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Sample records for advertisement loudness mitigation

  1. 76 FR 32116 - Implementation of the Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation (CALM) Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ...''). \\7\\ See 1984 Order, FCC 84-300, 49 FR 28077, July 10, 1984 (``1984 Order'') (observing in 1984 that..., FCC 11-36, 76 FR 14856, March 18, 2011 (``Video Description NPRM''). See also ATSC A/53, Part 5: 2010... 01-306, 66 FR 58973, November 26, 2001. 12. Section 2(a) expressly applies to each...

  2. 77 FR 40276 - Implementation of the Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation (CALM) Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ... Order, FCC 84-300, 49 FR 28077, July 10, 1984 (``1984 Order'') (observing in 1984 that ``the Commission....'' See 1984 Order at para. 14. See 1979 NOI, 44 FR 40532, July 11, 1979. The NTSC analog television... Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010, MB Docket No. 11-43, Report and Order, 76...

  3. 78 FR 70907 - Implementation of the Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation (CALM) Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ..., 77 FR 40276, July 9, 2012 (CALM Act Report and Order). \\4\\ See infra para. 7. II. Background 2. On... Order on Reconsideration, FCC 95-196, 60 FR 35854, July 12, 1995. \\43\\ NCTA, Industry Data, Number of...-189, Thirteenth Annual Report, FCC 07- 206, 74 FR 11102, March 16, 2009 (Thirteenth Annual...

  4. Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFazio, Frank A.; Arnold, Douglas

    1988-01-01

    Reaching students and donors through advertising is discussed in several articles including: "Proven Effective," on what makes three advertising campaigns work; "Commercial Appeal," on how advertising can help institutions meet its goals (Frank A. DeFazio); "Desperately Seeking Savvy," on finding the right advertising agency (Douglas Arnold); and…

  5. [Advertising].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombard, Jim

    1979-01-01

    The author presents examples of subliminal or indirect advertising in the mass media and suggests that advertising analysis be part of the elementary curriculum so that children can become sensitized to such nonverbal influences on their behavior. (SJL)

  6. How Loud Is Too Loud?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Hearing Loss How Loud Is Too Loud? Past Issues / Spring ... about the causes and prevention of noise-induced hearing loss. Decibel Chart Decibel Chart Danger Levels Decibels Sound ...

  7. Binaural Loudness Constancy.

    PubMed

    Culling, John F; Dare, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In binaural loudness summation, diotic presentation of a sound usually produces greater loudness than monaural presentation. However, experiments using loudspeaker presentation with and without earplugs find that magnitude estimates of loudness are little altered by the earplug, suggesting a form of loudness constancy. We explored the significance of controlling stimulation of the second ear using meatal occlusion as opposed to the deactivation of one earphone. We measured the point of subjective loudness equality (PSLE) for monaural vs. binaural presentation using an adaptive technique for both speech and noise. These stimuli were presented in a reverberant room over a loudspeaker to the right of the listener, or over lightweight headphones. Using the headphones, stimuli were either presented dry, or matched to those of the loudspeaker by convolution with impulse responses measured from the loudspeaker to the listener position, using an acoustic manikin. The headphone response was also compensated. Using the loudspeaker, monaural presentation was achieved by instructing the listener to block the left ear with a finger. Near perfect binaural loudness constancy was observed using loudspeaker presentation, while there was a summation effect of 3-6 dB for both headphone conditions. However, only partial constancy was observed when meatal occlusion was simulated. These results suggest that there may be contributions to binaural loudness constancy from residual low frequencies at the occluded ear as well as a cognitive element, which is activated by the knowledge that one ear is occluded. PMID:27080647

  8. Overall loudness of steady sounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.; Canright, V. R.

    1980-01-01

    Loudness (in sones) and loudness level (in phons) of any sound that is steady for tenths of second can be calculated using computer program derived from new operational theory of loudness. Theory is constructed from psychoacoustic and physiological data on mammalian (monkey) auditory systems. Computer program permits prediction of loudness of any steady sound including, for example, transportation noises, machinery noises, and other environmental noises, with possible additional applications to broadcasting, sound reproduction, establishment and enforcement of noise laws.

  9. Loudness determined by power summation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    The predicted overall loudness of steady, broad-band noise is usually computed by summing weighted loudnesses of sub-bands of the noise intensity (mean-square pressure) spectrum. It is proposed, instead, that the overall loudness should be computed by summing weighted intensities of sub-bands ('critical bands') of noise and then obtaining the loudness of the sum. This method seems to yield better agreement with published loudness judgments than does the usual method. It appears that the proposed method should also yield better agreement with annoyance judgments than does the 'perceived noise' method of Kryter.

  10. Loudness of shaped sonic booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1990-01-01

    A loudness model is adopted to study the feasibility of designing and operating a supersonic transport to produce minimized sonic booms. The loudness contours in this technique extend to a lower frequency (1 Hz) and thus are appropriate for sonic booms that contain significant low frequency energy. Input to the loudness calculation procedure is the power spectral density of the pressure-time signature. Calculations of loudness, for both indoor and outdoor conditions, demonstrate that shaped sonic booms are potentially more acceptable than N-waves possessing the same peak overpressure.

  11. Time course of loudness recalibration: implications for loudness enhancement.

    PubMed

    Arieh, Yoav; Marks, Lawrence E

    2003-09-01

    Loudness recalibration, the effect of a relatively loud 2500-Hz recalibrating tone on the loudness of a relatively soft 2500-Hz target tone, was measured as a function of the interstimulus interval (ISI) between them. The loudness of the target tone, assessed by a 500-Hz comparison tone, declined when the ISI equaled or exceeded about 200 ms and leveled off at an ISI of about 700 ms. Notably, the target tone's loudness did not change significantly at very short ISIs (< 150 ms). The latter result is incompatible with the literature reporting loudness enhancement in this time window, but is compatible with the suggestion made by Scharf, Buus, and Nieder [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112, 807-810 (2002)] that early measurements of enhancement were contaminated by the influence of the recalibrating tone on the comparison tone when the two shared the same frequency. In a second experiment the frequency of the comparison tone was changed to 2500 Hz and the results of a loudness enhancement paradigm was successfully predicted from the time course of recalibration obtained in experiment 1. PMID:14514208

  12. Hearing Sensation Changes When a Warning Predicts a Loud Sound in the False Killer Whale (Pseudorca crassidens).

    PubMed

    Nachtigall, Paul E; Supin, Alexander Y

    2016-01-01

    Stranded whales and dolphins have sometimes been associated with loud anthropogenic sounds. Echolocating whales produce very loud sounds themselves and have developed the ability to protect their hearing from their own signals. A false killer whale's hearing sensitivity was measured when a faint warning sound was given just before the presentation of an increase in intensity to 170 dB. If the warning occurred within 1-9 s, as opposed to 20-40 s, the whale showed a 13-dB reduction in hearing sensitivity. Warning sounds before loud pulses may help mitigate the effects of loud anthropogenic sounds on wild animals. PMID:26611027

  13. Loudness, noisiness, and vibration effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physical measurement of noise that determines psychological and physical behavioral effects in real life is investigated. The roles of loudness and noisiness judgement in the development of these measurement procedures are also examined.

  14. Loudness enhancement and decrement in four paradigms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmasian, R.; Galambos, R.; Bernheim, A., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    When one tone burst (the conditioner) preceeds another (the target) by 100 ms, target loudness is enhanced if the conditioner is more intense and decreased if it is less intense. We show here that similar loudness enhancements and decrements occur when the conditioner follows the target. In all instances, monaural loudness enhancements (in which the conditioner and target are delivered to the same ear) are greater than the dichotic enhancements (in which the conditioner is presented contralaterally), but the decrements, which are smaller than the enhancements, are similar in magnitude. Loudness enhancements and decrements are similar to sequential loudness effects and central tendency effects; the major difference is the relatively very large increases in loudness obtainable in loudness enhancement experiments. We outline a mechanism to account for these loudness phenomena and suggest that this mechanism is responsible for similar perceptual effects that occur in other stimulus dimensions and modalities.

  15. Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? KidsHealth > For Kids > Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? Print A A A Text ... up? Oh! You want to know if loud music can hurt your ears . Are you asking because ...

  16. Loudness enhancement following contralateral stimulation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galambos, R.; Bauer, J.; Picton, T.; Squires, K.; Squires , N.

    1972-01-01

    The apparent loudness of a tone pip can be increased by 15 dB or more if it is preceded by a tone burst to the contralateral ear. The experiment is done by delaying the pip, S1, by a variable time, Delta-T, after the offset of a contralateral tone; the listener assesses the loudness of S1 by adjusting the intensity of a second tone pip, S2, that follows S1 by 1500 msec. Some parametric explorations of the phenomenon are reported here.

  17. Functional Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Guy

    With minor modifications, an advertising fundamentals course can stimulate creative development and provide career direction while it presents the basic elements of advertising. A group presentation introduces students to research and familiarizes them with the conflict resolution process useful in preparing advertising. A group project arranges…

  18. Radio Loud AGNs are Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaberge, Marco; Gilli, Roberto; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Norman, Colin

    2015-06-01

    We measure the merger fraction of Type 2 radio-loud and radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z\\gt 1 using new samples. The objects have Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images taken with Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in the IR channel. These samples are compared to the 3CR sample of radio galaxies at z\\gt 1 and to a sample of non-active galaxies. We also consider lower redshift radio galaxies with HST observations and previous generation instruments (NICMOS and WFPC2). The full sample spans an unprecedented range in both redshift and AGN luminosity. We perform statistical tests to determine whether the different samples are differently associated with mergers. We find that all (92%-14%+8%) radio-loud galaxies at z\\gt 1 are associated with recent or ongoing merger events. Among the radio-loud population there is no evidence for any dependence of the merger fraction on either redshift or AGN power. For the matched radio-quiet samples, only 38%-15+16 are merging systems. The merger fraction for the sample of non-active galaxies at z\\gt 1 is indistinguishable from radio-quiet objects. This is strong evidence that mergers are the triggering mechanism for the radio-loud AGN phenomenon and the launching of relativistic jets from supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We speculate that major black hole (BH)–BH mergers play a major role in spinning up the central SMBHs in these objects.

  19. Spectral and binaural loudness summation for hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Oetting, Dirk; Hohmann, Volker; Appell, Jens-E; Kollmeier, Birger; Ewert, Stephan D

    2016-05-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss typically results in a steepened loudness function and a reduced dynamic range from elevated thresholds to uncomfortably loud levels for narrowband and broadband signals. Restoring narrowband loudness perception for hearing-impaired (HI) listeners can lead to overly loud perception of broadband signals and it is unclear how binaural presentation affects loudness perception in this case. Here, loudness perception quantified by categorical loudness scaling for nine normal-hearing (NH) and ten HI listeners was compared for signals with different bandwidth and different spectral shape in monaural and in binaural conditions. For the HI listeners, frequency- and level-dependent amplification was used to match the narrowband monaural loudness functions of the NH listeners. The average loudness functions for NH and HI listeners showed good agreement for monaural broadband signals. However, HI listeners showed substantially greater loudness for binaural broadband signals than NH listeners: on average a 14.1 dB lower level was required to reach "very loud" (range 30.8 to -3.7 dB). Overall, with narrowband loudness compensation, a given binaural loudness for broadband signals above "medium loud" was reached at systematically lower levels for HI than for NH listeners. Such increased binaural loudness summation was not found for loudness categories below "medium loud" or for narrowband signals. Large individual variations in the increased loudness summation were observed and could not be explained by the audiogram or the narrowband loudness functions. PMID:27006003

  20. Underwater loudness for pure tones: Duration effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cudahy, Edward A.; Schwaller, Derek; Fothergill, David; Wolgemuth, Keith

    2003-04-01

    The loudness of underwater pure tones was measured by loudness matching for pure tones from 100 to 16,000 Hz. The standard was a one second tone at 1000 Hz. The signal duration was varied from 20 milliseconds to 5 seconds. Subjects were instructed to match the loudness of the comparison tone at one of the test frequencies to the loudness of the standard tone. Loudness was measured at the threshold, the most comfortable loudness, and the maximum tolerable loudness. The intensity of the standard was varied randomly across the test series. The subjects were bareheaded U.S. Navy divers tested at a depth of 3 meters. All subjects had normal in-air hearing. Tones were presented to the right side of the subject from an array of underwater sound projectors. The sound pressure level was calibrated at the location of the subject's head with the subject absent. Loudness increased and threshold decreased as duration increased. The effect was greatest at the lowest and highest frequencies. The shape of the loudness contours across frequency and duration derived from these measurements are different from in-air measurements. [Research supported by ONR.

  1. Gender Advertisements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goffman, Erving

    A heavily illustrated discussion of the ways in which men and women are portrayed in advertisements is presented. The three essays which precede the 56 pages of illustrations discuss gender expressions, characteristics of public and private pictures, and gender commercials. The author notes that advertisements do not depict how men and women…

  2. Advertising Appeal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Sandra K.

    The individualized learning package for secondary consumer education deals with consumer buying as influenced by advertising. The teacher's section of the package contains a statement of purpose and instructional objectives. Equipment and materials (specific textbooks, audiovisual aids, and sources for sample post-test advertisements) needed for…

  3. 47 CFR 73.4075 - Commercials, loud.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Commercials, loud. 73.4075 Section 73.4075 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.4075 Commercials, loud. See Memorandum Opinion and...

  4. Binaural Loudness Summation in the Hearing Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, David B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Binaural loudness summation was measured using three different paradigms with 10 normally hearing and 20 bilaterally symmetrical high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss subjects. Binaural summation increased with presentation level using the loudness matching procedure, with values in the 6-10 dB range. Summation decreased with level using the…

  5. Loudness (annoyance), prediction procedure for steady sounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.; Lasalvia, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Method has been devised to predict loudness level of any steady sound solely from its measured power spectrum level. Method is based on assumption that, with respect to loudness sensation, the human auditory system acts as open-loop transmission system with transmittance function determined from measured tone curves.

  6. Subjective loudness response to simulated sonic booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1992-01-01

    A series of laboratory studies were conducted at LaRC to: (1) quantify the effects of sonic boom signature shaping on subjective loudness; (2) evaluate candidate loudness metrics; (3) quantify the effects of signature asymmetry on loudness; and (4) document sonic boom acceptability within the laboratory. A total of 212 test subjects evaluated a wide range of signatures using the NASA Langley Research Center's sonic boom simulator. Results indicated that signature shaping via front-shock minimization was particularly effective in reducing subjective loudness without requiring reductions in peak overpressure. Metric evaluations showed that A-weighted sound exposure level, Perceived Level (Stevens Mark 7), and Zwicker's Loudness level were effective descriptors of the loudness of symmetrical shaped signatures. The asymmetrical signatures were generally rated as being quieter than symmetrical signatures of equal calculated metric level. The magnitude of the loudness reductions were observed to increase as the degree of asymmetry increased and to be greatest when the rear half of the signature was loudest. This effect was not accounted for by the loudness metrics. Sonic boom acceptability criteria were determined within the laboratory. These agreed well with results previously obtained in more realistic situations.

  7. Calculation of Loudness for Normal and Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalupper, Josef

    Loudness is a hearing sensation which is almost ubiquitousin everyday life: traffic is too loud, announcements are too soft, children are very loud and a stereo can be adjusted to a comfortable loudness. Thus, it is not surprising that scientists started very early to carry out psychoacoustic experiments to investigate loudness. In 1933, Fletcher and Munson [1] measured “equal-loudness contours”. These curves are obtained if a reference sound (e.g. a 1,000-Hz sinusoid) is fixed in level and the test sound is adjusted to give a loudness match.

  8. Function of loud calls in wild bonobos.

    PubMed

    White, Frances; Waller, Michel; Boose, Klaree; Merrill, Michelle; Wood, Kimberley

    2015-07-20

    Under the social origins hypothesis, human language is thought to have evolved within the framework of non-human primate social contexts and relationships. Our two closest relatives, chimpanzees and bonobos, however, have very different social relationships and this may be reflected in their use of loud calls. Much of loud calling in the male-bonded and aggressive chimpanzee functions for male alliance formation and intercommunity aggression. Bonobos, however, are female bonded and less aggressive and little is known on the use and function of their loud calls. Data on frequencies, context, and locations of vocalizations were collected for wild bonobos, Pan paniscus, at the Lomako Forest study site in the Democratic Republic of the Congo from 1983 to 2009. Both males and females participated in loud calls used for inter-party communication. Calling and response rates by both males and females were higher during party fusion than party fission and were common at evening nesting. The distribution of loud calls within the community range of loud calls was not random with males calling significantly more towards the periphery of the range and females calling significantly more in central areas. Calling and party fission were common at food patches. Responses were more frequent for female calls than for male calls. Calling, followed by fusion, was more frequent when a small party called from a large patch. We conclude that bonobo females and males loud calls can function in inter-party communication to call others to large food patches. Females call to attract potential allies and males call to attract potential mates. Our results support the social hypothesis of the origin of language because differences in the function and use of loud calls reflect the differing social systems of chimpanzees and bonobos. Bonobo loud calls are important for female communication and function in party coordination and, unlike chimpanzees, are less important in male cooperative aggression

  9. Mental Imagery for Musical Changes in Loudness

    PubMed Central

    Bailes, Freya; Bishop, Laura; Stevens, Catherine J.; Dean, Roger T.

    2012-01-01

    Musicians imagine music during mental rehearsal, when reading from a score, and while composing. An important characteristic of music is its temporality. Among the parameters that vary through time is sound intensity, perceived as patterns of loudness. Studies of mental imagery for melodies (i.e., pitch and rhythm) show interference from concurrent musical pitch and verbal tasks, but how we represent musical changes in loudness is unclear. Theories suggest that our perceptions of loudness change relate to our perceptions of force or effort, implying a motor representation. An experiment was conducted to investigate the modalities that contribute to imagery for loudness change. Musicians performed a within-subjects loudness change recall task, comprising 48 trials. First, participants heard a musical scale played with varying patterns of loudness, which they were asked to remember. There followed an empty interval of 8 s (nil distractor control), or the presentation of a series of four sine tones, or four visual letters or three conductor gestures, also to be remembered. Participants then saw an unfolding score of the notes of the scale, during which they were to imagine the corresponding scale in their mind while adjusting a slider to indicate the imagined changes in loudness. Finally, participants performed a recognition task of the tone, letter, or gesture sequence. Based on the motor hypothesis, we predicted that observing and remembering conductor gestures would impair loudness change scale recall, while observing and remembering tone or letter string stimuli would not. Results support this prediction, with loudness change recalled less accurately in the gestures condition than in the control condition. An effect of musical training suggests that auditory and motor imagery ability may be closely related to domain expertise. PMID:23227014

  10. Mental imagery for musical changes in loudness.

    PubMed

    Bailes, Freya; Bishop, Laura; Stevens, Catherine J; Dean, Roger T

    2012-01-01

    Musicians imagine music during mental rehearsal, when reading from a score, and while composing. An important characteristic of music is its temporality. Among the parameters that vary through time is sound intensity, perceived as patterns of loudness. Studies of mental imagery for melodies (i.e., pitch and rhythm) show interference from concurrent musical pitch and verbal tasks, but how we represent musical changes in loudness is unclear. Theories suggest that our perceptions of loudness change relate to our perceptions of force or effort, implying a motor representation. An experiment was conducted to investigate the modalities that contribute to imagery for loudness change. Musicians performed a within-subjects loudness change recall task, comprising 48 trials. First, participants heard a musical scale played with varying patterns of loudness, which they were asked to remember. There followed an empty interval of 8 s (nil distractor control), or the presentation of a series of four sine tones, or four visual letters or three conductor gestures, also to be remembered. Participants then saw an unfolding score of the notes of the scale, during which they were to imagine the corresponding scale in their mind while adjusting a slider to indicate the imagined changes in loudness. Finally, participants performed a recognition task of the tone, letter, or gesture sequence. Based on the motor hypothesis, we predicted that observing and remembering conductor gestures would impair loudness change scale recall, while observing and remembering tone or letter string stimuli would not. Results support this prediction, with loudness change recalled less accurately in the gestures condition than in the control condition. An effect of musical training suggests that auditory and motor imagery ability may be closely related to domain expertise. PMID:23227014

  11. Loudness perception in the domestic cat: reaction time estimates of equal loudness contours and recruitment effects.

    PubMed

    May, Bradford J; Little, Nicole; Saylor, Stephanie

    2009-06-01

    The domestic cat is the primary physiological model of loudness coding and recruitment. At present, there are no published descriptions of loudness perception in this species. This study used a reaction time task to characterize loudness perception in six behaviorally trained cats. The psychophysical approach was based on the assumption that sounds of equal loudness elicit responses of equal latency. The resulting equal latency contours reproduced well-known features of human equal loudness contours. At the completion of normal baseline measures, the cats were exposed to intense sound to investigate the behavioral correlates of loudness recruitment, the abnormally rapid growth of loudness that is commonly associated with hearing loss. Observed recruitment effects were similar in magnitude to those that have been reported in hearing-impaired humans. Linear hearing aid amplification is known to improve speech intelligibility but also exacerbate recruitment in impaired listeners. The effects of speech spectra and amplification on recruitment were explored by measuring the growth of loudness for natural and amplified vowels before and after sound exposure. Vowels produced more recruitment than tones, and the effect was exacerbated by the selective amplification of formant structure. These findings support the adequacy of the domestic cat as a model system for future investigations of the auditory processes that underlie loudness perception, recruitment, and hearing aid design. PMID:19198944

  12. Loudness of steady sounds - A new theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    A new mathematical theory for calculating the loudness of steady sounds from power summation and frequency interaction, based on psychoacoustic and physiological information, assuems that loudness is a subjective measure of the electrical energy transmitted along the auditory nerve to the central nervous system. The auditory system consists of the mechanical part modeled by a bandpass filter with a transfer function dependent on the sound pressure, and the electrical part where the signal is transformed into a half-wave reproduction represented by the electrical power in impulsive discharges transmitted along neurons comprising the auditory nerve. In the electrical part the neurons are distributed among artificial parallel channels with frequency bandwidths equal to 'critical bandwidths for loudness', within which loudness is constant for constant sound pressure. The total energy transmitted to the central nervous system is the sum of the energy transmitted in all channels, and the loudness is proportional to the square root of the total filtered sound energy distributed over all channels. The theory explains many psychoacoustic phenomena such as audible beats resulting from closely spaced tones, interaction of sound stimuli which affect the same neurons affecting loudness, and of individually subliminal sounds becoming audible if they lie within the same critical band.

  13. The Radio-Loud Narrow-Line Quasar SDSS J172206.03+565451.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komossa, Stefanie; Voges, Wolfgang; Adorf, Hans-Martin; Xu, Dawei; Mathur, Smita; Anderson, Scott F.

    2006-03-01

    We report identification of the radio-loud narrow-line quasar SDSS J172206.03+565451.6, which we found in the course of a search for radio-loud narrow-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs). SDSS J172206.03+565451.6 is only about the fourth securely identified radio-loud narrow-line quasar and the second-most radio loud, with a radio index R1.4~100-700. Its black hole mass, MBH~=(2-3)×107 Msolar estimated from Hβ line width and 5100 Å luminosity, is unusually small given its radio loudness, and the combination of mass and radio index puts SDSS J172206.03+565451.6 in a scarcely populated region of MBH-R diagrams. SDSS J172206.03+565451.6 is a classical narrow-line Seyfert 1-type object with FWHMHβ~=1490 km s-1, an intensity ratio of [O III]/Hβ~=0.7, and Fe II emission complexes with Fe II λ4570/Hβ~=0.7. The ionization parameter of its narrow-line region, estimated from the line ratio [O II]/[O III], is similar to Seyferts, and its high ratio of [Ne V]/[Ne III] indicates a strong EUV-to-soft X-ray excess. We advertise the combined usage of [O II]/[O III] and [Ne V]/[Ne III] diagrams as a useful diagnostic tool to estimate ionization parameters and to constrain the EUV-soft X-ray continuum shape relatively independently from other parameters.

  14. Spectro-Temporal Weighting of Loudness

    PubMed Central

    Oberfeld, Daniel; Heeren, Wiebke; Rennies, Jan; Verhey, Jesko

    2012-01-01

    Real-world sounds like speech or traffic noise typically exhibit spectro-temporal variability because the energy in different spectral regions evolves differently as a sound unfolds in time. However, it is currently not well understood how the energy in different spectral and temporal portions contributes to loudness. This study investigated how listeners weight different temporal and spectral components of a sound when judging its overall loudness. Spectral weights were measured for the combination of three loudness-matched narrowband noises with different center frequencies. To measure temporal weights, 1,020-ms stimuli were presented, which randomly changed in level every 100 ms. Temporal weights were measured for each narrowband noise separately, and for a broadband noise containing the combination of the three noise bands. Finally, spectro-temporal weights were measured with stimuli where the level of the three narrowband noises randomly and independently changed every 100 ms. The data consistently showed that (i) the first 300 ms of the sounds had a greater influence on overall loudness perception than later temporal portions (primacy effect), and (ii) the lowest noise band contributed significantly more to overall loudness than the higher bands. The temporal weights did not differ between the three frequency bands. Notably, the spectral weights and temporal weights estimated from the conditions with only spectral or only temporal variability were very similar to the corresponding weights estimated in the spectro-temporal condition. The results indicate that the temporal and the spectral weighting of the loudness of a time-varying sound are independent processes. The spectral weights remain constant across time, and the temporal weights do not change across frequency. The results are discussed in the context of current loudness models. PMID:23209670

  15. Advertising Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandage, C. H.; Fryburger, Vernon

    The social and economic functions of advertising, its role in business, how it works, and how it is planned and created are the subject of this textbook. Sections include basic values and functions, background for planning advertising strategy, the advertising message, advertising media, testing advertising effectiveness, and the advertising…

  16. Loud noise exposure and acoustic neuroma.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James L; Pettersson, David; Palmisano, Sadie; Schwartzbaum, Judith A; Edwards, Colin G; Mathiesen, Tiit; Prochazka, Michaela; Bergenheim, Tommy; Florentzson, Rut; Harder, Henrik; Nyberg, Gunnar; Siesjö, Peter; Feychting, Maria

    2014-07-01

    The results from studies of loud noise exposure and acoustic neuroma are conflicting. A population-based case-control study of 451 acoustic neuroma patients and 710 age-, sex-, and region-matched controls was conducted in Sweden between 2002 and 2007. Occupational exposure was based on historical measurements of occupational noise (321 job titles summarized by a job exposure matrix) and compared with self-reported occupational noise exposure. We also evaluated self-reported noise exposure during leisure activity. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. There was no statistically significant association between acoustic neuroma and persistent occupational noise exposure, either with or without hearing protection. Exposure to loud noise from leisure activity without hearing protection was more common among acoustic neuroma cases (odds ratio = 1.47, 95% confidence interval: 1.06, 2.03). Statistically significant odds ratios were found for specific leisure activities including attending concerts/clubs/sporting events (odds ratio = 1.82, 95% confidence interval: 1.09, 3.04) and participating in workouts accompanied by loud music (odds ratio = 2.84, 95% confidence interval: 1.37, 5.89). Our findings do not support an association between occupational exposure to loud noise and acoustic neuroma. Although we report statistically significant associations between leisure-time exposures to loud noise without hearing protection and acoustic neuroma, especially among women, we cannot rule out recall bias as an alternative explanation. PMID:24786799

  17. Modeling Newspaper Advertising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Joseph; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a mathematical model for simulating a newspaper financial system. Includes the effects of advertising and circulation for predicting advertising linage as a function of population, income, and advertising rate. (RL)

  18. Loudness enhancement - Monaural, binaural, and dichotic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmasian, R.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    When one tone burst (T) precedes another (S) by 100 msec, variations in the intensity of T systematically influence the loudness of S. When T is more intense than S, S is increased; and when T is less intense, S loudness is decreased. This occurs in monaural, binaural, and dichotic paradigms of signal presentation. When T and S are presented to the same ear (monaural or binaural), there is more enhancement with less intersubject variability than when they are presented to different ears (dichotic paradigm). Monaural enhancements as large as 30 dB can readily be demonstrated, but decrements rarely exceed 5 dB. Possible physiological mechanisms are discussed for this loudness enhancement, which apparently shares certain characteristics with time-order error, assimilation, and temporal partial masking experiments.

  19. Loudness enhancement: Monaural, binaural and dichotic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmasian, R. O.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that when one tone burst precedes another by 100 msec variations in the intensity of the first systematically influences the loudness of second. When the first burst is more intense than the second, the second is increased and when the first burst is less intense, the loudness of the second is decreased. This occurs in monaural, binaural and dichotic paradigms of signal presentation. Where both bursts are presented to the same ear there is more enhancement with less intersubject variability than when they are presented to different ears. Monaural enhancements as large as 30 db can readily be demonstrated, but decrements rarely exceed 5 db. Possible physiological mechanisms are discussed for this loudness enhancement, which apparently shares certain characteristics with time-order-error, assimilation, and temporal partial masking experiments.

  20. Loudness scaling in rats and chinchillas.

    PubMed

    Pierrel-Sorrentino, R; Raslear, T G

    1980-08-01

    Chinchillas and rats were trained on operant discriminations in which the discriminative stimuli were two different sound pressure levels of a 4-kHz tone. Two or more of these two-intensity discriminations were used at each of three levels of discriminability: high, medium, and low. For any given level, each of the stimulus pairs used differed in decibel separation but were similar in loudness-unit differences calculated from a power function. Different groups of animals trained on stimuli separated by equal numbers of loudness units produced equivalent performances at each of the three levels of discriminability. It is concluded that loudness growth for both of these species, as for man, is well described by a power function (Stevens' law). For the chinchilla the exponent is .25, and for the rat it is .35. PMID:7410633

  1. Comparative learning of pitch and loudness identification.

    PubMed

    Houtsma, A J; Durlach, N I; Horowitz, D M

    1987-01-01

    This study investigated possible similarities between the ability to identify pitches and the ability to identify loudnesses. Systematic training of musically naive subjects indicated that frequency identification performance improves at about the same rate as intensity identification performance. Examination of frequency and intensity identification behavior of musically trained subjects showed that their ability to code pitch information efficiently does not generalize to an ability to encode loudness information more efficiently than untrained subjects. Intensity identification training curves of musically trained and untrained subjects are similar, but final performance levels are below frequency identification performance levels exhibited by musically trained subjects, especially those with absolute pitch. PMID:3819170

  2. Loudness function derives from data on electrical discharge rates in auditory nerve fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Judgements of the loudness of pure-tone sound stimuli yield a loudness function which relates perceived loudness to stimulus amplitude. A loudness function is derived from physical evidence alone without regard to human judgments. The resultant loudness function is L=K(q-q0), where L is loudness, q is effective sound pressure (specifically q0 at the loudness threshold), and K is generally a weak function of the number of stimulated auditory nerve fibers. The predicted function is in agreement with loudness judgment data reported by Warren, which imply that, in the suprathreshold loudness regime, decreasing the sound-pressure level by 6 db results in halving the loudness.

  3. The effect of loudness on the reverberance of music: reverberance prediction using loudness models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doheon; Cabrera, Densil; Martens, William L

    2012-02-01

    This study examines the auditory attribute that describes the perceived amount of reverberation, known as "reverberance." Listening experiments were performed using two signals commonly heard in auditoria: excerpts of orchestral music and western classical singing. Listeners adjusted the decay rate of room impulse responses prior to convolution with these signals, so as to match the reverberance of each stimulus to that of a reference stimulus. The analysis examines the hypothesis that reverberance is related to the loudness decay rate of the underlying room impulse response. This hypothesis is tested using computational models of time varying or dynamic loudness, from which parameters analogous to conventional reverberation parameters (early decay time and reverberation time) are derived. The results show that listening level significantly affects reverberance, and that the loudness-based parameters outperform related conventional parameters. Results support the proposed relationship between reverberance and the computationally predicted loudness decay function of sound in rooms. PMID:22352494

  4. How Loud Is Too Loud? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... too. Doctors, parents, and educators worry about portable music players and other noisy gadgets damaging hearing in children and young adults. Just how much depends on both loudness and time—the longer the exposure, the more ...

  5. Contour identification with pitch and loudness cues using cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Masterson, Megan E; Wu, Ching-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Different from speech, pitch and loudness cues may or may not co-vary in music. Cochlear implant (CI) users with poor pitch perception may use loudness contour cues more than normal-hearing (NH) listeners. Contour identification was tested in CI users and NH listeners; the five-note contours contained either pitch cues alone, loudness cues alone, or both. Results showed that NH listeners' contour identification was better with pitch cues than with loudness cues; CI users performed similarly with either cues. When pitch and loudness cues were co-varied, CI performance significantly improved, suggesting that CI users were able to integrate the two cues. PMID:24437857

  6. Q: How Does Loud Noise Affect Hearing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, William C.

    2010-01-01

    This is an appropriate question, especially in light of the recent news that the incidence of hearing loss in teens has been increased by a third. To understand how loud noise affects hearing, you need to know the basics of how your ear works. To understand how your ear works, it will help if you do the following activities and ignore that they…

  7. Loudness as a Variable in Persuasion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packwood, William T.

    1974-01-01

    A persuasion scale assessing counselor conviction and client agreement was used to rate 900 counselor statements. The 24 highest rated and 15 lowest rated persuasive statements were fed into a graphic level recorder. Differences in the graphs of high- and low- persuasive statements indicated that loudness is a characteristic of persuasion. (Author)

  8. Autophonic loudness perception in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Brajot, François-Xavier; Shiller, Douglas M; Gracco, Vincent L

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between the intensity and loudness of self-generated (autophonic) speech remains invariant despite changes in auditory feedback, indicating that non-auditory processes contribute to this form of perception. The aim of the current study was to determine if the speech perception deficit associated with Parkinson's disease may be linked to deficits in such processes. Loudness magnitude estimates were obtained from parkinsonian and non-parkinsonian subjects across four separate conditions: self-produced speech under normal, perturbed, and masked auditory feedback, as well as auditory presentation of pre-recorded speech (passive listening). Slopes and intercepts of loudness curves were compared across groups and conditions. A significant difference in slope was found between autophonic and passive-listening conditions for both groups. Unlike control subjects, parkinsonian subjects' magnitude estimates under auditory masking increased in variability and did not show as strong a shift in intercept values. These results suggest that individuals with Parkinson's disease rely on auditory feedback to compensate for underlying deficits in sensorimotor integration important in establishing and regulating autophonic loudness. PMID:27036273

  9. Subjective loudness of "minimized" sonic boom waveforms.

    PubMed

    Niedzwiecki, A; Ribner, H S

    1978-12-01

    For very long supersonic aircraft the "midfield" sonic boom signature may not have evolved fully into an N wave at ground level. Thus in current boom minimization techniques the shape of the aircraft may be tailored to optimize this midfield wave form for reduced subjective loudness. The present investigation tests a family of "flat-top" waveforms cited by Darden: all but one have a front shock height (deltapSH) less than the peak amplitude (deltapMAX). For equal subjective loudness, "flat top" vs N wave (peak overpressure deltapN), the peak amplitude of the "flat top" signature was found to be substantially higher than that of the N wave; thus for equal peak amplitude the "flat-top" signature was quieter. The results for equal loudness were well fitted by an emperical law deltapSH + 0.11deltapMAX = deltapN; the equivalence shows how the front shock amplitude (deltapSH) dominates the loudness. All this was found compatible with predictions by the method of Johnson and Robinson. PMID:739097

  10. Children's Advertising Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Better Business Bureaus, Inc., New York, NY.

