Science.gov

Sample records for ae signals generated

  1. AE 941.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    AE 941 [Arthrovas, Neoretna, Psovascar] is shark cartilage extract that inhibits angiogenesis. AE 941 acts by blocking the two main pathways that contribute to the process of angiogenesis, matrix metalloproteases and the vascular endothelial growth factor signalling pathway. When initial development of AE 941 was being conducted, AEterna assigned the various indications different trademarks. Neovastat was used for oncology, Psovascar was used for dermatology, Neoretna was used for ophthalmology and Arthrovas was used for rheumatology. However, it is unclear if these trademarks will be used in the future and AEterna appears to only be using the Neovastat trademark in its current publications regardless of the indication. AEterna Laboratories signed commercialisation agreements with Grupo Ferrer Internacional SA of Spain and Medac GmbH of Germany in February 2001. Under the terms of the agreement, AEterna has granted exclusive commercialisation and distribution rights to AE 941 in oncology to Grupo Ferrer Internacional for the Southern European countries of France, Belgium, Spain, Greece, Portugal and Italy. It also has rights in Central and South America. Medac GmbH will have marketing rights in Germany, the UK, Scandinavia, Switzerland, Austria, Ireland, the Netherlands and Eastern Europe. In October 2002, AEterna Laboratories announced that it had signed an agreement with Australian healthcare products and services company Mayne Group for marketing AE 941 (as Neovastat) in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and Mexico. In March 2003, AEterna Laboratories announced it has signed an agreement with Korean based LG Life Sciences Ltd for marketing AE 941 (as Neovastat) in South Korea. The agreement provides AEterna with upfront and milestone payments, as well as a return on manufacturing and sales of AE 941. AEterna Laboratories had granted Alcon Laboratories an exclusive worldwide licence for AE 941 for ophthalmic products. However, this licence has been terminated. In

  2. Correlation of laser ablation plasma emission with ICP-AES signal intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, A.J.; Mao, X.L.; Shannon, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    Laser ablation offers many favorable characteristics for direct solid sample chemical analysis. However, the technique usually provides poor precision in comparison to solution nebulization. The primary contributor to this imprecision is the irreproducibility of the laser material interaction. This paper describes a technique for monitoring changes in the laser material interaction directly, and using these data to improve inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Simultaneous measurements of the spectral emission intensity in the laser-induced plasma (LIP) and the ICP-AES were made under different power density conditions. The LIP spatial profile and excitation temperature was measured. The data from the LIP show a strong correlation with ICP-AES signal intensity. Both emission signals increase linearly with the laser power density (log-log) and show a change in the slope for different spot sizes and laser powers. These results support the occurrence of two different ablation mechanisms, a less efficient interaction dominating at the higher power densities (> 1 GW/cm2) and a more efficient interaction in the lower power density regimes. The benefits of using simultaneous monitoring of the laser induced plasma for chemical analysis by ICP-AES will be discussed.

  3. Gastrin inhibits a novel, pathological colon cancer signaling pathway involving EGR1, AE2 and P-ERK

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ling-Jun; Liu, Rui-Jun; Zeng, Zhi; Alper, Seth L.; Cui, Heng-Jing; Lu, Yang; Zheng, Lin; Yan, Zhao-Wen; Fu, Guo-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Human anion exchanger 2 (AE2) is a plasma membrane protein that regulates intracellular pH and cell volume. AE2 contributes to transepithelial transport of chloride and bicarbonate in normal colon and other epithelial tissues. We now report that AE2 overexpression in colon cancer cells is correlated with expression of the nuclear proliferation marker, Ki67. Survival analysis of 24 patients with colon cancer in early stage or 33 patients with tubular adenocarcinoma demonstrated that expression of AE2 is correlated with poor prognosis. Cellular and molecular experiments indicated that AE2 expression promoted proliferation of colon cancer cells. In addition, we found that transcription factor EGR1 underlies AE2 upregulation, and the AE2 sequester p16INK4a (P16) in the cytoplasm of colon cancer cells. Cytoplasmic P16 enhanced ERK phosphorylation and promoted proliferation of colon cancer cells. Gastrin inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells by suppressing expression of EGR1 and AE2 and by blocking ERK phosphorylation. Taken together, our data describe a novel EGR1/AE2/P16/P-ERK signaling pathway in colon carcinogenesis, with implications for pathologic prognosis and for novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:22228178

  4. Electronic signal generators: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Electronic signal generator data based on solid state concepts were simplified or refined to meet requirements, such as reliability, simplicity, fail-safe characteristics, and the capability of withstanding environmental extremes. Pulse generators, high voltage pulse generators, oscillators, analog signal generators, square wave signal generators, and special function signal generators are described.

  5. Tailpulse signal generator

    DOEpatents

    Baker, John; Archer, Daniel E.; Luke, Stanley John; Decman, Daniel J.; White, Gregory K.

    2009-06-23

    A tailpulse signal generating/simulating apparatus, system, and method designed to produce electronic pulses which simulate tailpulses produced by a gamma radiation detector, including the pileup effect caused by the characteristic exponential decay of the detector pulses, and the random Poisson distribution pulse timing for radioactive materials. A digital signal process (DSP) is programmed and configured to produce digital values corresponding to pseudo-randomly selected pulse amplitudes and pseudo-randomly selected Poisson timing intervals of the tailpulses. Pulse amplitude values are exponentially decayed while outputting the digital value to a digital to analog converter (DAC). And pulse amplitudes of new pulses are added to decaying pulses to simulate the pileup effect for enhanced realism in the simulation.

  6. Multiple source navigation signal generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojda, Petr

    2010-09-01

    The paper presents a FPGA based digital VOR/LOC signal generator. It provides the composite signal, which consists of the particular signals of several predefined navigation sources - VOR beacons. Design of the generator is implemented into the two different FPGA DSP platforms.

  7. Chirp signal generator feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chomiki, M.; Genauzeau, F.

    1983-03-01

    The feasibility of a signal generator with 100 microsec temporal dispersion, and 330 MHz frequency dispersion, for the ERS-1 (ESA satellite) radar altimeter, with a solid state transmitter, is demonstrated. Two surface wave dispersive filters (20 and 80 microsec dispersion) are cascaded with a frequency multiplier to give a 900 MHz output signal. The first filter receives an impulse which ensures an output signal to noise ratio 20 dB. The chirp signal output level is 0 dBm; amplitude fluctuation 2 dBcc, phase error compared with theory 10 deg rms; short term jitter 100 psec. The generator model occupies 0.5 l, and consumes 7 W.

  8. Evaluation of Generation Mechanism of Vertical Cracks in Top Coat of TBCs During APS Deposition by Laser AE Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, K.; Kuriki, H.; Araki, H.; Kuroda, S.; Enoki, M.

    2015-06-01

    Vertical cracks can be generated in the top coat of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). Since they are known to improve the durability of TBCs such as in the case of dense vertically cracked TBC, clarification of the mechanism and the criteria of cracking are very important. In this study, generation of such vertical cracks was monitored during APS process by laser acoustic emission (AE) method, which is an in situ, non-contact, and non-destructive technique. Temperature was also monitored inside and on the surface of a specimen during APS process for estimation of the temperature field in the top coat. Results of the AE and temperature monitoring were combined to evaluate the relationship between cracking and thermal stress in the top coat. Most of the AE events due to the generation of vertical cracks were detected during rapid heating of the surface of the top coat by the heat flux from the torch. It showed that the vertical cracks were induced due to the tensile stress caused by the temperature difference in the top coat from the rapid heating. Furthermore, the estimated critical thermal stress for vertical cracking from the monitoring results was consistent with a previously reported strength of YSZ coating deposited by thermal spray.

  9. Loss of the AE3 Cl−/HCO−3 exchanger in mice affects rate-dependent inotropy and stress-related AKT signaling in heart

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N.; Lasko, Valerie M.; Nieman, Michelle L.; Al Moamen, Nabeel J.; Shull, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    Cl−/HCO−3 exchangers are expressed abundantly in cardiac muscle, suggesting that HCO−3 extrusion serves an important function in heart. Mice lacking Anion Exchanger Isoform 3 (AE3), a major cardiac Cl−/HCO−3 exchanger, appear healthy, but loss of AE3 causes decompensation in a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) model. Using intra-ventricular pressure analysis, in vivo pacing, and molecular studies we identified physiological and biochemical changes caused by loss of AE3 that may contribute to decompensation in HCM. AE3-null mice had normal cardiac contractility under basal conditions and after β-adrenergic stimulation, but pacing of hearts revealed that frequency-dependent inotropy was blunted, suggesting that AE3-mediated HCO−3 extrusion is required for a robust force-frequency response (FFR) during acute biomechanical stress in vivo. Modest changes in expression of proteins that affect Ca2+-handling were observed, but Ca2+-transient analysis of AE3-null myocytes showed normal twitch-amplitude and Ca2+-clearance. Phosphorylation and expression of several proteins implicated in HCM and FFR, including phospholamban (PLN), myosin binding protein C, and troponin I were not altered in hearts of paced AE3-null mice; however, phosphorylation of Akt, which plays a central role in mechanosensory signaling, was significantly higher in paced AE3-null hearts than in wild-type controls and phosphorylation of AMPK, which is affected by Akt and is involved in energy metabolism and some cases of HCM, was reduced. These data show loss of AE3 leads to impaired rate-dependent inotropy, appears to affect mechanical stress-responsive signaling, and reduces activation of AMPK, which may contribute to decompensation in heart failure. PMID:24427143

  10. The AE9/AP9/SPM Next Generation Radiation Specification Models - Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul; Johnston, William Robert; Huston, Stuart; Guild, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    The AE9/AP9/SPM model has now been released to the global satellite design community, with a recent update to version 1.2. We are working on incorporating new data sources, such as AZUR and NASA's Van Allen Probes, while also addressing critiques raised by the science and engineering communities. In particular, we are investigating discrepancies for protons at low altitude and electrons at geostationary altitudes. Finally, we are scoping out architectural improvements to enable features requested by industry: improved stitching between the plasma and radiation models, local time dependence in the plasma model, longitude dependence in the electron radiation model, and solar cycle variation in the low altitude protons. We provide a brief update on the status of the model, discrepancy investigations, and plans for the future.

  11. Do earthquakes generate EM signals?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Christina; Onacha, Stephen; Malin, Peter; Shalev, Eylon; Lucas, Alan

    2010-05-01

    In recent years there has been significant interest in the seismoelectric effect which is the conversion of acoustic energy into electromagnetic energy. At the onset of the earthquake and at layer interfaces, it is postulated that the seismoelectric signal propagates at the speed of light and thus travels much faster than the acoustic wave. The focus has mainly been to use this method as a tool of predicting earthquakes. Our main objective is to study the possibility of using the seismoelectric effect to determine the origin time of an earthquake, establish an accurate velocity model and accurately locate microearthquakes. Another aspect of this research is to evaluate the possibility of detecting porous zones where seismic activity is postulated to generate fluid movement through porous medium. The displacement of pore fluid relative to the porous medium solid grains generates electromagnetic signals. The Institute of Earth Science and Engineering (IESE) has installed electromagnetic coils in 3 different areas to investigate the seismoelectric effect. Two of the research areas (Krafla in Iceland and Wairakei in New Zealand) are in active geothermal fields where high microearthquake activity has been recorded. The other area of research is at the site of the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) at Parkfield area on the active San Andreas Fault which is associated with repeating earthquakes. In the Wairakei and Parkfield cases a single borehole electromagnetic coil close to borehole seismometers has been used whereas in the Krafla study area, 3 borehole electromagnetic coils coupled to borehole seismometers have been used. The technical difficulties of working in the borehole environment mean that some of these deployments had a short life span. Nevertheless in all cases data was gathered and is being analysed. At the SAFOD site, the electromagnetic coil recorded seismoelectric signals very close to a magnitude 2 earthquake. In the Wairakei and Krafla

  12. A Novel HIV-1 Second-Generation Recombinant Form (CRF01_AE/07_BC) Among Heterosexuals in Nei Monggoi Autonomous Region in China.

    PubMed

    An, Minghui; Han, Xiaoxu; Zhao, Bin; Xu, Junjie; Chu, Zhenxing; Shang, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Increasing second-generation recombinant forms (CRF01_AE/07_BC) have been detected in China recently. Here, we isolated a novel CRF01_AE/07_BC second-generation recombinant form in HIV-1-positive Nei Monggoi's heterosexuals with one CRF07_BC inserted into the CRF01_AE backbone. Polygenetic analyses showed that the CRF01_AE region was grouped with the previously reported cluster 5 lineage, which spreads among the sexual population in north of China, inferring that this recombinant event occurred through heterosexual contact in the north of China possibly. The growing emergence of recombinant forms means coexistence of multiple strains and complexity of the HIV-1 epidemic, which reminds us of the urgent necessity to focus the HIV surveillance among the high-risk populations nationwide in China, particularly to enhance preventive measures in HIV-1 low-prevalence areas. PMID:27018546

  13. Microcontrollers Generate Timing Signals For CCD Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hostetter, Marilyn K.; Mccloskey, John C.; Reed, Kenneth V.

    1992-01-01

    Microcontrollers generate timing signals for charge-coupled-device array detectors in electronic system developed to test such detectors. With microcontroller, one changes timing signals via software, without changes in wiring. Approach more flexible, timing signals changed easier and quicker.

  14. Configurable Signal Generator Implemented on Tricore Microcontrollers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, M.; Silea, I.; Banea, M.

    Most of the electronic measurements laboratories need signal generators capable to generate several types of signals with different shapes, frequencies and amplitudes. Unfortunately the more versatile such a signal generator will be the higher its cost will be. The alternative is the PC based instrumentation. There are classical tools, as Lab VIEW, but sometimes a better approach is to develop a PC based instrumentation system targeted to one or few of the electronic measurement operations.

  15. Study of Randomness in AES Ciphertexts Produced by Randomly Generated S-Boxes and S-Boxes with Various Modulus and Additive Constant Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Suman; Sadique Uz Zaman, J. K. M.; Ghosh, Ranjan

    2016-06-01

    In Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), the standard S-Box is conventionally generated by using a particular irreducible polynomial {11B} in GF(28) as the modulus and a particular additive constant polynomial {63} in GF(2), though it can be generated by many other polynomials. In this paper, it has been shown that it is possible to generate secured AES S-Boxes by using some other selected modulus and additive polynomials and also can be generated randomly, using a PRNG like BBS. A comparative study has been made on the randomness of corresponding AES ciphertexts generated, using these S-Boxes, by the NIST Test Suite coded for this paper. It has been found that besides using the standard one, other moduli and additive constants are also able to generate equally or better random ciphertexts; the same is true for random S-Boxes also. As these new types of S-Boxes are user-defined, hence unknown, they are able to prevent linear and differential cryptanalysis. Moreover, they act as additional key-inputs to AES, thus increasing the key-space.

  16. Study of Randomness in AES Ciphertexts Produced by Randomly Generated S-Boxes and S-Boxes with Various Modulus and Additive Constant Polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Suman; Sadique Uz Zaman, J. K. M.; Ghosh, Ranjan

    2014-12-01

    In Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), the standard S-Box is conventionally generated by using a particular irreducible polynomial {11B} in GF(28) as the modulus and a particular additive constant polynomial {63} in GF(2), though it can be generated by many other polynomials. In this paper, it has been shown that it is possible to generate secured AES S-Boxes by using some other selected modulus and additive polynomials and also can be generated randomly, using a PRNG like BBS. A comparative study has been made on the randomness of corresponding AES ciphertexts generated, using these S-Boxes, by the NIST Test Suite coded for this paper. It has been found that besides using the standard one, other moduli and additive constants are also able to generate equally or better random ciphertexts; the same is true for random S-Boxes also. As these new types of S-Boxes are user-defined, hence unknown, they are able to prevent linear and differential cryptanalysis. Moreover, they act as additional key-inputs to AES, thus increasing the key-space.

  17. Signal conditioning, the next generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penharlow, David

    This paper describes recent advances in signal conditioning techiques used on flight test programs, which were achieved due to the availability to the electronic designer of new or improved analog and digital monolithic devices. These changes were driven by the design of new sensors, the architecture of the data acquisition systems, and by the vehicle type and design. The paper considers how each of these factors influenced the signal conditioning equipment and discusses new technology introduced, such as hybridized signal conditioners, amplifier-filter products, the self-balancing amplifier, and automatic gain ranging amplifiers.

  18. Electric signals generated by tornados

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeman, John R.; Schmitter, Ernst D.

    2009-04-01

    Severe weather events generate electrical phenomena beyond those related to lightning discharges. In the present letter we suggest that as precipitation like rain, hail stones, and dirt move in the thunderstorm they generate an electrical signature that is characteristic for the rotation properties of the associated storm. A case study is offered which clearly demonstrates that this electrical signature is present and detectable, though it is quite weak. It can be observed that as the speed of rotation increases and diameter decreases the emitted frequency increases as would be anticipated. Comparison to synchronous radar, surface and visual data suggest that developing tornadoes in this way can be detected earlier than currently feasible weather surveillance radars.

  19. Identification of Novel Recombinant Forms of Hepatitis B Virus Generated from Genotypes Ae and G in HIV-1-Positive Japanese Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yoko; Kawahata, Takuya; Mori, Haruyo; Furubayashi, Keiichi; Taniguchi, Yasushi; Itoda, Ichiro; Komano, Jun

    2015-07-01

    The rare hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype G (HBV/G) coinfects HIV-1-positive individuals along with HBV/A and generates recombinants. However, the circulation of HBV A/G recombinants remains poorly understood. This molecular epidemiologic study examined HBV A/G recombinants in Japanese HIV-1-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). Initially, blood specimens submitted for confirmatory tests of HIV infection in Osaka and Tokyo, Japan, from 2006 to 2013 were examined for HIV-1, and HIV-1-positive specimens were screened for HBV. Among 817 specimens from HIV-1-positive individuals, HBsAg was detected in 59 specimens; of these, HBV/Ae (alternatively A2), a subgenotype of HBV/A prevalent in Europe and North America, was identified in 70.2%, HBV/C in 17.5%, and HBV/G in 10.5%, and HBV/E in 1.8% according to the core gene sequence. The full-length genome analysis of HBV was performed on HBV/G-positive specimens because some HBV A/G recombinants were historically overlooked by genotyping based on a partial genome analysis. It revealed that five of the specimens contained novel Ae/G recombinants, the core gene of which had a high sequence similarity to HBV/G. Detailed analyses showed that novel recombinants were coinfected with HBV/Ae in a recombinant-dominant fashion. No major drug-resistant mutations were found in the newly identified HBV Ae/G recombinants. Some of the individuals asymptomatically coinfected with HIV/HBV suffered mild liver injury. This study demonstrated that novel Ae/G HBV recombinants were identified in Japanese HIV-1-positive MSM. The pathogenicity of novel HBV Ae/G recombinants should be examined in a future longitudinal study. Surveillance of such viruses in HIV-1-positive individuals should be emphasized. PMID:25825936

  20. Identification of Novel Recombinant Forms of Hepatitis B Virus Generated from Genotypes Ae and G in HIV-1-Positive Japanese Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Kawahata, Takuya; Mori, Haruyo; Furubayashi, Keiichi; Taniguchi, Yasushi; Itoda, Ichiro; Komano, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The rare hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype G (HBV/G) coinfects HIV-1-positive individuals along with HBV/A and generates recombinants. However, the circulation of HBV A/G recombinants remains poorly understood. This molecular epidemiologic study examined HBV A/G recombinants in Japanese HIV-1-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). Initially, blood specimens submitted for confirmatory tests of HIV infection in Osaka and Tokyo, Japan, from 2006 to 2013 were examined for HIV-1, and HIV-1-positive specimens were screened for HBV. Among 817 specimens from HIV-1-positive individuals, HBsAg was detected in 59 specimens; of these, HBV/Ae (alternatively A2), a subgenotype of HBV/A prevalent in Europe and North America, was identified in 70.2%, HBV/C in 17.5%, and HBV/G in 10.5%, and HBV/E in 1.8% according to the core gene sequence. The full-length genome analysis of HBV was performed on HBV/G-positive specimens because some HBV A/G recombinants were historically overlooked by genotyping based on a partial genome analysis. It revealed that five of the specimens contained novel Ae/G recombinants, the core gene of which had a high sequence similarity to HBV/G. Detailed analyses showed that novel recombinants were coinfected with HBV/Ae in a recombinant-dominant fashion. No major drug-resistant mutations were found in the newly identified HBV Ae/G recombinants. Some of the individuals asymptomatically coinfected with HIV/HBV suffered mild liver injury. This study demonstrated that novel Ae/G HBV recombinants were identified in Japanese HIV-1-positive MSM. The pathogenicity of novel HBV Ae/G recombinants should be examined in a future longitudinal study. Surveillance of such viruses in HIV-1-positive individuals should be emphasized. PMID:25825936

  1. Genomic Characterization of a Novel HIV-1 Second-Generation Recombinant Form Originated from CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC in Dali Prefecture of Yunnan Province, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianjian; Li, Lin; Li, Huiqin; Li, Jingyun; Yang, Shaomin; Zhang, Mi; Ouyang, Hongmei

    2016-06-01

    Yunnan seems to be a "hot spot" region of HIV-1 recombination. CRF01_AE and subtype CRF08_BC are two main HIV-1 clades circulating in Yunnan. We report here a novel HIV-1 second-generation recombinant form originated from CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC. The strain (12YN10551) was isolated from a HIV-positive male infected through heterosexual contact in Dali prefecture of Yunnan province, China. This is the first report of HIV-1 near full-length genomic sequence in Dali. Recombinant analysis shows that 12YN10551 was composed of two well-established circulating recombinant forms (CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC). Two CRF01_AE recombinant fragments were inserted into the CRF08_BC backbone genome in the pol/vif/vpr/tat/rev and nef gene regions, respectively. The discovery and characterization of this new recombinant indicate that intersubtype recombination is continuously generating new forms of HIV-1. More work is needed to better monitor the genetic diversity of HIV-1 in this region. PMID:26885777

  2. Apparatus for millimeter-wave signal generation

    DOEpatents

    Vawter, G. Allen; Hietala, Vincent M.; Zolper, John C.; Mar, Alan; Hohimer, John P.

    1999-01-01

    An opto-electronic integrated circuit (OEIC) apparatus is disclosed for generating an electrical signal at a frequency .gtoreq.10 GHz. The apparatus, formed on a single substrate, includes a semiconductor ring laser for generating a continuous train of mode-locked lasing pulses and a high-speed photodetector for detecting the train of lasing pulses and generating the electrical signal therefrom. Embodiments of the invention are disclosed with an active waveguide amplifier coupling the semiconductor ring laser and the high-speed photodetector. The invention has applications for use in OEICs and millimeter-wave monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs).

  3. A magnetoelectric composite based signal generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetisov, Y. K.; Serov, V. N.; Fetisov, L. Y.; Makovkin, S. A.; Viehland, D.; Srinivasan, G.

    2016-05-01

    Self-oscillations in an active loop consisting of a wide-band amplifier and a magnetoelectric composite in the feedback circuit have been observed. The composite with a ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate bimorph and ferromagnetic Metglas serves as a resonator that determines the frequency of oscillations and provides the feedback voltage. Under amplitude balance and phase matching conditions, the device generated signals at 2.3 kHz, at the bending resonance frequency of the composite. The oscillations were observed over a specific range of magnetic bias H. The shape of the signal generated is dependent on electrical circuit parameters and magnitude and orientation of H.

  4. Test signal generation for analog circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdiek, B.; Mathis, W.

    2003-05-01

    In this paper a new test signal generation approach for general analog circuits based on the variational calculus and modern control theory methods is presented. The computed transient test signals also called test stimuli are optimal with respect to the detection of a given fault set by means of a predefined merit functional representing a fault detection criterion. The test signal generation problem of finding optimal test stimuli detecting all faults form the fault set is formulated as an optimal control problem. The solution of the optimal control problem representing the test stimuli is computed using an optimization procedure. The optimization procedure is based on the necessary conditions for optimality like the maximum principle of Pontryagin and adjoint circuit equations.

  5. Feature extraction method of bearing AE signal based on improved FAST-ICA and wavelet packet energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Long; Li, Cheng Wei; Guo, Song Lin; Su, Xun Wen

    2015-10-01

    In order to accomplish the feature extraction from a mixed fault signal of bearings, this paper proposes a feature extraction method based on the improved Fast-ICA algorithm and the wavelet packet energy spectrum. The conventional fast-ICA algorithm can only separate the mixed signals, while the convergence speed is relatively slow and the convergence effect is not sufficient. The method of the third-order Newton iteration is adopted in this paper to improve the Fast-ICA algorithm. Moreover, the improved Fast-ICA algorithm is confirmed to have a faster convergence speed and higher precision than the conventional Fast-ICA algorithm. The improved Fast-ICA algorithm is applied to separate the acoustic emission signal in which two kinds of fault components are comprised. The wavelet packet energy spectrum is used to extract the feature information in the separated samples. In addition, the fault diagnosis is performed based on the SVM algorithm. It is confirmed that the slight damage and fracture of a bearing can accurately be recognized. The results show that the improved FAST-ICA and wavelet packet energy method in feature extraction is sufficiently effective.

  6. The correlation dimension: A robust chaotic feature for classifying acoustic emission signals generated in construction materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacimi, S.; Laurens, S.

    2009-07-01

    In the field of acoustic emission (AE) source recognition, this paper presents a classification feature based on the paradigm of nonlinear dynamical systems, often referred to as chaos theory. The approach considers signals as time series expressing an underlying dynamical phenomenon and enclosing all the information regarding the dynamics. The scientific knowledge on nonlinear dynamical systems has considerably improved for the past 40 years. The dynamical behavior is analyzed in the phase space, which is the space generated by the state variables of the system. The time evolution of a system is expressed in the phase space by trajectories, and the asymptotic behavior of trajectories defines a space area which is referred to as a system attractor. Dynamical systems may be characterized by the topological properties of attractors, such as the correlation dimension, which is a fractal dimension. According to Takens theorem, even if the system is not clearly defined, it is possible to infer topological information about the attractor from experimental observations. Such a method, which is called phase space reconstruction, was successfully applied for the classification of acoustic emission waveforms propagating in more or less complex materials such as granite and concrete. Laboratory tests were carried out in order to collect numerous AE waveforms from various controlled acoustic sources. Then, each signal was processed to extract a reconstructed attractor from which the correlation dimension was computed. The first results of this research show that the correlation dimension assessed after phase space reconstruction is very relevant and robust for classifying AE signals. These promising results may be explained by the fact that the totality of the signal is used to achieve classifying information. Moreover, due to the self-similar nature of attractors, the correlation dimension, and thus a correlation dimension-based classification approach, is theoretically

  7. Acoustic emissions (AE) during failure of granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    The release of shallow landslides and other geological mass movements is the result of progressive failure accumulation. Mechanical failure in disordered geologic materials occurs in intermittent breakage episodes marking the disintegration or rearrangement of load-bearing elements. Abrupt strain energy release in such breakage episodes is associated with generation of elastic waves measurable as high-frequency (kHz range) acoustic emissions (AE). The close association of AE with progressive failure events hold a promise for using such noninvasive methods to assess the mechanical state of granular Earth materials or for the development early warning methods for shallow landslides. We present numerical simulations that incorporate damage accumulation and associated stress redistribution using a fiber-bundle model. The stress released from element failure (fibers) is redistributed to the surrounding elements and eventually triggers larger failure avalanches. AE signals generated from such events and eventually hitting a virtual sensor are modeled using visco-elastic wave propagation laws. The model captures the characteristic saw-tooth shape of the observed stress-strain curves obtained from strain-controlled experiments with glass beads, including large intermittent stress release events that stem from cascading failure avalanches. The model also reproduces characteristics of AE signatures and yield a good agreement between simulation results and experimental data. Linking mechanical and AE information in the proposed modeling framework offer a solid basis for interpretation of measured field data.

  8. Near full-length genome sequence of a novel HIV type 1 second-generation recombinant form (CRF01_AE/CRF07_BC) identified among men who have sex with men in Jilin, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingguang; Ning, Chuanyi; He, Xiang; Yang, Yao; Xing, Hui; Hong, Kunxue; Shao, Yiming; Yang, Rongge

    2013-12-01

    We report here a novel HIV-1 second-generation recombinant form (CRF01_AE/CRF07_BC) composed of CRF01_AE and CRF07_BC, identified among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jilin, with four breakpoints observed in the pol, vif, and vpr genes. The CRF01_AE regions of the recombinant were clustered with the CRF01_AE lineage, which is mainly circulating among MSM in northern China, with the support of 100% bootstrap value, indicating that the parental origin of the CRF01_AE regions was from MSM, in which recombination events may be more likely to occur. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detection of a novel HIV-1 second-generation recombinant form (CRF01AE/CRF07_BC) in Jilin, which indicates active transmission networks of HIV-1 infection among MSM in the region. Therefore, it is necessary to continue monitoring the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 among MSM in Jilin to obtain a better understanding of the transmission and potential public health impact of HIV-1 among MSM in the region. PMID:23809010

  9. Acoustic signals generated in inclined granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Danielle S.; Jenkins, James T.; Keast, Stephen C.; Sachse, Wolfgang H.

    2015-10-01

    Spontaneous avalanching in specific deserts produces a low-frequency sound known as "booming." This creates a puzzle, because avalanches down the face of a dune result in collisions between sand grains that occur at much higher frequencies. Reproducing this phenomenon in the laboratory permits a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms for the generation of such lower frequency acoustic emissions, which may also be relevant to other dry granular flows. Here we report measurements of low-frequency acoustical signals, produced by dried "sounding" sand (sand capable of booming in the desert) flowing down an inclined chute. The amplitude of the signal diminishes over time but reappears upon drying of the sand. We show that the presence of this sound in the experiments may provide supporting evidence for a previously published "waveguide" explanation for booming. Also, we propose a model based on kinetic theory for a sheared inclined flow in which the flowing layer exhibits "breathing" modes superimposed on steady shearing. The predicted oscillation frequency is of a similar order of magnitude as the measurements, indicating that small perturbations can sustain oscillations of a low frequency. However, the frequency is underestimated, which indicates that the stiffness has been underestimated. Also, the model predicts a discrete spectrum of frequencies, instead of the broadband spectrum measured experimentally.

  10. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  11. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  12. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  13. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  14. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  15. Generating strain signals under consideration of road surface profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, T. E.; Abdullah, S.; Schramm, D.; Nuawi, M. Z.; Bruckmann, T.

    2015-08-01

    The current study aimed to develop the mechanism for generating strain signal utilising computer-based simulation. The strain data, caused by the acceleration, were undertaken from a fatigue data acquisition involving car movements. Using a mathematical model, the measured strain signals yielded to acceleration data used to describe the bumpiness of road surfaces. The acceleration signals were considered as an external disturbance on generating strain signals. Based on this comparison, both the actual and simulated strain data have similar pattern. The results are expected to provide new knowledge to generate a strain signal via a simulation.

  16. The state of adverse event reporting and signal generation of dietary supplements in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung Sik; Kwon, Oran

    2010-06-01

    One of the most important objectives of post-marketing monitoring of dietary supplements is the early detection of unknown and unexpected adverse events (AEs). Since 2006, the Korea Food & Drug Administration (KFDA) has established an AE monitoring system for dietary supplements with emphases on the facilitation of AE reporting from consumers, the creation of a new database for aggregating information from multiple sources, and the proposition of appropriate tools for analyzing the likelihood that a product or an ingredient caused an adverse reaction. During the 3-year period from 2006 through 2008, 1430 AE reports had been collected from consumers and 222 AE reports providing complete case details were extracted by integrating AE reports into the product information. The 'relative AE profile' method was applied first to detect statistically significant signals, resulting in only one substrate-event pair (dietary fiber and vomiting) as a signal. Subsequently, the WHO scale was used to estimate the likelihood that dietary fiber caused vomiting. Due to the limited information available, the KFDA determined that no conclusion could be drawn to support any regulatory action, but that the relationship between dietary fiber and vomiting is an area of concern warranting further investigation. PMID:20074608

  17. AE sources of droplet SCC testing in type 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiwa, Mitsuharu; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Yamawaki, Hisashi; Ito, Kaita; Enoki, Manabu

    2014-02-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) and optical video microscope (VMS) monitoring was proposed to investigate the stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steels of work-hardened (WH) and solution heat treatment (ST) specimen caused by a small magnesium-chloride droplet. The crack propagation length could measure clearly under the droplet with coved glass by VMS. The cracks velocities of WH were 3.2-5.2 ×10 μm/ks and it propagated almost continuously. That of ST were 2.1-3.8 ×10 μm/ks and it propagated similar to WH. AE signals were generated at early stage of SCC testing, after that they were generated discontinuously in WH. None of AE signals were detected in ST. The detected AE signals were synchronized with bubbling from pitting and on the crack in a droplet observed by high magnification VMS. With the SEM observations, cracking bottom of pitting and small pitting on the crack were observed at the bubbling position. It could be concluded that the detected AE signals were mainly attributed to the bubbling from the pitting.

  18. Reactive oxygen species generation and signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Baishnab Charan; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of molecular oxygen into the atmosphere was accompanied by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as side products of many biochemical reactions. ROS are permanently generated in plastids, peroxisomes, mitochiondria, the cytosol and the apoplast. Imbalance between ROS generation and safe detoxification generates oxidative stress and the accumulating ROS are harmful for the plants. On the other hand, specific ROS function as signaling molecules and activate signal transduction processes in response to various stresses. Here, we summarize the generation of ROS in the different cellular compartments and the signaling processes which are induced by ROS. PMID:23072988

  19. Generation and antitumor effects of an engineered and energized fusion protein VL-LDP-AE composed of single-domain antibody and lidamycin.

    PubMed

    Miao, QingFang; Shang, BoYang; Ouyang, ZhiGang; Liu, XiaoYun; Zhen, YongSu

    2007-08-01

    Type IV collagenase plays a pivotal role in invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of tumor. Single domain antibodies are attractive as tumor-targeting vehicle because of their much smaller size compared with antibody molecules produced by conventional methods. Lidamycin (LDM) is a potent enediyne-containing antitumor antibiotic. In this study an engineered and energized fusion protein VL-LDP-AE composed of lidamycin and VL domain of mAb 3G11 directed against type IV collagenase was prepared using a novel two-step method. First a VL-LDP fusion protein was constructed by DNA recombination. Secondly VL-LDP-AE was obtained by molecular reconstitution. In MTT assay, VL-LDP-AE showed potent cytotoxicity to HT-1080 cells and KB cells with IC(50) values of 8.55 x 10(-12) and 1.70 x 10(-11) mol/L, respectively. VL-LDP-AE showed antiangiogenic activity in chick chrorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and tube formation assay. In in vivo experiments, VL-LDP-AE was proved to be more effective than free LDM against the growth of subcutaneously transplanted hepatoma 22 in mice. Drugs were given intravenously on day 3 and 10 after tumor transplantation. Compared in terms of maximal tolerated doses, VL-LDP-AE at 0.25 mg/kg suppressed the tumor growth by 89.5%, LDM at 0.05 mg/kg by 69.9%, and mitomycin at 1 mg/kg by 35%. Having a molecular weight of 25.2 kDa, VL-LDP-AE was much smaller than other reported antibody-based drugs. The results suggested that VL-LDP-AE would be a promising candidate for tumor targeting therapy. And the 2-step approach could serve as a new technology platform for making a series of highly potent engineered antibody-based drugs for a variety of cancers. PMID:17653664

  20. 47 CFR 64.1514 - Generation of signalling tones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Generation of signalling tones. 64.1514 Section 64.1514 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... Services § 64.1514 Generation of signalling tones. No common carrier shall assign a telephone number...

  1. 47 CFR 64.1514 - Generation of signalling tones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Generation of signalling tones. 64.1514 Section 64.1514 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... Services § 64.1514 Generation of signalling tones. No common carrier shall assign a telephone number...

  2. 47 CFR 64.1514 - Generation of signalling tones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Generation of signalling tones. 64.1514 Section 64.1514 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... Services § 64.1514 Generation of signalling tones. No common carrier shall assign a telephone number...

  3. 47 CFR 64.1514 - Generation of signalling tones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Generation of signalling tones. 64.1514 Section 64.1514 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... Services § 64.1514 Generation of signalling tones. No common carrier shall assign a telephone number...

  4. 47 CFR 64.1514 - Generation of signalling tones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Generation of signalling tones. 64.1514 Section 64.1514 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... Services § 64.1514 Generation of signalling tones. No common carrier shall assign a telephone number...

  5. Automatic generation of signal processing integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    A system for the automated design of signal processing integrated circuits is described in this thesis. The system is based on a library of circuit cells, and a software package that can configure the cells into complete integrated circuits. The architecture of the cell library is optimized for low and medium bandwidth digital signal processing applications. Circuits designed with the system use a multiprocessor architecture. Input to the system is a design file written in a specialized programming language. Software emulation from the design file is used to verify performance. A two-pass silicon compiler is used to translate the design file into a mask-level description of an integrated circuit. A major goal of the project is to make the system useable by those with little or no formal training in integrated circuits. A second goal is to reduce the time and cost associated with performing an integrated circuit design, while still producing designs which are reasonably efficient in their use of the technology. Development of the system was guided by basic research on appropriate architectures and circuit constructs for signal processors. As part of this research an integrated circuit was designed which performs speech analysis and synthesis. This vocoder circuit is intended for use in low-bit-rate digital speech transmission systems.

  6. [Design of Electrocardiogram Signal Generator Based on Typical Electrocardiogram Database].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuting; Wang, Xiaofei; Li, Dongshang; Liu, Guili

    2016-02-01

    Using LabVIEW programming and high-speed multifunction data acquisition card PCI-6251, we designed an electrocardiogram (ECG) signal generator based on Chinese typical ECG database. When the ECG signals are given off by the generator, the generator can also display the ECG information annotations at the same time, including waveform data and diagnostic results. It could be a useful assisting tool of ECG automatic diagnose instruments. PMID:27382747

  7. Electronic modulation of biochemical signal generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordonov, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; Cheng, Yi; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary; Yin, Jun-Jie; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

    2014-08-01

    Microelectronic devices that contain biological components are typically used to interrogate biology rather than control biological function. Patterned assemblies of proteins and cells have, however, been used for in vitro metabolic engineering, where coordinated biochemical pathways allow cell metabolism to be characterized and potentially controlled on a chip. Such devices form part of technologies that attempt to recreate animal and human physiological functions on a chip and could be used to revolutionize drug development. These ambitious goals will, however, require new biofabrication methodologies that help connect microelectronics and biological systems and yield new approaches to device assembly and communication. Here, we report the electrically mediated assembly, interrogation and control of a multi-domain fusion protein that produces a bacterial signalling molecule. The biological system can be electrically tuned using a natural redox molecule, and its biochemical response is shown to provide the signalling cues to drive bacterial population behaviour. We show that the biochemical output of the system correlates with the electrical input charge, which suggests that electrical inputs could be used to control complex on-chip biological processes.

  8. Electronic modulation of biochemical signal generation.

    PubMed

    Gordonov, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; Cheng, Yi; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary; Yin, Jun-Jie; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E

    2014-08-01

    Microelectronic devices that contain biological components are typically used to interrogate biology rather than control biological function. Patterned assemblies of proteins and cells have, however, been used for in vitro metabolic engineering, where coordinated biochemical pathways allow cell metabolism to be characterized and potentially controlled on a chip. Such devices form part of technologies that attempt to recreate animal and human physiological functions on a chip and could be used to revolutionize drug development. These ambitious goals will, however, require new biofabrication methodologies that help connect microelectronics and biological systems and yield new approaches to device assembly and communication. Here, we report the electrically mediated assembly, interrogation and control of a multi-domain fusion protein that produces a bacterial signalling molecule. The biological system can be electrically tuned using a natural redox molecule, and its biochemical response is shown to provide the signalling cues to drive bacterial population behaviour. We show that the biochemical output of the system correlates with the electrical input charge, which suggests that electrical inputs could be used to control complex on-chip biological processes. PMID:25064394

  9. Memristive Sisyphus circuit for clock signal generation

    PubMed Central

    Pershin, Yuriy V.; Shevchenko, Sergey N.; Nori, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Frequency generators are widely used in electronics. Here, we report the design and experimental realization of a memristive frequency generator employing a unique combination of only digital logic gates, a single-supply voltage and a realistic thresholdtype memristive device. In our circuit, the oscillator frequency and duty cycle are defined by the switching characteristics of the memristive device and external resistors. We demonstrate the circuit operation both experimentally, using a memristor emulator, and theoretically, using a model memristive device with threshold. Importantly, nanoscale realizations of memristive devices offer small-size alternatives to conventional quartz-based oscillators. In addition, the suggested approach can be used for mimicking some cyclic (Sisyphus) processes in nature, such as “dripping ants” or drops from leaky faucets. PMID:27199243

  10. Digitally programmable signal generator and method

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, G.J.; Kaskey, J.A.

    1989-11-14

    Disclosed is a digitally programmable waveform generator for generating completely arbitrary digital or analog waveforms from very low frequencies to frequencies in the gigasample per second range. A memory array with multiple parallel outputs is addressed; then the parallel output data is latched into buffer storage from which it is serially multiplexed out at a data rate many times faster than the access time of the memory array itself. While data is being multiplexed out serially, the memory array is accessed with the next required address and presents its data to the buffer storage before the serial multiplexing of the last group of data is completed, allowing this new data to then be latched into the buffer storage for smooth continuous serial data output. In a preferred implementation, a plurality of these serial data outputs are paralleled to form the input to a digital to analog converter, providing a programmable analog output. 6 figs.

  11. Digitally programmable signal generator and method

    DOEpatents

    Priatko, Gordon J.; Kaskey, Jeffrey A.

    1989-01-01

    A digitally programmable waveform generator for generating completely arbitrary digital or analog waveforms from very low frequencies to frequencies in the gigasample per second range. A memory array with multiple parallel outputs is addressed; then the parallel output data is latched into buffer storage from which it is serially multiplexed out at a data rate many times faster than the access time of the memory array itself. While data is being multiplexed out serially, the memory array is accessed with the next required address and presents its data to the buffer storage before the serial multiplexing of the last group of data is completed, allowing this new data to then be latched into the buffer storage for smooth continuous serial data output. In a preferred implementation, a plurality of these serial data outputs are paralleled to form the input to a digital to analog converter, providing a programmable analog output.

  12. Memristive Sisyphus circuit for clock signal generation.

    PubMed

    Pershin, Yuriy V; Shevchenko, Sergey N; Nori, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Frequency generators are widely used in electronics. Here, we report the design and experimental realization of a memristive frequency generator employing a unique combination of only digital logic gates, a single-supply voltage and a realistic thresholdtype memristive device. In our circuit, the oscillator frequency and duty cycle are defined by the switching characteristics of the memristive device and external resistors. We demonstrate the circuit operation both experimentally, using a memristor emulator, and theoretically, using a model memristive device with threshold. Importantly, nanoscale realizations of memristive devices offer small-size alternatives to conventional quartz-based oscillators. In addition, the suggested approach can be used for mimicking some cyclic (Sisyphus) processes in nature, such as "dripping ants" or drops from leaky faucets. PMID:27199243

  13. Memristive Sisyphus circuit for clock signal generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershin, Yuriy V.; Shevchenko, Sergey N.; Nori, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Frequency generators are widely used in electronics. Here, we report the design and experimental realization of a memristive frequency generator employing a unique combination of only digital logic gates, a single-supply voltage and a realistic thresholdtype memristive device. In our circuit, the oscillator frequency and duty cycle are defined by the switching characteristics of the memristive device and external resistors. We demonstrate the circuit operation both experimentally, using a memristor emulator, and theoretically, using a model memristive device with threshold. Importantly, nanoscale realizations of memristive devices offer small-size alternatives to conventional quartz-based oscillators. In addition, the suggested approach can be used for mimicking some cyclic (Sisyphus) processes in nature, such as “dripping ants” or drops from leaky faucets.

