Science.gov

Sample records for ae signals generated

  1. Time-frequency Analyses of AE Signals in YBCO Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanato, N.; Takemoto, N.

    AE (Acoustic Emission) measurements are well known methods to detect mechanical signals from superconducting coil The mechanical signals could be generated by micro cracks of epoxy resins, the motion of superconductors and the thermal expansion of superconductors, which were generated before and/or after a quench. We have presented a time-frequency visualization of AE signals as a method to detect the quench. We can detect very small AE signals regardless of lectromagnetic noises and can find the time of the AE occurrence and the frequency bands of AE signals by using this method. Recently it has been presented that YBCO superconductors are delaminated and degraded by a transverse tensile stress. The delamination is accompanied with AE signals. Also, it is known that amplitudes and frequency bands of AE signals vary with causes of AE occurrence. In this paper, we present time-frequency analyses of AE signa s caused by the delamination of a YBCO superconductor and the micro of epoxy resins.

  2. Generating Lookup Tables from the AE9/AP9 Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-16

    21 iv Figures Figure 1. Visualization of AE9 integral 1 MeV...by The Aerospace Corporation. SOAP allows for a visualization of the 3D data table in 2D slices, as shown in Figure 1, and also allows for analysis of...and solar cycle. 2 Figure 1. Visualization of AE9 integral 1 MeV electrons using SOAP and a static 3D table containing data generated from

  3. The AE9/AP9 Next Generation Radiation Specification Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul; Ginet, Gregory; Huston, Stuart; Byers, David

    A significant effort is under way to develop the next-generation trapped proton and electron models for satellite design, AP-9 and AE-9, respectively. The primary objectives of the effort are to 1) improve the overall accuracy of the models; 2) provide indicators of the uncertainty in the model due to natural variability and instrument uncertainty; 3) cover a broad energy range including hot plasma, relativistic electrons and highly energetic protons; and 4) provide complete spatial coverage. In this paper we will present background, demonstration and initial feedback from a limited-release beta version of the model.

  4. AE 941.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    AE 941 [Arthrovas, Neoretna, Psovascar] is shark cartilage extract that inhibits angiogenesis. AE 941 acts by blocking the two main pathways that contribute to the process of angiogenesis, matrix metalloproteases and the vascular endothelial growth factor signalling pathway. When initial development of AE 941 was being conducted, AEterna assigned the various indications different trademarks. Neovastat was used for oncology, Psovascar was used for dermatology, Neoretna was used for ophthalmology and Arthrovas was used for rheumatology. However, it is unclear if these trademarks will be used in the future and AEterna appears to only be using the Neovastat trademark in its current publications regardless of the indication. AEterna Laboratories signed commercialisation agreements with Grupo Ferrer Internacional SA of Spain and Medac GmbH of Germany in February 2001. Under the terms of the agreement, AEterna has granted exclusive commercialisation and distribution rights to AE 941 in oncology to Grupo Ferrer Internacional for the Southern European countries of France, Belgium, Spain, Greece, Portugal and Italy. It also has rights in Central and South America. Medac GmbH will have marketing rights in Germany, the UK, Scandinavia, Switzerland, Austria, Ireland, the Netherlands and Eastern Europe. In October 2002, AEterna Laboratories announced that it had signed an agreement with Australian healthcare products and services company Mayne Group for marketing AE 941 (as Neovastat) in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and Mexico. In March 2003, AEterna Laboratories announced it has signed an agreement with Korean based LG Life Sciences Ltd for marketing AE 941 (as Neovastat) in South Korea. The agreement provides AEterna with upfront and milestone payments, as well as a return on manufacturing and sales of AE 941. AEterna Laboratories had granted Alcon Laboratories an exclusive worldwide licence for AE 941 for ophthalmic products. However, this licence has been terminated. In

  5. Propagation of Flexural Mode AE Signals in GR/EP Composite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Gorman, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    It has been documented that AE signals propagate in thin plates as extensional and flexural plate modes. This was demonstrated using simulated AE sources (pencil lead breaks) by Gorman on thin aluminum and gr/ep composite plates and by Gorman and Prosser on thin aluminum plates. A typical signal from a pencil lead break source which identifies these two modes is shown. AE signals from transverse matrix cracking sources in gr/ep composite plates were also shown to propagate as plate modes by Gorman and Ziola. Smith showed that crack growth events in thin aluminum plates under spectrum fatigue loading produced signals that propagated as plate modes. Additionally, Prosser et al. showed that AE signals propagated as plate modes in a thin walled composite tube.

  6. Scram signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, Edward W.; Simms, Richard

    1981-01-01

    A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

  7. Scram signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Johanson, E.W.; Simms, R.

    A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

  8. An up-to-date instrumentation system for detection, location and characterization of AE signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcredi, D.; Sala, A.; Tornelli, C.

    1988-11-01

    An acoustic emission data overseeing system (AEDOS) has been developed for detection, location, and multiparametrical analysis of AE events such as amplitude, rise time, duration, energy, and delay time. The equipment comprises three main sections: the 'in field part' to detect and condition the AE events; the 'front end' that collects all the signals, makes the first screening among the signals, and measures the main parameters of the events; and the 'computer' to set up the system, to store the data, to analyze and display parametric isthograms, graphics, and location maps, and to supply an easy menu driven interface to the operator. A detailed functional description including performance specification of the system is given.

  9. Tailpulse signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Baker, John; Archer, Daniel E.; Luke, Stanley John; Decman, Daniel J.; White, Gregory K.

    2009-06-23

    A tailpulse signal generating/simulating apparatus, system, and method designed to produce electronic pulses which simulate tailpulses produced by a gamma radiation detector, including the pileup effect caused by the characteristic exponential decay of the detector pulses, and the random Poisson distribution pulse timing for radioactive materials. A digital signal process (DSP) is programmed and configured to produce digital values corresponding to pseudo-randomly selected pulse amplitudes and pseudo-randomly selected Poisson timing intervals of the tailpulses. Pulse amplitude values are exponentially decayed while outputting the digital value to a digital to analog converter (DAC). And pulse amplitudes of new pulses are added to decaying pulses to simulate the pileup effect for enhanced realism in the simulation.

  10. Waveform Analysis of AE in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced, waveform based acoustic emission (AE) techniques have been developed to evaluate damage mechanisms in the testing of composite materials. This approach, more recently referred to as Modal AE, provides an enhanced capability to discriminate and eliminate noise signals from those generated by damage mechanisms. Much more precise source location can also be obtained in comparison to conventional, threshold crossing arrival time determination techniques. Two successful examples of the application of Modal AE are presented in this work. In the first, the initiation of transverse matrix cracking in cross-ply, tensile coupons was monitored. In these tests, it was documented that the same source mechanism, matrix cracking, can produce widely different AE signal amplitudes dependent on laminate stacking sequence and thickness. These results, taken together with well known propagation effects of attenuation and dispersion of AE signals in composite laminates, cast further doubt on the validity of simple amplitude or amplitude distribution analysis for AE source determination. For the second example, delamination propagation in composite ring specimens was monitored. Pressurization of these composite rings is used to simulate the stresses in a composite rocket motor case. AE signals from delamination propagation were characterized by large amplitude flexural plate mode components which have long signal durations because of the large dispersion of this mode.

  11. Loss of the AE3 Cl−/HCO−3 exchanger in mice affects rate-dependent inotropy and stress-related AKT signaling in heart

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N.; Lasko, Valerie M.; Nieman, Michelle L.; Al Moamen, Nabeel J.; Shull, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    Cl−/HCO−3 exchangers are expressed abundantly in cardiac muscle, suggesting that HCO−3 extrusion serves an important function in heart. Mice lacking Anion Exchanger Isoform 3 (AE3), a major cardiac Cl−/HCO−3 exchanger, appear healthy, but loss of AE3 causes decompensation in a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) model. Using intra-ventricular pressure analysis, in vivo pacing, and molecular studies we identified physiological and biochemical changes caused by loss of AE3 that may contribute to decompensation in HCM. AE3-null mice had normal cardiac contractility under basal conditions and after β-adrenergic stimulation, but pacing of hearts revealed that frequency-dependent inotropy was blunted, suggesting that AE3-mediated HCO−3 extrusion is required for a robust force-frequency response (FFR) during acute biomechanical stress in vivo. Modest changes in expression of proteins that affect Ca2+-handling were observed, but Ca2+-transient analysis of AE3-null myocytes showed normal twitch-amplitude and Ca2+-clearance. Phosphorylation and expression of several proteins implicated in HCM and FFR, including phospholamban (PLN), myosin binding protein C, and troponin I were not altered in hearts of paced AE3-null mice; however, phosphorylation of Akt, which plays a central role in mechanosensory signaling, was significantly higher in paced AE3-null hearts than in wild-type controls and phosphorylation of AMPK, which is affected by Akt and is involved in energy metabolism and some cases of HCM, was reduced. These data show loss of AE3 leads to impaired rate-dependent inotropy, appears to affect mechanical stress-responsive signaling, and reduces activation of AMPK, which may contribute to decompensation in heart failure. PMID:24427143

  12. The AE9/AP9/SPM Next Generation Radiation Specification Models - Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul; Johnston, William Robert; Huston, Stuart; Guild, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    The AE9/AP9/SPM model has now been released to the global satellite design community, with a recent update to version 1.2. We are working on incorporating new data sources, such as AZUR and NASA's Van Allen Probes, while also addressing critiques raised by the science and engineering communities. In particular, we are investigating discrepancies for protons at low altitude and electrons at geostationary altitudes. Finally, we are scoping out architectural improvements to enable features requested by industry: improved stitching between the plasma and radiation models, local time dependence in the plasma model, longitude dependence in the electron radiation model, and solar cycle variation in the low altitude protons. We provide a brief update on the status of the model, discrepancy investigations, and plans for the future.

  13. Study of Randomness in AES Ciphertexts Produced by Randomly Generated S-Boxes and S-Boxes with Various Modulus and Additive Constant Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Suman; Sadique Uz Zaman, J. K. M.; Ghosh, Ranjan

    2016-06-01

    In Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), the standard S-Box is conventionally generated by using a particular irreducible polynomial {11B} in GF(28) as the modulus and a particular additive constant polynomial {63} in GF(2), though it can be generated by many other polynomials. In this paper, it has been shown that it is possible to generate secured AES S-Boxes by using some other selected modulus and additive polynomials and also can be generated randomly, using a PRNG like BBS. A comparative study has been made on the randomness of corresponding AES ciphertexts generated, using these S-Boxes, by the NIST Test Suite coded for this paper. It has been found that besides using the standard one, other moduli and additive constants are also able to generate equally or better random ciphertexts; the same is true for random S-Boxes also. As these new types of S-Boxes are user-defined, hence unknown, they are able to prevent linear and differential cryptanalysis. Moreover, they act as additional key-inputs to AES, thus increasing the key-space.

  14. Genomic Characterization of a Novel HIV-1 Second-Generation Recombinant Form Originated from CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC in Dali Prefecture of Yunnan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianjian; Li, Lin; Li, Huiqin; Li, Jingyun; Yang, Shaomin; Zhang, Mi; Ouyang, Hongmei

    2016-06-01

    Yunnan seems to be a "hot spot" region of HIV-1 recombination. CRF01_AE and subtype CRF08_BC are two main HIV-1 clades circulating in Yunnan. We report here a novel HIV-1 second-generation recombinant form originated from CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC. The strain (12YN10551) was isolated from a HIV-positive male infected through heterosexual contact in Dali prefecture of Yunnan province, China. This is the first report of HIV-1 near full-length genomic sequence in Dali. Recombinant analysis shows that 12YN10551 was composed of two well-established circulating recombinant forms (CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC). Two CRF01_AE recombinant fragments were inserted into the CRF08_BC backbone genome in the pol/vif/vpr/tat/rev and nef gene regions, respectively. The discovery and characterization of this new recombinant indicate that intersubtype recombination is continuously generating new forms of HIV-1. More work is needed to better monitor the genetic diversity of HIV-1 in this region.

  15. Identification of Novel Recombinant Forms of Hepatitis B Virus Generated from Genotypes Ae and G in HIV-1-Positive Japanese Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Kawahata, Takuya; Mori, Haruyo; Furubayashi, Keiichi; Taniguchi, Yasushi; Itoda, Ichiro; Komano, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The rare hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype G (HBV/G) coinfects HIV-1-positive individuals along with HBV/A and generates recombinants. However, the circulation of HBV A/G recombinants remains poorly understood. This molecular epidemiologic study examined HBV A/G recombinants in Japanese HIV-1-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). Initially, blood specimens submitted for confirmatory tests of HIV infection in Osaka and Tokyo, Japan, from 2006 to 2013 were examined for HIV-1, and HIV-1-positive specimens were screened for HBV. Among 817 specimens from HIV-1-positive individuals, HBsAg was detected in 59 specimens; of these, HBV/Ae (alternatively A2), a subgenotype of HBV/A prevalent in Europe and North America, was identified in 70.2%, HBV/C in 17.5%, and HBV/G in 10.5%, and HBV/E in 1.8% according to the core gene sequence. The full-length genome analysis of HBV was performed on HBV/G-positive specimens because some HBV A/G recombinants were historically overlooked by genotyping based on a partial genome analysis. It revealed that five of the specimens contained novel Ae/G recombinants, the core gene of which had a high sequence similarity to HBV/G. Detailed analyses showed that novel recombinants were coinfected with HBV/Ae in a recombinant-dominant fashion. No major drug-resistant mutations were found in the newly identified HBV Ae/G recombinants. Some of the individuals asymptomatically coinfected with HIV/HBV suffered mild liver injury. This study demonstrated that novel Ae/G HBV recombinants were identified in Japanese HIV-1-positive MSM. The pathogenicity of novel HBV Ae/G recombinants should be examined in a future longitudinal study. Surveillance of such viruses in HIV-1-positive individuals should be emphasized. PMID:25825936

  16. Identification of Novel Recombinant Forms of Hepatitis B Virus Generated from Genotypes Ae and G in HIV-1-Positive Japanese Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yoko; Kawahata, Takuya; Mori, Haruyo; Furubayashi, Keiichi; Taniguchi, Yasushi; Itoda, Ichiro; Komano, Jun

    2015-07-01

    The rare hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype G (HBV/G) coinfects HIV-1-positive individuals along with HBV/A and generates recombinants. However, the circulation of HBV A/G recombinants remains poorly understood. This molecular epidemiologic study examined HBV A/G recombinants in Japanese HIV-1-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). Initially, blood specimens submitted for confirmatory tests of HIV infection in Osaka and Tokyo, Japan, from 2006 to 2013 were examined for HIV-1, and HIV-1-positive specimens were screened for HBV. Among 817 specimens from HIV-1-positive individuals, HBsAg was detected in 59 specimens; of these, HBV/Ae (alternatively A2), a subgenotype of HBV/A prevalent in Europe and North America, was identified in 70.2%, HBV/C in 17.5%, and HBV/G in 10.5%, and HBV/E in 1.8% according to the core gene sequence. The full-length genome analysis of HBV was performed on HBV/G-positive specimens because some HBV A/G recombinants were historically overlooked by genotyping based on a partial genome analysis. It revealed that five of the specimens contained novel Ae/G recombinants, the core gene of which had a high sequence similarity to HBV/G. Detailed analyses showed that novel recombinants were coinfected with HBV/Ae in a recombinant-dominant fashion. No major drug-resistant mutations were found in the newly identified HBV Ae/G recombinants. Some of the individuals asymptomatically coinfected with HIV/HBV suffered mild liver injury. This study demonstrated that novel Ae/G HBV recombinants were identified in Japanese HIV-1-positive MSM. The pathogenicity of novel HBV Ae/G recombinants should be examined in a future longitudinal study. Surveillance of such viruses in HIV-1-positive individuals should be emphasized.

  17. GRG5/AES Interacts with T-Cell Factor 4 (TCF4) and Downregulates Wnt Signaling in Human Cells and Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ângela M. Sousa; Pereira-Castro, Isabel; Ricardo, Elisabete; Spencer, Forrest; Fisher, Shannon; da Costa, Luís Teixeira

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional control by TCF/LEF proteins is crucial in key developmental processes such as embryo polarity, tissue architecture and cell fate determination. TCFs associate with β-catenin to activate transcription in the presence of Wnt signaling, but in its absence act as repressors together with Groucho-family proteins (GRGs). TCF4 is critical in vertebrate intestinal epithelium, where TCF4-β-catenin complexes are necessary for the maintenance of a proliferative compartment, and their abnormal formation initiates tumorigenesis. However, the extent of TCF4-GRG complexes’ roles in development and the mechanisms by which they repress transcription are not completely understood. Here we characterize the interaction between TCF4 and GRG5/AES, a Groucho family member whose functional relationship with TCFs has been controversial. We map the core GRG interaction region in TCF4 to a 111-amino acid fragment and show that, in contrast to other GRGs, GRG5/AES-binding specifically depends on a 4-amino acid motif (LVPQ) present only in TCF3 and some TCF4 isoforms. We further demonstrate that GRG5/AES represses Wnt-mediated transcription both in human cells and zebrafish embryos. Importantly, we provide the first evidence of an inherent repressive function of GRG5/AES in dorsal-ventral patterning during early zebrafish embryogenesis. These results improve our understanding of TCF-GRG interactions, have significant implications for models of transcriptional repression by TCF-GRG complexes, and lay the groundwork for in depth direct assessment of the potential role of Groucho-family proteins in both normal and abnormal development. PMID:23840876

  18. Apparatus for millimeter-wave signal generation

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen; Hietala, Vincent M.; Zolper, John C.; Mar, Alan; Hohimer, John P.

    1999-01-01

    An opto-electronic integrated circuit (OEIC) apparatus is disclosed for generating an electrical signal at a frequency .gtoreq.10 GHz. The apparatus, formed on a single substrate, includes a semiconductor ring laser for generating a continuous train of mode-locked lasing pulses and a high-speed photodetector for detecting the train of lasing pulses and generating the electrical signal therefrom. Embodiments of the invention are disclosed with an active waveguide amplifier coupling the semiconductor ring laser and the high-speed photodetector. The invention has applications for use in OEICs and millimeter-wave monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs).

  19. [Determination of trace lead in traditional Chinese herbal medicine Astragalus by microwave digestion-CTAB enhancing-continual flow ingection hydride generation-ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Lian; Ke, Shao-Ying; Ye, Rong; Ding, Ming-Yu

    2007-11-01

    A new method using microwave digestion technique was developed for the determination of lead in Astragalus by CTAB enhancing-continual flow hydride generation-inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (HG-ICP-AES). The experimental conditions of microwave digestion and hydride generation were optimized. This method shows a linear range of 0.23-800 microg x L(-1) and the correlation coefficient is 0.999 9. It is satisfactory to apply the microwave digestion procedure to the determination of Pb under the optimized conditions. The detection limit of the method is 0.23 microg x L(-1) and the RSD is 1.02%. The recovery obtained is 98.8%-100.1%. The results show that this method is rapid and simple with low environmental contamination and complete digestion of samples.

  20. Near full-length genome sequence of a novel HIV type 1 second-generation recombinant form (CRF01_AE/CRF07_BC) identified among men who have sex with men in Jilin, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingguang; Ning, Chuanyi; He, Xiang; Yang, Yao; Xing, Hui; Hong, Kunxue; Shao, Yiming; Yang, Rongge

    2013-12-01

    We report here a novel HIV-1 second-generation recombinant form (CRF01_AE/CRF07_BC) composed of CRF01_AE and CRF07_BC, identified among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jilin, with four breakpoints observed in the pol, vif, and vpr genes. The CRF01_AE regions of the recombinant were clustered with the CRF01_AE lineage, which is mainly circulating among MSM in northern China, with the support of 100% bootstrap value, indicating that the parental origin of the CRF01_AE regions was from MSM, in which recombination events may be more likely to occur. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detection of a novel HIV-1 second-generation recombinant form (CRF01AE/CRF07_BC) in Jilin, which indicates active transmission networks of HIV-1 infection among MSM in the region. Therefore, it is necessary to continue monitoring the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 among MSM in Jilin to obtain a better understanding of the transmission and potential public health impact of HIV-1 among MSM in the region.

  1. AE Recorder Characteristics and Development.

    SciTech Connect

    Partridge, Michael E.; Curtis, Shane Keawe; McGrogan, David Paul

    2016-11-01

    The Anomalous Environment Recorder (AE Recorder) provides a robust data recording capability for multiple high-shock applications including earth penetrators. The AE Recorder, packaged as a 2.4" di ameter cylinder 3" tall, acquires 12 accelerometer, 2 auxiliary, and 6 discrete signal channels at 250k samples / second. Recording depth is 213 seconds plus 75ms of pre-trigger data. The mechanical, electrical, and firmware are described as well as support electro nics designed for the first use of the recorder.

  2. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  3. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  4. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  5. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  6. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  7. Applications of Advanced, Waveform Based AE Techniques for Testing Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced, waveform based acoustic emission (AE) techniques have been previously used to evaluate damage progression in laboratory tests of composite coupons. In these tests, broad band, high fidelity acoustic sensors were used to detect signals which were then digitized and stored for analysis. Analysis techniques were based on plate mode wave propagation characteristics. This approach, more recently referred to as Modal AE, provides an enhanced capability to discriminate and eliminate noise signals from those generated by damage mechanisms. This technique also allows much more precise source location than conventional, threshold crossing arrival time determination techniques. To apply Modal AE concepts to the interpretation of AE on larger composite structures, the effects of wave propagation over larger distances and through structural complexities must be well characterized and understood. In this research, measurements were made of the attenuation of the extensional and flexural plate mode components of broad band simulated AE signals in large composite panels. As these materials have applications in a cryogenic environment, the effects of cryogenic insulation on the attenuation of plate mode AE signals were also documented.

  8. Effect of the Southeast Asian Ovalocytosis Deletion on the Conformational Dynamics of Signal-Anchor Transmembrane Segment 1 of Red Cell Anion Exchanger 1 (AE1, Band 3, or SLC4A1)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The first transmembrane (TM1) helix in the red cell anion exchanger (AE1, Band 3, or SLC4A1) acts as an internal signal anchor that binds the signal recognition particle and directs the nascent polypeptide chain to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane where it moves from the translocon laterally into the lipid bilayer. The sequence N-terminal to TM1 forms an amphipathic helix that lies at the membrane interface and is connected to TM1 by a bend at Pro403. Southeast Asian ovalocytosis (SAO) is a red cell abnormality caused by a nine-amino acid deletion (Ala400–Ala408) at the N-terminus of TM1. Here we demonstrate, by extensive (∼4.5 μs) molecular dynamics simulations of TM1 in a model 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine membrane, that the isolated TM1 peptide is highly dynamic and samples the structure of TM1 seen in the crystal structure of the membrane domain of AE1. The SAO deletion not only removes the proline-induced bend but also causes a “pulling in” of the part of the amphipathic helix into the hydrophobic phase of the bilayer, as well as the C-terminal of the peptide. The dynamics of the SAO peptide very infrequently resembles the structure of TM1 in AE1, demonstrating the disruptive effect the SAO deletion has on AE1 folding. These results provide a precise molecular view of the disposition and dynamics of wild-type and SAO TM1 in a lipid bilayer, an important early biosynthetic intermediate in the insertion of AE1 into the ER membrane, and extend earlier results of cell-free translation experiments. PMID:28068080

  9. Generating strain signals under consideration of road surface profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, T. E.; Abdullah, S.; Schramm, D.; Nuawi, M. Z.; Bruckmann, T.

    2015-08-01

    The current study aimed to develop the mechanism for generating strain signal utilising computer-based simulation. The strain data, caused by the acceleration, were undertaken from a fatigue data acquisition involving car movements. Using a mathematical model, the measured strain signals yielded to acceleration data used to describe the bumpiness of road surfaces. The acceleration signals were considered as an external disturbance on generating strain signals. Based on this comparison, both the actual and simulated strain data have similar pattern. The results are expected to provide new knowledge to generate a strain signal via a simulation.

  10. Reactive oxygen species generation and signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Baishnab Charan; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of molecular oxygen into the atmosphere was accompanied by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as side products of many biochemical reactions. ROS are permanently generated in plastids, peroxisomes, mitochiondria, the cytosol and the apoplast. Imbalance between ROS generation and safe detoxification generates oxidative stress and the accumulating ROS are harmful for the plants. On the other hand, specific ROS function as signaling molecules and activate signal transduction processes in response to various stresses. Here, we summarize the generation of ROS in the different cellular compartments and the signaling processes which are induced by ROS. PMID:23072988

  11. 47 CFR 64.1514 - Generation of signalling tones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Generation of signalling tones. 64.1514 Section 64.1514 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... Services § 64.1514 Generation of signalling tones. No common carrier shall assign a telephone number...

  12. 47 CFR 64.1514 - Generation of signalling tones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Generation of signalling tones. 64.1514 Section 64.1514 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... Services § 64.1514 Generation of signalling tones. No common carrier shall assign a telephone number...

  13. 47 CFR 64.1514 - Generation of signalling tones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Generation of signalling tones. 64.1514 Section 64.1514 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... Services § 64.1514 Generation of signalling tones. No common carrier shall assign a telephone number...

  14. 47 CFR 64.1514 - Generation of signalling tones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Generation of signalling tones. 64.1514 Section 64.1514 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... Services § 64.1514 Generation of signalling tones. No common carrier shall assign a telephone number...

  15. 47 CFR 64.1514 - Generation of signalling tones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Generation of signalling tones. 64.1514 Section 64.1514 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... Services § 64.1514 Generation of signalling tones. No common carrier shall assign a telephone number...

  16. Characterization of Aes nuclear foci in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Itatani, Yoshiro; Sonoshita, Masahiro; Kakizaki, Fumihiko; Okawa, Katsuya; Stifani, Stefano; Itoh, Hideaki; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Taketo, M Mark

    2016-01-01

    Amino-terminal enhancer of split (Aes) is a member of Groucho/Transducin-like enhancer (TLE) family. Aes is a recently found metastasis suppressor of colorectal cancer (CRC) that inhibits Notch signalling, and forms nuclear foci together with TLE1. Although some Notch-associated proteins are known to form subnuclear bodies, little is known regarding the dynamics or functions of these structures. Here, we show that Aes nuclear foci in CRC observed under an electron microscope are in a rather amorphous structure, lacking surrounding membrane. Investigation of their behaviour during the cell cycle by time-lapse cinematography showed that Aes nuclear foci dissolve during mitosis and reassemble after completion of cytokinesis. We have also found that heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70) is an essential component of Aes foci. Pharmacological inhibition of the HSC70 ATPase activity with VER155008 reduces Aes focus formation. These results provide insight into the understanding of Aes-mediated inhibition of Notch signalling.

  17. [Design of Electrocardiogram Signal Generator Based on Typical Electrocardiogram Database].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuting; Wang, Xiaofei; Li, Dongshang; Liu, Guili

    2016-02-01

    Using LabVIEW programming and high-speed multifunction data acquisition card PCI-6251, we designed an electrocardiogram (ECG) signal generator based on Chinese typical ECG database. When the ECG signals are given off by the generator, the generator can also display the ECG information annotations at the same time, including waveform data and diagnostic results. It could be a useful assisting tool of ECG automatic diagnose instruments.

  18. Electronic modulation of biochemical signal generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordonov, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; Cheng, Yi; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary; Yin, Jun-Jie; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2014-08-01

    Microelectronic devices that contain biological components are typically used to interrogate biology rather than control biological function. Patterned assemblies of proteins and cells have, however, been used for in vitro metabolic engineering, where coordinated biochemical pathways allow cell metabolism to be characterized and potentially controlled on a chip. Such devices form part of technologies that attempt to recreate animal and human physiological functions on a chip and could be used to revolutionize drug development. These ambitious goals will, however, require new biofabrication methodologies that help connect microelectronics and biological systems and yield new approaches to device assembly and communication. Here, we report the electrically mediated assembly, interrogation and control of a multi-domain fusion protein that produces a bacterial signalling molecule. The biological system can be electrically tuned using a natural redox molecule, and its biochemical response is shown to provide the signalling cues to drive bacterial population behaviour. We show that the biochemical output of the system correlates with the electrical input charge, which suggests that electrical inputs could be used to control complex on-chip biological processes.

  19. Digitally programmable signal generator and method

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, Gordon J.; Kaskey, Jeffrey A.

    1989-01-01

    A digitally programmable waveform generator for generating completely arbitrary digital or analog waveforms from very low frequencies to frequencies in the gigasample per second range. A memory array with multiple parallel outputs is addressed; then the parallel output data is latched into buffer storage from which it is serially multiplexed out at a data rate many times faster than the access time of the memory array itself. While data is being multiplexed out serially, the memory array is accessed with the next required address and presents its data to the buffer storage before the serial multiplexing of the last group of data is completed, allowing this new data to then be latched into the buffer storage for smooth continuous serial data output. In a preferred implementation, a plurality of these serial data outputs are paralleled to form the input to a digital to analog converter, providing a programmable analog output.

  20. Memristive Sisyphus circuit for clock signal generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershin, Yuriy V.; Shevchenko, Sergey N.; Nori, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Frequency generators are widely used in electronics. Here, we report the design and experimental realization of a memristive frequency generator employing a unique combination of only digital logic gates, a single-supply voltage and a realistic thresholdtype memristive device. In our circuit, the oscillator frequency and duty cycle are defined by the switching characteristics of the memristive device and external resistors. We demonstrate the circuit operation both experimentally, using a memristor emulator, and theoretically, using a model memristive device with threshold. Importantly, nanoscale realizations of memristive devices offer small-size alternatives to conventional quartz-based oscillators. In addition, the suggested approach can be used for mimicking some cyclic (Sisyphus) processes in nature, such as “dripping ants” or drops from leaky faucets.

  1. Memristive Sisyphus circuit for clock signal generation

    PubMed Central

    Pershin, Yuriy V.; Shevchenko, Sergey N.; Nori, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Frequency generators are widely used in electronics. Here, we report the design and experimental realization of a memristive frequency generator employing a unique combination of only digital logic gates, a single-supply voltage and a realistic thresholdtype memristive device. In our circuit, the oscillator frequency and duty cycle are defined by the switching characteristics of the memristive device and external resistors. We demonstrate the circuit operation both experimentally, using a memristor emulator, and theoretically, using a model memristive device with threshold. Importantly, nanoscale realizations of memristive devices offer small-size alternatives to conventional quartz-based oscillators. In addition, the suggested approach can be used for mimicking some cyclic (Sisyphus) processes in nature, such as “dripping ants” or drops from leaky faucets. PMID:27199243

  2. Modulation of photoacoustic signal generation from metallic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mitcham, Trevor; Homan, Kimberly; Frey, Wolfgang; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav; Hazle, John

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The ability to image metallic implants is important for medical applications ranging from diagnosis to therapy. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been recently pursued as a means to localize metallic implants in soft tissue. The work presented herein investigates different mechanisms to modulate the PA signal generated by macroscopic metallic surfaces. Wires of five different metals are tested to simulate medical implants/tools, while surface roughness is altered or physical vapor deposition (PVD) coatings are added to change the wires’ overall optical absorption. PA imaging data of the wires are acquired at 970 nm. Results indicate that PA signal generation predominately occurs in a wire’s metallic surface and not its aqueous surroundings. PA signal generation is similar for all metals tested, while addition of PVD coatings offers significant modulations (i.e., 4-dB enhancement and 26-dB reduction achieved) in PA signal generation. Results also suggest that PA signal increases with increasing surface roughness. Different coating and roughness schemes are then successfully utilized to generate spatial PA signal patterns. This work demonstrates the potential of surface modifications to enhance or reduce PA signal generation to permit improved PA imaging of implants/tools (i.e., providing location/orientation information) or to allow PA imaging of surrounding tissue. PMID:23652344

  3. Signal generator converts direct current to multiphase supplies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baude, J.

    1967-01-01

    Multiphase wave generator uses multivibrators in a feedback control mode that produces output signal pairs that are impressed on the primary windings of inverter transformers sequentially with a 120 degree phase shift from each other.

  4. A versatile waveform generator for testing neuroelectric signal processors.

    PubMed

    Kohn, A F

    1989-08-01

    A multi-channel waveform generator was designed for testing neuroelectric signal processors. Smooth transient signals that resemble action potentials or evoked potentials are generated by a second order switched capacitor filter excited by brief rectangular pulses. The choice of an integrated circuit switched capacitor filter simplified the design by circumventing some of the disadvantages of conventional active filters. The waveform generator is versatile, with several signal parameters being independently adjustable from front panel controls: duration, waveshape, latency, amplitude and signal-to-noise ratio. The generator has been used for testing evoked potential acquisition and processing systems, for evaluating the effects of analog filters on evoked potentials and for testing systems designed to detect and classify trains of multi-unit action potentials.

  5. [Modern spectral estimation of ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Jia, Q; Liu, S; Guo, L; Chen, H; Zeng, X

    2000-06-01

    The inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and its signal characteristics were discussed using modern spectral estimation technique. The power spectra density (PSD) was calculated using the auto-regression (AR) model of modern spectra estimation. The Levinson-Durbin recursion method was used to estimate the model parameters which were used for the PSD computation. The results obtained with actual ICP-AES spectra and measurements showed that the spectral estimation technique was helpful for the better understanding about spectral composition and signal characteristics.

  6. The Sensitive Infrared Signal Detection by Sum Frequency Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Teh-Hwa; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingxin

    2013-01-01

    An up-conversion device that converts 2.05-micron light to 700 nm signal by sum frequency generation using a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal is demonstrated. The achieved 92% up-conversion efficiency paves the path to detect extremely weak 2.05-micron signal with well established silicon avalanche photodiode detector for sensitive lidar applications.

  7. AE-941 (AEterna).

    PubMed

    Dredge, Keith

    2004-06-01

    AEterna is developing AE-941, an angiogenesis inhibitor derived from the ultrafiltration of liquid shark cartilage, with matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitory properties, for the potential treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.

  8. Study of seismic signals generated by explosions triggering avalanches.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surinach, Emma; Pérez-Guillén, Cristina; Tapia, Mar; Hiller, Martin; Dufour, François

    2014-05-01

    Our group is dedicated to the study of the seismic signals generated by avalanches. Through several years deploying seismic stations at the Vallée de la Sionne (VDLS) test site in Switzerland (operated by SLF) it has gathered a large amount of seismic signals forming a database. The database consists mainly on signals generated by snow avalanches descending the VDLS test site. However, signals corresponding to the explosions that triggered the avalanches and even earthquakes are also included in the database. Depending on the snowpack stability, some of the explosions, despite being of the same charge, are unable to trigger an avalanche. The explosion signals are recorded in 3-component seismometers placed at two or three sites separated a maximum distance of 2.5 km approx. from the release area of the avalanches. The seismic signals corresponding to the explosions recorded at different sites are analyzed and their characteristics compared. Amplitude and frequency content of the displacement, velocity and acceleration of the generated waves traveling into the ground and those of the blast (air) are calculated. These values are compared with those of the waves generated by avalanches and other seismic sources (earthquakes, helicopters, airplanes). These analyses allow us to quantify and evaluate parameters related to the possible triggering of secondary snow avalanches caused by the generated vibrations in air and ground. The results are related to the weather and snowpack conditions, when it is possible.

  9. AE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Spong, Donald A

    2016-06-20

    AE3D solves for the shear Alfven eigenmodes and eigenfrequencies in a torodal magnetic fusion confinement device. The configuration can be either 2D (e.g. tokamak, reversed field pinch) or 3D (e.g. stellarator, helical reversed field pinch, tokamak with ripple). The equations solved are based on a reduced MHD model and sound wave coupling effects are not currently included.

  10. Tone signal generator for producing multioperator tone signals using an operator circuit including a waveform generator, a selector and an enveloper

    DOEpatents

    Dong, Qiujie; Jenkins, Michael V.; Bernadas, Salvador R.

    1997-01-01

    A frequency modulation (FM) tone signal generator for generating a FM tone signal is disclosed. The tone signal generator includes a waveform generator having a plurality of wave tables, a selector and an enveloper. The waveform generator furnishes a waveform signal in response to a phase angle address signal. Each wave table stores a different waveform. The selector selects one of the wave tables in response to a plurality of selection signals such that the selected wave table largely provides the waveform signal upon being addressed largely by the phase angle address signal. Selection of the selected wave table varies with each selection signal. The enveloper impresses an envelope signal on the waveform signal. The envelope signal is used as a carrier or modulator for generating the FM tone signal.

  11. Tone signal generator for producing multioperator tone signals using an operator circuit including a waveform generator, a selector and an enveloper

    DOEpatents

    Dong, Q.; Jenkins, M.V.; Bernadas, S.R.

    1997-09-09

    A frequency modulation (FM) tone signal generator for generating a FM tone signal is disclosed. The tone signal generator includes a waveform generator having a plurality of wave tables, a selector and an enveloper. The waveform generator furnishes a waveform signal in response to a phase angle address signal. Each wave table stores a different waveform. The selector selects one of the wave tables in response to a plurality of selection signals such that the selected wave table largely provides the waveform signal upon being addressed largely by the phase angle address signal. Selection of the selected wave table varies with each selection signal. The enveloper impresses an envelope signal on the waveform signal. The envelope signal is used as a carrier or modulator for generating the FM tone signal. 17 figs.

  12. Implementation of an acoustic emission proximity detector for use in generating glass optics

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K.L.; Piscotty, M.A.; Taylor, J.S.

    1996-11-11

    We are using the approach acoustic emission (AE) signal during a grinding operation to detect the proximity of the grinding wheel relative to a brittle material workpiece and are using this detection as a feed- back control signal in our CNC. The repeatability of the AE signal during the wheel approach is the key that allows AE to be used as a proximity detector and is demonstrated at LLNL to be about mm. We noted significant changes of the AE signal as process parameters are modified, but conclude that with a quick CNC calibration routine and holding the parameters constant during a given operation, the AE system can be successfully used to sense pre- contact wheel- to- workpiece separation. Additionally, the AE sensing system allows real- time monitoring during grinding to provide in- process information. The first prototype of an AE system on a commercially available generator is currently be tested at the Center for Optics Manufacturing.

  13. Some aspects of AE application in tool condition monitoring

    PubMed

    Jemielniak

    2000-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is rather a well-known form of non-destructive testing. In the last few years the technology of the AE measurement has been expanded to cover the area of tool condition monitoring. The paper presents some experience of Warsaw University of Technology (WUT) in such applications of AE. It provides an interpretation of common AE signal distortions and possible solutions to avoid them. Furthermore, a characteristic study of several different AE and ultrasonic sensors being used in WUT is furnished. Evaluation of the applicability of some basic measures of acoustic emission for tool condition monitoring is also presented in the paper. Finally paper presents a method of the catastrophic tool failure detection in turning, which uses symptoms other than the direct magnitude AERMS signal. The method is based on the statistical analysis of the distributions of the AERMS signal.

  14. Multiple Lookup Table-Based AES Encryption Algorithm Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jin; Liu, Wenyi; Zhang, Huixin

    Anew AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) encryption algorithm implementation was proposed in this paper. It is based on five lookup tables, which are generated from S-box(the substitution table in AES). The obvious advantages are reducing the code-size, improving the implementation efficiency, and helping new learners to understand the AES encryption algorithm and GF(28) multiplication which are necessary to correctly implement AES[1]. This method can be applied on processors with word length 32 or above, FPGA and others. And correspondingly we can implement it by VHDL, Verilog, VB and other languages.

  15. Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation

    DOEpatents

    Hart, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communication, powered by a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of material resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications.

  16. Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation

    DOEpatents

    Hart, M.M.

    1995-04-18

    A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communications, powered by a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of materials resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications. 2 figs.

  17. Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation

    DOEpatents

    Hart, Mark M.

    1995-01-01

    A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communications, powered by a Pu.sub.238 or Sr.sub.90 thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu.sub.238 or Sr.sub.90 thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of materials resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications.

  18. 2-D Signal Generation Using State-Space Formulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    published that have established nonoptical .~ -~ Iimage processing as a viable area of research. A large portion of this research emphasizes the linear...research and the study of time-discrete linear systems. This thesis develops the discrete model of Roesser [Ref. 5] for linear image processing which... THESIS 2-D SIGNAL GENERATION USING STATE-SPACE FORMULATION - • by (.) Evangelos Theofilou December 1985 • Thesis Advisor: Sydney R. Parker Approved

  19. Acoustic Aspects of Photoacoustic Signal Generation and Detection in Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklós, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper photoacoustic signal generation and detection in gases is investigated and discussed from the standpoint of acoustics. Four topics are considered: the effect of the absorption-desorption process of modulated and pulsed light on the heat power density released in the gas; the generation of the primary sound by the released heat in an unbounded medium; the excitation of an acoustic resonator by the primary sound; and finally, the generation of the measurable PA signal by a microphone. When light is absorbed by a molecule and the excess energy is relaxed by collisions with the surrounding molecules, the average kinetic energy, thus also the temperature of an ensemble of molecules (called "particle" in acoustics) will increase. In other words heat energy is added to the energy of the particle. The rate of the energy transfer is characterized by the heat power density. A simple two-level model of absorption-desorption is applied for describing the heat power generation process for modulated and pulsed illumination. Sound generation by a laser beam in an unbounded medium is discussed by means of the Green's function technique. It is shown that the duration of the generated sound pulse depends mostly on beam geometry. A photoacoustic signal is mostly detected in a photoacoustic cell composed of acoustic resonators, buffers, filters, etc. It is not easy to interpret the measured PA signal in such a complicated acoustic system. The acoustic response of a PA detector to different kinds of excitations (modulated cw, pulsed, periodic pulse train) is discussed. It is shown that acoustic resonators respond very differently to modulated cw excitation and to excitation by a pulse train. The microphone for detecting the PA signal is also a part of the acoustic system; its properties have to be taken into account by the design of a PA detector. The moving membrane of the microphone absorbs acoustic energy; thus, it may influence the resonance frequency and

  20. AE-941 (Neovastat): a novel multifunctional antiangiogenic compound.

    PubMed

    Gingras, D; Batist, G; Béliveau, R

    2001-10-01

    AE-941 (Neovastat) is a naturally occurring product extracted from cartilage and has antiangiogenic properties. It has reached Phase III clinical trial evaluation for the treatment of solid tumors (non-small cell lung cancer and renal cell carcinoma) and a pivotal Phase II clinical trial in multiple myeloma is ongoing. AE-941 inhibits several steps of the angiogenesis process, including matrix metalloproteinase activities and VEGF signaling pathways. Moreover, AE-941 induces endothelial cell apoptosis and tissue-type plasminogen activator activity, thus suggesting that it is a multifunctional antiangiogenic drug. Results from Phase I/II clinical trials indicate that AE-941, given orally, is well tolerated. Moreover, the median survival time in patients with renal cell carcinoma and non-small cell lung cancer was significantly longer in patients receiving high doses of AE-941 compared to low doses.

  1. Generation of optimum pseudorandom signals for respiratory impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Daróczy, B; Hantos, Z

    1990-02-01

    Spontaneous breathing may impair the reliability of forced oscillatory impedance estimates at low frequencies, especially when the oscillatory power is distributed among many frequency values. Since the amplitude of the external forcing is limited to avoid non-linearities, it is suggested that the total energy of a composite electrical signal driving the loudspeaker be maximized at a given amplitude by finding the optimum phase relationships of the signal components, and that the low-frequency components increase in energy at the expense of the less disturbed high-frequency region. In healthy children and adults and in obstructed patients, the coherences and the coefficients of variation of the respiratory system impedance (Zrs) at 2 and 3 Hz were studied in the case of three test signals of 2-15 Hz bandwidth. Signals T1 and T2 had a flat power spectrum, whereas the components of T3 decreased sharply between 2 and 5 Hz; T1 was generated by simple random selection of phase angles, while optimization for maximum energy was done for T2 and T3. Optimization alone (T2) increased the reliability of the Zrs estimates at all frequencies, whereas enhancement of the low-frequency power (T3) resulted in a radical improvement of the estimates at 2 and 3 Hz, without loss in reliability at higher frequencies.

  2. Generation and processing of peripheral temperature signals in mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierau, Fr.-K.; Wurster, R. D.; Neya, T.; Yamasato, T.; Ulrich, J.

    1980-09-01

    Temperature transduction in peripheral cold receptors and processing of peripheral temperature signals in the spinal cord were studied in cats and rats. The temperature dependence of the generator potential is attributed to different temperature coefficients of an electrogenic Na-efflux and the passive Na-influx. Cold receptor activity and particularly its bursting pattern is considerably modulated by the local Ca-concentration, but the effect of elevated Ca-concentration is abolished by the ATPase blocker ouabain. — The peripheral temperature signals from the scrotal skin of rats are transformed in dorsal horn neurones (DHN) into temperature reactions, which occur only above (warm reaction) or below (cold reaction) a certain temperature threshold and are limited to an operational range of 1 4°C. Convergency of different temperature inputs were observed in one and the same DHN. Supraspinal control of temperature reactive DHN appears to be complex but predominantly excitatory.

  3. A test vector generator for a radar signal processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, C. B.

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the test vector generator (TVG) system developed for the purpose of testing a radar signal processor. This system simulates an eight channel radar receiver by providing input data for testing the signal processor test bed. The TVG system outputs 128-bit wide data samples at variable rates up to and including 10 million samples per second. The VTG memory array is one million samples deep. Variably sized output vectors can be addressed within the memory array and the vectors can be concatenated, repeated, and reshuffled in real time under the control of a single board computer. The TVG is seen having applications on a variety of programs. Discussions of adapting and scaling the system to these other applications are presented.

  4. Multistability, chaos, and random signal generation in semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Lei; Huang, Danhong; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Historically, semiconductor superlattices, artificial periodic structures of different semiconductor materials, were invented with the purpose of engineering or manipulating the electronic properties of semiconductor devices. A key application lies in generating radiation sources, amplifiers, and detectors in the "unusual" spectral range of subterahertz and terahertz (0.1-10 THz), which cannot be readily realized using conventional radiation sources, the so-called THz gap. Efforts in the past three decades have demonstrated various nonlinear dynamical behaviors including chaos, suggesting the potential to exploit chaos in semiconductor superlattices as random signal sources (e.g., random number generators) in the THz frequency range. We consider a realistic model of hot electrons in semiconductor superlattice, taking into account the induced space charge field. Through a systematic exploration of the phase space we find that, when the system is subject to an external electrical driving of a single frequency, chaos is typically associated with the occurrence of multistability. That is, for a given parameter setting, while there are initial conditions that lead to chaotic trajectories, simultaneously there are other initial conditions that lead to regular motions. Transition to multistability, i.e., the emergence of multistability with chaos as a system parameter passes through a critical point, is found and argued to be abrupt. Multistability thus presents an obstacle to utilizing the superlattice system as a reliable and robust random signal source. However, we demonstrate that, when an additional driving field of incommensurate frequency is applied, multistability can be eliminated, with chaos representing the only possible asymptotic behavior of the system. In such a case, a random initial condition will lead to a trajectory landing in a chaotic attractor with probability 1, making quasiperiodically driven semiconductor superlattices potentially as a reliable

  5. Multistability, chaos, and random signal generation in semiconductor superlattices.

    PubMed

    Ying, Lei; Huang, Danhong; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Historically, semiconductor superlattices, artificial periodic structures of different semiconductor materials, were invented with the purpose of engineering or manipulating the electronic properties of semiconductor devices. A key application lies in generating radiation sources, amplifiers, and detectors in the "unusual" spectral range of subterahertz and terahertz (0.1-10 THz), which cannot be readily realized using conventional radiation sources, the so-called THz gap. Efforts in the past three decades have demonstrated various nonlinear dynamical behaviors including chaos, suggesting the potential to exploit chaos in semiconductor superlattices as random signal sources (e.g., random number generators) in the THz frequency range. We consider a realistic model of hot electrons in semiconductor superlattice, taking into account the induced space charge field. Through a systematic exploration of the phase space we find that, when the system is subject to an external electrical driving of a single frequency, chaos is typically associated with the occurrence of multistability. That is, for a given parameter setting, while there are initial conditions that lead to chaotic trajectories, simultaneously there are other initial conditions that lead to regular motions. Transition to multistability, i.e., the emergence of multistability with chaos as a system parameter passes through a critical point, is found and argued to be abrupt. Multistability thus presents an obstacle to utilizing the superlattice system as a reliable and robust random signal source. However, we demonstrate that, when an additional driving field of incommensurate frequency is applied, multistability can be eliminated, with chaos representing the only possible asymptotic behavior of the system. In such a case, a random initial condition will lead to a trajectory landing in a chaotic attractor with probability 1, making quasiperiodically driven semiconductor superlattices potentially as a reliable

  6. Characterization of granular flows from the generated seismic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farin, Maxime; Mangeney, Anne; Toussaint, Renaud; De Rosny, Julien; Trinh, Phuong-Thu

    2016-04-01

    Landslides, rock avalanche and debris flows represent a major natural hazard in steep landscapes. Recent studies showed that the seismic signal generated by these events can provide quantitative information on their location and amplitude. However, owing to the lack of visual observations, the dynamics of gravitational events is still not well understood. A burning challenge is to establish relations between the characteristics of the landslide (volume, speed, runout distance,...) and that of the emitted seismic signal (maximum amplitude, seismic energy, frequencies,...). We present here laboratory experiments of granular columns collapse on an inclined plane. The seismic signal generated by the collapse is recorded by piezoelectric accelerometers sensitive in a wide frequency range (1 Hz - 56 kHz). The granular column is made of steel beads of the same diameter, between 1 mm and 3 mm that are initially contained in a cylinder. The column collapses when the cylinder is removed. A layer of steel beads is glued on the surface of the plane to provide basal roughness. For horizontal granular flows, we show that it is possible to distinguish the phases of acceleration and deceleration of the flow in the emitted seismic signal. Indeed, the signal envelope is symmetrical with respect to its maximum, separating the acceleration from the deceleration. When the slope angle increases, we observe that the signal envelope looses its symmetry: it stays unchanged during the acceleration but it is significantly extended during the deceleration. In addition, we propose a semi-empirical scaling law to describe the increase of the elastic energy radiated by a granular flow when the slope angle increases. The fit of this law with the seismic data allows us to retrieve the friction angle of the granular material, which is a crucial rheological parameter. Finally, we show that the ratio of the radiated elastic energy over the potential energy lost of granular flows, i.e. their seismic

  7. Modeling Guidelines for Code Generation in the Railway Signaling Context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, Alessio; Bacherini, Stefano; Fantechi, Alessandro; Zingoni, Niccolo

    2009-01-01

    Modeling guidelines constitute one of the fundamental cornerstones for Model Based Development. Their relevance is essential when dealing with code generation in the safety-critical domain. This article presents the experience of a railway signaling systems manufacturer on this issue. Introduction of Model-Based Development (MBD) and code generation in the industrial safety-critical sector created a crucial paradigm shift in the development process of dependable systems. While traditional software development focuses on the code, with MBD practices the focus shifts to model abstractions. The change has fundamental implications for safety-critical systems, which still need to guarantee a high degree of confidence also at code level. Usage of the Simulink/Stateflow platform for modeling, which is a de facto standard in control software development, does not ensure by itself production of high-quality dependable code. This issue has been addressed by companies through the definition of modeling rules imposing restrictions on the usage of design tools components, in order to enable production of qualified code. The MAAB Control Algorithm Modeling Guidelines (MathWorks Automotive Advisory Board)[3] is a well established set of publicly available rules for modeling with Simulink/Stateflow. This set of recommendations has been developed by a group of OEMs and suppliers of the automotive sector with the objective of enforcing and easing the usage of the MathWorks tools within the automotive industry. The guidelines have been published in 2001 and afterwords revisited in 2007 in order to integrate some additional rules developed by the Japanese division of MAAB [5]. The scope of the current edition of the guidelines ranges from model maintainability and readability to code generation issues. The rules are conceived as a reference baseline and therefore they need to be tailored to comply with the characteristics of each industrial context. Customization of these

  8. Characterization of Aes nuclear foci in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Itatani, Yoshiro; Sonoshita, Masahiro; Kakizaki, Fumihiko; Okawa, Katsuya; Stifani, Stefano; Itoh, Hideaki; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Taketo, M. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Amino-terminal enhancer of split (Aes) is a member of Groucho/Transducin-like enhancer (TLE) family. Aes is a recently found metastasis suppressor of colorectal cancer (CRC) that inhibits Notch signalling, and forms nuclear foci together with TLE1. Although some Notch-associated proteins are known to form subnuclear bodies, little is known regarding the dynamics or functions of these structures. Here, we show that Aes nuclear foci in CRC observed under an electron microscope are in a rather amorphous structure, lacking surrounding membrane. Investigation of their behaviour during the cell cycle by time-lapse cinematography showed that Aes nuclear foci dissolve during mitosis and reassemble after completion of cytokinesis. We have also found that heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70) is an essential component of Aes foci. Pharmacological inhibition of the HSC70 ATPase activity with VER155008 reduces Aes focus formation. These results provide insight into the understanding of Aes-mediated inhibition of Notch signalling. PMID:26229111

  9. Electroreception in Gymnotus carapo: differences between self-generated and conspecific-generated signal carriers.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, P A; Castelló, M E; Caputi, A A

    2001-01-01

    Local electric fields generated by the electric organ discharge of Gymnotus carapo were explored at selected points on the skin of an emitter fish ('local self-generated fields') and on the skin of a conspecific ('local conspecific-generated fields') using a specially designed probe. Local self-generated fields showed a constant pattern along the body of the fish. At the head, these fields were collimated, much stronger than elsewhere on the fish, and had a time waveform that was site-independent. This waveform consisted of a slow head-negative wave followed by a faster head-positive wave. In contrast, time waveforms in the trunk and tail regions were site-specific, with field vectors that changed direction over time. Local conspecific-generated fields were similar to the head-to-tail field, but their spatio-temporal pattern at the skin depended on the relative orientation between the receiving fish and the emitting fish. Because self-generated fields had a slow early component at the head region, they displayed a low-frequency peak in their power spectral density histograms. In contrast, the conspecific-generated fields had time waveforms with a sharper phase reversal, resulting in a peak at higher frequency than in the self-generated field. Lesions in emitting fish demonstrated that waveform components generated by the trunk and tail regions of the electric organ predominate in conspecific-generated fields, whereas waveform components generated by the abdominal region prevail in self-generated fields. Similar results were obtained from Brachyhypopomus pinnicaudatus. These results suggest that, in pulse-emitting gymnotids, electrolocation and electrocommunication signals may be carried by different field components generated by different regions of the electric organ.

  10. Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator (MITG) Design and Development, Part A-E. Original was presented at 1983 Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference (IECEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, A.

    1983-04-29

    Advanced RTG concepts utilizing improved thermoelectric materials and converter concepts are under study at Fairchild for DOE. The design described here is based on DOE's newly developed radioisotope heat source, and on an improved silicon-germanium material and a multicouple converter module under development at Syncal. Fairchild's assignment was to combine the above into an attractive power system for use in space, and to assess the specific power and other attributes of that design. The resultant design is highly modular, consisting of standard RTG slices, each producing 24 watts at the desired output voltage of 28 volt. Thus, the design could be adapted to various space missions over a wide range of power levels, with little or no redesign. Each RTG slice consists of a 250-watt heat source module, eight multicouple thermoelectric modules, and standard sections of insulator, housing, radiator fins, and electrical circuit. The design makes it possible to check each thermoelectric module for electrical performance, thermal contact, leaktightness, and performance stability, after the generator is fully assembled; and to replace any deficient modules without disassembling the generator or perturbing the others. The RTG end sections provide the spring-loaded supports required to hold the free-standing heat source stack together during launch vibration. Detailed analysis indicates that the present generation of RTGs, using the same heat source modules. There is a duplicate copy of this document. OSTI has a copy of this paper.

  11. Acoustic emission (AE) health monitoring of diaphragm type couplings using neural network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez-Azcuaga, Valery F.; Shu, Fong; Finlayson, Richard D.; O'Donnell, Bruce

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the latest results obtained from Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring and detection of cracks and/or damage in diaphragm couplings, which are used in some aircraft and engine drive systems. Early detection of mechanical failure in aircraft drive train components is a key safety and economical issue with both military and civil sectors of aviation. One of these components is the diaphragm-type coupling, which has been evaluated as the ideal drive coupling for many application requirements such as high speed, high torque, and non-lubrication. Its flexible axial and angular displacement capabilities have made it indispensable for aircraft drive systems. However, diaphragm-type couplings may develop cracks during their operation. The ability to monitor, detect, identify, and isolate coupling cracks on an operational aircraft system is required in order to provide sufficient advance warning to preclude catastrophic failure. It is known that metallic structures generate characteristic Acoustic Emission (AE) during crack growth/propagation cycles. This phenomenon makes AE very attractive among various monitoring techniques for fault detection in diaphragm-type couplings. However, commercially available systems capable of automatic discrimination between signals from crack growth and normal mechanical noise are not readily available. Positive classification of signals requires experienced personnel and post-test data analysis, which tend to be a time-consuming, laborious, and expensive process. With further development of automated classifiers, AE can become a fully autonomous fault detection technique requiring no human intervention after implementation. AE has the potential to be fully integrated with automated query and response mechanisms for system/process monitoring and control.

  12. Photonic generation of high order uniform QAM signals based on IQ modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    A pre-distortion algorithm of generating driving signals was proposed for high-order QAM modulation based on IQ modulator. IQ modulator working in the nonlinear area and driving by non-uniform signals was employed. The pre-distorted driving signal requires lower signal-to-noise ratio than the common uniform driving signal in QAM modulation.

  13. Modulation of Radio Frequency Signals by Nonlinearly Generated Acoustic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Spencer Joseph

    Acousto-electromagnetic scattering is a process in which an acoustic excitation is utilized to induce modulation on an electromagnetic (EM) wave. This phenomenon can be exploited in remote sensing and detection schemes whereby target objects are mechanically excited by high powered acoustic waves resulting in unique object characterizations when interrogated with EM signals. Implementation of acousto-EM sensing schemes, however, are limited by a lack of fundamental understanding of the nonlinear interaction between acoustic and EM waves and inefficient simulation methods in the determination of the radiation patterns of higher order scattered acoustic fields. To address the insufficient simulation issue, a computationally efficient mathematical model describing higher order scattered sound fields, particularly of third-order in which a 40x increase in computation speed is achieved, is derived using a multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) expansion that expresses the sound field of any arbitrary axially symmetric beam as a series of Gaussian base functions. The third-order intermodulation (IM3) frequency components are produced by considering the cascaded nonlinear second-order effects when analyzing the interaction between the first- and second-order frequency components during the nonlinear scattering of sound by sound from two noncollinear ultrasonic baffled piston sources. The theory is extended to the modeling of the sound beams generated by parametric transducer arrays, showing that the MGB model can be efficiently used to calculate both the second- and third-order sound fields of the array. Additionally, a near-to-far-field (NTFF) transformation method is developed to model the far-field characteristics of scattered sound fields, extending Kirchhoff's theorem, typically applied to EM waves, determining the far-field patterns of an acoustic source from amplitude and phase measurements made in the near-field by including the higher order sound fields generated by the

  14. (abstract) Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard

    1994-01-01

    AES is a low-cost analog of the TES downlooking modes. Because AES operates at ambient temperature, limb-viewing is not possible. The first flight of AES took place in April 1994 on the NASA P3B aircraft out of Wallops Island, VA. While planned as an engineering test flight, spectra were successfully acquired both over the Atlantic Ocean and the area of the Great Dismal Swamp on the Virginia-North Carolina border. At this writing (July 1994), a second series of flights on the NASA DC8 aircraft out of Ames RC,CA is in progress. By the time of the workshop, a third series using the NASA C130 should have been accomplished.

  15. Generation of square or hexagonal 16-QAM signals using a dual-drive IQ modulator driven by binary signals.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuangyi; Weng, Xuan; Gao, Yuliang; Lu, Chao; Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Ji, Yu; Liu, Lei; Xu, Xiaogeng

    2012-12-17

    We propose a simple square or hexagonal 16-QAM signal generation technique using a commercially available dual-drive IQ modulator driven by four binary electrical signals with properly designed amplitudes. We analytically derive the required driving signal amplitudes for square and hexagonal 16-QAM and characterize its implementation penalty. Polarization-multiplexed (PM)-16-QAM signals at 28 Gbuad are experimentally demonstrated and stable performance is achieved with simple bias control.

  16. ROS Generation in Peroxisomes and its Role in Cell Signaling.

    PubMed

    Del Río, Luis A; López-Huertas, Eduardo

    2016-07-01

    In plant cells, as in most eukaryotic organisms, peroxisomes are probably the major sites of intracellular H2O2 production, as a result of their essentially oxidative type of metabolism. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that peroxisomes carry out essential functions in eukaryotic cells. The generation of the important messenger molecule hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by animal and plant peroxisomes and the presence of catalase in these organelles has been known for many years, but the generation of superoxide radicals (O2(·(-)) ) and the occurrence of the metalloenzyme superoxide dismutase was reported for the first time in peroxisomes from plant origin. Further research showed the presence in plant peroxisomes of a complex battery of antioxidant systems apart from catalase. The evidence available of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in peroxisomes is presented, and the different antioxidant systems characterized in these organelles and their possible functions are described. Peroxisomes appear to have a ROS-mediated role in abiotic stress situations induced by the heavy metal cadmium (Cd) and the xenobiotic 2,4-D, and also in the oxidative reactions of leaf senescence. The toxicity of Cd and 2,4-D has an effect on the ROS metabolism and speed of movement (dynamics) of peroxisomes. The regulation of ROS production in peroxisomes can take place by post-translational modifications of those proteins involved in their production and/or scavenging. In recent years, different studies have been carried out on the proteome of ROS metabolism in peroxisomes. Diverse evidence obtained indicates that peroxisomes are an important cellular source of different signaling molecules, including ROS, involved in distinct processes of high physiological importance, and might play an important role in the maintenance of cellular redox homeostasis.

  17. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy Clay (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  18. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy C. (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  19. Action in the axon: generation and transport of signaling endosomes.

    PubMed

    Cosker, Katharina E; Courchesne, Stephanie L; Segal, Rosalind A

    2008-06-01

    Neurons extend axonal processes over long distances, necessitating efficient transport mechanisms to convey target-derived neurotrophic survival signals from remote distal axons to cell bodies. Retrograde transport, powered by dynein motors, supplies cell bodies with survival signals in the form of 'signaling endosomes'. In this review, we will discuss new advances in our understanding of the motor proteins that bind to and move signaling components in a retrograde direction and discuss mechanisms that might specify distinct neuronal responses to spatially restricted neurotrophin signals. Disruption of retrograde transport leads to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, highlighting the role of retrograde transport of signaling endosomes for axonal maintenance and the importance of efficient transport for neuronal survival and function.