    These guidelines have been developed for the use of advertisers and advertising agencies and for the self-regulatory mechanism which these groups have established, the National Advertising Division, to help ensure that advertising directed to children is truthful, accurate, and fair to children's perceptions. Preliminary sections set forth basic…

  11. Advertising on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jugenheimer, Donald W.

    1996-01-01

    States that although many advertisers have intentions of utilizing the Internet for advertising, which can provide specific audience targeting and buyer/seller interactivity, few have been successful. Explains advantages and disadvantages of using the Internet for advertising purposes. Cites special problems with Internet advertising and successes…

  12. When advertising turns "cheeky"!

    PubMed

    Burkitt, Jennifer A; Saucier, Deborah M; Thomas, Nicole A; Ehresman, Crystal

    2006-05-01

    Portraits typically exhibit leftward posing biases, with people showing more of their left cheek than their right. The current study investigated posing biases in print advertising to determine whether the product advertised affects the posing bias. As the posing bias may be decreasing over time, we also investigated changes in posing biases over a span of more than 100 years. The current investigation coded 2664 advertisements from two time periods; advertisements were coded for target group of advertisement (men, women, both) and posing bias (rightward, leftward, or central). Unlike other studies that typically observe a leftward posing bias, print advertisements exhibit a rightward posing bias, regardless of time-frame. Thus, print advertisements differ greatly from portraits, which may relate to the purpose of advertisements and the role of attractiveness in advertising. PMID:16644564

  13. 76 FR 77830 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Open Commission Meeting; Tuesday, December 13, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... Advertisement Loudness Mitigation (CALM) Act (MB Docket No. 11-93) Summary: The Commission will consider a Report and Order that protects consumers by implementing the Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation (CALM) Act to prevent digital television commercial advertisements from being transmitted at...

  14. The effect of stimulus bandwidth on binaural loudness summation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhiyue; Mo, Fangshuo; Mao, Dongxing

    2015-09-01

    Binaural loudness summation is an important property of the human auditory system. This paper presents an experimental investigation of how binaural loudness summation varies with stimulus bandwidth. Loudness matches were obtained between dichotic stimuli, with interaural level differences (ILDs) of 2-12 dB, and diotic stimuli. The stimuli were noise bands with seven center frequencies and four bandwidths. Results showed that the loudness of dichotic stimuli increased nonlinearly with ILD, the increase being slightly less with broader bandwidths. There was a bandwidth-dependent difference between the listening tests results and the predictions of Moore and Glasberg's [(2007) J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 121, 1604-1612] loudness model. The size of the difference was, however, small. A characteristic function was derived describing how overall loudness depends on stimulus bandwidth and ILD. PMID:26428788

  15. [A group of adolescents and its attitude towards loud music].

    PubMed

    Stefani, D; Rodríguez Feijoo, N; Shufer de Paikin, M L; Calvo de Couget, L

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to measure attitudes towards loud music and to evaluate the influence of some variables on such attitudes. The scale of attitudes towards loud music was administered to a sample of 173 sixteen-year old subjects. The majority of the adolescents show neutral or favorable attitudes towards loud music. The sex and environmental noise variables have a non significant influence on this attitude. The majority of the sampled group attend dancing places (clubs, discotheques, etc.) once or twice a month and sometimes listen to loud music at home or at friends' home. Finally, adolescents showing favorable attitudes attend dancing places or listen to loud music more often than those showing unfavorable attitudes. This paper is a first approach to a deeper research to evaluate the possibility of modifying experimentally the attitude towards loud music by means of a message displaying both physical and psychological damage this fashion has caused. PMID:3425358

  16. Spectral loudness summation as a function of duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhey, Jesko L.; Kollmeier, Birger

    2002-03-01

    Loudness was measured as a function of signal bandwidth for 10-, 100-, and 1000-ms-long signals. The test and reference signals were bandpass-filtered noise spectrally centered at 2 kHz. The bandwidth of the test signal was varied from 200 to 6400 Hz. The reference signal had a bandwidth of 3200 Hz. The reference levels were 45, 55, and 65 dB SPL. The level to produce equal loudness was measured with an adaptive, two-interval, two-alternative forced-choice procedure. A loudness matching procedure was used, where the tracks for all signal pairs to be compared were interleaved. Mean results for nine normal-hearing subjects showed that the magnitude of spectral loudness summation depends on signal duration. For all reference levels, a 6- to 8-dB larger level difference between equally loud signals with the smallest (Δf=200 Hz) and largest (Δf=6400 Hz) bandwidth is found for 10-ms-long signals than for the 1000-ms-long signals. The duration effect slightly decreases with increasing reference loudness. As a consequence, loudness models should include a duration-dependent compression stage. Alternatively, if a fixed loudness ratio between signals of different duration is assumed, this loudness ratio should depend on the signal spectrum.

  17. Temporal weighting of loudness: Comparison between two different psychophysical tasks.

    PubMed

    Ponsot, Emmanuel; Susini, Patrick; Oberfeld, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Psychophysical studies on loudness have so far examined the temporal weighting of loudness solely in level-discrimination tasks. Typically, listeners were asked to discriminate hundreds of level-fluctuating sounds regarding their global loudness. Temporal weights, i.e., the importance of each temporal portion of the stimuli for the loudness judgment, were then estimated from listeners' responses. Consistent non-uniform "u-shaped" temporal weighting patterns were observed, with greater weights assigned to the first and the last temporal portions of the stimuli, revealing significant primacy and recency effects, respectively. In this study, the question was addressed whether the same weighting pattern could be found in a traditional loudness estimation task. Temporal loudness weights were compared between a level-discrimination (LD) task and an absolute magnitude estimation (AME) task. Stimuli were 3-s broadband noises consisting of 250-ms segments randomly varying in level. Listeners were asked to evaluate the global loudness of the stimuli by classifying them as "loud" or "soft" (LD), or by assigning a number representing their loudness (AME). Results showed non-uniform temporal weighting in both tasks, but also significant differences between the two tasks. An explanation based on the difference in complexity between the evaluation processes underlying each task is proposed. PMID:26827035

  18. Effect of sonic boom asymmetry on subjective loudness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's sonic boom apparatus was used in an experimental study to quantify subjective loudness response to a wide range of asymmetrical N-wave sonic boom signatures. Results were used to assess the relative performance of several metrics as loudness estimators for asymmetrical signatures and to quantify in detail the effects on subjective loudness of varying both the degree and direction of signature loudness asymmetry. Findings of the study indicated that Perceived Level (Steven's Mark 7) and A-weighted sound exposure level were the best metrics for quantifying asymmetrical boom loudness. Asymmetrical signatures were generally rated as being less loud than symmetrical signatures of equivalent Perceived Level. The magnitude of the loudness reductions increased as the degree of boom asymmetry increased, and depended upon the direction of asymmetry. These loudness reductions were not accounted for by any of the metrics. Corrections were determined for use in adjusting calculated Perceived Level values to account for these reductions. It was also demonstrated that the subjects generally incorporated the loudness components of the complete signatures when making their subjective judgments.

  19. Newspaper Ideabook: Creative Advertising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasler, Wayne

    1977-01-01

    Offers suggestions to high school newspaper staffs for designing effective advertisements for local businesses and then selling them to the businesses. Notes that carefully planned advertisements can increase the appeal and value of a publication. (GW)

  20. Competition in Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Discusses five ways (high school newspaper and yearbook advertising, summer jobs, internships, contests, and student-run advertising agencies) students can start to prepare for a career in the competitive field of advertising while still in high school and college. (SR)

  1. The Bilingual Advertising Decision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grin, Francois

    1994-01-01

    Examines the relationship between linguistic plurality and the rationale of advertising decisions. The article presents a simple model of sales to different language groups as a function of the level of advertising in each language, language attitudes, incomes, and an advertising response function. The model is intended as a benchmark, and several…

  2. Home Study Advertising Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Michael P., Ed.; Welch, Sally R., Ed.

    This handbook contains a collections of nine articles on the subject of direct-response advertising. The handbook gives advice on how to create effective advertisements for home study courses. The nine articles are the following: "Overview of Home Study Advertising in the 1990s" (Michael P. Lambert); "Ad Features that Sell" (Nancie E. Robertson);…

  3. Pitch, Loudness, and Turn Regulation in Akan Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obeng, Samuel Gyasi

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between turn-regulation, the phonetic features of pitch, and loudness is examined in a study of two recorded natural conversations in Akan. Analysis of patterns in turn-delimitation suggests that (1) diminuendo loudness, a low pitch height, and falling pitch movement are treated by turn-occupants and their co-participants as…

  4. Rate and Loudness Manipulations in Dysarthria: Acoustic and Perceptual Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Gregory E.

    2004-01-01

    Both rate reduction and increased loudness reportedly are associated with an increase in the size of the articulatory-acoustic working space and improved acoustic distinctiveness for speakers with dysarthria. Improved intelligibility also has been reported. Few studies have directly compared rate and loudness effects for speakers with dysarthria,…

  5. A mathematical exploration of the mystery of loudness adaptation.

    PubMed

    Norwich, Kenneth H

    2010-02-01

    Loudness adaptation, or the decrease in perceived loudness of a steady, prolonged tone is rather a mysterious phenomenon. When measured by one technique (utilizing both ears), loudness of an extended tone will decrease by as much as 35 decibels; when measured by another technique (using only a single ear), loudness does not adapt at all regardless of how long the tone persists. The mystery is even more intriguing. When loudness adaptation does occur, the fractional reduction in the loudness of a tone (adaptation dB/sound level of extended tone dB SL) provides a good measure of the Stevens exponent, n, for loudness, an exponent which depends on sound frequency. When we analyze mathematically the two methods for measuring loudness adaptation, the reason for the apparent difference in adaptation emerges. Moreover, we derive the approximate equation showing that n equals fractional adaptation, and a method for improving the derivation of n from adaptation data. These results, derived mathematically, compare well with measured data, both our own and those obtained from the literature. PMID:19727963

  6. Amplitude modulation reduces loudness adaptation to high-frequency tones.

    PubMed

    Wynne, Dwight P; George, Sahara E; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2015-07-01

    Long-term loudness perception of a sound has been presumed to depend on the spatial distribution of activated auditory nerve fibers as well as their temporal firing pattern. The relative contributions of those two factors were investigated by measuring loudness adaptation to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated 12-kHz tones. The tones had a total duration of 180 s and were either unmodulated or 100%-modulated at one of three frequencies (4, 20, or 100 Hz), and additionally varied in modulation depth from 0% to 100% at the 4-Hz frequency only. Every 30 s, normal-hearing subjects estimated the loudness of one of the stimuli played at 15 dB above threshold in random order. Without any amplitude modulation, the loudness of the unmodulated tone after 180 s was only 20% of the loudness at the onset of the stimulus. Amplitude modulation systematically reduced the amount of loudness adaptation, with the 100%-modulated stimuli, regardless of modulation frequency, maintaining on average 55%-80% of the loudness at onset after 180 s. Because the present low-frequency amplitude modulation produced minimal changes in long-term spectral cues affecting the spatial distribution of excitation produced by a 12-kHz pure tone, the present result indicates that neural synchronization is critical to maintaining loudness perception over time. PMID:26233027

  7. Comparison of advertising strategies between the indoor tanning and tobacco industries.

    PubMed

    Greenman, Jennifer; Jones, David A

    2010-04-01

    The indoor tanning industry is large and continues to grow, with 2007 domestic sales in excess of $5 billion. Advertising is central to shaping the consumer's perception of indoor tanning as well as driving industry demand. This article aims to identify key drivers of consumer appeal by comparing tanning advertising strategies to those used by tobacco marketers. Tobacco advertising was selected as a reference framework because it is both well documented and designed to promote a product with known health hazards. Two thousand advertisements from 4 large tobacco advertisement databases were analyzed for type of advertisement strategy used, and 4 advertising method categories were devised to incorporate the maximum number of advertisements reviewed. Subsequently, contemporary tanning advertisements were collected from industry magazines and salon websites and evaluated relative to the identified strategy profiles. Both industries have relied on similar advertising strategies, including mitigating health concerns, appealing to a sense of social acceptance, emphasizing psychotropic effects, and targeting specific population segments. This examination is a small observational study, which was conducted without rigorous statistical analysis, and which is limited both by the number of advertisements and by advertising strategies examined. Given the strong parallels between tobacco and tanning advertising methodologies, further consumer education and investigation into the public health risks of indoor tanning is needed. PMID:20138395

  8. A loudness calculation procedure applied to shaped sonic booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1991-01-01

    Described here is a procedure that can be used to calculate the loudness of sonic booms. The procedure is applied to a wide range of sonic booms, both classical N-waves and a variety of other shapes of booms. The loudness of N-waves is controlled by overpressure and the associated rise time. The loudness of shaped booms is highly dependent on the characteristics of the initial shock. A comparison of the calculated loudness values indicates that shaped booms may have significantly reduced loudness relative to N-waves having the same peak overpressure. This result implies that a supersonic transport designed to yield minimized sonic booms may be substantially more acceptable than an unconstrained design.

  9. A striking reduction of simple loudness adaptation in autism

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Rebecca P.; Aylward, Jessica; White, Sarah; Rees, Geraint

    2015-01-01

    Reports of sensory disturbance, such as loudness sensitivity or sound intolerance, are ubiquitous in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) but a mechanistic explanation for these perceptual differences is lacking. Here we tested adaptation to loudness, a process that regulates incoming sensory input, in adults with ASD and matched controls. Simple loudness adaptation (SLA) is a fundamental adaptive process that reduces the subjective loudness of quiet steady-state sounds in the environment over time, whereas induced loudness adaptation (ILA) is a means of generating a reduction in the perceived volume of louder sounds. ASD participants showed a striking reduction in magnitude and rate of SLA relative to age and ability-matched typical adults, but in contrast ILA remained intact. Furthermore, rate of SLA predicted sensory sensitivity coping strategies in the ASD group. These results provide the first evidence that compromised neural mechanisms governing fundamental adaptive processes might account for sound sensitivity in ASD. PMID:26537694

  10. Musical expertise and the ability to imagine loudness.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Laura; Bailes, Freya; Dean, Roger T

    2013-01-01

    Most perceived parameters of sound (e.g. pitch, duration, timbre) can also be imagined in the absence of sound. These parameters are imagined more veridically by expert musicians than non-experts. Evidence for whether loudness is imagined, however, is conflicting. In music, the question of whether loudness is imagined is particularly relevant due to its role as a principal parameter of performance expression. This study addressed the hypothesis that the veridicality of imagined loudness improves with increasing musical expertise. Experts, novices and non-musicians imagined short passages of well-known classical music under two counterbalanced conditions: 1) while adjusting a slider to indicate imagined loudness of the music and 2) while tapping out the rhythm to indicate imagined timing. Subtests assessed music listening abilities and working memory span to determine whether these factors, also hypothesised to improve with increasing musical expertise, could account for imagery task performance. Similarity between each participant's imagined and listening loudness profiles and reference recording intensity profiles was assessed using time series analysis and dynamic time warping. The results suggest a widespread ability to imagine the loudness of familiar music. The veridicality of imagined loudness tended to be greatest for the expert musicians, supporting the predicted relationship between musical expertise and musical imagery ability. PMID:23460791

  11. Mid-bandwidth loudness depression in hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Hots, Jan; Jarzombek, Katrin; Verhey, Jesko L

    2016-05-01

    The loudness of a bandpass-filtered noise depends on its bandwidth. For bandwidths larger than a critical bandwidth, loudness increases as the bandwidth increases, an effect commonly referred to as spectral loudness summation. For bandwidths smaller than the critical bandwidth, it was shown recently for normal-hearing listeners that loudness decreases as the bandwidth increases. This study investigated if listeners with a hearing impairment of primarily cochlear origin also showed this effect. Levels at equal loudness between a 1500-Hz pure-tone reference and noise-band targets centered at 1500 Hz were measured for bandwidths in the range from 15 to 1620 Hz. The reference level was adjusted individually on the basis of the audiogram. The average level difference at equal loudness increased from 0 dB at 15 Hz up to a maximum of about 4 dB at 810 Hz. Thus, the mid-bandwidth loudness depression is also observed for hearing-impaired listeners. PMID:27250129

  12. Quasar Radio-Loudness and the Elliptical Core Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Timothy S.

    2010-01-01

    The dichotomy between radio-loud and radio-quiet QSOs is not simply one of host morphology. While radio-louds are almost always found in elliptical hosts, radio-quiets are known to reside in both elliptical and spiral galaxies. We find that what determines whether a given elliptical galaxy will host either a radio-loud or radio-quiet QSO is a combination of accretion rate and host scale. QSOs with high x-ray luminosities (above 10e44.9 erg/s at 0.5 keV) are nearly all found to be radio-loud. But those with low luminosities divide fairly neatly along the Kormendy law, the correlation between re and μe. Those larger than about 10 kpc are radio-loud, while smaller ones are radio-quiet. It has recently been found that core and coreless ellipticals are also divided at about this limit. This implies that for low-luminosity QSOs, radio-louds are found in core ellipticals, while radio-quiets are in coreless ellipticals and spirals. This segregation shows up particularly strongly for low-redshift objects. Since the presence or absence of a core may be tied to the galactic merger history, we have an evolutionary explanation for the differences between radio-loud and radio-quiet QSOs.

  13. Quality and loudness judgments for music subjected to compression limiting.

    PubMed

    Croghan, Naomi B H; Arehart, Kathryn H; Kates, James M

    2012-08-01

    Dynamic-range compression (DRC) is used in the music industry to maximize loudness. The amount of compression applied to commercial recordings has increased over time due to a motivating perspective that louder music is always preferred. In contrast to this viewpoint, artists and consumers have argued that using large amounts of DRC negatively affects the quality of music. However, little research evidence has supported the claims of either position. The present study investigated how DRC affects the perceived loudness and sound quality of recorded music. Rock and classical music samples were peak-normalized and then processed using different amounts of DRC. Normal-hearing listeners rated the processed and unprocessed samples on overall loudness, dynamic range, pleasantness, and preference, using a scaled paired-comparison procedure in two conditions: un-equalized, in which the loudness of the music samples varied, and loudness-equalized, in which loudness differences were minimized. Results indicated that a small amount of compression was preferred in the un-equalized condition, but the highest levels of compression were generally detrimental to quality, whether loudness was equalized or varied. These findings are contrary to the "louder is better" mentality in the music industry and suggest that more conservative use of DRC may be preferred for commercial music. PMID:22894236

  14. Musical Expertise and the Ability to Imagine Loudness

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Laura; Bailes, Freya; Dean, Roger T.

    2013-01-01

    Most perceived parameters of sound (e.g. pitch, duration, timbre) can also be imagined in the absence of sound. These parameters are imagined more veridically by expert musicians than non-experts. Evidence for whether loudness is imagined, however, is conflicting. In music, the question of whether loudness is imagined is particularly relevant due to its role as a principal parameter of performance expression. This study addressed the hypothesis that the veridicality of imagined loudness improves with increasing musical expertise. Experts, novices and non-musicians imagined short passages of well-known classical music under two counterbalanced conditions: 1) while adjusting a slider to indicate imagined loudness of the music and 2) while tapping out the rhythm to indicate imagined timing. Subtests assessed music listening abilities and working memory span to determine whether these factors, also hypothesised to improve with increasing musical expertise, could account for imagery task performance. Similarity between each participant’s imagined and listening loudness profiles and reference recording intensity profiles was assessed using time series analysis and dynamic time warping. The results suggest a widespread ability to imagine the loudness of familiar music. The veridicality of imagined loudness tended to be greatest for the expert musicians, supporting the predicted relationship between musical expertise and musical imagery ability. PMID:23460791

  15. Attention competition with advertisement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetin, Uzay; Bingol, Haluk O.

    2014-09-01

    In the new digital age, information is available in large quantities. Since information consumes primarily the attention of its recipients, the scarcity of attention is becoming the main limiting factor. In this study, we investigate the impact of advertisement pressure on a cultural market where consumers have a limited attention capacity. A model of competition for attention is developed and investigated analytically and by simulation. Advertisement is found to be much more effective when the attention capacity of agents is extremely scarce. We have observed that the market share of the advertised item improves if dummy items are introduced to the market while the strength of the advertisement is kept constant.

  16. Attention competition with advertisement.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Uzay; Bingol, Haluk O

    2014-09-01

    In the new digital age, information is available in large quantities. Since information consumes primarily the attention of its recipients, the scarcity of attention is becoming the main limiting factor. In this study, we investigate the impact of advertisement pressure on a cultural market where consumers have a limited attention capacity. A model of competition for attention is developed and investigated analytically and by simulation. Advertisement is found to be much more effective when the attention capacity of agents is extremely scarce. We have observed that the market share of the advertised item improves if dummy items are introduced to the market while the strength of the advertisement is kept constant. PMID:25314476

  17. Loudness predicts prominence: Fundamental frequency lends little

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanski, G.; Grabe, E.; Coleman, J.; Rosner, B.

    2005-08-01

    We explored a database covering seven dialects of British and Irish English and three different styles of speech to find acoustic correlates of prominence. We built classifiers, trained the classifiers on human prominence/nonprominence judgments, and then evaluated how well they behaved. The classifiers operate on 452 ms windows centered on syllables, using different acoustic measures. By comparing the performance of classifiers based on different measures, we can learn how prominence is expressed in speech. Contrary to textbooks and common assumption, fundamental frequency (f0) played a minor role in distinguishing prominent syllables from the rest of the utterance. Instead, speakers primarily marked prominence with patterns of loudness and duration. Two other acoustic measures that we examined also played a minor role, comparable to f0. All dialects and speaking styles studied here share a common definition of prominence. The result is robust to differences in labeling practice and the dialect of the labeler.

  18. Earplugs Help Prevent Hearing Loss Tied to Loud Concerts

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss that can happen after a high-decibel music concert. While getting young people wear earplugs at ... for that trend is increased exposure to loud music at venues such as concerts, festivals and nightclubs, ...

  19. Print Advertisements in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashim, Azirah

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines print advertisements in Malaysia to determine how advertisers seek to achieve their primary goal of persuading or influencing an audience by the use of both language and visuals. It describes the main component moves and rhetorical strategies used by writers to articulate the communicative purpose of the genre and the language…

  20. Advertising Public Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colihan, William J., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    "Several years ago an unpublished study reported that 85 per cent of established ETV stations (on-the-air two years or longer and replying to the questionnaire) used newspaper advertising for program promotion. The CPB commissioned the study reported here to determine the effects of such newspaper advertising on ETV audience size." (Editor)

  1. Advertising Pressures on Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammitt, Harry

    The majority of the media in the United States is funded through revenues derived from the sale of advertising space. The problem that arises from this situation is fundamentally an economic one: if advertisers are paying the bills for the media, how much control over content should they have? This report offers a review of instances in which…

  2. Advertising the American Woman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dispenza, Joseph E.

    This illustrated anthology of advertising in the popular press attempts to clarify the manner in which consumers have been conditioned to think about the roles of women in society. More than 2,000 copies of periodicals dating from 1900 to the present were consulted for the cultural information in their advertising. The selection of certain ads…

  3. Advertising in School Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Helen M-E.

    The needs of publication advisers in general and specifically those whose responsibility it is to direct the advertising staffs of school publications are the concern of this booklet. It is also designed to be a framework of reference and a guide which will enable the adviser to make the advertising experience of the staff members exciting and…

  4. Advertisements Demand Sense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clanton, Brandolyn; And Others

    Self-contained units of study on advertising will help secondary students to critically analyze the utility, completeness, and accuracy of various sources of product information. In the first of five units, students are asked to think about the many benefits consumers and producers derive from advertising. The second unit makes students aware that…

  5. Decibels Via Loudness - Distance Properties of a Loudspeaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Loudness, or sound intensity level, is a human perceived or subjective measurement with units, decibels, based on the response of the human ear to different sound intensities. The response of the human ear at fixed frequency is close to being logarithmic. The experiment reported here investigates the relationship between measured sound intensity level, or loudness, and distance from a sound source such as a loudspeaker.

  6. Advertising in This Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-09-01

    If you would like additional information about the products of the advertisers in this issue, the quickest and easiest way is via JCE Online's new service: Ad Index This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. To get advertising information via mail, fax, or email, refer to the top portion of the Readers Service Card inserted in the print issue. Whatever method of communication you use, be sure to mention to advertisers that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. Advertising Representative McNeill Group, Inc. · 301 Oxford Valley Road, Suite 804 Yardley, PA 19067 · phone: 215/321-9662 or 800/275-5084 fax: 215/321-9636; email: jchemed@mcneill-group.com

  7. Advertising in This Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-11-01

    If you would like additional information about the products of the advertisers in this issue, the quickest and easiest way is via JCE Online's new service: Ad Index This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. To get advertising information via mail, fax, or email, refer to the top portion of the Readers Service Card inserted in the print issue. Whatever method of communication you use, be sure to mention to advertisers that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. Advertising Representative McNeill Group, Inc. · 301 Oxford Valley Road, Suite 804 Yardley, PA 19067 · phone: 215/321-9662 or 800/275-5084 fax: 215/321-9636; email: jchemed@mcneill-group.com

  8. Advertising in This Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-10-01

    If you would like additional information about the products of the advertisers in this issue, the quickest and easiest way is via JCE Online's new service: Ad Index This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. To get advertising information via mail, fax, or email, refer to the top portion of the Readers Service Card inserted in the print issue. Whatever method of communication you use, be sure to mention to advertisers that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. Advertising Representative McNeill Group, Inc. · 301 Oxford Valley Road, Suite 804 Yardley, PA 19067 · phone: 215/321-9662 or 800/275-5084 fax: 215/321-9636; email: jchemed@mcneill-group.com

  9. Advertising in This Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-12-01

    If you would like additional information about the products of the advertisers in this issue, the quickest and easiest way is via JCE Online's new service: Ad Index This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. To get advertising information via mail, fax, or email, refer to the top portion of the Readers Service Card inserted in the print issue. Whatever method of communication you use, be sure to mention to advertisers that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. Advertising Representative McNeill Group, Inc. · 301 Oxford Valley Road, Suite 804 Yardley, PA 19067 · phone: 215/321-9662 or 800/275-5084 fax: 215/321-9636; email: jchemed@mcneill-group.com

  10. Ethical advertising in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Graskemper, Joseph P

    2009-01-01

    Advertising in dentistry has steadily increased since the 1970s to become a leading choice of many dentists to promote their practices. The manner in which advertising progresses within the profession affects all dentists and how patients perceive dentistry as a profession. This paper presents ethical concepts that should be followed when dentists are pursuing practice promotion through advertising. It also raises questions that, hopefully, will increase attention and discussion on dental advertising. The paper concludes that ethical advertising is easily achieved by promoting patient education while not placing the dentist's self-interests ahead of the patient's. With this approach, dentistry may continue to be one of the most trusted professions. PMID:19537484

  11. Polarity correspondence effect between loudness and lateralized response set

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Seah; Cho, Yang Seok

    2015-01-01

    Performance is better when a high pitch tone is associated with an up or right response and a low pitch tone with a down or left response compared to the opposite pairs, which is called the spatial-musical association of response codes effect. The current study examined whether polarity codes are formed in terms of the variation in loudness. In Experiments 1 and 2, in which participants performed a loudness-judgment task and a timbre-judgment task respectively, the correspondence effect was obtained between loudness and response side regardless of whether loudness was relevant to the task or not. In Experiments 3 and 4, in which the identical loudness- and timbre-judgment tasks were conducted while the auditory stimulus was presented only to the left or right ear, the correspondence effect was modulated by the ear to which the stimulus was presented, even though the effect was marginally significant in Experiment 4. The results suggest that loudness produced polarity codes that influenced response selection (Experiments 1 and 2), and additional spatial codes provided by stimulus position modulated the effect, generating the stimulus eccentricity effect (Experiments 3 and 4), which is consistent with the polarity correspondence principle. PMID:26052305

  12. Polarity correspondence effect between loudness and lateralized response set.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seah; Cho, Yang Seok

    2015-01-01

    Performance is better when a high pitch tone is associated with an up or right response and a low pitch tone with a down or left response compared to the opposite pairs, which is called the spatial-musical association of response codes effect. The current study examined whether polarity codes are formed in terms of the variation in loudness. In Experiments 1 and 2, in which participants performed a loudness-judgment task and a timbre-judgment task respectively, the correspondence effect was obtained between loudness and response side regardless of whether loudness was relevant to the task or not. In Experiments 3 and 4, in which the identical loudness- and timbre-judgment tasks were conducted while the auditory stimulus was presented only to the left or right ear, the correspondence effect was modulated by the ear to which the stimulus was presented, even though the effect was marginally significant in Experiment 4. The results suggest that loudness produced polarity codes that influenced response selection (Experiments 1 and 2), and additional spatial codes provided by stimulus position modulated the effect, generating the stimulus eccentricity effect (Experiments 3 and 4), which is consistent with the polarity correspondence principle. PMID:26052305

  13. Radio-Loud AGN: The Suzaku View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambruna, Rita

    2009-01-01

    We review our Suzaku observations of Broad-Line Radio Galaxies (BLRGs). The continuum above 2 approx.keV in BLRGs is dominated by emission from an accretion flow, with little or no trace of a jet, which is instead expected to emerge at GeV energies and be detected by Fermi. Concerning the physical conditions of the accretion disk, BLRGs are a mixed bag. In some sources the data suggest relatively high disk ionization, in others obscuration of the innermost regions, perhaps by the jet base. While at hard X-rays the distinction between BLRGs and Seyferts appears blurry, one of the cleanest observational differences between the two classes is at soft X-rays, where Seyferts exhibit warm absorbers related to disk winds while BLRGs do not. We discuss the possibility that jet formation inhibits disk winds, and thus is related to the remarkable dearth of absorption features at soft X-rays in BLRGs and other radio-loud AGN.

  14. Advertisers and Advertising Agencies: A National Survey of Current Attitudes toward Advertising Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinzon, Charles M.

    To measure attitudes toward advertising program graduates versus non-advertising graduates, a study was conducted of advertising managers nationwide and advertising agency middle managers in New York, California, Illinois and Texas. Two hundred and eighty-three self-administered questionnaires were completed. Results included the following…

  15. Intuitive visualizations of pitch and loudness in speech.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Rebecca S; Beijer, Lilian J; Seuskens, Wiel; Rietveld, Toni C M; Sadakata, Makiko

    2016-04-01

    Visualizing acoustic features of speech has proven helpful in speech therapy; however, it is as yet unclear how to create intuitive and fitting visualizations. To better understand the mappings from speech sound aspects to visual space, a large web-based experiment (n = 249) was performed to evaluate spatial parameters that may optimally represent pitch and loudness of speech. To this end, five novel animated visualizations were developed and presented in pairwise comparisons, together with a static visualization. Pitch and loudness of speech were each mapped onto either the vertical (y-axis) or the size (z-axis) dimension, or combined (with size indicating loudness and vertical position indicating pitch height) and visualized as an animation along the horizontal dimension (x-axis) over time. The results indicated that firstly, there is a general preference towards the use of the y-axis for both pitch and loudness, with pitch ranking higher than loudness in terms of fit. Secondly, the data suggest that representing both pitch and loudness combined in a single visualization is preferred over visualization in only one dimension. Finally, the z-axis, although not preferred, was evaluated as corresponding better to loudness than to pitch. This relation between sound and visual space has not been reported previously for speech sounds, and elaborates earlier findings on musical material. In addition to elucidating more general mappings between auditory and visual modalities, the findings provide us with a method of visualizing speech that may be helpful in clinical applications such as computerized speech therapy, or other feedback-based learning paradigms. PMID:26370217

  16. "Ruralizing" Presidential Job Advertisements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leist, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Rural community college presidential job advertisements that focus on geography, politics, and culture can improve the likelihood of a good fit between the senior leader and the institution. (Contains 2 figures.)

  17. Creative Designs Sell Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culpepper, Alyce

    1991-01-01

    Discusses six essential elements in the design of an advertisement: sales pitch, major headline, minor headline, company statistics, artwork or photograph, and white space. Offers five exercises for the classroom or staff. (SR)

  18. [Advertising and health education].