  14. Modulation of photoacoustic signal generation from metallic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mitcham, Trevor; Homan, Kimberly; Frey, Wolfgang; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav; Hazle, John

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The ability to image metallic implants is important for medical applications ranging from diagnosis to therapy. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been recently pursued as a means to localize metallic implants in soft tissue. The work presented herein investigates different mechanisms to modulate the PA signal generated by macroscopic metallic surfaces. Wires of five different metals are tested to simulate medical implants/tools, while surface roughness is altered or physical vapor deposition (PVD) coatings are added to change the wires’ overall optical absorption. PA imaging data of the wires are acquired at 970 nm. Results indicate that PA signal generation predominately occurs in a wire’s metallic surface and not its aqueous surroundings. PA signal generation is similar for all metals tested, while addition of PVD coatings offers significant modulations (i.e., 4-dB enhancement and 26-dB reduction achieved) in PA signal generation. Results also suggest that PA signal increases with increasing surface roughness. Different coating and roughness schemes are then successfully utilized to generate spatial PA signal patterns. This work demonstrates the potential of surface modifications to enhance or reduce PA signal generation to permit improved PA imaging of implants/tools (i.e., providing location/orientation information) or to allow PA imaging of surrounding tissue. PMID:23652344

  15. System for generating timing and control signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, M.; Rousey, W. J.; Messner, A. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A system capable of generating every possible data frame subperiod and delayed subperiod of a data frame of length of M clock pulse intervals (CPIs) comprised of parallel modulo-m sub i counters is presented. Each m sub i is a prime power divisor of M and a cascade of alpha sub i identical modulo-p sub i counters. The modulo-p sub i counters are feedback shift registers which cycle through p sub i distinct states. Every possible nontrivial data frame subperiod and delayed subperiod is derived and a specific CPI in the data frame is detected. The number of clock pulses required to bring every modulo-p sub i counter to a respective designated state or count is determined by the Chinese remainder theorem. This corresponds to the solution of simultaneous congruences over relatively prime moduli.

  16. A microwave photonic generator of chaotic and noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustinov, A. B.; Kondrashov, A. V.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    2016-04-01

    The transition to chaos in a microwave photonic generator has been experimentally studied for the first time, and the generated broadband chaotic microwave signal has been analyzed. The generator represented a ring circuit with the microwave tract containing a low-pass filter and a microwave amplifier. The optical tract comprised a fiber delay line. The possibility of generating chaotic oscillations with uniform spectral power density in a 3-8 GHz range is demonstrated.

  17. A versatile waveform generator for testing neuroelectric signal processors.

    PubMed

    Kohn, A F

    1989-08-01

    A multi-channel waveform generator was designed for testing neuroelectric signal processors. Smooth transient signals that resemble action potentials or evoked potentials are generated by a second order switched capacitor filter excited by brief rectangular pulses. The choice of an integrated circuit switched capacitor filter simplified the design by circumventing some of the disadvantages of conventional active filters. The waveform generator is versatile, with several signal parameters being independently adjustable from front panel controls: duration, waveshape, latency, amplitude and signal-to-noise ratio. The generator has been used for testing evoked potential acquisition and processing systems, for evaluating the effects of analog filters on evoked potentials and for testing systems designed to detect and classify trains of multi-unit action potentials. PMID:2770339

  18. The Sensitive Infrared Signal Detection by Sum Frequency Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Teh-Hwa; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingxin

    2013-01-01

    An up-conversion device that converts 2.05-micron light to 700 nm signal by sum frequency generation using a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal is demonstrated. The achieved 92% up-conversion efficiency paves the path to detect extremely weak 2.05-micron signal with well established silicon avalanche photodiode detector for sensitive lidar applications.

  19. Study of seismic signals generated by explosions triggering avalanches.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surinach, Emma; Pérez-Guillén, Cristina; Tapia, Mar; Hiller, Martin; Dufour, François

    2014-05-01

    Our group is dedicated to the study of the seismic signals generated by avalanches. Through several years deploying seismic stations at the Vallée de la Sionne (VDLS) test site in Switzerland (operated by SLF) it has gathered a large amount of seismic signals forming a database. The database consists mainly on signals generated by snow avalanches descending the VDLS test site. However, signals corresponding to the explosions that triggered the avalanches and even earthquakes are also included in the database. Depending on the snowpack stability, some of the explosions, despite being of the same charge, are unable to trigger an avalanche. The explosion signals are recorded in 3-component seismometers placed at two or three sites separated a maximum distance of 2.5 km approx. from the release area of the avalanches. The seismic signals corresponding to the explosions recorded at different sites are analyzed and their characteristics compared. Amplitude and frequency content of the displacement, velocity and acceleration of the generated waves traveling into the ground and those of the blast (air) are calculated. These values are compared with those of the waves generated by avalanches and other seismic sources (earthquakes, helicopters, airplanes). These analyses allow us to quantify and evaluate parameters related to the possible triggering of secondary snow avalanches caused by the generated vibrations in air and ground. The results are related to the weather and snowpack conditions, when it is possible.

  20. X-ray-generated ultrasonic signals - Characteristics and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachse, W.; Kim, K. Y.; Pierce, W. F.

    1986-09-01

    Experiments dealing with the characterization of X-ray-generated ultrasonic signals in materials and their application to the imaging of material inhomogeneities are described. A linear relationship is established between the X-ray photon power and the generated ultrasonic signals. The directivity of the X-ray/acoustic source was found to resemble that of other thermoelastic sources. A new double-modulation measurement technique is described in which the magnitude and phase of the modulated acoustic signals are measured. Use of the technique is explored with various materials, incident beam sizes, and inclusions. The results of preliminary imaging experiments are described which were carried out with direct and double-modulated X-ray/acoustic signals. It is shown from these results that using the images generated at two modulation frequencies, identification of the spatial inhomogeneities in a specimen is possible.

  1. AE measurements for evaluation of defects in FRP pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Masanori; Takatsu, Takashi

    1995-11-01

    AE (acoustic emission) measurement was conducted in a series of pressuring tests of FRP pressure vessels in order to examine its applicability to the safety evaluation of vessels. Tested vessels were commercial FRP pressure vessels fabricated by filament winding of high strength glass fibers, impregnated epoxy resin, on a Al alloy liner. At the final stage of fabrication, they were subjected to autofrettage, an overpressuring treatment to produce compressive residual stresses in metal liner. AE measurement results showed a strong Kaiser`s effect and high felicity ratios. In a virgin vessel, very few AE signals were detected below the autofrettage pressure. Vessels containing artificial defects showed distinct increase in AE signals at the level of test pressure. AE origin map were obtained by triangular-zone calculation. Discussions are directed, in particular, to the selection of threshold and to the applicability of AE measurement to the in-service inspection of FRP pressure vessel.

  2. Anarchy in AE Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, W. F.

    Interest in AE Aqr remains high, as evidenced by the lively discussion that took place during the workshop. In this contribution I briefly remark on the results I presented at the workshop, then address topics that were raised during the discussion. I attempt to preserve the spirit and flavor of that discussion.

  3. Summary of detection, location, and characterization capabilities of AE for continuous monitoring of cracks in reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, P.H.; Kurtz, R.J.; Friesel, M.A.; Pappas, R.A.; Skorpik, J.R.; Dawson, J.F.

    1984-10-01

    The objective of the program is to develop acoustic emission (AE) methods for continuous monitoring of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate crack growth. The approach involves three phases: develop relationships to identify crack growth AE signals and to use identified crack growth AE data to estimate flaw severity; evaluate and refine AE/flaw relationships through fatigue testing a heavy section vessel under simulated reactor conditions; and demonstrate continuous AE monitoring on a nuclear power reactor system.

  4. Performance results of a digital test signal generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Luaces, B. O.; Marina, M.; Parham, B.

    1993-01-01

    Performance results of a digital test signal-generator hardware-demonstration unit are reported. Capabilities available include baseband and intermediate frequency (IF) spectrum generation, for which test results are provided. Repeatability in the setting of a given signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when a baseband or an IF spectrum is being generated ranges from 0.01 dB at high SNR's or high data rates to 0.3 dB at low data rates or low SNR's. Baseband symbol SNR and carrier SNR (Pc/No) accuracies of 0.1 dB were verified with the built-in statistics circuitry. At low SNR's that accuracy remains to be fully verified. These results were confirmed with measurements from a demodulator synchronizer assembly for the baseband spectrum generation, and with a digital receiver (Pioneer 10 receiver) for the IF spectrum generation.

  5. Tone signal generator for producing multioperator tone signals using an operator circuit including a waveform generator, a selector and an enveloper

    DOEpatents

    Dong, Q.; Jenkins, M.V.; Bernadas, S.R.

    1997-09-09

    A frequency modulation (FM) tone signal generator for generating a FM tone signal is disclosed. The tone signal generator includes a waveform generator having a plurality of wave tables, a selector and an enveloper. The waveform generator furnishes a waveform signal in response to a phase angle address signal. Each wave table stores a different waveform. The selector selects one of the wave tables in response to a plurality of selection signals such that the selected wave table largely provides the waveform signal upon being addressed largely by the phase angle address signal. Selection of the selected wave table varies with each selection signal. The enveloper impresses an envelope signal on the waveform signal. The envelope signal is used as a carrier or modulator for generating the FM tone signal. 17 figs.

  6. Tone signal generator for producing multioperator tone signals using an operator circuit including a waveform generator, a selector and an enveloper

    DOEpatents

    Dong, Qiujie; Jenkins, Michael V.; Bernadas, Salvador R.

    1997-01-01

    A frequency modulation (FM) tone signal generator for generating a FM tone signal is disclosed. The tone signal generator includes a waveform generator having a plurality of wave tables, a selector and an enveloper. The waveform generator furnishes a waveform signal in response to a phase angle address signal. Each wave table stores a different waveform. The selector selects one of the wave tables in response to a plurality of selection signals such that the selected wave table largely provides the waveform signal upon being addressed largely by the phase angle address signal. Selection of the selected wave table varies with each selection signal. The enveloper impresses an envelope signal on the waveform signal. The envelope signal is used as a carrier or modulator for generating the FM tone signal.

  7. Implementation of an acoustic emission proximity detector for use in generating glass optics

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K.L.; Piscotty, M.A.; Taylor, J.S.

    1996-11-11

    We are using the approach acoustic emission (AE) signal during a grinding operation to detect the proximity of the grinding wheel relative to a brittle material workpiece and are using this detection as a feed- back control signal in our CNC. The repeatability of the AE signal during the wheel approach is the key that allows AE to be used as a proximity detector and is demonstrated at LLNL to be about mm. We noted significant changes of the AE signal as process parameters are modified, but conclude that with a quick CNC calibration routine and holding the parameters constant during a given operation, the AE system can be successfully used to sense pre- contact wheel- to- workpiece separation. Additionally, the AE sensing system allows real- time monitoring during grinding to provide in- process information. The first prototype of an AE system on a commercially available generator is currently be tested at the Center for Optics Manufacturing.

  8. Generation of two-mode optical signals with broadband frequency tunability and low spurious signal level.

    PubMed

    Song, Ho-Jin; Shimizu, Naofumi; Nagatsuma, Tadao

    2007-10-29

    For continuous millimeter and terahertz-wave applications, a two-mode optical signal generation technique that uses two arrayed waveguide gratings and two optical switch units is presented. In addition to easy and fast operation, this scheme offers broadband frequency tunability and high signal purity with a low spurious mode level. Mode spacing, which corresponds to the frequency of the generated MM/THz-wave signal after photomixing, was successfully swept in the range of 200 ~ 550 GHz and the optical spurious mode suppression ratio higher than 25 dBc was achieved. In addition, spurious modes characteristics were investigated by using second harmonic generation (SHG) autocorrelation methods for several frequencies. PMID:19550768

  9. Multiple Lookup Table-Based AES Encryption Algorithm Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jin; Liu, Wenyi; Zhang, Huixin

    Anew AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) encryption algorithm implementation was proposed in this paper. It is based on five lookup tables, which are generated from S-box(the substitution table in AES). The obvious advantages are reducing the code-size, improving the implementation efficiency, and helping new learners to understand the AES encryption algorithm and GF(28) multiplication which are necessary to correctly implement AES[1]. This method can be applied on processors with word length 32 or above, FPGA and others. And correspondingly we can implement it by VHDL, Verilog, VB and other languages.

  10. Recording and investigation of the seismic signal generated by hypervelocity impact experiments and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güldemeister, N.; Moser, D.; Wünnemann, K.; Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.

    2013-09-01

    Meteorite impacts can cause environmental consequences, one of which is the generation of ground motions that may exceed the magnitude of the largest earthquakes [1]. Impacts generate shock waves that attenuate with distance until they even tually turn into seismic waves. Thus, meteorite impact may be considered as a source for seismic shaking similar to earthquakes. Seismic signals have been recorded in explosion experiments [2] and in hydrocode models of large impact events such as the Chicxulub crater [3]. To determine how much of the kinetic energy Ekin of the impactoris turned into seismic energy Eseis can be investigated experimentally (by recording the acoustic emission) or by numerical models. The ratio of Eseis/Ekin is the so called seismic efficiency k. The seismic efficiency depends on material properties (porosity) and is usually estimated to range between 10-2 and 10-6 [2,4]. In the framework of the "MEMIN" (multidisciplinary experimental and modeling impact crater research network) project a suite of hypervelocity impact experiments on a decimeter scale have been carried out [5]. We use acoustic emission (AE) technique and pressure gauges in high spatiotemporal Meteorite impacts can cause environmental consequences, one of which is the generation of ground motions that may exceed the magnitude of the largest earthquakes [1]. Impacts generate shock waves that attenuate with distance until they even tually turn into seismic waves. Thus, meteorite impact may be considered as a source for seismic shaking similar to earthquakes. Seismic signals have been recorded in explosion experiments [2] and in hydrocode models of large impact events such as the Chicxulub crater [3]. To determine how much of the kinetic energy Ekin of the impactoris turned into seismic energy Eseis can be investigated experimentally (by recording the acoustic emission) or by numerical models. The ratio of Eseis/Ekin is the so called seismic efficiency k. The seismic efficiency depends

  11. Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation

    DOEpatents

    Hart, M.M.

    1995-04-18

    A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communications, powered by a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of materials resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications. 2 figs.

  12. Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation

    DOEpatents

    Hart, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communication, powered by a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu{sub 238} or Sr{sub 90} thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of material resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications.

  13. Fiber optic signal amplifier using thermoelectric power generation

    DOEpatents

    Hart, Mark M.

    1995-01-01

    A remote fiber optic signal amplifier for use as a repeater/amplifier, such as in transoceanic communications, powered by a Pu.sub.238 or Sr.sub.90 thermoelectric generator. The amplifier comprises a unit with connections on the receiving and sending sides of the communications system, and an erbium-doped fiber amplifier connecting each sending fiber to each receiving fiber. The thermoelectric generator, preferably a Pu.sub.238 or Sr.sub.90 thermoelectric generator delivers power to the amplifiers through a regulator. The heat exchange surfaces of the thermoelectric generator are made of materials resistant to corrosion and biological growth and are directly exposed to the outside, such as the ocean water in transoceanic communications.

  14. Acoustic Aspects of Photoacoustic Signal Generation and Detection in Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklós, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper photoacoustic signal generation and detection in gases is investigated and discussed from the standpoint of acoustics. Four topics are considered: the effect of the absorption-desorption process of modulated and pulsed light on the heat power density released in the gas; the generation of the primary sound by the released heat in an unbounded medium; the excitation of an acoustic resonator by the primary sound; and finally, the generation of the measurable PA signal by a microphone. When light is absorbed by a molecule and the excess energy is relaxed by collisions with the surrounding molecules, the average kinetic energy, thus also the temperature of an ensemble of molecules (called "particle" in acoustics) will increase. In other words heat energy is added to the energy of the particle. The rate of the energy transfer is characterized by the heat power density. A simple two-level model of absorption-desorption is applied for describing the heat power generation process for modulated and pulsed illumination. Sound generation by a laser beam in an unbounded medium is discussed by means of the Green's function technique. It is shown that the duration of the generated sound pulse depends mostly on beam geometry. A photoacoustic signal is mostly detected in a photoacoustic cell composed of acoustic resonators, buffers, filters, etc. It is not easy to interpret the measured PA signal in such a complicated acoustic system. The acoustic response of a PA detector to different kinds of excitations (modulated cw, pulsed, periodic pulse train) is discussed. It is shown that acoustic resonators respond very differently to modulated cw excitation and to excitation by a pulse train. The microphone for detecting the PA signal is also a part of the acoustic system; its properties have to be taken into account by the design of a PA detector. The moving membrane of the microphone absorbs acoustic energy; thus, it may influence the resonance frequency and

  15. Sparse asynchronous cortical generators can produce measurable scalp EEG signals.

    PubMed

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Dan, Jonathan; Frauscher, Birgit; Gotman, Jean

    2016-09-01

    We investigate to what degree the synchronous activation of a smooth patch of cortex is necessary for observing EEG scalp activity. We perform extensive simulations to compare the activity generated on the scalp by different models of cortical activation, based on intracranial EEG findings reported in the literature. The spatial activation is modeled as a cortical patch of constant activation or as random sets of small generators (0.1 to 3cm(2) each) concentrated in a cortical region. Temporal activation models for the generation of oscillatory activity are either equal phase or random phase across the cortical patches. The results show that smooth or random spatial activation profiles produce scalp electric potential distributions with the same shape. Also, in the generation of oscillatory activity, multiple cortical generators with random phase produce scalp activity attenuated on average only 2 to 4 times compared to generators with equal phase. Sparse asynchronous cortical generators can produce measurable scalp EEG. This is a possible explanation for seemingly paradoxical observations of simultaneous disorganized intracranial activity and scalp EEG signals. Thus, the standard interpretation of scalp EEG might constitute an oversimplification of the underlying brain activity. PMID:27262240

  16. Signal generator makes clean sweeps to 20 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, J.

    1986-02-01

    In the case of most swept frequency generators, approximately eight hours are required to calibrate the device, and a complex assortment of equipment is needed. The present article is concerned with a programmable sweep generator for which the calibration process is performed automatically in 15 minutes with the aid of an extra GPIB line dedicated to the control of a frequency counter and a power meter/power sensor combination. The signal generator has a frequency range from 2 to 20 GHz, a frequency resolution of 100 kHz, sweep times from 10 ms to 33 s, and a maximum levelled output power of 10 dBm at 18 GHz and 7 dBm at 20 GHz.

  17. Hierarchical organization of noise generates spontaneous signal in Paramecium cell.

    PubMed

    Ooyama, Shunsuke; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2011-08-21

    In many cellular processes, spontaneous activities are often the basis for their functioning. Paramecium cells change their swimming direction under a homogeneous environment, which is induced by a spontaneous signal generation in the membrane electric potential. For such a spontaneous activity, a theoretical model has been proposed by Oosawa (2007) [Biosystems 88, 191-201.], in which intracellular noise is hierarchically organized from thermal fluctuations to spike-like large fluctuations, which induces a signal to change spontaneously the swimming direction. Our analysis of the model shows that the system is a kind of excitable media, in which a spike is induced by a stochastic fluctuation. We show conditions of channels properties to have a spike train. PMID:21620864

  18. A test vector generator for a radar signal processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, C. B.

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the test vector generator (TVG) system developed for the purpose of testing a radar signal processor. This system simulates an eight channel radar receiver by providing input data for testing the signal processor test bed. The TVG system outputs 128-bit wide data samples at variable rates up to and including 10 million samples per second. The VTG memory array is one million samples deep. Variably sized output vectors can be addressed within the memory array and the vectors can be concatenated, repeated, and reshuffled in real time under the control of a single board computer. The TVG is seen having applications on a variety of programs. Discussions of adapting and scaling the system to these other applications are presented.

  19. Lights, camera, A&E.

    PubMed

    Gould, Mark

    Channel 4 series 24 Hours in A&E was one of the television highlights of 2011. Filmed at King's College Hospital in London, it showed the reality of life in an A&E department and may have improved the public's understanding of nursing. PMID:22324233

  20. Multistability, chaos, and random signal generation in semiconductor superlattices.

    PubMed

    Ying, Lei; Huang, Danhong; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Historically, semiconductor superlattices, artificial periodic structures of different semiconductor materials, were invented with the purpose of engineering or manipulating the electronic properties of semiconductor devices. A key application lies in generating radiation sources, amplifiers, and detectors in the "unusual" spectral range of subterahertz and terahertz (0.1-10 THz), which cannot be readily realized using conventional radiation sources, the so-called THz gap. Efforts in the past three decades have demonstrated various nonlinear dynamical behaviors including chaos, suggesting the potential to exploit chaos in semiconductor superlattices as random signal sources (e.g., random number generators) in the THz frequency range. We consider a realistic model of hot electrons in semiconductor superlattice, taking into account the induced space charge field. Through a systematic exploration of the phase space we find that, when the system is subject to an external electrical driving of a single frequency, chaos is typically associated with the occurrence of multistability. That is, for a given parameter setting, while there are initial conditions that lead to chaotic trajectories, simultaneously there are other initial conditions that lead to regular motions. Transition to multistability, i.e., the emergence of multistability with chaos as a system parameter passes through a critical point, is found and argued to be abrupt. Multistability thus presents an obstacle to utilizing the superlattice system as a reliable and robust random signal source. However, we demonstrate that, when an additional driving field of incommensurate frequency is applied, multistability can be eliminated, with chaos representing the only possible asymptotic behavior of the system. In such a case, a random initial condition will lead to a trajectory landing in a chaotic attractor with probability 1, making quasiperiodically driven semiconductor superlattices potentially as a reliable

  1. Multistability, chaos, and random signal generation in semiconductor superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Lei; Huang, Danhong; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Historically, semiconductor superlattices, artificial periodic structures of different semiconductor materials, were invented with the purpose of engineering or manipulating the electronic properties of semiconductor devices. A key application lies in generating radiation sources, amplifiers, and detectors in the "unusual" spectral range of subterahertz and terahertz (0.1-10 THz), which cannot be readily realized using conventional radiation sources, the so-called THz gap. Efforts in the past three decades have demonstrated various nonlinear dynamical behaviors including chaos, suggesting the potential to exploit chaos in semiconductor superlattices as random signal sources (e.g., random number generators) in the THz frequency range. We consider a realistic model of hot electrons in semiconductor superlattice, taking into account the induced space charge field. Through a systematic exploration of the phase space we find that, when the system is subject to an external electrical driving of a single frequency, chaos is typically associated with the occurrence of multistability. That is, for a given parameter setting, while there are initial conditions that lead to chaotic trajectories, simultaneously there are other initial conditions that lead to regular motions. Transition to multistability, i.e., the emergence of multistability with chaos as a system parameter passes through a critical point, is found and argued to be abrupt. Multistability thus presents an obstacle to utilizing the superlattice system as a reliable and robust random signal source. However, we demonstrate that, when an additional driving field of incommensurate frequency is applied, multistability can be eliminated, with chaos representing the only possible asymptotic behavior of the system. In such a case, a random initial condition will lead to a trajectory landing in a chaotic attractor with probability 1, making quasiperiodically driven semiconductor superlattices potentially as a reliable

  2. Characterization of granular flows from the generated seismic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farin, Maxime; Mangeney, Anne; Toussaint, Renaud; De Rosny, Julien; Trinh, Phuong-Thu

    2016-04-01

    Landslides, rock avalanche and debris flows represent a major natural hazard in steep landscapes. Recent studies showed that the seismic signal generated by these events can provide quantitative information on their location and amplitude. However, owing to the lack of visual observations, the dynamics of gravitational events is still not well understood. A burning challenge is to establish relations between the characteristics of the landslide (volume, speed, runout distance,...) and that of the emitted seismic signal (maximum amplitude, seismic energy, frequencies,...). We present here laboratory experiments of granular columns collapse on an inclined plane. The seismic signal generated by the collapse is recorded by piezoelectric accelerometers sensitive in a wide frequency range (1 Hz - 56 kHz). The granular column is made of steel beads of the same diameter, between 1 mm and 3 mm that are initially contained in a cylinder. The column collapses when the cylinder is removed. A layer of steel beads is glued on the surface of the plane to provide basal roughness. For horizontal granular flows, we show that it is possible to distinguish the phases of acceleration and deceleration of the flow in the emitted seismic signal. Indeed, the signal envelope is symmetrical with respect to its maximum, separating the acceleration from the deceleration. When the slope angle increases, we observe that the signal envelope looses its symmetry: it stays unchanged during the acceleration but it is significantly extended during the deceleration. In addition, we propose a semi-empirical scaling law to describe the increase of the elastic energy radiated by a granular flow when the slope angle increases. The fit of this law with the seismic data allows us to retrieve the friction angle of the granular material, which is a crucial rheological parameter. Finally, we show that the ratio of the radiated elastic energy over the potential energy lost of granular flows, i.e. their seismic

  3. Modeling Guidelines for Code Generation in the Railway Signaling Context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrari, Alessio; Bacherini, Stefano; Fantechi, Alessandro; Zingoni, Niccolo

    2009-01-01

    Modeling guidelines constitute one of the fundamental cornerstones for Model Based Development. Their relevance is essential when dealing with code generation in the safety-critical domain. This article presents the experience of a railway signaling systems manufacturer on this issue. Introduction of Model-Based Development (MBD) and code generation in the industrial safety-critical sector created a crucial paradigm shift in the development process of dependable systems. While traditional software development focuses on the code, with MBD practices the focus shifts to model abstractions. The change has fundamental implications for safety-critical systems, which still need to guarantee a high degree of confidence also at code level. Usage of the Simulink/Stateflow platform for modeling, which is a de facto standard in control software development, does not ensure by itself production of high-quality dependable code. This issue has been addressed by companies through the definition of modeling rules imposing restrictions on the usage of design tools components, in order to enable production of qualified code. The MAAB Control Algorithm Modeling Guidelines (MathWorks Automotive Advisory Board)[3] is a well established set of publicly available rules for modeling with Simulink/Stateflow. This set of recommendations has been developed by a group of OEMs and suppliers of the automotive sector with the objective of enforcing and easing the usage of the MathWorks tools within the automotive industry. The guidelines have been published in 2001 and afterwords revisited in 2007 in order to integrate some additional rules developed by the Japanese division of MAAB [5]. The scope of the current edition of the guidelines ranges from model maintainability and readability to code generation issues. The rules are conceived as a reference baseline and therefore they need to be tailored to comply with the characteristics of each industrial context. Customization of these

  4. Characterization of Aes nuclear foci in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Itatani, Yoshiro; Sonoshita, Masahiro; Kakizaki, Fumihiko; Okawa, Katsuya; Stifani, Stefano; Itoh, Hideaki; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Taketo, M Mark

    2016-01-01

    Amino-terminal enhancer of split (Aes) is a member of Groucho/Transducin-like enhancer (TLE) family. Aes is a recently found metastasis suppressor of colorectal cancer (CRC) that inhibits Notch signalling, and forms nuclear foci together with TLE1. Although some Notch-associated proteins are known to form subnuclear bodies, little is known regarding the dynamics or functions of these structures. Here, we show that Aes nuclear foci in CRC observed under an electron microscope are in a rather amorphous structure, lacking surrounding membrane. Investigation of their behaviour during the cell cycle by time-lapse cinematography showed that Aes nuclear foci dissolve during mitosis and reassemble after completion of cytokinesis. We have also found that heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70) is an essential component of Aes foci. Pharmacological inhibition of the HSC70 ATPase activity with VER155008 reduces Aes focus formation. These results provide insight into the understanding of Aes-mediated inhibition of Notch signalling. PMID:26229111

  5. Fluctuations in neighbourhood fertility generate variable signalling effort

    PubMed Central

    Taff, Conor C.; Patricelli, Gail L.; Freeman-Gallant, Corey R.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of sexual signalling generally focus on interactions between dyadic pairs, yet communication in natural populations often occurs in the context of complex social networks. The ability to survey social environments and adjust signal production appropriately should be a critical component of success in these systems, but has rarely been documented empirically. Here, we used autonomous recording devices to identify 118 472 songs produced by 26 male common yellowthroats (Geothlypis trichas) over two breeding seasons, coupled with detailed surveys of social conditions on each territory. We found strong evidence that common yellowthroat males adjusted their total song production in response to both changes in within-pair social context and changes in the fertility of neighbouring females up to 400 m away. Within the social pair, males drastically reduced their song production when mated, but the magnitude of this reduction depended on both the time of day and on the fertility status of the social mate. By contrast, when fertile females were present on nearby territories, males increased their song output, especially during daytime singing. At this time, it is unclear whether males actively gathered information on neighbouring female fertility or whether the patterns that we observed were driven by changes in social interactions that varied with neighbourhood fertility. Regardless of the mechanism employed, however, subtle changes in the social environment generated substantial variation in signalling effort. PMID:25339717

  6. Elastin Peptides Signaling Relies on Neuraminidase-1-Dependent Lactosylceramide Generation

    PubMed Central

    Rusciani, Anthony; Duca, Laurent; Sartelet, Hervé; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Bobichon, Hélène; Ploton, Dominique; Le Naour, Richard; Blaise, Sébastien; Martiny, Laurent; Debelle, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    The sialidase activity of neuraminidase-1 (Neu-1) is responsible for ERK 1/2 pathway activation following binding of elastin peptide on the elastin receptor complex. In this work, we demonstrate that the receptor and lipid rafts colocalize at the plasma membrane. We also show that the disruption of these microdomains as well as their depletion in glycolipids blocks the receptor signaling. Following elastin peptide treatment, the cellular GM3 level decreases while lactosylceramide (LacCer) content increases consistently with a GM3/LacCer conversion. The use of lactose or Neu-1 siRNA blocks this process suggesting that the elastin receptor complex is responsible for this lipid conversion. Flow cytometry analysis confirms this elastin peptide-driven LacCer generation. Further, the use of a monoclonal anti-GM3 blocking antibody shows that GM3 is required for signaling. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that Neu-1-dependent GM3/LacCer conversion is the key event leading to signaling by the elastin receptor complex. As a consequence, we propose that LacCer is an early messenger for this receptor. PMID:21103358

  7. v-Src Generates a p53-Independent Apoptotic Signal

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Brian L.; Jimenez, Elsa; Martin, G. Steven

    2000-01-01

    Evasion of apoptosis appears to be a necessary event in tumor progression. Some oncogenes, such as c-myc and E1A, induce apoptosis in the absence of survival factors. However, others, such as bcl-2 and v-src, activate antiapoptotic pathways. For v-Src, these antiapoptotic pathways are dependent on the function of Ras, phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, and Stat3. Here we asked whether v-Src can activate a proapoptotic signal when survival signaling is inhibited. We show that when the functions of Ras and PI 3-kinase are inhibited, v-src-transformed Rat-2 fibroblasts undergo apoptosis, evidenced by loss of adherence, nuclear fragmentation, and chromosomal DNA degradation. The apoptotic response is dependent on activation of caspase 3. Under similar conditions nontransformed Rat-2 cells undergo considerably lower levels of apoptosis. Apoptosis induced by v-Src is accompanied by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c and is blocked by overexpression of bcl-2, indicating that it is mediated by the mitochondrial pathway. However apoptosis induced by v-Src is not accompanied by an increase in the level of p53 and is not dependent on p53 function. Thus v-Src generates a p53-independent proapoptotic signal. PMID:11094078

  8. Droplet pairing and coalescence control for generation of combinatorial signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Eujin; Rogers, Matthew; Stone, Howard

    2013-03-01

    A co-flowing aqueous phase with an immiscible oil phase in a microchannel generates uniformly spaced, monodisperse droplets, which retain their shape by not touching each other or by being stabilized with surfactants at the oil-water interface. However, droplet coalescence is required in many advanced applications, which can be achieved by a complex channel geometry or size differences in the droplets, and as well as by procedures to reduce the effect of a surfactant. These approaches, again, hinder the stability of droplets further downstream. We designed a microchannel which consistently inserts gas-bubble between droplets so that pairing and coalescence of droplets occurs even in the presence of surfactant, and yet prevents unwanted merging with other droplets. Aqueous droplets placed between the bubbles alter their relative speeds and spacing, and consequently we study the change in the number of droplet pairings in relation to the characteristics of the bubbles and the volume of aqueous droplets. By integrating this approach with droplets of different materials, we can program the output sequence of droplet compositions, and such complex combinatorial signals generated are aimed for concentration gradient generation and dynamic stimulation of biological cells with chemicals.

  9. Acoustic emission (AE) health monitoring of diaphragm type couplings using neural network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez-Azcuaga, Valery F.; Shu, Fong; Finlayson, Richard D.; O'Donnell, Bruce

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents the latest results obtained from Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring and detection of cracks and/or damage in diaphragm couplings, which are used in some aircraft and engine drive systems. Early detection of mechanical failure in aircraft drive train components is a key safety and economical issue with both military and civil sectors of aviation. One of these components is the diaphragm-type coupling, which has been evaluated as the ideal drive coupling for many application requirements such as high speed, high torque, and non-lubrication. Its flexible axial and angular displacement capabilities have made it indispensable for aircraft drive systems. However, diaphragm-type couplings may develop cracks during their operation. The ability to monitor, detect, identify, and isolate coupling cracks on an operational aircraft system is required in order to provide sufficient advance warning to preclude catastrophic failure. It is known that metallic structures generate characteristic Acoustic Emission (AE) during crack growth/propagation cycles. This phenomenon makes AE very attractive among various monitoring techniques for fault detection in diaphragm-type couplings. However, commercially available systems capable of automatic discrimination between signals from crack growth and normal mechanical noise are not readily available. Positive classification of signals requires experienced personnel and post-test data analysis, which tend to be a time-consuming, laborious, and expensive process. With further development of automated classifiers, AE can become a fully autonomous fault detection technique requiring no human intervention after implementation. AE has the potential to be fully integrated with automated query and response mechanisms for system/process monitoring and control.

  10. Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator (MITG) Design and Development, Part A-E. Original was presented at 1983 Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference (IECEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, A.

    1983-04-29

    Advanced RTG concepts utilizing improved thermoelectric materials and converter concepts are under study at Fairchild for DOE. The design described here is based on DOE's newly developed radioisotope heat source, and on an improved silicon-germanium material and a multicouple converter module under development at Syncal. Fairchild's assignment was to combine the above into an attractive power system for use in space, and to assess the specific power and other attributes of that design. The resultant design is highly modular, consisting of standard RTG slices, each producing 24 watts at the desired output voltage of 28 volt. Thus, the design could be adapted to various space missions over a wide range of power levels, with little or no redesign. Each RTG slice consists of a 250-watt heat source module, eight multicouple thermoelectric modules, and standard sections of insulator, housing, radiator fins, and electrical circuit. The design makes it possible to check each thermoelectric module for electrical performance, thermal contact, leaktightness, and performance stability, after the generator is fully assembled; and to replace any deficient modules without disassembling the generator or perturbing the others. The RTG end sections provide the spring-loaded supports required to hold the free-standing heat source stack together during launch vibration. Detailed analysis indicates that the present generation of RTGs, using the same heat source modules. There is a duplicate copy of this document. OSTI has a copy of this paper.

  11. Study of acoustic emission sources and signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumarega, M. I. López; Armeite, M.; Oliveto, M. E.; Piotrkowski, R.; Ruzzante, J. E.

    2002-05-01

    Methods of acoustic emission (AE) signal analysis give information about material conditions, since AE generated in stressed solids can be used to indicate cracks and defect positions so as their damaging potential. We present a review of results of laboratory AE tests on metallic materials. Rings of seamless steel tubes, with and without oxide layers, were cut and then deformed by opening their ends. Seamless Zry-4 tubes were submitted to hydraulic stress tests until rupture with a purposely-constructed hydraulic system. In burst type signals, their parameters, Amplitude (A), Duration (D) and Risetime (R), were statistically studied. Amplitudes were found to follow the Log-normal distribution. This led to infer that the detected AE signal, is the complex consequence of a great number of random independent sources, which individual effects are linked. We could show, using cluster analysis for A, D and R mean values, with 5 clusters, coincidence between the clusters and the test types. A slight linear correlation was obtained for the parameters A and D. The arrival time of the AE signals was also studied, which conducted to discussing Poisson and Polya processes. The digitized signals were studied as (1/f)β noises. The general results are coherent if we consider the AE phenomena in the frame of Self Organized Criticality theory.

  12. Modulation of Radio Frequency Signals by Nonlinearly Generated Acoustic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Spencer Joseph

    Acousto-electromagnetic scattering is a process in which an acoustic excitation is utilized to induce modulation on an electromagnetic (EM) wave. This phenomenon can be exploited in remote sensing and detection schemes whereby target objects are mechanically excited by high powered acoustic waves resulting in unique object characterizations when interrogated with EM signals. Implementation of acousto-EM sensing schemes, however, are limited by a lack of fundamental understanding of the nonlinear interaction between acoustic and EM waves and inefficient simulation methods in the determination of the radiation patterns of higher order scattered acoustic fields. To address the insufficient simulation issue, a computationally efficient mathematical model describing higher order scattered sound fields, particularly of third-order in which a 40x increase in computation speed is achieved, is derived using a multi-Gaussian beam (MGB) expansion that expresses the sound field of any arbitrary axially symmetric beam as a series of Gaussian base functions. The third-order intermodulation (IM3) frequency components are produced by considering the cascaded nonlinear second-order effects when analyzing the interaction between the first- and second-order frequency components during the nonlinear scattering of sound by sound from two noncollinear ultrasonic baffled piston sources. The theory is extended to the modeling of the sound beams generated by parametric transducer arrays, showing that the MGB model can be efficiently used to calculate both the second- and third-order sound fields of the array. Additionally, a near-to-far-field (NTFF) transformation method is developed to model the far-field characteristics of scattered sound fields, extending Kirchhoff's theorem, typically applied to EM waves, determining the far-field patterns of an acoustic source from amplitude and phase measurements made in the near-field by including the higher order sound fields generated by the

  13. Generation and application of signaling pathway reporter lines in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Moro, Enrico; Vettori, Andrea; Porazzi, Patrizia; Schiavone, Marco; Rampazzo, Elena; Casari, Alessandro; Ek, Olivier; Facchinello, Nicola; Astone, Matteo; Zancan, Ilaria; Milanetto, Martina; Tiso, Natascia; Argenton, Francesco

    2013-06-01

    In the last years, we have seen the emergence of different tools that have changed the face of biology from a simple modeling level to a more systematic science. The transparent zebrafish embryo is one of the living models in which, after germline transformation with reporter protein-coding genes, specific fluorescent cell populations can be followed at single-cell resolution. The genetically modified embryos, larvae and adults, resulting from the transformation, are individuals in which time lapse analysis, digital imaging quantification, FACS sorting and next-generation sequencing can be performed in specific times and tissues. These multifaceted genetic and cellular approaches have permitted to dissect molecular interactions at the subcellular, intercellular, tissue and whole-animal level, thus allowing integration of cellular and developmental genetics with molecular imaging in the resulting frame of modern biology. In this review, we describe a new step in the zebrafish road to system biology, based on the use of transgenic biosensor animals expressing fluorescent proteins under the control of signaling pathway-responsive cis-elements. In particular, we provide here the rationale and details of this powerful tool, trying to focus on its huge potentialities in basic and applied research, while also discussing limits and potential technological evolutions of this approach. PMID:23674148

  14. (abstract) Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard

    1994-01-01

    AES is a low-cost analog of the TES downlooking modes. Because AES operates at ambient temperature, limb-viewing is not possible. The first flight of AES took place in April 1994 on the NASA P3B aircraft out of Wallops Island, VA. While planned as an engineering test flight, spectra were successfully acquired both over the Atlantic Ocean and the area of the Great Dismal Swamp on the Virginia-North Carolina border. At this writing (July 1994), a second series of flights on the NASA DC8 aircraft out of Ames RC,CA is in progress. By the time of the workshop, a third series using the NASA C130 should have been accomplished.

  15. Finite element modelling of ultrasound, with reference to transducers and AE waves.

    PubMed

    Hill, R; Forsyth, S A; Macey, P

    2004-04-01

    Finite element (FE) modelling has a role to play in simulating elastic wave propagation associated with structural vibrations, acoustic phenomena and ultrasound problems. In this work we have used the PAFEC software [PAFEC finite element software PACSYS, Strelley Hall, Nottingham, NG8 6PE, UK]. With the advent of increased computer power and greater availability of software these simulations have become more readily available and will provide improved insight into wave propagation problems. Simulations have been undertaken of transient wave propagation in steel plates with an attached simple resonant transducer. This simulates acoustic emission (AE) propagation in plate like structures relevant to many industrial applications. Simulations for short propagation distances suggest the resonant transducer voltage signal carries information on the plate-waves propagating in the structure, overlaid with the piezoelectric resonance and some information might be extracted from the transducer signal. Looking at the wave propagation information alone, a great deal of variability is seen in the displacement profile for different source types, orientations and locations. Although users have expressed a need for calibration of the AE detection process, this idea remains problematic since the complete generation and detection system has the features of a chaotic system. Using FE modelling a method of "point calibration" might be available, for some specific AE applications such as crack growth along known paths. PMID:15047294

  16. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy C. (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  17. Signal generation and mixing electronics for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruce, Tommy Clay (Inventor); Hallidy, William H. (Inventor); Chin, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention additionally comprises a method and apparatus for generating and mixing signals for frequency-domain lifetime and spectral fluorometry. The present invention comprises a plurality of signal generators that generate a plurality of signals where the signal generators modulate the amplitude and/or the frequency of the signals. The present invention uses one of these signals to drive an excitation signal that the present invention then directs and transmits at a target mixture, which absorbs the energy from the excitation signal. The property of fluorescence causes the target mixture to emit an emitted signal that the present invention detects with a signal detector. The present invention uses a plurality of mixers to produce a processor reference signal and a data signal. The present invention then uses a processor to compare the processor reference signal with the data signal by analyzing the differences in the phase and the differences in the amplitude between the two signals. The processor then extracts the fluorescence lifetime and fluorescence spectrum of the emitted signal from the phase and amplitude information using a chemometric analysis.

