H H; Konnopka, A; Bauer, M; Bechdolf, A; Correll, C; Juckel, G; Klosterkötter, J; Leopold, K; Pfennig, A; Karow, A

    2013-11-01

    Numerous birth-control studies, epidemiological studies, and observational studies have investigated mental health and health care in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood, including prevalence, age at onset, adversities, illness persistence, service use, treatment delay and course of illness. Moreover, the impact of the burden of illness, of deficits of present health care systems, and the efficacy and effectiveness of early intervention services on mental health were evaluated. According to these data, most mental disorders start during childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. Many children, adolescents and young adults are exposed to single or multiple adversities, which increase the risk for (early) manifestations of mental diseases as well as for their chronicity. Early-onset mental disorders often persist into adulthood. Service use by children, adolescents and young adults is low, even lower than for adult patients. Moreover, there is often a long delay between onset of illness and first adequate treatment with a variety of linked consequences for a poorer psychosocial prognosis. This leads to a large burden of illness with respect to disability and costs. As a consequence several countries have implemented so-called "early intervention services" at the interface of child and adolescent and adult psychiatry. Emerging studies show that these health-care structures are effective and efficient. Part 1 of the present review summarises the current state of mental health in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood, including prevalence, age at onset, adversities, illness persistence, service use, and treatment delay with consequences.

  3. Impact of adverse weather on sensors for vehicle collision avoidance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everson, Jeffrey H.; Kopala, Edward W.; Lazofson, Laurence E.; Choe, Howard C.; Pomerleau, Dean A.

    1995-12-01

    This paper treats the use of in-vehicle imaging sensors to achieve lateral control to avoid single vehicle roadway departure crashes. Since the sensor is expected to function under a variety of weather conditions, it is important to determine the overall performance envelope of the combined sensor/image processing algorithm. Initial roadway imagery was acquired under favorable ambient conditions and subsequently transformed to specified levels of adverse weather by means of software originally developed for military sensor applications. The transformed imagery was utilized to determine the relationship between adverse weather, measured in visibility ranges, versus the ability of the sensor/image processing algorithm to maintain lateral vehicle stability.

  4. The Noise from Wind Turbines: Potential Adverse Impacts on Children's Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronzaft, Arline L.

    2011-01-01

    Research linking loud sounds to hearing loss in youngsters is now widespread, resulting in the issuance of warnings to protect children's hearing. However, studies attesting to the adverse effects of intrusive sounds and noise on children's overall mental and physical health and well-being have not received similar attention. This, despite the…

  5. The Impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences on an Urban Pediatric Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Nadine J.; Hellman, Julia L.; Scott, Brandon G.; Weems, Carl F.; Carrion, Victor G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to investigate the adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) in youth in a low-income, urban community. Study design: Data from a retrospective chart review of 701 subjects from the Bayview Child Health Center in San Francisco are presented. Medical chart documentation of ACEs as defined in previous studies were…

  6. Prospective Observational Study of Adverse Drug Reactions of Anticancer Drugs Used in Cancer Treatment in a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Saini, V K; Sewal, R K; Ahmad, Yusra; Medhi, B

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions associated with the use of anticancer drugs are a worldwide problem and cannot be ignored. Adverse drug reactions can range from nausea, vomiting or any other mild reaction to severe myelosuppression. The study was planned to observe the suspected adverse drug reactions of cancer chemotherapy in patients aged >18 years having cancer attending Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh. During the study period, 101 patients of breast cancer and 73 patients of lung cancer were screened for occurrence of adverse drug reactions during their treatment with chemotherapy. About 87.36% patients experienced adverse drug reactions, 90.09% and 83.56% of breast and lung cancer patients experienced at least one adverse drug reaction respectively. In breast cancer patients, 41.58% patients were prescribed fluorouracil+doxorubicin+cyclophosphamide while paclitaxel was prescribed to 22.77% patients. Alopecia (54.94%), nail discolouration (43.96%), dysgeusia (38.46%), anorexia (30.77%), nausea (29.67%), and neuropathy (29.67%) were found to be very common in breast cancer patients treated with single/combined regimen. In lung cancer group of patients, cisplatin with docetaxel, cisplatin with pemetrexed and cisplatin with irinotecan were prescribed to 30.14, 24.65 and 17.81% patients, respectively. Dysgeusia (40.98%), diarrhoea (39.34%), anorexia (32.77%) and constipation (31.15%) and alopecia (31.15%) were commonly observed adverse drug reactions having lung cancer patients. Causality assessments using World Health Organization causality assessment scale showed that observed adverse drug reactions were of probable (64.67%) and possible (35.33%) categories. Alopecia, dysgeusia, anorexia, constipation diarrhoea, nausea, nail discoloration were more prevalent amongst the cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  7. A holistic look at minimizing adverse environmental impact under Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act.

    PubMed

    Veil, John A; Puder, Markus G; Littleton, Debra J; Johnson, Nancy

    2002-04-18

    Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires that "the location, design, construction, and capacity of cooling water intake structures reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact." As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) develops new regulations to implement Section 316(b), much of the debate has centered on adverse impingement and entrainment impacts of cooling-water intake structures. Depending on the specific location and intake layout, once-through cooling systems withdrawing many millions of gallons of water per day can, to a varying degree, harm fish and other aquatic organisms in the water bodies from which the cooling water is withdrawn. Therefore, opponents of once-through cooling systems have encouraged the EPA to require wet or dry cooling tower systems as the best technology available (BTA), without considering site-specific conditions. However, within the context of the broader scope of the CWA mandate, this focus seems too narrow. Therefore, this article examines the phrase "minimizing adverse environmental impact" in a holistic light. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the terms "environmental" and "minimizing." Congress chose "environmental" in lieu of other more narrowly focused terms like "impingement and entrainment," "water quality," or "aquatic life." In this light, BTA for cooling-water intake structures must minimize the entire suite of environmental impacts, as opposed to just those associated with impingement and entrainment. Wet and dry cooling tower systems work well to minimize entrainment and impingement, but they introduce other equally important impacts because they impose an energy penalty on the power output of the generating unit. The energy penalty results from a reduction in plant operating efficiency and an increase in internal power consumption. As a consequence of the energy penalty, power companies must generate additional electricity to achieve the same net output

  8. Impact of Extended-Duration Shifts on Medical Errors, Adverse Events, and Attentional Failures

    PubMed Central

    Barger, Laura K; Ayas, Najib T; Cade, Brian E; Cronin, John W; Rosner, Bernard; Speizer, Frank E; Czeisler, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    Background A recent randomized controlled trial in critical-care units revealed that the elimination of extended-duration work shifts (≥24 h) reduces the rates of significant medical errors and polysomnographically recorded attentional failures. This raised the concern that the extended-duration shifts commonly worked by interns may contribute to the risk of medical errors being made, and perhaps to the risk of adverse events more generally. Our current study assessed whether extended-duration shifts worked by interns are associated with significant medical errors, adverse events, and attentional failures in a diverse population of interns across the United States. Methods and Findings We conducted a Web-based survey, across the United States, in which 2,737 residents in their first postgraduate year (interns) completed 17,003 monthly reports. The association between the number of extended-duration shifts worked in the month and the reporting of significant medical errors, preventable adverse events, and attentional failures was assessed using a case-crossover analysis in which each intern acted as his/her own control. Compared to months in which no extended-duration shifts were worked, during months in which between one and four extended-duration shifts and five or more extended-duration shifts were worked, the odds ratios of reporting at least one fatigue-related significant medical error were 3.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.3–3.7) and 7.5 (95% CI, 7.2–7.8), respectively. The respective odds ratios for fatigue-related preventable adverse events, 8.7 (95% CI, 3.4–22) and 7.0 (95% CI, 4.3–11), were also increased. Interns working five or more extended-duration shifts per month reported more attentional failures during lectures, rounds, and clinical activities, including surgery and reported 300% more fatigue-related preventable adverse events resulting in a fatality. Conclusions In our survey, extended-duration work shifts were associated with an

  9. A Holistic Look at Minimizing Adverse Environmental Impact Under Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act

    DOE PAGES

    Veil, John A.; Puder, Markus G.; Littleton, Debra J.; ...

    2002-01-01

    Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires that “the location, design, construction, and capacity of cooling water intake structures reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact.” As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) develops new regulations to implement Section 316(b), much of the debate has centered on adverse impingement and entrainment impacts of cooling-water intake structures. Depending on the specific location and intake layout, once-through cooling systems withdrawing many millions of gallons of water per day can, to a varying degree, harm fish and other aquatic organisms in the water bodies from which the coolingmore » water is withdrawn. Therefore, opponents of once-through cooling systems have encouraged the EPA to require wet or dry cooling tower systems as the best technology available (BTA), without considering site-specific conditions. However, within the context of the broader scope of the CWA mandate, this focus seems too narrow. Therefore, this article examines the phrase “minimizing adverse environmental impact” in a holistic light. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the terms “environmental” and “minimizing.” Congress chose “environmental” in lieu of other more narrowly focused terms like “impingement and entrainment,” “water quality,” or “aquatic life.” In this light, BTA for cooling-water intake structures must minimize the entire suite of environmental impacts, as opposed to just those associated with impingement and entrainment. Wet and dry cooling tower systems work well to minimize entrainment and impingement, but they introduce other equally important impacts because they impose an energy penalty on the power output of the generating unit. The energy penalty results from a reduction in plant operating efficiency and an increase in internal power consumption. As a consequence of the energy penalty, power companies must generate additional

  10. The impact of outpatient chemotherapy-related adverse events on the quality of life of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tachi, Tomoya; Teramachi, Hitomi; Tanaka, Kazuhide; Asano, Shoko; Osawa, Tomohiro; Kawashima, Azusa; Yasuda, Masahiro; Mizui, Takashi; Nakada, Takumi; Noguchi, Yoshihiro; Tsuchiya, Teruo; Goto, Chitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of our study was to clarify the impact of adverse events associated with the initial course of outpatient chemotherapy on the quality of life of breast cancer patients. We conducted a survey to assess the quality of life in 48 breast cancer patients before and after receiving their first course of outpatient chemotherapy at Gifu Municipal Hospital. Patients completed the European Quality of Life 5 Dimensions and Quality of Life Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs before and after 1 course of outpatient chemotherapy. European Quality of Life 5 Dimensions utility value and Quality of Life Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs total score decreased significantly after chemotherapy (p<0.001 and p = 0.018, respectively). The mean scores for the activity, physical condition, and psychological condition subscales of the Quality of Life Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs decreased significantly after chemotherapy (p = 0.003, p<0.001, and p = 0.032, respectively), whereas the social relationships score increased significantly (p<0.001). Furthermore, in the evaluation of quality of life according to individual adverse events, the decrease in quality of life after chemotherapy in terms of the European Quality of Life 5 Dimensions utility value and the Quality of Life Questionnaire for Cancer Patients Treated with Anticancer Drugs total score was greater in anorexic patients than in non-anorexic patients (p = 0.009 and p<0.001, respectively). This suggests that anorexia greatly reduces quality of life. Our findings reveal that anticancer drug-related adverse events, particularly anorexia, reduce overall quality of life following the first course of outpatient chemotherapy in current breast cancer patients. These findings are extremely useful and important in understanding the impact of anticancer drug-related adverse events on quality of life.

  11. Stress Moderates the Effect of Childhood Trauma and Adversity on Recent Drinking in Treatment-seeking Alcohol-dependent Men

    PubMed Central

    Eames, Sarah F.; Businelle, Michael S.; Suris, Alina; Walker, Robrina; Rao, Uma; North, Carol S.; Xiao, Hong; Adinoff, Bryon

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study sought to clarify the relationship between childhood trauma and adversity with later alcohol consumption and the moderating effects of adult psychosocial stress. Method Seventy-seven recently abstinent alcohol-dependent men attending residential treatment programs were assessed. Childhood trauma/adversity was assessed with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), drinks per drinking day (DDD) with the TimeLine Follow Back, and chronic psychosocial stress with the UCLA Stress Interview. Drinking and stress were retrospectively assessed for six months prior to the present treatment episode. Direct associations between childhood trauma/adversity and alcohol consumption and the moderating effects of recent psychosocial stress were assessed. All measures were considered as continuous variables. Results Pretreatment drinking severity (DDD) was associated with CTQ Total score (p = .009) and the Emotional Abuse (p < .001) and Physical Abuse (p < .01) subscales. UCLA Total Stress significantly moderated the effects of CTQ Total score on drinking severity (p = .04). Whereas higher CTQ scores were significantly associated with a greater amount of pretreatment drinking in participants with high UCLA stress scores (p = .01), CTQ scores were not associated with the amount of drinking in those with low UCLA stress scores (p = .63). Conclusions Childhood trauma predicts drinking severity in alcohol-dependent men and this effect is stronger in participants with ongoing stress in adult life. These findings suggest that early childhood trauma/adversity may sensitize stress-response systems. PMID:24635549

  12. Identification and prioritization of relationships between environmental stressor and adverse human health impacts

    EPA Science Inventory

    AbstractBackground: There are over 80,000 chemicals in commerce with little data available describing their impacts on human health. Biomonitoring surveys, such as the NHANES, offer one route to identifying possible relationships between environmental chemicals and health impacts...

  13. Adverse Impact of Racial Isolation on Student Performance: A Study in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Andy; Joyner, Ann Moss; Osment, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of racial isolation on high school student performance in North Carolina, a state in the southeast United States. Our research goal is to investigate if increased isolation negatively impacts Black students' academic performance. Employing the North Carolina State Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) dataset, we…

  14. Relationship Between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Homelessness and the Impact of Axis I and II Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Leslie E.; Mota, Natalie; Afifi, Tracie O.; Katz, Laurence Y.; Distasio, Jino

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated the links between homelessness associated with serious mental and physical healthy disparities and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) in nationally representative data, with Axis I and II disorders as potential mediators. Methods. We examined data from the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions in 2001–2002 and 2004–2005, and included 34 653 participants representative of the noninstitutionalized US population who were 20 years old or older. We studied the variables related to 4 classes of Axis I disorders, all 10 Axis II personality disorders, a wide range of ACEs, and a lifetime history of homelessness. Results. Analyses revealed high prevalences of each ACE in individuals experiencing lifetime homelessness (17%–60%). A mediation model with Axis I and II disorders determined that childhood adversities were significantly related to homelessness through direct effects (adjusted odd ratios = 2.04, 4.24) and indirect effects, indicating partial mediation. Population attributable fractions were also reported. Conclusions. Although Axis I and II disorders partially mediated the relationship between ACEs and homelessness, a strong direct association remained. This novel finding has implications for interventions and policy. Additional research is needed to understand relevant causal pathways. PMID:24148049

  15. Late-onset Tay-Sachs disease: adverse effects of medications and implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, B E; Hatters-Friedman, S; Fernandes-Filho, J A; Anthony, K; Natowicz, M R

    2006-09-12

    The authors conducted a retrospective and brief prospective study of adverse effects of approximately 350 medications in 44 adults with late-onset Tay-Sachs disease (LOTS). Some medications were relatively safe, whereas others, particularly haloperidol, risperidone, and chlorpromazine, were associated with neurologic worsening.

  16. Serious Adverse Events in Randomized Psychosocial Treatment Studies: Safety or Arbitrary Edicts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, Nancy M.; Roll, John M.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.; Ball, Samuel A.; Stitzer, Maxine; Peirce, Jessica M.; Blaine, Jack; Kirby, Kimberly C.; McCarty, Dennis; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2008-01-01

    Human subjects protection policies developed for pharmaceutical trials are now being widely applied to psychosocial intervention studies. This study examined occurrences of serious adverse events (SAEs) reported in multicenter psychosocial trials of the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network. Substance-abusing participants (N =…

  17. Adverse Effect of Child Abuse Victimization among Substance-Using Women in Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Sung-Yeon; Magura, Stephen; Laudet, Alexandre; Whitney, Shirley

    1999-01-01

    Study examined adverse effects of childhood sexual/physical abuse among substance-abusing women with children. Several significant differences between abused and nonabused women were found in service outcomes. Abused women had more problems relating to drug use and psychiatric/psychological adjustment at follow-up. Findings support a need for…

  18. Managing treatment-related adverse events associated with egfr tyrosine kinase inhibitors in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, V.

    2011-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc) has the highest prevalence of all types of lung cancer, which is the second most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in Canada. The need for more effective and less toxic treatment options for nsclc has led to the development of agents targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (egfr)–mediated signalling pathway, such as egfr tyrosine kinase inhibitors (egfr-tkis). Although egfr-tkis are less toxic than traditional anti-neoplastic agents, they are commonly associated with acneiform-like rash and diarrhea. This review summarizes the clinical presentation and causes of egfr-tki–induced rash and diarrhea, and presents strategies for effective assessment, monitoring, and treatment of these adverse effects. Strategies to improve the management of egfr-tki–related adverse events should improve clinical outcomes, compliance, and quality of life in patients with advanced nsclc. PMID:21655159

  19. Long-term oral baclofen treatment in a child with cerebral palsy: electroencephalographic changes and clinical adverse effects.

    PubMed

    De Rinaldis, Marta; Losito, Luciana; Gennaro, Leonarda; Trabacca, Antonio

    2010-10-01

    Baclofen is widely used to control spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. Several publications described clinical adverse effects of baclofen oral treatment, but the effect of baclofen on seizure potentiation is still controversial. We describe a 10-year-old female patient with cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and mental retardation who developed clinical adverse effects (confusion, agitated state, insomnia, diffuse hypotonia, and hyporeflexia) and electroencephalographic (EEG) changes (quasiperiodic, generalized burst of sharp waves that take up >50% of standard EEG) during long-term oral baclofen treatment, after gradually increasing the dosage but still within the therapeutic dose. Our case showed clearly that the EEG changes in our patient, with a history of epilepsy in good control, have been induced by the baclofen increase, and we describe the possible mechanisms that could explain proconvulsive effect of baclofen.

  20. IMPACT OF ABDOMINAL OBESITY ON INCIDENCE OF ADVERSE METABOLIC EFFECTS ASSOCIATED WITH ANTIHYPERTENSIVE MEDICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Wen, Sheron; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Zineh, Issam; Gums, John G.; Turner, Stephen T.; Gong, Yan; Hall, Karen; Parekh, Vishal; Chapman, Arlene B.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Johnson, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    We assessed adverse metabolic effects (AMEs) of atenolol and hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) among hypertensive patients with and without abdominal obesity using data from a randomized, open-label study of hypertensive patients without evidence of cardiovascular disease or diabetes. Intervention included randomization to HCTZ 25mg or atenolol 100mg monotherapy followed by their combination. Fasting glucose, insulin, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol and uric acid were measured at baseline and after mono-and combination therapy. Outcomes included new occurrence of and predictors for new cases of glucose ≥ 100mg/dl (impaired fasting glucose [IFG]), triglyceride ≥ 150 mg/dl, HDL ≤ 40mg/dl for men or ≤ 50mg/dl for women, or new onset diabetes according to presence or absence of abdominal obesity. Abdominal obesity was present in 167/395 (58%). Regardless of strategy, in those with abdominal obesity, 20% had IFG at baseline compared with 40% at end of study (p<0.0001). Proportion with triglycerides ≥ 150 mg/dl increased from 33% at baseline to 46% at end of study (p<0.01). New onset diabetes occurred in 13 (6%) with and in 4 (2%) without abdominal obesity. Baseline levels of glucose, triglyceride and HDL predicted adverse outcomes and predictors for new onset diabetes after monotherapy in those with abdominal obesity included HCTZ strategy (OR 47, 95% CI 2.55-862), female sex (OR 31.3, 95% CI 2.10-500) and uric acid (OR 3.2, 95% CI 2.35-7.50). Development of AME, including new onset diabetes associated with short term exposure to HCTZ and atenolol was more common in those with abdominal obesity. PMID:19917874

  1. Interactions of early adversity with stress-related gene polymorphisms impact regional brain structure in females

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Arpana; Labus, Jennifer; Kilpatrick, Lisa A.; Bonyadi, Mariam; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Heendeniya, Nuwanthi; Bradesi, Sylvie; Chang, Lin; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2015-01-01

    Early adverse life events (EALs) have been associated with regional thinning of the subgenual cingulate cortex (sgACC), a brain region implicated in the development of disorders of mood and affect, and often comorbid functional pain disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Regional neuroinflammation related to chronic stress system activation has been suggested as a possible mechanism underlying these neuroplastic changes. However, the interaction of genetic and environmental factors in these changes is poorly understood. The current study aimed to evaluate the interactions of EALs and candidate gene polymorphisms in influencing thickness of the sgACC. 210 female subjects (137 healthy controls; 73 IBS) were genotyped for stress and inflammation-related gene polymorphisms. Genetic variation with EALs, and diagnosis on sgACC thickness was examined, while controlling for race, age, and total brain volume. Compared to HCs, IBS had significantly reduced sgACC thickness (p = 0.03). Regardless of disease group (IBS vs. HC), thinning of the left sgACC was associated with a significant gene-gene environment interaction between the IL-1β genotype, the NR3C1 haplotype, and a history of EALs (p = 0.05). Reduced sgACC thickness in women with the minor IL-1β allele, was associated with EAL total scores regardless of NR3C1 haplotype status (p = 0.02). In subjects homozygous for the major IL-1β allele, reduced sgACC with increasing levels of EALs was seen only with the less common NR3C1 haplotype (p = 0.02). These findings support an interaction between polymorphisms related to stress and inflammation and early adverse life events in modulating a key region of the emotion arousal circuit. PMID:25630611

  2. Factors influencing adverse skin responses in rats receiving repeated subcutaneous injections and potential impact on neurobehavior

    PubMed Central

    Levoe, S. Nikki; Flannery, Brenna M.; Brignolo, Laurie; Imai, Denise M.; Koehne, Amanda; Austin, Adam T.; Bruun, Donald A.; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated subcutaneous (s.c.) injection is a common route of administration in chronic studies of neuroactive compounds. However, in a pilot study we noted a significant incidence of skin abnormalities in adult male Long-Evans rats receiving daily s.c. injections of peanut oil (1.0 ml/kg) in the subscapular region for 21 d. Histopathological analyses of the lesions were consistent with a foreign body reaction. Subsequent studies were conducted to determine factors that influenced the incidence or severity of skin abnormalities, and whether these adverse skin reactions influenced a specific neurobehavioral outcome. Rats injected daily for 21 d with food grade peanut oil had an earlier onset and greater incidence of skin abnormalities relative to rats receiving an equal volume (1.0 ml/kg/d) of reagent grade peanut oil or triglyceride of coconut oil. Skin abnormalities in animals injected daily with peanut oil were increased in animals housed on corncob versus paper bedding. Comparison of animals obtained from different barrier facilities exposed to the same injection paradigm (reagent grade peanut oil, 1.0 ml/kg/d s.c.) revealed significant differences in the severity of skin abnormalities. However, animals from different barrier facilities did not perform differently in a Pavlovian fear conditioning task. Collectively, these data suggest that environmental factors influence the incidence and severity of skin abnormalities following repeated s.c. injections, but that these adverse skin responses do not significantly influence performance in at least one test of learning and memory. PMID:25705100

  3. Population Trends of Central European Montane Birds Provide Evidence for Adverse Impacts of Climate Change on High-Altitude Species.

    PubMed

    Flousek, Jiří; Telenský, Tomáš; Hanzelka, Jan; Reif, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is among the most important global threats to biodiversity and mountain areas are supposed to be under especially high pressure. Although recent modelling studies suggest considerable future range contractions of montane species accompanied with increased extinction risk, data allowing to test actual population consequences of the observed climate changes and identifying traits associated to their adverse impacts are very scarce. To fill this knowledge gap, we estimated long-term population trends of montane birds from 1984 to 2011 in a central European mountain range, the Giant Mountains (Krkonoše), where significant warming occurred over this period. We then related the population trends to several species' traits related to the climate change effects. We found that the species breeding in various habitats at higher altitudes had more negative trends than species breeding at lower altitudes. We also found that the species moved upwards as a response to warming climate, and these altitudinal range shifts were associated with more positive population trends at lower altitudes than at higher altitudes. Moreover, long-distance migrants declined more than residents or species migrating for shorter distances. Taken together, these results indicate that the climate change, besides other possible environmental changes, already influences populations of montane birds with particularly adverse impacts on high-altitude species such as water pipit (Anthus spinoletta). It is evident that the alpine species, predicted to undergo serious climatically induced range contractions due to warming climate in the future, already started moving along this trajectory.

  4. Population Trends of Central European Montane Birds Provide Evidence for Adverse Impacts of Climate Change on High-Altitude Species

    PubMed Central

    Flousek, Jiří; Telenský, Tomáš; Hanzelka, Jan; Reif, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is among the most important global threats to biodiversity and mountain areas are supposed to be under especially high pressure. Although recent modelling studies suggest considerable future range contractions of montane species accompanied with increased extinction risk, data allowing to test actual population consequences of the observed climate changes and identifying traits associated to their adverse impacts are very scarce. To fill this knowledge gap, we estimated long-term population trends of montane birds from 1984 to 2011 in a central European mountain range, the Giant Mountains (Krkonoše), where significant warming occurred over this period. We then related the population trends to several species' traits related to the climate change effects. We found that the species breeding in various habitats at higher altitudes had more negative trends than species breeding at lower altitudes. We also found that the species moved upwards as a response to warming climate, and these altitudinal range shifts were associated with more positive population trends at lower altitudes than at higher altitudes. Moreover, long-distance migrants declined more than residents or species migrating for shorter distances. Taken together, these results indicate that the climate change, besides other possible environmental changes, already influences populations of montane birds with particularly adverse impacts on high-altitude species such as water pipit (Anthus spinoletta). It is evident that the alpine species, predicted to undergo serious climatically induced range contractions due to warming climate in the future, already started moving along this trajectory. PMID:26426901

  5. Adverse Impact on Educational Opportunity in Cases Challenging State School Financing Schemes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannan, Patricia A.; Minorini, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    A number of state supreme courts have decided cases involving challenges to state public school financing. Summarizes the reactions of courts to plaintiffs' proof concerning the negative impact of inadequate funding on the educational opportunities provided to students in poor school districts. (43 references) (MLF)

  6. An Auxiliary Method To Reduce Potential Adverse Impacts Of Projected Land Developments: Subwatershed Prioritization

    EPA Science Inventory

    An index based method is developed that ranks the subwatersheds of a watershed based on their relative impacts on watershed response to anticipated land developments, and then applied to an urbanizing watershed in Eastern Pennsylvania. Simulations with a semi-distributed hydrolo...

  7. Building associations between markers of environmental stressors and adverse human health impacts using frequent itemset mining

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building associations between markers of exposure and effect using frequent itemset mining The human-health impact of environmental contaminant exposures is unclear. While some exposure-effect relationships are well studied, health effects are unknown for the vast majority of the...

  8. Two Degrees of Separation: Abrupt Climate Change and the Adverse Impact to US National Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    trend of increasing GHG emissions is marginally impacting or irrelevant altogether. “Other factors, including sun spots, solar winds, variations ...climate variations over a wide range of time scales, making it a natural sensor of climate variability and providing a visible expression of climate...many observed changes in phenology and distribution have been associated with rising water temperatures, as well as changes in salinity, oxygen levels

  9. Adverse reactions of Achilles tendon xanthomas in three hypercholesterolemic patients after treatment intensification with niacin and bile acid sequestrants.

    PubMed

    Lakey, Wanda C; Greyshock, Nicole; Guyton, John R

    2013-01-01

    Multiple cholesterol-reducing therapies have been shown to induce the regression of tendon xanthoma in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. We present 3 cases of adverse reactions in Achilles tendon xanthomas after the addition of niacin and bile acid sequestrants to ongoing statin therapy. Reduction in tendon dimensions and marked softening of xanthomas were interpreted as cholesterol removal from heavily infiltrated tissue sites. In 2 cases, changes in the xanthomas occurred despite only minor lipoprotein improvements, raising the possibility of direct drug effects in cholesterol-infiltrated tissue. Intriguingly, recent studies have described niacin receptor-mediated effects in macrophages. In summary, although adverse reactions in Achilles tendon xanthomas appear to be infrequent, clinicians should be aware of this phenomenon in their patients after intensifying lipid treatments, especially with the use of niacin in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia. Xanthoma responses may provide clues to new pharmacologic effects in cholesterol-infiltrated tissues.

  10. Ozone exposure and systemic biomarkers: Evaluation of evidence for adverse cardiovascular health impacts.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Julie E; Prueitt, Robyn L; Sax, Sonja N; Pizzurro, Daniella M; Lynch, Heather N; Zu, Ke; Venditti, Ferdinand J

    2015-05-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently concluded that there is likely to be a causal relationship between short-term (< 30 days) ozone exposure and cardiovascular (CV) effects; however, biological mechanisms to link transient effects with chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD) have not been established. Some studies assessed changes in circulating levels of biomarkers associated with inflammation, oxidative stress, coagulation, vasoreactivity, lipidology, and glucose metabolism after ozone exposure to elucidate a biological mechanism. We conducted a weight-of-evidence (WoE) analysis to determine if there is evidence supporting an association between changes in these biomarkers and short-term ozone exposure that would indicate a biological mechanism for CVD below the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 75 parts per billion (ppb). Epidemiology findings were mixed for all biomarker categories, with only a few studies reporting statistically significant changes and with no consistency in the direction of the reported effects. Controlled human exposure studies of 2 to 5 hours conducted at ozone concentrations above 75 ppb reported small elevations in biomarkers for inflammation and oxidative stress that were of uncertain clinical relevance. Experimental animal studies reported more consistent results among certain biomarkers, although these were also conducted at ozone exposures well above 75 ppb and provided limited information on ozone exposure-response relationships. Overall, the current WoE does not provide a convincing case for a causal relationship between short-term ozone exposure below the NAAQS and adverse changes in levels of biomarkers within and across categories, but, because of study limitations, they cannot not provide definitive evidence of a lack of causation.

  11. Severe burn and disuse in the rat independently adversely impact body composition and adipokines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Severe trauma is accompanied by a period of hypermetabolism and disuse. In this study, a rat model was used to determine the effects of burn and disuse independently and in combination on body composition, food intake and adipokines. Methods Male rats were assigned to four groups 1) sham ambulatory (SA), 2) sham hindlimb unloaded (SH), 3) 40% total body surface area full thickness scald burn ambulatory (BA) and 4) burn and hindlimb unloaded (BH). Animals designated to the SH and BH groups were placed in a tail traction system and their hindlimbs unloaded. Animals were followed for 14 days. Plasma, urine, fecal and tissue samples were analyzed. Results SA had a progressive increase in body mass (BM), SH and BA no change and BH a reduction. Compared to SA, BM was reduced by 10% in both SH and BA and by 17% when combined in BH. Compared to SA, all groups had reductions in lean and fat body mass with BH being greater. The decrease in lean mass was associated with the rate of urinary corticosterone excretion. The loss in fat mass was associated with decreases in plasma leptin and adiponectin and an increase in ghrelin. Following the acute response to injury, BH had a greater food intake per 100 g BM. Food intake was associated with the levels of leptin, adiponectin and ghrelin. Conclusions The effects of the combination of burn and disuse in this animal model were additive, therefore in assessing metabolic changes with severe trauma both injury and disuse should be considered. Furthermore, the observed changes in adipokines, corticosterone and ghrelin provide insights for interventions to attenuate the hypermetabolic state following injury, possibly reducing catabolism and muscle loss and subsequent adverse effects on recovery and function. PMID:24099533

  12. Preferences for Analgesic Treatments Are Influenced by Probability of the Occurrence of Adverse Effects and the Time to Reach Maximal Therapeutic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Shu; Wu, Shih-Yun; Wu, Long-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Research on shared medical decision-making suggested that both the potency of a treatment and the probability of it being successful influence individual treatment preferences. Patients also need to consider the negative attributes of treatments, such as the occurrence of adverse effects or a slow start to the therapeutic effects. It remains unclear how these attributes influence individual treatment preferences. We investigated how the analgesic effect, the adverse effect, and the time-course effect influenced the preference of analgesic treatments. Forty-five healthy volunteers participated in three hypothetical analgesic decision-making tasks. They were instructed to imagine that they were experiencing pain and choose between two hypothetical analgesic treatments: the more potent radical treatment and the less potent conservative treatment. The potency of a treatment was countered by the following attributes: the probability of working successfully, the probability of inducing an adverse effect, and the time required for the treatment to reach its maximal effect. We found that (a) when the overall probability that a treatment would induce an adverse effect decreased, the participants changed their preference from a conservative treatment to a radical treatment; (b) when the time-course for a treatment to reach its maximal effect was shortened, the participants changed their preference from a conservative treatment to a radical treatment, and (c) individual differences in prior clinical pain and the degree of imagined pain relief were associated with preferences. The findings showed that the adverse effects and the time course of treatments guide the analgesic treatment preferences, highlighting the importance of sharing information about negative attributes of treatments in pain management. The findings imply that patients may over-emphasize the occurrence of adverse effect or a slow time-course of treatment effect. In terms of shared medical decision

  13. Dyskinesia as a new adverse effect of hormonal treatment in West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sukhudyan, Biayna G; Dimova, Petia S; Capuano, Alessandro; Vigevano, Federico

    2014-03-01

    West syndrome is an age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy. Despite potential side effects, hormonal therapy remains the main treatment for West syndrome. Here, we report on 10 patients receiving steroid treatment who presented with unusual, mostly hyperkinetic, movements. Facial grimacing, repetitive mouth opening, adduction and abduction of upper and lower extremities, and periodical strabismus in different combinations were observed in all patients, independent of formulation, dose, duration, and efficacy of treatment. Symptoms disappeared in sleep and reappeared immediately on arousal. Dyskinesias stopped gradually after a month of discontinuation of treatment. Repeated EEGs did not show corresponding epileptiform activity. We conclude that these abnormal movements can be attributed to side effects of hormonal treatment.

  14. Impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences on Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration among Sri Lankan Men.

    PubMed

    Fonseka, Ruvani W; Minnis, Alexandra M; Gomez, Anu Manchikanti

    2015-01-01

    In Sri Lanka, over one in three women experience intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization in their lifetime, making it a serious public health concern. Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) such as child abuse and neglect, witnessing domestic violence, parental separation, and bullying are also widespread. Studies in Western settings have shown positive associations between ACEs and IPV perpetration in adulthood, but few have examined this relationship in a non-Western context. In the present study, we examined the association of ACEs with IPV perpetration among Sri Lankan men surveyed for the UN Multi-Country Study on Men and Violence in Asia and the Pacific. We found statistically significant positive associations between the number of ACE categories (ACE score) and emotional, financial, physical, and sexual IPV perpetration among Sri Lankan men. We analyzed the contributions of each ACE category and found that childhood abuse was strongly associated with perpetration of IPV in adulthood, with sexual abuse associated with the greatest increase in odds of perpetration (Adjusted odds ratio 2.36; 95% confidence interval: 1.69, 3.30). Witnessing abuse of one's mother was associated with the greatest increase in the odds of perpetrating physical IPV (AOR 1.82; 95% CI: 1.29, 2.58), while lack of a male parental figure was not associated with physical IPV perpetration (AOR 0.76; 95% CI: 0.53, 1.09). These findings support a social learning theory of IPV perpetration, in which children who are exposed to violence learn to perpetrate IPV in adulthood. They also suggest that in Sri Lanka, being raised in a female-headed household does not increase the risk of IPV perpetration in adulthood compared to being raised in a household with a male parental figure. The relationship between being raised in a female-headed household (the number of which increased dramatically during Sri Lanka's recent civil war) and perpetration of IPV warrants further study. Interventions that

  15. Impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences on Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration among Sri Lankan Men

    PubMed Central

    Fonseka, Ruvani W.; Minnis, Alexandra M.; Gomez, Anu Manchikanti

    2015-01-01

    In Sri Lanka, over one in three women experience intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization in their lifetime, making it a serious public health concern. Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) such as child abuse and neglect, witnessing domestic violence, parental separation, and bullying are also widespread. Studies in Western settings have shown positive associations between ACEs and IPV perpetration in adulthood, but few have examined this relationship in a non-Western context. In the present study, we examined the association of ACEs with IPV perpetration among Sri Lankan men surveyed for the UN Multi-Country Study on Men and Violence in Asia and the Pacific. We found statistically significant positive associations between the number of ACE categories (ACE score) and emotional, financial, physical, and sexual IPV perpetration among Sri Lankan men. We analyzed the contributions of each ACE category and found that childhood abuse was strongly associated with perpetration of IPV in adulthood, with sexual abuse associated with the greatest increase in odds of perpetration (Adjusted odds ratio 2.36; 95% confidence interval: 1.69, 3.30). Witnessing abuse of one’s mother was associated with the greatest increase in the odds of perpetrating physical IPV (AOR 1.82; 95% CI: 1.29, 2.58), while lack of a male parental figure was not associated with physical IPV perpetration (AOR 0.76; 95% CI: 0.53, 1.09). These findings support a social learning theory of IPV perpetration, in which children who are exposed to violence learn to perpetrate IPV in adulthood. They also suggest that in Sri Lanka, being raised in a female-headed household does not increase the risk of IPV perpetration in adulthood compared to being raised in a household with a male parental figure. The relationship between being raised in a female-headed household (the number of which increased dramatically during Sri Lanka’s recent civil war) and perpetration of IPV warrants further study. Interventions

  16. The Impact of Herbal Drug Use on Adverse Drug Reaction Profiles of Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mudzviti, Tinashe; Maponga, Charles C.; Khoza, Star; Ma, Qing; Morse, Gene D.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The main objective was to determine the impact of herbal drug use on adverse drug reactions in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methodology. Patients receiving first-line ART from the national roll-out program participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were interviewed and a data collection sheet was used to collect information from the corresponding medical record. Results. The majority (98.2%) of participants were using at least one herbal drug together with ART. The most common herbal remedies used were Allium Sativum (72.7%), Bidens pilosa (66.0%), Eucalyptus globulus (52.3%), Moringa oleifera (44.1%), Lippia javanica (36.3%), and Peltoforum africanum (34.3%). Two indigenous herbs, Musakavakadzi (OR = 0.25; 95% CI 0.076–0.828) and Peltoforum africanum (OR = 0.495; 95% CI 0.292–0.839) reduced the occurrence of adverse drug events. Conclusions. The use of herbal drugs is high in the HIV-infected population and there is need for pharmacovigilance programs to recognize the role they play in altering ADR profiles. PMID:22506106

  17. Using patient safety indicators to estimate the impact of potential adverse events on outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Peter E; Luther, Stephen L; Christiansen, Cindy L; Shibei Zhao; Loveland, Susan; Elixhauser, Anne; Romano, Patrick S; Rosen, Amy K

    2008-02-01

    The authors estimated the impact of potentially preventable patient safety events, identified by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs), on patient outcomes: mortality, length of stay (LOS), and cost. The PSIs were applied to all acute inpatient hospitalizations at Veterans Health Administration (VA) facilities in fiscal 2001. Two methods-regression analysis and multivariable case matching- were used independently to control for patient and facility characteristics while predicting the effect of the PSI on each outcome. The authors found statistically significant (p < .0001) excess mortality, LOS, and cost in all groups with PSIs. The magnitude of the excess varied considerably across the PSIs. These VA findings are similar to those from a previously published study of nonfederal hospitals, despite differences between VA and non-VA systems. This study contributes to the literature measuring outcomes of medical errors and provides evidence that AHRQ PSIs may be useful indicators for comparison across delivery systems.

  18. Evolution of pharmacological obesity treatments: focus on adverse side-effect profiles.

    PubMed

    Krentz, A J; Fujioka, K; Hompesch, M

    2016-06-01

    Pharmacotherapy directed toward reducing body weight may provide benefits for both curbing obesity and lowering the risk of obesity-associated comorbidities; however, many weight loss medications have been withdrawn from the market because of serious adverse effects. Examples include pulmonary hypertension (aminorex), cardiovascular toxicity, e.g. flenfluramine-induced valvopathy, stroke [phenylpropanolamine (PPA)], excess non-fatal cardiovascular events (sibutramine), and neuro-psychiatric issues (rimonabant; approved in Europe, but not in the USA). This negative experience has helped mould the current drug development and approval process for new anti-obesity drugs. Differences between the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency, however, in perceptions of risk-benefit considerations for individual drugs have resulted in discrepancies in approval and/or withdrawal of weight-reducing medications. Thus, two drugs recently approved by the FDA, i.e. lorcaserin and phentermine + topiramate extended release, are not available in Europe. In contrast, naltrexone sustained release (SR)/bupropion SR received FDA approval, and liraglutide 3.0 mg was recently approved in both the USA and Europe. Regulatory strategies adopted by the FDA to manage the potential for uncommon but potentially serious post-marketing toxicity include: (i) risk evaluation and mitigation strategy programmes; (ii) stipulating post-marketing safety trials; (iii) considering responder rates and limiting cumulative exposure by discontinuation if weight loss is not attained within a reasonable timeframe; and (iv) requiring large cardiovascular outcome trials before or after approval. We chronicle the adverse effects of anti-obesity pharmacotherapy and consider how the history of high-profile toxicity issues has shaped the current regulatory landscape for new and future weight-reducing drugs.

  19. Adverse Prognostic Impact of Bone Marrow Microvessel Density in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nuri; Lee, Hyewon; Moon, Soo Young; Sohn, Ji Yeon; Hwang, Sang Mee; Yoon, Ok Jin; Youn, Hye Sun

    2015-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis is important for the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Bone marrow (BM) microvessel density (MVD) is a useful marker of angiogenesis and is determined by immunohistochemical staining with anti-CD34 antibody. This study investigated the prognostic impact of MVD and demonstrated the relationship between MVD and previously mentioned prognostic factors in patients with MM. Methods The study included 107 patients with MM. MVD was assessed at initial diagnosis in a blinded manner by two hematopathologists who examined three CD34-positive hot spots per patient and counted the number of vessels in BM samples. Patients were divided into three groups according to MVD tertiles. Cumulative progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) curves, calculated by using Kaplan-Meier method, were compared among the three groups. Prognostic impact of MVD was assessed by calculating Cox proportional hazard ratio (HR). Results Median MVDs in the three groups were 16.8, 33.9, and 54.7. MVDs were correlated with other prognostic factors, including β2-microglobulin concentration, plasma cell percentage in the BM, and cancer stage according to the International Staging System. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that high MVD was an independent predictor of PFS (HR=2.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-5.42; P=0.013). PFS was significantly lower in the high MVD group than in the low MVD group (P=0.025). However, no difference was observed in the OS (P=0.428). Conclusions Increased BM MVD is a marker of poor prognosis in patients newly diagnosed with MM. BM MVD should be assessed at the initial diagnosis of MM. PMID:26354343

  20. Adverse events after endovascular treatment of chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, A; Annovazzi, P; Amato, M P; Capello, E; Cavalla, P; Cocco, E; Falcini, M; Gallo, A; Patti, F; Perini, P; Rodegher, M E; Rovaris, M; Rottoli, M R; Comi, G

    2013-06-01

    Although it is debated whether chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) plays a role in multiple sclerosis (MS) development, many patients undergo endovascular treatment (ET) of CCSVI. A study is ongoing in Italy to evaluate the clinical outcome of ET. Severe adverse events (AEs) occurred in 15/462 subjects at a variable interval after ET: jugular thrombosis in seven patients, tetraventricular hydrocephalus, stroke, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, status epilepticus, aspiration pneumonia, hypertension with tachicardia, or bleeding of bedsore in the remaining seven cases. One patient died because of myocardial infarction 10 weeks after ET. The risk of severe AEs related to ET for CCSVI must be carefully considered.

  1. Early Psychosocial Neglect Adversely Impacts Developmental Trajectories of Brain Oscillations and Their Interactions.

    PubMed

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Vanderwert, Ross E; Zeanah, Charles H; Fox, Nathan A; Nelson, Charles A

    2015-12-01

    Rhythmicity is a fundamental property of neural activity at multiple spatiotemporal scales, and associated oscillations represent a critical mechanism for communication and transmission of information across brain regions. During development, these oscillations evolve dynamically as a function of neural maturation and may be modulated by early experiences, positive and/or negative. This study investigated the impact of psychosocial deprivation associated with institutional rearing in early life and the effects of subsequent foster care intervention on developmental trajectories of neural oscillations and their cross-frequency correlations. Longitudinally acquired nontask EEGs from three cohorts of children from the Bucharest Early Intervention Project were analyzed. These included abandoned children initially reared in institutions and subsequently randomized to be placed in foster care or receive care as usual (prolonged institutional rearing) and a group of never-institutionalized children. Oscillation trajectories were estimated from 42 to 96 months, that is, 1-3 years after all children in the intervention arm of the study had been placed in foster care. Significant differences between groups were estimated for the amplitude trajectories of cognitive-related gamma, beta, alpha, and theta oscillations. Similar differences were identified as a function of time spent in institutions, suggesting that increased time spent in psychosocial neglect may have profound and widespread effects on brain activity. Significant group differences in cross-frequency coupling were estimated longitudinally between gamma and lower frequencies as well as alpha and lower frequencies. Lower cross-gamma coupling was estimated at 96 months in the group of children that remained in institutions at that age compared to the other two groups, suggesting potentially impaired communication between local and long-distance brain networks in these children. In contrast, higher cross

  2. Adverse effects reported in the use of gastroesophageal reflux disease treatments in children: a 10 years literature review.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Shlomi; Bueno de Mesquita, Mirjam; Mimouni, Francis B

    2015-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is commonly observed in children, particularly during the first year of life. Pharmacological therapy is mostly reserved for symptomatic infants diagnosed with GER disease (GERD), usually as defined in a recent consensus statement. The purpose of the present article was to review the reported adverse effects of pharmacological agents used in the treatment of paediatric GERD. We conducted this review using the electronic journal database Pubmed and Cochrane database systematic reviews using the latest 10-year period (1 January 2003 to 31 December 2012). Our search strategy included the following keywords: omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole, rantidine, cimetidine, famotidine, nizatidine, domperidone, metoclopramide, betanechol, erythromycin, baclofen, alginate. We used Pubmed's own filter of: 'child: birth-18 years'. All full articles were reviewed and we only included randomized controlled trials retrieved from our search. We addressed a summary of our search on a drug-by-drug basis with regard to its mechanism of action and clinical applications, and reviewed all of the adverse effects reported and the safety profile of each drug. Adverse effects have been reported in at least 23% of patients treated with histamine H2 receptor antagonists (H2 RAs) and 34% of those treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), and mostly include headaches, diarrhoea, nausea (H2 RAs and PPIs) and constipation (PPIs). Acid suppression may place immune-deficient infants and children, or those with indwelling catheters, at risk for the development of lower respiratory tract infections and nosocomial sepsis. Prokinetic agents have many adverse effects, without major benefits to support their routine use.

  3. Adverse effects reported in the use of gastroesophageal reflux disease treatments in children: a 10 years literature review

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Shlomi; Bueno de Mesquita, Mirjam; Mimouni, Francis B

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is commonly observed in children, particularly during the first year of life. Pharmacological therapy is mostly reserved for symptomatic infants diagnosed with GER disease (GERD), usually as defined in a recent consensus statement. The purpose of the present article was to review the reported adverse effects of pharmacological agents used in the treatment of paediatric GERD. We conducted this review using the electronic journal database Pubmed and Cochrane database systematic reviews using the latest 10-year period (1 January 2003 to 31 December 2012). Our search strategy included the following keywords: omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole, rantidine, cimetidine, famotidine, nizatidine, domperidone, metoclopramide, betanechol, erythromycin, baclofen, alginate. We used Pubmed’s own filter of: ’child: birth–18 years’. All full articles were reviewed and we only included randomized controlled trials retrieved from our search. We addressed a summary of our search on a drug-by-drug basis with regard to its mechanism of action and clinical applications, and reviewed all of the adverse effects reported and the safety profile of each drug. Adverse effects have been reported in at least 23% of patients treated with histamine H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) and 34% of those treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), and mostly include headaches, diarrhoea, nausea (H2RAs and PPIs) and constipation (PPIs). Acid suppression may place immune-deficient infants and children, or those with indwelling catheters, at risk for the development of lower respiratory tract infections and nosocomial sepsis. Prokinetic agents have many adverse effects, without major benefits to support their routine use. PMID:25752807

  4. The long-term impact of early adversities on psychiatric disorders: focus on neuronal plasticity.

    PubMed

    Luoni, Alessia; Richetto, Juliet; Racagni, Giorgio; Molteni, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    The impact of early physical and social environments on life-long pathological phenotypes is well known and there is now compelling evidence that stressful experiences during gestation or early in life can lead to enhanced susceptibility to mental illness. Here, we discuss the data from preclinical studies aimed at investigating the molecular consequences of the exposure to stressful events during prenatal or early postnatal life that might contribute to later psychopathology. Particularly, we will discuss the existence of age windows of vulnerability to environmental conditions during brain maturation using as examples several studies performed with different animal models. Specifically, major deviations from normative neurobehavioural trajectories have been reported in animal models obtained following exposure to severe stress (maternal separation) ea rly in infancy or with rodent models of difficult and/or stressful pregnancies, including obstetric complications (e.g. prenatal restrain stress) and gestational exposure to infection (e.g prenatal immune challenge). These models have been associated with profound long-lasting deficits in the offspring's emotional and social behaviour, and with molecular changes associated with neuroplasticity.

  5. Adverse Impact of Electromagnetic Radiation on Urban Environment and Natural Resources using Optical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pawan; Katiyar, Swati; Rani, Meenu

    2016-07-01

    We are living in the age of a rapidly growing population and changing environmental conditions with an advance technical capacity.This has resulted in wide spread land cover change. One of the main causes for increasing urban heat is that more than half of the world's population lives in a rapidly growing urbanized environment. Satellite data can be highly useful to map change in land cover and other environmental phenomena with the passage of time. Among several human-induced environmental and urban thermal problems are reported to be negatively affecting urban residents in many ways. The built-up structures in urbanized areas considerably alter land cover thereby affecting thermal energy flow which leads to development of elevated surface and air temperature. The phenomenon Urban Heat Island implies 'island' of high temperature in cities, surrounded by relatively lower temperature in rural areas. The UHI for the temporal period is estimated using geospatial techniques which are then utilized for the impact assessment on climate of the surrounding regions and how it reduce the sustainability of the natural resources like air, vegetation. The present paper describes the methodology and resolution dynamic urban heat island change on climate using the geospatial approach. NDVI were generated using day time LANDSAT ETM+ image of 1990, 2000 and 2013. Temperature of various land use and land cover categories was estimated. Keywords: NDVI, Surface temperature, Dynamic changes.

  6. Adverse impact of feed channel spacers on the performance of pressure retarded osmosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Chang; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-04-17

    This article analyzes the influence of feed channel spacers on the performance of pressure retarded osmosis (PRO). Unlike forward osmosis (FO), an important feature of PRO is the application of hydraulic pressure on the high salinity (draw solution) side to retard the permeating flow for energy conversion. We report the first observation of membrane deformation under the action of the high hydraulic pressure on the feed channel spacer and the resulting impact on membrane performance. Because of this observation, reverse osmosis and FO tests that are commonly used for measuring membrane transport properties (water and salt permeability coefficients, A and B, respectively) and the structural parameter (S) can no longer be considered appropriate for use in PRO analysis. To accurately predict the water flux as a function of applied hydraulic pressure difference and the resulting power density in PRO, we introduced a new experimental protocol that accounts for membrane deformation in a spacer-filled channel to determine the membrane properties (A, B, and S). PRO performance model predictions based on these determined A, B, and S values closely matched experimental data over a range of draw solution concentrations (0.5 to 2 M NaCl). We also showed that at high pressures feed spacers block the permeation of water through the membrane area in contact with the spacer, a phenomenon that we term the shadow effect, thereby reducing overall water flux. The implications of the results for power generation by PRO are evaluated and discussed.

  7. Fluidized bed ash and passive treatment reduce the adverse effects of acid mine drainage on aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Porter, Clint M; Nairn, Robert W

    2010-10-15

    Elevated concentrations of acidity and metals in acid mine drainage (AMD) may be effectively addressed by active and passive treatment technologies. However, typical evaluations consider only chemical water quality with little if any regard for biological metrics. Robust evaluations including both chemical and biological indicators of water quality improvement are needed. In this study, injection of alkaline fluidized bed ash (FBA) into a flooded underground coal mine was coupled with a five-cell passive treatment system to ameliorate an abandoned AMD discharge in eastern Oklahoma. The passive system included process units promoting both aerobic and anaerobic treatment mechanisms. Resulting water quality changes and biological responses were evaluated. Organisms of two distinct functional groups (the filter-feeding mollusk Corbicula fluminea and the wide-spectrum feeding fish Lepomis macrochirus) were exposed to mine waters in several treatment cells. The combination of treatment technologies was hypothesized to limit potential negative effects on these aquatic organisms. Tissues were harvested and analyzed for concentrations of several metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Ni, Cu and Zn) of interest. Organismal responses, such as hepatosomatic index, condition factor, and condition index, did not vary significantly among organisms exposed within different treatment cells when compared to non-AMD impaired waters. Metal tissue accumulation trends, compared to aqueous concentrations, were observed for Fe, Ni and Zn. Exposure experiments with these two organisms indicated that FBA introductions coupled with passive treatment decreased the potential adverse effects of AMD to biological systems.

  8. Adverse impact of intermittent portal clamping on long-term postoperative outcomes in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hao, S; Chen, S; Yang, X; Wan, C

    2017-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the impact of intermittent portal clamping (IPC) on long-term postoperative outcomes in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods Clinical records of 355 patients underwent curative liver resection for HCC in January 2007 to December 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. According to how portal clamping was performed, patients were grouped as: IPC, n=113; other portal clamping (OPC), n=190; and no portal clamping (NPC), n=52. Results Median recurrence-free survival (RFS) was statistically significantly shorter in the IPC (39.4 months) than OPC (47.3 months, p=0.010) and NPC groups (51.4 months, p=0.008). Median overall survival (OS) was also significantly shorter with IPC (46.3 months), versus 52.9 months with OPC (p=0.022) and 56.2 months with NPC (p=0.015). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that 5-year cumulative RFS was much lower in the IPC (42.5%) than OPC (50.9%, p=0.014) and NPC groups (49.6%, p=0.013). Five-year cumulative OS was also much lower in the IPC (44.9%) than OPC (58.0%, p=0.020) and NPC groups (57.7%, p=0.025). On univariate analysis, tumour grade, size and number, TNM stage, blood transfusion, vascular invasion and IPC were significantly inversely correlated with RFS and OS. On multivariate analysis, tumour size and number, blood transfusion, vascular invasion and IPC remained significant. Conclusions Our study suggests that IPC is an independent risk factor for poor long-term postoperative outcomes in patients with HCC.

  9. Simulation of effects of botulinum toxin on muscular mechanics in time course of treatment based on adverse extracellular matrix adaptations.

    PubMed

    Turkoglu, Ahu N; Yucesoy, Can A

    2016-05-03

    BTX effects on muscular mechanics are highly important, but their mechanism and variability in due treatment course is not well understood. Recent modeling shows that partial muscle paralysis per se causes restricted sarcomere shortening due to muscle fiber-extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanical interactions. This leads to two notable acute-BTX effects compared to pre-BTX treatment condition: (1) enhanced potential of active force production of the non-paralyzed muscle parts, and (2) decreased muscle length range of force exertion (ℓrange). Recent experiments also indicate increased ECM stiffness of BTX treated muscle. Hence, altered muscle fiber-ECM interactions and BTX effects are plausible in due treatment course. Using finite element modeling, the aim was to test the following hypotheses: acute-BTX treatment effects elevate with increased ECM stiffness in the long-term, and are also persistent post-BTX treatment. Model results confirm these hypotheses and show that restricted sarcomere shortening effect becomes more pronounced in the long-term and is persistent or reversed (for longer muscle lengths) post-BTX treatment. Consequently, force production capacity of activated sarcomeres gets further enhanced in the long-term. Remarkably, such enhanced capacity becomes permanent for the entire muscle post-treatment. Shift of muscle optimum length to a shorter length is more pronounced in the long-term, some of which remains permanent post-treatment. Compared to Pre-BTX treatment, a narrower ℓrange (20.3%, 27.1% and 3.4%, acute, long-term and post-BTX treatment, respectively) is a consistent finding. We conclude that ECM adaptations can affect muscular mechanics adversely both during spasticity management and post-BTX treatment. Therefore, this issue deserves major future attention.