  20. Generation, modulation and reception of orthogonally polarized signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The radiating electromagnetic field of a dipole antenna is considered. By allowing the dipole to rotate about its midpoint, one can construct an entire set of signal polarizations wherein distinct members of the set are mutually orthogonal. It is shown how these signals can be modulated and demodulated to convey information. These ideas are then generalized, and both balanced, as well as unbalanced quadrapole modulations are defined. Methods of receiver synchronization to such signals are described, as well as their potential application to multiple access and anti-jam communications.

  1. A Low-Power Low-Noise Clock Signal Generator for Next-Generation Mobile Wireless Terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai, Akihide; Kurose, Daisuke; Yamaji, Takafumi; Itakura, Tetsuro

    Sampling clock jitter degrades the dynamic range of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). In this letter, a low-power low-noise clock signal generator for ADCs is described. As a clock signal generator, a ring-VCO-based charge pump PLL is used to reduce power dissipation within a given jitter specification. The clock signal generator is fabricated on a CMOS chip with 200-MSPS 10-bit ADC. The measured results show that the ADC keeps a 60-MHz input bandwidth and 53-dB dynamic range and a next-generation mobile wireless terminal can be realized with the ADCs and the on-chip low-power clock generator.

  2. Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

  3. Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-06-08

    An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

  4. A high voltage power supply for the AE-C and D low energy electron experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of the electrical and mechanical design and operation of high voltage power supplies for space flight use. The supply was used to generate the spiraltron high voltage for low energy electron experiment on AE-C and D. Two versions of the supply were designed and built; one design is referred to as the low power version (AE-C) and the other as the high power version (AE-D). Performance is discussed under all operating conditions.

  5. Vector radio-frequency optical signal generation based on one directly modulated laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanyi; Xiao, Jiangnan; Chi, Nan; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-10-01

    We proposed single-sideband (SSB) quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) vector radio-frequency optical signal generation enabled by a single directly modulated laser without precoding technology, which can reduce the system cost and tolerate fiber dispersion. Based on our proposed scheme, we experimentally demonstrated 8-Gbaud SSB QPSK signals generation at 10 GHz, and the generated signals are transmitted over 50-km single-mode fiber without power penalty. Our experimental results show that an equal power SSB signal can tolerate fiber dispersion and have the highest receiver sensitivity.

  6. Photonic generation and independent steering of multiple RF signals for software defined radars.

    PubMed

    Ghelfi, Paolo; Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Serafino, Giovanni; Pinna, Sergio; Bogoni, Antonella

    2013-09-23

    As the improvement of radar systems claims for digital approaches, photonics is becoming a solution for software defined high frequency and high stability signal generation. We report on our recent activities on the photonic generation of flexible wideband RF signals, extending the proposed architecture to the independent optical beamforming of multiple signals. The scheme has been tested generating two wideband signals at 10 GHz and 40 GHz, and controlling their independent delays at two antenna elements. Thanks to the multiple functionalities, the proposed scheme allows to improve the effectiveness of the photonic approach, reducing its cost and allowing flexibility, extremely wide bandwidth, and high stability.

  7. Punch stretching process monitoring using acoustic emission signal analysis. II - Application of frequency domain deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Steven Y.; Dornfeld, David A.; Nickerson, Jackson A.

    1987-01-01

    The coloring effect on the acoustic emission signal due to the frequency response of the data acquisition/processing instrumentation may bias the interpretation of AE signal characteristics. In this paper, a frequency domain deconvolution technique, which involves the identification of the instrumentation transfer functions and multiplication of the AE signal spectrum by the inverse of these system functions, has been carried out. In this way, the change in AE signal characteristics can be better interpreted as the result of the change in only the states of the process. Punch stretching process was used as an example to demonstrate the application of the technique. Results showed that, through the deconvolution, the frequency characteristics of AE signals generated during the stretching became more distinctive and can be more effectively used as tools for process monitoring.

  8. AE mapping of engines for spatially located time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nivesrangsan, P.; Steel, J. A.; Reuben, R. L.

    2005-09-01

    This paper represents the first step towards using multiple acoustic emission (AE) sensors to produce spatially located time series signals for a running engine. By this it is meant the decomposition of a multi-source signal by acquiring it with an array of sensors and using source location to reconstitute the individual time series attributable to some or all of these signals. Internal combustion engines are a group of monitoring targets which would benefit from such an approach. A series of experiments has been carried out where AE from a standard source has been mapped for a large number of source-sensor pairs on a small diesel engine and on various cast iron blocks of simple geometry. The wave propagation on a typical diesel engine cylinder head or block is complex because of the heterogeneity of the cast iron and the complex geometry with variations in wall-thickness, boundaries and discontinuities. The AE signal distortion for a range of source-sensor pairs has been estimated using time-frequency analysis, and using a reference sensor placed close to the source. At this stage, the emphasis has been on determining a suitable processing scheme to recover a measure of the signal energy, which depends only on the distance of the source and not upon the path. Tentative recommendations are made on a suitable approach to sensor positioning and signal processing with reference to a limited set of data acquired from the running engine.

  9. On the multifractal effects generated by monofractal signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grech, Dariusz; Pamuła, Grzegorz

    2013-12-01

    We study quantitatively the level of false multifractal signal one may encounter while analyzing multifractal phenomena in time series within multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). The investigated effect appears as a result of finite length of used data series and is additionally amplified by the long-term memory the data eventually may contain. We provide the detailed quantitative description of such apparent multifractal background signal as a threshold in spread of generalized Hurst exponent values Δh or a threshold in the width of multifractal spectrum Δα below which multifractal properties of the system are only apparent, i.e. do not exist, despite Δα≠0 or Δh≠0. We find this effect quite important for shorter or persistent series and we argue it is linear with respect to autocorrelation exponent γ. Its strength decays according to power law with respect to the length of time series. The influence of basic linear and nonlinear transformations applied to initial data in finite time series with various levels of long memory is also investigated. This provides additional set of semi-analytical results. The obtained formulas are significant in any interdisciplinary application of multifractality, including physics, financial data analysis or physiology, because they allow to separate the ‘true’ multifractal phenomena from the apparent (artificial) multifractal effects. They should be a helpful tool of the first choice to decide whether we do in particular case with the signal with real multiscaling properties or not.

  10. Dynamic modes of microwave signal autogeneration in a radio photonic ring generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashov, A. V.; Ustinov, A. B.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic modes of microwave signal autogeneration in a radio photonic generator have been investigated. The generator is a ring circuit with a low-pass filter and microwave amplifier in its microwave path. The optical path contains an optical fiber delay line. The generator demonstrates the periodical, chaotic, and noise dynamics. It has been shown that the correlation dimensionality of the random signal attractor in the chaotic generation mode saturates with increasing phase space dimensionality. Saturation is not observed in the noise-generation mode.

  11. NLA-QAM - A method for generating high-power QAM signals through nonlinear amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, D. H.; Feher, K.

    1982-03-01

    A generalized technique for generating quadrature amplitude modulated (QAM) signals that permits nonlinear amplification is presented. With this technique a high-power (2 to the 2n power)-state QAM signal is generated by combining n unfiltered, nonlinear amplified, QPSK signals, n being a positive integer. The specific methods of generating 16- and 64-state signals using this technique are presented. An attractive feature of the technique is that despite significant difference with the conventional method of generating QAM signals, the same straightforward demodulation techniques apply to both, and the Pe versus S/N performances are essentially identical. In the 16-state version employing traveling wave tubes (TWT's) or GaAs FET amplifiers, the technique is shown to result in a transmitter output power advantage that is on the order of 5 dB compared to the conventional method. This advantage is achieved, however, at the expense of an additional output power amplifier.

  12. How metabolism generates signals during innate immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    McGettrick, Anne F; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2013-08-09

    The interplay between immunity, inflammation, and metabolic changes is a growing field of research. Toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors are families of innate immune receptors, and their role in the human immune response is well documented. Exciting new evidence is emerging with regard to their role in the regulation of metabolism and the activation of inflammatory pathways during the progression of metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. The proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β appears to play a central role in these disorders. There is also evidence that metabolites such as NAD(+) (acting via deacetylases such as SIRT1 and SIRT2) and succinate (which regulates hypoxia-inducible factor 1α) are signals that regulate innate immunity. In addition, the extracellular overproduction of metabolites such as uric acid and cholesterol crystals acts as a signal sensed by NLRP3, leading to the production of IL-1β. These observations cast new light on the role of metabolism during host defense and inflammation.

  13. Modulation of Radio Frequency Signals by Nonlinearly Generated Acoustic Fields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Kirchhoff’s theorem, typically applied to EM waves, determining the far-field patterns of an acoustic source from amplitude and phase measurements made in...two noncollinear ultrasonic baffled piston sources. The theory is extended to the modeling of the sound beams generated by parametric transducer arrays ...typically applied to EM waves, determining the far-field patterns of an acoustic source from amplitude and phase measurements made in the near-field by

  14. Brushless DC motor control system responsive to control signals generated by a computer or the like

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, D. T.

    1985-04-01

    A control system for a brushless DC motor responsive to digital control signals is disclosed. The motor includes a multiphase wound stator and a permanent magnet rotor. The motor is arranged so that each phase winding, when energized from a DC source, will drive the rotor through a predetermined angular position or step. A commutation signal generator responsive to the shaft position provides a commutation signal for each winding. A programmable control signal generator such as a computer or microprocessor produces individual digital control signals for each phase winding. The control signals and commutation signals associated with each winding are applied to an AND gate for that phase winding. Each gate controls a switch connected in series with the associated phase winding and the DC source so that each phase winding is energized only when the commutation signal and the control signal associated with that phase winding are present. The motor shaft may be advanced one step at a time to a desired position by applying a predetermined number of control signals in the proper sequence to the AND gates and the torque generated by the motor be regulated by applying a separate control signal and each AND gate which is pulse width modulated to control the total time that each switch connects its associated winding to the DC source during each commutation period.

  15. Brushless DC motor control system responsive to control signals generated by a computer or the like

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D. T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A control system for a brushless DC motor responsive to digital control signals is disclosed. The motor includes a multiphase wound stator and a permanent magnet rotor. The motor is arranged so that each phase winding, when energized from a DC source, will drive the rotor through a predetermined angular position or step. A commutation signal generator responsive to the shaft position provides a commutation signal for each winding. A programmable control signal generator such as a computer or microprocessor produces individual digital control signals for each phase winding. The control signals and commutation signals associated with each winding are applied to an AND gate for that phase winding. Each gate controls a switch connected in series with the associated phase winding and the DC source so that each phase winding is energized only when the commutation signal and the control signal associated with that phase winding are present. The motor shaft may be advanced one step at a time to a desired position by applying a predetermined number of control signals in the proper sequence to the AND gates and the torque generated by the motor be regulated by applying a separate control signal and each AND gate which is pulse width modulated to control the total time that each switch connects its associated winding to the DC source during each commutation period.

  16. Brushless DC motor control system responsive to control signals generated by a computer or the like

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Douglas T. (Inventor); Schmitt, Donald E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A control system for a brushless DC motor responsive to digital control signals is disclosed. The motor includes a multiphase wound stator and a permanent magnet rotor. The rotor is arranged so that each phase winding, when energized from a DC source, will drive the rotor through a predetermined angular position or step. A commutation signal generator responsive to the shaft position provides a commutation signal for each winding. A programmable control signal generator such as a computer or microprocessor produces individual digital control signals for each phase winding. The control signals and commutation signals associated with each winding are applied to an AND gate for that phase winding. Each gate controls a switch connected in series with the associated phase winding and the DC source so that each phase winding is energized only when the commutation signal and the control signal associated with that phase winding are present. The motor shaft may be advanced one step at a time to a desired position by applying a predetermined number of control signals in the proper sequence to the AND gates and the torque generated by the motor may be regulated by applying a separate control signal to each AND gate which is pulse width modulated to control the total time that each switch connects its associated winding to the DC source during each commutation period.

  17. Design and implementation of the NaI(Tl)/CsI(Na) detectors output signal generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xu; Liu, Cong-Zhan; Zhao, Jian-Ling; Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Yi-Fei; Li, Zheng-Wei; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Xu-Fang; Lu, Xue-Feng; Xu, Zhen-Ling; Lu, Fang-Jun

    2014-02-01

    We designed and implemented a signal generator that can simulate the output of the NaI(Tl)/CsI(Na) detectors' pre-amplifier onboard the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT). Using the development of the FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) with VHDL language and adding a random constituent, we have finally produced the double exponential random pulse signal generator. The statistical distribution of the signal amplitude is programmable. The occurrence time intervals of the adjacent signals contain negative exponential distribution statistically.

  18. Ultrawideband monocycle pulse generation based on polarization modulator and low speed electrical NRZ signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guodan; Zhang, Qiufang; Wang, Quan

    2015-07-01

    A novel ultrawideband (UWB) monocycle pulse generation system by modulating a polarization modulator (PolM) with a low speed electrical nonreturn-to-zero (NRZ) signal is proposed, which significantly reduce the bandwidth requirement of the driving signal. At each bit transition of the input NRZ signal, two polarity-reversed Gaussian pulses are generated. By properly setting the delay between these two Gaussian pulses, an optical UWB monocycle pulse can be generated. Biphase modulation (BPM) can be realized by electrically switching the polarization direction at the output of PolM, if an electrically tunable arbitrary wave plate (AWP) is employed.

  19. Next generation of network medicine: interdisciplinary signaling approaches.

    PubMed

    Korcsmaros, Tamas; Schneider, Maria Victoria; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2017-02-20

    In the last decade, network approaches have transformed our understanding of biological systems. Network analyses and visualizations have allowed us to identify essential molecules and modules in biological systems, and improved our understanding of how changes in cellular processes can lead to complex diseases, such as cancer, infectious and neurodegenerative diseases. "Network medicine" involves unbiased large-scale network-based analyses of diverse data describing interactions between genes, diseases, phenotypes, drug targets, drug transport, drug side-effects, disease trajectories and more. In terms of drug discovery, network medicine exploits our understanding of the network connectivity and signaling system dynamics to help identify optimal, often novel, drug targets. Contrary to initial expectations, however, network approaches have not yet delivered a revolution in molecular medicine. In this review, we propose that a key reason for the limited impact, so far, of network medicine is a lack of quantitative multi-disciplinary studies involving scientists from different backgrounds. To support this argument, we present existing approaches from structural biology, 'omics' technologies (e.g., genomics, proteomics, lipidomics) and computational modeling that point towards how multi-disciplinary efforts allow for important new insights. We also highlight some breakthrough studies as examples of the potential of these approaches, and suggest ways to make greater use of the power of interdisciplinarity. This review reflects discussions held at an interdisciplinary signaling workshop which facilitated knowledge exchange from experts from several different fields, including in silico modelers, computational biologists, biochemists, geneticists, molecular and cell biologists as well as cancer biologists and pharmacologists.

  20. Infrared observations of AE Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzi, E. G.; Chincarini, G.; Tarenghi, M.

    1981-01-01

    Broadband infrared observations of the cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii are reported. The observations were obtained in the J, H, K and L filters with the InSb photometer attached to the 1-m telescope of the European Southern Observatory. The infrared energy distribution observed from 0.35 to 3.5 microns for phase 0.5 suggests a spectral type of K5 V for the secondary and a distance to the system of approximately 70 pc if an absolute magnitude of 7.3 is assumed. Monitoring of the flux at 2.2 microns reveals a variability with an amplitude of approximately 0.3 magnitude over one third of the orbital period, the nature of which is under investigation.

  1. Digital test signal generation: An accurate SNR calibration approach for the DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Luaces, B. O.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of generating analog test signals with accurate signal to noise ratios (SNRs) is described. High accuracy will be obtained by simultaneous generation of digital noise and signal spectra at a given baseband or bandpass limited bandwidth. The digital synthesis will provide a test signal embedded in noise with the statistical properties of a stationary random process. Accuracy will only be dependent on test integration time with a limit imposed by the system quantization noise (expected to be 0.02 dB). Setability will be approximately 0.1 dB. The first digital SNR generator to provide baseband test signals is being built and will be available in early 1991.

  2. Generating clock signals for a cycle accurate, cycle reproducible FPGA based hardware accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Asaad, Sameth W.; Kapur, Mohit

    2016-01-05

    A method, system and computer program product are disclosed for generating clock signals for a cycle accurate FPGA based hardware accelerator used to simulate operations of a device-under-test (DUT). In one embodiment, the DUT includes multiple device clocks generating multiple device clock signals at multiple frequencies and at a defined frequency ratio; and the FPG hardware accelerator includes multiple accelerator clocks generating multiple accelerator clock signals to operate the FPGA hardware accelerator to simulate the operations of the DUT. In one embodiment, operations of the DUT are mapped to the FPGA hardware accelerator, and the accelerator clock signals are generated at multiple frequencies and at the defined frequency ratio of the frequencies of the multiple device clocks, to maintain cycle accuracy between the DUT and the FPGA hardware accelerator. In an embodiment, the FPGA hardware accelerator may be used to control the frequencies of the multiple device clocks.

  3. Compliant tactile sensor for generating a signal related to an applied force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Jara, Eduardo (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Tactile sensor. The sensor includes a compliant convex surface disposed above a sensor array, the sensor array adapted to respond to deformation of the convex surface to generate a signal related to an applied force vector.

  4. Photonics aided ultra-wideband W-band signal generation and air space transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinying; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-02-01

    We achieve several field trial demonstrations of ultra-wideband W-band millimeter-wave (mm-wave) signal generation and its long-distance air space transmission based on some enabling technologies and advanced devices. First, we demonstrated photonics generation and up to 1.7-km wireless delivery of 20-Gb/s polarization division multiplexing quadrature phase shift keying (PDM-QPSK) signal at W-band, adopting both optical and antenna polarization multiplexing. Then, we demonstrated photonics generation and up to 300-m wireless delivery of 80-Gb/s PDM-QPSK signal at W-band, adopting both optical and antenna polarization multiplexing as well as multi-band multiplexing. We also demonstrated photonics generation and up to 100-m wireless delivery of 100-Gb/s QPSK signal at W-band, adopting antenna polarization multiplexing.

  5. Micro-Structured Materials for Generation of Coherent Light and Optical Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-22

    within a laser linewidth of 1 GHz (matched to the doppler broadened bandwidth of the sodium layer) to provide enough return light to the wavefront...AND SUBTITLE Micro-Structured Materials for Generation of Coherent Light And Optical Signal Processing 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...2008 3. TITLE OF PROPOSAL: Micro-Structured Matenals for Generation of Coherent Light And Optical Signal Processing 4. LIST OF MANUSCRIPTS

  6. Engineering Synthetic Proteins to Generate Ca(2+) Signals in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Qudrat, Anam; Truong, Kevin

    2017-03-17

    The versatility of Ca(2+) signals allows it to regulate diverse cellular processes such as migration, apoptosis, motility and exocytosis. In some receptors (e.g., VEGFR2), Ca(2+) signals are generated upon binding their ligand(s) (e.g., VEGF-A). Here, we employed a design strategy to engineer proteins that generate a Ca(2+) signal upon binding various extracellular stimuli by creating fusions of protein domains that oligomerize to the transmembrane domain and the cytoplasmic tail of the VEGFR2. To test the strategy, we created chimeric proteins that generate Ca(2+) signals upon stimulation with various extracellular stimuli (e.g., rapamycin, EDTA or extracellular free Ca(2+)). By coupling these chimeric proteins that generate Ca(2+) signals with proteins that respond to Ca(2+) signals, we rewired, for example, dynamic cellular blebbing to increases in extracellular free Ca(2+). Thus, using this design strategy, it is possible to engineer proteins to generate a Ca(2+) signal to rewire a wide range of extracellular stimuli to a wide range of Ca(2+)-activated processes.

  7. Generation of Arbitrary Quadrature Signals Using One Dual-Drive Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Keang-Po; Cuei, Han-Wei

    2005-02-01

    Regardless of the number of constellation points, all quadrature-amplitude modulation (QAM) signals can be generated using a single dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator. When the general method is applied to quadrature-phase-shift-keying (QPSK) signals, three different QPSK transmitters are shown with drive signals having four, three, or two levels. The usage of only one dual-drive modulator greatly simplifies the design of QAM and QPSK transmitters.

  8. Chromosome isolation by flow sorting in Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and their allotetraploid hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata.

    PubMed

    Molnár, István; Kubaláková, Marie; Šimková, Hana; Cseh, András; Molnár-Láng, Márta; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential of flow cytometry for chromosome sorting in two wild diploid wheats Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and their natural allotetraploid hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata. Flow karyotypes obtained after the analysis of DAPI-stained chromosomes were characterized and content of chromosome peaks was determined. Peaks of chromosome 1U could be discriminated in flow karyotypes of Ae. umbellulata and Ae. biuncialis and the chromosome could be sorted with purities exceeding 95%. The remaining chromosomes formed composite peaks and could be sorted in groups of two to four. Twenty four wheat SSR markers were tested for their position on chromosomes of Ae. umbellulata and Ae. comosa using PCR on DNA amplified from flow-sorted chromosomes and genomic DNA of wheat-Ae. geniculata addition lines, respectively. Six SSR markers were located on particular Aegilops chromosomes using sorted chromosomes, thus confirming the usefulness of this approach for physical mapping. The SSR markers are suitable for marker assisted selection of wheat-Aegilops introgression lines. The results obtained in this work provide new opportunities for dissecting genomes of wild relatives of wheat with the aim to assist in alien gene transfer and discovery of novel genes for wheat improvement.

  9. Chromosome Isolation by Flow Sorting in Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and Their Allotetraploid Hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, István; Kubaláková, Marie; Šimková, Hana; Cseh, András; Molnár-Láng, Márta; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential of flow cytometry for chromosome sorting in two wild diploid wheats Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and their natural allotetraploid hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata. Flow karyotypes obtained after the analysis of DAPI-stained chromosomes were characterized and content of chromosome peaks was determined. Peaks of chromosome 1U could be discriminated in flow karyotypes of Ae. umbellulata and Ae. biuncialis and the chromosome could be sorted with purities exceeding 95%. The remaining chromosomes formed composite peaks and could be sorted in groups of two to four. Twenty four wheat SSR markers were tested for their position on chromosomes of Ae. umbellulata and Ae. comosa using PCR on DNA amplified from flow-sorted chromosomes and genomic DNA of wheat-Ae. geniculata addition lines, respectively. Six SSR markers were located on particular Aegilops chromosomes using sorted chromosomes, thus confirming the usefulness of this approach for physical mapping. The SSR markers are suitable for marker assisted selection of wheat-Aegilops introgression lines. The results obtained in this work provide new opportunities for dissecting genomes of wild relatives of wheat with the aim to assist in alien gene transfer and discovery of novel genes for wheat improvement. PMID:22132127

  10. Generation of optical OFDM signals using 21.4 GS/s real time digital signal processing.

    PubMed

    Benlachtar, Yannis; Watts, Philip M; Bouziane, Rachid; Milder, Peter; Rangaraj, Deepak; Cartolano, Anthony; Koutsoyannis, Robert; Hoe, James C; Püschel, Markus; Glick, Madeleine; Killey, Robert I

    2009-09-28

    We demonstrate a field programmable gate array (FPGA) based optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmitter implementing real time digital signal processing at a sample rate of 21.4 GS/s. The QPSK-OFDM signal is generated using an 8 bit, 128 point inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) core, performing one transform per clock cycle at a clock speed of 167.2 MHz and can be deployed with either a direct-detection or a coherent receiver. The hardware design and the main digital signal processing functions are described, and we show that the main performance limitation is due to the low (4-bit) resolution of the digital-to-analog converter (DAC) and the 8-bit resolution of the IFFT core used. We analyze the back-to-back performance of the transmitter generating an 8.36 Gb/s optical single sideband (SSB) OFDM signal using digital up-conversion, suitable for direct-detection. Additionally, we use the device to transmit 8.36 Gb/s SSB OFDM signals over 200 km of uncompensated standard single mode fiber achieving an overall BER<10(-3).

  11. AE8/AP8 Implementations in AE9/AP9, IRBEM, and SPENVIS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-18

    radiation belt model, SHIELDOSE, AE8/AP8 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...a wide range of locations within the radiation belts . The new AE9/AP9 model application includes the ability to query the legacy AE8 and AP8 models...trapped particle fluxes with the NASA models AP-8 and AE-8, Radiat . Meas., 26, pp. 947-952. International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy

  12. High Speed All Optical Nyquist Signal Generation and Full-band Coherent Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianjun; Fang, Yuan; Chi, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Spectrum efficient data transmission is of key interest for high capacity optical communication systems considering the limited available bandwidth. Transmission of the high speed signal with higher-order modulation formats within the Nyquist bandwidth using coherent detection brings attractive performance advantages. However, high speed Nyquist signal generation with high order modulation formats is challenging. Electrical Nyquist pulse generation is restricted by the limited sampling rate and processor capacities of digital-to-analog convertor devices, while the optical Nyquist signals can provide a much higher symbol rate using time domain multiplexing method. However, most optical Nyquist signals are based on direct detection with simple modulation formats. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of high speed all optical Nyquist signal generation based on Sinc-shaped pulse generation and time-division multiplexing with high level modulation format and full-band coherent detection. Our experiments demonstrate a highly flexible and compatible all optical high speed Nyquist signal generation and detection scheme for future fiber communication systems. PMID:25142269

  13. Genetic effect of the Aegilops caudata plasmon on the manifestation of the Ae. cylindrica genome.

    PubMed

    Tsunewaki, Koichiro; Mori, Naoki; Takumi, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    In the course of reconstructing Aegilops caudata from its own genome (CC) and its plasmon, which had passed half a century in common wheat (genome AABBDD), we produced alloplasmic Ae. cylindrica (genome CCDD) with the plasmon of Ae. caudata. This line, designated (caudata)-CCDD, was found to express male sterility in its second substitution backcross generation (SB2) of (caudata)-AABBCCDD pollinated three times with the Ae. cylindrica pollen. We repeatedly backcrossed these SB2 plants with the Ae. cylindrica pollen until the SB5 generation, and SB5F2 progeny were produced by self-pollination of the SB5 plants. Thirteen morphological and physiological characters, including pollen and seed fertilities, of the (caudata)-CCDD SB5F2 were compared with those of the euplasmic Ae. cylindrica. The results indicated that the male sterility expressed by (caudata)-CCDD was due to genetic incompatibility between the Ae. cylindrica genome and Ae. caudata plasmon that did not affect any other characters of Ae. cylindrica. Also, we report that the genome integrity functions in keeping the univalent transmission rate high.

  14. The AE-8 trapped electron model environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vette, James I.

    1991-01-01

    The machine sensible version of the AE-8 electron model environment was completed in December 1983. It has been sent to users on the model environment distribution list and is made available to new users by the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). AE-8 is the last in a series of terrestrial trapped radiation models that includes eight proton and eight electron versions. With the exception of AE-8, all these models were documented in formal reports as well as being available in a machine sensible form. The purpose of this report is to complete the documentation, finally, for AE-8 so that users can understand its construction and see the comparison of the model with the new data used, as well as with the AE-4 model.

  15. Laser ultrasonics - Generation and detection considerations for improved signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, James W.; Deaton, John B., Jr.; McKie, Andrew D. W.; Spicer, James B.

    It is shown that improvement in the detection sensitivity of laser-ultrasonic systems may be obtained by generating narrowband acoustic signals using both temporal and spatial modulation of the generating laser. A laser-generated acoustic tone burst waveform will have lower peak amplitudes than a single acoustic pulse providing the same system SNR. Consequently, lower power density laser pulses may be used to avoid surface damage.

  16. Laser ultrasonics: generation and detection considerations for improved signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, James W.; Deaton, John B., Jr.; McKie, Andrew D. W.; Spicer, James B.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that improvement in the detection sensitivity of laser-ultrasonic systems may be obtained by generating narrowband acoustic signals using both temporal and spatial modulation of the generating laser. A laser-generated acoustic tone burst waveform will have lower peak amplitudes than a single acoustic pulse providing the same system SNR. Consequently, lower power density laser pulses may be used to avoid surface damage.

  17. Wide bandwidth chaotic signal generation in a monolithically integrated semiconductor laser via optical injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xue-Mei; Zhong, Zhu-Qiang; Zhao, Ling-Juan; Lu, Dan; Qiu, Hai-Ying; Xia, Guang-Qiong; Wu, Zheng-Mao

    2015-11-01

    Wide bandwidth chaotic signal generation in a three-section monolithically integrated semiconductor laser (MISL) under external optical injection is investigated experimentally. Through evaluating the effective bandwidth of chaotic signals, the influences of the optical injection on the bandwidth of chaotic signal from the MISL are analyzed. The experimental results indicate that, for the currents of the DFB section (IDFB) and the phase section (IP) are fixed at 70.00 mA and 34.00 mA, respectively, the effective bandwidth of chaos signal generated by the solitary MISL reaches its maximum value of 14.36 GHz when the current of the amplification section (IA) takes 23.22 mA. After an external optical injection is introduced into the MISL, the effective bandwidth of the generated chaotic signal can be beyond 2.5 times of the maximum value. Furthermore, the effects of the injection strength and the frequency detuning on the effective bandwidth of the generated chaotic signal are also discussed.

  18. On the generation mechanisms of fluid-driven seismic signals related to volcano-tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Marco; Benson, Philip M.; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The generation mechanics of fluid-driven volcano seismic signals, and their evolution with time, remains poorly understood. We present a laboratory study aiming to better constrain the time evolution of such signals across temperature conditions 25 to 175°C in order to simulate a "bubbly liquid." Simulations used pressures equivalent to volcanic edifices up to 1.6 km in depth using a triaxial deformation apparatus equipped with an array of acoustic emission sensors. We investigate the origin of fluid-driven seismic signals by rapidly venting the pore pressure through a characterized damage zone. During the release of water at 25°C broadband signals were generated, with frequencies ranging from 50 to 160 kHz. However, the decompression of a water/steam phase at 175°C generated a bimodal spectrum of different signals, in the range 100-160 kHz. These new results are consistent with natural signals from active volcanoes, such as Mount Etna, and highlight the role of fluid and gas phases (such as bubbly liquids) in generating different types of volcano-tectonic seismicity.

  19. Investigation of a four-wave mixing signal generated in fiber-delivered CARS microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jun, Chang Su; Kim, Byoung Yoon; Park, Ju Hyun; Lee, Jae Yong; Lee, Eun Seong; Yeom, Dong-Il

    2010-07-10

    We studied the nonlinear signal generated in the fiber at an anti-Stokes wavelength during the delivery of the picosecond (ps) pump and Stokes beams in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. A small non-phase-matched four-wave mixing (FWM) signal was prevalently observed in the fiber at the power level where other nonlinear processes, including self-phase modulation and cross-phase modulation, were well suppressed. We analyzed the features of the FWM signal generation by varying the location of temporal overlap between two input pulses in the fiber to compare this to the CARS signal generated in the sample. Numerical modeling based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation was also conducted and clearly explains the results in the experiment. In addition, we experimentally verified the interferometric feature of this FWM signal with the CARS signal by employing a phase-shifting unit, which potentially suggests the use of the FWM signal as a local oscillator for the interferometric CARS system.

  20. Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signals During Laser Spot Welding of SS304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seounghwan; Ahn, Suneung; Park, Changsoon

    2014-03-01

    In this article, an in-process monitoring scheme for a pulsed Nd:YAG laser spot welding (LSW) is presented. Acoustic emission (AE) was selected for the feedback signal, and the AE data during LSW were sampled and analyzed for varying process conditions such as laser power and pulse duration. In the analysis, possible AE generation sources such as melting and solidification mechanism during welding were investigated using both the time- and frequency-domain signal processings. The results, which show close relationships between LSW and AE signals, were adopted in the feature (input) selection of a back-propagation artificial neural network, to predict the weldability of stainless steel sheets. Processed outputs agree well with LSW experimental data, which confirms the usefulness of the proposed scheme.

  1. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating coded signals

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S

    2014-12-30

    A system and a method for investigating rock formations includes generating, by a first acoustic source, a first acoustic signal comprising a first plurality of pulses, each pulse including a first modulated signal at a central frequency; and generating, by a second acoustic source, a second acoustic signal comprising a second plurality of pulses. A receiver arranged within the borehole receives a detected signal including a signal being generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first-and-second acoustic signal in a non-linear mixing zone within the intersection volume. The method also includes-processing the received signal to extract the signal generated by the non-linear mixing process over noise or over signals generated by a linear interaction process, or both.

  2. Detecting of ELF/VLF Signals Generated by GEMINIDS 2011 Meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkari, Amir Kayone; Zeinali, M. M.; Taraz, M.

    2015-07-01

    For a long time, the generation mechanism of simultaneous sound with passing of large meteors was a research edge until a reasonable mechanism was proposed for that. This mechanism is based on the existence of ELF/VLF radio signals. This research that aims for detection of these signals archives an improvement over previous works. The signal was found on the extremely low frequency (ELF) band which could not be generated by other sources like lightning, has a frequency range between several Hertz to 500 Hz, and so could be missed with noises produce by electrical machines. The new signal is presented at this work has a good correlation with synchronized visual data that were collected on the peak of Geminids 2011 meteor shower.

  3. A robust random number generator based on differential comparison of chaotic laser signals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Wang, Yuncai; Liu, Ming; Xue, Lugang; Li, Pu; Wang, Anbang; Zhang, Mingjiang

    2012-03-26

    We experimentally realize a robust real-time random number generator by differentially comparing the signal from a chaotic semiconductor laser and its delayed signal through a 1-bit analog-to-digital converter. The probability density distribution of the output chaotic signal based on the differential comparison method possesses an extremely small coefficient of Pearson's median skewness (1.5 × 10⁻⁶), which can yield a balanced random sequence much easily than the previously reported method that compares the signal from the chaotic laser with a certain threshold value. Moveover, we experimently demonstrate that our method can stably generate good random numbers at rates of 1.44 Gbit/s with excellent immunity from external perturbations while the previously reported method fails.

  4. Light generation of intracellular Ca2+ signals by a genetically encoded protein BACCS

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Tomohiro; Sato, Koji; Kakumoto, Toshiyuki; Miura, Shigenori; Touhara, Kazushige; Takeuchi, Shoji; Nakata, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+ signals are highly regulated in a spatiotemporal manner in numerous cellular physiological events. Here we report a genetically engineered blue light-activated Ca2+ channel switch (BACCS), as an optogenetic tool for generating Ca2+ signals. BACCS opens Ca2+-selective ORAI ion channels in response to light. A BACCS variant, dmBACCS2, combined with Drosophila Orai, elevates the Ca2+ concentration more rapidly, such that Ca2+ elevation in mammalian cells is observed within 1 s on light exposure. Using BACCSs, we successfully control cellular events including NFAT-mediated gene expression. In the mouse olfactory system, BACCS mediates light-dependent electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, we generate BACCS mutants, which exhibit fast and slow recovery of intracellular Ca2+. Thus, BACCSs are a useful optogenetic tool for generating temporally various intracellular Ca2+ signals with a large dynamic range, and will be applicable to both in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:26282514

  5. Spatial separation of two different pathways accounting for the generation of calcium signals in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oschmann, Franziska; Mergenthaler, Konstantin; Obermayer, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Astrocytes integrate and process synaptic information and exhibit calcium (Ca2+) signals in response to incoming information from neighboring synapses. The generation of Ca2+ signals is mostly attributed to Ca2+ release from internal Ca2+ stores evoked by an elevated metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activity. Different experimental results associated the generation of Ca2+ signals to the activity of the glutamate transporter (GluT). The GluT itself does not influence the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, but it indirectly activates Ca2+ entry over the membrane. A closer look into Ca2+ signaling in different astrocytic compartments revealed a spatial separation of those two pathways. Ca2+ signals in the soma are mainly generated by Ca2+ release from internal Ca2+ stores (mGluR-dependent pathway). In astrocytic compartments close to the synapse most Ca2+ signals are evoked by Ca2+ entry over the plasma membrane (GluT-dependent pathway). This assumption is supported by the finding, that the volume ratio between the internal Ca2+ store and the intracellular space decreases from the soma towards the synapse. We extended a model for mGluR-dependent Ca2+ signals in astrocytes with the GluT-dependent pathway. Additionally, we included the volume ratio between the internal Ca2+ store and the intracellular compartment into the model in order to analyze Ca2+ signals either in the soma or close to the synapse. Our model results confirm the spatial separation of the mGluR- and GluT-dependent pathways along the astrocytic process. The model allows to study the binary Ca2+ response during a block of either of both pathways. Moreover, the model contributes to a better understanding of the impact of channel densities on the interaction of both pathways and on the Ca2+ signal. PMID:28192424

  6. Digital test signal generation: An accurate SNR calibration approach for the DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Luaces, Benito O.

    1993-01-01

    In support of the on-going automation of the Deep Space Network (DSN) a new method of generating analog test signals with accurate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is described. High accuracy is obtained by simultaneous generation of digital noise and signal spectra at the desired bandwidth (base-band or bandpass). The digital synthesis provides a test signal embedded in noise with the statistical properties of a stationary random process. Accuracy is dependent on test integration time and limited only by the system quantization noise (0.02 dB). The monitor and control as well as signal-processing programs reside in a personal computer (PC). Commands are transmitted to properly configure the specially designed high-speed digital hardware. The prototype can generate either two data channels modulated or not on a subcarrier, or one QPSK channel, or a residual carrier with one biphase data channel. The analog spectrum generated is on the DC to 10 MHz frequency range. These spectra may be up-converted to any desired frequency without loss on the characteristics of the SNR provided. Test results are presented.

  7. Tunable microwave signal generator with an optically-injected 1310 nm QD-DFB laser.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Antonio; Mee, Jesse; Nami, Mohsen; Henning, Ian D; Adams, Michael J; Lester, Luke F

    2013-05-06

    Tunable microwave signal generation with frequencies ranging from below 1 GHz to values over 40 GHz is demonstrated experimentally with a 1310 nm Quantum Dot (QD) Distributed-Feedback (DFB) laser. Microwave signal generation is achieved using the period 1 dynamics induced in the QD DFB under optical injection. Continuous tuning in the positive detuning frequency range of the quantum dot's unique stability map is demonstrated. The simplicity of the experimental configuration offers promise for novel uses of these nanostructure lasers in Radio-over-Fiber (RoF) applications and future mobile networks.

  8. The phase of the crosspolarized signal generated by millimeter wave propagation through rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overstreet, W. P.; Bostian, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    Proposed schemes for cancelling rain-induced crosstalk in dual-polarized communications systems depend upon the phase relationships between the wanted and unwanted signals. This report investigates the phase relationship of the rain-generated crosspolarized signal relative to the copolarized signal. Theoretical results obtained from a commonly accepted propagation model are presented. Experimental data from the Communications Technology Satellite beacon and from the Comstar beacon are presented and the correlation between theory and data is discussed. An inexpensive semi-adaptive cancellation system is proposed and its performance expectations are presented. The implications of phase variations on a cancellation system are also discussed.

  9. Ultrasonic fatigue process analyzed by using LVD and continuous ae waveform analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiwa, M.; Furuya, Y.; Yamawaki, H.; Ito, K.; Enoki, M.

    2012-05-01

    Non-linear ultrasonic parameter β and acoustic emission signals of ultrasonic fatigue testing were analyzed by using Laser Doppler Vibrometer and continuous AE waveform analysis system. Notched specimens of the high-strength low-alloy steel were prepared for the ultrasonic fatigue testing with exciting vibration frequency of 20 kHz. The AE events for each broken specimens were detected prior to the increase of β parameter.

  10. Second-Generation Discrete Fourier Transform Signal Processor for Laser Velocimetry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    AEDC-TR-86-33 C.7- eAR 0 0 1987 Second- Generation Discrete Fourier Transform Signal Processor for Laser Velocimetry Thomas Chris Layne Calspan...available to the general public, including foreign nations. APPROVAL STATEMENT This report has been reviewed and approved. ROBERT W. SMITH...IFIFI) SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY C L ~ S I F I C A T I O N OF THIS PAGE 11. TITLE Second- Generation Discrete

  11. Signaling pathway for nitric oxide generation with simulated ischemia in flow-adapted endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Z; Al-Mehdi, A B; Fisher, A B

    2001-11-01

    Ischemia in the intact ventilated lung (oxygenated ischemia) leads to endothelial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). This study investigated the signaling pathway for NO generation with oxygenated ischemia in bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (BPAEC) that were flow adapted in vitro. BPAECs were cultured in an artificial capillary system and subjected to abrupt cessation of flow (ischemia) under conditions where cellular oxygenation was maintained. Immunoblotting and dichlorofluorescein/triazolofluorescein fluorescence were used to assess extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and ROS/NO generation, respectively. ERK1/2 phosphorylation significantly increased during ischemia, whereas total ERK1/2 did not change. ERK1/2 phosphorylation was suppressed by an inhibitor of tyrosine phosphorylation (genestein), cholesterol-binding reagents (filipin or cyclodextrin), or inhibitors of ROS (diphenyleneiodonium, N-acetylcysteine, or catalase), suggesting a role for both membrane cholesterol and ROS in ERK1/2 activation. Ischemia resulted in a 1.8-fold increase in NO generation that was suppressed by inhibitors of ERK1/2 activation (PD-98059 or U-0126). A calmodulin inhibitor (calmidizolium) or removal of Ca2+ from the medium also blocked NO generation, indicating that endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) is the activated isoform. These results indicate ischemia induces NO generation (possibly through a membrane cholesterol-sensitive flow sensor), the ERK1/2 cascade mediates signaling from the sensor to eNOS, and ROS are required for ERK activation.

  12. ICP-AES Data Validation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Document designed to offer data reviewers guidance in determining the validity ofanalytical data generated through the USEPA Contract Laboratory Program (CLP) Statement ofWork (SOW) ISM01.X Inorganic Superfund Methods (Multi-Media, Multi-Concentration)

  13. Fiber-optic delay-line stabilization of heterodyne optical signal generator and method using same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a laser heterodyne frequency generator system with a stabilizer for use in the microwave and millimeter-wave frequency ranges utilizing a photonic mixer as a photonic phase detector in a stable optical fiber delay-line. Phase and frequency fluctuations of the heterodyne laser signal generators are stabilized at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies by a delay line system operating as a frequency discriminator. The present invention is free from amplifier and mixer 1/.function. noise at microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies that typically limit phase noise performance in electronic cavity stabilized electronic oscillators. Thus, 1/.function. noise due to conventional mixers is eliminated and stable optical heterodyne generation of electrical signals is achieved.

  14. On norms of operators generated by shift transformations arising in signal and image processing on meshes supplied with semigroup structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumerov, R. N.

    2016-11-01

    Shift transformations and linear operators generated by shifts have a number of applications in signal and image processing. This note is concerned with a problem which has arisen in studying properties of real-world signals and images defined on meshes. For processing we suggest to introduce in domains of signals and images different semigroup structures. Semigroup operations give us opportunities to introduce shift transformations of signals and images. We study norms of polynomial filters generated by shift operators.

  15. Broadband signal generator for the approximation of a magnetotelluric source for indoor testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shuang-chao; Deng, Ming; Chen, Kai; Shi, Xin-yu

    2016-08-01

    To test the frequency response of a magnetotelluric (MT) receiver, a broadband source, especially white noise is more efficient and intuitive than single frequency signals. In view of the absence of an appropriate source generator for MT receiver indoor testing, we designed a broadband signal generator based on a pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS). Firstly, we divided the whole MT band into two segments to avoid data redundancy and simplify calculation in data processing and designed a generator composed of several modules: a clock module, a PRBS logic module, and a voltage level conversion module. We conducted a detailed analysis of the optimal parameter selection methods for each module, and key parameters including clock frequency, order, the primitive polynomial and the original states of the linear registers were determined. The generator provides four-channel PRBS signals with two effective bandwidths of 5  ×  10-4-714 Hz and 0.1 Hz-14 kHz which are broad enough to cover the frequency range for different MT methods. These four-channel signals were used to simulate two modes of sources (xy and yx) with strong auto-correlation and weak cross-correlation. The power spectral density is quite stable in the whole passband. The new generator is characterized by broadband output in low-frequency bands, low power consumption, simple operation and reliable performance. Indoor and field tests indicated that the generator can provide an analog MT source and is a practical tool for MT receiver indoor testing.

  16. Pipe wall damage detection by electromagnetic acoustic transducer generated guided waves in absence of defect signals.

    PubMed

    Vasiljevic, Milos; Kundu, Tribikram; Grill, Wolfgang; Twerdowski, Evgeny

    2008-05-01

    Most investigators emphasize the importance of detecting the reflected signal from the defect to determine if the pipe wall has any damage and to predict the damage location. However, often the small signal from the defect is hidden behind the other arriving wave modes and signal noise. To overcome the difficulties associated with the identification of the small defect signal in the time history plots, in this paper the time history is analyzed well after the arrival of the first defect signal, and after different wave modes have propagated multiple times through the pipe. It is shown that the defective pipe can be clearly identified by analyzing these late arriving diffuse ultrasonic signals. Multiple reflections and scattering of the propagating wave modes by the defect and pipe ends do not hamper the defect detection capability; on the contrary, it apparently stabilizes the signal and makes it easier to distinguish the defective pipe from the defect-free pipe. This paper also highlights difficulties associated with the interpretation of the recorded time histories due to mode conversion by the defect. The design of electro-magnetic acoustic transducers used to generate and receive the guided waves in the pipe is briefly described in the paper.

  17. Digitally generated excitation and near-baseband quadrature detection of rapid scan EPR signals

    PubMed Central

    Quine, Richard W.; Rinard, George A.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2014-01-01

    The use of multiple synchronized outputs from an AWG provides the opportunity to perform EPR experiments differently than by conventional EPR. We report a method for reconstructing the quadrature EPR spectrum from periodic signals that are generated with sinusoidal magnetic field modulation such as continuous wave (CW), multiharmonic, or rapid scan experiments. The signal is down-converted to an intermediate frequency (IF) that is less than the field scan or field modulation frequency and then digitized in a single channel. This method permits use of a high-pass analog filter before digitization to remove the strong non-EPR signal at the IF, that might otherwise overwhelm the digitizer. The IF is the difference between two synchronized X-band outputs from a Tektronix AWG 70002A arbitrary waveform generator (AWG), one of which is for excitation and the other is the reference for down-conversion. To permit signal averaging, timing was selected to give an exact integer number of full cycles for each frequency. In the experiments reported here the IF was 5 kHz and the scan frequency was 40 kHz. To produce sinusoidal rapid scans with a scan frequency eight times IF, a third synchronized output generated a square wave that was converted to a sine wave. The timing of the data acquisition with a Bruker SpecJet II was synchronized by an external clock signal from the AWG. The baseband quadrature signal in the frequency domain was reconstructed. This approach has the advantages that (i) the non-EPR response at the carrier frequency is eliminated, (ii) both real and imaginary EPR signals are reconstructed from a single physical channel to produce an ideal quadrature signal, and (iii) signal bandwidth does not increase relative to baseband detection. Spectra were obtained by deconvolution of the reconstructed signals for solid BDPA (1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl) in air, 0.2 mM trityl OX63 in water, 15N perdeuterated tempone, and a nitroxide with a 0.5 G partially

  18. Digitally generated excitation and near-baseband quadrature detection of rapid scan EPR signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseitlin, Mark; Yu, Zhelin; Quine, Richard W.; Rinard, George A.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2014-12-01

    The use of multiple synchronized outputs from an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) provides the opportunity to perform EPR experiments differently than by conventional EPR. We report a method for reconstructing the quadrature EPR spectrum from periodic signals that are generated with sinusoidal magnetic field modulation such as continuous wave (CW), multiharmonic, or rapid scan experiments. The signal is down-converted to an intermediate frequency (IF) that is less than the field scan or field modulation frequency and then digitized in a single channel. This method permits use of a high-pass analog filter before digitization to remove the strong non-EPR signal at the IF, that might otherwise overwhelm the digitizer. The IF is the difference between two synchronized X-band outputs from a Tektronix AWG 70002A, one of which is for excitation and the other is the reference for down-conversion. To permit signal averaging, timing was selected to give an exact integer number of full cycles for each frequency. In the experiments reported here the IF was 5 kHz and the scan frequency was 40 kHz. To produce sinusoidal rapid scans with a scan frequency eight times IF, a third synchronized output generated a square wave that was converted to a sine wave. The timing of the data acquisition with a Bruker SpecJet II was synchronized by an external clock signal from the AWG. The baseband quadrature signal in the frequency domain was reconstructed. This approach has the advantages that (i) the non-EPR response at the carrier frequency is eliminated, (ii) both real and imaginary EPR signals are reconstructed from a single physical channel to produce an ideal quadrature signal, and (iii) signal bandwidth does not increase relative to baseband detection. Spectra were obtained by deconvolution of the reconstructed signals for solid BDPA (1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl) in air, 0.2 mM trityl OX63 in water, 15N perdeuterated tempone, and a nitroxide with a 0.5 G partially

  19. Digitally generated excitation and near-baseband quadrature detection of rapid scan EPR signals.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Yu, Zhelin; Quine, Richard W; Rinard, George A; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2014-10-30

    The use of multiple synchronized outputs from an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) provides the opportunity to perform EPR experiments differently than by conventional EPR. We report a method for reconstructing the quadrature EPR spectrum from periodic signals that are generated with sinusoidal magnetic field modulation such as continuous wave (CW), multiharmonic, or rapid scan experiments. The signal is down-converted to an intermediate frequency (IF) that is less than the field scan or field modulation frequency and then digitized in a single channel. This method permits use of a high-pass analog filter before digitization to remove the strong non-EPR signal at the IF, that might otherwise overwhelm the digitizer. The IF is the difference between two synchronized X-band outputs from a Tektronix AWG 70002A, one of which is for excitation and the other is the reference for down-conversion. To permit signal averaging, timing was selected to give an exact integer number of full cycles for each frequency. In the experiments reported here the IF was 5kHz and the scan frequency was 40kHz. To produce sinusoidal rapid scans with a scan frequency eight times IF, a third synchronized output generated a square wave that was converted to a sine wave. The timing of the data acquisition with a Bruker SpecJet II was synchronized by an external clock signal from the AWG. The baseband quadrature signal in the frequency domain was reconstructed. This approach has the advantages that (i) the non-EPR response at the carrier frequency is eliminated, (ii) both real and imaginary EPR signals are reconstructed from a single physical channel to produce an ideal quadrature signal, and (iii) signal bandwidth does not increase relative to baseband detection. Spectra were obtained by deconvolution of the reconstructed signals for solid BDPA (1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl) in air, 0.2mM trityl OX63 in water, (15)N perdeuterated tempone, and a nitroxide with a 0.5G partially-resolved proton

  20. NO signalling decodes frequency of neuronal activity and generates synapse-specific plasticity in mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Namiki, Shigeyuki; Kakizawa, Sho; Hirose, Kenzo; Iino, Masamitsu

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger regulating neuronal functions. To visualize NO signalling in the brain, we generated a novel fluorescent NO indicator, which consists of the heme-binding region (HBR) of soluble guanylyl cyclase and the green fluorescent protein. The indicator (HBR–GFP) was expressed in the Purkinje cells of the mouse cerebellum and we imaged NO signals in acute cerebellar slices upon parallel fibre (PF) activation with a train of burst stimulations (BS, each BS consisting of five pulses at 50 Hz). Our results showed that the intensity of synaptic NO signal decays steeply with the distance from the synaptic input near PF–Purkinje cell synapses and generates synapse-specific long-term potentiation (LTP). Furthermore, the NO release level has a bell-shaped dependence on the frequency of PF activity. At an optimal frequency (1 Hz), but not at a low frequency (0.25 Hz) of a train of 60 BS, NO release as well as LTP was induced. However, both NO release and LTP were significantly reduced at higher frequencies (2–4 Hz) of BS train due to cannabinoid receptor-mediated retrograde inhibition of NO generation at the PF terminals. These results suggest that synaptic NO signalling decodes the frequency of neuronal activity to mediate synaptic plasticity at the PF–Purkinje cell synapse. PMID:15919714

  1. Single laser pulse generates dual photoacoustic signals for differential contrast photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zhang, Ruochong; Liu, Siyu; Ding, Ran; Kishor, Rahul; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2017-04-04

    Photoacoustic sensing and imaging techniques have been studied widely to explore optical absorption contrast based on nanosecond laser illumination. In this paper, we report a long laser pulse induced dual photoacoustic (LDPA) nonlinear effect, which originates from unsatisfied stress and thermal confinements. Being different from conventional short laser pulse illumination, the proposed method utilizes a long square-profile laser pulse to induce dual photoacoustic signals. Without satisfying the stress confinement, the dual photoacoustic signals are generated following the positive and negative edges of the long laser pulse. More interestingly, the first expansion-induced photoacoustic signal exhibits positive waveform due to the initial sharp rising of temperature. On the contrary, the second contraction-induced photoacoustic signal exhibits exactly negative waveform due to the falling of temperature, as well as pulse-width-dependent signal amplitude. An analytical model is derived to describe the generation of the dual photoacoustic pulses, incorporating Gruneisen saturation and thermal diffusion effect, which is experimentally proved. Lastly, an alternate of LDPA technique using quasi-CW laser excitation is also introduced and demonstrated for both super-contrast in vitro and in vivo imaging. Compared with existing nonlinear PA techniques, the proposed LDPA nonlinear effect could enable a much broader range of potential applications.

  2. AE analysis during corrosion, stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue processes

    SciTech Connect

    Yuyama, S.; Kishi, T.

    1983-01-01

    Current theoretical and experimental research on the use of acoustic emission (AE) techniques for studying corrosion problems is reviewed. In particular, attention is given to the AE behavior of Type 304 stainless steel in aqueous environment, and a new method for analyzing corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and corrosion fatigue in Type 304 steel is described. Results are also presented for other steels, aluminum and magnesium alloys, copper and its alloys, uranium alloys, and titanium and zirconium alloys. It is concluded that the AE method is a prommising approach to the detection and monitoring of localized corrosion in both laboratory specimens and engineering structures. Care must be taken, however, to discriminate valid AE signals from the background noise and to interpret the results correctly. 95 references.

  3. Mitochondrial generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide as the source of mitochondrial redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Brand, Martin D

    2016-11-01

    This review examines the generation of reactive oxygen species by mammalian mitochondria, and the status of different sites of production in redox signaling and pathology. Eleven distinct mitochondrial sites associated with substrate oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation leak electrons to oxygen to produce superoxide or hydrogen peroxide: oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes that feed electrons to NAD(+); respiratory complexes I and III, and dehydrogenases, including complex II, that use ubiquinone as acceptor. The topologies, capacities, and substrate dependences of each site have recently clarified. Complex III and mitochondrial glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase generate superoxide to the external side of the mitochondrial inner membrane as well as the matrix, the other sites generate superoxide and/or hydrogen peroxide exclusively in the matrix. These different site-specific topologies are important for redox signaling. The net rate of superoxide or hydrogen peroxide generation depends on the substrates present and the antioxidant systems active in the matrix and cytosol. The rate at each site can now be measured in complex substrate mixtures. In skeletal muscle mitochondria in media mimicking muscle cytosol at rest, four sites dominate, two in complex I and one each in complexes II and III. Specific suppressors of two sites have been identified, the outer ubiquinone-binding site in complex III (site IIIQo) and the site in complex I active during reverse electron transport (site IQ). These suppressors prevent superoxide/hydrogen peroxide production from a specific site without affecting oxidative phosphorylation, making them excellent tools to investigate the status of the sites in redox signaling, and to suppress the sites to prevent pathologies. They allow the cellular roles of mitochondrial superoxide/hydrogen peroxide production to be investigated without catastrophic confounding bioenergetic effects. They show that sites IIIQo and IQ are active in cells and

  4. Generating Ka-Band Signals Using an X-Band Vector Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott; Mysoor, Narayan; Lux, James; Cook, Brian; Shah, Biren

    2009-01-01

    A breadboard version of a transmitter for radio communication at a carrier frequency of 32 GHz (which is in the Ka band) utilizes a vector modulator operating at a carrier frequency of 8 GHz (the low end of the X band) to generate any of a number of advanced modulations that could include amplitude and/or phase modulation components. The 8-GHz modulated signal is mixed with a 24-GHz signal generated by an upconverter to obtain the desired 32-GHz modulated output. The transmitter is being developed as a prototype of downlink transmitters for transmission of data from spacecraft to Earth at high rates (>100 Mb/s). The transmitter design could also be adapted to terrestrial and Earth/satellite communication links. The advanced modulations (which can include M-ary phase-shift keying (M-PSK), offset phase-shift keying (OPSK), and M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (M-QAM). These modulations are needed because for a given amount of signal bandwidth, they enable transmission of data at rates greater than those of older, simpler modulation schemes. The transmitter architecture (see figure) was chosen not only to enable generation of the required modulations at 32 GHz but also to reduce the number of components needed to implement the transmitter. Instead of incorporating an 8-GHz signal source, the transmitter utilizes an 8-GHz signal generated by a voltage-controlled oscillator that is part of an X-band transponder with which the fully developed version of this transmitter would be used in the original intended spacecraft application. The oscillator power is divided onto two paths, one of which goes through the vector modulator, the other through amplifiers and a 3 frequency multiplier. Band-pass filters are included downstream of the frequency multiplier to suppress unwanted harmonics.

  5. Clinical epidemiology of human AE in Europe.

    PubMed

    Vuitton, D A; Demonmerot, F; Knapp, J; Richou, C; Grenouillet, F; Chauchet, A; Vuitton, L; Bresson-Hadni, S; Millon, L

    2015-10-30

    This review gives a critical update of the situation regarding alveolar echinococcosis (AE) in Europe in humans, based on existing publications and on findings of national and European surveillance systems. All sources point to an increase in human cases of AE in the "historic endemic areas" of Europe, namely Germany, Switzerland, Austria and France and to the emergence of human cases in countries where the disease had never been recognised until the end of the 20th century, especially in central-eastern and Baltic countries. Both increase and emergence could be only due to methodological biases; this point is discussed in the review. One explanation may be given by changes in the animal reservoir of the parasite, Echinococcus multilocularis (increase in the global population of foxes in Europe and its urbanisation, as well as a possible increased involvement of pet animals as definitive infectious hosts). The review also focuses onto 2 more original approaches: (1) how changes in therapeutic attitudes toward malignant and chronic inflammatory diseases may affect the epidemiology of AE in the future in Europe, since a recent survey of such cases in France showed the emergence of AE in patients with immune suppression since the beginning of the 21st century; (2) how setting a network of referral centres in Europe based on common studies on the care management of patients might contribute to a better knowledge of AE epidemiology in the future.

  6. Quantitative biomarkers of colonic dysplasia based on intrinsic second-harmonic generation signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Wu, Guizhu; Chen, Jianxin; Xie, Shusen

    2011-12-01

    Most colorectal cancers arise from dysplastic lesions, such as adenomatous polyps, and these lesions are difficult to be detected by the current endoscopic screening approaches. Here, we present the use of an intrinsic second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal as a novel means to differentiate between normal and dysplastic human colonic tissues. We find that the SHG signal can quantitatively identify collagen change associated with colonic dysplasia that is indiscernible by conventional pathologic techniques. By comparing normal with dysplastic mucosa, there were significant differences in collagen density and collagen fiber direction, providing substantial potential to become quantitative intrinsic biomarkers for in vivo clinical diagnosis of colonic dysplasia.

  7. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating conical broadcast signals

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-08-18

    A method of interrogating a formation includes generating a conical acoustic signal, at a first frequency--a second conical acoustic signal at a second frequency each in the between approximately 500 Hz and 500 kHz such that the signals intersect in a desired intersection volume outside the borehole. The method further includes receiving, a difference signal returning to the borehole resulting from a non-linear mixing of the signals in a mixing zone within the intersection volume.

  8. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30... DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of Commerce, Bureau of Census, electronic filing of export information. The AES shall serve as the...

  9. Immortalization of human AE pre-leukemia cells by hTERT allows leukemic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Wunderlich, Mark; Chou, Fu-Sheng; Mulloy, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) expressing fusion protein AML1-ETO (AE), generated by the t(8;21)(q22;q22) rearrangement, manifest enhanced self-renewal and dysregulated differentiation without leukemic transformation, representing a pre-leukemia stage. Enabling replicative immortalization via telomerase reactivation is a crucial step in cancer development. However, AE expression alone is not sufficient to maintain high telomerase activity to immortalize human HSPC cells, which may hamper transformation. Here, we investigated the cooperativity of telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase, and AE in disease progression. Enforced expression of hTERT immortalized human AE pre-leukemia cells in a telomere-lengthening independent manner, and improved the pre-leukemia stem cell function by enhancing cell proliferation and survival. AE-hTERT cells retained cytokine dependency and multi-lineage differentiation potential similar to parental AE clones. Over the short-term, AE-hTERT cells did not show features of stepwise transformation, with no leukemogenecity evident upon initial injection into immunodeficient mice. Strikingly, after extended culture, we observed full transformation of one AE-hTERT clone, which recapitulated the disease evolution process in patients and emphasizes the importance of acquiring cooperating mutations in t(8;21) AML leukemogenesis. In summary, achieving unlimited proliferative potential via hTERT activation, and thereby allowing for acquisition of additional mutations, is a critical link for transition from pre-leukemia to overt disease in human cells. AE-hTERT cells represent a tractable model to study cooperating genetic lesions important for t(8;21) AML disease progression. PMID:27509060

  10. Specifics of signal generation in receivers based on thermoelastic effect at multiple impulse exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevnina, Elena I.; Maraev, Anton A.; Ishanin, Gennady G.

    2016-04-01

    To provide operating supervision of the process there is a need of means of control with high temporal stability and resistance to radiation excess. Receivers based on the thermoelastic effect in crystalline quartz are designed for energy measurement of lasers in single impulse mode or for average power measurement in operation monitoring of industrial lasers. In the research we analyze work of the receiver at single impulse exposure. The heat storage time of the receiver is defined. Specifics of signal generation in receivers on thermoelastic effect at multiple impulse exposure are also analyzed. An algorithm for voltage calculation of the receiver with given parameters is developed. The modelling shows that generated signal growth in the detector exposed to an impulse consequence can influence the power measurement result and thus the ways to reduce the effect are proposed.