  18. Mutation Conferring Apical-Targeting Motif on AE1 Exchanger Causes Autosomal Dominant Distal RTA

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Andrew C.; Su, Ya; Yiu, Vivian; Cuthbert, Alan W.; Trachtman, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in SLC4A1 that mislocalize its product, the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger AE1, away from its normal position on the basolateral membrane of the α-intercalated cell cause autosomal dominant distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). We studied a family exhibiting dominant inheritance and defined a mutation (AE1-M909T) that affects the C terminus of AE1, a region rich in potential targeting motifs that are incompletely characterized. Expression of AE1-M909T in Xenopus oocytes confirmed preservation of its anion exchange function. Wild-type GFP-tagged AE1 localized to the basolateral membrane of polarized MDCK cells, but AE1-M909T localized to both the apical and basolateral membranes. Wild-type AE1 trafficked directly to the basolateral membrane without apical passage, whereas AE1-M909T trafficked to both cell surfaces, implying the gain of an apical-targeting signal. We found that AE1-M909T acquired class 1 PDZ ligand activity that the wild type did not possess. In summary, the AE1-M909T mutation illustrates the role of abnormal targeting in dRTA and provides insight into C-terminal motifs that govern normal trafficking of AE1. PMID:22518001

  19. Mutation conferring apical-targeting motif on AE1 exchanger causes autosomal dominant distal RTA.

    PubMed

    Fry, Andrew C; Su, Ya; Yiu, Vivian; Cuthbert, Alan W; Trachtman, Howard; Karet Frankl, Fiona E

    2012-07-01

    Mutations in SLC4A1 that mislocalize its product, the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger AE1, away from its normal position on the basolateral membrane of the α-intercalated cell cause autosomal dominant distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). We studied a family exhibiting dominant inheritance and defined a mutation (AE1-M909T) that affects the C terminus of AE1, a region rich in potential targeting motifs that are incompletely characterized. Expression of AE1-M909T in Xenopus oocytes confirmed preservation of its anion exchange function. Wild-type GFP-tagged AE1 localized to the basolateral membrane of polarized MDCK cells, but AE1-M909T localized to both the apical and basolateral membranes. Wild-type AE1 trafficked directly to the basolateral membrane without apical passage, whereas AE1-M909T trafficked to both cell surfaces, implying the gain of an apical-targeting signal. We found that AE1-M909T acquired class 1 PDZ ligand activity that the wild type did not possess. In summary, the AE1-M909T mutation illustrates the role of abnormal targeting in dRTA and provides insight into C-terminal motifs that govern normal trafficking of AE1. PMID:22518001

  20. Monitoring Rock Failure Processes Using the Hilbert-Huang Transform of Acoustic Emission Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ji; Peng, Weihong; Liu, Fengyu; Zhang, Haixiang; Li, Zhijian

    2016-02-01

    Rock fracturing generates acoustic emission (AE) signals that have statistical parameters referred to as AE signal parameters (AESP). Identification of rock fracturing or the failure process stage using such data raises several challenges. This study proposes a Hilbert-Huang transform-based AE processing approach to capture the time-frequency characteristics of both AE signals and AESP during rock failure processes. The damage occurring in tested rock specimens can be illustrated through analysis using this method. In this study, the specimens were 25 × 60 × 150 mm3 in size and were compressed at a displacement rate of 0.05 mm/min until failure. The recorded data included force and displacement, AE signals, and AESP. The AESP in the last third of the strain range period and 14 typical moments of strong AE signals were selected for further investigation. These results show that AE signals and AESP can be jointly used for identification of deformation stages. The transition between linear and nonlinear deformation stages was found to last for a short period in this process. The instantaneous frequency of the AE effective energy rate increased linearly from 0.5 to 1.5 Hz. Attenuation of elastic waves spreading in rock samples developed with deformation, as illustrated in the Hilbert spectra of AE signals. This attenuation is frequency dependent. Furthermore, AE signals in the softening process showed a complex frequency distribution attributed to the mechanical properties of the tested specimen. The results indicate that rock failure is predictable. The novel technology applied in this study is feasible for analysis of the entire deformation process, including softening and failure processes.

  1. Punch stretching process monitoring using acoustic emission signal analysis. II - Application of frequency domain deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Steven Y.; Dornfeld, David A.; Nickerson, Jackson A.

    1987-01-01

    The coloring effect on the acoustic emission signal due to the frequency response of the data acquisition/processing instrumentation may bias the interpretation of AE signal characteristics. In this paper, a frequency domain deconvolution technique, which involves the identification of the instrumentation transfer functions and multiplication of the AE signal spectrum by the inverse of these system functions, has been carried out. In this way, the change in AE signal characteristics can be better interpreted as the result of the change in only the states of the process. Punch stretching process was used as an example to demonstrate the application of the technique. Results showed that, through the deconvolution, the frequency characteristics of AE signals generated during the stretching became more distinctive and can be more effectively used as tools for process monitoring.

  2. Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-06-08

    An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

  3. The Generation of Organoids for Studying Wnt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Drost, Jarno; Artegiani, Benedetta; Clevers, Hans

    2016-01-01

    We established an in vitro culture model in which intestinal epithelial stem cells can grow into three-dimensional, ever-expanding epithelial organoids that retain their original organ identity and genetic stability. Moreover, organoids can easily be genetically modified using different genome modification strategies, including viral delivery of transgenes and CRISPR/Cas9 technology. These combined characteristics make them a useful in vitro model system to study many biological processes including the contribution of cellular signaling pathways to tissue homeostasis and disease. Here we describe our current laboratory protocols to establish human intestinal organoids and how to genetically modify both mouse and human intestinal organoids to study cellular signaling pathways, specifically Wnt signaling. Moreover, we provide a detailed protocol for lentiviral transduction and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome modification of organoid cultures. PMID:27590160

  4. Compact biomedical pulsed signal generator for bone tissue stimulation

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for stimulating bone tissue for stimulating bone growth or treating osteoporosis by applying directly to the skin of the patient an alternating current electrical signal comprising wave forms known to simulate the piezoelectric constituents in bone. The apparatus may, by moving a switch, stimulate bone growth or treat osteoporosis, as desired. Based on low-power CMOS technology and enclosed in a moisture-resistant case shaped to fit comfortably, two astable multivibrators produce the desired waveforms. The amplitude, pulse width and pulse frequency, and the subpulse width and subpulse frequency of the waveforms are adjustable. The apparatus, preferably powered by a standard 9-volt battery, includes signal amplitude sensors and warning signals indicate an output is being produced and the battery needs to be replaced.

  5. Photonic generation and independent steering of multiple RF signals for software defined radars.

    PubMed

    Ghelfi, Paolo; Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Serafino, Giovanni; Pinna, Sergio; Bogoni, Antonella

    2013-09-23

    As the improvement of radar systems claims for digital approaches, photonics is becoming a solution for software defined high frequency and high stability signal generation. We report on our recent activities on the photonic generation of flexible wideband RF signals, extending the proposed architecture to the independent optical beamforming of multiple signals. The scheme has been tested generating two wideband signals at 10 GHz and 40 GHz, and controlling their independent delays at two antenna elements. Thanks to the multiple functionalities, the proposed scheme allows to improve the effectiveness of the photonic approach, reducing its cost and allowing flexibility, extremely wide bandwidth, and high stability. PMID:24104176

  6. A high voltage power supply for the AE-C and D low energy electron experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of the electrical and mechanical design and operation of high voltage power supplies for space flight use. The supply was used to generate the spiraltron high voltage for low energy electron experiment on AE-C and D. Two versions of the supply were designed and built; one design is referred to as the low power version (AE-C) and the other as the high power version (AE-D). Performance is discussed under all operating conditions.

  7. Transport activity of chimaeric AE2-AE3 chloride/bicarbonate anion exchange proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fujinaga, Jocelyne; Loiselle, Frederick B; Casey, Joseph R

    2003-01-01

    Chloride/bicarbonate anion exchangers (AEs), found in the plasma membrane of most mammalian cells, are involved in pH regulation and bicarbonate metabolism. Although AE2 and AE3 are highly similar in sequence, AE2-transport activity was 10-fold higher than AE3 (41 versus 4 mM x min(-1) respectively), when expressed by transient transfection of HEK-293 cells. AE2-AE3 chimaeras were constructed to define the region responsible for differences in transport activity. The level of AE2 expression was approx. 30% higher than that of AE3. Processing to the cell surface, studied by chemical labelling and confocal microscopy, showed that AE2 is processed to the cell surface approx. 8-fold more efficiently than AE3. The efficiency of cell-surface processing was dependent on the cytoplasmic domain, since the AE2 domain conferred efficient processing upon the AE3 membrane domain, with a predominant role for amino acids 322-677 of AE2. AE2 that was expressed in HEK-293 cells was glycosylated, but little of AE3 was. However, AE2 expressed in the presence of the glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin, was not glycosylated, yet retained 85 +/- 8% of anion-transport activity. Therefore glycosylation has little, if any, role in the cell-surface processing or activity of AE2 or AE3. We conclude that the low anion-transport activity of AE3 in HEK-293 cells is due to low level processing to the plasma membrane, possibly owing to protein interactions with the AE3 cytoplasmic domain. PMID:12578559

  8. Synthetic mechanobiology: engineering cellular force generation and signaling.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jasmine Hannah; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-08-01

    Mechanobiology seeks to understand and control mechanical and related biophysical communication between cells and their surroundings. While experimental efforts in this field have traditionally emphasized manipulation of the extracellular force environment, a new suite of approaches has recently emerged in which cell phenotype and signaling are controlled by directly engineering the cell itself. One route is to control cell behavior by modulating gene expression using conditional promoters. Alternatively, protein activity can be actuated directly using synthetic protein ligands, chemically induced protein dimerization, optogenetic strategies, or functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. Proof-of-principle studies are already demonstrating the translational potential of these approaches, and future technological development will permit increasingly precise control over cell mechanobiology and improve our understanding of the underlying signaling events. PMID:27023733

  9. Acoustic emission characterization using AE (parameter) delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) parameter delay concept is defined as that particular measured value of a parameter at which a specified baseline level of cumulative AE activity is reached. The parameter can be from any of a broad range of elastic, plastic, viscoelastic, and fracture mechanics parameters, as well as their combinations. Such parameters include stress, load, strain, displacement, time, temperature, loading cycle, unloading stress, stress intensity factor, strain energy release rate, and crack tip plasticity zone size, while the AE activity may be AE event counts, ringdown counts, energy, event duration, etc., as well as their combinations. Attention is given to examples for the AE parameter delay concept, together with various correlations.

  10. On the multifractal effects generated by monofractal signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grech, Dariusz; Pamuła, Grzegorz

    2013-12-01

    We study quantitatively the level of false multifractal signal one may encounter while analyzing multifractal phenomena in time series within multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). The investigated effect appears as a result of finite length of used data series and is additionally amplified by the long-term memory the data eventually may contain. We provide the detailed quantitative description of such apparent multifractal background signal as a threshold in spread of generalized Hurst exponent values Δh or a threshold in the width of multifractal spectrum Δα below which multifractal properties of the system are only apparent, i.e. do not exist, despite Δα≠0 or Δh≠0. We find this effect quite important for shorter or persistent series and we argue it is linear with respect to autocorrelation exponent γ. Its strength decays according to power law with respect to the length of time series. The influence of basic linear and nonlinear transformations applied to initial data in finite time series with various levels of long memory is also investigated. This provides additional set of semi-analytical results. The obtained formulas are significant in any interdisciplinary application of multifractality, including physics, financial data analysis or physiology, because they allow to separate the ‘true’ multifractal phenomena from the apparent (artificial) multifractal effects. They should be a helpful tool of the first choice to decide whether we do in particular case with the signal with real multiscaling properties or not.

  11. Photonic Generation of Dual-Band Power-Efficient Millimeter-Wave UWB Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Peng; Guo, Hao; Chen, Dalei; Zhou, Hua

    2015-05-01

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) technology has attracted great interest because it can provide a promising solution of future radar and short-range broadband wireless communications. The generation of millimeter-wave UWB signals using photonic approaches can reduce the high cost of the millimeter-wave electrical circuits. Moreover, it is well compatible with fiber transmission, which can effectively extend its signal coverage. In this paper, a novel approach to the photonic generation of millimeter-wave UWB signals with dual-band operation consideration is proposed. The proposed scheme can simultaneously generate millimeter-wave UWB signals in both 24 GHz and 60 GHz millimeter band, and can efficiently exploit the spectrum limit allowed by the FCC mask by using the linear combination pulse design concept. A model describing the proposed system is developed and the generation of 24/60 GHz millimeter-wave UWB signals is demonstrated via computer simulations.

  12. UWB doublet signal generation and modulation based on DFB laser under optical pulses injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dalei; Wang, Rong; Xiang, Peng; Pu, Tao; Fang, Tao; Zhou, Hua; Zhao, Jiyong; Huang, Long; Zhu, Huatao; Wang, Peng

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a novel scheme to generate ultra-wideband (UWB) doublet signals based on the cross-gain modulation (XGM) effect in the DFB lasers is proposed and experimentally demonstrated, the modulation and transmission of the generated UWB doublet signals are also researched. In the proposed system, a gain-switched laser (GSL) is used as a master laser (ML) and the optical pulses from the ML are optically injected into two paralleled DFB lasers, which are used as slave lasers (SL). Then the outputs from the SLs are detected by a balanced photodiode (BPD) to generate the Bi-phased UWB signals. By properly setting the system parameters, UWB signals with various modulation formats such as on-off keying (OOK), pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) as well as the phase-shift keying (PSK) can be generated. In addition, fiber transmission of the modulated UWB signals is also experimentally investigated.

  13. High-power optical millimeter-wave signal generation with tunable frequency multiplication factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yi-shi; Zheng, Zhenyu; Luo, Zhixiao; Min, Zhixuan; Xu, Ou; Liu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    This work demonstrates a simple and novel scheme for millimeter-wave (MMW) signal generation using optical multi-sidebands (OMSB) modulation. In the proposed methods, several pairs of optical sidebands can be generated by employing parallel phase modulators driven by a low frequency radio frequency (RF) signal. The optical sidebands will beat at a photodetector (PD) to generate high frequency MMW signal with tunable frequency multiplication factor, such as frequency octupling, 12-tupling, 16-tupling and 18-tupling. Since no optical filters or DC bias are used, the MMW signal has the evident character of high-power output. A generalized analytic expression and simulation verification for generating the frequency multi-tupling MMW signal are developed. The influences caused by non-ideal factors are discussed in detail, and undesired power ratios versus non-ideal factors are plotted and analyzed.

  14. Photonic generation of arbitrarily phase-modulated microwave signals based on a single DDMZM.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Wen Ting; Sun, Wen Hui; Wang, Li Xian; Zhu, Ning Hua

    2014-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate a compact and cost-effective photonic approach to generate arbitrarily phase-modulated microwave signals using a conventional dual-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator (DDMZM). One arm (arm1) of the DDMZM is driven by a sinusoidal microwave signal whose power is optimized to suppress the optical carrier, while the other arm (arm2) of the DDMZM is driven by a coding signal. In this way, the phase-modulated optical carrier from the arm2 and the sidebands from the arm1 are combined together at the output of the DDMZM. Binary phase-coded microwave pulses which are free from the baseband frequency components can be generated when the coding signal is a three-level signal. In this case, the precise π phase shift of the microwave signal is independent of the amplitude of the coding signal. Moreover, arbitrarily phase-modulated microwave signals can be generated when an optical bandpass filter is attached after the DDMZM to achieve optical single-sideband modulation. The proposed approach is theoretically analyzed and experimentally verified. The binary phase-coded microwave pulses, quaternary phase-coded microwave signal, and linearly frequency-chirped microwave signal are experimentally generated. The simulated and the experimental results agree very well with each other. PMID:24718119

  15. Eddy current signal deconvolution technique for the improvement of steam generator tubing burst pressure predictions.

    SciTech Connect

    Petri, M. C.; Wei, T. Y. C.; Kupperman, D. S.; Reifman, J.; Morman, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Eddy current techniques are extremely sensitive to the presence of axial cracks in nuclear power plant steam generator tube walls, but they are equally sensitive to the presence of dents, fretting, support structures, corrosion products, and other artifacts. Eddy current signal interpretation is further complicated by cracking geometries more complex than a single axial crack. Although there has been limited success in classifying and sizing defects through artificial neural networks, the ability to predict tubing integrity has, so far, eluded modelers. In large part, this lack of success stems from an inability to distinguish crack signals from those arising from artifacts. We present here a new signal processing technique that deconvolves raw eddy current voltage signals into separate signal contributions from different sources, which allows signals associated with a dominant crack to be identified. The signal deconvolution technique, combined with artificial neural network modeling, significantly improves the prediction of tube burst pressure from bobbin-coil eddy current measurements of steam generator tubing.

  16. Transient signal generation in a self-assembled nanosystem fueled by ATP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzato, Cristian; Prins, Leonard J.

    2015-07-01

    A fundamental difference exists in the way signal generation is dealt with in natural and synthetic systems. While nature uses the transient activation of signalling pathways to regulate all cellular functions, chemists rely on sensory devices that convert the presence of an analyte into a steady output signal. The development of chemical systems that bear a closer analogy to living ones (that is, require energy for functioning, are transient in nature and operate out-of-equilibrium) requires a paradigm shift in the design of such systems. Here we report a straightforward strategy that enables transient signal generation in a self-assembled system and show that it can be used to mimic key features of natural signalling pathways, which are control over the output signal intensity and decay rate, the concentration-dependent activation of different signalling pathways and the transient downregulation of catalytic activity. Overall, the reported methodology provides temporal control over supramolecular processes.

  17. Development of Trouble Diagnosis Technology of 50W Grade Small Wind Turbine Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaoka, Masashige; Inohata, Kazuki; Miyake, Takuma; Tashima, Daisuke; Otsubo, Masahisa; Bouno, Toshio

    Establishment of an early trouble diagnosis system is demanded to prevent damage of wind turbine generator. Therefore, AE signal occurring by the damage of a wind blade was detected with the AE sensor which installed to the body of wind turbine generator and a pole. In this study, length of a blade of a small wind turbine generator was changed as simulated trouble in the constant wind velocity. The AE signal which occurred at this time was measured with an AE sensor. The signal was processed by FFT analysis, and a change of spectrum strength was examined. Then, trouble diagnosis technology of 50W grade small wind turbine generator was developed. As the results, a method to count the number of times more than threshold of AE signals was suggested by a wave pattern of an AE signal. It was understood that the number of the count was decided as standard to judge normality or abnormality of 50W grade small wind turbine generator.

  18. Brushless DC motor control system responsive to control signals generated by a computer or the like

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, Douglas T. (Inventor); Schmitt, Donald E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A control system for a brushless DC motor responsive to digital control signals is disclosed. The motor includes a multiphase wound stator and a permanent magnet rotor. The rotor is arranged so that each phase winding, when energized from a DC source, will drive the rotor through a predetermined angular position or step. A commutation signal generator responsive to the shaft position provides a commutation signal for each winding. A programmable control signal generator such as a computer or microprocessor produces individual digital control signals for each phase winding. The control signals and commutation signals associated with each winding are applied to an AND gate for that phase winding. Each gate controls a switch connected in series with the associated phase winding and the DC source so that each phase winding is energized only when the commutation signal and the control signal associated with that phase winding are present. The motor shaft may be advanced one step at a time to a desired position by applying a predetermined number of control signals in the proper sequence to the AND gates and the torque generated by the motor may be regulated by applying a separate control signal to each AND gate which is pulse width modulated to control the total time that each switch connects its associated winding to the DC source during each commutation period.

  19. Brushless DC motor control system responsive to control signals generated by a computer or the like

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D. T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A control system for a brushless DC motor responsive to digital control signals is disclosed. The motor includes a multiphase wound stator and a permanent magnet rotor. The motor is arranged so that each phase winding, when energized from a DC source, will drive the rotor through a predetermined angular position or step. A commutation signal generator responsive to the shaft position provides a commutation signal for each winding. A programmable control signal generator such as a computer or microprocessor produces individual digital control signals for each phase winding. The control signals and commutation signals associated with each winding are applied to an AND gate for that phase winding. Each gate controls a switch connected in series with the associated phase winding and the DC source so that each phase winding is energized only when the commutation signal and the control signal associated with that phase winding are present. The motor shaft may be advanced one step at a time to a desired position by applying a predetermined number of control signals in the proper sequence to the AND gates and the torque generated by the motor be regulated by applying a separate control signal and each AND gate which is pulse width modulated to control the total time that each switch connects its associated winding to the DC source during each commutation period.

  20. An electronic Doppler signal generator for assessing continuous-wave ultrasonic Doppler flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallwood, R. H.; Dixon, P.

    1986-03-01

    The design and performance of the electric Doppler signal generator are described. The features of the CW ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter, which operates in the 2-10 MHz range, that are relevant to the design of the generator are examined. Methods for evaluating the bandwidth, dynamic range, directional separation, and linearity of the zero-crossing detector are discussed. The use of a polyphase network as a phase shifter to generate a single sideband (SSB) signal is analyzed. The SSB generation is performed at a frequency of 100 kHz and the advantages of generation at this frequency are stated. The selection of proper SSB signals for the system is investigated. The performance of the Doppler signal generator is evaluated with a frequency analyzer; sideband rejection ratios and phase error in the quadrature oscillator are calculated. The Doppler generator was applied to a CW flowmeter and output signal levels were measured. The test reveals that the Doppler signal generator's performance exceeds the flowmeter requirements; rejection of the unwanted sideband exceeds 40 dB for Doppler frequencies up to 10 kHz, which is the minimum upper frequency for 10 MHz flowmeters.

  1. Ultrawideband monocycle pulse generation based on polarization modulator and low speed electrical NRZ signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guodan; Zhang, Qiufang; Wang, Quan

    2015-07-01

    A novel ultrawideband (UWB) monocycle pulse generation system by modulating a polarization modulator (PolM) with a low speed electrical nonreturn-to-zero (NRZ) signal is proposed, which significantly reduce the bandwidth requirement of the driving signal. At each bit transition of the input NRZ signal, two polarity-reversed Gaussian pulses are generated. By properly setting the delay between these two Gaussian pulses, an optical UWB monocycle pulse can be generated. Biphase modulation (BPM) can be realized by electrically switching the polarization direction at the output of PolM, if an electrically tunable arbitrary wave plate (AWP) is employed.

  2. Digital test signal generation: An accurate SNR calibration approach for the DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Luaces, B. O.

    1991-01-01

    A new method of generating analog test signals with accurate signal to noise ratios (SNRs) is described. High accuracy will be obtained by simultaneous generation of digital noise and signal spectra at a given baseband or bandpass limited bandwidth. The digital synthesis will provide a test signal embedded in noise with the statistical properties of a stationary random process. Accuracy will only be dependent on test integration time with a limit imposed by the system quantization noise (expected to be 0.02 dB). Setability will be approximately 0.1 dB. The first digital SNR generator to provide baseband test signals is being built and will be available in early 1991.

  3. CCY-1a-E2 induces G2/M phase arrest and apoptotic cell death in HL-60 leukemia cells through cyclin-dependent kinase 1 signaling and the mitochondria-dependent caspase pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Fen; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lin, Chingju; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Lee, Miau-Rong

    2016-09-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that 2-[(3-methoxybenzyl)oxy]benzaldehyde (CCY-1a-E2) is a potent compound that acts against multiple human leukemia cell lines. CCY-1a-E2 was also shown to have efficacious anti‑leukemic activity in vivo. However, the molecular mechanism of action of CCY‑1a‑E2 attributed to its anticancer effect remains poorly understood. In the present study, CCY‑1a‑E2 suppressed cell viability in multiple leukemia cell lines (HL‑60, K562, KG‑1 and KG‑1a) via inhibition of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. CCY‑1a‑E2 exhibited a marked toxic effect on HL‑60 cells and displayed low cytotoxicity in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results from flow cytometric analysis indicated that CCY‑1a‑E2 promoted G2/M phase arrest and promoted apoptosis in the HL‑60 cells. CCY‑1a‑E2 treatment upregulated cyclin B, cyclin‑dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), cell division cycle 25C (cdc25C) and p21 protein expression. CCY‑1a‑E2 caused apoptotic cell death and DNA fragmentation as determined by 4',6‑diamidino‑2‑phenylindole (DAPI) staining and DNA gel electrophoresis. Elevated activities of caspase‑8, ‑9 and ‑3 were observed during CCY‑1a‑E2‑induced cell apoptosis; their specific inhibitors were found to block CCY‑1a‑E2‑induced apoptosis, respectively. Moreover, CCY‑1a‑E2 time‑dependently disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and it enhanced the protein levels of Fas/CD95, cytochrome c, Bax, cleaved PARP, as well as attenuated Bcl‑2 expression in the HL‑60 cells. Our results provide direct evidence that supports the future potential therapeutic application of CCY-1a-E2 in leukemia. PMID:27461132

  4. Compliant tactile sensor for generating a signal related to an applied force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Jara, Eduardo (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Tactile sensor. The sensor includes a compliant convex surface disposed above a sensor array, the sensor array adapted to respond to deformation of the convex surface to generate a signal related to an applied force vector.

  5. Generating clock signals for a cycle accurate, cycle reproducible FPGA based hardware accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Asaad, Sameth W.; Kapur, Mohit

    2016-01-05

    A method, system and computer program product are disclosed for generating clock signals for a cycle accurate FPGA based hardware accelerator used to simulate operations of a device-under-test (DUT). In one embodiment, the DUT includes multiple device clocks generating multiple device clock signals at multiple frequencies and at a defined frequency ratio; and the FPG hardware accelerator includes multiple accelerator clocks generating multiple accelerator clock signals to operate the FPGA hardware accelerator to simulate the operations of the DUT. In one embodiment, operations of the DUT are mapped to the FPGA hardware accelerator, and the accelerator clock signals are generated at multiple frequencies and at the defined frequency ratio of the frequencies of the multiple device clocks, to maintain cycle accuracy between the DUT and the FPGA hardware accelerator. In an embodiment, the FPGA hardware accelerator may be used to control the frequencies of the multiple device clocks.

  6. Photonic generation of a millimeter-wave signal based on sextuple-frequency multiplication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hongwei; Chen, Minghua; Wang, Tianliang; Xie, Shizhong

    2007-05-01

    A millimeter-wave signal with sextuple-frequency multiplication of a microwave source is obtained with two cascaded optical modulators, which are driven by the same microwave source with phase deviation of pi/2 introduced by an electrical phase shifter. Without any optical filter, a wideband continuously tunable millimeter-wave signal is easily generated. PMID:17410221

  7. Photonic generation of a millimeter-wave signal based on sextuple-frequency multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hongwei; Chen, Minghua; Wang, Tianliang; Xie, Shizhong

    2007-05-01

    A millimeter-wave signal with sextuple-frequency multiplication of a microwave source is obtained with two cascaded optical modulators, which are driven by the same microwave source with phase deviation of π/2 introduced by an electrical phase shifter. Without any optical filter, a wideband continuously tunable millimeter-wave signal is easily generated.

  8. Photonic RF vector signal generation with enhanced spectral efficiency using precoded double single-sideband modulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanquan; Chien, Hung-Chang; Guo, HaiChao; Yu, Jianjun; Chang, Gee-Kung; Chi, Nan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a novel photonic vector signal at frequency (RF) bands generation scheme based on the beating of double single sidebands (SSBs) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The double SSBs carry separate constant- or multi-amplitude quadrature-amplitude-modulation vector signals are generated from a single I/Q modulator. By adopting phase and amplitude precoding, different constellations can be generated, such as 3-ary phase-shift keying (PSK), 4-PSK, 7-PSK, 8-PSK, and so on. In this work, 10-Gbaud 7-PSK vector signal generation at 20 GHz enabled by two precoded 4-PSK SSB signals via a single I/Q modulator is theoretically and experimentally investigated. Compared to a single-drive Mach-Zehnder modulator or conventional I/Q modulator-based photonic vector signal generation scheme, the spectrum efficiency can be doubled. Differential coding is also implemented at the transmitter side for accurate demodulation of 7-PSK into two 4-PSK signals. The bit-error ratio for 10-Gbaud 7-PSK vector signals can be under hard-decision forward-error-correction threshold of 3.8×10-3 after 10 km standard single-mode fiber transmission. PMID:27244413

  9. Infrared observations of AE Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzi, E. G.; Chincarini, G.; Tarenghi, M.

    1981-01-01

    Broadband infrared observations of the cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii are reported. The observations were obtained in the J, H, K and L filters with the InSb photometer attached to the 1-m telescope of the European Southern Observatory. The infrared energy distribution observed from 0.35 to 3.5 microns for phase 0.5 suggests a spectral type of K5 V for the secondary and a distance to the system of approximately 70 pc if an absolute magnitude of 7.3 is assumed. Monitoring of the flux at 2.2 microns reveals a variability with an amplitude of approximately 0.3 magnitude over one third of the orbital period, the nature of which is under investigation.

  10. BPSK optical mm-wave signal generation by septupling frequency via a single optical phase modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Peng; Ma, Jianxin

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a novel and simple scheme to generate the BPSK optical millimeter wave (MMW) signal with frequency septupling by using an optical phase modulator (PM) and a wavelength selective switch (WSS). In this scheme, the PM is driven by a radio frequency (RF) BPSK signal at the optimized modulation index of 4.89 to assure the 4th and 3rd-order sidebands have equal amplitudes. An wavelength selective switch (WSS) is used to abstract the -4th and +3rd-order sidebands from the spectrum generated by RF BPSK signal modulating the lightwave to form the BPSK optical MMW signal with frequency septupling the driving RF signal. In these two tones, only the +3rd-order sideband bears the BPSK signal while the -4th-order sideband is unmodulated since the phase information is canceled by the even times multiplication of the phase of BPSK signal. The MMW signal can avoid the pulse walk-off effect and the amplitude fading effect caused by the fiber chromatic dispersion. By adjusting the modulation index to assure the two tones have equal amplitude, the generated optical MMW signal has the maximal opto-electrical conversion efficiency and good transmission performance.

  11. All-optical UWB signal generation and multicasting using a nonlinear optical loop mirror.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tianye; Li, Jia; Sun, Junqiang; Chen, Lawrence R

    2011-08-15

    An all-optical scheme for ultra-wideband (UWB) signal generation (positive and negative monocycle and doublet pulses) and multicasting using a nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) is proposed and demonstrated. Five UWB signals (1 monocycle and 4 doublet pulses) are generated simultaneously from a single Gaussian optical pulse. The fractional bandwidths of the monocycle pulses are approximately 100% while those of the doublet pulses range from 100% to 133%. The UWB signals are then modulated using a 2(15)-1 pseudorandom bit sequence (PRBS) and error-free performance for each multicast channel is obtained. PMID:21934951

  12. All-optical UWB signal generation and multicasting using a nonlinear optical loop mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tianye; Li, Jia; Sun, Junqiang; Chen, Lawrence R.

    2011-08-01

    An all-optical scheme for ultra-wideband (UWB) signal generation (positive and negative monocycle and doublet pulses) and multicasting using a nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM) is proposed and demonstrated. Five UWB signals (1 monocycle and 4 doublet pulses) are generated simultaneously from a single Gaussian optical pulse. The fractional bandwidths of the monocycle pulses are approximately 100% while those of the doublet pulses range from 100% to 133%. The UWB signals are then modulated using a 215 - 1 pseudorandom bit sequence (PRBS) and error-free performance for each multicast channel is obtained.

  13. Batteryless wireless transmission system for electronic drum uses piezoelectric generator for play signal and power source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, H.; Yoshimi, A.; Takemura, K.; Tanaka, A.; Douseki, T.

    2015-12-01

    A batteryless self-powered wireless transmission system has been developed that sends a signal from a drum pad to a synthesizer. The power generated by a piezoelectric generator functions both as the “Play” signal for the synthesizer and as the power source for the transmitter. An FM transmitter, which theoretically operates with zero latency, and a receiver with quick-response squelch of the received signal were developed for wireless transmission with a minimum system delay. Experimental results for an electronic drum without any connecting wires fully demonstrated the feasibility of self-powered wireless transmission with a latency of 900 μs.

  14. High Speed All Optical Nyquist Signal Generation and Full-band Coherent Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianjun; Fang, Yuan; Chi, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Spectrum efficient data transmission is of key interest for high capacity optical communication systems considering the limited available bandwidth. Transmission of the high speed signal with higher-order modulation formats within the Nyquist bandwidth using coherent detection brings attractive performance advantages. However, high speed Nyquist signal generation with high order modulation formats is challenging. Electrical Nyquist pulse generation is restricted by the limited sampling rate and processor capacities of digital-to-analog convertor devices, while the optical Nyquist signals can provide a much higher symbol rate using time domain multiplexing method. However, most optical Nyquist signals are based on direct detection with simple modulation formats. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of high speed all optical Nyquist signal generation based on Sinc-shaped pulse generation and time-division multiplexing with high level modulation format and full-band coherent detection. Our experiments demonstrate a highly flexible and compatible all optical high speed Nyquist signal generation and detection scheme for future fiber communication systems. PMID:25142269

  15. Combinational logic for generating gate drive signals for phase control rectifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolland, C. R.; Trimble, D. W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Control signals for phase-delay rectifiers, which require a variable firing angle that ranges from 0 deg to 180 deg, are derived from line-to-line 3-phase signals and both positive and negative firing angle control signals which are generated by comparing current command and actual current. Line-to-line phases are transformed into line-to-neutral phases and integrated to produce 90 deg phase delayed signals that are inverted to produce three cosine signals, such that for each its maximum occurs at the intersection of positive half cycles of the other two phases which are inputs to other inverters. At the same time, both positive and negative (inverted) phase sync signals are generated for each phase by comparing each with the next and producing a square wave when it is greater. Ramp, sync and firing angle controls signals are than used in combinational logic to generate the gate firing control signals SCR gate drives which fire SCR devices in a bridge circuit.

  16. Microcomputer-controlled high-power low-frequency random-signal generator

    SciTech Connect

    Baishusin, B.M.; Galin, I.A.; Galishnikov, Y.P.; Voznyi, V.A.

    1986-07-01

    This paper describes a generator of high-power low-frequency random signals that is controlled by a microcomputer and realizes polygaussian expansions. The generator provides random as well as determined periodic or single signals of any shape with a power of up to 25 kW at frequencies of 0-200 Hz. A schematic diagram of the interface is shown. It consists of an Elektronika D3-28 microcomputer, an interface, a control-pulse generator, a thyristor switch unit, and a parallel voltage divider.

  17. Genetic effect of the Aegilops caudata plasmon on the manifestation of the Ae. cylindrica genome.

    PubMed

    Tsunewaki, Koichiro; Mori, Naoki; Takumi, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    In the course of reconstructing Aegilops caudata from its own genome (CC) and its plasmon, which had passed half a century in common wheat (genome AABBDD), we produced alloplasmic Ae. cylindrica (genome CCDD) with the plasmon of Ae. caudata. This line, designated (caudata)-CCDD, was found to express male sterility in its second substitution backcross generation (SB2) of (caudata)-AABBCCDD pollinated three times with the Ae. cylindrica pollen. We repeatedly backcrossed these SB2 plants with the Ae. cylindrica pollen until the SB5 generation, and SB5F2 progeny were produced by self-pollination of the SB5 plants. Thirteen morphological and physiological characters, including pollen and seed fertilities, of the (caudata)-CCDD SB5F2 were compared with those of the euplasmic Ae. cylindrica. The results indicated that the male sterility expressed by (caudata)-CCDD was due to genetic incompatibility between the Ae. cylindrica genome and Ae. caudata plasmon that did not affect any other characters of Ae. cylindrica. Also, we report that the genome integrity functions in keeping the univalent transmission rate high. PMID:25832746

  18. Effective AE source location of damages in the wind turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, D. J.; Han, B. H.

    2012-05-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) has emerged as a powerful nondestructive tool to detect preexisting defects or to characterize failure mechanisms. Recently, this technique or this kind of principle, that is an in-situ monitoring of inside damages of materials or structures, becomes increasingly popular for monitoring the integrity of large structures like a huge wind blade. Therefore, it is required to find a symptom of damage propagation before catastrophic failure through a continuous monitoring. In this study, we have tried to develop a source location algorithm for damage identification on the part of real wind turbine blade. First, it was focused to understand the activities of acoustic emission events generated from the glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) structures such as a wind blade. Secondly, this study aims to identify and locate the damages from blade specimens. In this work, the activities of AE signals generated from external artificial sources was evaluated and located by new developed source location algorithm. The results show that new suggested source location algorithm was much higher performance than conventional source location method.

  19. The AE-8 trapped electron model environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vette, James I.

    1991-01-01

    The machine sensible version of the AE-8 electron model environment was completed in December 1983. It has been sent to users on the model environment distribution list and is made available to new users by the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). AE-8 is the last in a series of terrestrial trapped radiation models that includes eight proton and eight electron versions. With the exception of AE-8, all these models were documented in formal reports as well as being available in a machine sensible form. The purpose of this report is to complete the documentation, finally, for AE-8 so that users can understand its construction and see the comparison of the model with the new data used, as well as with the AE-4 model.

  20. Wide bandwidth chaotic signal generation in a monolithically integrated semiconductor laser via optical injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xue-Mei; Zhong, Zhu-Qiang; Zhao, Ling-Juan; Lu, Dan; Qiu, Hai-Ying; Xia, Guang-Qiong; Wu, Zheng-Mao

    2015-11-01

    Wide bandwidth chaotic signal generation in a three-section monolithically integrated semiconductor laser (MISL) under external optical injection is investigated experimentally. Through evaluating the effective bandwidth of chaotic signals, the influences of the optical injection on the bandwidth of chaotic signal from the MISL are analyzed. The experimental results indicate that, for the currents of the DFB section (IDFB) and the phase section (IP) are fixed at 70.00 mA and 34.00 mA, respectively, the effective bandwidth of chaos signal generated by the solitary MISL reaches its maximum value of 14.36 GHz when the current of the amplification section (IA) takes 23.22 mA. After an external optical injection is introduced into the MISL, the effective bandwidth of the generated chaotic signal can be beyond 2.5 times of the maximum value. Furthermore, the effects of the injection strength and the frequency detuning on the effective bandwidth of the generated chaotic signal are also discussed.

  1. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating coded signals

    SciTech Connect

    Vu, Cung Khac; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S

    2014-12-30

    A system and a method for investigating rock formations includes generating, by a first acoustic source, a first acoustic signal comprising a first plurality of pulses, each pulse including a first modulated signal at a central frequency; and generating, by a second acoustic source, a second acoustic signal comprising a second plurality of pulses. A receiver arranged within the borehole receives a detected signal including a signal being generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first-and-second acoustic signal in a non-linear mixing zone within the intersection volume. The method also includes-processing the received signal to extract the signal generated by the non-linear mixing process over noise or over signals generated by a linear interaction process, or both.

  2. Detecting of ELF/VLF Signals Generated by GEMINIDS 2011 Meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkari, Amir Kayone; Zeinali, M. M.; Taraz, M.

    2015-07-01

    For a long time, the generation mechanism of simultaneous sound with passing of large meteors was a research edge until a reasonable mechanism was proposed for that. This mechanism is based on the existence of ELF/VLF radio signals. This research that aims for detection of these signals archives an improvement over previous works. The signal was found on the extremely low frequency (ELF) band which could not be generated by other sources like lightning, has a frequency range between several Hertz to 500 Hz, and so could be missed with noises produce by electrical machines. The new signal is presented at this work has a good correlation with synchronized visual data that were collected on the peak of Geminids 2011 meteor shower.

  3. Spectral characterization of microwave signals generated by the heterodyne of injection-locked semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberland, Martin; Tetu, Michel; Tremblay, Pierre

    1994-06-01

    Optical heterodyne has been proposed to generate the microwave signals to be used in phased array antenna systems. Optical injection-locking of secondary lasers to distinct FM-sidebands of a current-modulated laser diode has been used to improve the spectral purity of the microwave signal generated by heterodyne. A very narrow linewidth microwave signal superimposed over a Lorentzian shaped noise floor has been obtained. The spectral purity of the produced microwave signal has been characterized by three distinct means: power spectrum, phase fluctuations, and time-domain frequency stability (Allan variance). The power spectrum shows a linewidth smaller than 25 mHz (FWHM) and the Allan standard deviation gives a level 1 X 10-11 for an averaging time of 1 sec.

  4. A robust random number generator based on differential comparison of chaotic laser signals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Wang, Yuncai; Liu, Ming; Xue, Lugang; Li, Pu; Wang, Anbang; Zhang, Mingjiang

    2012-03-26

    We experimentally realize a robust real-time random number generator by differentially comparing the signal from a chaotic semiconductor laser and its delayed signal through a 1-bit analog-to-digital converter. The probability density distribution of the output chaotic signal based on the differential comparison method possesses an extremely small coefficient of Pearson's median skewness (1.5 × 10⁻⁶), which can yield a balanced random sequence much easily than the previously reported method that compares the signal from the chaotic laser with a certain threshold value. Moveover, we experimently demonstrate that our method can stably generate good random numbers at rates of 1.44 Gbit/s with excellent immunity from external perturbations while the previously reported method fails. PMID:22453429

  5. Light generation of intracellular Ca2+ signals by a genetically encoded protein BACCS

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Tomohiro; Sato, Koji; Kakumoto, Toshiyuki; Miura, Shigenori; Touhara, Kazushige; Takeuchi, Shoji; Nakata, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+ signals are highly regulated in a spatiotemporal manner in numerous cellular physiological events. Here we report a genetically engineered blue light-activated Ca2+ channel switch (BACCS), as an optogenetic tool for generating Ca2+ signals. BACCS opens Ca2+-selective ORAI ion channels in response to light. A BACCS variant, dmBACCS2, combined with Drosophila Orai, elevates the Ca2+ concentration more rapidly, such that Ca2+ elevation in mammalian cells is observed within 1 s on light exposure. Using BACCSs, we successfully control cellular events including NFAT-mediated gene expression. In the mouse olfactory system, BACCS mediates light-dependent electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, we generate BACCS mutants, which exhibit fast and slow recovery of intracellular Ca2+. Thus, BACCSs are a useful optogenetic tool for generating temporally various intracellular Ca2+ signals with a large dynamic range, and will be applicable to both in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:26282514

  6. Two-dimensionally tunable microwave signal generation based on optical frequency-to-time conversion.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jia; Yan, Lianshen; Pan, Wei; Luo, Bin; Zou, Xihua; Yi, Anlin; Yao, Xiaotian Steve

    2010-08-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an all-fiber-based approach to generate microwave signals with tunable frequency and pulse width. The adjustable optical power spectrum can be achieved using a spectrum shaper, consisting of a variable differential-group-delay element and a bandwidth-tunable optical filter. Through the frequency-to-time conversion in the dispersive fiber, the frequency and pulse width of the obtained microwave signals can be user defined by modifying the optical spectrum shape. PMID:20680073

  7. Acoustic emission and signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. K.

    1990-01-01

    A review is given of the acoustic emission (AE) phenomenon and its applications in NDE and geological rock mechanics. Typical instrumentation used in AE signal detection, data acquisition, processing, and analysis is discussed. The parameters used in AE signal analysis are outlined, and current methods of AE signal analysis procedures are discussed. A literature review is presented on the pattern classification of AE signals. A discussion then follows on the application of AE in aircraft component monitoring, with an experiment described which focuses on in-flight AE monitoring during fatigue crack growth in an aero engine mount. A pattern recognition approach is detailed for the classification of the experimental data. The approach subjects each of the data files to a cluster analysis by the threshold-k-means scheme. The technique is shown to classify the data successfully.

  8. Digital test signal generation: An accurate SNR calibration approach for the DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Luaces, Benito O.

    1993-01-01

    In support of the on-going automation of the Deep Space Network (DSN) a new method of generating analog test signals with accurate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is described. High accuracy is obtained by simultaneous generation of digital noise and signal spectra at the desired bandwidth (base-band or bandpass). The digital synthesis provides a test signal embedded in noise with the statistical properties of a stationary random process. Accuracy is dependent on test integration time and limited only by the system quantization noise (0.02 dB). The monitor and control as well as signal-processing programs reside in a personal computer (PC). Commands are transmitted to properly configure the specially designed high-speed digital hardware. The prototype can generate either two data channels modulated or not on a subcarrier, or one QPSK channel, or a residual carrier with one biphase data channel. The analog spectrum generated is on the DC to 10 MHz frequency range. These spectra may be up-converted to any desired frequency without loss on the characteristics of the SNR provided. Test results are presented.

  9. SCRF spectral mask compliant ultra-wideband signal generation approaches for RoF systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianova, Anna V.; Meshkov, Ivan K.; Sultanov, Albert K.; Vinogradova, Irina L.; Abdrakhmanova, Guzel I.; Grakhova, Elizaveta P.; Ishmiyarov, Arsen A.; Zainullin, Airat R.