  10. Generalized intense pruritus during canagliflozin treatment: Is it an adverse drug reaction?

    PubMed

    Vasapollo, Piero; Cione, Erika; Luciani, Filippo; Gallelli, Luca

    2016-04-05

    Selective agents able to locate and identify unique targets represent a crucial aspect of modern pharmacology. The exclusive location of sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLUT2) on kidneys prompt companies to develop SGLT2 inhibitors that today are the latest class of drugs for diabetes treatment. In particular, canagliflozin blocks the re-absorption of glucose in the kidney lowering blood glucose levels by increasing glucose excretion. We report a 61-year old woman who developed an intense and severe pruritus during the treatment with canagliflozin. Clinical and laboratory findings excluded the presence of systemic or skin diseases able to induce pruritus. The discontinuation of canagliflozin and the treatment with pioglitazone/metformin fixed combination induced a remission of pruritus. This case emphasizes the need to consider pruritus as a differential diagnosis during the treatment with canagliflozin.

  11. Assessment of wastewater treatment plant effluent on fish reproduction utilizing the adverse outcome pathway conceptual framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents are a known contributor of chemical mixture inputs into the environment. Whole effluent testing guidelines were developed to screen these complex mixtures for acute toxicity. However, efficient and cost-effective approaches for screenin...

  12. Risk factors for treatment-related adverse events in cancer-bearing dogs receiving piroxicam.

    PubMed

    Eichstadt, L R; Moore, G E; Childress, M O

    2016-10-06

    Piroxicam has antitumour effects in dogs with cancer, although side effects may limit its use. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively identify factors predisposing cancer-bearing dogs to adverse events (AEs) following piroxicam therapy. Medical records of dogs presented to the Purdue Veterinary Teaching Hospital between 2005 and 2015 were reviewed, and 137 dogs met the criteria for study inclusion. Toxic effects of piroxicam in these dogs were graded according to an established system. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the extent to which certain factors affected the risk for AEs. Age [odds ratio (OR) 1.250, P = 0.009; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.057-1.479] and concurrent use of gastroprotectant medications (OR 2.612, P = 0.025; 95% CI 1.127-6.056) significantly increased the risk for gastrointestinal AEs. The results of this study may help inform the risk versus benefit calculation for clinicians considering the use of piroxicam to treat dogs with cancer.

  13. European LeukemiaNet recommendations for the management and avoidance of adverse events of treatment in chronic myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Steegmann, J L; Baccarani, M; Breccia, M; Casado, L F; García-Gutiérrez, V; Hochhaus, A; Kim, D-W; Kim, T D; Khoury, H J; Le Coutre, P; Mayer, J; Milojkovic, D; Porkka, K; Rea, D; Rosti, G; Saussele, S; Hehlmann, R; Clark, R E

    2016-01-01

    Most reports on chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) focus on efficacy, particularly on molecular response and outcome. In contrast, adverse events (AEs) are often reported as infrequent, minor, tolerable and manageable, but they are increasingly important as therapy is potentially lifelong and multiple TKIs are available. For this reason, the European LeukemiaNet panel for CML management recommendations presents an exhaustive and critical summary of AEs emerging during CML treatment, to assist their understanding, management and prevention. There are five major conclusions. First, the main purpose of CML treatment is the antileukemic effect. Suboptimal management of AEs must not compromise this first objective. Second, most patients will have AEs, usually early, mostly mild to moderate, and which will resolve spontaneously or are easily controlled by simple means. Third, reduction or interruption of treatment must only be done if optimal management of the AE cannot be accomplished in other ways, and frequent monitoring is needed to detect resolution of the AE as early as possible. Fourth, attention must be given to comorbidities and drug interactions, and to new events unrelated to TKIs that are inevitable during such a prolonged treatment. Fifth, some TKI-related AEs have emerged which were not predicted or detected in earlier studies, maybe because of suboptimal attention to or absence from the preclinical data. Overall, imatinib has demonstrated a good long-term safety profile, though recent findings suggest underestimation of symptom severity by physicians. Second and third generation TKIs have shown higher response rates, but have been associated with unexpected problems, some of which could be irreversible. We hope these recommendations will help to minimise adverse events, and we believe that an optimal management of them will be rewarded by better TKI compliance and thus better CML outcomes, together with better

  14. Ivermectin for the treatment of Wuchereria bancrofti filariasis. Efficacy and adverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Kumaraswami, V; Ottesen, E A; Vijayasekaran, V; Devi, U; Swaminathan, M; Aziz, M A; Sarma, G R; Prabhakar, R; Tripathy, S P

    1988-06-03

    Ivermectin treatment was evaluated for efficacy and side effects in 40 patients in South India who had microfilaremia and bancroftian filariasis. Ivermectin was administered once orally at four dose levels (range, 25 to 200 micrograms/kg), and at each it was found to be completely effective in clearing blood microfilariae within five to 12 days. In most patients, microfilariae reappeared by three months; by six months the levels averaged 14% to 32% of pretreatment values in the four study groups, and all groups showed equivalent efficacy. Detailed monitoring identified some side effects in almost all patients: usually fever, headache, light-headedness, myalgia, sore throat, or cough that occurred most prominently 18 to 36 hours after treatment. These were most frequent and severe in patients with the greatest microfilaremia, but only when treated with the two higher doses of ivermectin (100 and 200 micrograms/kg). The low-dose (25 micrograms/kg) ivermectin group, despite equivalent efficacy in parasite killing, had clinical reaction scores that were minimal and that were not correlated with parasitemia. Since efficacy and side effects of ivermectin therapy compare favorably with those reported for treatment with the standard antifilarial drug diethylcarbamazine citrate, the major advantage of single-oral-dose administration makes ivermectin the best candidate to replace diethylcarbamazine as the treatment of choice for bancroftian filariasis.

  15. Biologic features and prognosis of ductal carcinoma in situ are not adversely impacted by initial large body mass.

    PubMed

    Kuerer, Henry M; Lari, Sara A; Arun, Banu K; Hu, Chung-Yuan; Brewster, Abenaa; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Albarracin, Constance T; Babiera, Gildy V; Caudle, Abigail S; Wagner, Jamie L; Litton, Jennifer K; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Lucci, Anthony; Hunt, Kelly K

    2012-06-01

    Obesity is associated with adverse biologic features and poor outcome in patients with invasive breast cancer, yet this relationship has not been evaluated in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). From 1996 to 2009, body mass index (BMI) was recorded at initial diagnosis for 1,885 patients with DCIS treated at our institution. Patients were categorized as obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), overweight (BMI 25 to <30 kg/m(2)), or of normal weight or underweight (BMI < 25 kg/m(2)). Logistic regression was used to examine associations between BMI and patient, clinical, and pathologic features and treatment. Local-regional recurrence was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. All statistical tests were two-sided. Of the 1,885 patients, 514 (27.7%) were obese, 510 (27.5%) were overweight, and 831 (44.8%) were normal/underweight. In multivariate analysis, overweight and obese patients were significantly more likely to be African American (odds ratio [OR], 3.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.66-5.80) or Hispanic (OR, 1.44; CI, 1.02-2.04), be postmenopausal (OR, 1.63; CI, 1.28-2.07), have diabetes (OR, 4.60; CI, 2.60-8.12), have estrogen-receptor-positive DCIS (OR, 1.39; CI, 1.00-192), and present with a radiologic abnormality rather than clinical symptoms (OR, 1.35; CI, 1.01-1.80). At a median follow-up time of 4.96 years (range, 1.0-14.34 years), no significant differences in local recurrence rates were detected based on patients' initial BMI category. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in risk of recurrence between diabetic patients receiving metformin or not. In conclusion, higher BMI is not associated with adverse biologic features or prognosis in patients with DCIS.

  16. Neurosyphilis presenting with dementia, chronic chorioretinitis and adverse reactions to treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Raycheva, Margarita Radoslavova; Petrova, Elena Petrova; Tsankov, Nikolay Konstantinov; Traykov, Latchezar Dintchov

    2009-01-01

    Neurosyphilis results from infection of the brain, meninges or spinal cord by Treponema pallidum and develops in about 25%-40% of persons who are not treated for syphilis. This article reports a rare case of active neurosyphilis with mild dementia, chronic chorioretinitis, and hearing loss. During the treatment with Penicillin, a rare combination of complications such as Jarisch-Herxheimer and Hoigné reactions were observed. The clinical feature is characterized by a slow progressive cognitive decline and behavior changes for the last 2 years. Neuropsychological examination revealed mild dementia (MMSE = 23) with impaired memory and attention and executive function. Left sided chronic chorioretinitis and hearing loss were documented. High dose intravenous penicillin therapy was complicated by Jarisch-Herxheimer and Hoigne reactions. During the follow up examinations at 6 and 12 months, the clinical signs, neuropsychological examination, and cerebrospinal fluid (CFS) samples showed improvement of dementia, CSF findings, and hydrocephalus. In conclusion, this atypical presentation of neurosyphilis in combination with rare complications of treatment is worthy of attention. Neurosyphilis should be part of the differential diagnosis of each patient showing cognitive deterioration and behaviour disturbances. PMID:19918420

  17. Adverse Events During Immunotherapy Against Grass Pollen-Induced Allergic Rhinitis - Differences Between Subcutaneous and Sublingual Treatment.

    PubMed

    Aasbjerg, Kristian; Dalhoff, Kim Peder; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-08-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) triggered by grass pollen is a common disease, affecting millions of people worldwide. Treatment consists of symptom-alleviating drugs, such as topical corticosteroids or antihistamines. Another option is potentially curative immunotherapy, currently available as sublingual and subcutaneous treatment. We investigated the potential differences in the prevalence and severity of adverse events related to subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) against grass pollen-induced AR. A thorough literature search was performed with PubMed and EMBASE. The findings were compared with the available summaries of product characteristics (SPC) and with commercial pharmacology databases (Micromedex). The majority of available safety data originate from registered products of standardized allergens. A surprisingly large percentage of drugs, especially those used in the United States, have no systematically collected safety data. No sufficiently powered randomized trials comparing sublingual and subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) were available, but general safety assessments indicate that sublingual tablet treatment is safer than subcutaneous treatment. Not all commonly used immunotherapy drugs are officially registered, and not all have systematically collected safety data. This is especially true for older drugs used in the United States. In contrast, newer drugs that have undergone extensive clinical testing have better documentation, but unified collection of safety data is still lacking. Considering the evidence available, most drugs elicit similar side effects from the same organ systems, and symptoms from the sublingual drug classes are probably less severe. However, a head-to-head comparison of safety and efficacy is lacking.

  18. Frequency, severity, and costs of adverse reactions following mass treatment for lymphatic filariasis using diethylcarbamazine and albendazole in Leogane, Haiti, 2000.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Steven I; Radday, Jeanne; Michel, Marie Carmel; Addiss, David G; Beach, Michael J; Lammie, Patrick J; Lammie, John; Rheingans, Richard; Lafontant, Jack

    2003-05-01

    In October 2000, 71,187 persons were treated for lymphatic filariasis using albendazole and diethylcarbamazine (DEC) or DEC alone in Leogane, Haiti. We documented the frequency of adverse reactions, severity and cost of treatment. Adverse reactions were classified as minor, moderate, or severe. Overall, 24% (17,421) of the treated persons reported one or more adverse reactions. There were 15,916 (91%) minor and 1502 (9%) moderate adverse reaction reports. Men outnumbered women 2:1 in reporting moderate problems. Three patients, representing roughly one in 25,000 persons treated, were hospitalized with severe adverse reactions judged to be treatment-associated by physician review. The cost per person treated for adverse reactions was more than twice the cost per person treated for lymphatic filariasis (dollar 1.60 versus dollar 0.71). Severe adverse reactions to lymphatic filariasis treatment using DEC with or without albendazole are uncommon. Minor and moderate reactions are more commonly reported and their management represents a challenge to lymphatic filariasis elimination programs.

  19. The Relationship Between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Recidivism in a Sample of Juvenile Offenders in Community-Based Treatment.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Kevin T; Baglivio, Michael T; Piquero, Alex R

    2015-11-12

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been identified as a key risk factor for a range of negative life outcomes, including delinquency. Much less is known about how exposure to negative experiences relates to continued offending among juvenile offenders. In this study, we examine the effect of ACEs on recidivism in a large sample of previously referred youth from the State of Florida who were followed for 1 year after participation in community-based treatment. Results from a series of Cox hazard models suggest that ACEs increase the risk of subsequent arrest, with a higher prevalence of ACEs leading to a shorter time to recidivism. The relationship between ACEs and recidivism held quite well in demographic-specific analyses. Implications for empirical research on the long-term effects of traumatic childhood events and juvenile justice policy are discussed.

  20. [Hypertension and palmar plantar erythroderma. Management of adverse events of angiogenetic inhibitors in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Rolfes, N; Lümmen, G

    2011-11-01

    The introduction of angiogenesis inhibitors has altered the systemic therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Being a"permanent" medication, the management of side effects has special importance, for adverse events may limit therapy. Hypertension (up to 34% of cases) and palmar plantar erythroderma (6-30% of cases) are common side effects.Blood pressure should be monitored during therapy, and arterial hypertension should be treated with a standard medication. If a hypertensive emergency still occurs, a dose reduction or discontinuation of treatment might be indicated.Prophylaxis may prevent or extenuate palmar plantar erythroderma in many cases, enabling regular chemotherapy as planned. In cases with severe clinical symptoms a reduction or interruption of the dose will be necessary. In most cases local therapy is sufficient.

  1. Response to treatment and adverse events associated with use of recombinant activated factor VII in children: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, James D.; Ritchey, Arthur K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) is United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for patients with hemophilia with inhibitors or congenital factor VII deficiency. Initial reports of off-label use highlighted its efficacy, though newer reports have not repeated these findings. In both types of publication, though, secondary thromboses have been seen in adult patients. The data in children are less clear. Methods: This study analyzed all rFVIIa use at a large children’s hospital for characteristics and outcomes. Recipients of rFVIIa were identified retrospectively via the electronic medical record. Data on patient diagnosis, lab data, other treatments, adverse events, and outcomes were collected. Results: Over 33 months, 66 patient episodes were treated with a total of 606 doses (median = 2). The most common indication (36.4%) was gastrointestinal bleeding (24/66 patients). Only one patient received a dose for an approved labeled indication. For control of bleeding, 33.3% of courses were unsuccessful (19/57). Bleeding from multiple sites was associated with treatment failure. In 16.7% of patients (11/66), unexpected adverse thromboses developed within 1 week of completing a course of rFVIIa. Thromboses in both intra- and extra-corporeal sites were included if they compromised patient care. Conclusions: In the majority of cases reviewed, rFVIIa was successful in stopping or slowing serious bleeding episodes. It was least effective when a patient had diffuse bleeding at the time of administration. The thrombosis rate of 16.7% was higher than expected, though causality cannot be declared. Further investigation is needed to determine the risk–benefit ratio in children. PMID:28255432

  2. Proposed methods and endpoints for defining and assessing adverse environmental impact (AEI) on fish communities/populations in Tennessee River reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Gary D; Brown, Mary L

    2002-06-07

    Two multimetric indices have been developed to help address fish community (reservoir fish assemblage index [RFAI]) and individual population quality (sport fishing index [SFI]) in Tennessee River reservoirs. The RFAI, with characteristics similar to the index of biotic integrity (IBI) used in stream fish community determinations, was developed to monitor the existing condition of resident fish communities. The index, which incorporates standardized electrofishing of littoral areas and experimental gill netting for limnetic bottom-dwelling species, has been used to determine residential fish community response to various anthropogenic impacts in southeastern reservoirs. The SFI is a multimetric index designed to address the quality of the fishery for individual resident sport fish species in a particular lake or reservoir[4]. The SFI incorporates measures of fish population aspects and angler catch and pressure estimates. This paper proposes 70% of the maximum RFAI score and 10% above the average SFI score for individual species as "screening" endpoints for balanced indigenous populations (BIP) or adverse environmental impact (AEI). Endpoints for these indices indicate: (1) communities/populations are obviously balanced indigenous populations (BIP) indicating no adverse environmental impact (AEI), or are "screened out"; (2) communities/populations are considered to be potentially impacted; and (3) where the resident fish community/population should be considered adversely impacted. Suggestions are also made concerning how examination of individual metric scores can help determine the source or cause of the impact.

  3. BDNF Val 66 Met and 5-HTTLPR genotype moderate the impact of early psychosocial adversity on plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor and depressive symptoms: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, Arlette F; Hellweg, Rainer; Rietschel, Marcella; Treutlein, Jens; Witt, Stephanie H; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Schmidt, Martin H; Esser, Günter; Banaschewski, Tobias; Laucht, Manfred; Deuschle, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies have emphasized an important role for neurotrophins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), in regulating the plasticity of neural circuits involved in the pathophysiology of stress-related diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine the interplay of the BDNF Val⁶⁶Met and the serotonin transporter promoter (5-HTTLPR) polymorphisms in moderating the impact of early-life adversity on BDNF plasma concentration and depressive symptoms. Participants were taken from an epidemiological cohort study following the long-term outcome of early risk factors from birth into young adulthood. In 259 individuals (119 males, 140 females), genotyped for the BDNF Val⁶⁶Met and the 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms, plasma BDNF was assessed at the age of 19 years. In addition, participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Early adversity was determined according to a family adversity index assessed at 3 months of age. Results indicated that individuals homozygous for both the BDNF Val and the 5-HTTLPR L allele showed significantly reduced BDNF levels following exposure to high adversity. In contrast, BDNF levels appeared to be unaffected by early psychosocial adversity in carriers of the BDNF Met or the 5-HTTLPR S allele. While the former group appeared to be most susceptible to depressive symptoms, the impact of early adversity was less pronounced in the latter group. This is the first preliminary evidence indicating that early-life adverse experiences may have lasting sequelae for plasma BDNF levels in humans, highlighting that the susceptibility to this effect is moderated by BDNF Val⁶⁶Met and 5-HTTLPR genotype.

  4. Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Tuberculosis Treatment Outcome and Adverse Reactions in Patients Receiving Directly Observed Treatment Strategy in India: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Ali Nasir; Khayyam, Khalid Umer

    2016-01-01

    Despite successful implementation of directly observed treatment, short course (DOTS) in India, the growing number of diabetes mellitus (DM) patients appears to be a cause in the increasing tuberculosis (TB) incidence, affecting their management. In this regard, a prospective study was conducted on DOTS patients in three primary health care centers in urban slum region of South Delhi, India, to evaluate the effect of DM on sputum conversion, treatment outcome, and adverse drug reactions (ADR) due to anti-TB treatment. Eligible TB patients underwent blood glucose screening at treatment initiation. Disease presentation, clinical outcome, and ADRs were compared between patients of TB with and without DM. Out of 316 patients, the prevalence of DM was found to be 15.8%, in which 19.4% and 9.6% were PTB and EPTB patients, respectively. DM patients have observed higher sputum positivity (OR 1.247 95% CI; 0.539–2.886) at the end of 2-month treatment and poor outcome (OR 1.176 95% CI; 0.310–4.457) at the completion of treatment compared with non DM patients. Presence of DM was significantly associated (OR 3.578 95% CI; 1.114–11.494, p = 0.032) with the development of ADRs. DM influences the treatment outcome of PTB patients in our setting and also on the ADR incidence. PMID:27642601

  5. Biologic features and prognosis of ductal carcinoma in situ are not adversely impacted by initial large body mass

    PubMed Central

    Lari, Sara A.; Arun, Banu K.; Hu, Chung-Yuan; Brewster, Abenaa; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Albarracin, Constance T.; Babiera, Gildy V.; Caudle, Abigail S.; Wagner, Jamie L.; Litton, Jennifer K.; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Lucci, Anthony; Hunt, Kelly K.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with adverse biologic features and poor outcome in patients with invasive breast cancer, yet this relationship has not been evaluated in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). From 1996 to 2009, body mass index (BMI) was recorded at initial diagnosis for 1,885 patients with DCIS treated at our institution. Patients were categorized as obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2), overweight (BMI 25 to<30 kg/m2), or of normal weight or underweight (BMI <25 kg/m2). Logistic regression was used to examine associations between BMI and patient, clinical, and pathologic features and treatment. Local–regional recurrence was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. All statistical tests were two-sided. Of the 1,885 patients, 514 (27.7%) were obese, 510 (27.5%) were overweight, and 831 (44.8%) were normal/underweight. In multivariate analysis, overweight and obese patients were significantly more likely to be African American (odds ratio [OR], 3.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.66–5.80) or Hispanic (OR, 1.44; CI, 1.02–2.04), be postmenopausal (OR, 1.63; CI, 1.28–2.07), have diabetes (OR, 4.60; CI, 2.60–8.12), have estrogen-receptor-positive DCIS (OR, 1.39; CI, 1.00–192), and present with a radiologic abnormality rather than clinical symptoms (OR, 1.35; CI, 1.01–1.80). At a median follow-up time of 4.96 years (range, 1.0–14.34 years), no significant differences in local recurrence rates were detected based on patients’ initial BMI category. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in risk of recurrence between diabetic patients receiving metformin or not. In conclusion, higher BMI is not associated with adverse biologic features or prognosis in patients with DCIS. PMID:22392043

  6. Glaucoma-related adverse events in the first five years after unilateral cataract removal in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Sharon F.; Lynn, Michael J.; Beck, Allen D.; Bothun, Erick D.; Orge, Faruk H.; Lambert, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Glaucoma-related adverse events constitute major sight-threatening complications of cataract removal in infancy, yet their relationship to aphakia versus primary intraocular lens (IOL) implantation remains unsettled. Objective To identify and characterize cases of glaucoma and glaucoma-related adverse events (glaucoma+glaucoma suspect) among children in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study (IATS) by the age of five years. Design, Setting, and Participants A multicenter randomized controlled trial of 114 infants with unilateral congenital cataract who were between age 1–6 months at surgery. Interventions Participants were randomized at cataract surgery to either primary IOL, or no IOL implantation (contact lens [CL]). Standardized definitions of glaucoma and glaucoma suspect were created for IATS and applied for surveillance and diagnosis. Main Outcome Measures Development of glaucoma and glaucoma+glaucoma suspect in operated eyes up to age five years, plus intraocular pressure, visual acuity, and axial length at age five years. Results Product limit estimates of the risk of glaucoma and glaucoma+glaucoma suspect at 4.8 years after surgery were 17% (95%CI=11%–25%) and 31% (95%CI=24%–41%), respectively. The CL and IOL groups were not significantly different for either outcome: glaucoma (hazard ratio(HR)=0.8[95%CI=0.3–2.0],p=0.62); glaucoma+glaucoma suspect: (HR=1.3[95%CI=0.6–2.5],p=0.58). Younger (versus older) age at surgery conferred increased risk of glaucoma (26% versus 9%, respectively at 4.8 years after surgery (HR=3.2[95%CI=1.2–8.3]), and smaller (versus larger) corneal diameter showed increased risk for glaucoma+glaucoma suspect (HR=2.5[95%CI=1.3–5.0]). Age and corneal diameter were significantly positively correlated. Glaucoma was predominantly open angle (19/20 cases, 95%), most eyes received medication (19/20, 95%), and 8/20 (40%) eyes had surgery. Conclusions and Relevance These results suggest that glaucoma-related adverse events

  7. Gestational diabetes mellitus treatment reduces obesity-induced adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes: the St. Carlos gestational study

    PubMed Central

    Assaf-Balut, Carla; Familiar, Cristina; García de la Torre, Nuria; Rubio, Miguel A; Bordiú, Elena; del Valle, Laura; Lara, Miriam; Ruiz, Teresa; Ortolá, Ana; Crespo, Irene; Duran, Alejandra; Herraiz, Miguel A; Izquierdo, Nuria; Perez, Noelia; Torrejon, Maria J; Runkle, Isabelle; Montañez, Carmen; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso L

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) increase the morbidity of the mother and newborn, which could increase further should they coexist. We aimed to determine the risk of adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes associated with excess weight (EW), and within this group identify potential differences between those with and without GDM. Methods We carried out a post-hoc analysis of the St. Carlos Gestational Study which included 3312 pregnant women, arranged in 3 groups: normal-weight women (NWw) (2398/72.4%), overweight women (OWw) (649/19.6%) and obese women (OBw) (265/8%). OWw and OBw were grouped as EW women (EWw). We analyzed variables related to adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes. Results The relative risk (95% CI) for GDM was 1.82 (1.47 to 2.25; p<0.0001) for OWw, and 3.26 (2.45 to 4.35; p<0.0001) in OBw. Univariate analysis showed associations of EW to higher rates of prematurity, birth weight >90th centile, newborns admitted to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), instrumental delivery and cesarean delivery (all p<0.005). Multivariate analysis, adjusted for parity and ethnicity, showed that EW increased the risk of prematurity, admission to NICU, cesarean and instrumental delivery, especially in EWw without GDM. NWw with GDM had a significantly lower risk of admission to NICU and cesarean delivery, compared with NWw without GDM. Conclusions EW is detrimental for pregnancy and neonatal outcomes, and treatment of GDM contributes to lowering the risk in EWw and NWw. Applying the same lifestyle changes to all pregnant women, independent of their weight or GDM condition, could improve these outcomes. PMID:28074143

  8. Adverse mandibular bone effects associated with kidney disease are only partially corrected with bisphosphonate and/or calcium treatment

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Matthew R.; Chen, Neal X.; Gattone, Vincent H.; Moe, Sharon M.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have high prevalence of periodontal disease that may predispose to tooth loss and inflammation. The goal of this study was to test the hypotheses that a genetic rat model of progressive CKD would exhibit altered oral bone properties and that treatment with either bisphosphonates or calcium could attenuate these adverse changes. Methods At 25 weeks of age, rats were treated with zoledronate, calcium gluconate, or their combination for 5 or 10 weeks. Mandible bone properties were assessed using micro-computed tomography to determine bone volume (BV/TV) and cement-enamel junction to alveolar crest distance (CEJ-AC). Results Untreated CKD animals had significantly lower BV/TV at both 30 (−5%) and 35 (−14%) weeks of age and higher CEJ-AC (+27 and 29%) compared to normal animals. CKD animals had significantly higher PTH compared to normal animals yet similar levels of C-reactive protein. Zoledronate-treatment normalized BV/TV over the first 5 weeks but this benefit was lost by 10 weeks. Calcium treatment, alone or in combination with zoledronate, was effective in normalizing BV/TV at both time points. Neither zoledronate nor calcium was able to correct the higher CEJ-AC caused by CKD. Calcium, but not zoledronate, significantly reduced serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) while neither treatment affected C-reactive protein. Conclusions 1) this progressive animal model of chronic kidney disease shows a clear mandibular skeletal phenotype consistent with periodontitis, 2) the periodontitis is not associated with systemic inflammation as measured by C-reactive protein, and 3) reducing PTH has positive effects on the mandible phenotype. PMID:24280830

  9. Business oriented EU human cell and tissue product legislation will adversely impact Member States' health care systems.

    PubMed

    Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Vanderkelen, Alain; De Vos, Daniel; Draye, Jean-Pierre; Rose, Thomas; Ceulemans, Carl; Ectors, Nadine; Huys, Isabelle; Jennes, Serge; Verbeken, Gilbert

    2013-12-01

    The transplantation of conventional human cell and tissue grafts, such as heart valve replacements and skin for severely burnt patients, has saved many lives over the last decades. The late eighties saw the emergence of tissue engineering with the focus on the development of biological substitutes that restore or improve tissue function. In the nineties, at the height of the tissue engineering hype, industry incited policymakers to create a European regulatory environment, which would facilitate the emergence of a strong single market for tissue engineered products and their starting materials (human cells and tissues). In this paper we analyze the elaboration process of this new European Union (EU) human cell and tissue product regulatory regime-i.e. the EU Cell and Tissue Directives (EUCTDs) and the Advanced Therapy Medicinal Product (ATMP) Regulation and evaluate its impact on Member States' health care systems. We demonstrate that the successful lobbying on key areas of regulatory and policy processes by industry, in congruence with Europe's risk aversion and urge to promote growth and jobs, led to excessively business oriented legislation. Expensive industry oriented requirements were introduced and contentious social and ethical issues were excluded. We found indications that this new EU safety and health legislation will adversely impact Member States' health care systems; since 30 December 2012 (the end of the ATMP transitional period) there is a clear threat to the sustainability of some lifesaving and established ATMPs that were provided by public health institutions and small and medium-sized enterprises under the frame of the EUCTDs. In the light of the current economic crisis it is not clear how social security systems will cope with the inflation of costs associated with this new regulatory regime and how priorities will be set with regard to reimbursement decisions. We argue that the ATMP Regulation should urgently be revised to focus on delivering

  10. Quality of life in patients with schizophrenia: the impact of socio-economic factors and adverse effects of atypical antipsychotics drugs.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes; de Araújo Dantas, Diego; do Nascimento, Gemma Galgani; Ribeiro, Susana Barbosa; Chaves, Katarina Melo; de Lima Silva, Vanessa; de Araújo, Raimundo Fernandes; de Souza, Dyego Leandro Bezerra; de Medeiros, Caroline Addison Carvalho Xavier

    2014-09-01

    This cross-sectional study compared the effects of treatment with atypical antipsychotic drugs on quality of life (QoL) and side effects in 218 patients with schizophrenia attending the ambulatory services of psychiatric in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Socio-economic variables were compared. The five-dimension EuroQoL (EQ-5D) was used to evaluate QoL, and side effects were assessed using the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser (UKU) Side Effect Rating Scale and the Simpson-Angus Scale. Data were analysed using the χ (2) test and Student's t test, with a significance level of 5 %. Average monthly household incomes in the medication groups were 1.1-2.1 minimum wages ($339-$678). UKU Scale scores showed significant differences in side effects, mainly, clozapine, quetiapine and ziprasidone (p < 0.05). EQ-5D scores showed that all drugs except olanzapine significantly impacted mobility (p < 0.05), and proportions of individuals reporting problems in other dimensions were high: 63.6 % of clozapine users reported mobility problems, 63.7 and 56.3 % of clozapine and ziprasidone users, respectively, had difficulties with usual activities, 68.8 and 54.5 % of ziprasidone and clozapine users, respectively, experienced pain and/or discomfort, and 72.8 % of clozapine users reported anxiety and/or depression. Psychiatric, neurological, and autonomous adverse effects, as well as other side effects, were prevalent in users of atypical antipsychotic drugs, especially clozapine and ziprasidone. Olanzapine had the least side effects. QoL was impacted by side effects and economic conditions in all groups. Thus, the effects of these antipsychotic agents appear to have been masked by aggravating social and economic situations.

  11. Impact of High-Normal Blood Pressure Measured in Emergency Room on Adverse Cardiac Events in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Nam Sik; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Jong Hyun; Chae, Shung Chull; Kim, Young Jo; Hur, Seung Ho; Seong, In Whan; Hong, Taek Jong; Choi, Donghoon; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Seung, Ki Bae; Chung, Wook Sung; Jang, Yang Soo; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Seung Jung

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Prehypertension according to JNC7 is common and is associated with increased vascular mortality. The importance of management in high-normal blood pressure (BP) is underemphasized. Subjects and Methods We analyzed major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry in normal BP (group I) and high-normal BP (group II) patients. Results Among 14871 patients, 159 (61±12.3 years, 122 males) satisfied the study indication. Six-month and one-year clinical follow-up rate was 88.9% and 85.8%, respectively. Group I had 78 patients (60.9±12.4 years). Group II had 81 patients (61.6±12.5 years). Demographics of patients were not different between groups. Treatment strategy was not different. Initial Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction flow grade 0 was less frequent in group II (n=32, 47.1%) than in group I (n=16, 21.9%) (p=0.001). Successful intervention rate was not different between group II (93.8%) and group I (97.1%) (p=0.590). Six-month MACE occurred in 3 patients in group I (4.4%) and 10 in group II (15.6%) (p=0.031). Compared with normal BP, the odds ratio for patients with high-normal BP was 1.147 (p=0.045, 95% confidence interval 1.011-1.402) for 6-month MACE. Conclusion Even though high-normal BP patients had a better baseline clinical status, the prognosis was poorer than patients with normal BP. Therapeutic BP target goal for the patients with acute myocardial infarction should be <140/90 mm Hg, which is recommended in JNC7. PMID:22701132

  12. Surrogate species selection for assessing potential adverse environmental impacts of genetically engineered insect-resistant plants on non-target organisms.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Keri; Cayabyab, Bonifacio; De Schrijver, Adinda; Gadaleta, Patricia G; Hellmich, Richard L; Romeis, Jörg; Storer, Nicholas; Valicente, Fernando H; Wach, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Most regulatory authorities require that developers of genetically engineered insect-resistant (GEIR) crops evaluate the potential for these crops to have adverse impacts on valued non-target organisms (NTOs), i.e., organisms not intended to be controlled by the trait. In many cases, impacts to NTOs are assessed using surrogate species, and it is critical that the data derived from surrogates accurately predict any adverse impacts likely to be observed from the use of the crop in the agricultural context. The key is to select surrogate species that best represent the valued NTOs in the location where the crop is going to be introduced, but this selection process poses numerous challenges for the developers of GE crops who will perform the tests, as well as for the ecologists and regulators who will interpret the test results. These issues were the subject of a conference "Surrogate Species Selection for Assessing Potential Adverse Environmental Impacts of Genetically Engineered Plants on Non-Target Organisms" convened by the Center for Environmental Risk Assessment, ILSI Research Foundation. This report summarizes the proceedings of the conference, including the presentations, discussions and the points of consensus agreed to by the participants.

  13. Impact of early life adversity on reward processing in young adults: EEG-fMRI results from a prospective study over 25 years.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Regina; Holz, Nathalie E; Buchmann, Arlette F; Blomeyer, Dorothea; Plichta, Michael M; Wolf, Isabella; Baumeister, Sarah; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Banaschewski, Tobias; Brandeis, Daniel; Laucht, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have implicated the mesolimbic dopamine reward pathway in altered brain function resulting from exposure to early adversity. The present study examined the impact of early life adversity on different stages of neuronal reward processing later in life and their association with a related behavioral phenotype, i.e. attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). 162 healthy young adults (mean age = 24.4 years; 58% female) from an epidemiological cohort study followed since birth participated in a simultaneous EEG-fMRI study using a monetary incentive delay task. Early life adversity according to an early family adversity index (EFA) and lifetime ADHD symptoms were assessed using standardized parent interviews conducted at the offspring's age of 3 months and between 2 and 15 years, respectively. fMRI region-of-interest analysis revealed a significant effect of EFA during reward anticipation in reward-related areas (i.e. ventral striatum, putamen, thalamus), indicating decreased activation when EFA increased. EEG analysis demonstrated a similar effect for the contingent negative variation (CNV), with the CNV decreasing with the level of EFA. In contrast, during reward delivery, activation of the bilateral insula, right pallidum and bilateral putamen increased with EFA. There was a significant association of lifetime ADHD symptoms with lower activation in the left ventral striatum during reward anticipation and higher activation in the right insula during reward delivery. The present findings indicate a differential long-term impact of early life adversity on reward processing, implicating hyporesponsiveness during reward anticipation and hyperresponsiveness when receiving a reward. Moreover, a similar activation pattern related to lifetime ADHD suggests that the impact of early life stress on ADHD may possibly be mediated by a dysfunctional reward pathway.

  14. Comparison of the Adverse Event Profile of TheraSphere(®) with SIR-Spheres(®) for the Treatment of Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kallini, Joseph Ralph; Gabr, Ahmed; Thorlund, Kristian; Balijepalli, Chakrapani; Ayres, Dieter; Kanters, Steve; Ebrahim, Shanil; Mills, Edward; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2017-02-28

    To compare the safety profiles of TheraSphere(®) (glass) and SIR-Spheres(®) (resin) Y90 microspheres for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. A systematic review was conducted using the databases MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Trials Register to identify all relevant studies. Baseline characteristics and adverse events of all grades related to gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, and respiratory systems were collected along with commonly reported outcomes related to post-embolization syndrome. For all outcomes, data from each study were tabulated for each intervention. Adverse events and patients were summed across studies on TheraSphere(®) and SIR-Spheres(®), respectively, and the resulting proportion of patients experiencing an outcome for both interventions was calculated. Thirty-one observational studies were included in the review. In the adverse events of all grades, more patients treated with resin microspheres reported gastric ulcers, hepatic encephalopathy, cholecystitis, hepatic failure, and pleural effusion. Patients treated with resin microspheres also had more hepatobiliary adverse events of grade 3 or higher. In the events related to post-embolization syndrome, glass microspheres exhibited a similar safety profile compared to resin microspheres. Ascites and nausea grade 3 or higher were recorded more frequently with glass microsphere treatment. Based on this review of the published literature, glass microspheres exhibit a safety profile with fewer gastrointestinal and pulmonary adverse events compared to resin microspheres in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  15. Perioperative treatment with the new synthetic TLR-4 agonist GLA-SE reduces cancer metastasis without adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Matzner, Pini; Sorski, Liat; Shaashua, Lee; Elbaz, Ely; Lavon, Hagar; Melamed, Rivka; Rosenne, Ella; Gotlieb, Neta; Benbenishty, Amit; Reed, Steve G; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2016-04-01

    The use of TLR agonists as an anti-cancer treatment is gaining momentum given their capacity to activate various host cellular responses through the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and type-I interferons. It is now also recognized that the perioperative period is a window of opportunity for various interventions aiming at reducing the risk of cancer metastases-the major cause of cancer related death. However, immune-stimulatory approach has not been used perioperatively given several contraindications to surgery. To overcome these obstacles, in this study, we used the newly introduced, fully synthetic TLR-4 agonist, Glucopyranosyl Lipid-A (GLA-SE), in various models of cancer metastases, and in the context of acute stress or surgery. Without exerting evident adverse effects, a single systemic administration of GLA-SE rapidly and dose dependently elevated both innate and adaptive immunity in the circulation, lungs and the lymphatic system. Importantly, GLA-SE treatment led to reduced metastatic development of a mammary adenocarcinoma and a colon carcinoma by approximately 40-75% in F344 rats and BALB/c mice, respectively, at least partly through elevating marginating-pulmonary NK cell cytotoxicity. GLA-SE is safe and well tolerated in humans, and currently is used as an adjuvant in phase-II clinical trials. Given that the TLR-4 receptor and its signaling cascade is highly conserved throughout evolution, our current results suggest that GLA-SE may be a promising immune stimulatory agent in the context of oncological surgeries, aiming to reduce long-term cancer recurrence.

  16. A Traditional Chinese Medicine Xiao-Ai-Tong Suppresses Pain through Modulation of Cytokines and Prevents Adverse Reactions of Morphine Treatment in Bone Cancer Pain Patients.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yan; Sun, Kefu; He, Xueming; Li, Jinxuan; Dong, Yanbin; Zheng, Bin; Tan, Xiao; Song, Xue-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Treating cancer pain continues to possess a major challenge. Here, we report that a traditional Chinese medicine Xiao-Ai-Tong (XAT) can effectively suppress pain and adverse reactions following morphine treatment in patients with bone cancer pain. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) were used for patient's self-evaluation of pain intensity and evaluating changes of adverse reactions including constipation, nausea, fatigue, and anorexia, respectively, before and after treatment prescriptions. The clinical trials showed that repetitive oral administration of XAT (200 mL, bid, for 7 consecutive days) alone greatly reduced cancer pain. Repetitive treatment with a combination of XAT and morphine (20 mg and 30 mg, resp.) produced significant synergistic analgesic effects. Meanwhile, XAT greatly reduced the adverse reactions associated with cancer and/or morphine treatment. In addition, XAT treatment significantly reduced the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α and increased the endogenous anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 in blood. These findings demonstrate that XAT can effectively reduce bone cancer pain probably mediated by the cytokine mechanisms, facilitate analgesic effect of morphine, and prevent or reduce the associated adverse reactions, supporting a use of XAT, alone or with morphine, in treating bone cancer pain in clinic.

  17. A Traditional Chinese Medicine Xiao-Ai-Tong Suppresses Pain through Modulation of Cytokines and Prevents Adverse Reactions of Morphine Treatment in Bone Cancer Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yan; Sun, Kefu; He, Xueming; Li, Jinxuan; Dong, Yanbin; Zheng, Bin; Tan, Xiao; Song, Xue-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Treating cancer pain continues to possess a major challenge. Here, we report that a traditional Chinese medicine Xiao-Ai-Tong (XAT) can effectively suppress pain and adverse reactions following morphine treatment in patients with bone cancer pain. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) were used for patient's self-evaluation of pain intensity and evaluating changes of adverse reactions including constipation, nausea, fatigue, and anorexia, respectively, before and after treatment prescriptions. The clinical trials showed that repetitive oral administration of XAT (200 mL, bid, for 7 consecutive days) alone greatly reduced cancer pain. Repetitive treatment with a combination of XAT and morphine (20 mg and 30 mg, resp.) produced significant synergistic analgesic effects. Meanwhile, XAT greatly reduced the adverse reactions associated with cancer and/or morphine treatment. In addition, XAT treatment significantly reduced the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α and increased the endogenous anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 in blood. These findings demonstrate that XAT can effectively reduce bone cancer pain probably mediated by the cytokine mechanisms, facilitate analgesic effect of morphine, and prevent or reduce the associated adverse reactions, supporting a use of XAT, alone or with morphine, in treating bone cancer pain in clinic. PMID:26617438

  18. Tourism impacts of Three Mile Island and other adverse events: Implications for Lincoln County and other rural counties bisected by radioactive wastes intended for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Himmelberger, J.J.; Ogneva-Himmelberger, Y.A.; Baughman, M.

    1995-11-01

    Whether the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository system will adversely impact tourism in southern Nevada is an open question of particular importance to visitor-oriented rural counties bisected by planned waste transportation corridors (highway or rail). As part of one such county`s repository impact assessment program, tourism implications of Three Mile Island (TMI) and other major hazard events have been revisited to inform ongoing county-wide socioeconomic assessments and contingency planning efforts. This paper summarizes key research implications of such research as applied to Lincoln County, Nevada. Implications for other rural counties are discussed in light of the research findings. 29 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Tourism impacts of Three Mile Island and other adverse events: Implications for Lincoln County and other rural counties bisected by radioactive wastes intended for Yucca Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmelberger, Jeffery J.; Baughman, Mike; Ogneva-Himmelberger, Yelena A.

    1995-11-01

    Whether the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository system will adversely impact tourism in southern Nevada is an open question of particular importance to visitor-oriented rural counties bisected by planned waste transportatin corridors (highway or rail). As part of one such county's repository impact assessment program, tourism implications of Three Mile Island (TMI) and other major hazard events have beem revisited to inform ongoing county-wide socioeconomic assessments and contingency planning efforts. This paper summarizes key research implications of such research as applied to Lincoln County, Nevada. Implications for other rural counties are discussed in light of the research findings.

  20. Adverse events of standardized regimens of corticosteroids for prophylaxis and treatment of nerve function impairment in leprosy: results from the 'TRIPOD' trials.

    PubMed

    Richardus, Jan H; Withington, Stephen G; Anderson, Alison M; Croft, Richard P; Nicholls, Peter G; Van Brakel, Wim H; Smith, W Cairns S

    2003-12-01

    Reactions in leprosy causing nerve function impairment (NFI) are increasingly treated with standardized regimens of corticosteroids, often under field conditions. Safety concerns led to an assessment of adverse events of corticosteroids, based on data of three trials studying prevention of NFI (the TRIPOD study). A multicentre, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted in leprosy control programmes in Nepal and Bangladesh. Treatment was with prednisolone according to fixed schedules for 16 weeks, starting in one trial with 20 mg/day (prophylactic regimen: total dosage 1.96 g) and in the other two trials with 40 mg/day (therapeutic regimen: total dosage 2.52 g). Minor adverse events were defined as moon face, fungal infections, acne, and gastric pain requiring antacid. Major adverse events were defined as psychosis, peptic ulcer, glaucoma, cataract, diabetes and hypertension. Also, the occurrence of infected plantar, palmar, and corneal ulceration was monitored, together with occurrence of TB. Considering all three trials together, minor adverse events were observed in 130/815 patients (16%). Of these, 51/414 (12%) were in the placebo group and 79/401 (20%) in the prednisolone group. The relative risk for minor adverse events in the prednisolone group was 1.6 (P = 0.004). Adverse events with a significantly increased risk were acne, fungal infections and gastric pain. Major adverse events were observed in 15/815 patients (2%); 7/414 (2%) in the placebo group and 8/401 (2%) in the prednisolone group. No major adverse events had a significantly increased risk in the prednisolone arm of the trials. No cases of TB were observed in 300 patients who could be followed-up for 24 months. Standardized regimens of corticosteroids for both prophylaxis and treatment of reactions and NFI in leprosy under field conditions in developing countries are safe when a standard pre-treatment examination is performed, treatment for minor conditions can be carried out

  1. Prevalence and Predictors of Adverse Events in Older Surgical Patients: Impact of the Present on Admission Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hongsoo; Capezuti, Elizabeth; Kovner, Christine; Zhao, Zhonglin; Boockvar, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To examine the effects of the present on admission (POA) indicator on the prevalence of and factors associated with postsurgical adverse events in older patients. Design and Methods: This is a secondary data analysis of 82,898 surgical patients aged 65 years or older in 252 acute care hospitals in California in 2004. Four…

  2. Alleviation of adverse effects of drought stress on growth and some potential physiological attributes in maize (Zea mays L.) by seed electromagnetic treatment.

    PubMed

    Javed, Namra; Ashraf, Muhammad; Akram, Nudrat Aisha; Al-Qurainy, Fahad

    2011-01-01

    Effects of varying preseed magnetic treatments on growth, chlorophyll pigments, photosynthesis, water relation attributes, fluorescence and levels of osmoprotectants in maize plants were tested under normal and drought stress conditions. Seeds of two maize cultivars were treated with different (T0 [0 mT], T1 [100 mT for 5 min], T2 [100 mT for 10 min], T3 [150 mT for 5 min] and T4 [150 mT for 10 min]) electromagnetic treatments. Drought stress considerably suppressed growth, chlorophyll a and b pigments, leaf water potential, photosynthetic rate (A), stomatal conductance (g(s)) and substomatal CO(2) concentration (C(i)), while it increased leaf glycinebetaine and proline accumulation in both maize cultivars. However, pretreated seeds with different magnetic treatments significantly alleviated the drought-induced adverse effects on growth by improving chlorophyll a, A, E, g(s), C(i) and photochemical quenching and nonphotochemical quenching, while it had no significant effect on other attributes. However, different magnetic treatments negatively affected the g(s) and C(i) particularly in cv. Agaiti-2002 under drought stress conditions. Of all magnetic treatments, 100 and 150 mT for 10 min were most effective in alleviating the drought-induced adverse effects. Overall, preseed electromagnetic treatments could be used to minimize the drought-induced adverse effects on different crop plants.

  3. Tracking the Impact of Excisional Cervical Treatment on the Cervix using Biospectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Halliwell, Diane E.; Kyrgiou, Maria; Mitra, Anita; Kalliala, Ilkka; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos; Theophilou, Georgios; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L.; Martin, Francis L.

    2016-01-01

    Local excisional treatment for cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN) is linked to significant adverse sequelae including preterm birth, with cone depth and radicality of treatment correlating to the frequency and severity of adverse events. Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy can detect underlying cervical disease more accurately than conventional cytology. The chemical profile of cells pre- and post-treatment may differ as a result of altered biochemical processes due to excision, or treatment of the disease. Since pre-treatment cervical length varies amongst women, the percentage of cervix excised may correlate more accurately to risk than absolute dimensions. We show that treatment for CIN significantly alters the biochemistry of the cervix, compared with women who have not had treatment; this is due to the removal of cervical tissue rather than the removal of the disease. However, the spectra do not seem to correlate to the cone depth or proportion of cervical length excised. Future research should aim to explore the impact of treatment in a larger cohort. PMID:27974821

  4. Adverse events and patients’ perceived health-related quality of life at the end of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment in Namibia

    PubMed Central

    Sagwa, Evans L; Ruswa, Nunurai; Mavhunga, Farai; Rennie, Timothy; Leufkens, Hubert GM; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients completing multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) treatment in Namibia and whether the occurrence of adverse events influenced patients’ rating of their HRQoL was evaluated. Patients and methods A cross-sectional analytic survey of patients completing or who recently completed MDR-TB treatment was conducted. The patients rated their HRQoL using the simplified Short Form-™ (SF-8) questionnaire consisting of eight Likert-type questions. Three supplemental questions on the adverse events that the patients may have experienced during their MDR-TB treatment were also included. Scoring of HRQoL ratings was norm-based (mean =50, standard deviation =10) ranging from 20 (worst health) to 80 (best health), rather than the conventional 0–100 scores. We evaluated the internal consistency of the scale items using the Cronbach’s alpha, performed descriptive analyses, and analyzed the association between the patients’ HRQoL scores and adverse events. Results Overall, 36 patients (20 males, 56%) aged 17–54 years (median =40 years) responded to the questionnaire. The median (range) HRQoL score for the physical component summary was 58.6 (35.3–60.5), while the median score for the mental component summary was 59.3 (26.6–61.9), indicating not-so-high self-rating of health. There was good internal consistency of the scale scores, with a Cronbach’s alpha value of >0.80. In all, 32 (89%) of the 36 patients experienced at least one adverse drug event of any severity during their treatment (median events =3, range 1–6), of which none was life-threatening. The occurrence of adverse events was not related to HRQoL scores. For patients reporting zero to two events, the median (range) HRQoL score was 56.8 (44.4–56.8), while for those reporting three or more events, the median score was 55.2 (38.6–56.8); P=0.34 for difference between these scores. Conclusion Patients completing treatment for MDR-TB in

  5. Periodontal Treatment Reduces Risk of Adverse Respiratory Events in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Propensity-Matched Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of periodontal diseases has been associated with benefit outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, no population-based cohort study has been conducted. We evaluated this relationship by retrospective cohort study using a large population data.Using the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 5562 COPD patients with periodontal diseases who had received periodontal treatment as the treatment group. The comparison group was selected at a 1:1 ratio matched by the propensity score estimated with age, sex, date of COPD diagnosis and periodontal treatment, and comorbidities. Both groups were followed up for 5 years to compare risks of acute exacerbation, pneumonia, and acute respiratory failure.The incidence rates of adverse respiratory events were significantly lower in the treatment group than in the comparison group: 3.79 versus 4.21 per 100 person-years for emergency room visits, 2.75 versus 3.65 per 100 person-years for hospitalizations, and 0.66 versus 0.75 per 100 person-years for intensive care unit admissions. The treatment group also had a 37% reduced risk of deaths (1.81 vs 2.87 per 100 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.57 (95% confidence interval 0.52-0.62).Periodontal treatment for COPD patients could reduce the risk of adverse respiratory events and mortality. The adequate periodontal health care is important for COPD patients with periodontal diseases.

  6. The Impact of Appropriate Antibiotic Prescribing on Treatment Evaluation Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Honoré, Mitonga Kabwebwe; Lubbe, Martie; Serfontein, Jan; Allen, Kirk

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic impact of inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics is debatable, particularly in situations where infections are treated empirically with multiply prescribed antibiotics. Prescribers may remain under the illusion that such prescriptions are appropriate on the basis of any observed positive treatment outcomes, even though an antibiotic prescribed in such combination therapy may actually be infective against infecting pathogens. This, inevitably, promotes inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. Prescribers may be motivated to make more conscious attempts to prescribe antibiotics appropriately if it is proven that judicious prescribing of antibiotics has positive impacts on treatment outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of appropriate prescribing of antibiotics on treatment outcomes, days of patient hospitalization and costs related to antibiotic treatment. Observational data on antibiotic treatment were collected for a one-month period from case notes of all inpatients (n=307) and outpatients (n=865) at five government and mission hospitals in Lesotho. Prescriptions were classified into categories of appropriateness based on extents to which antibiotics were prescribed according to principles. Treatment success rates, mean days of hospitalization and costs of antibiotic treatments of inpatients treated with specified prescription categories were determined. Appropriate prescribing of antibiotics for inpatients had positive impacts on treatment outcomes, patients’ days of hospitalization for infections and costs of antibiotic treatments. In outpatient settings, appropriate prescribing of antibiotics failed to show any significant impact on costs of antibiotics. Appropriate prescribing of antibiotics had a positive impact on patients’ recovery and costs of antibiotic treatments in inpatient settings.

  7. Risk factors, psychological impacts and current treatments of acne in Shanghai area of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peiru; Wang, Hongwei; Ding, Huilin; Lv, Ting; Miao, Fei; Li, Jingjing; Shi, Lei; Wang, Xiuli

    2016-01-01

    Acne is one complex skin disorders, which can lead to adverse psychological effects. Multiple factors are correlated with risk of acne and several treatments have been explored. The prevalence and risk factors are suspected to be varied in different populations with different genetic backgrounds and lifestyle. Therefore, this study investigated the risk factors, psychological impacts and current treatments of acne in Shanghai area of China by a retrospective questionnaire study. This study showed that the subjects with family history (especially paternal history) were prone to develop severe acne (p<0.001). Besides, patients with severe acne might exhibit more severe psychological disorders (p<0.001). The most frequently used methods were pharmacological treatments. These results indicate that acne is prone to induce severe psychological disorders, and could be affected by multiple factors. Furthermore, these results provide valuable reference for exploring the preventive measures and treatments of acne in Shanghai area of China.

  8. Impact of Cannabis Use on Treatment Outcomes among Adults Receiving Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for PTSD and Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ruglass, Lesia M.; Shevorykin, Alina; Radoncic, Vanja; Smith, Kathryn M. Z.; Smith, Philip H.; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R.; Papini, Santiago; Hien, Denise A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Research has demonstrated a strong link between trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders (SUDs) in general and cannabis use disorders in particular. Yet, few studies have examined the impact of cannabis use on treatment outcomes for individuals with co-occurring PTSD and SUDs. Methods: Participants were 136 individuals who received cognitive-behavioral therapies for co-occurring PTSD and SUD. Multivariate regressions were utilized to examine the associations between baseline cannabis use and end-of-treatment outcomes. Multilevel linear growth models were fit to the data to examine the cross-lagged associations between weekly cannabis use and weekly PTSD symptom severity and primary substance use during treatment. Results: There were no significant positive nor negative associations between baseline cannabis use and end-of-treatment PTSD symptom severity and days of primary substance use. Cross-lagged models revealed that as cannabis use increased, subsequent primary substance use decreased and vice versa. Moreover, results revealed a crossover lagged effect, whereby higher cannabis use was associated with greater PTSD symptom severity early in treatment, but lower weekly PTSD symptom severity later in treatment. Conclusion: Cannabis use was not associated with adverse outcomes in end-of-treatment PTSD and primary substance use, suggesting independent pathways of change. The theoretical and clinical implications of the reciprocal associations between weekly cannabis use and subsequent PTSD and primary substance use symptoms during treatment are discussed. PMID:28178207

  9. Azathioprine therapy and adverse drug reactions in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: impact of thiopurine S-methyltransferase polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Matthias; Schäffeler, Elke; Marx, Claudia; Fischer, Christine; Lang, Thomas; Behrens, Christoph; Gregor, Michael; Eichelbaum, Michel; Zanger, Ulrich M; Kaskas, Bernd A

    2002-08-01

    The efficacy of the immunosuppressants azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine has been well established in the therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). However, its use has been complicated by a high incidence of serious adverse drug reactions such as hematotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, pancreatitis and gastrointestinal disturbances. Whereas azathioprine-related pancytopenia has been clearly linked to thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) polymorphism limited data are available to explain gastrointestinal side effects. In a retrospective analysis of 93 adults with IBD and azathioprine therapy both phenotyping and genotyping was used to explore systematically the relationship between TPMT and azathioprine-related adverse reactions. At time of inclusion, 69 patients were still receiving azathioprine therapy and had never experienced side effects. Azathioprine had been withdrawn in 10 patients for non-medical reasons or lack of response and 14 patients (15%) had stopped medication or were on reduced dose due to severe azathioprine-related side effects. Nine of these 14 patients had developed gastrointestinal side effects (hepatotoxicity, n = 3; pancreatitis, n = 3; others, n = 3), but their normal red blood cell TPMT activities were in accordance to TPMT wild-type. TPMT deficiency in one patient had led to pancytopenia whereas only two of the remaining four patients with hematotoxicity displayed an intermediate phenotype of TPMT. This study demonstrates that azathioprine-related gastrointestinal side effects are independent of the TPMT polymorphism. Nevertheless pharmacogenetic testing for TPMT prior to commencing thiopurine therapy should become routine practice in order to avoid severe hematotoxicity in TPMT deficient patients and lowering the incidence of hematological side effects in individuals heterozygous for TPMT.