  11. Bedload sediment transport embedded in seismic signals generated from a mountain stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, D. L.; Brodsky, E. E.; Finnegan, N. J.; Turowski, J. M.; Wyss, C. R.; Badoux, A.; Schneider, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    We examine broadband (15 - 450 Hz) seismic data from the well-studied Erlenbach stream in the Swiss Prealps, where discharge, precipitation, and bedload transport are independently constrained during flood events. We perform a general linear least squares inversion of seismic data, exploiting times with isolated discharge or rain events, to identify the spectral signals of water turbulence and raindrop impacts. This, in turn, allows us to remove the contributions of turbulence and rainfall from the seismic spectra, thereby isolating the signal of bedload transport. We use one storm to calibrate the regression for bedload transport, then use this regression along with precipitation and discharge data to predict bedload transport rates for the remainder of the two-month campaign. Our predicted bedload transport rates correlate well with transport rates from calibrated geophones embedded in the channel (r2~0.6, p<<10-5). We also find that rain generates a roughly broadband seismic spectrum, while water turbulence and sediment transport exhibit power primarily in lower frequency bands (<100 Hz), due in part to different attenuation path lengths. We use the varying attenuation of water turbulence and bedload transport spectra to infer the locations of the primary sources generating each signal: a downstream waterfall, and the channel bed near the seismometers, respectively. Our results indicate that deconstruction of seismic signals from rivers can provide insight into the component signals generated by water turbulence, rain, and sediment transport. Further, we find that regression of seismic spectra with precipitation, discharge and bedload transport data for a single calibration period enables the estimation of transport for subsequent periods with only precipitation, discharge and seismic data. Since precipitation and discharge are significantly easier to monitor than transport, this represents a potential application for in-field monitoring of bedload activity.

  12. System for generating dry coal weight signal for coal feeder and control system based thereon

    SciTech Connect

    Finet, A.

    1984-02-14

    A system for generating a dry coal weight signal is provided, wherein the moisture content of a coal feed to a solid fuel burner is determined, and the dry coal weight calculated on that basis. Moisture content is determined by measuring density of the coal being fed and/or the torque required to drive a head pulley about which the belt feeding the coal is led at a constant velocity. The dry coal weight signal can be communicated to the drive means, whereby the belt speed is accelerated or decelerated to maintain a constant supply of coal, on a dry weight basis, to the boiler. Also disclosed is a control system employing the dry coal weight signal for a plurality of control functions.

  13. Piezoelectric crystals generate NMR-like signals for rapid spectrometer troubleshooting.

    PubMed

    Emery, Samuel B; Conradi, Mark S

    2014-05-01

    Use of frequency-control quartz crystals for the generation of NMR-like signals via the piezoelectric effect is discussed. Such crystals are inexpensive and cover a wide range of RF frequencies. The crystal is connected to the spectrometer through a 30dB attenuator. Excitation by single, short RF pulses results in time domain signals similar to NMR FIDs. We show that the crystal should be shunted by a low resistance for largest Q (longest T2). By using odd higher overtones, the crystals were made to resonate at the high operating frequencies typical of modern spectrometers, here up to 630MHz. The performance of precision manufactured crystals is particularly better at high frequencies, compared to mass production crystals. The abundant and stable signal provided by the piezoelectric crystals yields a simple method for troubleshooting and testing NMR spectrometers.

  14. A design of three-stage addressing sweep frequency signal generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhihui; Fan, Muwen; Zhou, Luchun

    2015-10-01

    In order to test the working state of adaptive optics system, it is necessary to design an online sweep-frequency circuit module to test the frequency response of the adaptive system. Sweep-frequency signal generator based on Direct Digital frequency Synthesis (DDS) is one of the core components. But the classic DDS technology also has some drawbacks: the truncation error of phase, the truncation error of magnitude (caused by memory FWL) and high occupancy of ROM. These are also the optimization directions in this paper. This paper presents a FPGA-based DDS sweep-frequency signal generator suitable in adaptive optics. It has a low occupancy rate with ROM. And in the case of low-ROM, the paper reduces the noise generated by the truncation error of phase and the truncation error of magnitude of DDS sweepfrequency signal generator by method of linear interpolation. The results show that, when the reference frequency is 100 MHz, the frequency resolution can be as low as 0.025 Hz. It only takes up 0.5 KB ROM with the ROM compression ratio of 64:1 in the optimized scheme in the paper and has higher precision due to the method of linear interpolation than the unoptimized scheme, which can meet the engineering needs. Compared with other schemes, the scheme in the paper improves signal accuracy in the case of reducing the truncation error of phase, the truncation error of magnitude and the occupancy rate with ROM, but only adds a multiplication and division circuit, which is a practical solution.

  15. The use of pneumatically generated water pressure signals for aquifer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, M.; Roberts, R.; Chace, D.

    2013-12-01

    The use of pneumatically generated pressure signals for aquifer characterization Hydraulic tests are the most reliable method of obtaining estimates of hydrologic properties, such as conductivity, that are essential for flow and transport modeling. The use of a sinusoidal signal for hydraulic testing is well established, with Streltsova (1988), Rasmussen (2003) and others having developed analytic solutions. Sinusoidal tests provide a unique easily distinguished signal that reduces ambiguity during analysis and we show that a sinusoidal pressure signal propagates farther into the formation than a standard slug-test signal. If a sinusoidal test is combined with a slug and/or a constant rate test, it can further reduce uncertainty in the estimated parameter values. We demonstrate how pneumatic pressure can be used to generate all three of these signals. By positioning pressure transducers both below the water level and in the head space above the water, we can monitor the total pressure acting on the formation and the changes in water level. From the changes in water level, it is possible to calculate the flow rate in and out of the well, assuming that the well diameter and water density are known. Using gas flow controllers with a Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) system we are able to precisely control the pressures in the well. The use of pneumatic pressure has the advantage that it requires less equipment (no pumps) and produces no water. We also show how the numerical well test analysis program nSIGHTS can be used to analyze all three types of tests simultaneously and to assess the relative contribution of each type of test to the parameter estimation. nSIGHTS was recently released as open source by Sandia National Laboratories and is available for free.

  16. Programmable ion-sensitive transistor interfaces. III. Design considerations, signal generation, and sensitivity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayant, Krishna; Auluck, Kshitij; Rodriguez, Sergio; Cao, Yingqiu; Kan, Edwin C.

    2014-05-01

    We report on factors that affect DNA hybridization detection using ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs). Signal generation at the interface between the transistor and immobilized biomolecules is widely ascribed to unscreened molecular charges causing a shift in surface potential and hence the transistor output current. Traditionally, the interaction between DNA and the dielectric or metal sensing interface is modeled by treating the molecular layer as a sheet charge and the ionic profile with a Poisson-Boltzmann distribution. The surface potential under this scenario is described by the Graham equation. This approximation, however, often fails to explain large hybridization signals on the order of tens of mV. More realistic descriptions of the DNA-transistor interface which include factors such as ion permeation, exclusion, and packing constraints have been proposed with little or no corroboration against experimental findings. In this study, we examine such physical models by their assumptions, range of validity, and limitations. We compare simulations against experiments performed on electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor capacitors and foundry-ready floating-gate ISFETs. We find that with weakly charged interfaces (i.e., low intrinsic interface charge), pertinent to the surfaces used in this study, the best agreement between theory and experiment exists when ions are completely excluded from the DNA layer. The influence of various factors such as bulk pH, background salinity, chemical reactivity of surface groups, target molecule concentration, and surface coatings on signal generation is studied. Furthermore, in order to overcome Debye screening limited detection, we suggest two signal enhancement strategies. We first describe frequency domain biosensing, highlighting the ability to sort short DNA strands based on molecular length, and then describe DNA biosensing in multielectrolytes comprising trace amounts of higher-valency salt in a background of

  17. Mitochondrial retrograde signaling induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and generates breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guha, M; Srinivasan, S; Ruthel, G; Kashina, A K; Carstens, R P; Mendoza, A; Khanna, C; Van Winkle, T; Avadhani, N G

    2014-11-06

    Metastatic breast tumors undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which renders them resistant to therapies targeted to the primary cancers. The mechanistic link between mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA) reduction, often seen in breast cancer patients, and EMT is unknown. We demonstrate that reducing mtDNA content in human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs) activates Calcineurin (Cn)-dependent mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway, which induces EMT-like reprogramming to fibroblastic morphology, loss of cell polarity, contact inhibition and acquired migratory and invasive phenotype. Notably, mtDNA reduction generates breast cancer stem cells. In addition to retrograde signaling markers, there is an induction of mesenchymal genes but loss of epithelial markers in these cells. The changes are reversed by either restoring the mtDNA content or knockdown of CnAα mRNA, indicating the causal role of retrograde signaling in EMT. Our results point to a new therapeutic strategy for metastatic breast cancers targeted to the mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway for abrogating EMT and attenuating cancer stem cells, which evade conventional therapies. We report a novel regulatory mechanism by which low mtDNA content generates EMT and cancer stem cells in hMECs.

  18. CD73-Dependent Generation of Adenosine and Endothelial Adora2b Signaling Attenuate Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tak, Eunyoung; Ridyard, Douglas; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Zimmerman, Michael; Werner, Tilmann; Wang, Xiaoxin X.; Shabeka, Uladzimir; Seo, Seong-Wook; Christians, Uwe; Klawitter, Jost; Moldovan, Radu; Garcia, Gabriela; Levi, Moshe; Haase, Volker; Ravid, Katya; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide phosphohydrolysis by the ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) is the main source for extracellular generation of adenosine. Extracellular adenosine subsequently signals through four distinct adenosine A receptors (Adora1, Adora2a, Adora2b, or Adora3). Here, we hypothesized a functional role for CD73-dependent generation and concomitant signaling of extracellular adenosine during diabetic nephropathy. CD73 transcript and protein levels were elevated in the kidneys of diabetic mice. Genetic deletion of CD73 was associated with more severe diabetic nephropathy, whereas treatment with soluble nucleotidase was therapeutic. Transcript levels of renal adenosine receptors showed a selective induction of Adora2b during diabetic nephropathy. In a transgenic reporter mouse, Adora2b expression localized to the vasculature and increased after treatment with streptozotocin. Adora2b−/− mice experienced more severe diabetic nephropathy, and studies in mice with tissue-specific deletion of Adora2b in tubular epithelia or vascular endothelia implicated endothelial Adora2b signaling in protection from diabetic nephropathy. Finally, treatment with a selective Adora2b agonist (BAY 60–6583) conveyed potent protection from diabetes-associated kidney disease. Taken together, these findings implicate CD73-dependent production of extracellular adenosine and endothelial Adora2b signaling in kidney protection during diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24262796

  19. Comparison of the optoacoustic signal generation efficiency of different nanoparticular contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bost, Wolfgang; Lemor, Robert; Fournelle, Marc

    2012-11-20

    Optoacoustic imaging represents a new modality that allows noninvasive in vivo molecular imaging with optical contrast and acoustical resolution. Whereas structural or functional imaging applications such as imaging of vasculature do not require contrast enhancing agents, nanoprobes with defined biochemical binding behavior are needed for molecular imaging tasks. Since the contrast of this modality is based on the local optical absorption coefficient, all particle or molecule types that show significant absorption cross sections in the spectral range of the laser wavelength used for signal generation are suitable contrast agents. Currently, several particle types such as gold nanospheres, nanoshells, nanorods, or polymer particles are used as optoacoustic contrast agents. These particles have specific advantages with respect to their absorption properties, or in terms of biologically relevant features (biodegradability, binding to molecular markers). In the present study, a comparative analysis of the signal generation efficiency of gold nanorods, polymeric particles, and magnetite particles using a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser for signal generation is described.

  20. Wire bonding quality monitoring via refining process of electrical signal from ultrasonic generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wuwei; Meng, Qingfeng; Xie, Youbo; Fan, Hong

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, a technique for on-line quality detection of ultrasonic wire bonding is developed. The electrical signals from the ultrasonic generator supply, namely, voltage and current, are picked up by a measuring circuit and transformed into digital signals by a data acquisition system. A new feature extraction method is presented to characterize the transient property of the electrical signals and further evaluate the bond quality. The method includes three steps. First, the captured voltage and current are filtered by digital bandpass filter banks to obtain the corresponding subband signals such as fundamental signal, second harmonic, and third harmonic. Second, each subband envelope is obtained using the Hilbert transform for further feature extraction. Third, the subband envelopes are, respectively, separated into three phases, namely, envelope rising, stable, and damping phases, to extract the tiny waveform changes. The different waveform features are extracted from each phase of these subband envelopes. The principal components analysis (PCA) method is used for the feature selection in order to remove the relevant information and reduce the dimension of original feature variables. Using the selected features as inputs, an artificial neural network (ANN) is constructed to identify the complex bond fault pattern. By analyzing experimental data with the proposed feature extraction method and neural network, the results demonstrate the advantages of the proposed feature extraction method and the constructed artificial neural network in detecting and identifying bond quality.

  1. Matt Rogers on AES Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Matt

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy and AES Energy Storage recently agreed to a $17.1M conditional loan guarantee commitment. This project will develop the first battery-based energy storage system to provide a more stable and efficient electrical grid for New York State's high-voltage transmission network. Matt Rogers is the Senior Advisor to the Secretary for Recovery Act Implementation.

  2. Matt Rogers on AES Energy Storage

    ScienceCinema

    Rogers, Matt

    2016-07-12

    The Department of Energy and AES Energy Storage recently agreed to a $17.1M conditional loan guarantee commitment. This project will develop the first battery-based energy storage system to provide a more stable and efficient electrical grid for New York State's high-voltage transmission network. Matt Rogers is the Senior Advisor to the Secretary for Recovery Act Implementation.

  3. Multi Station Frequency Response and Polarization of ELF/VLF Signals Generated via Ionospheric Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxworth, Ashanthi; Golkowski, Mark; University of Colorado Denver Team

    2013-10-01

    ELF/VLF wave generation via HF modulated ionospheric heating has been practiced for many years as a unique way to generate waves in the ELF/VLF band (3 Hz - 30 kHz). This paper presents experimental results and associated theoretical modeling from work performed at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. An experiment was designed to investigate the modulation frequency dependence of the generated ELF/VLF signal amplitudes and polarization at multiple sites at distances of 37 km, 50 km and 99 km from the facility. While no difference is observed for X mode versus O mode modulation of the heating wave, it is found that ELF/VLF amplitude and polarization as a function of modulated ELF/VLF frequency is different for each site. An ionospheric heating code is used to determine the primary current sources leading to the observations.

  4. GDE2 regulates subtype-specific motor neuron generation through inhibition of Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Priyanka; Lee, Changhee; Park, Sungjin; Rao, Meenakshi; Sockanathan, Shanthini

    2011-09-22

    The specification of spinal interneuron and motor neuron identities initiates within progenitor cells, while motor neuron subtype diversification is regulated by hierarchical transcriptional programs implemented postmitotically. Here we find that mice lacking GDE2, a six-transmembrane protein that triggers motor neuron generation, exhibit selective losses of distinct motor neuron subtypes, specifically in defined subsets of limb-innervating motor pools that correlate with the loss of force-generating alpha motor neurons. Mechanistically, GDE2 is expressed by postmitotic motor neurons but utilizes extracellular glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterase activity to induce motor neuron generation by inhibiting Notch signaling in neighboring motor neuron progenitors. Thus, neuronal GDE2 controls motor neuron subtype diversity through a non-cell-autonomous feedback mechanism that directly regulates progenitor cell differentiation, implying that subtype specification initiates within motor neuron progenitor populations prior to their differentiation into postmitotic motor neurons.

  5. Next-generation pulse oximetry. Focusing on Masimo's signal extraction technology.

    PubMed

    2000-10-01

    Pulse oximeters are used to determine trends in patients' blood oxygen saturation and to warn of dangerous saturation levels. But conventional pulse oximetry has some inherent limitations. For example, it has difficulty monitoring patients who are moving or who have poor perfusion; it is also subject to interference from certain visible and infrared light sources. Over the past several years, a number of companies have developed advanced signal-processing techniques that allow pulse oximeters to overcome many of these limitations. We refer to such new technologies as next-generation pulse oximetry. In this Evaluation, we focus on the first next-generation technology to have reached the market: Masimo Corporation's Signal Extraction Technology (SET). We designed our study of Masimo SET to address the main question that needs to be asked of any next-generation technology: How well does it compare to conventional pulse oximetry? Specifically, how well does it perform when a patient is moving or being moved, when a patient is poorly perfused, or when certain types of light strike the sensor while it is attached to or detached from the patient? We also examined one type of sensor used with this product, comparing it to conventional tape-on sensors for comfort and durability. Several other next-generation pulse-oximeter products have become available since we began this study. We are currently evaluating these products and will publish our findings in the near future. A list of the products, including a brief description of each, is included in this article. Pulse oximeters are used to determine trends in patients' blood oxygen saturation and to warn against dangerous saturation levels. These monitors are often vital in helping to ensure patient safety, especially for critically ill patients, pediatric patients, and neonates. But conventional pulse oximetry has some inherent limitations--most significantly, it has difficulty monitoring patients who are moving or who have

  6. AE Geomagnetic Index Predictability for High Speed Solar Wind Streams: A Wavelet Decomposition Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guarnieri, Fernando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Hajra, Rajkumar; Echer, Ezequiel; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    High speed solar wind streams cause geomagnetic activity at Earth. In this study we have applied a wavelet interactive filtering and reconstruction technique on the solar wind magnetic field components and AE index series to allowed us to investigate the relationship between the two. The IMF Bz component was found as the most significant solar wind parameter responsible by the control of the AE activity. Assuming magnetic reconnection associated to southward directed Bz is the main mechanism transferring energy into the magnetosphere, we adjust parameters to forecast the AE index. The adjusted routine is able to forecast AE, based only on the Bz measured at the L1 Lagrangian point. This gives a prediction approximately 30-70 minutes in advance of the actual geomagnetic activity. The correlation coefficient between the observed AE data and the forecasted series reached values higher than 0.90. In some cases the forecast reproduced particularities observed in the signal very well.The high correlation values observed and the high efficacy of the forecasting can be taken as a confirmation that reconnection is the main physical mechanism responsible for the energy transfer during HILDCAAs. The study also shows that the IMF Bz component low frequencies are most important for AE prediction.

  7. Optimizing seismic monitoring for landslides by using on-site artificially generated signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yfantis, Georgios; Martinez Carvajal, Hernan Eduardo; Pytharouli, Stella; Lunn, Rebecca

    2013-04-01

    We develop a methodology for the optimization of seismic arrays used for landslide monitoring. We design an experimental field set-up that generates signals caused by soil friction, such as those during a landslide. The set-up allows for controlling the normal stress, moisture content and the size of the slippage interface area. The optimization is based on the frequency and energy content analysis of the emitted artificial landslide signals and how local geology affects them. This can significantly improve the detection threshold of the monitoring system, the design of which, to-date, is mainly based on speculations for the site conditions or expensive borehole logs and its optimization on time-consuming trial and error procedures. We use a concrete cylinder, 0.5m high and 0.65m wide filled with high porous tropical clay excavated from the experimental site. The cylinder is placed on a 4m long, 2m wide clay strip, free from any surficial vegetation. As the cylinder is moved horizontally along the corridor, soil friction generates signals. By varying the load applied by the material within the cylinder we simulate slippage at different depths. Five different normal stress levels between 11.9kPa and 22.5kPa, corresponding to depths of 0.7 and 1.4m respectively, are simulated. The load applied on the slippage surface is the only variable, thus allowing the investigation of the normal stress effect on the emitted signals. The experiment is completed within 3 hours, under the same weather conditions. Therefore, no changes in the clay, i.e. moisture content, take place. We minimize the ambient noise by performing the experiment during the night. For the monitoring of the generated seismic signals we use 12 short period 3-component seismometers with natural frequency of 2Hz. Eight sensors are deployed as a linear array (spacing between them is 1 to 2m with the first and last sensors being 2m and 15m away from the strip, respectively) perpendicular to the direction of

  8. Fracture Analysis Based on Quantitative Evaluation of Microcracking in Ceramics Using AE Source Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Shuichi; Ishiwata, Kohei

    Quantitative detection of microcracks during fracture process of alumina was carried out by AE source characterization, which enables the quantitative characterization of the size, nucleation velocity and fracture mode, as well as nucleation time and location of individual microcracks. Fracture toughness tests of SENB specimens of two types of alumina with different grain size and purity were carried out in air and water. AE signals emitted from microcrackings were detected by piezoelectric transducers. The combined response function of the specimen and measurement system was experimentally determined using a pencil lead breaking as a simulated source. Then AE source function which describes the nature of microcrack nucleation was determined by the inverse calculation using obtained response function and detected signal. Consequently, it was clarified that the size of microcrack in water was larger than that in air for both alumina and larger microcracks nucleated in water resulted in the degradation of fracture resistance.

  9. Communication: Simplified two-beam rotational CARS signal generation demonstrated in 1D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlin, Alexis; Patterson, Brian D.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2013-02-01

    We explore a novel phase matching scheme for gas-phase rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The scheme significantly simplifies the employment of the technique in general. Two laser beams, one broadband and one narrowband, are crossed at arbitrary angle and the generated rotational CARS signal, copropagating with the probe beam, is isolated using a polarization gating technique. The effect of phase-vector mismatch for various experimental implementations was measured experimentally and compared to calculations. The spatial resolution of the current technique is improved by more than an order of magnitude over standard gas-phase CARS experimental arrangements, providing an interaction length of less than 50 μm when desired. Both the pump and Stokes photons originate from the broadband pulse, and are therefore automatically overlapped temporally and spatially. Significantly improved signal levels are achieved because of both the ease of alignment and the higher pulse energy available to the pump and Stokes fields. We demonstrate the technique for single-laser-shot 1D rotational CARS signal generation over approximately a 1 cm field in a flame.

  10. Communication: Simplified two-beam rotational CARS signal generation demonstrated in 1D.

    PubMed

    Bohlin, Alexis; Patterson, Brian D; Kliewer, Christopher J

    2013-02-28

    We explore a novel phase matching scheme for gas-phase rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The scheme significantly simplifies the employment of the technique in general. Two laser beams, one broadband and one narrowband, are crossed at arbitrary angle and the generated rotational CARS signal, copropagating with the probe beam, is isolated using a polarization gating technique. The effect of phase-vector mismatch for various experimental implementations was measured experimentally and compared to calculations. The spatial resolution of the current technique is improved by more than an order of magnitude over standard gas-phase CARS experimental arrangements, providing an interaction length of less than 50 μm when desired. Both the pump and Stokes photons originate from the broadband pulse, and are therefore automatically overlapped temporally and spatially. Significantly improved signal levels are achieved because of both the ease of alignment and the higher pulse energy available to the pump and Stokes fields. We demonstrate the technique for single-laser-shot 1D rotational CARS signal generation over approximately a 1 cm field in a flame.

  11. Chromosome- and spindle-pole-derived signals generate an intrinsic code for spindle position and orientation.

    PubMed

    Kiyomitsu, Tomomi; Cheeseman, Iain M

    2012-02-12

    Mitotic spindle positioning by cortical pulling forces defines the cell division axis and location, which is critical for proper cell division and development. Although recent work has identified developmental and extrinsic cues that regulate spindle orientation, the contribution of intrinsic signals to spindle positioning and orientation remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that cortical force generation in human cells is controlled by distinct spindle-pole- and chromosome-derived signals that regulate cytoplasmic dynein localization. First, dynein exhibits a dynamic asymmetric cortical localization that is negatively regulated by spindle-pole proximity, resulting in spindle oscillations to centre the spindle within the cell. We find that this signal comprises the spindle-pole-localized polo-like kinase (Plk1), which regulates dynein localization by controlling the interaction between dynein-dynactin and its upstream cortical targeting factors NuMA and LGN. Second, a chromosome-derived RanGTP gradient restricts the localization of NuMA-LGN to the lateral cell cortex to define and maintain the spindle orientation axis. RanGTP acts in part through the nuclear localization sequence of NuMA to locally alter the ability of NuMA-LGN to associate with the cell cortex in the vicinity of chromosomes. We propose that these chromosome- and spindle-pole-derived gradients generate an intrinsic code to control spindle position and orientation.

  12. PDM-16QAM vector signal generation and detection based on intensity modulation and direct detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Yu, Jianjun; Li, Xinying

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel and simple method to generate and detect high speed polarization-division-multiplexing 16-ary quadrature-amplitude-modulation (PDM-16QAM) vector signal enabled by Mach-Zehnder modulator-based (MZM-based) optical-carrier-suppression (OCS) intensity modulation and direct detection. Due to the adoption of OCS intensity modulation, carrier beating can be avoided at the receiver, and thus polarization de-multiplexing can be implemented by digital-signal-processing-based (DSP-based) cascaded multi-modulus algorithm (CMMA) equalization instead of a polarization tracking system. The change of both amplitude and phase information due to the adoption of OCS modulation can be equalized by DSP-based amplitude and phase precoding at the transmitter. Up to 64-Gb/s PDM-16QAM vector signal is generated and detected after 2-km single-mode fiber-28 (SMF-28) or 20-km large-effective-area fiber (LEAF) transmission with a bit-error-ratio (BER) less than the hard-decision forward-error-correction (HD-FEC) threshold of 3.8×10-3.

  13. Inhibition of mutant BRAF splice variant signaling by next-generation, selective RAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Basile, Kevin J; Le, Kaitlyn; Hartsough, Edward J; Aplin, Andrew E

    2014-05-01

    Vemurafenib and dabrafenib block MEK-ERK1/2 signaling and cause tumor regression in the majority of advanced-stage BRAF(V600E) melanoma patients; however, acquired resistance and paradoxical signaling have driven efforts for more potent and selective RAF inhibitors. Next-generation RAF inhibitors, such as PLX7904 (PB04), effectively inhibit RAF signaling in BRAF(V600E) melanoma cells without paradoxical effects in wild-type cells. Furthermore, PLX7904 blocks the growth of vemurafenib-resistant BRAF(V600E) cells that express mutant NRAS. Acquired resistance to vemurafenib and dabrafenib is also frequently driven by expression of mutation BRAF splice variants; thus, we tested the effects of PLX7904 and its clinical analog, PLX8394 (PB03), in BRAF(V600E) splice variant-mediated vemurafenib-resistant cells. We show that paradox-breaker RAF inhibitors potently block MEK-ERK1/2 signaling, G1/S cell cycle events, survival and growth of vemurafenib/PLX4720-resistant cells harboring distinct BRAF(V600E) splice variants. These data support the further investigation of paradox-breaker RAF inhibitors as a second-line treatment option for patients failing on vemurafenib or dabrafenib.

  14. Generation and tunable enhancement of a sum-frequency signal in lithium niobate nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeyev, Anton; Reig Escalé, Marc; Grange, Rachel

    2017-02-01

    Recent developments in the fabrication of lithium niobate (LiNbO3) structures down to the nanoscale opens up novel applications of this versatile material in nonlinear optics. Current nonlinear optical studies in sub-micron waveguides are mainly restricted to the generation of second and third harmonics. In this work, we demonstrate the generation and waveguiding of the sum-frequency generation (SFG) signal in a single LiNbO3 nanowire with a cross-section of 517 nm  ×  654 nm. Furthermore, we enhance the guided SFG signal 17.9 times by means of modal phase matching. We also display tuning of the phase-matched wavelength by varying the nanowire cross-section and changing the polarization of the incident laser. The results prove that LiNbO3 nanowires can be successfully used for nonlinear wave-mixing applications and assisting the miniaturization of optical devices. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J Phys D. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Rachel Grange was selected by the Editorial Board of J Phys D as an Emerging Leader.

  15. Dispersion-Tolerant Multiple WDM Channel Millimeter-Wave Signal Generation Using a Single Monolithic Mode-Locked Semiconductor Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attygalle, M.; Lim, C.; Nirmalathas, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a scheme by which multiple wavelength-division-multiplexed millimeter-wave (mm-wave) signals in the range of 30 GHz can be generated from a single monolithic semiconductor laser for applications in optically fed mm-wave networks or fiber radio networks. The mm-wave signals are generated using dual optical modes separated by a mm-wave frequency, obtained from spectrum slicing the output from a stable multimode hybrid mode-locked semiconductor laser. In this scheme, self-heterodyne detection at a high-speed photodetector achieves the photonic upconversion of low-data-rate signals to mm-wave frequencies without the need for electronic mixing. Experimental results show the generation of up to 14 WDM channels using a single laser. The phase noise of electrical signals generated by photonic upconversion of these signals is less than -94 dBc/Hz at 100-kHz offset frequency across the wavelengths. Also presented is the transmission of 155-Mb/s binary-phase-shift-keyed data signals at 30-GHz frequency over 10 km of single-mode fiber at different wavelengths using dual-mode signals. The results confirm that a bit-error rate of 10-^9 can be easily achieved. The dispersion tolerance of the dual-mode signals is evaluated using simulation and an analytical model and compared with other mm-wave signal generation techniques.

  16. Determination of collagen fibril size via absolute measurements of second-harmonic generation signals.

    PubMed

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Aimé, Carole; Gusachenko, Ivan; Kowalczuk, Laura; Latour, Gaël; Coradin, Thibaud; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2014-09-16

    The quantification of collagen fibril size is a major issue for the investigation of pathological disorders associated with structural defects of the extracellular matrix. Second-harmonic generation microscopy is a powerful technique to characterize the macromolecular organization of collagen in unstained biological tissues. Nevertheless, due to the complex coherent building of this nonlinear optical signal, it has never been used to measure fibril diameter so far. Here we report absolute measurements of second-harmonic signals from isolated fibrils down to 30 nm diameter, via implementation of correlative second-harmonic-electron microscopy. Moreover, using analytical and numerical calculations, we demonstrate that the high sensitivity of this technique originates from the parallel alignment of collagen triple helices within fibrils and the subsequent constructive interferences of second-harmonic radiations. Finally, we use these absolute measurements as a calibration for ex vivo quantification of fibril diameter in the Descemet's membrane of a diabetic rat cornea.

  17. Determination of collagen fibril size via absolute measurements of second-harmonic generation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bancelin, Stéphane; Aimé, Carole; Gusachenko, Ivan; Kowalczuk, Laura; Latour, Gaël; Coradin, Thibaud; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2014-09-01

    The quantification of collagen fibril size is a major issue for the investigation of pathological disorders associated with structural defects of the extracellular matrix. Second-harmonic generation microscopy is a powerful technique to characterize the macromolecular organization of collagen in unstained biological tissues. Nevertheless, due to the complex coherent building of this nonlinear optical signal, it has never been used to measure fibril diameter so far. Here we report absolute measurements of second-harmonic signals from isolated fibrils down to 30 nm diameter, via implementation of correlative second-harmonic-electron microscopy. Moreover, using analytical and numerical calculations, we demonstrate that the high sensitivity of this technique originates from the parallel alignment of collagen triple helices within fibrils and the subsequent constructive interferences of second-harmonic radiations. Finally, we use these absolute measurements as a calibration for ex vivo quantification of fibril diameter in the Descemet’s membrane of a diabetic rat cornea.

  18. AE Source Orientation by Plate Wave Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Prosser, William H.

    1991-01-01

    Lead breaks (Hsu-Neilsen source) were used to generate simulated acoustic emission signals in an aluminum plate at angles of 0, 30, 60, and 90 degrees with respect to the plane of the plate. This was accomplished by breaking the lead on slots cut into the plate at the respective angles. The out-of-plane and in-plane displacement components of the resulting signals were detected by broad band transducers and digitized. Analysis of the waveforms showed them to consist of the extensional and flexural plate modes. The amplitude of both components of the two modes was dependent on the source orientation angle. This suggests that plate wave analysis may be used to determine the source orientation of acoustic emission sources.

  19. Data mining based full ceramic bearing fault diagnostic system using AE sensors.

    PubMed

    He, David; Li, Ruoyu; Zhu, Junda; Zade, Mikhail

    2011-12-01

    Full ceramic bearings are considered the first step toward full ceramic, oil-free engines in the future. No research on full ceramic bearing fault diagnostics using acoustic emission (AE) sensors has been reported. Unlike their steel counterparts, signal processing methods to extract effective AE fault characteristic features and fault diagnostic systems for full ceramic bearings have not been developed. In this paper, a data mining based full ceramic bearing diagnostic system using AE based condition indicators (CIs) is presented. The system utilizes a new signal processing method based on Hilbert Huang transform to extract AE fault features for the computation of CIs. These CIs are used to build a data mining based fault classifier using a k-nearest neighbor algorithm. Seeded fault tests on full ceramic bearing outer race, inner race, balls, and cage are conducted on a bearing diagnostic test rig and AE burst data are collected. The effectiveness of the developed fault diagnostic system is validated using real full ceramic bearing seeded fault test data.

  20. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  1. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems.

    PubMed

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  2. Traits of acoustic signalization and generation of sounds by some schooling physostomous fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, M. Yu.

    2009-11-01

    The results of experimental investigations of acoustic activity of schooling physostomous fish are discussed, made with reference to chum salmon, pink salmon, Pacific herring, and sardine. Dynamic spectra of most investigated fish are concentrated within two subranges of frequency, according to each investigated fish species. Direct participation of the swimming bladder in sound formation in the investigated fish is shown. Morphological traits of sound-producing organs of salmons and herrings are considered. Mechanisms of generation of signals in physotmous fish involving the muscular sphincter and swimming bladder are analyzed.

  3. Generation and detection of millimeter-wave optical signals for use in power-combining arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Andrew Charles

    1997-10-01

    Optical distribution of millimeter-wave signals is an attractive technology for a number of applications. The feeding of antenna arrays and the distribution of signals in wireless communication systems both stand to benefit from the low power loss, low weight and size, and immunity from electromagnetic interference and crosstalk provided by optical fiber. This thesis presents results for a 60-GHz power-combining array, and also describes photodetectors and an optical source suitable for delivering signals to the elements of such an array. Chapter 2 describes a 60-GHz quasi-optical power- combining array employing IMPATT diodes in a weakly coupled, hybrid, two by four arrangement. Arrays such as this are motivated by the need for radiated power levels which a single semiconductor device cannot provide. Typically, many solid-state oscillators, each feeding an antenna, are locked together and their powers combined in free space. The array presented in chapter 2 relies on weak inter-element coupling to achieve locking among the elements, and produces a total radiated power in excess of 2 W. Pulsed operation was investigated to determine how the transient current pulse affected the locking behavior. While this array is not optically fed, locking each element of such an array to an optically delivered signal is an attractive option. Photodetectors are a necessary part of an optical distribution system, and these are studied in chapters 3 and 4. Chapter 3 presents a new means of measuring the transient response of high-speed detectors, and chapter 4 describes metal-semiconductor-metal detectors fabricated on GaInAs with copper electrodes for detection at wavelengths of 1.3 μm and 1.55 μm. The copper contacts were found to produce an improved barrier compared to more traditional Schottky metals, a result which highlights the possibility of improving Schottky contacts by careful metal selection. Chapter 5 addresses the generation of low phase noise millimeter-wave optical

  4. A tenuous X-ray corona enveloping AE Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venter, L. A.; Meintjes, P. J.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper we propose that the observed unpulsed X-ray emission in AE Aquarii is the result of a very tenuous hot corona associated with the secondary star, which is pumped magnetohydrodynamically by the propeller action of the fast rotating white dwarf. It is shown that the closed coronal field of the secondary star envelops a substantial portion of the binary system, including the fast rotating magnetized white dwarf. This implies that the propeller outflow of material in AE Aquarii is initiated inside an enveloping magnetic cavity. The outflow crossing the secondary dead-zone field constitutes a βgen = (8πρv2esc/B2) >> 1 plasma, acting as a magnetohydrodynamic generator resulting in the induction of field-aligned currents in these closed magnetospheric circuits where βcir = (8πnkT/B2) << 1. The Ohmic heating of the coronal circuit can readily account for a Tx >= 107 K plasma in the coronal flux tubes connecting the generator and the stellar surface. Further, the bremsstrahlung losses of the thermal electrons in the coronal circuit can readily drive the observed unpulsed X-ray luminosity of Lx ~ 1031 ergs -1, which correlates with the luminosity and relatively large source implied by recent XMM-Newton observations.

  5. Immunogenetics of the A-E alloantigen complex.

    PubMed

    Kopti, F; Briles, R W; Briles, W E

    1997-12-01

    The close linkage (0.5%) between the A and E erythrocyte alloantigen loci present a special challenge in the production of locus-specific typing antisera. The objective of the investigation was to determine immunogenetically the A-E haplotypes (genetically linked combinations of A and E antigens) existing in the locally maintained individuals of the New Hampshire (NH) and White Plymouth Rock (WR) breeds. The A and E alloantigens in these populations were identified using reference antisera previously produced in White Leghorns. A total of four A-E haplotypes were identified within each of the two breeds; A2E1, A6E2, A6E4, and A8E2 in WR and A2E1, A3E7, A7E4, and A8E2 in NH. Individuals of these two brown-egg breeds were backcrossed over several generations to a line of Ancona chickens homozygous at the A and E loci. Genetic segregation occurring over four generations resulted in nonrecombinant and recombinant progeny that were immunized reciprocally with the blood of siblings to raise antibodies reactive with the individual A and E antigens of the NH and WR stocks. The antisera resulting from the within-family alloimmunizations confirmed the haplotypes deduced in the WR and NH lines from the initial tests with the A and E reference antisera.

  6. Neural mechanisms for filtering self-generated sensory signals in cerebellum-like circuits.

    PubMed

    Requarth, Tim; Sawtell, Nathaniel B

    2011-08-01

    This review focuses on recent progress in understanding mechanisms for filtering self-generated sensory signals in cerebellum-like circuits in fish and mammals. Recent in vitro studies in weakly electric gymnotid fish have explored the interplay among anti-Hebbian plasticity, synaptic dynamics, and feedforward inhibition in canceling self-generated electrosensory inputs. Studies of the mammalian dorsal cochlear nucleus have revealed multimodal integration and anti-Hebbian plasticity, suggesting that this circuit may adaptively filter incoming auditory information. In vivo studies in weakly electric mormryid fish suggest a key role for granule cell coding in sensory filtering. The clear links between synaptic plasticity and systems level sensory filtering in cerebellum-like circuits may provide insights into hypothesized adaptive filtering functions of the cerebellum itself.

  7. Investigation of AE Features in Grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xun; Mohammed, Arif; Oluwajobi, Akinjide

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents recent investigation of acoustic emission (AE) behaviours in grinding processes. It demonstrated the acoustic emission features characterized in time and frequency domain are influenced by thermal behaviours of materials. By control laser conditions, the temperature elevation under laser irradiation can be similar to that in a grinding process. Therefore, an innovative concept that grinding process can be monitored by using thermal AE signatures from laser irradiation tests has been proposed. Accordingly, an artificial neural network (ANN), built on laser irradiation tests, was applied to monitor grinding thermal performance. The results showed that grinding performance variation due to wheel wear can be identified by using the ANN. This development could bring great benefits by reducing experimental works in the preparation of an ANN for grinding monitoring.

  8. Atmosphere Explorer (AE) spacecraft system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The principal design and performance characteristics of the AE spacecraft system designed to support the Atmosphere Explorer C, D, and E missions are summarized. It has been prepared for the information of experimenters and other participants in the Atmosphere Explorer program as a general guide for design and operational planning. The description represents the spacecraft system as defined at the conclusion of the interface definition study.

  9. Managing with A/E Ease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    provides a very good foundation on which to build the EASE programs. EASE application programs are a supplementary menu system to Enable’s own menus...mainframe computer systems. Other Peripherals Plotters provide the color graphics output necessary for A/E drawings , which is far superior to that of...for interactive drawing on the display. The EASE program was not designed to be driven by a mouse, but this possibility is currently being studied

  10. Danger of zooplankton feeding: the fluid signal generated by ambush-feeding copepods

    PubMed Central

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Jiang, Houshuo; Colin, Sean P.

    2010-01-01

    Zooplankton feed in any of three ways: they generate a feeding current while hovering, cruise through the water or are ambush feeders. Each mode generates different hydrodynamic disturbances and hence exposes the grazers differently to mechanosensory predators. Ambush feeders sink slowly and therefore perform occasional upward repositioning jumps. We quantified the fluid disturbance generated by repositioning jumps in a millimetre-sized copepod (Re ∼ 40). The kick of the swimming legs generates a viscous vortex ring in the wake; another ring of similar intensity but opposite rotation is formed around the decelerating copepod. A simple analytical model, that of an impulsive point force, properly describes the observed flow field as a function of the momentum of the copepod, including the translation of the vortex and its spatial extension and temporal decay. We show that the time-averaged fluid signal and the consequent predation risk is much less for an ambush-feeding than a cruising or hovering copepod for small individuals, while the reverse is true for individuals larger than about 1 mm. This makes inefficient ambush feeding feasible in small copepods, and is consistent with the observation that ambush-feeding copepods in the ocean are all small, while larger species invariably use hovering or cruising feeding strategies. PMID:20538648

  11. AES Water Architecture Study Interim Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The mission of the Advanced Exploration System (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) is to develop advanced water recovery systems in order to enable NASA human exploration missions beyond low earth orbit (LEO). The primary objective of the AES WRP is to develop water recovery technologies critical to near term missions beyond LEO. The secondary objective is to continue to advance mid-readiness level technologies to support future NASA missions. An effort is being undertaken to establish the architecture for the AES Water Recovery System (WRS) that meets both near and long term objectives. The resultant architecture will be used to guide future technical planning, establish a baseline development roadmap for technology infusion, and establish baseline assumptions for integrated ground and on-orbit environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) definition. This study is being performed in three phases. Phase I of this study established the scope of the study through definition of the mission requirements and constraints, as well as indentifying all possible WRS configurations that meet the mission requirements. Phase II of this study focused on the near term space exploration objectives by establishing an ISS-derived reference schematic for long-duration (>180 day) in-space habitation. Phase III will focus on the long term space exploration objectives, trading the viable WRS configurations identified in Phase I to identify the ideal exploration WRS. The results of Phases I and II are discussed in this paper.

  12. Derivative of Extremophilic 50S Ribosomal Protein L35Ae as an Alternative Protein Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Lomonosova, Anna V.; Ulitin, Andrei B.; Kazakov, Alexei S.; Mirzabekov, Tajib A.; Permyakov, Eugene A.

    2017-01-01

    Small antibody mimetics, or alternative binding proteins (ABPs), extend and complement antibody functionality with numerous applications in research, diagnostics and therapeutics. Given the superiority of ABPs, the last two decades have witnessed development of dozens of alternative protein scaffolds (APSs) for the design of ABPs. Proteins from extremophiles with their high structural stability are especially favorable for APS design. Here, a 10X mutant of the 50S ribosomal protein L35Ae from hyperthermophilic archaea Pyrococcus horikoshii has been probed as an APS. A phage display library of L35Ae 10X was generated by randomization of its three CDR-like loop regions (repertoire size of 2×108). Two L35Ae 10X variants specific to a model target, the hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL), were isolated from the resulting library using phage display. The affinity of these variants (L4 and L7) to HEL ranges from 0.10 μM to 1.6 μM, according to surface plasmon resonance data. While L4 has 1–2 orders of magnitude lower affinity to HEL homologue, bovine α-lactalbumin (BLA), L7 is equally specific to HEL and BLA. The reference L35Ae 10X is non-specific to both HEL and BLA. L4 and L7 are more resistant to denaturation by guanidine hydrochloride compared to the reference L35Ae 10X (mid-transition concentration is higher by 0.1–0.5 M). Chemical crosslinking experiments reveal an increased propensity of L4 and L7 to multimerization. Overall, the CDR-like loop regions of L35Ae 10X represent a proper interface for generation of functional ABPs. Hence, L35Ae is shown to extend the growing family of protein scaffolds dedicated to the design of novel binding proteins. PMID:28103321

  13. Free Radicals Generated by Ionizing Radiation Signal Nuclear Translocation of p53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, J. D.; Pennington, M. E.; Craven, M. T.; Warters, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a transcription factor that regulates several pathways, which function collectively to maintain the integrity of the genome. Nuclear localization is critical for wild-type function. However, the signals that regulate subcellular localization of p53 have not been identified. Here, we examine the effect of ionizing radiation on the subcellular localization of p53 in two cell lines in which p63 is normally sequestered in the cytoplasm and found that ionizing radiation caused a biphasic translocation response. p53 entered the nucleus 1-2 hours postirradiation (early response), subsequently emerged from the nucleus, and then again entered the nucleus 12-24 hours after the cells had been irradiated (delayed response). These changes in subcellular localization could be completely blocked by the free radical scavenger, WR1065. By comparison, two DNA-damaging agents that do not generate free radicals, mitomycin C and doxorubicin, caused translocation only after 12-24 h of exposure to the drugs, and this effect could not be inhibited by WR1065. Hence, although all three DNA-damaging agents induced relocalization of p53 to the nucleus, only the translocation caused by radiation was sensitive to free radical scavenging. We suggest that the free radicals generated by ionizing radiation can signal p53 translocation to the nucleus.

  14. Simple hybrid wire-wireless fiber laser sensor by direct photonic generation of beat signal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengchun; Gao, Liang; Yin, Zuowei; Shi, Yuechun; Zhang, Liang; Chen, Xiangfei; Cheng, Jianchun

    2011-04-20

    Based on direct photonic generation of a beat signal, a simple hybrid wire-wireless fiber laser sensor is proposed. In the sensor, an improved multilongitudinal modes fiber laser cavity is set up by only a fiber Bragg grating, a section of erbium-doped fiber, and a broadband reflector. A photodetector is used to detect the electrical beat signal. Next, the beat signal including the sensor information can access the wireless network through the wireless transmission. At last, a frequency spectrum analyzer is used to demodulate the sensing information. With this method, the long-distance real-time monitor of the fiber sensor can be realized. The proposed technique offers a simple and cheap way for sensing information of the fiber sensor to access the wireless sensor network. An experiment was implemented to measure the strain and the corresponding root mean square deviation is about -5.7 με at 916 MHz and -3.8 με at 1713 MHz after wireless transmission.

  15. Meprin Metalloproteases Generate Biologically Active Soluble Interleukin-6 Receptor to Induce Trans-Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Philipp; Boll, Inga; Rothaug, Michelle; Schumacher, Neele; Schmidt, Frederike; Wichert, Rielana; Schneppenheim, Janna; Lokau, Juliane; Pickhinke, Ute; Koudelka, Tomas; Tholey, Andreas; Rabe, Björn; Scheller, Jürgen; Lucius, Ralph; Garbers, Christoph; Rose-John, Stefan; Becker-Pauly, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Soluble Interleukin-6 receptor (sIL-6R) mediated trans-signaling is an important pro-inflammatory stimulus associated with pathological conditions, such as arthritis, neurodegeneration and inflammatory bowel disease. The sIL-6R is generated proteolytically from its membrane bound form and A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease (ADAM) 10 and 17 were shown to perform ectodomain shedding of the receptor in vitro and in vivo. However, under certain conditions not all sIL-6R could be assigned to ADAM10/17 activity. Here, we demonstrate that the IL-6R is a shedding substrate of soluble meprin α and membrane bound meprin β, resulting in bioactive sIL-6R that is capable of inducing IL-6 trans-signaling. We determined cleavage within the N-terminal part of the IL-6R stalk region, distinct from the cleavage site reported for ADAM10/17. Interestingly, meprin β can be shed from the cell surface by ADAM10/17 and the observation that soluble meprin β is not capable of shedding the IL-6R suggests a regulatory mechanism towards trans-signaling. Additionally, we observed a significant negative correlation of meprin β expression and IL-6R levels on human granulocytes, providing evidence for in vivo function of this proteolytic interaction. PMID:28276471

  16. Low-cost real-time infrared scene generation for image projection and signal injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford, James A., Jr.; King, David E.; Bowden, Mark H.

    1998-07-01

    As cost becomes an increasingly important factor in the development and testing of Infrared sensors and flight computer/processors, the need for accurate hardware-in-the- loop (HWIL) simulations is critical. In the past, expensive and complex dedicated scene generation hardware was needed to attain the fidelity necessary for accurate testing. Recent technological advances and innovative applications of established technologies are beginning to allow development of cost-effective replacements for dedicated scene generators. These new scene generators are mainly constructed from commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware and software components. At the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (MRDEC), researchers have developed such a dynamic IR scene generator (IRSG) built around COTS hardware and software. The IRSG is used to provide dynamic inputs to an IR scene projector for in-band seeker testing and for direct signal injection into the seeker or processor electronics. AMCOM MRDEC has developed a second generation IRSG, namely IRSG2, using the latest Silicon Graphics Incorporated (SGI) Onyx2 with Infinite Reality graphics. As reported in previous papers, the SGI Onyx Reality Engine 2 is the platform of the original IRSG that is now referred to as IRSG1. IRSG1 has been in operation and used daily for the past three years on several IR projection and signal injection HWIL programs. Using this second generation IRSG, frame rates have increased from 120 Hz to 400 Hz and intensity resolution from 12 bits to 16 bits. The key features of the IRSGs are real time missile frame rates and frame sizes, dynamic missile-to-target(s) viewpoint updated each frame in real-time by a six-degree-of- freedom (6DOF) system under test (SUT) simulation, multiple dynamic objects (e.g. targets, terrain/background, countermeasures, and atmospheric effects), latency compensation, point-to-extended source anti-aliased targets, and

  17. Photonic generation of a phase-coded microwave signal based on a single dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenzhou; Zhang, Tingting; Zhang, Fangzheng; Pan, Shilong

    2013-12-15

    A compact scheme for photonic generation of a phase-coded microwave signal using a dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator (DMZM) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. In the proposed scheme, the radio frequency (RF) carrier and the coding signal are sent to the two RF ports of the DMZM, respectively. By properly setting the amplitude of the coding signal and the bias voltage of the DMZM, an exact π-phase-shift phase-coded microwave signal is generated. The proposed scheme has a simple structure since only a single DMZM is required. In addition, good frequency tunability is achieved because no frequency-dependent electrical devices or wavelength-dependent optical devices are applied. The feasibility of the proposed scheme is verified by experiment. 2 or 2.5 Gb/s phase-coded 10 and 20 GHz microwave signals are successfully generated.

  18. An algorithm for the estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio in surface myoelectric signals generated during cyclic movements.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Valentina; Knaflitz, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In many applications requiring the study of the surface myoelectric signal (SMES) acquired in dynamic conditions, it is essential to have a quantitative evaluation of the quality of the collected signals. When the activation pattern of a muscle has to be obtained by means of single- or double-threshold statistical detectors, the background noise level e (noise) of the signal is a necessary input parameter. Moreover, the detection strategy of double-threshold detectors may be properly tuned when the SNR and the duty cycle (DC) of the signal are known. The aim of this paper is to present an algorithm for the estimation of e (noise), SNR, and DC of an SMES collected during cyclic movements. The algorithm is validated on synthetic signals with statistical properties similar to those of SMES, as well as on more than 100 real signals.

  19. Flashing light signaling circuit in sponges: endogenous light generation after tissue ablation in Suberites domuncula.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Matthias; Wang, Xiaohong; Unger, Andreas; Schröder, Heinz C; Grebenjuk, Vladislav A; Pisignano, Dario; Jochum, Klaus P; Müller, Werner E G

    2010-12-15

    The skeleton of siliceous sponges (phylum Porifera: classes Demospongiae and Hexactinellida), composed of tightly interacting spicules that assemble to a genetically fixed scaffold, is formed of bio-silica. This inorganic framework with the quality of quartz glass has been shown to operate as light waveguide in vitro and very likely has a similar function in vivo. Furthermore, the molecular toolkit for endogenous light generation (luciferase) and light/photon harvesting (cryptochrome) has been identified in the demosponge Suberites domuncula. These three components of a light signaling system, spicules-luciferase-cryptochrome, are concentrated in the surface layers (cortex) of the poriferan body. Specimens from which this cortex has been removed/ablated do not emit light. However, with regeneration and reconstitution of the cortex the animals re-gain the capacity to flash light. This newly discovered characteristic of sponges to generate light prompted us to investigate the genetic basis for the endogenous light signaling system. As a potential transcription factor involved in the expression of luciferase and cryptochrome, a SOX-related protein has been identified. In dark-adapted animals or in tissue from below the cortex region, the medulla, no gene or protein expression of SOX-related protein, luciferase, and cryptochrome could be detected. However, during the regeneration of the cortex, a stage-specific expression pattern was recorded: SOX-related protein > luciferase > cryptochrome. We conclude that a flashing light signaling circuit exists, which might control the retinoic acid-induced differentiation of stem cells into pulsating and contracting sponge cells, that is, pinacocytes and myocytes.

  20. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30 Section 120.30 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department...

  1. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30 Section 120.30 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department...

  2. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30 Section 120.30 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department...

  3. Towards 5G: A Photonic Based Millimeter Wave Signal Generation for Applying in 5G Access Fronthaul

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, S. E.; Soltanian, M. R. K.; Amiri, I. S.; Khalily, M.; Supa’at, A. S. M.; Ahmad, H.

    2016-01-01

    5G communications require a multi Gb/s data transmission in its small cells. For this purpose millimeter wave (mm-wave) RF signals are the best solutions to be utilized for high speed data transmission. Generation of these high frequency RF signals is challenging in electrical domain therefore photonic generation of these signals is more studied. In this work, a photonic based simple and robust method for generating millimeter waves applicable in 5G access fronthaul is presented. Besides generating of the mm-wave signal in the 60 GHz frequency band the radio over fiber (RoF) system for transmission of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) with 5 GHz bandwidth is presented. For the purpose of wireless transmission for 5G application the required antenna is designed and developed. The total system performance in one small cell was studied and the error vector magnitude (EVM) of the system was evaluated. PMID:26814621

  4. Towards 5G: A Photonic Based Millimeter Wave Signal Generation for Applying in 5G Access Fronthaul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, S. E.; Soltanian, M. R. K.; Amiri, I. S.; Khalily, M.; Supa’At, A. S. M.; Ahmad, H.

    2016-01-01

    5G communications require a multi Gb/s data transmission in its small cells. For this purpose millimeter wave (mm-wave) RF signals are the best solutions to be utilized for high speed data transmission. Generation of these high frequency RF signals is challenging in electrical domain therefore photonic generation of these signals is more studied. In this work, a photonic based simple and robust method for generating millimeter waves applicable in 5G access fronthaul is presented. Besides generating of the mm-wave signal in the 60 GHz frequency band the radio over fiber (RoF) system for transmission of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) with 5 GHz bandwidth is presented. For the purpose of wireless transmission for 5G application the required antenna is designed and developed. The total system performance in one small cell was studied and the error vector magnitude (EVM) of the system was evaluated.

  5. Towards 5G: A Photonic Based Millimeter Wave Signal Generation for Applying in 5G Access Fronthaul.

    PubMed

    Alavi, S E; Soltanian, M R K; Amiri, I S; Khalily, M; Supa'at, A S M; Ahmad, H

    2016-01-27

    5G communications require a multi Gb/s data transmission in its small cells. For this purpose millimeter wave (mm-wave) RF signals are the best solutions to be utilized for high speed data transmission. Generation of these high frequency RF signals is challenging in electrical domain therefore photonic generation of these signals is more studied. In this work, a photonic based simple and robust method for generating millimeter waves applicable in 5G access fronthaul is presented. Besides generating of the mm-wave signal in the 60 GHz frequency band the radio over fiber (RoF) system for transmission of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) with 5 GHz bandwidth is presented. For the purpose of wireless transmission for 5G application the required antenna is designed and developed. The total system performance in one small cell was studied and the error vector magnitude (EVM) of the system was evaluated.

  6. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: component analysis of EMG signals.

    PubMed

    Bengoetxea, Ana; Leurs, Françoise; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cebolla, Ana Maria; Dan, Bernard; Cheron, Guy; McIntyre, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    A central question in Neuroscience is that of how the nervous system generates the spatiotemporal commands needed to realize complex gestures, such as handwriting. A key postulate is that the central nervous system (CNS) builds up complex movements from a set of simpler motor primitives or control modules. In this study we examined the control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when performing different types of movement: discrete, point-to-point movements in eight different directions and continuous figure-eight movements in both the normal, upright orientation and rotated 90°. To test for the effects of biomechanical constraints, movements were performed in the frontal-parallel or sagittal planes, corresponding to two different nominal flexion/abduction postures of the shoulder. In all cases we measured limb kinematics and surface electromyographic activity (EMG) signals for seven different muscles acting around the shoulder. We first performed principal component analysis (PCA) of the EMG signals on a movement-by-movement basis. We found a surprisingly consistent pattern of muscle groupings across movement types and movement planes, although we could detect systematic differences between the PCs derived from movements performed in each shoulder posture and between the principal components associated with the different orientations of the figure. Unexpectedly we found no systematic differences between the figure eights and the point-to-point movements. The first three principal components could be associated with a general co-contraction of all seven muscles plus two patterns of reciprocal activation. From these results, we surmise that both "discrete-rhythmic movements" such as the figure eight, and discrete point-to-point movement may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the impedance of the limb over the time span of the movement and two others operating to generate movement, one aligned with the

  7. Coupled Research in Ocean Acoustics and Signal Processing for the Next Generation of Underwater Acoustic Communication Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-09

    Coupled Research in Ocean Acoustics and Signal Processing for the Next Generation of Underwater Acoustic Communication Systems 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Processing for the Next Generation of Underwater Acoustic Communication Systems Principal Investigator’s Name: Dr. James Preisig Period Covered By...correlation structure of received communications signals after they have been converted to the frequency domain via Fourier Transforms as de- scribed in

  8. Design considerations for a passive magnetic induction signal generator for sensing hypervelocity projectile passage

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Susoeff, A.R.; Greenwood, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of projectile passage after hypervelocity launch is an important measurement and/or trigger needed for electromagnetic launcher development. One method is to use a magnetic induction technique which takes advantage of the fact that a metal object passing through a magnetic field can move the magnetic flux aside and thereby produce a voltage in a coil. This type of system can be designed to use permanent magnets and thereby be totally passive. In addition this passive system can be designed to be insensitive to the high electromagnetic fields generated during the operation of electrothermal guns and railguns. This diagnostic has been used to trigger other electrically sensitive data acquisition equipment including flash x-rays and to determine the velocity of the projectile. This report discusses the results of tests and a comparison of data with a simple model for calculating the expected signal output of such a device.

  9. Discovering small molecules that promote cardiomyocyte generation by modulating Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Terri T.; Rellinger, Eric J.; Mukherjee, Amrita; Stephens, Lauren; Thorne, Cutris A; Kim, Kwangho; Hu, Jiangyong; Xie, Shuying; Lee, Ethan; Marnett, Larry; Hatzopoulos, Antonis K.; Zhong, Tao P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We have developed a robust in vivo small molecule screen that modulates heart size and cardiomyocyte generation in zebrafish. Three structurally-related compounds (Cardionogen-1 to -3) identified from our screen enlarge the size of the developing heart via myocardial hyperplasia. Increased cardiomyocyte number in Cardionogen-treated embryos is due to expansion of cardiac progenitor cells. In zebrafish embryos and murine embryonic stem (ES) cells, Cardionogen treatment promotes cardiogenesis during and after gastrulation, whereas inhibits heart formation before gastrulation. Cardionogen-induced effects can be antagonized by increasing Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity. We demonstrate that Cardionogen inhibits Wnt/β-catenin-dependent transcription in murine ES cells and zebrafish embryos. Cardionogen can rescue Wnt8-induced cardiomyocyte deficiency and heart-specific phenotypes during development. These findings demonstrate that in vivo small molecule screens targeted on heart size can discover compounds with cardiomyogenic effects and identify underlying target pathways. PMID:22195568

  10. Humanoid Locomotion: An Experimental Study on Signal Processing and Dynamic Approaches to Humanoid Walk Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gan, Quan

    2005-01-01

    It is hoped that one day robots will assist in lunar and Martian surface exploration by constructing facilities before their human counterparts arrive; robots with a human form-factor may be desirable since they can potentially use the same set of tools designed for humans. With the goal in mind, locomotion may be one of the biggest challenges for a humanoid sine the terrain is most likely uneven and varying. An adjustable walk has been developed for the HOAP-2 robot by gathering motor data from a preprogrammed fixed walk and using signal processing techniques. The result is a basic walk pattern adjustable in the frequency domain that can be used as a central pattern generator (CPG) in which the robot can modify using sensor feedback. Ultimately, the feedback can be applied to have the humanoid walk on various terrains, slopes, and avoid obstacles.

  11. Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wang, Zhiguo; Prange, Micah P.; Wu, Dangxin

    2014-12-01

    This Final Report presents work carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators” (Project number: PL10-Scin-theor-PD2Jf) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project was divided into four tasks: 1) Electronic response functions (ab initio data model) 2) Electron-hole yield, variance, and spatial distribution 3) Ab initio calculations of information carrier properties 4) Transport of electron-hole pairs and scintillation efficiency Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the four tasks is provided in this Final Report. Furthermore, published peer-reviewed articles based on the work carried under this project are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  12. A role for oxalic acid generation in ozone-induced signallization in Arabidopis cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Daniel; Kadono, Takashi; Molas, Maria Lia; Errakhi, Rafik; Briand, Joël; Biligui, Bernadette; Kawano, Tomonori; Bouteau, François

    2013-03-01

    Ozone (O(3) ) is an air pollutant with an impact increasingly important in our industrialized world. It affects human health and productivity in various crops. We provide the evidences that treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana with O(3) results in ascorbate-derived oxalic acid production. Using cultured cells of A. thaliana as a model, here we further showed that oxalic acid induces activation of anion channels that trigger depolarization of the cell, increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, generation of reactive oxygen species and cell death. We confirmed that O(3) reacts with ascorbate in the culture, thus resulting in production of oxalic acid and this could be part of the O(3) -induced signalling pathways that trigger programmed cell death.

  13. The influence of vibrations on time reference signals generated using quartz crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drumea, Andrei; Marcu, Alina; Plotog, Ioan

    2016-12-01

    32.768 kHz low frequency crystals are found in a large part of today's embedded systems that use microcontrollers especially in battery supplied applications which need low power consumption1]. Their main role is to offer a stable time reference. There are situations in which time measurement is needed when the system works in a mechanically unstable environment (cars, industrial equipment). The paper presents the studies done on the behavior of 32.768 kHz quartz crystals that are part of embedded systems which operate in a vibrating environment, in terms of period and long-time jitter of the generated time reference signal. The investigations of this effect were done using a test bench especially designed for this purpose which can measure the presented parameters determined by controlled mechanical stimulus (waveform, amplitude and frequency of the vibrations).

  14. BOREAS AES READAC Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, G. Barrie; Funk, Barry; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Canadian AES personnel collected and processed data related to surface atmospheric meteorological conditions over the BOREAS region. This data set contains 15-minute meteorological data from one READAC meteorology station in Hudson Bay, Saskatchewan. Parameters include day, time, type of report, sky condition, visibility, mean sea level pressure, temperature, dewpoint, wind, altimeter, opacity, minimum and maximum visibility, station pressure, minimum and maximum air temperature, a wind group, precipitation, and precipitation in the last hour. The data were collected non-continuously from 24-May-1994 to 20-Sep-1994. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data.

  15. BOREAS AES MARSII Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, G. Barrie; Funk, Barry; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Canadian AES personnel collected several data sets related to surface and atmospheric meteorological conditions over the BOREAS region. This data set contains 15-minute meteorological data from six MARSII meteorology stations in the BOREAS region in Canada. Parameters include site, time, temperature, dewpoint, visibility, wind speed, wind gust, wind direction, two cloud groups, precipitation, and station pressure. Temporally, the data cover the period of May to September 1994. Geo-graphically, the stations are spread across the provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data.