    2016-03-01

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) signal generation approach for Radio-over-Fiber (RoF) systems is proposed in the paper. Impulse-radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) transmission technology experimental realization comply with State Committee on Radio Frequency (SCRF) regulations is offered in the paper. Three separate IR-UWB signals with carrier frequencies 4,5 GHz, 7 GHz and 9,5 GHz are generated. Such frequencies were chosen because of SCRF spectral mask "windows". The frequencies 4,5 GHz, 7 GHz and 9,5 GHz are the central frequencies of these "windows". To assess the performance of proposed system bit error rate (BER) measurements were taken. UWB signal generation schemes and received IR-UWB signal are shown in the figures. The correlation between BER and received optical power is given in the paper. In the case of UWB signal photonic generation approach the correlation between BER and received optical power for different SMF fiber lengths is given.

  10. Vector 8QAM signal generation and transmission based on optical carrier suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jiangnan; Zhang, Zirang; Li, Xingying; Xu, Yuming; Chen, Long; Yu, Jianjun

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally demonstrate how to generate photonic eight quadrature amplitude modulation (M-QAM) vector signal by using only one Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM). Because of the 'square-law' characteristic of the photodetector (PD), the amplitudes and the phase of the driving radio-frequency (RF) signal are changed after detection. The pre-coding for the amplitudes and the phase of the driving radio-frequency (RF) signal before they drive the MZM will take the advantages of restoring the driving precoding signal to regular signal after PD. The transmission performance with different date rates at 1, 2, and 3-Gbaud over single-mode fiber (SMF) transmission is experimentally demonstrated. The bit-error ratios (BERs) of the transmission system are less than the forward-error-correction (FEC) threshold of 3.8×10-3.

  11. The phase of the crosspolarized signal generated by millimeter wave propagation through rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overstreet, W. P.; Bostian, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    Proposed schemes for cancelling rain-induced crosstalk in dual-polarized communications systems depend upon the phase relationships between the wanted and unwanted signals. This report investigates the phase relationship of the rain-generated crosspolarized signal relative to the copolarized signal. Theoretical results obtained from a commonly accepted propagation model are presented. Experimental data from the Communications Technology Satellite beacon and from the Comstar beacon are presented and the correlation between theory and data is discussed. An inexpensive semi-adaptive cancellation system is proposed and its performance expectations are presented. The implications of phase variations on a cancellation system are also discussed.

  12. Improving liver fibrosis diagnosis based on forward and backward second harmonic generation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qiwen; Zhuo, Shuangmu; So, Peter T. C.; Yu, Hanry

    2015-02-01

    The correlation of forward second harmonic generation (SHG) signal and backward SHG signal in different liver fibrosis stages was investigated. We found that three features, including the collagen percentage for forward SHG, the collagen percentage for backward SHG, and the average intensity ratio of two kinds of SHG signals, can quantitatively stage liver fibrosis in thioacetamide-induced rat model. We demonstrated that the combination of all three features by using a support vector machine classification algorithm can provide a more accurate prediction than each feature alone in fibrosis diagnosis.

  13. Building an ontology of adverse drug reactions for automated signal generation in pharmacovigilance.

    PubMed

    Henegar, Corneliu; Bousquet, Cédric; Lillo-Le Louët, Agnès; Degoulet, Patrice; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2006-01-01

    Automated signal generation in pharmacovigilance implements unsupervised statistical machine learning techniques in order to discover unknown adverse drug reactions (ADR) in spontaneous reporting systems. The impact of the terminology used for coding ADRs has not been addressed previously. The Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) used worldwide in pharmacovigilance cases does not provide formal definitions of terms. We have built an ontology of ADRs to describe semantics of MedDRA terms. Ontological subsumption and approximate matching inferences allow a better grouping of medically related conditions. Signal generation performances are significantly improved but time consumption related to modelization remains very important. PMID:16185681

  14. Generation of a 640 Gbit/s NRZ OTDM signal using a silicon microring resonator.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yunhong; Hu, Hao; Galili, Michael; Xu, Jing; Liu, Liu; Pu, Minhao; Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Peucheret, Christophe; Jeppesen, Palle; Zhang, Xinliang; Huang, Dexiu; Ou, Haiyan

    2011-03-28

    A 640 Gbit/s NRZ OTDM signal has been successfully generated for the first time by format conversion of a 640 Gbit/s OTDM signal from RZ to NRZ. First, a coherent 640 Gbit/s OTDM RZ signal is generated by wavelength conversion of the original incoherent OTDM signal utilizing Kerr switching in a highly nonlinear fiber. Second, RZ-to-NRZ format conversion is achieved in a specially designed silicon microring resonator with FSR of 1280 GHz, Q value of 638, high extinction ratio and low coupling loss to optical fiber. A 640 Gbit/s NRZ OTDM signal with very clear eye-diagram and narrower bandwidth than both the original incoherent 640 Gbit/s and the wavelength converted coherent 640 Gbit/s RZ OTDM signals has been obtained. Bit error ratio measurements show error free (<10(-9)) performance at a received power of -30 dBm for all the OTDM channels of the 640 Gbit/s NRZ signal, with very low power penalty (<0.5 dB) and improved dispersion tolerance compared to the wavelength converted RZ case. PMID:21451675

  15. Seascape-level variation in turbulence- and wave-generated hydrodynamic signals experienced by plankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Heidi L.; Gerbi, Gregory P.

    2016-02-01

    Plankton exhibit diverse and dramatic responses to fluid motions, and these behaviors are likely critical for survival and fitness. Fluid motions can be generated by organisms or by physical processes, including turbulence and surface gravity waves. Physical processes vary geographically in their intensity and generate hydrodynamic signals experienced by plankton as fluid forces on their sensory receptors. In this synthesis, we review how turbulence and waves vary in space, the scales and statistics of their motions, and the forces exerted on plankton. We then quantify the hydrodynamic signals produced by turbulence and waves in four seascape types - surf zones, inlets and estuaries, the continental shelf, and the open ocean - using published dissipation rates, wind and wave data from buoys, and observations from two coastal sites in Massachusetts, USA. We relate these geographic patterns in signals to the observed behaviors of example species and to the forces sensed by typical plankters with different receptor types. Turbulence-generated shears are largest in the surf zone, inlets and estuaries, while wave-generated accelerations are larger offshore; as a result, each seascape exhibits some range of combined shears and accelerations that is distinct. These signals generate forces on plankton that vary among habitats and with plankton size and swimming speed. Spatial patterns in fluid forces create a potential mechanism for dispersing larvae to distinguish habitats by their hydrodynamic signatures. However, turbulence can be strong in all seascapes and may cause widespread interference in signaling among predators and prey. Plankton with a single receptor type could identify nearshore habitats, while those with multiple receptor types potentially could distinguish inshore vs. offshore seascapes or decode signals produced by physical processes and by other organisms.

  16. AES analysis of barium fluoride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashin, G. N.; Makhnjuk, V. I.; Rumjantseva, S. M.; Shchekochihin, Ju. M.

    1993-06-01

    AES analysis of thin films of metal fluorides is a difficult problem due to charging and decomposition of such films under electron bombardment. We have developed a simple algorithm for a reliable quantitative AES analysis of metal fluoride thin films (BaF 2 in our work). The relative AES sensitivity factors for barium and fluorine were determined from BaF 2 single-crystal samples. We have investigated the dependence of composition and stability of barium fluoride films on the substrate temperature during film growth. We found that the instability of BaF 2 films grown on GaAs substrates at high temperatures (> 525°C) is due to a loss of fluorine. Our results show that, under the optimal electron exposure conditions, AES can be used for a quantitative analysis of metal fluoride thin films.

  17. Conductimetric membrane strip immunosensor with polyaniline-bound gold colloids as signal generator.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Cho, J H; Cha, G S; Lee, C W; Kim, H B; Paek, S H

    2000-02-01

    For point-of-care examination, an immuno-chromatographic assay system based on conductimetric detection was investigated by utilizing, as signal generator, colloidal gold with polyaniline bound on the metal surface. Although the gold is a widely used label for antibodies to produce colorimetric signals, the tracer does not lend itself for a suitable electric conduction along the gold particles due to the presence of protein barriers (e.g. immunoglobulin and blocking agent) against electron transfer. To overcome this problem, we introduced a conducting polymer, for instance, polyaniline, as a conductivity-modulating agent on the gold surface after immobilizing an antibody specific to human albumin used as model analyte. This novel signal generator amplified the conductimetric signal 4.7 times compared with the plain gold, and the signal was also maximum 2.3-fold higher than that from the photometric system under the same analytical conditions. The latter effect resulted from an exponential pattern in the dose-response curve of the electric signal that was different from the conventional sigmoidal shape. PMID:10722148

  18. Search for a QGP with a TPC spectrometer, and QGP signals predicted by new event generator

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1988-12-08

    The BNL/CCNY/Johns Hopkins/Rice Collaboration has developed and successfully tested a TPC Magnetic Spectrometer to search for OGP signals produced by ion beams at AGS. Test data with 14.5 GeV/c /times/ A Oxygen ions incident on a Pb target has been obtained. These include a 78-prong nuclear interaction in the MPS magnet which was pattern recognized with an efficiency approx.75%. A cascade and plasma event generator has also been developed, the predictions of which are used to illustrate how our technique can detect possible plasma signals at AGS and RHIC. A 4..pi.. tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer has been proposed for RHIC. The new event generator predicts striking central rapidity bump QGP signals at RHIC for p, /bar p/, ..pi../sup +-/, K/sup +-/, etc., produced by 100 GeV/c /times/ A Au on Au collisions and these are presented. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Function electrical stimulation signals generator circuits for the central nerve and the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Wenyuan, Li; Zhenyu, Zhang; Zhi-Gong, Wang

    2005-01-01

    Circuits for the signal generation of the FES (functional electrical stimulation) of the central nerve and the sciatic nerve have been designed. The circuits were implemented by using discrete devices. The FES circuits consist of two or three operational amplifiers. The bandwidths of the circuits are more than 10 kHz and their gains are variable from 20 dB to 60 dB. To a load of several kilo-ohms, according to the microelectrode with the nerve, the circuit for stimulating central nerve can provide a current signal, and the signal value is more than 1mA. The circuit for stimulating sciatic nerve can provide a stimulating voltage signal of more than 10 Vs. The loads of the circuits are microelectrodes contacted with nerves. The circuits can be used with two kinds of microelectrodes: cuff microelectrodes which for stimulating sciatic nerve and shaft microelectrodes which for stimulating central nerve. PMID:17281443

  20. Multi-frequency phase-coded microwave signal generation based on polarization modulation and balanced detection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Xu, Weiyuan; Wei, Zhengwu; Pan, Shilong

    2016-01-01

    Photonic multi-frequency phase-coded microwave signal generation is proposed and demonstrated based on polarization modulation and balanced detection. Consisting of only a polarization modulator (PolM) driven by an electrical coding data, a polarization beam splitter (PBS) and a balanced photodetector (BPD), the proposed microwave phase coder has no requirement on the wavelength, intensity modulation format, or modulation index of the input optical microwave signal, and allows phase coding of arbitrary-format RF signals, which enables multi-frequency phase coding with compact structure, simple operation, and high flexibility. A proof-of-concept experiment is performed, achieving simultaneous phase coding of 15 and 30 GHz, or 10 and 20 GHz RF signals with a coding rate of 5  Gb/s. PMID:26696170

  1. Generation Mechanism of Earth Potential Difference Signal during Seismic Wave Propagation and its Observation Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Kan; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Takayama, Masakazu; Takeuchi, Nobunao

    We have observed the co-seismic electromagnetic phenomena such as earth potential difference (EPD) variation in many observation sites of both Miyagi and Akita Prefectures. So far, in any earthquakes we observed clear signals of the EPD variation. However, the amplitude of observed EPD signals are very different at each site. To explain this difference, firstly we assumed the EPD generation mechanism to be the streaming potential. Secondarily, the underground circumstance is modeled as the composer of groundwater table, capillary tubes and fine tubes. The model how EPD variation signals appear is postulated to explain the observed data. The relative position of the ground water table against the buried electrodes is examined to explain the observed data. The groundwater table may be very sensitive to the appearance of the EPD variation. If electrodes were buried a few meters below the ground surface, we could observe the EPD signals in the case of shallow groundwater table.

  2. Fiber-optic delay-line stabilization of heterodyne optical signal generator and method using same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a laser heterodyne frequency generator system with a stabilizer for use in the microwave and millimeter-wave frequency ranges utilizing a photonic mixer as a photonic phase detector in a stable optical fiber delay-line. Phase and frequency fluctuations of the heterodyne laser signal generators are stabilized at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies by a delay line system operating as a frequency discriminator. The present invention is free from amplifier and mixer 1/.function. noise at microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies that typically limit phase noise performance in electronic cavity stabilized electronic oscillators. Thus, 1/.function. noise due to conventional mixers is eliminated and stable optical heterodyne generation of electrical signals is achieved.

  3. Broadband signal generator for the approximation of a magnetotelluric source for indoor testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shuang-chao; Deng, Ming; Chen, Kai; Shi, Xin-yu

    2016-08-01

    To test the frequency response of a magnetotelluric (MT) receiver, a broadband source, especially white noise is more efficient and intuitive than single frequency signals. In view of the absence of an appropriate source generator for MT receiver indoor testing, we designed a broadband signal generator based on a pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS). Firstly, we divided the whole MT band into two segments to avoid data redundancy and simplify calculation in data processing and designed a generator composed of several modules: a clock module, a PRBS logic module, and a voltage level conversion module. We conducted a detailed analysis of the optimal parameter selection methods for each module, and key parameters including clock frequency, order, the primitive polynomial and the original states of the linear registers were determined. The generator provides four-channel PRBS signals with two effective bandwidths of 5  ×  10‑4–714 Hz and 0.1 Hz–14 kHz which are broad enough to cover the frequency range for different MT methods. These four-channel signals were used to simulate two modes of sources (xy and yx) with strong auto-correlation and weak cross-correlation. The power spectral density is quite stable in the whole passband. The new generator is characterized by broadband output in low-frequency bands, low power consumption, simple operation and reliable performance. Indoor and field tests indicated that the generator can provide an analog MT source and is a practical tool for MT receiver indoor testing.

  4. Digitally generated excitation and near-baseband quadrature detection of rapid scan EPR signals

    PubMed Central

    Quine, Richard W.; Rinard, George A.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2014-01-01

    The use of multiple synchronized outputs from an AWG provides the opportunity to perform EPR experiments differently than by conventional EPR. We report a method for reconstructing the quadrature EPR spectrum from periodic signals that are generated with sinusoidal magnetic field modulation such as continuous wave (CW), multiharmonic, or rapid scan experiments. The signal is down-converted to an intermediate frequency (IF) that is less than the field scan or field modulation frequency and then digitized in a single channel. This method permits use of a high-pass analog filter before digitization to remove the strong non-EPR signal at the IF, that might otherwise overwhelm the digitizer. The IF is the difference between two synchronized X-band outputs from a Tektronix AWG 70002A arbitrary waveform generator (AWG), one of which is for excitation and the other is the reference for down-conversion. To permit signal averaging, timing was selected to give an exact integer number of full cycles for each frequency. In the experiments reported here the IF was 5 kHz and the scan frequency was 40 kHz. To produce sinusoidal rapid scans with a scan frequency eight times IF, a third synchronized output generated a square wave that was converted to a sine wave. The timing of the data acquisition with a Bruker SpecJet II was synchronized by an external clock signal from the AWG. The baseband quadrature signal in the frequency domain was reconstructed. This approach has the advantages that (i) the non-EPR response at the carrier frequency is eliminated, (ii) both real and imaginary EPR signals are reconstructed from a single physical channel to produce an ideal quadrature signal, and (iii) signal bandwidth does not increase relative to baseband detection. Spectra were obtained by deconvolution of the reconstructed signals for solid BDPA (1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl) in air, 0.2 mM trityl OX63 in water, 15N perdeuterated tempone, and a nitroxide with a 0.5 G partially

  5. Digitally generated excitation and near-baseband quadrature detection of rapid scan EPR signals.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Yu, Zhelin; Quine, Richard W; Rinard, George A; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2014-10-30

    The use of multiple synchronized outputs from an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) provides the opportunity to perform EPR experiments differently than by conventional EPR. We report a method for reconstructing the quadrature EPR spectrum from periodic signals that are generated with sinusoidal magnetic field modulation such as continuous wave (CW), multiharmonic, or rapid scan experiments. The signal is down-converted to an intermediate frequency (IF) that is less than the field scan or field modulation frequency and then digitized in a single channel. This method permits use of a high-pass analog filter before digitization to remove the strong non-EPR signal at the IF, that might otherwise overwhelm the digitizer. The IF is the difference between two synchronized X-band outputs from a Tektronix AWG 70002A, one of which is for excitation and the other is the reference for down-conversion. To permit signal averaging, timing was selected to give an exact integer number of full cycles for each frequency. In the experiments reported here the IF was 5kHz and the scan frequency was 40kHz. To produce sinusoidal rapid scans with a scan frequency eight times IF, a third synchronized output generated a square wave that was converted to a sine wave. The timing of the data acquisition with a Bruker SpecJet II was synchronized by an external clock signal from the AWG. The baseband quadrature signal in the frequency domain was reconstructed. This approach has the advantages that (i) the non-EPR response at the carrier frequency is eliminated, (ii) both real and imaginary EPR signals are reconstructed from a single physical channel to produce an ideal quadrature signal, and (iii) signal bandwidth does not increase relative to baseband detection. Spectra were obtained by deconvolution of the reconstructed signals for solid BDPA (1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl) in air, 0.2mM trityl OX63 in water, (15)N perdeuterated tempone, and a nitroxide with a 0.5G partially-resolved proton

  6. Digitally generated excitation and near-baseband quadrature detection of rapid scan EPR signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseitlin, Mark; Yu, Zhelin; Quine, Richard W.; Rinard, George A.; Eaton, Sandra S.; Eaton, Gareth R.

    2014-12-01

    The use of multiple synchronized outputs from an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) provides the opportunity to perform EPR experiments differently than by conventional EPR. We report a method for reconstructing the quadrature EPR spectrum from periodic signals that are generated with sinusoidal magnetic field modulation such as continuous wave (CW), multiharmonic, or rapid scan experiments. The signal is down-converted to an intermediate frequency (IF) that is less than the field scan or field modulation frequency and then digitized in a single channel. This method permits use of a high-pass analog filter before digitization to remove the strong non-EPR signal at the IF, that might otherwise overwhelm the digitizer. The IF is the difference between two synchronized X-band outputs from a Tektronix AWG 70002A, one of which is for excitation and the other is the reference for down-conversion. To permit signal averaging, timing was selected to give an exact integer number of full cycles for each frequency. In the experiments reported here the IF was 5 kHz and the scan frequency was 40 kHz. To produce sinusoidal rapid scans with a scan frequency eight times IF, a third synchronized output generated a square wave that was converted to a sine wave. The timing of the data acquisition with a Bruker SpecJet II was synchronized by an external clock signal from the AWG. The baseband quadrature signal in the frequency domain was reconstructed. This approach has the advantages that (i) the non-EPR response at the carrier frequency is eliminated, (ii) both real and imaginary EPR signals are reconstructed from a single physical channel to produce an ideal quadrature signal, and (iii) signal bandwidth does not increase relative to baseband detection. Spectra were obtained by deconvolution of the reconstructed signals for solid BDPA (1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl) in air, 0.2 mM trityl OX63 in water, 15N perdeuterated tempone, and a nitroxide with a 0.5 G partially

  7. Applying the self-organization feature map (SOM) algorithm to AE-based tool wear monitoring in micro-cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Chia-Liang; Lu, Ming-Chyuan; Chen, Jau-Liang

    2013-01-01

    This study applies a self-organization feature map (SOM) neural network to acoustic emission (AE) signal-based tool wear monitoring for a micro-milling process. An experiment was set up to collect the signal during cutting for the system development and performance analysis. The AE signal generated on the workpiece was first transformed to the frequency domain by Fast Fourier transformation (FFT), followed by feature extraction processing using the SOM algorithm. The performance verification in this study adopts a learning vector quantification (LVQ) network to evaluate the effects of the SOM algorithm on the classification performance for tool wear monitoring. To investigate the improvement achieved by the SOM algorithms, this study also investigates cases applying only the LVQ classifier and based on the class mean scatter feature selection (CMSFS) criterion and LVQ. Results show that accurate classification of the tool wear can be obtained by properly selecting features closely related to the tool wear based on the CMSFS and frequency resolution of spectral features. However, the SOM algorithms provide a more reliable methodology of reducing the effect on the system performance contributed by noise or variations in the cutting system.

  8. Tunable microwave signal generation based on an Opto-DMD processor and a photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Sang, Xin-Zhu; Yan, Bin-Bin; Ai, Qi; Li, Yan; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Gen-Xiang; Song, Fei-Jun; Zhang, Xia; Wang, Kui-Ru; Yuan, Jin-Hui; Yu, Chong-Xiu; Xiao, Feng; Alameh, Kamal

    2014-06-01

    Frequency-tunable microwave signal generation is proposed and experimentally demonstrated with a dual-wavelength single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) erbium-doped fiber ring laser based on a digital Opto-DMD processor and four-wave mixing (FWM) in a high-nonlinear photonic crystal fiber (PCF). The high-nonlinear PCF is employed for the generation of the FWM to obtain stable and uniform dual-wavelength oscillation. Two different short passive sub-ring cavities in the main ring cavity serve as mode filters to make SLM lasing. The two lasing wavelengths are electronically selected by loading different gratings on the Opto-DMD processor controlled with a computer. The wavelength spacing can be smartly adjusted from 0.165 nm to 1.08 nm within a tuning accuracy of 0.055 nm. Two microwave signals at 17.23 GHz and 27.47 GHz are achieved. The stability of the microwave signal is discussed. The system has the ability to generate a 137.36-GHz photonic millimeter signal at room temperature.

  9. The gravitational-wave signal generated by a galactic population of double neutron-star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shenghua; Jeffery, C. Simon

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the gravitational wave (GW) signal generated by a population of double neutron-star (DNS) binaries with eccentric orbits caused by kicks during supernova collapse and binary evolution. The DNS population of a standard Milky Way-type galaxy has been studied as a function of star formation history, initial mass function (IMF) and metallicity and of the binary-star common-envelope ejection process. The model provides birthrates, merger rates and total number of DNS as a function of time. The GW signal produced by this population has been computed and expressed in terms of a hypothetical space GW detector (eLISA) by calculating the number of discrete GW signals at different confidence levels, where `signal' refers to detectable GW strain in a given frequency-resolution element. In terms of the parameter space explored, the number of DNS-originating GW signals is greatest in regions of recent star formation, and is significantly increased if metallicity is reduced from 0.02 to 0.001, consistent with Belczynski et al. Increasing the IMF power-law index (from -2.5 to -1.5) increases the number of GW signals by a large factor. This number is also much higher for models where the common-envelope ejection is treated using the α-mechanism (energy conservation) than when using the γ-mechanism (angular-momentum conservation). We have estimated the total number of detectable DNS GW signals from the Galaxy by combining contributions from thin disc, thick disc, bulge and halo. The most probable numbers for an eLISA-type experiment are 0-1600 signals per year at S/N ≥ 1, 0-900 signals per year at S/N ≥ 3, and 0-570 at S/N ≥ 5, coming from about 0-65, 0-60 and 0-50 resolved DNS, respectively.

  10. Generating Ka-Band Signals Using an X-Band Vector Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott; Mysoor, Narayan; Lux, James; Cook, Brian; Shah, Biren

    2009-01-01

    A breadboard version of a transmitter for radio communication at a carrier frequency of 32 GHz (which is in the Ka band) utilizes a vector modulator operating at a carrier frequency of 8 GHz (the low end of the X band) to generate any of a number of advanced modulations that could include amplitude and/or phase modulation components. The 8-GHz modulated signal is mixed with a 24-GHz signal generated by an upconverter to obtain the desired 32-GHz modulated output. The transmitter is being developed as a prototype of downlink transmitters for transmission of data from spacecraft to Earth at high rates (>100 Mb/s). The transmitter design could also be adapted to terrestrial and Earth/satellite communication links. The advanced modulations (which can include M-ary phase-shift keying (M-PSK), offset phase-shift keying (OPSK), and M-ary quadrature amplitude modulation (M-QAM). These modulations are needed because for a given amount of signal bandwidth, they enable transmission of data at rates greater than those of older, simpler modulation schemes. The transmitter architecture (see figure) was chosen not only to enable generation of the required modulations at 32 GHz but also to reduce the number of components needed to implement the transmitter. Instead of incorporating an 8-GHz signal source, the transmitter utilizes an 8-GHz signal generated by a voltage-controlled oscillator that is part of an X-band transponder with which the fully developed version of this transmitter would be used in the original intended spacecraft application. The oscillator power is divided onto two paths, one of which goes through the vector modulator, the other through amplifiers and a 3 frequency multiplier. Band-pass filters are included downstream of the frequency multiplier to suppress unwanted harmonics.

  11. Optical observations of meteors generating infrasound-I: Acoustic signal identification and phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silber, Elizabeth A.; Brown, Peter G.

    2014-11-01

    We analyse infrasound signals from 71 bright meteors/fireballs simultaneously detected by video to investigate the phenomenology and characteristics of meteor-generated near-field infrasound (<300 km) and shock production. A taxonomy for meteor generated infrasound signal classification has been developed using the time-pressure signal of the infrasound arrivals. Based on the location along the meteor trail where the infrasound signal originates, we find most signals are associated with cylindrical shocks, with about a quarter of events evidencing spherical shocks associated with fragmentation episodes and optical flares. The video data indicate that all events with ray launch angles >117° from the trajectory heading are most likely generated by a spherical shock, while infrasound produced by the meteors with ray launch angles ≤117° can be attributed to both a cylindrical line source and a spherical shock. We find that meteors preferentially produce infrasound toward the end of their trails with a smaller number showing a preference for mid-trail production. Meteors producing multiple infrasound arrivals show a strong infrasound source height skewness to the end of trails and are much more likely to be associated with optical flares. We find that about 1% of all our optically-recorded meteors have associated detected infrasound and estimate that regional meteor infrasound events should occur on the order of once per week and dominate in numbers over infrasound associated with more energetic (but rarer) bolides. While a significant fraction of our meteors generating infrasound (~1/4 of single arrivals) are produced by fragmentation events, we find no instances where acoustic radiation is detectable more than about 60° beyond the ballistic regime at our meteoroid sizes (grams to tens of kilograms) emphasizing the strong anisotropy in acoustic radiation for meteors which are dominated by cylindrical line source geometry, even in the presence of fragmentation.

  12. The properties of ULF/VLF signals generated by the SURA facility without ionospheric currents modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotik, D. S.; Raybov, A. V.; Ermakova, E. N.

    2012-12-01

    During the last three years the comprehensive study of ionospheric generation of the artificial signals in ULF/VLF band was carried out at SURA facility. This research was stimulated by successive HAARP experiments on detection the low frequency signals genreated due the action of the ponderomotive forces. Two experimental campaigns under different ionospheric, geomagnetic and facility operation mode conditions was undertaken every year from 2010 to 2012. Here we are summarizing the main features of the artificial ULF/VLF signals observed in vicinity the SURA site. The signals in the 2-20 Hz band were observed in the small area around the facility with the radius approximately 15 km. It was not signal detection at the 30 km distance. The maximum of the amplitude was detected in the nearest receiving point about 3 km away from the transmitting array. The amplitude increased about 3 times when the beam was inclined on16 degrees to the south so the footprint of the geomagnetic field line comes close to the point of observation. The ULF signals increased slightly when the SURA operating frequency overlaps the critical foF2 frequency. As a rule the daytime signals are smaller then nighttime one. No any correlation was observed with geomagnetic disturbances. The time delay of the ionospheric ULF signals measured by phase method was estimated as 300-400 ms. Polarization of the ULF signals has a pronounced elliptical character. Sometimes it was linear. The part of measurements in June 2012 was coincide with magnetic storm (June 16-18, Kp=6). It was observed broadening of the signal line at frequencies of 11 and 17 Hz up to 0.2 Hz at the recovery stage of the storm at June 18 (see the figure). This fact can be interpreted as the result of the signal interaction with the radiation belt protons appeared over there during the storm time. In 2012 campaigns it was firstly observed at SURA signals on frequencies of several kilohertz at nightime which could not be explained by

  13. System and method for investigating sub-surface features of a rock formation with acoustic sources generating conical broadcast signals

    DOEpatents

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre -Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-08-18

    A method of interrogating a formation includes generating a conical acoustic signal, at a first frequency--a second conical acoustic signal at a second frequency each in the between approximately 500 Hz and 500 kHz such that the signals intersect in a desired intersection volume outside the borehole. The method further includes receiving, a difference signal returning to the borehole resulting from a non-linear mixing of the signals in a mixing zone within the intersection volume.

  14. An automated method for generating analogic signals that embody the Markov kinetics of model ionic channels.

    PubMed

    Luchian, Tudor

    2005-08-30

    In this work we present an automated method for generating electrical signals which reflect the kinetics of ionic channels that have custom-tailored intermediate sub-states and intermediate reaction constants. The concept of our virtual single-channel waveform generator makes use of two software platforms, one for the numerical generation of single channel traces stemming from a pre-defined model and another for the digital-to-analog conversion of such numerical generated single channel traces. This technique of continuous generation and recording of the activity of a model ionic channel provides an efficient protocol to teach neophytes in the field of single-channel electrophysiology about its major phenomenological facets. Random analogic signals generated by using our technique can be successfully employed in a number of applications, such us: assisted learning of the single-molecule kinetic investigation via electrical recordings, impedance spectroscopy, the evaluation of linear frequency response of neurons and the study of stochastic resonance of ion channels. PMID:16054511

  15. Response of acoustic signals generated in water by energetic xenon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyachi, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Kuraza, G.; Fujii, M.; Nagashima, A.; Hasebe, N.; Kobayashi, M. N.; Kobayashi, S.; Miyajima, M.; Okudaira, O.; Yamashita, N.; Shibata, H.; Murakami, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Okada, N.; Tou, T.

    2006-05-01

    The acoustic signals generated by bombarding 400 MeV/n xenon ions in water were studied using an array of piezoelectric lead-zirconate-titanate elements. The observed signal was reduced to a bipolar form through Fourier analysis. The output voltage corresponded to the amount of energy deposit in water, and it tailed off beyond the range of 400 MeV/n xenon in water. This magnitude was explained qualitatively as cumulative processes. Its behavior was consistent with the calculations based on the Bethe-Bloch formula. Possible applications of this detector to radiology and heavily doped radiation detectors are described.

  16. Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping and Probabilistic Atlas Generation of Hybrid Diffusion Imaging based on BFOR Signal Basis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jia; Hosseinbor, A. Pasha; Chung, Moo K.; Bendlin, Barbara B.; Suryawanshi, Gaurav; Alexander, Andrew L.; Qiu, Anqi

    2015-01-01

    We first propose a large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm to align multiple b-value diffusion weighted imaging (mDWI) data, specifically acquired via hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI).We denote this algorithm as LDDMM-HYDI. We then propose a Bayesian probabilistic model for estimating the white matter atlas from HYDIs. We adopt the work given in Hosseinbor et al. (2012) and represent the q-space diffusion signal with the Bessel Fourier orientation reconstruction (BFOR) signal basis. The BFOR framework provides the representation of mDWI in the q-space and the analytic form of the emsemble average propagator (EAP) reconstructure, as well as reduces memory requirement. In addition, since the BFOR signal basis is orthonormal, the L2 norm that quantifies the differences in the q-space signals of any two mDWI datasets can be easily computed as the sum of the squared differences in the BFOR expansion coefficients. In this work, we show that the reorientation of the q-space signal due to spatial transformation can be easily defined on the BFOR signal basis. We incorporate the BFOR signal basis into the LDDMM framework and derive the gradient descent algorithm for LDDMM-HYDI with explicit orientation optimization. Additionally, we extend the previous Bayesian atlas estimation framework for scalar-valued images to HYDIs and derive the expectation-maximization algorithm for solving the HYDI atlas estimation problem. Using real HYDI datasets, we show the Bayesian model generates the white matter atlas with anatomical details. Moreover, we show that it is important to consider the variation of mDWI reorientation due to a small change in diffeomorphic transformation in the LDDMM-HYDI optimization and to incorporate the full information of HYDI for aligning mDWI. Finally, we show that the LDDMM-HYDI outperforms the LDDMM algorithm with diffusion tensors generated from each shell of HYDI. PMID:24972378

  17. Ca2+ signal is generated only once in the mating pheromone response pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nakajima-Shimada, J; Sakaguchi, S; Tsuji, F I; Anraku, Y; Iida, H

    2000-04-01

    The mating pheromone, alpha-factor, of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae binds to the heterotrimeric G protein-coupled cell surface receptor of MATa cells and induces cellular responses necessary for mating. In higher eukaryotic cells, many hormones and growth factors rapidly mobilize a second messenger, Ca2+, by means of receptor-G protein signaling. Although striking similarities between the mechanisms of the receptor-G protein signaling in yeast and higher eukaryotes have long been known, it is still uncertain whether the pheromone rapidly mobilizes Ca2+ necessary for early events of the pheromone response. Here we reexamine this problem using sensitive methods for detecting Ca2+ fluxes and mobilization, and find no evidence that there is rapid Ca2+ influx leading to a rapid increase in the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration. In addition, the yeast PLC1 deletion mutant lacking phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, a key enzyme for generating Ca2+ signals in higher eukaryotic cells, responds normally to the pheromone. These findings suggest that the receptor-G protein signaling does not utilize Ca2+ as a second messenger in the early stage of the pheromone response pathway. Since the receptor-G protein signaling does stimulate Ca2+ influx after early events have finished and this stimulation is essential for late events in the pheromone response pathway [Iida et al., (1990) J. Biol. Chem., 265: 13391-13399] Ca2+ may be used only once in the signal transduction pathway in unicellular eukaryotes such as yeast. PMID:10885582

  18. Clinical epidemiology of human AE in Europe.

    PubMed

    Vuitton, D A; Demonmerot, F; Knapp, J; Richou, C; Grenouillet, F; Chauchet, A; Vuitton, L; Bresson-Hadni, S; Millon, L

    2015-10-30

    This review gives a critical update of the situation regarding alveolar echinococcosis (AE) in Europe in humans, based on existing publications and on findings of national and European surveillance systems. All sources point to an increase in human cases of AE in the "historic endemic areas" of Europe, namely Germany, Switzerland, Austria and France and to the emergence of human cases in countries where the disease had never been recognised until the end of the 20th century, especially in central-eastern and Baltic countries. Both increase and emergence could be only due to methodological biases; this point is discussed in the review. One explanation may be given by changes in the animal reservoir of the parasite, Echinococcus multilocularis (increase in the global population of foxes in Europe and its urbanisation, as well as a possible increased involvement of pet animals as definitive infectious hosts). The review also focuses onto 2 more original approaches: (1) how changes in therapeutic attitudes toward malignant and chronic inflammatory diseases may affect the epidemiology of AE in the future in Europe, since a recent survey of such cases in France showed the emergence of AE in patients with immune suppression since the beginning of the 21st century; (2) how setting a network of referral centres in Europe based on common studies on the care management of patients might contribute to a better knowledge of AE epidemiology in the future. PMID:26346900

  19. Generation of a CW local oscillator signal using a stabilized injection locked semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezeshki, Jonah Massih

    In high speed-communications, it is desirable to be able to detect small signals while maintaining a low bit-error rate. Conventional receivers for high-speed fiber optic networks are Amplified Direct Detectors (ADDs) that use erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) before the detector to achieve a suitable sensitivity. In principle, a better method for obtaining the maximum possible signal to noise ratio is through the use of homodyne detection. The major difficulty in implementing a homodyne detection system is the generation of a suitable local oscillator signal. This local oscillator signal must be at the same frequency as the received data signal, as well as be phase coherent with it. To accomplish this, a variety of synchronization techniques have been explored, including Optical Phase-Lock Loops (OPLL), Optical Injection Locking (OIL) with both Fabry-Perot and DFB lasers, and an Optical Injection Phase-Lock Loop (OIPLL). For this project I have implemented a method for regenerating a local oscillator from a portion of the received optical signal. This regenerated local oscillator is at the same frequency, and is phase coherent with, the received optical signal. In addition, we show that the injection locking process can be electronically stabilized by using the modulation transfer ratio of the slave laser as a monitor, given either a DFB or Fabry-Perot slave laser. We show that this stabilization technique maintains injection lock (given a locking range of ˜1GHz) for laser drift much greater than what is expected in a typical transmission system. In addition, we explore the quality of the output of the slave laser, and analyze its suitability as a local oscillator signal for a homodyne receiver.

  20. Low-cost real-time infrared scene generation for image projection and signal injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford, James A., Jr.; King, David E.; Bowden, Mark H.

    1997-07-01

    As cost becomes an increasingly important factor in the development and testing of infrared (IR) sensors and flight computer/processors, the need for accurate hardware-in-the- loop simulations is critical. In the past, expensive and complex dedicated scene generation hardware was needed to attain the fidelity necessary for accurately testing systems under test (SUT). Recent technological advances and innovative applications of established technologies are beginning to allow development of cost effective replacements for dedicated scene generators. These new scene generators are mainly constructed from commercial off-the- shelf (COTS) hardware and software components. At the U.S. Army Missile Command (MICOM) researchers have developed such a dynamic IR scene generator (IRSG) built around COTS hardware and software. The IRSG is being used to provide inputs to an IR scene projector for in-band sensor testing and for direct signal injection into the sensor or processor electronics. Using this `baseline' IRSG, up to 120 frames per second (Hz) of 12-bit intensity images are being generated at 640 by 640 pixel resolution. The IRSG SUT-to- target viewpoint is dynamically updated in real time by a six-degree-of-freedom SUT simulation executing on a facility simulation computer, synchronized with an external signal from the SUT hardware, and compensates for system latency using a special purpose hardware component implemented on a single VME card. Multiple dynamic targets, terrain/backgrounds, countermeasures, and atmospheric effects in real time by the facility simulation computer via a shared memory interface to the IRSG. The `next generation' IRSG is currently under development at MICOM using `next generation' COTS hardware and software. `Next generation' performance specifications are estimated to yield 16-bit intensity, 250 - 300 Hz frame rate, at 1024 X 1024 pixel resolution.

  1. Experimental demonstration of multiple pulse nonlinear optoacoustic signal generation and control.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Fletcher; Antonelli, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Generating underwater acoustic signals from a remote, aerial location by use of a high-energy pulsed infrared laser has been demonstrated. The laser beam is directed from the air and focused onto the water surface, where the optical energy was converted into a propagating acoustic wave. Sound pressure levels of 185 dB re microPa (decibel re microPa) were consistently recorded under freshwater laboratory conditions at laser-pulse repetition rates of up to 1000 pulses/s. The nonlinear optoacoustic transmission concept is outlined, and the experimental results from investigation of the time-domain and frequency-domain characteristics of the generated underwater sound are provided. A high repetition rate, high-energy per pulse laser was used in this test under freshwater laboratory conditions. A means of deterministically controlling the spectrum of the underwater acoustic signal was investigated and demonstrated by varying the laser-pulse repetition rate. PMID:15662891

  2. Photonic generation of frequency-quadrupling millimeter-wave signals using polarization property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Min; Tang, Xianfeng; Xi, Lixia; Zhang, Wenbo; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2016-03-01

    We propose and analyze a photonic method of generating frequency-quadrupling millimeter-wave signal. This scheme is realized by using a single LiNbO3 intensity modulator (IM) and a Faraday mirror based transverse-electrical and transverse-magnetic mode converter in a Sagnac loop without using an optical filter or an electrical microwave phase shifter. Making use of the intrinsic polarization dependence and the velocity phenomenon of the IM, a special double sideband modulation is implemented, which ensures that the optical carrier can be effectively cancelled employing polarization manipulation. A linear polarizer is used as the polarization selection element to choose the second-order sidebands from the modulated light. After beating at the photodiode, a frequency-quadrupled millimeter-wave signal with >30 dB radio frequency spurious suppression ratio is generated. The imperfection of the devices is considered when estimating the system performance.

  3. Filter-less frequency-doubling microwave signal generator with tunable phase shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yueqin; Pei, Li; Li, Jing; Wang, Yiqun; Yuan, Jin

    2016-07-01

    A prototype for frequency-doubling microwave signal generator with tunable phase shift based on a filter-less architecture is proposed and analyzed. In the proposal, one dual parallel polarization modulator is used as the key component to generate two ±1st order sidebands along the orthogonal polarization directions with suppressed carrier. Then the polarization states of the two sidebands are aligned with the principal axes of an electro-optical phase modulator (EOPM). Tunable phase shift is implemented by controlling the direct current voltage applied to the EOPM. Without using any filters or wavelength-dependent components, the system possesses good frequency tunability and it can be applied to multi-wavelength operation. Taking advantage of the ability of frequency multiplication, the frequency tuning range can be wider than the operation bandwidth of the modulator. By theoretical analyses and simulated verifications, a frequency-doubling microwave signal ranging from 22 to 40 GHz with full range phase shift is achieved.

  4. Low power laser generated ultrasound: Signal processing for time domain data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, A.; Veres, I.; Thursby, G.; McKee, C.; Armstrong, I.; Pierce, S. G.; Culshaw, B.

    2011-01-01

    The use of low power modulated laser diode systems has previously been established as a suitable method for non-destructive laser generation of ultrasound. Using a quasi-continuous optical excitation amplified by an erbium-doped fibre amplifier (EDFA) allows flexible generation of ultrasonic waves, offering control of further parameters such as the frequency content or signal shape. In addition, pseudo-random binary sequences (PRBS) can be used to improve the detected impulse response. Here we compare two sequences, the m-sequence and the Golay code, and discuss the advantages and practical limits of their application with laser diode based optical excitation of ultrasound.

  5. Bedload sediment transport embedded in seismic signals generated from a mountain stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, D. L.; Brodsky, E. E.; Finnegan, N. J.; Turowski, J. M.; Wyss, C. R.; Badoux, A.; Schneider, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    We examine broadband (15 - 450 Hz) seismic data from the well-studied Erlenbach stream in the Swiss Prealps, where discharge, precipitation, and bedload transport are independently constrained during flood events. We perform a general linear least squares inversion of seismic data, exploiting times with isolated discharge or rain events, to identify the spectral signals of water turbulence and raindrop impacts. This, in turn, allows us to remove the contributions of turbulence and rainfall from the seismic spectra, thereby isolating the signal of bedload transport. We use one storm to calibrate the regression for bedload transport, then use this regression along with precipitation and discharge data to predict bedload transport rates for the remainder of the two-month campaign. Our predicted bedload transport rates correlate well with transport rates from calibrated geophones embedded in the channel (r2~0.6, p<<10-5). We also find that rain generates a roughly broadband seismic spectrum, while water turbulence and sediment transport exhibit power primarily in lower frequency bands (<100 Hz), due in part to different attenuation path lengths. We use the varying attenuation of water turbulence and bedload transport spectra to infer the locations of the primary sources generating each signal: a downstream waterfall, and the channel bed near the seismometers, respectively. Our results indicate that deconstruction of seismic signals from rivers can provide insight into the component signals generated by water turbulence, rain, and sediment transport. Further, we find that regression of seismic spectra with precipitation, discharge and bedload transport data for a single calibration period enables the estimation of transport for subsequent periods with only precipitation, discharge and seismic data. Since precipitation and discharge are significantly easier to monitor than transport, this represents a potential application for in-field monitoring of bedload activity.

  6. The use of pneumatically generated water pressure signals for aquifer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, M.; Roberts, R.; Chace, D.