    PubMed

    López González, M L; Cueto Espinar, A; Martínez Cuervo, F; Redondo Cornejo, M L; Suárez González, J R; Secall Mellén, L

    1990-01-01

    Health education and advertising have a common aim: to modify human behaviour. Health education tries to induce healthy behaviours. In some occasions Publicity proposes risky behaviours. Ads appearing during a two-month period in magazines of the largest circulation in Spain are analyzed here. A total of 1,726 ads which could have a negative influence on health either because of the product or service offered or for the use of health as a persuasive argument in their text, are considered. The magazines Hola and Lecturas had the highest ratio ads/magazine. Spirits, food and drugs were the most frequently advertised products. And more than 50% of the ads used health and welfare as argument for better selling. Health educators should know and teach the critical analysis of publicity, and use advertisements as a teaching tool to enable people to see through misleading advertising. PMID:2086532

  19. Advertising for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuFresne, Robert A.; Nasstrom, Roy R.

    1978-01-01

    A six-month publicity and advertising campaign by Winona State University in Minnesota is considered a major factor in the enrollment increase despite a general decline in the state system as a whole. (Author/MLF)

  20. Frequency-dependent loudness balancing in bimodal cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Veugen, Lidwien C E; Chalupper, Josef; Snik, Ad F M; van Opstal, A John; Mens, Lucas H M

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion In users of a cochlear implant (CI) and a hearing aid (HA) in contralateral ears, frequency-dependent loudness balancing between devices did, on average, not lead to improved speech understanding as compared to broadband balancing. However, nine out of 15 bimodal subjects showed significantly better speech understanding with either one of the fittings. Objectives Sub-optimal fittings and mismatches in loudness are possible explanations for the large individual differences seen in listeners using bimodal stimulation. Methods HA gain was adjusted for soft and loud input sounds in three frequency bands (0-548, 548-1000, and >1000 Hz) to match loudness with the CI. This procedure was compared to a simple broadband balancing procedure that reflected current clinical practice. In a three-visit cross-over design with 4 weeks between sessions, speech understanding was tested in quiet and in noise and questionnaires were administered to assess benefit in real world. Results Both procedures resulted in comparable HA gains. For speech in noise, a marginal bimodal benefit of 0.3 ± 4 dB was found, with large differences between subjects and spatial configurations. Speech understanding in quiet and in noise did not differ between the two loudness balancing procedures. PMID:26986743

  1. Dependence of loudness evaluation by drivers on vehicle styling.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Junji; Igata, Takumi

    2012-12-01

    Influence of participants' impressions of vehicle styling on loudness of acceleration sounds was investigated. A series of images of luxury and sporty vehicles were presented to the participants while acceleration sounds were being replayed. The results indicated that frequent drivers perceived that the sound associated with luxury vehicles was louder than that associated with sporty vehicles. On the other hand, infrequent drivers perceived almost no difference between the loudness of the two vehicle types. Then, the infrequent drivers underwent a pseudo-loudness evaluation test to increase amount of experience for listening vehicle sound with vehicle styling image. After the procedure, the influence of vehicle styling on loudness was investigated again for the infrequent drivers. The result showed that the influence for the infrequent drivers was quite different from that for the frequent drivers. The participants who rarely drove perceived that the sound associated with luxury vehicles was softer than that associated with sporty vehicles. Furthermore, a questionnaire was filled out by both groups to investigate their preferred vehicle characteristics such as exterior design and engine performance. As a result, loudness was clarified to depend on both the participants' impressions of vehicle styling and their preferred vehicle characteristics. PMID:23231117

  2. Eight worst advertising mistakes.

    PubMed

    Maley, Catherine

    2010-11-01

    This article presents strategies for advertising the medical practice. The emphasis is on breaking out of the old rules of how one should advertise and delves into asking questions that lead to a true strategy unique to one's medical practice and offerings. The article discusses the myriad ways to think about and create a patient-centered approach, turning from "here is what we offer" to instead "what you want we offer." PMID:20974390

  3. 12 CFR 213.7 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... advertisement , or an electronic advertisement (such as an advertisement appearing on an Internet Web site... written advertisement in a publication of general circulation in the community served by the media...

  4. 12 CFR 213.7 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... advertisement , or an electronic advertisement (such as an advertisement appearing on an Internet Web site... written advertisement in a publication of general circulation in the community served by the media...

  5. Building an Ethical Advertising Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plopper, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    Discusses three of the more significant ethical problems related to the advertising operation of student and commercial publications: (1) explaining circulation to potential advertisers; (2) negotiating special deals; and (3) following through with quality and distribution. (MS)

  6. Online Advertising in Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagherjeiran, Abraham; Bhatt, Rushi P.; Parekh, Rajesh; Chaoji, Vineet

    Online social networks offer opportunities to analyze user behavior and social connectivity and leverage resulting insights for effective online advertising. This chapter focuses on the role of social network information in online display advertising.

  7. Bilingual Advertising in Melbourne Chinatown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Sherry Yong

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the function of bilingual advertising by analyzing a case study of bilingual advertising in the Chinatown of Melbourne, Australia. The use of bilingual advertising in an immigrant setting differentiates itself from those in Asian settings where English is not used by dominant proportion of speakers in the society, and this…

  8. Relations among pure-tone sound stimuli, neural activity, and the loudness sensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Both the physiological and psychological responses to pure-tone sound stimuli are used to derive formulas which: (1) relate the loudness, loudness level, and sound-pressure level of pure tones; (2) apply continuously over most of the acoustic regime, including the loudness threshold; and (3) contain no undetermined coefficients. Some of the formulas are fundamental for calculating the loudness of any sound. Power-law formulas relating the pure-tone sound stimulus, neural activity, and loudness are derived from published data.

  9. Male songbird indicates body size with low-pitched advertising songs.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michelle L; Kingma, Sjouke A; Peters, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Body size is a key sexually selected trait in many animal species. If size imposes a physical limit on the production of loud low-frequency sounds, then low-pitched vocalisations could act as reliable signals of body size. However, the central prediction of this hypothesis--that the pitch of vocalisations decreases with size among competing individuals--has limited support in songbirds. One reason could be that only the lowest-frequency components of vocalisations are constrained, and this may go unnoticed when vocal ranges are large. Additionally, the constraint may only be apparent in contexts when individuals are indeed advertising their size. Here we explicitly consider signal diversity and performance limits to demonstrate that body size limits song frequency in an advertising context in a songbird. We show that in purple-crowned fairy-wrens, Malurus coronatus coronatus, larger males sing lower-pitched low-frequency advertising songs. The lower frequency bound of all advertising song types also has a significant negative relationship with body size. However, the average frequency of all their advertising songs is unrelated to body size. This comparison of different approaches to the analysis demonstrates how a negative relationship between body size and song frequency can be obscured by failing to consider signal design and the concept of performance limits. Since these considerations will be important in any complex communication system, our results imply that body size constraints on low-frequency vocalisations could be more widespread than is currently recognised. PMID:23437221

  10. Bright Sneezes and Dark Coughs, Loud Sunlight and Soft Moonlight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Lawrence E.

    1982-01-01

    In a series of four experiments, subjects used scales of loudness, pitch, and brightness to evaluate the meanings of a variety of synesthetic metaphors--expressions in which words or phrases describing experiences proper to one sense modality transfer their meaning to another modality. (Author/PN)

  11. Subjective loudness of N-wave sonic booms.

    PubMed

    Niedzwiecki, A; Ribner, H S

    1978-12-01

    A loudspeaker-driven simulation booth with extended rise-time capability (down to 0.22 ms) has been used for subjective loudness tests of N-wave sonic booms. The test series compared signatures over a range of 0.22--10 ms in rise time, 100--250 ms in duration and 0.5--2.5 psf (24--120 Pa) in peak overpressure. In one sequence, the tradeoff between rise time and overpressure was measured for equal loudness; in another, the tradeoff between duration and overpressure. For equal loudness 10-ms rise time required 8-dB higher overpressure than for 1-ms rise time. Duration had little effect in the range 100--200 ms, but at 250 ms noticeably enhanced the loudness. These results confirm those measured by Shepherd and Sutherland made at 1-ms rise time and above (except for the anomalous enhancement at 250-ms duration), and extend the measurements down to 0.22 ms. There is also good agreement with theoretical predictions (Johnson-Robinson, Zepler-Harel methods) except for the 10-ms rise time and 250-ms duration cases. PMID:739096

  12. Continuous Loudness Judgments of Dynamics in Recorded Music Excerpts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geringer, John M.

    1995-01-01

    Reports on a study designed to investigate loudness judgments of 30 musician and 30 nonmusician listeners in response to performed dynamic changes within a musical context. Finds that musician subjects indicated a significantly smaller magnitude of dynamic change than did nonmusician subjects. (CFR)

  13. Thinking Out Loud while Studying Text: Rehearsing Key Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muth, K. Denise; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A study involving 32 undergraduate students was conducted to identify mechanisms by which instructional objectives affect learning. Protocols for thinking out loud were examined for evidence of rehearsal activity. Results suggest that instructional objectives enhanced real-time rehearsal activity, recall, and reading time. (TJH)

  14. Decibels via Loudness--Distance Properties of a Loudspeaker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Loudness, or sound intensity level, is a human perceived or subjective measurement with units, decibels, based on the response of the human ear to different sound intensities. The response of the human ear at fixed frequency is close to being logarithmic. The experiment reported here investigates the relationship between measured sound intensity…

  15. Loudness Change in Response to Dynamic Acoustic Intensity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Kirk N.; Stevens, Catherine J.; Tardieu, Julien

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments investigate psychological, methodological, and domain-specific characteristics of loudness change in response to sounds that continuously increase in intensity (up-ramps), relative to sounds that decrease (down-ramps). Timbre (vowel, violin), layer (monotone, chord), and duration (1.8 s, 3.6 s) were manipulated in Experiment 1.…

  16. Physiological motivated transmission-lines as front end for loudness models.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Iko; Mauermann, Manfred; Kollmeier, Birger; Ewert, Stephan D

    2016-05-01

    The perception of loudness is strongly influenced by peripheral auditory processing, which calls for a physiologically correct peripheral auditory processing stage when constructing advanced loudness models. Most loudness models, however, rather follow a functional approach: a parallel auditory filter bank combined with a compression stage, followed by spectral and temporal integration. Such classical loudness models do not allow to directly link physiological measurements like otoacoustic emissions to properties of their auditory filterbank. However, this can be achieved with physiologically motivated transmission-line models (TLMs) of the cochlea. Here two active and nonlinear TLMs were tested as the peripheral front end of a loudness model. The TLMs are followed by a simple generic back end which performs integration of basilar-membrane "excitation" across place and time to yield a loudness estimate. The proposed model approach reaches similar performance as other state-of-the-art loudness models regarding the prediction of loudness in sones, equal-loudness contours (including spectral fine structure), and loudness as a function of bandwidth. The suggested model provides a powerful tool to directly connect objective measures of basilar membrane compression, such as distortion product otoacoustic emissions, and loudness in future studies. PMID:27250182

  17. Loudness adaptation accompanying ribbon synapse and auditory nerve disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Michalewski, Henry J.; Starr, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal auditory adaptation is a standard clinical tool for diagnosing auditory nerve disorders due to acoustic neuromas. In the present study we investigated auditory adaptation in auditory neuropathy owing to disordered function of inner hair cell ribbon synapses (temperature-sensitive auditory neuropathy) or auditory nerve fibres. Subjects were tested when afebrile for (i) psychophysical loudness adaptation to comfortably-loud sustained tones; and (ii) physiological adaptation of auditory brainstem responses to clicks as a function of their position in brief 20-click stimulus trains (#1, 2, 3 … 20). Results were compared with normal hearing listeners and other forms of hearing impairment. Subjects with ribbon synapse disorder had abnormally increased magnitude of loudness adaptation to both low (250 Hz) and high (8000 Hz) frequency tones. Subjects with auditory nerve disorders had normal loudness adaptation to low frequency tones; all but one had abnormal adaptation to high frequency tones. Adaptation was both more rapid and of greater magnitude in ribbon synapse than in auditory nerve disorders. Auditory brainstem response measures of adaptation in ribbon synapse disorder showed Wave V to the first click in the train to be abnormal both in latency and amplitude, and these abnormalities increased in magnitude or Wave V was absent to subsequent clicks. In contrast, auditory brainstem responses in four of the five subjects with neural disorders were absent to every click in the train. The fifth subject had normal latency and abnormally reduced amplitude of Wave V to the first click and abnormal or absent responses to subsequent clicks. Thus, dysfunction of both synaptic transmission and auditory neural function can be associated with abnormal loudness adaptation and the magnitude of the adaptation is significantly greater with ribbon synapse than neural disorders. PMID:23503620

  18. Induced Loudness Reduction and Enhancement in Acoustic and Electric Hearing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ningyuan; Kreft, Heather; Oxenham, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    The loudness of a tone can be reduced by preceding it with a more intense tone. This effect, known as induced loudness reduction (ILR), has been reported to last for several seconds. The underlying neural mechanisms are unknown. One possible contributor to the effect involves changes in cochlear gain via the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferents. Since cochlear implants (CIs) bypass the cochlea, investigating whether and how CI users experience ILR should help provide a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. In the present study, ILR was examined in both normal-hearing listeners and CI users by examining the effects of an intense precursor (50 or 500 ms) on the loudness of a 50-ms target, as judged by comparing it to a spectrally remote 50-ms comparison sound. The interstimulus interval (ISI) between the precursor and the target was varied between 10 and 1000 ms to estimate the time course of ILR. In general, the patterns of results from the CI users were similar to those found in the normal-hearing listeners. However, in the short-precursor short-ISI condition, an enhancement in the loudness of target was observed in CI subjects that was not present in the normal-hearing listeners, consistent with the effects of an additional attenuation present in the normal-hearing listeners but not in the CI users. The results suggest that the MOC may play a role but that it is not the only source of these loudness context effects. PMID:27033086

  19. Ethical issues in professional advertising.

    PubMed

    Peters, C R

    1989-07-01

    Physician advertising has received considerable attention since the courts decided in favor of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in its initial complaint against the American Medical Association in the 1970s. Continued investigations by the FTC into AMA opinions on advertising and publicity have promulgated a new freedom in advertising by physicians. False and deceptive advertising though is the grounds for court action as well as license revocation. This is an attempt to analyze where physician advertising is most prevalent, which physicians are doing it and why. PMID:2600578

  20. Advertising media and cigarette demand.

    PubMed

    Goel, Rajeev K

    2011-01-01

    Using state-level panel data for the USA spanning three decades, this research estimates the demand for cigarettes. The main contribution lies in studying the effects of cigarette advertising disaggregated across five qualitatively different groups. Results show cigarette demand to be near unit elastic, the income effects to be generally insignificant and border price effects and habit effects to be significant. Regarding advertising effects, aggregate cigarette advertising has a negative effect on smoking. Important differences across advertising media emerge when cigarette advertising is disaggregated. The effects of public entertainment and Internet cigarette advertising are stronger than those of other media. Anti-smoking messages accompanying print cigarette advertising seem relatively more effective. Implications for smoking control policy are discussed. PMID:22167909

  1. Children's Advertisement Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrell, Andrew; Beard, Roger

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores primary school children's ability to engage with "the power of the text" by tackling persuasive writing in the form of an advertisement. It is eclectically framed within genre theory and rhetorical studies and makes use of linguistic tools and concepts. The paper argues that writing research has not built upon earlier…

  2. Teaching Burke Using Advertisements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Charles U.

    Kenneth Burke's concepts of identification, the five terms of dramatism, and strategic uses of ambiguity can be successfully taught to undergraduates if appropriate and familiar examples are used. Print and electronic advertising offer the instructor an up-to-date, familiar, and abundant source of classroom examples. Market segmentation models…

  3. Subliminal Advertising and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanot, Eric J.; Maddox, Lynda M.

    Claims that the academic community ignores the subject of subliminal advertising led to a study designed to ascertain the degree to which the topic is introduced in the classroom, what opinions professors offer concerning it, and the source with which they acquaint their students. A questionnaire containing a series of open- and close-ended…

  4. Language in Food Advertisements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plata, Maximino

    1992-01-01

    Analyses 476 food advertisements in newspapers from 3 different sized cities. Finds that brand names, food names, and descriptive vocabulary comprise the majority of language in food ads across newspaper groups. Offers suggestions for using newspaper ads in the classroom. (RS)

  5. Physician Advertising: The Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruhn, Diane; Alley, Susan

    In the area of commercial speech, the courts face two competing rights: the public's right to know and the state's right to discipline members of the medical profession. The Federal Trade Commission has taken strong action against medical advertising prohibitions, and legal precedents have been set in Virginia Board of Pharmacy v. Virginia…

  6. The Rhetoric of Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andren, Gunnar

    1980-01-01

    Presents results of a study of 300 magazine advertisements assessing the level at which the ads are objective and informative. Discusses how these ads are communications designed to influence consumer behavior to the extent that they correspond to the facts, are relevant, comprehensive, adequately supported, intelligible, and logical. (JMF)

  7. 12 CFR 230.8 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 230.8 Section 230.8 Banks and... SAVINGS (REGULATION DD) § 230.8 Advertising. (a) Misleading or inaccurate advertisements. An advertisement... obtain the advertised annual percentage yield. For tiered-rate accounts, the minimum balance required...

  8. 12 CFR 707.8 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 707.8 Section 707.8 Banks and... Advertising. (a) Misleading or inaccurate advertisements. An advertisement must not: (1) Be misleading or... balance required to earn the advertised annual percentage yield. For tiered-rate accounts, the...

  9. 27 CFR 4.65 - Comparative advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Comparative advertising. 4..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Advertising of Wine § 4.65 Comparative advertising. (a) General. Comparative advertising shall not be disparaging of a competitor's product....

  10. 27 CFR 7.55 - Comparative advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Comparative advertising. 7..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF MALT BEVERAGES Advertising of Malt Beverages § 7.55 Comparative advertising. (a) General. Comparative advertising shall not be disparaging of...

  11. 27 CFR 5.66 - Comparative advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Comparative advertising. 5..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF DISTILLED SPIRITS Advertising of Distilled Spirits § 5.66 Comparative advertising. (a) General. Comparative advertising shall not be disparaging of...

  12. Job and Career Satisfaction among Advertising Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jugenheimer, Donald W.

    A questionnaire survey of 300 advertising practitioners was used to determine the degree of job and career satisfaction among advertising practitioners. The subjects were separated according to whether they worked for advertising agencies, advertisers, or advertising media; 100 subjects in each area were selected from the prestigious directories…

  13. Policy Implications of Advertising to Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Emilie

    Since its inception the Children's Advertising Review Unit has turned to research in order to better evaluate children's advertisements, to develop guidelines for children's advertisers and to resolve some perplexing questions about certain types of advertising content. Although some work has been done in advertising directed toward children, most…

  14. Youths' understandings of cigarette advertisements.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Dan; Brucks, Merrie; Wallendorf, Melanie; Boland, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses two questions: (1) when youths are exposed to advertisements for cigarettes, do they primarily see advertisements for brands or products, and (2) is there a relationship between youths' understandings of cigarette advertisements and their susceptibility to smoking? A sample of 271 participants ranging in age from 7 to 12 viewed a series of print advertisements that included cigarette and non-tobacco-related ads. While viewing each ad, participants were asked to indicate what they thought the advertisement was trying to sell. Responses were coded into one of three categories reflecting important differences in participants' comprehension of each advertisement - no understanding, product category understanding, or brand understanding. Results show that youths typically understand the type of product an advertisement is promoting; however, the levels of brand understanding observed for cigarette advertisements were low in an absolute sense, and significantly lower than brand understanding of non-tobacco-related advertisements. Results also show that understanding cigarette ads as promoting specific brands of cigarettes is positively related to susceptibility to smoking. Taken together, these findings provide a glimpse of the psychological mechanisms that may underlie the well established link between exposure to cigarette advertising and youth smoking. PMID:18812253

  15. Leftward lighting in advertisements increases advertisement ratings and purchase intention.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Jennifer; Thomas, Nicole A; Elias, Lorin

    2011-07-01

    It has been reliably shown that light is assumed to come from above. There is also some suggestion that light from the left might be preferred. Leftward lighting biases have been observed across various mediums such as paintings, portraits, photographs, and advertisements. As advertisements are used to persuade the public to purchase products, it was of interest to better understand whether leftward lighting would influence future intention to purchase. Participants gave preference ratings for pairs of advertisements with opposing lighting directions. Attitude towards the advertisement and the brand as well as future purchase intention was then rated. Overall, participants indicated that they preferred advertisements with leftward lighting and were more likely to purchase these products in the future than when the same products were lit from the right. Findings are consistent with previously observed leftward lighting biases and suggest that advertisements with a leftward lighting bias might be more effective. PMID:21038169

  16. Argonne OutLoud Public Lecture Series: Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Roger Blomquist

    2012-12-10

    On November 15, 2012, Argonne National Laboratory opened its doors to the public for a presentation/discussion titled "Getting to Know Nuclear: Past, Present and Future." The speaker was Argonne researcher Roger Blomquist. The event was the latest in the Argonne OutLoud Public Lecture Series. For more information, visit the Argonne Nuclear Engineering Division website (http://www.ne.anl.gov/About/headlines...).

  17. Internet and Advertisement.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Khaled

    2016-02-01

    The Internet has revolutionized the way knowledge is currently produced, stored and disseminated. A few finger clicks on a keyboard can save time and many hours of search in libraries or shopping in stores. Online trademarks with an (e-) prefix such as e-library, e-business, e-health etc., are increasingly part of our daily professional vocabularies. However, the Internet has also produced multiple negative side effects, ranging from an unhealthy dependency to a dehumanization of human relationships. Fraudulent, unethical and scam practices are also flourishing through for example misleading online advertising methods. Some social and professional networks gather users' profiles for selling and advertising purposes, sometimes by making it technically difficult to unsubscribe. Here, I discuss some of these unethical aspects and propose some potential solutions to reduce them. PMID:25842044

  18. MAGNETIC FLUX PARADIGM FOR RADIO LOUDNESS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2013-02-20

    We argue that the magnetic flux threading the black hole (BH), rather than BH spin or Eddington ratio, is the dominant factor in launching powerful jets and thus determining the radio loudness of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Most AGNs are radio quiet because the thin accretion disks that feed them are inefficient in depositing magnetic flux close to the BH. Flux accumulation is more likely to occur during a hot accretion (or thick disk) phase, and we argue that radio-loud quasars and strong emission-line radio galaxies occur only when a massive, cold accretion event follows an episode of hot accretion. Such an event might be triggered by the merger of a giant elliptical galaxy with a disk galaxy. This picture supports the idea that flux accumulation can lead to the formation of a so-called magnetically choked accretion flow. The large observed range in radio loudness reflects not only the magnitude of the flux pressed against the BH, but also the decrease in UV flux from the disk, due to its disruption by the ''magnetosphere'' associated with the accumulated flux. While the strongest jets result from the secular accumulation of flux, moderate jet activity can also be triggered by fluctuations in the magnetic flux deposited by turbulent, hot inner regions of otherwise thin accretion disks, or by the dissipation of turbulent fields in accretion disk coronae. These processes could be responsible for jet production in Seyferts and low-luminosity AGNs, as well as jets associated with X-ray binaries.

  19. Reverberation mapping of two radio-loud quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Brotherton, Michael S.; Mason, Michelle; Roberts, Caroline Anna; Singh, Vikram; Johnson-Groh, Mara; Erickson, Nicholas; Lundquist, Michael J.; Alexander, Michael J.; Staudaher, Shawn; Cales, Sabrina; DiPompeo, Michael A.; Smullen, Rachel; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Nyugen, My; Chatterjee, Ritaban; Chatterjee, Suchetana; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of a reverberation mapping (RM) campaign on two radio-loud quasars, 3C 382 and PG 2209+184, using the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO). For 3C 382 we determine a Hβ time lag of &ea; = 47.2 ^{16.8}_{-30.4} days, with a RMS line dispersion of 2317±195 km s^{-1}, and a corresponding mass of 2.12^{0.92}_{-1.46} × 10^8 M_⊙. For PG 2209+184, we determine a Hβ time lag of τ = 38.9 ^{11.9}_{-21} days, with a RMS line dispersion of 2114±121 km s^{-1}, and a corresponding mass of 1.45^{0.58}_{-0.87} × 10^8 M_⊙. These two objects are consistent with the radius-luminosity relationship for H$β and bring the total of radio-loud quasars reverberation mapped to seven. Radio-loud quasars bring the potential of investigating orientation biases in quasar black hole mass determination.

  20. Separate Mechanisms for Audio-Tactile Pitch and Loudness Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Jeffrey M.; Weber, Alison I.; Bensmaia, Sliman J.

    2010-01-01

    A major goal in perceptual neuroscience is to understand how signals from different sensory modalities are combined to produce stable and coherent representations. We previously investigated interactions between audition and touch, motivated by the fact that both modalities are sensitive to environmental oscillations. In our earlier study, we characterized the effect of auditory distractors on tactile frequency and intensity perception. Here, we describe the converse experiments examining the effect of tactile distractors on auditory processing. Because the two studies employ the same psychophysical paradigm, we combined their results for a comprehensive view of how auditory and tactile signals interact and how these interactions depend on the perceptual task. Together, our results show that temporal frequency representations are perceptually linked regardless of the attended modality. In contrast, audio-tactile loudness interactions depend on the attended modality: Tactile distractors influence judgments of auditory intensity, but judgments of tactile intensity are impervious to auditory distraction. Lastly, we show that audio-tactile loudness interactions depend critically on stimulus timing, while pitch interactions do not. These results reveal that auditory and tactile inputs are combined differently depending on the perceptual task. That distinct rules govern the integration of auditory and tactile signals in pitch and loudness perception implies that the two are mediated by separate neural mechanisms. These findings underscore the complexity and specificity of multisensory interactions. PMID:21887147

  1. Role of short-term memory in loudness comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellermeier, Wolfgang; Werner, Birgit

    2003-04-01

    In an earlier study of the auditory discrimination of time-varying noise bursts [Ellermeier and Schrödl, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 2596 (2000)], listeners were found to place greater weight on the beginning and end of the sounds than on the middle portion. To investigate whether this outcome is due to primacy and recency effects in short-term memory which tend to be sensitive to manipulations of the inter-stimulus interval (ISI), the ISI separating the two noise bursts in a 2IFC task was varied systematically. Six participants performed loudness comparisons on 1-s samples of white noise randomly changing in level every 100 ms. In different blocks of trials, the two noise bursts to be compared were either separated by a 500-ms or a 2-s ISI. COSS analysis [Berg, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 86, 1743-1746 (1989)] of the overall loudness judgments revealed elevated weights for the beginning and end of the noises, as in the earlier study. These weighting patterns were largely unaffected by the manipulation of ISI, suggesting that the temporal weights found characterize loudness integration in general, and are not just due to idiosyncrasies of the timing used in the 2IFC procedure.

  2. Acoustic and Perceptual Consequences of Clear and Loud Speech

    PubMed Central

    Tjaden, Kris; Richards, Emily; Kuo, Christina; Wilding, Greg; Sussman, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Several issues concerning F2 slope in dysarthria were addressed by obtaining speech acoustic measures and judgments of intelligibility for sentences produced in Habitual, Clear and Loud conditions by speakers with Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthy controls. Patients and Methods Acoustic measures of average and maximum F2 slope for diphthongs, duration and intensity were obtained. Listeners judged intelligibility using a visual analog scale. Differences in measures among groups and conditions as well as relationships among measures were examined. Results Average and maximum F2 slope metrics were strongly correlated, but only average F2 slope consistently differed among groups and conditions, with shallower slopes for the PD group and steeper slopes for Clear speech versus Habitual and Loud. Clear and Loud speech were also characterized by lengthened durations, increased intensity and improved intelligibility versus Habitual. F2 slope and intensity were unrelated, and F2 slope was a significant predictor of intelligibility. Conclusion Average diphthong F2 slope was more sensitive than maximum F2 slope to articulatory mechanism involvement in mild dysarthria in PD. F2 slope holds promise as an objective measure of treatment-related changes in the articulatory mechanism for therapeutic techniques that focus on articulation. PMID:24504015

  3. Loud calls of adult male red howling monkeys (Alouatta seniculus).

    PubMed

    Schön Ybarra, M A

    1986-01-01

    Loud calls of adult male red howlers (Alouatta seniculus) inhabiting a deciduous and semideciduous open woodland site in Venezuela were recorded opportunistically and categorized by ear and sonographically as barks and roars. Five to six different bark syllables were identified as occurring singly or in sequences of doublets and triplets. In barks, spectral energy was concentrated in bands at 350-400 Hz, 900-1,100 Hz, 1,800-2,200 Hz and 3,000-3,500 Hz, but not all higher bands were present in each syllable. Roars appeared sonographically like prolonged barks composed of a pulsated preface, a long legato climax and a brief, fractionated and at times pulsated coda; each part varied internally to the ear and in acoustic structure. All loud calls were of the noisy type (nonharmonic energy over a broad frequency range). Acoustic characteristics of the calls are interpreted in terms of the subserving vocal tract anatomy. I compare loud calls of red howlers with those of mantled (A. palliata) and black (A. caraya) howlers. PMID:3609972

  4. Reverberation mapping of two radio-loud quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Brotherton, Michael S.; Mason, Michelle; Roberts, Caroline Anna; Singh, Vikram; Johnson-Groh, Mara; Erickson, Nicholas; Lundquist, Michael J.; Alexander, Michael J.; Staudaher, Shawn; Cales, Sabrina; DiPompeo, Michael A.; Smullen, Rachel; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Nyugen, My; Chatterjee, Ritaban; Chatterjee, Suchetana; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of a reverberation mapping (RM) campaign on two radio-loud quasars, 3C 382 and PG 2209+184, using the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO). For 3C 382 we determine a Hβ time lag of η = 47.2 ^{16.8}_{-30.4} days, with a RMS line dispersion of 2317±195 km s^{-1}, and a corresponding mass of 2.12^{0.92}_{-1.46} × 10^8 M_⊙. For PG 2209+184, we determine a Hβ time lag of τ = 38.9 ^{11.9}_{-21} days, with a RMS line dispersion of 2114±121 km s^{-1}, and a corresponding mass of 1.45^{0.58}_{-0.87} × 10^8 M_⊙. These two objects are consistent with the radius-luminosity relationship for H$β and bring the total of radio-loud quasars reverberation mapped to seven. Radio-loud quasars bring the potential of investigating orientation biases in quasar black hole mass determination.

  5. Modeling the Individual Variability of Loudness Perception with a Multi-Category Psychometric Function.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Andrea C; Jesteadt, Walt; Neely, Stephen T

    2016-01-01

    Loudness is a suprathreshold percept that provides insight into the status of the entire auditory pathway. Individuals with matched thresholds can show individual variability in their loudness perception that is currently not well understood. As a means to analyze and model listener variability, we introduce the multi-category psychometric function (MCPF), a novel representation for categorical data that fully describes the probabilistic relationship between stimulus level and categorical-loudness perception. We present results based on categorical loudness scaling (CLS) data for adults with normal-hearing (NH) and hearing loss (HL). We show how the MCPF can be used to improve CLS estimates, by combining listener models with maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation. We also describe how the MCPF could be used in an entropy-based stimulus-selection technique. These techniques utilize the probabilistic nature of categorical perception, a novel usage of this dimension of loudness information, to improve the quality of loudness measurements. PMID:27080656

  6. 12 CFR 1013.7 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... advertisement (such as an advertisement appearing on an Internet Web site), that provides a table or schedule of...) Directs the consumer to a written advertisement in a publication of general circulation in the...

  7. 12 CFR 1013.7 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... advertisement (such as an advertisement appearing on an Internet Web site), that provides a table or schedule of...) Directs the consumer to a written advertisement in a publication of general circulation in the...

  8. Point-of-Purchase Advertising. Learning Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shackelford, Ray

    1998-01-01

    In this technology education activity, students learn the importance of advertising, conduct a day-long survey of advertising strategies, and design and produce a tabletop point-of-purchase advertisement. (JOW)

  9. Educating the Consumer about Advertising: Some Issues. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Stephen S.

    Providing a basic overview of issues related to advertising and the consumer, this digest discusses the omnipresence of advertisements, suggesting ways for consumers to recognize advertising appeals. Deceptive advertising is discussed, with particular attention paid to financial advertising. (RS)

  10. 'Puffing' in medical advertising expands liability.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, B D

    1990-05-01

    Advertising is nothing new to the medical profession, although for many years reputable doctors did not advertise their skills. In 1975, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) successfully argued in a case that was appealed to the Supreme Court that the AMA had unlawfully restricted medical advertising. While the FTC usurped the job of policing medical advertising, it seems to regard medical adverstising as a local problem not worthy of FTC attention. It has avoided setting standards for medical advertising and has failed to initiate significant enforcement against deceptive medical advertising. This article briefly reviews the historical role of advertising in modern American medicine and discusses advertising in relation to risk management. PMID:2343421

  11. Subliminal Advertising: Is it Still Being Taught in Advertising Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applegate, Edd

    In 1974, 1976, and 1980 three best-selling books were published by Prentice Hall authored by Wilson Bryan Key. Key adopted the viewpoint that subliminal perception was a new phenomenon and that advertisers and advertising agencies were involved in manipulation of the public with the cooperation of the mass media. This study asks whether professors…

  12. Institutional Advertising in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittle, Bart

    2000-01-01

    An exploratory study surveyed 59 colleges and universities concerning their advertising practices, specifically media usage, importance of communication objectives for institutional messages, and the importance of audiences targeted for advertising. All major media were used by most of the institutions. Communication objectives mentioned most…

  13. Deceptive Advertising: Unprotected and Unknown.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ducoffe, Robert Hal

    The Supreme Court tentatively extended First Amendment protection to commercial speech, but left the issue of defining and regulating deceptive advertising to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), which has employed tools such as the cease-and-desist order, affirmative disclosure, and corrective advertising. The FTC Act did not define deception, but…

  14. Critical Media Literacy: Commercial Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Laurie

    Studying the influence of mass media on people's lives allows students to view advertising in a new light. This lesson provides students with the opportunity to look at mass media in a critical way--students become aware of the tremendous amount of advertising that they are exposed to on a daily basis. In the lesson, by looking at advertising…

  15. Drug Advertising and the FDA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levesque, Cynthia

    With increases in consumer focused advertising for prescription drugs, the Federal Drug Administration has renewed efforts to protect the public from false advertising. In 1982, it charged that the press kits Eli Lilly and Company distributed to reporters on its new antiarthritis drug, Oraflex, misrepresented the product. It recommended that Lilly…

  16. Individual, Contextual, and Age-Related Acoustic Variation in Simakobu (Simias concolor) Loud Calls

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Wendy M.; Hodges, J. Keith; Hammerschmidt, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Primate loud calls have the potential to encode information about the identity, arousal, age, or physical condition of the caller, even at long distances. In this study, we conducted an analysis of the acoustic features of the loud calls produced by a species of Asian colobine monkey (simakobu, Simias concolor). Adult male simakobu produce loud calls spontaneously and in response to loud sounds and other loud calls, which are audible more than 500 m. Individual differences in calling rates and durations exist, but it is unknown what these differences signal and which other acoustic features vary among individuals. We aimed to describe the structure and usage of calls and to examine acoustic features that vary within and among individuals. We determined the context of 318 loud calls and analyzed 170 loud calls recorded from 10 adult males at an undisturbed site, Pungut, Siberut Island, Indonesia. Most calls (53%) followed the loud call of another male, 31% were spontaneous, and the remaining 16% followed a loud environmental disturbance. The fundamental frequency (F0) decreased while inter-unit intervals (IUI) increased over the course of loud call bouts, possibly indicating caller fatigue. Discriminant function analysis indicated that calls were not well discriminated by context, but spontaneous calls had higher peak frequencies, suggesting a higher level of arousal. Individual calls were distinct and individuals were mainly discriminated by IUI, call duration, and F0. Loud calls of older males had shorter IUI and lower F0, while middle-aged males had the highest peak frequencies. Overall, we found that calls were individually distinct and may provide information about the age, stamina, and arousal of the calling male, and could thus be a way for males and females to assess competitors and mates from long distances. PMID:24376651

  17. The Attitudes of Advertising Educators Concerning the Philosophies of Legendary Advertising Practitioners (and Their Implications for Advertising Education).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanot, Eric J.; Lamp, Joseph

    A study explored the attitudes of professors of advertising toward well-known advertising practitioners, and the effect these famous practitioners have had on the teaching of advertising. Four influential and famous advertising practitioners were selected from a preliminary list of 10. Six statements reflecting each practitioner's advertising…

  18. Generation X and Objectionable Advertising: A Q-Sort of Senior Advertising Students' Attitudes toward Objectionable Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yssel, Johan C.; And Others

    A study investigated what a group of 29 senior advertising students, part of "Generation X," at a midwestern university found "objectionable" in 35 selected contemporary magazine advertising executions. Using a Q-sort, students ranked the advertisements and completed a personal interview. The majority of the advertisements that students found…

  19. Ultrafast outflows in radio-loud active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Tazaki, F.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Ueda, Y.; Cappi, M.; Gofford, J.; Reeves, J. N.; Guainazzi, M.