  10. Adverse events risk associated with anti-VEGFR agents in the treatment of advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Biao; Gao, WenChuang; Chu, HongJun; Gao, Jian; Fu, Zhi; Ding, Hui; Lv, JunJie; Wu, QingQuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To perform this meta-analysis, we investigated the risk of the most clinically relevant adverse events related to antivascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) agents in advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A comprehensive literature search for studies published up to October 2015 was performed. Prospective randomized controlled phase II/III clinical trials that comparing therapy with or without anti-VEGFR agents for advanced NSCLC were included for analysis. Summary relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random effects or fixed effects according to the heterogeneity among included trials. A total of 11,701 patients from 18 clinical trials were included for analysis. Pooled RR showed that the use of anti-VEGFR agents significantly increased the risk of developing hypertension (RR 4.71, 95% CI 3.29–6.73, P < 0.001) and fatal adverse events (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.12–1.58, P = 0.001). No statistically significant differences were found for gastrointestinal (GI) perforation (P = 0.41), arterial or venous thromboembolic events (P = 0.49 and P = 0.16, respectively), or hemorrhagic events (P = 0.81). Sensitive analysis indicated that the significance estimate of pooled RR of fatal adverse event (FAEs) was not significantly influenced by omitting any single study. The use of anti-VEGFR agents in advanced NSCLC does significantly increase the risk of hypertension and fatal adverse events, but not for arterial or venous thromboembolic events, GI perforation, or hemorrhagic events. PMID:27902583

  11. Infusion site adverse events in breast cancer patients receiving highly emetic chemotherapy with prophylactic anti-emetic treatment with aprepitant and fosaprepitant: A retrospective comparison.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Takashi; Kyomori, Chisato; Mizukami, Takuro; Taniyama, Tomoko; Izawa, Naoki; Horie, Yoshiki; Hirakawa, Mami; Ogura, Takashi; Nakajima, Takako Eguchi; Tsugawa, Koichiro; Boku, Narikazu

    2016-04-01

    The incidences of infusion site adverse events in chemotherapy regimens, including anthracyclines with either fosaprepitant or aprepitant as the anti-emetic, were not highlighted in the randomized trial comparing aprepitant and fosaprepitant. The present retrospective analysis was performed in breast cancer patients receiving anthracycline-containing chemotherapy, a combination of epirubicin and cyclophosphamide with or without 5-fluorouracil as the adjuvant or neoadjuvant, at the outpatient infusion center of St. Marianna University Hospital (Kawasaki, Japan). Infusion site adverse events were retrospectively compared between the 3 months prior to and three months following switching from 3 day oral administration of aprepitant to intravenous infusion of fosaprepitant. A total of 62 patients were included in the aprepitant group and 38 in the fosaprepitant group. Of these patients, 26 (42%) in the aprepitant group and 36 patients (96%) in the fosaprepitant group experienced any grade of infusion site adverse events at least once (P<0.001). As an anti-emetic treatment for chemotherapy using anthracyclines, fosaprepitant may be associated with a higher risk of infusion site adverse events compared with aprepitant.

  12. Identifying Impacts of Hydropower Regulation on Salmonid Habitats to Guide River Restoration for Existing Schemes and Mitigate Adverse Effects of Future Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddendorf, B.; Geris, J.; Malcolm, I.; Wilkinson, M.; Soulsby, C.

    2015-12-01

    A decrease in longitudinal connectivity in riverine ecosystems resulting from the construction of transverse barriers has been identified as a major threat to biodiversity. For example, Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) have a seasonal variety of hydraulic habitat requirements for their different life stages. However, hydropower impoundments impact the spatial and temporal connectivity of natural habitat along many salmon rivers in ways that are not fully understood. Yet, these changes may affect the sustainability of habitat at local and regional scales and so ultimately the conservation of the species. Research is therefore needed both to aid the restoration and management of rivers impacted by previous hydropower development and guide new schemes to mitigate potentially adverse effects. To this end we assessed the effects of hydropower development on the flow related habitat conditions for different salmon life stages in Scottish rivers at different spatial scales. We used GIS techniques to map the changes in structural connectivity at regional scales, applying a weighting for habitat quality. Next, we used hydrological models to simulate past and present hydrologic conditions that in turn drive reach-scale hydraulic models to assess the impacts of regulation on habitat suitability in both space and time. Preliminary results indicate that: 1) impacts on connectivity depend on the location of the barrier within the river network; 2) multiple smaller barriers may have a potentially lower impact than a single larger barrier; 3) there is a relationship between habitat and connectivity where losing less but more suitable habitat potentially has a disproportionally large impact; 4) the impact of flow regulation can lead to a deterioration of habitat quality, though the effects are spatially variable and the extent of the impact depends on salmon life stage. This work can form a basis for using natural processes to perform targeted and cost-effective restoration of rivers.

  13. Impacts of adverse childhood experiences on health, mental health, and substance use in early adulthood: a cohort study of an urban, minority sample in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Mersky, J P; Topitzes, J; Reynolds, A J

    2013-11-01

    Research has shown that adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) increase the risk of poor health-related outcomes in later life. Less is known about the consequences of ACEs in early adulthood or among diverse samples. Therefore, we investigated the impacts of differential exposure to ACEs on an urban, minority sample of young adults. Health, mental health, and substance use outcomes were examined alone and in aggregate. Potential moderating effects of sex were also explored. Data were derived from the Chicago Longitudinal Study, a panel investigation of individuals who were born in 1979 or 1980. Main-effect analyses were conducted with multivariate logistic and OLS regression. Sex differences were explored with stratified analysis, followed by tests of interaction effects with the full sample. Results confirmed that there was a robust association between ACEs and poor outcomes in early adulthood. Greater levels of adversity were associated with poorer self-rated health and life satisfaction, as well as more frequent depressive symptoms, anxiety, tobacco use, alcohol use, and marijuana use. Cumulative adversity also was associated with cumulative effects across domains. For instance, compared to individuals without an ACE, individuals exposed to multiple ACEs were more likely to have three or more poor outcomes (OR range=2.75-10.15) and four or more poor outcomes (OR range=3.93-15.18). No significant differences between males and females were detected. Given that the consequences of ACEs in early adulthood may lead to later morbidity and mortality, increased investment in programs and policies that prevent ACEs and ameliorate their impacts is warranted.

  14. Impacts of adverse childhood experiences on health, mental health, and substance use in early adulthood: A cohort study of an urban, minority sample in the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Topitzes, J.; Reynolds, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) increase the risk of poor health-related outcomes in later life. Less is known about the consequences of ACEs in early adulthood or among diverse samples. Therefore, we investigated the impacts of differential exposure to ACEs on an urban, minority sample of young adults. Health, mental health, and substance use outcomes were examined alone and in aggregate. Potential moderating effects of sex were also explored. Data were derived from the Chicago Longitudinal Study, a panel investigation of individuals who were born in 1979 or 1980. Main-effect analyses were conducted with multivariate logistic and OLS regression. Sex differences were explored with stratified analysis, followed by tests of interaction effects with the full sample. Results confirmed that there was a robust association between ACEs and poor outcomes in early adulthood. Greater levels of adversity were associated with poorer self-rated health and life satisfaction, as well as more frequent depressive symptoms, anxiety, tobacco use, alcohol use, and marijuana use. Cumulative adversity also was associated with cumulative effects across domains. For instance, compared to individuals without an ACE, individuals exposed to multiple ACEs were more likely to have three or more poor outcomes (OR range = 2.75–10.15) and four or more poor outcomes (OR range = 3.93–15.18). No significant differences between males and females were detected. Given that the consequences of ACEs in early adulthood may lead to later morbidity and mortality, increased investment in programs and policies that prevent ACEs and ameliorate their impacts is warranted. PMID:23978575

  15. Post-traumatic impaction of maxillary incisors: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paoloni, Valeria; Pavoni, Chiara; Mucedero, Manuela; Bollero, Patrizio; Laganà, Giuseppina; Cozza, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim To provide clinicians with useful information for immediate diagnosis and management of impacted maxillary incisors due to trauma. Methods We present a case of post-traumatic impaction of a central right maxillary incisor in a young patient. The treatment plan consisted in the interceptive management (surgical and orthodontic), the valuation of the necessary space to move the impacted tooth in the normal position and the biomechanical approach for anchorage, avoiding prosthetic/implants replacement. Results The therapy of an impacted maxillary incisor due to trauma requires a multidisciplinary approach: orthodontic, surgical, endodontic and periodontal considerations are essential for successful treatment. Conclusions Surgical exposure and orthodontic traction is the treatment most often used in case of posttraumatic impacted incisor: this technique in fact can lead to suitable results at the periodontal, occlusal and esthetics levels at an early stage and more definitively than with other treatment options. PMID:23991268

  16. The Adverse Impact of High Stakes Testing on Minority Students: Evidence from 100 Years of Test Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madaus, George F.; Clarke, Marguerite

    This paper examines four aspects of current high stakes testing that impact minority students and others traditionally underserved by American education. Data from research conducted at Boston College over 30 years highlight 4 issues: high stakes, high standards tests do not have a markedly positive effect on teaching and learning; high stakes…

  17. Interceptive approach to treatment of impacted maxillary canines.

    PubMed

    de Mendonça, Marcos Rogério; Verri, Ana Caroline Gonçales; Martins, Lídia Pimenta; Fabre, Aubrey Fernando; Cuoghi, Osmar Aparecido

    2012-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary canines can be prevented by early intervention in the mixed dentition phase after the correct diagnosis of malocclusion, reducing the complexity of the treatment. This article reports the case of a 10-year-old patient who possessed impacted maxillary canines and, after early extraction of primary canines, had reestablished favorable permanent successors' eruption axis. This 5-year radiographic follow-up study with panoramic radiography shows that this can be used in practice and that an effective control strategy ensures the accuracy in the inclination of the impacted canines. Treatment success is related to early diagnosis and strategic interceptive treatment choice.

  18. The impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in mitigating salt-induced adverse effects in sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.).

    PubMed

    Elhindi, Khalid M; El-Din, Ahmed Sharaf; Elgorban, Abdallah M

    2017-01-01

    Salinity is one of the serious abiotic stresses adversely affecting the majority of arable lands worldwide, limiting the crop productivity of most of the economically important crops. Sweet basil (Osmium basilicum) plants were grown in a non-saline soil (EC = 0.64 dS m(-1)), in low saline soil (EC = 5 dS m(-1)), and in a high saline soil (EC = 10 dS m(-1)). There were differences between arbuscular mycorrhizal (Glomus deserticola) colonized plants (+AMF) and non-colonized plants (-AMF). Mycorrhiza mitigated the reduction of K, P and Ca uptake due to salinity. The balance between K/Na and between Ca/Na was improved in +AMF plants. Growth enhancement by mycorrhiza was independent from plant phosphorus content under high salinity levels. Different growth parameters, salt stress tolerance and accumulation of proline content were investigated, these results showed that the use of mycorrhizal inoculum (AMF) was able to enhance the productivity of sweet basil plants under salinity conditions. Mycorrhizal inoculation significantly increased chlorophyll content and water use efficiency under salinity stress. The sweet basil plants appeared to have high dependency on AMF which improved plant growth, photosynthetic efficiency, gas exchange and water use efficiency under salinity stress. In this study, there was evidence that colonization with AMF can alleviate the detrimental salinity stress influence on the growth and productivity of sweet basil plants.

  19. Impact of Treatment Integrity on Intervention Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fryling, Mitch J.; Wallace, Michele D.; Yassine, Jordan N.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity has cogent implications for intervention effectiveness. Understanding these implications is an important, but often neglected, undertaking in behavior analysis. This paper reviews current research on treatment integrity in applied behavior analysis. Specifically, we review research evaluating the relation between integrity…

  20. Exercise can prevent and even reverse adverse effects of androgen suppression treatment in men with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Galvão, D A; Taaffe, D R; Spry, N; Newton, R U

    2007-01-01

    Side effects accompanying androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), including sarcopenia, loss of bone mass and reduction in muscle strength, can compromise physical function, particularly in older patients. Exercise, specifically resistance training, may be an effective and cost-efficient strategy to limit or even reverse some of these adverse effects during and following therapy. In this review, we discuss common morphological and physiological ADT-related side effects or 'Androgen Deprivation and Sarcopenia-Related Disorders' and the existing clinical trials incorporating physical exercise in prostate cancer patients receiving active therapy. Further, training concepts and guidelines are provided for prescribing resistance exercise programs for this population.

  1. Unbalanced international collaboration affects adversely the usefulness of countries' scientific output as well as their technological and social impact.

    PubMed

    Zanotto, Sonia R; Haeffner, Cristina; Guimarães, Jorge A

    2016-01-01

    The unbalanced international scientific collaboration as cause of misleading information on the country's contribution to the scientific world output was analyzed. ESI Data Base (Thomson Reuters' InCites), covering the scientific production of 217 active countries in the period 2010-2014 was used. International collaboration implicates in a high percentage (33.1 %) of double-counted world articles, thus impacting qualitative data as citations, impact and impact relative to word. The countries were divided into three groups, according to their individual contribution to the world publications: Group I (24 countries, at least 1 %) representing 83.9 % of the total double-counted world articles. Group II (40 countries, 0.1-0.99 % each). Group III, 153 countries (70.5 %) with <0.1 % and altogether 1.9 % of the world. Qualitative characteristics of each group were also analyzed: percentage of the country's GNP applied in R&D, proportion of Scientists and Engineers per million inhabitants and Human Development Index. Average international collaboration were: Group I, 43.0 %; Group II, 55.8 % and Group III, 85.2 %. We concluded that very high and unbalanced international collaboration, as presented by many countries, misrepresent the importance of their scientific production, technological and social outputs. Furthermore, it jeopardizes qualitative outputs of the countries themselves, artificially increasing their scientific impact, affecting all fields and therefore, the whole world. The data confirm that when dealing with the qualitative contribution of countries, it is necessary to take in consideration the level of international cooperation because, as seen here, it can and in fact it does create false impression of the real contribution of countries.

  2. Kava for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder RCT: analysis of adverse reactions, liver function, addiction, and sexual effects.

    PubMed

    Sarris, J; Stough, C; Teschke, R; Wahid, Z T; Bousman, C A; Murray, G; Savage, K M; Mouatt, P; Ng, C; Schweitzer, I

    2013-11-01

    Presently, little is known about a number issues concerning kava (Piper methysticum), including (i) whether kava has any withdrawal or addictive effects; (ii) if genetic polymorphisms of the cytochrome (CYP) P450 2D6 liver enzyme moderates any potential adverse effects; and (iii) if medicinal application of kava has any negative or beneficial effect on sexual function and experience. The study design was a 6-week, double-blind, randomized controlled trial (n = 75) involving chronic administration of kava (one tablet of kava twice per day; 120 mg of kavalactones per day, titrated in non-response to two tablets of kava twice per day; 240 mg of kavalactones) or placebo for participants with generalized anxiety disorder. Results showed no significant differences across groups for liver function tests, nor were there any significant adverse reactions that could be attributed to kava. No differences in withdrawal or addiction were found between groups. Interesting, kava significantly increased female's sexual drive compared to placebo (p = 0.040) on a sub-domain of the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX), with no negative effects seen in males. Further, it was found that there was a highly significant correlation between ASEX reduction (improved sexual function and performance) and anxiety reduction in the whole sample.

  3. Adapting water treatment design and operations to the impacts of global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Robert M.; Li, Zhiwei; Buchberger, Steven G.

    2011-12-01

    It is anticipated that global climate change will adversely impact source water quality in many areas of the United States and will therefore, potentially, impact the design and operation of current and future water treatment systems. The USEPA has initiated an effort called the Water Resources Adaptation Program (WRAP) which is intended to develop tools and techniques that can assess the impact of global climate change on urban drinking water and wastewater infrastructure. A three step approach for assessing climate change impacts on water treatment operation and design is being persude in this effort. The first step is the stochastic characterization of source water quality, the second step is the application of the USEPA Water Treatment Plant model and the third step is the application of cost algorithms to provide a metric that can be used to assess the coat impact of climate change. A model has been validated using data collected from Cincinnati's Richard Miller Water Treatment Plant for the USEPA Information Collection Rule (ICR) database. An analysis of the water treatment processes in response to assumed perturbations in raw water quality identified TOC, pH, and bromide as the three most important parameters affecting performance of the Miller WTP. The Miller Plant was simulated using the EPA WTP model to examine the impact of these parameters on selected regulated water quality parameters. Uncertainty in influent water quality was analyzed to estimate the risk of violating drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs).Water quality changes in the Ohio River were projected for 2050 using Monte Carlo simulation and the WTP model was used to evaluate the effects of water quality changes on design and operation. Results indicate that the existing Miller WTP might not meet Safe Drinking Water Act MCL requirements for certain extreme future conditions. However, it was found that the risk of MCL violations under future conditions could be controlled by

  4. A Possible Paradigm for the Mitigation of the Adverse Impacts of Natural Hazards in the Developing Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aswathanarayana, U.

    2001-05-01

    The proneness of a country or region to a given natural hazard depends upon its geographical location, physiography, geological and structural setting, landuse/landcover situation, and biophysical and socioeconomic environments (e.g. cyclones and floods in Bangladesh, earthquakes in Turkey, drought in Sub-Saharan Africa). While the natural hazards themselves cannot be prevented, it is possible to mitigate their adverse effects, by a knowledge-based, environmentally-sustainable approach, involving the stakeholder communities: (i) by being prepared: on the basis of the understanding of the land conditions which are prone to a given hazard and the processes which could culminate in damage to life and property (e.g. planting of dense-rooted vegetation belts to protect against landslides in the earthquake-prone areas), (ii) by avoiding improper anthropogenic activities that may exacerbate a hazard (e.g. deforestation accentuating the floods and droughts), and (iii) by putting a hazard to a beneficial use, where possible (groundwater recharging of flood waters), etc. Mitigation strategies need to be custom-made for each country/region by integrating the biophysical and socioeconomic components. The proposed paradigm is illustrated in respect of Extreme Weather Events (EWEs), which is based on the adoption of three approaches: (i) Typology approach, involving the interpretation of remotely sensed data, to predict (say) temporal and spatial distribution of precipitation, (ii) "black box" approach, whereby the potential environmental consequences of an EWE are projected on the basis of previously known case histories, and (iii) Information Technology approach, to translate advanced technical information in the form of "virtual" do-it-yourself steps understandable to lay public.

  5. Impact of single- vs double-layer closure on adverse outcomes and uterine scar defect: a systematic review and metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Stéphanie; Demers, Suzanne; Berghella, Vincenzo; Chaillet, Nils; Moore, Lynne; Bujold, Emmanuel

    2014-11-01

    A systematic review and metaanalysis were performed through electronic database searches to estimate the effect of uterine closure at cesarean on the risk of adverse maternal outcome and on uterine scar evaluated by ultrasound. Randomized controlled trials, which compared single vs double layers and locking vs unlocking sutures for uterine closure of low transverse cesarean, were included. Outcomes were short-term complications (endometritis, wound infection, maternal infectious morbidity, blood transfusion, duration of surgical procedure, length of hospital stay, mean blood loss), uterine rupture or dehiscence at next pregnancy, and uterine scar evaluation by ultrasound. Twenty of 1278 citations were included in the analysis. We found that all types of closure were comparable for short-term maternal outcomes, except for single-layer closure, which had shorter operative time (-6.1 minutes; 95% confidence interval [CI], -8.7 to -3.4; P < .001) than double-layer closure. Single layer (-2.6 mm; 95% CI, -3.1 to -2.1; P < .001) and locked first layer (mean difference, -2.5 mm; 95% CI, -3.2 to -1.8; P < .001) were associated with lower residual myometrial thickness. Two studies reported no significant difference between single- vs double-layer closure for uterine dehiscence (relative risk, 1.86; 95% CI, 0.44-7.90; P = .40) or uterine rupture (no case). In conclusion, current evidence based on randomized trials does not support a specific type of uterine closure for optimal maternal outcomes and is insufficient to conclude about the risk of uterine rupture. Single-layer closure and locked first layer are possibly coupled with thinner residual myometrium thickness.

  6. Increased biomass burning due to the economic crisis in Greece and its adverse impact on wintertime air quality in Thessaloniki.

    PubMed

    Saffari, Arian; Daher, Nancy; Samara, Constantini; Voutsa, Dimitra; Kouras, Athanasios; Manoli, Evangelia; Karagkiozidou, Olga; Vlachokostas, Christos; Moussiopoulos, Nicolas; Shafer, Martin M; Schauer, James J; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2013-01-01

    The recent economic crisis in Greece resulted in a serious wintertime air pollution episode in Thessaloniki. This air quality deterioration was mostly due to the increased price of fuel oil, conventionally used as a source of energy for domestic heating, which encouraged the residents to burn the less expensive wood/biomass during the cold season. A wintertime sampling campaign for fine particles (PM2.5) was conducted in Thessaloniki during the winters of 2012 and 2013 in an effort to quantify the extent to which the ambient air was impacted by the increased wood smoke emissions. The results indicated a 30% increase in the PM2.5 mass concentration as well as a 2-5-fold increase in the concentration of wood smoke tracers, including potassium, levoglucosan, mannosan, and galactosan. The concentrations of fuel oil tracers (e.g., Ni and V), on the other hand, declined by 20-30% during 2013 compared with 2012. Moreover, a distinct diurnal variation was observed for wood smoke tracers, with significantly higher concentrations in the evening period compared with the morning. Correlation analysis indicated a strong association between reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity and the concentrations of levoglucosan, galactosan, and potassium, underscoring the potential impact of wood smoke on PM-induced toxicity during the winter months in Thessaloniki.

  7. Treatment of adverse digitalis effects by hemoperfusion through columns with antidigoxin antibodies bound to agarose polyacrolein microsphere beads.

    PubMed

    Savin, H; Marcus, L; Margel, S; Ofarim, M; Ravid, M

    1987-05-01

    Ten patients with an array of moderate to severe adverse effects resulting from digitalis were effectively treated by hemoperfusion through small columns which contained antidigoxin antibodies bound to polyacrolein microspheres in agarose macrospheres (APAMB). The procedure was well tolerated. There was no detectable damage to formed blood elements and no changes in electrolytes, liver enzymes, or other related biochemical parameters. Despite some theoretic considerations to the contrary, the removal of a relatively small load of digoxin resulted in amelioration of the clinical symptoms and ECG abnormalities associated with digitalis. No rebound phenomena of intoxication or posthemoperfusion increase in digoxin serum levels were noted over the subsequent 5 to 6 days. A further increase in the capacity of the columns may render this method a safe and convenient emergency procedure for patients with digitalis toxicity.

  8. The impact of adverse health events on consumption: Understanding the mediating effect of income transfers, wealth, and health insurance.

    PubMed

    Babiarz, Patryk; Yilmazer, Tansel

    2017-03-21

    Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics for years 1999-2013, we investigate the impact of physical and mental illnesses on household consumption and financial status. In comparison to severe physical health problems, mental illnesses lead to larger decreases in labor income. Increases in public and private transfers following the onset of a mental illness do not completely offset the decline in labor income. Consequently, we find a significant decrease in consumption expenditures after the household head experiences a mental problem. On the other hand, public and private transfers and accumulated wealth offset the relatively smaller decline in labor income and enable households with severe physical problems to smooth their consumption. Health insurance helps to prevent larger drops in consumption after the onset of a mental health problem.

  9. Differential behavioural and neurochemical outcomes from chronic paroxetine treatment in adolescent and adult rats: a model of adverse antidepressant effects in human adolescents?

    PubMed

    Karanges, Emily; Li, Kong M; Motbey, Craig; Callaghan, Paul D; Katsifis, Andrew; McGregor, Iain S

    2011-05-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use is associated with increased risk of suicidal ideation in adolescent humans, yet the neuropharmacological basis of this phenomenon is unknown. Consequently, we examined the behavioural and neurochemical effects of chronic paroxetine (PRX) treatment in adult and adolescent rats. Rats received PRX in their drinking water (target dose 10 mg/kg) for 22 d, during which time they were assessed for depression- and anxiety-like behaviours. Subsequent ex-vivo analyses examined serum PRX concentrations, striatal neurotransmitter content, and regional serotonin and dopamine transporter (SERT, DAT) binding density. After 11-12 d treatment, PRX-treated adolescent rats showed a significant inhibition of social interaction while adults were unaffected. After 19-20 d treatment, adolescents failed to show an antidepressant-like effect of PRX treatment on the forced swim test (FST), while PRX-treated adults showed a typical decrease in immobility and increase in swimming. Two PRX-treated adolescents died unexpectedly after the FST suggesting a compromised response to physical stress. Despite their greater apparent adverse reaction to the drug, adolescents had significantly lower plasma PRX than adults at day 22 of treatment. Chronic PRX treatment had similar effects in adults and adolescents on striatal 5-HT (unchanged relative to controls) and 5-HIAA levels (decreased), while markers of dopaminergic function (DOPAC, HVA, DA turnover) were increased in adults only. SERT density was up-regulated in the amygdala in PRX-treated adolescents only while DAT density in the nucleus accumbens was down-regulated only in PRX-treated adults. These data suggest that the immature rat brain responds differently to PRX and that this might be of use in modelling the atypical response of human adolescents to antidepressants. The age-specific PRX-induced changes in dopaminergic markers and SERT and DAT binding provide clues as to the neural mechanisms

  10. Medical and Genetic Differences in the Adverse Impact of Sleep Loss on Performance: Ethical Considerations for the Medical Profession

    PubMed Central

    Czeisler, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    without unacceptably compromising patient safety? Moreover, once it is possible to identify reliably those most vulnerable to the adverse effects of sleep loss on performance, will academic medical centers have an obligation to evaluate the proficiency of both residents and staff physicians under conditions of acute and chronic sleep deprivation? Should work-hour policy limits be modified to ensure that they are not hazardous for the patients of the most vulnerable quartile of physicians, or should the limits be personalized to enable the most resistant quartile to work longer hours? Given that the prevalence of sleep disorders has increased in our society overall, and increases markedly with age, how should fitness for extended duration work hours be monitored over a physician's career? In the spirit of the dictum to do no harm, advances in understanding the medical and genetic basis of inter-individual differences in the performance vulnerability to sleep loss should be incorporated into the development of work-hour policy limits for both physicians and surgeons. PMID:19768182

  11. Medical and genetic differences in the adverse impact of sleep loss on performance: ethical considerations for the medical profession.

    PubMed

    Czeisler, Charles A

    2009-01-01

    without unacceptably compromising patient safety? Moreover, once it is possible to identify reliably those most vulnerable to the adverse effects of sleep loss on performance, will academic medical centers have an obligation to evaluate the proficiency of both residents and staff physicians under conditions of acute and chronic sleep deprivation? Should work-hour policy limits be modified to ensure that they are not hazardous for the patients of the most vulnerable quartile of physicians, or should the limits be personalized to enable the most resistant quartile to work longer hours? Given that the prevalence of sleep disorders has increased in our society overall, and increases markedly with age, how should fitness for extended duration work hours be monitored over a physician's career? In the spirit of the dictum to do no harm, advances in understanding the medical and genetic basis of inter-individual differences in the performance vulnerability to sleep loss should be incorporated into the development of work-hour policy limits for both physicians and surgeons.

  12. Antimicrobial-related severe adverse events during treatment of bone and joint infection due to methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Valour, Florent; Karsenty, Judith; Bouaziz, Anissa; Ader, Florence; Tod, Michel; Lustig, Sébastien; Laurent, Frédéric; Ecochard, René; Chidiac, Christian; Ferry, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged antimicrobial therapy is recommended for methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bone and joint infections (BJI), but its safety profile and risk factors for severe adverse events (SAE) in clinical practice are unknown. We addressed these issues in a retrospective cohort study (2001 to 2011) analyzing antimicrobial-related SAE (defined according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) in 200 patients (male, 62%; median age, 60.8 years [interquartile range {IQR}, 45.5 to 74.2 years]) with MSSA BJI admitted to a reference regional center with acute (66%) or chronic arthritis (7.5%), osteomyelitis (9.5%), spondylodiscitis (16%), or orthopedic device-related infections (67%). These patients received antistaphylococcal therapy for a median of 26.6 weeks (IQR, 16.8 to 37.8 weeks). Thirty-eight SAE occurred in 30 patients (15%), with a median time delay of 34 days (IQR, 14.75 to 60.5 days), including 10 patients with hematologic reactions, 9 with cutaneomucosal reactions, 6 with acute renal injuries, 4 with hypokalemia, and 4 with cholestatic hepatitis. The most frequently implicated antimicrobials were antistaphylococcal penicillins (ASP) (13 SAE/145 patients), fluoroquinolones (12 SAE/187 patients), glycopeptides (9 SAE/101 patients), and rifampin (7 SAE/107 patients). Kaplan-Meier curves and stepwise binary logistic regression analyses were used to determine the risk factors for the occurrence of antimicrobial-related SAE. Age (odds ratio [OR], 1.479 for 10-year increase; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.116 to 1.960; P = 0.006) appeared to be the only independent risk factor for SAE. In patients receiving ASP or rifampin, daily dose (OR, 1.028; 95% CI, 1.006 to 1.051; P = 0.014) and obesity (OR, 8.991; 95% CI, 1.453 to 55.627; P = 0.018) were associated with the occurrence of SAE. The high rate of SAE and their determinants highlighted the importance of the management and follow-up of BJI, with particular attention to be paid to

  13. Antimicrobial-Related Severe Adverse Events during Treatment of Bone and Joint Infection Due to Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Valour, Florent; Karsenty, Judith; Bouaziz, Anissa; Ader, Florence; Tod, Michel; Lustig, Sébastien; Laurent, Frédéric; Ecochard, René; Chidiac, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged antimicrobial therapy is recommended for methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bone and joint infections (BJI), but its safety profile and risk factors for severe adverse events (SAE) in clinical practice are unknown. We addressed these issues in a retrospective cohort study (2001 to 2011) analyzing antimicrobial-related SAE (defined according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) in 200 patients (male, 62%; median age, 60.8 years [interquartile range {IQR}, 45.5 to 74.2 years]) with MSSA BJI admitted to a reference regional center with acute (66%) or chronic arthritis (7.5%), osteomyelitis (9.5%), spondylodiscitis (16%), or orthopedic device-related infections (67%). These patients received antistaphylococcal therapy for a median of 26.6 weeks (IQR, 16.8 to 37.8 weeks). Thirty-eight SAE occurred in 30 patients (15%), with a median time delay of 34 days (IQR, 14.75 to 60.5 days), including 10 patients with hematologic reactions, 9 with cutaneomucosal reactions, 6 with acute renal injuries, 4 with hypokalemia, and 4 with cholestatic hepatitis. The most frequently implicated antimicrobials were antistaphylococcal penicillins (ASP) (13 SAE/145 patients), fluoroquinolones (12 SAE/187 patients), glycopeptides (9 SAE/101 patients), and rifampin (7 SAE/107 patients). Kaplan-Meier curves and stepwise binary logistic regression analyses were used to determine the risk factors for the occurrence of antimicrobial-related SAE. Age (odds ratio [OR], 1.479 for 10-year increase; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.116 to 1.960; P = 0.006) appeared to be the only independent risk factor for SAE. In patients receiving ASP or rifampin, daily dose (OR, 1.028; 95% CI, 1.006 to 1.051; P = 0.014) and obesity (OR, 8.991; 95% CI, 1.453 to 55.627; P = 0.018) were associated with the occurrence of SAE. The high rate of SAE and their determinants highlighted the importance of the management and follow-up of BJI, with particular attention to be paid to

  14. [Gabapentin treatment in a female patient with panic disorder and adverse effects under carbamazepine during benzodiazepine withdrawal].

    PubMed

    Himmerich, Hubertus; Nickel, Thomas; Dalal, Mira A; Müller, Marianne B

    2007-03-01

    Despite their addictive potential, benzodiazepines belong to the most often prescribed drugs. We report on a patient with alprazolam dependence, who initially was treated with carbamazepine because of severe withdrawal symptoms. Due to liver enzyme elevation related to carbamazepine, we had to stop this treatment and instead of that started gabapentin treatment. Under this new therapy, the patient showed a dramatic relief of withdrawal symptoms and of the panic attacks recurring during withdrawal. Hence, due to their effectiveness and tolerability, newer anticonvulsants could be considered as medication for benzodiazepine withdrawal and as an alternative for benzodiazepine treatment in panic disorders.

  15. Statins as Targeted "Magical Pills" for the Conservative Treatment of Endometriosis: May Potential Adverse Effects on Female Fertility Represent the "Dark Side of the Same Coin"? A Systematic Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Vitagliano, Amerigo; Noventa, Marco; Quaranta, Michela; Gizzo, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze all the available evidence from both in vitro and in vivo studies regarding the efficacy of statin therapy in the treatment of endometriosis, evaluating the potential efficacy, side effects, and contraindications of their administration in humans. We focused on defining the potential benefits that the administration of statins may have on patients affected by endometriosis and the possible adverse effects of such a therapy on ovarian function and fertility profile. According to our article selection criteria, we included in the review in vitro and in vivo studies performed on human or animal models. The systematic review of literature identified 24 eligible articles, 12 of which reported evidence regarding the effects of statins on endometrial/endometriotic cells and 12 regarding their effects on ovarian function and fertility. All articles seem to emphasize the utility of statin administration in the treatment of endometriosis due to their anti-proliferative/proapoptotic effects, their ability to reduce cell viability and migration, and the inhibition of angiogenesis and anti-inflammatory activities. Regarding the potential adverse effects on gonadal activities, steroidogenesis and fertility function, no conclusive data were collected in human models (excluding women affected by polycystic ovary syndrome in which significant decline of androgen levels was reported after statin treatment), while contrasting results were reported by studies conducted in in vitro and in vivo in animal models. Despite evidence supporting statins as the potential therapeutic agent for a targeted conservative treatment of endometriosis, the uncertainties regarding their impact on gonadal function may not define them as an appropriate therapy for all young fertile women.

  16. A clean-burning biofuel as a response to adverse impacts of woodsmoke and coalsmoke on Navajo health

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, E.B. Jr.; Bragg, W.G.; Whittier, J.

    1994-12-31

    Because over 60% of Navajo households are heated with woodfuel and coal, and indoor air pollution from woodsmoke and coalsmoke is problematic, most Navajos are probably at risk of respiratory and other smoke-induced illnesses. A previous study has shown that Navajo children living in homes heated by a wood/coal stove are nearly five times more likely to contract acute lower respiratory tract infections than children from homes that do not use those fuels. Stove and flue improvements to reduce leakage of smoke into the home would help. So would clean-burning solid fuels in replacement of woodfuel and coal. The authors describe a clean-burning fast-growing carbohydrate biofuel, prepared by sun-drying the roots of a wild southwestern gourd plant, Cucurbita foetidissima. They call it {open_quotes}rootfuel.{close_quotes} A test plot is growing during the 1994 season at the NMSU Agricultural Science Center on the Navajo Nation, near Farmington, New Mexico. Irrigation requirements are being measured. In the Fall, a preliminary needs assessment will be conducted to learn more about how fuel usage impacts Navajo health. The acceptability of rootfuel in selected homes will be tested during the upcoming heating season.

  17. Escaping the Adverse Impacts of NSAIDs on Tooth Movement During Orthodontics: Current Evidence Based on a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jie; Li, Yifei; Zhang, Keke; Zhao, Zhihe; Mei, Li

    2016-04-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used to relieve pain during orthodontic treatments; however, the possible inhibition of orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) by NSAIDs has been debated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of some commonly used NSAIDs on OTM during orthodontic treatments. A review of the literature identified relevant studies up to August 2014. A meta-analysis was performed following the guidelines of the Cochrane review group and the PRISMA statement. Studies were identified by searching PUBMED, EMBASE, Web of Science, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the WHO Clinical Trials Registry Platform. Meta-analysis was performed in a fixed/random-effect model using Revman 5.1.1.Five studies, including 128 subjects and 3 main NSAIDs (celecoxib, acetaminophen, and aspirin), were included for quantitative synthesis and analysis. Celecoxib did not inhibit OTM except with middle-term use (2-3 weeks) (95% CI [-6.47 to -0.43], P = 0.03). Acetaminophen did not inhibit OTM except with long-term use (>1 month) and low-dose use (∼100 mg/kg per day), (95% CI [-2.96 to -0.78], P = 0.0008; 95%CI [-2.42, -0.46], P = 0.004; respectively). Aspirin was found to inhibit OTM (95%CI [-2.40 to -0.64], P = 0.0008). Our systematic review with meta-analysis suggests that aspirin might inhibit OTM in rat models, whereas the short-term (<1 week) use of celecoxib and acetaminophen for relieving orthodontic pain would not inhibit OTM. Well-designed human research should be completed before a solid conclusion can be reached.

  18. Telithromycin: review of adverse effects.

    PubMed

    2014-11-01

    Telithromycin is a macrolide antibiotic that has been marketed since the early 2000s. It has not been shown to be more effective against any bacteria than other macrolide antibiotics. Its antibacterial activity is in no way remarkable. In early 2014, we reviewed its adverse effect profile using data from periodic safety update reports, drug regulatory agencies, and detailed published case reports. In addition to the adverse effect profile telithromycin shares with the other macrolides, it provokes several specific adverse effects: visual disturbances due to impaired accommodation; taste and smell disorders; severe liver damage; worsening of myasthenia gravis; rhabdomyolysis; and loss of consciousness. Prolongation of the QT interval with standard oral doses is a worrisome adverse effect. In practice, it is better not to use telithromycin as it exposes patients to disproportionate, serious adverse effects. When treatment with a macrolide antibiotic appears necessary, it is prudent to choose a different macrolide, such as spiramycin or azithromycin, which have fewer adverse effects.

  19. Trading places - an innovative SO{sub 2} trading program to mitigate potential adverse impacts on Class I areas: part I. impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Louis Militana; Cindy Huber; Christopher Colbert; Chris Arrington; Don Shepherd

    2005-07-01

    Published in two parts, this article describes a new emissions cap-and-trade program to reduce acid deposition and visibility impacts in four Class I areas (e.g. wildernesses and national parks) from the proposed Longview Power coal-fired power plant to be located in Maidsville, WV. Part I discusses the air quality impacts of the proposed project. 5 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Computational identification of potential multitarget treatments for ameliorating the adverse effects of amyloid-β on synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Anastasio, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The leading hypothesis on Alzheimer Disease (AD) is that it is caused by buildup of the peptide amyloid-β (Aβ), which initially causes dysregulation of synaptic plasticity and eventually causes destruction of synapses and neurons. Pharmacological efforts to limit Aβ buildup have proven ineffective, and this raises the twin challenges of understanding the adverse effects of Aβ on synapses and of suggesting pharmacological means to prevent them. The purpose of this paper is to initiate a computational approach to understanding the dysregulation by Aβ of synaptic plasticity and to offer suggestions whereby combinations of various chemical compounds could be arrayed against it. This data-driven approach confronts the complexity of synaptic plasticity by representing findings from the literature in a course-grained manner, and focuses on understanding the aggregate behavior of many molecular interactions. The same set of interactions is modeled by two different computer programs, each written using a different programming modality: one imperative, the other declarative. Both programs compute the same results over an extensive test battery, providing an essential crosscheck. Then the imperative program is used for the computationally intensive purpose of determining the effects on the model of every combination of ten different compounds, while the declarative program is used to analyze model behavior using temporal logic. Together these two model implementations offer new insights into the mechanisms by which Aβ dysregulates synaptic plasticity and suggest many drug combinations that potentially may reduce or prevent it. PMID:24847263

  1. Adverse impacts of pasture abandonment in Himalayan protected areas: Testing the efficiency of a Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Nautiyal, Sunil . E-mail: sunil.nautiyal@zalf.de; Kaechele, Harald

    2007-03-15

    The high elevational areas in the Himalayas of India are dominated by forests and alpine pastures. There are many protected areas in the region, including Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve (NDBR) and Valley of Flowers (VOF) where natural resource management plan (NRMP) has been implemented for the conservation of biodiversity. This has affected the traditional animal husbandry system, as well as the vegetation dynamics of alpine pastures. An integrated approach to studying the impact of NRMP in the region has been applied by us. First, a survey was conducted regarding livestock management, data pertaining the livestock husbandry, the role of animal husbandry in economics of rural household, and socioeconomics. Second, field based study on phytosociology of some important alpine herbs was done to enumerate the density and species richness in different land mark of the region. Thereafter, satellite data and Geographic Information System (GIS) were used to develop a land cover map of the area and to note changes in the landscape over time after implementation of NRMP. From an economic point of view the implementation of such plan is a setback to the rural economy. However, the ecological perspective of such models is a threat to the diversity of alpine pastures. The invasion of bushes/thorny bushes/shrubs and weeds with their luxuriant growth is changing the vegetation index and dynamics. Consequently, the diversity of herbs in alpine pastures of the Himalayan Mountains is in jeopardy. Overall, the situation is leading to landscape change in the region. This study is helpful for generating useful outcomes and strategies considering the question or debate 'is grazing good or bad for pasture ecosystems in the Himalayas?'.

  2. Prescription stimulants in individuals with and without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: misuse, cognitive impact, and adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Lakhan, Shaheen E; Kirchgessner, Annette

    2012-01-01

    Prescription stimulants are often used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Drugs like methylphenidate (Ritalin, Concerta), dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine), and dextroamphetamine-amphetamine (Adderall) help people with ADHD feel more focused. However, misuse of stimulants by ADHD and nonaffected individuals has dramatically increased over recent years based on students' misconceptions or simple lack of knowledge of associated risks. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the use and increasing misuse of prescription stimulants among high school and college students and athletes. Given the widespread belief that stimulants enhance performance, there are in fact only a few studies reporting the cognitive enhancing effects of stimulants in ADHD and nonaffected individuals. Student athletes should be apprised of the very serious consequences that can emerge when stimulants are used to improve sports performance. Moreover, misuse of stimulants is associated with dangers including psychosis, myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathy, and even sudden death. As ADHD medications are prescribed for long-term treatment, there is a need for long-term safety studies and education on the health risks associated with misuse is imperative. PMID:23139911

  3. Current trends in the treatment of hepatitis C: interventions to avoid adverse effects and increase effectiveness of anti-HCV drugs

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Mushtaq, Muhammed Fahd; Saleem, Muhammad; Muhammad, Syed Taqi; Akhtar, Bushra; Sharif, Ali; Peerzada, Sohaib

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis, an inflammatory liver disease, is caused by various genotypes of hepatitis C viruses (HCV). Hepatitis C slowly sprouts into fibrosis, which progresses to cirrhosis. Over a prolonged period of time compensated cirrhosis can advance to decompensated cirrhosis culminating in hepatic failure and death. Conventional treatment of HCV involves the administration of interferons. However, association of interferon with the adverse drug reactions led to the development of novel anti-HCV drugs given as monotherapy or in combination with the other drugs. Advances in drug delivery systems (DDS) improved the pharmacokinetic profile and stability of drugs, ameliorated tissue damages on extravasation and increased the targeting of affected sites. Liposomes and lipid based vehicles have been employed with polyethylene glycol (PEG) so as to stabilize the formulations as PEG drug complex. Sofosbuvir, a novel anti-HCV drug, is administered as monotherapy or in combination with daclatasvir, ledipasivir, protease inhibitors, ribavirin and interferon for the treatment of HCV genotypes 1, 2 and 3. These drug combinations are highly effective in eradicating the interferon resistance, recurrent HCV infection in liver transplant, concurrent HIV infection and preventing interferon related adverse effects. Further investigations to improve drug targeting and identification of new drug targets are highly warranted due to the rapid emergence of drug resistance in HCV. PMID:28096788

  4. Current trends in the treatment of hepatitis C: interventions to avoid adverse effects and increase effectiveness of anti-HCV drugs.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Mushtaq, Muhammed Fahd; Saleem, Muhammad; Muhammad, Syed Taqi; Akhtar, Bushra; Sharif, Ali; Peerzada, Sohaib

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis, an inflammatory liver disease, is caused by various genotypes of hepatitis C viruses (HCV). Hepatitis C slowly sprouts into fibrosis, which progresses to cirrhosis. Over a prolonged period of time compensated cirrhosis can advance to decompensated cirrhosis culminating in hepatic failure and death. Conventional treatment of HCV involves the administration of interferons. However, association of interferon with the adverse drug reactions led to the development of novel anti-HCV drugs given as monotherapy or in combination with the other drugs. Advances in drug delivery systems (DDS) improved the pharmacokinetic profile and stability of drugs, ameliorated tissue damages on extravasation and increased the targeting of affected sites. Liposomes and lipid based vehicles have been employed with polyethylene glycol (PEG) so as to stabilize the formulations as PEG drug complex. Sofosbuvir, a novel anti-HCV drug, is administered as monotherapy or in combination with daclatasvir, ledipasivir, protease inhibitors, ribavirin and interferon for the treatment of HCV genotypes 1, 2 and 3. These drug combinations are highly effective in eradicating the interferon resistance, recurrent HCV infection in liver transplant, concurrent HIV infection and preventing interferon related adverse effects. Further investigations to improve drug targeting and identification of new drug targets are highly warranted due to the rapid emergence of drug resistance in HCV.

  5. Adverse events in an integrated home-based treatment program for MDR-TB and HIV in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Brust, James C M; Shah, N Sarita; van der Merwe, Theo L; Bamber, Sheila; Ning, Yuming; Heo, Moonseong; Moll, Anthony P; Loveday, Marian; Lalloo, Umesh G; Friedland, Gerald H; Gandhi, Neel R

    2013-04-01

    Most patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in South Africa are HIV-infected, but the safety and tolerability of cotreatment are unknown. The authors reviewed all adverse events (AEs) for patients with MDR-TB in a home-based treatment program in rural KwaZulu-Natal. Of 91 MDR-TB patients, 74 (81%) were HIV-positive and receiving antiretroviral therapy. AEs were common, but most were mild and did not require therapy modification. The most common severe AEs were hypothyroidism (36%) and psychosis (5%). Patients receiving concurrent antiretroviral therapy did not experience AEs more frequently than those on MDR-TB therapy alone. Concurrent treatment for MDR-TB/HIV can be safely administered in a home-based care setting.

  6. Clozapine Treatment of Childhood-Onset Schizophrenia: Evaluation of Effectiveness, Adverse Effects, and Long-Term Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sporn, Alexandra L.; Vermani, Anoop; Greenstein, Deanna K.; Bobb, Aaron J.; Spencer, Edgar P.; Clasen, Liv S.; Tossell, Julia W.; Stayer, Catherine C.; Gochman, Peter A.; Lenane, Marge C.; Rapoport, Judith L.; Gogtay, Nitin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Clozapine is a unique atypical antipsychotic with superior efficacy in treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Plasma concentration of clozapine and its major metabolite N-desmethylclozapine (NDMC) as well as the ratio of NDMC to clozapine have been reported to be predictors of clozapine response. Here we evaluate these as well as other…

  7. Projected 21st Century Impacts of Climate Change on the Performance of the Los Angeles Aqueduct and Adaptation Measures to Mitigate Adverse Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, B.; Sayenko, K.; Roy, S. B.; Lew, C.

    2011-12-01

    One of the largest sources of drinking water to the City of Los Angeles (the City) comes from snow melt from the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains that drain into Owens Valley and Mono Basin. Much of this water is then transported to the City via the Los Angeles Aqueduct (LAA) originally built in 1913. During the 1980s and earlier, up to 500,000 acre-feet (af) of water was conveyed annually, but more recently less water has been transported due to increasing usage in Owens Valley, and due to a series of dry years.The City is concerned about potential impacts of climate change on this water supply, and commissioned the authors to perform a study to evaluate these potential impacts on both the infrastructure of the LAA and water supply to the City. This presentation focuses on the water supply issue, which has the potential to impact millions of customers. The study results presented here are part of a larger study where 16 global climate models were downscaled and applied to the Owens Valley and Mono Basin watersheds. This presentation begins by assuming base-of-mountain runoff is known from the 16 GCMs, and does not focus on the GCMs or downscaling.The results of the study described in this presentation are those of the authors and not of the LADWP. One of the most consequential findings of the study is the projected decrease in runoff from the watershed over the 21st century. While wet years are still dispersed between dry years, over the 21st century the loss in runoff is equivalent to approximately five years of historical average runoff. In addition to climate change impacts, water usage in the Owens valley is projected to increase over the 21st century and that increasing usage is projected to be comparable to climate change impacts. Eight adaptation options were identified to mitigate potential impacts. These included increasing storage volume of reservoirs in Owens Valley, changing operational rules for releasing water, construction of surface storage or

  8. Adverse effects of mefloquine for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Thailand: A pooled analysis of 19, 850 individual patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sue J.; ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Luxemburger, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Mefloquine (MQ) has been used for the treatment of malaria since the mid-1980s, first as monotherapy or as fixed combination with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (MSP) and since the mid-1990s in combination with artesunate. There is a renewed interested in MQ as part of a triple therapy for the treatment of multi-drug resistance P. falciparum malaria. The widespread use of MQ beyond south-East Asia has been constrained by reports of poor tolerability. Here we present the side effect profile of MQ for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria on the Thai-Myanmar/Cambodia borders. In total 19,850 patients received seven different regimens containing either 15 or 24–25 mg/kg of MQ, the latter given either as a single dose, or split over two or three days. The analysis focused on (predominantly) gastrointestinal and neuropsychiatric events as compared to the new fixed dose combination of MQ plus artesunate given as equal doses of 8 mg/kg MQ per day over three days. Gastrointestinal side effects were dose-dependent and associated with the severity of malaria symptoms. Serious neuropsychiatric side effects associated with MQ use were rare: for a single 25 mg/kg dose it was 11.9 per 10,000 treatments (95% confidence interval, CI, 4–285) vs. 7.8 (3–15) for the 15 mg/kg dose. The risk with 25 mg/kg was much higher when it was given as repeat dosing in patients who had failed treatment with 15 mg/kg MQ in the preceding month; (RR 6.57 (95% CI 1.33 to 32.4), p = 0.0077). MQ was best tolerated as 15 mg/kg or as 24 mg/kg when given over three days in combination with artesunate. We conclude that the tolerance of a single dose of MQ in the treatment of uncomplicated malaria is moderate, but can be improved by administering it as a split dose over three days. PMID:28192434

  9. Efficacy and Adverse Events Associated With Use of OnabotulinumtoxinA for Treatment of Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose OnabotulinumtoxinA is used widely for the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess its efficacy and safety for neurogenic detrusor overactivity treatment. Methods A systematic literature review was performed to identify all published randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of onabotulinumtoxinA for neurogenic detrusor overactivity treatment. MEDLINE, Embase, and the CENTRAL were employed. Reference lists of retrieved studies were reviewed carefully. Results Six publications involving 871 patients, which compared onabotulinumtoxinA with a placebo were analyzed. Efficacy of onabotulinumtoxinA treatment was shown as a reduction of the mean number of urinary incontinence episodes per day (mean difference, -1.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.70 to -1.12; P<0.00001), maximum cystometric capacity (135.48; 95% CI, 118.22–152.75; P<0.00001), and maximum detrusor pressure (-32.98; 95% CI, -37.33 to -28.62; P<0.00001). Assessment of adverse events revealed that complications due to onabotulinumtoxinA injection were localized primarily to the urinary tract. Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests that onabotulinumtoxinA is an effective treatment for neurogenic detrusor overactivity with localized advent events. PMID:28361515

  10. Adverse Renal, Endocrine, Hepatic, and Metabolic Events during Maintenance Mood Stabilizer Treatment for Bipolar Disorder: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Marston, Louise; Walters, Kate; Geddes, John R.; King, Michael; Osborn, David P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is limited, poorly characterized information about adverse events occurring during maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. We aimed to determine adverse event rates during treatment with lithium, valproate, olanzapine, and quetiapine. Methods and Findings We conducted a propensity score adjusted cohort study using nationally representative United Kingdom electronic health records from January 1, 1995, until December 31, 2013. We included patients who had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and were prescribed lithium (n = 2148), valproate (n = 1670), olanzapine (n = 1477), or quetiapine (n = 1376) as maintenance mood stabilizer treatment. Adverse outcomes were chronic kidney disease, thyroid disease, hypercalcemia, weight gain, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and hepatotoxicity. The propensity score included important demographic, physical health, and mental health predictors of drug treatment allocation. The median duration of drug treatment was 1.48 y (interquartile range 0.64–3.43). Compared to patients prescribed lithium, those taking valproate, olanzapine, and quetiapine had reduced rates of chronic kidney disease stage 3 or more severe, following adjustment for propensity score, age, and calendar year, and accounting for clustering by primary care practice (valproate hazard ratio [HR] 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45–0.69; p < 0.001, olanzapine HR 0.57; 95% CI 0.45–0.71; p < 0.001, quetiapine HR 0.62; 95% CI 0.47–0.80; p < 0.001). Hypothyroidism was reduced in those taking valproate (HR 0.60; 95% CI 0.40–0.89; p = 0.012) and olanzapine (HR 0.48; 95% CI 0.29–0.77; p = 0.003), compared to those taking lithium. Rates of new onset hyperthyroidism (valproate HR 0.24; 95% CI 0.09–0.61; p = 0.003, olanzapine HR 0.31; 95% CI 0.13–0.73; p = 0.007) and hypercalcemia (valproate HR 0.25; 95% CI 0.10–0.60; p = 0.002, olanzapine HR 0.32; 95% CI 0.14–0.76; p = 0.008, quetiapine HR 0.23; 95% CI 0.07

  11. Drug switch because of treatment-related adverse side effects in endocrine adjuvant breast cancer therapy: how often and how often does it work?