    2013-12-01

    The use of pneumatically generated pressure signals for aquifer characterization Hydraulic tests are the most reliable method of obtaining estimates of hydrologic properties, such as conductivity, that are essential for flow and transport modeling. The use of a sinusoidal signal for hydraulic testing is well established, with Streltsova (1988), Rasmussen (2003) and others having developed analytic solutions. Sinusoidal tests provide a unique easily distinguished signal that reduces ambiguity during analysis and we show that a sinusoidal pressure signal propagates farther into the formation than a standard slug-test signal. If a sinusoidal test is combined with a slug and/or a constant rate test, it can further reduce uncertainty in the estimated parameter values. We demonstrate how pneumatic pressure can be used to generate all three of these signals. By positioning pressure transducers both below the water level and in the head space above the water, we can monitor the total pressure acting on the formation and the changes in water level. From the changes in water level, it is possible to calculate the flow rate in and out of the well, assuming that the well diameter and water density are known. Using gas flow controllers with a Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) system we are able to precisely control the pressures in the well. The use of pneumatic pressure has the advantage that it requires less equipment (no pumps) and produces no water. We also show how the numerical well test analysis program nSIGHTS can be used to analyze all three types of tests simultaneously and to assess the relative contribution of each type of test to the parameter estimation. nSIGHTS was recently released as open source by Sandia National Laboratories and is available for free.

  7. Programmable ion-sensitive transistor interfaces. III. Design considerations, signal generation, and sensitivity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayant, Krishna; Auluck, Kshitij; Rodriguez, Sergio; Cao, Yingqiu; Kan, Edwin C.

    2014-05-01

    We report on factors that affect DNA hybridization detection using ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs). Signal generation at the interface between the transistor and immobilized biomolecules is widely ascribed to unscreened molecular charges causing a shift in surface potential and hence the transistor output current. Traditionally, the interaction between DNA and the dielectric or metal sensing interface is modeled by treating the molecular layer as a sheet charge and the ionic profile with a Poisson-Boltzmann distribution. The surface potential under this scenario is described by the Graham equation. This approximation, however, often fails to explain large hybridization signals on the order of tens of mV. More realistic descriptions of the DNA-transistor interface which include factors such as ion permeation, exclusion, and packing constraints have been proposed with little or no corroboration against experimental findings. In this study, we examine such physical models by their assumptions, range of validity, and limitations. We compare simulations against experiments performed on electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor capacitors and foundry-ready floating-gate ISFETs. We find that with weakly charged interfaces (i.e., low intrinsic interface charge), pertinent to the surfaces used in this study, the best agreement between theory and experiment exists when ions are completely excluded from the DNA layer. The influence of various factors such as bulk pH, background salinity, chemical reactivity of surface groups, target molecule concentration, and surface coatings on signal generation is studied. Furthermore, in order to overcome Debye screening limited detection, we suggest two signal enhancement strategies. We first describe frequency domain biosensing, highlighting the ability to sort short DNA strands based on molecular length, and then describe DNA biosensing in multielectrolytes comprising trace amounts of higher-valency salt in a background of

  8. Programmable ion-sensitive transistor interfaces. III. Design considerations, signal generation, and sensitivity enhancement.

    PubMed

    Jayant, Krishna; Auluck, Kshitij; Rodriguez, Sergio; Cao, Yingqiu; Kan, Edwin C

    2014-05-01

    We report on factors that affect DNA hybridization detection using ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs). Signal generation at the interface between the transistor and immobilized biomolecules is widely ascribed to unscreened molecular charges causing a shift in surface potential and hence the transistor output current. Traditionally, the interaction between DNA and the dielectric or metal sensing interface is modeled by treating the molecular layer as a sheet charge and the ionic profile with a Poisson-Boltzmann distribution. The surface potential under this scenario is described by the Graham equation. This approximation, however, often fails to explain large hybridization signals on the order of tens of mV. More realistic descriptions of the DNA-transistor interface which include factors such as ion permeation, exclusion, and packing constraints have been proposed with little or no corroboration against experimental findings. In this study, we examine such physical models by their assumptions, range of validity, and limitations. We compare simulations against experiments performed on electrolyte-oxide-semiconductor capacitors and foundry-ready floating-gate ISFETs. We find that with weakly charged interfaces (i.e., low intrinsic interface charge), pertinent to the surfaces used in this study, the best agreement between theory and experiment exists when ions are completely excluded from the DNA layer. The influence of various factors such as bulk pH, background salinity, chemical reactivity of surface groups, target molecule concentration, and surface coatings on signal generation is studied. Furthermore, in order to overcome Debye screening limited detection, we suggest two signal enhancement strategies. We first describe frequency domain biosensing, highlighting the ability to sort short DNA strands based on molecular length, and then describe DNA biosensing in multielectrolytes comprising trace amounts of higher-valency salt in a background of

  9. Reconfigurable embedded system architecture for next-generation Neural Signal Processing.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Karthikeyan; Obeid, Iyad

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a new architectural framework for next generation Neural Signal Processing (NSP). The essential features of the NSP hardware platform include scalability, reconfigurability, real-time processing ability and data storage. This proposed framework has been implemented in a proof-of-concept NSP prototype using an embedded system architecture synthesized in a Xilinx(®)Virtex(®)5 development board. The prototype includes a threshold-based spike detector and a fuzzy logic-based spike sorter. PMID:21096398

  10. A design of three-stage addressing sweep frequency signal generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhihui; Fan, Muwen; Zhou, Luchun

    2015-10-01

    In order to test the working state of adaptive optics system, it is necessary to design an online sweep-frequency circuit module to test the frequency response of the adaptive system. Sweep-frequency signal generator based on Direct Digital frequency Synthesis (DDS) is one of the core components. But the classic DDS technology also has some drawbacks: the truncation error of phase, the truncation error of magnitude (caused by memory FWL) and high occupancy of ROM. These are also the optimization directions in this paper. This paper presents a FPGA-based DDS sweep-frequency signal generator suitable in adaptive optics. It has a low occupancy rate with ROM. And in the case of low-ROM, the paper reduces the noise generated by the truncation error of phase and the truncation error of magnitude of DDS sweepfrequency signal generator by method of linear interpolation. The results show that, when the reference frequency is 100 MHz, the frequency resolution can be as low as 0.025 Hz. It only takes up 0.5 KB ROM with the ROM compression ratio of 64:1 in the optimized scheme in the paper and has higher precision due to the method of linear interpolation than the unoptimized scheme, which can meet the engineering needs. Compared with other schemes, the scheme in the paper improves signal accuracy in the case of reducing the truncation error of phase, the truncation error of magnitude and the occupancy rate with ROM, but only adds a multiplication and division circuit, which is a practical solution.

  11. Generation of Rayleigh-wave dispersion images from multichannel seismic data using sparse signal reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Songchol; Bao, Yuequan; Li, Hui

    2015-11-01

    The accurate estimation of dispersion curves has been a key issue for ensuring high quality in geophysical surface wave exploration. Many studies have been carried out on the generation of a high-resolution dispersion image from array measurements. In this study, the sparse signal representation and reconstruction techniques are employed to obtain the high resolution Rayleigh-wave dispersion image from seismic wave data. First, a sparse representation of the seismic wave data is introduced, in which the signal is assumed to be sparse in terms of wave speed. Then, the sparse signal is reconstructed by optimization using l1-norm regularization, which gives the signal amplitude spectrum as a function of wave speed. A dispersion image in the f-v domain is generated by arranging the sparse spectra for all frequency slices in the frequency range. Finally, to show the efficiency of the proposed approach, the Surfbar-2 field test data, acquired by B. Luke and colleagues at the University of Nevada Las Vegas, are analysed. By comparing the real-field dispersion image with the results from other methods, the high mode-resolving ability of the proposed approach is demonstrated, particularly for a case with strongly coherent modes.

  12. State-of-the-art RF signal generation from optical frequency division.

    PubMed

    Hati, Archita; Nelson, Craig W; Barnes, Corey; Lirette, Danielle; Fortier, Tara; Quinlan, Franklyn; DeSalvo, Jason A; Ludlow, Andrew; Diddams, Scott A; Howe, David A

    2013-09-01

    We present the design of a novel, ultralow-phase-noise frequency synthesizer implemented with extremely-low-noise regenerative frequency dividers. This synthesizer generates eight outputs, viz. 1.6 GHz, 320 MHz, 160 MHz, 80 MHz, 40 MHz, 20 MHz, 10 MHz and 5 MHz for an 8 GHz input frequency. The residual single-sideband (SSB) phase noises of the synthesizer at 5 and 10 MHz outputs at 1 Hz offset from the carrier are -150 and -145 dBc/Hz, respectively, which are unprecedented phase noise levels. We also report the lowest values of phase noise to date for 5 and 10 MHz RF signals achieved with our synthesizer by dividing an 8 GHz signal generated from an ultra-stable optical-comb-based frequency division. The absolute SSB phase noises achieved for 5 and 10 MHz signals at 1 Hz offset are -150 and -143 dBc/Hz, respectively; at 100 kHz offset, they are -177 and -174 dBc/Hz, respectively. The phase noise of the 5 MHz signal corresponds to a frequency stability of approximately 7.6 × 10(-15) at 1 s averaging time for a measurement bandwidth (BW) of 500 Hz, and the integrated timing jitter over 100 kHz BW is 20 fs. PMID:24658712

  13. Mitochondrial retrograde signaling induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition and generates breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Guha, M; Srinivasan, S; Ruthel, G; Kashina, AK; Carstens, RP; Mendoza, A; Khanna, C; Van Winkle, T; Avadhani, NG

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic breast tumors undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which renders them resistant to therapies targeted to the primary cancers. The mechanistic link between mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA) reduction, often seen in breast cancer patients, and EMT is unknown. We demonstrate that reducing mtDNA content in human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs) activates Calcineurin (Cn)-dependent mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway, which induces EMT-like reprogramming to fibroblastic morphology, loss of cell polarity, contact inhibition and acquired migratory and invasive phenotype. Notably, mtDNA reduction generates breast cancer stem cells. In addition to retrograde signaling markers, there is an induction of mesenchymal genes but loss of epithelial markers in these cells. The changes are reversed by either restoring the mtDNA content or knockdown of CnAα mRNA, indicating the causal role of retrograde signaling in EMT. Our results point to a new therapeutic strategy for metastatic breast cancers targeted to the mitochondrial retrograde signaling pathway for abrogating EMT and attenuating cancer stem cells, which evade conventional therapies. We report a novel regulatory mechanism by which low mtDNA content generates EMT and cancer stem cells in hMECs. PMID:24186204

  14. The accretion column of AE Aqr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Claudia; Costa, D. Joaquim; Luna, Gerardo; Lima, Isabel J.; Silva, Karleyne M. G.; De Araujo, Jose Carlos N.; Coelho, Jaziel

    2016-07-01

    AE Aqr is a magnetic cataclysmic variable, whose white dwarf rotates at the very fast rate of 33 s modulating the flux from high-energies to optical wavelengths. There are many studies of the origin of its emission, which consider emission from a rotating magnetic field or from an accretion column. Recently, MAGIC observations have discarded AE Aqr emission in very high energy gamma-rays discarding non-thermal emission. Furthermore, soft and hard X-ray data from Swift and NuSTAR were fitted using thermal models. Here we present the modelling of AE Aqr X-ray spectra and light curve considering the emission of a magnetic accretion column using the Cyclops code. The model takes into consideration the 3D geometry of the system, allowing to properly represent the white-dwarf auto eclipse, the pre-shock column absorption, and the varying density and temperature of a tall accretion column.

  15. Identifying fatigue crack geometric features from acoustic emission signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jingjing; Poddar, Banibrata; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) caused by the growth of fatigue crack were well studied by researchers. Conventional approaches predominantly are based on statistical analysis. In this study we focus on identifying geometric features of the crack from the AE signals using physics based approach. One of the main challenges of this approach is to develop a physics of materials based understanding of the generation and propagation of acoustic emissions due to the growth of a fatigue crack. As the geometry changes due to the crack growth, so does the local vibration modes around the crack. Our aim is to understand these changing local vibration modes and find possible relation between the AE signal features and the geometric features of the crack. Finite element (FE) analysis was used to model AE events due to fatigue crack growth. This was done using dipole excitation at the crack tips. Harmonic analysis was also performed on these FE models to understand the local vibration modes. Experimental study was carried out to verify these results. Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) were used to excite cracked specimen and the local vibration modes were captured using laser Doppler vibrometry. The preliminary results show that the AE signals do carry the information related to the crack geometry.

  16. UVB Generates Microvesicle Particle Release in Part Due to Platelet-activating Factor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bihl, Ji C; Rapp, Christine M; Chen, Yanfang; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    The lipid mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF) and oxidized glycerophosphocholine PAF agonists produced by ultraviolet B (UVB) have been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in UVB-mediated processes, from acute inflammation to delayed systemic immunosuppression. Recent studies have provided evidence that microvesicle particles (MVPs) are released from cells in response to various signals including stressors. Importantly, these small membrane fragments can interact with various cell types by delivering bioactive molecules. The present studies were designed to test if UVB radiation can generate MVP release from epithelial cells, and the potential role of PAF receptor (PAF-R) signaling in this process. We demonstrate that UVB irradiation of the human keratinocyte-derived cell line HaCaT resulted in the release of MVPs. Similarly, treatment of HaCaT cells with the PAF-R agonist carbamoyl PAF also generated equivalent amounts of MVP release. Of note, pretreatment of HaCaT cells with antioxidants blocked MVP release from UVB but not PAF-R agonist N-methyl carbamyl PAF (CPAF). Importantly, UVB irradiation of the PAF-R-negative human epithelial cell line KB and KB transduced with functional PAF-Rs resulted in MVP release only in PAF-R-positive cells. These studies demonstrate that UVB can generate MVPs in vitro and that PAF-R signaling appears important in this process. PMID:26876152

  17. Comparison of the optoacoustic signal generation efficiency of different nanoparticular contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bost, Wolfgang; Lemor, Robert; Fournelle, Marc

    2012-11-20

    Optoacoustic imaging represents a new modality that allows noninvasive in vivo molecular imaging with optical contrast and acoustical resolution. Whereas structural or functional imaging applications such as imaging of vasculature do not require contrast enhancing agents, nanoprobes with defined biochemical binding behavior are needed for molecular imaging tasks. Since the contrast of this modality is based on the local optical absorption coefficient, all particle or molecule types that show significant absorption cross sections in the spectral range of the laser wavelength used for signal generation are suitable contrast agents. Currently, several particle types such as gold nanospheres, nanoshells, nanorods, or polymer particles are used as optoacoustic contrast agents. These particles have specific advantages with respect to their absorption properties, or in terms of biologically relevant features (biodegradability, binding to molecular markers). In the present study, a comparative analysis of the signal generation efficiency of gold nanorods, polymeric particles, and magnetite particles using a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser for signal generation is described. PMID:23207315

  18. Differential attack on mini-AES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajeng Gemellia, Asadini Dwi; Indarjani, Santi

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents the results of differential attack on Mini-AES algorithm. The differential trails are constructed using all combinations of propagation ratio without repetition. To give practical results, we implement the key extraction for differential characteristics which have the highest and lowest probability as a comparison. Based on total propagation ratio and complexity resulted, Mini-AES algorithms are vulnerable to differential attack. The best differential characteristic is the differential characteristic using a single active s-box with the propagation ratio of 8 / 16.

  19. Ground level signal strength of electromagnetic waves generated by pulsed electron beams in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harker, K. J.; Neubert, T.; Banks, P. M.; Fraser-Smith, A. C.; Donohue, D. J.

    1991-11-01

    A theoretical study has been made of the signal strengths at ground level of waves generated by pulsed electron beams in space. The radiated energy is first calculated by an improved version of a theory based on coherent spontaneous emission. This theory evaluates the electric and magnetic field strengths and power fluxes in the far field by applying asymptotic expansion techniques. The power flowing out within a cone whose apex is located at the gun position is calculated, and the intersection of the rays in this cone with the earth's surface is determined by using Snell's law considerations. Ground signal levels are calculated for typical ionospheric conditions as a function of pulsing frequency for fixed beam voltage and for voltage adjusted for resonance between the waves and the particles. For short beams, the ground level signal strengths are relatively insensitive to the wave particle resonance condition, but for longer beams the associated peaking of the signal level begins to be observed. Finally, these results are compared against ambient noise levels to determine under which circumstances these ground signals can be detected.

  20. Mice with a Targeted Disruption of the Cl−/HCO3− Exchanger AE3 Display a Reduced Seizure Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Hentschke, Moritz; Wiemann, Martin; Hentschke, Suna; Kurth, Ingo; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Seidenbecher, Thomas; Jentsch, Thomas J.; Gal, Andreas; Hübner, Christian A.

    2006-01-01

    Neuronal activity results in significant pH shifts in neurons, glia, and interstitial space. Several transport mechanisms are involved in the fine-tuning and regulation of extra- and intracellular pH. The sodium-independent electroneutral anion exchangers (AEs) exchange intracellular bicarbonate for extracellular chloride and thereby lower the intracellular pH. Recently, a significant association was found with the variant Ala867Asp of the anion exchanger AE3, which is predominantly expressed in brain and heart, in a large cohort of patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. To analyze a possible involvement of AE3 dysfunction in the pathogenesis of seizures, we generated an AE3-knockout mouse model by targeted disruption of Slc4a3. AE3-knockout mice were apparently healthy, and neither displayed gross histological and behavioral abnormalities nor spontaneous seizures or spike wave complexes in electrocorticograms. However, the seizure threshold of AE3-knockout mice exposed to bicuculline, pentylenetetrazole, or pilocarpine was reduced, and seizure-induced mortality was significantly increased compared to wild-type littermates. In the pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampal CA3 region, where AE3 is strongly expressed, disruption of AE3 abolished sodium-independent chloride-bicarbonate exchange. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that AE3 modulates seizure susceptibility and, therefore, are of significance for understanding the role of intracellular pH in epilepsy. PMID:16354689

  1. Investigation on magnetoacoustic signal generation with magnetic induction and its application to electrical conductivity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingyu; He, Bin

    2007-08-21

    A theoretical study on the magnetoacoustic signal generation with magnetic induction and its applications to electrical conductivity reconstruction is conducted. An object with a concentric cylindrical geometry is located in a static magnetic field and a pulsed magnetic field. Driven by Lorentz force generated by the static magnetic field, the magnetically induced eddy current produces acoustic vibration and the propagated sound wave is received by a transducer around the object to reconstruct the corresponding electrical conductivity distribution of the object. A theory on the magnetoacoustic waveform generation for a circular symmetric model is provided as a forward problem. The explicit formulae and quantitative algorithm for the electrical conductivity reconstruction are then presented as an inverse problem. Computer simulations were conducted to test the proposed theory and assess the performance of the inverse algorithms for a multi-layer cylindrical model. The present simulation results confirm the validity of the proposed theory and suggest the feasibility of reconstructing electrical conductivity distribution based on the proposed theory on the magnetoacoustic signal generation with magnetic induction. PMID:17671355

  2. Lactobacillus rhamnosus blocks inflammatory signaling in vivo via reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Patricia W; Myers, Loren E S; Ray, Laurie; Song, Shuh-Chyung; Nasr, Tala R; Berardinelli, Andrew J; Kundu, Kousik; Murthy, Niren; Hansen, Jason M; Neish, Andrew S

    2009-10-15

    Uncontrolled inflammatory responses in the immature gut may play a role in the pathogenesis of many intestinal inflammatory syndromes that present in newborns or children, such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), idiopathic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), or infectious enteritis. Consistent with previous reports that murine intestinal function matures over the first 3 weeks of life, we show that inflammatory signaling in the neonatal mouse gut increases during postnatal maturation, with peak responses occurring at 2-3 weeks. Probiotic bacteria can block inflammatory responses in cultured epithelia by inducing the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which inhibit NF-kappaB activation through oxidative inactivation of the key regulatory enzyme Ubc12. We now report for the first time that the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) can induce ROS generation in intestinal epithelia in vitro and in vivo. Intestines from immature mice gavage fed LGG exhibited increased GSH oxidation and cullin-1 deneddylation, reflecting local ROS generation and its resultant Ubc12 inactivation, respectively. Furthermore, prefeeding LGG prevented TNF-alpha-induced intestinal NF-kappaB activation. These studies indicate that LGG can reduce inflammatory signaling in immature intestines by inducing local ROS generation and may be a mechanism by which probiotic bacteria can prevent NEC in premature infants or reduce the severity of IBD in children. PMID:19660542

  3. Efficient Generation of Cardiac Purkinje Cells from ESCs by Activating cAMP Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Su-Yi; Maass, Karen; Lu, Jia; Fishman, Glenn I.; Chen, Shuibing; Evans, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dysfunction of the specialized cardiac conduction system (CCS) is associated with life-threatening arrhythmias. Strategies to derive CCS cells, including rare Purkinje cells (PCs), would facilitate models for mechanistic studies and drug discovery and also provide new cellular materials for regenerative therapies. A high-throughput chemical screen using CCS:lacz and Contactin2:egfp (Cntn2:egfp) reporter embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines was used to discover a small molecule, sodium nitroprusside (SN), that efficiently promotes the generation of cardiac cells that express gene profiles and generate action potentials of PC-like cells. Imaging and mechanistic studies suggest that SN promotes the generation of PCs from cardiac progenitors initially expressing cardiac myosin heavy chain and that it does so by activating cyclic AMP signaling. These findings provide a strategy to derive scalable PCs, along with insight into the ontogeny of CCS development. PMID:26028533

  4. A thermal signal generator probe for the study of neural thermal transduction.

    PubMed

    Maluf, N I; McNutt, E L; Monroe, S; Tanelian, D L; Kovacs, G T

    1994-07-01

    The study of thermal transduction in neural tissues has been impeded by the lack of instrumentation able to generate complex, focal temperature variations. Specifically, we are interested in the study of neural thermal transduction within the cornea, with its homogeneous thermal conductivity and avascularity. We present a thermal signal generator probe that is capable of producing arbitrarily shaped bipolar (heating or cooling) thermal swings in a small volume of corneal tissue with which it is in contact. Heating and cooling of the probe tip are achieved by means of a Peltier effect thermoelectric device. The probe temperature, measured directly at the tip, is controlled using closed-loop control circuitry and waveform generation software on a host computer. Response characteristics of thermally sensitive C-fibers were investigated in an in vitro preparation of the rabbit cornea. PMID:7927385

  5. Multi Station Frequency Response and Polarization of ELF/VLF Signals Generated via Ionospheric Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxworth, Ashanthi; Golkowski, Mark; University of Colorado Denver Team

    2013-10-01

    ELF/VLF wave generation via HF modulated ionospheric heating has been practiced for many years as a unique way to generate waves in the ELF/VLF band (3 Hz - 30 kHz). This paper presents experimental results and associated theoretical modeling from work performed at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. An experiment was designed to investigate the modulation frequency dependence of the generated ELF/VLF signal amplitudes and polarization at multiple sites at distances of 37 km, 50 km and 99 km from the facility. While no difference is observed for X mode versus O mode modulation of the heating wave, it is found that ELF/VLF amplitude and polarization as a function of modulated ELF/VLF frequency is different for each site. An ionospheric heating code is used to determine the primary current sources leading to the observations.

  6. Efficient Signal Processing in Random Networks that Generate Variability: A Comparison of Internally Generated and Externally Induced Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Nishikawa, Isao; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Toyoizumi, Taro

    Source of cortical variability and its influence on signal processing remain an open question. We address the latter, by studying two types of balanced randomly connected networks of quadratic I-F neurons, with irregular spontaneous activity: (a) a deterministic network with strong connections generating noise by chaotic dynamics (b) a stochastic network with weak connections receiving noisy input. They are analytically tractable in the limit of large network-size and channel time-constant. Despite different sources of noise, spontaneous activity of these networks are identical unless majority of neurons are simultaneously recorded. However, the two networks show remarkably different sensitivity to external stimuli. In the former, input reverberates internally and can be read out over long time, but in the latter, inputs rapidly decay. This is further enhanced with activity-dependent plasticity at input synapses producing marked difference in decoding inputs from neural activity. We show, this leads to distinct performance of the two networks to integrate temporally separate signals from multiple sources, with the deterministic chaotic network activity serving as reservoir for Monte Carlo sampling to perform near optimal Bayesian integration, unlike its stochastic counterpart.

  7. AE Geomagnetic Index Predictability for High Speed Solar Wind Streams: A Wavelet Decomposition Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guarnieri, Fernando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Hajra, Rajkumar; Echer, Ezequiel; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    High speed solar wind streams cause geomagnetic activity at Earth. In this study we have applied a wavelet interactive filtering and reconstruction technique on the solar wind magnetic field components and AE index series to allowed us to investigate the relationship between the two. The IMF Bz component was found as the most significant solar wind parameter responsible by the control of the AE activity. Assuming magnetic reconnection associated to southward directed Bz is the main mechanism transferring energy into the magnetosphere, we adjust parameters to forecast the AE index. The adjusted routine is able to forecast AE, based only on the Bz measured at the L1 Lagrangian point. This gives a prediction approximately 30-70 minutes in advance of the actual geomagnetic activity. The correlation coefficient between the observed AE data and the forecasted series reached values higher than 0.90. In some cases the forecast reproduced particularities observed in the signal very well.The high correlation values observed and the high efficacy of the forecasting can be taken as a confirmation that reconnection is the main physical mechanism responsible for the energy transfer during HILDCAAs. The study also shows that the IMF Bz component low frequencies are most important for AE prediction.

  8. Matt Rogers on AES Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Matt

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy and AES Energy Storage recently agreed to a $17.1M conditional loan guarantee commitment. This project will develop the first battery-based energy storage system to provide a more stable and efficient electrical grid for New York State's high-voltage transmission network. Matt Rogers is the Senior Advisor to the Secretary for Recovery Act Implementation.

  9. Matt Rogers on AES Energy Storage

    ScienceCinema

    Rogers, Matt

    2013-05-29

    The Department of Energy and AES Energy Storage recently agreed to a $17.1M conditional loan guarantee commitment. This project will develop the first battery-based energy storage system to provide a more stable and efficient electrical grid for New York State's high-voltage transmission network. Matt Rogers is the Senior Advisor to the Secretary for Recovery Act Implementation.

  10. Determination of the AES attitude from the angular velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasberg, P. E.; Pivovarov, M. L.

    1984-10-01

    A nonlinear algorithm that could be used for the AES satellite to determine its motions relative to its mass center using rate sensor data is presented. The calculations are performed relative to absolute geocentric and satellite body coordinate systems. A transfer matrix of cosines relates positions and velocities in one system to positions and velocities in the other. The orientation algorithm is obtained with a matrix kinematic equation solved by a least squares technique. Sample calculations for the Intercosmos 17 satellite, employing sun sensor and magnetometer data, show the algorithm's capabilities for generating the satellite variations in the orbital coordinate system. Yaw, roll and pitch data are obtained.

  11. PDM-16QAM vector signal generation and detection based on intensity modulation and direct detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Yu, Jianjun; Li, Xinying

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel and simple method to generate and detect high speed polarization-division-multiplexing 16-ary quadrature-amplitude-modulation (PDM-16QAM) vector signal enabled by Mach-Zehnder modulator-based (MZM-based) optical-carrier-suppression (OCS) intensity modulation and direct detection. Due to the adoption of OCS intensity modulation, carrier beating can be avoided at the receiver, and thus polarization de-multiplexing can be implemented by digital-signal-processing-based (DSP-based) cascaded multi-modulus algorithm (CMMA) equalization instead of a polarization tracking system. The change of both amplitude and phase information due to the adoption of OCS modulation can be equalized by DSP-based amplitude and phase precoding at the transmitter. Up to 64-Gb/s PDM-16QAM vector signal is generated and detected after 2-km single-mode fiber-28 (SMF-28) or 20-km large-effective-area fiber (LEAF) transmission with a bit-error-ratio (BER) less than the hard-decision forward-error-correction (HD-FEC) threshold of 3.8×10-3.

  12. gLAB-A Fully Software Tool to Generate, Process and Analyze GNSS Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionisio, Cesare; Citterico, Dario; Pirazzi, Gabriele; De Quattro, Nicola; Marracci, Riccardo; Cucchi, Luca; Valdambrini, Nicola; Formaioni, Irene

    2010-08-01

    In this paper the concept of Software Defined Radio (SDR) and its use in modern GNSS receiver is highlighted demonstrating how software receivers are important in many situations especially for verification and validation. After a brief introduction of gLab, a fully software high modular tool to generate, process and analyze current and future GNSS signals, the different software modules will be described. Demonstrating the wide range of uses concerning gLab, different practical example will be briefly overviewed: from the analysis of real data over the experimental GIOVE-B satellite, to the antenna group delay determination or the CN0 estimation under wide dynamic range etc.. gLab is the result of different projects leaded by Intecs in GNSS SW Radio: the signal generator is the result of the SWAN (Sistemi softWare per Applicazioni di Navigazione) project under Italian Space Agency (ASI) contract, the analyzer and the processing module have been developed for ESA to V&V the IOV (In Orbit Validation) Galileo Phase. In this case the GNSS SW RX works in parallel with Test User Receivers (TUR) in order to validate the Signal In Space (SiS). Is remarkable that gLab is the result of over three years of development and approximately one year of test and validation under ESA (European Space Agency) supervision.

  13. Magnetic signals generated by ocean flow in Swarm satellite data: prediction and observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einspigel, David; Velimsky, Jakub; Martinec, Zdenek; Sachl, Libor

    2015-04-01

    Motion of sea water in the Earth's main magnetic field generates the secondary induced field which can be decomposed into its poloidal and toroidal components. While the toroidal component is not directly observable outside the oceans, the poloidal magnetic field have been already validated by CHAMP satellite magnetic observations, land-based magnetic measurements and sea surface magnetic field measurements, despite the poloidal field being rather weak, reaching an intensity of up to a few nT. New possibilities of observations of the ocean-induced magnetic field came with the launching of ESA's Swarm mission satellites which have provided a valuable amount of high-precision and high-resolution measurements of the Earth's magnetic field. For a detection of weak ocean-induced signals and their interpretation, numerical modelling is crucial. We present results of modelling of the secondary magnetic field generated by ocean flow. Two ocean flow models are incorporated: 1) DEBOT, a barotropic model of ocean tide flow and 2) LSOMG, a baroclinic model of global ocean circulation. The secondary magnetic field is modelled by two different approaches: 1) a single-layer approximation model and 2) a three-dimensional time-domain electromagnetic induction model. A preliminary comparison of predicted signals and observed signals extracted from Swarm satellite data will be shown. The future aim is to assimilate magnetic data provided by Swarm mission into the models.

  14. Cyclic AMP Signaling through Epac Axis Modulates Human Hemogenic Endothelium and Enhances Hematopoietic Cell Generation.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Shobhit; Rönn, Roger E; Guibentif, Carolina; Moraghebi, Roksana; Woods, Niels-Bjarne

    2016-05-10

    Hematopoietic cells emerge from hemogenic endothelium in the developing embryo. Mechanisms behind human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development remain unclear. Using a human pluripotent stem cell differentiation model, we report that cyclic AMP (cAMP) induction dramatically increases HSC-like cell frequencies. We show that hematopoietic cell generation requires cAMP signaling through the Exchange proteins activated by cAMP (cAMP-Epac) axis; Epac signaling inhibition decreased both hemogenic and non-hemogenic endothelium, and abrogated hematopoietic cell generation. Furthermore, in hematopoietic progenitor and stem-like cells, cAMP induction mitigated oxidative stress, created a redox-state balance, and enhanced C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expression, benefiting the maintenance of these primitive cells. Collectively, our study provides insights and mechanistic details on the previously unrecognized role of cAMP signaling in regulating human hematopoietic development. These findings advance the mechanistic understanding of hematopoietic development toward the development of transplantable human hematopoietic cells for therapeutic needs. PMID:27117782

  15. Ocean-generated magnetic field study based on satellite geomagnetic measurements: 2. Signal inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, Yury

    2012-09-01

    The work presented here is the second part of an ocean-generated magnetic field study and provides a procedure for inferring the ocean-generated magnetic field from satellite geomagnetic measurements. The procedure was first tested on synthetic data. The simulation employed a hypothetical satellite measuring the magnetic field at an altitude of 400 km. The “measurements” (generated by the CM4 and CHAOS models) included the core field, the lithospheric field, the ionospheric and magnetospheric fields, the secular variation, and the ocean-generated magnetic field. The search algorithm, as proposed in part 1, converts irregular measurements into fields on a regular grid. The filtration procedure is based on the Savitzky-Golay algorithm. The procedure includes four steps providing seven unknown filter parameters. Parameter values were obtained by solving the problem of minimizing the spatially averaged squared residuals between the inferred field and the model field. Then, the parameters were used in the filter to infer the ocean-generated magnetic field that was initially added to the “measurements.” The inferred signal, although spatially corrupted and having a smaller magnitude (60% of the magnitude of the initial signal), indicated the presence of magnetic anomalies within the Southern Ocean. The technique was then applied to CHAMP geomagnetic measurements. The result of filtering was clear magnetic anomalies within the Southern Ocean with a spatial character that were close to what models of the ocean-generated magnetic field provided. The magnitude of the inferring signal was 5 nT, the corrected values were 7-8 nT, 1-2 nT larger than the modeled field magnitude. To compare the temporal variability of the inferred field with the variability of sea surface height, ten 10° by 10° areas were selected within the Southern Ocean and the root-mean-square of both SSH and the magnetic field were computed for each area. A comparison of the results indicated a

  16. GUN4-Protoporphyrin IX Is a Singlet Oxygen Generator with Consequences for Plastid Retrograde Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tarahi Tabrizi, Shabnam; Sawicki, Artur; Zhou, Shuaixiang; Luo, Meizhong; Willows, Robert D

    2016-04-22

    The genomes uncoupled 4 (GUN4) protein is a nuclear-encoded, chloroplast-localized, porphyrin-binding protein implicated in retrograde signaling between the chloroplast and nucleus, although its exact role in this process is still unclear. Functionally, it enhances Mg-chelatase activity in the chlorophyll biosynthesis pathway. Because GUN4 is present only in organisms that carry out oxygenic photosynthesis and because it binds protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) and Mg-PPIX, it has been suggested that it prevents production of light- and PPIX- or Mg-PPIX-dependent reactive oxygen species. A chld-1/GUN4 mutant with elevated PPIX has a light-dependent up-regulation of GUN4, implicating this protein in light-dependent sensing of PPIX, with the suggestion that GUN4 reduces PPIX-generated singlet oxygen, O2(a(1)Δg), and subsequent oxidative damage (Brzezowski, P., Schlicke, H., Richter, A., Dent, R. M., Niyogi, K. K., and Grimm, B. (2014) Plant J. 79, 285-298). In direct contrast, our results show that purified GUN4 and oxidatively damaged ChlH increase the rate of PPIX-generated singlet oxygen production in the light, by a factor of 5 and 10, respectively, when compared with PPIX alone. Additionally, the functional GUN4-PPIX-ChlH complex and ChlH-PPIX complexes generate O2(a(1)Δg) at a reduced rate when compared with GUN4-PPIX. As O2(a(1)Δg) is a potential plastid-to-nucleus signal, possibly through second messengers, light-dependent O2(a(1)Δg) generation by GUN4-PPIX is proposed to be part of a signal transduction pathway from the chloroplast to the nucleus. GUN4 thus senses the availability and flux of PPIX through the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway and also modulates Mg-chelatase activity. The light-dependent O2(a(1)Δg) generation from GUN4-PPIX is thus proposed as the first step in retrograde signaling from the chloroplast to the nucleus. PMID:26969164

  17. Magnetic fields in Herbig Ae stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubrig, S.; Schöller, M.; Yudin, R. V.

    2004-12-01

    Herbig Ae stars are young A-type stars in the pre-main sequence evolutionary phase with masses of ˜1.5-3 M⊙. They show rather intense surface activity (Dunkin et al. \\cite{Du97}, MNRAS, 290, 165) and infrared excess related to the presence of circumstellar disks. Because of their youth, primordial magnetic fields inherited from the parent molecular cloud may be expected, but no direct evidence for the presence of magnetic fields on their surface, except in one case (Donati et al. \\cite{Do97}, MNRAS, 291, 658), has been found until now. Here we report observations of optical circular polarization with FORS 1 at the VLT in the three Herbig Ae stars HD 139614, HD 144432 and HD 144668. A definite longitudinal magnetic field at 4.8 σ level, =-450±93 G, has been detected in the Herbig Ae star HD 139614. This is the largest magnetic field ever diagnosed for a Herbig Ae star. A hint of a weak magnetic field is found in the other two Herbig Ae stars, HD 144432 and HD 144668, for which magnetic fields are measured at the ˜1.6 σ and ˜2.5 σ level respectively. Further, we report the presence of circular polarization signatures in the Ca II K line in the V Stokes spectra of HD 139614 and HD 144432, which appear unresolved at the low spectral resolution achievable with FORS 1. We suggest that models involving accretion of matter from the disk to the star along a global stellar magnetic field of a specific geometry can account for the observed Zeeman signatures. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programme No. 072.D-0377).

  18. Significant Chiral Signal Amplification of Langmuir Monolayers Probed by Second Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Lv, Kai; Lin, Lu; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Li; Guo, Yuan; Lu, Zhou; Liu, Minghua

    2015-05-01

    With the development of the nonlinear optical technique such as SHG (second harmonic generation), the in situ measurements of the chirality in the monolayers at the air/water interface have become possible. However, when performing the SHG measurement of the chirality in a monolayer, it is still a great challenge to obtain the chiral signals with a good S/N (signal-to-noise) ratio. In this Letter, interfacial assemblies with induced supramolecular chirality were used to amplify the weak chiral SHG signals from the monolayers at the air/water interface. Tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin (TPPS) J aggregates were used as the subphase, and when chiral amphiphilic molecules were spread on it, chiral domains of the amphiphile/TPPS J aggregates were formed and then significantly amplified chiral signals that otherwise could not be detected. Moreover, the sign of the DCE (degree of chiral excess) changed with the chirality of the amphiphilic molecules, thus providing a possible way to obtain the absolute chiral information in situ in the monolayers. PMID:26263339

  19. PDM-QPSK vector signal generation by MZM-based optical carrier suppression and direct detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinying; Yu, Jianjun; Xiao, Jiangnan; Chi, Nan; Xu, Yuming; Chen, Long

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the generation of polarization-division-multiplexing quadrature-phase-shift-keying (PDM-QPSK) modulated vector signal adopting Mach-Zehnder-modulator-based (MZM-based) optical-carrier-suppression (OCS) intensity modulation and direct detection. The MZM is driven by a 6-GHz precoded vector signal carrying 2-Gbaud QPSK transmitter data, and biased at its minimum transmission point to realize OCS modulation. The phase of the 6-GHz precoded vector signal is 1/2 of that of the regular QPSK symbol. Only one polarization beam splitter (PBS) is needed to implement optical polarization diversity. The bit-error rate (BER) for the 2-Gbaud PDM-QPSK modulated vector signal can reach the hard-decision forward-error-correction (HD-FEC) threshold of 3.8×10-3 after 80-km single-mode fiber-28 (SMF-28) transmission in the presence of optical dispersion compensation, and 80-km SMF-28 transmission causes no power penalty.

  20. Implementation of a widely tunable microwave signal generator based on dual-polarization fiber grating laser.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qiang; Liang, Yizhi; Jin, Long; Cheng, Linghao; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the implementation of a widely tunable microwave signal generator based on a dual-polarization fiber grating laser. The laser contains two strong, wavelength-matched Bragg gratings photoinscribed in an Er-doped fiber and emits two polarization modes when pumped with a 980 nm laser diode. By beating the two modes, a microwave signal with a signal-to-noise ratio over 60 dB can be obtained. For a free running laser the fluctuations in intensity and frequency of the microwave signal are ±1  dB and ±5  kHz, respectively, and the noise level is about -40  dBc/Hz at 1 kHz. The frequency can be continuously tuned from 1.8 to 15.1 GHz, by transversely loading the laser cavity and changing the intracavity birefringence by use of a piezoelectric transducer-based mechanical device. The measured response time rate of tuning is about 90 MHz/μs and the intensity fluctuation at different frequencies is less than ±1.5  dB. The frequency fluctuation under loading is controlled within 1 MHz by introducing an electrical feedback. PMID:25967802

  1. Neural network inversion of synthetic eddy current testing signals from flaws in steam generator tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S. J.; Kim, C. H.; Shin, Y. K.; Lee, H. B.; Park, Y. W.; Yim, C. J.

    2001-04-01

    This paper reports our recent endeavor to develop automated, systematic inversion tools by the novel combination of neural networks and finite element modeling for eddy current flaw characterization in steam generator tubes. Specifically, this paper describes 1) development of the finite element models that can simulate synthetic ECT signals from axisymmetric flaws with arbitrary cross-sections, 2) construction of databases with abundant flaw signals, 3) implementation of effective feature extraction software and proposition of feature selection criteria, and finally 4) development of inversion tools by use of two neural networks for flaw classification and sizing. In addition, this paper also presents the performance of the proposed inversion tools for solving two sample problems: classification of flaws with non-symmetric cross-sections, and classification and sizing of flaws with tip variation.

  2. L-Cysteine Desulfhydrase 1 modulates the generation of the signaling molecule sulfide in plant cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Luis C.; García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Consistent with data in animal systems, experimental evidence highlights sulfide as a signaling molecule of equal importance to NO and H2O2 in plant systems. In mammals, two cytosolic enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), have been shown to be responsible for the endogenous production of sulfide. L-cysteine desulfhydrase 1 (DES1) has been recently established as the only enzyme that is involved in the generation of hydrogen sulfide in plant cytosol. Although plants have an available source of sulfide within chloroplasts, the basic stromal pH prevents sulfide release into the cytosol. Therefore, DES1 is essential for the production of sulfide for signaling purposes. PMID:23428891

  3. Bacterial signaling systems as platforms for rational design of new generations of biosensors.

    PubMed

    Checa, Susana K; Zurbriggen, Matias D; Soncini, Fernando C

    2012-10-01

    Bacterial signal-responsive regulatory circuits have been employed as platform to design and construct whole-cell bacterial biosensors for reporting toxicity. A new generation of biosensors with improved performance and a wide application range has emerged after the application of synthetic biology concepts to biosensor design. Site-directed mutagenesis, directed evolution and domain swapping were applied to upgrade signal detection or to create novel sensor modules. Rewiring of the genetic circuits allows improving the determinations and reduces the heterogeneity of the response between individual reporter cells. Moreover, the assembly of natural or engineered modules to biosensor platforms provides innovative outputs, expanding the range of application of these devises, from monitoring toxics and bioremediation to killing targeted cells. PMID:22658939

  4. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems.

    PubMed

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  5. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  6. Experimental Verification of Model-Based ECT Signal Interpretation for Quantitative Flaw Characterization in Steam Generator Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sung-Jin; Kim, Young H.; Kim, Eui-Lae; Chung, Tae-Eon; Yim, Chang-Jae

    2003-03-01

    The model-based inversion tools for eddy current signals have been developed by the novel combination of neural networks and finite element modeling for quantitative flaw characterization in steam generator tubes. In the present work, interpretation of experimental eddy current signals was carried out in order to validate the developed inversion tools. A database was constructed using the synthetic flaw signals generated by the finite element modeling. The hybrid neural networks of a PNN classifier and BPNN size estimators were trained using the synthetic signals. Experimental eddy current signals were obtained from axisymmetric artificial flaws. Interpretations of flaws were carried out by feeding experimental signals into the neural networks. The results of interpretations were excellent, so that the developed inversion tools would be applicable to the interpretation of experimental eddy current signals.

  7. Estimation of Electro-Magnetic Signals Generated by Stress Changes before the Arrival of Seismic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, K.