  16. A design of DDS single-frequency signal generator based on phrase jitter technology to reduce scattering noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhihui; Fan, Muwen; Zhou, Luchun

    2015-10-01

    In order to test the working status of adaptive optics systems, it is necessary to design a disturbance signal module. Disturbance signal module based on DDS (Direct Digital frequency Synthesis) is used to generate single-frequency disturbance signal to test the working conditions of deformable mirror and adaptive optics systems. But DDS is a periodic sampling sequence and will inevitably lead to the introduction of periodic noise which makes the disturbance signal scattering. This paper uses two methods to reduce the scattering of the single-frequency signal generated by DDS technology. The first method is the compression ROM table. In the case of the same ROM capacity, it is equivalent to extend the compressed ROM table with 256 points to ROM table with 1024 points. In this process, Oversampling is introduced to improve spectral purity to reduce the scattering of the single-frequency signal. The second method is the random phase jitter technology. It introduces m sequence as DDS sampling output random phase jitter unit. The purpose is to generate some random number added at the end of the phase accumulator. As a result, the output does not always push back than ideal, but randomly in advance, thus breaking its periodicity. This method changes the original uniform look-up sampling into a random non-uniform look-up sampling, making DDS output spectrum white. It can also improve spectral purity of the DDS output, thereby reducing the scatting of the single-frequency signal generated by DDS technology.

  17. Gsalpha signalling suppresses PPARgamma2 generation and inhibits 3T3L1 adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Paddon, Carol; Lewis, Mark D; Grennan-Jones, Fiona; Ludgate, Marian

    2009-08-01

    Since TSH receptor (TSHR) expression increases during adipogenesis and signals via cAMP/phospho-cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), reported to be necessary and sufficient for adipogenesis, we hypothesised that TSHR activation would induce preadipocyte differentiation. Retroviral vectors introduced constitutively active TSHR (TSHR*) into 3T3L1 preadipocytes; despite increased cAMP (RIA) and phospho-CREB (western blot) there was no spontaneous adipogenesis (assessed morphologically, using oil red O and QPCR measurement of adipogenesis markers). We speculated that Gbetagamma signalling may be inhibitory but failed to induce adipogenesis using activated Gsalpha (gsp*). Inhibition of phosphodiesterases did not promote adipogenesis in TSHR* or gsp* populations. Furthermore, differentiation induced by adipogenic medium with pioglitazone was reduced in TSHR* and abolished in gsp* expressing 3T3L1 cells. TSHR* and gsp* did not inactivate PPARgamma (PPARG as listed in the HUGO database) by phosphorylation but expression of PPARgamma1 was reduced and PPARgamma2 undetectable in gsp*. FOXO1 phosphorylation (required to inactivate this repressor of adipogenesis) was lowest in gsp* despite the activation of AKT by phosphorylation. PROF is a mediator that facilitates FOXO1 phosphorylation by phospho-Akt. Its transcript levels remained constantly low in the gsp* population. In most measurements, the TSHR* cells were between the gsp* and control 3T3L1 preadipocytes. The enhanced down-regulation of PREF1 (adipogenesis inhibitor) permits retention of some adipogenic potential in the TSHR* population. We conclude that Gsalpha signalling impedes FOXO1 phosphorylation and thus inhibits PPARgamma transcription and the alternative promoter usage required to generate PPARgamma2, the fat-specific transcription factor necessary for adipogenesis.

  18. Detection of Heater Generated Super Small Scale Striations Using GPS Signal Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmi, A. C.; Milikh, G. M.; Chiang, K.; Psiaki, M.; Secan, J. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Briczinski, S. J.; Siefring, C. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    Recent theoretical models predict that super small striations (SSS) of the electron density, on the order of ten centimeters, can be excited by HF waves with frequency close to multiples of the electron gyro frequency [Gurevich et al., 2006]. The first experimental verification of SSS was made at HAARP [Milikh et al., 2008]. We present results of HAARP experiments that include simultaneous observations of GPS carrier phase and SEE observations of ionospheric turbulence. These observations show that SSS excited by HF frequencies near the fourth harmonic of the gyro frequency scatter GPS signals, and in three out of six experiments indicate the presence of strong turbulence, similar to that observed in descending artificial ionized layer experiments [Pedersen et al., 2010]. This turbulence is capable of generating suprathermal electrons, and in one of the experiments, the presence of fast electrons was confirmed by the HAARP incoherent scattering radar. Estimates on the SSS shows that they correspond to 3-10% electron density depletions. Such irregularities affect UHF signals including GPS, and thus can be important in applications. Gurevich, A.V. and K.P. Zybin (2006), Phys. Lett. A, 358, 159. Milikh, G., et al. (2008), Geophys. Res. Let., 35, L22102, doi:10.1029/2008GL035527. Pedersen, T. et al. (2010), Geophys. Res. Let., 37, L02106, doi:10.1029/2009GL041895.

  19. Multi-octave tunable RF signal generation based on a dual-polarization fiber grating laser.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yan-Nan; Jin, Long; Cheng, Linghao; Quan, Zhan; Li, Mengping; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2012-03-26

    A simple technique has been proposed and demonstrated to generate radio-frequency (RF) signal based on a fiber grating laser with multi-octave tunablity. The laser is fabricated by inscribing a wavelength-matched Bragg grating pair in a short section of low-birefringence Er/Yb co-doped fiber. A RF signal can be obtained by beating the two-polarization mode output with its frequency determined by the birefringence within the cavity. By slicing the laser cavity into two sections and then aligning them with a rotated angle, the output beat frequency can be continuously tuned in a multi-octave frequency range as shown in the experiment from 2.05 GHz down to 289 MHz, as a result of the induced change in optical length for each polarization mode. The present technique has the advantages including simple scheme and large tuning range, and the ability of tuning could be further improved by use of active fibers with higher birefringence.

  20. Signal generator exciting an electromagnetic field for ion beam transport to the vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubol'tsev, Yu. V.; Kogan, V. T.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Chichagov, Yu. V.; Antonov, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    A high-voltage high-frequency signal generator is described that excites an electric field for ion beam transport from an ion source to the vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer. Excitation signals to the number of two are high-frequency sine-wave out-of-phase signals with the same amplitudes. The amplitude and phase of the signals vary from 20 to 100 V and from 10 kHz to 1 MHz, respectively. The generator also produces a controlled bias voltage in the interval 50-200 V. The frequency and amplitude of the signals, as well as the bias voltage, are computer-controlled via the USB interface.

  1. Tunnel barrier enhanced voltage signals generated by magnetization precession of a single ferromagnetic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Takahiro

    2009-03-01

    A variety of experimentally observed phenomena involving nonlocal magnetization dynamics in magnetic multilayers are due to two complementary effects: (i) the transfer of spin angular momentum accompanying charge currents driven by the applied bias voltage between ferromagnetic layers results in torques that (for sufficiently high current densities) generate spontaneous magnetization precession and switching; and (ii) the precessing magnetization of a ferromagnet (FM) pumps spins into adjacent normal metal layers (NM) with no applied bias. In particular, the spin pumping effect is a promising candidate for realizing a spin battery device [1] as a source of elusive pure spin currents (not accompanied by any net charge transport) emitted at the FM/NM interface, where steady magnetization precession of the FM layer is sustained by the absorption of external rf radiation under the FMR conditions. We report the electrical detection of magnetization dynamics in an Al/AlOx/Ni80Fe20/Cu tunnel junction, where a Ni80Fe20 ferromagnetic layer is brought into precession under the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) conditions. The dc voltage generated across the junction by the precessing ferromagnet is enhanced about an order of magnitude compared to the voltage signal observed in Cu/FeNi/Pt structures [2]. A structure of Cu (100nm)/Al (10nm)/AlOx (2.3nm)/Ni80Fe20 (20nm)/Cu (70nm)/Au (25nm) was fabricated on a Si substrate with a 1μm thick thermal oxide layer. The bottom-most 100 nm Cu layer was patterned into a coplanar waveguide (CPW) and the rest of the structure was patterned into a pillar structure on the signal line of the CPW. Dc voltages ˜μV were observed in the Al/AlOx/Ni80Fe20/Cu tunnel junction when the Ni80Fe20 is in the ferromagnetic resonance. The dc voltages increase as the precession cone angle and frequency increase. We discuss the relation of this phenomenon to magnetic spin pumping and speculate on other possible underlying mechanisms responsible for the

  2. Optical differential phase-shift keyed signal generation, transmission and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lize, Yannick Keith

    When encoding information on an electromagnetic wave such as infrared light, to be transmitted through an optical fibre in telecommunication networks, any of the physical properties of light can be modulated. Light has a frequency, intensity, polarization and a phase. Until recently, optical communication systems strictly employed conventional intensity (IM) modulation signals in either non return-to-zero (NRZ) or return-to-zero (RZ) format. But a number of advanced optical modulation formats have attracted increasing attention in the last few years. One prime example is the phase-shift-keyed (PSK) family of formats which carry the information on the optical phase. Since absolute phase is not easily detected through coherent demodulation, differential encoding in which the phase of the preceding bit is used as a relative phase reference for demodulation has become a method of choice for phase modulated signals. The result in the differential-phase-shift-keyed (DPSK) formats, which carry the information in the difference in optical phase between successive bits. In this thesis by article, composed of six papers, we investigate the generation, transmission and demodulation of DPSK in optical fibre transmission systems. We propose a novel way to encode optical packets using DPSK in our investigation of the generation. We also investigate transmission effects monitoring using a novel partial-bit delay interferometer-assisted clock tone monitoring method for sensitive optical-signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR), chromatic dispersion and polarization mode dispersion monitoring. Then we look at the demodulation of DPSK, first investigating the reduced tolerances and power penalties of DPSK demodulation when more than one bit delay is used in the interferometer. We also propose an optical error correction method combining DPSK optical logic gates with electronic logic gates to improve receiver sensitivity and transmission impairment tolerances. Finally we redefine the previously

  3. Endogenous Generation and Signaling Actions of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Electrophilic Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Cipollina, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are beneficial for a number of conditions ranging from cardiovascular disease to chronic airways disorders, neurodegeneration, and cancer. Growing evidence has shown that bioactive oxygenated derivatives are responsible for transducing these salutary effects. Electrophilic oxo-derivatives of omega-3 PUFAs represent a class of oxidized derivatives that can be generated via enzymatic and nonenzymatic pathways. Inflammation and oxidative stress favor the formation of these signaling species to promote the resolution of inflammation within a fine autoregulatory loop. Endogenous generation of electrophilic oxo-derivatives of omega-3 PUFAs has been observed in in vitro and ex vivo human models and dietary supplementation of omega-3 PUFAs has been reported to increase their formation. Due to the presence of an α,β-unsaturated ketone moiety, these compounds covalently and reversibly react with nucleophilic residues on target proteins triggering the activation of cytoprotective pathways, including the Nrf2 antioxidant response, the heat shock response, and the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and suppressing the NF-κB proinflammatory pathway. The endogenous nature of electrophilic oxo-derivatives of omega-3 PUFAs combined with their ability to simultaneously activate multiple cytoprotective pathways has made these compounds attractive for the development of new therapies for the treatment of chronic disorders and acute events characterized by inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:26339618

  4. Announcing the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    b9 da 5e 15 46 57 a7 8d 9d 84 6 90 d8 ab 00 8c bc d3 0a f7 e4 58 05 b8 b3 45 06 7 d0 2c 1e 8f ca 3f 0f 02 c1 af bd 03 01...e3 4a 46 cf 11 d6 5a d6 5a cf 11 09 63 cf d0 47 fe 7e 88 3 03 ef d2 9a 7b df b5 b8 b8 7b df b5 93 33 7c dc ⊕ 7d 3e 44 3b = 48 67 4d d6 52 85 e3 f6 52...6c fb c8 6c 4f d1 11 3a 4c d1 83 f2 f9 7f 63 35 be d2 fb 96 ae 96 ae d2 fb a9 d1 33 c0 c6 9d b8 15 5 e8 c0 50 01 9b ba 53 7c 7c 9b ba 53 ad 68 8e b0

  5. All optical up-converted signal generation with high dispersion tolerance using frequency quadrupling technique for radio over fiber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yiying; Zhao, Jiayi; Hu, Jingjing; Kang, Zijian; Zhu, Wenwu; Fan, Feng; Han, Xiuyou; Zhao, Mingshan

    2016-05-01

    A novel all optical up-converted signal generation scheme with optical single-sideband (OSSB) technique for radio over fiber (RoF) application is presented and experimentally demonstrated using low-bandwidth devices. The OSSB signal is generated by one low-bandwidth intensity LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator (LN-MZM) under frequency quadrupling modulation scheme and one low-bandwidth LN-MZM under double sideband carrier suppressed modulation (DSB-CS) scheme. The proposed all OSSB generation scheme is capable of high tolerance of fiber chromatic dispersion induced power fading (DIPF) effect. Benefiting from this novel OSSB generation scheme, a 26 GHz radio frequency (RF) signal up-conversion is realized successfully when one sideband of the optical LO signal is reused as the optical carrier for intermediate frequency (IF) signal modulation. The received vector signal transmission over long distance single-mode fiber (SMF) shows negligible DIPF effect with the error vector magnitude (EVM) of 15.7% rms. In addition, a spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) of the OSSB up-converting system is measured up to 81 dB Hz2/3. The experiment results indicate that the proposed system may find potential applications in future wireless communication networks, especially in microcellular personal communication system (MPCS).

  6. Photonic generation of frequency-sextupled microwave signal based on dual-polarization modulation without an optical filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zihang; Zhao, Shanghong; Li, Xuan; Qu, Kun; Lin, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Frequency-sextupled microwave signal generation based on dual-polarization modulation using an electro-optic dual-parallel polarization modulator (DPPolM) without an optical filter is proposed. From a theoretical analysis, the frequency-sextupled microwave signal can be obtained by properly adjusting the polarization directions of the modulated optical signals, the powers and the phases of the microwave drive signals applied to the DPPolM. Simulation results show that a 24 GHz microwave signal with an optical sideband suppression ratio (OSSR) exceeding 31 dB and a radio frequency spurious suppression ratio (RFSSR) higher than 25 dB is generated from a 4 GHz microwave drive signal, which match well with the theoretical analysis. Furthermore, it is also proved to be valid that even if the microwave drive voltage, the phase difference, and the polarization direction of light wave deviate from the ideal values to a certain degree, the performance of the generated frequency-sextupled microwave signal is still acceptable.

  7. Investigation on the generation characteristic of pressure pulse wave signal during the measurement-while-drilling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changqing, Zhao; Kai, Liu; Tong, Zhao; Takei, Masahiro; Weian, Ren

    2014-04-01

    The mud-pulse logging instrument is an advanced measurement-while-drilling (MWD) tool and widely used by the industry in the world. In order to improve the signal transmission rate, ensure the accurate transmission of information and address the issue of the weak signal on the ground of oil and gas wells, the signal generator should send out the strong mud-pulse signals with the maximum amplitude. With the rotary valve pulse generator as the study object, the three-dimensional Reynolds NS equations and standard k - ɛ turbulent model were used as a mathematical model. The speed and pressure coupling calculation was done by simple algorithms to get the amplitudes of different rates of flow and axial clearances. Tests were done to verify the characteristics of the pressure signals. The pressure signal was captured by the standpiece pressure monitoring system. The study showed that the axial clearances grew bigger as the pressure wave amplitude value decreased and caused the weakening of the pulse signal. As the rate of flow got larger, the pressure wave amplitude would increase and the signal would be enhanced.

  8. Collider Signals of a Composite Higgs in the Standard Model with Four Generations

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, A.; Bar-Shalom, S.; Eilam, G.

    2010-03-20

    Recent fits of electroweak precision data to the StandardModel (SM) with a 4th sequential family (SM4) point to a possible 'three-prong composite solution': (1) the Higgs mass is at the TeV-scale, (2) the masses of the 4th family quarks t{prime}, b{prime} are of {Omicron}(500) GeV and (3) the mixing angle between the 4th and 3rd generation quarks is of the order of the Cabibbo angle, {theta}{sub 34} {approx} {Omicron}(0.1). Such a manifestation of the SM4 is of particular interest as it may suggest that the Higgs is a composite state, predominantly of the 4th generation heavy quarks. Motivated by the above, we show that the three-prong composite solution to the SM4 can have interesting new implications for Higgs phenomenology. For example, the Higgs can decay to a single heavy 4th generation quark via the 3-body decays (through an off-shell t{prime} or b{prime}) H {yields} {bar t}{prime}t{prime}* {yields} {bar t}{prime}bW{sup +} and H {yields} {bar b}{prime}b{prime}* {yields} {bar b}{prime}tW{sup -}. These flavor diagonal decays can be dramatically enhanced at the LHC (by several orders of magnitudes) due to the large width effects of the resonating heavy Higgs in the processes gg {yields} H {yields} {bar t}{prime}t{prime}* {yields} {bar t}{prime}bW{sup +} and gg {yields} H {yields} {bar b}{prime}b{prime}* {yields} {bar b}{prime}tW{sup -}, thus yielding a viable signal above the corresponding continuum QCD production rates. In addition, the Higgs can decay to a single t{prime} and b{prime} in the loop-generated flavor changing (FC) channels H {yields} b{prime}{bar b}, t{prime}{bar t}. These FC decays are essentially 'GIM-free' and can, therefore, have branching ratios as large as 10{sup -4} - 10{sup -3}.

  9. Curcumin sensitizes glioblastoma to temozolomide by simultaneously generating ROS and disrupting AKT/mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Yin, Haitao; Zhou, Yun; Wen, Cuixia; Zhou, Chong; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Xiang; Wang, Lifeng; You, Chuanwen; Shao, Junfei

    2014-10-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ), a DNA alkylating agent, represents the most important chemotherapeutic option for the treatment of glioblastoma in the clinic. Despite its frequent use, the therapeutic efficacy of TMZ remains very limited due to its frequent resistance in glioblastoma. Previous evidence suggested that curcumin (CUM), an ingredient of the Indian spice turmeric, is able to sensitize glioblastoma to TMZ treatment. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. In the present study, we performed in vitro and in vivo experiments to evaluate the interaction of CUM and TMZ on the inhibition of glioblastoma and to investigate its potential mechanisms of action using U87MG cell lines and xenograft mouse models. We demonstrated that CUM enhanced the therapeutic response to TMZ in U87MG glioblastoma by enhancing apoptosis. We then proceeded to investigate the potential apoptotic signaling pathways that are involved. We observed a synergistic effect of the combination of CUM and TMZ in generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, suggesting that ROS may contribute to the impact of CUM on sensitizing TMZ treatment. We also showed that CUM and TMZ treatment alone significantly suppressed phosphorylated AKT and mTOR, whereas their combination achieved a more pronounced inhibitory effect. These data indicated that blockage of AKT/mTOR signaling appeared to contribute to the elevated apoptosis caused by the combination treatment with CUM and TMZ. In conclusion, this study provided molecular insights into the effects of CUM on the therapeutic response of glioblastoma to TMZ and opened new avenues for optimizing the therapeutic effects of TMZ-based therapies.

  10. Synaptic generation of an intracellular retrograde signal requires activation of the tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling cascades in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Stough, Shara; Kopec, Ashley M; Carew, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Cellular changes underlying memory formation can be generated in an activity-dependent manner at specific synapses. Thus an important question concerns the mechanisms by which synaptic signals communicate with the cell body to mediate these cellular changes. A monosynaptic circuit that is enhanced by sensitization in Aplysia is well-suited to study this question because three different subcellular compartments: (i) the sensorimotor SN-MN synapses, (ii) the SN projections to MNs via axonal connections, (iii) the SN cell bodies, can all be manipulated and studied independently. Here, we report that activity-dependent (AD) training in either the entire SN-MN circuit or in only the synaptic compartment, activates MAPK in a temporally and spatially specific pattern. Specifically, we find (i) MAPK activation is first transiently generated at SN-MN synapses during training, (ii) immediately after training MAPK is transiently activated in SN-MN axonal connections and persistently activated in SN cell bodies, and finally, (iii) MAPK is activated in SN cell bodies and SN-MN synapses 1h after training. These data suggest that there is an intracellularly transported retrograde signal generated at the synapse which is later responsible for delayed MAPK activation at SN somata. Finally, we find that this retrograde signal requires activation of tyrosine kinase (TK) and MEK signaling cascades at the synapses.

  11. Genetically Identified Suppressed-by-Contrast Retinal Ganglion Cells Reliably Signal Self-Generated Visual Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Nai-Wen; Pearson, James T.; Heller, Charles R.; Demas, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Spike trains of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the sole source of visual information to the brain; and understanding how the ∼20 RGC types in mammalian retinae respond to diverse visual features and events is fundamental to understanding vision. Suppressed-by-contrast (SbC) RGCs stand apart from all other RGC types in that they reduce rather than increase firing rates in response to light increments (ON) and decrements (OFF). Here, we genetically identify and morphologically characterize SbC-RGCs in mice, and target them for patch-clamp recordings under two-photon guidance. We find that strong ON inhibition (glycine > GABA) outweighs weak ON excitation, and that inhibition (glycine > GABA) coincides with decreases in excitation at light OFF. These input patterns explain the suppressive spike responses of SbC-RGCs, which are observed in dim and bright light conditions. Inhibition to SbC-RGC is driven by rectified receptive field subunits, leading us to hypothesize that SbC-RGCs could signal pattern-independent changes in the retinal image. Indeed, we find that shifts of random textures matching saccade-like eye movements in mice elicit robust inhibitory inputs and suppress spiking of SbC-RGCs over a wide range of texture contrasts and spatial frequencies. Similarly, stimuli based on kinematic analyses of mouse blinking consistently suppress SbC-RGC spiking. Receiver operating characteristics show that SbC-RGCs are reliable indicators of self-generated visual stimuli that may contribute to central processing of blinks and saccades. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study genetically identifies and morphologically characterizes suppressed-by-contrast retinal ganglion cells (SbC-RGCs) in mice. Targeted patch-clamp recordings from SbC-RGCs under two-photon guidance elucidate the synaptic mechanisms mediating spike suppression to contrast steps, and reveal that SbC-RGCs respond reliably to stimuli mimicking saccade-like eye movements and blinks. The similarity of

  12. Possible Origins of the `Free T Phase' Seismic Signals Generated by the Kick `em Jenny Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohais, A.; Mohais, R.

    2006-12-01

    The Kick 'em Jenny submarine volcano located approximately 9km off the North Coast of Grenada in the Lesser Antilles, was discovered in 1939. Since then, it has had a history of twelve recorded eruptions. Geophysicists have determined over the years that many of these eruptions have been accompanied by T- phases occurring in the absence of P and S-phases. Although these authors have characterized these 'free T- phases' and have analyzed the frequency components of the seismic activity, there has been little attention given to the possible origins of these signals. Based on the analysis of the seismic signals of eruptions of Kick 'em Jenny, an attempt is made to determine a possible source of the free T-phases. Previous studies of sample free T-phases showed a spectral peak of 0.7 Hz, corresponding to a period of 1.43 seconds. Although no definitive statement by previous authors was made on this analysis, one may be led to categorise the event as a long period event. When the power spectral densities of a long period event from a volcanic earthquake was compared to that of a free T phase however, there was a marked difference between the two. Within the bandwidth of 1 to 6 Hz, the power spectrum of the T phase of an earthquake exhibits frequency peaks beyond the 10 Hz value as compared to a value less than 1. Also in the 1990 Kick 'em Jenny eruption, there was a period of harmonic tremor preceding the T phase. Harmonic tremor lends itself to the idea of the signal originating from a resonator. One possibility is the resonance of a fluid filled cavity which accompanies the oscillation of magma within a fissure arising from rapid degassing. This may be applicable in the case of Kick 'em Jenny since it is in fact active. The other possibility is the presence of reverberations in the stratified structure of the volcano. Other evidence suggests that in the time domain there is a significant difference between the free T-phase and the earthquake generated T phase, in that

  13. AE Monitoring and Analysis of HVOF Thermal Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, N. H.; Ahmed, R.; Reuben, R. L.; Allcock, B.

    2011-09-01

    This work presents an in situ monitoring of HVOF thermal spraying process through an acoustic emission (AE) technique in an industrial coating chamber. Single layer thermal spraying on substrate was carried out through slits. Continuous multilayer thermal spraying onto the sample without slit was also conducted. The AE was measured using a broadband piezoelectric AE sensor positioned on the back of the substrate. A mathematical model has been developed to determine the total kinetic energy of particles impacting the substrate through slits. Results of this work demonstrate that AE associated with particle impacts can be used for in situ monitoring of coating process. Results also show that the amplitude and AE energy is related to the spray gun transverse speed and the oxy-fuel pressure. The measured AE energy was found to vary with the number of particles impacting the substrate, determined using the mathematical model.

  14. Operational Safety Assessment of Turbo Generators with Wavelet Rényi Entropy from Sensor-Dependent Vibration Signals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Baojian; Chen, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of sensor technology, various professional sensors are installed on modern machinery to monitor operational processes and assure operational safety, which play an important role in industry and society. In this work a new operational safety assessment approach with wavelet Rényi entropy utilizing sensor-dependent vibration signals is proposed. On the basis of a professional sensor and the corresponding system, sensor-dependent vibration signals are acquired and analyzed by a second generation wavelet package, which reflects time-varying operational characteristic of individual machinery. Derived from the sensor-dependent signals’ wavelet energy distribution over the observed signal frequency range, wavelet Rényi entropy is defined to compute the operational uncertainty of a turbo generator, which is then associated with its operational safety degree. The proposed method is applied in a 50 MW turbo generator, whereupon it is proved to be reasonable and effective for operation and maintenance. PMID:25894934

  15. Coupled Research in Ocean Acoustics and Signal Processing for the Next Generation of Underwater Acoustic Communication Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-05

    JPAnalytics LLC CC: DCMA Boston DTIC Director, NRL Progress Report #9 Coupled Research in Ocean Acoustics and Signal Processing for the Next Generation...of Underwater Acoustic Communication Systems Principal Investigator’s Name: Dr. James Preisig Period Covered By Report: 4/20/2016 to 7/19/2016 Report...lower dimensional structures in acoustic communications data, specifically fre- quency domain transformations of received communications signals, to

  16. BOREAS AES Campbell Scientific Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, G. Barrie; Funk, Barrie; Knapp. David E. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Canadian AES personnel collected data related to surface and atmospheric meteorological conditions over the BOREAS region. This data set contains 15-minute meteorological data from 14 automated meteorology stations located across the BOREAS region. Included in this data are parameters of date, time, mean sea level pressure, station pressure, temperature, dew point, wind speed, resultant wind speed, resultant wind direction, peak wind, precipitation, maximum temperature in the last hour, minimum temperature in the last hour, pressure tendency, liquid precipitation in the last hour, relative humidity, precipitation from a weighing gauge, and snow depth. Temporally, the data cover the period of August 1993 to December 1996. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data.

  17. Higgs Properties in the Fourth Generation MSSM: Boosted Signals Over the 3G Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Cotta, R.C.; Hewett, J.L.; Ismail, A.; Le, M.-P.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-15

    The generalization of the MSSM to the case of four chiral fermion generations (4GMSSM) can lead to significant changes in the phenomenology of the otherwise familiar Higgs sector. In most of the 3GMSSM parameter space, the lighter CP-even h is {approx} 115-125 GeV and mostly Standard Model-like while H,A,H{sup {+-}} are all relatively heavy. Furthermore, the ratio of Higgs vevs, tan {beta}, is relatively unconstrained. In contrast to this, in the 4GMSSM, heavy fourth generation fermion loops drive the masses of h,H,H{sup {+-}} to large values while the CP-odd boson, A, can remain relatively light and tan {beta} is restricted to the range 1/2 {approx}< tan {beta} {approx}< 2 due to perturbativity requirements on Yukawa couplings. We explore this scenario in some detail, concentrating on the collider signatures of the light CP-odd Higgs at both the Tevatron and LHC. We find that while gg {yields} A may lead to a potential signal in the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} channel at the LHC, A may first be observed in the {gamma}{gamma} channel due to a highly loop-enhanced cross section that can be more than an order of magnitude greater than that of a SM Higgs for A masses of {approx} 115-120 and tan {beta} < 1. We find that the CP-even states h,H are highly mixed and can have atypical branching fractions. Precision electroweak constraints, particularly for the light A parameter space region, are examined in detail.

  18. Fatigue crack localization with near-field acoustic emission signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changjiang; Zhang, Yunfeng

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents an AE source localization technique using near-field acoustic emission (AE) signals induced by crack growth and propagation. The proposed AE source localization technique is based on the phase difference in the AE signals measured by two identical AE sensing elements spaced apart at a pre-specified distance. This phase difference results in canceling-out of certain frequency contents of signals, which can be related to AE source direction. Experimental data from simulated AE source such as pencil breaks was used along with analytical results from moment tensor analysis. It is observed that the theoretical predictions, numerical simulations and the experimental test results are in good agreement. Real data from field monitoring of an existing fatigue crack on a bridge was also used to test this system. Results show that the proposed method is fairly effective in determining the AE source direction in thick plates commonly encountered in civil engineering structures.

  19. Numerical study of magnetoacoustic signal generation with magnetic induction based on inhomogeneous conductivity anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xun; Hu, Sanqing; Li, Lihua; Zhu, Shanan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is a noninvasive imaging modality for generating electrical conductivity images of biological tissues with high spatial resolution. In this paper, we create a numerical model, including a permanent magnet, a coil, and a two-layer coaxial cylinder with anisotropic electrical conductivities, for the MAT-MI forward problem. We analyze the MAT-MI sources in two cases, on a thin conductive boundary layer and in a homogeneous medium, and then develop a feasible numerical approach to solve the MAT-MI sound source densities in the anisotropic conductive model based on finite element analysis of electromagnetic field. Using the numerical finite element method, we then investigate the magnetoacoustic effect of anisotropic conductivity under the inhomogeneous static magnetic field and inhomogeneous magnetic field, quantitatively compute the boundary source densities in the conductive model, and calculate the sound pressure. The anisotropic conductivity contributes to the distribution of the eddy current density, Lorentz force density, and acoustic signal. The proposed models and approaches provide a more realistic simulation environment for MAT-MI.

  20. Extracting ocean-generated tidal magnetic signals from Swarm data through satellite gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Tyler, Robert H.; Olsen, Nils

    2016-04-01

    Ocean-generated magnetic field models of the Principal Lunar, M2, and the Larger Lunar elliptic, N2, semidiurnal tidal constituents were estimated through a "Comprehensive Inversion" of the first 20.5 months of magnetic measurements from European Space Agency's (ESA) Swarm satellite constellation mission. While the constellation provides important north-south along-track gradiometry information, it is the unique low-spacecraft pair that allows for east-west cross-track gradiometry. This latter type is crucial in delivering an M2 estimate of similar quality with that derived from over 10 years of CHAMP satellite data but over a shorter interval, at higher altitude, and during more magnetically disturbed conditions. Recovered N2 contains nonoceanic signal but is highly correlated with theoretical models in regions of maximum oceanic amplitude. Thus, satellite magnetic gradiometry may eventually enable the monitoring of ocean electrodynamic properties at temporal resolutions of 1 to 2 years, which may have important implications for the inference of ocean temperature and salinity.

  1. Extracting Ocean-Generated Tidal Magnetic Signals from Swarm Data Through Satellite Gradiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Tyler, Robert H.; Olsen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Ocean-generated magnetic field models of the Principal Lunar, M2, and the Larger Lunar elliptic, N2, semidiurnal tidal constituents were estimated through a "Comprehensive Inversion" of the first 20.5 months of magnetic measurements from European Space Agency's (ESA) Swarm satellite constellation mission. While the constellation provides important north-south along-track gradiometry information, it is the unique low-spacecraft pair that allows for east-west cross-track gradiometry. This latter type is crucial in delivering an M2 estimate of similar quality with that derived from over 10 years of CHAMP satellite data but over a shorter interval, at higher altitude, and during more magnetically disturbed conditions. Recovered N2 contains nonoceanic signal but is highly correlated with theoretical models in regions of maximum oceanic amplitude. Thus, satellite magnetic gradiometry may eventually enable the monitoring of ocean electrodynamic properties at temporal resolutions of 1 to 2 years, which may have important implications for the inference of ocean temperature and salinity.

  2. An unsupervised pattern recognition approach for AE data originating from fatigue tests on polymer-composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, D. D.; Ramasso, E.; Placet, V.; Zhang, S.; Boubakar, L.; Zerhouni, N.

    2015-12-01

    This work investigates acoustic emission generated during tension fatigue tests carried out on a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite specimen. Since massive fatigue data processing, especially noise reduction, remains an important challenge in AE data analysis, a Mahalanobis distance-based noise modeling has been proposed in the present work to tackle this problem. A sequential feature selection based on Davies-Bouldin index has been implemented for fast dimensionality reduction. An unsupervised classifier offline-learned from quasi-static data is then used to classify the data to different AE sources with the possibility to dynamically accommodate with unseen ones. With an efficient proposed noise removal and automatic separation of AE events, this pattern discovery procedure provides an insight into fatigue damage development in composites in the presence of millions of AE events.

  3. AKAP signaling complexes: pointing towards the next generation of therapeutic targets?

    PubMed

    Esseltine, Jessica L; Scott, John D

    2013-12-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) streamline signal transduction by localizing signaling enzymes with their substrates. Great strides have been made in elucidating the role of these macromolecular signaling complexes as new binding partners and novel AKAPs are continually being uncovered. The mechanics and dynamics of these multi-enzyme assemblies suggest that AKAP complexes are viable targets for therapeutic intervention. This review will highlight recent advances in AKAP research focusing on local signaling events that are perturbed in disease.

  4. Discrete convolution of digital optical signals during noncollinear second harmonic generation in the LiIO3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berishev, I. E.; Rakovskii, V. Iu.; Selishchev, A. V.; Shcherbakov, A. S.

    1989-04-01

    The paper reports results of an experimental study of the possibility of implementing the discrete convolution of digital optical signals using the effect of second harmonic generation in a crystal with quadratic nonlinearity. With reference to results obtained for a LiIO3 single crystal, it is shown that, in the regime of noncollinear optical second harmonic generation, a nonlinear crystal can be used as a high-speed active element of a digital optical processor with parallel coding of binary data.

  5. A novel LabVIEW-based multi-channel non-invasive abdominal maternal-fetal electrocardiogram signal generator.

    PubMed

    Martinek, Radek; Kelnar, Michal; Koudelka, Petr; Vanus, Jan; Bilik, Petr; Janku, Petr; Nazeran, Homer; Zidek, Jan

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the design, construction, and testing of a multi-channel fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) signal generator based on LabVIEW. Special attention is paid to the fetal heart development in relation to the fetus' anatomy, physiology, and pathology. The non-invasive signal generator enables many parameters to be set, including fetal heart rate (FHR), maternal heart rate (MHR), gestational age (GA), fECG interferences (biological and technical artifacts), as well as other fECG signal characteristics. Furthermore, based on the change in the FHR and in the T wave-to-QRS complex ratio (T/QRS), the generator enables manifestations of hypoxic states (hypoxemia, hypoxia, and asphyxia) to be monitored while complying with clinical recommendations for classifications in cardiotocography (CTG) and fECG ST segment analysis (STAN). The generator can also produce synthetic signals with defined properties for 6 input leads (4 abdominal and 2 thoracic). Such signals are well suited to the testing of new and existing methods of fECG processing and are effective in suppressing maternal ECG while non-invasively monitoring abdominal fECG. They may also contribute to the development of a new diagnostic method, which may be referred to as non-invasive trans-abdominal CTG +  STAN. The functional prototype is based on virtual instrumentation using the LabVIEW developmental environment and its associated data acquisition measurement cards (DAQmx). The generator also makes it possible to create synthetic signals and measure actual fetal and maternal ECGs by means of bioelectrodes.

  6. [Application of kalman filtering based on wavelet transform in ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Qin, Xia; Shen, Lan-sun

    2002-12-01

    Kalman filtering is a recursive algorithm, which has been proposed as an attractive alternative to correct overlapping interferences in ICP-AES. However, the noise in ICP-AES contaminates the signal arising from the analyte and hence limits the accuracy of kalman filtering. Wavelet transform is a powerful technique in signal denoising due to its multi-resolution characteristics. In this paper, first, the effect of noise on kalman filtering is discussed. Then we apply the wavelet-transform-based soft-thresholding as the pre-processing of kalman filtering. The simulation results show that the kalman filtering based on wavelet transform can effectively reduce the noise and increase the accuracy of the analysis.

  7. PDS 144: The First Confirmed Herbig Ae-Herbig Ae Wide Binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornbeck, J. B.; Grady, C. A.; Perrin, M. D.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Tofflemire, B. M.; Brown, A.; Holtzman, J. A.; Arraki, K.; Hamaguchi, K.; Woodgate, B.; Petre, R.; Daly, B.; Grogin, N. A.; Bonfield, D. G.; Williger, G. M.; Lauroesch, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    PDS 144 is a pair of Herbig Ae stars that are separated by 5.35" on the sky. It has previously been shown to have an A2Ve Herbig Ae star viewed at 83 deg inclination as its northern member and an A5Ve Herbig Ae star as its southern member. Direct imagery revealed a disk occulting PDS 144 N - the first edge-on disk observed around a Herbig Ae star. The lack of an obvious disk in direct imagery suggested PDS 144 S might be viewed face-on or not physically associated with PDS 144 N. Multi-epoch HST imagery of PDS 144 with a 5 yr baseline demonstrates PDS 144 N & S are comoving and have a common proper motion with TYC 6782-878-1. TYC 6782-878-1 has previously been identified as a member of Upper Sco sub-association A at d = 145 +/- 2 pc with an age of 5 - 10 Myr. Ground-based imagery reveals jets and a string of HH knots extending 13' (possibly further) which are aligned to within 7 deg +/- 6 deg on the sky. By combining proper motion data and the absence of a dark mid-plane with radial velocity data, we measure the inclination of PDS 144 S to be i = 73 deg +/- 7 deg. The radial velocity of the jets from PDS 144 N & S indicates they, and therefore their disks, are misaligned by 25 deg +/- 9 deg.. This degree of misalignment is similar to that seen in T-Tauri wide binaries.

  8. The stability of calibration standards for ICP/AES analysis: Six-month study

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, E.A.; Huff, D.R.

    1992-05-01

    The stability of instrument calibration standards for Inductively Coupled Plasma/Atomic Emission Spectrometric (ICP/AES) analysis was studied over a six-month period. Data were obtained as functions of analyte concentration, acid type, and acidity. The impact of acid concentration on signal-to-background ratios (S/B) was also assessed. The results show that analytes maintain their integrity over extended periods with appropriate inorganic acid preservatives. Thus, frequent standard preparations become unnecessary to obtain valid analytical data.

  9. Synaptic signal streams generated by ex vivo neuronal networks contain non-random, complex patterns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmook; Zemianek, Jill M; Shultz, Abraham; Vo, Anh; Maron, Ben Y; Therrien, Mikaela; Courtright, Christina; Guaraldi, Mary; Yanco, Holly A; Shea, Thomas B

    2014-11-01

    Cultured embryonic neurons develop functional networks that transmit synaptic signals over multiple sequentially connected neurons as revealed by multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) embedded within the culture dish. Signal streams of ex vivo networks contain spikes and bursts of varying amplitude and duration. Despite the random interactions inherent in dissociated cultures, neurons are capable of establishing functional ex vivo networks that transmit signals among synaptically connected neurons, undergo developmental maturation, and respond to exogenous stimulation by alterations in signal patterns. These characteristics indicate that a considerable degree of organization is an inherent property of neurons. We demonstrate herein that (1) certain signal types occur more frequently than others, (2) the predominant signal types change during and following maturation, (3) signal predominance is dependent upon inhibitory activity, and (4) certain signals preferentially follow others in a non-reciprocal manner. These findings indicate that the elaboration of complex signal streams comprised of a non-random distribution of signal patterns is an emergent property of ex vivo neuronal networks.

  10. Electrically controlled nonlinear optical generation and signal processing in plasmonic metamaterials (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wenshan

    2016-09-01

    Metamaterials have offered not only the unprecedented opportunity to generate unconventional electromagnetic properties that are not found in nature, but also the exciting potential to create customized nonlinear media with tailored high-order effects. Two particularly compelling directions of current interests are active metamaterials, where the optical properties can be purposely manipulated by external stimuli, and nonlinear metamaterials, which enable intensity-dependent frequency conversion of light. By exploring the interaction of these two directions, we leverage the electrical and optical functions simultaneously supported in nanostructured metals and demonstrate electrically-controlled nonlinear processes from photonic metamaterials. We show that a variety of nonlinear optical phenomena, including the wave mixing and the optical rectification, can be purposely modulated by applied voltage signals. In addition, electrically-induced and voltage-controlled nonlinear effects facilitate us to demonstrate the backward phase matching in a negative index material, a long standing prediction in nonlinear metamaterials. Other results to be covered in this talk include photon-drag effect in plasmonic metamaterials and ion-assisted nonlinear effects from metamaterials in electrolytes. Our results reveal a grand opportunity to exploit optical metamaterials as self-contained, dynamic electrooptic systems with intrinsically embedded electrical functions and optical nonlinearities. Reference: L. Kang, Y. Cui, S. Lan, S. P. Rodrigues, M. L. Brongersma, and W. Cai, Nature Communications, 5, 4680 (2014). S. P. Rodrigues and W.Cai, Nature Nanotechnology, 10, 387 (2015). S. Lan, L. Kang, D. T. Schoen, S. P. Rodrigues, Y. Cui, M. L. Brongersma, and W. Cai, Nature Materials, 14, 807 (2015).

  11. Monitoring of Surface Grinding process using Acoustic Emission (AE) with emphasis on Cutting Fluid selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisal, Tejas V.

    Correct selection of cutting fluid is an important step in all machining operations. In this study, experiments were designed and conducted on AISI 52100 steel to determine the effects of using different cutting fluids in Surface Grinding. The grinding parameters varied were wheel speed, feed, depth of cut and type of cutting fluid. The grinding responses studied here were Acoustic Emission (AE) Signals, Normal and Tangential Forces on the workpiece surface, Grinding Temperature and Surface Roughness. Potential of Acoustic Emission technique as a tool to provide efficient real-time knowledge and monitoring of the grinding process, is tested in this research. AERMS values were used to analyses the process characteristics. This paper proposes four different statistical models for predicting Grinding Temperature, Force, Acoustic Emission (AERMS) and Roughness, based on grinding parameters. This research concludes that the selection of Cutting Fluids influence the Surface finish, AE signals, Temperature and grinding Forces measured. Further, prediction of surface roughness during the grinding process using AE signal monitoring is demonstrated in this work.

  12. 15 CFR Appendix B to Part 30 - AES Filing Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false AES Filing Codes B Appendix B to Part..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS Pt. 30, App. B Appendix B to Part 30—AES Filing Codes Part I—Method of Transportation Codes 10Vessel 11Vessel Containerized 12Vessel (Barge) 20Rail...

  13. 15 CFR Appendix B to Part 30 - AES Filing Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false AES Filing Codes B Appendix B to Part 30 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS Pt. 30, App. B Appendix B to Part 30—AES Filing Codes Part...

  14. 15 CFR Appendix B to Part 30 - AES Filing Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false AES Filing Codes B Appendix B to Part 30 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS Pt. 30, App. B Appendix B to Part 30—AES Filing Codes Part...

  15. 15 CFR Appendix B to Part 30 - AES Filing Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false AES Filing Codes B Appendix B to Part 30 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS Pt. 30, App. B Appendix B to Part 30—AES Filing Codes Part...

  16. 15 CFR Appendix B to Part 30 - AES Filing Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false AES Filing Codes B Appendix B to Part 30 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS Pt. 30, App. B Appendix B to Part 30—AES Filing Codes Part...

  17. Seismoacoustic analysis of Ultra-Long-Period Signals Generated in the Atmosphere during the 2009 Eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. J.; Haney, M. M.; Van Eaton, A. R.; Schwaiger, H. F.; Schneider, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate a novel recording of volcanically-generated atmospheric gravity waves on multiple (proximal) stations during the 2009 eruptive activity of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska. From March 23 - April 4, 2009, 16 of the 19 ash-generating explosions reached the stratosphere (>10 km asl.), and a subset of these explosions produced significant ultra-long-period (ULP) seismic signals at periods greater than 250 s. The ULP signals were recorded on a temporary network of seismometers (0.033 - 50 Hz) and a single permanent infrasound sensor (0.1 - 50 Hz) all located within 12 kilometers of the active vent. The ULP signals have delayed arrivals following explosion onsets in both the seismic and infrasound data, indicating that they are generated in the atmosphere. The atmosphere sustains two types of ULP signals: acoustic waves and gravity waves. ULP acoustic waves are mostly controlled by the compressibility of the atmosphere, travel close to the speed of sound, and have a maximum period limited by the acoustic cut-off frequency of about 300 s. Gravity waves are buoyancy-controlled oscillations set up by the disruption of the normal density stratification of the atmosphere, typically have periods greater than 300 s and phase velocities of 10s of m/s. We observe a range in peak ULP energy (300 - 400+ s) that suggests both types of ULP signals were generated by the Redoubt explosions, but that gravity waves dominate for some of the explosions. Moreover, we see moveout velocities of 10s of m/s for some events and acoustic speeds for others since the ULP signals were recorded across the local network. In addition to signals on the vertical components, high amplitude signals are also recorded on the horizontal components. Since we are dealing with signals in the tilt-dominated portion of the seismometer response, the horizontal components are converted to tilt and we observe multiple tilt cycles at periods similar to the ULP signals. These signals indicate tilts of 10s-100s of

  18. The global compendium of Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Moritz U. G.; Sinka, Marianne E.; Duda, Kirsten A.; Mylne, Adrian; Shearer, Freya M.; Brady, Oliver J.; Messina, Jane P.; Barker, Christopher M.; Moore, Chester G.; Carvalho, Roberta G.; Coelho, Giovanini E.; van Bortel, Wim; Hendrickx, Guy; Schaffner, Francis; Wint, G. R. William; Elyazar, Iqbal R. F.; Teng, Hwa-Jen; Hay, Simon I.

    2015-07-01

    Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus are the main vectors transmitting dengue and chikungunya viruses. Despite being pathogens of global public health importance, knowledge of their vectors’ global distribution remains patchy and sparse. A global geographic database of known occurrences of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus between 1960 and 2014 was compiled. Herein we present the database, which comprises occurrence data linked to point or polygon locations, derived from peer-reviewed literature and unpublished studies including national entomological surveys and expert networks. We describe all data collection processes, as well as geo-positioning methods, database management and quality-control procedures. This is the first comprehensive global database of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus occurrence, consisting of 19,930 and 22,137 geo-positioned occurrence records respectively. Both datasets can be used for a variety of mapping and spatial analyses of the vectors and, by inference, the diseases they transmit.

  19. W-band OFDM photonic vector signal generation employing a single Mach-Zehnder modulator and precoding.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiangnan; Li, Xinying; Xu, Yuming; Zhang, Ziran; Chen, Long; Yu, Jianjun

    2015-09-07

    We present a simple radio-over-fiber (RoF) link architecture for millimeter-wave orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmission using only one Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) and precoding technique. In the transmission system, the amplitudes and the phase of the driving radio-frequency (RF) OFDM signal on each sub-carrier are precoded, to ensure that the OFDM signal after photodetector (PD) can be restored to original OFDM signal. The experimental results show that the bit-error ratios (BERs) of the transmission system are less than the forward-error-correction (FEC) threshold of 3.8 × 10(-3), which demonstrates that the generation of OFDM vector signal based on our proposed scheme can be employed in our system architecture.

  20. Generation of phase-coded microwave signals using a polarization-modulator-based photonic microwave phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yamei; Pan, Shilong

    2013-03-01

    A scheme for the generation of phase-coded microwave signals using an electrically tunable photonic microwave phase shifter is proposed and demonstrated. The photonic phase shifter is based on a single-sideband polarization modulator (PolM), and the tuning of the phase shifter is implemented by a second PolM. By introducing an RF signal to the first PolM and an electrical coding signal to the second PolM, a phase-coded microwave signal with binary phase codes or polyphase codes is achieved. An experiment is performed. The simple and flexible operation, high coding rate, large frequency range, excellent transmission performance, and high stability of the system is confirmed.

  1. Phase-coded microwave signal generation based on a single electro-optical modulator and its application in accurate distance measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangzheng; Ge, Xiaozhong; Gao, Bindong; Pan, Shilong

    2015-08-24

    A novel scheme for photonic generation of a phase-coded microwave signal is proposed and its application in one-dimension distance measurement is demonstrated. The proposed signal generator has a simple and compact structure based on a single dual-polarization modulator. Besides, the generated phase-coded signal is stable and free from the DC and low-frequency backgrounds. An experiment is carried out. A 2 Gb/s phase-coded signal at 20 GHz is successfully generated, and the recovered phase information agrees well with the input 13-bit Barker code. To further investigate the performance of the proposed signal generator, its application in one-dimension distance measurement is demonstrated. The measurement accuracy is less than 1.7 centimeters within a measurement range of ~2 meters. The experimental results can verify the feasibility of the proposed phase-coded microwave signal generator and also provide strong evidence to support its practical applications.

  2. Study on generation mechanisms of second-order nonlinear signals in surface acoustic wave devices and their suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Ryo; Kyoya, Haruki; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Kihara, Takashi; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we examine the generation mechanisms of the second-order nonlinear signals in surface acoustic wave resonators/duplexers fabricated on a 42°YX-LiTaO3 substrate. It is shown that the crystal asymmetry of the substrate can generate the second-order nonlinear signals. The following two mechanisms mainly contribute to their generation: (a) self-mixing of the electrostatic field and (b) mixing of the electrostatic field with the strain field associated with laterally propagating modes. Both of them occur at the gaps between the electrode tip and the dummy electrode. In addition, an interdigital transducer design that cancels this asymmetry is proposed. The design is applied to a one-port resonator and a duplexer, and the effectiveness of this technique is demonstrated.

  3. Principal component analysis of soft x-ray signals generated by the PF-1000 facility in experiments with solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska-Strzęciwilk, Ewa; Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Czarnecka, Agata; Kubkowska, Monika; Paduch, Marian; Zielińska, Ewa

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents the analysis of soft x-ray signals generated in the PF-1000 facility equipped with a modified inner electrode with a central tungsten insert of 50 mm diameter in experiments with tungsten and carbon samples. The PF-1000 machine was operated with pure deuterium filling under the initial pressure of 1.3 hPa. The machine was powered using a condenser bank charged initially to 24 kV, corresponding to the stored energy of 380 kJ, with the maximum discharge current amounted to 1.8 MA. For investigation of plasma stream-sample interactions, we applied 16-frame laser interferometry, optical spectroscopy and soft x-ray measurements with the use of a system of four silicon pin-diodes. In this paper, we mainly focus on the principal component analysis (PCA) of the registered x-ray signals to find a corelation between the neutron yield and observed maxima in signals. X-ray signals collected by four pin-diodes covered a 9 cm range in front of the electrode ends. Each diode collected a signal from the circle of 3 cm diameter. The presented PCA analysis is based on 57 PF discharges and 16 parameters are taken into account in the analysis. The study of signals from the pin-diode system showed good correlation between the neutron yield and the maximum in the x-ray signal, which appeared about 1000-1300 ns after the maximum of plasma compression.

  4. [Anticonvulsant and forced swim anti-immobility effects of tetrahydro-N, N-dimethyl-2,2-diphenyl-3-furanemethanamine (AE37): common action mechanism?].

    PubMed

    Vamvakidès, A

    2002-03-01

    Tetrahydro-N, N-dimethyl-2, 2-diphenyl-3-furanemethanamine (AE 37) is a newly synthesized anticonvulsant drug efficient against electrogenic (maximal electroshock: MES) or pentetrazole (PTZ) induced tonic convulsions of mice. It also antagonizes the immobility of adult or aged mice in the forced swim test (FST), which is used to detect antidepressive properties. Neurochemical changes induced by AE37 (antagonistic action on the sodium channel currents and on the receptors sensitive to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid) could generate the aforementioned pharmacological properties, whereas the partial agonistic action of AE 37 on the brain muscarinic receptors seems to confer to this drug characteristics of third generation antiepileptic.

  5. Gene flow between wheat and wild relatives: empirical evidence from Aegilops geniculata, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis

    PubMed Central

    Arrigo, Nils; Guadagnuolo, Roberto; Lappe, Sylvain; Pasche, Sophie; Parisod, Christian; Felber, François

    2011-01-01

    Gene flow between domesticated species and their wild relatives is receiving growing attention. This study addressed introgression between wheat and natural populations of its wild relatives (Aegilops species). The sampling included 472 individuals, collected from 32 Mediterranean populations of three widespread Aegilops species (Aegilops geniculata, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis) and compared wheat field borders to areas isolated from agriculture. Individuals were characterized with amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting, analysed through two computational approaches (i.e. Bayesian estimations of admixture and fuzzy clustering), and sequences marking wheat-specific insertions of transposable elements. With this combined approach, we detected substantial gene flow between wheat and Aegilops species. Specifically, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis showed significantly more admixed individuals close to wheat fields than in locations isolated from agriculture. In contrast, little evidence of gene flow was found in Ae. geniculata. Our results indicated that reproductive barriers have been regularly bypassed during the long history of sympatry between wheat and Aegilops. PMID:25568015

  6. FGF/FGFR2 signaling regulates the generation and correct positioning of Bergmann glia cells in the developing mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Meier, Florian; Giesert, Florian; Delic, Sabit; Faus-Kessler, Theresa; Matheus, Friederike; Simeone, Antonio; Hölter, Sabine M; Kühn, Ralf; Weisenhorn, Daniela M Vogt; Wurst, Wolfgang; Prakash, Nilima

    2014-01-01

    The normal cellular organization and layering of the vertebrate cerebellum is established during embryonic and early postnatal development by the interplay of a complex array of genetic and signaling pathways. Disruption of these processes and of the proper layering of the cerebellum usually leads to ataxic behaviors. Here, we analyzed the relative contribution of Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2)-mediated signaling to cerebellar development in conditional Fgfr2 single mutant mice. We show that during embryonic mouse development, Fgfr2 expression is higher in the anterior cerebellar primordium and excluded from the proliferative ventricular neuroepithelium. Consistent with this finding, conditional Fgfr2 single mutant mice display the most prominent defects in the anterior lobules of the adult cerebellum. In this context, FGFR2-mediated signaling is required for the proper generation of Bergmann glia cells and the correct positioning of these cells within the Purkinje cell layer, and for cell survival in the developing cerebellar primordium. Using cerebellar microexplant cultures treated with an FGFR agonist (FGF9) or antagonist (SU5402), we also show that FGF9/FGFR-mediated signaling inhibits the outward migration of radial glia and Bergmann glia precursors and cells, and might thus act as a positioning cue for these cells. Altogether, our findings reveal the specific functions of the FGFR2-mediated signaling pathway in the generation and positioning of Bergmann glia cells during cerebellar development in the mouse.

  7. AE analysis in developing the Hot Fractured Rock geothermal power in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Y.; Kaieda, H.; Asanuma, H.; Wyborn, D.

    2004-12-01

    The hot fractured rock (HFR) geothermal power is being developed in Cooper Basin, South Australia since 2002. HFR geothermal power is one of natural energy acquiring systems, in which water is pumped into hot, crystalline rock via an injection well, becomes superheated as it flows through open joints in the hot rock reservoir, and is returned through production wells. At the surface, the useful heat is extracted by conventional processes, and the same water is re-circulated to mine more heat. Such hot granites are buried beneath 3.7 km of insulating sedimentary rocks at the site. The temperature of the granites reaches 250_E#381; or more. The first injection well Habanero#1 was drilled 720m into the granite, and a reservoir was made by the hydraulic fracturing in the vicinity of the well bottom (4421m in depth) in 2003. During the hydraulic fracturing many acoustic emissions (AE) were generated. We observed the AE activity using seismic network deployed in 8 wells around Habanero#1 to evaluate the reservoir. Total of 12000 or more AE were observed during the fracturing period from November to December, 2003. Although the AE hypocenters were located in the south side of the well at the initial stage, they finally distributed N-S to NE-SW direction at about 3km in diameter. The magnitude of the AE ranges M-2 to M1 for most events, but several felt earthquakes as maximum size of M3.7 were also generated. The hypocenters of the larger 12 events (> M2.5) were located by the seismic network of Geoscience Australia. The mechanism solution of these large events is basically E-W compression type, and it almost agrees to the regional stress estimated by borehole breakout in wells in the area. The AE generation property will help to understand earthquake dynamics and mechanics since it is controlled by hydraulic pressure. We will mainly discuss the relation between the generated regional energy and the mechanism solution of the events.

  8. The antiangiogenic agent Neovastat (AE-941) induces endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Dominique; Gendron, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Edith; Gingras, Denis; Béliveau, Richard

    2002-08-01

    Neovastat (AE-941), a naturally occurring multifunctional antiangiogenic agent, has been shown to inhibit key components of the angiogenic process, including matrix metalloproteinases and vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated signaling events. In this study, we report the presence of a proapoptotic activity within this compound. Neovastat treatment of bovine aortic endothelial cells caused cell death with characteristics of apoptosis, including chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Neovastat markedly induced caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9 activities, at similar levels to those measured in cells treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Activation of caspases by Neovastat appears to be essential for its proapoptotic effects because all apoptotic features were blocked by zVAD-fmk, a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor. The activation of caspases was correlated with the cleavage of the nuclear substrate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and by a concomitant release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytoplasm. Neovastat-induced apoptosis appears to be specific to endothelial cells because treatment of other cell types such as U-87, COS-7, NIH-3T3, and SW1353 did not result in increased caspase-3 activity. These results demonstrate that Neovastat contains a proapoptotic factor that specifically induces the activation of caspases in endothelial cells and the resulting apoptosis of these cells.

  9. Cause of the exceptionally high AE average for 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestes, A.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we focus on the year of 2003 when the AE index was extremely high (AE=341nT, with peak intensity more than 2200nT), this value is almost 100 nT higher when compared with others years of the cycle 23. Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and plasma data are compared with geomagnetic AE and Dst indices to determine the causes of exceptionally high AE average value. Analyzing the solar wind parameters we found that the annual average speed value was extremely high, approximately 542 km/s (peak value ~1074 km/s). These values were due to recurrent high-speed solar streams from large coronal holes, which stretch to the solar equator, and low-latitude coronal holes, which exist for many solar rotations. AE was found to increase with increasing solar wind speed and decrease when solar wind speed decrease. The cause of the high AE activity during 2003 is the presence of the high-speed corotating streams that contain large-amplitude Alfvén waves throughout the streams, which resulted in a large number of HILDCAAs events. When plasma and field of solar wind impinge on Earth's magnetosphere, the southward field turnings associated with the wave fluctuations cause magnetic reconnection and consequential high levels of AE activity and very long recovery phases on Dst, sometimes lasting until the next stream arrives.

  10. AE9/AP9/SPM Radiation Environment Model: User’s Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-18

    calculation results . Dose calculation results are also available. The GUI program ‘testAe9Ap9Gui.exe’ provides a graphical user interface to specify an...automatically generated according to the user’s selections in the interface. Basic 2D plots of the model results may also be produced. In addition to this...interface for producing mission statistics Aggregates results of many MC scenarios (flux, fluence, mean, percentiles) Provides access to orbit

  11. Varied skill set needed for AE (D) role.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-05-01

    IHEEM's AE (D) Panel plays an important role in managing and administering the UK's only official register of such specialist personnel, and indeed it is the Panel that selects qualified candidates for registration, interviews those considered "the right material", and confers registered AE (D) status on those that Panel members feel have the right combination of professional experience and expertise, academic qualifications, and knowledge, to fulfil the role. HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie examines the history of the AE (D) register and Panel, and talks to the latter's chairman, Eric Thomas, to find out more.

  12. The global joule heat production rate and the AE index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, S.; Ahn, B.-H.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1985-01-01

    The degree of accuracy with which the AE index may be used as a measure of the joule heat production rate is evaluated for a typical substorm event on March 18, 1978, by estimating the global joule heat production rate as a function of time on the basis of data obtained from the IMS's six meridian chains. It is found that, although the AE index is statistically linearly related to the global joule heat production rate, caution is required when one assumes that details of AE index time variations during individual events are representative of those of the joule heat production rate.

  13. Millimeter-wave signal generation for a wireless transmission system based on on-chip photonic integrated circuit structures.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, R; Carpintero, G; Gordon, C; Orbe, L

    2016-10-15

    We demonstrate and compare two different photonic-based signal sources for generating the carrier wave in a wireless communication link operating in the millimeter-wave range. The first signal source uses the optical heterodyne technique to generate a 113 GHz carrier wave frequency, while the second employs a different technique based on a pulsed mode-locked source with 100 GHz repetition rate frequency. The two optical sources were fabricated in a multi-project wafer run from an active/passive generic integration platform process using standardized building blocks, including multimode interference reflectors which allow us to define the structures on chip, without the need for cleaved facet mirrors. We highlight the superior performance of the mode-locked sources over an optical heterodyne technique. Error-free transmission was achieved in this experiment.

  14. New microwave excitation signal generating circuit for quantum frequency standard on the atoms of caesium Cs133

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A. A.; Davydov, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    In this work the study, design, development and experimental results of a new microwave excitation signal generating circuit are presented. New design of this circuit is based on the method of direct digital synthesis. The results of theoretical calculations and experimental researches show that the new design not only has a high precision, but also has an improvement in the spectral characteristics of the output signal. Range of generated output frequencies is expanded, that leads to the possibility of detuning the frequency of the neighboring resonance of spectral line and adjust the C-field in quantum frequency standard. Experimental research of the metrological characteristics of the quantum frequency standard on the atoms of caesium with a new functional unit showed an improvement in the daily frequency stability.

  15. HVCN1 modulates BCR signal strength via regulation of BCR-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Melania; Bhamrah, Mandeep K; Henley, Tom; Boyd, Robert S; Langlais, Claudia; Cain, Kelvin; Dinsdale, David; Pulford, Karen; Kan, Mahmood; Musset, Boris; Cherny, Vladimir V; Morgan, Deri; Gascoyne, Randy D; Vigorito, Elena; DeCoursey, Thomas E; MacLennan, Ian C M; Dyer, Martin J S

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton currents regulate generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in phagocytic cells. In B cells, stimulation of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) results in the production of ROS that participate in B cell activation, but the involvement of proton channels is unknown. We report here that the voltage-gated proton channel HVCN1 associated with the BCR complex and was internalized together with the BCR after activation. BCR-induced generation of ROS was lower in HVCN1-deficient B cells, which resulted in attenuated BCR signaling via impaired BCR-dependent oxidation of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. This resulted in less activation of the kinases Syk and Akt, impaired mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis, and diminished antibody responses in vivo. Our findings identify unanticipated functions for proton channels in B cells and demonstrate the importance of ROS in BCR signaling and downstream metabolism. PMID:20139987

  16. Photonic generation of phase-stable and wideband chirped microwave signals based on phase-locked dual optical frequency combs.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yitian; Zhou, Qian; Han, Daming; Li, Baiyu; Xie, Weilin; Liu, Zhangweiyi; Qin, Jie; Wang, Xiaocheng; Dong, Yi; Hu, Weisheng

    2016-08-15

    A photonics-based scheme is presented for generating wideband and phase-stable chirped microwave signals based on two phase-locked combs with fixed and agile repetition rates. By tuning the difference of the two combs' repetition rates and extracting different order comb tones, a wideband linearly frequency-chirped microwave signal with flexible carrier frequency and chirped range is obtained. Owing to the scheme of dual-heterodyne phase transfer and phase-locked loop, extrinsic phase drift and noise induced by the separated optical paths is detected and suppressed efficiently. Linearly frequency-chirped microwave signals from 5 to 15 GHz and 237 to 247 GHz with 30 ms duration are achieved, respectively, contributing to the time-bandwidth product of 3×108. And less than 1.3×10-5 linearity errors (RMS) are also obtained.