    2014-09-01

    Recent X-ray observations show absorbing winds with velocities up to mildly relativistic values of the order of ˜0.1c in a limited sample of six broad-line radio galaxies. They are observed as blueshifted Fe XXV-XXVI K-shell absorption lines, similarly to the ultrafast outflows (UFOs) reported in Seyferts and quasars. In this work we extend the search for such Fe K absorption lines to a larger sample of 26 radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) observed with XMM-Newton and Suzaku. The sample is drawn from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope 58-month catalogue and blazars are excluded. X-ray bright Fanaroff-Riley Class II radio galaxies constitute the majority of the sources. Combining the results of this analysis with those in the literature we find that UFOs are detected in >27 per cent of the sources. However, correcting for the number of spectra with insufficient signal-to-noise ratio, we can estimate that the incidence of UFOs is this sample of radio-loud AGN is likely in the range f ≃ (50 ± 20) per cent. A photoionization modelling of the absorption lines with XSTAR allows us to estimate the distribution of their main parameters. The observed outflow velocities are broadly distributed between vout ≲ 1000 km s-1 and vout ≃ 0.4c, with mean and median values of vout ≃ 0.133c and vout ≃ 0.117c, respectively. The material is highly ionized, with an average ionization parameter of logξ ≃ 4.5 erg s-1 cm, and the column densities are larger than NH > 1022 cm-2. Overall, these characteristics are consistent with the presence of complex accretion disc winds in a significant fraction of radio-loud AGN and demonstrate that the presence of relativistic jets does not preclude the existence of winds, in accordance with several theoretical models.

  20. Broad absorption line variability in radio-loud quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, C. A.; Miller, B. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Capellupo, D. M.; Gibson, R. R.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate C IV broad absorption line (BAL) variability within a sample of 46 radio-loud quasars (RLQs), selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)/Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (FIRST) data to include both core-dominated (39) and lobe-dominated (7) objects. The sample consists primarily of high-ionization BAL quasars, and a substantial fraction have large BAL velocities or equivalent widths; their radio luminosities and radio-loudness values span ˜2.5 orders of magnitude. We have obtained 34 new Hobby-Eberly Telescope spectra of 28 BAL RLQs to compare to earlier SDSS data, and we also incorporate archival coverage (primarily dual-epoch SDSS) for a total set of 78 pairs of equivalent width measurements for 46 BAL RLQs, probing rest-frame time-scales of ˜80-6000 d (median 500 d). In general, only modest changes in the depths of segments of absorption troughs are observed, akin to those seen in prior studies of BAL radio-quiet quasars (RQQs). Also similar to previous findings for RQQs, the RLQs studied here are more likely to display BAL variability on longer rest-frame time-scales. However, typical values of |{Δ}EW| and |{Δ}EW|/ are ˜40 ± 20 per cent lower for BAL RLQs when compared with those of a time-scale-matched sample of BAL RQQs. Optical continuum variability is of similar amplitude in BAL RLQs and BAL RQQs; for both RLQs and RQQs, continuum variability tends to be stronger on longer time-scales. BAL variability in RLQs does not obviously depend upon their radio luminosities or radio-loudness values, but we do find tentative evidence for greater fractional BAL variability within lobe-dominated RLQs. Enhanced BAL variability within more edge-on (lobe-dominated) RLQs supports some geometrical dependence to the outflow structure.

  1. It's not your father's recruitment: A new view of loudness growth in cochlear hearing loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florentine, Mary; Buus, Søren

    2002-05-01

    For over 60 years, one of the most commonly held beliefs in audiology has been that loudness grows more rapidly than normal near the elevated thresholds of listeners with cochlear hearing losses. This belief was based on the untested assumption that loudness at threshold is the same-often incorrectly assumed to be zero-in normal listeners and listeners with cochlear hearing losses. Recent tests of this assumption indicate that loudness at threshold is not zero in either group of listeners. These data also indicate that loudness near threshold grows at a normal rate in listeners with cochlear hearing losses. In other words, recruitment in the sense of a rapid growth of loudness near an elevated threshold does not occur. How, then, can intense sounds have approximately normal loudness in listeners with cochlear hearing losses? The explanation is that loudness at threshold is greater when the threshold is elevated by a cochlear loss than when it is normal. We call this softness imperception. Therefore, listeners with cochlear hearing losses not only have reduced dynamic range of audibility; they also have reduced dynamic range of loudness. Implications for the design of hearing aids will be discussed. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD grant R01DC02241.

  2. The Relationship of Vocal Loudness Manipulation to Prosodic F0 and Durational Variables in Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Peter J.; Hughes, Deanna

    2006-01-01

    This investigation was motivated by observations that when persons with dysarthria increase loudness their speech improves. Some studies have indicated that this improvement may be related to an increase of prosodic variation. Studies have reported an increase of fundamental frequency (F0) variation with increased loudness, but there has been no…

  3. Comfortable Loudness Level: Stimulus Effects, Long-Term Reliability, and Predictability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Robyn M.

    1989-01-01

    Three studies investigated comfortable loudness levels with particular reference to their application to hearing aid gain prescriptions. The studies, involving 33 normal hearing adults and 77 adults with hearing impairments, suggest that comfortable loudness levels for continuous speech bands can be estimated rather accurately, quickly, and with…

  4. Effects of relative and absolute frequency in the spectral weighting of loudness.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Suyash Narendra; Wróblewski, Marcin; Schmid, Kendra K; Jesteadt, Walt

    2016-01-01

    The loudness of broadband sound is often modeled as a linear sum of specific loudness across frequency bands. In contrast, recent studies using molecular psychophysical methods suggest that low and high frequency components contribute more to the overall loudness than mid frequencies. In a series of experiments, the contribution of individual components to the overall loudness of a tone complex was assessed using the molecular psychophysical method as well as a loudness matching task. The stimuli were two spectrally overlapping ten-tone complexes with two equivalent rectangular bandwidth spacing between the tones, making it possible to separate effects of relative and absolute frequency. The lowest frequency components of the "low-frequency" and the "high-frequency" complexes were 208 and 808 Hz, respectively. Perceptual-weights data showed emphasis on lowest and highest frequencies of both the complexes, suggesting spectral-edge related effects. Loudness matching data in the same listeners confirmed the greater contribution of low and high frequency components to the overall loudness of the ten-tone complexes. Masked detection thresholds of the individual components within the tone complex were not correlated with perceptual weights. The results show that perceptual weights provide reliable behavioral correlates of relative contributions of the individual frequency components to overall loudness of broadband sounds. PMID:26827032

  5. Effects of auditory enhancement on the loudness of masker and target components.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ningyuan; Oxenham, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    Auditory enhancement refers to the observation that the salience of one spectral region (the "signal") of a broadband sound can be enhanced and can "pop out" from the remainder of the sound (the "masker") if it is preceded by the broadband sound without the signal. The present study investigated auditory enhancement as an effective change in loudness, to determine whether it reflects a change in the loudness of the signal, the masker, or both. In the first experiment, the 500-ms precursor, an inharmonic complex with logarithmically spaced components, was followed after a 50-ms gap by the 100-ms signal or masker alone, the loudness of which was compared with that of the same signal or masker presented 2 s later. In the second experiment, the loudness of the signal embedded in the masker was assessed with and without a precursor using the same method, as was the loudness of the entire signal-plus-masker complex. The results suggest that the precursor does not affect the loudness of the signal or the masker alone, but enhances the loudness of the signal in the presence of the masker, while leaving the loudness of the surrounding masker unaffected. The results are consistent with an explanation based on "adaptation of inhibition" [Viemeister and Bacon (1982). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 71, 1502-1507]. PMID:26805025

  6. Correspondences among pupillary dilation response, subjective salience of sounds, and loudness.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hsin-I; Kidani, Shunsuke; Yoneya, Makoto; Kashino, Makio; Furukawa, Shigeto

    2016-04-01

    A pupillary dilation response is known to be evoked by salient deviant or contrast auditory stimuli, but so far a direct link between it and subjective salience has been lacking. In two experiments, participants listened to various environmental sounds while their pupillary responses were recorded. In separate sessions, participants performed subjective pairwise-comparison tasks on the sounds with respect to their salience, loudness, vigorousness, preference, beauty, annoyance, and hardness. The pairwise-comparison data were converted to ratings on the Thurstone scale. The results showed a close link between subjective judgments of salience and loudness. The pupil dilated in response to the sound presentations, regardless of sound type. Most importantly, this pupillary dilation response to an auditory stimulus positively correlated with the subjective salience, as well as the loudness, of the sounds (Exp. 1). When the loudnesses of the sounds were identical, the pupil responses to each sound were similar and were not correlated with the subjective judgments of salience or loudness (Exp. 2). This finding was further confirmed by analyses based on individual stimulus pairs and participants. In Experiment 3, when salience and loudness were manipulated by systematically changing the sound pressure level and acoustic characteristics, the pupillary dilation response reflected the changes in both manipulated factors. A regression analysis showed a nearly perfect linear correlation between the pupillary dilation response and loudness. The overall results suggest that the pupillary dilation response reflects the subjective salience of sounds, which is defined, or is heavily influenced, by loudness. PMID:26163191

  7. Loudness perception affected by high doses of salicylate--a behavioral model of hyperacusis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Flowers, Elizabeth; Li, Jun-Xu; Wang, Qiuju; Sun, Wei

    2014-09-01

    The major side-effects of high doses of salicylate include sensorial hearing loss and tinnitus. Although salicylate decreases cochlear output, it enhances the evoked potentials recorded from the central auditory system (CAS), suggesting an increase to sound sensitivity. However, the loudness change after salicylate administration has not yet been directly measured. In this study, we established an operant conditioning based behavioral task in rats and measured their loudness perception changes before and after high doses of salicylate injection (250 mg/kg, i.p.). We found that high doses of salicylate induced a significant increase to loudness response in 40% of the rats (out of 20 rats), suggesting a hyperacusis behavior. In another 40% of rats, a rapid increase of loudness response was detected, suggesting loudness recruitment. The reaction time of the rats was also measured during the loudness tests before and after salicylate exposure. The reaction time level functions are highly correlated to the loudness response functions. Our studies confirmed that increased sound sensitivity, which is commonly seen in patients with tinnitus and hyperacusis, can be induced by high doses of salicylate. This loudness change induced by salicylate may be related with hypersensitivity in the CAS. PMID:24882611

  8. Effects of Loud and Amplified Speech on Sentence and Word Intelligibility in Parkinson Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, Amy T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In the two experiments in this study, the author examined the effects of increased vocal effort (loud speech) and amplification on sentence and word intelligibility in speakers with Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: Five talkers with PD produced sentences and words at habitual levels of effort and using loud speech techniques. Amplified…

  9. Development of a loudness normalisation strategy for combined cochlear implant and acoustic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Francart, Tom; McDermott, Hugh J

    2012-12-01

    Users of a cochlear implant together with a hearing aid in the non-implanted ear currently use devices that were developed separately and are often fitted separately. This results in very different growth of loudness with level in the two ears, potentially leading to decreased wearing comfort and suboptimal perception of interaural level differences. A loudness equalisation strategy, named 'SCORE bimodal', is proposed. It equalises loudness growth for the two modalities using existing models of loudness for acoustic and electric stimulation, and is suitable for implementation in wearable devices. Loudness balancing experiments were performed with six bimodal listeners to validate the strategy. In a first set of experiments, the function of each loudness model used was validated by balancing the loudness of four harmonic complexes of different bandwidths, ranging from 200 Hz to 1000 Hz, separately for each ear. Both the electric and acoustic loudness models predicted the data well. In a second set of experiments, binaural balancing was done for the same stimuli. It was found that SCORE significantly improved binaural balance. PMID:23000118

  10. Representation of Instantaneous and Short-Term Loudness in the Human Cortex.

    PubMed

    Thwaites, Andrew; Glasberg, Brian R; Nimmo-Smith, Ian; Marslen-Wilson, William D; Moore, Brian C J

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic signals pass through numerous transforms in the auditory system before perceptual attributes such as loudness and pitch are derived. However, relatively little is known as to exactly when these transformations happen, and where, cortically or sub-cortically, they occur. In an effort to examine this, we investigated the latencies and locations of cortical entrainment to two transforms predicted by a model of loudness perception for time-varying sounds: the transforms were instantaneous loudness and short-term loudness, where the latter is hypothesized to be derived from the former and therefore should occur later in time. Entrainment of cortical activity was estimated from electro- and magneto-encephalographic (EMEG) activity, recorded while healthy subjects listened to continuous speech. There was entrainment to instantaneous loudness bilaterally at 45, 100, and 165 ms, in Heschl's gyrus, dorsal lateral sulcus, and Heschl's gyrus, respectively. Entrainment to short-term loudness was found in both the dorsal lateral sulcus and superior temporal sulcus at 275 ms. These results suggest that short-term loudness is derived from instantaneous loudness, and that this derivation occurs after processing in sub-cortical structures. PMID:27199645

  11. Representation of Instantaneous and Short-Term Loudness in the Human Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Thwaites, Andrew; Glasberg, Brian R.; Nimmo-Smith, Ian; Marslen-Wilson, William D.; Moore, Brian C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic signals pass through numerous transforms in the auditory system before perceptual attributes such as loudness and pitch are derived. However, relatively little is known as to exactly when these transformations happen, and where, cortically or sub-cortically, they occur. In an effort to examine this, we investigated the latencies and locations of cortical entrainment to two transforms predicted by a model of loudness perception for time-varying sounds: the transforms were instantaneous loudness and short-term loudness, where the latter is hypothesized to be derived from the former and therefore should occur later in time. Entrainment of cortical activity was estimated from electro- and magneto-encephalographic (EMEG) activity, recorded while healthy subjects listened to continuous speech. There was entrainment to instantaneous loudness bilaterally at 45, 100, and 165 ms, in Heschl's gyrus, dorsal lateral sulcus, and Heschl's gyrus, respectively. Entrainment to short-term loudness was found in both the dorsal lateral sulcus and superior temporal sulcus at 275 ms. These results suggest that short-term loudness is derived from instantaneous loudness, and that this derivation occurs after processing in sub-cortical structures. PMID:27199645

  12. 16 CFR 238.1 - Bait advertisement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bait advertisement. 238.1 Section 238.1 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES AGAINST BAIT ADVERTISING § 238.1 Bait advertisement. No advertisement containing an offer to sell a product should be published when the offer is not a bona fide...

  13. 12 CFR 1030.8 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advertising. 1030.8 Section 1030.8 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION TRUTH IN SAVINGS (REGULATION DD) § 1030.8 Advertising. (a) Misleading or inaccurate advertisements. An advertisement shall not: (1) Be misleading or inaccurate...

  14. 12 CFR 1030.8 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advertising. 1030.8 Section 1030.8 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION TRUTH IN SAVINGS (REGULATION DD) § 1030.8 Advertising. (a) Misleading or inaccurate advertisements. An advertisement shall not: (1) Be misleading or inaccurate...

  15. 12 CFR 1030.8 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advertising. 1030.8 Section 1030.8 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION TRUTH IN SAVINGS (REGULATION DD) § 1030.8 Advertising. (a) Misleading or inaccurate advertisements. An advertisement shall not: (1) Be misleading or inaccurate...

  16. 16 CFR 259.2 - Advertising disclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... advertised. Fuel economy estimates assigned to “unique nameplates” (see 40 CFR 600.207-86(a)(2)) apply only... ADVERTISING FOR NEW AUTOMOBILES § 259.2 Advertising disclosures. (a) No manufacturer or dealer shall make any express or implied representation in advertising concerning the fuel economy of any new automobile...

  17. 16 CFR 259.2 - Advertising disclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... advertised. Fuel economy estimates assigned to “unique nameplates” (see 40 CFR 600.207-86(a)(2)) apply only... ADVERTISING FOR NEW AUTOMOBILES § 259.2 Advertising disclosures. (a) No manufacturer or dealer shall make any express or implied representation in advertising concerning the fuel economy of any new automobile...

  18. 16 CFR 259.2 - Advertising disclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... advertised. Fuel economy estimates assigned to “unique nameplates” (see 40 CFR 600.207-86(a)(2)) apply only... ADVERTISING FOR NEW AUTOMOBILES § 259.2 Advertising disclosures. (a) No manufacturer or dealer shall make any express or implied representation in advertising concerning the fuel economy of any new automobile...

  19. 16 CFR 259.2 - Advertising disclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... advertised. Fuel economy estimates assigned to “unique nameplates” (see 40 CFR 600.207-86(a)(2)) apply only... ADVERTISING FOR NEW AUTOMOBILES § 259.2 Advertising disclosures. (a) No manufacturer or dealer shall make any express or implied representation in advertising concerning the fuel economy of any new automobile...

  20. 16 CFR 259.2 - Advertising disclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... advertised. Fuel economy estimates assigned to “unique nameplates” (see 40 CFR 600.207-86(a)(2)) apply only... ADVERTISING FOR NEW AUTOMOBILES § 259.2 Advertising disclosures. (a) No manufacturer or dealer shall make any express or implied representation in advertising concerning the fuel economy of any new automobile...

  1. 32 CFR 644.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Advertising. 644.540 Section 644.540 National... HANDBOOK Disposal Sale Procedure § 644.540 Advertising. (a) Definition and purposes. GSA regulations... for sale. Sales will be made to the highest responsible bidder after advertising. Advertising...

  2. 20 CFR 655.1303 - Advertising requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advertising requirements. 655.1303 Section... Employment in the United States (H-2A Workers) § 655.1303 Advertising requirements. All advertising conducted... the H-2A workers. All advertising must contain the following information: (a) The employer's name...

  3. 32 CFR 644.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Advertising. 644.540 Section 644.540 National... HANDBOOK Disposal Sale Procedure § 644.540 Advertising. (a) Definition and purposes. GSA regulations... for sale. Sales will be made to the highest responsible bidder after advertising. Advertising...

  4. 12 CFR 226.24 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 226.24 Section 226.24 Banks and... LENDING (REGULATION Z) Closed-End Credit § 226.24 Advertising. (a) Actually available terms. If an... annual rate of interest will apply over the term of the advertised loan, the advertisement shall...

  5. 36 CFR 223.63 - Advertised rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Advertised rates. 223.63... Sale Contracts Appraisal and Pricing § 223.63 Advertised rates. Timber shall be advertised for sale at... construction is to be accomplished by the timber purchaser. The advertised rates shall be not less than...

  6. 12 CFR 338.3 - Nondiscriminatory advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...'s regulations (24 CFR 110.25(a)). (2) With respect to oral advertisements, this requirement may be... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nondiscriminatory advertising. 338.3 Section... POLICY FAIR HOUSING Advertising § 338.3 Nondiscriminatory advertising. (a) Any bank which directly...

  7. 20 CFR 655.17 - Advertising requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advertising requirements. 655.17 Section 655... States (H-2B Workers) § 655.17 Advertising requirements. All advertising conducted to satisfy the... employment which are not less favorable than those to be offered to the H-2B workers. All advertising...

  8. Advertising Practitioners' Uses and Perceptions of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severn, Jessica J. H.; Dunham, Rodney A.

    A study examined (1) how advertising practitioners perceive research related to their profession, (2) how advertising practitioners learn of current research results, and (3) how, if at all, advertising practitioners use research. Individual discussions with advertising practitioners in the San Diego market led to an initial bank of items from…

  9. Advertising to Children: Concepts and Controversies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macklin, M. Carole, Ed.; Carlson, Les, Ed.

    This book presents cutting-edge research designed to stimulate and inform the debate over advertising to the children's market and the effects such advertising has on children. Perspectives are organized in sections to address what children know and think about advertising, how advertising works with children, and what issues are at the forefront…

  10. 12 CFR 707.8 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advertising. 707.8 Section 707.8 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS TRUTH IN SAVINGS § 707.8 Advertising. (a) Misleading or inaccurate advertisements. An advertisement must not: (1) Be misleading...

  11. Loudness modulation after transient and permanent hearing loss: implications for tinnitus and hyperacusis.

    PubMed

    Fournier, P; Schönwiesner, M; Hébert, S

    2014-12-26

    Loudness is the primary perceptual correlate of sound intensity. The relationship between sound intensity and loudness is not fixed, and can be modified by short-term sound deprivation or stimulation. Deprivation increases sound sensitivity, whereas stimulation decreases it. We review the effects of short-term auditory deprivation and stimulation on the auditory central nervous system of humans and animals, and we extend the discussion to permanent auditory deprivation (hearing loss) and auditory pathologies of loudness perception. Although there is sufficient evidence to conclude that loudness can be modulated in normal hearing listeners by temporary sound deprivation and stimulation, evidence is scanter for the hearing-impaired listeners. In addition, cortical effects of sound deprivation and stimulation in humans, which may correlate with loudness coding, are still largely unknown and should be the target of future research. PMID:25135356

  12. The effect of turbulence on the loudness of minimized sonic boom signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotkin, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    An important issue for shaped minimized sonic booms is whether turbulence-induced distortions will adversely affect the benefits gained by shaping. This question was considerably simplified by two recent results. The first is the finding that the loudness of sonic booms is well quantified by loudness. The second is that loudness of a shaped boom is dominated by the shock waves. The issue is now the effect of turbulence on weak (1 psf or less) sonic booms. Since it is clear that molecular relaxation effects have a significant effect on shock structure and loudness, turbulence effects must be examined in conjunction with relaxation-thickened shocks. This analysis must be directed toward loudness calculations and include all pertinent mechanisms.

  13. Recent laboratory studies of loudness and annoyance to sonic booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1993-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is supporting NASA High-Speed Research Program efforts to develop an updated technology base for future high-speed civil transport aircraft. Part of this effort involves (a) quantification of loudness and annoyance benefits due to sonic boom shaping and (b) determination of boom exposures acceptable to the public. Langley is conducting a series of laboratory studies to investigate in detail the subjective reactions to a wide range of shaped sonic boom signatures and to examine several metrics as estimators of sonic boom subjective effects. Results from several of these studies, as well as results obtained by other investigators, demonstrated that substantial reductions in the loudness of sonic booms can be achieved by careful shaping of the boom signatures. Recent Langley studies extended this work to include: (a) quantification of subjective effects due to booms heard indoors, (b) determination of subjective reactions due to ground-reflected booms, and (c) determination of subjective reactions to simulator reproductions of booms recently at White Sands Missile Range.

  14. Sonic boom loudness study and airplane configuration development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jessica G.; Haglund, George T.

    1988-01-01

    Sonic boom wave form parameters as related to loudness were investigated analytically. The parameters studied include rise time, duration, maximum overpressure and initial overpressure. The design criteria of a 72 dBA for corridors and 65 dBA for unconstrained flight were chosen based on a review of human response testing. The 72 dBA criterion suggests that 1.0 psf shock waves may be acceptable. On that basis, acceptable low sonic boom wave forms were explored with respect to cruise conditions, aerodynamic lifting length requirements and configuration design at M 1.5 and M 2.4. An M 2.4 baseline arrow wing configuration was studied as a possible vehicle for M 1.5 cruise overland. Modifications made to approach the low boom wave form included a slightly longer forebody, staggered nacelles, a lifting arrow wing horizontal tail, and carefully tailored lift and volume elements. The same wave form criteria applied for M 2.4 cruise results in a low boom configuration that has significant weight, length and balance penalties. Further detailed design work is required to reach the target wave form and resultant loudness level for overland cruise at M 1.5. These results so far suggest that a properly designed M 2.4 overwater configuration may be capable of M 1.5 overland operation with sonic boom noise characteristcs that meet the criterion.

  15. Recruitment-of-loudness effects of attenuative noise reduction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmal, Nathaniel; Vosoughi, Azadeh

    2002-05-01

    Hearing-impaired listeners have greater difficulty understanding speech in noise than normal-hearing listeners do. As a result, hearing aid users are often challenged by the inability of their hearing aids to improve intelligibility in noise. Several investigators have addressed this problem by using well-known signal processing methods (e.g., spectral subtraction, Wiener filtering) to enhance noise-corrupted speech. Unfortunately, these methods have failed to provide significant improvements in intelligibility. One possible explanation is the level-dependent nature of the attenuation that the algorithms impose on the speech. In the cases described above, this attenuation resembles the piecewise-linear input-output characteristic observed in certain recruitment-of-loudness simulators. The purpose of this study was to compare the intelligibility of processed speech with that expected for recruitment-of-loudness simulation. Trials of the CUNY Nonsense Syllable Test were conducted with 12 normal-hearing listeners, using syllables that were mixed with additive noise at SNRs of 6, 12, and 18 dB. Input-output characteristics for the signals were measured and used to determine the effective threshold shift imposed by the algorithms. Comparisons of measured intelligibility scores with articulation index-based intelligibility predictions indicate that the behavior of such noise reduction algorithms can be successfully modeled as a form of mild sensorineural hearing loss.

  16. 77 FR 50071 - Petition for Reconsideration of Action in Rulemaking Proceeding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ..., released August 13, 2012. The full text of this document is available for viewing and copying in Room CY... Advertisement Loudness Mitigation (CALM) Act, Report and Order, FCC 11-182, published at 77 FR 40276, July...

  17. Understanding advertising in pet nutrition.

    PubMed

    Brown, R G

    1994-04-01

    Advertising is part of the effort to attract attention of consumers to products, in this case, pet foods. It is generally benign in its effect, but it can be misleading, although rarely deliberately so. It uses a specialized vocabulary, which must be mastered if one is to understand what is intended. For all of the expense and effort, advertising figures directly in relatively few decisions to purchase. Its main intention is to call our attention to a particular pet food and to give that product an image. If the pet food does not perform in the consumer's hands, then all of the advertising on earth will not be persuasive. On the other hand, if a product performs well, the word-of-mouth will be positive and that mode of advertising is one of the most effective. PMID:8076285

  18. Understanding advertising in pet nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R G

    1994-01-01

    Advertising is part of the effort to attract attention of consumers to products, in this case, pet foods. It is generally benign in its effect, but it can be misleading, although rarely deliberately so. It uses a specialized vocabulary, which must be mastered if one is to understand what is intended. For all of the expense and effort, advertising figures directly in relatively few decisions to purchase. Its main intention is to call our attention to a particular pet food and to give that product an image. If the pet food does not perform in the consumer's hands, then all of the advertising on earth will not be persuasive. On the other hand, if a product performs well, the word-of-mouth will be positive and that mode of advertising is one of the most effective. PMID:8076285

  19. The effect of search condition and advertising type on visual attention to Internet advertising.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gho; Lee, Jang-Han

    2011-05-01

    This research was conducted to examine the level of consumers' visual attention to Internet advertising. It was predicted that consumers' search type would influence visual attention to advertising. Specifically, it was predicted that more attention to advertising would be attracted in the exploratory search condition than in the goal-directed search condition. It was also predicted that there would be a difference in visual attention depending on the advertisement type (advertising type: text vs. pictorial advertising). An eye tracker was used for measurement. Results revealed that search condition and advertising type influenced advertising effectiveness. PMID:20973730

  20. Morphometric Differences of Vocal Tract Articulators in Different Loudness Conditions in Singing

    PubMed Central

    Echternach, Matthias; Burk, Fabian; Burdumy, Michael; Traser, Louisa; Richter, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dynamic MRI analysis of phonation has gathered interest in voice and speech physiology. However, there are limited data addressing the extent to which articulation is dependent on loudness. Material and Methods 12 professional singer subjects of different voice classifications were analysed concerning the vocal tract profiles recorded with dynamic real-time MRI with 25fps in different pitch and loudness conditions. The subjects were asked to sing ascending scales on the vowel /a/ in three loudness conditions (comfortable = mf, very soft = pp, very loud = ff, respectively). Furthermore, fundamental frequency and sound pressure level were analysed from the simultaneously recorded optical audio signal after noise cancellation. Results The data show articulatory differences with respect to changes of both pitch and loudness. Here, lip opening and pharynx width were increased. While the vertical larynx position was rising with pitch it was lower for greater loudness. Especially, the lip opening and pharynx width were more strongly correlated with the sound pressure level than with pitch. Conclusion For the vowel /a/ loudness has an effect on articulation during singing which should be considered when articulatory vocal tract data are interpreted. PMID:27096935

  1. An active loudness model suggesting tinnitus as increased central noise and hyperacusis as increased nonlinear gain

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2012-01-01

    The present study uses a systems engineering approach to delineate the relationship between tinnitus and hyperacusis as a result of either hearing loss in the ear or an imbalanced state in the brain. Specifically examined is the input–output function, or loudness growth as a function of intensity in both normal and pathological conditions. Tinnitus reduces the output dynamic range by raising the floor, while hyperacusis reduces the input dynamic range by lowering the ceiling or sound tolerance level. Tinnitus does not necessarily steepen the loudness growth function but hyperacusis always does. An active loudness model that consists of an expansion stage following a compression stage can account for these key properties in tinnitus and hyperacusis loudness functions. The active loudness model suggests that tinnitus is a result of increased central noise, while hyperacusis is due to increased nonlinear gain. The active loudness model also generates specific predictions on loudness growth in tinnitus, hyperacusis, hearing loss or any combinations of the three conditions. These predictions need to be verified by experimental data and have explicit implications for treatment of tinnitus and hyperacusis. PMID:22641191

  2. Effects of consonant-vowel intensity ratio on loudness of monosyllabic words.

    PubMed

    Orr, Suzanne B; Montgomery, Allen A; Healy, Eric W; Dubno, Judy R

    2010-11-01

    Previous research has suggested that speech loudness is determined primarily by the vowel in consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) monosyllabic words, and that consonant intensity has a negligible effect. The current study further examines the unique aspects of speech loudness by manipulating consonant-vowel intensity ratios (CVRs), while holding the vowel constant at a comfortable listening level (70 dB), to determine the extent to which vowels and consonants contribute differentially to the loudness of monosyllabic words with voiced and voiceless consonants. The loudness of words edited to have CVRs ranging from -6 to +6 dB was compared to that of standard words with unaltered CVR by 10 normal-hearing listeners in an adaptive procedure. Loudness and overall level as a function of CVR were compared for four CVC word types: both voiceless consonants modified; only initial voiceless consonants modified; both voiced consonants modified; and only initial voiced consonants modified. Results indicate that the loudness of CVC monosyllabic words is not based strictly on the level of the vowel; rather, the overall level of the word and the level of the vowel contribute approximately equally. In addition to furthering the basic understanding of speech perception, the current results may be of value for the coding of loudness by hearing aids and cochlear implants. PMID:21110606

  3. Influence of pitch, loudness, and timbre on the perception of instrument dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, Marco; Friberg, Anders

    2011-10-01

    The effect of variations in pitch, loudness, and timbre on the perception of the dynamics of isolated instrumental tones is investigated. A full factorial design was used in a listening experiment. The subjects were asked to indicate the perceived dynamics of each stimulus on a scale from pianissimo to fortissimo. Statistical analysis showed that for the instruments included (i.e., clarinet, flute, piano, trumpet, and violin) timbre and loudness had equally large effects, while pitch was relevant mostly for the first three. The results confirmed our hypothesis that loudness alone is not a reliable estimate of the dynamics of musical tones. PMID:21974491

  4. Influence of impression of vehicle styling on loudness of acceleration sounds in cabin.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Junji; Igata, Takumi

    2011-07-01

    The influence of participants' impressions of vehicle styling on the loudness of acceleration sounds was investigated. A series of images of luxury or sporty vehicles was presented to the participants as acceleration sounds were being replayed. The results indicated that participants who were frequent drivers felt that the sound associated with luxury vehicles was louder than that associated with sporty vehicles. However, participants who rarely drove perceived almost no difference between the loudness of the two vehicles types. Thus, the loudness was shown to depend on both the participants' impression of the vehicle and their driving frequency. PMID:21786863

  5. Fossil shell emission in dying radio loud AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kino, M.; Ito, H.; Kawakatu, N.; Orienti, M.; Nagai, H.; Wajima, K.; Itoh, R.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate shell emission associated with dying radio loud AGNs. First, based on our recent work by Ito et al. (2015), we describe the dynamical and spectral evolution of shells after stopping the jet energy injection. We find that the shell emission overwhelms that of the radio lobes soon after stopping the jet energy injection because fresh electrons are continuously supplied into the shell via the forward shock, while the radio lobes rapidly fade out without jet energy injection. We find that such fossil shells can be a new class of target sources for SKA telescope. Next, we apply the model to the nearby radio source 3C84. Then, we find that the fossil shell emission in 3C84 is less luminous in the radio band while it is bright in the TeV γ-ray band and can be detectable by CTA. Data from STELLA

  6. Experimental studies of loudness and annoyance response to sonic booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Brenda M.; Leatherwood, Jack D.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the most recent sonic boom laboratory studies performed at NASA-LaRC using the Sonic Boom Simulator. The first used synthesized idealized outdoor boom shapes which were filtered to represent booms heard inside a house. The test explored the efficacy of various metrics in assessing both loudness and annoyance responses to these booms. The second test investigated the effects of adding single reflections to idealized boom signatures, and the third compared booms recorded from real aircraft with idealized boom signatures to determine if subjects rated the real booms differently. In these studies, as in previous studies performed at NASA-LaRC, there was a continuing effort to evaluate metrics for predicting the subjective effects of sonic booms.