    2014-12-01

    This work aims to increase the efficiency of earthquake early warning (EEW) systems. Conventional EEW systems detect occurrence of earthquakes by means of detecting seismic P-waves; thus, they cannot make alert before P-waves reach the ground surface in principle. If we desires to break this limitation, we must observe other physical quantities including the electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational fields, variations of which propagate faster than elastic waves. The present study focuses on changes in the magnetic field generated by co-seismic stress changes in the Earth's crust. When magnetic minerals in the Earth's crust are subjected to mechanical forces, increments or decrements of magnetization appear. This is called the piezomagnetic effect. Significant changes in values of the geomagnetic field has frequently observed between before and after major earthquakes or volcanic ground deformation, which is considered to be generated by the piezomagnetic effect. The problem is, however, whether or not co-seismic changes in the stress field generates earlier signals, that is, changes in the magnetic field at observation sites which occur before arrival of seismic waves. To answer the question, a set of equations governing elastodynamics, electromagnetics, and the piezomagnetic effect, are solved for a whole space stuffed with a uniform physical properties. An impulsive double couple is assumed to represent the earthquake source mechanism. A set of solutions is derived in time-domain, and its features are investigated for several sets of parameters including electrical conductivity and seismic velocities. We can confirm that there are certain amount of changes in the EM field, even before arrival of seismic waves. EM signals before arrival of seismic waves (i.e. earlier EM signals) are relatively large in the case that the Earth's crust is conductive (> 0.01 S/m). However, the appearance of relatively large EM signal is not simultaneous to the rupture; instead, it is

  8. Dye-doped organosilicate nanoparticles as cell-preserving labels for photoacoustic signal generation.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Perez, Francisco I; Gutiérrez-Juárez Gerardo; Bok, Sangho; Gangopadhyay, Keshab; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra; Baker, Gary A; Polo-Parada, Luis

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticle-assisted ultrasound generation by pulsed laser or photoacoustic (PA) techniques has been employed in the study of several tissues both in vivo and in vitro. Among the many applications of this technology, the detection of few cells in vitro is of particular interest. However, the toxicity induced by laser irradiation used for PA signal generation, whether in the absence or the presence of PA enhancers, within single isolated cells has not yet been investigated in detail. Herein, we report our studies of the cellular health of two different nanoparticle-labeled cell lines one hour after being subjected to a single laser pulse in vitro. We selected for this study an Hs936 skin epithelial melanoma cell line, which can be naturally detected photoacoustically, as well as a T47D human mammary breast gland epithelial cell line which has proven difficult to detect photoacoustically due to the absence of natural melanin. We have evaluated the amplitude of the PA signal derived from these two cell types, unlabeled and labeled with nanoparticles of two types (gold nanoparticles, AuNPs, or rhodamine 6G-doped organosilicate nanoparticles, R6G-NPOs), and assessed their health one hour subsequent to laser treatment. The current work corroborates previous findings that, for unlabeled cells, Hs936 produces a detectable PA signal whereas the T47D line does not. Cells labeled with AuNPs or R6G-NPOs produced a detectable PA signal of similar amplitude for the two cell lines. A significant number of Hs936 cells (both unlabeled cells and those labeled with AuNPs) exhibited cell nuclei alterations, as revealed by DAPI staining conducted an hour after photo treatment. Remarkably, the T47D cells suffered damage only when labeled with AuNPs. A significant finding, the R6G-NPOs proved capable of non-destructive PA signal generation in both cell types. Our findings advocate a transformational path forward for the use of dye-doped silicate nanoparticles in cell-compatible PA

  9. Decomposition of frequency characteristics of acoustic emission signals for different types of partial discharges sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witos, F.; Gacek, Z.; Paduch, P.

    2006-11-01

    The problem touched in the article is decomposition of frequency characteristic of AE signals into elementary form of three-parametrical Gauss function. At the first stage, for modelled curves in form of sum of three-parametrical Gauss peaks, accordance of modelled curve and a curve resulting from a solutions obtained using method with dynamic windows, Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, genetic algorithms and differential evolution algorithm are discussed. It is founded that analyses carried out by means differential evolution algorithm are effective and the computer system served an analysis of AE signal frequency characteristics was constructed. Decomposition of frequency characteristics for selected AE signals coming from modelled PD sources using different ends of the bushing, and real PD sources in generator coil bars are carried out.

  10. Spectral Characteristics of Continuous Acoustic Emission (AE) Data from Laboratory Rock Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, J. William; Goodfellow, Sebastian; Reyes-Montes, Juan; Nasseri, Farzine; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Continuous acoustic emission (AE) data recorded during rock deformation tests facilitates the monitoring of fracture initiation and propagation due to applied stress changes. Changes in the frequency and energy content of AE waveforms have been previously observed and were associated with microcrack coalescence and the induction or mobilisation of large fractures which are naturally associated with larger amplitude AE events and lower-frequency components. The shift from high to low dominant frequency components during the late stages of the deformation experiment, as the rate of AE events increases and the sample approaches failure, indicates a transition from the micro-cracking to macro-cracking regime, where large cracks generated result in material failure. The objective of this study is to extract information on the fracturing process from the acoustic records around sample failure, where the fast occurrence of AE events does not allow for identification of individual AE events and phase arrivals. Standard AE event processing techniques are not suitable for extracting this information at these stages. Instead the observed changes in the frequency content of the continuous record can be used to characterise and investigate the fracture process at the stage of microcrack coalescence and sample failure. To analyse and characterise these changes, a detailed non-linear and non-stationary time-frequency analysis of the continuous waveform data is required. Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA) are two of the techniques used in this paper to analyse the acoustic records which provide a high-resolution temporal frequency distribution of the data. In this paper we present the results from our analysis of continuous AE data recorded during a laboratory triaxial deformation experiment using the combined EMD and HSA method.

  11. All-optical binary phase-coded UWB signal generation for multi-user UWB communications.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jianji; Yu, Yuan; Zhang, Yin; Li, Xiang; Huang, Dexiu; Zhang, Xinliang

    2011-05-23

    An all-optical incoherent scheme for generation of binary phase-coded ultra-wideband (UWB) signals is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The binary phase coding is performed based on all-optical phase modulation in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and phase modulation to intensity modulation (PM-IM) conversion in a fiber delay interferometer (DI) that serves as a multichannel frequency discriminator. By locating the phase-modulated light waves at the positive and negative slopes of the DI transmission spectra, binary phase encoded UWB codes (0 and π) are generated. We also experimentally demonstrate a bipolar UWB coding system with a code length of 4, operating at 1.25 Gb/s. And the decoding is analyzed as well. Our proposed system has potential application in future high-speed UWB impulse radio over optical fiber access networks. PMID:21643312

  12. Ae4 (Slc4a9) Anion Exchanger Drives Cl- Uptake-dependent Fluid Secretion by Mouse Submandibular Gland Acinar Cells.

    PubMed

    Peña-Münzenmayer, Gaspar; Catalán, Marcelo A; Kondo, Yusuke; Jaramillo, Yasna; Liu, Frances; Shull, Gary E; Melvin, James E

    2015-04-24

    Transcellular Cl(-) movement across acinar cells is the rate-limiting step for salivary gland fluid secretion. Basolateral Nkcc1 Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporters play a critical role in fluid secretion by promoting the intracellular accumulation of Cl(-) above its equilibrium potential. However, salivation is only partially abolished in the absence of Nkcc1 cotransporter activity, suggesting that another Cl(-) uptake pathway concentrates Cl(-) ions in acinar cells. To identify alternative molecular mechanisms, we studied mice lacking Ae2 and Ae4 Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchangers. We found that salivation stimulated by muscarinic and β-adrenergic receptor agonists was normal in the submandibular glands of Ae2(-/-) mice. In contrast, saliva secretion was reduced by 35% in Ae4(-/-) mice. The decrease in salivation was not related to loss of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter or Na(+)/H(+) exchanger activity in Ae4(-/-) mice but correlated with reduced Cl(-) uptake during β-adrenergic receptor activation of cAMP signaling. Direct measurements of Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger activity revealed that HCO3 (-)-dependent Cl(-) uptake was reduced in the acinar cells of Ae2(-/-) and Ae4(-/-) mice. Moreover, Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger activity was nearly abolished in double Ae4/Ae2 knock-out mice, suggesting that most of the Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger activity in submandibular acinar cells depends on Ae2 and Ae4 expression. In conclusion, both Ae2 and Ae4 anion exchangers are functionally expressed in submandibular acinar cells; however, only Ae4 expression appears to be important for cAMP-dependent regulation of fluid secretion. PMID:25745107

  13. The Impact of Church Affiliation on Language Use in Kwara'ae (Solomon Islands).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson-Gegeo, Karen Ann; Gegeo, David Welchman

    1991-01-01

    The impact of church affiliation on language use, identity, and change among Kwara'ae speakers in the Solomon Islands is examined. It was found that members of different sects signal their separate identities not only through linguistic code but also through discourse patterns and nonverbal aspects of communication. (26 references) (JL)

  14. Simple hybrid wire-wireless fiber laser sensor by direct photonic generation of beat signal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengchun; Gao, Liang; Yin, Zuowei; Shi, Yuechun; Zhang, Liang; Chen, Xiangfei; Cheng, Jianchun

    2011-04-20

    Based on direct photonic generation of a beat signal, a simple hybrid wire-wireless fiber laser sensor is proposed. In the sensor, an improved multilongitudinal modes fiber laser cavity is set up by only a fiber Bragg grating, a section of erbium-doped fiber, and a broadband reflector. A photodetector is used to detect the electrical beat signal. Next, the beat signal including the sensor information can access the wireless network through the wireless transmission. At last, a frequency spectrum analyzer is used to demodulate the sensing information. With this method, the long-distance real-time monitor of the fiber sensor can be realized. The proposed technique offers a simple and cheap way for sensing information of the fiber sensor to access the wireless sensor network. An experiment was implemented to measure the strain and the corresponding root mean square deviation is about -5.7 με at 916 MHz and -3.8 με at 1713 MHz after wireless transmission. PMID:21509073

  15. Cathepsin S Signals via PAR2 and Generates a Novel Tethered Ligand Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Ethan A.

    2014-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 is widely expressed in mammalian epithelial, immune and neural tissues. Cleavage of PAR2 by serine proteases leads to self-activation of the receptor by the tethered ligand SLIGRL. The contribution of other classes of proteases to PAR activation has not been studied in detail. Cathepsin S is a widely expressed cysteine protease that is upregulated in inflammatory conditions. It has been suggested that cathepsin S activates PAR2. However, cathepsin S activation of PAR2 has not been demonstrated directly nor has the potential mechanism of activation been identified. We show that cathepsin S cleaves near the N-terminus of PAR2 to expose a novel tethered ligand, KVDGTS. The hexapeptide KVDGTS generates downstream signaling events specific to PAR2 but is weaker than SLIGRL. Mutation of the cathepsin S cleavage site prevents receptor activation by the protease while KVDGTS retains activity. In conclusion, the range of actions previously ascribed to cysteine cathepsins in general, and cathepsin S in particular, should be expanded to include molecular signaling. Such signaling may link together observations that had been attributed previously to PAR2 or cathepsin S individually. These interactions may contribute to inflammation. PMID:24964046

  16. A study of the initial oxidation of evaporated thin films of aluminum by AES, ELS, and ESD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bujor, M.; Larson, L. A.; Poppa, H.

    1982-01-01

    The room temperature, low pressure, oxidation of evaporated aluminum thin films has been studied by AES, ELS, and ESD. ESD was the most sensitive of the three methods to characterize a clean aluminum surface. Two oxidation stages were distinguished in the 0-3000 L oxygen exposure range. Between 0 and 50 L, the chemisorption of oxygen atoms was characterized by a fast decrease of the 67 eV AES Al peak and the 10 eV surface plasmon peak, and by a simultaneous increase of the oxygen AES and ESD signals. After 50 L, a change in slope in all AES and ESD signal variations was attributed to the slow growth of a thin layer of aluminum oxide, which after 3000 L was still only a few angstroms thick.

  17. Free Radicals Generated by Ionizing Radiation Signal Nuclear Translocation of p53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, J. D.; Pennington, M. E.; Craven, M. T.; Warters, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a transcription factor that regulates several pathways, which function collectively to maintain the integrity of the genome. Nuclear localization is critical for wild-type function. However, the signals that regulate subcellular localization of p53 have not been identified. Here, we examine the effect of ionizing radiation on the subcellular localization of p53 in two cell lines in which p63 is normally sequestered in the cytoplasm and found that ionizing radiation caused a biphasic translocation response. p53 entered the nucleus 1-2 hours postirradiation (early response), subsequently emerged from the nucleus, and then again entered the nucleus 12-24 hours after the cells had been irradiated (delayed response). These changes in subcellular localization could be completely blocked by the free radical scavenger, WR1065. By comparison, two DNA-damaging agents that do not generate free radicals, mitomycin C and doxorubicin, caused translocation only after 12-24 h of exposure to the drugs, and this effect could not be inhibited by WR1065. Hence, although all three DNA-damaging agents induced relocalization of p53 to the nucleus, only the translocation caused by radiation was sensitive to free radical scavenging. We suggest that the free radicals generated by ionizing radiation can signal p53 translocation to the nucleus.

  18. Photonic vector signal generation at W-band employing an optical frequency octupling scheme enabled by a single MZM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinying; Yu, Jianjun; Zhang, Ziran; Xiao, Jiangnan; Chang, Gee-Kung

    2015-08-01

    We propose photonic vector signal generation at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) bands enabled by a single Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) and phase-precoding technique, which can realize photonic frequency multiplication of the precoded microwave vector signal used for the drive of the single MZM. We also experimentally demonstrate the generation of quadrature-phase-shift-keying (QPSK) modulated vector signal at W-band adopting photonic frequency octupling (×8) based on our proposed scheme. The MZM is driven by a 12-GHz QPSK modulated precoded vector signal. Up to 4-Gbaud QPSK-modulated electrical vector signal at 96 GHz is generated and then delivered over 3-m wireless transmission distance.

  19. Low-cost real-time infrared scene generation for image projection and signal injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford, James A., Jr.; King, David E.; Bowden, Mark H.

    1998-07-01

    As cost becomes an increasingly important factor in the development and testing of Infrared sensors and flight computer/processors, the need for accurate hardware-in-the- loop (HWIL) simulations is critical. In the past, expensive and complex dedicated scene generation hardware was needed to attain the fidelity necessary for accurate testing. Recent technological advances and innovative applications of established technologies are beginning to allow development of cost-effective replacements for dedicated scene generators. These new scene generators are mainly constructed from commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware and software components. At the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (MRDEC), researchers have developed such a dynamic IR scene generator (IRSG) built around COTS hardware and software. The IRSG is used to provide dynamic inputs to an IR scene projector for in-band seeker testing and for direct signal injection into the seeker or processor electronics. AMCOM MRDEC has developed a second generation IRSG, namely IRSG2, using the latest Silicon Graphics Incorporated (SGI) Onyx2 with Infinite Reality graphics. As reported in previous papers, the SGI Onyx Reality Engine 2 is the platform of the original IRSG that is now referred to as IRSG1. IRSG1 has been in operation and used daily for the past three years on several IR projection and signal injection HWIL programs. Using this second generation IRSG, frame rates have increased from 120 Hz to 400 Hz and intensity resolution from 12 bits to 16 bits. The key features of the IRSGs are real time missile frame rates and frame sizes, dynamic missile-to-target(s) viewpoint updated each frame in real-time by a six-degree-of- freedom (6DOF) system under test (SUT) simulation, multiple dynamic objects (e.g. targets, terrain/background, countermeasures, and atmospheric effects), latency compensation, point-to-extended source anti-aliased targets, and

  20. AES Water Architecture Study Interim Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The mission of the Advanced Exploration System (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) is to develop advanced water recovery systems in order to enable NASA human exploration missions beyond low earth orbit (LEO). The primary objective of the AES WRP is to develop water recovery technologies critical to near term missions beyond LEO. The secondary objective is to continue to advance mid-readiness level technologies to support future NASA missions. An effort is being undertaken to establish the architecture for the AES Water Recovery System (WRS) that meets both near and long term objectives. The resultant architecture will be used to guide future technical planning, establish a baseline development roadmap for technology infusion, and establish baseline assumptions for integrated ground and on-orbit environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) definition. This study is being performed in three phases. Phase I of this study established the scope of the study through definition of the mission requirements and constraints, as well as indentifying all possible WRS configurations that meet the mission requirements. Phase II of this study focused on the near term space exploration objectives by establishing an ISS-derived reference schematic for long-duration (>180 day) in-space habitation. Phase III will focus on the long term space exploration objectives, trading the viable WRS configurations identified in Phase I to identify the ideal exploration WRS. The results of Phases I and II are discussed in this paper.

  1. Towards 5G: A Photonic Based Millimeter Wave Signal Generation for Applying in 5G Access Fronthaul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, S. E.; Soltanian, M. R. K.; Amiri, I. S.; Khalily, M.; Supa'At, A. S. M.; Ahmad, H.

    2016-01-01

    5G communications require a multi Gb/s data transmission in its small cells. For this purpose millimeter wave (mm-wave) RF signals are the best solutions to be utilized for high speed data transmission. Generation of these high frequency RF signals is challenging in electrical domain therefore photonic generation of these signals is more studied. In this work, a photonic based simple and robust method for generating millimeter waves applicable in 5G access fronthaul is presented. Besides generating of the mm-wave signal in the 60 GHz frequency band the radio over fiber (RoF) system for transmission of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) with 5 GHz bandwidth is presented. For the purpose of wireless transmission for 5G application the required antenna is designed and developed. The total system performance in one small cell was studied and the error vector magnitude (EVM) of the system was evaluated.

  2. Towards 5G: A Photonic Based Millimeter Wave Signal Generation for Applying in 5G Access Fronthaul.

    PubMed

    Alavi, S E; Soltanian, M R K; Amiri, I S; Khalily, M; Supa'at, A S M; Ahmad, H

    2016-01-01

    5G communications require a multi Gb/s data transmission in its small cells. For this purpose millimeter wave (mm-wave) RF signals are the best solutions to be utilized for high speed data transmission. Generation of these high frequency RF signals is challenging in electrical domain therefore photonic generation of these signals is more studied. In this work, a photonic based simple and robust method for generating millimeter waves applicable in 5G access fronthaul is presented. Besides generating of the mm-wave signal in the 60 GHz frequency band the radio over fiber (RoF) system for transmission of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) with 5 GHz bandwidth is presented. For the purpose of wireless transmission for 5G application the required antenna is designed and developed. The total system performance in one small cell was studied and the error vector magnitude (EVM) of the system was evaluated. PMID:26814621

  3. Towards 5G: A Photonic Based Millimeter Wave Signal Generation for Applying in 5G Access Fronthaul

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, S. E.; Soltanian, M. R. K.; Amiri, I. S.; Khalily, M.; Supa’at, A. S. M.; Ahmad, H.

    2016-01-01

    5G communications require a multi Gb/s data transmission in its small cells. For this purpose millimeter wave (mm-wave) RF signals are the best solutions to be utilized for high speed data transmission. Generation of these high frequency RF signals is challenging in electrical domain therefore photonic generation of these signals is more studied. In this work, a photonic based simple and robust method for generating millimeter waves applicable in 5G access fronthaul is presented. Besides generating of the mm-wave signal in the 60 GHz frequency band the radio over fiber (RoF) system for transmission of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) with 5 GHz bandwidth is presented. For the purpose of wireless transmission for 5G application the required antenna is designed and developed. The total system performance in one small cell was studied and the error vector magnitude (EVM) of the system was evaluated. PMID:26814621

  4. Fast generation model of high density surface EMG signals in a cylindrical conductor volume.

    PubMed

    Carriou, Vincent; Boudaoud, Sofiane; Laforet, Jeremy; Ayachi, Fouaz Sofiane

    2016-07-01

    In the course of the last decade, fast and qualitative computing power developments have undoubtedly permitted for a better and more realistic modeling of complex physiological processes. Due to this favorable environment, a fast, generic and reliable model for high density surface electromyographic (HD-sEMG) signal generation with a multilayered cylindrical description of the volume conductor is presented in this study. Its main peculiarity lies in the generation of a high resolution potential map over the skin related to active Motor Units (MUs). Indeed, the analytical calculus is fully performed in the frequency domain. HD-sEMG signals are obtained by surfacic numerical integration of the generated high resolution potential map following a variety of electrode shapes. The suggested model is implemented using parallel computing techniques as well as by using an object-oriented approach which is comprehensive enough to be fairly quickly understood, used and potentially upgraded. To illustrate the model abilities, several simulation analyses are put forward in the results section. These simulations have been performed on the same muscle anatomy while varying the number of processes in order to show significant speed improvement. Accuracy of the numerical integration method, illustrating electrode shape diversity, is also investigated in comparison to analytical transfer functions definition. An additional section provides an insight on the volume detection of a circular electrode according to its radius. Furthermore, a large scale simulation is introduced with 300MUs in the muscle and a HD-sEMG electrode grid composed of 16×16 electrodes for three constant isometric contractions in 12s. Finally, advantages and limitations of the proposed model are discussed with a focus on perspective works. PMID:27183535

  5. Nucleotide receptor signaling in murine macrophages is linked to reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Zachary A; Guerra, Alma N; Hill, Lindsay M; Gavala, Monica L; Prabhu, Usha; Aga, Mini; Hall, David J; Bertics, Paul J

    2007-05-15

    Macrophage activation is critical in the innate immune response and can be regulated by the nucleotide receptor P2X7. In this regard, P2X7 signaling is not well understood but has been implicated in controlling reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by various leukocytes. Although ROS can contribute to microbial killing, the role of ROS in nucleotide-mediated cell signaling is unclear. In this study, we report that the P2X7 agonists ATP and 3'-O-(4-benzoyl) benzoic ATP (BzATP) stimulate ROS production by RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. These effects are potentiated in lipopolysaccharide-primed cells, demonstrating an important interaction between extracellular nucleotides and microbial products in ROS generation. In terms of nucleotide receptor specificity, RAW 264.7 macrophages that are deficient in P2X7 are greatly reduced in their capacity to generate ROS in response to BzATP treatment (both with and without LPS priming), thus supporting a role for P2X7 in this process. Because MAP kinase activation is key for nucleotide regulation of macrophage function, we also tested the hypothesis that P2X7-mediated MAP kinase activation is dependent on ROS production. We observed that BzATP stimulates MAP kinase (ERK1/ERK2, p38, and JNK1/JNK2) phosphorylation and that the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and ascorbic acid strongly attenuate BzATP-mediated JNK1/JNK2 and p38 phosphorylation but only slightly reduce BzATP-induced ERK1/ERK2 phosphorylation. These studies reveal that P2X7 can contribute to macrophage ROS production, that this effect is potentiated upon lipopolysaccharide exposure, and that ROS are important participants in the extracellular nucleotide-mediated activation of several MAP kinase systems. PMID:17448897

  6. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: component analysis of EMG signals

    PubMed Central

    Bengoetxea, Ana; Leurs, Françoise; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cebolla, Ana Maria; Dan, Bernard; Cheron, Guy; McIntyre, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    A central question in Neuroscience is that of how the nervous system generates the spatiotemporal commands needed to realize complex gestures, such as handwriting. A key postulate is that the central nervous system (CNS) builds up complex movements from a set of simpler motor primitives or control modules. In this study we examined the control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when performing different types of movement: discrete, point-to-point movements in eight different directions and continuous figure-eight movements in both the normal, upright orientation and rotated 90°. To test for the effects of biomechanical constraints, movements were performed in the frontal-parallel or sagittal planes, corresponding to two different nominal flexion/abduction postures of the shoulder. In all cases we measured limb kinematics and surface electromyographic activity (EMG) signals for seven different muscles acting around the shoulder. We first performed principal component analysis (PCA) of the EMG signals on a movement-by-movement basis. We found a surprisingly consistent pattern of muscle groupings across movement types and movement planes, although we could detect systematic differences between the PCs derived from movements performed in each shoulder posture and between the principal components associated with the different orientations of the figure. Unexpectedly we found no systematic differences between the figure eights and the point-to-point movements. The first three principal components could be associated with a general co-contraction of all seven muscles plus two patterns of reciprocal activation. From these results, we surmise that both “discrete-rhythmic movements” such as the figure eight, and discrete point-to-point movement may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the impedance of the limb over the time span of the movement and two others operating to generate movement, one aligned with the

  7. Simultaneous generation of 3G and millimeter-wave signals using a dual-electrode MZM in ROF systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Xiang-yue; Xu, Tie-feng; Liu, Tai-jun; Nie, Qiu-hua; Wen, Hua-feng; Li, Jun

    2015-07-01

    A novel radio-over-fiber (ROF) scheme to simultaneously generate and transmit the 3rd generation telecommunication (3G) and millimeter-wave (MMW) signals by using a single dual-electrode Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) is proposed. There is no apparent nonlinearity induced by the ROF system. By employing this analog ROF signal transmission technique, highly transparent fiber-wireless convergence networks can be realized, which are ideal for multi-standard wireless system operation.

  8. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30... DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of... data and defense services shall be reported directly to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls...

  9. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30... DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of... data and defense services shall be reported directly to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls...

  10. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30... DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of... data and defense services shall be reported directly to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls...

  11. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30... DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of... data and defense services shall be reported directly to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls...

  12. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30... DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of... data and defense services shall be reported directly to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls...

  13. Raman Based Dispersive Systems for Short Pulse Generation and Optical Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyoncu, Salih Kagan

    Spatiotemporal dispersive systems have been widely utilized for nonlinear optics and optical signal processing applications. This thesis is dedicated to the investigation of dispersive and nonlinear properties of optical fibers, temporal dispersion for real time operation and spatially dispersed pulse shaping systems. In particular, this thesis is focused on Raman based dispersive systems based on such promising techniques as dispersion management, photonic time stretching and space-to-wavelength mapping for synchronous pulse generation and all-optical RF arbitrary waveform generation incorporated with mature MEMS technology. The first part of this thesis discusses a novel technique of using dispersion managed system for synchronous first and second order pulsed Raman lasers that can achieve frequency spacing of up to 1000 cm-1, which are widely utilized for CARS microscopy applications. In particular, I focus on analytical and numerical analysis of pulsed stability derived for Raman lasers by using dispersion-managed telecom fibers and pumping at near 1530 nm telecom wavelengths. I show the evolution of the first and second order Stokes signals at the output for different peak pump power and the net anomalous dispersion combinations. I determine the stability condition for dispersion-managed synchronous Raman lasers up to second order. In the second part of the thesis, the noise performance of the amplified time stretched systems is investigated. Amplified time stretched systems enabling real time applications such as high-speed analog-to-digital converters, RF arbitrary waveform generation and dispersive imaging are performance limited by the noise cumulated in the system. In particular, I analyze the noise performance and hence the effective number of bits (ENOB) performance of time stretch ADCs with distributed and lumped amplifications. I estimate that distributed amplification in time stretch system with >10GHz analog bandwidth exhibit up to 16dB higher SNR

  14. A small-signal generator based on a multi-layer graphene/molybdenum disulfide heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Zhen; Tian, He; Feng, Tingting; Zhao, Lianfeng; Xie, Dan; Yang, Yi; Xiao, Lei; Wang, Jing; Ren, Tian-Ling E-mail: JunXu@tsinghua.edu.cn; Xu, Jun E-mail: JunXu@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2013-12-23

    In this work, we fabricate a heterojunction small-signal generator (HSSG) based on a graphene-molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) heterojunction. The HSSG is fundamentally different from any analog device developed previously. The HSSG is composed of two quasi-2D heterojunctions and has three terminals named injector (I), recombinator (R), and generator (G). MoS{sub 2} serves as I and G, and graphene works as R in the HSSG. The scale coefficient (β = I{sub G}/I{sub R}) of the HSSG is 1.14 × 10{sup −4} (V{sub IG, IR} = 0.2 V) to 1.95 × 10{sup −4} (V{sub IG, IR} = 1 V). The current generated from G could be as low as pA scale, which reveals the good performance of the HSSG.

  15. A frequency domain method for the generation of partially coherent normal stationary time domain signals

    SciTech Connect

    Smallwood, D.O.; Paez, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for generating vectors of time domain signals which are partially coherent in a prescribed manner is described. The procedure starts with the spectral density matrix, (G{sub xx}(f)), that relates pairs of elements of the vector random process (x(t), {minus}{infinity} < t < {infinity}). The spectral density matrix is decomposed into the form (G{sub xx}(f)) = (U(f)) (S(f)) (U(f)){prime} where (U(f)) is a matrix of complex frequency response functions, and (S(f)) is a diagonal matrix of real functions which can vary with frequency. The factors of the spectral density matrix, (U(f)) and (S(f)), are then used to generate a frame of random data in the frequency domain. The data is transformed into the time domain using an inverse FFT to generate a frame of data in the time domain. Successive frames of data are then windowed, overlapped, and added to form a vector of normal stationary sampled time histories, (x(t)), of arbitrary length. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Effects of Auger electron elastic scattering in quantitative AES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Aleksander

    1987-09-01

    The Monte Carlo algorithm was developed for simulating the trajectories of electrons elastically scattered in the solid. The distribution of scattering angles was determined using the partial wave expansion method. This algorithm was used to establish the influence of Auger electron elastic collisions on the results of quantitative AES analysis. The calculations were performed for the most pronounced KLL, L 3 MM and M 5NN Auger transitions. It turned out that due to the elastic collisions the Auger electron signal is decreased by up to 10%. The corresponding decreased of the escape depth of Auger electrons reaches 30% as compared with the value derived from the inelastic mean free path. The values of the inelastic mean free path resulting from the overalyer method may be strongly affected by elastic scattering of Auger electrons.

  17. Humanoid Locomotion: An Experimental Study on Signal Processing and Dynamic Approaches to Humanoid Walk Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gan, Quan

    2005-01-01

    It is hoped that one day robots will assist in lunar and Martian surface exploration by constructing facilities before their human counterparts arrive; robots with a human form-factor may be desirable since they can potentially use the same set of tools designed for humans. With the goal in mind, locomotion may be one of the biggest challenges for a humanoid sine the terrain is most likely uneven and varying. An adjustable walk has been developed for the HOAP-2 robot by gathering motor data from a preprogrammed fixed walk and using signal processing techniques. The result is a basic walk pattern adjustable in the frequency domain that can be used as a central pattern generator (CPG) in which the robot can modify using sensor feedback. Ultimately, the feedback can be applied to have the humanoid walk on various terrains, slopes, and avoid obstacles.

  18. Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wang, Zhiguo; Prange, Micah P.; Wu, Dangxin

    2014-12-01

    This Final Report presents work carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators” (Project number: PL10-Scin-theor-PD2Jf) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project was divided into four tasks: 1) Electronic response functions (ab initio data model) 2) Electron-hole yield, variance, and spatial distribution 3) Ab initio calculations of information carrier properties 4) Transport of electron-hole pairs and scintillation efficiency Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the four tasks is provided in this Final Report. Furthermore, published peer-reviewed articles based on the work carried under this project are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  19. A Hybrid TDM/WDM-PON System With FWM-Generated Source of Multiwavelength Optical Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyashuk, I.; Shchemelev, A.; Ivanov, G.

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to FTTx solutions is proposed, in the framework of which a hybrid TDM/WDM system using cascaded FWM-generated optical signals is evaluated by calculating the BER parameter and the optical power budget. Computer simulation is employed as the main method of calculations, with the results presented both in numerical and graphical forms. The results show that the use of a forward error correction allows the power margin of 4 dB to be achieved for the system to work reliably. The system can provide the total number of users up to 128 (8γx16 TDM users) with a bandwidth of multiple hundreds of Mbit/s p.u. by means of the existing passive optical networking infrastructure, with only minor improvements needed.

  20. Campbelling-type theory of fission chamber signals generated by neutron chains in a multiplying medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pál, L.; Pázsit, I.

    2015-09-01

    The signals of fission chambers are usually evaluated with the help of the co-called Campbelling techniques. These are based on the Campbell theorem, which states that if the primary incoming events, generating the detector pulses, are independent, then relationships exist between the moments of various orders of the signal in the current mode. This gives the possibility to determine the mean value of the intensity of the detection events, which is proportional to the static flux, from the higher moments of the detector current, which has certain advantages. However, the main application area of fission chambers is measurements in power reactors where, as is well known, the individual detection events are not independent, due to the branching character of the neutron chains (neutron multiplication). Therefore it is of interest to extend the Campbelling-type theory for the case of correlated neutron events. Such a theory could address two questions: partly, to investigate the bias when the traditional Campbell techniques are used for correlated incoming events; and partly, to see whether the correlation properties of the detection events, which carry information on the multiplying medium, could be extracted from the measurements. This paper is devoted to the investigation of these questions. The results show that there is a potential possibility to extract the same information from fission chamber signals in the current mode as with the Rossi- or Feynman-alpha methods, or from coincidence and multiplicity measurements, which so far have required detectors working in the pulse mode. It is also shown that application of the standard Campbelling techniques to neutron detection in multiplying systems does not lead to an error for estimating the stationary flux as long as the detector is calibrated in in situ measurements.

  1. Operational safety assessment of turbo generators with wavelet Rényi entropy from sensor-dependent vibration signals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Baojian; Chen, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of sensor technology, various professional sensors are installed on modern machinery to monitor operational processes and assure operational safety, which play an important role in industry and society. In this work a new operational safety assessment approach with wavelet Rényi entropy utilizing sensor-dependent vibration signals is proposed. On the basis of a professional sensor and the corresponding system, sensor-dependent vibration signals are acquired and analyzed by a second generation wavelet package, which reflects time-varying operational characteristic of individual machinery. Derived from the sensor-dependent signals' wavelet energy distribution over the observed signal frequency range, wavelet Rényi entropy is defined to compute the operational uncertainty of a turbo generator, which is then associated with its operational safety degree. The proposed method is applied in a 50 MW turbo generator, whereupon it is proved to be reasonable and effective for operation and maintenance. PMID:25894934

  2. Detection of Heater Generated Super Small Scale Striations Using GPS Signal Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najmi, A. C.; Milikh, G. M.; Chiang, K.; Psiaki, M.; Secan, J. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Briczinski, S. J.; Siefring, C. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2013-12-01

    Recent theoretical models predict that super small striations (SSS) of the electron density, on the order of ten centimeters, can be excited by HF waves with frequency close to multiples of the electron gyro frequency [Gurevich et al., 2006]. The first experimental verification of SSS was made at HAARP [Milikh et al., 2008]. We present results of HAARP experiments that include simultaneous observations of GPS carrier phase and SEE observations of ionospheric turbulence. These observations show that SSS excited by HF frequencies near the fourth harmonic of the gyro frequency scatter GPS signals, and in three out of six experiments indicate the presence of strong turbulence, similar to that observed in descending artificial ionized layer experiments [Pedersen et al., 2010]. This turbulence is capable of generating suprathermal electrons, and in one of the experiments, the presence of fast electrons was confirmed by the HAARP incoherent scattering radar. Estimates on the SSS shows that they correspond to 3-10% electron density depletions. Such irregularities affect UHF signals including GPS, and thus can be important in applications. Gurevich, A.V. and K.P. Zybin (2006), Phys. Lett. A, 358, 159. Milikh, G., et al. (2008), Geophys. Res. Let., 35, L22102, doi:10.1029/2008GL035527. Pedersen, T. et al. (2010), Geophys. Res. Let., 37, L02106, doi:10.1029/2009GL041895.

  3. Dependence of photoacoustic signal generation on the transducer and source type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Miranda, C. A.; González-Vega, A.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.

    2014-03-01

    The influence of size, geometry, temporal response of finite sensors and source geometry on the detected photoacoustic pressure is explored. We started considering the transducer simulated by a mesh of point-like sensors connected in parallel, which implies that appropriate modeling of pressure depends on the discretization size of the sensing surface. On the other hand, in analogy with the approach for the finite sensor, a finite source can be considered as a set of point like sources. We simulated the pressure produced by the linear, cylindrical and spherical source geometries, located at certain position over an axis perpendicular to the sensing surface. In order to simulate the photoacoustic signal, the computed pressure was convolved with the impulse response of two kind of commercial sensors: a low frequency transducer (3.5 MHz) and a high frequency transducer (125 MHz). Taking a fixed coordinate system we investigated the signal variations when the translational degree of freedom was modified. We found that simulated pressure generated by the different geometries using the proposed approach clearly differs from the point-like detection model.

  4. An immunochromatographic biosensor combined with a water-swellable polymer for automatic signal generation or amplification.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kahee; Joung, Hyou-Arm; Han, Gyeo-Re; Kim, Min-Gon

    2016-11-15

    An immunochromatographic assay (ICA) strip is one of the most widely used platforms in the field of point-of-care biosensors for the detection of various analytes in a simple, fast, and inexpensive manner. Currently, several approaches for sequential reactions in ICA platforms have improved their usability, sensitivity, and versatility. In this study, a new, simple, and low-cost approach using automatic sequential-reaction ICA strip is described. The automatic switching of a reagent pad from separation to attachment to the test membrane was achieved using a water-swellable polymer. The reagent pad was dried with an enzyme substrate for signal generation or with signal-enhancing materials. The strip design and system operation were confirmed by the characterization of the raw materials and flow analysis. We demonstrated the operation of the proposed sensor by using various chemical reaction-based assays, including metal-ion amplification, enzyme-colorimetric reaction, and enzyme-catalyzed chemiluminescence. Furthermore, by employing C-reactive protein as a model, we successfully demonstrated that the new water-swellable polymer-based ICA sensor can be utilized to detect biologically relevant analytes in human serum. PMID:27203463

  5. Signal generator exciting an electromagnetic field for ion beam transport to the vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubol'tsev, Yu. V.; Kogan, V. T.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Chichagov, Yu. V.; Antonov, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    A high-voltage high-frequency signal generator is described that excites an electric field for ion beam transport from an ion source to the vacuum chamber of a mass spectrometer. Excitation signals to the number of two are high-frequency sine-wave out-of-phase signals with the same amplitudes. The amplitude and phase of the signals vary from 20 to 100 V and from 10 kHz to 1 MHz, respectively. The generator also produces a controlled bias voltage in the interval 50-200 V. The frequency and amplitude of the signals, as well as the bias voltage, are computer-controlled via the USB interface.

  6. BOREAS AES READAC Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, G. Barrie; Funk, Barry; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Canadian AES personnel collected and processed data related to surface atmospheric meteorological conditions over the BOREAS region. This data set contains 15-minute meteorological data from one READAC meteorology station in Hudson Bay, Saskatchewan. Parameters include day, time, type of report, sky condition, visibility, mean sea level pressure, temperature, dewpoint, wind, altimeter, opacity, minimum and maximum visibility, station pressure, minimum and maximum air temperature, a wind group, precipitation, and precipitation in the last hour. The data were collected non-continuously from 24-May-1994 to 20-Sep-1994. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data.

  7. BOREAS AES MARSII Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, G. Barrie; Funk, Barry; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Canadian AES personnel collected several data sets related to surface and atmospheric meteorological conditions over the BOREAS region. This data set contains 15-minute meteorological data from six MARSII meteorology stations in the BOREAS region in Canada. Parameters include site, time, temperature, dewpoint, visibility, wind speed, wind gust, wind direction, two cloud groups, precipitation, and station pressure. Temporally, the data cover the period of May to September 1994. Geo-graphically, the stations are spread across the provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data.

  8. Generating pancreatic beta-cells from embryonic stem cells by manipulating signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Champeris Tsaniras, Spyridon; Jones, Peter M

    2010-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes results from an insufficiency of insulin production as a result of autoimmune destruction of the insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells. It can be treated by transplantation of islets of Langerhans from human donors, but widespread application of this therapy is restricted by the scarcity of donor tissue. Generation of functional beta-cells from embryonic stem (ES) cells in vitro could provide a source of an alternative graft material. Several ES cell differentiation protocols have reported the production of insulin-producing cells by mimicking the in vivo developmental stages of pancreatic organogenesis in which cells are transitioned through mesendoderm, definitive endoderm, foregut endoderm, pancreatic endoderm, and the endocrine precursor stage, until mature beta-cells are obtained. These studies provide proof of concept that recapitulating pancreatic development in vitro offers a useful strategy for generating beta-cells, but current differentiation protocols employ a bewildering variety of growth factors, mitogens, and pharmacological agents. In this review, we will attempt to clarify the functions of these agents in in vitro differentiation strategies by focusing on the intracellular signaling pathways through which they operate - phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, transforming growth factor beta, Wnt/beta-catenin, Hedgehog, and Notch. PMID:20385725

  9. All optical up-converted signal generation with high dispersion tolerance using frequency quadrupling technique for radio over fiber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yiying; Zhao, Jiayi; Hu, Jingjing; Kang, Zijian; Zhu, Wenwu; Fan, Feng; Han, Xiuyou; Zhao, Mingshan

    2016-05-01

    A novel all optical up-converted signal generation scheme with optical single-sideband (OSSB) technique for radio over fiber (RoF) application is presented and experimentally demonstrated using low-bandwidth devices. The OSSB signal is generated by one low-bandwidth intensity LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator (LN-MZM) under frequency quadrupling modulation scheme and one low-bandwidth LN-MZM under double sideband carrier suppressed modulation (DSB-CS) scheme. The proposed all OSSB generation scheme is capable of high tolerance of fiber chromatic dispersion induced power fading (DIPF) effect. Benefiting from this novel OSSB generation scheme, a 26 GHz radio frequency (RF) signal up-conversion is realized successfully when one sideband of the optical LO signal is reused as the optical carrier for intermediate frequency (IF) signal modulation. The received vector signal transmission over long distance single-mode fiber (SMF) shows negligible DIPF effect with the error vector magnitude (EVM) of 15.7% rms. In addition, a spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) of the OSSB up-converting system is measured up to 81 dB Hz2/3. The experiment results indicate that the proposed system may find potential applications in future wireless communication networks, especially in microcellular personal communication system (MPCS).

  10. The inner zone electron model AE-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teague, M. J.; Vette, J. I.

    1972-01-01

    A description is given of the work performed in the development of the inner radiation zone electron model, AE-5. A complete description of the omnidirectional flux model is given for energy thresholds E sub T in the range 4.0 E sub T/(MeV) 0.04 and for L values in the range 2.8 L 1.2 for an epoch of October 1967. Confidence codes for certain regions of B-L space and certain energies are given based on data coverage and the assumptions made in the analysis. The electron model programs that can be supplied to a user are referred to. One of these, a program for accessing the model flux at arbitrary points in B-L space and arbitrary energies, includes the latest outer zone electron model and proton model. The model AE-5, is based on data from five satellites, OGO 1, OGO 3, 1963-38C, OV3-3, and Explorer 26, spanning the period December 1964 to December 1967.

  11. Improved signal-to-noise ratio of 10 GHz microwave signals generated with a mode-filtered femtosecond laser frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Diddams, S A; Kirchner, M; Fortier, T; Braje, D; Weiner, A M; Hollberg, L

    2009-03-01

    We use a Fabry-Perot cavity to optically filter the output of a Ti:sapphire frequency comb to integer multiples of the original 1 GHz mode spacing. This effectively increases the pulse repetition rate, which is useful for several applications. In the case of low-noise microwave signal generation, such filtering leads to improved linearity of the high-speed photodiodes that detect the mode-locked laser pulse train. The result is significantly improved signal-to-noise ratio at the 10 GHz harmonic with the potential for a shot-noise limited single sideband phase noise floor near -168 dBc/Hz. PMID:19259170

  12. STS-80 Payload WSF-3 in Hanger AE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In NASA's Building AE on Cape Canaveral Air Station, preparation of the Wake Shield Facility-3 (WSF-3) continues as workers install Get Away Special canisters for ballast on the spacecraft. The WSF-3 represents the third flight since 1994 of the disk- shaped satellite primarily designed to generate an ultravacuum in space in which to grow advanced semiconductor high-purity thin films. The WSF-3 is one of the primary payloads scheduled to fly aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia on Mission STS-80, targeted to lift off around Nov. 8. On this mission, the WSF-3 will fly free of the orbiter for about three days. It will be deployed from the orbiter and retrieved using the Remote Manipulator System robotic arm.