    PubMed

    Güth, Uwe; Myrick, Mary Elizabeth; Schötzau, Andreas; Kilic, Nerbil; Schmid, Seraina Margaretha

    2011-10-01

    Therapy-related adverse side effects are a main reason for non-persistence to adjuvant endocrine breast cancer therapy. This study reports frequency of drug-related adverse side effects that were so severe that a modification of the therapy was necessary. We evaluated how many patients discontinued adjuvant endocrine therapy because of these side effects (non-persistence). Last, we analyzed how often a drug switch was undertaken for this reason and how often this measure led to the patient successfully continuing their endocrine therapy. Data concerning all postmenopausal breast cancer patients (≤ 80 years), who initiated endocrine adjuvant therapy between 1998 and 2008 in a Swiss breast center (n = 400), were analyzed. Out of these 400 women, 37 (9.3%) were defined as being non-persistent to the therapy; out of these, 24 (64.9%) because of therapy-related side effects. About 78 patients (19.5%) suffered from severe therapy-related side effects that made a modification of therapy necessary. Out of these 78 cases, 14 patients (17.9%) stopped the therapy without attempting a drug switch (non-persistence). In 64 patients (82.1%; 16% of all women who started endocrine therapy), a drug switch was undertaken. Out of these 64 cases, in 52 cases (81.3%) endocrine therapy was completed after therapy modification. Patients who reported one major adverse effect were more likely to continue the endocrine therapy after a drug switch (P = 0.048) compared with those who suffered from at least two different side effects. In 10 of the 64 cases (15.6%), modification of the therapy was not successful and the patients stopped the treatment prematurely (non-persistence) because of ongoing side effects. In cases when therapy-related side effects occur, a drug switch is a promising step to further improve persistence and, by doing so, the outcome of breast cancer patients.

  12. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Clinical Efficacy and Adverse Effects of Chinese Herbal Decoction for the Treatment of Gout

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Pinyi; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Yanqi; Wu, Yazhou; Pettigrew, Julia Christine; Cheng, Dixiang; Yi, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Background In East Asia, numerous reports describe the utilization of traditional Chinese herbal decoctions to treat gout. However, the reported clinical effects vary. Objectives In this study, we reviewed and analyzed a large number of randomized controlled clinical trials to systematically assess the clinical efficacy and adverse reactions of Chinese herbal decoctions for treating gout. Methods We performed a comprehensive search of databases, such as PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Chinese biomedical literature database, et al. In addition, we manually searched the relevant meeting information in the library of the Third Military Medical University. Results Finally, 17 randomized controlled trials with a sample size of 1,402 cases met the criteria and were included in the study. The results of the meta-analysis showed that when gout had progressed to the stage of acute arthritis, there was no significant difference in clinical efficacy between Chinese herbal decoctions and traditional Western medicine, as indicated based on the following parameters: serum uric acid (standardized mean difference (SMD):0.35, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.03 to 0.67), C reactive protein (SMD: 0.25, 95% CI: −0.18 to 0.69), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (SMD: 0.21, 95% CI: −0.02 to 0.45) and overall clinical response (relative risk (RR): 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.10). However, the Chinese herbal decoction was significantly better than traditional Western medicine in controlling adverse drug reactions (RR: 0.06, 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.13). Conclusions Through a systematic review of the clinical efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal decoctions and traditional Western medicine for the treatment of gout, we found that Chinese herbal decoction and traditional Western medicine led to similar clinical efficacy, but the Chinese herbal decoctions were superior to Western medicine in terms of controlling adverse drug reactions. PMID:24465466

  13. Dapsone in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris: adverse effects and its importance as a corticosteroid sparing agent*

    PubMed Central

    Quaresma, Maria Victória; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Hezel, Janaína; Peretti, Murilo Calvo; Kac, Bernard Kawa; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune disease characterized by suprabasal blisters with acantholysis, which has a fatal course in a large number of untreated patients. Systemic corticosteroid therapy is considered first-line therapy. Adjuvant treatment with the goal of sparing corticosteroids include, among others, dapsone. This drug is not without side effects and its use requires clinical and laboratory control. We present a patient with PV initially managed with suboptimal dose of prednisone, evolving into drug-induced hepatitis after introduction of dapsone. PMID:26312673

  14. [Gonadal disorder as a result of adverse reaction to antineoplastic drugs--diagnosis, symptoms, prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Kowalska, A

    The past three decades have shown the increasing success of chemotherapy as the treatment of malignancies. This therapeutic success has focused attention on the associated gonadal toxicity. Cytotoxic agents may induce infertility and endocrine disfunction. Data for analysis were provided by studies on gonadal function after chemotherapy for: Hodgkin's disease, acute lymphocytic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, breast cancer; renal disease, bone-marrow transplantation. The likelihood of developing chemotherapy-induced damage depended on the chemotherapeutic regimen and prescribed dose, illness, sex and degree of gonadal activity at the time of treatment. Despite of the high frequency of chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage its prevention has received a little attention. LH-RHA and oral contraceptive therapy and testosterone have been tested to a limited extent of gonadal toxicity. Usually in male endocrine disfunction of testis does not need to be treated because it is moderate and does not cause any clinical symptoms. In female hormonal substitution seems to be necessary to decrease unpleasant feelings connected with menopause induced by chemotherapy. Further investigations should considered use of new cytotoxic agents without gonadal toxicity or use of new drugs which can better protect gonadal function.

  15. [An Elderly Patient with Metastatic Breast Cancer Who Developed Severe Adverse Events such as Stomatitis and Interstitial Pneumonia after Everolimus plus Exemestane Treatment].

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Kana; Yoshida, Takashi; Goto, Yoshinari; Kimura, Morihiko

    2016-06-01

    An 80-year-old woman was diagnosed with right breast cancer with clinical Stage IIIA 6 years previously. She underwent mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection. The pathological diagnosis was invasive micropapillary carcinoma with lymph node involvement. Immunohistochemically, the tumor was positive for estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, and negative for HER2. Postoperatively, the patient was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel, followed by endocrine therapy with letrozole. Four years after surgery, she experienced a recurrence of breast cancer in the thoracic wall, and was treated with exemestane, toremifene, and fulvestrant for 1 year and 5 months. However, she developed carcinomatous pleurisy and was treated with eribulin. This last treatment was ineffective. Subsequently, she received combination therapy with everolimus and exemestane. Although the pleural effusion reduced markedly after 5 weeks, stomatitis, diarrhea, melena, and interstitial pneumonia occurred as adverse events. The symptoms improved after drug discontinuation and steroid therapy. The combination therapy with everolimus and exemestane is a prospective therapy for hormone-resistant recurrent breast cancer, but the management of adverse events is very important.

  16. Systematic review of the impact of adult drug treatment courts

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Randall T.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. correctional system is overburdened by individuals suffering from substance use disorders. These illnesses also exact a heavy toll in individual and public health and well-being. Effective methods for reducing the negative impact of substance use disorders comprise critical concerns for policy makers. Drug court treatment programs (DTCs) are present in over 1800 county, tribal, and territorial jurisdictions in the United States, as an alternative to incarceration for offenders with substance use disorders. This review article summarizes available descriptive information on representative drug treatment court populations, summarizes observational studies of drug court participants, and specifically reviews available experimental effectiveness literature on drug treatment courts. The review concludes by examining limitations of the current literature, challenges to conducting research in drug court samples, and potential future directions for research on drug treatment court interventions. Review of non-experimental and quasi-experimental literature regarding the impact of drug treatment courts point toward benefit vs. traditional adjudication in averting future criminal behavior and in reducing future substance use, at least in the short term. Randomized effectiveness studies of drug treatment courts are scant (three identified in the literature on U.S. adult drug courts), and methodological issues arise in combining their findings. These randomized trials failed to demonstrate consistent effect upon re-arrest rates for drug-involved offenders participating in drug treatment court vs. typical adjudication. The two studies examining reconviction and reincarceration, however, demonstrated reductions for the drug treatment court group vs. those typically adjudicated. PMID:20478542

  17. Impact of Arsenic Treatment Techniques on Distribution Water Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will summarize the results of the distribution water quality studies (arsenic, lead, and copper) of the demonstration program. The impact of the treatment systems by type of system (adsorptive media, coagulation/filtration, ion exchange, etc) will be shown by co...

  18. NEW INSIGHTS INTO LEAD CORROSION CONTROL AND TREATMENT CHANGE IMPACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will summarize recent research into the chemistry of lead corrosion control, and focus on five different areas that could impact the prediction of whether or not particular treatment changes are likely to either disturb existing lead corrosion scales, or to actu...

  19. 40 CFR 125.94 - How will requirements reflecting best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact be established for my Phase II existing... technology available to minimize adverse environmental impact for your facility in accordance with paragraphs... technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact. This determination must be based...

  20. Oral Palmitoylethanolamide Treatment Is Associated with Reduced Cutaneous Adverse Effects of Interferon-β1a and Circulating Proinflammatory Cytokines in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Orefice, Nicola S; Alhouayek, Mireille; Carotenuto, Antonio; Montella, Silvana; Barbato, Franscesco; Comelli, Albert; Calignano, Antonio; Muccioli, Giulio G; Orefice, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is an endogenous lipid mediator known to reduce pain and inflammation. However, only limited clinical studies have evaluated the effects of PEA in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune and inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. Although subcutaneous administration of interferon (IFN)-β1a is approved as first-line therapy for the treatment of relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS), its commonly reported adverse events (AEs) such as pain, myalgia, and erythema at the injection site, deeply affect the quality of life (QoL) of patients with MS. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we tested the effect of ultramicronized PEA (um-PEA) added to IFN-β1a in the treatment of clinically defined RR-MS. The primary objectives were to estimate whether, with um-PEA treatment, patients with MS perceived an improvement in pain and a decrease of the erythema width at the IFN-β1a injection site in addition to an improvement in their QoL. The secondary objectives were to evaluate the effects of um-PEA on circulating interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-17 serum levels, N-acylethanolamine plasma levels, Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) progression, and safety and tolerability after 1 year of treatment. Patients with MS receiving um-PEA perceived an improvement in pain sensation without a reduction of the erythema at the injection site. A significant improvement in QoL was observed. No significant difference was reported in EDSS score, and um-PEA was well tolerated. We found a significant increase of palmitoylethanolamide, anandamide and oleoylethanolamide plasma levels, and a significant reduction of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-17 serum profile compared with the placebo group. Our results suggest that um-PEA may be considered as an appropriate add-on therapy for the treatment of IFN-β1a-related adverse effects in

  1. Protection of palak (Beta vulgaris L. var Allgreen) plants from ozone injury by ethylenediurea (EDU): roles of biochemical and physiological variations in alleviating the adverse impacts.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Supriya; Agrawal, Madhoolika

    2009-06-01

    Ameliorative effects of ethylenediurea (N-[2-(2-oxo-1-imidazolinidyl) ethyl]-N' phenylurea, abbreviated as EDU) against ozone stress were studied on selected growth, biochemical, physiological and yield characteristics of palak (Beta vulgaris L. var Allgreen) plants grown in field at a suburban site of Varanasi, India. Mean eight hourly ozone concentration varied from 52 to 73 ppb which was found to produce adverse impacts on plant functioning and growth characteristics. The palak plants were treated with 300 ppm EDU at 10 days after germination at 10 days interval up to the plant maturity. Lipid peroxidation in EDU treated plants declined significantly as compared to non-EDU treated ones. Significant increment in F(v)/F(m) ratio in EDU treated plants as compared to non-EDU treated ones was recorded. EDU treated plants showed significant increment in ascorbic acid contents and reduction in peroxidase activity as compared to non-EDU treated ones. As a result of the protection provided by EDU against ozone induced stress on biochemical and physiological characteristics of palak, the morphological parameters also responded positively. Significant increments were recorded in shoot length, number of leaves plant(-1), leaf area and root and shoot biomass of EDU treated plants as compared to non-EDU treated ones. Contents of Na, K, Ca, Mg and Fe were higher in EDU treated plants as compared to non-EDU treated ones. The present investigation proves the usefulness of EDU in partially ameliorating ozone injury in ambient conditions.

  2. Incidence rates of treatment-emergent adverse events and related hospitalization are reduced with azacitidine compared with conventional care regimens in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Seymour, John F; Döhner, Hartmut; Minden, Mark D; Stone, Richard; Gambini, Dominique; Dougherty, Donna; Beach, C L; Weaver, Jerry; Dombret, Hervé

    2017-06-01

    Relative risks of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and related hospitalization is most accurate when accounting for treatment exposure. AZA-AML-001 showed azacitidine (AZA) prolonged overall survival versus conventional care regimens (CCR) in older patients (≥65 years) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) by 3.9 months. Preselection of CCR before study randomization allows evaluation of AZA safety in patient subgroups with similar clinical features. Within preselection groups, AZA exposure was greater than each CCR. Incidence rates (IRs; numbers of events normalized for drug exposure time) of hospitalizations and days in hospital for TEAEs per patient-year of exposure were to varying degrees lower with AZA versus each CCR. Overall survival was significantly prolonged with AZA versus best supportive care (BSC) in AZA-AML-001; this analysis showed 55% and 41% reductions in IRs of TEAE-related hospitalization and days in hospital, respectively, with AZA versus BSC. Older patients with AML unable to tolerate intensive therapy should be offered active low-intensity treatment.

  3. Cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

    PubMed

    Imbesi, S; Allegra, A; Calapai, G; Musolino, C; Gangemi, S

    2015-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) used principally in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), myelodysplastic syndromes (MS) and amyloidosis. Adverse reactions related to lenalidomide include myelosuppression (mainly neutropenia but also thrombocytopenia), gastrointestinal problems, skin eruption, atrial fibrillation and asthenia, decreased peripheral blood stem cell yield during stem cell collection, venous thromboembolism, and secondary malignances. In this review we focused our attention on the cutaneous adverse reactions to lenalidomide.

  4. The Impact of PTSD Treatment on the Cortisol Awakening Response

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, Maria L.; Feeny, Norah; Zoellner, Lori; Delahanty, Douglas L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with abnormal functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis; however, limited research has examined whether cortisol levels change following successful PTSD treatment. The current study examined the impact of successful PTSD treatment on the cortisol awakening response (CAR). Method Twenty-nine adults participating in a treatment trial for chronic PTSD provided saliva samples (upon waking, and 30, 45, and 60-min post-waking) before and after receiving either prolonged exposure therapy or sertraline. PTSD responder status (i.e., loss or retention of a PTSD diagnosis) served as the predictor variable. Outcome measures included area under the curve with respect to ground and increase, reflecting total cortisol output and HPA axis reactivity, respectively. Results A series of hierarchical regressions revealed no significant main effects of PTSD responder status for either CAR outcome. However, a significant gender by treatment response interaction for cortisol reactivity revealed that female treatment non-responders displayed higher cortisol reactivity following treatment than female responders, whereas cortisol reactivity did not change pre- to post-treatment for male responders. Findings remained after controlling for age, trauma history, baseline medication status, baseline PTSD, and baseline depressive symptoms. Conclusion Loss of a PTSD diagnosis may contribute to decreased cortisol reactivity in females. Neuroendocrine changes following treatment may emerge only for specific subgroups, highlighting the importance of exploring treatment moderators. PMID:25327949

  5. Combining antiangiogenic therapy with neoadjuvant chemotherapy increases treatment efficacy in stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer without increasing adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoliang; Su, Yanjun; You, Jian; Gong, Liqun; Zhang, Zhenfa; Wang, Meng; Zhao, Zhenqing; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Xiaolin; Wang, Changli

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of combining Endostar antiangiogenic therapy with neoadjuvant chemotherapy for the treatment of stage IIIA (N2) NSCLC, we conducted a randomized, controlled, open-label clinical study of 30 NSCLC patients. Patients were randomly assigned to the test or control groups, which received either two cycles of an NP neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen combined with Endostar or the NP regimen alone, respectively, at a 2:1 ratio. Efficacy was assessed after 3 weeks, and surgical resection occurred within 4 weeks, in the 26 patients who successfully completed treatment. While total response rates (RR) and clinical benefit rates (CBR) did not differ between the experimental groups, total tumor regression rates (TRR) were higher in the test group than in the control group. Median DFS and OS also did not differ between the test and control groups. Clinical perioperative indicators, including intraoperative blood loss, number of dissected lymph node groups, duration of postoperative indwelling catheter use, and time to postoperative discharge, were comparable in the test and control groups. Finally, hematological and non-hematological toxicities and postoperative pathological indicators, including down-staging ratio, complete resection ratio, and metastatic lymph node ratio, also did not differ between the groups. Overall, combining Endostar with NP neoadjuvant chemotherapy increased therapeutic efficacy without increasing adverse effects in stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC patients. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (number NCT02497118). PMID:27566586

  6. Impact of Hyperglycemia on Survival and Infection-Related Adverse Events in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Who Were Receiving Palliative Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yong Joo; Han, Hye-Suk; Jeong, Yusook; Jeong, Jiwon; Lim, Sung-Nam; Choi, Hyung Jin; Jeon, Hyun-Jung; Oh, Tae-Keun; Lee, Sang-Jeon; Lee, Ki Hyeong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Non-metastatic colorectal cancer patients with diabetes have poor overall survival than those without diabetes. However, the effect of hyperglycemia on survival after diagnosis of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been assessed. Therefore, we assessed the impact of hyperglycemia on the survival and infection-related adverse events (AEs) in patients with metastatic CRC. Materials and Methods We reviewed the records of 206 patients with newly diagnosed metastatic CRC who were treated with palliative chemotherapy from March 2000 to December 2012 at Chungbuk National University Hospital. The mean glucose level of each patient was calculated using all available glucose results. Results The mean glucose levels ranged between 76.8 and 303.5 mg/dL, and patients were categorized into quartiles in accordance to their mean glucose level: group 1 (< 106.7 mg/dL), group 2 (106.7-117.2 mg/dL), group 3 (117.3-142.6 mg/dL), and group 4 (> 142.6 mg/dL). The median overall survival for patients in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 22.6, 20.1, 18.9, and 17.9 months, respectively; however, this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.643). Compared with patients in group 1, those in groups 2, 3, and 4 were at a higher risk of infection-related AEs, according to a multivariate analysis (p=0.002). Conclusion Hyperglycemia was not associated with shorter survival; however, it was associated with infection-related AEs in patients with newly diagnosed metastatic CRC receiving palliative chemotherapy. PMID:25038764

  7. Psychological impact of illness intrusiveness in epilepsy - comparison of treatments.

    PubMed

    Poochikian-Sarkissian, Sonia; Sidani, Souraya; Wennberg, Richard A; Devins, Gerald M

    2008-03-01

    Chronic illnesses are associated with multiple stressors that compromise quality of life (QOL). Implicit in many of these is the concept of illness intrusiveness, the disruption of lifestyles and activities attributable to constraints imposed by chronic disease and its treatment. This study tested the illness intrusiveness theoretical framework in epilepsy and compared the impact of pharmacological and surgical treatments on illness intrusiveness and QOL. Cross-sectional data compared three epilepsy groups (N = 145): (a) 40 patients admitted for presurgical evaluation to an Epilepsy Monitoring Unit; (b) 52 patients treated pharmacologically; and (c) 53 post-surgical patients. Illness intrusiveness differed significantly across epilepsy patients with the differences primarily related to seizure control. Illness intrusiveness varied inversely with seizure control (p < .05). Seizure freedom, whether achieved by surgical or pharmacological treatments, was associated with maximal reduction of illness intrusiveness. Increased illness intrusiveness correlated significantly with decreased QOL and increased depressive symptoms. Perceived control over diverse life domains correlated positively with QOL and psychosocial outcomes. Path analysis supported the validity of the illness intrusiveness theoretical framework in epilepsy. Illness intrusiveness is an important determinant of the psychosocial impact of epilepsy and its treatment. Effective pharmacological or surgical treatment may reduce illness intrusiveness in epilepsy. Findings also offer encouragement that QOL in epilepsy, as in other chronic conditions, may be enhanced by multidisciplinary bio-psychosocial efforts. Health care providers should consider multifaceted interventions to reduce illness intrusiveness and, thereby, improve QOL.

  8. Impact of comorbid personality disorders and personality disorder symptoms on outcomes of behavioral treatment for cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Marlowe, D B; Kirby, K C; Festinger, D S; Husband, S D; Platt, J J

    1997-08-01

    Studies have revealed a significant adverse impact of comorbid personality disorders on treatment tenure and outcome in a variety of psychiatric and substance abuse populations. We investigated whether this negative relationship also exists among 137 urban, poor, cocaine abusers in behaviorally oriented treatment. Axis II diagnoses were generated categorically using the SCID-II as well as dimensionally using numbers of SCID-II symptoms within diagnostic categories. Contrary to expectations, there were no significant differences between subjects with and without various categorical personality disorders on any outcome measures. Categorical Axis II diagnoses were also minimally correlated with drug use severity, depression, and anxiety at intake, indicating that these were not potential coveriates of outcome. However, dimensional analyses of personality symptoms generated from the SCID-II accounted for substantial proportions of variance in treatment outcomes. Implications of these data for Axis II assessment and drug treatment planning are discussed.

  9. Adverse Events among HIV/MDR-TB Co-Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral and Second Line Anti-TB Treatment in Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Isaakidis, Petros; Varghese, Bhanumati; Mansoor, Homa; Cox, Helen S.; Ladomirska, Joanna; Saranchuk, Peter; Da Silva, Esdras; Khan, Samsuddin; Paryani, Roma; Udwadia, Zarir; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Reid, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Background Significant adverse events (AE) have been reported in patients receiving medications for multidrug- and extensively-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB & XDR-TB). However, there is little prospective data on AE in MDR- or XDR-TB/HIV co-infected patients on antituberculosis and antiretroviral therapy (ART) in programmatic settings. Methods Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is supporting a community-based treatment program for drug-resistant tuberculosis in HIV-infected patients in a slum setting in Mumbai, India since 2007. Patients are being treated for both diseases and the management of AE is done on an outpatient basis whenever possible. Prospective data were analysed to determine the occurrence and nature of AE. Results Between May 2007 and September 2011, 67 HIV/MDR-TB co-infected patients were being treated with anti-TB treatment and ART; 43.3% were female, median age was 35.5 years (Interquartile Range: 30.5–42) and the median duration of anti-TB treatment was 10 months (range 0.5–30). Overall, AE were common in this cohort: 71%, 63% and 40% of patients experienced one or more mild, moderate or severe AE, respectively. However, they were rarely life-threatening or debilitating. AE occurring most frequently included gastrointestinal symptoms (45% of patients), peripheral neuropathy (38%), hypothyroidism (32%), psychiatric symptoms (29%) and hypokalaemia (23%). Eleven patients were hospitalized for AE and one or more suspect drugs had to be permanently discontinued in 27 (40%). No AE led to indefinite suspension of an entire MDR-TB or ART regimen. Conclusions AE occurred frequently in this Mumbai HIV/MDR-TB cohort but not more frequently than in non-HIV patients on similar anti-TB treatment. Most AE can be successfully managed on an outpatient basis through a community-based treatment program, even in a resource-limited setting. Concerns about severe AE in the management of co-infected patients are justified, however, they should not cause delays

  10. Treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder: the impact of paroxetine.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Jonathan R T

    2003-01-01

    The past decade has seen remarkable advances in our ability to treat patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In addition, we are now much more aware of the prevalence of PTSD in civilian populations, and treatment studies now reflect the broad spectrum of patients with PTSD. Findings of studies conducted with the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), mood stabilizers, and benzodiazepines suggest varying degrees of efficacy, with the MAOIs being particularly efficacious. However, the adverse-effect profiles of these agents, especially the TCAs and the MAOIs, limit their widespread use. The efficacy and tolerability of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), paroxetine, sertraline, and fluoxetine, also have been demonstrated in clinical trials. Paroxetine is especially well studied in this regard, with demonstrated efficacy in men and women, in both short-term and long-term studies, and in combat veterans and civilians. Paroxetine also has been shown to improve quality of life, and to improve sleep disturbances, which can be remarkably disabling, in patients with PTSD. Emerging evidence also suggests that long-term treatment with paroxetine reverses the reductions in hippocampal volume and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis abnormalities associated with PTSD.

  11. Drug-induced blood consumption: the impact of adverse drug reactions on demand for blood components in German departments of internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Rottenkolber, Dominik; Schmiedl, Sven; Rottenkolber, Marietta; Thuermann, Petra A; Hasford, Joerg

    2012-10-01

    Therapy for adverse drug reactions (ADRs) often results in the application of blood components. This study aims to assess the demand for blood components and the resulting economic burden (hospital perspective) in German hospitals induced by ADRs leading to admissions to departments of internal medicine. In this prospective study, ADRs leading to hospitalization were surveyed in four regional pharmacovigilance centres in Germany during the years 2000-2007. ADRs assessed as 'possible', 'likely' or 'very likely' were included. Market prices for blood components and hospitalization data were determined by desktop research. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed. A total of 6099 patients were admitted to internal medicine departments because of an outpatient ADR of whom 1165 patients (19.1%; mean age, 73.0 ± 13.0 years) required treatment with blood components owing to major bleeding events. Overall consumption was 4185 erythrocyte concentrates (EC), 426 fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and 48 thrombocyte (TC) units. On the basis of statistical hospital data, we estimated a nationwide demand of approximately 132,020 EC, 13,440 FFP and 1515 TC units, resulting in total costs of €12.66 million per year for all German hospitals. Some 19.2% of all ADR cases were assessed as preventable. Theoretically, a nationwide decreased demand for blood components and a savings potential of €2.43 million per year could be achieved by preventing ADRs in Germany. Blood components are used in one-fifth (mainly gastrointestinal bleeding) of all ADRs, leading to hospitalizations in internal medicine departments. Both blood demand and hospital procurement costs can be significantly lowered by preventing ADRs.

  12. Coding of adverse events of suicidality in clinical study reports of duloxetine for the treatment of major depressive disorder: descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Tendal, Britta; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Lundh, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of coding and coding conventions on summaries and tabulations of adverse events data on suicidality within clinical study reports. Design Systematic electronic search for adverse events of suicidality in tables, narratives, and listings of adverse events in individual patients within clinical study reports. Where possible, for each event we extracted the original term reported by the investigator, the term as coded by the medical coding dictionary, medical coding dictionary used, and the patient’s trial identification number. Using the patient’s trial identification number, we attempted to reconcile data on the same event between the different formats for presenting data on adverse events within the clinical study report. Setting 9 randomised placebo controlled trials of duloxetine for major depressive disorder submitted to the European Medicines Agency for marketing approval. Data sources Clinical study reports obtained from the EMA in 2011. Results Six trials used the medical coding dictionary COSTART (Coding Symbols for a Thesaurus of Adverse Reaction Terms) and three used MedDRA (Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities). Suicides were clearly identifiable in all formats of adverse event data in clinical study reports. Suicide attempts presented in tables included both definitive and provisional diagnoses. Suicidal ideation and preparatory behaviour were obscured in some tables owing to the lack of specificity of the medical coding dictionary, especially COSTART. Furthermore, we found one event of suicidal ideation described in narrative text that was absent from tables and adverse event listings of individual patients. The reason for this is unclear, but may be due to the coding conventions used. Conclusion Data on adverse events in tables in clinical study reports may not accurately represent the underlying patient data because of the medical dictionaries and coding conventions used. In clinical study reports, the

  13. Adverse effects of falciparum and vivax malaria and the safety of antimalarial treatment in early pregnancy: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    McGready, R; Lee, SJ; Wiladphaingern, J; Ashley, EA; Rijken, MJ; Boel, M; Simpson, JA; Paw, MK; Pimanpanarak, M; Mu, Oh; Singhasivanon, P; White, NJ; Nosten, FH

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The effects of malaria and its treatment in the first trimester of pregnancy remain an area of concern. We aimed to assess the outcome of malaria-exposed and malaria-unexposed first-trimester pregnancies of women from the Thai–Burmese border and compare outcomes after chloroquine-based, quinine-based, or artemisinin-based treatments. Methods We analysed all antenatal records of women in the first trimester of pregnancy attending Shoklo Malaria Research Unit antenatal clinics from May 12, 1986, to Oct 31, 2010. Women without malaria in pregnancy were compared with those who had a single episode of malaria in the first trimester. The association between malaria and miscarriage was estimated using multivariable logistic regression. Findings Of 48 426 pregnant women, 17 613 (36%) met the inclusion criteria: 16 668 (95%) had no malaria during the pregnancy and 945 (5%) had a single episode in the first trimester. The odds of miscarriage increased in women with asymptomatic malaria (adjusted odds ratio 2·70, 95% CI 2·04–3·59) and symptomatic malaria (3·99, 3·10–5·13), and were similar for Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Other risk factors for miscarriage included smoking, maternal age, previous miscarriage, and non-malaria febrile illness. In women with malaria, additional risk factors for miscarriage included severe or hyperparasitaemic malaria (adjusted odds ratio 3·63, 95% CI 1·15–11·46) and parasitaemia (1·49, 1·25–1·78 for each ten-fold increase in parasitaemia). Higher gestational age at the time of infection was protective (adjusted odds ratio 0·86, 95% CI 0·81–0·91). The risk of miscarriage was similar for women treated with chloroquine (92 [26%] of 354), quinine (95 [27%) of 355), or artesunate (20 [31%] of 64; p=0·71). Adverse effects related to antimalarial treatment were not observed. Interpretation A single episode of falciparum or vivax malaria in the first trimester of pregnancy can cause

  14. Geospatial Strategy for Adverse Impact of Urban Heat Island in upper atmospheres of the earth Mountain Areas using LANDSAT ETM+ Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Vandana, Vandana

    2016-07-01

    We are living in the age of the rapidly growing population and changing environmental conditions with advanced technical capacity. This has been resulting in widespread land cover change. Among several human-induced environmental and urban thermal problems are reported to be negatively affecting urban residents in many ways. Urban Heat Islands exist in many large cities especially metropolitan cities and can significantly affect the permafrost layer in mountain areas. The adverse effect of urban heat island has become the subject of numerous studies in recent decades and is reflected in many major mountain cities around the world. The built-up structures in urbanized areas considerably alter land cover thereby affecting thermal energy flow which leads to the development of elevated surface and air temperature. The phenomenon Urban Heat Island implies 'island' of high temperature in cities, surrounded by relatively lower temperature in rural areas. The Urban Heat Island for the temporal period is estimated using geospatial techniques which are then utilized for the impact assessment of the climate of the surrounding regions and how it reduce the sustainability of the natural resources like air, vegetation. The knowledge of surface temperature is important for the study of urban climate and human health. The rapid growth of industries in peri-urban areas results in excessive warming and variations in weather conditions. It leads to soil degradation in frozen areas due to high temperature which leads to melting of snow in mountain areas Remotely sensed data of thermal infrared band in the region of 10.4-12.5 µm of EMR spectrum, available from LANDSAT- ETM+ is proved to be very helpful to identify urban heat islands. Thermal infrared data acquired during the daytime and night time can be used to monitor the heat island associated with urban areas as well as atmospheric pollution. The present paper describes the methodology and resolution dynamic urban heat island

  15. Clinical picture, epidemiology and outcome of Loa-associated serious adverse events related to mass ivermectin treatment of onchocerciasis in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Boussinesq, Michel; Gardon, Jacques; Gardon-Wendel, Nathalie; Chippaux, Jean-Philippe

    2003-01-01

    In August 2002, 65 cases of Loa-associated neurological Serious Adverse Events were reported after ivermectin treatment. The first signs, occurring within the 12–24 hours following treatment, included fatigue, generalized arthralgia, and sometimes agitation, mutism, and incontinence. Disorders of consciousness, including coma, generally appeared between 24 and 72 hours, and showed a rapid variation with time. The most frequent objective neurological signs were extrapyramidal. The patients presented with haemorrhages of the conjunctiva and of the retina. Biological examinations showed a massive Loa microfilaruria, the passage of Loa microfilariae into the cerebrospinal fluid, haematuria, and an increase in the C-reactive protein, all of which have been correlated with the high intensity of the initial Loa microfilaraemia. Eosinophil counts decreased dramatically within the first 24 hours, and then rose again rapidly. Electroencephalograms suggested the existence of a diffuse pathological process within the first weeks; the abnormalities disappearing after 3–6 months. Death may occur when patients are not properly managed, i.e. in the absence of good nursing. However, some patients who recovered showed sequelae such as aphasia, episodic amnesia, or extrapyramidal signs. The main risk factor for these encephalopathies is the intensity of the initial Loa microfilaraemia. The disorders of consciousness may occur when there are >50,000 Loa microfilariae per ml. The possible roles of co-factors, such as Loa strains, genetic predisposition of individuals, co-infestations with other parasites, or alcohol consumption, seem to be minor but they should be considered. The mechanisms of the post-ivermectin Loa-related encephalopathies should be investigated to improve the management of patients developing the condition. PMID:14975061

  16. Impact of Childhood Trauma on Treatment Outcome in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Cara C.; Simons, Anne D.; Nguyen, Lananh J.; Murakami, Jessica L.; Reid, Mark W.; Silva, Susan G.; March, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The impact of childhood trauma was examined in 427 adolescents (54% girls, 74% Caucasian, mean = 14.6, SD = 1.5) with major depressive disorder participating in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). Method: TADS compared the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), fluoxetine (FLX), their combination (COMB),…

  17. Relationships of Childhood Adverse Experiences With Mental Health and Quality of Life at Treatment Start for Adult Refugees Traumatized by Pre-Flight Experiences of War and Human Rights Violations

    PubMed Central

    Opaas, Marianne; Varvin, Sverre

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adverse and potentially traumatic experiences (PTEs) in childhood were examined among 54 adult refugee patients with pre-flight PTEs of war and human rights violations (HRVs) and related to mental health and quality of life at treatment start. Extent of childhood PTEs was more strongly related to mental health and quality of life than the extent of war and HRV experiences. Childhood PTEs were significantly related to arousal and avoidance symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and to quality of life, whereas pre-flight war and HRV experiences were significantly related to reexperiencing symptoms of PTSD only. Within childhood adversities, experiences of family violence and external violence, but not of loss and illness, were significantly related to increased mental health symptoms and reduced quality of life. These results point to the importance of taking childhood adverse experiences into account in research and treatment planning for adult refugees with war and HRVs trauma. PMID:26103604

  18. Relationships of Childhood Adverse Experiences With Mental Health and Quality of Life at Treatment Start for Adult Refugees Traumatized by Pre-Flight Experiences of War and Human Rights Violations.

    PubMed

    Opaas, Marianne; Varvin, Sverre

    2015-09-01

    Adverse and potentially traumatic experiences (PTEs) in childhood were examined among 54 adult refugee patients with pre-flight PTEs of war and human rights violations (HRVs) and related to mental health and quality of life at treatment start. Extent of childhood PTEs was more strongly related to mental health and quality of life than the extent of war and HRV experiences. Childhood PTEs were significantly related to arousal and avoidance symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and to quality of life, whereas pre-flight war and HRV experiences were significantly related to reexperiencing symptoms of PTSD only. Within childhood adversities, experiences of family violence and external violence, but not of loss and illness, were significantly related to increased mental health symptoms and reduced quality of life. These results point to the importance of taking childhood adverse experiences into account in research and treatment planning for adult refugees with war and HRVs trauma.

  19. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  20. Investigating the impacts of extraneous water on wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Rödel, S; Günthert, F W; Brüggemann, T

    2017-02-01

    To demonstrate the effects of increased extraneous water on operation, purification, and energy efficiency, two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have been investigated in detail under the research project 'Sealing of sewer pipes - Effects on the purification performance of WWTPs and their impact on the local water balance'. Both treatment plants, after evaluating and analyzing the measurement data and information about them, were compared in the light of existing literature and other practical investigations. Furthermore, the results were assessed with respect to transferability to other treatment plants. In WWTP 1, extraneous water reduction led to lower energy consumption of certain plant components such as the pumping station and aeration. An increased percentage of extraneous water had an impact on the wastewater characteristics (e.g. organic load) in WWTP 2. A decrease in extraneous water increases the concentration of biodegradable matters; however, an increase in extraneous water increases the loads in the effluent. The results are in accordance with the theoretical approaches described in the literature and confirm the correlations between extraneous water and purification efficiency and energy consumption of WWTPs.

  1. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  2. The impact of African Americans' beliefs about HIV medical care on treatment adherence: a systematic review and recommendations for interventions.

    PubMed

    Gaston, Gina B; Alleyne-Green, Binta

    2013-01-01

    Disparities in access to and retention of regular HIV medical treatment persist among African Americans living with HIV. Many scholars believe that the mistrust of health care held by many African Americans stems from a legacy of abuse, from medical experimentation on slaves to the unethical practices with patients in the Tuskegee Syphilis study. We performed a systematic appraisal of the literature, using several key terms, in order to understand how attitudes about HIV-related health care influence African Americans' engagement in care. We examined peer-reviewed studies published during the period January 2001 through May 2012. An initial search generated 326 studies. Sixteen descriptive studies met our inclusion criteria. Experiences of racism, conspiracy beliefs and the quality of provider relationships appeared to impact engagement. Providers should openly investigate personal beliefs that adversely affect their treatment decisions, listen to patient narratives, and share treatment decisions in order to create a transparent environment.

  3. SMARTS (Systematic Monitoring of Adverse events Related to TreatmentS): The development of a pragmatic patient-completed checklist to assess antipsychotic drug side effects

    PubMed Central

    Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang; Peuskens, Joseph; Cavallaro, Roberto; Lean, Michael EJ; Morozova, Margarita; Reynolds, Gavin; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Thomas, Pierre; Möller, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Antipsychotic drug side effects are common and can cause stigmatisation, decreased quality of life, poor adherence, and secondary morbidity and mortality. Systematic assessment of anticipated side effects is recommended as part of good clinical care, but is uncommon in practice and patients may not spontaneously report side effects. We aimed to develop a simple patient-completed checklist to screen systematically for potential antipsychotic side effects. Methods: The SMARTS checklist was developed over a series of group meetings by an international faculty of 12 experts (including psychiatrists, a general physician and a psychopharmacologist) based on their clinical experience and knowledge of the literature. The emphasis is on tolerability (i.e. assessment of side effects that ‘trouble’ the patient) as subjective impact of side effects is most relevant to medication adherence. The development took account of feedback from practising psychiatrists in Europe, the Middle East and Africa, a process that contributed to face validity. Results: The SMARTS checklist assesses whether patients are currently ‘troubled’ by 11 well-established potential antipsychotic side effects. Patients provide their responses to these questions by circling relevant side effects. An additional open question enquires about any other possible side effects. The checklist has been translated into Italian and Turkish. Conclusions: The SMARTS checklist aims to strike a balance between brevity and capturing the most common and important antipsychotic side effects. It is appropriate for completion by patients prior to a clinical consultation, for example, in the waiting room. It can then form the focus for a more detailed clinical discussion about side effects. It can be used alone or form part of a more comprehensive assessment of antipsychotic side effects including blood tests and a physical examination when appropriate. The checklist assesses current problems and can be used

  4. Corticosteroid Treatment Impact on Spinal Deformity in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sanzarello, Ilaria; Merlini, Luciano; Traina, Francesco; Rosa, Michele Attilio; Faldini, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease with loss of ambulation at around 9-10 years of age, followed, if untreated, by development of scoliosis, respiratory insufficiency, and death in the second decade of life. This review highlights the natural history of the disease, in particular, with regard to the development of the spinal deformity and how this complication has been modified by surgical interventions and overall by corticosteroid treatment. The beneficial effect of corticosteroids may have also an impact on the clinical trial design of the new emerging causative therapies. PMID:27382620

  5. Costs of adverse events associated with erlotinib or afatinib in first-line treatment of advanced EGFR-positive non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Isla, Dolores; De Castro, Javier; Juan, Oscar; Grau, Santiago; Orofino, Javier; Gordo, Rocío; Rubio-Terrés, Carlos; Rubio-Rodríguez, Darío

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Epidermal growth factor receptor–tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) are an established treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutation. According to published meta-analyses, no significant efficacy differences have been demonstrated between erlotinib and afatinib. However, the incidence of EGFR–TKI-related adverse events (AEs) was lower with erlotinib. This study compares the cost of management of the AEs associated with these two drugs from the perspective of the Spanish National Health System (NHS). Methods The frequency of AEs was established from a recently published meta-analysis. In Spain, the daily cost of both drugs can be considered similar; as a result, only the costs of management of the AEs were considered. Costs and resource utilization in the management of the AEs were estimated by a panel of Spanish oncologists and from studies previously carried out in Spain. A probabilistic analysis was performed based on a Monte Carlo simulation. Results The model generated 1,000 simulations. The total cost per patient treated with erlotinib and afatinib was €657.44 and €1,272.15, respectively. With erlotinib, the cost per patient and per AE of grades ≤2 and ≥3 was €550.86 and €106.58, respectively, whereas the cost with afatinib was €980.63 and €291.52, respectively. The reduction in the number of AEs with erlotinib could avoid a mean cost for the NHS of €614.71 (95% CI: €342.57–881.29) per patient. Conclusion In advanced EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC patients, first-line treatment with erlotinib could reduce health care costs for the NHS, due to a decrease in the AE rate compared with afatinib. In long-term treatments, the avoidance of complications and the lowering of costs associated with the management of AEs are relevant factors that contribute to the sustainability of the health system. PMID:28115857

  6. Reversible Ototoxicity: A Rare Adverse Reaction of Liposomal Amphotericin-B Used for the Treatment of Antimony-Resistant Visceral Leishmaniasis in an Elderly Male

    PubMed Central

    Das, PC; Kandel, Ramesh; Sikka, Kapil; Dey, AB

    2014-01-01

    Amphotericin-B, a broad spectrum antifungal agent, has been known to cause adverse effects such as nephrotoxicity and infusion-related side effects such as fever, chills, rigor, and arthralgias. However, ototoxicity as an adverse effect of Amphotericin-B has not yet been reported in medical literature. We here report a case of a reversible form of ototoxicity induced by liposomal Amphotericin-B (L-AmB). PMID:25093006

  7. Model assessment of individual tumor control rate and adverse effects in comparing locally advanced cervical cancer treatment using intracavitary with and without interstitial brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Keyur J; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Shankar, Viswanathan; Bodner, William; Garg, Madhur; Rivera, Amanda; Tomé, Wolfgang A.; Kalnicki, Shalom

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study assessed the modeled probability of tumor control and organ at risk toxicities in locally advanced cervical cancer in patients treated by external beam radiation plus brachytherapy using intracavitary combined with interstitial brachytherapy (IC/IS) vs. intracavitary brachytherapy (IC) alone. Material and methods Twenty cervical cancer patients with a mean HR-CTV volume of 47.4 cm3 and a mean width of 54 mm were planned with both IC/IS and IC brachytherapy alone. A probit model was utilized to model 3-year (3-yr) local control rate (LC), 3-yr cancer specific survival rate (CSS), and the adverse effect (AE) of the organ at risk by using a modeled data set from multiple institutions. Modeling results were used to estimate the LC, CSS, and AE of the treatments in this study. Results Using the IC/IS technique, an EQD2 increase of 12.3 Gy to D90 (from 76.1 Gy to 88.3 Gy) of HR-CTV is expected to increase 3-yr LC and 3-yr CSS by 12.5%, and 11.0%, respectively. Comparing IC/IS to IC alone, the expected G2+ AE were 7.7% vs. 7.9% for the bladder, and 5.9% vs. 6.8% for the rectum. Conclusions The IC/IS technique improved dose coverage to the HR-CTV without significantly increasing dose to 2 cm3 of the organ at risk (OAR) surrounding it. With different regimens of EBRT combined with BT, IC/IS can be used to increase the probability of LC and CSS, or decrease the risk of AE. PMID:28115959

  8. Explaining Disproportionately High Rates of Adverse Birth Outcomes among African Americans: The Impact of Stress, Racism, and Related Factors in Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giscombe, Cheryl L.; Lobel, Marci

    2005-01-01

    Compared with European Americans, African American infants experience disproportionately high rates of low birth weight and preterm delivery and are more than twice as likely to die during their 1st year of life. The authors examine 5 explanations for these differences in rates of adverse birth outcomes: (a) ethnic differences in health behaviors…

  9. Adverse events in healthcare: learning from mistakes.

    PubMed

    Rafter, N; Hickey, A; Condell, S; Conroy, R; O'Connor, P; Vaughan, D; Williams, D

    2015-04-01

    Large national reviews of patient charts estimate that approximately 10% of hospital admissions are associated with an adverse event (defined as an injury resulting in prolonged hospitalization, disability or death, caused by healthcare management). Apart from having a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality, adverse events also result in increased healthcare costs due to longer hospital stays. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of adverse events are preventable. Through identifying the nature and rate of adverse events, initiatives to improve care can be developed. A variety of methods exist to gather adverse event data both retrospectively and prospectively but these do not necessarily capture the same events and there is variability in the definition of an adverse event. For example, hospital incident reporting collects only a very small fraction of the adverse events found in retrospective chart reviews. Until there are systematic methods to identify adverse events, progress in patient safety cannot be reliably measured. This review aims to discuss the need for a safety culture that can learn from adverse events, describe ways to measure adverse events, and comment on why current adverse event monitoring is unable to demonstrate trends in patient safety.

  10. Impact of Solvents Treatment on the Wettability of Froth Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of solvent addition to bitumen froth on the wettability of froth solids. The wettability of solids determines the transportation/partitioning of the solids between phases, which in turn affects the solids and water rejection in a Clark hot water extraction process (CHWE). The impact of solvents treatment on the wettability of froth solids was studied using both a model system and a real bitumen froth system. The vulnerabilities of four kinds of model minerals to hydrocarbon contamination/wettability alteration in different solvents were compared and discussed by considering solvent composition and mineral types. The wettability of solids extracted from the industrial froth using different solvents was also compared. The XRD analysis on these solids confirmed the partitioning behavior of solids observed in model solids system. The results from this study indicate that the composition of paraffinic/aromatic solvent in an industrial froth treatment process could be tailor-optimized to achieve a better solids/water rejection.

  11. [Clinical survey of tizanidine-induced adverse effects--impact of concomitant drugs providing cytochrome P450 1A2 modification--].

    PubMed

    Momo, Kenji; Homma, Masato; Matsumoto, Sayaka; Sasaki, Tadanori; Kohda, Yukinao

    2013-01-01

    The drug-drug interactions of tizanidine and cytochrome (CYP) P450 1A2 inhibitors, which potentially alter the hepatic metabolism of tizanidine, were investigated by retrospective survey of medical records with regard to prescription. One thousand five hundred sixty-three patients treated with tizanidine at University of Tsukuba Hospital were investigated. Of those, 713 patients (45.6%) were treated with coadministration of tizanidine and CYP1A2 inhibitors (37 drugs). The patients who received a combination of tizanidine and CYP1A2 inhibitors were characterized as elderly, having multiple diseases, and taking a large number of comedications (over 10 drugs) for a long period as compared with the patients who did not receive CYP1A2 inhibitors. Tizanidine-induced adverse effects were examined in 100 patients treated with coadministration of tizanidine and 8 CYP1A2 inhibitors. Adverse effects (e.g., drowsiness: 10 patients; low blood pressure: 9 patients; low heart rate: 9 patients) were observed in 23 patients (23%) 8±10 days after CYP1A2 inhibitors were coadministered. The patients with tizanidine-induced adverse effects were of older age (64.3±9.8 vs. 57.5±18.1 years, p<0.05) and received a higher daily dose of tizanidine (3.00±0.74 vs. 2.56±0.86 mg/day, p<0.05) than the patients without adverse effects. The present results suggest that coadministration of tizanidine and CYP1A2 inhibitors enhances tizanidine-induced adverse effects, especially in elderly patients treated with a higher dose of tizanidine.

  12. Report of a Scientific Working Group on Serious Adverse Events following Mectizan(R) treatment of onchocerciasis in Loa loa endemic areas.

    PubMed

    2003-10-24

    The occurrence of Serious Adverse Experiences (SAEs) following Mectizan(R) treatment of onchocerciasis in Loa loa endemic areas has been increasingly reported over the past decade. These SAEs include a severely disabling, and potentially fatal, encephalopathy, which appears to correlate with a high load of L. loa microfilariae (> 30,000 mf/ml).Previous consultations organized by the Mectizan(R) Donation Program (MDP) in 1995 and 1999 have developed useful "case" definitions of encephalopathic SAEs following Mectizan(R) treatment and have summarized available evidence on its pathogenesis and optimal clinical management. At both meetings, the need for better understanding of the pathogenesis of the encephalopathy was emphasized, including the need for biological and autopsy specimens from the affected cases.Following a recommendation at the Joint Action Forum of the African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control in December 2001, the MDP, on behalf of the Mectizan(R) Expert Committee, organized a Scientific Working Group on L. loa associated SAEs following Mectizan(R) treatment in May 2002. The present report includes the background, new evidence, conclusions and recommendations from that Scientific Working Group. The following points represent a summary of the present status:1. Although there are more and better quality clinical and epidemiological data on L. loa, the pathogenesis of the Mectizan(R)-related L. loa encephalopathy remains obscure.2. Very limited progress has been made in research on the pathogenesis of encephalopathy, because of the lack of specimens from cases, and the lack of animal models.3. There has been no particular breakthrough in terms of the medical management of patients with L. loa encephalopathy; however, a favorable outcome usually results from prompt general nursing and nutritional care which remain the major interventions.The main recommendations for future actions are as follows:1. Validate and update the mapping of L. loa with a

  13. Patient-reported adverse drug reactions and their influence on adherence and quality of life of chronic myeloid leukemia patients on per oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kekäle, Meri; Peltoniemi, Marikki; Airaksinen, Marja

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate adverse drug reactions (ADRs) experienced by chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients during per oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment and correlation of ADR symptoms with medication adherence and perceived quality of life (QoL). Patients and methods Eighty-six adult, chronic-phase CML patients who had been on TKI treatment (79% on imatinib, 10.5% dasatinib, and 10.5% nilotinib) for at least 6 months participated in the study (mean age: 57.8 years, 52% males). The mean time from diagnosis was 5.1 years. All patients were interviewed, and patient-reported ADRs were obtained using a structured list. Adherence was assessed using Morisky’s 8-item Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS). The symptoms’ interference with patient’s daily QoL was measured by asking patients about the influence of symptom(s) on their mood, general condition, enjoyment of life, walking, relationships, and work. Results Ninety-seven percent of the patients were suffering from at least one ADR. The mean number of different symptoms was seven (range: 0–15, median 6). The most commonly perceived ADRs were muscle soreness or cramp (69/86, 80%); swelling of hands, legs, feet, or around the eyes (59/86, 69%); and fatigue (43/86, 50%). No correlation was found between adherence and ADRs, because symptoms were equally common in each MMAS adherence class. Half of the patients felt that the ADRs had a negative influence on their daily QoL. A quarter of the patients reported that ADRs affected either their mood, general condition, or enjoyment of life. The incidence of almost all ADRs was much higher among patients reporting negative influence of ADRs on their daily life compared to total study population (P=0.016). Conclusion TKI-related ADRs were common among CML patients irrespective of patient’s adherence level. Patients who reported that ADRs had a negative influence on their daily QoL perceived more ADRs than those who did not experience a negative influence. PMID

  14. Immunomodulatory drugs: Oral and systemic adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Riikka; Gomez-Font, Rafael; Meurman, Jukka H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The main objectives are to present the different adverses effects of the immunomodulatory drugs that can impair the quality of life of the immunosupressed patients and study the impact of immunomodualtion on oral diseases. Immunomodulatory drugs have changed the treatment protocols of many diseases where immune functions play a central role, such as rheumatic diseases. Their effect on oral health has not been systematically investigated, however. Study Design: We review current data on the new immunomodulatory drugs from the oral health perspective based on open literature search of the topic. Results: These target specific drugs appear to have less drug interactions than earlier immunomodulating medicines but have nevertheless potential side effects such as activating latent infections. There are some data showing that the new immunomodulatory drugs may also have a role in the treatment of certain oral diseases such as lichen planus or ameliorating symptoms in Sjögren´s syndrome, but the results have not been overly promising. Conclusions: In general, data are sparse of the effect of these new drugs vs. oral diseases and there are no properly powered randomized controlled trials published on this topic. Key words:Immunomodulatory drugs, oral diseases, adverse effects, therapeutic action. PMID:23986016

  15. Magnesium Modifies the Impact of Calcitriol Treatment on Vascular Calcification in Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Zelt, Jason G E; McCabe, Kristin M; Svajger, Bruno; Barron, Henry; Laverty, Kim; Holden, Rachel M; Adams, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are commonly treated with vitamin D analogs, such as calcitriol. Recent epidemiologic evidence revealed a significant interaction between vitamin D and magnesium, since an inverse relationship between vitamin D levels and mortality mainly occurs in patients with a high magnesium intake. The aim of the study was to assess the mechanisms involved by determining whether magnesium alone or combined with calcitriol treatments differentially impacts vascular calcification (VC) in male Sprague-Dawley rats with adenine-induced CKD. Treatment with moderate doses of calcitriol (80 μg/kg) suppressed parathyroid hormone to near or slightly below control levels. Given alone, this dose of calcitriol increased the prevalence of VC; however, when magnesium was given in combination, the severity of calcification was attenuated in the abdominal aorta (51% reduction), iliac (44%), and carotid arteries (46%) compared with CKD controls. The decreases in vascular calcium content were associated with a 20-50% increase in vascular magnesium. Calcitriol treatment alone significantly decreased TRPM7 protein (↓ to ∼11%), whereas the combination treatment increased both mRNA (1.7×) and protein (6.8×) expression compared with calcitriol alone. In summary, calcitriol increased VC in certain conditions, but magnesium prevented the reduction in TRPM7 and reduced the severity of VC, thereby increasing the bioavailable magnesium in the vascular microenvironment. These findings suggest that modifying the adverse effect profile of calcitriol with magnesium may be a plausible approach to benefiting the increasing number of CKD patients being prescribed calcitriol.

  16. Impact of obesity treatment on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abraham; Kim, Aram; Sanossian, Cassandra; Francois, Fritz

    2016-01-28

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a frequently encountered disorder. Obesity is an important risk factor for GERD, and there are several pathophysiologic mechanisms linking the two conditions. For obese patients with GERD, much of the treatment effort is focused on weight loss and its consistent benefit to symptoms, while there is a relative lack of evidence regarding outcomes after novel or even standard medical therapy is offered to this population. Physicians are hesitant to recommend operative anti-reflux therapy to obese patients due to the potentially higher risks and decreased efficacy, and these patients instead are often considered for bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgical approaches are broadening, and each technique has emerging evidence regarding its effect on both the risk and outcome of GERD. Furthermore, combined anti-reflux and bariatric options are now being offered to obese patients with GERD. However, currently Roux-en-Y gastric bypass remains the most effective surgical treatment option in this population, due to its consistent benefits in both weight loss and GERD itself. This article aims to review the impact of both conservative and aggressive approaches of obesity treatment on GERD.

  17. Impact of motivational pharmacotherapy on treatment retention among depressed Latinos.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Balán, Iván C; Patel, Sapana R; Sánchez-Lacay, J Arturo; Alfonso, César; Gorritz, Magdaliz; Blanco, Carlos; Schmidt, Andrew; Jiang, Huiping; Schneier, Franklin; Moyers, Theresa B

    2013-01-01

    Compared to non-Latino Whites, U.S. racial/ethnic minority groups show higher non-adherence with outpatient antidepressant therapy, including lower retention, despite adjusting for sociodemographic and insurance covariates. Culturally salient concerns about antidepressants leading to ambivalence about treatment engagement may contribute to this discrepancy. To improve treatment adherence among depressed Latinos, we developed motivational pharmacotherapy, a novel approach that combines motivational interviewing, standard pharmacotherapy, and attention to Latino cultural concerns about antidepressants. This 12-week, open-trial, pre-post pilot study assessed the impact of motivational pharmacotherapy on antidepressant therapy retention, response (symptoms, functioning, and quality of life), and visit duration among n = 50 first-generation Latino outpatients with major depressive disorder. At study endpoint, 20% of patients discontinued treatment, with a mean therapy duration of 74.2 out of 84 days. Patients' symptoms, psychosocial functioning, and quality of life improved significantly. Mean visit length was 36.7 minutes for visit 1 and 24.3 minutes for subsequent visits, compatible with use in community clinics. Responder and remitter rates were 82% and 68%. Compared to published Latino proportions of non-retention (32-53%) and previous studies at our clinic with similar samples and medications (36-46%), Motivational pharmacotherapy appears to improve Latino retention in antidepressant therapy and should be investigated further in controlled designs.