  7. Radio-Loud Coronal Mass Ejections without Shocks near Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Xie, H.; Yashiro, S.; Makela, P. A.; St Cyr, O. C.; MacDowall, R. J.; Kaiser, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    Type II radio bursts are produced by low energy electrons accelerated in shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). One can infer shocks near the Sun, in the Interplanetary medium, and near Earth depending on the wavelength range in which the type II bursts are produced. In fact, type II bursts are good indicators of CMEs that produce solar energetic particles. If the type II burst occurs from a source on the Earth-facing side of the solar disk, it is highly likely that a shock arrives at Earth in 2-3 days and hence can be used to predict shock arrival at Earth. However, a significant fraction of CMEs producing type II bursts were not associated shocks at Earth, even though the CMEs originated close to the disk center. There are several reasons for the lack of shock at 1 AU. CMEs originating at large central meridian distances (CMDs) may be driving a shock, but the shock may not be extended sufficiently to reach to the Sun-Earth line. Another possibility is CME cannibalism because of which shocks merge and one observes a single shock at Earth. Finally, the CME-driven shock may become weak and dissipate before reaching 1 AU. We examined a set of 30 type II bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES experiment that had the solar sources very close to the disk center (within a CMD of 15 degrees), but did not have shock at Earth. We find that the near-Sun speeds of the associated CMEs average to ~600 km/s, only slightly higher than the average speed of CMEs associated with radio-quiet shocks. However, the fraction of halo CMEs is only ~28%, compared to 40% for radio-quiet shocks and 72% for all radio-loud shocks. We conclude that the disk-center radio loud CMEs with no shocks at 1 AU are generally of lower energy and they drive shocks only close to the Sun.

  8. Multiphase ISM in Radio Loud Early Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Sheetal Kumar; Chaware, Laxmikant; Pandey, S. K.

    We present optical, IR and X-ray photometric study of a sample of radio loud early type galaxies chosen from B2 sample. To get radial profiles of various photometric and geometrical parameters, We per- formed multiband surface photometry on CCD images of our sample gala- xies in ’BVR’ broad band filter and Hα narrow band filter obtained from IUCAA Girawali Observatory(IGO 2m telescope) Pune(INDIA),that descri- be elliptical isophotes fitted to the 2D light distribution of the galaxies. The main focus of our study is to analyze radial profiles of quantities such as the (local) surface brightness, the ellipticity, and the deviations from elliptical isophotes parametrized by the Fourier coefficients. We generated color maps,residual maps,dust extinction maps, Hα emission maps and x-ray diffuse maps (obtained from CHANDRA data archive) of the galaxies to study the morphology of the dust, ionized and hot gas content present in the galaxies. We carried out detailed analysis of the dust properties(mass and temperature of the dust) for sample galaxies. We also made use of the HST(WFPC2) archival optical images to investigate properties of the dust in the central region(˜10 arcsec) of our sample galaxies, including this we also estimated molecular gas mass, mass loss by red giant stars and mass loss rate from evolved stars in the sample galaxies obtained from IRAS fluxes. This multiwavelength study of our sample galaxies enabled us to find physical correlation among different phases of ISM also to address various issues related to dust i.e origin, nature and ate(evolution)of dust in radio-loud early type galaxies, coexistence of multiphase ISM in extra-galactic environment and its possible implications for the scenarios of formation and evolution of galaxies.

  9. 27 CFR 6.84 - Point of sale advertising materials and consumer advertising specialties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Point of sale advertising materials and consumer advertising specialties. 6.84 Section 6.84 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms....84 Point of sale advertising materials and consumer advertising specialties. (a) General. The act...

  10. Advertising, Desire, and the Unified Field: A Metaphysical Perspective on Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesson, David A.

    Suggesting that ills said to be perpetrated by advertising are really attributes of a unified field of consciousness, this paper discusses the concept that advertising creates desire. The generally undisputed notion that advertising helps to create specific desires is distinguished from the criticism that advertising increases the level and…

  11. Teenage Drinking: Does Advertising Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkin, Charles; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Surveyed teenagers (grades 7-12) about their drinking behavior, their exposure to alcohol advertising, relevant demographic information, and other communication influences. Concluded that exposure to alcohol advertising is significantly associated with teenage drinking behavior and intentions. (PD)

  12. Advertising's Image of Minorities and Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Patricia Bell

    1977-01-01

    Home economists and other educators are responsible for making certain that consumers are aware not only of racism and sexism in advertising, but also of their right to complain about advertisements. (TA)

  13. Critical Listening/Reading of Advertisements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutolo, Daniel

    1981-01-01

    Discusses techniques used in advertising parity products (products that do not differ from brand to brand) to attract children's attention and advocates consumer education for children to make them aware of advertising claims. (HTH)

  14. 48 CFR 803.570 - Commercial advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Commercial advertising. 803.570 Section 803.570 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL... Commercial advertising....

  15. Attitudes toward physician advertising among rural consumers.

    PubMed

    Kviz, F J

    1984-04-01

    The issue of whether physicians should advertise their services has been the subject of much debate among health policymakers. This study reports data from a survey of rural residents in Illinois regarding attitudes toward physician advertising and reasons for opposition or support of the practice. The results indicate neither strong opposition nor strong support for physician advertising. While those who are opposed are largely nonspecific regarding their reasons, those in favor primarily expect that it will aid in the selection of a physician. However, few respondents indicate a predisposition to shop for a physician. Although the major concern about physician advertising is a danger of false advertising by some physicians, it appears that the respondents are not trusting of advertising in general rather than of advertising by physicians in particular. These findings suggest that regardless of its potential advantages, physician advertising may be relatively ineffective because consumers may be inattentive, unresponsive, or distrusting . PMID:6717113

  16. Application of magnitude estimation scaling to the assessment of subjective loudness response to simulated sonic booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, S.; Leatherwood, J. D.; Sullivan, B. M.

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted for the following reasons: (1) to investigate the application of magnitude estimation scaling for evaluating the subjective loudness of sonic booms; and (2) to compare the relative merits of magnitude estimation and numerical category scaling for sonic boom loudness evaluation. The study was conducted in the NASA LeRC's sonic boom simulator and used a total of 80 test subjects (48 for magnitude estimation and 32 for numerical category scaling). Results demonstrated that magnitude estimation was a practical and effective method for quantifying subjective loudness of sonic booms. When using magnitude estimation, the subjects made valid and consistent ratio judgments of sonic boom loudness irrespective of the frequency of presentation of the standard stimulus. Presentation of the standard as every fourth stimulus was preferred by the subjects and is recommended as the standard presentation frequency to be used in future tests.

  17. Concentration of Tobacco Advertisements at SNAP and WIC Stores, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Chilton, Mariana; Zhao, Qian-Wei; Szymkowiak, Dorota; Coffman, Ryan; Mallya, Giridhar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Tobacco advertising is widespread in urban areas with racial/ethnic minority and low-income households that participate in nutrition assistance programs. Tobacco sales and advertising are linked to smoking behavior, which may complicate matters for low-income families struggling with disparate health risks relating to nutrition and chronic disease. We investigated the relationship between the amount and type of tobacco advertisements on tobacco outlets and the outlet type and location. Methods By using field visits and online images, we inspected all licensed tobacco retail outlets in Philadelphia (N = 4,639). Point pattern analyses were used to identify significant clustering of tobacco outlets and outlets with exterior tobacco advertisements. Logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between the outlet’s acceptance of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and the presence of tobacco advertisements. Results Tobacco outlets with exterior tobacco advertisements were significantly clustered in several high-poverty areas. Controlling for racial/ethnic and income composition and land use, SNAP and WIC vendors were significantly more likely to have exterior (SNAP odds ratio [OR], 2.11; WIC OR, 1.59) and interior (SNAP OR, 3.43; WIC OR, 1.69) tobacco advertisements than other types of tobacco outlets. Conclusion Tobacco advertising is widespread at retail outlets, particularly in low-income and racial/ethnic minority neighborhoods. Policy makers may be able to mitigate the effects of this disparate exposure through tobacco retail licensing, local sign control rules, and SNAP and WIC authorization. PMID:25654220

  18. Psychoacoustic Tinnitus Loudness and Tinnitus-Related Distress Show Different Associations with Oscillatory Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Balkenhol, Tobias; Wallhäusser-Franke, Elisabeth; Delb, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background The phantom auditory perception of subjective tinnitus is associated with aberrant brain activity as evidenced by magneto- and electroencephalographic studies. We tested the hypotheses (1) that psychoacoustically measured tinnitus loudness is related to gamma oscillatory band power, and (2) that tinnitus loudness and tinnitus-related distress are related to distinct brain activity patterns as suggested by the distinction between loudness and distress experienced by tinnitus patients. Furthermore, we explored (3) how hearing impairment, minimum masking level, and (4) psychological comorbidities are related to spontaneous oscillatory brain activity in tinnitus patients. Methods and Findings Resting state oscillatory brain activity recorded electroencephalographically from 46 male tinnitus patients showed a positive correlation between gamma band oscillations and psychoacoustic tinnitus loudness determined with the reconstructed tinnitus sound, but not with the other psychoacoustic loudness measures that were used. Tinnitus-related distress did also correlate with delta band activity, but at electrode positions different from those associated with tinnitus loudness. Furthermore, highly distressed tinnitus patients exhibited a higher level of theta band activity. Moreover, mean hearing loss between 0.125 kHz and 16 kHz was associated with a decrease in gamma activity, whereas minimum masking levels correlated positively with delta band power. In contrast, psychological comorbidities did not express significant correlations with oscillatory brain activity. Conclusion Different clinically relevant tinnitus characteristics show distinctive associations with spontaneous brain oscillatory power. Results support hypothesis (1), but exclusively for the tinnitus loudness derived from matching to the reconstructed tinnitus sound. This suggests to preferably use the reconstructed tinnitus spectrum to determine psychoacoustic tinnitus loudness. Results also support

  19. Development and Current Status of the “Cambridge” Loudness Models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the evolution of a series of models of loudness developed in Cambridge, UK. The first model, applicable to stationary sounds, was based on modifications of the model developed by Zwicker, including the introduction of a filter to allow for the effects of transfer of sound through the outer and middle ear prior to the calculation of an excitation pattern, and changes in the way that the excitation pattern was calculated. Later, modifications were introduced to the assumed middle-ear transfer function and to the way that specific loudness was calculated from excitation level. These modifications led to a finite calculated loudness at absolute threshold, which made it possible to predict accurately the absolute thresholds of broadband and narrowband sounds, based on the assumption that the absolute threshold corresponds to a fixed small loudness. The model was also modified to give predictions of partial loudness—the loudness of one sound in the presence of another. This allowed predictions of masked thresholds based on the assumption that the masked threshold corresponds to a fixed small partial loudness. Versions of the model for time-varying sounds were developed, which allowed prediction of the masked threshold of any sound in a background of any other sound. More recent extensions incorporate binaural processing to account for the summation of loudness across ears. In parallel, versions of the model for predicting loudness for hearing-impaired ears have been developed and have been applied to the development of methods for fitting multichannel compression hearing aids. PMID:25315375

  20. Sacred and the Profane in Advertising Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuk, Bill; Dalton, Robert

    This paper examines the arguments for and against inclusion of advertising art in art education programs, and presents a case for the educational benefits of critically examining advertising art based on museum masterpieces. A search for examples of fine art masterpieces used in advertising art examined which masterpieces are commonly used in…

  1. Perceptions of Advertising Influence on Broadcast News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Hubert W.; Barnes, Beth E.

    2001-01-01

    Finds that while students (studying broadcast journalism or advertising) and practitioners (station news directors and agency media directors) were in agreement on the majority of opinion statements discussing advertising's influence on broadcast news content, except students were less bothered by advertising's influence on news content than were…

  2. Use of Endorsers in Magazine Advertisements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Patricia A.; Moon, Young Sook

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes full-page advertisements in four national magazines for the years 1980 to 1986. Finds (1) endorsements occurred in about half of the advertisements; (2) endorsers most used were celebrities; (3) advertisements with endorsers contain less information; and (4) celebrities most often endorsed personal care or apparel products. (RS)

  3. Attitudes toward Advertisements of the Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, M.; Moliner, M. A.; Sanchez, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we will analyze the attitude of older adults to advertisements, differentiating between advertisements that contain rhetorical figures (trope ads) and those that do not (explicit ads). We will also study their attitude toward the brand advertised according to their degree of involvement with the product. In the course of the…

  4. 36 CFR 1005.1 - Advertisements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advertisements. 1005.1 Section 1005.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST COMMERCIAL AND PRIVATE OPERATIONS § 1005.1 Advertisements. Commercial notices or advertisements shall not be displayed, posted, or distributed within the area administered by the...

  5. 36 CFR 223.227 - Sale advertisement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sale advertisement. 223.227 Section 223.227 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER Special Forest Products Advertisement and Bids § 223.227 Sale advertisement. (a) The Forest Service...

  6. 36 CFR 5.1 - Advertisements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advertisements. 5.1 Section 5.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR COMMERCIAL AND PRIVATE OPERATIONS § 5.1 Advertisements. Commercial notices or advertisements shall not be displayed, posted, or distributed on federally owned...

  7. Advertising Content in Physical Activity Print Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the advertising content contained in physical activity print materials. Analysis of print materials obtained from 80 sources (e.g., physicians' offices and fitness events) indicated that most materials contained some form of advertising. Materials coming from commercial product vendors generally contained more advertising than materials…

  8. 25 CFR 215.12 - Advertising costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Advertising costs. 215.12 Section 215.12 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.12 Advertising costs. All advertising costs, publication fees,...

  9. 25 CFR 215.12 - Advertising costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advertising costs. 215.12 Section 215.12 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.12 Advertising costs. All advertising costs, publication fees,...

  10. 12 CFR 1026.24 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advertising. 1026.24 Section 1026.24 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Closed-End Credit § 1026.24 Advertising. (a) Actually available terms. If an advertisement for credit states specific...

  11. 12 CFR 1026.24 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advertising. 1026.24 Section 1026.24 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Closed-End Credit § 1026.24 Advertising. (a) Actually available terms. If an advertisement for credit states specific...

  12. 12 CFR 1026.24 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advertising. 1026.24 Section 1026.24 Banks and Banking BUREAU OF CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Closed-End Credit § 1026.24 Advertising. (a) Actually available terms. If an advertisement for credit states specific...

  13. 12 CFR 230.8 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advertising. 230.8 Section 230.8 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) TRUTH IN SAVINGS (REGULATION DD) § 230.8 Advertising. (a) Misleading or inaccurate advertisements....

  14. 12 CFR 230.8 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advertising. 230.8 Section 230.8 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) TRUTH IN SAVINGS (REGULATION DD) § 230.8 Advertising. (a) Misleading or inaccurate advertisements....

  15. 12 CFR 230.8 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advertising. 230.8 Section 230.8 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) TRUTH IN SAVINGS (REGULATION DD) § 230.8 Advertising. (a) Misleading or inaccurate advertisements....

  16. Advertising: A Research Subject for Persuasive Writers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malachowski, Ann Marie

    1984-01-01

    Describes using the parallels between developing the persuasive essay and an advertisement to help advertising students become aware of the importance of voice, point of view, and audience. Students complete a written essay modeled after the language and techniques employed by advertisers. (HTH)

  17. Practitioner Perceptions of Advertising Education Accreditation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Donald

    According to a 1981 survey, advertising practitioners place more importance on the accreditation of college advertising programs when it comes to evaluating a graduate of such a program than do the educators who must earn the accreditation. Only directors of advertising education programs in the communication-journalism area that are currently…

  18. Adolescence, Advertising, and the Ideology of Menstruation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merskin, Debra

    1999-01-01

    Conducted a content analysis of 10 years of feminine hygiene advertisements in "Seventeen" and "Teen" magazines. Finds that advertising copy in these magazines works to dispel myths about menstruation but that few black models are shown. Discusses advertising as an element of socialization for adolescent girls. (SLD)

  19. 20 CFR 655.42 - Newspaper advertisements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Newspaper advertisements. 655.42 Section 655... advertisements must satisfy the requirements in § 655.41. (d) The employer must maintain copies of newspaper... containing the text of the printed advertisements and the dates of publication, consistent with the...

  20. Runaway Slave Advertisements: Teaching from Primary Documents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Tom; Doyle, Brooke

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss how children can learn from runaway slave advertisements. The advertisements for runaway slaves that masters placed in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century newspapers are among the documentary sources available to teachers for studying the lives of African-American slaves. Such advertisements often describe a…

  1. Advertising Ethics: Student Attitudes and Behavioral Intent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullerton, Jami A.; Kendrick, Alice; McKinnon, Lori Melton

    2013-01-01

    A national survey of 1,045 advertising students measured opinions about the ethical nature of advertising and ethical dilemmas in the advertising business. More than nine out of ten students agreed that working for a company with high ethical standards was important. Students rated all twelve workplace dilemmas presented as somewhat unethical. For…

  2. 7 CFR 1955.146 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Advertising. 1955.146 Section 1955.146 Agriculture... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Disposal of Inventory Property General § 1955.146 Advertising. (a... real estate brokers, it is the servicing official's responsibility to ensure adequate advertising...

  3. 41 CFR 101-4.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Advertising. 101-4.540... Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 101-4.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference, limitation, specification,...

  4. 29 CFR 36.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Advertising. 36.540 Section 36.540 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING... Activities Prohibited § 36.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to...

  5. Persuasive and Informative Advertising: A Classroom Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeborn, Beth A.; Hulbert, Jason P.

    2011-01-01

    The authors outline a pair of classroom activities designed to provide an intuitive foundation to the theoretical introduction of advertising in monopoly markets. The roles of both informative and persuasive advertising are covered. Each student acts as a monopolist and chooses the number of (costly) advertisements and the price. The experiments…

  6. 15 CFR 8a.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 8a.540 Section 8a.540... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 8a.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference, limitation, specification,...

  7. 38 CFR 23.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Advertising. 23.540 Section 23.540 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED... Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference,...

  8. 18 CFR 1317.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advertising. 1317.540 Section 1317.540 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON... Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference,...

  9. 14 CFR 399.84 - Price advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Price advertising. 399.84 Section 399.84... STATEMENTS STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY Policies Relating to Enforcement § 399.84 Price advertising. The Board considers any advertising or solicitation by a direct air carrier, indirect air carrier, or...

  10. 44 CFR 19.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Advertising. 19.540 Section 19.540 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... Programs or Activities Prohibited § 19.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related...

  11. 45 CFR 86.59 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Advertising. 86.59 Section 86.59 Public Welfare... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 86.59 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference, limitation, specification,...

  12. 32 CFR 196.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Advertising. 196.540 Section 196.540 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS... Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference,...

  13. 40 CFR 5.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Advertising. 5.540 Section 5.540... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 5.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference, limitation, specification,...

  14. 37 CFR 10.32 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Advertising. 10.32 Section 10... of Professional Responsibility § 10.32 Advertising. (a) Subject to § 10.31, a practitioner may advertise services through public media, including a telephone directory, legal directory, newspaper,...

  15. 27 CFR 6.52 - Cooperative advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cooperative advertising. 6..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Paying for Advertising, Display Or Distribution Service § 6.52 Cooperative advertising. An arrangement in which an industry member...

  16. 12 CFR 226.16 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 226.16 Section 226.16 Banks and... LENDING (REGULATION Z) Open-End Credit § 226.16 Advertising. (a) Actually available terms. If an... periodic payment amount advertised. The disclosure of the total of payments and the time period to...

  17. 14 CFR 1253.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Advertising. 1253.540 Section 1253.540... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1253.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference, limitation, specification,...

  18. 41 CFR 101-4.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Advertising. 101-4.540... Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 101-4.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference, limitation, specification,...

  19. 34 CFR 106.59 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Advertising. 106.59 Section 106.59 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION... Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference,...

  20. 6 CFR 17.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 17.540 Section 17.540 Domestic... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 17.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference, limitation, specification,...

  1. 10 CFR 5.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 5.540 Section 5.540 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL... Prohibited § 5.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment...

  2. 45 CFR 2555.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Advertising. 2555.540 Section 2555.540 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE... Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference,...

  3. 14 CFR 141.23 - Advertising limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising limitations. 141.23 Section 141...) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS General § 141.23 Advertising limitations. (a) The... certificate may not advertise that the school is certificated unless it clearly differentiates between...

  4. 45 CFR 618.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Advertising. 618.540 Section 618.540 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NONDISCRIMINATION... Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference,...

  5. 22 CFR 229.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advertising. 229.540 Section 229.540 Foreign... in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 229.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference, limitation, specification, or discrimination based...

  6. 12 CFR 528.4 - Nondiscriminatory advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nondiscriminatory advertising. 528.4 Section... REQUIREMENTS § 528.4 Nondiscriminatory advertising. No savings association may directly or indirectly engage in any form of advertising that implies or suggests a policy of discrimination or exclusion in...

  7. 36 CFR 1211.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Advertising. 1211.540 Section 1211.540 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION GENERAL RULES... Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference,...

  8. 28 CFR 54.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Advertising. 54.540 Section 54.540... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 54.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference, limitation, specification,...

  9. 43 CFR 41.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Advertising. 41.540 Section 41.540 Public... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 41.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference, limitation, specification,...

  10. 31 CFR 28.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Advertising. 28.540 Section 28.540... Basis of Sex in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 28.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference, limitation,...

  11. 14 CFR 381.7 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 381.7 Section 381.7... REGULATIONS SPECIAL EVENT TOURS § 381.7 Advertising. No operator of a Special Event Tour or agent of such an operator shall conduct, or cause or allow to be conducted, any advertising, solicitation or other...

  12. 12 CFR 563.27 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 563.27 Section 563.27 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS Operation and Structure § 563.27 Advertising. No savings association shall use advertising (which includes...

  13. 24 CFR 3.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advertising. 3.540 Section 3.540 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development... Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference,...

  14. 14 CFR 142.31 - Advertising limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising limitations. 142.31 Section 142...) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES TRAINING CENTERS General § 142.31 Advertising limitations. (a) A certificate holder may not conduct, and may not advertise to conduct, any training, testing, and checking...

  15. 7 CFR 15a.59 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 15a.59 Section 15a.59 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM... Activities Prohibited § 15a.59 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to...

  16. 7 CFR 1955.146 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 1955.146 Section 1955.146 Agriculture... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Disposal of Inventory Property General § 1955.146 Advertising. (a... real estate brokers, it is the servicing official's responsibility to ensure adequate advertising...

  17. 13 CFR 113.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 113.540 Section 113.540 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION IN FINANCIAL... Advertising. A recipient shall not in any advertising related to employment indicate preference,...

  18. 14 CFR 147.45 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 147.45 Section 147.45... OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN SCHOOLS Operating Rules § 147.45 Advertising... aviation maintenance technician school indicates in advertising that it is a certificated school, it...

  19. 47 CFR 32.6613 - Product advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Product advertising. 32.6613 Section 32.6613... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Expense Accounts § 32.6613 Product advertising. This... the purchase of products and services. This excludes nonproduct-related advertising, such as...

  20. 20 CFR 655.152 - Advertising requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advertising requirements. 655.152 Section 655... Employment in the United States (H-2A Workers) Post-Acceptance Requirements § 655.152 Advertising requirements. All advertising conducted to satisfy the required recruitment activities under § 655.151...

  1. 12 CFR 213.7 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 213.7 Section 213.7 Banks and... (REGULATION M) § 213.7 Advertising. (a) General rule. An advertisement for a consumer lease may state that a... paragraph (d)(1) of this section shall also state the following items: (i) That the transaction...

  2. How Advertising History Helps Explain Current Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanfranco, Leonard W.

    Students majoring in advertising can benefit from a study of that field in its historical context because such study helps them to understand current practices and to foresee future developments. One model of teaching advertising history within a required course about advertising and society begins with some basic definitions of the advertising…

  3. 12 CFR 213.7 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advertising. 213.7 Section 213.7 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM CONSUMER LEASING (REGULATION M) § 213.7 Advertising. (a) General rule. An advertisement for a consumer lease may state that a specific lease of property at specific...

  4. 32 CFR 705.13 - Commercial advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Commercial advertising. 705.13 Section 705.13 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.13 Commercial advertising. (a) The Navy encourages cooperation with advertisers. However,...

  5. Web Usage, Advertising, and Shopping: Relationship Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korgaonkar, Pradeep; Wolin, Lori D.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses Web sales and explores the differences between heavy, medium, and light Web users in terms of their beliefs about Web advertising, attitudes toward Web advertising, purchasing patterns, and demographics. Suggests marketers need to target Web advertising to particular Web users. (Author/LRW)

  6. Canadian Perspectives on Sex Stereotyping in Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Alice E.; Whipple, Thomas W.

    Based on research findings that sex stereotyping used for product commercials is offensive and often ineffective, recommendations for change have been proposed to the advertising industry. Women, in particular, have been portrayed in advertising in traditional domestic roles, emphasizing the consumer role, especially in television advertising.…

  7. 36 CFR 327.17 - Advertisment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advertisment. 327.17 Section 327.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY RULES AND... § 327.17 Advertisment. (a) Advertising and the distribution of printed matter is allowed within...

  8. 27 CFR 4.65 - Comparative advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Comparative advertising. 4.65 Section 4.65 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Advertising of Wine § 4.65...

  9. 12 CFR 213.7 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advertising. 213.7 Section 213.7 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM CONSUMER LEASING (REGULATION M) § 213.7 Advertising. (a) General rule. An advertisement for a consumer lease may state that...

  10. 16 CFR 307.10 - Cooperative advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cooperative advertising. 307.10 Section 307.10 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS... tobacco products from advertising or causing to advertise any smokeless tobacco product within the...

  11. 27 CFR 7.55 - Comparative advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Comparative advertising. 7.55 Section 7.55 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF MALT BEVERAGES Advertising of Malt...

  12. 27 CFR 5.66 - Comparative advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Comparative advertising. 5.66 Section 5.66 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF DISTILLED SPIRITS Advertising of...

  13. 12 CFR 230.8 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advertising. 230.8 Section 230.8 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN SAVINGS (REGULATION DD) § 230.8 Advertising. (a) Misleading or inaccurate advertisements. An...

  14. 25 CFR 215.12 - Advertising costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Advertising costs. 215.12 Section 215.12 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.12 Advertising costs. All advertising costs, publication fees,...

  15. 12 CFR 563.27 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advertising. 563.27 Section 563.27 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS-OPERATIONS Operation and Structure § 563.27 Advertising. No savings association shall use advertising (which includes...

  16. Corporate Web Sites in Traditional Print Advertisements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardun, Carol J.; Lamb, Larry

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Web presence in print advertisements to determine how marketers are creating bridges between traditional advertising and the Internet. Content analysis showed Web addresses in print ads; categories of advertisers most likely to link print ads with Web sites; and whether the Web site attempts to develop a database of potential…

  17. Basic Teaching Kit on Consumer Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor and Gamble Co., Cincinnati, OH.

    This advertising kit was developed by Procter and Gamble in response to requests from teachers and consumer educators who asked for materials from business about business. The kit is not intended to cover the entire field of advertising. Rather, it centers on advertising as it is known and practiced by Procter and Gamble. The purpose of the kit is…

  18. Loudness and annoyance response to simulated outdoor and indoor sonic booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1993-01-01

    The sonic boom simulator of the Langley Research Center was used to quantify subjective loudness and annoyance response to simulated indoor and outdoor sonic boom signatures. The indoor signatures were derived from the outdoor signatures by application of house filters that approximated the noise reduction characteristics of a residential structure. Two indoor listening situations were simulated: one with the windows open and the other with the windows closed. Results were used to assess loudness and annoyance as sonic boom criterion measures and to evaluate several metrics as estimators of loudness and annoyance. The findings indicated that loudness and annoyance were equivalent criterion measures for outdoor booms but not for indoor booms. Annoyance scores for indoor booms were significantly higher than indoor loudness scores. Thus, annoyance was recommended as the criterion measure of choice for general use in assessing sonic boom subjective effects. Perceived level was determined to be the best estimator of annoyance for both indoor and outdoor booms, and of loudness for outdoor booms. It was recommended as the metric of choice for predicting sonic boom subjective effects.

  19. A rating scale experiment on loudness, noisiness and annoyance of environmental sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramatsu, K.; Takagi, K.; Yamamoto, T.

    1988-12-01

    How people judge loudness, noisiness and annoyance of sounds was investigated by using a variety of environmental sounds. Fifty male and female subjects, aged from 18 to 60 years, heard 59 environmental sounds as well as seven kinds of white noise and judged their loudness, noisiness and annoyance on rating scales. Average scores on the three concepts given to the steady white noises are approximately in linear proportion to the level of the noise, with high correlation coefficients. The relationships were used to convert the scores given to the sounds to the levels of white noise which would have the same scores and can be regarded as points of subjective equality ( PSE's) of the sounds. It is found that the PSE thus obtained concerning loudness is best correlated among the three with Perceived Level and that concerning annoyance is least correlated with the level. Scattergrams of PSE's between the three concepts plotted against each other showed considerably high correlations. They are more correlated when sounds such as music, church bell, birds, etc., being on average judged pleasant or neutral, are excluded. This suggests that the human responses concerning those three concepts of auditory sensation and/or perception are mutually correlated. Lower correlation between loudness and annoyance, however, suggests sounds heard as equally loud could be differently annoying. More detailed analysis of the results showed that the judgement of loudness was not independent of noisiness and/or annoyance of the sound.

  20. Loudness of subcritical sounds as a function of bandwidth, center frequency, and level.

    PubMed

    Hots, J; Rennies, J; Verhey, J L

    2014-03-01

    Level differences at equal loudness between band-pass noise and pure tones with a frequency equal to the center frequency of the noise were measured in normal-hearing listeners using a loudness matching procedure. The center frequencies were 750, 1500, and 3000 Hz and noise bandwidths from 5 to 1620 Hz were used. The level of the reference pure tone was 30, 50, or 70 dB. For all center frequencies and reference levels, the level at equal loudness was close to 0 dB for the narrowest bandwidth, increased with bandwidth for bandwidths smaller than the critical bandwidth, and decreased for bandwidths larger than the critical bandwidth. For bandwidths considerably larger than the critical bandwidth, the level difference was negative. The maximum positive level difference was measured for a bandwidth close to the critical bandwidth. This maximum level difference decreased with increasing reference level. A similar effect was found when the level differences were derived from data of an additional categorical loudness scaling experiment. The results indicate that the decrease of loudness at equal level with increasing subcritical bandwidth is a common property of the auditory system which is not taken into account in current loudness models. PMID:24606270

  1. The effects of consonant-vowel intensity ratios on speech loudness in monosyllables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gresle, Suzanne Orr

    Previous research on normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners at a high presentation level (90 dB SPL) suggested that information about speech loudness is contained primarily in the vowel in consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) monosyllables, and that consonant intensity has a negligible effect. The purpose of the present study was to further examine the unique aspects of speech loudness by manipulating consonant-vowel intensity ratios (CVRs), while holding the vowel constant, at a comfortable listening level (70 dB) to determine whether vowels and consonants contribute differentially to the loudness of monosyllabic words with voiced and voiceless consonants. Words edited to have CVRs ranging from -6 to +6 dB were presented to 10 normal-hearing listeners and compared to a standard word with unaltered CVR in an adaptive procedure to obtain the loudness in relative dB. Loudness and overall level as a function of CVR were compared for four word types: CVC words with both voiceless consonants modified; words with only the initial voiceless consonants modified; CVC words with both voiced consonants modified; and words with only the initial voiced consonants modified. Results indicate that the loudness of CVC monosyllables is not based on strict vowel dominance; rather, the overall level of the word and the level of the vowel contribute approximately equally. Possible implications for the design of cochlear implants are presented.

  2. Binaural loudness summation for speech presented via earphones and loudspeaker with and without visual cuesa)

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Michael; Florentine, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary data [M. Epstein and M. Florentine, Ear. Hear. 30, 234–237 (2009)] obtained using speech stimuli from a visually present talker heard via loudspeakers in a sound-attenuating chamber indicate little difference in loudness when listening with one or two ears (i.e., significantly reduced binaural loudness summation, BLS), which is known as “binaural loudness constancy.” These data challenge current understanding drawn from laboratory measurements that indicate a tone presented binaurally is louder than the same tone presented monaurally. Twelve normal listeners were presented recorded spondees, monaurally and binaurally across a wide range of levels via earphones and a loudspeaker with and without visual cues. Statistical analyses of binaural-to-monaural ratios of magnitude estimates indicate that the amount of BLS is significantly less for speech presented via a loudspeaker with visual cues than for stimuli with any other combination of test parameters (i.e., speech presented via earphones or a loudspeaker without visual cues, and speech presented via earphones with visual cues). These results indicate that the loudness of a visually present talker in daily environments is little affected by switching between binaural and monaural listening. This supports the phenomenon of binaural loudness constancy and underscores the importance of ecological validity in loudness research. PMID:22559371

  3. Children's recognition of advertisements on television and on Web pages.

    PubMed

    Blades, Mark; Oates, Caroline; Li, Shiying

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we consider the issue of advertising to children. Advertising to children raises a number of concerns, in particular the effects of food advertising on children's eating habits. We point out that virtually all the research into children's understanding of advertising has focused on traditional television advertisements, but much marketing aimed at children is now via the Internet and little is known about children's awareness of advertising on the Web. One important component of understanding advertisements is the ability to distinguish advertisements from other messages, and we suggest that young children's ability to recognise advertisements on a Web page is far behind their ability to recognise advertisements on television. PMID:22543303

  4. Satisfaction with the Advertising Agency: From the Advertisers' Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Caryn C.; And Others

    Based on the idea that the relationship between a client and its advertising agency is primarily a "people" relationship, a study was undertaken to examine the factors that influence a client's satisfaction with its agency, particularly in the day-to-day, or maintenance, phase of the relationship. Data were taken from responses given by 182…

  5. Radio-Loud Coronal Mass Ejections Without Shocks Near Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; SaintCyr, O. C.; MacDowall, R. J.; Kaiser, M. L.; Xie, H.; Makela, P.; Akiyama, S.