  17. Targeted expression of RALT in mouse skin inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and generates a Waved-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ballarò, Costanza; Ceccarelli, Sara; Tiveron, Cecilia; Tatangelo, Laura; Salvatore, Anna Maria; Segatto, Oreste; Alemà, Stefano

    2005-08-01

    Although it has been clearly established that negative feedback loops have a fundamental role in the regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling in flies, their role in the regulation of mammalian EGFR has been inferred only recently from in vitro studies. Here, we report on the forced expression of RALT/MIG-6, a negative feedback regulator of ErbB receptors, in mouse skin. A RALT transgene driven by the K14 promoter generated a dose-dependent phenotype resembling that caused by hypomorphic and antimorphic Egfr alleles-that is, wavy coat, curly whiskers and open eyes at birth. Ex vivo keratinocytes from K14-RALT mice showed reduced biochemical and biological responses when stimulated by ErbB ligands. Conversely, knockdown of RALT by RNA interference enhanced ErbB mitogenic signalling. Thus, RALT behaves as a suppressor of EGFR signalling in mouse skin.

  18. Targeted expression of RALT in mouse skin inhibits epidermal growth factor receptor signalling and generates a Waved-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ballarò, Costanza; Ceccarelli, Sara; Tiveron, Cecilia; Tatangelo, Laura; Salvatore, Anna Maria; Segatto, Oreste; Alemà, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    Although it has been clearly established that negative feedback loops have a fundamental role in the regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling in flies, their role in the regulation of mammalian EGFR has been inferred only recently from in vitro studies. Here, we report on the forced expression of RALT/MIG-6, a negative feedback regulator of ErbB receptors, in mouse skin. A RALT transgene driven by the K14 promoter generated a dose-dependent phenotype resembling that caused by hypomorphic and antimorphic Egfr alleles—that is, wavy coat, curly whiskers and open eyes at birth. Ex vivo keratinocytes from K14-RALT mice showed reduced biochemical and biological responses when stimulated by ErbB ligands. Conversely, knockdown of RALT by RNA interference enhanced ErbB mitogenic signalling. Thus, RALT behaves as a suppressor of EGFR signalling in mouse skin. PMID:16007071

  19. Effect of the surface roughness on the seismic signal generated by a single rock impact: insight from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, Vincent; Mangeney, Anne; de Rosny, Julien; Toussaint, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    The seismic signal generated by rockfalls, landslides or avalanches is a unique tool to detect, characterize and monitor gravitational flow activity, with strong implication in terms of natural hazard monitoring. Indeed, as natural flows travel down the slope, they apply stresses on the ground, generating seismic waves in a wide frequency band. Our ultimate objective is to relate the granular flow properties to the generated signals that result from the different physical processes involved. We investigate here the more simple process: the impact of a single bead on a rough surface. Farin et al. [2015] have already shown theoretically and experimentally the existence of a link between the properties of an impacting bead (mass and velocity) on smooth surfaces, and the emitted signal (radiated elastic energy and mean frequency). This demonstrates that the single impactor properties can be deduced from the form of the emitted signal. We extend this work here by investigating the impact of single beads and gravels on rough and erodible surfaces. Experimentally, we drop glass and steel beads of diameters from 2 mm to 10 mm on a PMMA plate. The roughness of this last is obtained by gluing 3mm-diameter glass beads on one of its face. Free beads have been also added to get erodible beds. We track the dropped impactor motion, times between impacts and the generated acoustic waves using two fast cameras and 8 accelerometers. Cameras are used in addition to estimate the impactor rotation. We investigate the energy balance during the impact process, especially how the energy restitution varies as a function of the energy lost through acoustic waves. From these experiments, we clearly observe that even if more dissipative processes are involved (friction, grain reorganization, etc.), the single bead scaling laws obtained on smooth surfaces remain valid. A main result of this work is to quantify the fluctuations of the characteristic quantities such as the bounce angle, the

  20. Implementation of an acoustic emission proximity detector for use in generating glass optics

    SciTech Connect

    Piscotty, M.A.; Taylor, J.S.; Blaedel, K.L.

    1996-12-31

    The use acoustic emission (AE) sensing as a method to monitor proximity between a grinding wheel and a brittle material workpiece is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Center for Optics Manufacturing (COM) in Rochester, NY. Significantly reducing the amount of expensive {open_quote}air-grinding{close_quote} is one of the primary motivations behind this effort, along with lessening the chances of a crash which could damage the wheel, part and machine tool. AE sensing is well developed and routinely used in the metal working industry for {open_quote}initial contact{close_quote} sensing or tool breakage, for example, and in monitoring diamond turning and grinding processes. However, using AE sensing to switch from a rapid to a final in-feed rate at the detection of initial-contact between the grinding wheel and a brittle material workpiece, such as an optical glass, is often unacceptable during fine grinding (less than 10 {mu}m grit wheels) which produce surfaces with roughness values of 100 {Angstrom} rms or less. In the approach taken here, the authors are sensing the AE prior to contact between the workpiece and the tool. The coolant between the workpiece and the grinding wheel is used as an AE medium to transfer AE signals generated by the relative motions of the coolant, workpiece and wheel. Capitalizing on the repeatability of the AE approach signal, the authors have developed a system to detect the proximity of the grinding wheel relative to the workpiece prior to initial contact.

  1. Ultralow-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal generator assisted with an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb

    PubMed Central

    Ishizawa, A.; Nishikawa, T.; Goto, T.; Hitachi, K.; Sogawa, T.; Gotoh, H.

    2016-01-01

    Low-noise millimetre-wave signals are valuable for digital sampling systems, arbitrary waveform generation for ultra-wideband communications, and coherent radar systems. However, the phase noise of widely used conventional signal generators (SGs) will increase as the millimetre-wave frequency increases. Our goal has been to improve commercially available SGs so that they provide a low-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal with assistance from an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb (EOM-OFC). Here, we show that the phase noise can be greatly reduced by bridging the vast frequency difference between the gigahertz and terahertz ranges with an EOM-OFC. The EOM-OFC serves as a liaison that magnifies the phase noise of the SG. With the EOM-OFC used as a phase noise “booster” for a millimetre-wave signal, the phase noise of widely used SGs can be reduced at an arbitrary frequency f (6 ≦ f ≦ 72 GHz). PMID:27185040

  2. Ultralow-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal generator assisted with an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Ishizawa, A; Nishikawa, T; Goto, T; Hitachi, K; Sogawa, T; Gotoh, H

    2016-05-17

    Low-noise millimetre-wave signals are valuable for digital sampling systems, arbitrary waveform generation for ultra-wideband communications, and coherent radar systems. However, the phase noise of widely used conventional signal generators (SGs) will increase as the millimetre-wave frequency increases. Our goal has been to improve commercially available SGs so that they provide a low-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal with assistance from an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb (EOM-OFC). Here, we show that the phase noise can be greatly reduced by bridging the vast frequency difference between the gigahertz and terahertz ranges with an EOM-OFC. The EOM-OFC serves as a liaison that magnifies the phase noise of the SG. With the EOM-OFC used as a phase noise "booster" for a millimetre-wave signal, the phase noise of widely used SGs can be reduced at an arbitrary frequency f (6 ≦ f ≦ 72 GHz).

  3. Signaling and Transcription Factors during Inner Ear Development: The Generation of Hair Cells and Otic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gálvez, Héctor; Abelló, Gina; Giraldez, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Integration between cell signals and bHLH transcription factors plays a prominent role during the development of hair cells of the inner ear. Hair cells are the sensory receptors of the inner ear, responsible for the mechano-transduction of sound waves into electrical signals. They derive from multipotent progenitors that reside in the otic placode. Progenitor commitment is the result of cell signaling from the surrounding tissues that result in the restricted expression of SoxB1 transcription factors, Sox2 and Sox3. In turn, they induce the expression of Neurog1 and Atoh1, two bHLH factors that specify neuronal and hair cell fates, respectively. Neuronal and hair cell development, however, do not occur simultaneously. Hair cell development is prevented during neurogenesis and prosensory stages, resulting in the delay of hair cell development with respect to neuron production. Negative interactions between Neurog1 and Atoh1, and of Atoh1 with other bHLH factors driven by Notch signaling, like Hey1 and Hes5, account for this delay. In summary, the regulation of Atoh1 and hair cell development relies on interactions between cell signaling and bHLH transcription factors that dictate cell fate and timing decisions during development. Interestingly, these mechanisms operate as well during hair cell regeneration after damage and during stem cell directed differentiation, making developmental studies instrumental for improving therapies for hearing impairment. PMID:28393066

  4. Interference signals in "third-generation" BEBE sector field mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Detlef; Schwarz, Helmut

    1995-08-01

    From the inception of analytical mass spectrometry numerous efforts have been undertaken to minimize artifacts in mass spectra. While double-focusing techniques brought about significant progress in that interference signals in ionsource mass spectra can now be excluded, for MS/MS studies several kinds of artifacts exist when only two sectors are used in MSn (n [greater-or-equal, slanted] 2) experiments. Tandem mass spectrometers having more than two sectors provide the possibility of mass-selecting parent ions under high resolution conditions and thus one might assume that artifact signals can be avoided in these machines. However, this is simply not true, and in this paper we describe possible sources of interference signals in a tandem mass spectrometer of BEBE configuration; similar considerations apply for other configurations of large-scale mass spectrometers as well. Artifact signals will be discussed which originate from limited parent-ion and/or daughter-ion resolution, from fragmentation processes occurring within the analyzers, and of interference signals which can be traced back to other sources.

  5. The endocannabinoid signaling system: a potential target for next-generation therapeutics for alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S.

    2007-01-01

    Research into the endocannabinoid signaling system has grown exponentially in recent years following the discovery of cannabinoid receptors (CB) and their endogenous ligands, such as anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Important advances have been made in our understanding of the endocannabinoid signaling system in various aspects of alcoholism, including alcohol-seeking behavior. Alcohol increases the synthesis or impairs the degradation of endocannabinoids, leading to a locally elevated endocannabinoid tone within the brain. Elevated endocannabinoid tone might be expected to result in compensatory down-regulation of CB1 receptors or dampened signal transduction. Following release, endocannabinoids diffuse back to the presynaptic neuron where they act as short-range modulators of synaptic activity by altering neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity. Mice treated with the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A (rimonabant) or homozygous for a deletion of the CB1 receptor gene exhibit reduced voluntary alcohol intake. CB1 knockout mice also show increased alcohol sensitivity, withdrawal, and reduced conditioned place preference. Conversely, activation of CB1 receptor promotes alcohol intake. Recent studies also suggest that elevated endocannabinoid tone due to impaired degradation contributes to high alcohol preference and self-administration. These effects are reversed by local administration of rimonabant, suggesting the participation of the endocannabinoid signaling system in high alcohol preference and self-administration. These recent advances will be reviewed with an emphasis on the endocannabinoid signaling system for possible therapeutic interventions of alcoholism. PMID:17692039

  6. Palm-shaped spectrum generation for dual-band millimeter wave and baseband signals over fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R.; Feng, Z.; Tang, M.; Wang, R.; Fu, S.; Shum, P.; Liu, D.; Chen, J.

    2016-05-01

    In order to offer abundant available bandwidth for radio access networks satisfying future 5G requirements on capacity, this paper proposes a simple and cost-effective palm-shaped spectrum generation scheme that can be used for high capacity radio over fiber (RoF) system. The proposed scheme can simultaneously generate an optical carrier used for upstream and two bands of millimeter wave (MMW) that are capable of carrying different downstream data. The experiment results show that the proposed palm-shaped spectrum generation scheme outperforms optical frequency comb (OFC) based multi-band MMW generation in terms of upstream transmission performance. Furthermore, simulation is carried out with different dual-band MMW configurations to verify the feasibility of using the proposed spectrum generation scheme in the RoF system.

  7. Photonic generation of widely tunable phase-coded microwave signals based on a dual-parallel polarization modulator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shifeng; Zhu, Dan; Wei, Zhengwu; Pan, Shilong

    2014-07-01

    A photonic approach for the generation of a widely tunable arbitrarily phase-coded microwave signal based on a dual-parallel polarization modulator (DP-PolM) is proposed and demonstrated without using any optical or electrical filter. Two orthogonally polarized ± first-order optical sidebands with suppressed carrier are generated based on the DP-PolM, and their polarization directions are aligned with the two principal axes of the following PolM. Phase coding is implemented at a following PolM driven by an electrical coding signal. The inherent frequency-doubling operation can make the system work at a frequency beyond the operation bandwidth of the DP-PolM and the 90° hybrid. Because no optical or electrical filter is applied, good frequency tunability is realized. An experiment is performed. The generation of phase-coded signals tuning from 10 to 40 GHz with up to 10  Gbit/s coding rates is verified.

  8. Frequency Analysis of the Photoacoustic Signal Generated by Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaque.

    PubMed

    Daeichin, Verya; Wu, Min; De Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F W; van Soest, Gijs

    2016-08-01

    The identification of unstable atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries is emerging as an important tool for guiding percutaneous coronary interventions and may enable preventive treatment of such plaques in the future. Assessment of plaque stability requires imaging of both structure and composition. Spectroscopic photoacoustic (sPA) imaging can visualize atherosclerotic plaque composition on the basis of the optical absorption contrast. It is an established fact that the frequency content of the photoacoustic (PA) signal is correlated with structural tissue properties. As PA signals can be weak, it is important to match the transducer bandwidth to the signal frequency content for in vivo imaging. In this ex vivo study on human coronary arteries, we combined sPA imaging and analysis of frequency content of the PA signals. Using a broadband transducer (-3-dB one-way bandwidth of 10-35 MHz) and a 1-mm needle hydrophone (calibrated for 1-20 MHz), we covered a large frequency range of 1-35 MHz for receiving the PA signals. Spectroscopic PA imaging was performed at wavelengths ranging from 1125 to 1275 nm with a step of 2 nm, allowing discrimination between plaque lipids and adventitial tissue. Under sPA imaging guidance, the frequency content of the PA signals from the plaque lipids was quantified. Our data indicate that more than 80% of the PA energy of the coronary plaque lipids lies in the frequency band below 8 MHz. This frequency information can guide the choice of the transducer element used for PA catheter fabrication.

  9. Pulsational stability of the SX Phe star AE UMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, J. H.; Renteria, A.; Villarreal, C.; Pina, D. S.; Soni, A. A.; Guillen, J.; Vargas, K.; Trejo, O.

    2016-11-01

    From newly determined times of maxima of the SX Phe star AE UMa and a compilation of previous times of maxima, we were able to determine the nature of this star. With uv photometry we determined its physical parameters.

  10. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Commerce, Bureau of Census, electronic filing of export information. The AES shall serve as the primary...). Also, requests for special reporting may be made by DDTC on a case-by-case basis, (e.g.,...

  11. A plasma membrane microdomain compartmentalizes ephrin-generated cAMP signals to prune developing retinal axon arbors

    PubMed Central

    Averaimo, Stefania; Assali, Ahlem; Ros, Oriol; Couvet, Sandrine; Zagar, Yvrick; Genescu, Ioana; Rebsam, Alexandra; Nicol, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The development of neuronal circuits is controlled by guidance molecules that are hypothesized to interact with the cholesterol-enriched domains of the plasma membrane termed lipid rafts. Whether such domains enable local intracellular signalling at the submicrometre scale in developing neurons and are required for shaping the nervous system connectivity in vivo remains controversial. Here, we report a role for lipid rafts in generating domains of local cAMP signalling in axonal growth cones downstream of ephrin-A repulsive guidance cues. Ephrin-A-dependent retraction of retinal ganglion cell axons involves cAMP signalling restricted to the vicinity of lipid rafts and is independent of cAMP modulation outside of this microdomain. cAMP modulation near lipid rafts controls the pruning of ectopic axonal branches of retinal ganglion cells in vivo, a process requiring intact ephrin-A signalling. Together, our findings indicate that lipid rafts structure the subcellular organization of intracellular cAMP signalling shaping axonal arbors during the nervous system development. PMID:27694812

  12. AE-5 end of mission tests report. [Explorer 55 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, T. H.; Kissel, F.; Schaefer, J.; Kalil, F.

    1981-01-01

    A spin up test and a TDRS tracking simulation were performed on the AE-5 spacecraft before its end of mission. the spin up test showed that the Body Horizon Scanner could be successfully used on other spacecraft with spin rates up to 10 RPM. the TDRS tracking simulation showed that an AE-5 type attitude control system could be successfully used to point the spacecraft towards a TDRS for the purpose of transmitting/relaying data via the TDRS.

  13. Arcing and rf signal generation during target irradiation by a high-energy, pulsed neutral particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Robiscoe, R.T.

    1988-02-01

    We present a theory describing the dynamics of arc discharges in bulk dielectric materials on board space-based vehicles. Such ''punch-through'' arcs can occur in target satellites irradiated by high-energy (250 MeV), pulsed (100 mA x 10 ms) neutral particle beams. We treat the arc as a capacitively limited avalanche current in the target dielectric material, and we find expressions for the arc duration, charge transport, currents, and discharge energy. These quantities are adjusted to be consistent with known scaling laws for the area of charge depleted by the arc. After a brief account of the statistical distribution of voltages at which the arc starts and stops, we calculate the signal strength and frequency spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation broadcast by the arc. We find that arcs from thick ()similarreverse arrowto)1 cm) targets can generate rf signals detectable up to 1000 km from the target, bu a radio receiver operating at frequency 80 MHz, bandwidth 100 kHz, and detection threshold -105 dBm. These thick-target arc signals are 10 to 20 dB above ambient noise at the receiver, and they provide target hit assessment if the signal spectrum can be sampled at several frequencies in the nominal range 30-200 MHz. Thin-target ()similarreverse arrowto)1 mm) arc signals are much weaker, but when they are detecable in conjunction with thick-target signals, target discrimination is possible by comparing the signal frequency spectra. 24 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Exploitation of parallelism and ultraspeed integrated circuits in the next generation of distributed super signal processors

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, B.K.; Naused, B.A.; Hartley, S.M.; Vannurden, W.K.; Deming, R.

    1983-10-01

    The emerging application of gallium arsenide digital integrated circuits to signal processing problems will require the development of architectures tuned to its special characteristics. Chip design methods may be similar to those used for silicon very high-speed integrated circuit (VHSIC) components, but system design constraints will be unique to GAAS. 8 references.

  15. Microparticles generated during chronic cerebral ischemia deliver proapoptotic signals to cultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Sarah C.; Edrissi, Hamidreza; Burger, Dylan; Cadonic, Robert; Hakim, Antoine; Thompson, Charlie

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Microparticles are elevated in the plasma in a rodent model of chronic cerebral ischemia. • These microparticles initiate apoptosis in cultured cells. • Microparticles contain caspase 3 and they activate receptors for TNF-α and TRAIL. - Abstract: Circulating microparticles (MPs) are involved in many physiological processes and numbers are increased in a variety of cardiovascular disorders. The present aims were to characterize levels of MPs in a rodent model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) and to determine their signaling properties. MPs were isolated from the plasma of rats exposed to CCH and quantified by flow cytometry. When MPs were added to cultured endothelial cells or normal rat kidney cells they induced cell death in a time and dose dependent manner. Analysis of pellets by electron microscopy indicates that cell death signals are carried by particles in the range of 400 nm in diameter or less. Cell death involved the activation of caspase 3 and was not a consequence of oxidative stress. Inhibition of the Fas/FasL signaling pathway also did not improve cell survival. MPs were found to contain caspase 3 and treating the MPs with a caspase 3 inhibitor significantly reduced cell death. A TNF-α receptor blocker and a TRAIL neutralizing antibody also significantly reduced cell death. Levels of circulating MPs are elevated in a rodent model of chronic cerebral ischemia. MPs with a diameter of 400 nm or less activate the TNF-α and TRAIL signaling pathways and may deliver caspase 3 to cultured cells.

  16. Compressive sensing of signals generated in plastic scintillators in a novel J-PET instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raczyński, L.; Moskal, P.; Kowalski, P.; Wiślicki, W.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E.; Gajos, A.; Kapłon, Ł.; Kochanowski, A.; Korcyl, G.; Kowal, J.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Kubicz, E.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pałka, M.; Rudy, Z.; Rundel, O.; Salabura, P.; Sharma, N. G.; Silarski, M.; Słomski, A.; Smyrski, J.; Strzelecki, A.; Wieczorek, A.; Zieliński, M.; Zoń, N.

    2015-06-01

    The J-PET scanner, which allows for single bed imaging of the whole human body, is currently under development at the Jagiellonian University. The discussed detector offers improvement of the Time of Flight (TOF) resolution due to the use of fast plastic scintillators and dedicated electronics allowing for sampling in the voltage domain of signals with durations of few nanoseconds. In this paper we show that recovery of the whole signal, based on only a few samples, is possible. In order to do that, we incorporate the training signals into the Tikhonov regularization framework and we perform the Principal Component Analysis decomposition, which is well known for its compaction properties. The method yields a simple closed form analytical solution that does not require iterative processing. Moreover, from the Bayes theory the properties of regularized solution, especially its covariance matrix, may be easily derived. This is the key to introduce and prove the formula for calculations of the signal recovery error. In this paper we show that an average recovery error is approximately inversely proportional to the number of acquired samples.

  17. Microparticles generated during chronic cerebral ischemia deliver proapoptotic signals to cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Schock, Sarah C; Edrissi, Hamidreza; Burger, Dylan; Cadonic, Robert; Hakim, Antoine; Thompson, Charlie

    2014-07-18

    Circulating microparticles (MPs) are involved in many physiological processes and numbers are increased in a variety of cardiovascular disorders. The present aims were to characterize levels of MPs in a rodent model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) and to determine their signaling properties. MPs were isolated from the plasma of rats exposed to CCH and quantified by flow cytometry. When MPs were added to cultured endothelial cells or normal rat kidney cells they induced cell death in a time and dose dependent manner. Analysis of pellets by electron microscopy indicates that cell death signals are carried by particles in the range of 400 nm in diameter or less. Cell death involved the activation of caspase 3 and was not a consequence of oxidative stress. Inhibition of the Fas/FasL signaling pathway also did not improve cell survival. MPs were found to contain caspase 3 and treating the MPs with a caspase 3 inhibitor significantly reduced cell death. A TNF-α receptor blocker and a TRAIL neutralizing antibody also significantly reduced cell death. Levels of circulating MPs are elevated in a rodent model of chronic cerebral ischemia. MPs with a diameter of 400 nm or less activate the TNF-α and TRAIL signaling pathways and may deliver caspase 3 to cultured cells.

  18. Role of NBCe1 and AE2 in Secretory Ameloblasts

    PubMed Central

    Paine, Michael L.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Wang, HongJun; Abuladze, Natalia; Pushkin, Alexander; Liu, Weixin; Kao, Li Yo; Wall, Susan M.; Kim, Young-Hee; Kurtz, Ira

    2008-01-01

    The H+/base transport processes that control the pH of the microenvironment adjacent to ameloblasts are not currently well understood. Mice null for the AE2 anion exchanger have abnormal enamel. In addition, patients with mutations in the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1 and mice lacking NBCe1 have enamel abnormalities. These observations suggest that AE2 and NBCe1 play important roles in amelogenesis. The present study aimed to understand the roles of AE2 and NBC1 in ameloblasts. The data showed that NBCe1 is expressed at the basolateral membrane of secretory ameloblasts, whereas AE2 is expressed at the apical membrane. Transcripts for AE2a and NBCe1-B were detected in RNA isolated from cultured ameloblast-like LS8 cells. Our data are the first evidence that AE2 and NBCe1 are expressed in ameloblasts in vivo in a polarized fashion thereby providing a mechanism for ameloblast transcellular bicarbonate secretion in the process of enamel formation and maturation. PMID:18362326

  19. Oligomeric structure of bAE3 protein.

    PubMed

    Pushkin, A V; Tsuprun, V L; Abuladze, N K; Newman, D; Kurtz, I

    2000-12-01

    The "brain" form of the anion exchanger protein 3 (bAE3) has been purified to homogeneity from the rabbit kidney by differential centrifugation and immunoaffinity chromatography. A single protein band of approximately 165 kDa was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting. Monomers, dimers (a major component), and a higher oligomeric form (apparently tetramers) were found after oxidative cross-linking of purified bAE3. The largest form of bAE3 was separated from dimers and monomers by sucrose gradient centrifugation and was studied by transmission electron microscopy to confirm a tetrameric structure. Two main types of bAE3 images were detected, round (approximately 11-14 nm) and square-shaped (approximately 12 x 12 nm). Image analysis revealed fourfold rotational symmetry of both the round and square-shaped images, indicating that bAE3 consists of multiples of 4 subunits. We conclude that bAE3 in Triton X-100 solution is predominantly a mixture of dimers and tetramers with a smaller amount of monomers.

  20. Evaluation of Therapeutic Tissue Crosslinking (TXL) for Myopia Using Second Harmonic Generation Signal Microscopy in Rabbit Sclera

    PubMed Central

    Zyablitskaya, Mariya; Takaoka, Anna; Munteanu, Emilia L.; Nagasaki, Takayuki; Trokel, Stephen L.; Paik, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Second harmonic generation signals (SHG) are emitted preferentially from collagenous tissue structures and have been used to evaluate photochemically-induced (CXL) crosslinking changes in the cornea. Since therapeutic tissue crosslinking (TXL) using sodium hydroxymethylglycinate (SMG) of the sclera is a potential treatment for high myopia, we explored the use of SHG microscopy to evaluate the effects. Methods Single sub-Tenon's (sT) injections (400 μL) using SMG (40–400 mM) were made at the equatorial 12 o'clock position of the right eye of cadaveric rabbit heads (n = 16 pairs). After 3.5 hours, confocal microscopy (CM) was performed using 860 nm two-photon excitation and 400 to 450 nm emission. Pixel density and fiber bundle “waviness” analyses were performed on the images. Crosslinking effects were confirmed using thermal denaturation (Tm) temperature. Comparison experiments with riboflavin photochemical crosslinking were done. Results Therapeutic tissue crosslinking localization studies indicated that crosslinking changes occurred at the site of injection and in adjacent sectors. Second harmonic generation signals revealed large fibrous collagenous bundled structures that displayed various degrees of waviness. Histogram analysis showed a nearly 6-fold signal increase in 400 mM SMG over 40 mM. This corresponded to a ΔTm = 13°C for 400 mM versus ΔTm = 4°C for 40 mM. Waviness analysis indicated increased fiber straightening as a result of SMG CXL. Conclusions Second harmonic generation signal intensity and fiber bundle waviness is altered by scleral tissue crosslinking using SMG. These changes provide insights into the macromolecular changes that are induced by therapeutic crosslinking technology and may provide a method to evaluate connective tissue protein changes induced by scleral crosslinking therapies. PMID:28055099

  1. Application of AE techniques in the evaluation of rock anchor stability

    SciTech Connect

    Unal, E.; Hardy, H.R. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The development of a testing facility for detailed evaluation of rock bolt behavior and the results of a series of tests carried out on expansion-type rock bolts are discussed. In developing the testing facility special emphasis was placed on the detailed monitoring of all rock bolt components, as well as the associated bolt tension and torque, and the acoustic emission (AE) generated during various stages of bolt testing. During the study various anchorage testing parameters were investigated, and a significant correlation was obtained between a number of these parameters and the observed AE. The results presented are based on a limited number of tests and a more detailed testing program is planned in the future.

  2. LDV arterial pulse signal: Evidence for local generation in the carotid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casaccia, Sara; Sirevaag, Erik J.; Richter, Edward J.; Casacanditella, Luigi; Scalise, Lorenzo; Rohrbaugh, John W.

    2016-06-01

    The external blood pressure pulse, recorded on a non-contact basis using the method of laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV), has been shown to be a rich source of information regarding cardiac and vascular dynamics. Considerable attention has been directed specifically to the pulse from the neck, overlying the carotid artery, which is of special interest because the carotid pulse is highly similar to the central aortic pressure pulse. The findings presented here are consistent with an interpretation of the signal at the neck as originating in the carotid artery. A detailed mapping study involving a 35 point matrix over the right neck disclosed a focal zone of maximal signal amplitude, with a course consistent with the tract of the underlying carotid. Appreciable individual differences in the 22 examinees were disclosed, particularly at lower sites. In addition to confirming a local source for the LDV carotid pulse, the data highlight the importance of accurate targeting considerations.

  3. Processing and interpretation of microbarograph signals generated by the explosion of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Delclos, C.; Blanc, E. ); Broche, P. ); Glangeaud, F.; Lacoume, J.L. )

    1990-04-20

    Following the eruption of the Mount St. Helens volcano on May 18, 1980, atmospheric waves were recorded by a network of micrographs located over 7,000 km from the source. Analysis of these data requires the use of complex processing techniques based on a high-resolution method to extract the signals produced by the St. Helens source from spurious waves or noise in each record. This facilitates interpretation of the wave trains in terms of propagation modes. It is thus shown that Lamb mode L{sub 0} is present in the low-frequency part of all signals, whereas acoustic modes (more probably A{prime}{sub 2}) are needed to explain all the properties of the high-frequency part, which is clearly observed for a westward and a southward propagation.

  4. Tree shoot bending generates hydraulic pressure pulses: a new long-distance signal?

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rosana; Badel, Eric; Peraudeau, Sebastien; Leblanc-Fournier, Nathalie; Beaujard, François; Julien, Jean-Louis; Cochard, Hervé; Moulia, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    When tree stems are mechanically stimulated, a rapid long-distance signal is induced that slows down primary growth. An investigation was carried out to determine whether the signal might be borne by a mechanically induced pressure pulse in the xylem. Coupling xylem flow meters and pressure sensors with a mechanical testing device, the hydraulic effects of mechanical deformation of tree stem and branches were measured. Organs of several tree species were studied, including gymnosperms and angiosperms with different wood densities and anatomies. Bending had a negligible effect on xylem conductivity, even when deformations were sustained or were larger than would be encountered in nature. It was found that bending caused transient variation in the hydraulic pressure within the xylem of branch segments. This local transient increase in pressure in the xylem was rapidly propagated along the vascular system in planta to the upper and lower regions of the stem. It was shown that this hydraulic pulse originates from the apoplast. Water that was mobilized in the hydraulic pulses came from the saturated porous material of the conduits and their walls, suggesting that the poroelastic behaviour of xylem might be a key factor. Although likely to be a generic mechanical response, quantitative differences in the hydraulic pulse were found in different species, possibly related to differences in xylem anatomy. Importantly the hydraulic pulse was proportional to the strained volume, similar to known thigmomorphogenetic responses. It is hypothesized that the hydraulic pulse may be the signal that rapidly transmits mechanobiological information to leaves, roots, and apices.

  5. Reactive Oxygen Species Generation-Scavenging and Signaling during Plant-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal and Piriformospora indica Interaction under Stress Condition

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Manoj; Bhatt, Deepesh; Prasad, Ram; Gill, Sarvajeet S.; Anjum, Naser A.; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    A defined balance between the generation and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is essential to utilize ROS as an adaptive defense response of plants under biotic and abiotic stress conditions. Moreover, ROS are not only a major determinant of stress response but also act as signaling molecule that regulates various cellular processes including plant-microbe interaction. In particular, rhizosphere constitutes the biologically dynamic zone for plant–microbe interactions which forms a mutual link leading to reciprocal signaling in both the partners. Among plant–microbe interactions, symbiotic associations of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and arbuscular mycorrhizal-like fungus especially Piriformospora indica with plants are well known to improve plant growth by alleviating the stress-impacts and consequently enhance the plant fitness. AMF and P. indica colonization mainly enhances ROS-metabolism, maintains ROS-homeostasis, and thereby averts higher ROS-level accrued inhibition in plant cellular processes and plant growth and survival under stressful environments. This article summarizes the major outcomes of the recent reports on the ROS-generation, scavenging and signaling in biotic-abiotic stressed plants with AMF and P. indica colonization. Overall, a detailed exploration of ROS-signature kinetics during plant-AMF/P. indica interaction can help in designing innovative strategies for improving plant health and productivity under stress conditions. PMID:27818671

  6. Pilot Signal Generation Scheme Using Frequency-Dependent Cyclic Shift ZC Sequence for Inter-Cell Interference Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Daichi; Ogawa, Yoshihiko; Iwai, Takashi; Takata, Tomohumi; Hiramatsu, Katsuhiko; Miya, Kazuyuki; Homma, Koichi

    In this paper, we study and propose an inter-cell co-channel interference (CCI) mitigation method for pilot signals using cyclic shift Zadoff-Chu (CS-ZC) sequences for SC-FDMA-based uplink without tight scheduler coordination among cells. Firstly, we investigate the issue of severe detection performance degradation created by the lack of orthogonality among the pilot signals without alignment of the allocated frequency resource positions among cells when using the conventional CS-ZC sequences generation scheme. Secondly, we identify the primary factor causing the issue. Thirdly, we propose a frequency-dependent CS-ZC sequence generation scheme by allocating the same spectrum elements of the ZC sequence to the overlapped subcarriers among cells to mitigate the inter-cell CCI of the pilot signals without alignment of the frequency resource positions among cells. Finally, we confirm the validity of the proposal using uplink data BLER evaluation under a multipath fading condition by computer simulation compared to the conventional method, and show that the proposal achieves around 0.9dB and 0.6dB better performance at 10% BLER than the conventional method for 1 RB and 2 RBs frequency offsets in 3 RBs transmission bandwidth, respectively.

  7. Time-frequency Analysis for Acoustic Emission Signals of Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. G.; Pang, B. J.; Zhang, W.; Sun, F.; Guan, G. S.

    The risk of collision of man-made orbital debris with spacecraft in near Earth orbits continues to increase A major of the space debris between 1mm and 10mm can t be well tracked in Earth orbits Damage from these un-tracked debris impacts is a serious hazard to aircraft and spacecraft These on-orbit collisions occur at velocities exceeding 10km s and at these velocities even very small particles can create significant damage The development of in-situ impact detecting system is indispensable for protecting the spacecraft from tragedy malfunction by the debris Acoustic Emission AE detecting technique has been recognized as an important technology for non-destructive detecting due to the AE signals offering a potentially useful additional means of non-invasively gathering concerning the state of spacecrafts Also Acoustic emission health monitoring is able to detect locate and assess impact damage when the spacecrafts is impacted by hypervelocity space debris and micrometeoroids This information can help operators and designers at the ground station take effective measures to maintain the function of spacecraft In this article Acoustic emission AE is used for characterization and location for hypervelocity Impacts Two different Acoustic Emission AE sensors were used to detect the arrival time and signals of the hits Hypervelocity Impacts were generated with a two-stage light-gas gun firing small Aluminum ball projectiles 4mm 6 4mm In the impact studies the signals were recorded with Disp AEwin PAC instruments by the conventional crossing

  8. Heavy bino dark matter and collider signals in the MSSM with vectorlike fourth-generation particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Mohammad; Feng, Jonathan L.; Iwamoto, Sho; Lillard, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    MSSM4G models, in which the minimal supersymmetric standard model is extended to include vectorlike copies of standard model particles, are promising possibilities for weak-scale supersymmetry. In particular, two models, called QUE and QDEE, realize the major virtues of supersymmetry (naturalness consistent with the 125 GeV Higgs boson, gauge coupling unification, and thermal relic neutralino dark matter) without the need for fine-tuned relations between particle masses. We determine the implications of these models for dark matter and collider searches. The QUE and QDEE models revive the possibility of heavy bino dark matter with mass in the range 300-700 GeV, which is not usually considered. Dark matter direct detection cross sections are typically below current limits, but are naturally expected above the neutrino floor and may be seen at next-generation experiments. Indirect detection prospects are bright at the Cherenkov Telescope Array, provided the fourth-generation leptons have mass above 350 GeV or decay to taus. In a completely complementary way, discovery prospects at the LHC are dim if the fourth-generation leptons are heavy or decay to taus, but are bright for fourth-generation leptons with masses below 350 GeV that decay either to electrons or to muons. We conclude that the combined set of direct detection, CTA, and LHC experiments will discover or exclude these MSSM4G models in the coming few years, assuming the Milky Way has an Einasto dark matter profile.

  9. Signal Analysis and Waveform Reconstruction of Shock Waves Generated by Underwater Electrical Wire Explosions with Piezoelectric Pressure Probes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibin; Zhang, Yongmin; Han, Ruoyu; Jing, Yan; Wu, Jiawei; Liu, Qiaojue; Ding, Weidong; Qiu, Aici

    2016-04-22

    Underwater shock waves (SWs) generated by underwater electrical wire explosions (UEWEs) have been widely studied and applied. Precise measurement of this kind of SWs is important, but very difficult to accomplish due to their high peak pressure, steep rising edge and very short pulse width (on the order of tens of μs). This paper aims to analyze the signals obtained by two kinds of commercial piezoelectric pressure probes, and reconstruct the correct pressure waveform from the distorted one measured by the pressure probes. It is found that both PCB138 and Müller-plate probes can be used to measure the relative SW pressure value because of their good uniformities and linearities, but none of them can obtain precise SW waveforms. In order to approach to the real SW signal better, we propose a new multi-exponential pressure waveform model, which has considered the faster pressure decay at the early stage and the slower pressure decay in longer times. Based on this model and the energy conservation law, the pressure waveform obtained by the PCB138 probe has been reconstructed, and the reconstruction accuracy has been verified by the signals obtained by the Müller-plate probe. Reconstruction results show that the measured SW peak pressures are smaller than the real signal. The waveform reconstruction method is both reasonable and reliable.

  10. Signal Analysis and Waveform Reconstruction of Shock Waves Generated by Underwater Electrical Wire Explosions with Piezoelectric Pressure Probes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibin; Zhang, Yongmin; Han, Ruoyu; Jing, Yan; Wu, Jiawei; Liu, Qiaojue; Ding, Weidong; Qiu, Aici

    2016-01-01

    Underwater shock waves (SWs) generated by underwater electrical wire explosions (UEWEs) have been widely studied and applied. Precise measurement of this kind of SWs is important, but very difficult to accomplish due to their high peak pressure, steep rising edge and very short pulse width (on the order of tens of μs). This paper aims to analyze the signals obtained by two kinds of commercial piezoelectric pressure probes, and reconstruct the correct pressure waveform from the distorted one measured by the pressure probes. It is found that both PCB138 and Müller-plate probes can be used to measure the relative SW pressure value because of their good uniformities and linearities, but none of them can obtain precise SW waveforms. In order to approach to the real SW signal better, we propose a new multi-exponential pressure waveform model, which has considered the faster pressure decay at the early stage and the slower pressure decay in longer times. Based on this model and the energy conservation law, the pressure waveform obtained by the PCB138 probe has been reconstructed, and the reconstruction accuracy has been verified by the signals obtained by the Müller-plate probe. Reconstruction results show that the measured SW peak pressures are smaller than the real signal. The waveform reconstruction method is both reasonable and reliable. PMID:27110789

  11. Fractional dynamical model for the generation of ECG like signals from filtered coupled Van-der Pol oscillators.

    PubMed

    Das, Saptarshi; Maharatna, Koushik

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, an incommensurate fractional order (FO) model has been proposed to generate ECG like waveforms. Earlier investigation of ECG like waveform generation is based on two identical Van-der Pol (VdP) family of oscillators, which are coupled by time delays and gains. In this paper, we suitably modify the three state equations corresponding to the nonlinear cross-product of states, time delay coupling of the two oscillators and low-pass filtering, using the concept of fractional derivatives. Our results show that a wide variety of ECG like waveforms can be simulated from the proposed generalized models, characterizing heart conditions under different physiological conditions. Such generalization of the modelling of ECG waveforms may be useful to understand the physiological process behind ECG signal generation in normal and abnormal heart conditions. Along with the proposed FO models, an optimization based approach is also presented to estimate the VdP oscillator parameters for representing a realistic ECG like signal.

  12. The γ-secretase-generated intracellular domain of β-amyloid precursor protein binds Numb and inhibits Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roncarati, Roberta; Šestan, Nenad; Scheinfeld, Meir H.; Berechid, Bridget E.; Lopez, Peter A.; Meucci, Olimpia; McGlade, Jane C.; Rakic, Pasko; D'Adamio, Luciano

    2002-01-01

    The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the Notch receptor undergo intramembranous proteolysis by the Presenilin-dependent γ-secretase. The cleavage of APP by γ-secretase releases amyloid-β peptides, which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and the APP intracellular domain (AID), for which the function is not yet well understood. A similar γ-secretase-mediated cleavage of the Notch receptor liberates the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). NICD translocates to the nucleus and activates the transcription of genes that regulate the generation, differentiation, and survival of neuronal cells. Hence, some of the effects of APP signaling and Alzheimer's disease pathology may be mediated by the interaction of APP and Notch. Here, we show that membrane-tethered APP binds to the cytosolic Notch inhibitors Numb and Numb-like in mouse brain lysates. AID also binds Numb and Numb-like, and represses Notch activity when released by APP. Thus, γ-secretase may have opposing effects on Notch signaling; positive by cleaving Notch and generating NICD, and negative by processing APP and generating AID, which inhibits the function of NICD. PMID:12011466

  13. Performance evaluation of the Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing device and comparison with piezoelectric sensors for AE detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuang; Bond, Leonard J.

    2017-02-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) of engineering structures in service has assumed a significant role in assessing their safety and integrity. Several sensing modalities have been developed to monitor cracking, using acoustic emission (AE). Piezoelectric sensors are commonly used in AE systems, however, for some applications there are limitations and challenges. One alternative approach that is being investigated is using Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors which have emerged as a reliable, in situ and nondestructive tool in some applications for monitoring and diagnostics in large-scale structure. The main objective of this work is to evaluate and compare the AE sensing characteristics for FBG and piezoelectric sensors. A ball drop impact is used as the source for generating waves in an Aluminum plate. The source repeatability was verified and a 4-channel FBG AE detection device was used to compare with the response of PZT sensors, investigating amplitude and frequency response which can indicate sensitivity. The low sensitivity and slow sampling rate are identified, for the unit investigated, as the main factors limiting FBG engineering AE applications.

  14. Transmission and full-band coherent detection of polarization-multiplexed all-optical Nyquist signals generated by Sinc-shaped Nyquist pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianjun; Chi, Nan

    2015-09-01

    All optical method is considered as a promising technique for high symbol rate Nyquist signal generation, which has attracted a lot of research interests for high spectral-efficiency and high-capacity optical communication system. In this paper, we extend our previous work and report the fully experimental demonstration of polarization-division multiplexed (PDM) all-optical Nyquist signal generation based on Sinc-shaped Nyquist pulse with advanced modulation formats, fiber-transmission and single-receiver full-band coherent detection. Using this scheme, we have successfully demonstrated the generation, fiber transmission and single-receiver full-band coherent detection of all-optical Nyquist PDM-QPSK and PDM-16QAM signals up to 125-GBaud. 1-Tb/s single-carrier PDM-16QAM signal generation and full-band coherent detection is realized, which shows the advantage and feasibility of the single-carrier all-optical Nyquist signals.

  15. Proposal for all-optical generation of multiple-frequency millimeter-wave signals for RoF system with multiple base stations using FWM in SOA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongfu; Wang, Leyang; Qiu, Kun

    2011-07-18

    An approach for the multiple-frequency millimeter-wave (mm-wave) signals generation is proposed and demonstrated, specifically, which can be applied to a radio-over-fiber (RoF) system with multiple base stations (BSs). In this scheme, optical double sideband (ODSB) modulation is achieved using a Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) to generate the two-sideband signals. New frequencies of the optical signals are obtained by using four-wave mixing (FWM) in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). At the BSs, two different frequencies are achieved using a comb optical filter (COF), and which then input a photodiode (PD) to generate the mm-wave signals with the frequencies of 20, 40 or 60 GHz for different BSs, by mixing of these frequencies components. Experimental results verify that the proposed multiple-frequency mm-wave signals generation scheme for a RoF system with multiple base stations can work properly.

  16. Transmission and full-band coherent detection of polarization-multiplexed all-optical Nyquist signals generated by Sinc-shaped Nyquist pulses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianjun; Chi, Nan

    2015-01-01

    All optical method is considered as a promising technique for high symbol rate Nyquist signal generation, which has attracted a lot of research interests for high spectral-efficiency and high-capacity optical communication system. In this paper, we extend our previous work and report the fully experimental demonstration of polarization-division multiplexed (PDM) all-optical Nyquist signal generation based on Sinc-shaped Nyquist pulse with advanced modulation formats, fiber-transmission and single-receiver full-band coherent detection. Using this scheme, we have successfully demonstrated the generation, fiber transmission and single-receiver full-band coherent detection of all-optical Nyquist PDM-QPSK and PDM-16QAM signals up to 125-GBaud. 1-Tb/s single-carrier PDM-16QAM signal generation and full-band coherent detection is realized, which shows the advantage and feasibility of the single-carrier all-optical Nyquist signals. PMID:26323238

  17. Transmission and full-band coherent detection of polarization-multiplexed all-optical Nyquist signals generated by Sinc-shaped Nyquist pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianjun; Chi, Nan

    2015-09-01

    All optical method is considered as a promising technique for high symbol rate Nyquist signal generation, which has attracted a lot of research interests for high spectral-efficiency and high-capacity optical communication system. In this paper, we extend our previous work and report the fully experimental demonstration of polarization-division multiplexed (PDM) all-optical Nyquist signal generation based on Sinc-shaped Nyquist pulse with advanced modulation formats, fiber-transmission and single-receiver full-band coherent detection. Using this scheme, we have successfully demonstrated the generation, fiber transmission and single-receiver full-band coherent detection of all-optical Nyquist PDM-QPSK and PDM-16QAM signals up to 125-GBaud. 1-Tb/s single-carrier PDM-16QAM signal generation and full-band coherent detection is realized, which shows the advantage and feasibility of the single-carrier all-optical Nyquist signals.

  18. Tree shoot bending generates hydraulic pressure pulses: a new long-distance signal?

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Rosana; Badel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    When tree stems are mechanically stimulated, a rapid long-distance signal is induced that slows down primary growth. An investigation was carried out to determine whether the signal might be borne by a mechanically induced pressure pulse in the xylem. Coupling xylem flow meters and pressure sensors with a mechanical testing device, the hydraulic effects of mechanical deformation of tree stem and branches were measured. Organs of several tree species were studied, including gymnosperms and angiosperms with different wood densities and anatomies. Bending had a negligible effect on xylem conductivity, even when deformations were sustained or were larger than would be encountered in nature. It was found that bending caused transient variation in the hydraulic pressure within the xylem of branch segments. This local transient increase in pressure in the xylem was rapidly propagated along the vascular system in planta to the upper and lower regions of the stem. It was shown that this hydraulic pulse originates from the apoplast. Water that was mobilized in the hydraulic pulses came from the saturated porous material of the conduits and their walls, suggesting that the poroelastic behaviour of xylem might be a key factor. Although likely to be a generic mechanical response, quantitative differences in the hydraulic pulse were found in different species, possibly related to differences in xylem anatomy. Importantly the hydraulic pulse was proportional to the strained volume, similar to known thigmomorphogenetic responses. It is hypothesized that the hydraulic pulse may be the signal that rapidly transmits mechanobiological information to leaves, roots, and apices. PMID:24558073

  19. 25 Gbit/s differential phase-shift-keying signal generation using directly modulated quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeghuzi, A. Schmeckebier, H.; Stubenrauch, M.; Bimberg, D.; Meuer, C.; Schubert, C.; Bunge, C.-A.

    2015-05-25

    Error-free generation of 25-Gbit/s differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) signals via direct modulation of InAs quantum-dot (QD) based semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is experimentally demonstrated with an input power level of −5 dBm. The QD SOAs emit in the 1.3-μm wavelength range and provide a small-signal fiber-to-fiber gain of 8 dB. Furthermore, error-free DPSK modulation is achieved for constant optical input power levels from 3 dBm down to only −11 dBm for a bit rate of 20 Gbit/s. Direct phase modulation of QD SOAs via current changes is thus demonstrated to be much faster than direct gain modulation.

  20. Dynamic generation of robust and controlled beating signals in an asymmetric procedure of light storage and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qian-Qian; Gao, Jin-Wei; Cui, Cui-Li; Wang, Gang; Xue, Yan; Wu, Jin-Hui

    2011-06-06

    We propose an efficient scheme for the robust and controlled generation of beating signals in a sample of stationary atoms driven into the tripod configuration. This scheme relies on an asymmetric procedure of light storage and retrieval where the two classical coupling fields have equal detunings in the storage stage but opposite detunings in the retrieval stage. A quantum probe field, incident upon such an atomic sample, is first transformed into two spin coherence wave-packets and then retrieved with two optical components characterized by different time-dependent phases. Therefore the retrieved quantum probe field exhibits a series of maxima and minima (beating signals) in intensity due to the alternative constructive and destructive interference. This interesting phenomenon involves in fact the coherent manipulation of two dark-state polaritons and may be explored to achieve the fast quantum limited measurement.

  1. A simian-human immunodeficiency virus carrying the rt gene from Chinese CRF01_AE strain of HIV is sensitive to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and has a highly genetic stability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Nan; Ju, Bin; Dong, Zhihui; Cong, Zhe; Jiang, Hong; Qin, Chuan; Wei, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 subtype CRF01_AE is one of the major HIV-1 subtypes that dominate the global epidemic. However, its drug resistance, associated mutations, and viral fitness have not been systemically studied, because available chimeric simian-HIVs (SHIVs) usually express the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (rt) gene of subtype B HIV-1, which is different from subtype CRF01_AE HIV-1. In this study, a recombinant plasmid, pRT-SHIV/AE, was constructed to generate a chimeric RT-SHIV/AE by replacing the rt gene of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239) with the counterpart of Chinese HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE. The infectivity, replication capacity, co-receptor tropism, drug sensitivity, and genetic stability of RT-SHIV/AE were characterized. The new chimeric RT-SHIV/AE effectively infected and replicated in human T cell line and rhesus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (rhPBMC). The rt gene of RT-SHIV/AE lacked the common mutation (T215I) associated with drug resistance. RT-SHIV-AE retained infectivity and immunogenicity, similar to that of its counterpart RT-SHIV/TC virus following intravenous inoculation in Chinese rhesus macaque. RT-SHIV-AE was more sensitive to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) than the RT-SHIV/TC. RT-SHIV/AE was genetically stable in Chinese rhesus macaque. The new chimeric RT-SHIV/AE may be a valuable tool for evaluating the efficacy of the rt-based antiviral drugs against the subtype CRF01_AE HIV-1.

  2. Electronic constant current and current pulse signal generator for nuclear instrumentation testing

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Roger A.

    1994-01-01

    Circuitry for testing the ability of an intermediate range nuclear instrut to detect and measure a constant current and a periodic current pulse. The invention simulates the resistance and capacitance of the signal connection of a nuclear instrument ion chamber detector and interconnecting cable. An LED flasher/oscillator illuminates an LED at a periodic rate established by a timing capacitor and circuitry internal to the flasher/oscillator. When the LED is on, a periodic current pulse is applied to the instrument. When the LED is off, a constant current is applied. An inductor opposes battery current flow when the LED is on.

  3. Electronic constant current and current pulse signal generator for nuclear instrumentation testing

    DOEpatents

    Brown, R.A.

    1994-04-19

    Circuitry is described for testing the ability of an intermediate range nuclear instrument to detect and measure a constant current and a periodic current pulse. The invention simulates the resistance and capacitance of the signal connection of a nuclear instrument ion chamber detector and interconnecting cable. An LED flasher/oscillator illuminates an LED at a periodic rate established by a timing capacitor and circuitry internal to the flasher/oscillator. When the LED is on, a periodic current pulse is applied to the instrument. When the LED is off, a constant current is applied. An inductor opposes battery current flow when the LED is on. 1 figures.

  4. Hedgehog and retinoid signaling alters multiple myeloma microenvironment and generates bortezomib resistance

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Salvador; Hernandez, Daniela; Chang, Yu-ting; Gocke, Christian B.; McCray, Megan; Varadhan, Ravi; Matsui, William H.; Jones, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between multiple myeloma (MM) cells and the BM microenvironment play a critical role in bortezomib (BTZ) resistance. However, the mechanisms involved in these interactions are not completely understood. We previously showed that expression of CYP26 in BM stromal cells maintains a retinoic acid–low (RA-low) microenvironment that prevents the differentiation of normal and malignant hematopoietic cells. Since a low secretory B cell phenotype is associated with BTZ resistance in MM and retinoid signaling promotes plasma cell differentiation and Ig production, we investigated whether stromal expression of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP26 modulates BTZ sensitivity in the BM niche. CYP26-mediated inactivation of RA within the BM microenvironment prevented plasma cell differentiation and promoted a B cell–like, BTZ-resistant phenotype in human MM cells that were cocultured on BM stroma. Moreover, paracrine Hedgehog secretion by MM cells upregulated stromal CYP26 and further reinforced a protective microenvironment. These results suggest that crosstalk between Hedgehog and retinoid signaling modulates BTZ sensitivity in the BM niche. Targeting these pathological interactions holds promise for eliminating minimal residual disease in MM. PMID:27775549

  5. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase Generation of Electrophilic Lipid Signaling Mediators from Hydroxy Ω-3 Fatty Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Wenzel, Sally; Sobol, Robert W.; Holguin, Fernando; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15PGDH) is the primary enzyme catalyzing the conversion of hydroxylated arachidonic acid species to their corresponding oxidized metabolites. The oxidation of hydroxylated fatty acids, such as the conversion of prostaglandin (PG) E2 to 15-ketoPGE2, by 15PGDH is viewed to inactivate signaling responses. In contrast, the typically electrophilic products can also induce anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative responses. This study determined that hydroxylated docosahexaenoic acid metabolites (HDoHEs) are substrates for 15PGDH. Examination of 15PGDH substrate specificity was conducted in cell culture (A549 and primary human airway epithelia and alveolar macrophages) using chemical inhibition and shRNA knockdown of 15PGDH. Substrate specificity is broad and relies on the carbon position of the acyl chain hydroxyl group. 14-HDoHE was determined to be the optimal DHA substrate for 15PGDH, resulting in the formation of its electrophilic metabolite, 14-oxoDHA. Consistent with this, 14-HDoHE was detected in bronchoalveolar lavage cells of mild to moderate asthmatics, and the exogenous addition of 14-oxoDHA to primary alveolar macrophages inhibited LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression. These data reveal that 15PGDH-derived DHA metabolites are biologically active and can contribute to the salutary signaling actions of Ω-3 fatty acids. PMID:25586183

  6. An investigation of the effects of material anisotropy and heterogeneity on pulsed, laser-generated acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Hurley, D H; Spicer, J B

    1999-01-01

    Point-source and line-source models for the laser ultrasonic source in materials exhibiting transverse isotropy are applied to the specific problem of laser generation and ultrasonic propagation in unidirectional, polymer matrix composite materials. Comparing experiment and theory, it is shown that these composite materials exhibit homogeneous behavior, at the frequencies investigated, for ultrasonic wave propagation perpendicular to the fiber direction. For ultrasonic propagation in the fiber direction, ultrasonic dispersion, resulting from the inhomogeneous nature of the composite, affects the laser ultrasonic signal.

  7. A scaling relationship between AE and natural earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimitsu, N.; Kawakata, H.; Takahashi, N.

    2013-12-01

    Micro fracture which occurs during rock fracture experiments are called acoustic emission (AE), and it help us to understand detailed processes of fault growth. However, it was unclear whether AE can be considered as a small earthquake or not. Usually, the seismic moment and the corner frequency are used for characterizing source property. It has been reported that the seismic moment is inversely proportional to the cube of corner frequency for natural earthquakes (with magnitude higher than ~ -4). In this study, we examine continuity of this relationship toward smaller magnitude of AE (around magnitude -8), estimating the source parameters of AE. Previously, it was impossible to record AE waveforms by broadband transducers under tri-axial conditions due to lack of pressure seal mechanism. Here we achieved protection of broadband transducers to use them under high pressure environments. This achievement enabled us to do spectral analysis of AE. At the same time, we also achieved multi-channel continuous recording with a high sampling rate, so as not to miss some events smaller than threshold or hide some events behind the mask times by triggered recording. We prepared a cylindrical Westerly granite sample, 50 mm in diameter and 100 mm in height. Sealed nine broadband transducers (sensitive range; 100 kHz - 2000 kHz) were attached on the sample surface. High sampling recording as 20 MS/s per channel was continued, during tri-axial loading (confining pressure: 10 MPa) which was continued to be controlled even after the peak strength. More than 6000 hypocenters were estimated from all pick data during the experiment. We clustered events around the peak strength, so that their differences of hypocenter locations were shorter than 2 mm and their cross correlation values for more than four channels were higher than 0.8. Then, we analyzed two of the largest clusters. After calibrating transducer response, we obtained displacement spectra for S waves, and estimated their

  8. 40 Gb/s W-band (75-110 GHz) 16-QAM radio-over-fiber signal generation and its wireless transmission.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Atsushi; Inagaki, Keizo; Morohashi, Isao; Sakamoto, Takahide; Kuri, Toshiaki; Hosako, Iwao; Kawanishi, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Yuki; Kitayama, Ken-ichi

    2011-12-12

    The generation of a 40-Gb/s 16-QAM radio-over-fiber (RoF) signal and its demodulation of the wireless signal transmitted over free space of 30 mm in W-band (75-110 GHz) is demonstrated. The 16-QAM signal is generated by a coherent polarization synthesis method using a dual-polarization QPSK modulator. A combination of the simple RoF generation and the versatile digital receiver technique is suitable for the proposed coherent optical/wireless seamless network.

  9. Similarity assessment of acoustic emission signals and its application in source localization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiwan; Yang, Chunhe; Wang, Guibin; Liu, Wei

    2017-03-01

    In conventional AE source localization acoustic emission (AE) signals are applied directly to localize the source without any waveform identification or quality evaluation, which always leads to large errors in source localization. To improve the reliability and accuracy of acoustic emission source localization, an identification procedure is developed to assess the similarity of AE signals to select signals with high quality to localize the AE source. Magnitude square coherence (MSC), wavelet coherence and dynamic timing warping (DTW) are successively applied for similarity assessment. Results show that cluster analysis based on DTW distance is effective to select AE signals with high similarity. Similarity assessment results of the proposed method are almost completely consistent with manual identification. A novel AE source localization procedure is developed combining the selected AE signals with high quality and a direct source localization algorithm. AE data from thermal-cracking tests in Beishan granite are analyzed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed AE localization procedure. AE events are re-localized by the proposed AE localization procedure. And the accuracy of events localization has been improved significantly. The reliability and credibility of AE source localization will be improved by the proposed method.

  10. Pattern-dependent role of NMDA receptors in action potential generation: consequences on extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meilan; Adams, J Paige; Dudek, Serena M

    2005-07-27

    Synaptic long-term potentiation is maintained through gene transcription, but how the nucleus is recruited remains controversial. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) 1 and 2 with synaptic stimulation has been shown to require NMDA receptors (NMDARs), yet stimulation intensities sufficient to recruit action potentials (APs) also appear to be required. This has led us to ask the question of whether NMDARs are necessary for AP generation as they relate to ERK activation. To test this, we examined the effects of NMDAR blockade on APs induced with synaptic stimulation using whole-cell current-clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells in hippocampal slices. NMDAR antagonists were found to potently inhibit APs generated with 5 and 100 Hz synaptic stimulation. Blockade of APs and ERK activation could be overcome with the addition of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, indicating that APs are sufficient to activate signals such as ERK in the nucleus and throughout the neuron in the continued presence of NMDAR antagonists. Interestingly, no effects of the NMDAR antagonists were observed when theta-burst stimulation (TBS) was used. This resistance to the antagonists is conferred by temporal summation during the bursts. These results clarify findings from a previous study showing that ERK activation induced with TBS is resistant to 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate, in contrast to that induced with 5 or 100 Hz stimulation, which is sensitive. By showing that NMDAR blockade inhibits AP generation, we demonstrate that a major role that NMDARs play in cell-wide and nuclear ERK activation is through their contribution to action potential generation.

  11. Second generation biological signal processor. Final progress report, February 15, 1993--February 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Biological Information Signal Processor (BISP) is a VLSI ASIC implementation of the dynamic programming methods favored for direct sequence-to-sequence comparison in order to discover local as well as global similarities. These methods, based on the local algorithm of Smith and Waterman provide the most mathematically robust solution to the problem of sequence alignment (determination of the optimal character-to-character registration between the two sequence, including relative insertions and deletions, indels). BISP provides a complete implementation of the standard Smith and Waterman algorithm in a systolic array that allows full parameterization and several novel extensions to the algorithm. BISP operates at supercomputer speeds from a VME board on a Sun workstation. Each VME array provides a complete systolic pipeline for comparison and multiple arrays can be combined linearly in order to increase the pipeline length. Overall performance is a function of the IO speed of the pipelined disk-resident data and the length of the array.

  12. Detection, Evaluation, and Optimization of Optical Signals Generated by Fiber Optic Bragg Gratings Under Dynamic Excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Lekki, John; Lock, James A.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic response of a fiber optic Bragg grating to mechanical vibrations is examined both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical expressions describing the consequences of changes in the grating's reflection spectrum are derived for partially coherent beams in an interferometer. The analysis is given in terms of the dominant wavelength, optical bandwidth, and optical path difference of the interfering signals. Changes in the reflection spectrum caused by a periodic stretching and compression of the grating were experimentally measured using an unbalanced Michelson interferometer, a Michelson interferometer with a non-zero optical path difference. The interferometer's sensitivity to changes in dominant wavelength of the interfering beams was measured as a function of interferometer unbalance and was compared to theoretical predictions. The theoretical analysis enables the user to determine the optimum performance for an unbalanced interferometer.