  13. Possible Origins of the `Free T Phase' Seismic Signals Generated by the Kick `em Jenny Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohais, A.; Mohais, R.

    2006-12-01

    The Kick 'em Jenny submarine volcano located approximately 9km off the North Coast of Grenada in the Lesser Antilles, was discovered in 1939. Since then, it has had a history of twelve recorded eruptions. Geophysicists have determined over the years that many of these eruptions have been accompanied by T- phases occurring in the absence of P and S-phases. Although these authors have characterized these 'free T- phases' and have analyzed the frequency components of the seismic activity, there has been little attention given to the possible origins of these signals. Based on the analysis of the seismic signals of eruptions of Kick 'em Jenny, an attempt is made to determine a possible source of the free T-phases. Previous studies of sample free T-phases showed a spectral peak of 0.7 Hz, corresponding to a period of 1.43 seconds. Although no definitive statement by previous authors was made on this analysis, one may be led to categorise the event as a long period event. When the power spectral densities of a long period event from a volcanic earthquake was compared to that of a free T phase however, there was a marked difference between the two. Within the bandwidth of 1 to 6 Hz, the power spectrum of the T phase of an earthquake exhibits frequency peaks beyond the 10 Hz value as compared to a value less than 1. Also in the 1990 Kick 'em Jenny eruption, there was a period of harmonic tremor preceding the T phase. Harmonic tremor lends itself to the idea of the signal originating from a resonator. One possibility is the resonance of a fluid filled cavity which accompanies the oscillation of magma within a fissure arising from rapid degassing. This may be applicable in the case of Kick 'em Jenny since it is in fact active. The other possibility is the presence of reverberations in the stratified structure of the volcano. Other evidence suggests that in the time domain there is a significant difference between the free T-phase and the earthquake generated T phase, in that

  14. Genetically Identified Suppressed-by-Contrast Retinal Ganglion Cells Reliably Signal Self-Generated Visual Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Nai-Wen; Pearson, James T.; Heller, Charles R.; Demas, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Spike trains of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the sole source of visual information to the brain; and understanding how the ∼20 RGC types in mammalian retinae respond to diverse visual features and events is fundamental to understanding vision. Suppressed-by-contrast (SbC) RGCs stand apart from all other RGC types in that they reduce rather than increase firing rates in response to light increments (ON) and decrements (OFF). Here, we genetically identify and morphologically characterize SbC-RGCs in mice, and target them for patch-clamp recordings under two-photon guidance. We find that strong ON inhibition (glycine > GABA) outweighs weak ON excitation, and that inhibition (glycine > GABA) coincides with decreases in excitation at light OFF. These input patterns explain the suppressive spike responses of SbC-RGCs, which are observed in dim and bright light conditions. Inhibition to SbC-RGC is driven by rectified receptive field subunits, leading us to hypothesize that SbC-RGCs could signal pattern-independent changes in the retinal image. Indeed, we find that shifts of random textures matching saccade-like eye movements in mice elicit robust inhibitory inputs and suppress spiking of SbC-RGCs over a wide range of texture contrasts and spatial frequencies. Similarly, stimuli based on kinematic analyses of mouse blinking consistently suppress SbC-RGC spiking. Receiver operating characteristics show that SbC-RGCs are reliable indicators of self-generated visual stimuli that may contribute to central processing of blinks and saccades. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study genetically identifies and morphologically characterizes suppressed-by-contrast retinal ganglion cells (SbC-RGCs) in mice. Targeted patch-clamp recordings from SbC-RGCs under two-photon guidance elucidate the synaptic mechanisms mediating spike suppression to contrast steps, and reveal that SbC-RGCs respond reliably to stimuli mimicking saccade-like eye movements and blinks. The similarity of

  15. The Effect of Steep Topography on Explosion-Generated Seismic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. L.; O'Brien, M.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear monitoring requires a detailed understanding of the physical factors that affect seismic signals. Nuclear tests have frequently been performed in locations with strong topography, and we are performing a series of calculations to determine the effects of topography on seismic signals. We examined the effect of depth beneath a mountainside or other steep slope on seismic waves by performing three 3D nonlinear calculations. The first is placed beneath a mountain; the second is higher and inside the mountain; the third is beneath a flat surface. We find that generation of long period surface waves is strongly dependent on location relative to the slope. Long period surface waves are generated almost entirely by the static horizontal displacement in the upper few hundred meters below the surface. If the explosion is inside the mountain and close enough to the free surface that stress is relieved by the sides of the mountain, then subsurface horizontal displacement is reduced and surface wave amplitudes are reduced dramatically. However, for explosions that are below the mountain, long period surface waves are increased in amplitude. In contrast, regional P and S phases are slightly larger for the explosion in the mountain than beneath it, especially for paths that go across the mountain. Otherwise, there is little difference in regional phases between the flat and topographic calculations. Far field P body waves are slightly enhanced by the presence of the mountain due to reduction of the pP interference. Far field SV body waves are reduced in amplitude relative to the flat case because the pS phase which is very strong for a flat surface is reduced in amplitude for the mountain. Far field SH waves which do not exist for the flat surface are comparable in amplitude to SV for the mountain cases. Nonlinear calculations with topography are difficult because the grid must be brought into gravitational equilibrium before the explosion calculation can be started. We

  16. Optical injection locking of monolithically integrated photonic source for generation of high purity signals above 100 GHz.

    PubMed

    Balakier, Katarzyna; Fice, Martyn J; van Dijk, Frederic; Kervella, Gael; Carpintero, Guillermo; Seeds, Alwyn J; Renaud, Cyril C

    2014-12-01

    A monolithically integrated photonic source for tuneable mm-wave signal generation has been fabricated. The source consists of 14 active components, i.e. semiconductor lasers, amplifiers and photodetectors, all integrated on a 3 mm(2) InP chip. Heterodyne signals in the range between 85 GHz and 120 GHz with up to -10 dBm output power have been successfully generated. By optically injection locking the integrated lasers to an external optical comb source, high-spectral-purity signals at frequencies >100 GHz have been generated, with phase noise spectral density below -90 dBc/Hz being achieved at offsets from the carrier greater than 10 kHz. PMID:25606875

  17. Operational Safety Assessment of Turbo Generators with Wavelet Rényi Entropy from Sensor-Dependent Vibration Signals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Baojian; Chen, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of sensor technology, various professional sensors are installed on modern machinery to monitor operational processes and assure operational safety, which play an important role in industry and society. In this work a new operational safety assessment approach with wavelet Rényi entropy utilizing sensor-dependent vibration signals is proposed. On the basis of a professional sensor and the corresponding system, sensor-dependent vibration signals are acquired and analyzed by a second generation wavelet package, which reflects time-varying operational characteristic of individual machinery. Derived from the sensor-dependent signals’ wavelet energy distribution over the observed signal frequency range, wavelet Rényi entropy is defined to compute the operational uncertainty of a turbo generator, which is then associated with its operational safety degree. The proposed method is applied in a 50 MW turbo generator, whereupon it is proved to be reasonable and effective for operation and maintenance. PMID:25894934

  18. Simultaneous generation of independent WCDMA and millimeter-wave signals using a dual-electrode MZM in ROF systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Xiang-yue; Xu, Tie-feng; Liu, Tai-jun; Nie, Qiu-hua; Wen, Hua-feng; Li, Jun

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a novel radio-over-fiber (ROF) scheme to simultaneously generate and transmit wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA) and millimeter-wave (MMW) signals by using a single dual-electrode Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) is proposed. There is no apparent nonlinearity induced by the ROF system. By employing this analog ROF signal transmission technique, the highly transparent fiber-wireless networks, which are ideal for multi-standard wireless system operation, can be realized.

  19. Higgs Properties in the Fourth Generation MSSM: Boosted Signals Over the 3G Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Cotta, R.C.; Hewett, J.L.; Ismail, A.; Le, M.-P.; Rizzo, T.G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-15

    The generalization of the MSSM to the case of four chiral fermion generations (4GMSSM) can lead to significant changes in the phenomenology of the otherwise familiar Higgs sector. In most of the 3GMSSM parameter space, the lighter CP-even h is {approx} 115-125 GeV and mostly Standard Model-like while H,A,H{sup {+-}} are all relatively heavy. Furthermore, the ratio of Higgs vevs, tan {beta}, is relatively unconstrained. In contrast to this, in the 4GMSSM, heavy fourth generation fermion loops drive the masses of h,H,H{sup {+-}} to large values while the CP-odd boson, A, can remain relatively light and tan {beta} is restricted to the range 1/2 {approx}< tan {beta} {approx}< 2 due to perturbativity requirements on Yukawa couplings. We explore this scenario in some detail, concentrating on the collider signatures of the light CP-odd Higgs at both the Tevatron and LHC. We find that while gg {yields} A may lead to a potential signal in the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} channel at the LHC, A may first be observed in the {gamma}{gamma} channel due to a highly loop-enhanced cross section that can be more than an order of magnitude greater than that of a SM Higgs for A masses of {approx} 115-120 and tan {beta} < 1. We find that the CP-even states h,H are highly mixed and can have atypical branching fractions. Precision electroweak constraints, particularly for the light A parameter space region, are examined in detail.

  20. Numerical study of magnetoacoustic signal generation with magnetic induction based on inhomogeneous conductivity anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xun; Hu, Sanqing; Li, Lihua; Zhu, Shanan

    2013-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is a noninvasive imaging modality for generating electrical conductivity images of biological tissues with high spatial resolution. In this paper, we create a numerical model, including a permanent magnet, a coil, and a two-layer coaxial cylinder with anisotropic electrical conductivities, for the MAT-MI forward problem. We analyze the MAT-MI sources in two cases, on a thin conductive boundary layer and in a homogeneous medium, and then develop a feasible numerical approach to solve the MAT-MI sound source densities in the anisotropic conductive model based on finite element analysis of electromagnetic field. Using the numerical finite element method, we then investigate the magnetoacoustic effect of anisotropic conductivity under the inhomogeneous static magnetic field and inhomogeneous magnetic field, quantitatively compute the boundary source densities in the conductive model, and calculate the sound pressure. The anisotropic conductivity contributes to the distribution of the eddy current density, Lorentz force density, and acoustic signal. The proposed models and approaches provide a more realistic simulation environment for MAT-MI. PMID:23606896

  1. Extracting Ocean-Generated Tidal Magnetic Signals from Swarm Data Through Satellite Gradiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Tyler, Robert H.; Olsen, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Ocean-generated magnetic field models of the Principal Lunar, M2, and the Larger Lunar elliptic, N2, semidiurnal tidal constituents were estimated through a "Comprehensive Inversion" of the first 20.5 months of magnetic measurements from European Space Agency's (ESA) Swarm satellite constellation mission. While the constellation provides important north-south along-track gradiometry information, it is the unique low-spacecraft pair that allows for east-west cross-track gradiometry. This latter type is crucial in delivering an M2 estimate of similar quality with that derived from over 10 years of CHAMP satellite data but over a shorter interval, at higher altitude, and during more magnetically disturbed conditions. Recovered N2 contains nonoceanic signal but is highly correlated with theoretical models in regions of maximum oceanic amplitude. Thus, satellite magnetic gradiometry may eventually enable the monitoring of ocean electrodynamic properties at temporal resolutions of 1 to 2 years, which may have important implications for the inference of ocean temperature and salinity.

  2. Finite Element Simulation of a Biomimetic Olfactory Microsystem for Spatio-temporal Signal Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S. L.; Covington, J. A.; Gardner, J. W.; Pearce, T. C.

    The sense of smell is a powerful biological tool although it is the least understood. Attempts to mimic this feature over the last two decades have resulted in the creation of the electronic nose. In comparison to the biological system, its ability to distinguish complex odours is poor. This has mainly been attributed to the lack of sensors and their diversity compared to the human in the order of 105 and 102 respectively. In our efforts to improve the performance of the electronic nose, here we have used a different approach using a unique feature of the biological olfactory system. This technique is analogous to a multi-dimensional gas chromatography (MD-GC) technique that is capable in generating spatial and temporal signals to aid odour discrimination. As the physical realisation requires expensive and time consuming micro- nano fabrication processes, finite element method simulations have been used to validate the proposed design and aid optimisation. This paper describes the finite element modelling process and compares these simulation results to that of the well-established analytical model. Preliminary results of the optimised system are also presented; these results are in good agreement to the simulated outputs.

  3. Impaired Generation Of 12-Hydroxylated Bile Acids Links Hepatic Insulin Signaling With Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Haeusler, Rebecca A.; Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew; Welch, Carrie L.; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Accili, Domenico

    2011-01-01

    Summary The association of type 2 diabetes with elevated plasma triglyceride (TG) and very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL), and intrahepatic lipid accumulation represents a pathophysiological enigma and an unmet therapeutic challenge. Here we uncover a link between insulin action through FoxO1, bile acid (BA) composition, and altered lipid homeostasis that brings new insight to this longstanding conundrum. FoxO1 ablation brings about two signature lipid abnormalities of diabetes and the metabolic syndrome, elevated liver and plasma TG. These changes are associated with deficiency of 12α-hydroxylated BAs and their synthetic enzyme, Cyp8b1, that hinders the TG-lowering effects of the BA receptor, Fxr. Accordingly, pharmacological activation of Fxr with GW4064 overcomes the BA imbalance, restoring hepatic and plasma TG levels of FoxO1-deficient mice to normal levels. We propose that generation of 12α-hydroxylated products of BA metabolism represents a signaling mechanism linking hepatic lipid abnormalities with type 2 diabetes, and a treatment target for this condition. PMID:22197325

  4. Extracting ocean-generated tidal magnetic signals from Swarm data through satellite gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Tyler, Robert H.; Olsen, Nils

    2016-04-01

    Ocean-generated magnetic field models of the Principal Lunar, M2, and the Larger Lunar elliptic, N2, semidiurnal tidal constituents were estimated through a "Comprehensive Inversion" of the first 20.5 months of magnetic measurements from European Space Agency's (ESA) Swarm satellite constellation mission. While the constellation provides important north-south along-track gradiometry information, it is the unique low-spacecraft pair that allows for east-west cross-track gradiometry. This latter type is crucial in delivering an M2 estimate of similar quality with that derived from over 10 years of CHAMP satellite data but over a shorter interval, at higher altitude, and during more magnetically disturbed conditions. Recovered N2 contains nonoceanic signal but is highly correlated with theoretical models in regions of maximum oceanic amplitude. Thus, satellite magnetic gradiometry may eventually enable the monitoring of ocean electrodynamic properties at temporal resolutions of 1 to 2 years, which may have important implications for the inference of ocean temperature and salinity.

  5. Energy efficiency analysis and implementation of AES on an FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, David

    The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) was developed by Joan Daemen and Vincent Rjimen and endorsed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology in 2001. It was designed to replace the aging Data Encryption Standard (DES) and be useful for a wide range of applications with varying throughput, area, power dissipation and energy consumption requirements. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are flexible and reconfigurable integrated circuits that are useful for many different applications including the implementation of AES. Though they are highly flexible, FPGAs are often less efficient than Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs); they tend to operate slower, take up more space and dissipate more power. There have been many FPGA AES implementations that focus on obtaining high throughput or low area usage, but very little research done in the area of low power or energy efficient FPGA based AES; in fact, it is rare for estimates on power dissipation to be made at all. This thesis presents a methodology to evaluate the energy efficiency of FPGA based AES designs and proposes a novel FPGA AES implementation which is highly flexible and energy efficient. The proposed methodology is implemented as part of a novel scripting tool, the AES Energy Analyzer, which is able to fully characterize the power dissipation and energy efficiency of FPGA based AES designs. Additionally, this thesis introduces a new FPGA power reduction technique called Opportunistic Combinational Operand Gating (OCOG) which is used in the proposed energy efficient implementation. The AES Energy Analyzer was able to estimate the power dissipation and energy efficiency of the proposed AES design during its most commonly performed operations. It was found that the proposed implementation consumes less energy per operation than any previous FPGA based AES implementations that included power estimations. Finally, the use of Opportunistic Combinational Operand Gating on an AES cipher

  6. BOREAS AES Campbell Scientific Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, G. Barrie; Funk, Barrie; Knapp. David E. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Canadian AES personnel collected data related to surface and atmospheric meteorological conditions over the BOREAS region. This data set contains 15-minute meteorological data from 14 automated meteorology stations located across the BOREAS region. Included in this data are parameters of date, time, mean sea level pressure, station pressure, temperature, dew point, wind speed, resultant wind speed, resultant wind direction, peak wind, precipitation, maximum temperature in the last hour, minimum temperature in the last hour, pressure tendency, liquid precipitation in the last hour, relative humidity, precipitation from a weighing gauge, and snow depth. Temporally, the data cover the period of August 1993 to December 1996. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data.

  7. Discovery of radio emission from AE Aquarii

    SciTech Connect

    Bookbinder, J.A.; Lamb, D.Q.

    1987-12-01

    VLA 1.4-GHz and 4.9-GHz observations of six DQ Her cataclysmic variables, obtained in the C/D hybrid configuration with 50-MHz bandwidth, 7-sec time resolution, and limiting flux density about 200 microJy on July 21, 1984, are reported. Variable radio emission with time scale less than 5 min, circular polarization less than 15 percent, and flux density 3-5 mJy at 1.4 GHz and 8-16 mJy at 4.9 GHz is detected from AE Aqr. This emission is tentatively attributed to synchrotron emission from mildly relativistic electrons, powered by the MHD torque coupling the magnetic white dwarf to either (1) a secondary with a strong magnetic field or (2) an accretion disk. 20 references.

  8. Discovery of radio emission from AE Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookbinder, J. A.; Lamb, D. Q.

    1987-01-01

    VLA 1.4-GHz and 4.9-GHz observations of six DQ Her cataclysmic variables, obtained in the C/D hybrid configuration with 50-MHz bandwidth, 7-sec time resolution, and limiting flux density about 200 microJy on July 21, 1984, are reported. Variable radio emission with time scale less than 5 min, circular polarization less than 15 percent, and flux density 3-5 mJy at 1.4 GHz and 8-16 mJy at 4.9 GHz is detected from AE Aqr. This emission is tentatively attributed to synchrotron emission from mildly relativistic electrons, powered by the MHD torque coupling the magnetic white dwarf to either (1) a secondary with a strong magnetic field or (2) an accretion disk.

  9. An unsupervised pattern recognition approach for AE data originating from fatigue tests on polymer-composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, D. D.; Ramasso, E.; Placet, V.; Zhang, S.; Boubakar, L.; Zerhouni, N.

    2015-12-01

    This work investigates acoustic emission generated during tension fatigue tests carried out on a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite specimen. Since massive fatigue data processing, especially noise reduction, remains an important challenge in AE data analysis, a Mahalanobis distance-based noise modeling has been proposed in the present work to tackle this problem. A sequential feature selection based on Davies-Bouldin index has been implemented for fast dimensionality reduction. An unsupervised classifier offline-learned from quasi-static data is then used to classify the data to different AE sources with the possibility to dynamically accommodate with unseen ones. With an efficient proposed noise removal and automatic separation of AE events, this pattern discovery procedure provides an insight into fatigue damage development in composites in the presence of millions of AE events.

  10. A novel LabVIEW-based multi-channel non-invasive abdominal maternal-fetal electrocardiogram signal generator.

    PubMed

    Martinek, Radek; Kelnar, Michal; Koudelka, Petr; Vanus, Jan; Bilik, Petr; Janku, Petr; Nazeran, Homer; Zidek, Jan

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the design, construction, and testing of a multi-channel fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) signal generator based on LabVIEW. Special attention is paid to the fetal heart development in relation to the fetus' anatomy, physiology, and pathology. The non-invasive signal generator enables many parameters to be set, including fetal heart rate (FHR), maternal heart rate (MHR), gestational age (GA), fECG interferences (biological and technical artifacts), as well as other fECG signal characteristics. Furthermore, based on the change in the FHR and in the T wave-to-QRS complex ratio (T/QRS), the generator enables manifestations of hypoxic states (hypoxemia, hypoxia, and asphyxia) to be monitored while complying with clinical recommendations for classifications in cardiotocography (CTG) and fECG ST segment analysis (STAN). The generator can also produce synthetic signals with defined properties for 6 input leads (4 abdominal and 2 thoracic). Such signals are well suited to the testing of new and existing methods of fECG processing and are effective in suppressing maternal ECG while non-invasively monitoring abdominal fECG. They may also contribute to the development of a new diagnostic method, which may be referred to as non-invasive trans-abdominal CTG +  STAN. The functional prototype is based on virtual instrumentation using the LabVIEW developmental environment and its associated data acquisition measurement cards (DAQmx). The generator also makes it possible to create synthetic signals and measure actual fetal and maternal ECGs by means of bioelectrodes. PMID:26799770

  11. [Application of kalman filtering based on wavelet transform in ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Qin, Xia; Shen, Lan-sun

    2002-12-01

    Kalman filtering is a recursive algorithm, which has been proposed as an attractive alternative to correct overlapping interferences in ICP-AES. However, the noise in ICP-AES contaminates the signal arising from the analyte and hence limits the accuracy of kalman filtering. Wavelet transform is a powerful technique in signal denoising due to its multi-resolution characteristics. In this paper, first, the effect of noise on kalman filtering is discussed. Then we apply the wavelet-transform-based soft-thresholding as the pre-processing of kalman filtering. The simulation results show that the kalman filtering based on wavelet transform can effectively reduce the noise and increase the accuracy of the analysis. PMID:12914186

  12. MAGIC search for VHE γ-ray emission from AE Aquarii in a multiwavelength context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Bangale, P.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Doert, M.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Idec, W.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Krause, J.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lozano, I.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nakajima, D.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Persic, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Preziuso, S.; Puljak, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, T.; Saito, K.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Storz, J.; Strzys, M.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Zanin, R.

    2014-08-01

    Context. It has been claimed that the nova-like cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii (AE Aqr) is a very-high-energy (VHE, E> 100 GeV) source both on observational and theoretical grounds. Aims: We search for VHE γ-ray emission from AE Aqr during different states of the source at several wavelengths to confirm or rule out previous claims of detection of γ-ray emission from this object. Methods: We report on observations of AE Aqr performed by MAGIC. The source was observed during 12 h as part of a multiwavelength campaign carried out between May and June 2012 covering the optical, X-ray, and γ-ray ranges. Besides MAGIC, the other facilities involved were the KVA, Skinakas, and Vidojevica telescopes in the optical and Swift in X-rays. We calculated integral upper limits coincident with different states of the source in the optical. We computed upper limits to the pulsed emission limiting the signal region to 30% of the phaseogram and we also searched for pulsed emission at different frequencies applying the Rayleigh test. Results: AE Aqr was not detected at VHEs during the multiwavelength campaign. We establish integral upper limits at the 95% confidence level for the steady emission assuming the differential flux proportional to a power-law function dφ/ dE ∝ E- Γ, with a Crab-like photon spectral index of Γ = 2.6. The upper limit above 200 GeV is 6.4 × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 and above 1 TeV is 7.4 × 10-13 cm-2 s-1. We obtained an upper limit for the pulsed emission of 2.6 × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 for energies above 200 GeV. Applying the Rayleigh test for pulsed emission at different frequencies we did not find any significant signal. Conclusions: Our results indicate that AE Aqr is not a VHE γ-ray emitter at the level of emission previously claimed. We have established the most constraining upper limits for the VHE γ-ray emission of AE Aqr.

  13. PDS 144: THE FIRST CONFIRMED Herbig Ae-Herbig Ae WIDE BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Hornbeck, J. B.; Williger, G. M.; Lauroesch, J. T.; Grady, C. A.; Perrin, M. D.; Grogin, N. A.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Tofflemire, B. M.; Brown, A.; Holtzman, J. A.; Arraki, K.; Hamaguchi, K.; Woodgate, B.; Petre, R.; Bonfield, D. G.; Daly, B.

    2012-01-01

    PDS 144 is a pair of Herbig Ae stars that are separated by 5.''35 on the sky. It has previously been shown to have an A2Ve Herbig Ae star viewed at 83 Degree-Sign inclination as its northern member and an A5Ve Herbig Ae star as its southern member. Direct imagery revealed a disk occulting PDS 144 N-the first edge-on disk observed around a Herbig Ae star. The lack of an obvious disk in direct imagery suggested PDS 144 S might be viewed face-on or not physically associated with PDS 144 N. Multi-epoch Hubble Space Telescope imagery of PDS 144 with a 5 year baseline demonstrates PDS 144 N and S are comoving and have a common proper motion with TYC 6782-878-1. TYC 6782-878-1 has previously been identified as a member of Upper Sco sub-association A at d = 145 {+-} 2 pc with an age of 5-10 Myr. Ground-based imagery reveals jets and a string of Herbig-Haro knots extending 13' (possibly further) which are aligned to within 7 Degree-Sign {+-} 6 Degree-Sign on the sky. By combining proper motion data and the absence of a dark mid-plane with radial velocity data, we measure the inclination of PDS 144 S to be i = 73 Degree-Sign {+-} 7 Degree-Sign . The radial velocity of the jets from PDS 144 N and S indicates they, and therefore their disks, are misaligned by 25 Degree-Sign {+-} 9 Degree-Sign . This degree of misalignment is similar to that seen in T Tauri wide binaries.

  14. PDS 144: The First Confirmed Herbig Ae-Herbig Ae Wide Binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornbeck, J. B.; Grady, C. A.; Perrin, M. D.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Tofflemire, B. M.; Brown, A.; Holtzman, J. A.; Arraki, K.; Hamaguchi, K.; Woodgate, B.; Petre, R.; Daly, B.; Grogin, N. A.; Bonfield, D. G.; Williger, G. M.; Lauroesch, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    PDS 144 is a pair of Herbig Ae stars that are separated by 5.35" on the sky. It has previously been shown to have an A2Ve Herbig Ae star viewed at 83 deg inclination as its northern member and an A5Ve Herbig Ae star as its southern member. Direct imagery revealed a disk occulting PDS 144 N - the first edge-on disk observed around a Herbig Ae star. The lack of an obvious disk in direct imagery suggested PDS 144 S might be viewed face-on or not physically associated with PDS 144 N. Multi-epoch HST imagery of PDS 144 with a 5 yr baseline demonstrates PDS 144 N & S are comoving and have a common proper motion with TYC 6782-878-1. TYC 6782-878-1 has previously been identified as a member of Upper Sco sub-association A at d = 145 +/- 2 pc with an age of 5 - 10 Myr. Ground-based imagery reveals jets and a string of HH knots extending 13' (possibly further) which are aligned to within 7 deg +/- 6 deg on the sky. By combining proper motion data and the absence of a dark mid-plane with radial velocity data, we measure the inclination of PDS 144 S to be i = 73 deg +/- 7 deg. The radial velocity of the jets from PDS 144 N & S indicates they, and therefore their disks, are misaligned by 25 deg +/- 9 deg.. This degree of misalignment is similar to that seen in T-Tauri wide binaries.

  15. Design and simulation of fast-pulse control signal generator for the electro-holographic optical switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yansheng; Ji, Jiarong; Dou, Wenhua; Wen, Changli

    2010-10-01

    The electro-holographic optical switch based on the quadratic electro-optic effect in paraelectric photorefractive crystals requires driving signal of fast pulse. The pulse rise/fall time and voltage are 10-10-10-8s and 102-103V, respectively, depending on the applications. A pulse control signal generator for the electro-holographic optical switch was designed and simulated. Considering the integration of pulse signal generator and the switch, the circuit employs three stages compact Marx generators utilizing parallel avalanche bipolar junction transistors series operated in the avalanche mode in each stage. These transistors and the crystals are mounted on printed circuit board. According to the simulated results, the output voltage ranged from 1.2kV to 1.5kV. The rise/fall time of this pulse is less than 3 nanoseconds. The pulse width is 20 nanoseconds, and trigger delay is about 1 nanosecond. The repetition rate is less than 50MHz which can be increased by reducing the pulse width of the trigger. The simulation results indicate that the pulse control signals from the designed generator can match the application of electro-holographic optical switch well.

  16. Generation of phase-coded microwave signals using a polarization-modulator-based photonic microwave phase shifter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yamei; Pan, Shilong

    2013-03-01

    A scheme for the generation of phase-coded microwave signals using an electrically tunable photonic microwave phase shifter is proposed and demonstrated. The photonic phase shifter is based on a single-sideband polarization modulator (PolM), and the tuning of the phase shifter is implemented by a second PolM. By introducing an RF signal to the first PolM and an electrical coding signal to the second PolM, a phase-coded microwave signal with binary phase codes or polyphase codes is achieved. An experiment is performed. The simple and flexible operation, high coding rate, large frequency range, excellent transmission performance, and high stability of the system is confirmed. PMID:23455292

  17. W-band OFDM photonic vector signal generation employing a single Mach-Zehnder modulator and precoding.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiangnan; Li, Xinying; Xu, Yuming; Zhang, Ziran; Chen, Long; Yu, Jianjun

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple radio-over-fiber (RoF) link architecture for millimeter-wave orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) transmission using only one Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) and precoding technique. In the transmission system, the amplitudes and the phase of the driving radio-frequency (RF) OFDM signal on each sub-carrier are precoded, to ensure that the OFDM signal after photodetector (PD) can be restored to original OFDM signal. The experimental results show that the bit-error ratios (BERs) of the transmission system are less than the forward-error-correction (FEC) threshold of 3.8 × 10(-3), which demonstrates that the generation of OFDM vector signal based on our proposed scheme can be employed in our system architecture. PMID:26368494

  18. Stable optical frequency comb generation and applications in arbitrary waveform generation, signal processing and optical data mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozharar, Sarper

    This thesis focuses on the generation and applications of stable optical frequency combs. Optical frequency combs are defined as equally spaced optical frequencies with a fixed phase relation among themselves. The conventional source of optical frequency combs is the optical spectrum of the modelocked lasers. In this work, we investigated alternative methods for optical comb generation, such as dual sine wave phase modulation, which is more practical and cost effective compared to modelocked lasers stabilized to a reference. Incorporating these comblines, we have generated tunable RF tones using the serrodyne technique. The tuning range was +/-1 MHz, limited by the electronic waveform generator, and the RF carrier frequency is limited by the bandwidth of the photodetector. Similarly, using parabolic phase modulation together with time division multiplexing, RF chirp extension has been realized. Another application of the optical frequency combs studied in this thesis is real time data mining in a bit stream. A novel optoelectronic logic gate has been developed for this application and used to detect an 8 bit long target pattern. Also another approach based on orthogonal Hadamard codes have been proposed and explained in detail. Also novel intracavity modulation schemes have been investigated and applied for various applications such as (a) improving rational harmonic modelocking for repetition rate multiplication and pulse to pulse amplitude equalization, (b) frequency skewed pulse generation for ranging and (c) intracavity active phase modulation in amplitude modulated modelocked lasers for supermode noise spur suppression and integrated jitter reduction. The thesis concludes with comments on the future work and next steps to improve some of the results presented in this work.

  19. High speed all-optical PRBS generation using binary phase shift keyed signal based on QD-SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenbo; Hu, Hongyu; Dutta, Niloy K.

    2014-09-01

    A scheme to generate return-to-zero on-off keying (RZ-OOK) high speed all-optical pseudo random bit sequence (PRBS) using binary phase shift keyed (BPSK) signal based on quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers (QD-SOA) has been designed and studied. The PRBS is generated by a linear feedback shift register (LFSR) composed of all-optical logic XOR and AND gates. The XOR gate is composed of a pair of QD SOA Mach-Zehnder interferometers, which can generate BSPK signal to realize all-optical logic XOR gate. Results show that this scheme can mitigate the patterning effects and increase the operation speed to ~250Gb/s.

  20. Principal component analysis of soft x-ray signals generated by the PF-1000 facility in experiments with solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska-Strzęciwilk, Ewa; Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Czarnecka, Agata; Kubkowska, Monika; Paduch, Marian; Zielińska, Ewa

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents the analysis of soft x-ray signals generated in the PF-1000 facility equipped with a modified inner electrode with a central tungsten insert of 50 mm diameter in experiments with tungsten and carbon samples. The PF-1000 machine was operated with pure deuterium filling under the initial pressure of 1.3 hPa. The machine was powered using a condenser bank charged initially to 24 kV, corresponding to the stored energy of 380 kJ, with the maximum discharge current amounted to 1.8 MA. For investigation of plasma stream-sample interactions, we applied 16-frame laser interferometry, optical spectroscopy and soft x-ray measurements with the use of a system of four silicon pin-diodes. In this paper, we mainly focus on the principal component analysis (PCA) of the registered x-ray signals to find a corelation between the neutron yield and observed maxima in signals. X-ray signals collected by four pin-diodes covered a 9 cm range in front of the electrode ends. Each diode collected a signal from the circle of 3 cm diameter. The presented PCA analysis is based on 57 PF discharges and 16 parameters are taken into account in the analysis. The study of signals from the pin-diode system showed good correlation between the neutron yield and the maximum in the x-ray signal, which appeared about 1000-1300 ns after the maximum of plasma compression.

  1. 15 CFR 758.2 - Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Automated Export System (AES). 758.2... CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS § 758.2 Automated Export System (AES). The Census Bureau's Foreign Trade Statistics Regulations (FTSR) (15 CFR Part 30) contain provisions for filing Shipper's Export Declarations...

  2. 15 CFR 758.2 - Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automated Export System (AES). 758.2... CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS § 758.2 Automated Export System (AES). The Census Bureau's Foreign Trade Statistics Regulations (FTSR) (15 CFR Part 30) contain provisions for filing Shipper's Export Declarations...

  3. 15 CFR 758.2 - Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Automated Export System (AES). 758.2... CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS § 758.2 Automated Export System (AES). The Census Bureau's Foreign Trade Statistics Regulations (FTSR) (15 CFR part 30) contain provisions for filing Shipper's Export Declarations...

  4. 15 CFR 758.2 - Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Automated Export System (AES). 758.2... CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS § 758.2 Automated Export System (AES). The Census Bureau's Foreign Trade Statistics Regulations (FTSR) (15 CFR Part 30) contain provisions for filing Shipper's Export Declarations...

  5. A Grammar Sketch of the Kaki Ae Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifton, John M.

    Kaki Ae is a non-Austronesian language spoken by about 300 people on the south coast of Papua New Guinea, at best distantly related to any other language in that area. A brief grammar sketch of the language is presented, including discussion of the phonology, sentences, phrases, words, and morpheme categories. Kaki Ae phonemics include 11…

  6. The global compendium of Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Moritz U. G.; Sinka, Marianne E.; Duda, Kirsten A.; Mylne, Adrian; Shearer, Freya M.; Brady, Oliver J.; Messina, Jane P.; Barker, Christopher M.; Moore, Chester G.; Carvalho, Roberta G.; Coelho, Giovanini E.; Van Bortel, Wim; Hendrickx, Guy; Schaffner, Francis; Wint, G. R. William; Elyazar, Iqbal R. F.; Teng, Hwa-Jen; Hay, Simon I.

    2015-01-01

    Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus are the main vectors transmitting dengue and chikungunya viruses. Despite being pathogens of global public health importance, knowledge of their vectors’ global distribution remains patchy and sparse. A global geographic database of known occurrences of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus between 1960 and 2014 was compiled. Herein we present the database, which comprises occurrence data linked to point or polygon locations, derived from peer-reviewed literature and unpublished studies including national entomological surveys and expert networks. We describe all data collection processes, as well as geo-positioning methods, database management and quality-control procedures. This is the first comprehensive global database of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus occurrence, consisting of 19,930 and 22,137 geo-positioned occurrence records respectively. Both datasets can be used for a variety of mapping and spatial analyses of the vectors and, by inference, the diseases they transmit. PMID:26175912

  7. FGF/FGFR2 Signaling Regulates the Generation and Correct Positioning of Bergmann Glia Cells in the Developing Mouse Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Faus-Kessler, Theresa; Matheus, Friederike; Simeone, Antonio; Hölter, Sabine M.; Kühn, Ralf; Weisenhorn, Daniela M. Vogt.; Wurst, Wolfgang; Prakash, Nilima

    2014-01-01

    The normal cellular organization and layering of the vertebrate cerebellum is established during embryonic and early postnatal development by the interplay of a complex array of genetic and signaling pathways. Disruption of these processes and of the proper layering of the cerebellum usually leads to ataxic behaviors. Here, we analyzed the relative contribution of Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2)-mediated signaling to cerebellar development in conditional Fgfr2 single mutant mice. We show that during embryonic mouse development, Fgfr2 expression is higher in the anterior cerebellar primordium and excluded from the proliferative ventricular neuroepithelium. Consistent with this finding, conditional Fgfr2 single mutant mice display the most prominent defects in the anterior lobules of the adult cerebellum. In this context, FGFR2-mediated signaling is required for the proper generation of Bergmann glia cells and the correct positioning of these cells within the Purkinje cell layer, and for cell survival in the developing cerebellar primordium. Using cerebellar microexplant cultures treated with an FGFR agonist (FGF9) or antagonist (SU5402), we also show that FGF9/FGFR-mediated signaling inhibits the outward migration of radial glia and Bergmann glia precursors and cells, and might thus act as a positioning cue for these cells. Altogether, our findings reveal the specific functions of the FGFR2-mediated signaling pathway in the generation and positioning of Bergmann glia cells during cerebellar development in the mouse. PMID:24983448

  8. Gene flow between wheat and wild relatives: empirical evidence from Aegilops geniculata, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis

    PubMed Central

    Arrigo, Nils; Guadagnuolo, Roberto; Lappe, Sylvain; Pasche, Sophie; Parisod, Christian; Felber, François

    2011-01-01

    Gene flow between domesticated species and their wild relatives is receiving growing attention. This study addressed introgression between wheat and natural populations of its wild relatives (Aegilops species). The sampling included 472 individuals, collected from 32 Mediterranean populations of three widespread Aegilops species (Aegilops geniculata, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis) and compared wheat field borders to areas isolated from agriculture. Individuals were characterized with amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting, analysed through two computational approaches (i.e. Bayesian estimations of admixture and fuzzy clustering), and sequences marking wheat-specific insertions of transposable elements. With this combined approach, we detected substantial gene flow between wheat and Aegilops species. Specifically, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis showed significantly more admixed individuals close to wheat fields than in locations isolated from agriculture. In contrast, little evidence of gene flow was found in Ae. geniculata. Our results indicated that reproductive barriers have been regularly bypassed during the long history of sympatry between wheat and Aegilops. PMID:25568015

  9. GABA-CREB signalling regulates maturation and survival of newly generated neurons in the adult hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Jagasia, Ravi; Steib, Kathrin; Englberger, Elisabeth; Herold, Sabine; Faus-Kessler, Theresa; Saxe, Michael; Gage, Fred H.; Song, Hongjun; Lie, D. Chichung

    2009-01-01

    Survival and integration of new neurons in the hippocampal circuit are rate-limiting steps in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Neuronal network activity is a major regulator of these processes, yet little is known about the respective downstream signalling pathways. Here, we investigate the role of CREB signalling in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. CREB is activated in new granule neurons during a distinct developmental period. Loss of CREB function in a cell-autonomous fashion impairs dendritic development, decreases the expression of the neurogenic transcription factor NeuroD and of the neuronal microtubule associated protein, DCX, and compromises the survival of newborn neurons. In addition, GABA-mediated excitation regulates CREB activation at early developmental stages. Importantly, developmental defects following loss of GABA-mediated excitation can be compensated by enhanced CREB signalling. These results indicate that CREB signalling is a central pathway in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, regulating the development and survival of new hippocampal neurons downstream of GABA-mediated excitation. PMID:19553437

  10. Optical-fiber pulse rate multiplier for ultralow phase-noise signal generation.

    PubMed

    Haboucha, A; Zhang, W; Li, T; Lours, M; Luiten, A N; Le Coq, Y; Santarelli, G

    2011-09-15

    In this Letter we report on an all optical-fiber approach to the synthesis of ultralow-noise microwave signals by photodetection of femtosecond laser pulses. We use a cascade of Mach-Zehnder fiber interferometers to realize stable and efficient repetition rate multiplication. This technique increases the signal level of the photodetected microwave signal by close to 18 dB. That in turn allows us to demonstrate a residual phase-noise level of -118 dBc/Hz at 1 Hz and -160 dBc/Hz at 10 MHz from a 12 GHz signal. The residual noise floor of the fiber multiplier and photodetection system alone is around -164 dBc/Hz at the same offset frequency, which is very close to the fundamental shot-noise floor. PMID:21931422

  11. Cause of the exceptionally high AE average for 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestes, A.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we focus on the year of 2003 when the AE index was extremely high (AE=341nT, with peak intensity more than 2200nT), this value is almost 100 nT higher when compared with others years of the cycle 23. Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and plasma data are compared with geomagnetic AE and Dst indices to determine the causes of exceptionally high AE average value. Analyzing the solar wind parameters we found that the annual average speed value was extremely high, approximately 542 km/s (peak value ~1074 km/s). These values were due to recurrent high-speed solar streams from large coronal holes, which stretch to the solar equator, and low-latitude coronal holes, which exist for many solar rotations. AE was found to increase with increasing solar wind speed and decrease when solar wind speed decrease. The cause of the high AE activity during 2003 is the presence of the high-speed corotating streams that contain large-amplitude Alfvén waves throughout the streams, which resulted in a large number of HILDCAAs events. When plasma and field of solar wind impinge on Earth's magnetosphere, the southward field turnings associated with the wave fluctuations cause magnetic reconnection and consequential high levels of AE activity and very long recovery phases on Dst, sometimes lasting until the next stream arrives.

  12. Ionospheric ELF radio signal generation due to LF and/or MF radio transmissions. I - Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, P. S.

    1982-10-01

    Data obtained in a program of ELF/VLF goniometer recordings in northern Scandinavia are analyzed. The results indicate that six 1-kHz timing signals (pips) received on the hour were produced by a nonlinear demodulation mechanism in the D region of the auroral ionosphere. A positive temporal correlation between ELF pip generation and periods of enhanced local magnetic activity is obtained, demonstrating a close association between the reception of the ELF pips and the auroral electrojet. The pip magnetic field strengths are found to be of the order of 0.1 pT. The originating signals are shown to emanate from one or more Soviet LF and/or MF radio transmitters located at least several hundred km from the favored generation region.

  13. Mechanism for laser-induced fluorescence signal generation in a nanoparticle-seeded flow for planar flame thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, D. H.; Sun, Z. W.; Medwell, P. R.; Alwahabi, Z. T.; Dally, B. B.; Nathan, G. J.

    2015-02-01

    The mechanism of atomic indium generation for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of indium from laser ablation seeding was investigated in a hydrogen/nitrogen non-premixed flame. The morphology and particle size distributions of the ablation products were examined with scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These investigations show that the ablation products comprise complex agglomerates of nano-sized primary particles of indium compounds and micron-sized spherical indium beads. Images of the atomic indium LIF, Mie scattering of ablation products and natural fluorescence emission of indium in the flame were recorded to investigate the mechanism of fluorescence signal generation. The relative contribution of natural fluorescence emission of indium towards the total indium fluorescence signal was assessed by comparing these images. These images also reveal the evolution of ablation products through the flame structure and the correlation between LIF signal and ablation products. It is found that the LIF signal generation is associated with the vapourisation of indium nanoparticles into the gas phase by thermal decomposition in the flame. A further mechanism for thermal decomposition of the nanoparticles was also identified, that of heating the ablation products by in situ laser ablation. This was assessed by means of a second laser, introduced prior to the excitation laser, to reveal that the LIF signal can be enhanced by in situ laser ablation, particularly in the upstream regions of the flame. These findings supersede the mechanism deduced previously by the authors that neutral atomic indium can survive a convection time of the order of tens of seconds and be directly seeded into reacting or non-reacting flows. The possible influences of laser ablation seeding on the nonlinear two-line atomic fluorescence thermometry technique were also assessed.