    2010-01-01

    Type II radio bursts are produced by low energy electrons accelerated in shocks driven by corona) mass ejections (CMEs). One can infer shocks near the Sun, in the Interplanetary medium, and near Earth depending on the wavelength range in which the type II bursts are produced. In fact, type II bursts are good indicators of CMEs that produce solar energetic particles. If the type 11 burst occurs from a source on the Earth-facing side of the solar disk, it is highly likely that a shock arrives at Earth in 2-3 days and hence can be used to predict shock arrival at Earth. However, a significant fraction of CMEs producing type II bursts were not associated shocks at Earth, even though the CMEs originated close to the disk center. There are several reasons for the lack of shock at 1 AU. CMEs originating at large central meridian distances (CMDs) may be driving a shock, but the shock may not be extended sufficiently to reach to the Sun-Earth line. Another possibility is CME cannibalism because of which shocks merge and one observes a single shock at Earth. Finally, the CME-driven shock may become weak and dissipate before reaching 1 AU. We examined a set of 30 type II bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES experiment that had the solar sources very close to the disk center (within a CMD of 15 degrees), but did not have shock at Earth. We find that the near-Sun speeds of the associated CMEs average to approx.600 km/s, only slightly higher than the average speed of CMEs associated with radio-quiet shocks. However, the fraction of halo CMEs is only approx.28%, compared to 40% for radio-quiet shocks and 72% for all radio-loud shocks. We conclude that the disk-center radio loud CMEs with no shocks at 1 AU are generally of lower energy and they drive shocks only close to the Sun.

  6. Constraining the Radio-loud Fraction of Quasars at z > 5.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bañados, E.; Venemans, B. P.; Morganson, E.; Hodge, J.; Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Stern, D.; Schlafly, E.; Farina, E. P.; Greiner, J.; Chambers, K. C.; Fan, X.; Rix, H.-W.; Burgett, W. S.; Draper, P. W.; Flewelling, J.; Kaiser, N.; Metcalfe, N.; Morgan, J. S.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.

    2015-05-01

    Radio-loud active galactic nuclei at z˜ 2-4 are typically located in dense environments and their host galaxies are among the most massive systems at those redshifts, providing key insights for galaxy evolution. Finding radio-loud quasars at the highest accessible redshifts (z˜ 6) is important to the study of their properties and environments at even earlier cosmic time. They could also serve as background sources for radio surveys intended to study the intergalactic medium beyond the epoch of reionization in HI 21 cm absorption. Currently, only five radio-loud (R={{f}ν ,5 GHz}/{{f}ν ,4400 \\overset{\\circA }}\\gt 10) quasars are known at z˜ 6. In this paper we search for 5.5≲ z≲ 7.2 quasars by cross-matching the optical Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System 1 and radio Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm surveys. The radio information allows identification of quasars missed by typical color-based selections. While we find no good 6.4≲ z≲ 7.2 quasar candidates at the sensitivities of these surveys, we discover two new radio-loud quasars at z˜ 6. Furthermore, we identify two additional z˜ 6 radio-loud quasars that were not previously known to be radio-loud, nearly doubling the current z˜ 6 sample. We show the importance of having infrared photometry for z\\gt 5.5 quasars to robustly classify them as radio-quiet or radio-loud. Based on this, we reclassify the quasar J0203+0012 (z = 5.72), previously considered radio-loud, to be radio-quiet. Using the available data in the literature, we constrain the radio-loud fraction of quasars at z˜ 6, using the Kaplan-Meier estimator, to be 8.1-3.2+5.0%. This result is consistent with there being no evolution of the radio-loud fraction with redshift, in contrast to what has been suggested by some studies at lower redshifts.

  7. Pleasantness, activation, and sex differences in advertising.

    PubMed

    Whissell, C; McCall, L

    1997-10-01

    Advertisements in men's, women's, girls', and boys' magazines (n = 38,195 words) were scored objectively in terms of 15 measures of linguistic style, e.g., use of common words, use of long words, use of specific words and emotional tone (pleasantness and activation, as measured by the Dictionary of Affect). There were several sex- and age-related differences among advertisements from different sources. Advertisements from boys' magazines were extremely active, those from women's and girls' magazines were shorter and unusually pleasant. In two follow-up studies (N = 122 volunteers), objective emotional measures of advertising text proved to be related to ratings of persuasion and of success of appeal for individual advertisements. The most preferred advertisement for women was pleasant and active, that for men unpleasant and active. When men and women created advertisements, women's were shorter and more pleasant. PMID:9354085

  8. Point-of-sale tobacco advertising in Beirut, Lebanon following a national advertising ban

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to conduct an audit of point-of-sale (POS) tobacco advertising and assess compliance with an advertising ban in a large district of Beirut, Lebanon. Methods The audit was conducted 3 months following the ban on tobacco advertising. Trained students observed all tobacco retail outlets (n = 100) and entered data into a web-based form using iPad® technology. Presence of tobacco advertisements was assessed to determine compliance with the national advertising ban. Results Among the 100 tobacco retail outlets, 62% had tobacco advertisements, including 7% with a tobacco brand logo as part of the main exterior store sign. Conclusions POS tobacco advertising is widespread in Beirut despite the national advertising ban. These findings point to an urgent need for the enforcement of the advertisement ban with tobacco retail outlets in Lebanon. PMID:23731766

  9. Cochlear precursors of neural pitch and loudness codes.

    PubMed

    Zwislocki, J J

    1995-09-01

    It has been believed by most auditory scientists for over a century that the place of maximum vibration in the cochlea provides the main pitch code. Recently, we have obtained experimental evidence showing that this is quite unlikely, because the maximum of cochlear excitation changes its location with sound intensity, moving over the useful sound intensity range toward the cochlear base by a distance equivalent to more than one octave, whereas the pitch remains almost constant. In the presence of outer hair cell damage, the maximum is shifted toward the base by a similar distance, whereas the pitch is hardly affected. Of interest, the location of the apical cutoff of excitation is practically unaffected by sound intensity or cochlear damage. For any given sound frequency, the shift of the maximum with sound intensity precludes any single cochlear location from coding for loudness over the entire useful intensity range. The code is very likely provided by the maximum, which changes its location with the intensity, or by the whole cochlear excitation area. Of significance in this respect is our determination that the growth of the output of the whole auditory nerve parallels the growth of the excitation area. These findings may be useful for the coding of sound in cochlear implants, as well as for hearing aid dynamics. PMID:7668600

  10. Adjective Identification in Television Advertisements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abd Rahim, Normaliza

    2013-01-01

    Learning the Malay language has been a challenging task for foreign language learners. Learners have to learn Malay grammar structure rules in order to write simple sentences. The word choice is important in constructing a sentence. Therefore, the study focuses on the use of adjectives in television advertisements among Korean learners at Hankuk…

  11. Bicultural Advertising and Hispanic Acculturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Wan-Hsiu Sunny; Li, Cong

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the moderating effects of acculturation modes (assimilated, integrated, and separated) on Hispanic consumers' responses to three advertising targeting strategies (Caucasian targeted, bicultural, and Hispanic targeted). The hypotheses were empirically tested in a 3 x 3 factorial experiment with 155 self-identified Hispanic adult…

  12. Global Imagery in Online Advertisements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hynes, Geraldine E.; Janson, Marius

    2007-01-01

    A well-designed online advertisement is essential for effective communication with potential customers and contributes to successful e-commerce. However, creating online sales messages that appeal to a broad range of cultures can pose unique challenges. Internet ads must offer both a globally appealing and a culture-specific message that in turn…

  13. Description of Children's Television Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcus, F. Earle

    This paper is a report of two studies which were conducted on children's television. The first, "Saturday Children's Television," is a content analysis of programming and advertising matter on four Boston commercial TV stations. The second, "Romper Room, An Analysis," focuses on that program's commercial practices. The first study involved the…

  14. Advertising and Sales Promotion Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document contains teacher materials for a 4-unit, 1-year marketing education course in advertising and sales promotion offered in grades 11 and 12 in North Carolina. The preface contains a rationale for the development of the course, a course description, course objectives, a list of the instructional units of the course, and a list of the…

  15. Advertising. New Horizons in Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Justine; Grogan, Jane, Ed.

    This instructional handbook is one of series of ten packets designed to form a comprehensive course in nutrition for secondary students. This unit uses advertisements for products low in cholesterol as a link to a discussion of the nutrient, fat. It contains a page of teaching suggestions, a pre-test for the students, and factual nutrition…

  16. Teaching Commercial German Through Advertisements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyer, Elfriede A.

    Advertisements can be used in many ways to facilitate the teaching of a commercial language. If reproduced as slides or other visual aids, they serve as a visual warm-up exercise for each class period, either reinforcing previously discussed topics or introducing new ones. Catchy headlines in commercials promote rapid expansion of vocabulary and…

  17. Advertising and Invasion of Privacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrer, Daniel Morgan

    The right of privacy as it relates to advertising and the use of a person's name or likeness is discussed in this paper. After an introduction that traces some of the history of invasion of privacy in court decisions, the paper examines cases involving issues such as public figures and newsworthy items, right of privacy waived, right of privacy…

  18. Guide to Sources: Advertising. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Lucinda M.

    This guide is designed to introduce the student to some of the major sources of advertising information available in the Fogler Library at the University of Maine. A brief description and exploration of the card catalog, Library of Congress Subject Headings, Library of Congress Classification System, and the Dewey Decimal System are included. In…

  19. Assessing Linearity in the Loudness Envelope of the Messa di Voce Singing Exercise Through Acoustic Signal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Manuj; Cabrera, Densil; Kenny, Dianna T

    2015-09-01

    Messa di voce (MDV) is a singing exercise that involves sustaining a single pitch with a linear change in loudness from silence to maximum intensity (the crescendo part) and back to silence again (the decrescendo part), with time symmetry between the two parts. Previous studies have used the sound pressure level (SPL, in decibels) of a singer's voice to measure loudness, so as to assess the linearity of each part-an approach that has limitations due to loudness and SPL not being linearly related. This article studies the loudness envelope shapes of MDVs, comparing the SPL approach with approaches that are more closely related to human loudness perception. The MDVs were performed by a cohort of tertiary singing students, recorded six times (once per semester) over a period of 3 years. The loudness envelopes were derived for a typical audience listening position, and for listening to one's own singing, using three models: SPL, Stevens' power law-based model, and a computational loudness model. The effects on the envelope shape due to room acoustics (an important effect) and vibrato (minimal effect) were also considered. The results showed that the SPL model yielded a lower proportion of linear crescendi and decrescendi, compared with other models. The Stevens' power law-based model provided results similar to the more complicated computational loudness model. Longitudinally, there was no consistent trend in the shape of the MDV loudness envelope for the cohort although there were some individual singers who exhibited improvements in linearity. PMID:25892091

  20. Practical Ranges of Loudness Levels of Various Types of Environmental Noise, Including Traffic Noise, Aircraft Noise, and Industrial Noise

    PubMed Central

    Salomons, Erik M.; Janssen, Sabine A.

    2011-01-01

    In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a noise signal varies considerably with the shape of the frequency spectrum of the noise signal. In particular the bandwidth of the spectrum has a large effect on the loudness level, due to the effect of critical bands in the human hearing system. The low-frequency content of the spectrum also has an effect on the loudness level. In this note the relation between loudness level and A-weighted sound level is analyzed for various environmental noise spectra, including spectra of traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise. From loudness levels calculated for these environmental noise spectra, diagrams are constructed that show the relation between loudness level, A-weighted sound level, and shape of the spectrum. The diagrams show that the upper limits of the loudness level for broadband environmental noise spectra are about 20 to 40 phon higher than the lower limits for narrowband spectra, which correspond to the loudness levels of pure tones. The diagrams are useful for assessing limitations and potential improvements of environmental noise control methods and policy based on A-weighted sound levels. PMID:21776205

  1. Practical ranges of loudness levels of various types of environmental noise, including traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise.

    PubMed

    Salomons, Erik M; Janssen, Sabine A

    2011-06-01

    In environmental noise control one commonly employs the A-weighted sound level as an approximate measure of the effect of noise on people. A measure that is more closely related to direct human perception of noise is the loudness level. At constant A-weighted sound level, the loudness level of a noise signal varies considerably with the shape of the frequency spectrum of the noise signal. In particular the bandwidth of the spectrum has a large effect on the loudness level, due to the effect of critical bands in the human hearing system. The low-frequency content of the spectrum also has an effect on the loudness level. In this note the relation between loudness level and A-weighted sound level is analyzed for various environmental noise spectra, including spectra of traffic noise, aircraft noise, and industrial noise. From loudness levels calculated for these environmental noise spectra, diagrams are constructed that show the relation between loudness level, A-weighted sound level, and shape of the spectrum. The diagrams show that the upper limits of the loudness level for broadband environmental noise spectra are about 20 to 40 phon higher than the lower limits for narrowband spectra, which correspond to the loudness levels of pure tones. The diagrams are useful for assessing limitations and potential improvements of environmental noise control methods and policy based on A-weighted sound levels. PMID:21776205

  2. The impact of medical tourism and the code of medical ethics on advertisement in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Makinde, Olusesan Ayodeji; Brown, Brandon; Olaleye, Olalekan

    2014-01-01

    Advances in management of clinical conditions are being made in several resource poor countries including Nigeria. Yet, the code of medical ethics which bars physician and health practices from advertising the kind of services they render deters these practices. This is worsened by the incursion of medical tourism facilitators (MTF) who continue to market healthcare services across countries over the internet and social media thereby raising ethical questions. A significant review of the advertisement ban in the code of ethics is long overdue. Limited knowledge about advances in medical practice among physicians and the populace, the growing medical tourism industry and its attendant effects, and the possibility of driving brain gain provide evidence to repeal the code. Ethical issues, resistance to change and elitist ideas are mitigating factors working in the opposite direction. The repeal of the code of medical ethics against advertising will undoubtedly favor health facilities in the country that currently cannot advertise the kind of services they render. A repeal or review of this code of medical ethics is necessary with properly laid down guidelines on how advertisements can be and cannot be done. PMID:25722776

  3. The impact of medical tourism and the code of medical ethics on advertisement in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Makinde, Olusesan Ayodeji; Brown, Brandon; Olaleye, Olalekan

    2014-01-01

    Advances in management of clinical conditions are being made in several resource poor countries including Nigeria. Yet, the code of medical ethics which bars physician and health practices from advertising the kind of services they render deters these practices. This is worsened by the incursion of medical tourism facilitators (MTF) who continue to market healthcare services across countries over the internet and social media thereby raising ethical questions. A significant review of the advertisement ban in the code of ethics is long overdue. Limited knowledge about advances in medical practice among physicians and the populace, the growing medical tourism industry and its attendant effects, and the possibility of driving brain gain provide evidence to repeal the code. Ethical issues, resistance to change and elitist ideas are mitigating factors working in the opposite direction. The repeal of the code of medical ethics against advertising will undoubtedly favor health facilities in the country that currently cannot advertise the kind of services they render. A repeal or review of this code of medical ethics is necessary with properly laid down guidelines on how advertisements can be and cannot be done. PMID:25722776

  4. How did the Master Settlement Agreement change tobacco industry expenditures for cigarette advertising and promotions?

    PubMed

    Pierce, John P; Gilpin, Elizabeth A

    2004-07-01

    The 1998 multistate Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) with the tobacco industry restricted cigarette advertising and promotions. The MSA monetary settlement was also associated with an average cigarette price increase of U.S.$1.19/pack between 1998 and 2001 to fund, in part, industry payments to the states. We examined Federal Trade Commission reports on how the tobacco industry spends its cigarette advertising and promotional dollars to see if changes expected as a result of the MSA occurred. Expected changes included reduced total expenditures and reductions for outdoor advertising, specialty promotional items identified with a brand (e.g., caps, t-shirts, lighters), and public entertainment. However, tobacco industry spending for advertising and promotions increased 96% between 1995 and 2001, with large increases in 1998 and 1999, as the MSA took effect. Between 1997 and 2001, outdoor advertising declined 98%, expenditures for specialty promotional items decreased 41%, although public entertainment increased 45%. However, in 2001, these categories represented only a small fraction of the total budget. Expenditures for retail-value-added increased 344% between 1997 and 2001 (to 42.5% of total), perhaps to mitigate increased cigarette prices. In 2001, the incentives-to-merchants and retail-value-added categories comprised more than 80% of total expenditures. To adequately monitor tobacco industry expenditures as they adapt to the MSA and other tobacco control efforts, more refined reporting categories are essential. PMID:15231101

  5. Mitigation Action Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

  6. 12 CFR 328.3 - Official advertising statement requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official advertising statement requirements... OF GENERAL POLICY ADVERTISEMENT OF MEMBERSHIP § 328.3 Official advertising statement requirements. (a... advertising statement. The official advertising statement shall be in substance as follows: “Member of...

  7. 48 CFR 852.203-70 - Commercial advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Commercial advertising... Commercial advertising. As prescribed in 803.570-2, insert the following clause: Commercial Advertising (JAN... solicitation, he/she will not advertise the award of the contract in his/her commercial advertising in such...

  8. Young Children's Ability to Recognize Advertisements in Web Page Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Moondore; Blades, Mark; Oates, Caroline; Blumberg, Fran

    2009-01-01

    Identifying what is, and what is not an advertisement is the first step in realizing that an advertisement is a marketing message. Children can distinguish television advertisements from programmes by about 5 years of age. Although previous researchers have investigated television advertising, little attention has been given to advertisements in…

  9. A Q-Analysis of College Students Attitudes Toward Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Ernest F.

    Eighty college students were administered 26 Likert-type statements designed to measure their attitudes toward advertising along four different dimensions: economic effects of advertising, social effects of advertising, ethics of advertising, and regulation of advertising. Analysis of the responses revealed five clusters or "types" of individuals…

  10. The Influence of Advertising on Attendance at Park Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyburn, Jerry H.; Knudson, Douglas M.

    1975-01-01

    Investigated were the effects on attendance of four types of pre-program advertising: no advertising, personal invitation, signs, and innovation. All three advertising treatments increased program attendance over no advertising. Each advertising technique has advantages and disadvantages. Signs are impersonal, but effective. Personal invitation is…

  11. Continuous loudness response to acoustic intensity dynamics in melodies: effects of melodic contour, tempo, and tonality.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Kirk N; Stevens, Catherine J; Dean, Roger T; Bailes, Freya

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate perceived loudness change in response to melodies that increase (up-ramp) or decrease (down-ramp) in acoustic intensity, and the interaction with other musical factors such as melodic contour, tempo, and tonality (tonal/atonal). A within-subjects design manipulated direction of linear intensity change (up-ramp, down-ramp), melodic contour (ascending, descending), tempo, and tonality, using single ramp trials and paired ramp trials, where single up-ramps and down-ramps were assembled to create continuous up-ramp/down-ramp or down-ramp/up-ramp pairs. Twenty-nine (Exp 1) and thirty-six (Exp 2) participants rated loudness continuously in response to trials with monophonic 13-note piano melodies lasting either 6.4s or 12s. Linear correlation coefficients >.89 between loudness and time show that time-series loudness responses to dynamic up-ramp and down-ramp melodies are essentially linear across all melodies. Therefore, 'indirect' loudness change derived from the difference in loudness at the beginning and end points of the continuous response was calculated. Down-ramps were perceived to change significantly more in loudness than up-ramps in both tonalities and at a relatively slow tempo. Loudness change was also greater for down-ramps presented with a congruent descending melodic contour, relative to an incongruent pairing (down-ramp and ascending melodic contour). No differential effect of intensity ramp/melodic contour congruency was observed for up-ramps. In paired ramp trials assessing the possible impact of ramp context, loudness change in response to up-ramps was significantly greater when preceded by down-ramps, than when not preceded by another ramp. Ramp context did not affect down-ramp perception. The contribution to the fields of music perception and psychoacoustics are discussed in the context of real-time perception of music, principles of music composition, and performance of musical dynamics. PMID:24809252

  12. Strengthening the Canadian alcohol advertising regulatory system.

    PubMed

    Heung, Carly M; Rempel, Benjamin; Krank, Marvin

    2012-01-01

    Research evidence points to harmful effects from alcohol advertising among children and youth. In particular, exposure to alcohol advertising has been associated with adolescents drinking both earlier and heavier. Although current federal and provincial guidelines have addressed advertising practices to prevent underage drinking, practice has not been supported by existing policy. While protective measures such as social marketing campaigns have the potential for counteracting the effects from alcohol advertising, the effectiveness of such measures can be easily drowned out with increasing advertising activities from the alcohol industry, especially without effective regulation. Research reviewed by the European Focus on Alcohol Safe Environment (FASE) Project has identified a set of key elements that are necessary to make alcohol advertising policy measures effective at protecting children and youth from the harmful effects of alcohol marketing. Using these key elements as an evaluation framework, there are critical components in the Canadian alcohol advertising regulatory system that clearly require strengthening. To protect impressionable children and youth against the harmful effects of alcohol advertising, 13 recommendations to strengthen current alcohol advertising regulations in Canada are provided for Canadian policy-makers, advertising standard agencies, and public health groups. PMID:23618638

  13. Advertising of toothpaste in parenting magazines.

    PubMed

    Basch, Corey H; Hammond, Rodney; Guinta, Alexis; Rajan, Sonali; Basch, Charles E

    2013-10-01

    We assessed advertisements for children's toothpaste in two widely read US parenting magazines. Data on the number and type of toothpaste advertisements in two parenting magazines were collected from 116 magazine issues between 2007 and 2011. The number of children's toothpaste advertisements per year and across magazines was computed. The amount of toothpaste presented in each advertisement was categorized. We noted whether the toothpaste advertisement stated that the toothpaste was fluoridated. We identified a total of 117 children's toothpaste advertisements in these magazines and confirmed that the majority of the magazine issues contained at least one toothpaste advertisement. Of the 31 advertisements that depicted a picture of a toothbrush with toothpaste, all but one (96.8 %) depicted a full swirl of toothpaste covering the entire toothbrush head, which is well over the recommended amount. The pictures on the advertisements show an excessive amount of toothpaste on the brush, which directly conflicts with the instructions on many toothpastes and dentist recommendations. Those advertisements with photographs that depict a toothbrush with a full brush head of toothpaste are showing over four times the recommended amount for children. PMID:23674195

  14. Auditory sensitivity and equal loudness in the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus).

    PubMed Central

    Green, S

    1975-01-01

    The effects of the type of reinforcer on auditory sensitivity and equal-loudness data were determined in the squirrel monkey. The monkeys, restrained and provided with earphones, were conditioned to depress and hold a bar down in the presence of a stimulus light and then to terminate the holding response after onset of a tone. In Experiment 1, the specified behavior sequence postponed electric shock; in Experiment 2, a food reinforcer was dependent on bar release during the tone. The shape of the auditory sensitivity function and the acuity level at each frequency were the same for the two procedures. The audible frequency range extended from below 0.125 kHz (lowest frequency used) to 46 kHz. Sensitivity was maximum at 8 kHz. Latency of bar release following tone onset served as the basic data for constructing a family of equal-loudness contours. The type of reinforcer appeared not to be a determinant of either the shape of individual loudness contours or the pattern of family of equal-loudness functions. At the lower sound-pressure levels, the equal-loudness contours closely paralleled the threshold curves. At more-intense levels, the contours tended to flatten and depend less on frequency. Images Fig. 1. PMID:804532

  15. Does physiologic response to loud tones change following cognitive-behavioral treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder?

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michael G; Resick, Patricia A; Galovski, Tara E

    2012-02-01

    This study examined responses to loud tones before and after cognitive-behavioral treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Seventy-four women in a PTSD treatment outcome study for rape-related (n = 54) or physical assault-related PTSD (n = 20) were assessed in an auditory loud tone paradigm. Assessments were conducted before and after a 6-week period of cognitive-behavioral therapy. Physiologic responses to loud tones included heart rate (HR), skin conductance (SC), and eye-blink electromyogram (EMG). Groups were formed based upon treatment outcome and included a treatment responder group (no PTSD at posttreatment) and a nonresponder group (PTSD-positive at posttreatment). Treatment was successful for 53 of 74 women (72%) and unsuccessful for 21 women (28%). Responders and nonresponders were not significantly different from each other at pretreatment on the main outcome variables. Treatment responders showed a significant reduction in loud tone-related EMG, HR, and SC responses from pre- to posttreatment (partial η(2) = .24, .31, and .36, respectively; all p < .001) and the EMG and HR responses were significantly smaller than nonresponders at posttreatment (partial η(2) = .11, p = .004 and .19, p < .001, respectively). Successful cognitive-behavioral treatment of PTSD is associated with a quantifiable reduction in physiological responding to loud tones. PMID:22354505

  16. Pitch and Loudness from Tinnitus in Individuals with Noise-induced Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Leticia Sousa; Teixeira, Adriane Ribeiro; Rosito, Leticia Petersen Schmidt; Seimetz, Bruna Macagnin; Dall'Igna, Celso

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  Tinnitus is one of the symptoms that affects individuals suffering from noise induced hearing loss. This condition can be disabling, leading the affected individual to turn away from work. Objective  This literature review aims to analyze the possible association between gender and tinnitus pitch and loudness, the degree of hearing loss and the frequencies affected in subjects with noise-induced hearing loss. Methods  This contemporary cohort study was conducted through a cross-sectional analysis. The study sample consisted of adults with unilateral or bilateral tinnitus, who had been diagnosed with noise-induced hearing loss. The patients under analysis underwent an otorhinolaryngological evaluation, pure tone audiometry, and acuphenometry. Results  The study included 33 subjects with noise-induced hearing loss diagnoses, of which 22 (66.7%) were men. Authors observed no statistical difference between gender and loudness/pitch tinnitus and loudness/pitch in subjects with bilateral tinnitus. Authors found an inverse relation between tinnitus loudness with intensity greater hearing threshold and the average of the thresholds and the grade of hearing loss. The tinnitus pitch showed no association with higher frequency of hearing threshold. Conclusion  Data analysis shows that, among the individuals evaluated, the greater the hearing loss, the lower the loudness of tinnitus. We did not observe an association between hearing loss and tinnitus pitch.

  17. Laboratory study of effects of sonic boom shaping on subjective loudness and acceptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    1992-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine the effects of sonic boom signature shaping on subjective loudness and acceptability. The study utilized the sonic boom simulator at the Langley Research Center. A wide range of symmetrical, front-shock-minimized signature shapes were investigated together with a limited number of asymmetrical signatures. Subjective loudness judgments were obtained from 60 test subjects by using an 11-point numerical category scale. Acceptability judgments were obtained using the method of constant stimuli. Results were used to assess the relative predictive ability of several noise metrics, determine the loudness benefits of detailed boom shaping, and derive laboratory sonic boom acceptability criteria. These results indicated that the A-weighted sound exposure level, the Stevens Mark 7 Perceived Level, and the Zwicker Loudness Level metrics all performed well. Significant reductions in loudness were obtained by increasing front-shock rise time and/or decreasing front-shock overpressure of the front-shock minimized signatures. In addition, the asymmetrical signatures were rated to be slightly quieter than the symmetrical front-shock-minimized signatures of equal A-weighted sound exposure level. However, this result was based on a limited number of asymmetric signatures. The comparison of laboratory acceptability results with acceptability data obtained in more realistic situations also indicated good agreement.

  18. Does Physiologic Response to Loud Tones Change Following Cognitive–Behavioral Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michael G.; Resick, Patricia A.; Galovski, Tara E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined responses to loud tones before and after cognitive–behavioral treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Seventy-four women in a PTSD treatment outcome study for rape-related (n = 54) or physical assault-related PTSD (n = 20) were assessed in an auditory loud tone paradigm. Assessments were conducted before and after a 6-week period of cognitive–behavioral therapy. Physiologic responses to loud tones included heart rate (HR), skin conductance (SC), and eye-blink electromyogram (EMG). Groups were formed based upon treatment outcome and included a treatment responder group (no PTSD at posttreatment) and a nonresponder group (PTSD-positive at posttreatment). Treatment was successful for 53 of 74 women (72%) and unsuccessful for 21 women (28%). Responders and nonresponders were not significantly different from each other at pretreatment on the main outcome variables. Treatment responders showed a significant reduction in loud tone-related EMG, HR, and SC responses from pre- to posttreatment (partial η2 = .243, .308, and .365, respectively; all p < .001) and the EMG and HR responses were significantly smaller than nonresponders at posttreatment (partial η22 = .107, p = .004 and .193, p < .001, respectively). Successful cognitive–behavioral treatment of PTSD is associated with a quantifiable reduction in physiological responding to loud tones. PMID:22354505

  19. Tobacco advertising in retail stores.

    PubMed

    Cummings, K M; Sciandra, R; Lawrence, J

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have described tobacco advertising in the print media, on billboards, and through sponsorship of cultural and sporting events. However, little attention has been given to another common and unavoidable source of tobacco advertising, that which is encountered in retail stores. In July 1987, we conducted a survey of 61 packaged goods retail stores in Buffalo, NY, to assess the prevalence and type of point-of-sale tobacco advertising. In addition, store owners or managers were surveyed to determine their store's policy regarding tobacco advertising, receipt of monetary incentives from distributors for displaying tobacco ads, and willingness to display antitobacco ads. Six types of stores were involved in the study: 10 supermarkets, 10 privately owned grocery stores, 9 chain convenience food stores that do not sell gasoline, 11 chain convenience food stores that sell gasoline, 11 chain pharmacies, and 10 private pharmacies. Two-thirds of the stores displayed tobacco posters, and 87 percent had promotional items advertising tobacco products, primarily cigarettes. Larger stores, and those that were privately owned, tended to display more posters and promotional items. Eighty percent of tobacco product displays were for cigarettes, 16 percent for smokeless tobacco products, and 4 percent for cigars and pipe tobacco. Convenience stores selling gasoline had the most separate tobacco product displays. Of tobacco product displays, 24 percent were located adjacent to candy and snack displays. Twenty-nine of the 61 store owners or managers indicated that their store had a policy regulating the display of tobacco ads and tobacco product displays. Policies dealt primarily with the location of tobacco posters (for example, no ads in the window) and number of product displays. Only 14 shop owners or managers indicated that they had previously displayed antitobacco information; more than half (31 of 61) said that they would be willing to display antitobaccoads.In many

  20. Eye movements when viewing advertisements

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Emily; Leinenger, Mallorie; Rayner, Keith

    2013-01-01

    In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind that appear on alcohol and tobacco ads), before turning to a consideration of advertisements in dynamic media (television and the Internet). Finally, we propose topics and methodological approaches that may prove to be useful in future research. PMID:24672500

  1. Eye movements when viewing advertisements.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Emily; Leinenger, Mallorie; Rayner, Keith

    2014-01-01

    In this selective review, we examine key findings on eye movements when viewing advertisements. We begin with a brief, general introduction to the properties and neural underpinnings of saccadic eye movements. Next, we provide an overview of eye movement behavior during reading, scene perception, and visual search, since each of these activities is, at various times, involved in viewing ads. We then review the literature on eye movements when viewing print ads and warning labels (of the kind that appear on alcohol and tobacco ads), before turning to a consideration of advertisements in dynamic media (television and the Internet). Finally, we propose topics and methodological approaches that may prove to be useful in future research. PMID:24672500

  2. Advertising emergency department wait times.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Scott G

    2013-03-01

    Advertising emergency department (ED) wait times has become a common practice in the United States. Proponents of this practice state that it is a powerful marketing strategy that can help steer patients to the ED. Opponents worry about the risk to the public health that arises from a patient with an emergent condition self-triaging to a further hospital, problems with inaccuracy and lack of standard definition of the reported time, and directing lower acuity patients to the higher cost ED setting instead to primary care. Three sample cases demonstrating the pitfalls of advertising ED wait times are discussed. Given the lack of rigorous evidence supporting the practice and potential adverse effects to the public health, caution about its use is advised. PMID:23599836

  3. Whatalotwegot--the messages in drug advertisements.

    PubMed Central

    Ferner, R. E.; Scott, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    Advertisers are increasingly using symbols to circumvent logical argument when trying to persuade people (the "targets" of the advertisement) to make choices that are not strictly rational. Symbols can convey covert meanings and awaken or exploit subconscious feelings, such as a desire for power or a fear of doing harm. Some of the ways in which pharmaceutical advertisements use these techniques are examined: advertising by contagion; adding to our worries; polarity of choices; teasers; idealisation. Rational prescribing should be based on logic, but advertisements do not depend on logical arguments for their most powerful effects: the advertisers may subvert us by appealing to our unconscious desires. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 FIG 5 FIG 6 PMID:7820006

  4. Costly advertising and the evolution of cooperation.

    PubMed

    Brede, Markus

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I investigate the co-evolution of fast and slow strategy spread and game strategies in populations of spatially distributed agents engaged in a one off evolutionary dilemma game. Agents are characterized by a pair of traits, a game strategy (cooperate or defect) and a binary 'advertising' strategy (advertise or don't advertise). Advertising, which comes at a cost [Formula: see text], allows investment into faster propagation of the agents' traits to adjacent individuals. Importantly, game strategy and advertising strategy are subject to the same evolutionary mechanism. Via analytical reasoning and numerical simulations I demonstrate that a range of advertising costs exists, such that the prevalence of cooperation is significantly enhanced through co-evolution. Linking costly replication to the success of cooperators exposes a novel co-evolutionary mechanism that might contribute towards a better understanding of the origins of cooperation-supporting heterogeneity in agent populations. PMID:23861752

  5. Mitigation Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) (September 1992) for the Proposed Renewal of the Contract between the United States Department of Energy and The Regents of the University of California for the Operation and Management of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory identifies the environmental impacts associated with renewing the contract and specifies a series of measures designed to mitigate adverse impacts to the environment. This Mitigation Monitoring Plan describes the procedures the University will use to implement the mitigation measures adopted in connection with the approval of the Contract.