  18. Impact of Motivational Pharmacotherapy on Treatment Retention among Depressed Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Balán, Iván C.; Patel, Sapana R.; Sánchez-Lacay, J. Arturo; Alfonso, César; Gorritz, Magdaliz; Blanco, Carlos; Schmidt, Andrew; Jiang, Huiping; Schneier, Franklin; Moyers, Theresa B.

    2015-01-01

    Compared to non-Latino Whites, US racial/ethnic minority groups show higher non-adherence with outpatient antidepressant therapy, including lower retention, despite adjusting for sociodemographic and insurance covariates. Culturally salient concerns about antidepressants leading to ambivalence about treatment engagement may contribute to this discrepancy. To improve treatment adherence among depressed Latinos, we developed Motivational Pharmacotherapy, a novel approach that combines Motivational Interviewing, standard pharmacotherapy, and attention to Latino cultural concerns about antidepressants. This 12-week, open-trial, pre-post pilot study assessed the impact of Motivational Pharmacotherapy on antidepressant therapy retention, response (symptoms, functioning, and quality of life), and visit duration among N=50 first-generation Latino outpatients with Major Depressive Disorder. At study endpoint, 20% of patients discontinued treatment, with a mean therapy duration of 74.2 out of 84 days. Patients’ symptoms, psychosocial functioning, and quality of life improved significantly. Mean visit length was 36.7 minutes for visit 1 and 24.3 minutes for subsequent visits, compatible with use in community clinics. Responder and remitter rates were 82% and 68%. Compared to published Latino proportions of non-retention (32-53%) and previous studies at our clinic with similar samples and medications (36-46%), Motivational Pharmacotherapy appears to improve Latino retention in antidepressant therapy, and should be investigated further in controlled designs. PMID:23965261

  19. Impact Toughness and Heat Treatment for Cast Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for transforming a cast component made of modified aluminum alloy by increasing the impact toughness coefficient using minimal heat and energy. The aluminum alloy is modified to contain 0.55%-0.60% magnesium, 0.10%-0.15% titanium or zirconium, less than 0.07% iron, a silicon-tomagnesium product ratio of 4.0, and less than 0.15% total impurities. The shortened heat treatment requires an initial heating at 1,000deg F. for up to I hour followed by a water quench and a second heating at 350deg F. to 390deg F. for up to I hour. An optional short bake paint cycle or powder coating process further increase.

  20. Antidepressant-associated sexual dysfunction: impact, effects, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Agnes; Nash, Michael; Lynch, Aileen M

    2010-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of antidepressants and can have significant impact on the person's quality of life, relationships, mental health, and recovery. The reported incidence of sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressant medication varies considerably between studies, making it difficult to estimate the exact incidence or prevalence. The sexual problems reported range from decreased sexual desire, decreased sexual excitement, diminished or delayed orgasm, to erection or delayed ejaculation problems. There are a number of case reports of sexual side effects, such as priapism, painful ejaculation, penile anesthesia, loss of sensation in the vagina and nipples, persistent genital arousal and nonpuerperal lactation in women. The focus of this article is to explore the incidence, pathophysiology, and treatment of antidepressant iatrogenic sexual dysfunction.

  1. Association of a probiotic to a Helicobacter pylori eradication regimen does not increase efficacy or decreases the adverse effects of the treatment: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The treatment for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is complex; full effectiveness is rarely achieved and it has many adverse effects. In developing countries, increased resistance to antibiotics and its cost make eradication more difficult. Probiotics can reduce adverse effects and improve the infection treatment efficacy. If the first-line therapy fails a second-line treatment using tetracycline, furazolidone and proton-pump inhibitors has been effective and low cost in Brazil; however it implies in a lot of adverse effects. The aim of this study was to minimize the adverse effects and increase the eradication rate applying the association of a probiotic compound to second-line therapy regimen. Methods Patients with peptic ulcer or functional dyspepsia infected by H. pylori were randomized to treatment with the furazolidone, tetracycline and lansoprazole regimen, twice a day for 7 days. In a double-blind study, patients received placebo or a probiotic compound (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Streptococcus faecium) in capsules, twice a day for 30 days. A symptom questionnaire was administered in day zero, after completion of antibiotic therapy, after the probiotic use and eight weeks after the end of the treatment. Upper digestive endoscopy, histological assessment, rapid urease test and breath test were performed before and eight weeks after eradication treatment. Results One hundred and seven patients were enrolled: 21 men with active probiotic and 19 with placebo plus 34 women with active probiotic and 33 with placebo comprising a total of 55 patients with active probiotic and 52 with placebo. Fifty-one patients had peptic ulcer and 56 were diagnosed as functional dyspepsia. The per-protocol eradication rate with active probiotic was 89.8% and with placebo, 85.1% (p = 0.49); per intention to treat, 81.8% and 79.6%, respectively (p = 0.53). The rate of adverse effects at 7 days with the

  2. Urbanicity, social adversity and psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Andreas; Deserno, Lorenz; Reininghaus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in research on geographical variation in the incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses. In this paper, we review the evidence on variation in incidence of schizophrenia and other psychoses in terms of place, as well as the individual- and area-level factors that account for this variation. We further review findings on potential mechanisms that link adverse urban environment and psychosis. There is evidence from earlier and more recent studies that urbanicity is associated with an increased incidence of schizophrenia and non-affective psychosis. In addition, considerable variation in incidence across neighbourhoods has been observed for these disorders. Findings suggest it is unlikely that social drift alone can fully account for geographical variation in incidence. Evidence further suggests that the impact of adverse social contexts – indexed by area-level exposures such as population density, social fragmentation and deprivation – on risk of psychosis is explained (confounding) or modified (interaction) by environmental exposures at the individual level (i.e., cannabis use, social adversity, exclusion and discrimination). On a neurobiological level, several studies suggest a close link between social adversity, isolation and stress on the one hand, and monoamine dysfunction on the other, which resembles findings in schizophrenia patients. However, studies directly assessing correlations between urban stress or discrimination and neurobiological alterations in schizophrenia are lacking to date. PMID:24096775

  3. Impact of riverbank filtration on treatment of polluted river water.

    PubMed

    Singh, P; Kumar, P; Mehrotra, I; Grischek, T

    2010-05-01

    The impact of riverbank filtration (RBF) on the treatment of water from the River Yamuna at Mathura, which has disagreeable visual properties, has been investigated. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and colour of the river water were 4.0-6.8mg/L and 40-65 colour units (CU), respectively. Pre-chlorination is in practice to improve raw water quality. Chlorine doses as high as 60mg/L ahead of the water treatment units reduced colour by about 78%. Removal of DOC and UV-absorbance was less than 18%. In comparison to direct pumping of the river water, collection of water through RBF resulted in the reduction of DOC, colour, UV-absorbance and fecal coliforms by around 50%. However, riverbank filtrate did not conform to the drinking water quality standards. Therefore, riverbank-filtered water along with the Yamuna water were ozonated for different durations. To reduce DOC to the desired level, the dose of ozone required for the riverbank filtrate was found to be considerably less than the ozone required for the river water. RBF as compared to direct pumping of Yamuna water appears to be effective in improving the quality of the raw water.

  4. Cardiovascular impact of drugs used in the treatment of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation predicts that by 2035 10% of the population of the world will have been diagnosed with diabetes, raising serious concerns over the resulting elevated morbidity and mortality as well as the impact on health care budgets. It is also well recognized that cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of the high morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes, raising the concern that appropriate drug therapy should not only correct metabolic dysfunction, but also protect the cardiovascular system from the effects of, in particular, the epigenetic changes that result from hyperglycaemia. A number of new classes of drugs for the treatment of diabetes have been introduced in the past decade, providing the opportunity to optimize treatment; however, comparative information of the cardiovascular benefits, or risks, of the newer drugs versus older therapies such as metformin is variable. This review, in addition to summarizing the cellular basis for the therapeutic action of these drugs, addresses the evidence for their cardiovascular benefits and risks. A particular focus is provided on metformin as it is the first choice drug for most patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25364492

  5. Treatment of landfill leachate in municipal wastewater treatment plants and impacts on effluent ammonium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Brennan, R B; Clifford, E; Devroedt, C; Morrison, L; Healy, M G

    2017-03-01

    Landfill leachate is the result of water percolating through waste deposits that have undergone aerobic and anaerobic microbial decomposition. In recent years, increasingly stringent wastewater discharge requirements have raised questions regarding the efficacy of co-treatment of leachate in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This study aimed to (1) examine the co-treatment of leachate with a 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5): chemical oxygen demand (COD) ratio less than or slightly greater than 0.26 (intermediate age leachate) in municipal WWTPs (2) quantify the maximum hydraulic and mass (expressed as mass nitrogen or COD) loading of landfill leachate (as a percentage of the total influent loading rate) above which the performance of a WWTP may be inhibited, and (3) quantify the impact of a range of hydraulic loading rates (HLRs) of young and intermediate age leachate, loaded on a volumetric basis at 0 (study control), 2, 4 and 10% (volume landfill leachate influent as a percentage of influent municipal wastewater), on the effluent ammonium concentrations. The leachate loading regimes examined were found to be appropriate for effective treatment of intermediate age landfill leachate in the WWTPs examined, but co-treatment may not be suitable in WWTPs with low ammonium-nitrogen (NH4-N) and total nitrogen (TN) emission limit values (ELVs). In addition, intermediate leachate, loaded at volumetric rates of up to 4% or 50% of total WWTP NH4-N loading, did not significantly inhibit the nitrification processes, while young leachate, loaded at volumetric rates greater of than 2% (equivalent to 90% of total WWTP NH4-N loading), resulted in a significant decrease in nitrification. The results show that current hydraulic loading-based acceptance criteria recommendations should be considered in the context of leachate NH4-N composition. The results also indicate that co-treatment of old leachate in municipal WWTPs may represent the most sustainable solution

  6. Reverse engineering adverse outcome pathways.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Edward J; Chipman, J Kevin; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or incompletely characterized, mechanisms of action. The application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) can be used to overcome these limitations. This approach was used to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows (FHM, Pimephales promelas). Gene expression changes in FHM ovaries in response to seven different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions, were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. Potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide were examined using two mutual information-based methods to infer gene regulatory networks and potential AOPs. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict network paths from stressor to adverse outcome as candidate AOPs. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment, thus leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biological processes, biomarkers, or alternative endpoints that can be used to monitor an AOP. Finally, the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology were identified and a road map for the utilization of these tools presented.

  7. Impact of Wet-Weather Peak Flow Blending on Disinfection and Treatment: A Case Study at Three Wastewater Treatment Plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    A U.S. EPA study evaluated the impact on disinfection during peak flows (wet-weather flow events) when a portion of the flow to the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) bypasses secondary treatment prior to disinfection. The practice of bypassing secondary treatment during peak flo...

  8. Impact of Wet Weather Peak Flow Blending on Disinfection and Treatment: A Case Study at Three Wastewater Treatment Plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    A U.S. EPA study evaluated the impact on disinfection during peak flows (wet-weather flow events) when a portion of the flow to the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) bypasses secondary treatment prior to disinfection. The practice of bypassing secondary treatment during peak flo...

  9. Focal treatment of spasticity using botulinum toxin A in cerebral palsy cases of GMFCS level V: evaluation of adverse effects☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, Ana Paula; Martins, Juliana Saccol; Nicolini-Panisson, Renata D’Agostini

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report on the experience of injections of botulinum toxin A (BTA) in a series of patients with cerebral palsy of Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level V. Methods This was a retrospective case series study on 33 patients with cerebral palsy of GMFCS level V who received 89 sessions of BTA application (of which 84 were Botox® and five were other presentations), in which the basic aim was to look for adverse effects. Results The mean number of application sessions per patient was three, and the mean age at the time of each injection was 4 + 6 years (range: 1.6–13 years). The muscles that most frequently received injections were the gastrocnemius, hamstrings, hip adductors, biceps brachii and finger flexors. The mean total dose was 193 U and the mean dose per weight was 12.5 U/kg. Only one patient received anesthesia for the injections and no sedation was used in any case. No local or systemic adverse effects were observed within the minimum follow-up of one month. Conclusion The absence of adverse effects in our series was probably related to the use of low doses and absence of sedation or anesthesia. According to our data, BTA can be safely used for patients with cerebral palsy of GMFCS level V, using low doses and preferably without sedation or anesthesia. PMID:26229827

  10. Are food insecurity's health impacts underestimated in the U.S. population? Marginal food security also predicts adverse health outcomes in young U.S. children and mothers.

    PubMed

    Cook, John T; Black, Maureen; Chilton, Mariana; Cutts, Diana; Ettinger de Cuba, Stephanie; Heeren, Timothy C; Rose-Jacobs, Ruth; Sandel, Megan; Casey, Patrick H; Coleman, Sharon; Weiss, Ingrid; Frank, Deborah A

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses epidemiological, public health, and social policy implications of categorizing young children and their adult female caregivers in the United States as food secure when they live in households with "marginal food security," as indicated by the U.S. Household Food Security Survey Module. Existing literature shows that households in the US with marginal food security are more like food-insecure households than food-secure households. Similarities include socio-demographic characteristics, psychosocial profiles, and patterns of disease and health risk. Building on existing knowledge, we present new research on associations of marginal food security with health and developmental risks in young children (<48 mo) and health in their female caregivers. Marginal food security is positively associated with adverse health outcomes compared with food security, but the strength of the associations is weaker than that for food insecurity as usually defined in the US. Nonoverlapping CIs, when comparing odds of marginally food-secure children's fair/poor health and developmental risk and caregivers' depressive symptoms and fair/poor health with those in food-secure and -insecure families, indicate associations of marginal food security significantly and distinctly intermediate between those of food security and food insecurity. Evidence from reviewed research and the new research presented indicates that households with marginal food security should not be classified as food secure, as is the current practice, but should be reported in a separate discrete category. These findings highlight the potential underestimation of the prevalence of adverse health outcomes associated with exposure to lack of enough food for an active, healthy life in the US and indicate an even greater need for preventive action and policies to limit and reduce exposure among children and mothers.

  11. Exposure of Particulate Matters PM10 and PM2.5 to Pregnant Ladies during First Trimester and its Impact on Adverse Birth Outcomes in Delhi, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Goyal, P.

    2015-12-01

    The incessant exposure to criteria air pollutants at different level of concentrations is associated with adverse birth outcomes. The present study advocates the importance of the early period of pregnancy (first trimester) for association between growth in term of small gestational age (SGA) and birth weight (BW) with PM2.5 and PM10 for megacity Delhi. The association of PM10 and PM2.5 average concentration, SGA, pre term birth (PTB) and lower birth weight (LBW < 2500g or 5.5 pounds) outcomes have been investigated among 1749 live births in a large hospital during the year 2012 New Delhi, India. The air pollutants PM2.5 and PM10 have been used in single pollutant logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios (OR) for these outcomes. Growth in term of SGA is associated with PM2.5 levels (OR = 0.99, confidence interval (CI) = 0.99 - 1.0) and PM10 levels (OR= 0.99, CI= 0.99 - 1.001) in the first trimester of pregnancy. Birth weight outcome in terms of lower birth weight (LBW) has been found to be significantly associated with PM2.5 (OR= 0.99, CI = 0.98 - 1.00) exposure in the first trimester. A very significant decrease of 0.1% has been observed in growth of infant in terms of SGA with per 10 mg/m3 increase in PM2.5. Also, 0.1 % statistically significant adverse association of BW in terms of LBW has been found with per 10 mg/m3 increased vulnerability of PM2.5 during first trimester of gestation.

  12. Childhood adversity profiles and adult psychopathology in a representative Northern Ireland study.

    PubMed

    McLafferty, Margaret; Armour, Cherie; McKenna, Aine; O'Neill, Siobhan; Murphy, Sam; Bunting, Brendan

    2015-10-01

    Childhood adversities are key aetiological factors in the onset and persistence of psychopathology. The aims of this study were to identify childhood adversity profiles, and investigate the relationship between the adversity classes and psychopathology in Northern Ireland. The study utilized data from the Northern Ireland Study of Health and Stress, an epidemiological survey (N=1986), which used the CIDI to examine mental health disorders and associated risk factors. Latent Class Analysis revealed 3 distinct typologies; a low risk class (n=1709; 86%), a poly-adversity class (n=122; 6.1%), and an economic adversity class (n=155; 7.8%). Logistic Regression models revealed that individuals in the economic adversity class had a heightened risk of anxiety and substance disorders, with individuals in the poly-adversity class more likely to have a range of mental health problems and suicidality. The findings indicate the importance of considering the impact of co-occurring childhood adversities when planning treatment, prevention, and intervention programmes.

  13. Levetiracetam extended release and levetiracetam immediate release as adjunctive treatment for partial-onset seizures: an indirect comparison of treatment-emergent adverse events using meta-analytic techniques.

    PubMed

    Richy, Florent F; Banerjee, Soutrik; Brabant, Yves; Helmers, Sandra

    2009-10-01

    The safety profiles of once-daily adjunctive levetiracetam (LEV) extended release (XR) (1000mg/day) and adjunctive LEV immediate release (IR) (500mg twice daily) were compared using data from three randomized, placebo (PBO)-controlled phase III clinical trials in patients with partial-onset seizures. MedDRA 9.0 treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were indirectly compared using meta-analytic techniques, including calculation of risk difference (RD) and mixed-effects analysis. Statistical significance was set at 10% alpha risk, the normative value for these analyses. Data from 555 patients older than 16 (204 LEV IR, 70 LEV XR, 281 PBO) were analyzed. Following adjustment for incidence of placebo TEAEs, LEV XR showed statistically significantly lower rates of TEAEs than LEV IR across nervous system disorders (RD=-18%, P=0.03), psychiatric disorders (RD=-11%, P=0.08), and metabolism and nutrition disorders (RD=-3%, P=0.08). Among nervous system disorders, the RD for headache favored LEV XR (RD=-11%, P=0.08). These results suggest that adjunctive LEV XR may be associated with a lower incidence of nervous system, psychiatric, and nutritional and metabolic TEAEs as compared with LEV IR. However, this difference was observed at a broad scale and not at a specific TEAE level except for headache.

  14. Hospital deaths and adverse events in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adverse events are considered a major international problem related to the performance of health systems. Evaluating the occurrence of adverse events involves, as any other outcome measure, determining the extent to which the observed differences can be attributed to the patient's risk factors or to variations in the treatment process, and this in turn highlights the importance of measuring differences in the severity of the cases. The current study aims to evaluate the association between deaths and adverse events, adjusted according to patient risk factors. Methods The study is based on a random sample of 1103 patient charts from hospitalizations in the year 2003 in 3 teaching hospitals in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The methodology involved a retrospective review of patient charts in two stages - screening phase and evaluation phase. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between hospital deaths and adverse events. Results The overall mortality rate was 8.5%, while the rate related to the occurrence of an adverse event was 2.9% (32/1103) and that related to preventable adverse events was 2.3% (25/1103). Among the 94 deaths analyzed, 34% were related to cases involving adverse events, and 26.6% of deaths occurred in cases whose adverse events were considered preventable. The models tested showed good discriminatory capacity. The unadjusted odds ratio (OR 11.43) and the odds ratio adjusted for patient risk factors (OR 8.23) between death and preventable adverse event were high. Conclusions Despite discussions in the literature regarding the limitations of evaluating preventable adverse events based on peer review, the results presented here emphasize that adverse events are not only prevalent, but are associated with serious harm and even death. These results also highlight the importance of risk adjustment and multivariate models in the study of adverse events. PMID:21929810

  15. Synergistic childhood adversities and complex adult psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Karen T; Harris, William W; Putnam, Frank W

    2013-08-01

    Numerous studies find a cumulative effect of different types of childhood adversities on increasing risk for serious adult mental and medical outcomes. This study uses the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication sample to investigate the cumulative impact of 8 childhood adversities on complex adult psychopathology as indexed by (a) number of lifetime diagnoses according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994); (b) number of 4 DSM-IV disorder categories (mood, anxiety, impulse control, and substance abuse disorders); and (c) coexistence of internalizing and externalizing disorders. Seven of the 8 childhood adversities were significantly associated with complex adult psychopathology. Individuals with 4 or more childhood adversities had an odds ratio of 7.3, 95% confidence interval [4.7, 11.7] for 4 disorder categories. Additive and multiplicative synergistic effects increasing adult psychopathology were found for specific pairwise combinations of childhood adversities. Synergistic patterns differed by gender suggesting that women are more impacted by sexual abuse and men by economic hardship. The absence of childhood adversities was protective, in that it significantly decreased an individual's risk for subsequent adult mental illness. The results support the clinical impression that increased childhood adversity is associated with more complex adult psychopathology.

  16. Tourism Impacts of Three Mile Island and Other Adverse Events: Implications for Lincoln County and Other Rural Counties Bisected by Radioactive Wastes Intended for Yucca Mountain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himmelberger, Jeffery J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Summarizes key research implications of Three Mile Island and other major hazard events as related to tourism. Examines how the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository system will impact tourism in southern Nevada and other visitor-oriented rural counties bisected by planned waste transportation corridors. (AIM)

  17. The Impact of Delays on Parents' Perceptions of Treatments for Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Call, Nathan A.; Reavis, Andrea R.; McCracken, Courtney E.; Gillespie, Scott E.; Scheithauer, Mindy C.

    2015-01-01

    Parent engagement in behavioral interventions is critical for treatments to succeed. Parental decision-making regarding treatments can be impacted by systematic biases, such as the tendency to discount the value of delayed benefits, or "delay discounting". This study examined the impact of delay discounting on parents' perceptions of…

  18. Trading places - an innovative SO{sub 2} trading program to mitigate potential adverse impacts on class I areas: part II. Mitigation plan

    SciTech Connect

    Louis Militana; Cindy Huber; Christopher Colbert; Chris Arrington; Don Shepherd

    2005-08-01

    This is the second of two articles describing a plan that was developed to mitigate the effects of acid deposition and visibility impairment in four Class I areas from the proposed Longview Power Project. Part I (published in July 2005) discussed the air quality impacts of the proposed coal-fired power plant. Part II discusses the mitigation plan. 2 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Cell-based metabolomics approach for assessing the impact of wastewater treatment plant effluent on downstream water quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) are a known source of various types of chemicals including pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), naturally occurring hormones, and pesticides. There is great concern regarding their adverse effects on human and ecological health th...

  20. [Clinical usefulness of ondansetron hydrochloride for nausea and vomiting during repeated courses of chemotherapy for malignant lymphoma--impact of prognosis announcement on anti-emetic effect and evaluation of patient perception of chemotherapy-associated adverse events].

    PubMed

    Kodama, Fumio; Mohri, Hiroshi; Motomura, Shigeki; Fukawa, Hitoshi; Tanabe, Juichi; Koharasawa, Hideyuki; Kanamori, Heiwa; Hashimoto, Yoshimi; Harano, Hiroshi; Sakai, Rika; Tomita, Naoto; Fujimaki, Katsumichi; Takemura, Sachiya; Hattori, Michiko

    2002-02-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and safety of ondansetron hydrochloride (OND) on nausea and vomiting during repeated courses of CHOP or ACOMP-B therapy in patients with malignant lymphoma. The impact of the prognosis announcement on the anti-emetic effect and chemotherapy-associated adverse events was also investigated. Forty-two subjects with malignant lymphoma who underwent CHOP or ACOMP-B therapy including cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2 and adriamycin 40 mg/m2 were investigated for a maximum of 6 courses. For acute nausea and vomiting, ondansetron was injected intravenously before the start of chemotherapy on the first day of each course of chemotherapy. For delayed emesis, ondansetron was administered orally for 4 days from the following day. The efficacy on acute nausea and vomiting was found to be 95.0% (1st course), 95.0% (2nd course), 90.9% (3rd course), 88.2% (4th course), 92.3% (5th course) and 91.7% (6th course), respectively. A high efficacy of > or = 85% was also obtained for delayed nausea and vomiting on each day. Though the adverse event of elevated GPT value developed in one subject. It was mild and resolved. No difference in efficacy was seen with or without announcement of prognosis to patients. Following the investigation on antiemetic effect, patient perception of chemotherapy-induced adverse events was evaluated. The most common event was hair loss, followed by taste abnormality and numbness and hyposthesia of the tips of the fingers. The incidence of nausea and vomiting was the 4th and 5th most common, which are less frequent than in the report of Coates in 1983. In conclusion, ondansetron is considered clinically useful with stable anti-emetic effect on both acute and delayed nausea and vomiting over repeated courses of chemotherapy, without any significant safety problem.

  1. Sub-chronic exposure to fluoride impacts the response to a subsequent nephrotoxic treatment with gentamicin.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-González, Mariana; Jacobo Estrada, Tania; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan; Bobadilla, Norma A; Barbier, Olivier C; Del Razo, Luz M

    2016-02-01

    Fluoride is an important groundwater contaminant, and more than 200 million people are exposed to high fluoride levels in drinking water, the major source of fluoride exposure. Exposure above 2 ppm of fluoride is associated with renal impairment in humans. In rats, moderate levels of fluoride induce kidney injury at early stages in which the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is not altered. In the present study, we investigated if sub-nephrotoxic stimulus induced by fluoride might impact the response to a subsequent nephrotoxic treatment with gentamicin. Male Wistar rats (~21 days) were exposed to 0, 15 or 50 ppm of fluoride through drinking water during 40 days. Afer that, rats were co-exposed to gentamicin (40 mg kg(-1) day(-1), 7 days). Gentamicin induced a marked decrease in the GFR and an increase in urinary levels as well as the protein and mRNA expression of biomarkers of early kidney injury, such as Kim-1. Interestingly, gentamicin nephrotoxicity was less pronounced in groups previously exposed to fluoride than in the group only treated with gentamicin. Fluoride induced Hsp72, a cytoprotective molecule, which might have improved the response against gentamicin. Moreover, fluoride decreased the expression of megalin, a molecule necessary for internalization of gentamicin into the proximal tubule, potentially reducing gentamicin accumulation. The present results suggest that fluoride reduced gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity by inducing a compensatory response carried out by Hsp72 and by decreasing gentamicin accumulation. These findings should not be interpreted to suggest that fluoride is a protective agent as megalin deficiency could lead to serious adverse effects on the kidney physiology.

  2. The Impact of Prostate Cancer Treatment-Related Symptoms on Low-Income Latino Couples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    study is to describe the impact of prostate cancer treatment -related symptoms on low-income couples in which the man has undergone a radical...prostatectomy. The authors will investigate the impact of prostate cancer treatment -related symptoms on low-income Latino, African-American, and Caucasian...specific to the culture and needs of low-income couples who are managing the symptoms of prostate cancer treatment .

  3. The impact of 12 months treatment with ivacaftor on Scottish paediatric patients with cystic fibrosis with the G551D mutation: a review.

    PubMed

    Dryden, Carol; Wilkinson, Jane; Young, David; Brooker, Richard John

    2016-06-10

    We reviewed the impact of ivacaftor on Scottish paediatric patients with cystic fibrosis ≥6 years of age after 12 months of treatment. Statistically significant improvements in FEV1 and body mass index and a reduction in sweat chloride, all comparable with previously published data were observed. The findings also suggested reduced use of intravenous antibiotics and oral antibiotics. No significant adverse effects were observed but a possible association with cataract formation could not be excluded. This review suggests that, in the short term at least, ivacaftor is effective and safe in paediatric patients ≥6 years of age with G551D.

  4. Scientists Trace Adversity's Toll

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2012-01-01

    The stress of a spelling bee or a challenging science project can enhance a student's focus and promote learning. But the stress of a dysfunctional or unstable home life can poison a child's cognitive ability for a lifetime, according to new research. Those studies show that stress forms the link between childhood adversity and poor academic…

  5. Adverse Effects of Psychotropic Medications: A Call to Action.

    PubMed

    Mago, Rajnish

    2016-09-01

    Adverse effects are common, bothersome, and a leading cause of discontinuation of treatment. The methodology for evaluating adverse effects of medications has been greatly neglected, however, especially in comparison to the methodology for assessment of efficacy of medications. Existing methods for assessment and reporting of adverse effects have important limitations leading to lack of much-needed data related to adverse effects. Lastly, there is little systematic research into management of most adverse effects. A series of recommendations are made in this article about how to improve identification, assessment, reporting, and management of adverse effects.

  6. The Impact of HIV/AIDS and ARV Treatment on Worker Absenteeism: Implications for African Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habyarimana, James; Mbakile, Bekezela; Pop-Eleches, Cristian

    2010-01-01

    We characterize medium and long-run labor market impacts of HIV/AIDS and ARV treatment using unique panel data of worker absenteeism and information from an AIDS treatment program at a large mining firm in Botswana. We present robust evidence of an inverse-V shaped pattern in worker absenteeism around the time of ARV treatment inception.…

  7. IMPACT ON DISINFECTION AT PEAK FLOWS DURING BLENDING/PARTIAL BYPASSING OF SECONDARY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A U.S EPA study evaluated the impact on disinfection during peak flows when a portion of the flow to the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) bypasses secondary treatment prior to disinfection. The practice of bypassing secondary treatment during peak flows, referred to as “blending...

  8. Current United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service research on understanding agrochemical fate and transport to prevent and mitigate adverse environmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Hapeman, Cathleen J; McConnell, Laura L; Rice, Clifford P; Sadeghi, Ali M; Schmidt, Walter F; McCarty, Gregory W; Starr, James L; Rice, Pamela J; Angier, Jonathan T; Harman-Fetcho, J A

    2003-01-01

    Environmentally and economically viable agriculture requires a variety of cultivation practices and pest management options as no one system will be appropriate for every situation. Agrochemicals are some of the many pest control tools used in an integrated approach to pest management. They are applied with the intent of maximizing efficacy while minimizing off-site movement; however, their judicious use demands a practical knowledge of their fate and effects in agricultural and natural ecosystems. Agrochemical distribution into environmental compartments is influenced by the physical and chemical properties of the agrochemical and environmental conditions, ie soil type and structure, and meteorological conditions. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) researchers working in the area of agrochemical fate have focused on accurately describing those processes that govern the transport, degradation and bioavailability of these chemicals under conditions reflecting actual agronomic practices. Results from ARS research concerning the environmental fate and effects of agrochemicals have led to the development of science-based management practices that will protect vulnerable areas of the ecosystem. The new challenge is to identify these vulnerable areas and the temporal and spatial variations prior to use of the chemical by predicting how it will behave in environmental matrices, and using that information, predict its transport and transformation within an air- or watershed. With the development of better predictive tools and GIS (Geographic Information System)-based modeling, the risks of agricultural management systems can be assessed at the watershed and basin levels, and management strategies can be identified that minimize negative environmental impacts.

  9. Do Sessions of Different Treatments Have Different Impacts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiles, William B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Forty clients received eight psychodynamic treatment (exploratory) sessions and eight cognitive/behavioral treatment (prescriptive) sessions in crossover design. Counselors and external raters rated exploratory sessions as deeper and more powerful; counselors, external raters, and clients rated prescriptive sessions as smoother and easier.…

  10. Drug Induced Pneumonitis Secondary to Treatment with Paritaprevir/Ritonavir/Ombitasvir and Dasabuvir (VIEKIRA PAK®) for Chronic Hepatitis C: Case Report of an Unexpected Life-Threatening Adverse Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Faire, Bridget; Gane, Edward

    2017-01-01

    VIEKIRA PAK (ritonavir-boosted paritaprevir/ombitasvir and dasabuvir) is an approved treatment for compensated patients with genotype 1 (GT1) chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This oral regimen has minimal adverse effects and is well tolerated. Cure rates are 97% in patients infected with HCV GT 1a and 99% in those with HCV GT 1b. We report the first case of life-threatening allergic pneumonitis associated with VIEKIRA PAK. This unexpected serious adverse event occurred in a 68-year-old Chinese female with genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C and Child-Pugh A cirrhosis. One week into treatment with VIEKIRA PAK without ribavirin, she was admitted to hospital with respiratory distress and acute kidney injury requiring intensive care input. She was initially diagnosed with community acquired pneumonia and improved promptly with intravenous antibiotics and supported care. No bacterial or viral pathogens were cultured. Following complete recovery, she recommenced VIEKIRA PAK but represented 5 days later with more rapidly progressive respiratory failure, requiring intubation and ventilation, inotropic support, and haemodialysis. The final diagnosis was drug induced pneumonitis.

  11. Adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly-Foley, Georgina

    2017-04-05

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The CPD article defined the different types of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and explored when they can occur. It emphasised the importance of being knowledgeable about medications, considering patient safety when patients are taking medications, being alert to the possibility of ADRs, and recognising and responding to suspected ADRs.

  12. Paradoxical effects of kisspeptin: it enhances oocyte in vitro maturation but has an adverse impact on hatched blastocysts during in vitro culture.

    PubMed

    Saadeldin, Islam M; Koo, Ok Jae; Kang, Jung Taek; Kwon, Dae Kee; Park, Sol Ji; Kim, Su Jin; Moon, Joon Ho; Oh, Hyun Ju; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2012-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kp) is best known as a multifunctional peptide with roles in reproduction, the cardiovascular system and cancer. In the present study the expression of kisspeptin hierarchy elements (KISS1, GNRH1 and LHB) and their receptors (KISS1R, GNRHR and LHCGR, respectively) in porcine ovary and in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were investigated, as were its effects on the in vitro maturation (IVM) of oocytes and their subsequent ability to sustain preimplantation embryo competence after parthenogenetic electrical activation. Kp system elements were expressed and affected IVM of oocytes when maturation medium was supplemented with 10(-6)M Kp. Oocyte maturation, maternal gene expression (MOS, GDF9 and BMP15), blastocyst formation rate, blastocyst hatching and blastocyst total cell count were all significantly increased when oocytes were matured in medium containing Kp compared with the control group (without Kp). A Kp antagonist (p234) at 4×10(-6)M interfered with this hierarchy but did not influence the threshold effect of gonadotrophins on oocyte maturation. FSH was critical and permissive to Kp action on COCs by increasing the relative expression of KISS1R. In contrast, Kp significantly increased apoptosis, the expression of pro-apoptotic gene, BAK1, and suppressed trophoblast outgrowths from hatched blastocysts cultured on feeder cells. The present study provides the first functional evidence of the Kp hierarchy in porcine COCs and its role in enhancing oocyte maturation and subsequent developmental competence in an autocrine-paracrine manner. However, Kp supplementation may have a harmful impact on cultured hatched blastocysts reflecting systemic or local regulation during the critical early period of embryonic development.

  13. Comorbidity in youth with specific phobias: Impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome and the impact of treatment on comorbid disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ollendick, Thomas H.; Öst, Lars-Göran; Reuterskiöld, Lena; Costa, Natalie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold. In an analysis of data from an existing randomized control trial of brief cognitive behavioral treatment on specific phobias (One-Session Treatment, OST; Ollendick et al., 2009), we examined 1) the effect of comorbid specific phobias and other anxiety disorders on treatment outcomes, and 2) the effect of treatment of the specific phobia on these co-occurring disorders. These relations were explored in 100 youth presenting with animal, natural environment, situational, and “other” types of phobia. Youth were reliably diagnosed with the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV: Child and Parent versions (Silverman & Albano, 1996). Clinician Severity Ratings at post-treatment and 6-month follow-up were examined as were parent and child treatment outcome satisfaction measures. Results indicated that the presence of comorbid phobias or anxiety disorders did not affect treatment outcomes; moreover, treatment of the targeted specific phobias led to significant reductions in the clinical severity of other co-occurring specific phobias and related anxiety disorders. These findings speak to the generalization of the effects of this time-limited treatment approach. Implications for treatment of principal and comorbid disorders are discussed, and possible mechanisms for these effects are commented upon. PMID:20573338

  14. Comorbidity in youth with specific phobias: Impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome and the impact of treatment on comorbid disorders.

    PubMed

    Ollendick, Thomas H; Ost, Lars-Göran; Reuterskiöld, Lena; Costa, Natalie

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was twofold. In an analysis of data from an existing randomized control trial of brief cognitive behavioral treatment on specific phobias (One-Session Treatment, OST; Ollendick et al., 2009), we examined 1) the effect of comorbid specific phobias and other anxiety disorders on treatment outcomes, and 2) the effect of treatment of the specific phobia on these co-occurring disorders. These relations were explored in 100 youth presenting with animal, natural environment, situational, and "other" types of phobia. Youth were reliably diagnosed with the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV: Child and Parent versions (Silverman & Albano, 1996). Clinician severity ratings at post-treatment and 6-month follow-up were examined as were parent and child treatment outcome satisfaction measures. Results indicated that the presence of comorbid phobias or anxiety disorders did not affect treatment outcomes; moreover, treatment of the targeted specific phobias led to significant reductions in the clinical severity of other co-occurring specific phobias and related anxiety disorders. These findings speak to the generalization of the effects of this time-limited treatment approach. Implications for treatment of principal and comorbid disorders are discussed, and possible mechanisms for these effects are commented upon.

  15. Randomised clinical trial: escitalopram for the prevention of psychiatric adverse events during treatment with peginterferon-alfa-2a and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    de Knegt, R J; Bezemer, G; Van Gool, A R; Drenth, J P H; Hansen, B E; Droogleever Fortuyn, H A; Weegink, C J; Hengeveld, M W; Janssen, H L A

    2011-12-01

    BACKGROUND  Treatment of hepatitis C with peginterferon and ribavirin is associated with psychiatric side-effects, frequently necessitating dose reduction or therapy cessation. AIM  To assess the efficacy of prophylactic escitalopram to prevent psychiatric side-effects during peginterferon and ribavirin treatment in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. METHODS  Seventy-nine hepatitis C patients were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin. Patients received escitalopram (n = 40, 10 mg) or placebo (n = 39), which was initiated together with peginterferon and ribavirin. Primary outcomes were an increase of two points or more on the items reported sadness, inner tension and impaired concentration of the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, and hostile feelings of the Brief Anxiety Scale. Secondary outcome was the development of depression diagnosed by the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Measurements were performed at baseline, week 4, 12 and 24 during anti-viral treatment, and 24 weeks thereafter. RESULTS  The incidence of psychiatric side-effects was significantly lower in patients treated with escitalopram compared with placebo for all primary and secondary outcomes, except for impaired concentration: reported sadness 27.5 vs. 48.7% (P = 0.052), inner tension 17.5 vs. 38.5% (P = 0.038), impaired concentration 55.0 vs. 66.7% (P = 0.288) and hostile feelings 22.5 vs. 43.6% (P = 0.046) (escitalopram vs. placebo, Chi-squared test). The sum scores of all four endpoints showed an overall beneficial effect of escitalopram (P = 0.009, Mann-Whitney U-test). Depression occurred in 12.5% of the patients in the escitalopram-group vs. 35.9% in the placebo-group (P = 0.015, Chi-squared test). CONCLUSIONS  Prophylactic treatment with escitalopram is effective in the prevention of psychiatric side-effects during interferon-based treatment of hepatitis C.

  16. Combined treatment with acupuncture reduces effective dose and alleviates adverse effect of L-dopa by normalizing Parkinson's disease-induced neurochemical imbalance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Nam; Doo, Ah-Reum; Park, Ji-Yeun; Choo, Hyunwoo J; Shim, Insop; Park, Jongbae J; Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, Bena; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon

    2014-01-28

    This study first showed the behavioural benefits of novel combination therapy of L-dopa with acupuncture on Parkinson's disease, and its underlying mechanisms within basal ganglia. The previous study reported that acupuncture may improve the motor function of a Parkinson's disease (PD) mouse model by increasing the dopamine efflux and turnover ratio of dopamine. Hence, we hypothesised that combining L-dopa with acupuncture would have a behavioural benefit for those with PD. We performed unilateral injections of 6-OHDA into the striatum of C57Bl/6 mice to model hemi-Parkinsonian attributes. To test motor function and dyskinetic anomalies, we examined cylinder behaviour and abnormal involuntary movement (AIM), respectively. We found that (1) a 50% reduced dose of L-dopa (7.5 mg/kg) combined with acupuncture showed an improvement in motor function that was comparable to mice given the standard dose of L-dopa treatment (15 mg/kg) only, and that (2) the combination treatment (L-dopa +acupuncture) was significantly superior in reducing AIM scores when equivalent doses of L-dopa were used. The combination treatment also significantly reduces the abnormal increase of GABA contents in the substantia nigra compared to the standard L-dopa treatment. Furthermore, abnormal expression of FosB, the immediate early gene of L-dopa induced dyskinesia (LID), was mitigated in the striatum by the combination treatment. All of these results indicate that acupuncture enhances the benefits of L-dopa on motor function with reduced dose of L-dopa and alleviating LID by normalising neurochemical imbalance within the basal ganglia.

  17. Combined treatment with acupuncture reduces effective dose and alleviates adverse effect of l-dopa by normalizing Parkinson’s disease-induced neurochemical imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Nam; Doo, Ah-Reum; Park, Ji-Yeun; Choo, Hyunwoo J.; Shim, Insop; Park, Jongbae J.; Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, Bena; Lee, Hyejung; Park, Hi-Joon

    2014-01-01

    This study first showed the behavioural benefits of novel combination therapy of l-dopa with acupuncture on Parkinson’s disease, and its underlying mechanisms within basal ganglia. The previous study reported that acupuncture may improve the motor function of a Parkinson’s disease (PD) mouse model by increasing the dopamine efflux and turnover ratio of dopamine. Hence, we hypothesised that combining l-dopa with acupuncture would have a behavioural benefit for those with PD. We performed unilateral injections of 6-OHDA into the striatum of C57Bl/6 mice to model hemi-Parkinsonian attributes. To test motor function and dyskinetic anomalies, we examined cylinder behaviour and abnormal involuntary movement (AIM), respectively. We found that (1) a 50% reduced dose of l-dopa (7.5 mg/kg) combined with acupuncture showed an improvement in motor function that was comparable to mice given the standard dose of l-dopa treatment (15 mg/kg) only, and that (2) the combination treatment (l-dopa +acupuncture) was significantly superior in reducing AIM scores when equivalent doses of l-dopa were used. The combination treatment also significantly reduces the abnormal increase of GABA contents in the substantia nigra compared to the standard l-dopa treatment. Furthermore, abnormal expression of FosB, the immediate early gene of l-dopa induced dyskinesia (LID), was mitigated in the striatum by the combination treatment. All of these results indicate that acupuncture enhances the benefits of l-dopa on motor function with reduced dose of l-dopa and alleviating LID by normalising neurochemical imbalance within the basal ganglia. PMID:24321617

  18. TOXICITY APPROACHES TO ASSESSING MINING IMPACTS AND MINE WASTE TREATMENT EFFECTIVENESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA Office of Research and Development's National Exposure Research Laboratory and National Risk Management Research Laboratory have been evaluating the impact of mining sites on receiving streams and the effectiveness of waste treatment technologies in removing toxicity fo...

  19. Advances in the treatment of type 2 diabetes: impact of dulaglutide.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Angela M; Trujillo, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a review of current data of the most recently approved glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1-receptor agonist, dulaglutide, in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. To complete this, a PubMed search was performed to identify manuscripts published from 1947 to July 2015. The search terms "Trulicity", "dulaglutide", and "LY2189265" were utilized, and publications were included if they evaluated the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety, or patient-reported outcomes of dulaglutide. Dulaglutide is a GLP-1 receptor agonist that mimics endogenous GLP-1, the hormone produced in response to food intake. Modifications have been made to the molecule to delay breakdown and allow for once-weekly dosing. Dulaglutide has been studied as monotherapy and in combination with several agents, including metformin, glimepiride, pioglitazone, and insulin lispro. Dulaglutide has demonstrated superior efficacy compared to placebo, metformin, insulin glargine, sitagliptin, and twice-daily exenatide. It was found to be noninferior to liraglutide. The most common adverse effects in clinical studies were gastrointestinal-related adverse events, and patient satisfaction was high with the use of dulaglutide. Dulaglutide is an appealing option for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, based on its once-weekly dosing, A1c lowering comparable to liraglutide, weight reduction comparable to exenatide, and a similar adverse-effect profile to other GLP-1 receptor agonists.

  20. Adverse effect of mild temperature hyperthermia combined with hexamethylenetetramine compared to its effect combined with tirapazamine in the treatment of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Masunaga, Shin-Ichiro; Tano, Keizo; Nakamura, Jun; Watanabe, Masami; Kashino, Genro; Suzuki, Minoru; Kinashi, Yuko; Ono, Koji

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect on solid tumors of mild temperature hyperthermia (MTH) combined with hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) or tirapazamine (TPZ). Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC VII) tumor-bearing mice were continuously administered 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label intratumor proliferating (P) cells. Mice received HMTA or TPZ through intraperitoneal single or subcutaneous continuous administration, with or without MTH (40°C, 60 min), followed or not by γ-ray irradiation or cisplatin treatment. After HMTA or TPZ administration without γ-ray irradiation or cisplatin treatment, immediately after γ-ray irradiation, or 1 h after cisplatin treatment, the response of quiescent (Q) cells was assessed in terms of micronucleus frequency using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The response of the total (P + Q) tumor cells was determined based on a comparison with non-BrdU-treated tumors. Without MTH, HMTA and TPZ had a nearly equal radiosensitizing and cisplatin sensitivity-enhancing effect on both total and Q cells. With MTH, radio- and cisplatin-sensitizing effects by HMTA were reduced, particularly in the Q cells. In contrast, the enhancing effects of TPZ were increased, particularly in the Q cells. Continuous administration of HMTA and TPZ resulted in higher radio- and cisplatin-sensitizing effects than intraperitoneal single administration. In terms of tumor cytotoxicity as a whole, including Q cells, the administration of γ-ray irradiation or cisplatin treatment combined with continuous HMTA administration is promising, taking into account the clinical use of HMTA. However, MTH should not be combined with HMTA administration.

  1. Adverse effects of cannabis.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Cannabis, Cannabis sativa L., is used to produce a resin that contains high levels of cannabinoids, particularly delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which are psychoactive substances. Although cannabis use is illegal in France and in many other countries, it is widely used for its relaxing or euphoric effects, especially by adolescents and young adults. What are the adverse effects of cannabis on health? During consumption? And in the long term? Does cannabis predispose users to the development of psychotic disorders? To answer these questions, we reviewed the available evidence using the standard Prescrire methodology. The long-term adverse effects of cannabis are difficult to evaluate. Since and associated substances, with or without the user's knowledge. Tobacco and alcohol consumption, and particular lifestyles and behaviours are often associated with cannabis use. Some traits predispose individuals to the use of psychoactive substances in general. The effects of cannabis are dosedependent.The most frequently report-ed adverse effects are mental slowness, impaired reaction times, and sometimes accentuation of anxiety. Serious psychological disorders have been reported with high levels of intoxication. The relationship between poor school performance and early, regular, and frequent cannabis use seems to be a vicious circle, in which each sustains the other. Many studies have focused on the long-term effects of cannabis on memory, but their results have been inconclusive. There do not * About fifteen longitudinal cohort studies that examined the influence of cannabis on depressive thoughts or suicidal ideation have yielded conflicting results and are inconclusive. Several longitudinal cohort studies have shown a statistical association between psychotic illness and self-reported cannabis use. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to methodological problems, particularly the unknown reliability of self-reported data. It has not been possible to

  2. Impact of drug classes and treatment availability on the rate of antiretroviral treatment change in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD)

    PubMed Central

    Srasuebkul, Preeyaporn; Calmy, Alexandra; Zhou, Jialun; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Law, Matthew; Lim, Poh Lian

    2007-01-01

    Background It is critical to understand the pattern of antiretroviral treatment (ART) prescription in different regions of the world as ART procurement needs to be anticipated. We aimed at exploring rates and predictors of ART combination changes in clinical practice in Treat Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD). Methods Rates of ART changes were examined in patients who started first line triple or more ART combination in TAHOD, and had at least one follow-up visit. Rates of ART changes were summarised per follow-up year, and factors associated with changes assessed using random-effect Poisson regression. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine durations of patients in their first, second and third regimen. Results A total of 1846 patients initiated an ART combination with at least three drugs. Median follow up time for the first treatment was 3.2 years. The overall rate of ART change was 29 per 100-person-year. In univariate analyses, rate of treatment change was significantly associated with exposure category, the country income category, the drug class combination, calendar year and the number of combinations. In multivariate analysis, compared to d4T/3TC/NVP, starting ART with another NNRTI-containing regimen, with PI only or with a triple NRTI regimen was associated with a higher risk of combination change (relative risk (RR) 1.6 (95% CI 1.64 – 1.96), p < 0.001, RR 3.39 (2.76 – 4.16) p < 0.001, RR 6.37 (4.51 – 9.00), p < 0.001). Being on a second or a third combination regimen was also associated with a decreased rate of ART change, compared with first ART combination (RR 0.82 (0.68 – 0.99), p = 0.035, RR 0.77 (0.61 – 0.97), p = 0.024). Sites with fewer than 12 drugs used had an increased rate of treatment changes (1.31 (1.13 – 1.51), p < 0.001). Injecting drug users, and other/unknown exposure was found to increase rate of treatment change (1.24 (1.00 – 1.54), p = 0.055). Percentages of patients who stopped treatment due to adverse

  3. Toxic cyanobacteria and drinking water: Impacts, detection, and treatment.

    PubMed

    He, Xuexiang; Liu, Yen-Ling; Conklin, Amanda; Westrick, Judy; Weavers, Linda K; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Lenhart, John J; Mouser, Paula J; Szlag, David; Walker, Harold W

    2016-04-01

    Blooms of toxic cyanobacteria in water supply systems are a global issue affecting water supplies on every major continent except Antarctica. The occurrence of toxic cyanobacteria in freshwater is increasing in both frequency and distribution. The protection of water supplies has therefore become increasingly more challenging. To reduce the risk from toxic cyanobacterial blooms in drinking water, a multi-barrier approach is needed, consisting of prevention, source control, treatment optimization, and monitoring. In this paper, current research on some of the critical elements of this multi-barrier approach are reviewed and synthesized, with an emphasis on the effectiveness of water treatment technologies for removing cyanobacteria and related toxic compounds. This paper synthesizes and updates a number of previous review articles on various aspects of this multi-barrier approach in order to provide a holistic resource for researchers, water managers and engineers, as well as water treatment plant operators.

  4. Adverse reactions to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan L; Nelson, Michael R; Hershey, Joyce N; Engler, Renata J M

    2003-06-01

    (The opinions or assertions contained herein are the private views of the authors and are not to be construed as official or as reflecting the views of the Department of the Army or the Department of Defense.) Immunization healthcare is becoming increasingly complex as the number and types of vaccines have continued to expand. Like all prescription drugs, vaccines may be associated with adverse events. The majority of these reactions are self-limited and not associated with prolonged disability. The media, Internet and public advocacy groups have focused on potentially serious vaccine-associated adverse events with questions raised about causal linkages to increasing frequencies of diseases such as autism and asthma. Despite a lack of evidence of a causal relationship to a variety of vaccine safety concerns, including extensive reviews by the Institute of Medicine, questions regarding vaccine safety continue to threaten the success of immunization programs. Risk communication arid individual risk assessment is further challenged by the public health success of vaccine programs creating the perception that certain vaccines are no longer necessary or justified because of the rare reaction risk. There is a need for improved understanding of true vaccine contraindications and precautions as well as host factors and disease threat in order to develop a patient specific balanced risk communication intervention. When they occur, vaccine related adverse events must be treated, documented and reported through the VAERS system. The increasing complexity of vaccination health care has led the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to identify Vaccine Safety Assessment and Evaluation as a potential new specialty.

  5. The impact of spirometry on pediatric asthma diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Holt, E W; Tan, J; Hosgood, H D

    2006-09-01

    Research has shown that spirometry is underutilized in the clinical setting. This study profiles the use of spirometry in an asthma management program at an inner-city community health clinic. Eligible subjects included 56 children who presented with an acute asthma exacerbation. Physicians recorded patient diagnosis before and after viewing spirometry. Bivariate and multivariate analysis was used to determine associations between symptoms and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). Physicians changed 30.4% of patients' treatment plans after viewing spirometry results. Wheezing was significantly associated with FEV1 in bivariate analysis; however, multivariate modeling failed to identify significant relationships. The use of spirometry influenced patient diagnosis and treatment.

  6. VETERINARY PHARMACEUTICALS: POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT AND TREATMENT STRATEGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the late 1970s it was recognized that there were increasing occurrences of antibiotic-resistant organisms in Europe and the US. Even in the early stages, concerns were raised that large-scale treatment of farm animals for infectious disease as well as growth enhancement may be...

  7. Empirically Supported Treatment's Impact on Organizational Culture and Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson-Silver Wolf, David A.; Dulmus, Catherine N.; Maguin, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: With the continued push to implement empirically supported treatments (ESTs) into community-based organizations, it is important to investigate whether working condition disruptions occur during this process. While there are many studies investigating best practices and how to adopt them, the literature lacks studies investigating the…

  8. IMPACTS OF DNAPL SOURCE TREATMENT: OVERVIEW OF GWERD RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD) is conducting research to evaluate the benefits derived from aggressive DNAPL source treatment. It is assumed that contaminant mass flux from the source zone can be used to estimate the performance of applied remedial ...

  9. Impact on Psychiatric Interns of Watching Live Electroconvulsive Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazdag, Gabor; Sebestyen, Gabor; Ungvari, Gabor S.; Tolna, Judit

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Watching a live electroconvulsive treatment (ECT) has both positive and negative effects on spectators. The authors aim to survey the attitude change towards ECT in interns after watching a live ECT session. Methods: A 23-item questionnaire was administered to 66 interns before and after watching ECT. Results: In five statements, the…

  10. Depression in type 2 diabetes mellitus: prevalence, impact, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Semenkovich, Katherine; Brown, Miriam E; Svrakic, Dragan M; Lustman, Patrick J

    2015-04-01

    Clinically significant depression is present in one of every four people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Depression increases the risk of the development of T2DM and the subsequent risks of hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and micro- and macrovascular complications. Conversely, a diagnosis of T2DM increases the risk of incident depression and can contribute to a more severe course of depression. This linkage reflects a shared etiology consisting of complex bidirectional interactions among multiple variables, a process that may include autonomic and neurohormonal dysregulation, weight gain, inflammation, and hippocampal structural alterations. Two recent meta-analyses of randomized controlled depression treatment trials in patients with T2DM concluded that psychotherapy and antidepressant medication (ADM) were each moderately effective for depression and that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) had beneficial effects on glycemic control. However, the number of studies (and patients exposed to randomized treatment) included in these analyses is extremely small and limits the certainty of conclusions that can be drawn from the data. Ultimately, there is no escaping the paucity of the evidence base and the need for additional controlled trials that specifically address depression management in T2DM. Future trials should determine both the effects of treatment and the change in depression during treatment on measures of mood, glycemic control, and medical outcome.

  11. Impact of Arsenic Treatment Systems on Distribution System Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the USEPA Arsenic Demonstration Program, 50 arsenic removal treatment systems were installed and their performance evaluated over a period of one to three years. The program was limited to small systems whose population served were less than 10,000. Ten of the systems were ...