  13. Peroxisomes as cell generators of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B; Palma, José M; del Río, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a gaseous free radical with a wide range of direct and indirect actions in plant cells. However, the enzymatic sources of NO and its subcellular localization in plants are still under debate. Among the different subcellular compartments where NO has been found to be produced, peroxisomes are the best characterized since in these organelles it has been demonstrated the presence of NO and it has been biochemically characterized a L-arginine-dependent nitric oxide synthase activity. This chapter summarizes the present knowledge of the NO metabolism and its derived reactive nitrogen species (RNS) in plant peroxisomes and how this gaseous free radical is involved in natural senescence, and is released to the cytosol under salinity stress conditions acting as a signal molecule.

  14. 77 FR 15098 - AES Hawaii, Inc.; Notice of Petition for Temporary Waiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission AES Hawaii, Inc.; Notice of Petition for Temporary Waiver Take notice that... (Commission) Rules of Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 292.205(c), AES Hawaii, Inc. (AES Hawaii) filed a Request... on the island of Oauh, Hawaii. AES Hawaii makes such a request because of a forced boiler outage...

  15. Applications of high resolution ICP-AES in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.G.; Giglio, J.J.; Goodall, P.S.; Cummings, D.G.

    1998-07-01

    Application of high resolution ICP-AES to selected problems of importance in the nuclear industry is a growing field. The advantages in sample preparation time, waste minimization and equipment cost are considerable. Two examples of these advantages are presented in this paper, burnup analysis of spent fuel and analysis of major uranium isotopes. The determination of burnup, an indicator of fuel cycle efficiency, has been accomplished by the determination of {sup 139}La by high resolution inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (HR-ICP-AES). Solutions of digested samples of reactor fuel rods were introduced into a shielded glovebox housing an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and the resulting atomic emission transmitted to a high resolution spectrometer by a 31 meter fiber optic bundle. Total and isotopic U determination by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is presented to allow for the calculation of burnup for the samples. This method of burnup determination reduces the time, material, sample handling and waste generated associated with typical burnup determinations which require separation of lanthanum from the other fission products with high specific activities. Work concerning an alternative burnup indicator, {sup 236}U, is also presented for comparison. The determination of {sup 235}U:{sup 238}U isotope ratios in U-Zr fuel alloys is also presented to demonstrate the versatility of HR-ICP-AES.

  16. C-Myc regulation by costimulatory signals modulates the generation of CD8+ memory T cells during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Haque, Mohammad; Song, Jianyong; Fino, Kristin; Wang, Youfei; Sandhu, Praneet; Song, Xinmeng; Norbury, Christopher; Ni, Bing; Fang, Deyu; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Song, Jianxun

    2016-01-01

    The signalling mechanisms of costimulation in the development of memory T cells remain to be clarified. Here, we show that the transcription factor c-Myc in CD8(+) T cells is controlled by costimulatory molecules, which modulates the development of memory CD8(+) T cells. C-Myc expression was dramatically reduced in Cd28(-/-) or Ox40(-/-) memory CD8(+) T cells, and c-Myc over-expression substantially reversed the defects in the development of T-cell memory following viral infection. C-Myc regulated the expression of survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis, which promoted the generation of virus-specific memory CD8(+) T cells. Moreover, over-expression of survivin with bcl-xL, a downstream molecule of NF-κB and intracellular target of costimulation that controls survival, in Cd28(-/-) or Ox40(-/-) CD8(+) T cells, reversed the defects in the generation of memory T cells in response to viral infection. These results identify c-Myc as a key controller of memory CD8(+) T cells from costimulatory signals.

  17. MHC class II tetramer analyses in AE37-vaccinated prostate cancer patients reveal vaccine-specific polyfunctional and long-lasting CD4(+) T-cells.

    PubMed

    Anastasopoulou, Eleftheria A; Voutsas, Ioannis F; Papamichail, Michael; Baxevanis, Constantin N; Perez, Sonia A

    2016-07-01

    Realizing the basis for generating long-lasting clinical responses in cancer patients after therapeutic vaccinations provides the means to further ameliorate clinical efficacy. Peptide cancer vaccines stimulating CD4(+) T helper cells are often promising for inducing immunological memory and persistent CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell responses. Recent reports from our clinical trial with the AE37 vaccine, which is a HER2 hybrid polypeptide, documented its efficacy to induce CD4(+) T cell immunity, which was associated with clinical improvements preferentially among HLA-DRB1*11(+) prostate cancer patients. Here, we performed in-depth investigation of the CD4(+) T cell response against the AE37 vaccine. We used the DR11/AE37 tetramer in combination with multicolor flow cytometry to identify and characterize AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells regarding memory and Tregs phenotype in HLA-DRB1*11(+) vaccinated patients. To verify vaccine-specific immunological memory in vivo, we also assessed AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells in defined CD4(+) memory subsets by cell sorting. Finally, vaccine-induced AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells were assessed regarding their functional profile. AE37-specific memory CD4(+) T cells could be detected in peptide-stimulated cultures from prostate cancer patients following vaccination even 4 y post-vaccination. The vast majority of vaccine-induced AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells exhibited a multifunctional, mostly Th1 cytokine signature, with the potential of granzyme B production. In contrast, we found relatively low frequencies of Tregs among AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells. This is the first report on the identification of vaccine-induced HER2-specific multifunctional long-lasting CD4(+) T cells in vaccinated prostate cancer patients.

  18. Mapping Copper and Lead Concentrations at Abandoned Mine Areas Using Element Analysis Data from ICP-AES and Portable XRF Instruments: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeongyu; Choi, Yosoon; Suh, Jangwon; Lee, Seung-Ho

    2016-03-30

    Understanding spatial variation of potentially toxic trace elements (PTEs) in soil is necessary to identify the proper measures for preventing soil contamination at both operating and abandoned mining areas. Many studies have been conducted worldwide to explore the spatial variation of PTEs and to create soil contamination maps using geostatistical methods. However, they generally depend only on inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) analysis data, therefore such studies are limited by insufficient input data owing to the disadvantages of ICP-AES analysis such as its costly operation and lengthy period required for analysis. To overcome this limitation, this study used both ICP-AES and portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) analysis data, with relatively low accuracy, for mapping copper and lead concentrations at a section of the Busan abandoned mine in Korea and compared the prediction performances of four different approaches: the application of ordinary kriging to ICP-AES analysis data, PXRF analysis data, both ICP-AES and transformed PXRF analysis data by considering the correlation between the ICP-AES and PXRF analysis data, and co-kriging to both the ICP-AES (primary variable) and PXRF analysis data (secondary variable). Their results were compared using an independent validation data set. The results obtained in this case study showed that the application of ordinary kriging to both ICP-AES and transformed PXRF analysis data is the most accurate approach when considers the spatial distribution of copper and lead contaminants in the soil and the estimation errors at 11 sampling points for validation. Therefore, when generating soil contamination maps for an abandoned mine, it is beneficial to use the proposed approach that incorporates the advantageous aspects of both ICP-AES and PXRF analysis data.

  19. Mapping Copper and Lead Concentrations at Abandoned Mine Areas Using Element Analysis Data from ICP–AES and Portable XRF Instruments: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeongyu; Choi, Yosoon; Suh, Jangwon; Lee, Seung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Understanding spatial variation of potentially toxic trace elements (PTEs) in soil is necessary to identify the proper measures for preventing soil contamination at both operating and abandoned mining areas. Many studies have been conducted worldwide to explore the spatial variation of PTEs and to create soil contamination maps using geostatistical methods. However, they generally depend only on inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP–AES) analysis data, therefore such studies are limited by insufficient input data owing to the disadvantages of ICP–AES analysis such as its costly operation and lengthy period required for analysis. To overcome this limitation, this study used both ICP–AES and portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) analysis data, with relatively low accuracy, for mapping copper and lead concentrations at a section of the Busan abandoned mine in Korea and compared the prediction performances of four different approaches: the application of ordinary kriging to ICP–AES analysis data, PXRF analysis data, both ICP–AES and transformed PXRF analysis data by considering the correlation between the ICP–AES and PXRF analysis data, and co-kriging to both the ICP–AES (primary variable) and PXRF analysis data (secondary variable). Their results were compared using an independent validation data set. The results obtained in this case study showed that the application of ordinary kriging to both ICP–AES and transformed PXRF analysis data is the most accurate approach when considers the spatial distribution of copper and lead contaminants in the soil and the estimation errors at 11 sampling points for validation. Therefore, when generating soil contamination maps for an abandoned mine, it is beneficial to use the proposed approach that incorporates the advantageous aspects of both ICP–AES and PXRF analysis data. PMID:27043594

  20. Systems Medicine in Oncology: Signaling Network Modeling and New-Generation Decision-Support Systems.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Silvio; Riccardi, Giuseppe; Castagnino, Nicoletta; Tortolina, Lorenzo; Maffei, Massimo; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Nencioni, Alessio; Ballestrero, Alberto; Patrone, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Two different perspectives are the main focus of this book chapter: (1) A perspective that looks to the future, with the goal of devising rational associations of targeted inhibitors against distinct altered signaling-network pathways. This goal implies a sufficiently in-depth molecular diagnosis of the personal cancer of a given patient. A sufficiently robust and extended dynamic modeling will suggest rational combinations of the abovementioned oncoprotein inhibitors. The work toward new selective drugs, in the field of medicinal chemistry, is very intensive. Rational associations of selective drug inhibitors will become progressively a more realistic goal within the next 3-5 years. Toward the possibility of an implementation in standard oncologic structures of technologically sufficiently advanced countries, new (legal) rules probably will have to be established through a consensus process, at the level of both diagnostic and therapeutic behaviors.(2) The cancer patient of today is not the patient of 5-10 years from now. How to support the choice of the most convenient (and already clinically allowed) treatment for an individual cancer patient, as of today? We will consider the present level of artificial intelligence (AI) sophistication and the continuous feeding, updating, and integration of cancer-related new data, in AI systems. We will also report briefly about one of the most important projects in this field: IBM Watson US Cancer Centers. Allowing for a temporal shift, in the long term the two perspectives should move in the same direction, with a necessary time lag between them.

  1. Metabolic clock generates nutrient anticipation rhythms in mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Khapre, Rohini V; Patel, Sonal A; Kondratova, Anna A; Chaudhary, Amol; Velingkaar, Nikkhil; Antoch, Marina P; Kondratov, Roman V

    2014-08-01

    The mTOR signaling pathway modulates metabolic processes with respect to nutrient availability and other growth-related cues. According to the existing paradigm, mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activityin vivo is induced by food and gradually decreases during fasting. We found that mTORC1 activity is controlled by an internal clock mechanism different from the known light-entrainable circadian clock. We observed 24-hr rhythms in phosphorylation of mTORC1 downstream targets, which were entrained by food, persisted during fasting and could be uncoupled from oscillating expression of the canonical circadian clock genes. Furthermore, these rhythms were present in tissues of mice with disrupted light-entrainable circadian clock. We propose tissue-specific rhythms in the expression of tor and its negative regulator deptor as the molecular mechanism of the mTORC1 activity oscillation. Our data demonstrate the existence of at least two independent molecular circadian clocks: one providing metabolic adaptation to periodic light/darkness and the other - to feeding.

  2. Quantifying internally generated and externally forced climate signals at regional scales in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Kewei; Zhang, Xuebin; Church, John A.; Hu, Jianyu

    2015-11-01

    The Earth's climate evolves because of both internal variability and external forcings. Using Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models, here we quantify the ratio of externally forced variance to total variance on interannual and longer time scales for regional surface air temperature (SAT) and sea level, which depends on the relative strength of externally forced signal compared to internal variability. The highest ratios are found in tropical areas for SAT but at high latitudes for sea level over the historical period when ocean dynamics and global mean thermosteric contributions are considered. Averaged globally, the ratios over a fixed time interval (e.g., 30 years) are projected to increase during the 21st century under the business-as-usual scenario (RCP8.5). In contrast, under two mitigation scenarios (RCP2.6 and RCP4.5), the ratio declines sharply by the end of the 21st century for SAT, but only declines slightly or stabilizes for sea level, indicating a slower response of sea level to climate mitigation.

  3. Comparative analysis of brain EEG signals generated from the right and left hand while writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardesai, Neha; Jamali Mahabadi, S. E.; Meng, Qinglei; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides a comparative analysis of right handed people and left handed people when they write with both their hands. Two left handed and one right handed subject were asked to write their respective names on a paper using both, their left and right handed, and their brain signals were measured using EEG. Similarly, they were asked to perform simple mathematical calculations using both their hand. The data collected from the EEG from writing with both hands is compared. It is observed that though it is expected that the right brain only would contribute to left handed writing and vice versa, it is not so. When a right handed person writes with his/her left hand, the initial instinct is to go for writing with the right hand. Hence, both parts of the brain are active when a subject writes with the other hand. However, when the activity is repeated, the brain learns to expect to write with the other hand as the activity is repeated and then only the expected part of the brain is active.

  4. A study of signal generation and charge collection in a-Si:H diodes for radiation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fujieda, I.

    1990-10-01

    Its high radiation resistivity and large-area capability are the expected advantages of this material together with its ability to provide a front-end readout electronics in the vicinity of the sensor element. Electrons and holes created by incoming charged particles, X-rays, {gamma} rays, are drifted by the electric field inside a-Si:H diodes and this carrier movement induces signal charges on electrodes. Charge collection and signal generation process are analyzed in terms of carrier mobilities, lifetimes and electric field. Charge collection in thick a-Si:H diodes is often limited by deep-level trapping of carriers during transit and a finite charge integration time required for single particle counting in some applications and sometimes by volume recombination of carriers for detecting heavily-ionizing particles such as {alpha} particles. The charge collection process is also strongly affected by the non-uniform electric field profiles in a-Si:H diodes caused by the fixed space charges inside the material under reverse-bias. Signal generation due to a weak light pulse irradiating each end of a thick diode is measured as a function of a reverse-bias and it gives a valuable information about the fixed space charges. Field profiles can be manipulated by either doping, electrode geometry, or combination of both to improve the charge collection process. One can apply a higher reverse-bias on a diode with an equivalent thickness by providing buffer layers at each end of the diode and thus suppressing soft breakdown phenomena. X-ray detection with a good sensitivity is demonstrated by an a-Si:H photodiode coupled to an evaporated CsI scintillator. The scintillation quality of evaporated CsI layers can be made almost identical to its single crystal counterpart. Fields of a-Si:H radiation detector application include high energy physics, medical imaging, materials science and life science. 78 refs., 68 figs., 11 tabs.

  5. Highly enhanced electrochemiluminescent strategy for tumor biomarkers detection with in situ generation of L-homocysteine for signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haijun; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo; Cao, Yaling; Bai, Lijuan

    2014-03-07

    In this work, an ultrasensitive peroxydisulfate electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor using in situ generation of L-homocysteine (L-Hcys) for signal amplification was successfully constructed for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). In the reaction of biological methylation, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) catalyzed the reversible hydrolysis of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH) to produce L-Hcys, which was inducted into ECL system to construct the immunosensor for signal amplification in this work. Simultaneously, Gold and palladium nanoparticles functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Au-PdNPs@MWCNTs) were prepared, which were introduced to immobilize the secondary antibody (Ab2) and SAHH with high loading amount and good biological activity due to their improved surface area and excellent biocompatibility. Then the proposed ECL immunosensor was developed by a sandwich-type format using Au-PdNPs@MWCNTs-SAHH-Ab2 as tracer and graphene together with AuNPs as substrate. Besides the enhancement of Au-PdNPs, the enzymatic catalysis reaction also amplified the ECL signal dramatically, which was achieved by efficient catalysis of the SAHH towards the hydrolysis of SAH to generate improved amount of L-Hcys in situ. Furthermore, due to the special interaction between Au-PdNPs and -SH or -NH2 in L-Hcys, L-Hcys would gradually accumulate on the surface of the immunosensor, which greatly enhanced the concentration of L-Hcys on the immunosensor surface and further improved the ECL intensity. With the amplification factors above, a wide linear ranged from 0.1 pg mL(-1) to 80 ng mL(-1) was acquired with a relatively low detection limit of 33 fg mL(-1) for CEA.

  6. Gap Junction-Mediated Signaling from Motor Neurons Regulates Motor Generation in the Central Circuits of Larval Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Teruyuki; Kohsaka, Hiroshi; Nose, Akinao

    2017-02-22

    In this study, we used the peristaltic crawling of Drosophila larvae as a model to study how motor patterns are regulated by central circuits. We built an experimental system that allows simultaneous application of optogenetics and calcium imaging to the isolated ventral nerve cord (VNC). We then investigated the effects of manipulating local activity of motor neurons (MNs) on fictive locomotion observed as waves of MN activity propagating along neuromeres. Optical inhibition of MNs with halorhodopsin3 in a middle segment (A4, A5, or A6), but not other segments, dramatically decreased the frequency of the motor waves. Conversely, local activation of MNs with channelrhodopsin2 in a posterior segment (A6 or A7) increased the frequency of the motor waves. Since peripheral nerves mediating sensory feedback were severed in the VNC preparation, these results indicate that MNs send signals to the central circuits to regulate motor pattern generation. Our results also indicate segmental specificity in the roles of MNs in motor control. The effects of the local MN activity manipulation were lost in shaking-B(2) (shakB(2) ) or ogre(2) , gap-junction mutations in Drosophila, or upon acute application of the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone, implicating electrical synapses in the signaling from MNs. Cell-type-specific RNAi suggested shakB and ogre function in MNs and interneurons, respectively, during the signaling. Our results not only reveal an unexpected role for MNs in motor pattern regulation, but also introduce a powerful experimental system that enables examination of the input-output relationship among the component neurons in this system.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Motor neurons are generally considered passive players in motor pattern generation, simply relaying information from upstream interneuronal circuits to the target muscles. This study shows instead that MNs play active roles in the control of motor generation by conveying information via gap junctions to the

  7. PDLIM5 links kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) to ILK and is required for membrane targeting of kAE1

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ya; Hiemstra, Thomas F.; Yan, Yahui; Li, Juan; Karet, Hannah I.; Rosen, Lawrence; Moreno, Pablo; Frankl, Fiona E. Karet

    2017-01-01

    Anion exchanger 1 (AE1) mediates Cl−/HCO3− exchange in erythrocytes and kidney intercalated cells where it functions to maintain normal bodily acid-base homeostasis. AE1’s C-terminal tail (AE1C) contains multiple potential membrane targeting/retention determinants, including a predicted PDZ binding motif, which are critical for its normal membrane residency. Here we identify PDLIM5 as a direct binding partner for AE1 in human kidney, via PDLIM5’s PDZ domain and the PDZ binding motif in AE1C. Kidney AE1 (kAE1), PDLIM5 and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) form a multiprotein complex in which PDLIM5 provides a bridge between ILK and AE1C. Depletion of PDLIM5 resulted in significant reduction in kAE1 at the cell membrane, whereas over-expression of kAE1 was accompanied by increased PDLIM5 levels, underscoring the functional importance of PDLIM5 for proper kAE1 membrane residency, as a crucial linker between kAE1 and actin cytoskeleton-associated proteins in polarized cells. PMID:28045035

  8. The transcriptional repressor Blimp-1 acts downstream of BMP signaling to generate primordial germ cells in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Taro; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2016-01-15

    Segregation of the germ line from the soma is an essential event for transmission of genetic information across generations in all sexually reproducing animals. Although some well-studied systems such as Drosophila and Xenopus use maternally inherited germ determinants to specify germ cells, most animals, including mice, appear to utilize zygotic inductive cell signals to specify germ cells during later embryogenesis. Such inductive germ cell specification is thought to be an ancestral trait of Bilateria, but major questions remain as to the nature of an ancestral mechanism to induce germ cells, and how that mechanism evolved. We previously reported that BMP signaling-based germ cell induction is conserved in both the mouse Mus musculus and the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, which is an emerging model organism for functional studies of induction-based germ cell formation. In order to gain further insight into the functional evolution of germ cell specification, here we examined the Gryllus ortholog of the transcription factor Blimp-1 (also known as Prdm1), which is a widely conserved bilaterian gene known to play a crucial role in the specification of germ cells in mice. Our functional analyses of the Gryllus Blimp-1 ortholog revealed that it is essential for Gryllus primordial germ cell development, and is regulated by upstream input from the BMP signaling pathway. This functional conservation of the epistatic relationship between BMP signaling and Blimp-1 in inductive germ cell specification between mouse and cricket supports the hypothesis that this molecular mechanism regulated primordial germ cell specification in a last common bilaterian ancestor.

  9. New Role for Kruppel-like Factor 14 as a Transcriptional Activator Involved in the Generation of Signaling Lipids*

    PubMed Central

    de Assuncao, Thiago M.; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A.; Huebert, Robert C.; Urrutia, Raul A.; Shah, Vijay H.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  10. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession.

  11. Epithelial polarity--generating and integrating signals from the ECM with integrins.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Aki

    2015-06-10

    Epithelial cells are important building blocks of most tissues and the corner stone of tissue architectures that allow directional transport of nutrients, ions and waste products in and out of the body. In tissues composed of millions of cells every individual cell needs to make right decisions when to differentiate, migrate, divide or die. Tight control of such fundamental cell-level processes ensures proper tissue morphogenesis, homeostasis and function. Cellular decisions are guided by biochemical and mechanical cues from their immediate microenvironment that consists of the extracellular matrix (ECM), neighboring cells and soluble factors. Generation of two distinct surfaces one facing the outside world (the apical domain) and the other contacting the neighboring cells and basal ECM (basolateral domain) is the most fundamental property of epithelial cells. The cues from the ECM are of particular importance in this process and communication between the cells and the ECM is largely mediated by transmembrane ECM receptors. Integrins constitute the largest family of such receptors binding to the ECM. Integrins have been shown to be essential for the establishment of initial polarity cues that define the position of the basal domain and thereby govern the orientation of the forming apico-basal axis. In this review I will discuss the multifaceted roles of integrins in epithelial cells with a particular focus on recent developments unveiling the specific functions of the different integrin heterodimers in regulating epithelial cell polarization and morphogenesis.

  12. Superoxide generation in extracts from isolated plant cell walls is regulated by fungal signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Kiba, A; Miyake, C; Toyoda, K; Ichinose, Y; Yamada, T; Shiraishi, T

    1997-08-01

    ABSTRACT Fractions solubilized with NaCl from cell walls of pea and cowpea plants catalyzed the formation of blue formazan from nitroblue tetrazolium. Because superoxide dismutase decreased formazan production by over 90%, superoxide anion (O(2) ) may participate in the formation of formazan in the solubilized cell wall fractions. The formazan formation in the fractions solubilized from pea and cowpea cell walls was markedly reduced by exclusion of NAD(P)H, manganese ion, or p-coumaric acid from the reaction mixture. The formazan formation was severely inhibited by salicylhydroxamic acid and catalase, but not by imidazole, pyridine, quinacrine, and diphenyleneiodonium. An elicitor preparation from the pea pathogen Mycosphaerella pinodes enhanced the activities of formazan formation nonspecifically in both pea and cowpea fractions. The suppressor preparation from M. pinodes inhibited the activity in the pea fraction in the presence or absence of the elicitor. In the cowpea fraction, however, the suppressor did not inhibit the elicitor-enhanced activity, and the suppressor alone stimulated formazan formation. These results indicated that O(2) generation in the fractions solubilized from pea and cowpea cell walls seems to be catalyzed by cell wall-bound peroxidase(s) and that the plant cell walls alone are able to respond to the elicitor non-specifically and to the suppressor in a species-specific manner, suggesting the plant cell walls may play an important role in determination of plant-fungal pathogen specificity.

  13. Signal photon flux generated by high-frequency relic gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Wang, Sai; Wen, Hao

    2016-08-01

    The power spectrum of primordial tensor perturbations increases rapidly in the high frequency region if the spectral index n t > 0. It is shown that the amplitude of relic gravitational waves h t(5 × 109 Hz) varies from 10-36 to 10-25 while n t varies from -6.25 × 10-3 to 0.87. A high frequency gravitational wave detector proposed by F.-Y. Li detects gravitational waves through observing the perturbed photon flux that is generated by interaction between relic gravitational waves and electromagnetic field. It is shown that the perturbative photon flux (5 × 109 Hz) varies from 1.40 × 10-4 s-1 to 2.85 × 107 s-1 while n t varies from -6.25 × 10-3 to 0.87. Correspondingly, the ratio of the transverse perturbative photon flux to the background photon flux varies from 10-28 to 10-16. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305181,11322545,11335012) and Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Y5KF181CJ1)

  14. All-fibre photonic signal generator for attosecond timing and ultralow-noise microwave.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-11-04

    High-impact frequency comb applications that are critically dependent on precise pulse timing (i.e., repetition rate) have recently emerged and include the synchronization of X-ray free-electron lasers, photonic analogue-to-digital conversion and photonic radar systems. These applications have used attosecond-level timing jitter of free-running mode-locked lasers on a fast time scale within ~100 μs. Maintaining attosecond-level absolute jitter over a significantly longer time scale can dramatically improve many high-precision comb applications. To date, ultrahigh quality-factor (Q) optical resonators have been used to achieve the highest-level repetition-rate stabilization of mode-locked lasers. However, ultrahigh-Q optical-resonator-based methods are often fragile, alignment sensitive and complex, which limits their widespread use. Here we demonstrate a fibre-delay line-based repetition-rate stabilization method that enables the all-fibre photonic generation of optical pulse trains with 980-as (20-fs) absolute r.m.s. timing jitter accumulated over 0.01 s (1 s). This simple approach is based on standard off-the-shelf fibre components and can therefore be readily used in various comb applications that require ultra-stable microwave frequency and attosecond optical timing.

  15. All-fibre photonic signal generator for attosecond timing and ultralow-noise microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-11-01

    High-impact frequency comb applications that are critically dependent on precise pulse timing (i.e., repetition rate) have recently emerged and include the synchronization of X-ray free-electron lasers, photonic analogue-to-digital conversion and photonic radar systems. These applications have used attosecond-level timing jitter of free-running mode-locked lasers on a fast time scale within ~100 μs. Maintaining attosecond-level absolute jitter over a significantly longer time scale can dramatically improve many high-precision comb applications. To date, ultrahigh quality-factor (Q) optical resonators have been used to achieve the highest-level repetition-rate stabilization of mode-locked lasers. However, ultrahigh-Q optical-resonator-based methods are often fragile, alignment sensitive and complex, which limits their widespread use. Here we demonstrate a fibre-delay line-based repetition-rate stabilization method that enables the all-fibre photonic generation of optical pulse trains with 980-as (20-fs) absolute r.m.s. timing jitter accumulated over 0.01 s (1 s). This simple approach is based on standard off-the-shelf fibre components and can therefore be readily used in various comb applications that require ultra-stable microwave frequency and attosecond optical timing.

  16. All-fibre photonic signal generator for attosecond timing and ultralow-noise microwave

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    High-impact frequency comb applications that are critically dependent on precise pulse timing (i.e., repetition rate) have recently emerged and include the synchronization of X-ray free-electron lasers, photonic analogue-to-digital conversion and photonic radar systems. These applications have used attosecond-level timing jitter of free-running mode-locked lasers on a fast time scale within ~100 μs. Maintaining attosecond-level absolute jitter over a significantly longer time scale can dramatically improve many high-precision comb applications. To date, ultrahigh quality-factor (Q) optical resonators have been used to achieve the highest-level repetition-rate stabilization of mode-locked lasers. However, ultrahigh-Q optical-resonator-based methods are often fragile, alignment sensitive and complex, which limits their widespread use. Here we demonstrate a fibre-delay line-based repetition-rate stabilization method that enables the all-fibre photonic generation of optical pulse trains with 980-as (20-fs) absolute r.m.s. timing jitter accumulated over 0.01 s (1 s). This simple approach is based on standard off-the-shelf fibre components and can therefore be readily used in various comb applications that require ultra-stable microwave frequency and attosecond optical timing. PMID:26531777

  17. Magnitude and sign of long-range correlated time series: Decomposition and surrogate signal generation.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Extremera, Manuel; Carpena, Pedro; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Bernaola-Galván, Pedro A

    2016-04-01

    We systematically study the scaling properties of the magnitude and sign of the fluctuations in correlated time series, which is a simple and useful approach to distinguish between systems with different dynamical properties but the same linear correlations. First, we decompose artificial long-range power-law linearly correlated time series into magnitude and sign series derived from the consecutive increments in the original series, and we study their correlation properties. We find analytical expressions for the correlation exponent of the sign series as a function of the exponent of the original series. Such expressions are necessary for modeling surrogate time series with desired scaling properties. Next, we study linear and nonlinear correlation properties of series composed as products of independent magnitude and sign series. These surrogate series can be considered as a zero-order approximation to the analysis of the coupling of magnitude and sign in real data, a problem still open in many fields. We find analytical results for the scaling behavior of the composed series as a function of the correlation exponents of the magnitude and sign series used in the composition, and we determine the ranges of magnitude and sign correlation exponents leading to either single scaling or to crossover behaviors. Finally, we obtain how the linear and nonlinear properties of the composed series depend on the correlation exponents of their magnitude and sign series. Based on this information we propose a method to generate surrogate series with controlled correlation exponent and multifractal spectrum.

  18. Generation of fluoroscopic 3D images with a respiratory motion model based on an external surrogate signal.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Martina; Williams, Christopher L; Mishra, Pankaj; Rottmann, Joerg; Dhou, Salam; Wagar, Matthew; Mannarino, Edward G; Mak, Raymond H; Lewis, John H

    2015-01-21

    Respiratory motion during radiotherapy can cause uncertainties in definition of the target volume and in estimation of the dose delivered to the target and healthy tissue. In this paper, we generate volumetric images of the internal patient anatomy during treatment using only the motion of a surrogate signal. Pre-treatment four-dimensional CT imaging is used to create a patient-specific model correlating internal respiratory motion with the trajectory of an external surrogate placed on the chest. The performance of this model is assessed with digital and physical phantoms reproducing measured irregular patient breathing patterns. Ten patient breathing patterns are incorporated in a digital phantom. For each patient breathing pattern, the model is used to generate images over the course of thirty seconds. The tumor position predicted by the model is compared to ground truth information from the digital phantom. Over the ten patient breathing patterns, the average absolute error in the tumor centroid position predicted by the motion model is 1.4 mm. The corresponding error for one patient breathing pattern implemented in an anthropomorphic physical phantom was 0.6 mm. The global voxel intensity error was used to compare the full image to the ground truth and demonstrates good agreement between predicted and true images. The model also generates accurate predictions for breathing patterns with irregular phases or amplitudes.

  19. Generation of fluoroscopic 3D images with a respiratory motion model based on an external surrogate signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Martina; Williams, Christopher L.; Mishra, Pankaj; Rottmann, Joerg; Dhou, Salam; Wagar, Matthew; Mannarino, Edward G.; Mak, Raymond H.; Lewis, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory motion during radiotherapy can cause uncertainties in definition of the target volume and in estimation of the dose delivered to the target and healthy tissue. In this paper, we generate volumetric images of the internal patient anatomy during treatment using only the motion of a surrogate signal. Pre-treatment four-dimensional CT imaging is used to create a patient-specific model correlating internal respiratory motion with the trajectory of an external surrogate placed on the chest. The performance of this model is assessed with digital and physical phantoms reproducing measured irregular patient breathing patterns. Ten patient breathing patterns are incorporated in a digital phantom. For each patient breathing pattern, the model is used to generate images over the course of thirty seconds. The tumor position predicted by the model is compared to ground truth information from the digital phantom. Over the ten patient breathing patterns, the average absolute error in the tumor centroid position predicted by the motion model is 1.4 mm. The corresponding error for one patient breathing pattern implemented in an anthropomorphic physical phantom was 0.6 mm. The global voxel intensity error was used to compare the full image to the ground truth and demonstrates good agreement between predicted and true images. The model also generates accurate predictions for breathing patterns with irregular phases or amplitudes.

  20. Inefficient Chronic Activation of Parietal Cells in Ae2a,b−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Recalde, Sergio; Muruzábal, Francisco; Looije, Norbert; Kunne, Cindy; Burrell, María A.; Sáez, Elena; Martínez-Ansó, Eduardo; Salas, January T.; Mardones, Pablo; Prieto, Jesús; Medina, Juan F.; Elferink, Ronald P.J. Oude

    2006-01-01

    In parietal cells, basolateral Ae2 Cl−/HCO3− exchanger (Slc4a2) appears to compensate for luminal H+ pumping while providing Cl− for apical secretion. In mouse and rat, mRNA variants Ae2a, Ae2b1, Ae2b2, and Ae2c2 are all found in most tissues (although the latter at very low levels), whereas Ae2c1 is restricted to the stomach. We studied the acid secretory function of gastric mucosa in mice with targeted disruption of Ae2a, Ae2b1, and Ae2b2 (but not Ae2c) isoforms. In the oxyntic mucosa of Ae2a,b−/− mice, total Ae2 protein was nearly undetectable, indicating low gastric expression of the Ae2c isoforms. In Ae2a,b−/− mice basal acid secretion was normal, whereas carbachol/histamine-stimulated acid secretion was impaired by 70%. These animals showed increased serum gastrin levels and hyperplasia of G cells. Immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy revealed baseline activation of parietal cells with fusion of intracellular H+/K+-ATPase-containing vesicles with the apical membrane and degenerative changes (but not substantial apoptosis) in a subpopulation of these cells. Increased expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in the oxyntic glands suggested enhanced Ae2a,b−/− parietal cell turnover. These data reveal a critical role of Ae2a-Ae2b1-Ae2b2 isoforms in stimulated gastric acid secretion whereas residual Ae2c isoforms could account to a limited extent for basal acid secretion. PMID:16816370

  1. 19 CFR 192.11 - Description of the AES.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Description of the AES. 192.11 Section 192.11 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE... 30 of the Census Regulations (15 CFR part 30, subpart E), denominated Electronic Filing...

  2. The phenotype Ae1B: a probable result of chimerism.

    PubMed Central

    Longster, G H; Robinson, E A; North, D I

    1978-01-01

    An apparently normal healthy adult with the blood group phenotype Ae1B is described. The unusual ABO group is apparently the result of chimerism, the proportion of the minor population of cells being so small as to be only detectable by absorption and elution techniques. PMID:739532

  3. 15 CFR 758.2 - Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS § 758.2 Automated Export System (AES). The Census Bureau's Foreign Trade Statistics... Administration Regulations (EAR) and Foreign Trade Statistics Regulations (FTSR). These procedures and safeguards... § 750.8(b) of the EAR, if requested; (v) Compliance with the destination control statement provisions...

  4. 15 CFR 758.2 - Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Automated Export System (AES). 758.2 Section 758.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS...

  5. 15 CFR 758.2 - Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automated Export System (AES). 758.2 Section 758.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS...

  6. Gravity waves in the thermosphere observed by the AE satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S. H.; Reber, C. A.; Huang, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    Atmospheric Explorer (AE) satellite data were used to investigate the spectra characteristics of wave-like structure observed in the neutral and ionized components of the thermosphere. Power spectral analysis derived by the maximum entropy method indicate the existence of a broad spectrum of scale sizes for the fluctuations ranging from tens to thousands of kilometers.

  7. 19 CFR 192.11 - Description of the AES.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXPORT CONTROL Filing of Export Information Through the Automated Export System (AES... commodity export information (see, 15 CFR 30.16) to submit such information electronically, rather than...

  8. An AES study of surface oxidation of zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, M.; Tanabe, T.; Imoto, S.

    1989-02-01

    A clean Zr surface, prepared by several cycles of heating and Ar ion sputtering, is exposed to oxygen gas under 10 -5-10 -6 Pa at room temperature (RT), and surface oxidation behavior is examined by in-situ AES measurements. Subsequent depth profiling of the oxidized sample is carried out and the oxygen diffusion coefficient in α-Zr is evaluated. All AES peaks of Zr and O are modified with increasing oxygen exposure. The changes of the AES peaks show three stages of oxidation which are attributed to (1) oxygen solution in α-Zr, (2) nucleation and growth of ZrO 2 on the surface and (3) growth of the ZrO 2 layer. Above 9000 L, the surface is completely covered with ZrO 2 and the present AES study shows no evidence of the appearance of suboxide suggested by Sen et al. and de Gonzalez et al. The depth profiling of the oxidized sample indicates coexistence of ZrO 2 and α-Zr(O) with an oxygen content of around 30 at% over a depth of several nm without any clear-cut boundary of ZrO 2 and α-Zr(O). The apparent oxygen diffusion coefficient at RT estimated using a simple model, 10 -21 m 2 s -1, is much larger than the extrapolated value, around 10 -40 m 2 s -1, from the literature at high temperatures.

  9. A case of bleomycin-induced acral erythema (AE) with eccrine squamous syringometaplasia (ESS) and summary of reports of AE with ESS in the literature.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Hiromi; Yonemoto, Kohzoh; Katsuoka, Kensei

    2005-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced acral erythema (AE) is primarily induced by hydroxyurea, methotrexate, and cytarabine, although there are rare reports of AE induced by combination chemotherapy containing bleomycin. It is thought that the accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs in eccrine glands may cause eccrine squamous syringometaplasia (ESS), which is characterized by metaplasia and focal necrosis of the epithelium of the eccrine duct. ESS is occasionally detected in conjunction with AE, but such occurrences are relatively uncommon. This is the first report of AE with ESS induced by the administration of bleomycin alone. We also provide a summary of past cases of AE with ESS in the literature.

  10. Generation of FCC-compliant and background-free millimeter-wave ultrawideband signal based on nonlinear polarization rotation in a highly nonlinear fiber.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Wen Ting; Sun, Wen Hui; Liu, Jian Guo; Zhu, Ning Hua

    2014-05-05

    We propose a novel approach to generating millimeter-wave (MMW) ultrawideband (UWB) signal based on nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) in a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF). The MMW UWB signal is background-free by eliminating the baseband frequency components using an optical filter. The proposed scheme is theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified. The generated MMW UWB signal centered at 25.5 GHz has a 10-dB bandwidth of 7 GHz from 22 to 29 GHz, which fully satisfies the spectral mask regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

  11. Luminol encapsulated liposome as a signal generator for the detection of specific antigen-antibody reactions and nucleotide hybridization.

    PubMed

    Rakthong, Pakavadee; Intaramat, Akarin; Ratanabanangkoon, Kavi

    2010-01-01

    Liposomes prepared with biotinylated phospholipids and luminol entrapped were shown to be of 187 nm in size, 59% of which were unilamellar and with 43% luminol trapping efficiency. Liposome prepared from biotinylated phospholipids with a longer hydrophilic PEG2000 spacer, but not with the shorter hydrophobic caproyl one, bound efficiently and specifically with immobilized streptavidin in a microplate assay. The interactions of dinitrophenol and tobramycin with their respective antibodies, and the hybridization of 20-mers oligonucleotides were studied using the liposome as a signal generator. These reactions were shown to be specific with limits of detection of 0.58 microM, 0.96 microM and 18 nM, respectively.

  12. High-bandwidth generation of duobinary and alternate-mark-inversion modulation formats using SOA-based signal processing.

    PubMed

    Dailey, James M; Power, Mark J; Webb, Roderick P; Manning, Robert J

    2011-12-19

    We report on the novel all-optical generation of duobinary (DB) and alternate-mark-inversion (AMI) modulation formats at 42.6 Gb/s from an input on-off keyed signal. The modulation converter consists of two semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer gates. A detailed SOA model numerically confirms the operational principles and experimental data shows successful AMI and DB conversion at 42.6 Gb/s. We also predict that the operational bandwidth can be extended beyond 40 Gb/s by utilizing a new pattern-effect suppression scheme, and demonstrate dramatic reductions in patterning up to 160 Gb/s. We show an increasing trade-off between pattern-effect reduction and mean output power with increasing bitrate.

  13. Generation of 64 GBd 4ASK signals using a silicon-organic hybrid modulator at 80°C.

    PubMed

    Lauermann, M; Wolf, S; Hartmann, W; Palmer, R; Kutuvantavida, Y; Zwickel, H; Bielik, A; Altenhain, L; Lutz, J; Schmid, R; Wahlbrink, T; Bolten, J; Giesecke, A L; Freude, W; Koos, C

    2016-05-02

    We demonstrate a silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) generating four-level amplitude shift keying (4ASK) signals at symbol rates of up to 64 GBd both at room temperature and at an elevated temperature of 80°C. The measured line rate of 128 Gbit/s corresponds to the highest value demonstrated for silicon-based MZM so far. We report bit error ratios of 10-10 (64 GBd BPSK), 10-5 (36 GBd 4ASK), and 4 × 10-3 (64 GBd 4ASK) at room temperature. At 80 °C, the respective bit error ratios are 10-10, 10-4, and 1.3 × 10-2. The high-temperature experiments were performed in regular oxygen-rich ambient atmosphere.

  14. Supraphysiologic levels of the AML1-ETO isoform AE9a are essential for transformation

    PubMed Central

    Link, Kevin A.; Lin, Shan; Shrestha, Mahesh; Bowman, Melissa; Wunderlich, Mark; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Huang, Gang; Mulloy, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation 8;21 is found in 40% of the FAB M2 subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The resultant in-frame fusion protein AML1-ETO (AE) acts as an initiating oncogene for leukemia development. AE immortalizes human CD34+ cord blood cells in long-term culture. We assessed the transforming properties of the alternatively spliced AE isoform AE9a (or alternative splicing at exon 9), which is fully transforming in a murine retroviral model, in human cord blood cells. Full activity was realized only upon increased fusion protein expression. This effect was recapitulated in the AE9a murine AML model. Cotransduction of AE and AE9a resulted in a strong selective pressure for AE-expressing cells. In the context of AE, AE9a did not show selection for increased expression, affirming observations of human t(8;21) patient samples where full-length AE is the dominant protein detected. Mechanistically, AE9a showed defective transcriptional regulation of AE target genes that was partially corrected at high expression. Together, these results bring an additional perspective to our understanding of AE function and highlight the contribution of oncogene expression level in t(8;21) experimental models. PMID:27457952

  15. Improvement of sensitivity of electrolyte cathode discharge atomic emission spectrometry (ELCAD-AES) for mercury using acetic acid medium.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, R

    2012-05-15

    A method has been developed to improve the sensitivity of the electrolyte cathode discharge atomic emission spectrometry (ELCAD-AES) for mercury determination. Effects of various low molecular weight organic solvents at different volume percentages as well as at different acid molarities on the mercury signal were investigated using ELCAD-AES. The addition of few percent of organic solvent, acetic acid produced significant enhancement in mercury signal. Acetic acid of 5% (v/v) with the 0.2M acidity has been found to give 500% enhancement for mercury signal in flow injection mode. Under the optimized parameters the repeatability, expressed as the percentage relative standard deviation of spectral peak area for mercury with 5% acetic acid was found to be 10% for acid blank solution and 5% for 20 ng/mL mercury standard based on multiple measurements with a multiple sample loading in flow injection mode. Limit of detection of this method was determined to be 2 ng/mL for inorganic mercury. The proposed method has been validated by determining mercury in certified reference materials, Tuna fish (IAEA-350) and Aquatic plant (BCR-060). Accuracy of the method for the mercury determination in the reference materials has been found to be between 3.5% and 5.9%. This study enhances the utility of ELCAD-AES for various types of biological and environmental materials to quantify total mercury at very low levels.

  16. MicroRNA-150 suppression of angiopoetin-2 generation and signaling is crucial for resolving vascular injury

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Charu; Tauseef, Mohammad; Farazuddin, Mohammad; Yazbeck, Pascal; Amin, Md-Ruhul; Avin, Vijay BR; Sharma, Tiffany; Mehta, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Increased vascular permeability is a hallmark of sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Angiopoietin (Ang2) induces vascular leak, and excess Ang2 generation is associated with patient mortality from these diseases. However, mechanisms dampening Ang2 generation during injury remain unclear. Interestingly, microRNA-150 levels were decreased in septic patients. MicoRNAs (miR) regulate signaling networks by silencing mRNAs containing complementary sequences. Thus, we hypothesized that miR-150 suppresses Ang2 generation and thereby resolves vascular injury. Approach and Results Wild-type or miR-150−/− mice or endothelial cells were exposed to lipopolysaccharide or sepsis and Ang2 levels, adherens junction re-annealing, endothelial barrier function and mortality were determined. While Ang2 transiently increased during lipopolysaccharide-induced injury in wild-type endothelial cells and lungs, miR-150 expression was elevated only during recovery from injury. Deletion of miR-150 caused a persistent increase in Ang2 levels and impaired adherens junctions re-annealing after injury, resulting thereby in an irreversible increase in vascular permeability. Also, miR-150−/− mice died rapidly after sepsis. Rescuing miR-150 expression in endothelial cells prevented Ang2 generation, thereby restoring vascular barrier function in miR-150−/− mice. miR-150 terminated Ang2 generation by targeting the transcription factor, early growth response 2. Thus, early growth response 2 or Ang2 depletion in miR-150−/− endothelial cells restored junctional re-annealing and reinstated barrier function. Importantly, upregulating miR-150 expression by injecting a chemically synthesized miR-150 mimic into WT-mice vasculature decreased EGR2 and Ang2 levels and hence mortality from sepsis. Conclusions miR-150 is a novel suppressor of Ang2 generation with a key role in resolving vascular injury and reducing mortality resulting from sepsis. PMID:26743170

  17. Compact optical displacement sensing by detection of microwave signals generated from a monolithic passively mode-locked laser under feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, Christos; Simos, Hercules; Nikas, Thomas; Syvridis, Dimitris

    2015-05-01

    A monolithic passively mode-locked laser is proposed as a compact optical sensor for displacements and vibrations of a reflecting object. The sensing principle relies on the change of the laser repetition frequency that is induced by optical feedback from the object under measurement. It has been previously observed that, when a semiconductor passively mode locked laser receives a sufficient level of optical feedback from an external reflecting surface it exhibits a repetition frequency that is no more determined by the mode-locking rule of the free-running operation but is imposed by the length of the external cavity. Therefore measurement of the resulting laser repetition frequency under self-injection permits the accurate and straightforward determination of the relative position of the reflecting object. The system has an inherent wireless capability since the repetition rate of the laser can be wirelessly detected by means of a simple antenna which captures the microwave signal generated by the saturable absorber and is emitted through the wiring of the laser. The sensor setup is very simple as it requires few optical components besides the laser itself. Furthermore, the deduction of the relative position of the reflecting object is straightforward and does not require any processing of the detected signal. The proposed sensor has a theoretical sub-wavelength resolution and its performance depends on the RF linewidth of the laser and the resolution of the repetition frequency measurement. Other physical parameters that induce phase changes of the external cavity could also be quantified.

  18. Comparison Between Tsunami Signals Generated by Different Source Models and the Observed Data of the Illapel 2015 Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calisto, Ignacia; Miller, Matthew; Constanzo, Iván

    2016-04-01

    A major interplate earthquake occurred on September 16th, 2015, near Illapel, central Chile. This event generated a tsunami of moderate height, however, one which caused significant near field damage. In this study, we model the tsunami produced by some rapid and preliminary fault models with the potential to be calculated within tens of minutes of the event origin time. We simulate tsunami signals from two different heterogeneous slip models, a homogeneous source based on parameters from the global CMT Project, and furthermore we used plate coupling data from GPS observations to construct a heterogeneous fault based on a priori knowledge of the subduction zone. We compare the simulated signals with the observed tsunami at tide gauges located along the Chilean coast and at offshore DART buoys. For this event, concerning rapid response, the homogeneous source and coupling model represent the tsunami at least as well as the heterogeneous sources. We suggest that the initial heterogeneous fault models could be better constrained with continuous GPS measurements in the rupture area, and additionally DART records directly in front of the rupture area, to improve the tsunami simulation based on quickly calculated models for near coastal areas. Additionally, in terms of tsunami modeling, the source estimated from prior plate coupling information in this case is representative of the event that later occurs; placing further importance on the need to monitor subduction zones with GPS.

  19. Regulatory effects of SKAR in interferon α signaling and its role in the generation of type I IFN responses.

    PubMed

    Kroczynska, Barbara; Mehrotra, Swarna; Majchrzak-Kita, Beata; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Altman, Jessica K; Stein, Brady L; McMahon, Brandon; Kozlowski, Piotr; Kahle, Philipp J; Eklund, Elizabeth A; Fish, Eleanor N; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2014-08-05

    We provide evidence that S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) Aly/REF-like target (SKAR) is engaged in IFN-α signaling and plays a key role in the generation of IFN responses. Our data demonstrate that IFN-α induces phosphorylation of SKAR, which is mediated by either the p90 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (RSK) or p70 S6 kinase (S6K1), in a cell type-specific manner. This type I IFN-inducible phosphorylation of SKAR results in enhanced interaction with the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)4G and recruitment of activated RSK1 to 5' cap mRNA. Our studies also establish that SKAR is present in cap-binding CBP80 immune complexes and that this interaction is mediated by eIF4G. We demonstrate that inducible protein expression of key IFN-α-regulated protein products such as ISG15 and p21(WAF1/CIP1) requires SKAR activity. Importantly, our studies define a requirement for SKAR in the generation of IFN-α-dependent inhibitory effects on malignant hematopoietic progenitors from patients with chronic myeloid leukemia or myeloproliferative neoplasms. Taken altogether, these findings establish critical and essential roles for SKAR in the regulation of mRNA translation of IFN-sensitive genes and induction of IFN-α biological responses.

  20. Small-Signal Analysis of Autonomous Hybrid Distributed Generation Systems in Presence of Ultracapacitor and Tie-Line Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Prakash K.; Mohanty, Soumya R.; Kishor, Nand

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents small-signal analysis of isolated as well as interconnected autonomous hybrid distributed generation system for sudden variation in load demand, wind speed and solar radiation. The hybrid systems comprise of different renewable energy resources such as wind, photovoltaic (PV) fuel cell (FC) and diesel engine generator (DEG) along with the energy storage devices such as flywheel energy storage system (FESS) and battery energy storage system (BESS). Further ultracapacitors (UC) as an alternative energy storage element and interconnection of hybrid systems through tie-line is incorporated into the system for improved performance. A comparative assessment of deviation of frequency profile for different hybrid systems in the presence of different storage system combinations is carried out graphically as well as in terms of the performance index (PI), ie integral square error (ISE). Both qualitative and quantitative analysis reflects the improvements of the deviation in frequency profiles in the presence of the ultracapacitors (UC) as compared to other energy storage elements.

  1. Retinoic Acid Signaling in B Cells Is Required for the Generation of an Effective T-Independent Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Ellen; Ortiz, Carla; Pantazi, Eirini; Bailey, Charlotte S.; Lord, Graham M.; Waldschmidt, Thomas J.; Noelle, Randolph J.; Elgueta, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays an important role in the balance of inflammation and tolerance in T cells. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that RA facilitates IgA isotype switching in B cells in vivo. However, it is unclear whether RA has a direct effect on T-independent B cell responses in vivo. To address this question, we generated a mouse model where RA signaling is specifically silenced in the B cell lineage. This was achieved through the overexpression of a dominant negative receptor α for RA (dnRARα) in the B cell lineage. In this model, we found a dramatic reduction in marginal zone (MZ) B cells and accumulation of transitional 2 B cells in the spleen. We also observed a reduction in B1 B cells in the peritoneum with a defect in the T-independent B cell response against 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl. This was not a result of inhibited development of B cells in the bone marrow, but likely the result of both defective expression of S1P1 in MZ B cells and a defect in the development of MZ and B1 B cells. This suggests that RARα expression in B cells is important for B cell frequency in the MZ and peritoneum, which is crucial for the generation of T-independent humoral responses. PMID:28066447

  2. Measuring elastic properties of bones and silicon from V(z) curve generated by multiply reflected signals.

    PubMed

    Kundu, T; Jørgensen, C S

    2002-04-01

    Acoustic microscopes can be used to measure Rayleigh and longitudinal or P-wave speeds in a specimen at microscopic resolution. The wave speeds are obtained from the interference pattern as a function of the defocus distance or V(z) curve. The received signal voltage amplitude Vis generated by two beams--the normally reflected central beam and a non-specularly reflected beam that strikes the fluid-solid interface at critical angle. It is shown in this paper that instead of analyzing the interference pattern between these two beams if we consider two other beams that follow the same path but travel through the coupling fluid multiple times before interfering then the V(z) curve generated by this higher order interference gives more accurate values for the material properties. The spacing distance between two successive dips of the V(z) curve is smaller for the higher order interference. The higher order interference, although weaker, gives more accurate results. Justification for the greater accuracy of the higher order interference is given in the paper. Material properties of silicon and bone are obtained by the new technique. Bones are microscopically heterogeneous and anisotropic. Anisotropic properties of homogeneous specimens can be obtained by the line focus acoustic microscope; however, it does not work when the specimen is microscopically heterogeneous. An attempt has been made here to obtain anisotropic properties of bones using point focus lens.

  3. Simultaneous generation of wavelength division multiplexing PON and RoF signals using a hybrid mode-locked laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldaya, Ivan; Campuzano, Gabriel; Castañón, Gerardo

    2015-06-01

    The use of millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequencies has been proposed to overcome the imminent saturation of the ultra high frequency band, justifying research on radio over fiber (RoF) networks as an inexpensive and green solution to distribute multi-Gbps signals. Coincidently, telecommunication operators are investing a significant effort to deploy their passive optical network (PON) infrastructure closer to the users. In this work, we present a novel cost-efficient architecture based on a hybrid mode locked laser capable to simultaneously generate up-to 5 wavelength division multiplexing PON and RoF channels, being compatible with the 50-GHz ITU frequency grid. We analyze the limits of operation of our proposed architecture considering the high modal relative intensity noise induced by mode partition noise, as well as fiber impairments, such as chromatic dispersion and nonlinearities. The feasibility of generation and transmission of 5×10-Gbps PON and 5×5-Gbps RoF using orthogonal frequency division multiplexing up to 50 km has been demonstrated through realistic numerical simulations.

  4. Generating a fault-tolerant global clock using high-speed control signals for the MetaNet architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Ofek, Y. )

    1994-05-01

    This work describes a new technique, based on exchanging control signals between neighboring nodes, for constructing a stable and fault-tolerant global clock in a distributed system with an arbitrary topology. It is shown that it is possible to construct a global clock reference with time step that is much smaller than the propagation delay over the network's links. The synchronization algorithm ensures that the global clock tick' has a stable periodicity, and therefore, it is possible to tolerate failures of links and clocks that operate faster and/or slower than nominally specified, as well as hard failures. The approach taken in this work is to generate a global clock from the ensemble of the local transmission clocks and not to directly synchronize these high-speed clocks. The steady-state algorithm, which generates the global clock, is executed in hardware by the network interface of each node. At the network interface, it is possible to measure accurately the propagation delay between neighboring nodes with a small error or uncertainty and thereby to achieve global synchronization that is proportional to these error measurements. It is shown that the local clock drift (or rate uncertainty) has only a secondary effect on the maximum global clock rate. The synchronization algorithm can tolerate any physical failure. 18 refs.

  5. Comparison of alternatives to amplitude thresholding for onset detection of acoustic emission signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, F.; Gagar, D.; Foote, P.; Zhao, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring can be used to detect the presence of damage as well as determine its location in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) applications. Information on the time difference of the signal generated by the damage event arriving at different sensors in an array is essential in performing localisation. Currently, this is determined using a fixed threshold which is particularly prone to errors when not set to optimal values. This paper presents three new methods for determining the onset of AE signals without the need for a predetermined threshold. The performance of the techniques is evaluated using AE signals generated during fatigue crack growth and compared to the established Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and fixed threshold methods. It was found that the 1D location accuracy of the new methods was within the range of < 1 - 7.1 % of the monitored region compared to 2.7% for the AIC method and a range of 1.8-9.4% for the conventional Fixed Threshold method at different threshold levels.

  6. Research of laser cleaning technology for steam generator tubing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Suixa; Luo, Jijun; Xu, Jun; Yuan, Bo

    2010-10-01

    Surface cleaning based on the laser-induced breakdown of gas and subsequent shock wave generation can remove small particles from solid surfaces. Accordingly, several studies in steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants were performed to expand the cleaning capability of the process. In this work, experimental apparatus of laser cleaning was designed in order to clean heat tubes in steam generator. The laser cleaning process is monitored by analyzing acoustic emission signal experimentally. Experiments demonstrate that laser cleaning can remove smaller particles from the surface of steam generator tubes better than other cleaning process. It has advantages in saving on much manpower and material resource, and it is a good cleaning method for heat tubes, which can be real-time monitoring in laser cleaning process of heat tubes by AE signal. As a green cleaning process, laser cleaning technology in equipment maintenance will be a good prospect.

  7. Acoustic emission signals frequency-amplitude characteristics of sandstone after thermal treated under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Biao; Wang, Enyuan; Li, Zenghua; Wang, Xiaoran; Niu, Yue; Kong, Xiangguo

    2017-01-01

    Thermally treated sandstone deformation and fracture produced abundant acoustic emission (AE) signals. The AE signals waveform contained plentiful precursor information of sandstone deformation and fracture behavior. In this paper, uniaxial compression tests of sandstone after different temperature treatments were conducted, the frequency-amplitude characteristics of AE signals were studied, and the main frequency distribution at different stress level was analyzed. The AE signals frequency-amplitude characteristics had great difference after different high temperature treatment. Significant differences existed of the main frequency distribution of AE signals during thermal treated sandstone deformation and fracture. The main frequency band of the largest waveforms proportion was not unchanged after different high temperature treatments. High temperature caused thermal damage to the sandstone, and sandstone deformation and fracture was obvious than the room temperature. The number of AE signals was larger than the room temperature during the initial loading stage. The low frequency AE signals had bigger proportion when the stress was 0.1, and the maximum value of the low frequency amplitude was larger than high frequency signals. With the increase of stress, the low and high frequency AE signals were gradually increase, which indicated that different scales ruptures were broken in sandstone. After high temperature treatment, the number of high frequency AE signals was significantly bigger than the low frequency AE signals during the latter loading stage, this indicates that the small scale rupture rate of recurrence and frequency were more than large scale rupture. The AE ratio reached the maximum during the sandstone instability failure period, and large scale rupture was dominated in the failure process. AE amplitude increase as the loading increases, the deformation and fracture of sandstone was increased gradually. By comparison, the value of the low frequency

  8. Analysis of low-frequency seismic signals generated during a multiple-iceberg calving event at Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, Fabian; Amundson, Jason M.; O'Neel, Shad; Truffer, Martin; Fahnestock, Mark; Fricker, Helen A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated seismic signals generated during a large-scale, multiple iceberg calving event that occurred at Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland, on 21 August 2009. The event was recorded by a high-rate time-lapse camera and five broadband seismic stations located within a few hundred kilometers of the terminus. During the event two full-glacier-thickness icebergs calved from the grounded (or nearly grounded) terminus and immediately capsized; the second iceberg to calve was two to three times smaller than the first. The individual calving and capsize events were well-correlated with the radiation of low-frequency seismic signals (<0.1 Hz) dominated by Love and Rayleigh waves. In agreement with regional records from previously published ‘glacial earthquakes’, these low-frequency seismic signals had maximum power and/or signal-to-noise ratios in the 0.05–0.1 Hz band. Similarly, full waveform inversions indicate that these signals were also generated by horizontal single forces acting at the glacier terminus. The signals therefore appear to be local manifestations of glacial earthquakes, although the magnitudes of the signals (twice-time integrated force histories) were considerably smaller than previously reported glacial earthquakes. We thus speculate that such earthquakes may be a common, if not pervasive, feature of all full-glacier-thickness calving events from grounded termini. Finally, a key result from our study is that waveform inversions performed on low-frequency, calving-generated seismic signals may have only limited ability to quantitatively estimate mass losses from calving. In particular, the choice of source time function has little impact on the inversion but dramatically changes the earthquake magnitude. Accordingly, in our analysis, it is unclear whether the smaller or larger of the two calving icebergs generated a larger seismic signal.

  9. Resistance to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in ae3 −/− mice, deficient in the AE3 Cl−/HCO3− exchanger

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac hypertrophy is central to the etiology of heart failure. Understanding the molecular pathways promoting cardiac hypertrophy may identify new targets for therapeutic intervention. Sodium-proton exchanger (NHE1) activity and expression levels in the heart are elevated in many models of hypertrophy through protein kinase C (PKC)/MAPK/ERK/p90RSK pathway stimulation. Sustained NHE1 activity, however, requires an acid-loading pathway. Evidence suggests that the Cl−/HCO3− exchanger, AE3, provides this acid load. Here we explored the role of AE3 in the hypertrophic growth cascade of cardiomyocytes. Methods AE3-deficient (ae3 −/− ) mice were compared to wildtype (WT) littermates to examine the role of AE3 protein in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Mouse hearts were assessed by echocardiography. As well, responses of cultured cardiomyocytes to hypertrophic stimuli were measured. pH regulation capacity of ae3 −/− and WT cardiomyocytes was assessed in cultured cells loaded with the pH-sensitive dye, BCECF-AM. Results ae3 −/− mice were indistinguishable from wild type (WT) mice in terms of cardiovascular performance. Stimulation of ae3 −/− cardiomyocytes with hypertrophic agonists did not increase cardiac growth or reactivate the fetal gene program. ae3 −/− mice are thus protected from pro-hypertrophic stimulation. Steady state intracellular pH (pHi) in ae3 −/− cardiomyocytes was not significantly different from WT, but the rate of recovery of pHi from imposed alkalosis was significantly slower in ae3 −/− cardiomyocytes. Conclusions These data reveal the importance of AE3-mediated Cl−/HCO3− exchange in cardiovascular pH regulation and the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Pharmacological antagonism of AE3 is an attractive approach in the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:25047106

  10. Validation of the new trapped environment AE9/AP9/SPM at low Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, Francis F.

    2014-09-01

    The completion of the international space station (ISS) in 2011 has provided the space research community an ideal proving ground for future long duration human activities in space. Ionizing radiation measurements in ISS form the ideal tool for the validation of radiation environmental models, nuclear transport codes and nuclear reaction cross sections. Indeed, prior measurements on the space transportation system (STS; shuttle) provided vital information impacting both the environmental models and the nuclear transport code developments by indicating the need for an improved dynamic model of the low Earth orbit (LEO) trapped environment. Additional studies using thermo-luminescent detector (TLD), tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) area monitors, and computer aided design (CAD) model of earlier ISS configurations, confirmed STS observations that, as input, computational dosimetry requires an environmental model with dynamic and directional (anisotropic) behavior, as well as an accurate six degree of freedom (DOF) definition of the vehicle attitude and orientation along the orbit of ISS. At LEO, a vehicle encounters exposure from trapped particles and attenuated galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Within the trapped field, a challenge arises from properly estimating the amount of exposure acquired. There exist a number of models to define the intensities of the trapped particles during the solar quiet and active times. At active times, solar energetic particles (SEP) generated by solar flare or coronal mass ejection (CME) also contribute to the exposure at high northern and southern latitudes. Among the more established trapped models are the historic and popular AE8/AP8, dating back to the 1980s, the historic and less popular CRRES electron/proton, dating back to 1990s and the recently released AE9/AP9/SPM. The AE9/AP9/SPM model is a major improvement over the older AE8/AP8 and CRRES models. This model is derived from numerous measurements acquired over four

  11. Optical spectrophotometry of oscillations and flickering in AE Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, William F.; Horne, Keith; Oke, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    We observed rapid variations in the nova-like cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii for 1.7 hr with 4.3 s time resolution using the 30-channel (3227-10494 A) spectrophotometer on the Hale 5 m telescope. The 16.5 and 33.0 s oscillations show a featureless blue spectrum that can be represented by a blackbody with temperature and area much smaller than the accretion disk. Models consisting of the sum of a K star spectrum and a hydrogen slab in LTE at T = 6000-10,000 K can fit the spectrum of AE Aquarii reasonably well. The spectrum of a flare indicates optically thin gas with T = 8000-12,000 K. The energy released by the flare is large compared to typical stellar flares.