  6. Loudness summation and the mismatch negativity event-related brain potential in humans

    PubMed Central

    OCEÁK, ATTILA; WINKLER, ISTVÁN; SUSSMAN, ELYSE; ALHO, KIMMO

    2010-01-01

    Infrequently omitting a sound from a repetitive sequence elicits the mismatch negativity (MMN) ERP response when the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) is less than 200 ms. We contrasted two alternative explanations of omission MMN. (1) Each sound starts a separate temporal integration process. Omissions violate the constancy of the temporal structure within the integration window. (2) Sounds preceding an omission are perceived to be louder than those followed by a sound within the integration period, because omissions allow the full stimulus aftereffect to be included in perceived loudness. We varied the SOA between 117 and 217 ms. For this case, the temporal structure explanation predicts that no MMN will be elicited, whereas the loudness summation explanation predicts that MMN will be elicited. MMN was elicited by tone omissions with random SOA, suggesting that loudness summation plays an important role in the elicitation of omission MMN. PMID:16629681

  7. A study of loudness as a metric for sonic boom acceptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needleman, Kathy E.; Darden, Christine M.; Mack, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    A parametric study of loudness levels with respect to weight, altitude, and Mach number for sonic boom signatures generated by two Mach 2.0 conceptual configurations is presented and compared with a similar study for nose shock overpressure. This paper discusses the relative importance of the two sonic boom metrics and the implications of the trends shown. Of the two configurations considered in this study, one was designed for optimum aerodynamic performance and the second was designed to produce a constrained overpressure sonic boom signature at cruise flight conditions. Results indicate that reductions in both loudness and overpressure level are possible when the configuration is shaped to produce a low boom signature. Results also prove that the loudness metric is a more reliable measure of the disturbance due to sonic booms than nose shock overpressure, because the overpressure does not include the sometimes significant effects of embedded shocks which are often present in mid-field low boom signatures.

  8. The Population of Gamma-Ray Loud NLSy1 Galaxies With Blazar-Like Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Hugh R.; Eggen, Joseph R.; Maune, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    We report an investigation of the blazar-like properties for a subset of a sample of radio-loud NLSy1 galaxies. Using the properties of rapid and large amplitude optical and radio variability, rapid and large amplitude variations in the optical polarization and position angle, and choosing a sample that is very radio loud (R > 100), we find that that one can identify a sample of NLSy1 galaxies which exhibit properties, such as gamma ray emission, that are thought to be characteristic of the presence of relativistic jets oriented near the line-of-sight to the observer. As a result, we report the identification a number of newly discovered gamma-ray loud NLSy1 galaxies found in the Fermi database.

  9. Subjective loudness and annoyance of filtered N-wave sonic booms.

    PubMed

    Niedzwiecki, A; Ribner, H S

    1979-03-01

    The contribution of the "infrasonic" low-frequency content of sonic boom N waves to subjective loudness and annoyance has been investigated. An extended low-frequency response loudspeaker-driven simulation booth was employed, with computer-generated input test signals. For test N waves of 1 ms rise time and 150 ms duration, frequencies below 25 and 50 Hz, respectively, were cut off by digital filters simulating simple RC circuits. The filtered signal amplitude was adjusted versus the amplitude (48 Pa) of a reference unfiltered N wave (effective low-frequency cutoff approximately 0.1 Hz) until the two sounded equally loud (first experiment) or equally annoying (second experiment). The amplitude differences for equality were very slight: less than 0.6 dB at most. Surprisingly, while loss of the low frequencies slightly decreased the loudness, it slightly increased the annoyance. PMID:447906

  10. Advancing astronomy on the American frontier: the career of Frank Herbert Loud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskin, Steve

    2012-07-01

    Frank Herbert Loud came to Colorado Springs in 1877 to teach mathematics and became interested in astronomy after witnessing the solar eclipse of 1878. His nearly 50-year astronomical career included overseeing the building of two observatories, founding the Western Association for Stellar Photography, supporting expeditions for two solar eclipses, supplying astronomers with meteorological data for the Rocky Mountains, educating students, publishing astronomical articles and giving public lectures, and aiding and influencing two Directors of Harvard College Observatory. Despite this, Loud and the two observatories he directed have been mostly forgotten, although they were well known by contemporary astronomers. Loud and his work deserve to be remembered given the relative scarcity of astronomers and observatories in the American West (i.e. west of the Mississippi River) in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

  11. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT[R]LOUD) for Parkinson's Disease Following Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielman, Jennifer; Mahler, Leslie; Halpern, Angela; Gilley, Phllip; Klepitskaya, Olga; Ramig, Lorraine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intensive voice therapy (LSVT[R]LOUD) can effectively manage voice and speech symptoms associated with idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD). This small-group study evaluated voice and speech in individuals with and without deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) before and after LSVT LOUD, to determine whether outcomes…

  12. Advertising's new medium: human experience.

    PubMed

    Rayport, Jeffrey F

    2013-03-01

    We live in a media-saturated world, where consumers are drowning in irrelevant messages delivered from the web, TV, radio, print, outdoor displays, and a proliferating array of mobile devices. Advertising strategies built on persuading through interruption, repetition, and brute ubiquity are increasingly ineffective. To win consumers' attention and trust, marketers must think less about what advertising says to its targets and more about what it does for them. Rayport outlines four domains of human experience: In the public sphere people move from one place or activity to another, both online and off. In the social sphere they interact with and relate to one another. In the tribal sphere they affiliate with groups to define or express their identity. In the psychological sphere they connect language with specific thoughts and feelings. Savvy marketers think about crafting messages that consumers will welcome in these domains. Zappos did that when it placed ads in airport security bins (the public sphere)--reaching people whose minds may be on their shoes. Nintendo identified young mothers who were willing to host Wii parties and provided them with everything they needed for these social-sphere events. Yelp's Elite Squad of reviewers have a heightened sense of tribal affiliation that makes them powerful brand ambassadors. Life is good Inc. is rooted in the psychological sphere: It advertises only through the optimism-promoting logo and slogan on its products. PMID:23451529

  13. Recommendation advertising method based on behavior retargeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yao; YIN, Xin-Chun; CHEN, Zhi-Min

    2011-10-01

    Online advertising has become an important business in e-commerce. Ad recommended algorithms are the most critical part in recommendation systems. We propose a recommendation advertising method based on behavior retargeting which can avoid leakage click of advertising due to objective reasons and can observe the changes of the user's interest in time. Experiments show that our new method can have a significant effect and can be further to apply to online system.

  14. Corporate Advertisements and Environmental Futures: An Educational Odyssey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomashow, Mitchell

    1988-01-01

    Analyzes advertisements as vision, myth, and mirror. Provides an interpretive technique that can be used as a curriculum for studying issues advertisements. Offers eight advertisements as examples and provides an analysis and critique of each. (MVL)

  15. 3C 57 as an atypical radio-loud quasar: implications for the radio-loud/radio-quiet dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulentic, J. W.; Martínez-Carballo, M. A.; Marziani, P.; del Olmo, A.; Stirpe, G. M.; Zamfir, S.; Plauchu-Frayn, I.

    2015-06-01

    Lobe-dominated radio-loud (LD RL) quasars occupy a restricted domain in the 4D Eigenvector 1 (4DE1) parameter space which implies restricted geometry/physics/kinematics for this subclass compared to the radio-quiet (RQ) majority of quasars. We discuss how this restricted domain for the LD RL parent population supports the notion for a RQ-RL dichotomy among type 1 sources. 3C 57 is an atypical RL quasar that shows both uncertain radio morphology and falls in a region of 4DE1 space where RL quasars are rare. We present new radio flux and optical spectroscopic measures designed to verify its atypical optical/UV spectroscopic behaviour and clarify its radio structure. The former data confirms that 3C 57 falls off the 4DE1 quasar `main sequence' with both extreme optical Fe II emission (R_{Fe II} ˜ 1) and a large C IV λ1549 profile blueshift (˜-1500 km s-1). These parameter values are typical of extreme Population A sources which are almost always RQ. New radio measures show no evidence for flux change over a 50+ year time-scale consistent with compact steep-spectrum (or young LD) over core-dominated morphology. In the 4DE1 context where LD RL are usually low L/LEdd quasars, we suggest that 3C 57 is an evolved RL quasar (i.e. large blackhole mass) undergoing a major accretion event leading to a rejuvenation reflected by strong Fe II emission, perhaps indicating significant heavy metal enrichment, high bolometric luminosity for a low-redshift source and resultant unusually high Eddington ratio giving rise to the atypical C IV λ1549.

  16. The Social Effects of Advertising as Perceived by Advertising Executives, Businessmen, and the General Public.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surlin, Stuart H.

    This study attempts to compare the perceptions and self-reported behavior of high, middle, and low authoritarian advertising executives, business executives, and members of the general public concerning the social effects of advertising. For the advertising sample, a total of 393 men and women were selected according to their executive positions…

  17. 27 CFR 6.84 - Point of sale advertising materials and consumer advertising specialties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Point of sale advertising materials and consumer advertising specialties. 6.84 Section 6.84 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Exceptions § 6.84 Point of sale advertising...

  18. 27 CFR 6.84 - Point of sale advertising materials and consumer advertising specialties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Point of sale advertising materials and consumer advertising specialties. 6.84 Section 6.84 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Exceptions § 6.84 Point of sale advertising...

  19. 27 CFR 6.84 - Point of sale advertising materials and consumer advertising specialties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Point of sale advertising materials and consumer advertising specialties. 6.84 Section 6.84 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Exceptions § 6.84 Point of sale advertising...

  20. 15 CFR 265.42 - Photography for advertising or commercial purposes; advertising and soliciting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Photography for advertising or commercial purposes; advertising and soliciting. 265.42 Section 265.42 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... COLLINS, COLORADO Buildings and Grounds § 265.42 Photography for advertising or commercial...

  1. Small Business Advertising: A Springboard for Advertising Majors and a Service to the Business Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Patricia J.

    Intended to give experience to students hoping to begin careers in advertising and also to serve a neglected segment of advertisers, a specialized senior-level course in small business advertising was developed at Clarion University of Pennsylvania. Early in the semester, lectures and demonstration clients focused on the distinct promotional…

  2. Four Institutional Views of Advertising--Perspectives for Understanding. Advertising Working Paper Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotzoll, Kim B.

    In this paper, the first in a series of working papers on various significant aspects of advertising, the author examines in depth the writings of four essayists who have looked at advertising from the institutional viewpoint. James Carey sees advertising's basic institutional function as market information and the secondary function as social…

  3. Perceptions of Advertising in the Newly Independent States: Kazakstani Students' Beliefs about Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullerton, Jami A.; Weir, Tom

    This study attempts to answer Andrews' (1991) question, "do perceptions of advertising in general vary cross-culturally?" Eighty-two undergraduate students from the former Soviet Union republic of Kazakstan were questioned about their beliefs about advertising. The analysis revealed predominantly negative feelings toward advertising in general.…

  4. Restriction of television food advertising in South Korea: impact on advertising of food companies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soyoung; Lee, Youngmi; Yoon, Jihyun; Chung, Sang-Jin; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Kim, Hyogyoo

    2013-03-01

    The association between exposure to television (TV) food advertising and children's dietary habits has been well established in previous studies. However, the efficacy of restrictions on TV food advertising in the prevention of childhood obesity remains controversial. The South Korean government has recently enforced a regulation, termed the Special Act on Safety Management of Children's Dietary Life, which restricts TV advertising of energy-dense and nutrient-poor (EDNP) foods targeting children. This study aimed to determine the impact of this regulation by examining changes in the TV advertising practices of South Korean food companies since the scheduled enforcement date of January 2010. The total advertising budget, number of advertisement placements and gross rating points (GRPs) for advertisements on EDNP foods aired on the five representative TV channels in South Korea were compared and analyzed for the year before and after January 2010. After January 2010, the total adverting budget, number of advertisement placements and GRPs decreased during regulated hours. Even during non-regulated hours, a significant decline was noticed in the number of advertisement placements and GRPs. The total advertising budget for non-EDNP foods increased, whereas that for EDNP foods decreased at a higher rate in addition to a drop in its percentage share. These results suggest positive changes in TV advertising practices of food companies because of the regulation, thereby lowering children's exposure to TV advertising of EDNP foods and promoting a safer environment that may facilitate child health improvement in South Korea. PMID:22717614

  5. 15 CFR 265.42 - Photography for advertising or commercial purposes; advertising and soliciting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Photography for advertising or... COLLINS, COLORADO Buildings and Grounds § 265.42 Photography for advertising or commercial purposes... approval. Photography for advertising and commercial purposes may be conducted only with the...

  6. Remedies by competitors for false advertising.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, B D; Wilcox, D P

    1990-05-01

    Patients who are victimized as a consequence of false medical advertising are not the only ones who can sue for damages. Under section 43(a) of the Lanham Act, effective November 17, 1989, anyone "who believes that he or she is or is likely to be damaged" by deceptive advertising may bring a civil action for damages (1). Competing physicians may sue other physicians who falsely advertise that they possess unique skills and achieve better results than other physicians because they employ exclusive methods of treatment or claim that certain surgical procedures they perform in the office are absolutely safe and without risk or who advertise false professional credentials to lure patients. Voluntary informed consent excludes the use of deceit. Misrepresentation through advertising deprives a patient of the right to exercise an informed consent (2). A patient who relies on a doctor's false advertising in agreeing to a procedure that causes the patient injury may sue for malpractice even if the procedure was performed without negligence. False medical advertising also exposes the advertiser to litigation by competitors for unfair competition. This article is concerned with the remedy that may be available for instituting private litigation against physicians and other health care providers who engage in untruthful advertising. PMID:2343426

  7. Orbital Debris Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, R. L.; Jarkey, D. R.; Stansbery, G.

    2014-01-01

    Policies on limiting orbital debris are found throughout the US Government, many foreign space agencies, and as adopted guidelines in the United Nations. The underlying purpose of these policies is to ensure the environment remains safe for the operation of robotic and human spacecraft in near- Earth orbit. For this reason, it is important to consider orbital debris mitigation during the design of all space vehicles. Documenting compliance with the debris mitigation guidelines occurs after the vehicle has already been designed and fabricated for many CubeSats, whereas larger satellites are evaluated throughout the design process. This paper will provide a brief explanation of the US Government Orbital Debris Mitigation Standard Practices, a discussion of international guidelines, as well as NASA's process for compliance evaluation. In addition, it will discuss the educational value of considering orbital debris mitigation requirements as a part of student built satellite design.

  8. Policy thresholds in mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricke, Katharine L.; Moreno-Cruz, Juan B.; Schewe, Jacob; Levermann, Anders; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Some climate change impacts rise fast with little warming, and then taper off. To avoid diminishing incentives to reduce emissions and inadvertently slipping into a lower-welfare world, mitigation policy needs to be ambitious early on.

  9. Mitigation win-win

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Dominic; Lucas, Amanda; Barnes, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Win-win messages regarding climate change mitigation policies in agriculture tend to oversimplify farmer motivation. Contributions from psychology, cultural evolution and behavioural economics should help to design more effective policy.

  10. Study on Personalized Recommendation Model of Internet Advertisement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ning; Chen, Yongyue; Zhang, Huiping

    With the rapid development of E-Commerce, the audiences put forward higher requirements on personalized Internet advertisement than before. The main function of Personalized Advertising System is to provide the most suitable advertisements for anonymous users on Web sites. The paper offers a personalized Internet advertisement recommendation model. By mining the audiences' historical and current behavior, and the advertisers' and publisher's web site content, etc, the system can recommend appropriate advertisements to corresponding audiences.

  11. 18 CFR 367.9130 - Account 913, Advertising expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... material for newspapers, periodicals, billboards, and other similar forms of advertisement, and preparing..., periodicals, billboards, radio, and other similar forms of advertisement, for sales promotion purposes,...

  12. [Advertising and Zeitgeist. The advertising of Schwabe Pharmaceuticals].

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Cornelia; Riha, Ortrun

    2015-01-01

    This contribution explores the advertisements for homeopathic products in magazines in the first half of the twentieth century, focusing on the period between 1933 and 1945 and based on the example of the pharmaceutical company Dr Willmar Schwabe. In the first half of the twentieth century, Schwabe Pharmaceuticals was market leader for homeopathic and other complementary medical products (phytotherapy, biochemicals). The example chosen as well as the time frame complement the existing research. We searched three German publications (the homeopathy journal Leipziger Populäre Zeitschrift für Homöopathie, the medical weekly Münchner Medizinische Wochenschrift and the pharma magazine Pharmazeutische Zeitung) and collected target-group-specific results for laypersons, physicians and pharmacists. Analysis of the images and texts in the selected advertisements often reflected the historical background and the respective health policies (wartime requirements, times of need, "Neue Deutsche Heilkunde"). The history of this traditional company was seen as an important point in advertising, as were the recognisability of the brand through the company logo, the emphasis on the high quality of their products and the reference to the company's own research activities. We furthermore found the kind of argumentation that is typical of natural medicine (naturalness, the power of the sun, prominent representatives). Schwabe met the expectations of its clients, who were interested in complementary medicine, whilst pursuing an approach to homeopathy that was compatible with natural science, and it presented itself as a modern, scientifically oriented enterprise. The company did not lose credibility as a result, but increased its clientele by expanding to include the whole naturopathic market. PMID:26137649

  13. Adoption of Information Technology by Advertising Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herling, Thomas J.; Merskin, Debra

    Since little empirical research has been conducted on adoption of currently available information technology by the advertising industry, a study explored the extent of advertising agencies' adoption of selected information technologies such as online database services and electronic mail. The study discussed data from earlier studies and analyzed…

  14. 21 CFR 1316.75 - Advertisement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Advertisement. 1316.75 Section 1316.75 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ADMINISTRATIVE FUNCTIONS, PRACTICES, AND PROCEDURES Seizure, Forfeiture, and Disposition of Property § 1316.75 Advertisement. (a) If the appraised value does not exceed the monetary...

  15. Need for Advertising No Longer Debatable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breyer, Carol Ann

    1979-01-01

    In discussing the use of paid advertising for community college promotion, considers the resistance to advertising among administrative and legislative bodies, assesses legislative and financial restrictions, and describes some economical ways of increasing college visibility: direct mailing, public service announcements, and cooperative…

  16. [Children's Television Advertising Excesses and Abuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate, Robert B.

    This testimony presents evidence of children's television advertising excesses and abuses. The testimony points out that the average TV-watching child sees more than 22,000 commercials a year, and that on the programs most popular with children large numbers of over-the-counter drugs and hazardous products are advertised. The history of private…

  17. 23 CFR 710.311 - Construction advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to project acquisitions as required by 23 CFR 635.309. For non-Interstate projects, the oversight... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Construction advertising. 710.311 Section 710.311...-WAY AND REAL ESTATE Project Development § 710.311 Construction advertising. The State must manage...

  18. 23 CFR 710.311 - Construction advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to project acquisitions as required by 23 CFR 635.309. For non-Interstate projects, the oversight... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Construction advertising. 710.311 Section 710.311...-WAY AND REAL ESTATE Project Development § 710.311 Construction advertising. The State must manage...

  19. Energy efficiency public service advertising campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson-Grant, Amanda

    2015-06-12

    The Advertising Council (“the Ad Council”) and The United States Department of Energy (DOE) created and launched a national public service advertising campaign designed to promote energy efficiency. The objective of the Energy Efficiency campaign was to redefine how consumers approach energy efficiency by showing that saving energy can save homeowners money.

  20. 12 CFR 226.24 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advertising. 226.24 Section 226.24 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Closed-End Credit § 226.24 Advertising. (a) Actually available terms....

  1. 47 CFR 73.4055 - Cigarette advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cigarette advertising. 73.4055 Section 73.4055 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.4055 Cigarette advertising. See 15 U.S.C. 1335....

  2. 47 CFR 73.4055 - Cigarette advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cigarette advertising. 73.4055 Section 73.4055 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.4055 Cigarette advertising. See 15 U.S.C. 1335....

  3. 47 CFR 73.4055 - Cigarette advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cigarette advertising. 73.4055 Section 73.4055 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.4055 Cigarette advertising. See 15 U.S.C. 1335....

  4. 27 CFR 6.52 - Cooperative advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cooperative advertising. 6.52 Section 6.52 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Paying for Advertising, Display Or Distribution Service § 6.52...

  5. 27 CFR 6.98 - Advertising service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Advertising service. 6.98 Section 6.98 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Exceptions § 6.98 Advertising service. The listing of the names and addresses of two or more...

  6. 27 CFR 6.52 - Cooperative advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cooperative advertising. 6.52 Section 6.52 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Paying for Advertising, Display Or Distribution Service § 6.52...

  7. 27 CFR 6.98 - Advertising service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Advertising service. 6.98 Section 6.98 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Exceptions § 6.98 Advertising service. The listing of the names and addresses of two or more...

  8. 27 CFR 6.52 - Cooperative advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cooperative advertising. 6.52 Section 6.52 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Paying for Advertising, Display Or Distribution Service § 6.52...

  9. 27 CFR 6.98 - Advertising service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Advertising service. 6.98 Section 6.98 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL âTIED-HOUSEâ Exceptions § 6.98 Advertising service. The listing of the names and addresses of two or more...

  10. You Be the Judge: Newspaper Advertising Layout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koeninger, Jimmy G.

    The learning package is designed to provide the marketing educator with a culminating activity for an instructional unit focusing on advertising layout principles and procedures. It is to be used in conjunction with 35mm slides of newspaper advertisements, which the student views and rates in comparison with the ratings of a panel of experts. A…

  11. Alcohol advertising and alcohol consumption by adolescents.

    PubMed

    Saffer, Henry; Dave, Dhaval

    2006-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of alcohol advertising on adolescent alcohol consumption. The theory of an industry response function and evidence from prior studies indicate the importance of maximizing the variance in advertising measures. Monitoring the Future (MTF) and National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) data are augmented with alcohol advertising, originating on the market level, for five media. The large sample of the MTF allows estimation of race and gender-specific models. The longitudinal nature of the NLSY97 allows controls for unobserved heterogeneity with state-level and individual fixed effects. Price and advertising effects are generally larger for females relative to males. Controls for individual heterogeneity yield larger advertising effects, implying that the MTF results may understate the effects of alcohol advertising. Results from the NLSY97 suggest that a 28% reduction in alcohol advertising would reduce adolescent monthly alcohol participation from 25% to between 24 and 21%. For binge participation, the reduction would be from 12% to between 11 and 8%. The past month price-participation elasticity is estimated at -0.26, consistent with prior studies. The results show that reduction of alcohol advertising can produce a modest decline in adolescent alcohol consumption, though effects may vary by race and gender. PMID:16475245

  12. 14 CFR 399.84 - Price advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Price advertising. 399.84 Section 399.84... STATEMENTS STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY Policies Relating to Enforcement § 399.84 Price advertising. The... ground accommodations) or a tour component (e.g., a hotel stay) that states a price for such...

  13. Young Adolescents, Tobacco Advertising, and Smoking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santana, Yolanda; Gonzalez, Beatriz; Pinilla, Jaime; Calvo, Jose Ramon; Barber, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Background: In adolescents aged 12-14, we measured attitudes to tobacco advertising. Our purpose is to understand the relation of these attitudes to tobacco use and identify the groups most influenced by the advertising. Methods: Survey of adolescents on Gran Canaria Island, Spain, about aspects of family, school, peers, tobacco consumption, and…

  14. Perception of Women in Magazine Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Susan R.; Rossi, Joseph S.

    Advertising research has indicated that a high degree of sexism toward women occurs in magazine and television advertising. However, the design of such marketing studies is different from the designs typically used in most psychological research. An experimental approach was used for a study in which 137 college students rated 10 control and 10…

  15. 36 CFR 327.17 - Advertisement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Advertisement. 327.17 Section... all other rules and regulations pertaining to vessels and vehicles. (d) The District Commander shall... present danger to the public health and safety; or (3) The number of persons engaged in the advertising...

  16. 50 CFR 27.96 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Advertising. 27.96 Section 27.96 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.96 Advertising. Except...

  17. 12 CFR 741.211 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 741.211 Section 741.211 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR... Also Apply to Federally Insured State-Chartered Credit Unions § 741.211 Advertising. Any credit...

  18. 38 CFR 21.4507 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Advertising. 21.4507 Section 21.4507 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Education Loans § 21.4507 Advertising. (a) General. No...

  19. 49 CFR 25.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Advertising. 25.540 Section 25.540 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 25.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any...

  20. 27 CFR 6.98 - Advertising service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advertising service. 6.98 Section 6.98 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Exceptions § 6.98 Advertising service. The listing of the...

  1. 48 CFR 503.570 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Advertising. 503.570 Section 503.570 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Other Improper Business Practices 503.570 Advertising....

  2. 7 CFR 550.30 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 550.30 Section 550.30 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Program Management § 550.30 Advertising. The Cooperator will not refer in any manner to the USDA...

  3. 22 CFR 146.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advertising. 146.540 Section 146.540 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CIVIL RIGHTS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 146.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any...

  4. 12 CFR 626.6020 - Nondiscriminatory advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Development's implementing regulations (24 CFR parts 100 and 109), and title VII (the Equal Credit Opportunity... implementing regulation (12 CFR part 202), or this subpart. (b) Written advertisements relating to dwellings... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nondiscriminatory advertising. 626.6020...

  5. 10 CFR 1042.540 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising. 1042.540 Section 1042.540 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR... Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 1042.540 Advertising. A recipient shall not in any...

  6. 47 CFR 73.4055 - Cigarette advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cigarette advertising. 73.4055 Section 73.4055 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.4055 Cigarette advertising. See 15 U.S.C. 1335....

  7. Merging Advertising and PR: Integrated Marketing Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Patricia B.; Miller, Debra A.

    1994-01-01

    Identifies and compares the perceived educational needs of advertising and public relations practitioners. Explores differences between practitioners in small versus large markets, and assesses practitioners' beliefs about integrated marketing communications (the merger of advertising and public relations under a single organizational unit). (SR)

  8. 14 CFR 381.7 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advertising. 381.7 Section 381.7 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS SPECIAL EVENT TOURS § 381.7 Advertising. No operator of a Special Event Tour or agent of such...

  9. Commercial Speech Protection and Alcoholic Beverage Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Sue

    An examination of the laws governing commercial speech protection and alcoholic beverage advertisements, this document details the legal precedents for and implications of banning such advertising. An introduction looks at the current amount of alcohol consumed in the United States and the recent campaigns to have alcoholic beverage ads banned.…

  10. Practical and Constitutional Implications of Legal Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Dirk C.

    Recent Supreme Court decisions have fundamentally altered the attorney's right to advertise. This potentially revolutionary revision in prescribed professional communications has paradoxically had ambiguous results. Despite the freedom to advertise, most attorneys forego this opportunity to maximize profits, expand clientele, or merely enhance…

  11. The Future of Children's Media: Advertising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children Now, 2007

    2007-01-01

    American companies currently spend $15 billion a year on marketing and advertising to children under the age of 12. Annually, children influence $500 billion in spending on fast food, junk food, toys and other advertised products, and the average child sees thousands of ads on television alone. From video games and the Internet to cell phones and…

  12. The Digital Medium Meets the Advertising Message.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nisenholtz, Martin

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the likelihood that companies will use online services as an advertising medium. Topics addressed include the art of interactive marketing; advertising in the digital age; early experiments with interactive marketing, including the use of videotex and videodisc; and recent trends that set the stage for interactive marketing to personal…

  13. [Archeology of the radio pharmaceutical advertisement].

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Thierry

    2002-01-01

    After Second World War, a debate sets in France the partisans and the detractors of the radio advertisement, in particular pharmaceutical advertisement. In this article, the author revises campaigns led, during the thirties, by Robert Desnos for Armand Salacrou. PMID:12731488

  14. Advertising as a Site of Language Contact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piller, Ingrid

    2003-01-01

    Reviews work on language contact phenomena in advertising. More emphasis is being placed on multilingual discourses in advertising and the ways in which these index identities, both of the products and services with which multiple cods are associated and of the consumers who peruse them. Also examines the various functions of different contact…

  15. Message Effects of Public Service Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Jerry R.

    Public service advertisements, disseminated via the mass media, have been credited with "positive attitudinal effects" in past research, but only certain kinds of such advertisements are really effective. Of the types of appeals used in television commercials--informative, emotional, "establishment" (or status quo), and fear--the establishment…

  16. Job Satisfaction among Women in Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pokrywczynski, James V.; Crowley, John H.

    A study examined job satisfaction among women in advertising. Subjects were 48 female respondents from a mail survey of membership of a Midwest advertising club. Two types of job satisfaction measures were used: items from the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire and the action tendency scales developed by E. Locke. The results showed a high level…

  17. Reducing Alcohol Consumption through Television Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, James G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed impact of television commercial based on controlled-drinking principles. Measures were taken 12 months prior to start of campaign and 3 weeks after campaign from regular drinkers of general public whose drinking behavior was known to be unaffected by previous antidrug advertising campaign. Found that advertisement reduced intake provided…

  18. 14 CFR 142.31 - Advertising limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advertising limitations. 142.31 Section 142.31 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... certificate holder may not conduct, and may not advertise to conduct, any training, testing, and checking...

  19. 12 CFR 226.24 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advertising. 226.24 Section 226.24 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Closed-End Credit § 226.24 Advertising. (a) Actually available terms. If...

  20. 48 CFR 503.570 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advertising. 503.570 Section 503.570 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Other Improper Business Practices 503.570 Advertising....

  1. It Pays to Advertise...Truthfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Louis W.

    1975-01-01

    Many colleges are using commercial advertising techniques as an aid to recruitment. Federal Trade Commission safeguards against false or misleading advertising currently apply to proprietary schools, and may soon be applied to private non-profit and public schools as well. Administrators should apprise themselves of FTC standards. (NHM)

  2. 12 CFR 626.6020 - Nondiscriminatory advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Development's implementing regulations (24 CFR parts 100 and 109), and title VII (the Equal Credit Opportunity... implementing regulation (12 CFR part 202), or this subpart. (b) Written advertisements relating to dwellings... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nondiscriminatory advertising. 626.6020...

  3. 47 CFR 32.6613 - Product advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Product advertising. 32.6613 Section 32.6613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Expense Accounts § 32.6613 Product advertising....

  4. 38 CFR 21.4507 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advertising. 21.4507 Section 21.4507 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Education Loans § 21.4507 Advertising. (a) General. No...

  5. 12 CFR 226.16 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advertising. 226.16 Section 226.16 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Open-End Credit § 226.16 Advertising. (a) Actually available terms. If...

  6. 12 CFR 528.4 - Nondiscriminatory advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nondiscriminatory advertising. 528.4 Section 528.4 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NONDISCRIMINATION REQUIREMENTS § 528.4 Nondiscriminatory advertising. No savings association may directly or indirectly engage...

  7. 37 CFR 10.32 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advertising. 10.32 Section 10.32 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF... advertise services through public media, including a telephone directory, legal directory, newspaper,...

  8. 14 CFR 381.7 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advertising. 381.7 Section 381.7 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) SPECIAL REGULATIONS SPECIAL EVENT TOURS § 381.7 Advertising. No operator of a Special Event Tour or agent of such...

  9. 47 CFR 73.4055 - Cigarette advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cigarette advertising. 73.4055 Section 73.4055 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.4055 Cigarette advertising. See 15 U.S.C. 1335....

  10. 12 CFR 338.3 - Nondiscriminatory advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...'s regulations (24 CFR 110.25(a)). (2) With respect to oral advertisements, this requirement may be... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nondiscriminatory advertising. 338.3 Section 338.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF...

  11. 14 CFR 141.23 - Advertising limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advertising limitations. 141.23 Section 141... relating to its certification and ratings that is false or designed to mislead any person contemplating... certificate may not advertise that the school is certificated unless it clearly differentiates between...

  12. 50 CFR 27.96 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advertising. 27.96 Section 27.96 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.96 Advertising. Except...

  13. 27 CFR 6.98 - Advertising service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Advertising service. 6.98 Section 6.98 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Exceptions § 6.98 Advertising service. The listing of the...

  14. 14 CFR 399.84 - Price advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Price advertising. 399.84 Section 399.84 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY Policies Relating to Enforcement § 399.84 Price advertising....

  15. 27 CFR 6.52 - Cooperative advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cooperative advertising. 6.52 Section 6.52 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Paying for Advertising, Display...

  16. 12 CFR 1026.16 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., activity or similar charge that is a finance charge under § 1026.4 that could be imposed. (ii) Any periodic... the plan provides for a variable periodic rate, that fact shall be disclosed. (iii) Any membership or... services specified in the advertisement states a periodic payment amount, the advertisement shall...

  17. Some Correlates of Media Political Advertising Credibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einsiedel, E. F.; Casey, William

    Data collected as part of a larger survey that focused on the 1978 gubernatorial race in New York State were used in a study of political advertising and media credibility. Specifically, the study examined the factors that influence an individual's rating of the helpfulness of political advertising and related these factors to voting patterns. A…

  18. Advertising Agencies: An Analysis of Industry Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra J.

    Noting that advertising agencies have not been examined as a collective industry, this paper looks at the development and structure of the advertising agency industry. The first portion of the paper discusses the development of the agency. The remaining two sections deal with trends in and the structure of the industry including: (1) the growth of…

  19. Advertising in the Schools. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aidman, Amy

    This digest reviews the recent history of advertising to children, spotlights controversial marketing efforts, and examines the nature of commercial messages directed toward children in public schools. Because of the increase in children's spending power in recent decades, advertisers have closely targeted children as consumers. Advertising…

  20. Enhancing Newspaper's Value as Local Advertising Medium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prater, Bruce W.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Finds that, to enhance the value of a newspaper's advertising, newspaper executives seek to broaden the scope of their operations by adding new subscribers and advertisers, while marketers tend to prefer narrowing the focus of operations, serving the existing customer base or concentrating exclusively on select market segments. (SR)

  1. Language, Cognition, and Manipulation in Advertising Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egorova, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    This research examines advertising discourse in Russian and English as acts of communicative exchange and interpersonal relationship between advertising discourse participants. The purpose was to identify and describe the way that viewers process information contained in television commercials and how they become consumers moving from getting…

  2. 47 CFR 32.6613 - Product advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Product advertising. 32.6613 Section 32.6613 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Expense Accounts § 32.6613 Product advertising. This account shall include...