  12. Combined orthodontic-surgical approach in the treatment of impacted maxillary canines: three clinical cases

    PubMed Central

    SPUNTARELLI, M.; CECCHETTI, F.; ARCURI, L.; TESTI, D.; MELONE, P.; BIGELLI, E.; GERMANO, F.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Impaction of maxillary canine is a relatively frequent orthodontic anomaly which could represent fuctional and aesthetic problems for patients. Nowadays, the conventional technique to impacted canines consists of a combined orthodontic and surgical approach, aimed to guide cuspids at the center of the alveolar ridge in a stable position and surrounded by healthy hard and soft tissues. This article presents three cases studies with different combined surgical-orthodontic approaches for the treatment of infraosseous impacted canines. An impacted maxillary canine could be guided, after adequate space is created orthodontically, to the center of the ridge through an orthodontic traction directly applied to the crown of impacted cuspid. Several surgical techniques have been proposed to expose the crown of impacted tooth. Location (buccal or palatal side) of impactation and depth influence surgical approach in order to obtain best aesthetic and functional results. PMID:27555906

  13. Impact of Latent Infection Treatment in Indigenous Populations

    PubMed Central

    Yuhara, Lucia Suemi; Sacchi, Flávia Patussi Correia; Croda, Julio

    2013-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to identify risk factors associated with latent tuberculosis (TB), examine the development of active disease among contacts, and assess the effectiveness of treating latent infection in indigenous Brazilians from January 2006 to December 2011. This was a retrospective study consisting of 1,371 tuberculosis contacts, 392 of whom underwent treatment for latent infection. Morbidity-from-TB data were obtained from the Information System for Disease Notification (SINAN) database, and the contacts’ data were collected from the clinical records using forms employed by Special Department of Indigenous Health (SESAI) multidisciplinary teams, according to SESAI’s instructions. The variables that were associated with latent infection among the contacts were age (odds ratio [OR]: 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02–1.04) and close contact with a smear-positive index case (OR: 2.26, 95% CI: 1.59–3.22). The variables associated with the development of active TB among the contacts were a tuberculin skin test (TST) ≥10 mm (relative risk [RR]: 1.12, 95% CI: 1.07–1.17), age (RR: 1.01, 95% CI: 1.00–1.03), and treatment of latent infection (RR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.01–0.27). The estimated number of latent infection treatments needed to prevent one case of active TB among the contacts was 51 treatments (95% CI: 33–182). In contacts with TST ≥10 mm, 10 (95% CI: 6–19) latent infection treatments were necessary to prevent one case of active TB. Age and close contact with a smear-positive index case were associated with latent TB. Screening with TST is a high priority among individuals contacting smear-positive index cases. Age and TST are associated with the development of active TB among contacts, and treatment of latent infection is an effective measure to control TB in indigenous communities. PMID:23936264

  14. The Impact of Drug Abuse Treatment upon Criminality: A Look at 19 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, George

    This document reports on an exhaustive study into the large-scale treatment of drug abuse in New Jersey. Seeking to assess the impact of these programs, the state provided money to cover the cost of this comprehensive, year-long survey of both methadone maintenance and drug-free treatment projects. The findings generally supported the New Jersey…

  15. Impact of Harmful Algal Blooms on Several Lake Erie Drinking Water Treatment Plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent events in Ohio have demonstrated the challenge treatment facilities face in providing safe drinking water when encountering extreme harmful algal bloom (HAB) events. Over the last two years the impact of HAB-related microcystins on several drinking water treatment facilit...

  16. The Economic Impact of AIDS Treatment: Labor Supply in Western Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thirumurthy, Harsha; Zivin, Joshua Graff; Goldstein, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Using longitudinal survey data collected in collaboration with a treatment program, this paper estimates the economic impacts of antiretroviral treatment. The responses in two outcomes are studied: (1) labor supply of treated adult AIDS patients; and (2) labor supply of individuals in patients' households. Within six months after treatment…

  17. Reconsidering Findings of "No Effects" in Randomized Control Trials: Modeling Differences in Treatment Impacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, Bradford

    2016-01-01

    The primary technique that many researchers use to analyze data from randomized control trials (RCTs)--detecting the average treatment effect (ATE)--imposes assumptions upon the data that often are not correct. Both theory and past research suggest that treatments may have significant impacts on subgroups even when showing no overall effect.…

  18. 75 FR 44981 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for Vegetation Treatments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... Treatments Using Herbicides on Bureau of Land Management Lands in Oregon AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management... Impact Statement (EIS) for Vegetation Treatments Using Herbicides on Bureau of Land Management lands in... herbicides currently in use on BLM- managed lands in Oregon and increase the number of objectives for...

  19. IMPACT OF FIVE TREATMENT FACTORS ON MUSSEL MORTALITY

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2003-12-08

    Under this USDOE-NETL contract, the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens is being developed as a biocontrol agent for zebra mussels. The specific purpose of the contract is to identify factors that affect mussel kill. Test results reported herein indicate that mussel kill should not be affected by: (1) air bubbles being carried by currents through power plant pipes; (2) pipe orientation (e.g., vertical or horizontal); (3) whether the bacterial cell concentration during a treatment is constant or slightly varying; (4) whether a treatment is between 3 hr and 12 hr in duration, given that the total quantity of bacteria being applied to the pipe is a constant; and (5) whether the water temperature is between 13 C and 23 C.

  20. Emotional impact of diagnosis and early treatment of lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, G G; Parker, A C; Ludlam, C A; McGuire, R J

    1984-01-01

    Psychiatric morbidity, relevant symptoms and satisfaction with communication were assessed in patients suffering from malignant lymphoma. Before treatment started 15 of 40 patients had clinically significant psychiatric morbidity. Treatment, in its early stages, was not associated with a significant change in mean psychiatric morbidity scores but there was a decrease in ratings of concern about illness and an increase in ratings of nausea. Eleven of 31 patients seen for a second interview reported dissatisfaction with some aspect of communication with the medical staff. The findings suggest that emotional distress can be contained with a policy of frank communication; nevertheless dissatisfaction is common, being associated with initial less concern, good general health and neurotic personality traits. Personality assessment should be incorporated in future studies of doctor-patient communication.

  1. Treatment and impact of dyslipidemia in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Tadashi; Shimizu, Miho; Furuichi, Kengo; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    Recent epidemiological research revealed that dyslipidemia is a risk factor for development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Results from interventional studies revealed the possibility that anti-hyperlipidemic agents have a better effect on diabetic nephropathy through improvement of albuminuria and loss of renal function. In addition, dyslipidemia may be a consequence of albuminuria and renal dysfunction, thereby perpetuating kidney damage. Today, the proportion of diabetic patients receiving statins is increasing due to their beneficial effect on cardiovascular mortality. However, treatment for patients should be determined based on consideration of the risk and benefit of the treatment. More insight into the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy and the effects of life-style changes is required.

  2. The Impact of Endovascular Treatment on Isolated Iliac Artery Aneurysm Treatment and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Dominique B.; Bensley, Rodney P.; Darling, Jeremy; Curran, Thomas; McCallum, John C.; Moll, Frans L.; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Isolated Iliac artery aneurysms are rare, but potentially fatal. The impact of recent trends in the utilization of endovascular iliac aneurysm repair (EVIR) on isolated iliac artery aneurysm-associated mortality is unknown. Methods We identified all patients with a primary diagnosis of iliac artery aneurysm in the NIS from 1988 to 2011. We examined trends in management (open vs. EVIR, elective and urgent) and overall isolated iliac artery aneurysm related deaths (with or without repair). We compared in-hospital mortality and complications for the subgroup of patients undergoing elective open and EVIR from 2000-2011. Results We identified 33,161 patients undergoing isolated iliac artery aneurysm repair from 1988-2011: of which there were 9,016 EVIR and 4,933 open elective repairs from 2000-2011. Total repairs increased after introduction of EVIR from 28 to 71 per 10M US population (P<.001). EVIR surpassed open repair in 2003. Total isolated iliac artery aneurysm-related deaths, due to rupture or elective repair, decreased after the introduction of EVIR (4.4 to 2.3 per 10M US population, P<.001). However, urgent admissions have not decreased over this time period (15 to 15 procedures per 10M US population, P=0.30). Among elective repairs after 2000, EVIR patients were older (72.4 vs. 69.4 years, P=0.002) and were more likely to have a history of prior MI (14.0% vs. 11.3%, P<.001) and renal failure (7.2% vs. 3.6%, P<.001). Open repair had significantly higher in-hospital mortality (1.8% vs. 0.5%, P<0.001) and complications (17.9% vs. 6.7%, P<0.001), and a longer length of stay (6.7 vs. 2.3 days, P<0.001). Conclusions Treatment of isolated iliac artery aneurysm has increased since the introduction of EVIR and is associated with lower perioperative mortality, despite a higher burden of comorbid illness. Decreasing iliac artery aneurysm-attributable in-hospital deaths are likely related primarily to lower elective mortality with EVIR rather than rupture

  3. Patients' satisfaction in early breast cancer treatment: Change in treatment over time and impact of HER2-targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Spano, Jean-Philippe; Azria, David; Gonçalves, Anthony

    2015-06-01

    Although breast cancer remains a major cause of cancer death, its related death rate has dropped in the last years through early tumor detection and better available treatments. With the development of innovative techniques and new molecules as well as new routes of administration, local treatment and adjuvant therapy of early breast cancer have evolved, from mutilating, time-consuming and/or painful procedures to breast-conservative ones, sparing healthy tissues, reducing the total dose of treatment and the treatment time which in turn reduce the occurrence and severity of toxicity. In parallel with these improvements leading to an increase in survival rate, patients' health-related quality of life has become a major concern. This review aims at describing the evolution of early breast cancer treatment, and its impact on patients' quality of life, convenience, and satisfaction, including a special insight into emerging human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted therapy.

  4. The impact of digital technology on psychological treatments and their dissemination.

    PubMed

    Fairburn, Christopher G; Patel, Vikram

    2017-01-01

    The psychological treatment of mental health problems is beginning to undergo a sea-change driven by the widespread availability of digital technology. In this paper we provide an overview of the developments to date and those in the pipeline. We describe the various uses of digital interventions and consider their likely impact on clinical practice, clinical services and the global dissemination of psychological treatments. We note the importance of online clinics, blended treatment, digital assessment and digital training.

  5. Environmental impacts of post-consumer material managements: recycling, biological treatments, incineration.

    PubMed

    Valerio, F

    2010-11-01

    The environmental impacts of recycling, mechanical biological treatments (MBT) and waste-to-energy incineration, the main management strategies to respond to the increasing production of post-consumer materials are reviewed and compared. Several studies carried out according to life-cycle assessment (LCA) confirm that the lowest environmental impact, on a global scale, is obtained by recycling and by biological treatments (composting and anaerobic fermentations) if compost is used in agriculture. The available air emission factors suggest that, on a local scale, mechanical biological treatments with energy recovery of biogas, may be intrinsically safer than waste-to-energy incinerators. Several studies confirm the capability of biological treatments to degrade many toxic xenobiotic contaminating urban wastes such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, an important property to be improved, for safe agricultural use of compost. Further LCA studies to compare the environmental impact of MBTs and of waste-to-energy incinerators are recommended.

  6. Childhood adversity and frequent medical consultations.

    PubMed

    Fiddler, Maggie; Jackson, Judy; Kapur, Navneet; Wells, Adrian; Creed, Francis

    2004-01-01

    between childhood adversity and frequent medical consultations is mediated by the number of bodily symptoms attributed to the illness. Psychological treatments should be targeted at these patients with a view to reducing their frequent doctor visits.

  7. Regulatory Impact on Thrombosis Treatment, Prevention, and Anticoagulant Use.

    PubMed

    Dannemiller, Robert; Ward, Tucker; Fanikos, John

    2016-10-01

    Thromboembolism afflicts millions of patients annually in the United States and is associated with a significant cost burden. Oral anticoagulants provide clinicians with options for management of these diseases and their use continues to grow. Accordingly, regulatory, legislative, and nonprofit organizations have set performance standards with the goal of improving patient outcomes, ensuring patient safety, and reducing costs. Recent efforts in quality improvement have introduced changes surrounding regulatory requirements, surveillance, litigation, and oversight that clinicians should be familiar with. This article summarizes key updates related to the management of anticoagulant therapy as it relates to thrombosis prevention and treatment.

  8. Cardiac Remodeling: Concepts, Clinical Impact, Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Pharmacologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is defined as a group of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes that manifest clinically as changes in size, mass, geometry and function of the heart after injury. The process results in poor prognosis because of its association with ventricular dysfunction and malignant arrhythmias. Here, we discuss the concepts and clinical implications of cardiac remodeling, and the pathophysiological role of different factors, including cell death, energy metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, collagen, contractile proteins, calcium transport, geometry and neurohormonal activation. Finally, the article describes the pharmacological treatment of cardiac remodeling, which can be divided into three different stages of strategies: consolidated, promising and potential strategies. PMID:26647721

  9. [Cutaneous adverse drug reactions].

    PubMed

    Lebrun-Vignes, B; Valeyrie-Allanore, L

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR) represent a heterogeneous field including various clinical patterns without specific features suggesting drug causality. Exanthematous eruptions, urticaria and vasculitis are the most common forms of CADR. Fixed eruption is uncommon in western countries. Serious reactions (fatal outcome, sequelae) represent 2% of CADR: bullous reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis), DRESS (drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome) and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). These forms must be quickly diagnosed to guide their management. The main risk factors are immunosuppression, autoimmunity and some HLA alleles in bullous reactions and DRESS. Most systemic drugs may induce cutaneous adverse reactions, especially antibiotics, anticonvulsivants, antineoplastic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, allopurinol and contrast media. Pathogenesis includes immediate or delayed immunologic mechanism, usually not related to dose, and pharmacologic/toxic mechanism, commonly dose-dependent or time-dependent. In case of immunologic mechanism, allergologic exploration is possible to clarify drug causality, with a variable sensitivity according to the drug and to the CADR type. It includes epicutaneous patch testing, prick test and intradermal test. However, no in vivo or in vitro test can confirm the drug causality. To determine the cause of the eruption, a logical approach based on clinical characteristics, chronologic factors and elimination of differential diagnosis is required, completed with a literature search. A reporting to pharmacovigilance network is essential in case of a serious CADR whatever the suspected drug and in any case if the involved drug is a newly marketed one or unusually related to cutaneous reactions.

  10. Impact of leachate composition on the advanced oxidation treatment.

    PubMed

    Oulego, Paula; Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are gaining importance as an alternative to the biological or physicochemical treatments for the management of leachates. In this work, it has been studied the effect of the characteristics of the leachate (content in humic acids, landfill age and degree of stabilization) on the wet oxidation process and final quality of the treated effluent. A high concentration of humic acids in the leachate had a positive effect on the COD removal because this fraction is more easily oxidizable. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that the simultaneous presence of humic acid and the intermediates generated during the oxidation process improved the degradation of this acid, since such intermediates are stronger initiators of free radicals than the humic acid itself. Similar values of COD removals (49% and 51%) and biodegradability indices (0.30 and 0.35) were observed, after 8 h of wet oxidation, for the stabilised leachate (biologically pretreated) and the raw one, respectively. Nevertheless, final colour removal was much higher for the stabilised leachate, achieving values up to 91%, whereas for the raw one only 56% removal was attained for the same reaction time. Besides, wet oxidation treatment was more efficient for the young leachate than for the old one, with final COD conversions of 60% and 37%, respectively. Eventually, a triangular "three-lump" kinetic model, which considered direct oxidation to CO2 and partial oxidation through intermediate compounds, was here proposed.

  11. Elimination of African onchocerciasis: modeling the impact of increasing the frequency of ivermectin mass treatment.

    PubMed

    Coffeng, Luc E; Stolk, Wilma A; Hoerauf, Achim; Habbema, Dik; Bakker, Roel; Hopkins, Adrian D; de Vlas, Sake J

    2014-01-01

    The African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC) is currently shifting its focus from morbidity control to elimination of infection. To enhance the likelihood of elimination and speed up its achievement, programs may consider to increase the frequency of ivermectin mass treatment from annual to 6-monthly or even higher. In a computer simulation study, we examined the potential impact of increasing the mass treatment frequency for different settings. With the ONCHOSIM model, we simulated 92,610 scenarios pertaining to different assumptions about transmission conditions, history of mass treatment, the future mass treatment strategy, and ivermectin efficacy. Simulation results were used to determine the minimum remaining program duration and number of treatment rounds required to achieve 99% probability of elimination. Doubling the frequency of treatment from yearly to 6-monthly or 3-monthly was predicted to reduce remaining program duration by about 40% or 60%, respectively. These reductions come at a cost of additional treatment rounds, especially in case of 3-monthly mass treatment. Also, aforementioned reductions are highly dependent on maintained coverage, and could be completely nullified if coverage of mass treatment were to fall in the future. In low coverage settings, increasing treatment coverage is almost just as effective as increasing treatment frequency. We conclude that 6-monthly mass treatment may only be worth the effort in situations where annual treatment is expected to take a long time to achieve elimination in spite of good treatment coverage, e.g. because of unfavorable transmission conditions or because mass treatment started recently.

  12. Interpersonal impacts mediate the association between personality and treatment response in major depression.

    PubMed

    Dermody, Sarah S; Quilty, Lena C; Bagby, R Michael

    2016-07-01

    Personality, as characterized by the Five-Factor Model, predicts response to psychotherapy for depression. To explain how personality impacts treatment response, the present study investigated patient and therapist interpersonal processes in treatment sessions as an explanatory pathway. A clinical trial was conducted in which 103 outpatients (mean age: 41.17 years, 65% female) with primary major depressive disorder completed 16-20 weeks of cognitive-behavioral or interpersonal therapy. Before treatment, patients completed the Revised NEO Personality Inventory to assess personality domains (neuroticism, extraversion, openness-to-experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness). After 3 and 13 weeks, patient interpersonal behavior was rated by the therapist and vice versa to determine levels of patient and therapist communal and agentic behaviors. Depression levels were measured before and after treatment. Structural equation modeling supported that patients' interpersonal behavior during therapy mediated the associations between pretreatment personality and depression treatment outcome. Specifically, extraversion, conscientiousness, and neuroticism (inverse) predicted higher levels of patient communion throughout treatment, which was in turn associated with improved treatment outcomes. Furthermore, patient agreeableness was inversely associated with agency throughout treatment, which was linked to poorer treatment response. Therapist interpersonal behavior was not a significant mediator. Results suggest that patient interpersonal behavior during treatment may be one way that patient personality impacts clinical outcomes in depression. Results underscore the clinical utility of Five-Factor Model domains in treatment process and outcome. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Impact of food processing and detoxification treatments on mycotoxin contamination.

    PubMed

    Karlovsky, Petr; Suman, Michele; Berthiller, Franz; De Meester, Johan; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Perrin, Irène; Oswald, Isabelle P; Speijers, Gerrit; Chiodini, Alessandro; Recker, Tobias; Dussort, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    Mycotoxins are fungal metabolites commonly occurring in food, which pose a health risk to the consumer. Maximum levels for major mycotoxins allowed in food have been established worldwide. Good agricultural practices, plant disease management, and adequate storage conditions limit mycotoxin levels in the food chain yet do not eliminate mycotoxins completely. Food processing can further reduce mycotoxin levels by physical removal and decontamination by chemical or enzymatic transformation of mycotoxins into less toxic products. Physical removal of mycotoxins is very efficient: manual sorting of grains, nuts, and fruits by farmers as well as automatic sorting by the industry significantly lowers the mean mycotoxin content. Further processing such as milling, steeping, and extrusion can also reduce mycotoxin content. Mycotoxins can be detoxified chemically by reacting with food components and technical aids; these reactions are facilitated by high temperature and alkaline or acidic conditions. Detoxification of mycotoxins can also be achieved enzymatically. Some enzymes able to transform mycotoxins naturally occur in food commodities or are produced during fermentation but more efficient detoxification can be achieved by deliberate introduction of purified enzymes. We recommend integrating evaluation of processing technologies for their impact on mycotoxins into risk management. Processing steps proven to mitigate mycotoxin contamination should be used whenever necessary. Development of detoxification technologies for high-risk commodities should be a priority for research. While physical techniques currently offer the most efficient post-harvest reduction of mycotoxin content in food, biotechnology possesses the largest potential for future developments.

  14. Empirically Supported Treatment's Impact on Organizational Culture and Climate.

    PubMed

    Patterson-Silver Wolf, David A; Dulmus, Catherine N; Maguin, Eugene

    2012-11-01

    OBJECTIVES: With the continued push to implement empirically supported treatments (ESTs) into community-based organizations, it is important to investigate whether working condition disruptions occur during this process. While there are many studies investigating best practices and how to adopt them, the literature lacks studies investigating the working conditions in programs that currently use ESTs. METHOD: This study compared the culture and climate scores of a large organization's programs that use ESTs and those programs indicating no EST usage. RESULTS: Of the total 55 different programs (1,273 frontline workers), 27 programs used ESTs. Results indicate that the programs offering an EST had significantly more rigid and resistant cultures, compared to those without any ESTs. In regard to climate, programs offering an EST were significantly less engaged, less functional, and more stressed. CONCLUSION: Outcomes indicate a significant disruption in organizational culture and climate for programs offering ESTs.

  15. Impact of treatment protocol on outcome of localized Ewing's sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Nasaka, Srividya; Gundeti, Sadashivudu; Ganta, Ranga Raman; Arigela, Ravi Sankar; Linga, Vijay Gandhi; Maddali, Lakshmi Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Background: The outcome of localized Ewing's sarcoma has improved with multi-disciplinary approach. Survivals of Ewing's sarcoma from the Asian countries differed between centers. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the records of newly diagnosed localized Ewing's sarcoma patients from 2002 to 2012. The patients were analyzed in three groups; Group 1(2002-2004) who received non-ifosfomide based regimens, Group 2(2005-2008) who received VDC/IE for 12 cycles, and Group 3(2009-2012), who received VDC/IE for 17 cycles. The groups were compared for their baseline characteristics, treatment protocol and outcome. Results: Seventy three patients were included in the study. The median age of presentation was 15 years, with slight male predominance. Axial primary was seen in 62%. The median RFS of the three groups was 26.4, 31.4 and 36.8 months respectively (P = 0.0018). The median OS was 27.9, 35 and 43 months respectively (P = 0.0007). At a median follow-up of 35 months, the 3 year RFS and OS for the three treatment groups were 17%, 31%, 60% and 35%, 45% and 70% respectively. Larger tumor size, axial primary, high LDH were associated with poorer survival. Radiotherapy was associated with inferior local control and survival. Conclusions: We found that the survival of our ESFT patients improved over time with intensified multiagent chemotherapy and with lesser time to local therapy. But the results were still inferior to those reported in literature. We had majority of patients presenting in axial site and radiotherapy as the predominant mode of local control. The outcome may further improve with surgery as local control procedure. PMID:28032089

  16. Childhood Adversities and Adult Cardiometabolic Health: Does the Quantity, Timing, and Type of Adversity Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Esther M.; Montez, Jennifer Karas; Sheehan, Connor McDevitt; Guenewald, Tara L.; Seeman, Teresa E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adverse events in childhood can indelibly influence adult health. While evidence for this association has mounted, a fundamental set of questions about how to operationalize adverse events has been understudied. Method We used data from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States to examine how quantity, timing, and types of adverse events in childhood are associated with adult cardiometabolic health. Results The best-fitting specification of quantity of events was a linear measure reflecting a dose–response relationship. Timing of event mattered less than repeated exposure to events. Regarding the type of event, academic interruptions and sexual/physical abuse were most important. Adverse childhood events elevated the risk of diabetes and obesity similarly for men and women but had a greater impact on women’s risk of heart disease. Discussion Findings demonstrate the insights that can be gleaned about the early-life origins of adult health by examining operationalization of childhood exposures. PMID:25903978

  17. Environmental adversity and uncertainty favour cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Andras, Peter; Lazarus, John; Roberts, Gilbert

    2007-01-01

    Background A major cornerstone of evolutionary biology theory is the explanation of the emergence of cooperation in communities of selfish individuals. There is an unexplained tendency in the plant and animal world – with examples from alpine plants, worms, fish, mole-rats, monkeys and humans – for cooperation to flourish where the environment is more adverse (harsher) or more unpredictable. Results Using mathematical arguments and computer simulations we show that in more adverse environments individuals perceive their resources to be more unpredictable, and that this unpredictability favours cooperation. First we show analytically that in a more adverse environment the individual experiences greater perceived uncertainty. Second we show through a simulation study that more perceived uncertainty implies higher level of cooperation in communities of selfish individuals. Conclusion This study captures the essential features of the natural examples: the positive impact of resource adversity or uncertainty on cooperation. These newly discovered connections between environmental adversity, uncertainty and cooperation help to explain the emergence and evolution of cooperation in animal and human societies. PMID:18053138

  18. The impact of advanced wastewater treatment technologies and wastewater strength on the energy consumption of large wastewater treatment plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, Timothy

    Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process often requiring the use of advanced treatment technologies. Stricter effluent standards have resulted in an increase in the number of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with advanced treatment over time. Accordingly, associated energy consumption has also increased. Concerns about lowering operating costs for WWTPs and reducing associated greenhouse gas generation present an incentive to investigate energy use in WWTPs. This research investigated the impact of wastewater strength and the introduction of advanced treatment technologies, to replace traditional technologies on energy use to treat wastewater in WWTPs. Major unit processes were designed for a 100 MGD plant and variables controlling energy were identified and used to compute energy consumption. Except for primary clarification and plate and frame press dewatering, energy consumption computed using fundamental equations are within values in the literature. Results show that energy consumption for dissolved air flotation thickeners, centrifuges, gravity thickeners, and aeration basins are heavily influence by wastewater strength. Secondary treatment and tertiary treatment require a significant amount of energy. Secondary treatment requires 104 times the energy of preliminary treatment, 17 times the energy of solids processing, and 2.5 times the energy of tertiary treatment. Secondary treatment requires 41 times the energy of preliminary treatment, and 7 times the energy of solids processing. The results of this research provide a means of estimating energy consumption in the design and operation phase of a WWTP. By using the fundamental equations and methodology presented, alternative technologies can be compared or targeted for future energy savings implementation. Limitations of the methodology include design assumptions having to be made carefully, as well as assumptions of motor and equipment efficiencies.

  19. The effect of heat treatment on the hardness and impact properties of medium carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazni Ismail, Noor; Khatif, Nurul Aida Amir; Aliff Kamil Awang Kecik, Mohamad; Hanafiah Shaharudin, Mohd Ali

    2016-02-01

    This paper covers the effect of heat treatment on the mechanical properties of medium carbon steel. The main objective of this project is to investigate the hardness and impact properties of medium carbon steel treated at different heat treatment processes. Three types of heat treatment were performed in this project which are annealing, quenching and tempering. During annealing process, the specimens were heated at 900°C and soaked for 1 hour in the furnace. The specimens were then quenched in a medium of water and open air, respectively. The treatment was followed by tempering processes which were done at 300°C, 450°C, and 600°C with a soaking time of 2 hours for each temperature. After the heat treatment process completed, Rockwell hardness test and Charpy impact test were performed. The results collected from the Rockwell hardness test and Charpy impact test on the samples after quenching and tempering were compared and analysed. The fractured surfaces of the samples were also been examined by using Scanning Electron Microscope. It was observed that different heat treatment processes gave different hardness value and impact property to the steel. The specimen with the highest hardness was found in samples quenched in water. Besides, the microstructure obtained after tempering provided a good combination of mechanical properties due to the process reduce brittleness by increasing ductility and toughness.

  20. Psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics and desire for orthodontic treatment among Chinese undergraduate students

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Song; Zhang, Chuqin; Ni, Chulei; Qian, Ying; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics in undergraduate students in the People’s Republic of China and to investigate the association between normal orthodontic treatment needs, psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics, and desire for orthodontic treatment. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in two universities in a city of the People’s Republic of China with 374 young adults aged between 19 years and 24 years. The students answered a Chinese version of the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ) and addressed their desire for orthodontic treatment. Objective malocclusion severity was assessed with the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). Statistical analysis was performed by the SPSS software (Version 15.0). Results There was no statistical sex difference in relation to the dental health component of IOTN (P=0.893) and PIDAQ scores (P=0.06), but it was found that the desire for orthodontic treatment was significantly stronger among females. The total and subscale PIDAQ scores and malocclusion severity differed significantly among the five grades of desire (P<0.01). Significant positive correlation was found among desire for orthodontic treatment, IOTN-dental health component grades, and total or subscale PIDAQ scores (P<0.01). High correlation was found between desire and PIDAQ score (r=0.93). Conclusion The desire for orthodontic treatment is higher among female young adults who have the same orthodontic treatment needs compared to males. The desire for orthodontic treatment has high positive correlation with PIDAQ scores and increases with the increase in self-perceived psychosocial impacts of malocclusion and the needs for orthodontic treatment. PMID:27354773

  1. Thymoma versus thymic carcinoma: differences in biology impacting treatment.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ronan J

    2013-05-01

    A better understanding of the biology of both thymomas and thymic carcinomas has occurred in recent years thanks to advanced technologies such as comparative genomic hybridization, expression array analysis, and next-generation sequencing. Gene expression profiling and genomic clustering studies have shown that thymic tumors as classified by the 2004 WHO system do have different molecular features. Because of the rarity of these tumors, there is a paucity of high-quality clinical research data, and treatment decisions are often guided by the small amount of prospective trial data, retrospective series, and individual case reports. The literature does report on several advanced thymic tumors that have responded to new targeted agents, indicating that across the spectrum of thymic malignancies there may be clinically relevant molecular subsets. Genomic profiling distinguishes type B3 thymoma and thymic carcinoma from type A and B2 thymomas. Furthermore, type B2 thymomas can be separated from other subgroups in that it has a more distinctly lymphocytic component than the other groups in which epithelial cells predominate. The presence of KIT mutations in thymic carcinomas rather than in thymomas further adds to a growing body of evidence showing that underlying tumor biology may in the future lead to molecular classifications, which may enhance therapies for these rare tumors.

  2. The impact of cancer treatment on the diets and food preferences of patients receiving outpatient treatment.

    PubMed

    Coa, Kisha I; Epstein, Joel B; Ettinger, David; Jatoi, Aminah; McManus, Kathy; Platek, Mary E; Price, Wendy; Stewart, Meghan; Teknos, Theodoros N; Moskowitz, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing cancer treatment experience a multitude of symptoms that can influence their ability to complete treatment as well as their quality of life during and after treatment. This cross-sectional study sought to describe the dietary changes experienced by cancer patients and to identify associations between these changes and common treatment symptoms. A convenience sample of 1199 cancer patients aged 18 yr and older undergoing active treatment were recruited from 7 cancer centers to complete a self-administered paper-and-pencil survey. Descriptive analyses were conducted to estimate prevalence of dietary changes and chi-squared tests were used to examine associations between dietary changes and health outcomes. Approximately 40% of patients reported a decreased appetite since beginning treatment, and 67.2% of patients reported at least 1 chemosensory alteration. Increased taste sensitivities were more common than decreased taste sensitivities, with increased sensitivity to metallic being the most common taste sensitivity (18.6%). Patients also had increased sensitivities to certain smells including cleaning solutions (23.4%), perfume (22.4%), and food cooking (11.4%). Patients reported a wide range of food preferences and aversions. Patients who had less energy or lost weight since beginning treatment were more likely than others to report treatment-related dietary changes.

  3. An Experimental Examination of the Impact of Choice of Treatment Components on Treatment Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Melissa; Daly, Edward J., III

    2013-01-01

    Although there is a growing body of research on the use of performance feedback to improve treatment integrity, antecedent interventions have received little attention. Antecedent interventions are simple to use and have a strong research base. This study examined the effects of offering teachers choice of treatment components. A choice condition…

  4. Adverse cutaneous drug reaction.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Surajit; Acharjya, Basanti

    2008-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, almost all physicians come across many instances of suspected adverse cutaneous drug reactions (ACDR) in different forms. Although such cutaneous reactions are common, comprehensive information regarding their incidence, severity and ultimate health effects are often not available as many cases go unreported. It is also a fact that in the present world, almost everyday a new drug enters market; therefore, a chance of a new drug reaction manifesting somewhere in some form in any corner of world is unknown or unreported. Although many a times, presentation is too trivial and benign, the early identification of the condition and identifying the culprit drug and omit it at earliest holds the keystone in management and prevention of a more severe drug rash. Therefore, not only the dermatologists, but all practicing physicians should be familiar with these conditions to diagnose them early and to be prepared to handle them adequately. However, we all know it is most challenging and practically difficult when patient is on multiple medicines because of myriad clinical symptoms, poorly understood multiple mechanisms of drug-host interaction, relative paucity of laboratory testing that is available for any definitive and confirmatory drug-specific testing. Therefore, in practice, the diagnosis of ACDR is purely based on clinical judgment. In this discussion, we will be primarily focusing on pathomechanism and approach to reach a diagnosis, which is the vital pillar to manage any case of ACDR.

  5. Ultrastructural features of eosinophilic oesophagitis: impact of treatment on desmosomes

    PubMed Central

    Capocelli, Kelley E; Fernando, Shahan D; Menard-Katcher, Calies; Furuta, Glenn T; Masterson, Joanne C; Wartchow, Eric P

    2015-01-01

    Aims A growing body of evidence suggests a role for altered epithelial barrier function in the pathophysiology of eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE), but few have described the epithelial structure during inflammation. The purpose of this study was to define ultrastructural features of active, inactive EoE and control subject’s oesophageal epithelia. Methods We prospectively enrolled patients undergoing diagnostic upper endoscopy for evaluation of EoE. Mucosal pinch biopsies were obtained from the distal oesophagus and processed for routine histology and electron microscopic assessment. Clinical features of enrolled subjects were analysed and subjects were divided into four groups: normal, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), inactive EoE and active EoE. Representative photomicrographs of the basal and superficial epithelia were reviewed for abnormalities. Desmosomes were quantified on the surface of epithelia three to four prickle-cell layers above the basal layer. Results Twenty-nine paediatric cases (ages 2–18 years) were enrolled in the study. We observed a significant decrease in the number of desmosomes per cell (DPC) of subjects with active EoE compared with inactive EoE, GERD and normal epithelia. With respect to DPC, no significant differences were found between inactive EoE compared with GERD or normal subjects. Additional ultrastructural features observed included epithelial microplicae and evidence of eosinophil transmigration, degranulation, and sombrero formation. Conclusions Consistent with clinical and molecular findings, our ultrastructural data provide support for an altered oesophageal barrier in paediatric cases with active EoE, which may improve following treatment. PMID:25359789

  6. Adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Messerli, F H

    1981-09-01

    Early essential hypertension is asymptomatic and should remain so throughout treatment. In view of the increasing number of available antihypertensive agents, clinicians need to become familiar with the potential side effects of these drugs. By placing more emphasis on non-pharmacological treatment (sodium restriction, weight loss, exercise) and thoroughly evaluating each case in particular, the pharmacological regimen can be optimally tailored to the patient's needs. Potential side effects should be predicted and can often be avoided; if they become clinically significant they should be rapidly recognised and corrected. These side effects can be easily remembered in most instances, as they fall into 3 broad categories: (a) those caused by an exaggerated therapeutic effect; (b) those due to a non-therapeutic pharmacological effect; and (c) those caused by a non-therapeutic, non-pharmacological effect probably representing idiosyncratic reactions. This review focuses mainly on adverse effects of the second and third kind. Each group of drugs in general shares the common side effects of the first two categories, while each individual drug has its own idiosyncratic side effects.

  7. Adverse perinatal events associated with ART.

    PubMed

    Skora, Daniel; Frankfurter, David

    2012-04-01

    Since the advent of ART, much research has focused on the potential adverse for resultant harm. Prematurity, low birth-weight, PIH, congenital malformations, and CP are closely tied to multiple gestation. With the increase in elective single embryo transfer, there will be a reduction in adversity related to multiple birth. It is understood that underlying causes of infertility, including advanced maternal age, PCOS, thyroid disease, and uterine fibroids, predispose to adverse outcomes. However, imprinting abnormalities do not appear to stem from multiple births, and thus the need to consider the association between fertility treatment and methylation disorders remains essential. These, as well as risks of multi-fetal gestation, must be discussed with patients when considering using assisted reproduction.

  8. Adverse Environments and Children's Creativity Development: Transforming the Notion of "Success in Adversity" in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Li; Tan, Mei; Liu, Zhengkui

    2015-01-01

    China has been undergoing great social change due to its new focus on urbanization and globalization. Such change has had a tremendous adverse impact on the living conditions of millions of young children, simultaneously generating new interest in children's creativity development. The intersection of these two issues has important implications…

  9. Impact of GLP-1 Receptor Agonists on Major Gastrointestinal Disorders for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Mixed Treatment Comparison Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Feng; Yu, Kai; Yang, Zhirong; Wu, Shanshan; Zhang, Yuan; Shi, Luwen; Ji, Linong; Zhan, Siyan

    2012-01-01

    Aim. We aimed to integrate evidence from all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and assess the impact of different doses of exenatide or liraglutide on major gastrointestinal adverse events (GIAEs) in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods. RCTs evaluating different doses of exenatide and liraglutide against placebo or an active comparator with treatment duration ≥4 weeks were searched and reviewed. A total of 35, 32 and 28 RCTs met the selection criteria evaluated for nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, respectively. Pairwise random-effects meta-analyses and mixed treatment comparisons (MTC) of all RCTs were performed. Results. All GLP-1 dose groups significantly increased the probability of nausea, vomiting and diarrhea relative to placebo and conventional treatment. MTC meta-analysis showed that there was 99.2% and 85.0% probability, respectively, that people with exenatide 10 μg twice daily (EX10BID) was more vulnerable to nausea and vomiting than those with other treatments. There was a 78.90% probability that liraglutide 1.2 mg once daily (LIR1.2) has a higher risk of diarrhea than other groups. A dose-dependent relationship of exenatide and liraglutide on GIAEs was observed. Conclusions. Our MTC meta-analysis suggests that patients should be warned about these GIAEs in early stage of treatment by GLP-1s, especially by EX10BID and LIR1.2, to promote treatment compliance. PMID:23365557

  10. [Major depression in primary care and clinical impacts of treatment strategies: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Beaucage, Clément; Cardinal, Lise; Kavanagh, Mélanie; Aubé, Denise

    2009-01-01

    Major or clinical depression represents a frequent mental illness that is often associated with a high level of morbidity and mortality. Yet, major depression remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. On the level of treatment, it would appear desirable for reasons of better prognosis, to aim more than the simple reduction of depressive symptoms and target their remission resolutely and the fastest return to the individual's optimal functioning. This article presents a systematic review of the literature relating to the clinical impacts of treatment strategies aiming at the improvement of services offered to people who suffer of clinical depression and who consult in primary care. The authors summarize results drawn from 41 studies that include a measurement of the clinical impacts (reduction of symptoms, response, remission and functioning) of various treatment strategies. It appears that using complex treatment strategies favour positive outcomes. The authors propose various paths of research to further increase current knowledge.

  11. Alimentation impact of treatments of 254 oropharyngeal cancers (1998-2003).

    PubMed

    Buiret, Guillaume; Daveau, Clémentine; Landry, Guillaume; Colin, Carole; Pignat, Jean-Christian; Poupart, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the functional impact of the various possible treatments of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas to find the main prognostic factors of dysphagia induced by these treatments. Patients. Clinical data from 254 patients treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx between 1998 and 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. A multivariate model enabled us to evaluate the role of each potentially harmful factor on swallowing. Main Outcome Measures. The significant factors influencing the consumption of liquid, pasty, and normal food were the same: the initial T stage and the type of treatment. Conclusion. Whatever the possible and selected treatment was, the impact on the functional capacities, and thus, the quality of life of the patients was considerable. Even though we could not significantly demonstrate exclusive radiotherapy caused more long-term undesirable effects than surgery followed by radiotherapy, our daily practice has shown that we should favour the latter.

  12. Impact of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on the Levels of Placental Growth Factor (PlGF) and Their Value for Predicting Short-Term Adverse Outcomes in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Barcelo, Antonia; Bauça, Josep Miquel; Yañez, Aina; Fueyo, Laura; Gomez, Cristina; de la Peña, Monica; Pierola, Javier; Rodriguez, Alberto; Sanchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Abad, Jorge; Mediano, Olga; Amilibia, Jose; Masdeu, Maria Jose; Teran, Joaquin; Montserrat, Josep Maria; Mayos, Mercè; Sanchez-de-la-Torre, Alicia; Barbé, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Background Placental growth factor (PlGF) induces angiogenesis and promotes tissue repair, and plasma PlGF levels change markedly during acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Currently, the impact of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients with AMI is a subject of debate. Our objective was to evaluate the relationships between PlGF levels and both the severity of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and short-term outcomes after ACS in patients with and without OSA. Methods A total of 538 consecutive patients (312 OSA patients and 226 controls) admitted for ACS were included in this study. All patients underwent polygraphy in the first 72 hours after hospital admission. The severity of disease and short-term prognoses were evaluated during the hospitalization period. Plasma PlGF levels were measured using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Results Patients with OSA were significantly older and more frequently hypertensive and had higher BMIs than those without OSA. After adjusting for age, smoking status, BMI and hypertension, PlGF levels were significantly elevated in patients with OSA compared with patients without OSA (19.9 pg/mL, interquartile range: 16.6–24.5 pg/mL; 18.5 pg/mL, interquartile range: 14.7–22.7 pg/mL; p<0.001), and a higher apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was associated with higher PlGF concentrations (p<0.003). Patients with higher levels of PlGF had also an increased odds ratio for the presence of 3 or more diseased vessels and for a Killip score>1, even after adjustment. Conclusions The results of this study show that in patients with ACS, elevated plasma levels of PlGF are associated with the presence of OSA and with adverse outcomes during short-term follow-up. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01335087 PMID:26930634

  13. Adverse consequences of immunostimulation.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The therapeutic uses of immunostimulatory agents are generally in the treatments of infections or cancer. The traditional example of vaccination is one form of immunostimulation used in the prevention of pathogenic infections or cancer (e.g., human papillomavirus vaccine). Recombinant cytokines are increasingly used to stimulate immune system function. For example, interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) and interleukin (IL)-2 have been used to treat chronic hepatitis C virus infection and metastatic melanoma, respectively. In contrast, monoclonal antibodies are used to target malignant cells for elimination via antibody-dependent cytotoxicity mechanisms or apoptosis, including the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-CD56 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab used in the treatment of B-cell malignancies, and the anti-erb2 receptor antibody trastuzumab used in the treatment of breast cancer. Finally, immunostimulation may develop via modulation of pathways involved in immune system regulation. For example, the anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody TGN1412 was developed as an agonist of regulatory T-cells for treatment of T-cell-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases or leukemias. A panel was convened to discuss potential toxicities associated with immunostimulation. At the Immunotoxicology IV meeting in 2006, a panel, moderated by Dr. Robert House (Dynport Vaccine Co., Frederick, MD), included Drs. Gary Burleson (Burleson Research Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, NC), Kenneth Hastings (US FDA, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research [CDER], Rockville, MD), Barbara Mounho (Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA), Rafael Ponce (ZymoGenetics, Inc., Seattle, WA), Mark Wing (Huntington Life Sciences, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom), Lauren Black (Navigators Consulting, Sparks, NV) and Anne Pilaro (US FDA, CDER, Rockville, MD). This paper reviews the major identified toxicities associated with immunostimulation, including the acute phase response, cell and tissue abnormalities/injury, cytokine

  14. [Impacts of alkaline thermal treatment on characteristics of sludge from sewage treatment plant].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Dong; Chen, Xia; Liu, Cao; Xiao, Ben-Yi

    2015-02-01

    Alkaline thermal treatment is an important pretreatment method for sewage sludge. In this paper, in order to optimize the alkaline thermal treatment conditions for sludge pretreatment, four pretreatment parameters ( sludge concentration, pH, temperature and treatment time) were investigated through orthogonal experiments to determine their effects on the sludge disintegration, sludge concentration and sludge morphology of sewage sludge. The experimental results showed that the significance of the four factors on sludge characteristics was in the order of pH > temperature > treatment time > sludge concentration. Additionally, the optimal conditions of the four factors for the release of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of unit sludge and decrease of sludge concentration were as follows: 36.55 g x L(-1), pH 12.45, 175 degrees C and 60 min. While the optimal conditions for the decrease of particle size and fractal dimension were 36.55 g x L(-1), pH 12.5, 175 degrees C and 45 min.

  15. NEW INSIGHTS INTO LEAD AND COPPER CORROSION CONTROL AND TREATMENT CHANGE IMPACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation summarizes recent research into the chemistry of lead corrosion control, and focus on different areas that could impact the prediction of whether or not particular treatment changes are likely to either disturb existing lead corrosion scales, or to actually impr...

  16. Structure fragmentation of a surface layer of commercial purity titanium during ultrasonic impact treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kozelskaya, Anna Kazachenok, Marina Sinyakova, Elena Pochivalov, Yurii Perevalova, Olga; Panin, Alexey Hairullin, Rustam

    2015-10-27

    The mechanisms of surface layer fragmentation of titanium specimens subjected to ultrasonic impact treatment is investigated by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. It is shown that the twin boundaries Σ7b and Σ11b are unable to be strong obstacles for propagation of dislocations and other twins.

  17. The Co-Occurrence of Reading Disorder and ADHD: Epidemiology, Treatment, Psychosocial Impact, and Economic Burden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Chris C.; Gelhorn, Heather L.; Bell, Jill A.; Classi, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The co-occurrence of reading disorder (RD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has received increasing attention. This review summarizes the epidemiology, treatment strategies, psychosocial impact, and economic burden associated with the co-occurrence of these conditions. Common genetic and neuropsychological deficits may partially…

  18. Impact of Fecal Incontinence and Its Treatment on Quality of Life in Women

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Holly E.

    2015-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a physically and psychosocially debilitating disorder which negatively impacts quality of life (QOL). It bears a significant burden not only on patients but also on their families, caretakers, as well as society as a whole. Even though it is considered a somewhat common condition, especially as women age, the prevalence is often underestimated due to patients’ reluctance to report symptoms or seek care. The evaluation and treatment of FI can be also hindered by lack of understanding of the current management options among healthcare providers and how they impact on QOL. This article provides a comprehensive review on the impact of FI and its treatment on QOL in women. PMID:25776296

  19. Impact of bromide on halogen incorporation into organic moieties in chlorinated drinking water treatment and distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Tan, J; Allard, S; Gruchlik, Y; McDonald, S; Joll, C A; Heitz, A

    2016-01-15

    The impact of elevated bromide concentrations (399 to 750 μg/L) on the formation of halogenated disinfection by-products (DBPs), namely trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, and adsorbable organic halogen (AOX), in two drinking water systems was investigated. Bromine was the main halogen incorporated into all of the DBP classes and into organic carbon, even though chlorine was present in large excess to maintain a disinfectant residual. Due to the higher reactivity of bromine compared to chlorine, brominated DBPs were rapidly formed, followed by a slower increase in chlorinated DBPs. Higher bromine substitution and incorporation factors for individual DBP classes were observed for the chlorinated water from the groundwater source (lower concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC)), which contained a higher concentration of bromide, than for the surface water source (higher DOC). The molar distribution of adsorbable organic bromine to chlorine (AOBr/AOCl) for AOX in the groundwater distribution system was 1.5:1 and almost 1:1 for the surface water system. The measured (regulated) DBPs only accounted for 16 to 33% of the total organic halogen, demonstrating that AOX measurements are essential to provide a full understanding of the formation of halogenated DBPs in drinking waters. In addition, the study demonstrated that a significant proportion (up to 94%) of the bromide in source waters can be converted AOBr. An evaluation of AOBr and AOCl through a second groundwater treatment plant that uses conventional treatment processes for DOC removal produced 70% of AOX as AOBr, with 69% of the initial source water bromide converted to AOBr. Exposure to organobromine compounds is suspected to result in greater adverse health consequences than their chlorinated analogues. Therefore, this study highlights the need for improved methods to selectively reduce the bromide content in source waters.

  20. Adverse Reactions to Hallucinogenic Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E. , Ed.

    This reports a conference of psychologists, psychiatrists, geneticists and others concerned with the biological and psychological effects of lysergic acid diethylamide and other hallucinogenic drugs. Clinical data are presented on adverse drug reactions. The difficulty of determining the causes of adverse reactions is discussed, as are different…

  1. How do disease perception, treatment features, and dermatologist–patient relationship impact on patients assuming topical treatment? An Italian survey

    PubMed Central

    Burroni, Anna Graziella; Fassino, Mariella; Torti, Antonio; Visentin, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Background Psoriasis largely affects daily activities and social interactions and has a strong impact on patients’ quality of life. Psoriatic patients have different attitudes toward their condition. Topical medications are essential for the treatment of psoriasis, but the majority of patients do not adhere to these therapies. Objective The history of treatment success or failure seems to influence patient attitude toward topical therapy. Therefore, it is important to understand the psychological, experiential, and motivational aspects that could be critical for treatment adherence, and to describe the different attitudes toward topical treatment. Furthermore, the physician–patient relationship and the willingness to trust the dermatologist may have a substantial role in encouraging or discouraging patients’ attitudes toward topical therapy. Methods A survey was designed to collect aspects that could be relevant to understanding different patient attitudes toward psoriasis and its treatments. A total of 495 self-administered questionnaires compiled by psoriatic patients were analyzed from 20 Italian specialized hospital centers in order to provide a nationwide picture. Results Psoriatic patients have different perceptions and experiences in relation to their condition: half of them consider psoriasis as a disease, while the other half consider psoriasis as a disorder or a nuisance. Topical therapy is the most widely used treatment, even though it is not considered the most effective one and often perceived to be cosmetic. The main findings are: 1) inadequate patient education about this disease, 2) lack of information about topical treatment, and 3) lack of results within the expected time frame. Furthermore, physicians need to build a good relationship with psoriatic patients in order to motivate them, to trust in their care, and to adhere to treatment. Conclusion This survey adds new and important details about daily life and well-being and the needs of

  2. Clinicians' recognition of the metabolic adverse effects of antipsychotic medications.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Peter F; Miller, Del D; Singer, Beth; Arena, John; Stirewalt, Edna M

    2005-11-15

    There is a growing concern regarding the propensity of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) to induce weight gain and metabolic adverse effects. Recent consensus guidelines have recommended assessment and monitoring procedures to appropriately detect and manage these adverse effects. This study addresses the appreciation and readiness of clinicians to implement management guidelines for these adverse effects. Respondents indicated awareness of the risks of treatment with SGAs. The extent of monitoring for metabolic adverse effects was low and inconsistent across measures and in frequency of evaluation. Ongoing efforts are needed to support and encourage change in clinician practice.

  3. Impact of active ingredients on the swelling properties of orally disintegrating tablets prepared by microwave treatment.

    PubMed

    Sano, Syusuke; Iwao, Yasunori; Kimura, Susumu; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2014-07-01

    The impact of different active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) loading on the properties of orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs) prepared according to our previously reported microwave (MW) treatment process was evaluated using famotidine (FAM), acetaminophen (AAP), and ibuprofen (IBU). None of the APIs interrupted the tablet swelling during the MW treatment and the tablet hardness were improved by more than 20 N. MW treatment, however, led to a significant increase in the disintegration time of the ODTs containing IBU, but it had no impact on that of the ODTs containing FAM or AAP. This increased disintegration time of the ODTs containing IBU was attributed to the relatively low melting point of IBU (Tm=76 °C), with the IBU particles melting during the MW treatment to form agglomerates, which interrupted the penetration of water into the tablets and delayed their disintegration. The effects of the MW treatment on the chemical stability and dissolution properties of ODTs were also evaluated. The results revealed that MW treatment did not promote the degradations of FAM and AAP or delay their release from the ODTs, while dissolution of the ODTs containing IBU delayed by MW treatment. Based on these results, the MW method would be applicable to the preparation of ODTs containing APIs with melting points higher than 110 °C.

  4. Impact of trauma and surgical treatment on the quality of life of patients with facial fractures.

    PubMed

    Conforte, J J; Alves, C P; Sánchez, M del P R; Ponzoni, D

    2016-05-01

    This study assessed the impact of oral and maxillofacial trauma and surgical treatment on the quality of life of patients. The study included 66 patients (age range 18-65 years) with facial fractures; 33 required surgical treatment and 33 required conservative (non-surgical) treatment. Quality of life was evaluated by applying the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-14) immediately after diagnosis of the trauma (T1), 30 days after surgery or trauma (T2), and 90 days after surgery or trauma (T3). For the control group (conservative treatment), there was a change in quality of life at T1 and T2. A change in quality of life was found for all of the surgical patients, regardless of the type of fracture and the observation period analyzed. There was no statistical difference when T1, T2, and T3 were compared in cases of zygomatic, Le Fort I, and nasal fractures, however there was an improvement in the quality of life of patients with mandibular fractures (P=0.0102) and multiple facial fractures (P=0.0097) at T3. Facial trauma caused the greatest impact on the quality of life of surgical patients at T1. The surgical treatment significantly improved quality of life for patients with mandibular and multiple facial fractures.

  5. Ecotoxicological impact of two soil remediation treatments in Lactuca sativa seeds.

    PubMed

    Rede, Diana; Santos, Lúcia H M L M; Ramos, Sandra; Oliva-Teles, Filipe; Antão, Cristina; Sousa, Susana R; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Pharmaceuticals have been identified as environmental emerging pollutants and are present in different compartments, including soils. Chemical remediation showed to be a good and suitable approach for soil remediation, though the knowledge in their impact for terrestrial organisms is still limited. Therefore, in this work, two different chemical remediation treatments (Fenton oxidation and nanoremediation) were applied to a soil contaminated with an environmental representative concentration of ibuprofen (3 ng g(-1)). The phytotoxic impact of a traditional soil remediation treatment (Fenton oxidation) and of a new and more sustainable approach for soil remediation (nanoremediation using green nano-scale zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVIs)) was evaluated in Lactuca sativa seeds. Percentage of seed germination, root elongation, shoot length and leaf length were considered as endpoints to assess the possible acute phytotoxicity of the soil remediation treatments as well as of the ibuprofen contaminated soil. Both chemical remediation treatments showed to have a negative impact in the germination and development of lettuce seeds, exhibiting a reduction up to 45% in the percentage of seed germination and a decrease around 80% in root elongation comparatively to the contaminated soil. These results indicate that chemical soil remediation treatments could be more prejudicial for terrestrial organisms than contaminated soils.

  6. The impact of HIV treatment-related stigma on uptake of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cama, Elena; Brener, Loren; Slavin, Sean; de Wit, John

    2015-01-01

    HIV-related stigma has been linked to avoidance of health care services and suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, less is known about concerns of stigma related specifically to the taking of ART in uptake of treatment. This study examines experiences of HIV treatment-related stigma and assesses if these experiences are associated with ART uptake, independent of general HIV-related stigma. People living with HIV (PLHIV; n = 697) were targeted to complete an online questionnaire measuring perceived HIV- and treatment-related stigma, social support, self-esteem, resilience, psychological distress, health satisfaction and quality of life. Findings suggest that experiences of general and treatment-related stigma were common, and that participants appear to experience greater stigma related to taking HIV treatment than general stigma associated with HIV. Neither general nor treatment-related stigma uniquely impacted HIV treatment uptake. Instead, treatment uptake was associated with being older (adjusted OR 1.05; 95% CIs: 1.03, 1.08), greater duration of HIV infection (adjusted OR 1.07; 95% CIs: 1.03-1.11) and having greater health satisfaction (adjusted OR 1.28; 95% CIs: 1.03, 1.59). Findings highlight that concerns around taking HIV treatment can be an added source of stigma for PLHIV, however other factors may be greater contributors to the likelihood of taking HIV treatment.

  7. The role of antiparasite treatment experiments in assessing the impact of parasites on wildlife.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Amy B; Fenton, Andy

    2015-05-01

    It has become increasingly clear that parasites can have significant impacts on the dynamics of wildlife populations. Recently, researchers have shifted from using observational approaches to infer the impact of parasites on the health and fitness of individuals to using antiparasite drug treatments to test directly the consequences of infection. However, it is not clear the extent to which these experiments work in wildlife systems, or whether the results of these individual-level treatment experiments can predict the population-level consequences of parasitism. Here, we assess the results of treatment experiments, laying out the benefits and limitations of this approach, and discuss how they can be used to improve our understanding of the role of parasites in wildlife populations.

  8. Impact of a Daily SMS Medication Reminder System on Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Shama; Glennerster, Rachel; Khan, Aamir J.