  12. A Novel Byte-Substitution Architecture for the AES Cryptosystem.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Fakir Sharif; Ali, Md Liakot

    2015-01-01

    The performance of Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) mainly depends on speed, area and power. The S-box represents an important factor that affects the performance of AES on each of these factors. A number of techniques have been presented in the literature, which have attempted to improve the performance of the S-box byte-substitution. This paper proposes a new S-box architecture, defining it as ultra low power, robustly parallel and highly efficient in terms of area. The architecture is discussed for both CMOS and FPGA platforms, and the pipelined architecture of the proposed S-box is presented for further time savings and higher throughput along with higher hardware resources utilization. A performance analysis and comparison of the proposed architecture is also conducted with those achieved by the existing techniques. The results of the comparison verify the outperformance of the proposed architecture in terms of power, delay and size.

  13. A Novel Byte-Substitution Architecture for the AES Cryptosystem

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Fakir Sharif; Ali, Md. Liakot

    2015-01-01

    The performance of Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) mainly depends on speed, area and power. The S-box represents an important factor that affects the performance of AES on each of these factors. A number of techniques have been presented in the literature, which have attempted to improve the performance of the S-box byte-substitution. This paper proposes a new S-box architecture, defining it as ultra low power, robustly parallel and highly efficient in terms of area. The architecture is discussed for both CMOS and FPGA platforms, and the pipelined architecture of the proposed S-box is presented for further time savings and higher throughput along with higher hardware resources utilization. A performance analysis and comparison of the proposed architecture is also conducted with those achieved by the existing techniques. The results of the comparison verify the outperformance of the proposed architecture in terms of power, delay and size. PMID:26491967

  14. HARPS spectropolarimetry of Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubrig, S.; Ilyin, I.; Schöller, M.; Lo Curto, G.

    2013-12-01

    Our knowledge of the presence and the strength of magnetic fields in intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence stars remains very poor. We present new magnetic field measurements in six Herbig Ae/Be stars observed with HARPS in spectropolarimetric mode. We downloaded from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) archive the publically available HARPS spectra for six Herbig Ae/Be stars. Wavelength shifts between right- and left-hand side circularly polarised spectra were interpreted in terms of a longitudinal magnetic field , using the moment technique introduced by Mathys. The application of the moment technique to the HARPS spectra allowed us in addition to study the presence of the crossover effect and quadratic magnetic fields. Our search for longitudinal magnetic fields resulted in first detections of weak magnetic fields in the Herbig Ae/Be stars HD 58647 and HD 98922. Further, we confirm the previous tentative detection of a weak magnetic field in HD 104237 by Donati et al. and confirm the previous detection of a magnetic field in the Herbig Ae star HD 190073. Surprisingly, the measured longitudinal magnetic field of HD 190073, < Bz >=91±18 G at a significance level of 5σ is not in agreement with the measurement results of Alecian et al. (2013), < Bz >=-10±20 G, who applied the LSD method to exactly the same data. No crossover effect was detected for any star in the sample. Only for HD 98922 the crossover effect was found to be close to 3σ with a measured value of -4228±1443 km s-1 G. A quadratic magnetic field of the order of 10 kG was detected in HD 98922, and of ˜3.5 kG in HD 104237. Based on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility under requests MSCHOELLER 51301, 51324, 36608-36611.

  15. Circumstellar matter in Herbig AeBe stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natta, Antonella

    1994-03-01

    I briefly summarize the observational evidence for large envelopes in the immediate environment of Herbig AeBe stars, and the results of star + envelope models. Then, I discuss two alternative possibilities to account for the observed mid-infrared fluxes, namely as the emission of very small grains (VSG) and policyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the envelope, or as due to the emission of circumstellar accretion disks, and suggest how MIR high spatial resolution observations can discriminate between these two hypotheses.

  16. Shh/Boc Signaling Is Required for Sustained Generation of Ipsilateral Projecting Ganglion Cells in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Camacho, Cristina; Carreres, M. Isabel; Herrera, Eloisa; Okada, Ami; Bovolenta, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling is an important determinant of vertebrate retinal ganglion cell (RGC) development. In mice, there are two major RGC populations: (1) the Islet2-expressing contralateral projecting (c)RGCs, which both produce and respond to Shh; and (2) the Zic2-expressing ipsilateral projecting RGCs (iRGCs), which lack Shh expression. In contrast to cRGCs, iRGCs, which are generated in the ventrotemporal crescent (VTC) of the retina, specifically express Boc, a cell adhesion molecule that acts as a high-affinity receptor for Shh. In Boc−/− mutant mice, the ipsilateral projection is significantly decreased. Here, we demonstrate that this phenotype results, at least in part, from the misspecification of a proportion of iRGCs. In Boc−/− VTC, the number of Zic2-positive RGCs is reduced, whereas more Islet2/Shh-positive RGCs are observed, a phenotype also detected in Zic2 and Foxd1 null embryos. Consistent with this observation, organization of retinal projections at the dorsallateral geniculate nucleus is altered in Boc−/− mice. Analyses of the molecular and cellular consequences of introducing Shh into the developing VTC and Zic2 and Boc into the central retina indicate that Boc expression alone is in sufficient to fully activate the ipsilateral program and that Zic2 regulates Shh expression. Taking these data together, we propose that expression of Boc in cells from the VTC is required to sustain Zic2 expression, likely by regulating the levels of Shh signaling from the nearby cRGCs. Zic2, in turn, directly or indirectly, counteracts Shh and Islet2 expression in the VTC and activates the ipsilateral program. PMID:23678105

  17. Assessing Magnetospheric Accretion in Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarnio, Alicia; Monnier, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Recent large spectropolarimetric surveys have found low magnetic field detection rates in Herbig Ae/Be stars. Efforts to measure and map young stars' magnetic fields have also noted that field structure and strength dramatically change with increasing stellar mass. These results are highly suggestive that the mechanisms for accretion and outflow in Herbig Ae/Be star+disk systems may differ from the magnetospheric accretion paradigm as envisaged for T Tauri star+disk systems. We have performed a high resolution optical spectroscopic campaign of ~60 Herbig AeBe stars including some multi-epoch observations; the timescales sampled range from high cadence (~minutes) to observations taken years spart, covering a wide range of kinematic processes. We find that the strength of variability increases with the cadence of the observations, and over all timescales sampled, the strongest variability occurs within the blueshifted absorption components of the Balmer series lines. We see no inverse P-Cygni signatures as are often seen in lower mass T Tauri stars and generally thought to be diagnostic of infall in accretion streams along the line of sight. We discuss the implications of these results in context of recent spectropolarimetric surveys for our understanding of how accretion is occurring in these objects, as well as ongoing radiative transfer modeling.

  18. TDM-PON compatible generation of 10 Gbps NRZ and 1.25 Gbps UWB signals by a single light source.

    PubMed

    Malekizandi, Mohammadreza; Le, Quang Trung; Emsia, Ali; Briggmann, Dieter; Chipouline, Arkadi; Küppers, Franko

    2016-07-25

    A novel and cost-efficient technique is presented to generate non-return-to-zero (NRZ) and ultra-wideband (UWB) signals in different time slots of time division multiplexing-passive optical network (TDM-PON) by using a single chirped controlled semiconductor laser associated with an optical bandpass filter. In this technique, the chirp of the laser is controlled by different bias burst amplitudes (BBA) for different time slots. Through the proper selection of the burst amplitudes, 10 Gbps NRZ and 1.25 Gbps UWB signals are generated in different time slots. Principle of operation is discussed, the complete chirp behavior of the laser is experimentally investigated, data transmission of the generated signals is demonstrated and bit-error-rate (BER) level of 10-9 is achieved.

  19. Multifrequency Acoustic Emissions (AE) for Monitoring the Time Evolution of Microprocesses within Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paparo, Gabriele; Gregori, Giovanni P.

    2003-03-01

    Microprocesses occur like chain reactions where bonds progressively yield. The temporal evolution can be tracked by multifrequency AE. Two principle ideas. One relies on time series of AE of increasingly lower frequency. The second compares time histories of every AE event (fixed frequency) with a lognormal distribution: deviations reveal additional parameters, and the tail results modulated by external effects, envisaging what triggers every AE. Natural environmental phenomena are effective feasibility tests, for subsequent laboratory implementation.

  20. SU-E-J-73: Generation of Volumetric Images with a Respiratory Motion Model Based On An External Surrogate Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Hurwitz, M; Williams, C; Mishra, P; Dhou, S; Lewis, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion during radiotherapy treatment can differ significantly from motion observed during imaging for treatment planning. Our goal is to use an initial 4DCT scan and the trace of an external surrogate marker to generate 3D images of patient anatomy during treatment. Methods: Deformable image registration is performed on images from an initial 4DCT scan. The deformation vectors are used to develop a patient-specific linear relationship between the motion of each voxel and the trajectory of an external surrogate signal. Correlations in motion are taken into account with principal component analysis, reducing the number of free parameters. This model is tested with digital phantoms reproducing the breathing patterns of ten measured patient tumor trajectories, using five seconds of data to develop the model and the subsequent thirty seconds to test its predictions. The model is also tested with a breathing physical anthropomorphic phantom programmed to reproduce a patient breathing pattern. Results: The error (mean absolute, 95th percentile) over 30 seconds in the predicted tumor centroid position ranged from (0.8, 1.3) mm to (2.2, 4.3) mm for the ten patient breathing patterns. The model reproduced changes in both phase and amplitude of the breathing pattern. Agreement between prediction and truth over the entire image was confirmed by assessing the global voxel intensity RMS error. In the physical phantom, the error in the tumor centroid position was less than 1 mm for all images. Conclusion: We are able to reconstruct 3D images of patient anatomy with a model correlating internal respiratory motion with motion of an external surrogate marker, reproducing the expected tumor centroid position with an average accuracy of 1.4 mm. The images generated by this model could be used to improve dose calculations for treatment planning and delivered dose estimates. This work was partially funded by a research grant from Varian Medical Systems.

  1. CarF Mediates Signaling by Singlet Oxygen, Generated via Photoexcited Protoporphyrin IX, in Myxococcus xanthus Light-Induced Carotenogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Galbis-Martínez, Marisa; Padmanabhan, S.; Murillo, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Blue light triggers carotenogenesis in the nonphototrophic bacterium Myxococcus xanthus by inducing inactivation of an anti-σ factor, CarR, and the consequent liberation of the cognate extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factor, CarQ. CarF, the protein implicated earliest in the response to light, does not resemble any known photoreceptor. It interacts physically with CarR and is required for its light-driven inactivation, but the mechanism is unknown. Blue-light sensing in M. xanthus has been attributed to the heme precursor protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), which can generate the highly reactive singlet oxygen species (1O2) by energy transfer to oxygen. However, 1O2 involvement in M. xanthus light-induced carotenogenesis remains to be established. Here, we present genetic evidence of the involvement of PPIX as well as 1O2 in light-induced carotenogenesis in M. xanthus and of how these are linked to CarF in the signal transduction pathway. Response to light was examined in carF-bearing and carF-deficient M. xanthus strains lacking endogenous PPIX due to deletion of hemB or accumulating PPIX due to deletion of hemH (hemB and hemH are early- and late-acting heme biosynthesis genes, respectively). This demonstrated that light induction of the CarQ-dependent promoter, PQRS, correlated directly with cellular PPIX levels. Furthermore, we show that PQRS activation is triggered by 1O2 and is inhibited by exogenously supplied hemin and that CarF is essential for the action of 1O2. Thus, our findings indicate that blue light interaction with PPIX generates 1O2, which must be transmitted via CarF to trigger the transcriptional response underlying light-induced carotenogenesis in M. xanthus. PMID:22267513

  2. Organized Emergence of Multiple-Generations of Teeth in Snakes Is Dysregulated by Activation of Wnt/Beta-Catenin Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Gaete, Marcia; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to mammals, most reptiles constantly regenerate their teeth. In the snake, the epithelial dental lamina ends in a successional lamina, which proliferates and elongates forming multiple tooth generations, all linked by a permanent dental lamina. To investigate the mechanisms used to control the initiation of new tooth germs in an ordered sequential pattern we utilized the polyphodont (multiple-generation) corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus). We observed that the dental lamina expressed the transcription factor Sox2, a multipotent stem cell marker, whereas the successional lamina cells expressed the transcription factor Lef1, a Wnt/β-catenin pathway target gene. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in culture increased the number of developing tooth germs, in comparison to control untreated cultures. These additional tooth germs budded off from ectopic positions along the dental lamina, rather than in an ordered sequence from the successional lamina. Wnt/β-catenin activation enhanced cell proliferation, particularly in normally non-odontogenic regions of the dental lamina, which widely expressed Lef1, restricting the Sox2 domain. This suggests an expansion of the successional lamina at the expense of the dental lamina. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in cultured snake dental organs, therefore, led to changes in proliferation and to the molecular pattern of the dental lamina, resulting in loss of the organised emergence of tooth germs. These results suggest that epithelial compartments are critical for the arrangement of organs that develop in sequence, and highlight the role of Wnt/β-catenin signalling in such processes. PMID:24019968

  3. Spectroscopic signatures of magnetospheric accretion in Herbig Ae/Be stars. I. The case of HD 101412

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöller, M.; Pogodin, M. A.; Cahuasquí, J. A.; Drake, N. A.; Hubrig, S.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.; Savanov, I. S.; Wolff, B.; González, J. F.; Mysore, S.; Ilyin, I.; Järvinen, S. P.; Stelzer, B.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Models of magnetically-driven accretion and outflows reproduce many observational properties of T Tauri stars. This concept is not well established for the more massive Herbig Ae/Be stars. Aims: We intend to examine the magnetospheric accretion in Herbig Ae/Be stars and search for rotational modulation using spectroscopic signatures, in this first paper concentrating on the well-studied Herbig Ae star HD 101412. Methods: We used near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the magnetic Herbig Ae star HD 101412 to test the magnetospheric character of its accretion disk/star interaction. We reduced and analyzed 30 spectra of HD 101412, acquired with the CRIRES and X-shooter spectrographs installed at the VLT (ESO, Chile). The spectroscopic analysis was based on the He iλ10 830 and Paγ lines, formed in the accretion region. Results: We found that the temporal behavior of these diagnostic lines in the near-infrared spectra of HD 101412 can be explained by rotational modulation of line profiles generated by accreting gas with a period P = 20.53d±1.68d. The discovery of this period, about half of the magnetic rotation period Pm = 42.076d previously determined from measurements of the mean longitudinal magnetic field, indicates that the accreted matter falls onto the star in regions close to the magnetic poles intersecting the line-of-sight two times during the rotation cycle. We intend to apply this method to a larger sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme IDs 087.C-0124(A), 088.C-0218(A,B,C,E), 090.C-0331(A), and 092.C-0126(A).

  4. Photonic frequency-quadrupling and balanced pre-coding technologies for W-band QPSK vector mm-wave signal generation based on a single DML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanyi; Yang, Chao; Chi, Nan; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel scheme for high-frequency quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) photonic vector signal generation based on a single directly modulated laser (DML) employing photonic frequency quadrupling and balanced pre-coding technologies. In order to realize frequency quadrupling, a wavelength selective switch (WSS) is intruded in our experiment. The intruded WSS combined with DML can not only realize high-frequency vector signal generation but also simplify the architecture. We experimentally demonstrate 1-or 2-Gbaud QPSK vector signal generation at 88 GHz based on our proposed scheme. The generated 1-Gbaud balanced pre-coded QPSK vector signal is transmitted 0.5-m wireless distance with the bit-error-ratio (BER) below hard-decision forward-error-correction (HD-FEC) threshold of 3.8×10-3. To our knowledge, this is the first time to demonstrate W-band mm-wave vector signal based on a single DML with quadrupling frequency and pre-coding technologies.

  5. Modelling infrasound signal generation from two underground explosions at the Source Physics Experiment using the Rayleigh integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kyle R.; Whitaker, Rodney W.; Arrowsmith, Stephen J.

    2015-02-01

    We use the Rayleigh integral (RI) as an approximation to the Helmholtz-Kirchoff integral to model infrasound generation and propagation from underground chemical explosions at distances of 250 m out to 5 km as part of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE). Using a sparse network of surface accelerometers installed above ground zero, we are able to accurately create synthetic acoustic waveforms and compare them to the observed data. Although the underground explosive sources were designed to be symmetric, the resulting seismic wave at the surface shows an asymmetric propagation pattern that is stronger to the northeast of the borehole. This asymmetric bias may be attributed to the subsurface geology and faulting of the area and is observed in the acoustic waveforms. We compare observed and modelled results from two of the underground SPE tests with a sensitivity study to evaluate the asymmetry observed in the data. This work shows that it is possible to model infrasound signals from underground explosive sources using the RI and that asymmetries observed in the data can be modelled with this technique.

  6. Protein disulfide isomerase acts as an injury response signal that enhances fibrin generation via tissue factor activation

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Christoph; von Brühl, Marie-Luise; Manukyan, Davit; Grahl, Lenka; Lorenz, Michael; Altmann, Berid; Dlugai, Silke; Hess, Sonja; Konrad, Ildiko; Orschiedt, Lena; Mackman, Nigel; Ruddock, Lloyd; Massberg, Steffen; Engelmann, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    The activation of initiator protein tissue factor (TF) is likely to be a crucial step in the blood coagulation process, which leads to fibrin formation. The stimuli responsible for inducing TF activation are largely undefined. Here we show that the oxidoreductase protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) directly promotes TF-dependent fibrin production during thrombus formation in vivo. After endothelial denudation of mouse carotid arteries, PDI was released at the injury site from adherent platelets and disrupted vessel wall cells. Inhibition of PDI decreased TF-triggered fibrin formation in different in vivo murine models of thrombus formation, as determined by intravital fluorescence microscopy. PDI infusion increased — and, under conditions of decreased platelet adhesion, PDI inhibition reduced — fibrin generation at the injury site, indicating that PDI can directly initiate blood coagulation. In vitro, human platelet–secreted PDI contributed to the activation of cryptic TF on microvesicles (microparticles). Mass spectrometry analyses indicated that part of the extracellular cysteine 209 of TF was constitutively glutathionylated. Mixed disulfide formation contributed to maintaining TF in a state of low functionality. We propose that reduced PDI activates TF by isomerization of a mixed disulfide and a free thiol to an intramolecular disulfide. Our findings suggest that disulfide isomerases can act as injury response signals that trigger the activation of fibrin formation following vessel injury. PMID:18274674

  7. Generation of a Homozygous Transgenic Rat Strain Stably Expressing a Calcium Sensor Protein for Direct Examination of Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Szebényi, Kornélia; Füredi, András; Kolacsek, Orsolya; Pergel, Enikő; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Bender, Balázs; Vajdovich, Péter; Tóvári, József; Homolya, László; Szakács, Gergely; Héja, László; Enyedi, Ágnes; Sarkadi, Balázs; Apáti, Ágota; Orbán, Tamás I.

    2015-01-01

    In drug discovery, prediction of selectivity and toxicity require the evaluation of cellular calcium homeostasis. The rat is a preferred laboratory animal for pharmacology and toxicology studies, while currently no calcium indicator protein expressing rat model is available. We established a transgenic rat strain stably expressing the GCaMP2 fluorescent calcium sensor by a transposon-based methodology. Zygotes were co-injected with mRNA of transposase and a CAG-GCaMP2 expressing construct, and animals with one transgene copy were pre-selected by measuring fluorescence in blood cells. A homozygous rat strain was generated with high sensor protein expression in the heart, kidney, liver, and blood cells. No pathological alterations were found in these animals, and fluorescence measurements in cardiac tissue slices and primary cultures demonstrated the applicability of this system for studying calcium signaling. We show here that the GCaMP2 expressing rat cardiomyocytes allow the prediction of cardiotoxic drug side-effects, and provide evidence for the role of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and its beneficial pharmacological modulation in cardiac reperfusion. Our data indicate that drug-induced alterations and pathological processes can be followed by using this rat model, suggesting that transgenic rats expressing a calcium-sensitive protein provide a valuable system for pharmacological and toxicological studies. PMID:26234466

  8. Dopamine-Signaled Reward Predictions Generated by Competitive Excitation and Inhibition in a Spiking Neural Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Chorley, Paul; Seth, Anil K.

    2011-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons in the mammalian substantia nigra display characteristic phasic responses to stimuli which reliably predict the receipt of primary rewards. These responses have been suggested to encode reward prediction-errors similar to those used in reinforcement learning. Here, we propose a model of dopaminergic activity in which prediction-error signals are generated by the joint action of short-latency excitation and long-latency inhibition, in a network undergoing dopaminergic neuromodulation of both spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity and neuronal excitability. In contrast to previous models, sensitivity to recent events is maintained by the selective modification of specific striatal synapses, efferent to cortical neurons exhibiting stimulus-specific, temporally extended activity patterns. Our model shows, in the presence of significant background activity, (i) a shift in dopaminergic response from reward to reward-predicting stimuli, (ii) preservation of a response to unexpected rewards, and (iii) a precisely timed below-baseline dip in activity observed when expected rewards are omitted. PMID:21629770

  9. Field-programmable gate array based arbitrary signal generator and oscilloscope for use in slow light and storage of light experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Stanko N.; Batić, Viktor; Panić, Bratimir; Jelenković, Branislav M.

    2013-06-01

    We present a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based device that simultaneously generates two arbitrary analog voltage signals with the maximum sample rate of 1.25 MHz and acquires two analog voltage signals with the maximum sample rate of 2.5 MHz. All signals are synchronized with internal FPGA clock. The personal computer application developed for controlling and communicating with FPGA chip provides the shaping of the output signals by mathematical expressions and real-time monitoring of the input signals. The main advantages of FPGA based digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital cards are high speed, rapid reconfigurability, friendly user interface, and low cost. We use this module in slow light and storage of light experiments performed in Rb buffer gas cell.

  10. Field-programmable gate array based arbitrary signal generator and oscilloscope for use in slow light and storage of light experiments.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Stanko N; Batić, Viktor; Panić, Bratimir; Jelenković, Branislav M

    2013-06-01

    We present a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based device that simultaneously generates two arbitrary analog voltage signals with the maximum sample rate of 1.25 MHz and acquires two analog voltage signals with the maximum sample rate of 2.5 MHz. All signals are synchronized with internal FPGA clock. The personal computer application developed for controlling and communicating with FPGA chip provides the shaping of the output signals by mathematical expressions and real-time monitoring of the input signals. The main advantages of FPGA based digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital cards are high speed, rapid reconfigurability, friendly user interface, and low cost. We use this module in slow light and storage of light experiments performed in Rb buffer gas cell.

  11. Modulation and detection of the THz range signals using the highest harmonics of the fundamental frequency of the superlattice-based generator for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Vladimir V.; Maksimenko, Vladimir A.; Ponomarenko, Vladimir I.; Khramova, Marina V.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Prokhorov, Mikhail D.; Karavaev, Anatoly S.

    2016-04-01

    The data transmission method using the highest harmonics of semiconductor superlattice-based microwave generator has been proposed for biomedical applications. Semiconductor superlattice operated in charge domain formation regime is characterized by the rich high-harmonics power spectrum. The numerical modeling of modulation and detection of the THz range signals using the highest harmonics of the fundamental frequency of the superlattice-based generator was carried out. We have shown effectiveness of the proposed method and discussed the possible applications.

  12. Spectroscopic Signatures Of Magnetospheric Accretion In Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, Silva P.; Schöller, Markus; Pogodin, Michail A.; Cahuasqui, Andres; Drake, Natalia A.; Hubrig, S.; Petr-Gotzens, Monika; Savanov, Igor S.; Ilyin, Ilya; Stelzer, Beate

    2016-07-01

    Important diagnostics of the star/circumstellar interaction region of HerbigAe/Be stars are accessible by examining the temporal behavior of thenear-IR spectral lines He I λ10830 and Paschen gamma. We reduced andanalyzed 30 spectra of the strongly magnetic Herbig Ae star HD101412,acquired with the CRIRES and X-shooter spectrographs installed at theVLT (ESO, Chile). We found that the temporal behavior of these diagnosticlines in the near-infrared spectra can be explained by rotational modulationof line profiles generated by accreting gas with a period P = 20.53d.This period is about half of the magnetic rotation period P = 42.76dpreviously determined from measurements of the mean longitudinal magneticfield. Our finding indicates that the accreted matter falls onto the star in regions close to the magnetic poles intersecting the line-of-sight twiceduring the rotation cycle. The results of our study clearly demonstratethe power of such an analysis to diagnose the physical properties ofaccretion flows onto pre-main sequence stars.

  13. Mid-IR Spectra Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Herbig Ae/Be stars are intermediate mass pre-main sequence stars, the higher mass analogues to the T Tauri stars. Because of their higher mass, they are expected form more rapidly than the T Tauri stars. Whether the Herbig Ae/Be stars accrete only from collapsing infalling envelopes or whether accrete through geometrically flattened viscous accretion disks is of current debate. When the Herbig Ae/Be stars reach the main sequence they form a class called Vega-like stars which are known from their IR excesses to have debris disks, such as the famous beta Pictoris. The evolutionary scenario between the pre-main sequence Herbig Ae/Be stars and the main sequence Vega-like stars is not yet revealed and it bears on the possibility of the presence of Habitable Zone planets around the A stars. Photometric studies of Herbig Ae/Be stars have revealed that most are variable in the optical, and a subset of stars show non-periodic drops of about 2 magnitudes. These drops in visible light are accompanied by changes in their colors: at first the starlight becomes reddened, and then it becomes bluer, the polarization goes from less than 0.1 % to roughly 1% during these minima. The theory postulated by V. Grinnin is that large cometary bodies on highly eccentric orbits occult the star on their way to being sublimed, for systems that are viewed edge-on. This theory is one of several controversial theories about the nature of Herbig Ae/Be stars. A 5 year mid-IR spectrophotometric monitoring campaign was begun by Wooden and Butner in 1992 to look for correlations between the variations in visible photometry and mid-IR dust emission features. Generally the approximately 20 stars that have been observed by the NASA Ames HIFOGS spectrometer have been steady at 10 microns. There are a handful, however, that have shown variable mid-IR spectra, with 2 showing variations in both the continuum and features anti-correlated with visual photometry, and 3 showing variations in the emission

  14. Numerical and experimental characterizations of low frequency MEMS AE sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Ozevin, Didem

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, new MEMS Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors are introduced. The transduction principle of the sensors is capacitance due to gap change. The sensors are numerically modeled using COMSOL Multiphysics software in order to estimate the resonant frequencies and capacitance values, and manufactured using MetalMUMPS process. The process includes thick metal layer (20 μm) made of nickel for freely vibration layer and polysilicon layer as the stationary layer. The metal layer provides a relatively heavy mass so that the spring constant can be designed high for low frequency sensor designs in order to increase the collapse voltage level (proportional to the stiffness), which increases the sensor sensitivity. An insulator layer is deposited between stationary layer and freely vibration layer, which significantly reduces the potential of stiction as a failure mode. As conventional AE sensors made of piezoelectric materials cannot be designed for low frequencies (<300 kHz) with miniature size, the MEMS sensor frequencies are tuned to 50 kHz and 200 kHz. The each sensor contained several parallel-connected cells with an overall size of approximately 250μm × 500 μm. The electromechanical characterizations are performed using high precision impedance analyzer and compared with the numerical results, which indicate a good fit. The initial mechanical characterization tests in atmospheric pressure are conducted using pencil lead break simulations. The proper sensor design reduces the squeeze film damping so that it does not require any vacuum packaging. The MEMS sensor responses are compared with similar frequency piezoelectric AE sensors.

  15. Spatiotemporal patterns of acoustic emission (AE) activity in salt mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghsoudi, S.; Cesca, S.; Hainzl, S.; Kaiser, D.; Dahm, T.

    2012-04-01

    Assessing the magnitude of completeness (Mc) is essential for the correct interpretation of earthquake catalogs. Knowledge on the spatiotemporal variation of Mc allows the mapping of other seismicity parameters, such as b-values. Spatial and temporal variations of b-values can indicate structural heterogeneities, stress perturbations and time-dependent fracturing processes. In order to precisely estimate Mc in strongly heterogeneous media, we propose a 3D development of the probabilistic magnitude of completeness (PMC) method, which relies on the analysis of network detection capabilities, to study spatial distribution of the Mc and b-value estimations for mining networks. We used a large dataset including more than 1 million acoustic emissions (AE), recorded at the Morsleben salt mine, Germany. Our study shows that the PMC estimations strongly depend on the source-receiver direction, and cannot be correctly accounted using a standard approach. The comparison between Mc using the 3D PMC method and Gutenberg-Richter methods show agreements for two reference depth ranges. Following our approach, we estimate Mc ranging between 1.25 (AE ,relative acoustic magnitude), at the center of the network, and 3.5, at further distances outside the network. Our method provides small-scale details about the capability of sensors to detect an AE event, and spatial distributions of Mc and b-value, which can be linked to the presence of structural heterogeneities or cavities in specific directions. Effects of heterogeneities on detection analysis are confirmed by synthetic tests using waveform modeling in heterogeneous media. This work has been funded by the German BMBF "Geotechnologien" project MINE (BMBF03G0737A).

  16. Subaru Near-Infrared Imaging of Herbig Ae Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukagawa, Misato; Tamura, Motohide; Itoh, Yoichi; Oasa, Yumiko; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Kato, Eri; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Itoh, Yusuke; Shibai, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2010-04-01

    We report results of H-band (λ = 1.65μm) imaging observations of young intermediate-mass stars using the Subaru 8.2-m Telescope with the adaptive optics AO36 and the infrared coronagraph CIAO. The targets consist of 16 Herbig Ae/Be stars (15 Herbig Ae stars and one Herbig Be star) and four additional main-sequence stars with infrared excesses. Five protoplanetary disks have been spatially resolved around the Herbig Ae stars with ages of 2-8 Myr. The resolved disks have outer radii of several 100 AU, and their surface brightnesses range from 10 mag arcsec-2 to 18 mag arcsec-2. The images reveal various morphologies in optically thick disks: spiral arms around AB Aur, a banana-split structure with an outer arm for HD 142527, a compact circumprimary disk of HD 150193, a faint discontinuous ring around HD 163296, and an unstructured face-on disk of HD 169142. The detection of an optically thick disk in scattered light implies that it is vertically flared, and intercepts stellar light at least in the outer region where those images were obtained. However, the surface brightness distribution, the resolved structure, and other observational characteristics suggest that the disks are unlikely to be continuously flared young disks with small grains well mixed with gas. The detection rate and the disk brightness do not correlate with the stellar age and the disk mass, but there is a tendency that the brightest disks are still surrounded by long-lived envelopes (AB Aur, HD 100546, HD 142527). The significant diversity of the disk structure can be attributed to the multiplicity and the initial condition of the local star-forming environments. The detections of companion candidates around our targeted stars are also reported.

  17. Detection and characterization of debris avalanche and pyroclastic flow dynamics from the simulation of the seismic signal they generate: application to Montserrat, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Mangeney, A.; Moretti, L.; Stutzmann, E.; Calder, E. S.; Smith, P. J.; Capdeville, Y.; Le Friant, A.; Cole, P.; Luckett, R.; Robertson, R.

    2011-12-01

    Gravitational instabilities such as debris avalanches or pyroclastic flows represent one of the major natural hazards for populations who live in mountainous or volcanic areas. Detection and understanding of the dynamics of these events is crucial for risk assessment. Furthermore, during an eruption, a series of explosions and gravitational flows can occur, making it difficult to retrieve the characteristics of the individual gravitational events such as their volume, velocity, etc. In this context, the seismic signal generated by these events provides a unique tool to extract information on the history of the eruptive process and to validate gravitational flow models. We analyze here a series of events including explosions, debris avalanche and pyroclastic flows occurring in Montserrat in December 1997. This seismic signal is composed of six main pulses. The characteristics of the seismic signals generated by pyroclastic flows (amplitude, emergent onset, frequency spectrum, etc.) are described and linked to the volume of the individual events estimated from past field surveys. As a first step, we simulate the waveform of each event by assuming that the generation process reduces to a simple force applied at the surface of the topography. Going further, we perform detailed numerical simulation of the Boxing Day debris avalanche and of the following pyroclastic flow using a landslide model able to take into account the 3D topography. The stress field generated by the gravitational flows on the topography is then applied as surface boundary condition in a wave propagation model, making it possible to simulate the seismic signal generated by the avalanche and pyroclastic flow. Comparison between the simulated signal and the seismic signal recorded at the Puerto Rico seismic station located 450 km away from the source, show that this method allows us to reproduce the low frequency seismic signal and to constrain the volume and frictional behavior of the individual

  18. Simple and flexible generation of vestigial side band modified duobinary return-to-zero signals at 10, 20 and 40 Gb/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yu; Zhang, Xinliang; Wang, Fei; Huang, Dexiu

    2010-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a simple and flexible approach to generate vestigial side band modified duobinary return-to-zero (VSB MD-RZ) signals at 10-40 Gb/s, using a dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator and a detuned optical band-pass filter. The performance of the proposed VSB MD-RZ signal is investigated by comparing with double side band MD-RZ (DSB MD-RZ) and conventional VSB MD-RZ. Bit error ratio (BER) measurement at 10 Gb/s shows an error free operation for the generated signal. Good performance is further observed after 100 km of single-mode-fiber transmission at 40 Gb/s.

  19. [Determination of trace elements in beans by ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Xin, Shi-gang

    2004-02-01

    In this paper,the contents of trace elements in beans such as Ca, Mg, Mn, Sr, Fe, Co, Ni, Se and Ba were determined by ICP-AES uing nitrifying method of high pressure nitrifying pot, and compared with the results of wet method. The two methods showed no obvious differences. The method proves to be simple, rapid, highly sensitive, accurate and can be used to determine many elements at the same time. In addition, there was little environment pollution. Its recovery is 96.8%-102%, and relative standard deviation is 3.35%.

  20. Artificial epi-Retinal Prosthesis (AeRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doorish, John F.

    2006-09-01

    There are several research projects going on around the world, which are attempting to develop a prosthetic device to restore sight to the blind. This paper describes the efforts of Second Sight of New York, Inc. The device being developed is called an Artificial epi-Retinal Prosthesis (AeRP), which is basically a small optical computer that fits into the intraocular space of the eye. The AeRP is designed to draw light into the device by specially designed fibre optics. The light is ‘digitized’ by the fibre optic system and then directed to individual photodiode cells making up concentric cylinders thus providing several hundred photodiode cells in the device. The produced electrical stimulation from each cell is then delivered to the retinal ganglion cells by a specially designed delivery system utilizing electrically conducting polymer strands (ECP), which sit on an ‘umbrella’ at the back of the device. The retinal ganglion cells receive the electrical stimulation, which would then be transmitted through the visual system of the brain. There are several innovations in this approach as compared to the other projects. They include, first the design, which will allow for a high number of PC to produce electrical stimulation that will stimulate multiple RGC per PC; the use of the ECP strands has not been used in such an approach before this. Tests have revealed that nerve cells have a good affinity for the material of the ECP. The use of the ECP as well as the fact that the AeRP is completely photovoltaic, with no external power sources, implies that there will not be high heat build-up in the back of the eye, which might damage RGC. A smaller version of the AeRP called the Mini epi-Retinal Prosthesis (MeRP) is the subject of a complimentary paper. It is being built now and will be tested in cell culture studies to determine the efficacy of the design and materials. No actual implants have been performed yet.

  1. STS-80 Payload WSF-3 in Hanger AE (side view)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In NASA's Building AE on Cape Canaveral Air Station, the Wake Shield Facility-3 (WSF-3) is just about ready for flight. The WSF-3 and the other primary payload of Space Shuttle Mission STS- 80, the Orbiting and Retrievable Far and Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrograph-Shuttle Pallet Satellite (ORFEUS-SPAS), will make the trip to Launch Pad 39B together, with the transfer scheduled to occur on Oct. 11. There they will await the arrival of the Space Shuttle Columbia to be installed in the orbiter payload bay. Columbia is scheduled to lift off on Mission STS-80 around Nov. 8.

  2. Using patient passports to improve A&E asthma care.

    PubMed

    Newell, Karen; Bunce, Rebecca; Hume, Shenagh

    The asthma patient passport (APP) is a patient-specific asthma plan that details what to do when asthma is out of control. It helps patients who have severe, difficult-to-manage asthma, and health professionals when these patients present at accident and emergency. This article shows that, while the APP acts as a patient's advocate, it also facilitates accessing emergency care by making it more streamlined. Case studies explore why people with asthma have avoided going to A&E, putting their lives at risk, and provide an insight into how difficult it can be for people to navigate the healthcare system when they are at their most vulnerable.

  3. Photonic generation of ultra-wideband signals by direct current modulation on SOA section of an SOA-integrated SGDBR laser.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hui; Yu, Yonglin; Shu, Tan; Huang, Dexiu; Jiang, Shan; Barry, Liam P

    2010-03-29

    Photonic ultra-wideband (UWB) pulses are generated by direct current modulation of a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) section of an SOA-integrated sampled grating distributed Bragg reflector (SGDBR) laser. Modulation responses of the SOA section of the laser are first simulated with a microwave equivalent circuit model. Simulated results show a resonance behavior indicating the possibility to generate UWB signals with complex shapes in the time domain. The UWB pulse generation is then experimentally demonstrated for different selected wavelength channels with an SOA-integrated SGDBR laser.

  4. Milliwatt-level mid-infrared (10.5-16.5 μm) difference frequency generation with a femtosecond dual-signal-wavelength optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Hegenbarth, Robin; Steinmann, Andy; Sarkisov, Sergey; Giessen, Harald

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate the generation of mid-infrared radiation using a femtosecond dual-signal-wavelength optical parametric oscillator and difference frequency generation in an extracavity gallium selenide or silver gallium diselenide crystal. This system generates up to 4.3 mW of average mid-infrared power. Its spectra can be tuned to between 10.5 μm and 16.5 μm wavelength (952  cm(-1)-606  cm(-1)) with more than 50  cm(-1) spectral bandwidth. We demonstrate that the power and spectra of this system are temporally very stable.

  5. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling.

    PubMed

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2(.)) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling.

  6. Analysis of the seismic signals generated by controlled single-block rockfalls on soft clay shales sediments: the Rioux Bourdoux slope experiment (French Alps).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibert, Clément; Provost, Floriane; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Bourrier, Franck; Berger, Frédéric; Bornemann, Pierrick; Borgniet, Laurent; Tardif, Pascal; Mermin, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the dynamics of rockfalls is critical to mitigate the associated hazards but is made very difficult by the nature of these natural disasters that makes them hard to observe directly. Recent advances in seismology allow to determine the dynamics of the largest landslides on Earth from the very low-frequency seismic waves they generate. However, the vast majority of rockfalls that occur worldwide are too small to generate such low-frequency seismic waves and thus these methods cannot be used to reconstruct their dynamics. However, if seismic sensors are close enough, these events will generate high-frequency seismic signals. Unfortunately we cannot yet use these high-frequency seismic records to infer parameters synthetizing the rockfall dynamics as the source of these waves is not well understood. One of the first steps towards understanding the physical processes involved in the generation of high-frequency seismic waves by rockfalls is to study the link between the dynamics of a single block propagating along a well-known path and the features of the seismic signal generated. We conducted controlled releases of single blocks of limestones in a gully of clay-shales (e.g. black marls) in the Rioux Bourdoux torrent (French Alps). 28 blocks, with masses ranging from 76 kg to 472 kg, were released. A monitoring network combining high-velocity cameras, a broadband seismometer and an array of 4 high-frequency seismometers was deployed near the release area and along the travel path. The high-velocity cameras allow to reconstruct the 3D trajectories of the blocks, to estimate their velocities and the position of the different impacts with the slope surface. These data are compared to the seismic signals recorded. As the distance between the block and the seismic sensors at the time of each impact is known, we can determine the associated seismic signal amplitude corrected from propagation and attenuation effects. We can further compare the velocity, the

  7. Immunologic biomarkers in prostate cancer: the AE37 paradigm.

    PubMed

    Baxevanis, Constantin N; Papamichail, Michael; Perez, Sonia A

    2014-01-01

    One major achievement in cancer therapy is to select patients who will most likely benefit from a specific treatment. Predictive biomarkers play an important role in this respect being already useful in management of breast cancer and melanoma. For example, HER-2/neu (HER-2) overexpression selects for breast cancer patients to be treated with trastuzumab, and BRAFV600E mutations select for melanoma patients to be treated with vemurafenib. Identification of factors associated with T cell responsiveness to vaccination remains critical. Pre-existent immunity and circulating suppressor cells may regulate the levels of vaccine-specific T cell immunity after vaccination. The identification of immunologic endpoints to immunotherapy would thus considerably help guide the development of immunotherapy-based clinical trials. This commentary is based on a retrospective analysis we performed of data from prostate cancer patients vaccinated and boosted with the AE37 vaccine. The aim of these exploratory analyses was to identify factors useful in predicting which patients are more likely to respond to the treatment under study. The issue we are addressing here is to which extent common variables used pre- and/or following vaccinations with AE37 to assess the immune response status of the prostate cancer patients, may predict overall survival.

  8. The spectrum and variability of radio emission from AE Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abada-Simon, Meil; Lecacheux, Alain; Bastian, Tim S.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; Dulk, George A.

    1993-01-01

    The first detections of the magnetic cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii at millimeter wavelengths are reported. AE Aqr was detected at wavelengths of 3.4 and 1.25 mm. These data are used to show that the time-averaged spectrum is generally well fitted by a power law S(nu) varies as nu exp alpha, where alpha is approximately equal to 0.35-0.60, and that the power law extends to millimeter wavelengths, i.e., the spectral turnover is at a frequency higher than 240 GHz. It is suggested that the spectrum is consistent with that expected from a superposition of flarelike events where the frequency distribution of the initial flux density is a power law f (S0) varies as S0 exp -epsilon, with index epsilon approximately equal to 1.8. Within the context of this model, the high turnover frequency of the radio spectrum implies magnetic field strengths in excess of 250 G in the source.

  9. Decryption-decompression of AES protected ZIP files on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Tan Nhat; Pham, Phong Hong; Nguyen, Duc Huu; Nguyen, Thuy Thanh; Le, Hung Duc

    2011-10-01

    AES is a strong encryption system, so decryption-decompression of AES encrypted ZIP files requires very large computing power and techniques of reducing the password space. This makes implementations of techniques on common computing system not practical. In [1], we reduced the original very large password search space to a much smaller one which surely containing the correct password. Based on reduced set of passwords, in this paper, we parallel decryption, decompression and plain text recognition for encrypted ZIP files by using CUDA computing technology on graphics cards GeForce GTX295 of NVIDIA, to find out the correct password. The experimental results have shown that the speed of decrypting, decompressing, recognizing plain text and finding out the original password increases about from 45 to 180 times (depends on the number of GPUs) compared to sequential execution on the Intel Core 2 Quad Q8400 2.66 GHz. These results have demonstrated the potential applicability of GPUs in this cryptanalysis field.

  10. Repressing Notch Signaling and Expressing TNFα Are Sufficient to Mimic Retinal Regeneration by Inducing Müller Glial Proliferation to Generate Committed Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Clay; Ackerman, Kristin M.; Lahne, Manuela; Hobgood, Joshua S.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal damage in teleosts, unlike mammals, induces robust Müller glia-mediated regeneration of lost neurons. We examined whether Notch signaling regulates Müller glia proliferation in the adult zebrafish retina and demonstrated that Notch signaling maintains Müller glia in a quiescent state in the undamaged retina. Repressing Notch signaling, through injection of the γ-secretase inhibitor RO4929097, stimulates a subset of Müller glia to reenter the cell cycle without retinal damage. This RO4929097-induced Müller glia proliferation is mediated by repressing Notch signaling because inducible expression of the Notch Intracellular Domain (NICD) can reverse the effect. This RO4929097-induced proliferation requires Ascl1a expression and Jak1-mediated Stat3 phosphorylation/activation, analogous to the light-damaged retina. Moreover, coinjecting RO4929097 and TNFα, a previously identified damage signal, induced the majority of Müller glia to reenter the cell cycle and produced proliferating neuronal progenitor cells that committed to a neuronal lineage in the undamaged retina. This demonstrates that repressing Notch signaling and activating TNFα signaling are sufficient to induce Müller glia proliferation that generates neuronal progenitor cells that differentiate into retinal neurons, mimicking the responses observed in the regenerating retina. PMID:25339752

  11. [Determination of trace elements in radix ophiopogonis by HG-ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Lou, Qi-Zheng; Xu, Run-Sheng

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, a method of microwave digestion technique for the contents determination of trace elements Ni, Zn, Mn, Cu, Mg, Fe, Ca and Pb in radix ophiopogonis by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma atomic emition spectrometry (HG-ICP-AES) was reported. Its recovery ratio obtained by standard addition method ranged between 97.8% and 102.5%, and its RSD was lower than 4.0%. The results of the determination show that radix ophiopogonis is rich in the inorganic elements such as Fe, and the content of Zn in radix ophiopogonis of Zhejiang is much higher in radix ophiopogonis of Sichun. The result will provide scientific data for the study on the elements in radix ophiopogonis and on their relativity of medicine efficacy.

  12. Statins upregulate cystathionine γ-lyase transcription and H2S generation via activating Akt signaling in macrophage.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Du, Hua-Ping; Li, Jiaojiao; Xu, Ran; Wang, Ya-Li; You, Shou-Jiang; Liu, Huihui; Wang, Fen; Cao, Yong-Jun; Liu, Chun-Feng; Hu, Li-Fang

    2014-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third gaseous transmitter, is implicated in various pathophysiologic processes. In the cardiovascular system, H2S exerts effects of cardioprotection, vascular tone regulation, and atherogenesis inhibition. Recent studies demonstrated that atorvastatin, the inhibitor of 3-hydroxyl-3-methyl coenzyme A reductase, affected H2S formation in kidney and other organs. However, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we examined the effects of three different statins (fluvastatin, atorvastatin and pravastatin) on H2S formation in raw264.7 macrophages. There was a remarkable rise in H2S level in fluvastatin- and atorvastatin-stimulated macrophages, while pravastatin failed to show any significant effect on it. Moreover, fluvastatin and atorvastatin enhanced the mRNA and protein expression of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) in dose- and time-dependent manners. Fluvastatin also markedly enhanced the CSE activity. However, fluvastatin did not alter the mRNA or protein expression of another H2S-producing enzyme 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase. Blockade of CSE with its inhibitor dl-propargylglycine (PAG) or siRNA markedly reduced the H2S level in fluvastatin-stimulated macrophages. In addition, fluvastatin elevated Akt phosphorylation, which occurred as early as 15 min after treatment, peaked at 1h, and lasted at least 3h. Both PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (10 μM) and Akt inhibitor perifosine (10μM) were able to reverse the increases of CSE mRNA and H2S production in fluvastatin-stimulated macrophages. Last, we showed that fluvastatin reduced the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory molecules such as IL-1β and MCP-1 in LPS-treated macrophages, which were completely reversed by CSE inhibitor PAG. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that statins may up-regulate CSE expression/activity and subsequently elevate H2S generation by activating Akt signaling pathway and also imply that CSE-H2S pathway plays a critical role in the anti

  13. Transformation of AeIn4 Indides (Ae = Ba, Sr) into an AeAu2In2 Structure Type Through Gold Substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jing-Cao; Corbett, John D.

    2007-04-17

    The title compounds were prepared from the elements by high-temperature solid-state synthesis techniques. X-ray structural analyses shows that BaAu{sub 2}In{sub 2} (1) and SrAu{sub 2}In{sub 2} (2) crystallize in a new orthorhombic structure, Pnma, Z = 4 (a = 8.755(2), 8.530(2) {angstrom}; b = 4.712(1), 4.598(1) {angstrom}; c = 12.368(3), 12.283(4) {angstrom}, respectively). Gold substitutes for 50% of the indium atoms in the tetragonal BaIn{sub 4} and monoclinic SrIn{sub 4} parents to give this new and more flexible orthorhombic structure. The Ae atoms in this structure are contained within chains of hexagonal prisms built of alternating In and Au that have additional augmenting atoms around their waists from further condensation of parallel displaced chains. The driving forces for these structural changes are in part the shorter Au-In distances (2.72 and 2.69 {angstrom}) relative to d(In-In) in the parents, presumably because of relativistic contractions with Au. Generalities about such centered prismatic building blocks and their condensation modes in these and related phases are described. Band structure calculations (EHTB) demonstrate that the two compounds are metallic, which is confirmed by measurements of the resistivity of 1 and the magnetic susceptibilities of both.

  14. Acoustic Emission Signals in Thin Plates Produced by Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Gorman, Michael R.; Humes, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signals created by impact sources in thin aluminum and graphite/epoxy composite plates were analyzed. Two different impact velocity regimes were studied. Low-velocity (less than 0.21 km/s) impacts were created with an airgun firing spherical steel projectiles (4.5 mm diameter). High-velocity (1.8 to 7 km/s) impacts were generated with a two-stage light-gas gun firing small cylindrical nylon projectiles (1.5 mm diameter). Both the impact velocity and impact angle were varied. The impacts did not penetrate the aluminum plates at either low or high velocities. For high-velocity impacts in composites, there were both impacts that fully penetrated the plate as well as impacts that did not. All impacts generated very large amplitude AE signals (1-5 V at the sensor), which propagated as plate (extensional and/or flexural) modes. In the low-velocity impact studies, the signal was dominated by a large flexural mode with only a small extensional mode component detected. As the impact velocity was increased within the low velocity regime, the overall amplitudes of both the extensional and flexural modes increased. In addition, a relative increase in the amplitude of high-frequency components of the flexural mode was also observed. Signals caused by high-velocity impacts that did not penetrate the plate contained both a large extensional and flexural mode component of comparable amplitudes. The signals also contained components of much higher frequency and were easily differentiated from those caused by low-velocity impacts. An interesting phenomenon was observed in that the large flexural mode component, seen in every other case, was absent from the signal when the impact particle fully penetrated through the composite plates.

  15. c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase signaling axis regulates diallyl trisulfide-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and cell cycle arrest in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Antosiewicz, Jedrzej; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna; Marynowski, Stanley W; Singh, Shivendra V

    2006-05-15

    We have shown previously that generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a critical event in G(2)-M phase cell cycle arrest caused by diallyl trisulfide (DATS), which is a highly promising anticancer constituent of processed garlic. Using DU145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells as a model, we now report a novel mechanism involving c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling axis, which is known for its role in regulation of cell survival and apoptosis, in DATS-induced ROS production. The DATS-induced ROS generation, G(2)-M phase cell cycle arrest and degradation, and hyperphosphorylation of Cdc25C were significantly attenuated in the presence of EUK134, a combined mimetic of superoxide dismutase and catalase. Interestingly, the DATS-induced ROS generation and G(2)-M phase cell cycle arrest were also inhibited significantly in the presence of desferrioxamine, an iron chelator, but this protection was not observed with iron-saturated desferrioxamine. DATS treatment caused a marked increase in the level of labile iron that was accompanied by degradation of light chain of iron storage protein ferritin. Interestingly, DATS-mediated degradation of ferritin, increase in labile iron pool, ROS generation, and/or cell cycle arrest were significantly attenuated by ectopic expression of a catalytically inactive mutant of JNK kinase 2 and RNA interference of stress-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (SEK1), upstream kinases in JNK signal transduction pathway. In conclusion, the present study provides experimental evidence to indicate existence of a novel pathway involving JNK signaling axis in regulation of DATS-induced ROS generation.

  16. Near Full-Length Identification of a Novel HIV-1 CRF01_AE/B/C Recombinant in Northern Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan-Heng; Chen, Xin; Liang, Yue-Bo; Pang, Wei; Qin, Wei-Hong; Zhang, Chiyu; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-08-01

    The Myanmar-China border appears to be the "hot spot" region for the occurrence of HIV-1 recombination. The majority of the previous analyses of HIV-1 recombination were based on partial genomic sequences, which obviously cannot reflect the reality of the genetic diversity of HIV-1 in this area well. Here, we present a near full-length characterization of a novel HIV-1 CRF01_AE/B/C recombinant isolated from a long-distance truck driver in Northern Myanmar. It is the first description of a near full-length genomic sequence in Myanmar since 2003, and might be one of the most complicated HIV-1 chimeras ever detected in Myanmar, containing four CRF01_AE, six B segments, and five C segments separated by 14 breakpoints throughout its genome. The discovery and characterization of this new CRF01_AE/B/C recombinant indicate that intersubtype recombination is ongoing in Myanmar, continuously generating new forms of HIV-1. More work based on near full-length sequence analyses is urgently needed to better understand the genetic diversity of HIV-1 in these regions.

  17. Latitudinal variation of thermospheric hydrogen near solstice from AE-D observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanatani, S.; Breig, E. L.

    1988-01-01

    Variations of thermospheric neutral atomic hydrogen with latitude during a solstice season near solar minimum were investigated using data acquired with the polar-orbiting AE-D satellite. Hydrogen concentrations at low latitude were found to be comparable to those found from observations with the AE-E satellite, but were slightly higher than concentrations derived from the 1983 mass spectrometer incoherent scatter atmospheric model. Results confirm the general summer-to-winter density increase, large latitudinal gradients in the summer hemisphere, and the winter enhancement of hydrogen observed in AE-C nighttime measurements. The AE-D data, however, show a small polar depression in hydrogen concentration at high winter latitudes, attributed to atmospheric dynamics following auroral heating. The density gradients observed by AE-D in the summer hemisphere were in sharp contrast to the more constant horizontal daytime profiles reported from OGO-6 and previous AE-C measurements, indicating the possibility of local time effects.

  18. A high-resolution spectropolarimetric survey of Herbig Ae/Be stars - I. Observations and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alecian, E.; Wade, G. A.; Catala, C.; Grunhut, J. H.; Landstreet, J. D.; Bagnulo, S.; Böhm, T.; Folsom, C. P.; Marsden, S.; Waite, I.

    2013-02-01

    This is the first in a series of papers in which we describe and report the analysis of a large survey of Herbig Ae/Be stars in circular spectropolarimetry. Using the ESPaDOnS and Narval high-resolution spectropolarimeters at the Canada-France-Hawaii and Bernard Lyot Telescopes, respectively, we have acquired 132 circularly polarized spectra of 70 Herbig Ae/Be stars and Herbig candidates. The large majority of these spectra are characterized by a resolving power of about 65 000, and a spectral coverage from about 3700 Å to 1 μm. The peak signal-to-noise ratio per CCD pixel ranges from below 100 (for the faintest targets) to over 1000 (for the brightest). The observations were acquired with the primary aim of searching for magnetic fields in these objects. However, our spectra are suitable for a variety of other important measurements, including rotational properties, variability, binarity, chemical abundances, circumstellar environment conditions and structure, etc. In this paper, we describe the sample selection, the observations and their reduction, and the measurements that will comprise the basis of much of our following analysis. We describe the determination of fundamental parameters for each target. We detail the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) that we have applied to each of our spectra, including the selection, editing and tuning of the LSD line masks. We describe the fitting of the LSD Stokes I profiles using a multicomponent model that yields the rotationally broadened photospheric profile (providing the projected rotational velocity and radial velocity for each observation) as well as circumstellar emission and absorption components. Finally, we diagnose the longitudinal Zeeman effect via the measured circular polarization, and report the longitudinal magnetic field and Stokes V Zeeman signature detection probability. As an appendix, we provide a detailed review of each star observed.

  19. 3-D AE visualization of bone-cement fatigue locations.

    PubMed

    Qi, G; Pujol, J; Fan, Z

    2000-11-01

    This study addresses the visualization of crack locations in bone-cement material using a three-dimensional acoustic emission source location technique. Computer software based on an earthquake location technique was developed to determine AE source locations and was used to investigate material cracks formed at the tip of a notch in bone cement. The computed locations show that the cracks form linear features with dimensions between 0.1 and 0.2 mm although larger linear features (almost 3.5 mm) also are present. There is a difference of about 2.5 mm between the average of the event locations, and the location of the tip of the notch is 2.5 mm, which may be due to the finite size of the sensors (5 mm in diameter).

  20. NPS alternate techsat satellite, design project for AE-4871

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This project was completed as part of AE-4871, Advanced Spacecraft Design. The intent of the course is to provide experience in the design of all the major components in a spacecraft system. Team members were given responsibility for the design of one of the six primary subsystems: power, structures, propulsion, attitude control, telemetry, tracking and control (TT&C), and thermal control. In addition, a single member worked on configuration control, launch vehicle integration, and a spacecraft test plan. Given an eleven week time constraint, a preliminary design of each subsystem was completed. Where possible, possible component selections were also made. Assistance for this project came principally from the Naval Research Laboratory's Spacecraft Technology Branch. Specific information on components was solicited from representatives in industry. The design project centers on a general purpose satellite bus that is currently being sought by the Strategic Defense Initiative.

  1. Report on the Development of the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)

    PubMed Central

    Nechvatal, James; Barker, Elaine; Bassham, Lawrence; Burr, William; Dworkin, Morris; Foti, James; Roback, Edward

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated a process to select a symmetric-key encryption algorithm to be used to protect sensitive (unclassified) Federal information in furtherance of NIST’s statutory responsibilities. In 1998, NIST announced the acceptance of 15 candidate algorithms and requested the assistance of the cryptographic research community in analyzing the candidates. This analysis included an initial examination of the security and efficiency characteristics for each algorithm. NIST reviewed the results of this preliminary research and selected MARS, RC™, Rijndael, Serpent and Twofish as finalists. Having reviewed further public analysis of the finalists, NIST has decided to propose Rijndael as the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES). The research results and rationale for this selection are documented in this report. PMID:27500035

  2. Role of AE2 for pHi regulation in biliary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Concepcion, Axel R.; Lopez, María; Ardura-Fabregat, Alberto; Medina, Juan F.

    2013-01-01

    The Cl−/HCO−3anion exchanger 2 (AE2) is known to be involved in intracellular pH (pHi) regulation and transepithelial acid-base transport. Early studies showed that AE2 gene expression is reduced in liver biopsies and blood mononuclear cells from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), a disease characterized by chronic non-suppurative cholangitis associated with antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) and other autoimmune phenomena. Microfluorimetric analysis of the Cl−/HCO−3 anion exchange (AE) in isolated cholangiocytes showed that the cAMP-stimulated AE activity is diminished in PBC compared to both healthy and diseased controls. More recently, it was found that miR-506 is upregulated in cholangiocytes of PBC patients and that AE2 may be a target of miR-506. Additional evidence for a pathogenic role of AE2 dysregulation in PBC was obtained with Ae2−/−a,b mice, which develop biochemical, histological, and immunologic alterations that resemble PBC (including development of serum AMA). Analysis of HCO−3 transport systems and pHi regulation in cholangiocytes from normal and Ae2−/−a,b mice confirmed that AE2 is the transporter responsible for the Cl−/HCO−3exchange in these cells. On the other hand, both Ae2+/+a,b and Ae2−/−a,b mouse cholangiocytes exhibited a Cl−-independent bicarbonate transport system, essentially a Na+-bicarbonate cotransport (NBC) system, which could contribute to pHi regulation in the absence of AE2. PMID:24478713

  3. OPTICAL MASS FLOW DIAGNOSTICS IN HERBIG AE/BE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Cauley, P. Wilson; Johns-Krull, Christopher M. E-mail: cmj@rice.edu

    2015-09-01

    We examine a broad range of mass flow diagnostics in a large sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars (HAEBES) using high resolution optical spectra. The Hβ and He i 5876 Å lines show the highest incidence of P Cygni (30%) and inverse P Cygni (14%) morphologies, respectively. The Fe ii 4924 Å line also shows a large incidence of P Cygni profiles (11%). We find support for many of the conclusions reached in a study based on the analysis of the He i λ10830 line in a large sample of HAEBES. Namely, HAEBES exhibit smaller fractions of both blueshifted absorption (i.e., mass outflow) and redshifted absorption (i.e., mass infall or accretion) than their lower mass cousins, the classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs). In particular, the optical data supports the conclusion that HAEBES displaying redshifted absorption, in general, show maximum redshifted absorption velocities that are smaller fractions of their stellar escape velocities than is found for CTTSs. This suggests that HAEBE accretion flows are originating deeper in the gravitational potentials of their stars than in CTTS systems. In addition, we find a lack of inner disk wind signatures in the blueshifted absorption objects; only stellar wind signatures are clearly observed. These findings, along with the lack of detected magnetic fields around HAEBES, support the idea that large magnetospheres are not prevalent around HAEBES and that accretion flows are instead mediated by significantly smaller magnetospheres with relatively smaller truncation radii (e.g., 1–2 R{sub *}). Redshifted absorption is much more common around Herbig Ae stars than Be stars, suggesting that Herbig Be stars may accrete via a boundary layer rather than along magnetic field lines.

  4. Rational chemical design of the next generation of molecular imaging probes based on physics and biology: mixing modalities, colors and signals.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Longmire, Michelle R; Ogawa, Mikako; Choyke, Peter L

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, numerous in vivo molecular imaging probes have been developed. As a consequence, much has been published on the design and synthesis of molecular imaging probes focusing on each modality, each type of material, or each target disease. More recently, second generation molecular imaging probes with unique, multi-functional, or multiplexed characteristics have been designed. This critical review focuses on (i) molecular imaging using combinations of modalities and signals that employ the full range of the electromagnetic spectra, (ii) optimized chemical design of molecular imaging probes for in vivo kinetics based on biology and physiology across a range of physical sizes, (iii) practical examples of second generation molecular imaging probes designed to extract complementary data from targets using multiple modalities, color, and comprehensive signals (277 references).