  3. 50 CFR 27.96 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Advertising. 27.96 Section 27.96 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.96 Advertising. Except...

  4. 50 CFR 27.96 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Advertising. 27.96 Section 27.96 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.96 Advertising. Except...

  5. 50 CFR 27.96 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Advertising. 27.96 Section 27.96 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM PROHIBITED ACTS Other Disturbing Violations § 27.96 Advertising. Except...

  6. Regulating Children's Television Advertising: Reassessing Parental Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Leonard N.

    In response to public concern over the effects of television commercials on children, the Federal Trade Commission formulated regulatory proposals that would ban certain advertising from children's television and regulate advertising intended for the eight year old to the eleven year old age group. However, in the light of two recent research…

  7. A Study of Musical Loudness Discrimination of Three- to Five-Year-Old Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Darhyl S.; Ramsey, Jonny H.

    An investigation was made of the effects of age and sex on preschool children's discrimination of intensity in musical contexts. Subjects included 92 children ranging in age from 37 to 70 months. A total of 47 females and 45 males participated in the study. To determine preschoolers' loudness discrimination abilities, a new test was designed: The…

  8. Effects of broadband noise on cortical evoked auditory responses at different loudness levels in young adults.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mridula; Purdy, Suzanne C; Munro, Kevin J; Sawaya, Kathleen; Peter, Varghese

    2014-03-26

    Young adults with no history of hearing concerns were tested to investigate their /da/-evoked cortical auditory evoked potentials (P1-N1-P2) recorded from 32 scalp electrodes in the presence and absence of noise at three different loudness levels (soft, comfortable, and loud), at a fixed signal-to-noise ratio (+3 dB). P1 peak latency significantly increased at soft and loud levels, and N1 and P2 latencies increased at all three levels in the presence of noise, compared with the quiet condition. P1 amplitude was significantly larger in quiet than in noise conditions at the loudest level. N1 amplitude was larger in quiet than in noise for the soft level only. P2 amplitude was reduced in the presence of noise to a similar degree at all loudness levels. The differential effects of noise on P1, N1, and P2 suggest differences in auditory processes underlying these peaks. The combination of level and signal-to-noise ratio should be considered when using cortical auditory evoked potentials as an electrophysiological indicator of degraded speech processing. PMID:24323122

  9. Radio Loudness of AGNs: Host Galaxy Morphology and the Spin Paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, L.; Sikora, M.; Lasota, J.-P.

    2007-10-15

    We investigate how the total radio luminosity of AGN-powered radio sources depends on their accretion luminosity and the central black hole mass. We find that AGNs form two distinct and well separated sequences on the radio-loudness -- Eddington-ratio plane. We argue that these sequences mark the real upper bounds of radio-loudness of two distinct populations of AGNs: those hosted respectively by elliptical and disk galaxies. Both sequences show the same dependence of the radio-loudness on the Eddington ratio (an increase with decreasing Eddington ratio), which suggests that another parameter in addition to the accretion rate must play a role in determining the jet production efficiency in active galactic nuclei, and that this parameter is related to properties of the host galaxy. The revealed host-related radio dichotomy breaks down at high accretion rates where the dominant fraction of luminous quasars hosted by elliptical galaxies is radio quiet. We argue that the huge difference between the radio-loudness reachable by AGNs in disc and elliptical galaxies can be explained by the scenario according to which the spin of a black hole determines the outflows power, and central black holes can reach large spins only in early type galaxies (following major mergers), and not (in a statistical sense) in spiral galaxies.

  10. Effects of Posture and Stimulus Spectral Composition on Peripheral Physiological Responses to Loud Sounds.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jennifer; Flemming, Jan; Zeffiro, Thomas; Rufer, Michael; Orr, Scott P; Mueller-Pfeiffer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    In the "loud-tone" procedure, a series of brief, loud, pure-tone stimuli are presented in a task-free situation. It is an established paradigm for measuring autonomic sensitization in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Successful use of this procedure during fMRI requires elicitation of brain responses that have sufficient signal-noise ratios when recorded in a supine, rather than sitting, position. We investigated the modulating effects of posture and stimulus spectral composition on peripheral psychophysiological responses to loud sounds. Healthy subjects (N = 24) weekly engaged in a loud-tone-like procedure that presented 500 msec, 95 dB sound pressure level, pure-tone or white-noise stimuli, either while sitting or supine and while peripheral physiological responses were recorded. Heart rate, skin conductance, and eye blink electromyographic responses were larger to white-noise than pure-tone stimuli (p's < 0.001, generalized eta squared 0.073-0.076). Psychophysiological responses to the stimuli were similar in the sitting and supine position (p's ≥ 0.082). Presenting white noise, rather than pure-tone, stimuli may improve the detection sensitivity of the neural concomitants of heightened autonomic responses by generating larger responses. Recording in the supine position appears to have little or no impact on psychophysiological response magnitudes to the auditory stimuli. PMID:27583659

  11. Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Response to Speaking Rate and Loudness Manipulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mefferd, Antje S.; Green, Jordan R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In this investigation, the authors determined the strength of association between tongue kinematic and speech acoustics changes in response to speaking rate and loudness manipulations. Performance changes in the kinematic and acoustic domains were measured using two aspects of speech production presumably affecting speech clarity:…

  12. Effects of Music Loudness on Task Performance and Self-Report of College-Aged Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, David E.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of the loudness of background music on task performance of college students was studied. Results indicated that the experimental conditions had no significant effect on task performance; the majority of students did recognize the music; and students in the 80-90 B group perceived the music as most distracting. (Author/IS)

  13. "Look Out Below": Helping Children Who Are Loud and Aggressive in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Polly

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author responds to a teacher's request for advice on how to handle students who are loud and aggressive in the classroom. The author provides some suggestions on how to establish a smooth-running classroom. She firmly believes in creating well-thought out policies and procedures and politely, but firmly, insisting that…

  14. Selection of High-z Radio-Loud Quasars, and Their Luminosity Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccillo, D.; González-Serrano, J. I.; Benn, C. R.

    We present the selection techniques based on the use of Neural Networks and on the cross match between FIRST and SDSS that lead to the spectroscopic identification of 15 new Radio Loud QSOs in the redshift range 3. 6 ≤ z ≤ 4. 4. These QSOs did not have previous spectroscopical identification in SDSS or other works. Our selection method is highly complete (97 %) and it allows the estimation of the binned luminosity function of radio-loud quasar at z ˜ 4 with unprecedented accuracy. Our luminosity function is compared with the results of other samples of RL QSOs in similar ranges of redshift and with the whole population of QSOs (RL+RQ). The evolution of the luminosity function with redshift was for many years interpreted as a flattening of the bright end slope, but has recently been re-interpreted as strong evolution of the break luminosity for high-z QSOs and our results, for the radio-loud population, are consistent with this. We also find indications of a constant radio-loud fraction for QSOs at high z. Our next investigation will select RL QSOs candidates in the range of redshift 4. 4 ≤ z ≤ 5. 7, and will make use of data in the radio (FIRST), in the optical (SDSS DR10) and in the infrared (UKIDSS Large Area Survey DR10, and WISE).

  15. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy and Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Cynthia Marie; Boliek, Carol Ann

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an intensive voice treatment (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, commonly known as LSVT LOUD) for children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and dysarthria. Method: A nonconcurrent multiple baseline single-subject design with replication across 5 children with spastic CP was used.…

  16. Voice Loudness and Gender Effects on Jitter and Shimmer in Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockmann, Meike; Storck, Claudio; Carding, Paul N.; Drinnan, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate voice loudness and gender effects on jitter and shimmer in healthy young adults because previous descriptions have been inconsistent. Method: Fifty-seven healthy adults (28 women, 29 men) aged 20-40 years were included in this cross-sectional single-cohort study. Three phonations of /a/ at soft,…

  17. Age-Related Changes to Speech Breathing with Increased Vocal Loudness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Jessica E.; Spruill, John, III

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The present study examines the effect of normal aging on respiratory support for speech when utterance length is controlled. Method: Fifteen women (M = 71 years of age) and 10 men (M = 73 years of age) produced 2 sentences of different lengths in 4 loudness conditions while respiratory kinematics were measured. Measures included those…

  18. Effect of Unpleasant Loud Noise on Hippocampal Activities during Picture Encoding: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Masafumi; Watanabe, Kazuko; Niwa, Masami; Takahashi, Toru; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Ido, Yasushi; Tomida, Mihoko; Onozuka, Minoru

    2006-01-01

    The functional link between the amygdala and hippocampus in humans has not been well documented. We examined the effect of unpleasant loud noise on hippocampal and amygdaloid activities during picture encoding by means of fMRI, and on the correct response in humans. The noise reduced activity in the hippocampus during picture encoding, decreased…

  19. Changes to Articulatory Kinematics in Response to Loudness Cues in Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Meghan; Huber, Jessica E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) exhibit differences in displacement and velocity of the articulators as compared with older adults. The purpose of the current study was to examine effects of 3 loudness cues on articulatory movement patterns in individuals with PD. Method: Nine individuals diagnosed with idiopathic PD and 9 age-…

  20. Evaluating standard airborne sound insulation measures in terms of annoyance, loudness, and audibility ratings.

    PubMed

    Park, H K; Bradley, J S

    2009-07-01

    This paper reports the results of an evaluation of the merits of standard airborne sound insulation measures with respect to subjective ratings of the annoyance and loudness of transmitted sounds. Subjects listened to speech and music sounds modified to represent transmission through 20 different walls with sound transmission class (STC) ratings from 34 to 58. A number of variations in the standard measures were also considered. These included variations in the 8-dB rule for the maximum allowed deficiency in the STC measure as well as variations in the standard 32-dB total allowed deficiency. Several spectrum adaptation terms were considered in combination with weighted sound reduction index (R(w)) values as well as modifications to the range of included frequencies in the standard rating contour. A STC measure without an 8-dB rule and an R(w) rating with a new spectrum adaptation term were better predictors of annoyance and loudness ratings of speech sounds. R(w) ratings with one of two modified C(tr) spectrum adaptation terms were better predictors of annoyance and loudness ratings of transmitted music sounds. Although some measures were much better predictors of responses to one type of sound than were the standard STC and R(w) values, no measure was remarkably improved for predicting annoyance and loudness ratings of both music and speech sounds. PMID:19603878

  1. Pharmaceutical Advertising and Medicare Part D

    PubMed Central

    Lakdawalla, Darius; Sood, Neeraj; Gu, Qian

    2013-01-01

    We explore how and to what extent prescription drug insurance expansions affects incentives for pharmaceutical advertising. When insurance expansions make markets more profitable, firms respond by boosting advertising. Theory suggests this effect will be magnified in the least competitive drug classes, where firms internalize a larger share of the benefits from advertising. Empirically, we find that the implementation of Part D coincides with a 14% to 19% increase in total advertising expenditures. This effect is indeed concentrated in the least competitive drug classes. The additional advertising raised utilization among non-elderly patients outside the Part D program by about 3.6%. This is roughly half of the direct utilization effect of Part D on elderly beneficiaries. The results suggest the presence of considerable spillover effects from publicly subsidized prescription drug insurance on the utilization and welfare of consumers outside the program. PMID:24308884

  2. Direct-to-Consumer Advertising of Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Gellad, Ziad F.; Lyles, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    Since the FDA released new guidelines on broadcast direct-to-consumer advertising in 1997, the prevalence of direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs has increased exponentially. The impact on providers, patients and the health care system is varied and dynamic, and the rapid changes in the last several years have markedly altered the health care landscape. To continue providing optimal medical care, physicians and other health-care providers must be able to manage this influence on their practice, and a more thorough understanding of this phenomenon is an integral step toward this goal. This review will summarize the history of direct-to-consumer drug advertisements and the current regulations governing them. It will summarize the evidence concerning the impact of direct-to-consumer advertising on the public, providers and the health care system and conclude with observations regarding the future of direct-to-consumer advertising. PMID:17524744

  3. Ethics in medical information and advertising.

    PubMed

    Serour, G I; Dickens, B M

    2004-05-01

    This article presents findings and recommendations of an international conference held in Cairo, Egypt in 2003 concerning issues of ethical practice in how information is provided to and by medical practitioners. Professional advertising to practitioners and the public is necessary, but should exclude misrepresentation of qualifications, resources, and authorship of research papers. Medical institutions are responsible for how staff members present themselves, and their institutions. Medical associations, both governmental licensing authorities and voluntary societies, have powers and responsibilities to monitor professional advertisement to defend the public interest against deception. Medical journals bear duties to ensure authenticity of authorship and integrity in published papers, and the scientific basis of commercial advertisers' claims. A mounting concern is authors' conflict of interest. Mass newsmedia must ensure accuracy and proportionality in reporting scientific developments, and product manufacturers must observe truth in advertising, particularly in Direct-to-Consumer advertising. Consumer protection by government agencies is a continuing responsibility. PMID:15099793

  4. Cigarette advertising to counter New Year's resolutions.

    PubMed

    Basil, M D; Basil, D Z; Schooler, C

    2000-01-01

    One process through which tobacco advertising may work is by reducing rates of quitting. Theories of addiction support the notion that relapse can be prompted by environmental cues. Further, because withdrawal symptoms occur over a predictable time frame, and because the most popular time to quit smoking is the beginning of the year, as a New Year's resolution, tobacco companies can make use of advertising to remind quitters of their need to smoke. Study 1 examined advertising in 10 popular magazines. It found a higher number of ads in January and February than the rest of the year after 1984. Study 2 examined cigarette advertising on the back cover of 10 other popular magazines. This study also found a higher rate of cigarette advertisements in January and February than for the rest of the year. The results suggest that cigarette marketers may be attempting to preempt quitting by cuing smoking behavior. PMID:11010347

  5. A false killer whale reduces its hearing sensitivity when a loud sound is preceded by a warning.

    PubMed

    Nachtigall, Paul E; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2013-08-15

    We investigated the possibility of conditioned dampening of whale hearing thresholds when a loud sound is preceded by a warning sound. The loud sound was a tone of 20 kHz, 170 dB re. 1 μPa, 5 s. Hearing sensitivity was measured using pip-train test stimuli and auditory evoked potential recording. The same test-sound stimuli served as warning sounds. The durations of the warning sounds were varied randomly to avoid locking an anticipated conditioning effect to the timing immediately before the loud sound. When the warning sound lasted from 1 to 9 s or from 5 to 35 s prior to the loud sound, hearing thresholds before the loud sound increased, relative to the baseline, by 12.7 and 7.3 dB, respectively. When the warning sound duration varied within a range of 20 to 140 s, the threshold increase was as low as 3.0 dB. The observed hearing threshold increase was not a result of the unconditioned effect of the loud sound, like a temporary threshold shift, so it was considered to be a manifestation of a conditioned dampening of hearing when the subject anticipated the quick appearance of a loud sound, most likely to protect its hearing. PMID:23619406

  6. Do drug advertisements provide therapeutic information?

    PubMed

    Stimson, G V

    1977-03-01

    In this study of advertisements appearing in medical periodicals and by direct mail advertising to general practitioners, Dr. Stimson, a sociologist, concludes that from what is intended to provide therapeutic information hardly any therapeutic information is provided. He reminds the reader of the safeguards which surround all drug advertising by law and by the code of practice of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry but these safeguards do not appear to control real or potential sins of omission. Frequently in these advertisements the literature relating to the drug is quoted but Dr. Stimson found that it was difficult to trace all the papers quoted in different types of medical library. (Some references quoted were to unpublished papers but surely the blame should be shared in this situation?) Dr. Stimson also gives a vivid and fascinating glimpse of what he calls the 'images and stereotypes' of the patients who, it is claimed, would benefit from the drug being advertised. Certainly most general practitioners must be aware that when they prescribe that image is displaced by an individual but the portrait gallery is indeed depressing. However, to balance these advertisements drug companies issue data sheets which must be more informative than advertisements and conform to regulations in their format. Unfortunately data sheets are only issued every 15 months whereas the 'average general practitioner is potentially exposed to 1,300 advertisements every month'. In other words, the data sheet and not the advertisement should be the guideline but it arrives too infrequently to offset the lack of therapeutic information contained in advertisements. PMID:870694

  7. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF A SAMPLE OF INTERMEDIATE-LUMINOSITY RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Karen T.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Cheung, Chi C.; Eracleous, Michael; Kadler, Matthias

    2011-07-15

    We present the results from exploratory (12-23 ks) XMM-Newton observations of six optically selected, radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs), together with new radio data and a reanalysis of their archival SDSS spectra. The sources were selected in an effort to expand the current sample of radio-loud AGNs suitable for detailed X-ray spectroscopy studies. The sample includes three broad-line and three narrow-line sources, with X-ray luminosities of the order of L{sub 2-10keV} {approx} 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}. The EPIC spectra of the broad-lined sources can be described by single power laws with photon indices {Gamma} {approx} 1.6 and little to negligible absorption (N{sub H} {approx}<10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}); on the contrary, significant absorption is detected in the narrow-lined objects, N{sub H} {approx} 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}, one of which displays a prominent (equivalent width {approx}2 keV) Fe K{alpha} emission line. Studying their location in several luminosity-luminosity diagrams for radio-loud AGNs, we find that the sources fall at the lower end of the distribution for bright, classical radio-loud AGNs and close to LINER-like sources. As such, and as indicated by the ratios of their optical emission lines, we conclude that the sources of our sample fall on the border between radiatively efficient and inefficient accretion flows. Future deeper studies of these targets at X-rays and longer wavelengths will expand our understanding of the central engines of radio-loud AGNs at a critical transition region.

  8. Satellite Breakup Risk Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leleux, Darrin P.; Smith, Jason T.

    2006-01-01

    Many satellite breakups occur as a result of an explosion of stored energy on-board spacecraft or rocket-bodies. These breakups generate a cloud of tens or possibly hundreds of thousands of debris fragments which may pose a transient elevated threat to spaceflight crews and vehicles. Satellite breakups pose a unique threat because the majority of the debris fragments are too small to be tracked from the ground. The United States Human Spaceflight Program is currently implementing a risk mitigation strategy that includes modeling breakup events, establishing action thresholds, and prescribing corresponding mitigation actions in response to satellite breakups.

  9. Effective Application of Psychological Motivators for Social Advertisers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severn, Jessica

    Social advertisers--those responsible for public and nonprofit advertising and marketing--must employ many of the major psychological motivations used by commercial advertisers to stimulate desire and action on the part of target audiences. For example, commercial advertisers create psychological stimuli to facilitate motivation of the fulfillment…

  10. 48 CFR 5.504 - Use of advertising agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of advertising... ACQUISITION PLANNING PUBLICIZING CONTRACT ACTIONS Paid Advertisements 5.504 Use of advertising agencies. (a) General. Basic ordering agreements may be placed with advertising agencies for assistance in producing...

  11. 16 CFR 14.15 - In regard to comparative advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false In regard to comparative advertising. 14.15... comparative advertising. (a) Introduction. The Commission's staff has conducted an investigation of industry trade associations and the advertising media regarding their comparative advertising policies. In...

  12. 47 CFR 76.946 - Advertising of rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Advertising of rates. 76.946 Section 76.946... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation § 76.946 Advertising of rates. Cable operators that advertise rates for basic service and cable programming service tiers shall be required to advertise...

  13. 12 CFR 740.2 - Accuracy of advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Accuracy of advertising. 740.2 Section 740.2... ADVERTISING AND NOTICE OF INSURED STATUS § 740.2 Accuracy of advertising. No insured credit union may use any advertising (which includes print, electronic, or broadcast media, displays and signs, stationery, and...

  14. 48 CFR 552.203-71 - Restriction on Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Restriction on Advertising... Restriction on Advertising. As prescribed in 503.570-2, insert the following clause: Restriction on Advertising (SEP 1999) The Contractor shall not refer to this contract in commercial advertising or...

  15. 12 CFR 740.3 - Advertising of excess insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advertising of excess insurance. 740.3 Section... ACCURACY OF ADVERTISING AND NOTICE OF INSURED STATUS § 740.3 Advertising of excess insurance. Any advertising that mentions share or savings account insurance provided by a party other than the NCUA...

  16. Student-Run Advertising Agency: A Showcase for Student Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, James R.; Marra, James L.

    One of the best forums for teaching creativity in advertising is the student-run advertising agency. It is organized like a typical advertising agency with a creative department, a media department, a research department and an account service department, and has a pyramidic structure. Student-run advertising agencies exist for two primary…

  17. Graduate Study in Advertising and the Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applegate, Edd

    1995-01-01

    Discusses business school guidelines and journalism school guidelines for graduate education. Discusses graduate study in advertising and the advertising core. Outlines suggested changes to the advertising core to make it more attractive to advertising agency executives and to meet the challenges of the future. (SR)

  18. 47 CFR 76.946 - Advertising of rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advertising of rates. 76.946 Section 76.946... advertise rates for basic service and cable programming service tiers shall be required to advertise rates... advertise a complete range of fees without specific identification of the rate for each individual area....

  19. Targeting gender: A content analysis of alcohol advertising in magazines.

    PubMed

    Jung, A-Reum; Hovland, Roxanne

    2016-01-01

    Creating target specific advertising is fundamental to maximizing advertising effectiveness. When crafting an advertisement, message and creative strategies are considered important because they affect target audiences' attitudes toward advertised products. This study endeavored to find advertising strategies that are likely to have special appeal for men or women by examining alcohol advertising in magazines. The results show that the substance of the messages is the same for men and women, but they only differ in terms of presentation. However, regardless of gender group, the most commonly used strategies in alcohol advertising are appeals to the target audience's emotions. PMID:27442880

  20. Financing recreational mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hennagir, T.

    1995-07-01

    Recreational resource area mitigation remains an important operational requirement for hydropower project owners, especially in the western United States. Increasingly, producers of electric capacity must accommodate a rapidly growing demand for public recreation, providing opportunities in accordance with Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) relicensing requirements.

  1. Space Debris Mitigation Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of national and international space debris mitigation guides is to promote the preservation of near-Earth space for applications and exploration missions far into the future. To accomplish this objective, the accumulation of objects, particularly in long-lived orbits, must be eliminated or curtailed.

  2. Analysis of medicine advertisement produced in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Wzorek, Lorilei de Fátima; Correr, Cassyano J.; Badaró Trindade, Angela C.; Pontarolo, Roberto

    Objective To analyze the compliance of drug advertisements with regulations in Brazil, subject to Resolution RDC No. 102/2000 since 2000, which abides by the WHO’s (World Health Organization) Ethical Criteria for Medicinal Drug Promotion, published in 1988. Methods Drug advertisements running within the period of October 2002 to October 2003 were collected and recorded. Media sources included various AM and FM radio stations, television channels, newspapers, and magazines, as well as printed material distributed in doctors’ offices, hospitals, drugstores, conferences, billboards, and bus doors. All sources were located in Curitiba City, Brazil, and its surrounding area. Advertisement content was analyzed according to a conformity checklist prepared based on the legal requirements of RDC No. 102/00. Results A total of 827 advertisements for 517 different products, 83.91% regularly registered as medicinal drugs and 16.09% unregistered products that should be registered according to the Brazilian regulations, were recorded and collected. Approximately 74.73% of the advertisements did not comply with regulations; on average, such advertisements had 4.6 infractions each. Conclusions The results of this research suggest that RDC No. 102/00 is not followed, which strengthens the need to adopt new forms of regulation to prohibit excesses of the pharmaceutical industry and to protect the population from abusive and misleading drug advertising. PMID:25214926

  3. Advertising and Defamation of Character.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrer, Daniel Morgan

    Defamation of character, as applied to libel and slander legal decisions, is the subject of this paper. After briefly describing the basis of liability, the author discusses "libels per quod." He then cites numerous court decisions in commenting on mitigating circumstances in action for libel or slander, including absolute privilege, fair comment,…

  4. Homosexual imagery in print advertisements: attended, remembered, but disliked.

    PubMed

    Angelini, James R; Bradley, Samuel D

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether print advertisements featuring homosexual imagery elicit greater attention and recall while eliciting more negative responses than advertisements featuring heterosexual images. Data indicate that these advertisements were indeed better remembered and required more time to cognitively process, likely because of the advertisement's imagery being inconsistent with existing gender schema. Other responses demonstrated that homosexual imagery negatively impacted opinions about the advertisement itself and the brand featured, and elicited more negative self-reported valence and arousal. PMID:20391007

  5. Two advertisements for TV drug ads.

    PubMed

    Bodenheimer, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The paper by Joel Weissman and colleagues addresses the increasingly important topic of the effects of direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) by pharmaceutical companies. The authors claim that their results should be reassuring to "those concerned about potential adverse health care consequences of DTCA". However, the study and analysis of the data are marred by several flaws that diminish the importance and relevance of the findings, including weakness in design, overgenerous interpretations, and failure to address key questions. Rather than informing the debate, the study amounts to little more than an advertisement for drug advertisements. PMID:14527241

  6. Examining the use of a time-varying loudness algorithm for quantifying characteristics of nonlinearly propagated noise (L).

    PubMed

    Swift, S Hales; Gee, Kent L

    2011-05-01

    A previous letter by Gee et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 121, EL1-EL7 (2007)] revealed likely shortcomings in using common, stationary (long-term) spectrum-based measures to quantify the perception of nonlinearly propagated noise. Here, the Glasberg and Moore [J. Audio Eng. Soc. 50, 331-342 (2002)] algorithm for time-varying loudness is investigated. Their short-term loudness, when applied to a shock-containing broadband signal and a phase-randomized signal with equivalent long-term spectrum, does not show a significant difference in loudness between the signals. Further analysis and discussion focus on the possible utility of the instantaneous loudness and the need for additional investigation in this area. PMID:21568378

  7. Do television food advertisements portray advertised foods in a 'healthy' food context?

    PubMed

    Adams, Jean; Tyrrell, Rachel; White, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Exposure to food promotion influences food preferences and diet. As food advertisements tend to promote 'less healthy' products, food advertising probably plays some role in the 'obesity epidemic'. Amid calls for increased regulation, food manufacturers are beginning to engage in a variety of health-promoting marketing initiatives. Positioning products in the context of a 'healthy', balanced diet in television advertisements is one such initiative. We explored whether the wider food context in which foods are advertised on television are 'healthier' than the advertised foods themselves. All foods shown in food advertisements broadcast during 1 week on one commercial UK channel were identified and classified as 'primary' (i.e. the focus of advertisements) or 'incidental'. The nutritional content of all foods was determined and that of primary and incidental foods were compared. Almost two-thirds of food advertisements did not include any incidental foods. When a wider food context was present, this tended to be 'healthier' than the primary foods that were the focus of food advertisements - particularly in terms of the food groups represented. It is not yet clear what effect this may have on consumers' perceptions and behaviour, and whether or not this practice should be encouraged or discouraged from a public health perspective. PMID:21078214

  8. The advertising of doctors' services.

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, D H

    1991-01-01

    Medicine is unique among professions and trades, offering a 'product' which is unlike any other. The consequences for patients of being attracted by misleading information to an inappropriate doctor or service are such as to demand special restrictions on the advertising of doctors' services. Furthermore, health care in the UK is organised around the 'referral system', whereby general practitioners refer patients to specialists when necessary rather than have specialists accept patients on self-referral. But this need not inhibit the provision of helpful factual information to those who need it. Recent policy changes by the General Medical Council considerably broaden the scope for general practitioners to make factual information of their services available to local people, while safeguarding the public against promotional activities which are designed to increase demand for certain kinds of specialist service by playing upon individuals' fears and lack of medical knowledge. PMID:2033629

  9. Social Interaction in Advertising Directed to Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughlin, Meagan; Desmond, Roger J.

    1981-01-01

    Investigates the efficacy of including peer interaction in television advertising directed to children. Results suggest that this variable provides increased liking for commercials, but does not affect product desirability. Nine references are cited. (Author/MER)

  10. Adolescent Reasoning about Advertisements: Preliminary Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Marcia C.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Three studies investigate the role of competence factors (defined as acquisition of Piagetian formal reasoning) and performance factors (defined as influences from content and expectations) with respect to adolescents' reasoning about advertisements reporting product tests. (Author/MP)

  11. Advertising Field Experience and Experiential Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Kevin L.

    1992-01-01

    Presents research describing internship arrangements at colleges and universities with advertising programs. Finds that internships are widely used, are most often optional, and are usually awarded academic credit. Discusses grading systems, scheduling, employment offers, and types of work required. (SR)

  12. 32 CFR 705.13 - Commercial advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provisions of 32 CFR part 721. (2) It must be in good taste and not reflect discredit on the Navy or the U.S... encourages cooperation with advertisers. However, the layout, artwork and text of the proposed...

  13. 7 CFR 1955.146 - Advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Disposal of Inventory Property General § 1955.146 Advertising. (a... parties. Other innovative means are encouraged, such as the use of a bulletin board to display...

  14. Factors Affecting Creativity in Generation of Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Leonard N.

    1978-01-01

    Presents additional data on the author's previously formulated associative model of advertising creativity, looking at the impact of confidence, involvement, satisfaction, attitude, and associative ability on an individual's creative ability. (Author)

  15. Mitigating Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, Victoria

    The emergence of new, transmissible infections poses a significant threat to human populations. As the 2009 novel influenza A/H1N1 pandemic and the 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic demonstrate, we have observed the effects of rapid spread of illness in non-immune populations and experienced disturbing uncertainty about future potential for human suffering and societal disruption. Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of a newly emerged infectious organism are usually gathered in retrospect as the outbreak evolves and affects populations. Knowledge of potential effects of outbreaks and epidemics and most importantly, mitigation at community, regional, national and global levels is needed to inform policy that will prepare and protect people. Study of possible outcomes of evolving epidemics and application of mitigation strategies is not possible in observational or experimental research designs, but computational modeling allows conduct of `virtual' experiments. Results of well-designed computer simulations can aid in the selection and implementation of strategies that limit illness and death, and maintain systems of healthcare and other critical resources that are vital to public protection. Mitigating Infectious Disease Outbreaks.

  16. Radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies with high-velocity outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komossa, S.; Xu, D.; Zensus, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    We have studied four radio-loud Narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies with extreme optical emission-line shifts, indicating radial outflow velocities of up 2450 km s-1. The shifts are accompanied by strong line broadening, up to 2270 km s-1 in [NeV]. A significant ionization stratification (higher line shift at higher ionization potential) of most ions implies that we see a large-scale wind rather than single, localized jet-cloud interactions. The observations are consistent with a scenario, where the signatures of outflows are maximized because of a pole-on view into the central engine of these radio-loud NLS1 galaxies.

  17. A SOUND SOURCE LOCALIZATION TECHNIQUE TO SUPPORT SEARCH AND RESCUE IN LOUD NOISE ENVIRONMENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Hiroshi; Mizutani, Koichi; Wakatsuki, Naoto

    At some sites of earthquakes and other disasters, rescuers search for people buried under rubble by listening for the sounds which they make. Thus developing a technique to localize sound sources amidst loud noise will support such search and rescue operations. In this paper, we discuss an experiment performed to test an array signal processing technique which searches for unperceivable sound in loud noise environments. Two speakers simultaneously played a noise of a generator and a voice decreased by 20 dB (= 1/100 of power) from the generator noise at an outdoor space where cicadas were making noise. The sound signal was received by a horizontally set linear microphone array 1.05 m in length and consisting of 15 microphones. The direction and the distance of the voice were computed and the sound of the voice was extracted and played back as an audible sound by array signal processing.

  18. Effect of loudness on reaction time and response force in different motor tasks.

    PubMed

    Jaśkowski, Piotr; Włodarczyk, Dariusz

    2005-12-01

    Van der Molen and Keuss, in 1979 and 1981, showed that paradoxically long reaction times occur with extremely strong auditory stimuli when the task is difficult, e.g., choice-by-location or Simon paradigm. It was argued that this paradoxical behavior of RT is due to active inhibition of an arousal-dependent bypassing mechanism to prevent false responses. As the peak force, i.e., maximal force exerted by participants on a response key, is considered to be related to immediate arousal, we predicted that for extremely loud stimuli and for difficult tasks, lengthening of RT should be associated with reduction of peak force. Moreover, these effects should be enhanced when emphasis is on accuracy rather than speed. Although the relation between RT and intensity depended on task difficulty, no increase in RT was found for the loudest tones. Moreover, peak force increased monotonically with loudness, showing no tendency to be suppressed for loudest tones and difficult tasks. PMID:16491701

  19. Loudness evaluation of sounds transmitted through walls—basic experiment with artificial sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, H.; Hamada, Y.; Sato, F.

    1988-12-01

    A basic psycho-acoustic experiment was performed in order to establish a reliable method for evaluating insulation properties of building walls against airborne sound. Eleven models were used to represent actual sound insulation characteristics and three models used for incident noises on walls. Results of a four-step hearing test were arranged according to five well-known measures for noise assessment, and Perceived Level ( PL) was found to be the best among them for assessing the loudness of the sound transmitted through walls. In addition, arithmetic mean values of the sound pressure levels in octave bands from 63 Hz or 125 Hz to 4 kHz were examined. It was found that such simple measures have an unexpectedly high correlation with the loudness, surpassing even the PL. This suggests that the arithmetic mean value of the sound transmission losses in octave bands is a good single-number measure for rating the airborne sound insulation performance of walls.

  20. A study of listening habits in adolescents: Correlating stated loudness preferences with actual listening levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Laura; Warren, Jean; Cheenne, Dominique

    2001-05-01

    Evidence suggests that children are damaging their hearing in substantial numbers [Niskar et al., J. Am. Med. Assoc. (1998)]. Conventional thinking would suggest that cultural norms and attitudes contribute to a desire in children to model what they have seen in the media, thus implying that they would be listening to music at levels that are considered harmful. Our study focused on a gender-balanced group of 316 elementary-age students and aimed at assessing a correlation between an attitudinal survey related to loud music and the children's own listening levels. The study was broader in scope and in sample size than previous work [Fucci, 138th ASA Meeting, 11/99]. Findings were both surprising and encouraging, citing that a majority of children who expressed favoritism towards loud music listened to the presented samples at lower levels than expected. The study also proposes a set of listening level distribution curves that may prove useful for future studies with older participants.