    2016-01-01

    Importance The rapid uptake of mobile phones in low and middle-income countries over the past decade has provided public health programs unprecedented access to patients. While programs have used text messages to improve medication adherence, there have been no high-powered trials evaluating their impact on tuberculosis treatment outcomes. Objective To measure the impact of Zindagi SMS, a two-way SMS reminder system, on treatment success of people with drug-sensitive tuberculosis. Design We conducted a two-arm, parallel design, effectiveness randomized controlled trial in Karachi, Pakistan. Individual participants were randomized to either Zindagi SMS or the control group. Zindagi SMS sent daily SMS reminders to participants and asked them to respond through SMS or missed (unbilled) calls after taking their medication. Non-respondents were sent up to three reminders a day. Setting Public and private sector tuberculosis clinics in Karachi, Pakistan. Participants Newly-diagnosed patients with smear or bacteriologically positive pulmonary tuberculosis who were on treatment for less than two weeks; 15 years of age or older; reported having access to a mobile phone; and intended to live in Karachi throughout treatment were eligible to participate. We enrolled 2,207 participants, with 1,110 randomized to Zindagi SMS and 1,097 to the control group. Main Outcome The primary outcome was clinically recorded treatment success based upon intention-to-treat. Results We found no significant difference between the Zindagi SMS or control groups for treatment success (719 or 83% vs. 903 or 83%, respectively, p = 0·782). There was no significant program effect on self-reported medication adherence reported during unannounced visits during treatment. Conclusion In this large-scale randomized controlled effectiveness trial of SMS medication reminders for tuberculosis treatment, we found no significant impact. Trial Registration The trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT

  9. Impact of Aetiological Treatment on Conventional and Multiplex Serology in Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Viotti, Rodolfo; Vigliano, Carlos; Álvarez, María Gabriela; Lococo, Bruno; Petti, Marcos; Bertocchi, Graciela; Armenti, Alejandro; De Rissio, Ana María; Cooley, Gretchen; Tarleton, Rick; Laucella, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Background The main criterion for treatment effectiveness in Chagas Disease has been the seronegative conversion, achieved many years post-treatment. One of the main limitations in evaluating treatment for chronic Chagas disease is the lack of reliable tests to ensure parasite clearance and to examine the effects of treatment. However, declines in conventional serological titers and a new multiplex assay can be useful tools to monitor early the treatment impact. Methodology/Principal Findings Changes in antibody levels, including seronegative conversion as well as declines in titers, were serially measured in 53 benznidazole-treated and 89 untreated chronic patients in Buenos Aires, Argentina with a median follow-up of 36 months. Decrease of titers (34/53 [64%] treated vs. 19/89 [21%] untreated, p<0.001) and seronegative conversion (21/53, [40%] treated vs. 6/89, [7%] untreated, p<0.001) in at least one conventional serological test were significantly higher in the benznidazole-treated group compare with the untreated group. When not only complete seronegative conversion but also seronegative conversion on 2 tests and the decreases of titers on 2 or 3 tests were considered, the impact of treatment on conventional serology increased from 21% (11/53 subjects) to 45% (24/53 subjects). A strong concordance was found between the combination of conventional serologic tests and multiplex assay (kappa index 0.60) to detect a decrease in antibody levels pos-treatment. Conclusions/Significance Treatment with benznidazole in subjects with chronic Chagas disease has a major impact on the serology specific for T. cruzi infection in a shorter follow-up period than previously considered, reflected either by a complete or partial seronegative conversion or by a significant decrease in the levels of T. cruzi antibodies, consistent with a possible elimination or reduction of parasite load. PMID:21909451

  10. Impact of Community-Based HIV/AIDS Treatment on Household Incomes in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Feulefack, Joseph F.; Luckert, Martin K.; Mohapatra, Sandeep; Cash, Sean B.; Alibhai, Arif; Kipp, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Though health benefits to households in developing countries from antiretroviral treatment (ART) programs are widely reported in the literature, specific estimates regarding impacts of treatments on household incomes are rare. This type of information is important to governments and donors, as it is an indication of returns to their ART investments, and to better understand the role of HIV/AIDS in development. The objective of this study is to estimate the impact of a community-based ART program on household incomes in a previously underserved rural region of Uganda. A community-based ART program, based largely on labor contributions from community volunteers, was implemented and evaluated. All households with HIV/AIDS patients enrolled in the treatment programme (n = 134 households) were surveyed five times; once at the beginning of the treatment and every three months thereafter for a period of one year. Data were collected on household income from cash earnings and value of own production. The analysis, using ordinary least squares and quantile regressions, identifies the impact of the ART program on household incomes over the first year of the treatment, while controlling for heterogeneity in household characteristics and temporal changes. As a result of the treatment, health conditions of virtually all patients improved, and household incomes increased by approximately 30% to 40%, regardless of household income quantile. These increases in income, however, varied significantly depending on socio-demographic and socio-economic control variables. Overall, results show large and significant impacts of the ART program on household incomes, suggesting large returns to public investments in ART, and that treating HIV/AIDS is an important precondition for development. Moreover, development programs that invest in human capital and build wealth are important complements that can increase the returns to ART programs. PMID:23840347

  11. Treatment of biodiversity issues in impact assessment of electricity power transmission lines: A Finnish case review

    SciTech Connect

    Soederman, Tarja . E-mail: tarja.soderman@ymparisto.fi

    2006-05-15

    The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) process concerning the route of a 400 kV power transmission line between Loviisa and Hikiae in southern Finland was reviewed in order to assess how biodiversity issues are treated and to provide suggestions on how to improve the effectiveness of treatment of biodiversity issues in impact assessment of linear development projects. The review covered the whole assessment process, including interviews of stakeholders, participation in the interest group meetings and review of all documents from the project. The baseline studies and assessment of direct impacts in the case study were detailed but the documentation, both the assessment programme and the assessment report, only gave a partial picture of the assessment process. All existing information, baseline survey and assessment methods should be addressed in the scoping phase in order to promote interaction between all stakeholders. In contrast to the assessment of the direct effects, which first emphasized impacts on the nationally important and protected flying squirrel but later expanded to deal with the assessment of impacts on ecologically important sites, the indirect and cumulative impacts of the power line were poorly addressed. The public was given the opportunity to become involved in the EIA process. However, they were more concerned with impacts on their properties and less so on biodiversity and species protection issues. This suggests that the public needs to become more informed about locally important features of biodiversity.

  12. Diagnosis of potential stressors adversely affecting benthic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Greenwich Bay is an urbanized embayment of Narragansett Bay potentially impacted by multiple stressors. The present study identified the important stressors affecting Greenwich Bay benthic fauna. First, existing data and information were used to confirm that the waterbody was impaired. Second, the presence of source, stressor, and effect were established. Then linkages between source, stressor, and effect were developed. This allows identification of probable stressors adversely affecting the waterbody. Three pollutant categories were assessed: chemicals, nutrients, and suspended sediments. This weight of evidence approach indicated that Greenwich Bay was primarily impacted by eutrophication-related stressors. The sediments of Greenwich Bay were carbon enriched and low dissolved oxygen concentrations were commonly seen, especially in the western portions of Greenwich Bay. The benthic community was depauperate, as would be expected under oxygen stress. Although our analysis indicated that contaminant loads in Greenwich Bay were at concentrations where adverse effects might be expected, no toxicity was observed, as a result of high levels of organic carbon in these sediments reducing contaminant bioavailability. Our analysis also indicated that suspended sediment impacts were likely nonexistent for much of the Bay. This analysis demonstrates that the diagnostic procedure was useful to organize and assess the potential stressors impacting the ecological well-being

  13. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Disordered Gambling: Assessing the Mediating Role of Emotion Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Poole, Julia C; Kim, Hyoun S; Dobson, Keith S; Hodgins, David C

    2017-03-03

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), such as sexual and physical abuse, have been established as risk factors for the development of disordered gambling. The underlying mechanism by which ACEs influence disordered gambling, however, remains unknown. The aims of the present research were to comprehensively investigate ten types of childhood adversity and their relationships to disordered gambling in adulthood, and to test whether emotion dysregulation mediated the relationship between ACEs and disordered gambling. A sample of community gamblers (N = 414) completed self-report measures of ACEs, emotion dysregulation, and gambling severity. Results revealed a significant association between all but one type (physical abuse) of ACEs and disordered gambling. Further, the results highlighted the cumulative impact of ACEs on gambling. Specifically, individuals who experienced three or more types of ACEs were more than three times as likely to report disordered gambling as compared to individuals with no history of childhood adversity. Importantly, as hypothesized, emotion dysregulation mediated the relationship between ACEs and disordered gambling. Findings from this research describe the association between ACEs and gambling and indicate a causal link between childhood adversity and disordered gambling. Results suggest that treatment initiatives may do well to address both ACEs and emotion dysregulation in the treatment of problem gambling.

  14. Ultrasonic Impact Treatment to Improve Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Gou, G.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, H.; Yang, Y. P.

    2016-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the major issues for welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy in high-speed trains. High residual stress in the welded joints under corrosion results in stress corrosion cracking. Ultrasonic impact treatment was used to control the residual stress of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy. Experimental tests show that ultrasonic impact treatment can induce compressive longitudinal and transverse residual stress in the welded joint, harden the surface, and increase the tensile strength of welded joints. Salt-fog corrosion tests were conducted for both an as-welded sample and an ultrasonic impact-treated sample. The surface of the treated sample had far fewer corrosion pits than that of the untreated sample. The treated sample has higher strength and lower tensile residual stress than the untreated sample during corrosion. Therefore, ultrasonic impact treatment is an effective technique to improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy.

  15. How Does Scale of Implementation Impact the Environmental Sustainability of Wastewater Treatment Integrated with Resource Recovery?

    PubMed

    Cornejo, Pablo K; Zhang, Qiong; Mihelcic, James R

    2016-07-05

    Energy and resource consumptions required to treat and transport wastewater have led to efforts to improve the environmental sustainability of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Resource recovery can reduce the environmental impact of these systems; however, limited research has considered how the scale of implementation impacts the sustainability of WWTPs integrated with resource recovery. Accordingly, this research uses life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate how the scale of implementation impacts the environmental sustainability of wastewater treatment integrated with water reuse, energy recovery, and nutrient recycling. Three systems were selected: a septic tank with aerobic treatment at the household scale, an advanced water reclamation facility at the community scale, and an advanced water reclamation facility at the city scale. Three sustainability indicators were considered: embodied energy, carbon footprint, and eutrophication potential. This study determined that as with economies of scale, there are benefits to centralization of WWTPs with resource recovery in terms of embodied energy and carbon footprint; however, the community scale was shown to have the lowest eutrophication potential. Additionally, technology selection, nutrient control practices, system layout, and topographical conditions may have a larger impact on environmental sustainability than the implementation scale in some cases.

  16. Beyond reducing fire hazard: fuel treatment impacts on overstory tree survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Brandon M.; Das, Adrian J.; Battles, John J.; Fry, Danny L.; Krasnow, Kevin D.; Stephens, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    Fuel treatment implementation in dry forest types throughout the western United States is likely to increase in pace and scale in response to increasing incidence of large wildfires. While it is clear that properly implemented fuel treatments are effective at reducing hazardous fire potential, there are ancillary ecological effects that can impact forest resilience either positively or negatively depending on the specific elements examined, as well as treatment type, timing, and intensity. In this study, we use overstory tree growth responses, measured seven years after the most common fuel treatments, to estimate forest health. Across the five species analyzed, observed mortality and future vulnerability were consistently low in the mechanical-only treatment. Fire-only was similar to the control for all species except Douglas-fir, while mechanical-plus-fire had high observed mortality and future vulnerability for white fir and sugar pine. Given that overstory trees largely dictate the function of forests and services they provide (e.g., wildlife habitat, carbon sequestration, soil stability) these results have implications for understanding longer-term impacts of common fuel treatments on forest resilience.

  17. The impact of the therapeutic alliance on treatment outcome in patients with dissociative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Elisabeth; Brand, Bethany L.; Mattanah, Jonathan F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Research has shown that the therapeutic alliance plays an important role in enhancing treatment outcome among individuals with a variety of disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the therapeutic alliance and treatment outcome has not yet been studied in dissociative disorders (DD). Objectives The current study sought to investigate the impact of alliance on treatment outcome for DD patients. Methods Data from a naturalistic, longitudinal international treatment study of DD patients and their therapists were analyzed to determine if the alliance, as reported by patients and therapists, was associated with treatment outcome. Results Patients with higher self-rated alliance had fewer symptoms of dissociation, PTSD, and general distress, as well as higher levels of therapist-rated adaptive functioning. Over time, self-rated alliance scores predicted better outcomes, after controlling for patient adaptive capacities including symptom management at the time when the alliance ratings were made. Patient-rated alliance was more strongly associated with outcome than therapist-rated alliance. Conclusion Therapists who work with DD patients should understand the importance of the alliance on treatment outcome. These findings are consistent with previous literature demonstrating the importance of developing and maintaining a strong therapeutic alliance, although the effect sizes of individuals with DD were stronger than what has been found in many other patient groups. A greater understanding of the impact of the alliance in traumatized individuals may contribute to better outcomes for these individuals. PMID:24616755

  18. Impact of comorbidity on treatment outcome in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bøje, Charlotte Rotbøl

    2014-01-01

    The significant association with tobacco and alcohol combined with advanced age at time of diagnosis predispose head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients to increased risk of comorbidities. The presence of comorbidity affects treatment, treatment selection and subsequent outcome. Multiple studies have demonstrated comorbidity to be a strong prognostic factor for survival, and therefore comorbidity can be a major confounder in clinical trials. This review provides a summary of the current literature on comorbidity in head and neck cancer, measurements of comorbidity, the impact of comorbidity on treatment, treatment selection, and survival. A systematic search was performed in six electronic databases. In all, 31 papers were selected for this review. A meta-analysis on the prognostic impact of comorbidity was performed including 10 studies. Furthermore, 21 studies concerning comorbidity were reviewed. Several valid indices to classify comorbidity were described in the literature, none proven to be superior over the other. The prevalence of comorbidity increased with age and the presence of comorbidity influenced treatment and treatment selection. Furthermore, comorbidity was associated with lower socio economic status and increased the risk of early retirement after treatment. The meta-analysis on comorbidity as a prognostic factor, including 22,932 patients, showed that overall survival was significantly worsened among patients with comorbidity (HR=1.38 (1.32-1.43)). Increasing comorbidity-score was associated with increased risk of death. Comorbidity is important in HNSCC and significantly impacts on overall survival. Trials concerning HNSCC should always include information on comorbidity and randomized trials should stratify patients according to comorbidity in order to avoid bias in the study.

  19. 40 CFR 125.94 - How will requirements reflecting best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact be established for my Phase II existing... environmental impact be established for my Phase II existing facility? (a) Compliance alternatives. You must... for minimizing adverse environmental impact at your facility: (1)(i)You may demonstrate to...

  20. 40 CFR 125.94 - How will requirements reflecting best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact be established for my Phase II existing... environmental impact be established for my Phase II existing facility? (a) Compliance alternatives. You must... for minimizing adverse environmental impact at your facility: (1)(i)You may demonstrate to...

  1. 40 CFR 125.94 - How will requirements reflecting best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact be established for my Phase II existing... environmental impact be established for my Phase II existing facility? (a) Compliance alternatives. You must... for minimizing adverse environmental impact at your facility: (1)(i)You may demonstrate to...

  2. Potential Impact of Diet on Treatment Effect from Anti-TNF Drugs in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Vibeke; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2017-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the current knowledge on the impact of diet on anti-TNF response in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), to identify dietary factors that warrant further investigations in relation to anti-TNF treatment response, and, finally, to discuss potential strategies for such investigations. PubMed was searched using specified search terms. One small prospective study on diet and anti-TNF treatment in 56 patients with CD found similar remission rates after 56 weeks among 32 patients with good compliance that received concomitant enteral nutrition and 24 with poor compliance that had no dietary restrictions (78% versus 67%, p = 0.51). A meta-analysis of 295 patients found higher odds of achieving clinical remission and remaining in clinical remission among patients on combination therapy with specialised enteral nutrition and Infliximab (IFX) compared with IFX monotherapy (OR 2.73; 95% CI: 1.73–4.31, p < 0.01, OR 2.93; 95% CI: 1.66–5.17, p < 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, evidence-based knowledge on impact of diet on anti-TNF treatment response for clinical use is scarce. Here we propose a mechanism by which Western style diet high in meat and low in fibre may promote colonic inflammation and potentially impact treatment response to anti-TNF drugs. Further studies using hypothesis-driven and data-driven strategies in prospective observational, animal and interventional studies are warranted. PMID:28294972

  3. Therapeutic impact of CT-guided percutaneous catheter drainage in treatment of deep tissue abscesses.

    PubMed

    Asai, Nobuhiro; Ohkuni, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Ikuo; Kaneko, Norihiro; Aoshima, Masahiro; Kawamura, Yasutaka

    2013-01-01

    Combination therapy of CT-guided percutaneous drainage and antibiotics is the first-line treatment for abscesses. Its effectiveness has been demonstrated. However, the therapeutic impact of this procedure for infection treatment has never been reported. We retrospectively analyzed all 47 patients who received CT-guided percutaneous drainage for infection treatment. Patients' characteristics, pathogens isolated, antibiotics administered, technical and clinical outcomes, complications related to this procedure and therapeutic impacts were investigated. Patients were 26 males and 21 females. The mean age was 63.5 years (±18.7). The diseases targeted were 19 retroperitoneal abscesses, 18 intra-abdominal abscesses, three pelvic abscesses, and seven others. As for technical outcomes, all of the 54 procedures (100%) were successful. As for clinical outcomes, 44 (93.6%) were cured and three patients (6.4%) died. No complications related to this procedure were found in this study. A total of 42 patients (88%) had a change in the management of their infection as a result of CT-guided percutaneous drainage, such as selection and discontinuation of antibiotics. In conclusion, CT-guided percutaneous drainage is a safe and favorable procedure in the treatment of deep tissue abscesses. Therapeutic impact of these procedures helped physicians make a rational decision for antibiotics selection.

  4. Evaluation of impact of steroid replacement treatment on bone health in children with 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Delvecchio, M; Soldano, L; Lonero, A; Ventura, A; Giordano, P; Cavallo, L; Grano, M; Brunetti, G; Faienza, M F

    2015-04-01

    There are conflicting data regarding the potential impact of chronic glucocorticoid (GC) therapy on the bone mineral density of patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Previous studies performed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry reported conflicting results. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of chronic GC replacement treatment in children with classical and non classical CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) by quantitative ultrasonometry (QUS), an easy, cheap, and radiation-free technique. The study population consisted of nineteen 21-OHD patients (nine males) on lifelong GC treatment. Anthropometric, hormonal, and treatment data were recorded for each patient, and bone quality was assessed by QUS measurements. QUS findings (amplitude-dependent speed of sound and bone transmission time) were normal in 21-OHD patients and did not correlate with duration of treatment, daily, total, and yearly hydrocortisone dose. Furthermore, no significant correlation was found between QUS findings and 17α-hydroxy progesterone, Δ4-androstenedione, and testosterone levels. In conclusion, our results provide reassurance that currently used replacement doses of GC do not have a major impact on bone in patients with CAH. QUS seems to be a reliable tool for screening of bone health in children with 21-OHD.

  5. Orthodontic Treatment of Malocclusion and its Impact on Oral Health-Related Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Jamilian, Abdolreza; Kiaee, Bita; Sanayei, Shabnam; Khosravi, Saeed; Perillo, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Malocclusion, though not life-threatening, has vast impact on individual’s social interactions and self-esteem. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to assess whether orthodontic treatment of adolescents with malocclusion had any association with their oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Methods: The subjects for this study were recruited at a state-funded university clinic. Data were collected from 100 participants aged 17 to 21 with moderate to severe malocclusion. Experimental group comprised of 50 subjects who were in the retention phase of their orthodontic treatment and the control group comprised of 50 untreated subjects. The shortened version of the Oral Health Impacts Profile (OHIP-14) as used to assess the subjects’ oral health-related impact. T-test, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann Whitney tests were used to analyze the data and p-value was set at P < 0.05. Results: In general, oral health-related quality of life of all subjects significantly improved after orthodontic treatment. (p<0.001) Subjects with moderate malocclusion showed better improvement than severe malocclusion subjects. (P<0.001) Conclusion: This study showed that oral health-related quality of life improves with the treatment of malocclusion. PMID:27386009

  6. Potential Impact of Diet on Treatment Effect from Anti-TNF Drugs in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Vibeke; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2017-03-15

    We wanted to investigate the current knowledge on the impact of diet on anti-TNF response in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), to identify dietary factors that warrant further investigations in relation to anti-TNF treatment response, and, finally, to discuss potential strategies for such investigations. PubMed was searched using specified search terms. One small prospective study on diet and anti-TNF treatment in 56 patients with CD found similar remission rates after 56 weeks among 32 patients with good compliance that received concomitant enteral nutrition and 24 with poor compliance that had no dietary restrictions (78% versus 67%, p = 0.51). A meta-analysis of 295 patients found higher odds of achieving clinical remission and remaining in clinical remission among patients on combination therapy with specialised enteral nutrition and Infliximab (IFX) compared with IFX monotherapy (OR 2.73; 95% CI: 1.73-4.31, p < 0.01, OR 2.93; 95% CI: 1.66-5.17, p < 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, evidence-based knowledge on impact of diet on anti-TNF treatment response for clinical use is scarce. Here we propose a mechanism by which Western style diet high in meat and low in fibre may promote colonic inflammation and potentially impact treatment response to anti-TNF drugs. Further studies using hypothesis-driven and data-driven strategies in prospective observational, animal and interventional studies are warranted.

  7. Swan Hills Special Waste Treatment Centre human health impact assessment. Volume 2: Technical appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    Appendices to a study of human health impacts of the Swan Hills Waste Treatment Centre in Alberta include: Background information on the Centre, including site characteristics, operational history, environmental incidents, and land use; protocols for sampling of locally obtained meat and fish; data on levels of polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins in meat and fish samples; protocols for human blood monitoring and sampling; congener profiles for deer, fish, and human blood samples; survey questionnaires and news releases related to possible impacts of a contaminant release from the Centre; and information on databases used.

  8. Swan Hills Special Waste Treatment Centre human health impact assessment. Volume 2: Technical appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1997-01-01

    Appendices to a study of human health impacts of the Swan Hills Waste Treatment Centre in Alberta include: Background information on the Centre, including site characteristics, operational history, environmental incidents, and land use; protocols for sampling of locally obtained meat and fish; data on levels of polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins in meat and fish samples; protocols for human blood monitoring and sampling; congener profiles for deer, fish, and human blood samples; survey questionnaires and news releases related to possible impacts of a contaminant release from the Centre; and information on databases used.

  9. Impact of metallic and metal oxide nanoparticles on wastewater treatment and anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Zhang, Chiqian; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Metallic and metal oxide nanomaterials have been increasingly used in consumer products (e.g. sunscreen, socks), the medical and electronic industries, and environmental remediation. Many of them ultimately enter wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) or landfills. This review paper discusses the fate and potential effects of four types of nanoparticles, namely, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), nano ZnO, nano TiO2, and nano zero valent iron (NZVI), on waste/wastewater treatment and anaerobic digestion. The stabilities and chemical properties of these nanoparticles (NPs) result in significant differences in antimicrobial activities. Analysis of published data of metallic and metal oxide NPs suggests that oxygen is often a prerequisite for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for AgNPs and NZVI, while illumination is necessary for ROS generation for nano TiO2 and nano ZnO. Furthermore, such nanoparticles are capable of being oxidized or dissolved in water and can release metal ions, leading to metal toxicity. Therefore, AgNPs and nano TiO2 are chemically stable NPs that have no adverse effects on microbes under anaerobic conditions. Although the toxicity of nanomaterials has been studied intensively under aerobic conditions, more research is needed to address their fate in anaerobic waste/wastewater treatment systems and their long-term effects on the environment.

  10. Association of diabetes and tuberculosis: impact on treatment and post-treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Corona, María Eugenia; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; García-García, Lourdes; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Bobadilla-del-Valle, Miriam; Canizales-Quintero, Sergio; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Téllez-Vázquez, Norma; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Mongua-Rodriguez, Norma; Martínez-Gamboa, Rosa Areli; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical consequences of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods We conducted a prospective study of patients with TB in Southern Mexico. From 1995 to 2010, patients with acid-fast bacilli or Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples underwent epidemiological, clinical and microbiological evaluation. Annual follow-ups were performed to ascertain treatment outcome, recurrence, relapse and reinfection. Results The prevalence of DM among 1262 patients with pulmonary TB was 29.63% (n=374). Patients with DM and pulmonary TB had more severe clinical manifestations (cavities of any size on the chest x-ray, adjusted OR (aOR) 1.80, 95% CI 1.35 to 2.41), delayed sputum conversion (aOR 1.51, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.10), a higher probability of treatment failure (aOR 2.93, 95% CI 1.18 to 7.23), recurrence (adjusted HR (aHR) 1.76, 95% CI 1.11 to 2.79) and relapse (aHR 1.83, 95% CI 1.04 to 3.23). Most of the second episodes among patients with DM were caused by bacteria with the same genotype but, in 5/26 instances (19.23%), reinfection with a different strain occurred. Conclusions Given the growing epidemic of DM worldwide, it is necessary to add DM prevention and control strategies to TB control programmes and vice versa and to evaluate their effectiveness. The concurrence of both diseases potentially carries a risk of global spreading, with serious implications for TB control and the achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. PMID:23250998

  11. Impact of proton beam availability on patient treatment schedule in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric D; Derenchuk, Vladimir; Das, Indra J; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2012-11-08

    Proton beam therapy offers unique physical properties with potential for reduced toxicity and better patient care. There is an increased interest in radiation oncology centers to acquire proton therapy capabilities. The operation of a proton treatment center is quite different than a photon-based clinic because of the more complex technology involved, as well as the single proton beam source serving multiple treatment rooms with no backup source available. There is limited published data which investigates metrics that can be used to determine the performance of a proton facility. The purpose of this study is to evaluate performance metrics of Indiana University Cyclotron Operations (IUCO), including availability, mean time between failures, and mean time to repair, and to determine how changes in these metrics impact patient treatments. We utilized a computerized maintenance management system to log all downtime occurrences and servicing operations for the facility. These data were then used to calculate the availability as well as the mean time between failures and mean time to repair. Impact on patient treatments was determined by analyzing delayed and missed treatments, which were recorded in an electronic medical record and database maintained by the therapists. The availability of the IUCO proton beam has been increasing since beginning of operation in 2003 and averaged 96.9% for 2009 through 2011. The mean time between failures and mean time to repair were also determined and correlated with improvements in the maintenance and operating procedures of the facility, as well as environmental factors. It was found that events less than 15 minutes in duration have minimal impact on treatment delays, while events lasting longer than one hour may result in missed treatments. The availability of the proton beam was more closely correlated with delayed than with missed treatments, demonstrating the utility and limitations of the availability metric. In conclusion, we

  12. Impact of Rotation Correction after Brace Treatment on Prognosis in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Masato; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Arataki, Shinya; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Level 4 retrospective review. Purpose Brace treatment is the standard nonoperative treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Rotation correction is also important, because AIS involves a rotation deformity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of rotation correction after Osaka Medical College (OMC) brace treatment on clinical outcomes in AIS. Overview of Literature Brace treatment has a significant effect on the progression of AIS. However, few reports have examined rotation correction after brace treatment. Methods A total of 46 patients who wore the OMC brace were retrospectively reviewed. The curve magnitude was determined according to the Cobb method, and the rotation angle of the apical vertebrae was measured by the modified Nash-Moe method. Based on the difference in the rotation angle before and after the initial brace treatment, patients were divided into two groups. Group A (n=33) was defined as no change or improvement of the rotation angle; group B (n=13) was defined as deterioration of the rotation angle. If the patients had curve or rotation progression of 5° or more at skeletal maturity, or had undergone surgery, the treatment was considered a failure. Results Differences of rotation angle between before and after the initial brace treatment were 2°±2° in group A and –3°±2° in group B (p<0.001). The rates of treatment failure were 42% in group A and 77% in group B (p<0.05). This study included 25 patients with Lenke type 1 (54%). Group A (24%) with Lenke type 1 also had a significantly better success rate of brace treatment than group B (75%) (p<0.05). Conclusions Insufficient rotation correction increased brace treatment failure. Better rotation correction resulted in a higher success rate of brace treatment in patients with Lenke type 1. PMID:27790317

  13. Adverse environments and children's creativity development: transforming the notion of "success in adversity" in China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li; Tan, Mei; Liu, Zhengkui

    2015-01-01

    China has been undergoing great social change due to its new focus on urbanization and globalization. Such change has had a tremendous adverse impact on the living conditions of millions of young children, simultaneously generating new interest in children's creativity development. The intersection of these two issues has important implications for China's future as it brings together one of China's core cultural values-"success in adversity"-the importance of creativity, and very real social and economic needs. "Success in adversity" reflects the strongly held belief that individuals who suffer adverse environments can rise to excellence and success through persistence, effort, and creativity. In this article, we briefly explore the historical sources of this belief and how it is closely related to the Chinese conception of creativity. We then present some studies on the creativity of some of China's migrant children. Findings show that while migrant children as a group may not generally exhibit higher creativity than their urban peers as hypothesized, indications of resilience and creative potential suggest that the notion of success in adversity may contribute to the positive development of China's migrant children more substantially when it is informed by research and augmented by research-supported policy.

  14. EVALUATING INNOVATIVE STORMWATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES UNDER THE ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing, controlling, and treating combined-sewer overflows (CSO), sanitary sewer overflows (SSO), and urban stormwater runoff have become priorities for communities. Improved and cost effective treatment technologies are needed to reduce the adverse impacts that wet weather f...

  15. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Modules: Differential Impact on Treatment Processes and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Villatte, Jennifer L.; Vilardaga, Roger; Villatte, Matthieu; Plumb Vilardaga, Jennifer C.; Atkins, David C.; Hayes, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    A modular, transdiagnostic approach to treatment design and implementation may increase the public health impact of evidence-based psychosocial interventions. Such an approach relies on algorithms for selecting and implementing treatment components intended to have a specific therapeutic effect, yet there is little evidence for how components function independent of their treatment packages when employed in clinical service settings. This study aimed to demonstrate the specificity of treatment effects for two components of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a promising candidate for modularization. A randomized, nonconcurrent, multiple-baseline across participants design was used to examine component effects on treatment processes and outcomes in 15 adults seeking mental health treatment. The ACT OPEN module targeted acceptance and cognitive defusion; the ACT ENGAGED module targeted values-based activation and persistence. According to Tau- U analyses, both modules produced significant improvements in psychiatric symptoms, quality of life, and targeted therapeutic processes. ACT ENGAGED demonstrated greater improvements in quality of life and values-based activation. ACT OPEN showed greater improvements in symptom severity, acceptance, and defusion. Both modules improved awareness and non-reactivity, which were mutually targeted, though using distinct intervention procedures. Both interventions demonstrated high treatment acceptability, completion, and patient satisfaction. Treatment effects were maintained at 3-month follow up. ACT components should be considered for inclusion in a modular approach to implementing evidence-based psychosocial interventions for adults. PMID:26716932

  16. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy modules: Differential impact on treatment processes and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Villatte, Jennifer L; Vilardaga, Roger; Villatte, Matthieu; Plumb Vilardaga, Jennifer C; Atkins, David C; Hayes, Steven C

    2016-02-01

    A modular, transdiagnostic approach to treatment design and implementation may increase the public health impact of evidence-based psychosocial interventions. Such an approach relies on algorithms for selecting and implementing treatment components intended to have a specific therapeutic effect, yet there is little evidence for how components function independent of their treatment packages when employed in clinical service settings. This study aimed to demonstrate the specificity of treatment effects for two components of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a promising candidate for modularization. A randomized, nonconcurrent, multiple-baseline across participants design was used to examine component effects on treatment processes and outcomes in 15 adults seeking mental health treatment. The ACT OPEN module targeted acceptance and cognitive defusion; the ACT ENGAGED module targeted values-based activation and persistence. According to Tau-U analyses, both modules produced significant improvements in psychiatric symptoms, quality of life, and targeted therapeutic processes. ACT ENGAGED demonstrated greater improvements in quality of life and values-based activation. ACT OPEN showed greater improvements in symptom severity, acceptance, and defusion. Both modules improved awareness and non-reactivity, which were mutually targeted, though using distinct intervention procedures. Both interventions demonstrated high treatment acceptability, completion, and patient satisfaction. Treatment effects were maintained at 3-month follow up. ACT components should be considered for inclusion in a modular approach to implementing evidence-based psychosocial interventions for adults.

  17. How will the growing threat of resistant hypertension impact the future treatment of high blood pressure?

    PubMed

    Lackland, Daniel T

    2013-11-01

    Hypertension treatment and control efforts represent a major component of primary care with dedicated clinical guidelines and recommendations. However, high blood pressure (BP) control rates are complicated with the difficult to treat and resistant hypertensive patients. This category of patient, therefore, affects the development and implementation of the clinical guidelines. The recommendations of specific algorithms for resistant hypertension and difficult-to-treat patients with elevated BPs have been developed in consideration of new therapies and combination drug treatment. Hypertension treatment guidelines include and will continue to grade evidence from randomized clinical trials with detailed strategies on the management of these high-risk patients. Although resistant hypertension affects high BP control rates, the inclusion of refined pharmaceutical and device treatment strategies in evidence-based guidelines will be expected to have a significant impact on the clinical management of this high-risk patient population.

  18. MDR-TB treatment as prevention: The projected population-level impact of expanded treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Azman, Andrew S.; Cobelens, Frank G.; Dowdy, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Background In 2013, approximately 480,000 people developed active multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), while only 97,000 started MDR-TB treatment. We sought to estimate the impact of improving access to MDR-TB diagnosis and treatment, under multiple diagnostic algorithm and treatment regimen scenarios, on ten-year projections of MDR-TB incidence and mortality. Methods We constructed a dynamic transmission model of an MDR-TB epidemic in an illustrative East/Southeast Asian setting. Using approximate Bayesian computation, we investigated a wide array of potential epidemic trajectories consistent with current notification data and known TB epidemiology. Results Despite an overall projected decline in TB incidence, data-consistent simulations suggested that MDR-TB incidence is likely to rise between 2015 and 2025 under continued 2013 treatment practices, although with considerable uncertainty (median 17% increase, 95% Uncertainty Range [UR] -38% to +137%). But if, by 2017, all identified active TB patients with previously-treated TB could be tested for drug susceptibility, and 85% of those with MDR-TB could initiate MDR-appropriate treatment, then MDR-TB incidence in 2025 could be reduced by 26% (95% UR 4–52%) relative to projections under continued current practice. Also expanding this drug-susceptibility testing and appropriate MDR-TB treatment to treatment-naïve as well as previously-treated TB cases, by 2020, could reduce MDR-TB incidence in 2025 by 29% (95% UR 6–55%) compared to continued current practice. If this diagnosis and treatment of all MDR-TB in known active TB cases by 2020 could be implemented via a novel second-line regimen with similar effectiveness and tolerability as current first-line therapy, a 54% (95% UR 20–74%) reduction in MDR-TB incidence compared to current-practice projections could be achieved by 2025. Conclusions Expansion of diagnosis and treatment of MDR-TB, even using current sub-optimal second-line regimens, is expected

  19. Impact of Targeted Educational Interventions on Clostridium difficile Infection Treatment in Critically Ill Adults.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Drayton A; Hughes, Catherine A; Painter, Jacob T; Pennick, Rose E; Chatterjee, Kshitij; Boye, Bradley; Meena, Nikhil

    2016-12-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a growing clinical and economic burden throughout the world. Pharmacists often are members of the primary care team in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting; however, the impact of pharmacists educating other health care providers on appropriateness of CDI treatment has not been previously examined. Objective: This study was performed to determine the impact of structured educational interventions on CDI treatment on appropriateness of CDI treatment and clinical outcomes. Methods: This was a single-center, retrospective, cohort study of patients with CDI in the medical ICU at an academic medical center between January and June 2014 (pre-period) and 2015 (post-period). All patients were evaluated for appropriate CDI treatment before and after implementing pharmacist-provided educational interventions on CDI treatment. Results: Patients in the post-period were prescribed appropriate CDI treatment more frequently than patients in the pre-period (91.7% vs 41.7%; p = .03) and received fewer inappropriate doses of a CDI treatment agent (14 doses vs 30 doses). Patients in the pre-period had a shorter ICU length of stay [1.5 days (range, 1-19) vs 3.5 days (range, 2-36); p = .01] and a similar hospital length of stay [9.5 days (range, 4-24) vs 11.5 days (range, 3-56); p = .30]. Total time spent providing interventions was 4 hours. Conclusion: Patients had appropriate CDI treatment initiated more frequently in the post-period. This low-cost intervention strategy should be easy to implement in institutions where pharmacists interact with physicians during clinical rounds and should be evaluated in institutions where interactions between pharmacists and physicians occur more frequently in non-rounding situations.

  20. Orthodontic treatment of impacted anterior teeth due to odontomas: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Batra, Puneet; Duggal, Ritu; Kharbanda, Om Prakash; Parkash, Hari

    2004-01-01

    Two cases are presented where the odontomas had caused the impaction of the anterior teeth and required a combined surgical and orthodontic treatment to bring these teeth into the arch. In the first case a large a complex odontome had caused the impaction of the right central incisor, lateral incisor and canine. In the second case a compound odontome blocked the eruption pathway of the right central incisor. It is emphasised that radiographic examination of all pediatric patients that present clinical evidence of delayed permanent tooth eruption or temporary tooth displacement with or without a history of previous dental trauma should be performed. Early diagnosis of odontomas allows adoption of a less complex and less expensive treatment and ensures a better prognosis.

  1. Predicting the sound power and impact of a wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    De Heyder, B; Ockier, P; Jansen, R; Huiberts, R

    2001-01-01

    Several process units at a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) can produce a significant level of sound and thus induce sound nuisance for nearby residents. The risk for sound nuisance should be considered by making a prognosis of sound impact in an early project phase (planning, design). A prognosis requires information with respect to the sound characteristics of the different process units. This paper reports the development of empirical models for the sound power of relevant process units in the water line at Aquafin WWTPs. The used methodology for model derivation and validation allowed us to minimize the required number of measurements. Besides the methodology, the paper describes in detail the derivation and validation of the empirical model for the splashing water of screw pumps. Also the use of all the derived empirical models to determine the sound impact of a wastewater treatment plant at close distance is illustrated with a case-study.

  2. Strain localization of commercially pure titanium subjected to ultrasonic impact treatment followed by uniaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, Alexey; Kazachenok, Marina; Kozelskaya, Anna; Perevalova, Olga; Balokhonov, Ruslan; Romanova, Varvara; Pochivalov, Yurii

    2016-11-01

    It was demonstrated that the ultrasonic impact treatment results in the gradient microstructure of the surface layer of commercially pure titanium composed of nanosized nonequiaxial α-Ti grains, underlying course α-grains with banded substructure and deformation twins, and subjacent layer characterized by the presence of a few twins and extinction contours within the course grains. The effect of ultrasonic impact treatment on the mechanical behavior of titanium specimen under tension was revealed theoretically and experimentally Using optical and atomic force microscopes it was shown that the fine-grained surface layer impede dislocation motion causing the initiation and propagation of shear bands oriented along the direction of maximum shear stresses. The fine structure of shear bands was studied by transmission electron microscopy.

  3. Impact of ozonation and biological treatment on disinfection by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Shukairy, H.M.; Summers, R.S.; Miltner, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    The paper summarizes several recent studies on the impact of ozonation and biological treatment on DBP formation. Ozonation was characterized by the formation of ozonation DBPs such as aldehydes, assimilable organic carbon (AOC), biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and the oxidation of bromide to bromate. The oxidation of the DBP precursor compounds and the effectiveness of biotreatent for the control of DBPs were monitored by the formation potential (FP) for total organic halogen (TOX), total THMs (TTHMs) and total measured haloacetic acid (THAAs). Special attention was also given to the impact of bromide concentration on the speciation of the DBPs. A specific objective of the paper was to compare DBP control by batch biological treatment at the bench-scale to that by a continuous flow sand filter at the pilot-scale.

  4. Simplified treatment mechanics with a miniscrew for a case of canine impaction

    PubMed Central

    Bakhsh, Zuhair

    2016-01-01

    With the introduction of miniscrews into the orthodontic field, the efficiency and effectiveness of treating complex cases have significantly improved. Biomechanical considerations, especially relating to anchorage control have become less of a concern and side effects, as a consequence, have become minimal. This article reports on a canine impaction case in which an orthodontic miniscrew has been used to effectively and efficiently pull the canine, thereby reducing anchorage unit side effects and simplifying treatment mechanics. PMID:26998475

  5. Skeletal manifestations of juvenile hypothyroidism and the impact of treatment on skeletal system.

    PubMed

    Gutch, Manish; Philip, Rajeev; Philip, Renjit; Toms, Ajit; Saran, Sanjay; Gupta, K K

    2013-10-01

    Thyroid hormone mediates growth and development of the skeleton through its direct effects and through its permissive effects on growth hormone. The effect of hypothyroidism on bone is well described in congenital hypothyroidism, but the impact of thyroid hormone deficiency on a growing skeleton, as it happens with juvenile hypothyroidism, is less defined. In addition, the extent to which the skeletal defects of juvenile hypothyroidism revert on the replacement of thyroid hormone is not known. A study was undertaken in 29 juvenile autoimmune hypothyroid patients to study the skeletal manifestations of juvenile hypothyroidism and the impact of treatment of hypothyroidism on the skeletal system of juvenile patients. Hypothyroidism has a profound impact on the skeletal system and delayed bone age, dwarfism, and thickened bands at the metaphyseal ends being the most common findings. Post treatment, skeletal findings like delayed bone age and dwarfism improved significantly, but there were no significant changes in enlargement of sella, presence of wormian bones, epihyseal dysgenesis, vertebral changes and thickened band at the metaphyseal ends. With the treatment of hypothyroidism, there is an exuberant advancement of bone age, the catch up of bone age being approximately double of the chronological age advancement.

  6. Commentary: Childhood Exposure to Environmental Adversity and the Well-Being of People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, E.

    2013-01-01

    People with intellectual disabilities have poorer health than their non-disabled peers. They are also more likely to be exposed to a wide range of environmental adversities in childhood. Research undertaken in the general population has demonstrated that exposure to environmental adversity in childhood can have an adverse impact on health and…

  7. Patient-initiated second opinions: systematic review of characteristics and impact on diagnosis, treatment, and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Payne, Velma L; Singh, Hardeep; Meyer, Ashley N D; Levy, Lewis; Harrison, David; Graber, Mark L

    2014-05-01

    The impact of second opinions on diagnosis in radiology and pathology is well documented; however, the value of patient-initiated second opinions for diagnosis and treatment in general medical practice is unknown. We conducted a systematic review of patient-initiated second opinions to assess their impact on clinical outcomes and patient satisfaction and to determine characteristics and motivating factors of patients who seek a second opinion. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, and Academic OneFile databases using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) indexes and keyword searches. Search terms included referral and consultation, patient-initiated, patient preference, patient participation, second opinion, second review, and diagnosis. Multiple reviewers screened abstracts and articles to determine eligibility and extract data. We assessed risk of bias using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool and rated study quality using Cochrane's GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. We screened 1342 abstracts and reviewed full text of 41 articles, identifying 7 articles that reported clinical agreement data and 10 that discussed patient characteristics, motivation, and satisfaction. We found that a second opinion typically confirms the original diagnosis or treatment regimen but that 90% of patients with poorly defined conditions remain undiagnosed. However, 10% to 62% of second opinions yield a major change in the diagnosis, treatment, or prognosis. A larger fraction of patients receive different advice on treatment than on diagnosis. Factors motivating a second opinion include diagnosis or treatment confirmation, dissatisfaction with a consultation, desire for more information, persistent symptoms, or treatment complications. Patients generally believed that second opinions were valuable. Second opinions can result in diagnostic and treatment differences. The literature on patient-initiated second opinions is limited, and the accuracy of

  8. Treating Cattle to Protect People? Impact of Footbath Insecticide Treatment on Tsetse Density in Chad

    PubMed Central

    Ndeledje, Noël; Bouyer, Jérémy; Stachurski, Frédéric; Grimaud, Patrice; Belem, Adrien Marie Gaston; Molélé Mbaïndingatoloum, Fidèle; Bengaly, Zakaria; Oumar Alfaroukh, Idriss; Cecchi, Guiliano; Lancelot, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    Background In Chad, several species of tsetse flies (Genus: Glossina) transmit African animal trypanosomoses (AAT), which represents a major obstacle to cattle rearing, and sleeping sickness, which impacts public health. After the failure of past interventions to eradicate tsetse, the government of Chad is now looking for other approaches that integrate cost-effective intervention techniques, which can be applied by the stake holders to control tsetse-transmitted trypanosomoses in a sustainable manner. The present study thus attempted to assess the efficacy of restricted application of insecticides to cattle leg extremities using footbaths for controlling Glossina m. submorsitans, G. tachinoides and G. f. fuscipes in southern Chad. Methodology/Principal Findings Two sites were included, one close to the historical human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) focus of Moundou and the other to the active foci of Bodo and Moissala. At both sites, a treated and an untreated herd were compared. In the treatment sites, cattle were treated on a regular basis using a formulation of deltamethrin 0.005% (67 to 98 cattle were treated in one of the sites and 88 to 102 in the other one). For each herd, tsetse densities were monthly monitored using 7 biconical traps set along the river and beside the cattle pen from February to December 2009. The impact of footbath treatment on tsetse populations was strong (p < 10-3) with a reduction of 80% in total tsetse catches by the end of the 6-month footbath treatment. Conclusions/Significance The impact of footbath treatment as a vector control tool within an integrated strategy to manage AAT and HAT is discussed in the framework of the “One Health” concept. Like other techniques based on the treatment of cattle, this technology should be used under controlled conditions, in order to avoid the development of insecticide and acaricide resistance in tsetse and tick populations, respectively. PMID:23799148

  9. Recurrent adverse pregnancy outcome and antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    Reece, E A; Gabrielli, S; Cullen, M T; Zheng, X Z; Hobbins, J C; Harris, E N

    1990-07-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies, which include lupus-like anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibody, have been linked to a number of adverse pregnancy outcomes, although their exact pathogenic mechanisms remain poorly defined. The relative risk of complications such as intrauterine growth retardation, spontaneous abortions, and stillbirth in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies also remains undetermined. Heightened attention has been focused on the association, leading to investigations into the pathogenesis. Uncontrolled studies have also explored therapeutic regimens such as aspirin, steroids, and heparin, and clinical trials have used various treatment protocols. Although knowledge into the association of antiphospholipid antibodies and recurrent adverse pregnancy outcome is limited and continues to evolve, this association provides new insights into the disease and offers promise for pharmacologic prophylaxis. In this article, current concepts on pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapy are reviewed and recommendations are made for clinical care of these patients.

  10. Impact of dissociation and interpersonal functioning on inpatient treatment for early sexually abused adults

    PubMed Central

    Jepsen, Ellen K. K.; Langeland, Willie; Heir, Trond

    2013-01-01

    Background Little is known about the possible predictors of treatment outcome in early chronically sexually abused adults. The current study aimed to investigate what impact initial levels of dissociation and pre-treatment negative change in interpersonal functioning have on treatment response after 3 months of first-phase trauma inpatient treatment as well as after a period of 1 year the patients returned to their usual lives. Methods The sample comprised 48 inpatients with childhood sexual abuse histories and mixed trauma-related disorders who were examined at discharge and prospectively followed up for a period of 1 year under naturalistic conditions. Outcome variables were general psychiatric symptoms and interpersonal problems as measured with the Symptom Check List-Revised (SCL-R) and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP) Circumplex. Results The central findings were that pathological dissociation and deterioration in interpersonal functioning prior to admittance predicted general psychiatric symptom levels and interpersonal problems at the end of treatment and at 1-year follow-up. Pathological dissociation, involving memory and identity problems, alone predicted negative outcome at the end of treatment. The findings at 1-year follow-up indicate that it is not pathological dissociation in isolation that affects outcomes, but rather the interaction between dissociation and change in interpersonal functioning prior to treatment. Conclusion These findings indicate the need of addressing dissociation and interpersonal problems in treatment planning and favor an integrated treatment approach for complex trauma patients. Future research should investigate whether and how this leads to better outcome, including long-term maintenance of gains after the end of treatment. PMID:24386549

  11. Adverse effects of public health interventions: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Lorenc, Theo; Oliver, Kathryn

    2014-03-01

    Public health interventions may have a range of adverse effects. However, there is limited guidance as to how evaluations should address the possibility of adverse effects. This discussion paper briefly presents a framework for thinking about the potential harms of public health interventions, focusing on the following categories: direct harms; psychological harms; equity harms; group and social harms; and opportunity harms. We conclude that the possibility of adverse effects needs to be taken into account by those implementing and evaluating interventions, and requires a broad perspective on the potential impacts of public health strategies.

  12. Impact of antiepileptic drugs on bone health: Need for monitoring, treatment, and prevention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Ekta; Singh, Harmanjit; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder affecting approximately 50 million people worldwide. In India, overall prevalence of epilepsy is reported to be 5.59/1000 population. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) constitute the main-stay of treatment with a large number of AEDs available in the market. High incidence of adverse effects is a major limitation with AEDs. One of the major concerns is significant metabolic effects on the bone. However, little attention has been paid to this issue because most of the bone effects remain subclinical for a long time and may take years to manifest clinically. The main effects include hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, reduced serum levels of Vitamin D, increase in parathormone (PTH) levels, and alterations in bone turnover markers. The CYP450 enzyme-inducing AEDs such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and primidone are the most common AEDs associated with bone disorders while the data regarding the effect of valproate and newer AEDs such as lamotrigine, gabapentin, vigabatrin, levetiracetam, and topiramate on bone metabolism and bone density are scanty and controversial. Deficiency of Vitamin D is commonly described as a cause for the bone loss in epileptic patients while others being decreased absorption of calcium, increased PTH levels, and inhibition of calcitonin secretion, etc. However, there are no formal practical guidelines for the management of bone disease among those taking AEDs. Evidence-based strategies regarding monitoring, prevention, and treatment of bone diseases in patients on AED therapy are needed. PMID:27843822

  13. Factors affecting the development of adverse drug reactions (Review article)

    PubMed Central

    Alomar, Muaed Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To discuss the effect of certain factors on the occurrence of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs). Data Sources A systematic review of the literature in the period between 1991 and 2012 was made based on PubMed, the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, EMBASE and IDIS. Key words used were: medication error, adverse drug reaction, iatrogenic disease factors, ambulatory care, primary health care, side effects and treatment hazards. Summary Many factors play a crucial role in the occurrence of ADRs, some of these are patient related, drug related or socially related factors. Age for instance has a very critical impact on the occurrence of ADRs, both very young and very old patients are more vulnerable to these reactions than other age groups. Alcohol intake also has a crucial impact on ADRs. Other factors are gender, race, pregnancy, breast feeding, kidney problems, liver function, drug dose and frequency and many other factors. The effect of these factors on ADRs is well documented in the medical literature. Taking these factors into consideration during medical evaluation enables medical practitioners to choose the best drug regimen. Conclusion Many factors affect the occurrence of ADRs. Some of these factors can be changed like smoking or alcohol intake others cannot be changed like age, presence of other diseases or genetic factors. Understanding the different effects of these factors on ADRs enables healthcare professionals to choose the most appropriate medication for that particular patient. It also helps the healthcare professionals to give the best advice to patients. Pharmacogenomics is the most recent science which emphasizes the genetic predisposition of ADRs. This innovative science provides a new perspective in dealing with the decision making process of drug selection. PMID:24648818

  14. Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) Network Development for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are descriptive biological sequences that start from a molecular initiating event (MIE) and end with an adverse health outcome. AOPs provide biological context for high throughput chemical testing and further prioritize environmental health risk research. According to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines, AOPs are pathways with one MIE anchored to an adverse outcome (AO) by key events (KEs) and key event relationships (KERs). However, this approach does not always capture the cumulative impacts of multiple MIEs on the AO. For example, hepatic lipid flux due to chemical-induced toxicity initiates from multiple ligand-activated receptors and signaling pathways that cascade across biology to converge upon a common fatty liver (FL, also known as steatosis) outcome. To capture this complexity, a top-down strategy was used to develop a FL AOP network (AOPnet). Literature was queried based on the terms steatosis, fatty liver, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Search results were analyzed for physiological and pathophysiological organ level, cellular and molecular processes, as well as pathway intermediates, to identify potential KEs and MIEs that are key for hepatic lipid metabolism, maintenance, and dysregulation. The analysis identified four apical KE nodes (hepatic fatty acid uptake, de novo fatty acid and lipid synthesis, fatty acid oxidation, and lipid efflux) juxtaposed to the FL AO. The apic

  15. Serious Adverse Events After Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Over the past several decades there have been many advances in the equipment, instrumentation and techniques of performing cataract surgery. This review will address the impact of these advances on the safety profile of cataract surgery. Recent Findings Recent studies have demonstrated a decline in the risk of serious postoperative adverse events (endophthalmitis, suprachoroidal hemorrhage, retinal detachment) following cataract surgery. Factors that increase the risk of serious complications from cataract surgery include patient-related factors (male sex, concomitant diabetic retinopathy, same day cataract surgery combined with another intraocular surgery, tamsulosin use) and surgeon-related factors (low surgical volume, limited experience, operating on patients who are most prone to adverse events). Summary Cataract surgery continues to be a very safe surgical procedure with few patients experiencing serious sight-threatening adverse events. Studies in the literature have helped surgeons identify patients who are at high risk for surgical complications and to develop strategies to limit surgical complications when operating on these patients. As multifocal intraocular lenses, femtosecond laser technology, and other surgical innovations continue to gain popularity, it will be interesting in the coming years to determine whether there will be a continued reduction in complications of cataract surgery. PMID:22450221

  16. Combating adverse selection in secondary PC markets.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Stewart W; Fitzpatrick, Colin

    2008-04-15

    Adverse selection is a significant contributor to market failure in secondary personal computer (PC) markets. Signaling can act as a potential solution to adverse selection and facilitate superior remarketing of second-hand PCs. Signaling is a means whereby usage information can be utilized to enhance consumer perception of both value and utility of used PCs and, therefore, promote lifetime extension for these systems. This can help mitigate a large portion of the environmental impact associated with PC system manufacture. In this paper, the computer buying and selling behavior of consumers is characterized via a survey of 270 Irish residential users. Results confirm the existence of adverse selection in the Irish market with 76% of potential buyers being unwilling to purchase and 45% of potential vendors being unwilling to sell a used PC. The so-called "closet affect" is also apparent with 78% of users storing their PC after use has ceased. Results also indicate that consumers place a higher emphasis on specifications when considering a second-hand purchase. This contradicts their application needs which are predominantly Internet and word-processing/spreadsheet/presentation applications, 88% and 60% respectively. Finally, a market solution utilizing self monitoring and reporting technology (SMART) sensors for the purpose of real time usage monitoring is proposed, that can change consumer attitudes with regard to second-hand computer equipment.