  5. Rational chemical design of the next generation of molecular imaging probes based on physics and biology: mixing modalities, colors and signals

    PubMed Central

    Longmire, Michelle R.; Ogawa, Mikako; Choyke, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, numerous in vivo molecular imaging probes have been developed. As a consequence, much has been published on the design and synthesis of molecular imaging probes focusing on each modality, each type of material, or each target disease. More recently, second generation molecular imaging probes with unique, multi-functional, or multiplexed characteristics have been designed. This critical review focuses on (i) molecular imaging using combinations of modalities and signals that employ the full range of the electromagnetic spectra, (ii) optimized chemical design of molecular imaging probes for in vivo kinetics based on biology and physiology across a range of physical sizes, (iii) practical examples of second generation molecular imaging probes designed to extract complementary data from targets using multiple modalities, color, and comprehensive signals (277 references). PMID:21607237

  6. Broadband frequency-chirped terahertz-wave signal generation using periodically-poled lithium niobate for frequency-modulated continuous-wave radar application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamazaki, Junichi; Ogawa, Yoh; Sekine, Norihiko; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Kanno, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Hosako, Iwao

    2016-02-01

    We have proposed a method by using a nonlinear optical technique to generate frequency-modulated (FM) signals in the terahertz (THz) band with much broader bandwidth. Periodically-poled lithium niobates (PPLNs) are excited by ultrashort pulses, and linearly frequency-chirped THz pulses are obtained by changing the periodicity of the PPLN gradually. The bandwidth achieved is approximately 1 THz at a center frequency of 1.5 THz. Using this wave in a FM continuous (CW) radar system is expected to result in a range resolution of ~150 μm. This FM-THz signal generation technique will thus be useful in or future civil safety applications requiring high-resolution ranging or imaging.

  7. Analysis of behavior of focusing error signals generated by astigmatic method when a focused spot moves beyond the radius of a land-groove-type optical disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Masahisa; Nakatani, Hidehiko; Nakai, Kenya; Ohmaki, Masayuki

    2015-09-01

    We theoretically calculate behaviors of focusing error signals generated by an astigmatic method in a land-groove-type optical disk. The focusing error signal from the land does not coincide with that from the groove. This behavior is enhanced when a focused spot of an optical pickup moves beyond the radius of the optical disk. A gain difference between the slope sensitivities of focusing error signals from the land and the groove is an important factor with respect to stable focusing servo control. In our calculation, the format of digital versatile disc-random access memory (DVD-RAM) is adopted as the land-groove-type optical disk model, and the dependences of the gain difference on various factors are investigated. The gain difference strongly depends on the optical intensity distribution of the laser beam in the optical pickup. The calculation method and results in this paper will be reflected in newly developed land-groove-type optical disks.

  8. Stomatin modulates the activity of the Anion Exchanger 1 (AE1, SLC4A1)

    PubMed Central

    Genetet, Sandrine; Desrames, Alexandra; Chouali, Youcef; Ripoche, Pierre; Lopez, Claude; Mouro-Chanteloup, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Anion Exchanger 1 (AE1) and stomatin are integral proteins of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane. Erythroid and kidney AE1 play a major role in HCO3− and Cl− exchange. Stomatins down-regulate the activity of many channels and transporters. Biochemical studies suggested an interaction of erythroid AE1 with stomatin. Moreover, we previously reported normal AE1 expression level in stomatin-deficient RBCs. Here, the ability of stomatin to modulate AE1-dependent Cl−/HCO3− exchange was evaluated using stopped-flow methods. In HEK293 cells expressing recombinant AE1 and stomatin, the permeabilities associated with AE1 activity were 30% higher in cells overexpressing stomatin, compared to cells with only endogenous stomatin expression. Ghosts from stomatin-deficient RBCs and controls were resealed in the presence of pH- or chloride-sensitive fluorescent probes and submitted to inward HCO3− and outward Cl− gradients. From alkalinization rate constants, we deduced a 47% decreased permeability to HCO3− for stomatin-deficient patients. Similarly, kinetics of Cl− efflux, followed by the probe dequenching, revealed a significant 42% decrease in patients. In situ Proximity Ligation Assays confirmed an interaction of AE1 with stomatin, in both HEK recombinant cells and RBCs. Here we show that stomatin modulates the transport activity of AE1 through a direct protein-protein interaction. PMID:28387307

  9. New strategies for SHM based on a multichannel wireless AE node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez-Azcuaga, Valery; Ley, Obdulia

    2014-03-01

    This paper discusses the development of an Acoustic Emission (AE) wireless node and its application for SHM (Structural Health Monitoring). The instrument development was planned for applications monitoring steel and concrete bridges components. The final product, now commercially available, is a sensor node which includes multiple sensing elements, on board signal processing and analysis capabilities, signal conditioning electronics, power management circuits, wireless data transmission element and energy harvesting unit. The sensing elements are capable of functioning in both passive and active modes, while the multiple parametric inputs are available for connecting various sensor types to measure external characteristics affecting the performance of the structure under monitoring. The output of all these sensors are combined and analyzed at the node in order to minimize the data transmission rate, which consumes significant amount of power. Power management circuits are used to reduce the data collection intervals through selective data acquisition strategies and minimize the sensor node power consumption. This instrument, known as the 1284, is an excellent platform to deploy SHM in the original bridge applications, but initial prototypes has shown significant potential in monitoring composite wind turbine blades and composites mockups of Unmanned Autonomous Vehicles (UAV) components; currently we are working to extend the use of this system to fields such as coal flow, power transformer, and off-shore platform monitoring.

  10. Structural and mutational analyses of Aes, an inhibitor of MalT in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schiefner, André; Gerber, Kinga; Brosig, Alexander; Boos, Winfried

    2014-02-01

    The acyl esterase Aes effectively inhibits the transcriptional activity of MalT-the central activator of maltose and maltodextrin utilizing genes in Escherichia coli. To provide better insight into the nature of the interaction between Aes and MalT, we determined two different crystal structures of Aes-in its native form and covalently modified by a phenylmethylsulfonyl moiety at its active site serine. Both structures show distinct space groups and were refined to a resolution of 1.8 Å and 2.3 Å, respectively. The overall structure of Aes resembles a canonical α/β-hydrolase fold, which is extended by a funnel-like cap structure that forms the substrate-binding site. The catalytic triad of Aes, comprising residues Ser165, His292, and Asp262, is located at the bottom of this funnel. Analysis of the crystal-packing contacts of the two different space groups as well as analytical size-exclusion chromatography revealed a homodimeric arrangement of Aes. The Aes dimer adopts an antiparallel contact involving both the hydrolase core and the cap, with its twofold axis perpendicular to the largest dimension of Aes. To identify the surface area of Aes that is responsible for the interaction with MalT, we performed a structure-based alanine-scanning mutagenesis to pinpoint Aes residues that are significantly impaired in MalT inhibition, but still exhibit wild-type expression and enzymatic activity. These residues map to a shallow slightly concave surface patch of Aes at the opposite site of the dimerization interface and indicate the surface area that interacts with MalT.

  11. Smurf-mediated differential proteolysis generates dynamic BMP signaling in germline stem cells during Drosophila testis development.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Jie; Pi, Haiwei; Hsieh, Chang-Che; Fuller, Margaret T

    2013-11-01

    Germline stem cells (GSCs) produce gametes throughout the reproductive life of many animals, and intensive studies have revealed critical roles of BMP signaling to maintain GSC self-renewal in Drospophila adult gonads. Here, we show that BMP signaling is downregulated as testes develop and this regulation controls testis growth, stem cell number, and the number of spermatogonia divisions. Phosphorylated Mad (pMad), the activated Drosophila Smad in germ cells, was restricted from anterior germ cells to GSCs and hub-proximal cells during early larval development. pMad levels in GSCs were then dramatically downregulated from early third larval instar (L3) to late L3, and maintained at low levels in pupal and adult GSCs. The spatial restriction and temporal down-regulation of pMad, reflecting the germ cell response to BMP signaling activity, required action in germ cells of E3 ligase activity of HECT domain protein Smurf. Analyses of Smurf mutant testes and dosage-dependent genetic interaction between Smurf and mad indicated that pMad downregulation was required for both the normal decrease in stem cell number during testis maturation in the pupal stage, and for normal limit of four rounds of spermatogonia cell division for control of germ cell numbers and testis size. Smurf protein was expressed at a constant low level in GSCs and spermatogonia during development. Rescue experiments showed that expression of exogenous Smurf protein in early germ cells promoted pMad downregulation in GSCs in a stage-dependent but concentration-independent manner, suggesting that the competence of Smurf to attenuate response to BMP signaling may be regulated during development. Taken together, our work reveals a critical role for differential attenuation of the response to BMP signaling in GSCs and early germ cells for control of germ cell number and gonad growth during development.

  12. Perturbing a Stochastic Weather Generator with Different Climate Change Signals to Assess Extreme Precipitation under Influence of Climate Change at Urban Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørup, H. J.; Christensen, O. B.; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, K.; Mikkelsen, P. S.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, urban flooding has occurred in Denmark due to very short lived local extreme precipitation events. Several of these floods have been among the most severe experienced to date. Climate change is expected to alter the frequency of extreme precipitation events causing floods, but in general climate models are poor in representing extreme precipitation events. The current study demonstrates how the Spatio-Temporal Neyman-Scott Rectangular Pulses weather generator can be applied at urban scale and how it can be used for statistical downscaling by perturbation with a climate change signal. The weather generator is fitted to data from a dense network of high resolution tipping bucket rain gauges in and around Copenhagen. The weather generator is validated by its ability to reproduce realistic extreme precipitation statistics. The model reproduces intensity-duration-frequency statistics down to the one-hour time scale satisfactorily. It furthermore reproduces realistic spatial correlation patterns at the extreme rain event level when output is sampled on a 2-km grid. For downscaling, perturbation with a climate change signal obtained from four different regional climate model simulations has been analyzed. The analyzed data sets originates from two regional climate model (RCM) runs from the European ENSEMBLES project (RACMO/ECHAM and HIRHAM/ECHAM, A1B scenario and 25 km spatial scale) and two RCM runs just for southern Scandinavia performed by the Danish Meteorological Institute (both HIRHAM/EC-EARTH, rcp 4.5 and rcp 8.5 scenarios and 8 km spatial scale). The data sets are all at one-hour time resolution. All data sets result in markedly different perturbation schemes for the weather generator. The downscaled time series are analyzed in accordance to the validation procedure and change factors for the extremes are derived as a function of return period. Despite different perturbation schemes both A1B scenario model runs and the rcp 4.5 scenario model run

  13. Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrum of AE Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauche, Christopher W.

    2009-11-01

    The nova-like cataclysmic binary AE Aqr, which is currently understood to be a former supersoft X-ray binary and current magnetic propeller, was observed for over two binary orbits (78 ks) in 2005 August with the High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) on board the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The long, uninterrupted Chandra observation provides a wealth of details concerning the X-ray emission of AE Aqr, many of which are new and unique to the HETG. First, the X-ray spectrum is that of an optically thin multi-temperature thermal plasma; the X-ray emission lines are broad, with widths that increase with the line energy from σ ≈ 1 eV (510 km s-1) for O VIII to σ ≈ 5.5 eV (820 km s-1) for Si XIV; the X-ray spectrum is reasonably well fit by a plasma model with a Gaussian emission measure distribution that peaks at log T(K) = 7.16, has a width σ = 0.48, an Fe abundance equal to 0.44 times solar, and other metal (primarily Ne, Mg, and Si) abundances equal to 0.76 times solar; and for a distance d = 100 pc, the total emission measure EM = 8.0 × 1053 cm-3 and the 0.5-10 keV luminosity L X = 1.1 × 1031 erg s-1. Second, based on the f/(i + r) flux ratios of the forbidden (f), intercombination (i), and recombination (r) lines of the Heα triplets of N VI, O VII, and Ne IX measured by Itoh et al. in the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer spectrum and those of O VII, Ne IX, Mg XI, and Si XIII in the Chandra HETG spectrum, either the electron density of the plasma increases with temperature by over three orders of magnitude, from n e ≈ 6 × 1010 cm-3 for N VI [log T(K) ≈ 6] to n e ≈ 1 × 1014 cm-3 for Si XIII [log T(K) ≈ 7], and/or the plasma is significantly affected by photoexcitation. Third, the radial velocity of the X-ray emission lines varies on the white dwarf spin phase, with two oscillations per spin cycle and an amplitude K ≈ 160 km s-1. These results appear to be inconsistent with the recent models of Itoh et al., Ikhsanov, and Venter

  14. Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrum of AE Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauche, Christopher W.

    2010-03-01

    The nova-like cataclysmic binary AE Aqr was observed for over two binary orbits in 2005 August with the High-Energy Transmission Grating onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The resulting spectrum is reasonably well fit by an optically thin multi-temperature thermal plasma model with a Gaussian emission measure distribution that peaks at log T (K)=7.16, has a width sigma=0.4, an Fe abundance equal to 0.44 times solar, other metal abundances equal to 0.76 times solar, an emission measure EM=8.0x1053 cm-3, and a 0.5-10 keV X-ray luminosity LX=1.1x1031 erg s-1. Based on the f/(i+r) flux ratios of the He alpha triplets of N VI, O VII, Ne IX, Mg XI, and Si XIII in the XMM-Newton RGS and Chandra HETG spectra, we find that either the electron density of the plasma increases with temperature by over three orders of magnitude, from ne 6x1010 cm-3 for N VI to ne 1x1014 cm-3 for Si XIII, and/or the plasma is significantly affected by photoexcitation. The radial velocity of the X-ray emission lines varies on the white dwarf spin phase, with two oscillations per spin cycle and an amplitude K 160 km s-1 . These results appear to be inconsistent with the recent models of Itoh et al., Ikhsanov, and Venter & Meintjes of an extended, low-density source of X-rays in AE Aqr, but instead support earlier models in which the dominant source of X-rays is of high density and/or in close proximity to the white dwarf. Support for this work was provided by NASA through Chandra Award Number GO5-6020X issued by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of NASA under contract NAS8-03060. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Progesterone generates cancer stem cells through membrane progesterone receptor-triggered signaling in basal-like human mammary cells.

    PubMed

    Vares, Guillaume; Sai, Sei; Wang, Bing; Fujimori, Akira; Nenoi, Mitsuru; Nakajima, Tetsuo

    2015-07-01

    Ionizing radiation and cumulative exposure to steroid hormones are known risk factors for breast cancer. There is increasing evidence that breast tumors are driven by a subpopulation of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells (CSCs). In MCF10A non-cancerous basal-like PR(-) cells, progesterone treatment and X-rays generated ALDH(+) and CD44(+)/CD24(-) CSCs. Here, we report that in irradiated MCF10A cells, progesterone activated the PI3K/Akt pathway via membrane progesterone receptor (mPR). Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt pathway counteracted the generation of CSCs by progesterone and irradiation. The stimulation of PI3K/Akt via mPR resulted in the inactivation of FOXO transcriptional activity, the upregulation of snail and slug expression and a downregulation of miR-29 expression, which led to increased levels of KLF4, a transcription factor required for breast CSC maintenance. Stabilization of miR-29 expression impeded the generation of CSCs, while its inhibition alone was sufficient to generate CSCs. This study provides a new mechanistic basis for progesterone and radiation-induced breast cancer risk in basal cells. In addition, the elucidation of new pathways and miRNA regulations involved in CSC generation and maintenance may open the door to potential novel anti-CSC strategies.

  16. 15 CFR Appendix D to Part 30 - AES Filing Citation, Exemption and Exclusion Legends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false AES Filing Citation, Exemption and Exclusion Legends D Appendix D to Part 30 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and... Appendix D to Part 30—AES Filing Citation, Exemption and Exclusion Legends I. USML Proof of Filing...

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Brevibacterium linens AE038-8, an Extremely Arsenic-Resistant Bacterium

    DOE PAGES

    Maizel, Daniela; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Brown, Steven D.; ...

    2015-04-16

    To understand the arsenic biogeocycles in the groundwaters at Tucumán, Argentina, we isolated Brevibacterium linens sp. strain AE38-8, obtained from arsenic-contaminated well water. This strain is extremely resistant to arsenicals and has arsenic resistance (ars) genes in its genome. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. linens AE38-8.

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Brevibacterium linens AE038-8, an Extremely Arsenic-Resistant Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Maizel, Daniela; Utturkar, Sagar M; Brown, Steven D; Ferrero, Marcela A; Rosen, Barry P

    2015-04-16

    To understand the arsenic biogeocycles in the groundwaters at Tucumán, Argentina, we isolated Brevibacterium linens sp. strain AE38-8, obtained from arsenic-contaminated well water. This strain is extremely resistant to arsenicals and has arsenic resistance (ars) genes in its genome. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. linens AE38-8.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Brevibacterium linens AE038-8, an Extremely Arsenic-Resistant Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Maizel, Daniela; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Brown, Steven D.; Ferrero, Marcela A.

    2015-01-01

    To understand the arsenic biogeocycles in the groundwaters at Tucumán, Argentina, we isolated Brevibacterium linens sp. strain AE38-8, obtained from arsenic-contaminated well water. This strain is extremely resistant to arsenicals and has arsenic resistance (ars) genes in its genome. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. linens AE38-8. PMID:25883298

  20. Coupled Research in Ocean Acoustics and Signal Processing for the Next Generation of Underwater Acoustic Communication Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-05

    order of millimeters in the tank with wind speeds up to 16 meters per second. The data from the experiment was all quality checked and found to be of...mechanism which remains stable (i.e., no vibration) at the wind speeds used in the experiment. The second purpose was to conduct the tests up to higher wind ...speeds to determine of the apparent plateauing of some quantitative signal characteristics with increasing wind speed at the upper limit of the usable

  1. The Rho GTPase Rif signals through IRTKS, Eps8 and WAVE2 to generate dorsal membrane ruffles and filopodia.

    PubMed

    Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Sem, Kai Ping; Liew, Hwi Fen; Yu, Yuan Hong; Goh, Wah Ing; Chou, Ai Mei; Ahmed, Sohail

    2016-07-15

    Rif induces dorsal filopodia but the signaling pathway responsible for this has not been identified. We show here that Rif interacts with the I-BAR family protein IRTKS (also known as BAIAP2L1) through its I-BAR domain. Rif also interacts with Pinkbar (also known as BAIAP2L2) in N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. IRTKS and Rif induce dorsal membrane ruffles and filopodia. Dominant-negative Rif inhibits the formation of IRTKS-induced morphological structures, and Rif activity is blocked in IRTKS-knockout (KO) cells. To further define the Rif-IRTKS signaling pathway, we identify Eps8 and WAVE2 (also known as WASF2) as IRTKS interactors. We find that Eps8 regulates the size and number of dorsal filopodia and membrane ruffles downstream of Rif-IRTKS signaling, whereas WAVE2 modulates dorsal membrane ruffling. Furthermore, our data suggests that Tir, a protein essential for enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection, might compete for Rif for interaction with the I-BAR domain of IRTKS. Based on this evidence, we propose a model in which Rho family GTPases use the I-BAR proteins, IRSp53 (also known as BAIAP2), IRTKS and Pinkbar, as a central mechanism to modulate cell morphology.

  2. Innate immunity signaling: cytosolic Ca2+ elevation is linked to downstream nitric oxide generation through the action of calmodulin or a calmodulin-like protein.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Smigel, Andries; Tsai, Yu-Chang; Braam, Janet; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2008-10-01

    Ca(2+) rise and nitric oxide (NO) generation are essential early steps in plant innate immunity and initiate the hypersensitive response (HR) to avirulent pathogens. Previous work from this laboratory has demonstrated that a loss-of-function mutation of an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plasma membrane Ca(2+)-permeable inwardly conducting ion channel impairs HR and that this phenotype could be rescued by the application of a NO donor. At present, the mechanism linking cytosolic Ca(2+) rise to NO generation during pathogen response signaling in plants is still unclear. Animal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation is Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) dependent. Here, we present biochemical and genetic evidence consistent with a similar regulatory mechanism in plants: a pathogen-induced Ca(2+) signal leads to CaM and/or a CaM-like protein (CML) activation of NOS. In wild-type Arabidopsis plants, the use of a CaM antagonist prevents NO generation and the HR. Application of a CaM antagonist does not prevent pathogen-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation, excluding the possibility of CaM acting upstream from Ca(2+). The CaM antagonist and Ca(2+) chelation abolish NO generation in wild-type Arabidopsis leaf protein extracts as well, suggesting that plant NOS activity is Ca(2+)/CaM dependent in vitro. The CaM-like protein CML24 has been previously associated with NO-related phenotypes in Arabidopsis. Here, we find that innate immune response phenotypes (HR and [avirulent] pathogen-induced NO elevation in leaves) are inhibited in loss-of-function cml24-4 mutant plants. Pathogen-associated molecular pattern-mediated NO generation in cells of cml24-4 mutants is impaired as well. Our work suggests that the initial pathogen recognition signal of Ca(2+) influx into the cytosol activates CaM and/or a CML, which then acts to induce downstream NO synthesis as intermediary steps in a pathogen perception signaling cascade, leading to innate immune responses, including the HR.

  3. Leishmania donovani-Induced Prostaglandin E2 Generation Is Critically Dependent on Host Toll-Like Receptor 2–Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Amrita; Majumder, Saikat; Das, Shibali; Ghosh, Sweta; Biswas, Satabdi

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is the second-largest parasitic killer disease after malaria. During VL, the protozoan Leishmania donovani induces prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) generation within host macrophages to aid parasite survival. PGE2 significantly influences leishmanial pathogenesis, as L. donovani proliferation is known to be attenuated in PGE2-inhibited macrophages. Here, we report for the first time that signaling via macrophage Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) plays an instrumental role in inducing PGE2 release from L. donovani-infected macrophages. This signaling cascade, mediated via the TLR2–phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)–phospholipase C (PLC) signaling pathway, was found to be indispensable for activation of two major enzymes required for PGE2 generation: cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox2). Inhibition of cPLA2, but not secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) or calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2), arrested L. donovani infection. During infection, cPLA2 activity increased >7-fold in a calcium-dependent and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent manner, indicating that elevation of intracellular calcium and ERK-mediated phosphorylation was necessary for L. donovani-induced cPLA2 activation. For transcriptional upregulation of cyclooxygenase 2, activation of the calcium-calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling was required in addition to the TLR2-PI3K-PLC pathway. Detailed studies by site-directed mutagenesis of potential NFAT binding sites and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed that the binding of macrophage NFATc2, at the −73/−77 site on the cox2 promoter, induced L. donovani-driven cox2 transcriptional activation. Collectively, these findings highlight the contribution of TLR2 downstream signaling toward activation of cPLA2 and Cox2 and illustrate how the TLR2-PI3K-PLC pathway acts in a concerted manner with calcium-calcineurin-NFATc2 signaling to modulate PGE2

  4. Characterization of an inducible amidase from Pseudomonas acidovorans AE1.

    PubMed

    Alt, J; Heymann, E; Krisch, K

    1975-05-06

    The main molecular and catalytic properties of an acetanilide-hydrolyzing enzyme from Pseudomonas acidovorans AE 1, purified to a homogeneous state, were investigated. The molecular weight was 57 500 as determined by gel filtration and 55 300 as computed from the amino acid composition. By polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in dodecylsulfate a polypeptide chain weight of 56 700 was obtained. Based on the reaction of the highly purufied enzyme with diethyl-4-nitrophenyl phosphate an equivalent weight of approximately 59 100 was found. From these results it was concluded that the enzyme consists of a single polypeptide chain and contains one active site per molecule. The enzyme hydrolyzed esters as well as certain aromatic amides. It also catalysed the transfer of acetyl groups to phenetidine yielding phenacetin. The activities towards aliphatic esters were much smaller. The enzyme was stable at pH values ranging from 7 to 9 and its pH-optimum was about 10. It was strongly inhibited by organophosphorous compounds, like diethyl-4-nitrophenyl phosphate or diisopropylphosphorofluoridate, as well as by physostigmine sulfate and -SH-blocking reagents, like HgCl-2 or 4-chloromercuribenzoic acid. o-Nitrophenol caused a competitive inhibition and phenetidine an uncompetitive inhibition.

  5. The (BETA) Pictoris Phenomenon Among Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C. A.; Perez, M. R.; Talavera, A.; Bjorkman, K. S.; deWinter, D.; The, P.-S.; Molster, F. J.; vandenAncker, M. E.; Sitko, M. L.; Morrison, N. D.; Beaver, M. L.; McCollum, B.; Castelaz, M. W.

    1996-01-01

    We present a survey of high dispersion UV and optical spectra of Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) and related stars. We find accreting, circumstellar gas over the velocity range +100 to +400 km/s, and absorption profiles similar to those seen toward Beta Pic, in 36% of the 33 HAeBe stars with IUE data as well as in 3 non-emission B stars. We also find evidence of accretion in 7 HAeBe stars with optical data only. Line profile variability appears ubiquitous. As a group, the stars with accreting gas signatures have higher v sin i than the stars with outflowing material, and tend to exhibit large amplitude (greater than or equal to 1(sup m)) optical light variations. All of the program stars with polarimetric variations that are anti-correlated with the optical light, previously interpreted as the signature of a dust disk viewed close to equator-on, also show spectral signatures of accreting gas. These data imply that accretion activity in HAeBe stars is preferentially observed when the line of sight transits the circumstellar dust disk. Our data imply that the spectroscopic signatures of accreting circumstellar material seen in Beta Pic are not unique to that object, but instead are consistent with interpretation of Beta Pic as a comparatively young A star with its associated circumstellar disk.

  6. On the location of the oscillations in AE Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, William F.; Horne, Keith; Gomer, Richard

    1993-01-01

    There is much recent interest on the nature of the oscillations in the cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii. Detected in the optical, UV, X-ray, and possibly gamma-ray bands, the origin of these 33-sec oscillations remains poorly understood; the oscillation time-delay curve is phase shifted by about 60 deg with respect to the emission-line radial velocity curve, although both should track the orbital motion of the white dwarf. We present simultaneous absorption and emission-line radial velocities, and from the absorption lines we derive an improved ephemeris. Our emission-line velocities are phase shifted by about 75 deg, and hence are unreliable tracers of the orbital motion of the white dwarf. However, the oscillation orbit is shifted by only 5 deg +/- 3 deg percent confirming that the oscillations arise from a region concentric with the white dwarf. Thus the arrival times of the oscillations yield a measure of the white dwarfs apparent orbital velocity, independent of emission-line radial velocity measurements.

  7. Ca2+-dependent generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species serves as a signal for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 activation during glutamate excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yuntao; Gross, Robert A; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation are both required for glutamate-induced excitotoxic neuronal death. Since activation of the glutamate receptors can induce increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we investigated the relationship of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and ROS generation, and the possibility that ROS increase is a required signal for PARP-1 activation in cultured striatal neurons. Based on the spatial profile of NMDA-induced ROS generation, we found that only mitochondria showed a significant ROS increase within 30 min after NMDA receptor activation. This ROS increase was inhibited by the mitochondrial complex inhibitors rotenone and oligomycin, but not by the cytosolic phospholipase A2 or xanthine oxidase inhibitors. Mitochondrial ROS generation was also inhibited by both removal of Ca2+ from extracellular medium and blockage of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake by either a mitochondrial uncoupler or a Ca2+ uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, both DNA damage and PARP-1 activation induced by NMDA treatment was inhibited by blocking mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake or by antioxidants. Our results demonstrate that ROS production during the early stage of acute excitotoxicity derives primarily from mitochondria and is Ca2+-dependent. More importantly, the increase of mitochondrial ROS serves as a signal for PARP-1 activation, suggesting that concomitant mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and PARP-1 activation constitute a unified mechanism for excitotoxic neuronal death. PMID:17947304

  8. Propagation of flexural mode AE signals in GR/EP composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, W. H.; Gorman, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    A Fourier phase technique has been used to measure the dispersion of the flexural plate mode in graphite-epoxy composite laminates. Classical plate theory is shown to be of limited value in predicting the dispersion of this mode because it assumes that the effects of shear deformation and rotatory inertia are negligible. Higher-order plate theory, which includes these effects, gives much better agreement with measured values.

  9. Attenuation of bone morphogenetic protein signaling during amphibian limb development results in the generation of stage-specific defects

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tamsin E M; Day, Robert C; Beck, Caroline W

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate limb is one of the most intensively studied organs in the field of developmental biology. Limb development in tetrapod vertebrates is highly conserved and dependent on the interaction of several important molecular pathways. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling cascade is one of these pathways and has been shown to be crucial for several aspects of limb development. Here, we have used a Xenopus laevis transgenic line, in which expression of the inhibitor Noggin is under the control of the heat-shock promoter hsp70 to examine the effects of attenuation of BMP signaling at different stages of limb development. Remarkably different phenotypes were produced at different stages, illustrating the varied roles of BMP in development of the limb. Very early limb buds appeared to be refractory to the effects of BMP attenuation, developing normally in most cases. Ectopic limbs were produced by overexpression of Noggin corresponding to a brief window of limb development at about stage 49/50, as recently described by Christen et al. (2012). Attenuation of BMP signaling in stage 51 or 52 tadpoles lead to a reduction in the number of digits formed, resulting in hypodactyly or ectrodactyly, as well as occasional defects in the more proximal tibia-fibula. Finally, inhibition at stage 54 (paddle stage) led to the formation of dramatically shortened digits resulting from loss of distal phalanges. Transcriptome analysis has revealed the possibility that more Noggin-sensitive members of the BMP family could be involved in limb development than previously suspected. Our analysis demonstrates the usefulness of heat-shock-driven gene expression as an effective method for inhibiting a developmental pathway at different times during limb development. PMID:23981117

  10. Generating a representative signal of coal ash content to anticipate combustion control in a thermal power station.

    PubMed

    Prieto-Fernández, Ismael; Santurio-Díaz, José M; Folgueras-Díaz, Belén; López-Bobo, M Rosario; Fernández-Viar, Pedro

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes the possibilities of continuously measuring coal ash in the boiler feeding circuit of a thermal power station so that the measurement can be used as a signal for the boiler combustion control system. An installation was designed, at semi-industrial scale, that could faithfully reproduce the operation of a belt feeder. In order to measure the ash content, a natural radioactivity meter was installed and a large number of coal samples with different ranks and grain sizes were tested, eventually showing the possibility of achieving the objective.

  11. Determination of trace elements in coal and coal fly ash by joint-use of ICP-AES and atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Iwashita, Akira; Nakajima, Tsunenori; Takanashi, Hirokazu; Ohki, Akira; Fujita, Yoshio; Yamashita, Toru

    2007-01-15

    Microwave-acid digestion (MW-AD) followed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS), and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HGAAS) were examined for the determination of various elements in coal and coal fly ash (CFA). Eight certified reference materials (four coal samples and four CFA samples) were tested. The 10 elements (As, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Se), which are described in the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), were especially considered. For coal, the HF-free MW-AD followed by ICP-AES was successful in the determination of various elements except for As, Be, Cd, Sb, and Se. These elements (except for Sb) were well-determined by use of GFAAS (Be and Cd) and HGAAS (As and Se). For CFA, the addition of HF in the digestion acid mixture was needed for the determination of elements, except for As, Sb, and Se, for which the HF-free MW-AD was applicable. The use of GFAAS (Be and Cd) or HGAAS (Sb and Se) resulted in the successful determination of the elements for which ICP-AES did not work well. The protocol for the determination of the 10 elements in coal and CFA by MW-AD followed by the joint-use of ICP-AES, GFAAS, and HGAAS was established.

  12. Quercetin regulates the sestrin 2-AMPK-p38 MAPK signaling pathway and induces apoptosis by increasing the generation of intracellular ROS in a p53-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Guen Tae; Lee, Se Hee; Kim, Jong Il; Kim, Young Min

    2014-04-01

    The induction of apoptosis in cancer cells is a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory mechanisms responsible for quercetin-induced apoptosis, mamely the increased expression of sestrin 2 and the activation of the 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Our results revealed that quercetin induced apoptosis by generating the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increasing the expression of sestrin 2. The induction of apoptosis by quercetin occurred through the activation of the AMPK/p38 signaling pathway and was dependent on sestrin 2. However, the silencing of sestrin 2 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting sestrin 2 revealed that quercetin did not regulate AMPK or p38 phosphorylation in the cells in which sestrin 2 was silenced. On the other hand, it has been previously reported that sestrin 2 expression is not dependent on p53 expression under hypoxic conditions, whereas DNA damage is dependent on p53. We demonstrate that the increase in the expression of sestrin 2 by quercetin-generated intracellular ROS is p53-independent. The increased expression of sestrin 2 induced apoptosis through the AMPK/p38 signaling pathway in the HT-29 colon cancer cells, which are p53 mutant, treated with quercetin. Thus, our data suggest that quercetin induces apoptosis by reducing mitochondrial membrane potential, generating intracellular ROS production and increasing sestrin 2 expression through the AMPK/p38 pathway. In addition, p53 is not a necessary element for an apoptotic event induced by sestrin 2.

  13. Detection of DNA hybridization by field-effect DNA-based biosensors: mechanisms of signal generation and open questions.

    PubMed

    Cherstvy, A G

    2013-08-15

    We model theoretically the electrostatic effects taking place upon DNA hybridization in dense DNA arrays immobilized on a layer of Au nano-particles deposited on the surface of a field-effect-based DNA capacitive biosensor. We consider the influence of separation of a charged analyte from the sensor surface and the salinity of electrolyte solution, in the framework of both linear and nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann theories. The latter predicts a substantially weaker sensor signals due to electrostatic saturation effects that is the main conclusion of this paper. We analyze how different physical parameters of dense DNA brushes affect the magnitude of hybridization signals. The list includes the fraction of DNA charge neutralization, the length and spatial conformations of adsorbed DNA molecules, as well as the discreteness of DNA charges. We also examine the effect of Donnan ionic equilibrium in DNA lattices on the sensor response. The validity of theoretical models is contrasted against recent experimental observations on detection of DNA hybridization via its intrinsic electric charge. The sensitivity of such biochemical sensing devices, their detection limit, and DNA hybridization efficiency are briefly discussed in the end.

  14. Concurrent measurements of change in the bark and xylem diameters of trees reveal a phloem-generated turgor signal.

    PubMed

    Mencuccini, Maurizio; Hölttä, Teemu; Sevanto, Sanna; Nikinmaa, Eero

    2013-06-01

    · Currently, phloem transport in plants under field conditions is not well understood. This is largely the result of the lack of techniques suitable for the measurement of the physiological properties of phloem. · We present a model that interprets the changes in xylem diameter and live bark thickness and separates the components responsible for such changes. We test the predictions from this model on data from three mature Scots pine trees in Finland. The model separates the live bark thickness variations caused by bark water capacitance from a residual signal interpreted to indicate the turgor changes in the bark. · The predictions from the model are consistent with processes related to phloem transport. At the diurnal scale, this signal is related to patterns of photosynthetic activity and phloem loading. At the seasonal scale, bark turgor showed rapid changes during two droughts and after two rainfall events, consistent with physiological predictions. Daily cumulative totals of this turgor term were related to daily cumulative totals of canopy photosynthesis. Finally, the model parameter representing radial hydraulic conductance between phloem and xylem showed a temperature dependence consistent with the temperature-driven changes in water viscosity. · We propose that this model has potential for the continuous field monitoring of tree phloem function.

  15. TIME STRUCTURE OF GAMMA-RAY SIGNALS GENERATED IN LINE-OF-SIGHT INTERACTIONS OF COSMIC RAYS FROM DISTANT BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Prosekin, Anton; Aharonian, Felix; Essey, Warren; Kusenko, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    Blazars are expected to produce both gamma rays and cosmic rays. Therefore, observed high-energy gamma rays from distant blazars may contain a significant contribution from secondary gamma rays produced along the line of sight by the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with background photons. Unlike the standard models of blazars that consider only the primary photons emitted at the source, models that include the cosmic-ray contribution predict that even {approx}10 TeV photons should be detectable from distant objects with redshifts as high as z {>=} 0.1. Secondary photons contribute to signals of point sources only if the intergalactic magnetic fields are very small, B {approx}< 10{sup -14} G, and their detection can be used to set upper bounds on magnetic fields along the line of sight. Secondary gamma rays have distinct spectral and temporal features. We explore the temporal properties of such signals using a semi-analytical formalism and detailed numerical simulations, which account for all the relevant processes, including magnetic deflections. In particular, we elucidate the interplay of time delays coming from the proton deflections and from the electromagnetic cascade, and we find that, at multi-TeV energies, secondary gamma rays can show variability on timescales of years for B {approx} 10{sup -15} G.

  16. Coupled Research in Ocean Acoustics and Signal Processing for the Next Generation of Underwater Acoustic Communication Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-05

    equalizer adaptation algorithms to that over when the environment can be considered time-invariant. Work continued on a simulation environment based...predictions and the performance of algorithms operating on the data generated by the sim- ulator. This work falls under Research Task 1 from Section 2.2...November, 2015. The third area of work involved the development of new methods of apply- ing reduced-dimensional inference algorithms to improve the

  17. Interferon γ (IFNγ) Signaling via Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 (mTORC2) and Regulatory Effects in the Generation of Type II Interferon Biological Responses*

    PubMed Central

    Kroczynska, Barbara; Rafidi, Robert L.; Majchrzak-Kita, Beata; Kosciuczuk, Ewa M.; Blyth, Gavin T.; Jemielity, Jacek; Warminska, Zofia; Saleiro, Diana; Mehrotra, Swarna; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Fish, Eleanor N.; Platanias, Leonidas C.

    2016-01-01

    We provide evidence for a unique pathway engaged by the type II IFN receptor, involving mTORC2/AKT-mediated downstream regulation of mTORC1 and effectors. These events are required for formation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F complex (eIF4F) and initiation of mRNA translation of type II interferon-stimulated genes. Our studies establish that Rictor is essential for the generation of type II IFN-dependent antiviral and antiproliferative responses and that it controls the generation of type II IFN-suppressive effects on normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Together, our findings establish a central role for mTORC2 in IFNγ signaling and type II IFN responses. PMID:26645692

  18. Interferon γ (IFNγ) Signaling via Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2 (mTORC2) and Regulatory Effects in the Generation of Type II Interferon Biological Responses.

    PubMed

    Kroczynska, Barbara; Rafidi, Robert L; Majchrzak-Kita, Beata; Kosciuczuk, Ewa M; Blyth, Gavin T; Jemielity, Jacek; Warminska, Zofia; Saleiro, Diana; Mehrotra, Swarna; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Fish, Eleanor N; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2016-01-29

    We provide evidence for a unique pathway engaged by the type II IFN receptor, involving mTORC2/AKT-mediated downstream regulation of mTORC1 and effectors. These events are required for formation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F complex (eIF4F) and initiation of mRNA translation of type II interferon-stimulated genes. Our studies establish that Rictor is essential for the generation of type II IFN-dependent antiviral and antiproliferative responses and that it controls the generation of type II IFN-suppressive effects on normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Together, our findings establish a central role for mTORC2 in IFNγ signaling and type II IFN responses.

  19. Reprocessing of Archival Direct Imaging Data of Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safsten, Emily; Stephens, Denise C.

    2017-01-01

    Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) stars are intermediate mass (2-10 solar mass) pre-main sequence stars with circumstellar disks. They are the higher mass analogs of the better-known T Tauri stars. Observing planets within these young disks would greatly aid in understanding planet formation processes and timescales, particularly around massive stars. So far, only one planet, HD 100546b, has been confirmed to orbit a HAeBe star. With over 250 HAeBe stars known, and several observed to have disks with structures thought to be related to planet formation, it seems likely that there are as yet undiscovered planetary companions within the circumstellar disks of some of these young stars.Direct detection of a low-luminosity companion near a star requires high contrast imaging, often with the use of a coronagraph, and the subtraction of the central star's point spread function (PSF). Several processing algorithms have been developed in recent years to improve PSF subtraction and enhance the signal-to-noise of sources close to the central star. However, many HAeBe stars were observed via direct imaging before these algorithms came out. We present here current work with the PSF subtraction program PynPoint, which employs a method of principal component analysis, to reprocess archival images of HAeBe stars to increase the likelihood of detecting a planet in their disks.

  20. Microbes versus microbes: immune signals generated by probiotic lactobacilli and their role in protection against microbial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Cross, Martin L

    2002-12-13

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria can signal the immune system through innate cell surface pattern recognition receptors or via direct lymphoid cell activation. In some cases, this action has been shown to be sufficient to modulate local- and systemic-level in vivo immune responses. Practical applications of probiotics include their use in anti-tumour and anti-allergy immunotherapy, but there is also increasing evidence that some probiotics can stimulate a protective immune response sufficiently to enhance resistance to microbial pathogens. This review outlines the experimental and clinical evidence for enhanced anti-microbial immune protection by probiotic lactic acid bacteria, focussing on those studies where a correlative or suggestive link has been shown between immune modulation and enhanced protection.

  1. Bloch oscillations of exciton-polaritons and photons for the generation of an alternating terahertz spin signal

    SciTech Connect

    Flayac, H.; Solnyshkov, D. D.; Malpuech, G.

    2011-09-15

    We analyze theoretically the spin dynamics of exciton-polaritons and photons during their Bloch oscillations in a wire-shaped microcavity. The reduced system dimensionality induces a specific momentum-dependent energy splitting between the TE- and TM-polarized eigenmodes. As a consequence, the spin of the particles oscillates during their motion along the wire. We show that the periods of the Bloch oscillations and of the spin precession can become commensurate. Under such conditions, linearly polarized exciting pulses can be transformed in a THz alternating spin current. The structure acts as a spin-optronic device which converts the polarization and emits spin-polarized pulses. Finally, we propose two different schemes which allow us to maintain the intensity of the spin signal for much longer than the polariton lifetime.

  2. On a dark-field signal generated by micrometer-sized calcifications in phase-contrast mammography.

    PubMed

    Michel, Thilo; Rieger, Jens; Anton, Gisela; Bayer, Florian; Beckmann, Matthias W; Durst, Jürgen; Fasching, Peter A; Haas, Wilhelm; Hartmann, Arndt; Pelzer, Georg; Radicke, Marcus; Rauh, Claudia; Ritter, André; Sievers, Peter; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Uder, Michael; Wachter, David L; Weber, Thomas; Wenkel, Evelyn; Zang, Andrea

    2013-04-21

    We show that a distribution of micrometer-sized calcifications in the human breast which are not visible in clinical x-ray mammography at diagnostic dose levels can produce a significant dark-field signal in a grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging setup with a tungsten anode x-ray tube operated at 40 kVp. A breast specimen with invasive ductal carcinoma was investigated immediately after surgery by Talbot-Lau x-ray interferometry with a design energy of 25 keV. The sample contained two tumors which were visible in ultrasound and contrast-agent enhanced MRI but invisible in clinical x-ray mammography, in specimen radiography and in the attenuation images obtained with the Talbot-Lau interferometer. One of the tumors produced significant dark-field contrast with an exposure of 0.85 mGy air-kerma. Staining of histological slices revealed sparsely distributed grains of calcium phosphate with sizes varying between 1 and 40 μm in the region of this tumor. By combining the histological investigations with an x-ray wave-field simulation we demonstrate that a corresponding distribution of grains of calcium phosphate in the form of hydroxylapatite has the ability to produce a dark-field signal which would-to a substantial degree-explain the measured dark-field image. Thus we have found the appearance of new information (compared to attenuation and differential phase images) in the dark-field image. The second tumor in the same sample did not contain a significant fraction of these very fine calcification grains and was invisible in the dark-field image. We conclude that some tumors which are invisible in x-ray absorption mammography might be detected in the x-ray dark-field image at tolerable dose levels.

  3. On a dark-field signal generated by micrometer-sized calcifications in phase-contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Thilo; Rieger, Jens; Anton, Gisela; Bayer, Florian; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Durst, Jürgen; Fasching, Peter A.; Haas, Wilhelm; Hartmann, Arndt; Pelzer, Georg; Radicke, Marcus; Rauh, Claudia; Ritter, André; Sievers, Peter; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Uder, Michael; Wachter, David L.; Weber, Thomas; Wenkel, Evelyn; Zang, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    We show that a distribution of micrometer-sized calcifications in the human breast which are not visible in clinical x-ray mammography at diagnostic dose levels can produce a significant dark-field signal in a grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging setup with a tungsten anode x-ray tube operated at 40 kVp. A breast specimen with invasive ductal carcinoma was investigated immediately after surgery by Talbot-Lau x-ray interferometry with a design energy of 25 keV. The sample contained two tumors which were visible in ultrasound and contrast-agent enhanced MRI but invisible in clinical x-ray mammography, in specimen radiography and in the attenuation images obtained with the Talbot-Lau interferometer. One of the tumors produced significant dark-field contrast with an exposure of 0.85 mGy air-kerma. Staining of histological slices revealed sparsely distributed grains of calcium phosphate with sizes varying between 1 and 40 μm in the region of this tumor. By combining the histological investigations with an x-ray wave-field simulation we demonstrate that a corresponding distribution of grains of calcium phosphate in the form of hydroxylapatite has the ability to produce a dark-field signal which would—to a substantial degree—explain the measured dark-field image. Thus we have found the appearance of new information (compared to attenuation and differential phase images) in the dark-field image. The second tumor in the same sample did not contain a significant fraction of these very fine calcification grains and was invisible in the dark-field image. We conclude that some tumors which are invisible in x-ray absorption mammography might be detected in the x-ray dark-field image at tolerable dose levels.

  4. Phylodynamic analysis of the dissemination of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Liao, Huanan; Tee, Kok Keng; Hase, Saiki; Uenishi, Rie; Li, Xiao-Jie; Kusagawa, Shigeru; Thang, Pham Hong; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Pybus, Oliver G; Takebe, Yutaka

    2009-08-15

    To estimate the epidemic history of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in Vietnam and adjacent Guangxi, China, we determined near full-length nucleotide sequences of CRF01_AE from a total of 33 specimens collected in 1997-1998 from different geographic regions and risk populations in Vietnam. Phylogenetic and Bayesian molecular clock analyses were performed to estimate the date of origin of CRF01_AE lineages. Our study reconstructs the timescale of CRF01_AE expansion in Vietnam and neighboring regions and suggests that the series of CRF01_AE epidemics in Vietnam arose by the sequential introduction of founder strains into new locations and risk groups. CRF01_AE appears to have been present among heterosexuals in South-Vietnam for more than a decade prior to its epidemic spread in the early 1990s. In the late 1980s, the virus spread to IDUs in Southern Vietnam and subsequently in the mid-1990s to IDUs further north. Our results indicate the northward dissemination of CRF01_AE during this time.

  5. Acoustic emissions (AE) monitoring of large-scale composite bridge components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, E.; Klein, D. J.; Robinson, M. J.; Kosmatka, J. B.

    2008-03-01

    Acoustic Emissions (AE) has been successfully used with composite structures to both locate and give a measure of damage accumulation. The current experimental study uses AE to monitor large-scale composite modular bridge components. The components consist of a carbon/epoxy beam structure as well as a composite to metallic bonded/bolted joint. The bonded joints consist of double lap aluminum splice plates bonded and bolted to carbon/epoxy laminates representing the tension rail of a beam. The AE system is used to monitor the bridge component during failure loading to assess the failure progression and using time of arrival to give insight into the origins of the failures. Also, a feature in the AE data called Cumulative Acoustic Emission counts (CAE) is used to give an estimate of the severity and rate of damage accumulation. For the bolted/bonded joints, the AE data is used to interpret the source and location of damage that induced failure in the joint. These results are used to investigate the use of bolts in conjunction with the bonded joint. A description of each of the components (beam and joint) is given with AE results. A summary of lessons learned for AE testing of large composite structures as well as insight into failure progression and location is presented.

  6. Application of Normal Mode Expansion to AE Waves in Finite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, M. R.; Prosser, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    Breckenridge et al. (1975), Hsu (1985) and Pao (1978) adapted approaches from seismology to calculate the response at the surface of an infinite half-space and an infinite plate. These approaches have found use in calibrating acoustic emission (AE) transducers. However, it is difficult to extend this theoretical approach to AE testing of practical structures. Weaver and Pao (1982) considered a normal mode solution to the Lamb equations. Hutchinson (1983) pointed out the potential relevance of Mindlin's plate theory (1951) to AE. Pao (1982) reviewed Medick s (1961) classical plate theory for a point source, but rejected it as useful for AE and no one seems to have investigated its relevance to AE any further. Herein, a normal mode solution to the classical plate bending equation was investigated for its applicability to AE. The same source-time function chosen by Weaver and Pao is considered. However, arbitrary source and receiver positions are chosen relative to the boundaries of the plate. This is another advantage of the plate theory treatment in addition to its simplicity. The source does not have to be at the center of the plate as in the axisymmetric treatment. The plate is allowed to remain finite and reflections are predicted. The importance of this theory to AE is that it can handle finite plates, realistic boundary conditions, and can be extended to composite materials.

  7. The disease-linked Glu-26-Lys mutant version of Coronin 1A exhibits pleiotropic and pathway-specific signaling defects

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Virginia; Robles-Valero, Javier; Barreira, María; Bustelo, Xosé R.

    2015-01-01

    Coronin 1A (Coro1A) is involved in cytoskeletal and signaling events, including the regulation of Rac1 GTPase– and myosin II–dependent pathways. Mutations that generate truncated or unstable Coro1A proteins cause immunodeficiencies in both humans and rodents. However, in the case of the peripheral T-cell–deficient (Ptcd) mouse strain, the immunodeficiency is caused by a Glu-26-Lys mutation that targets a surface-exposed residue unlikely to affect the intramolecular architecture and stability of the protein. Here we report that this mutation induces pleiotropic effects in Coro1A protein, including the exacerbation of Coro1A-dependent actin-binding and -bundling activities; the formation of large meshworks of Coro1AE26K-decorated filaments endowed with unusual organizational, functional, and staining properties; and the elimination of Coro1A functions associated with both Rac1 and myosin II signaling. By contrast, it does not affect the ability of Coro1A to stimulate the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NF-AT). Coro1AE26K is not a dominant-negative mutant, indicating that its pathological effects are derived from the inability to rescue the complete loss of the wild-type counterpart in cells. These results indicate that Coro1AE26K behaves as either a recessive gain-of-function or loss-of-function mutant protein, depending on signaling context and presence of the wild-type counterpart in cells. PMID:26108624

  8. Global temperature constraints on Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus persistence and competence for dengue virus transmission

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is a disease that has undergone significant expansion over the past hundred years. Understanding what factors limit the distribution of transmission can be used to predict current and future limits to further dengue expansion. While not the only factor, temperature plays an important role in defining these limits. Previous attempts to analyse the effect of temperature on the geographic distribution of dengue have not considered its dynamic intra-annual and diurnal change and its cumulative effects on mosquito and virus populations. Methods Here we expand an existing modelling framework with new temperature-based relationships to model an index proportional to the basic reproductive number of the dengue virus. This model framework is combined with high spatial and temporal resolution global temperature data to model the effects of temperature on Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus persistence and competence for dengue virus transmission. Results Our model predicted areas where temperature is not expected to permit transmission and/or Aedes persistence throughout the year. By reanalysing existing experimental data our analysis indicates that Ae. albopictus, often considered a minor vector of dengue, has comparable rates of virus dissemination to its primary vector, Ae. aegypti, and when the longer lifespan of Ae. albopictus is considered its competence for dengue virus transmission far exceeds that of Ae. aegypti. Conclusions These results can be used to analyse the effects of temperature and other contributing factors on the expansion of dengue or its Aedes vectors. Our finding that Ae. albopictus has a greater capacity for dengue transmission than Ae. aegypti is contrary to current explanations for the comparative rarity of dengue transmission in established Ae. albopictus populations. This suggests that the limited capacity of Ae. albopictus to transmit DENV is more dependent on its ecology than vector competence. The recommendations, which we

  9. Aerosol absorption coefficient and Equivalent Black Carbon by parallel operation of AE31 and AE33 aethalometers at the Zeppelin station, Ny Ålesund, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleftheriadis, Konstantinos; Kalogridis, Athina-Cerise; Vratolis, Sterios; Fiebig, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Light absorbing carbon in atmospheric aerosol plays a critical role in radiative forcing and climate change. Despite the long term measurements across the Arctic, comparing data obtained by a variety of methods across stations requires caution. A method for extracting the aerosol absorption coefficient from data obtained over the decades by filter based instrument is still under development. An IASOA Aerosol working group has been initiated to address this and other cross-site aerosol comparison opportunities. Continuous ambient measurements of EBC/light attenuation by means of a Magee Sci. AE-31 aethalometer operating at the Zeppelinfjellet station (474 m asl; 78°54'N, 11°53'E), Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, have been available since 2001 (Eleftheriadis et al, 2009), while a new aethalometer model (AE33, Drinovec et al, 2014) has been installed to operate in parallel from the same inlet since June 2015. Measurements are recorded by a Labview routine collecting all available parameters reported by the two instrument via RS232 protocol. Data are reported at 1 and 10 minute intervals as averages for EBC (μg m-3) and aerosol absorption coefficients (Mm-1) by means of routine designed to report Near Real Time NRT data at the EBAS WDCA database (ebas.nilu.no) Results for the first 6 month period are reported here in an attempt to evaluate comparative performance of the two instruments in terms of their response with respect to the variable aerosol load of light absorbing carbon during the warm and cold seasons found in the high arctic. The application of available conversion schemes for obtaining the absorption coefficient by the two instruments is found to demonstrate a marked difference in their output. During clean periods of low aerosol load (EBC < 30 ng m-3), the two instruments display a better agreement with regression slope for the 880 nm signal between the two at ~ 0.9 compared to a slope at ~ 0.6 during the period of higher absorbing carbon loads (400< EBC<30 ng m

  10. 76 FR 1427 - AES Wind Generation, Inc. v. California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ... Transition Cluster. By this notice, the date for filing answers to the Motion for Stay is shortened to and...Support@ferc.gov , or call (866) 208-3676 (toll free). For TTY, call (202) 502-8659. Comment Date: 5...

  11. Application of microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) for environmental monitoring of industrially contaminated sites in Hyderabad city.

    PubMed

    Kamala C T; Balaram V; Dharmendra V; Satyanarayanan M; Subramanyam K S V; Krishnaiah A

    2014-11-01

    Recently introduced microwave plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (MP-AES) represents yet another and very important addition to the existing array of modern instrumental analytical techniques. In this study, an attempt is made to summarize the performance characteristics of MP-AES and its potential as an analytical tool for environmental studies with some practical examples from Patancheru and Uppal industrial sectors of Hyderabad city. A range of soil, sediment, water reference materials, particulate matter, and real-life samples were chosen to evaluate the performance of this new analytical technique. Analytical wavelengths were selected considering the interference effects of other concomitant elements present in different sample solutions. The detection limits for several elements were found to be in the range from 0.05 to 5 ng/g. The trace metals analyzed in both the sectors followed the topography with more pollution in the low-lying sites. The metal contents were found to be more in ground waters than surface waters. Since a decade, the pollutants are transfered from Patancheru industrial area to Musi River. After polluting Nakkavagu and turning huge tracts of agricultural lands barren besides making people residing along the rivulet impotent and sick, industrialists of Patancheru are shifting the effluents to downstream of Musi River through an 18-km pipeline from Patancheru. Since the effluent undergoes primary treatment at Common Effluent Treatment Plant (CETP) at Patanchru and travels through pipeline and mixes with sewage, the organic effluents will be diluted. But the inorganic pollutants such as heavy and toxic metals tend to accumulate in the environmental segments near and downstreams of Musi River. The data generated by MP-AES of toxic metals like Zn, Cu, and Cr in the ground and surface waters can only be attributed to pollution from Patancheru since no other sources are available to Musi River.

  12. Alantolactone induces apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells via reactive oxygen species generation, glutathione depletion and inhibition of the Bcl-2/Bax signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, YAN; XU, HANJIE; WANG, JIAFEI

    2016-01-01

    Alantolactone is the active ingredient in frankincense, and is extracted from the dry root of elecampane. It has a wide variety of uses, including as an insect repellent, antibacterial, antidiuretic, analgesic and anticancer agent. In addition, alantolactone induces apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells, however, its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study investigated whether alantolactone was able to induce apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells, and its potential mechanisms of action were analyzed. Treatment of HeLa cells with alantolactone (0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 µM) for 12 h significantly inhibited growth in a dose-dependent manner. Cells treated with 30 µM of alantolactone for 0, 3, 6 and 12 h demonstrated marked induction of apoptosis in a time-dependent manner. Treatment of HeLa cells with 30 µM of alantolactone for 0, 3, 6 and 12 h significantly induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibited glutathione (GSH) production in HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner. Alantolactone additionally markedly inhibited the Bcl-2/Bax signaling pathway in HeLa cells. Therefore, administration of alantolactone induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells via ROS generation, GSH depletion and inhibition of the Bcl-2/Bax signaling pathway. PMID:27313767

  13. NLRX1 accelerates cisplatin-induced ototoxity in HEI-OC1 cells via promoting generation of ROS and activation of JNK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Haiyan; Sun, Gaoying; Yang, Qianqian; Chen, Chen; Qi, Qi; Wang, Haibo; Li, Jianfeng

    2017-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing family member X1 (NLRX1), located in mitochondria, can recognize cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptors and is tightly related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial function, apoptosis and inflammation. The present study was designed to explore whether NLRX1 expresses in HEI-OC1 cells and, if so, to investigate the possible correlations between NLRX1 and cisplatin-induced ototoxity in vitro. Here, we report that NLRX1 was specifically localized to mitochondria in the cytoplasm of HEI-OC1 cells and its expression was increased concurrent with the increase of ROS production and occurrence of apoptosis in HEI-OC1 cells in response to cisplatin stimulus. NLRX1 overexpression led to a higher apoptosis in HEI-OC1 cells treated with cisplatin, whereas, NLRX silencing decreased cisplatin induced apoptosis. Mechanistic studies showed that NLRX1 activated mitochondrial apoptosis pathway as well as promoted ROS generation and JNK activation. Either inhibition of ROS generation or JNK signaling significantly prevented NLRX1-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis in HEI-OC1cells. In addition, NLRX1 expression was confirmed in cochlear explants. The findings from this work reveal that NLRX1 sensitizes HEI-OC1 cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis via activation of ROS/JNK signaling pathway, suggesting that NLRX1 acts as an important regulator of the cisplatin-elicited ototoxity. PMID:28287190

  14. Active phenomena in the pre-main sequence Herbig Ae star HD 163296

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catala, C.; Praderie, F.; Simon, T.; Talavera, A.; The, P. S.

    1989-01-01

    Observations by IUE of the short-term variability of the Mg II and Ca II resonance lines in the Herbig Ae star HD 163296 are presented. Evidence that these lines show a phenomenon of rotational modulation, similar to the one observed in AB Aur, another Herbig Ae star is found. The variations in the spectrum of HD 163296 are even more conspicuous than in the spectrum of AB Aur. Magnetically structured winds may thus be a widespread phenomenon among the pre-main sequence Herbig Ae/Be stars.

  15. Automated Estimating System (AES): Version 6.1: User`s manual. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.K.; Holder, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    This document describes Version 6.1 of the Automated Estimating System (AES), a personal computer-based software package. The AES is designed to aid in the creation, updating, and reporting of project cost estimates for the Estimating and Scheduling Engineering Department of Central Engineering Services of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems,Inc. AES provides formatted input screens to guide the user through the estimate creation/update process and provides several standardized reports that allow cost to be sorted and summarized in many different formats and at several levels of aggregation.

  16. Automated Estimating System (AES) version 6.0 - user`s manual. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, D.A.; Schwarz, R.K.

    1994-06-01

    This document describes Version 6.0 of the Automated Estimating System (AES), a personal computer-based software package. The AES is designed to aid in the creation, updating, and reporting of project cost estimates for the Estimating and Scheduling Engineering Department of Central Engineering Services of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. AES provides formatted input screens to guide the user through the estimate creation/update process and provides several standardized reports that allow cost to be sorted and summarized in many different formats and at several levels of aggregation.

  17. Application of TURBO-AE to Flutter Prediction: Aeroelastic Code Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyniak, Daniel; Simons, Todd A.; Stefko, George (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The TURBO-AE program has been evaluated by comparing the obtained results to cascade rig data and to prediction made from various in-house programs. A high-speed fan cascade, a turbine cascade, a turbine cascade and a fan geometry that shower flutter in torsion mode were analyzed. The steady predictions for the high-speed fan cascade showed the TURBO-AE predictions to match in-house codes. However, the predictions did not match the measured blade surface data. Other researchers also reported similar disagreement with these data set. Unsteady runs for the fan configuration were not successful using TURBO-AE .

  18. Cross-correlation analysis of the AE index and the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, C.-I.; Tsurutani, B.; Kawasaki, K.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1973-01-01

    A cross-correlation study between magnetospheric activity (the AE index) and the southward-directed component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is made for a total of 792 hours (33 days) with a time resolution of about 5.5 min. The peak correlation tends to occur when the interplanetary data are shifted approximately 40 min later with respect to the AE index data. Cross-correlation analysis is conducted on some idealized wave forms to illustrate that this delay between southward turning of the IMF and the AE index should not be interpreted as being the duration of the growth phase.

  19. Can Technology Capture the Signals That Certain Sites May Be Generating Electromagnetically, Which Some Traditional Cultures May Have Incorporated Into Their World-views?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedge, Jonathan S.; Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2002-10-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) signals may be associated with certain "artifacts" of N.E., such as N.H.'s "Old Man of the Mountain," or its possible "equivalents," as on the Penley Hill ledge at Mexico, ME, or the "enhanced" smaller versions at Mashamocket Brook State Park, CT, Potato Cave at Acton, MA, and especially a site in Lowell, MA, which may date to AD1069. Without physical evidence, they could be dismissed as figments of the imagination. Can electromagnetic signals be correlated with the Lowell site, which RDM observed as it tipped over a 27" TV set? It seems to generate somewhat periodic signals and may stimulate certain nerve endings, like the Psychiatrist Guirdham's "pins and needles," and could evoke "tinnitus." Can solenoids detect "elastic" EMFs "breaking and reconnecting" as hypothesized by RDM, where EMF lines may be running from the equivalent of "N" to "S" rotating poles? Is there a physical correlation with psychophysically detected phenomena, with cultural, religious, and historic implications on a worldwide basis?

  20. Ae2Sb2X4F2 (Ae = Sr, Ba): new members of the homologous series Ae2M(1+n)X(3+n)F2 designed from rock salt and fluorite 2D building blocks.

    PubMed

    Kabbour, Houria; Cario, Laurent

    2006-03-20

    We have designed new compounds within the homologous series Ae2F2M(1+n)X(3+n) (Ae = Sr, Ba; M = main group metal; n = integer) built up from the stacking of 2D building blocks of rock salt and fluorite types. By incrementally increasing the size of the rock salt 2D building blocks, we have obtained two new n = 1 members of this homologous series, namely, Sr2F2Sb2Se4 and Ba2F2Sb2Se4. We then succeeded in synthesizing these compounds using a high-temperature ceramic method. The structure refinements from the powder or single-crystal X-ray diffraction data confirmed presence of the expected alternating stacking of fluorite [Ae2F2] (Ae = Sr, Ba) and rock salt [Sb2Se4] 2D building blocks. However the Ba derivative shows a strong distortion of the [Sb2Se4] block and a concomitant change of the Sb atom coordination likely related to the lone-pair activity.