  17. Adverse effects of isolation in hospitalised patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Abad, C; Fearday, A; Safdar, N

    2010-10-01

    The use of transmission precautions such as contact isolation in patients known to be colonised or infected with multidrug-resistant organisms is recommended in healthcare institutions. Although essential for infection control, contact isolation has recently been associated with adverse effects in patients. We undertook a systematic review to determine whether contact isolation leads to psychological or physical problems for patients. Studies were included if (1) hospitalised patients were placed under isolation precautions for an underlying medical indication, and (2) any adverse events related to the isolation were evaluated. We found 16 studies that reported data regarding the impact of isolation on patient mental well-being, patient satisfaction, patient safety or time spent by healthcare workers in direct patient care. The majority showed a negative impact on patient mental well-being and behaviour, including higher scores for depression, anxiety and anger among isolated patients. A few studies also found that healthcare workers spent less time with patients in isolation. Patient satisfaction was adversely affected by isolation if patients were kept uninformed of their healthcare. Patient safety was also negatively affected, leading to an eight-fold increase in adverse events related to supportive care failures. We found that contact isolation may negatively impact several dimensions of patient care. Well-validated tools are necessary to investigate these results further. Large studies examining a number of safety indicators to assess the adverse effects of isolation are needed. Patient education may be an important step to mitigate the adverse psychological effects of isolation and is recommended.

  18. Adverse childhood experiences and health anxiety in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Reiser, Sarah J; McMillan, Katherine A; Wright, Kristi D; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2014-03-01

    Childhood experiences are thought to predispose a person to the development of health anxiety later in life. However, there is a lack of research investigating the influence of specific adverse experiences (e.g., childhood abuse, household dysfunction) on this condition. The current study examined the cumulative influence of multiple types of childhood adversities on health anxiety in adulthood. Adults 18-59 years of age (N=264) completed a battery of measures to assess adverse childhood experiences, health anxiety, and associated constructs (i.e., negative affect and trait anxiety). Significant associations were observed between adverse childhood experiences, health anxiety, and associated constructs. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicted that adverse childhood experiences were predictive of health anxiety in adulthood; however, the unique contribution of these experience were no longer significant following the inclusion of the other variables of interest. Subsequently, mediation analyses indicated that both negative affect and trait anxiety independently mediated the relationship between adverse childhood experiences and health anxiety in adulthood. Increased exposure to adverse childhood experiences is associated with higher levels of health anxiety in adulthood; this relationship is mediated through negative affect and trait anxiety. Findings support the long-term negative impact of cumulative adverse childhood experiences and emphasize the importance of addressing negative affect and trait anxiety in efforts to prevent and treat health anxiety.

  19. Impact of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination on Cervical Cytology Screening, Colposcopy, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; González, Paula; Wacholder, Sholom; Porras, Carolina; Jiménez, Silvia; Schiffman, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination on cervical screening, colposcopy, and treatment is incompletely understood. In 2004–2005, investigators in the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial randomized 7,466 women aged 18–25 years, 1:1, to receive HPV vaccination or hepatitis A vaccination. The worst-ever cytology diagnosis and the 4-year cumulative proportions of colposcopy referral and treatment by vaccination arm were compared for 2 cohorts. The total vaccinated cohort included 6,844 women who provided cervical samples. The naive cohort included 2,284 women with no evidence of previous HPV exposure. In the total vaccinated cohort, HPV-vaccinated women had a significant (P = 0.01) reduction in cytological abnormalities: 12.4% for high-grade lesions and 5.9% for minor lesions. Colposcopy referral was reduced by 7.9% (P = 0.03) and treatment by 11.3% (P = 0.24). Greater relative reductions in abnormal cytology (P < 0.001) were observed for HPV-vaccinated women in the naive cohort: 49.2% for high-grade lesions and 18.1% for minor lesions. Colposcopy referral and treatment were reduced by 21.3% (P = 0.01) and 45.6% (P = 0.08), respectively, in the naive cohort. The overall impact on health services will be modest in the first years after vaccine introduction among young adult women, even in regions with high coverage. PMID:23843026

  20. LITERATURE REVIEW ON IMPACT OF GLYCOLATE ON THE 2H EVAPORATOR AND THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Adu-Wusu, K.

    2012-05-10

    Glycolic acid (GA) is being studied as an alternate reductant in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. It will either be a total or partial replacement for the formic acid that is currently used. A literature review has been conducted on the impact of glycolate on two post-DWPF downstream systems - the 2H Evaporator system and the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The DWPF recycle stream serves as a portion of the feed to the 2H Evaporator. Glycolate enters the evaporator system from the glycolate in the recycle stream. The overhead (i.e., condensed phase) from the 2H Evaporator serves as a portion of the feed to the ETF. The literature search revealed that virtually no impact is anticipated for the 2H Evaporator. Glycolate may help reduce scale formation in the evaporator due to its high complexing ability. The drawback of the solubilizing ability is the potential impact on the criticality analysis of the 2H Evaporator system. It is recommended that at least a theoretical evaluation to confirm the finding that no self-propagating violent reactions with nitrate/nitrites will occur should be performed. Similarly, identification of sources of ignition relevant to glycolate and/or update of the composite flammability analysis to reflect the effects from the glycolate additions for the 2H Evaporator system are in order. An evaluation of the 2H Evaporator criticality analysis is also needed. A determination of the amount or fraction of the glycolate in the evaporator overhead is critical to more accurately assess its impact on the ETF. Hence, use of predictive models like OLI Environmental Simulation Package Software (OLI/ESP) and/or testing are recommended for the determination of the glycolate concentration in the overhead. The impact on the ETF depends on the concentration of glycolate in the ETF feed. The impact is classified as minor for feed glycolate concentrations {le} 33 mg/L or 0.44 mM. The ETF unit operations that will have

  1. Adverse effects of new antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Onat, Filiz; Ozkara, Cigdem

    2004-04-01

    Starting with phenobarbital in the 1900s, it took almost 70-80 years to introduce old-generation agents for the treatment of epilepsy. Then, in eleven years, nine more new antiepileptic drugs were added to the armamentarium. These drugs produce a nearly 40-50% decrease in seizure incidence in refractory patients, but few patients have been able to achieve complete freedom from seizures. So the search for more effective drugs with minimal adverse effect profiles will continue. Although the new antiepileptic drugs do not demonstrate a superior efficacy compared to the older ones, they do offer some advantages in terms of tolerability, fewer drug interactions and simpler pharmacokinetics. However, our knowledge concerning their safety profiles can not yet be considered adequate due to the relatively short time these drugs have been on the market and to the limited number of patients exposed to them. The fact that the serious side effects of felbamate and vigabatrine appeared late after marketing should be taken as an important lesson because it implies the potential for unknown side effects at any time during treatment. Antiepileptic drug treatment should begin with diagnosis of the seizure and epileptic syndrome, followed by selection of the drug most appropriate for treatment of the individual patient, and continued with monitoring of not only the seizures but the adverse effect profile as well.

  2. Economic impacts of zebra mussels on drinking water treatment and electric power generation facilities.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Nancy A; O'Neill, Charles R; Knuth, Barbara A; Brown, Tommy L

    2007-07-01

    Invasions of nonnative species such as zebra mussels can have both ecological and economic consequences. The economic impacts of zebra mussels have not been examined in detail since the mid-1990s. The purpose of this study was to quantify the annual and cumulative economic impact of zebra mussels on surface water-dependent drinking water treatment and electric power generation facilities (where previous research indicated the greatest impacts). The study time frame was from the first full year after discovery in North America (Lake St. Clair, 1989) to the present (2004); the study area was throughout the mussels' North American range. A mail survey resulted in a response rate of 31% for electric power companies and 41% for drinking water treatment plants. Telephone interviews with a sample of nonrespondents assessed nonresponse bias; only one difference was found and adjusted for. Over one-third (37%) of surveyed facilities reported finding zebra mussels in the facility and almost half (45%) have initiated preventive measures to prevent zebra mussels from entering the facility operations. Almost all surveyed facilities (91%) with zebra mussels have used control or mitigation alternatives to remove or control zebra mussels. We estimated that 36% of surveyed facilities experienced an economic impact. Expanding the sample to the population of the study area, we estimated 267 million dollars (BCa 95% CI = 161 million dollars - 467 million dollars) in total economic costs for electric generation and water treatment facilities through late 2004, since 1989. Annual costs were greater (44,000 dollars/facility) during the early years of zebra mussel infestation than in recent years (30,000 dollars). As a result of this and other factors, early predictions of the ultimate costs of the zebra mussel invasion may have been excessive.

  3. Minimally invasive surgical treatment for large impacted upper ureteral stones: Ureteroscopic lithotripsy or percutaneous nephrolithotomy?

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Ibrahim Halil; Yonguc, Tarik; Arslan, Burak; Degirmenci, Tansu; Gunlusoy, Bulent; Aydogdu, Ozgu; Koras, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The management of patients with large impacted upper ureteral stones is difficult; there is no standard treatment. We compared the outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) and ureteroscopic lithotripsy (UL) to treat large (≥1.5 cm), impacted, upper ureteral stones. Methods: In total, 86 patients with large impacted upper ureteral stones were included in this study. Of these patients 41 underwent UL and 45 underwent PCNL. The inclusion criteria were: longest diameter of stone ≥1.5 cm, the localization of stone between the lower border of L4 spine and ureteropelvic junction and impacted stone. Results: In the UL group, we were unable to reach the stone in 3 patients because of ureteral stricture and edema despite balloon dilation. Of these 3 patients, we were unable to optimally visualize the stone in 2 patients due to bleeding and mucosal injury following balloon dilation. The stricture was too firm and could not be passed in the third patient. Also in the UL group, 15 patients had stones or big fragments which migrated into the renal collecting system. In the PCNL group, 21 patients had concurrent renal stones <1 cm and stones were successfully removed in all patients. No statistically significant difference was found between groups in terms of operation time. Mean hospital stay was significantly shorter in the UL group. Success rates were 82.3% in the UL group and 97.6% in the PCNL group (p = 0.001). Conclusion: The recent study confirms that PCNL is a safe and effective minimally invasive procedure with acceptable complication rates in the treatment of patients with large, impacted upper ureteral stones. PMID:25844097

  4. Impact on the Quality of Life When Living Close to a Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant

    PubMed Central

    Vantarakis, A.; Paparrodopoulos, S.; Kokkinos, P.; Vantarakis, G.; Fragou, K.; Detorakis, I.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the impact on the quality of life of people living close to a municipal wastewater treatment plant. A case control study, including 235 inhabitants living within a 500 m radius by a municipal wastewater treatment plant (cases) and 97 inhabitants living in a different area (controls), was conducted. A standardized questionnaire was self-completed by the participants which examined the general health perception and the overall life satisfaction. Also, the concentration of airborne pathogenic microorganisms in aerosol samples collected around the wastewater treatment plant was investigated. Significant risk for symptoms such as headache, unusual tiredness, and concentration difficulties was recorded and an increased possibility for respiratory and skin diseases was reported. A high rate of the cases being irritable and moody was noticed. Significantly higher gastrointestinal symptoms were also reported among the cases in relation to the controls. The prevalence of pathogenic airborne microorganisms originating from the wastewater treatment plant was reported in high numbers in sampling points close to the wastewater treatment plant. More analytical epidemiological investigations are needed to determine the cause as well as the burden of the diseases to inhabitants living surrounding the wastewater treatment plant. PMID:27375747

  5. Impacts of municipal wastewater oxidative treatments: changes in metal physical speciation and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, C; Turcotte, P; Trépanier, S; Gagné, F; Cejka, P-J

    2014-02-01

    The environmental repercussions of the discharge of disinfected effluents are still poorly understood. This study assessed the impact of ozonation and UV oxidative treatment processes on metal forms - particulate, colloidal and permeable fractions - and bioavailability in disinfected wastewaters. In addition to wastewater analyses, mussels were placed in continuous flow-through aquaria and exposed for 4wk to wastewater, then metals in their tissues were analysed in parallel with exposure biomarkers. Metal size distribution was affected by oxidative processes; results showed that ozonation treatment generally increases the permeable fraction of some metals, particularly Cd and Cu, in treated waters, whereas UV treatment fosters the formation of permeable Zn. Ozone treatment of wastewater generally increased the bioavailability of specific metals. Metal bioaccumulation was in most cases significantly higher in mussels exposed to ozone-treated effluent compared to the UV treatment: 58%, 32%, 42% and 47% higher, respectively, for Ag, Cd, Cr and Cu. Physical metal speciation in these wastewaters comparatively measured the permeable fraction of metals to relate them to the bioaccumulation results for the exposed mussels. The levels of lipid peroxidation were significantly increased in gills but not in the digestive gland. The levels of metallothionein in the digestive gland were also significantly reduced suggest decreased input of particulate metals. Results of bioaccumulation in mussels suggested that metal bioavailability can be modified by the different oxidative processes. Despite this disadvantage, ozonation still represents a great choice of treatment considering the overall environmental benefits.

  6. Impact of positive hepatitis B surface antigen on the outcome of IVF treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian Chi Yan; Ng, Ernest Hung Yu; Yeung, William Shu Biu; Ho, Pak Chung

    2010-11-01

    There has been controversy about the effect of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection on pregnancy outcome after IVF treatment. A total of 1676 couples undergoing their first IVF cycle were included in this study. The prevalence of HBV infection in the female partners of the subfertile population seeking treatment with assisted reproductive technology was 7.8-9.6% during the study period. The ongoing pregnancy rate was not significantly different between couples with HBV-seropositive wives and seronegative ones (26.7% versus 30.2%). The ongoing pregnancy rate and the live-birth rate of couples with both partners being HBV surface antigen positive was not significantly different from couples with discordant HBV serostatus and those couples with both partners being HBV surface antigen negative (23% versus 29% versus 30%, respectively; 23% versus 27% versus 27%, respectively). The percentage of normal sperm morphology in HBV-seropositive husbands was significantly lower than that of seronegative counterparts (5.0% versus 10.0%, P=0.009). In conclusion, there was no adverse effect of HBV infection on the assisted reproduction outcomes. This study was the first report on the live-birth rate of hepatitis B (HBV) seropositive couples, revealing the effect on the pregnancy outcome of IVF. The prevalence of HBV infection in the female partners of subfertile population seeking treatment with ART was 7.8-9.6%. Both the ongoing pregnancy rate and live-birth rate were not significantly different among couples with both partners being positive for HBV surface antigen, couples with discordant HBV serostatus and those couples with both partners being negative for HBV surface antigen. The percentage of normal sperm morphology in HBV-seropositive husbands was significantly lower than that of seronegative counterparts.

  7. Mass treatment with ivermectin for filariasis control in Papua New Guinea: impact on mosquito survival.

    PubMed

    Bockarie, M J; Hii, J L; Alexander, N D; Bockarie, F; Dagoro, H; Kazura, J W; Alpers, M P

    1999-05-01

    Field studies were carried out to determine the impact of mass human treatment with ivermectin on the survival of anthropophagic mosquitoes of the Anopheles punctulatus complex (Diptera: Culicidae), the vectors of lymphatic filariasis and malaria in Papua New Guinea. In a village where mass treatment had been given, using 400 microg/kg ivermectin plus 6 mg/kg diethylcarbamazine citrate (DEC), we performed pre- and post-treatment collections of freshly blood-engorged mosquitoes from the same nine bedrooms. All blood-fed mosquitoes collected less than 4 days after mass treatment died within 9 days, whereas 67% of those collected before treatment survived for >9 days. Comparison (using the log-rank test) of the survival curves for mosquitoes collected (i) before treatment, (ii)<4 days after treatment, and (iii) 28 days after treatment, showed the survival rate of group (ii) to be significantly lower than the other two (chi2=176, df=2, P<0.0001). Pre- and post-treatment all-night landing catches showed no reduction in human biting rates in the experimental village. In another village, where people were mass treated with ivermectin (400 microg/kg) only, the survival rates of freshly blood-engorged An. punctulatus collected from bedroom resting-sites less than 1 day after treatment, were compared to similar collections carried out at the same time in a nearby village where people were not treated with ivermectin. The 48-h survival rate for the ivermectin-treated village was 31% compared to 94% for the other; this difference was highly significant (chi2=32.42, df=1, P<0.0001). Mosquitoes fed 2 months post-treatment with DEC or collected 38 days post-treatment with ivermectin had normal survival rates. We conclude that the duration of the systemic lethal effect of ivermectin on mosquitoes is insufficient to be of epidemiological significance in filariasis control programmes that are based on biannual and annual single-dose treatments, but might reduce vectorial capacity

  8. Impact of Advanced Health Care Directives on Treatment Decisions by Physicians in Patients with Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Chaudhry, Saqib A.; Connelly, Bo; Abott, Emily; Janjua, Tariq; Kim, Stanley H.; Miley, Jefferson T.; Rodriguez, Gustavo J.; Uzun, Guven; Watanabe, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    Background The implementation of advance health care directives, prepared by almost half of the adult population in United States remains relatively under studied. We determined the impact of advance health care directives on treatment decisions by multiple physicians in stroke patients. Methods A de-identified summary of clinical and radiological records of 28 patients with stroke was given to six stroke physicians who were not involved in the care of the patients. Each physician independently rated 28 treatment decisions per patient in the presence or absence of advance health care directives 1 month apart to allow memory washout. The percentage agreement to treat/intervene per patient and proportion of treatment withheld as a group were estimated for each of the 28 treatment decision items. We also determined the interobserver reliability between the two raters (attorneys) in interpretation of 6 items characterizing the adequacy of documentation within the 28 advance health care directives. Results The percentage agreement among physician raters for treatment decisions in 28 stroke patients was highest for treatment of hyperpyrexia (100%, 100%) and lowest for intensive care unit monitoring duration based on family-physician considerations outside of accepted criteria within institution (68%, 69%) in presence and absence of advance care health directives. The physician rater agreement in choosing “yes” was highest for “routine complexity” treatment decisions and lowest for “moderate complexity” treatment decisions. The choice of withholding treatment in routine complexity,” “moderate complexity,” or “high complexity” treatment decisions was remarkably similar among raters in presence or absence of advance care health directives. The only treatment decision that showed an impact of advance care health directives was intensive care unit monitoring withheld in 32% of treatment decisions in presence of directives (compared with 8% in the absence

  9. Surface Damage and Treatment by Impact of a Low Temperature Nitrogen Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laribou, Hicham; Fressengeas, Claude; Entemeyer, Denis; Jeanclaude, Véronique; Tazibt, Abdel

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen jets under high pressure and low temperature have been introduced recently. The process consists in projecting onto a surface a low temperature jet obtained from releasing the liquid nitrogen stored in a high pressure tank (e.g. 3000 bars) through a nozzle. It can be used in a range of industrial applications, including surface treatment or material removal through cutting, drilling, striping and cleaning. The process does not generate waste other than the removed matter, and it only releases neutral gas into the atmosphere. This work is aimed at understanding the mechanisms of the interaction between the jet and the material surface. Depending on the impacted material, the thermo-mechanical shock and blast effect induced by the jet can activate a wide range of damage mechanisms, including cleavage, crack nucleation and spalling, as well as void expansion and localized ductile failure. The test parameters (standoff distance, dwell time, operating pressure) play a role in selecting the dominant damage mechanism, but combinations of these various modes are usually present. Surface treatment through phase transformation or grain fragmentation in a layer below the surface can also be obtained by adequate tuning of the process parameters. In the current study, work is undertaken to map the damage mechanisms in metallic materials as well as the influence of the test parameters on damage, along with measurements of the thermo-mechanical conditions (impact force, temperature) in the impacted area.

  10. Effects of Various Heat Treatments on the Ballistic Impact Properties of Inconel 718 Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2000-01-01

    Uncontained failures of aircraft engine fan blades are serious events that can cause equipment damage and loss of life. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification requires that all engines demonstrate the ability to contain a released fan blade with the engine running at full power. However, increased protection generally comes at the expense of weight. Proper choice of materials is therefore imperative to an optimized design. The process of choosing a good casing material is done primarily through trial and error. This costly procedure could be minimized if there was a better understanding of the relationships among static material properties, impact properties, and failure mechanisms. This work is part of a program being conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to study these relationships. Ballistic impact tests were conducted on flat, square sheets of Inconel 718 that had been subjected to different heat treatments. Two heat treatments and the as-received condition were studied. In addition, results were compared with those from an earlier study involving a fourth heat treatment. The heat treatments were selected on the basis of their effects on the static tensile properties of the material. The impact specimens used in this study were 17.8-cm square panels that were centered and clamped over a 15.2-cm square hole in a 1.27-cm-thick steel plate. Three nominal plate thickness dimensions were studied, 1.0, 1.8, and 2.0 mm. For each thickness, all the specimens were taken from the same sheet of material. The projectile was a Ti-6Al-4V cylinder with a length of 25.4 mm, a diameter of 12.7 mm, and a mass ranging from 14.05 to 14.20 g. The projectiles were accelerated toward the specimens at normal incidence using a gas gun with a 2-m-long, 12.7-mm inner-diameter barrel. The ballistic limit for each heat treatment condition and thickness was determined by conducting a number of impact tests that bracketed as closely as possible the velocity

  11. No impact of concomitant methotrexate use on serious adverse event and serious infection risk in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with bDMARDs: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baradat, Claire; Degboé, Yannick; Constantin, Arnaud; Cantagrel, Alain; Ruyssen-Witrand, Adeline

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To compare the risk of serious adverse events, serious infections and death caused by methotrexate and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD) combination therapy versus a bDMARD prescribed as monotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods A systematic literature review was conducted until February 2016 in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases by selecting randomised controlled trials comparing methotrexate and bDMARD combination therapy to bDMARD monotherapy in RA. The meta-analysis compared the occurrence of (1) serious adverse events, (2) serious infections and (3) death among these groups by the Mantel-Haenszel method. Results The literature review selected 16 controlled trials comparing methotrexate and bDMARD combination therapy to bDMARD monotherapy. After meta-analysis comparing patients under monotherapy to those under combination therapy: (1) the risk of occurrence of serious adverse events was comparable in 12 trials: RR (95% CI) 0.92 (0.78 to 1.08). (2) No significant difference was observed in the risk of occurrence of serious infections in 13 trials: RR (95% CI) 1.15 (0.84 to 1.58). We noted a trend, although insignificant, towards a high risk of the occurrence of tuberculosis in 10 studies: RR (95% CI) 1.78 (0.63 to 4.99). (3) The risk of death was comparable in 12 trials: RR (95% CI) 0.73 (0.40 to 1.35). Conclusions The results showed no significant difference between the two groups, confirming that the use of methotrexate and bDMARD combination therapy in RA does not cause an increased risk of serious adverse events or serious infections or death compared with bDMARD monotherapy. PMID:28270933

  12. Impacts of microalgae pre-treatments for improved anaerobic digestion: thermal treatment, thermal hydrolysis, ultrasound and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ometto, Francesco; Quiroga, Gerardo; Pšenička, Pavel; Whitton, Rachel; Jefferson, Bruce; Villa, Raffaella

    2014-11-15

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of microalgae is primarily inhibited by the chemical composition of their cell walls containing biopolymers able to resist bacterial degradation. Adoption of pre-treatments such as thermal, thermal hydrolysis, ultrasound and enzymatic hydrolysis have the potential to remove these inhibitory compounds and enhance biogas yields by degrading the cell wall, and releasing the intracellular algogenic organic matter (AOM). This work investigated the effect of four pre-treatments on three microalgae species, and their impact on the quantity of soluble biomass released in the media and thus on the digestion process yields. The analysis of the composition of the soluble COD released and of the TEM images of the cells showed two main degradation actions associated with the processes: (1) cell wall damage with the release of intracellular AOM (thermal, thermal hydrolysis and ultrasound) and (2) degradation of the cell wall constituents with the release of intracellular AOM and the solubilisation of the cell wall biopolymers (enzymatic hydrolysis). As a result of this, enzymatic hydrolysis showed the greatest biogas yield increments (>270%) followed by thermal hydrolysis (60-100%) and ultrasounds (30-60%).

  13. Impact of Parkinson's disease and its pharmacologic treatment on quality of life and economic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Scheife, R T; Schumock, G T; Burstein, A; Gottwald, M D; Luer, M S

    2000-05-15

    The impact of Parkinson's disease (PD) and its pharmacologic treatment on health-related quality of life (HRQL) and economic outcomes is reviewed. PD is a chronic and progressive neurologic disorder characterized by specific motor deficits resulting from the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The cardinal symptoms are tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and loss of postural reflexes. PD markedly reduces HRQL and places an economic burden on society of up to $25 billion per year. Patients' inability to move freely and to perform everyday tasks restricts their independence and leads to increased reliance on caregivers and assistive devices. Emotional and psychosocial well-being is also negatively affected. As the disease progresses, the response to levodopa typically decreases and various motor complications develop; these are difficult to treat and result in further declines in HRQL. The economic costs of PD include both direct health care costs (for drugs, physician services, and hospitalization) and indirect costs (for lost worker productivity). Economic analyses of PD and its treatments can help guide effective allocation of health care resources. Various antiparkinsonian agents and formulations, such as extended-release levodopa-carbidopa and pramipexole, have been found to be cost-effective relative to other agents. The newest antiparkinsonian drugs, cathechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors, also have the potential to improve HRQL and economic outcomes, although more study is needed to confirm this. The total impact of PD and its treatment can be fully appreciated only when HRQL and economic outcomes, in addition to clinical outcomes, are examined.

  14. Fluoxetine treatment reverses the intergenerational impact of maternal separation on fear and anxiety behaviors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Gui-Jing; Yang, Yuan; Cao, Jun; Mao, Rong-Rong; Xu, Lin

    2015-05-01

    Early life stress increases risks of fear and anxiety related disorders in adulthood, which may be alleviated by fluoxetine treatment. However, the intergenerational impacts of maternal separation (MS) on fear and anxiety behaviors from father to their offspring are little known. And the potential effects of fluoxetine treatment on the intergenerational transmission have not been well tested. Here, we investigated whether fluoxetine can reverse the intergenerational effects of MS on fear and anxiety behaviors. The first generation (F1) male rats were exposed to MS 3 h daily from postnatal day 2-14 and then treated with fluoxetine for four weeks during adulthood before fear conditioning. We found that maternal separation significantly impaired contextual fear extinction in F1 adult male rats but not in their second generation (F2). Although no obvious effects of MS on anxiety were observed in F1 male rats, the F2 offspring displayed a phenotype of low anxiety-like behaviors despite they were reared in normal condition. Fluoxetine treatment in F1 males not only reversed the impairment of fear extinction in F1 males but also the low anxiety-like behaviors in their F2 offspring. These findings highlight the intergenerational impacts of early life stress on fear and anxiety behaviors, and provide a new sight of the intergenerational effect of fluoxetine therapy for early life stress related mental problems.

  15. Impact of ultraviolet radiation treatments on the quality of freshly prepared tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) juice.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Rajeev

    2016-12-15

    Impact of ultraviolet (UV-C) radiation treatments (0, 15, 30 and 60min) on freshly extracted tomato juice quality (physicochemical properties, antioxidant activity and microbial load) was evaluated. On exposure to UV-C, level of water activity, total soluble solids, and titratable acidity exhibited non-significant increase up to 30min of exposure time. Regarding colour analysis, L∗ value significantly increased with subsequent decrease in a∗ and b∗ values post UV-C treatments. Clarity, DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging activity and total phenolics content significantly increased, whereas ascorbic acid level significantly reduced at 60min of UV-C exposure time. So also, lycopene content exhibited a non-significant decrease after UV-C treatment. Microbial studies showed reduction in total plate count and total mould counts post UV-C treatment. Overall, UV-C treatment being a physical, non-thermal method of food preservation holds the ability to improve or preserve vital quality parameters in freshly prepared tomato juices, and henceforth possesses high scope for commercial exploration.

  16. Evaluation of the impact of polyclonal infection and heteroresistance on treatment of tuberculosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kargarpour Kamakoli, Mansour; Sadegh, Hamid Reza; Farmanfarmaei, Ghazaleh; Masoumi, Morteza; Fateh, Abolfazl; Javadi, Gholamreza; Rahimi Jamnani, Fatemeh; Vaziri, Farzam; Siadat, Seyed Davar

    2017-01-01

    Mixed strain infections of Mycobacterium tuberculosis make diagnosis, treatment, and control of tuberculosis (TB) more difficult. This study was aimed to evaluate the relationship between mixed infections, antibiotic resistance patterns and treatment of TB patients. In this study, among 2850 suspected TB clinical samples, a total of ninety-six clinical samples from 66 TB confirmed patients were subjected to the 24-locus variable-number tandem repeat method to evaluate the prevalence of mixed infections. For all studied strains, 288 colonies (three individual clones for each sample) were isolated from different colonies and separately analyzed by the Drug Susceptibility Test (DST). For all patients, follow up was done after 6 months of treatment. Based on direct 24 loci MIRU-VNTR, in the 66 TB patients, 53% (35/66) showed mixed infection. In the mixed samples, 45.71% (16/35) showed different antibiotic resistant patterns. Among the mixed infection patients, eight (22.9%; 8/35) showed treatment failure after six- month therapy. Six of these non-treated patients (75%; 6/8) had different antibiotic resistant patterns. We conclude that mixed infections, have a negative impact on treatment of TB patients especially when co-infecting M. tuberculosis strains display heteroresistance. PMID:28120910

  17. Impact of Treatment for Depression on Desire for Hastened Death in Patients With Advanced AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Breitbart, William; Rosenfeld, Barry; Gibson, Christopher; Kramer, Michael; Li, Yuelin; Tomarken, Alexis; Nelson, Christian; Pessin, Hayley; Esch, Julie; Galietta, Michele; Garcia, Nerina; Brechtl, John; Schuster, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the development of multi-drug regimens for HIV, palliative care and quality-of-life issues in patients with advanced AIDS remain important areas of clinical investigation. Objective Authors assessed the impact of treatment for depression on desire for hastened death in patients with advanced AIDS. Method Patients with advanced AIDS (N=372) were interviewed shortly after admission to a palliative-care facility, and were reinterviewed monthly for the next 2 months. Patients diagnosed with a major depressive syndrome were provided with antidepressant treatment and reinterviewed weekly. Desire for hastened death was assessed with two questionnaire measures. Results Desire for death was highly associated with depression, and it decreased dramatically in patients who responded to antidepressant treatment. Little change in desire for hastened death was observed in patients whose depression did not improve. Although improved depression was not significantly associated with the use of antidepressant medication, those individuals prescribed antidepressant medication showed the largest decreases in desire for hastened death. Discussion Successful treatment for depression appears to substantially decrease desire for hastened death in patients with advanced AIDS. The authors discuss implications of these findings for palliative-care treatment and the physician-assisted suicide debate. PMID:20332284

  18. [Treatment of breast and uterus cancer: physiological and psychological impact on sexual function].

    PubMed

    Hannoun-Levi, J M

    2005-05-01

    The analysis of the impact of breast and uterus cancer and their treatments on sexual function remains a tricky approach, especially due to some difficulties of communication between patient and medical staff. Some cultural, social, physiological and psychological considerations can change the evolution of sexual function during and after cancer treatment. For breast cancer, mastectomy or conservative approach, as well as radiotherapy and chemotherapy, can induce a modification of body image, femininity, power of seduction and sexuality. For uterus cancer, radio-surgical treatments can induce local (shrinking or vagina dryness,...) or general (early menopause) modifications leading to a decrease of sexual relations. The present analysis of the literature gives a better knowledge of the sexual function troubles according to the type, stage and treatment of the cancer as well as the context in which it appears, especially in regard to personal, family (couple relation before the disease occurrence), social and cultural considerations. A critical point is to introduce, as soon as possible, in the therapeutic program, a global approach including side effects on sexual function and to analyze very carefully the own ability of the patient to manage the difficulties occurring during the treatment.

  19. Dental transposition of canine and lateral incisor and impacted central incisor treatment: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Gebert, Tarcisio Jacinto; Palma, Vinícius Canavarros; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Dental transposition and impaction are disorders related to ectopic eruption or failure in tooth eruption, which can affect child physical, mental and social development and may be difficult to be clinically solved. Methods We describe a case of transposition between the upper left canine and lateral incisor associated with impaction of the central incisor on the same side, in a 12-year-old patient. Conservative treatment involving surgical-orthodontic correction of transposed teeth and traction of the central incisor was conducted. Conclusion The option of correcting transposition and orthodontic traction by means of the segmented arch technique with devices such as cantilever and TMA rectangular wire loops, although a complex alternative, was proved to be esthetically and functionally effective. PMID:24713567

  20. Rare and very rare adverse effects of clozapine

    PubMed Central

    De Fazio, Pasquale; Gaetano, Raffaele; Caroleo, Mariarita; Cerminara, Gregorio; Maida, Francesca; Bruno, Antonio; Muscatello, Maria Rosaria; Moreno, Maria Jose Jaén; Russo, Emilio; Segura-García, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Clozapine (CLZ) is the drug of choice for the treatment of resistant schizophrenia; however, its suitable use is limited by the complex adverse effects’ profile. The best-described adverse effects in the literature are represented by agranulocytosis, myocarditis, sedation, weight gain, hypotension, and drooling; nevertheless, there are other known adverse effects that psychiatrists should readily recognize and manage. This review covers the “rare” and “very rare” known adverse effects of CLZ, which have been accurately described in literature. An extensive search on the basis of predefined criteria was made using CLZ and its combination with adverse effects as keywords in electronic databases. Data show the association between the use of CLZ and uncommon adverse effects, including ischemic colitis, paralytic ileus, hematemesis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, priapism, urinary incontinence, pityriasis rosea, intertriginous erythema, pulmonary thromboembolism, pseudo-pheochromocytoma, periorbital edema, and parotitis, which are influenced by other variables including age, early diagnosis, and previous/current pharmacological therapies. Some of these adverse effects, although unpredictable, are often manageable if promptly recognized and treated. Others are serious and potentially life-threatening. However, an adequate knowledge of the drug, clinical vigilance, and rapid intervention can drastically reduce the morbidity and mortality related to CLZ treatment. PMID:26273202

  1. Toxins and adverse drug reactions affecting the equine nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Dominic R

    2011-12-01

    This article provides an overview of the more common toxins and adverse drug reactions, along with more rare toxins and reactions (Table 1), that result in neurologic dysfunction in horses. A wide variety of symptoms, treatments, and outcomes are seen with toxic neurologic disease in horses. An in-depth history and thorough physical examination are needed to determine if a toxin or adverse drug reaction is responsible for the clinical signs. Once a toxin or adverse drug reaction is identified, the specific antidote, if available, and supportive care should be administered promptly.

  2. Impact of Different Treatment Approaches on Pregnancy Outcomes in 99 Women Treated for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Filippone, Francesco Romeo; Alfo, Marco; Muni, Roberta; Cavalieri, Elena; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Annechini, Giorgia; Valeriani, Maurizio; Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Minniti, Giuseppe; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pregnancy outcomes in women with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) diagnosis, treated between 1972 and 1999 at Department of Radiotherapy and Hematology of University 'Sapienza' of Roma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 99 female patients that conceived after treatment for HL. Fifty-nine (59%) were treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, 32 (32%) with radiotherapy alone as supradiaphragmatic or as infradiaphragmatic and 8 (8%) patients with chemotherapy alone. Results: Ninety-nine patients reported 145 pregnancies. We observed 132 deliveries (2 of them twin births) after a median of 55 months (range, 14-278 months) from the end of therapy. Twelve women (12%) experienced 13 miscarriages after a median of 50 months (range, 13-120) from the end of therapy. We recorded 9/132 (7%) premature births and 3/134 babies (2%) were underweight at the time of birth. We recorded 2 cases of congenital malformations. No statistical differences were recorded when adverse pregnancy outcomes were analyzed with respect to chemotherapy alone, radiotherapy alone, or combined therapy. Conclusions: No significant associations between pregnancy outcomes and therapeutic approaches were found. In particular, the infradiaphragmatic radiotherapy showed no statistical association with miscarriages, premature birth, and low birth weight at term when compared with other therapeutic approaches.

  3. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Hallucinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, C.L.; Dube, S.R.; Felitti, V.J.; Anda, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:: Little information is available about the contribution of multiple adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) to the likelihood of reporting hallucinations. We used data from the ACE study to assess this relationship. Methods:: We conducted a survey about childhood abuse and household dysfunction while growing up, with questions about health…

  4. Adverse ocular reactions to drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Spiteri, M. A.; James, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs acting on various parts of the body may also affect the eye insidiously. Increased awareness of such drug toxicity by the prescribing doctor should encourage him to consider effects on the cornea, lens, retina, optic nerve and elsewhere when checking the patient's progress. The following review concerns adverse ocular effects of systemic drug administration. PMID:6356101

  5. Interdisciplinary treatment of unruptured intracranial aneurysms: impact of intraprocedural rupture and ischemia in 563 aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Mathias; Bakhshai, Yasmin; Zausinger, Stefan; Fesl, Gunther; Janssen, Hendrik; Brückmann, Hartmut; Tonn, Jörg Christian; Schichor, Christian

    2013-05-01

    This study was conducted to determine the risk factors and the clinical impact of intraprocedural aneurysm rupture (IAR) and periprocedural ischemia in the treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs). A single-center retrospective data analysis of 563 UIAs treated between 2000 and 2010 was conducted. Treatment assignment was made on the basis of individual aneurysmal criteria in an interdisciplinary neurovascular conference with attending neurosurgeons, neuroradiologists and neurologists. In 363 microsurgical and 200 endovascular procedures, the permanent morbidity rate was 4.9 and 6 %. The overall mortality rate was 0.7 %-no procedure-related death occurred in microsurgery, and four patients had fatal outcomes after endovascular treatment. IAR occurred in 34 (9.4 %) microsurgical and 8 (4 %) endovascular procedures (p = 0.03). Risk factors for IAR were age, aneurysm diameter, symptomatic aneurysms, hypertension and smoking in microsurgery. IAR was associated with significantly worse outcome at discharge after microsurgical and at discharge and follow-up after endovascular procedures and was followed by fatal outcome in four endovascular cases. Periprocedural ischemia (12.1 vs. 9 %) resulted in significantly worse outcome in both groups. Risk factors for periprocedural ischemia were IAR during microsurgery, aneurysm diameter, symptomatic aneurysms and smoking in either group. Treatment of UIAs can be conducted with an equivalent low rate of permanent morbidity for clipping and coiling-treatment of symptomatic aneurysms elevates the procedural risk. IAR was less frequent during coiling, but was associated with relevant mortality. IAR and periprocedural ischemia represent significant treatment-associated risks, which should be taken into account in interdisciplinary treatment planning and patient counseling.

  6. The impact of melanoma genetics on treatment response and resistance in clinical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Kunz, M; Hölzel, M

    2017-02-16

    Recent attempts to characterize the melanoma mutational landscape using high-throughput sequencing technologies have identified new genes and pathways involved in the molecular pathogenesis of melanoma. Apart from mutated BRAF, NRAS, and KIT, a series of new recurrently mutated candidate genes with impact on signaling pathways have been identified such as NF1, PTEN, IDH1, RAC1, ARID2, and TP53. Under targeted treatment using BRAF and MEK1/2 inhibitors either alone or in combination, a majority of patients experience recurrences, which are due to different genetic mechanisms such as gene amplifications of BRAF or NRAS, MEK1/2 and PI3K mutations. In principle, resistance mechanisms converge on two signaling pathways, MAPK and PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathways. Resistance may be due to small subsets of resistant cells within a heterogeneous tumor mass not identified by sequencing of the bulk tumor. Future sequencing studies addressing tumor heterogeneity, e.g., by using single-cell sequencing technology, will most likely improve this situation. Gene expression patterns of metastatic lesions were also shown to predict treatment response, e.g., a MITF-low/NF-κB-high melanoma phenotype is resistant against classical targeted therapies. Finally, more recent treatment approaches using checkpoint inhibitors directed against PD-1 and CTLA-4 are very effective in melanoma and other tumor entities. Here, the mutational and neoantigen load of melanoma lesions may help to predict treatment response. Taken together, the new sequencing, molecular, and bioinformatic technologies exploiting the melanoma genome for treatment decisions have significantly improved our understanding of melanoma pathogenesis, treatment response, and resistance for either targeted treatment or immune checkpoint blockade.

  7. A review of the impact of exclusion criteria on the generalizability of schizophrenia treatment research.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Keith

    2014-06-20

    Treatment research studies employ criteria that determine which patients are eligible to participate and which are not. When such exclusion criteria produce a treatment research sample that is a small and unrepresentative subset of all patients with a particular disease, clinicians may be hesitant to apply the research results in front-line clinical practice. Accordingly, the present paper reviews the English-language literature on exclusion criteria in schizophrenia treatment research and draws initial conclusions about their impact.Empirically-derived estimates of the rate of exclusion vary widely (31.0-98.2%), but the best available evidence suggests that about 4 in 5 patients with schizophrenia would be ineligible to enroll in a typical treatment research study. Women are particularly likely to be excluded from schizophrenia treatment research, which is problematic from both a clinical and social justice viewpoint. Excluded patients also tend to be older than eligible patients, and, though it has been examined in only a few studies, they also tend to have more severe problems at baseline and different outcomes over time than patients who are allowed to participate in research.More limited use of exclusion criteria in schizophrenia treatment research would be beneficial in terms of increasing generalizability, but would also potentially involve costs, particularly a need for larger samples. More modest steps that would improve treatment outcome research reports include requiring a full description of the rationale for and nature of any exclusion criteria, and, having a designated place in the discussion section which draws attention to the proper scope of generalization.

  8. Impact of centralized intake on drug and alcohol treatment placement decisions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Christy K; Foss, Mark A

    2002-01-01

    The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) and others have asserted that matching persons to an appropriate level of care will result in more positive and cost-effective treatment outcomes. The Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, through its Target Cities demonstration project, proposed the implementation of centralized intake and the use of comprehensive standardized assessment procedures as mechanisms for improving the treatment process. As part of Chicago Target Cities, it was decided to implement ASAM criteria at the central intake units (CIU). A comprehensive assessment instrument was developed, assessors were trained, and decision protocols were designed to facilitate the implementation. This article examines the impact of these interventions on the placement decision process. The placement decisions of the assessors employed by individual treatment agencies before implementation of the CIU were compared to the placement decision process of the CIU assessors. The role of patient preferences, the information assessors used to make placement decisions, and the willingness of assessors to make the clinical judgments indicated by ASAM PPC-2 were examined. Results indicate that the CIU assessors' final treatment recommendations were more similar to what they thought was best for the patient, and less related to patient preference than those made by assessors at the individual treatment agencies. The CIU assessors also used a wider range of information when making their placement decisions than did the Pre-CIU assessors. Finally, the CIU assessors were more willing to rate patients on ASAM criteria than were the Pre-CIU assessors. Implementation of the ASAM PPC-2 at the CIUs produced the expected differences in the placement decision processes at the CIU from those observed at the treatment agencies. The results indicate that the implementation of ASAM PPC-2 is both feasible and produces expected changes in the placement decision process.

  9. Adverse childhood experience and asthma onset: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Exley, Daniel; Norman, Alyson; Hyland, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Adverse childhood experiences such as abuse and neglect are associated with subsequent immune dysregulation. Some studies show an association between adverse childhood experiences and asthma onset, although significant disparity in results exists in the published literature. We aimed to review available studies employing a prospective design that investigates associations between adverse childhood experience and asthma. A search protocol was developed and studies were drawn from four electronic journal databases. Studies were selected in accordance with pre-set inclusion criteria and relevant data were extracted. 12 studies, assessing data from a total of 31 524 individuals, were identified that investigate the impact of a range of adverse childhood experiences on the likelihood of developing asthma. Evidence suggests that chronic stress exposure and maternal distress in pregnancy operate synergistically with known triggers such as traffic-related air pollution to increase asthma risk. Chronic stress in early life is associated with an increased risk of asthma onset. There is evidence that adverse childhood experience increases the impact of traffic-related air pollution and inconsistent evidence that adverse childhood experience has an independent effect on asthma onset.

  10. Biodegradation and reversible inhibitory impact of sulfamethoxazole on the utilization of volatile fatty acids during anaerobic treatment of pharmaceutical industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cetecioglu, Zeynep; Ince, Bahar; Gros, Meritxell; Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Barceló, Damia; Ince, Orhan; Orhon, Derin

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the chronic impact and biodegradability of sulfamethoxazole under anaerobic conditions. For this purpose, a lab-scale anaerobic sequencing batch reactor was operated in a sequence of different phases with gradually increasing sulfamethoxazole doses of 1 to 45 mg/L. Conventional parameters, such as COD, VFA, and methane generation, were monitored with corresponding antimicrobial concentrations in the reactor and the methanogenic activity of the sludge. The results revealed that anaerobic treatment was suitable for pharmaceutical industry wastewater with concentrations of up to 40 mg/L of sulfamethoxazole. Higher levels exerted toxic effects on the microbial community under anaerobic conditions, causing the inhibition of substrate/COD utilization and biogas generation and leading to a total collapse of the reactor. The adverse long-term impact was quite variable for fermentative bacteria and methanogenic achaea fractions of the microbial community based on changes inflicted on the composition of the residual organic substrate and mRNA expression of the key enzymes.

  11. The co-occurrence of reading disorder and ADHD: epidemiology, treatment, psychosocial impact, and economic burden.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Chris C; Gelhorn, Heather L; Bell, Jill A; Classi, Peter M

    2012-01-01

    The co-occurrence of reading disorder (RD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has received increasing attention. This review summarizes the epidemiology, treatment strategies, psychosocial impact, and economic burden associated with the co-occurrence of these conditions. Common genetic and neuropsychological deficits may partially explain the high degree of overlap between RD and ADHD. Children who face the additive problems of both disorders are at greater risk for academic failure, psychosocial consequences, and poor long-term outcomes that persist into adulthood. However, few studies have evaluated interventions targeted to this patient population, underscoring the importance of identifying effective multimodal treatments that address the neuropsychological deficits of RD and ADHD through carefully planned clinical research.

  12. Pregnancy morbidity in antiphospholipid syndrome: what is the impact of treatment?

    PubMed

    de Jesús, Guilherme R; Rodrigues, Gustavo; de Jesús, Nilson R; Levy, Roger A

    2014-02-01

    Women with persistently circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) have a higher incidence of recurrent abortions, fetal losses, pre-eclampsia, and placental insufficiency. Current treatment of patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) during pregnancy with heparin and aspirin can act by preventing clot formation and improving live birth rates, but other obstetric morbidities remain high, especially in patients with a history of thrombotic events. In addition to the classical thrombotic placental events, other factors involving inflammation and complement activation seem to play a role in certain complications. In this article, we will review how medications interfere in the pathogenic mechanisms of APS, discuss the impact of current recommended treatment on pregnancy morbidity, and analyze new promising therapies.

  13. Impact of imagery rehearsal treatment on distressing dreams, psychological distress, and sleep parameters in nightmare patients.

    PubMed

    Germain, Anne; Nielsen, Tore

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the impact of imagery rehearsal treatment (IRT) on nightmare frequency, psychological distress, and sleep quality using polysomnography (PSG). 12 chronic nightmare patients completed prospective dream logs, measures of psychological distress, and underwent PSG prior to and 8.5 weeks following a single IRT session. Post-treatment, significant reductions were observed in retrospective nightmare frequency (d = 1.06, p = .007), prospective bad dream frequency (d = 0.53, p = .03), and anxiety scores (d = 1.01, p = .004). Minimal sleep alterations were found post-IRT, and varied as a function of nightmare etiology. The results independently replicate the efficacy of IRT for alleviating disturbing dreams and psychological distress. Sleep improvement may occur later in the recovery process.

  14. Effects of ultrasound pretreatment on the characteristic evolutions of drinking water treatment sludge and its impact on coagulation property of sludge recycling process.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Yang, Yanling; Li, Xing

    2015-11-01

    Large amounts of drinking water treatment sludge (DWTS) are produced during the flocculation or flotation process. The recycling of DWTS is important for reducing and reclaiming the waste residues from drinking water treatment. To improve the coagulation step of the DWTS recycling process, power ultrasound was used as a pretreatment to disintegrate the DWTS and degrade or inactivate the constituents that are difficult to remove by coagulation. The effects of ultrasound pretreatment on the characteristics of DWTS, including the extent of disintegration, variation in DWTS floc characteristics, and DWTS dewaterability, were investigated. The capacity of the recycling process to remove particulates and organic matter from low-turbidity surface water compared to a control treatment process without DWTS was subsequently evaluated. The coagulation mechanism was further investigated by analyzing the formation, breakage, and re-growth of re-coagulated flocs. Our results indicated that under the low energy density applied (0.03-0.033 W/mL) for less than 15 min at a frequency of 160 kHz, the level of organic solubilization was less elevated, which was evidenced by the lower release of proteins and polysaccharides and lower fluorescence intensities of humic- and protein-like substances. The applied ultrasound conditions had an adverse effect on the dewaterability of the DWTS. Ultrasound pretreatment had no significant impact on the pH or surface charge of the DWTS flocs, whereas particle size decreased slightly and the specific surface area was moderately increased. The pollution removal capacity decreased somewhat for the recycled sonicated DWTS treatment, which was primarily ascribed to organic solubilization rather than variability in the floc characteristics of sonicated DWTS. The main coagulation mechanism was floc sweeping and physical adsorption. The breakage process of the flocs formed by the recycling process displayed distinct irreversibility, and the flocs were

  15. The perceived impact of extraction and nonextraction treatments on matched samples of African American patients.

    PubMed

    Scott, S H; Johnston, L E

    1999-09-01

    Orthodontic patients of African descent often seek some measure of reduction in profile protrusion. Lip retraction, however, seems to imply a need for premolar extraction. But in a nonextraction era, what does orthodontics have to offer the bimaxillary protrusion patient? To a considerable extent, it depends on what the patient wants and what treatment can provide. The present study was designed to address these questions by comparing the esthetic impact of extraction and nonextraction therapy on two morphologically similar samples of African American patients with Class I and II malocclusions. In addition to the patients, four panels of judges (black and white orthodontists and black and white laypersons) were asked to compare the pretreatment and posttreatment profile tracings and to quantify their perceptions of the esthetic impact of the change that occurred during treatment. Although there was a strong correlation among the various groups' ratings, there were a number of statistically significant differences. Premolar extraction led to a modest reduction in dental and soft tissue protrusion; nonextraction, by way of contrast, produced an increase. Presumably in response to these changes, all panels, independent of race or education, tended to prefer the posttreatment profiles, especially the posttreatment extraction profiles. There was, however, a significant interaction between race and treatment. The perceived effects of nonextraction treatment were modest and largely unrelated to the pretreatment profile, whereas the impact of premolar extraction was a highly significant function of initial protrusion: convex profiles were improved, but relatively straight profiles were made worse. The various panels, however, differed in their estimate of the point at which a profile might benefit from extraction (ie, profile reduction). For our white panelists, that point was reached when the lower lip was about 2 mm in front of Ricketts' E-plane. For our black panelists

  16. The impact of orthodontic treatment on the quality of life a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although a great number of specific quality of life measures have been developed to analyze the impact of wearing fixed appliances, there is still a paucity of systematic appraisal of the consequences of orthodontics on quality of life. To assess the current evidence of the relationship between orthodontic treatment and quality of life. Methods Four electronic databases were searched for articles concerning the impact of orthodontic treatment on quality of life published between January 1960 and December 2013. Electronic searches were supplemented by manual searches and reference linkages. Eligible literature was reviewed and assessed by methodologic quality as well as by analytic results. Results From 204 reviewed articles, 11 met the inclusion criteria and used standardized health related quality of life and orthodontic assessment measures. The majority of studies (7/11) were conducted among child/adolescent populations. Eight of the papers were categorized as level 1 or 2 evidence based on the criteria of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. An observed association between quality of life and orthodontic treatment was generally detected irrespective of how they were assessed. However, the strength of the association could be described as modest at best. Key findings and future research considerations are described in the review. Conclusions Findings of this review suggest that there is an association (albeit modest) between orthodontic treatment and quality of life. There is a need for further studies of their relationship, particularly studies that employ standardized assessment methods so that outcomes are uniform and thus amenable to meta-analysis. PMID:24913619

  17. Sleep-disordered breathing in children with asthma: a systematic review on the impact of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Trinidad; Castro-Rodríguez, José A; Brockmann, Pablo E

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective was to perform a systematic review in order to describe the relationship between asthma and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children, especially regarding the impact of treatment and management. Methods We performed an electronic search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS database. Study inclusion criteria were the following: 1) studies that examined the relationship between asthma/wheezing and SDB/obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); and 2) studies conducted in children <18 years of age. Primary outcomes were the prevalence of asthma and SDB, the tests used for diagnosis, and the influence of their treatment and management. Results One thousand and twenty studies were identified, among which 32 were selected (n=143,343 children; 51% males; age [mean ± standard deviation] 8.4±2.5 years). Most studies (n=26) diagnosed SDB using questionnaires or clinical history. Nine studies performed a sleep study for diagnosing OSA. The diagnosis of asthma was based on clinical history (n=16), previous medical diagnosis (n=4), questionnaires (n=12), and spirometry (n=5). Children with asthma were more likely to develop habitual snoring and OSA, and children with SDB were more likely to develop asthma. Moreover, asthma was associated with more severe OSA, and the presence of SDB was associated with severe asthma. Treatment of SDB with adenotonsillectomy was associated with significant asthma improvement. Conclusion The relationship between asthma and SDB appears to be bidirectional, and adenotonsillectomy appears to improve asthma control. Future trials on how asthma treatment could impact on SDB are needed. PMID:27143940

  18. Charpy impact toughness of martensitic steels irradiated in FFTF: Effect of heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1992-12-31

    Charpy tests were made on plates of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels given four different normalizing-and-tempering treatments. One-third-size Charpy specimens from each steel were irradiated to 7.4-8 {times} 10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2} (about 34--37 dpa) at 420C in the Materials Open Test Assembly of the Fast Flux Test Facility. Specimens were also thermally aged to 20000 h at 400C to determine the effect of aging during irradiation. Previous work on these steels irradiated to 4--5 dpa at 365C in MOTA were reexamined in light of the new results. The tests indicated that prior austenite grain size, which was varied by different normalizing treatments, had an effect on impact behavior of the 9Cr-1MoVNb but not on the 12Cr-1MoVW. Tempering treatment had relatively little effect on the shift in DBTT for both steels. conclusions are presented on how heat treatment can be used to optimize properties.

  19. Charpy impact toughness of martensitic steels irradiated in FFTF: Effect of heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    Charpy tests were made on plates of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels given four different normalizing-and-tempering treatments. One-third-size Charpy specimens from each steel were irradiated to 7.4-8 [times] 10[sup 26] n/m[sup 2] (about 34--37 dpa) at 420C in the Materials Open Test Assembly of the Fast Flux Test Facility. Specimens were also thermally aged to 20000 h at 400C to determine the effect of aging during irradiation. Previous work on these steels irradiated to 4--5 dpa at 365C in MOTA were reexamined in light of the new results. The tests indicated that prior austenite grain size, which was varied by different normalizing treatments, had an effect on impact behavior of the 9Cr-1MoVNb but not on the 12Cr-1MoVW. Tempering treatment had relatively little effect on the shift in DBTT for both steels. conclusions are presented on how heat treatment can be used to optimize properties.

  20. Impact of high hydrostatic pressure treatment on microbial communities in chinese water-boiled salted duck.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yulin; Ye, Keping; Wang, Huhu; Sun, Yi; Xu, Xinglian; Liu, Dengyong; Zhou, Guanghong

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment on microbial communities in Chinese water-boiled salted duck (CWBSD) and the synergistic effect of HHP and mild heat treatment. In this work, the bacterial diversity was evaluated by using both a culture-dependent method and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The total aerobic bacterial counts in pressure-treated samples were significantly lower than those in controls, which indicated that HHP could extend the shelf life of CWBSD. Weissella hellenica and Enterobacteriaceae, the predominant bacteria found in CWBSD, were not detected after HHP treatment. On the other hand, Staphylococcus spp. and Bacillus spp. became the predominant bacteria in HHP-treated samples. Moreover, the inhibitory effect was greater at 400 MPa than at 200 MPa combined with mild heat at 40°C. This study investigated the diversity of bacteria in HHP-treated CWBSD, and the information derived from this research may help to understand the bacterial ecology and develop effective HHP treatments to extend the shelf life of CWBSD.