  14. Combined AES, LEED, SEM and TEM characterizations of CuSi(100) interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanbücken, M.; Métois, J. J.; Mathiez, P.; Salvan, F.

    1985-10-01

    CuSi(100) interfaces prepared under UHV at different substrate temperatures ( TS) have been characterized using in-situ Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) as well as ex-situ scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM). At room temperature (RT), the film grows in a layer by layer like mode. With increasing TS, the intensity of the Cu M 2,3VV (61 eV) Auger transition decreases and at TS = 500°C no Cu Auger signal could be measured below θ ˜ 100. Yet SEM and TEM observations of these deposits show islands in epitaxial relation with the substrate. It can be determined from TEM images that these islands are covered with a Si skin ( ˜ 50 Å; thick) and that they are deeply implanted in the Si substrate. This explains the AES measurements.

  15. BMP signaling is required for the generation of primordial germ cells in an insect

    PubMed Central

    Donoughe, Seth; Nakamura, Taro; Ewen-Campen, Ben; Green, Delbert A.; Henderson, Lory; Extavour, Cassandra G.

    2014-01-01

    Two modes of germ cell formation are known in animals. Specification through maternally inherited germ plasm occurs in many well-characterized model organisms, but most animals lack germ plasm by morphological and functional criteria. The only known alternative mechanism is induction, experimentally described only in mice, which specify germ cells through bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signal-mediated induction of a subpopulation of mesodermal cells. Until this report, no experimental evidence of an inductive germ cell signal for specification has been available outside of vertebrates. Here we provide functional genetic experimental evidence consistent with a role for BMP signaling in germ cell formation in a basally branching insect. We show that primordial germ cells of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus transduce BMP signals and require BMP pathway activity for their formation. Moreover, increased BMP activity leads to ectopic and supernumerary germ cells. Given the commonality of BMP signaling in mouse and cricket germ cell induction, we suggest that BMP-based germ cell formation may be a shared ancestral mechanism in animals. PMID:24591634

  16. Generation of systemin signaling in tobacco by transformation with the tomato systemin receptor kinase gene

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Justin M.; Pearce, Gregory; Ryan, Clarence A.

    2003-01-01

    The tomato systemin receptor, SR160, a plasma membrane-bound, leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase that signals systemic plant defense, and the brassinolide (BL) receptor, BRI1, that regulates developmental processes, have been shown recently to have identical amino acid sequences. We report herein that tobacco, a solanaceous species that does not express a systemin precursor gene nor responds to systemin, when transformed with the SR160 receptor gene, expresses the gene in suspension-cultured cells, evidenced by mRNA and protein analyses and photoaffinity-labeling experiments. Additionally, systemin induced an alkalinization response in the transgenic tobacco cells similar to that found in tomato cells, but not in WT cells. The gain in function in tobacco cells indicates that early steps of the systemin signaling pathway found in tomato are present in tobacco cells. A tomato line, cu-3, in which a mutation in the BRI1 gene has rendered the plant nonfunctional in BL signaling, exhibits a severely reduced response to systemin. In leaves of WT tomato plants, BL strongly and reversibly antagonized systemic signaling by systemin. The results suggest that the systemin-mediated systemic defense response may have evolved in some solanaceous species by co-opting the BRI1 receptor and associated components for defense signaling. PMID:12900501

  17. BMP signaling is required for the generation of primordial germ cells in an insect.

    PubMed

    Donoughe, Seth; Nakamura, Taro; Ewen-Campen, Ben; Green, Delbert A; Henderson, Lory; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2014-03-18

    Two modes of germ cell formation are known in animals. Specification through maternally inherited germ plasm occurs in many well-characterized model organisms, but most animals lack germ plasm by morphological and functional criteria. The only known alternative mechanism is induction, experimentally described only in mice, which specify germ cells through bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signal-mediated induction of a subpopulation of mesodermal cells. Until this report, no experimental evidence of an inductive germ cell signal for specification has been available outside of vertebrates. Here we provide functional genetic experimental evidence consistent with a role for BMP signaling in germ cell formation in a basally branching insect. We show that primordial germ cells of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus transduce BMP signals and require BMP pathway activity for their formation. Moreover, increased BMP activity leads to ectopic and supernumerary germ cells. Given the commonality of BMP signaling in mouse and cricket germ cell induction, we suggest that BMP-based germ cell formation may be a shared ancestral mechanism in animals. PMID:24591634

  18. Effect of the surface roughness on the seismic signal generated by a single rock impact: insight from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelet, Vincent; Mangeney, Anne; de Rosny, Julien; Toussaint, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    The seismic signal generated by rockfalls, landslides or avalanches is a unique tool to detect, characterize and monitor gravitational flow activity, with strong implication in terms of natural hazard monitoring. Indeed, as natural flows travel down the slope, they apply stresses on the ground, generating seismic waves in a wide frequency band. Our ultimate objective is to relate the granular flow properties to the generated signals that result from the different physical processes involved. We investigate here the more simple process: the impact of a single bead on a rough surface. Farin et al. [2015] have already shown theoretically and experimentally the existence of a link between the properties of an impacting bead (mass and velocity) on smooth surfaces, and the emitted signal (radiated elastic energy and mean frequency). This demonstrates that the single impactor properties can be deduced from the form of the emitted signal. We extend this work here by investigating the impact of single beads and gravels on rough and erodible surfaces. Experimentally, we drop glass and steel beads of diameters from 2 mm to 10 mm on a PMMA plate. The roughness of this last is obtained by gluing 3mm-diameter glass beads on one of its face. Free beads have been also added to get erodible beds. We track the dropped impactor motion, times between impacts and the generated acoustic waves using two fast cameras and 8 accelerometers. Cameras are used in addition to estimate the impactor rotation. We investigate the energy balance during the impact process, especially how the energy restitution varies as a function of the energy lost through acoustic waves. From these experiments, we clearly observe that even if more dissipative processes are involved (friction, grain reorganization, etc.), the single bead scaling laws obtained on smooth surfaces remain valid. A main result of this work is to quantify the fluctuations of the characteristic quantities such as the bounce angle, the

  19. Generation of spectral-encoded signals in noncoherent optical communication systems based on acousto-optic multiwavelength filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proklov, V. V.; Byshevski-Konopko, O. A.; Filatov, A. L.

    2015-10-01

    New acousto-optical (AO) methods and devices necessary for the creation of noncoherent optical code division multiple access (O-CDMA) systems are considered. Based on an AO multiwavelength filter, an original device generating spectral-encoded signals for O-CDMA systems with optimum WDM has been created and studied. It is shown that modern AO technology is capable of surmounting difficulties that previously hindered the transition of optical communication systems to CDMA data transmission.

  20. Ultralow-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal generator assisted with an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizawa, A.; Nishikawa, T.; Goto, T.; Hitachi, K.; Sogawa, T.; Gotoh, H.

    2016-05-01

    Low-noise millimetre-wave signals are valuable for digital sampling systems, arbitrary waveform generation for ultra-wideband communications, and coherent radar systems. However, the phase noise of widely used conventional signal generators (SGs) will increase as the millimetre-wave frequency increases. Our goal has been to improve commercially available SGs so that they provide a low-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal with assistance from an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb (EOM-OFC). Here, we show that the phase noise can be greatly reduced by bridging the vast frequency difference between the gigahertz and terahertz ranges with an EOM-OFC. The EOM-OFC serves as a liaison that magnifies the phase noise of the SG. With the EOM-OFC used as a phase noise “booster” for a millimetre-wave signal, the phase noise of widely used SGs can be reduced at an arbitrary frequency f (6 ≦ f ≦ 72 GHz).

  1. Generation of late-born neurons in the ventral spinal cord requires the coordination of retinoic acid and Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jae-Ho; Kong, Hee Jeong; Park, Jung Youn; Lim, Kyung-Eun; An, Cheul Min; Lee, Jehee; Yeo, Sang-Yeob

    2015-08-18

    Neural progenitor cells generate various types of neurons and glia in a tightly regulated manner. During primary neurogenesis, retinoic acid (RA) acts earlier than Notch signaling and regulates differentiation and proliferation by upregulating proneural and neurogenic genes in the neural plate. However, the relationship between Notch signaling and the retinoid pathway during late neurogenesis remains unclear. We investigated the role of Mindbomb (Mib)-mediated Notch signaling in the differentiation of neural progenitors during late neurogenesis by overexpressing Mib and administering RA to Tg[hsp70-Mib:EGFP]. The majority of cells in the p3 domain differentiated into GABAergic Kolmer-Agduhr (KA) cells in Tg[hsp70-mib:EGFP] embryos heat-shocked during late neurogenesis, whereas these phenotypes were suppressed by exogenous RA. Our observations suggest that Mib-mediated Notch signaling plays a critical role in the temporal differentiation of neural progenitors, and that the generation of late-born KA″ cells is regulated by the interplay between Mib and RA. PMID:26151587

  2. Temporal variations in magnetic signals generated by the piezomagnetic effect for dislocation sources in a uniform medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Ken'ichi

    2016-07-01

    Fault ruptures in the Earth's crust generate both elastic and electromagnetic (EM) waves. If the corresponding EM signals can be observed, then earthquakes could be detected before the first seismic waves arrive. In this study, I consider the piezomagnetic effect as a mechanism that converts elastic waves to EM energy, and I derive analytical formulas for the conversion process. The situation considered in this study is a whole-space model, in which elastic and EM properties are uniform and isotropic. In this situation, the governing equations of the elastic and EM fields, combined with the piezomagnetic constitutive law, can be solved analytically in the time domain by ignoring the displacement current term. Using the derived formulas, numerical examples are investigated, and the corresponding characteristics of the expected magnetic signals are resolved. I show that temporal variations in the magnetic field depend strongly on the electrical conductivity of the medium, meaning that precise detection of signals generated by the piezomagnetic effect is generally difficult. Expected amplitudes of piezomagnetic signals are estimated to be no larger than 0.3 nT for earthquakes with a moment magnitude of ≥7.0 at a source distance of 25 km; however, this conclusion may not extend to the detection of real earthquakes, because piezomagnetic stress sensitivity is currently poorly constrained.

  3. Ultralow-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal generator assisted with an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb

    PubMed Central

    Ishizawa, A.; Nishikawa, T.; Goto, T.; Hitachi, K.; Sogawa, T.; Gotoh, H.

    2016-01-01

    Low-noise millimetre-wave signals are valuable for digital sampling systems, arbitrary waveform generation for ultra-wideband communications, and coherent radar systems. However, the phase noise of widely used conventional signal generators (SGs) will increase as the millimetre-wave frequency increases. Our goal has been to improve commercially available SGs so that they provide a low-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal with assistance from an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb (EOM-OFC). Here, we show that the phase noise can be greatly reduced by bridging the vast frequency difference between the gigahertz and terahertz ranges with an EOM-OFC. The EOM-OFC serves as a liaison that magnifies the phase noise of the SG. With the EOM-OFC used as a phase noise “booster” for a millimetre-wave signal, the phase noise of widely used SGs can be reduced at an arbitrary frequency f (6 ≦ f ≦ 72 GHz). PMID:27185040

  4. Temporal variations in magnetic signals generated by the piezomagnetic effect for dislocation sources in a uniform medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Ken'ichi

    2016-04-01

    Fault ruptures in the Earth's crust generate both elastic and electromagnetic (EM) waves. If the corresponding EM signals can be observed, then earthquakes could be detected before the first seismic waves arrive. In this study, I consider the piezomagnetic effect as a mechanism that converts elastic waves to EM energy, and I derive analytical formulas for the conversion process. The situation considered in this study is a whole-space model, in which elastic and EM properties are uniform and isotropic. In this situation, the governing equations of the elastic and EM fields, combined with the piezomagnetic constitutive law, can be solved analytically in the time domain by ignoring the displacement current term. Using the derived formulas, numerical examples are investigated, and the corresponding characteristics of the expected magnetic signals are resolved. I show that temporal variations in the magnetic field depend strongly on the electrical conductivity of the medium, meaning that precise detection of signals generated by the piezomagnetic effect is generally difficult. Expected amplitudes of piezomagnetic signals are estimated to be no larger than 0.3 nT for earthquakes with a moment magnitude of ≥7.0 at a source distance of 25 km; however, this conclusion may not extend to the detection of real earthquakes, because piezomagnetic stress sensitivity is currently poorly constrained.

  5. Ultralow-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal generator assisted with an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Ishizawa, A; Nishikawa, T; Goto, T; Hitachi, K; Sogawa, T; Gotoh, H

    2016-01-01

    Low-noise millimetre-wave signals are valuable for digital sampling systems, arbitrary waveform generation for ultra-wideband communications, and coherent radar systems. However, the phase noise of widely used conventional signal generators (SGs) will increase as the millimetre-wave frequency increases. Our goal has been to improve commercially available SGs so that they provide a low-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal with assistance from an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb (EOM-OFC). Here, we show that the phase noise can be greatly reduced by bridging the vast frequency difference between the gigahertz and terahertz ranges with an EOM-OFC. The EOM-OFC serves as a liaison that magnifies the phase noise of the SG. With the EOM-OFC used as a phase noise "booster" for a millimetre-wave signal, the phase noise of widely used SGs can be reduced at an arbitrary frequency f (6 ≦ f ≦ 72 GHz). PMID:27185040

  6. Automated Estimating System (AES), Version 5. 1, User's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.K.; Holder, D.A.

    1992-08-01

    This document describes Version 5.1 of the Automated Estimating System (AES), a personal computer-based software package. The AES is designed to aid in the creation, updating, and reporting of project cost estimates for the Estimating and Scheduling Department of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Engineering Division. AES provides formatted input screens to guide the user though the estimate creation/update process and provides several standardized reports that allow cost to be sorted and summarized in many different formats and at several levels of aggregation.

  7. Continuous tooth generation in mouse is induced by activated epithelial Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Elina; Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac; Birchmeier, Walter; Taketo, Makoto M.; Jernvall, Jukka; Thesleff, Irma

    2006-01-01

    The single replacement from milk teeth to permanent teeth makes mammalian teeth different from teeth of most nonmammalian vertebrates and other epithelial organs such as hair and feathers, whose continuous replacement has been linked to Wnt signaling. Here we show that mouse tooth buds expressing stabilized β-catenin in epithelium give rise to dozens of teeth. The molar crowns, however, are typically simplified unicusped cones. We demonstrate that the supernumerary teeth develop by a renewal process where new signaling centers, the enamel knots, bud off from the existing dental epithelium. The basic aspects of the unlocked tooth renewal can be reproduced with a computer model on tooth development by increasing the intrinsic level of activator production, supporting the role of β-catenin pathway as an upstream activator of enamel knot formation. These results may implicate Wnt signaling in tooth renewal, a capacity that was all but lost when mammals evolved progressively more complicated tooth shapes. PMID:17121988

  8. Continuous tooth generation in mouse is induced by activated epithelial Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, Elina; Salazar-Ciudad, Isaac; Birchmeier, Walter; Taketo, Makoto M; Jernvall, Jukka; Thesleff, Irma

    2006-12-01

    The single replacement from milk teeth to permanent teeth makes mammalian teeth different from teeth of most nonmammalian vertebrates and other epithelial organs such as hair and feathers, whose continuous replacement has been linked to Wnt signaling. Here we show that mouse tooth buds expressing stabilized beta-catenin in epithelium give rise to dozens of teeth. The molar crowns, however, are typically simplified unicusped cones. We demonstrate that the supernumerary teeth develop by a renewal process where new signaling centers, the enamel knots, bud off from the existing dental epithelium. The basic aspects of the unlocked tooth renewal can be reproduced with a computer model on tooth development by increasing the intrinsic level of activator production, supporting the role of beta-catenin pathway as an upstream activator of enamel knot formation. These results may implicate Wnt signaling in tooth renewal, a capacity that was all but lost when mammals evolved progressively more complicated tooth shapes. PMID:17121988

  9. Photonic generation of widely tunable phase-coded microwave signals based on a dual-parallel polarization modulator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shifeng; Zhu, Dan; Wei, Zhengwu; Pan, Shilong

    2014-07-01

    A photonic approach for the generation of a widely tunable arbitrarily phase-coded microwave signal based on a dual-parallel polarization modulator (DP-PolM) is proposed and demonstrated without using any optical or electrical filter. Two orthogonally polarized ± first-order optical sidebands with suppressed carrier are generated based on the DP-PolM, and their polarization directions are aligned with the two principal axes of the following PolM. Phase coding is implemented at a following PolM driven by an electrical coding signal. The inherent frequency-doubling operation can make the system work at a frequency beyond the operation bandwidth of the DP-PolM and the 90° hybrid. Because no optical or electrical filter is applied, good frequency tunability is realized. An experiment is performed. The generation of phase-coded signals tuning from 10 to 40 GHz with up to 10  Gbit/s coding rates is verified. PMID:24978781

  10. Frequency Analysis of the Photoacoustic Signal Generated by Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaque.

    PubMed

    Daeichin, Verya; Wu, Min; De Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F W; van Soest, Gijs

    2016-08-01

    The identification of unstable atherosclerotic plaques in the coronary arteries is emerging as an important tool for guiding percutaneous coronary interventions and may enable preventive treatment of such plaques in the future. Assessment of plaque stability requires imaging of both structure and composition. Spectroscopic photoacoustic (sPA) imaging can visualize atherosclerotic plaque composition on the basis of the optical absorption contrast. It is an established fact that the frequency content of the photoacoustic (PA) signal is correlated with structural tissue properties. As PA signals can be weak, it is important to match the transducer bandwidth to the signal frequency content for in vivo imaging. In this ex vivo study on human coronary arteries, we combined sPA imaging and analysis of frequency content of the PA signals. Using a broadband transducer (-3-dB one-way bandwidth of 10-35 MHz) and a 1-mm needle hydrophone (calibrated for 1-20 MHz), we covered a large frequency range of 1-35 MHz for receiving the PA signals. Spectroscopic PA imaging was performed at wavelengths ranging from 1125 to 1275 nm with a step of 2 nm, allowing discrimination between plaque lipids and adventitial tissue. Under sPA imaging guidance, the frequency content of the PA signals from the plaque lipids was quantified. Our data indicate that more than 80% of the PA energy of the coronary plaque lipids lies in the frequency band below 8 MHz. This frequency information can guide the choice of the transducer element used for PA catheter fabrication. PMID:27181689

  11. The Time-Frequency Signatures of Advanced Seismic Signals Generated by Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C. R.; Huang, C. J.; Lin, C. R.; Wang, C. C.; Kuo, B. Y.; Yin, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The seismic monitoring is expected to reveal the process of debris flow from the initial area to alluvial fan, because other field monitoring techniques, such as the video camera and the ultrasonic sensor, are limited by detection range. For this reason, seismic approaches have been used as the detection system of debris flows over the past few decades. The analysis of the signatures of the seismic signals in time and frequency domain can be used to identify the different phases of debris flow. This study dedicates to investigate the different stages of seismic signals due to debris flow, including the advanced signal, the main front, and the decaying tail. Moreover, the characteristics of the advanced signals forward to the approach of main front were discussed for the warning purpose. This study presents a permanent system, composed by two seismometers, deployed along the bank of Ai-Yu-Zi Creek in Nantou County, which is one of the active streams with debris flow in Taiwan. The three axes seismometer with frequency response of 7 sec - 200 Hz was developed by the Institute of Earth Sciences (IES), Academia Sinica for the purpose to detect debris flow. The original idea of replacing the geophone system with the seismometer technique was for catching the advanced signals propagating from the upper reach of the stream before debris flow arrival because of the high sensitivity. Besides, the low frequency seismic waves could be also early detected because of the low attenuation. However, for avoiding other unnecessary ambient vibrations, the sensitivity of seismometer should be lower than the general seismometer for detecting teleseism. Three debris flows with different mean velocities were detected in 2013 and 2014. The typical triangular shape was obviously demonstrated in time series data and the spectrograms of the seismic signals from three events. The frequency analysis showed that enormous debris flow bearing huge boulders would induce low frequency seismic

  12. Clustering reveals cavitation-related acoustic emission signals from dehydrating branches.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, Lidewei L; Sause, Markus G R; De Baerdemaeker, Niels J F; De Roo, Linus; Steppe, Kathy

    2016-06-01

    The formation of air emboli in the xylem during drought is one of the key processes leading to plant mortality due to loss in hydraulic conductivity, and strongly fuels the interest in quantifying vulnerability to cavitation. The acoustic emission (AE) technique can be used to measure hydraulic conductivity losses and construct vulnerability curves. For years, it has been believed that all the AE signals are produced by the formation of gas emboli in the xylem sap under tension. More recent experiments, however, demonstrate that gas emboli formation cannot explain all the signals detected during drought, suggesting that different sources of AE exist. This complicates the use of the AE technique to measure emboli formation in plants. We therefore analysed AE waveforms measured on branches of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. 'Chardonnay') during bench dehydration with broadband sensors, and applied an automated clustering algorithm in order to find natural clusters of AE signals. We used AE features and AE activity patterns during consecutive dehydration phases to identify the different AE sources. Based on the frequency spectrum of the signals, we distinguished three different types of AE signals, of which the frequency cluster with high 100-200 kHz frequency content was strongly correlated with cavitation. Our results indicate that cavitation-related AE signals can be filtered from other AE sources, which presents a promising avenue into quantifying xylem embolism in plants in laboratory and field conditions. PMID:27095256

  13. Palm-shaped spectrum generation for dual-band millimeter wave and baseband signals over fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R.; Feng, Z.; Tang, M.; Wang, R.; Fu, S.; Shum, P.; Liu, D.; Chen, J.

    2016-05-01

    In order to offer abundant available bandwidth for radio access networks satisfying future 5G requirements on capacity, this paper proposes a simple and cost-effective palm-shaped spectrum generation scheme that can be used for high capacity radio over fiber (RoF) system. The proposed scheme can simultaneously generate an optical carrier used for upstream and two bands of millimeter wave (MMW) that are capable of carrying different downstream data. The experiment results show that the proposed palm-shaped spectrum generation scheme outperforms optical frequency comb (OFC) based multi-band MMW generation in terms of upstream transmission performance. Furthermore, simulation is carried out with different dual-band MMW configurations to verify the feasibility of using the proposed spectrum generation scheme in the RoF system.

  14. Hydrolysis products generated by lipoprotein lipase and endothelial lipase differentially impact THP-1 macrophage cell signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Essaji, Yasmin; Yang, Yanbo; Albert, Carolyn J; Ford, David A; Brown, Robert J

    2013-08-01

    Macrophages express lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and endothelial lipase (EL) within atherosclerotic plaques; however, little is known about how lipoprotein hydrolysis products generated by these lipases might affect macrophage cell signalling pathways. We hypothesized that hydrolysis products affect macrophage cell signalling pathways associated with atherosclerosis. To test our hypothesis, we incubated differentiated THP-1 macrophages with products from total lipoprotein hydrolysis by recombinant LPL or EL. Using antibody arrays, we found that the phosphorylation of six receptor tyrosine kinases and three signalling nodes--most associated with atherosclerotic processes--was increased by LPL derived hydrolysis products. EL derived hydrolysis products only increased the phosphorylation of tropomyosin-related kinase A, which is also implicated in playing a role in atherosclerosis. Using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, we identified the species of triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines that were hydrolyzed by LPL and EL, and we identified the fatty acids liberated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. To determine if the total liberated fatty acids influenced signalling pathways, we incubated differentiated THP-1 macrophages with a mixture of the fatty acids that matched the concentrations of liberated fatty acids from total lipoproteins by LPL, and we subjected cell lysates to antibody array analyses. The analyses showed that only the phosphorylation of Akt was significantly increased in response to fatty acid treatment. Overall, our study shows that macrophages display potentially pro-atherogenic signalling responses following acute treatments with LPL and EL lipoprotein hydrolysis products. PMID:23794138

  15. AGE-RAGE signal generates a specific NF-κB RelA "barcode" that directs collagen I expression.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yunqian; Kim, Ji-Min; Park, Hal-Sol; Yang, Annie; Islam, Celia; Lakatta, Edward G; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are sugar-modified biomolecules that accumulate in the body with advancing age, and are implicated in the development of multiple age-associated structural and functional abnormities and diseases. It has been well documented that AGEs signal via their receptor RAGE to activate several cellular programs including NF-κB, leading to inflammation. A large number of stimuli can activate NF-κB; yet different stimuli, or the same stimulus for NF-κB in different cellular settings, produce a very different transcriptional landscape and physiological outcome. The NF-κB barcode hypothesis posits that cellular network dynamics generate signal-specific post-translational modifications, or a "barcode" to NF-κB, and that a signature "barcode" mediates a specific gene expression pattern. In the current study, we established that AGE-RAGE signaling results in NF-κB activation that directs collagen Ia1 and Ia2 expression. We further demonstrated that AGE-RAGE signal induces phosphorylation of RelA at three specific residues, T254, S311, and S536. These modifications are required for transcription of collagen I genes and are a consequence of cellular network dynamics. The increase of collagen content is a hallmark of arterial aging, and our work provides a potential mechanistic link between RAGE signaling, NF-κB activation, and aging-associated arterial alterations in structure and function. PMID:26729520

  16. Arcing and rf signal generation during target irradiation by a high-energy, pulsed neutral particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Robiscoe, R.T.

    1988-02-01

    We present a theory describing the dynamics of arc discharges in bulk dielectric materials on board space-based vehicles. Such ''punch-through'' arcs can occur in target satellites irradiated by high-energy (250 MeV), pulsed (100 mA x 10 ms) neutral particle beams. We treat the arc as a capacitively limited avalanche current in the target dielectric material, and we find expressions for the arc duration, charge transport, currents, and discharge energy. These quantities are adjusted to be consistent with known scaling laws for the area of charge depleted by the arc. After a brief account of the statistical distribution of voltages at which the arc starts and stops, we calculate the signal strength and frequency spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation broadcast by the arc. We find that arcs from thick ()similarreverse arrowto)1 cm) targets can generate rf signals detectable up to 1000 km from the target, bu a radio receiver operating at frequency 80 MHz, bandwidth 100 kHz, and detection threshold -105 dBm. These thick-target arc signals are 10 to 20 dB above ambient noise at the receiver, and they provide target hit assessment if the signal spectrum can be sampled at several frequencies in the nominal range 30-200 MHz. Thin-target ()similarreverse arrowto)1 mm) arc signals are much weaker, but when they are detecable in conjunction with thick-target signals, target discrimination is possible by comparing the signal frequency spectra. 24 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Microparticles generated during chronic cerebral ischemia deliver proapoptotic signals to cultured endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Sarah C.; Edrissi, Hamidreza; Burger, Dylan; Cadonic, Robert; Hakim, Antoine; Thompson, Charlie

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Microparticles are elevated in the plasma in a rodent model of chronic cerebral ischemia. • These microparticles initiate apoptosis in cultured cells. • Microparticles contain caspase 3 and they activate receptors for TNF-α and TRAIL. - Abstract: Circulating microparticles (MPs) are involved in many physiological processes and numbers are increased in a variety of cardiovascular disorders. The present aims were to characterize levels of MPs in a rodent model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) and to determine their signaling properties. MPs were isolated from the plasma of rats exposed to CCH and quantified by flow cytometry. When MPs were added to cultured endothelial cells or normal rat kidney cells they induced cell death in a time and dose dependent manner. Analysis of pellets by electron microscopy indicates that cell death signals are carried by particles in the range of 400 nm in diameter or less. Cell death involved the activation of caspase 3 and was not a consequence of oxidative stress. Inhibition of the Fas/FasL signaling pathway also did not improve cell survival. MPs were found to contain caspase 3 and treating the MPs with a caspase 3 inhibitor significantly reduced cell death. A TNF-α receptor blocker and a TRAIL neutralizing antibody also significantly reduced cell death. Levels of circulating MPs are elevated in a rodent model of chronic cerebral ischemia. MPs with a diameter of 400 nm or less activate the TNF-α and TRAIL signaling pathways and may deliver caspase 3 to cultured cells.

  18. Compressive sensing of signals generated in plastic scintillators in a novel J-PET instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raczyński, L.; Moskal, P.; Kowalski, P.; Wiślicki, W.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Czerwiński, E.; Gajos, A.; Kapłon, Ł.; Kochanowski, A.; Korcyl, G.; Kowal, J.; Kozik, T.; Krzemień, W.; Kubicz, E.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pałka, M.; Rudy, Z.; Rundel, O.; Salabura, P.; Sharma, N. G.; Silarski, M.; Słomski, A.; Smyrski, J.; Strzelecki, A.; Wieczorek, A.; Zieliński, M.; Zoń, N.

    2015-06-01

    The J-PET scanner, which allows for single bed imaging of the whole human body, is currently under development at the Jagiellonian University. The discussed detector offers improvement of the Time of Flight (TOF) resolution due to the use of fast plastic scintillators and dedicated electronics allowing for sampling in the voltage domain of signals with durations of few nanoseconds. In this paper we show that recovery of the whole signal, based on only a few samples, is possible. In order to do that, we incorporate the training signals into the Tikhonov regularization framework and we perform the Principal Component Analysis decomposition, which is well known for its compaction properties. The method yields a simple closed form analytical solution that does not require iterative processing. Moreover, from the Bayes theory the properties of regularized solution, especially its covariance matrix, may be easily derived. This is the key to introduce and prove the formula for calculations of the signal recovery error. In this paper we show that an average recovery error is approximately inversely proportional to the number of acquired samples.

  19. 15 CFR Appendix B to Part 30 - AES Filing Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false AES Filing Codes B Appendix B to Part 30 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS Pt. 30, App. B Appendix B to Part 30—AES Filing Codes Part I—Method of Transportation...

  20. LDV arterial pulse signal: Evidence for local generation in the carotid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casaccia, Sara; Sirevaag, Erik J.; Richter, Edward J.; Casacanditella, Luigi; Scalise, Lorenzo; Rohrbaugh, John W.

    2016-06-01

    The external blood pressure pulse, recorded on a non-contact basis using the method of laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV), has been shown to be a rich source of information regarding cardiac and vascular dynamics. Considerable attention has been directed specifically to the pulse from the neck, overlying the carotid artery, which is of special interest because the carotid pulse is highly similar to the central aortic pressure pulse. The findings presented here are consistent with an interpretation of the signal at the neck as originating in the carotid artery. A detailed mapping study involving a 35 point matrix over the right neck disclosed a focal zone of maximal signal amplitude, with a course consistent with the tract of the underlying carotid. Appreciable individual differences in the 22 examinees were disclosed, particularly at lower sites. In addition to confirming a local source for the LDV carotid pulse, the data highlight the importance of accurate targeting considerations.

  1. Processing and interpretation of microbarograph signals generated by the explosion of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Delclos, C.; Blanc, E. ); Broche, P. ); Glangeaud, F.; Lacoume, J.L. )

    1990-04-20

    Following the eruption of the Mount St. Helens volcano on May 18, 1980, atmospheric waves were recorded by a network of micrographs located over 7,000 km from the source. Analysis of these data requires the use of complex processing techniques based on a high-resolution method to extract the signals produced by the St. Helens source from spurious waves or noise in each record. This facilitates interpretation of the wave trains in terms of propagation modes. It is thus shown that Lamb mode L{sub 0} is present in the low-frequency part of all signals, whereas acoustic modes (more probably A{prime}{sub 2}) are needed to explain all the properties of the high-frequency part, which is clearly observed for a westward and a southward propagation.

  2. Use of parabolic reflector to amplify in-air signals generated during impact-echo testing.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaowei; Zhu, Jinying; Tsai, Yi-Te; Haberman, Michael R

    2011-10-01

    The impact-echo method is a commonly used nondestructive testing technique for elastic plates in civil engineering. The impact-echo mode corresponds to the frequency at zero group velocity of S(1) Lamb mode. Recent development of the air-coupled impact-echo (ACIE) method introduces the possibility for rapid scanning of large structures and increases the practicality of in situ measurements. However, sensors used in ACIE are susceptible to ambient noise, which complicates in situ ACIE measurements. This letter presents the results of ACIE measurements taken using a parabolic reflector together with standard measurement microphones to increase the signal to noise ratio for ACIE measurements. The signal gain and effects of sensor location with respect to impact location are discussed. PMID:21974487

  3. Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase δ Regulates Dectin-2 Signaling and the Generation of Th2 and Th17 Immunity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Jung; Yoshimoto, Eri; Saijo, Shinobu; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Lin, Xin; Katz, Howard R; Kanaoka, Yoshihide; Barrett, Nora A

    2016-07-01

    The C-type lectin receptor Dectin-2 can trigger the leukotriene C4 synthase-dependent generation of cysteinyl leukotrienes and the caspase-associated recruitment domain 9- and NF-κB-dependent generation of cytokines, such as IL-23, IL-6, and TNF-α, to promote Th2 and Th17 immunity, respectively. Dectin-2 activation also elicits the type 2 cytokine IL-33, but the mechanism by which Dectin-2 induces these diverse innate mediators is poorly understood. In this study, we identify a common upstream requirement for PI3Kδ activity for the generation of each Dectin-2-dependent mediator elicited by the house dust mite species, Dermatophagoides farinae, using both pharmacologic inhibition and small interfering RNA knockdown of PI3Kδ in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. PI3Kδ activity depends on spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and regulates the activity of protein kinase Cδ, indicating that PI3Kδ is a proximal Syk-dependent signaling intermediate. Inhibition of PI3Kδ also reduces cysteinyl leukotrienes and cytokines elicited by Dectin-2 cross-linking, confirming the importance of this molecule in Dectin-2 signaling. Using an adoptive transfer model, we demonstrate that inhibition of PI3Kδ profoundly reduces the capacity of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells to sensitize recipient mice for Th2 and Th17 pulmonary inflammation in response to D. farinae Furthermore, administration of a PI3Kδ inhibitor during the sensitization of wild-type mice prevents the generation of D. farinae-induced pulmonary inflammation. These results demonstrate that PI3Kδ regulates Dectin-2 signaling and its dendritic cell function. PMID:27194783

  4. Bacterium-Generated Nitric Oxide Hijacks Host Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Signaling and Modulates the Host Cell Cycle In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mocca, Brian

    2012-01-01

    In mammalian cells, nitric oxide (NO·) is an important signal molecule with concentration-dependent and often controversial functions of promoting cell survival and inducing cell death. An inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in various mammalian cells produces higher levels of NO· from l-arginine upon infections to eliminate pathogens. In this study, we reveal novel pathogenic roles of NO· generated by bacteria in bacterium-host cell cocultures using Moraxella catarrhalis, a respiratory tract disease-causing bacterium, as a biological producer of NO·. We recently demonstrated that M. catarrhalis cells that express the nitrite reductase (AniA protein) can produce NO· by reducing nitrite. Our study suggests that, in the presence of pathophysiological levels of nitrite, this opportunistic pathogen hijacks host cell signaling and modulates host gene expression through its ability to produce NO· from nitrite. Bacterium-generated NO· significantly increases the secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and modulates the expression of apoptotic proteins, therefore triggering host cell programmed death partially through TNF-α signaling. Furthermore, our study reveals that bacterium-generated NO· stalls host cell division and directly results in the death of dividing cells by reducing the levels of an essential regulator of cell division. This study provides unique insight into why NO· may exert more severe cytotoxic effects on fast growing cells, providing an important molecular basis for NO·-mediated pathogenesis in infections and possible therapeutic applications of NO·-releasing molecules in tumorigenesis. This study strongly suggests that bacterium-generated NO· can play important pathogenic roles during infections. PMID:22636782

  5. Parameter estimation for compact binary coalescence signals with the first generation gravitational-wave detector network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S.; Bao, Y.; Barayoga, J. C. B.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Beck, D.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bouhou, B.; Braccini, S.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet–Castell, J.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, W.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colacino, C. N.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coulon, J.-P.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Daw, E. J.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Paolo Emilio, M.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorsher, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Endrőczi, G.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Farr, B. F.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franc, J.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M. A.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P. J.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Galimberti, M.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gáspár, M. E.; Gelencser, G.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Hayau, J.-F.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; James, E.; Jang, Y. J.; Jaranowski, P.; Jesse, E.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Kasprzack, M.; Kasturi, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufman, K.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Keresztes, Z.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, B. K.; Kim, C.; Kim, H.; Kim, K.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y. M.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kurdyumov, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Langley, A.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lawrie, C.; Lazzarini, A.; Le Roux, A.; Leaci, P.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Leonor, I.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Lhuillier, V.; Li, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Lindquist, P. E.; Litvine, V.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Logue, J.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macarthur, J.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morgia, A.; Mori, T.; Morriss, S. R.; Mosca, S.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow–Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nash, T.; Naticchioni, L.; Necula, V.; Nelson, J.; Neri, I.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nishizawa, A.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Oldenberg, R. G.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Page, A.; Palladino, L.; Palomba, C.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoletti, R.; Papa, M. A.; Parisi, M.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Persichetti, G.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pihlaja, M.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Poggiani, R.; Pöld, J.; Postiglione, F.; Poux, C.; Prato, M.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Quetschke, V.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Rankins, B.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Re, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Roberts, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, C.; Rodruck, M.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Röver, C.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Santostasi, G.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R. L.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaltev, M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Sintes, A. M.; Skelton, G. R.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Speirits, F. C.; Sperandio, L.; Stefszky, M.; Steinert, E.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Stroeer, A. S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sung, M.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Szeifert, G.; Tacca, M.; Taffarello, L.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; ter Braack, A. P. M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Thüring, A.; Titsler, C.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Torre, O.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Tournefier, E.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Tse, M.; Ugolini, D.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Putten, S.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vavoulidis, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Villar, A. E.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wanner, A.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yeaton-Massey, D.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; Zadrożny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2013-09-01

    Compact binary systems with neutron stars or black holes are one of the most promising sources for ground-based gravitational-wave detectors. Gravitational radiation encodes rich information about source physics; thus parameter estimation and model selection are crucial analysis steps for any detection candidate events. Detailed models of the anticipated waveforms enable inference on several parameters, such as component masses, spins, sky location and distance, that are essential for new astrophysical studies of these sources. However, accurate measurements of these parameters and discrimination of models describing the underlying physics are complicated by artifacts in the data, uncertainties in the waveform models and in the calibration of the detectors. Here we report such measurements on a selection of simulated signals added either in hardware or software to the data collected by the two LIGO instruments and the Virgo detector during their most recent joint science run, including a “blind injection” where the signal was not initially revealed to the collaboration. We exemplify the ability to extract information about the source physics on signals that cover the neutron-star and black-hole binary parameter space over the component mass range 1M⊙-25M⊙ and the full range of spin parameters. The cases reported in this study provide a snapshot of the status of parameter estimation in preparation for the operation of advanced detectors.

  6. Modification of lightning quasi-electrostatic signal by mesospheric halo generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, A. J.

    2014-06-01

    Current induced by the electrostatic component of lightning on a conductor exposed to the atmosphere was measured at 100 Hz by detectors at two sites in southern England. These detectors were separated by 120 km and capable of lightning detection to a range of approximately 100 km. Signals from the same flash detected by both receivers were generally of the same shape, as expected if the source was charge neutralisation by lightning of relatively small horizontal extent. For approximately 1% of flashes detected the signal shape received at both sites was considerably different, indicating that the small vertical dipole approximation was not sufficient to explain the detected charge reconfiguration during the flash. This discrepancy was explained by the addition of a short pulse of horizontally extensive charge above the flash, consistent with a mesospheric halo. The effect of this halo superimposed on the signal from the parent lightning is described. The observations support previous evidence that quasi-static current measurement can be used to identify flashes which produce halos and so complement existing optical halo detection instrumentation.

  7. Signal Analysis and Waveform Reconstruction of Shock Waves Generated by Underwater Electrical Wire Explosions with Piezoelectric Pressure Probes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibin; Zhang, Yongmin; Han, Ruoyu; Jing, Yan; Wu, Jiawei; Liu, Qiaojue; Ding, Weidong; Qiu, Aici

    2016-01-01

    Underwater shock waves (SWs) generated by underwater electrical wire explosions (UEWEs) have been widely studied and applied. Precise measurement of this kind of SWs is important, but very difficult to accomplish due to their high peak pressure, steep rising edge and very short pulse width (on the order of tens of μs). This paper aims to analyze the signals obtained by two kinds of commercial piezoelectric pressure probes, and reconstruct the correct pressure waveform from the distorted one measured by the pressure probes. It is found that both PCB138 and Müller-plate probes can be used to measure the relative SW pressure value because of their good uniformities and linearities, but none of them can obtain precise SW waveforms. In order to approach to the real SW signal better, we propose a new multi-exponential pressure waveform model, which has considered the faster pressure decay at the early stage and the slower pressure decay in longer times. Based on this model and the energy conservation law, the pressure waveform obtained by the PCB138 probe has been reconstructed, and the reconstruction accuracy has been verified by the signals obtained by the Müller-plate probe. Reconstruction results show that the measured SW peak pressures are smaller than the real signal. The waveform reconstruction method is both reasonable and reliable. PMID:27110789

  8. Signal Analysis and Waveform Reconstruction of Shock Waves Generated by Underwater Electrical Wire Explosions with Piezoelectric Pressure Probes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibin; Zhang, Yongmin; Han, Ruoyu; Jing, Yan; Wu, Jiawei; Liu, Qiaojue; Ding, Weidong; Qiu, Aici

    2016-01-01

    Underwater shock waves (SWs) generated by underwater electrical wire explosions (UEWEs) have been widely studied and applied. Precise measurement of this kind of SWs is important, but very difficult to accomplish due to their high peak pressure, steep rising edge and very short pulse width (on the order of tens of μs). This paper aims to analyze the signals obtained by two kinds of commercial piezoelectric pressure probes, and reconstruct the correct pressure waveform from the distorted one measured by the pressure probes. It is found that both PCB138 and Müller-plate probes can be used to measure the relative SW pressure value because of their good uniformities and linearities, but none of them can obtain precise SW waveforms. In order to approach to the real SW signal better, we propose a new multi-exponential pressure waveform model, which has considered the faster pressure decay at the early stage and the slower pressure decay in longer times. Based on this model and the energy conservation law, the pressure waveform obtained by the PCB138 probe has been reconstructed, and the reconstruction accuracy has been verified by the signals obtained by the Müller-plate probe. Reconstruction results show that the measured SW peak pressures are smaller than the real signal. The waveform reconstruction method is both reasonable and reliable. PMID:27110789

  9. Tree shoot bending generates hydraulic pressure pulses: a new long-distance signal?

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Rosana; Badel, Eric

    2014-01-01

    When tree stems are mechanically stimulated, a rapid long-distance signal is induced that slows down primary growth. An investigation was carried out to determine whether the signal might be borne by a mechanically induced pressure pulse in the xylem. Coupling xylem flow meters and pressure sensors with a mechanical testing device, the hydraulic effects of mechanical deformation of tree stem and branches were measured. Organs of several tree species were studied, including gymnosperms and angiosperms with different wood densities and anatomies. Bending had a negligible effect on xylem conductivity, even when deformations were sustained or were larger than would be encountered in nature. It was found that bending caused transient variation in the hydraulic pressure within the xylem of branch segments. This local transient increase in pressure in the xylem was rapidly propagated along the vascular system in planta to the upper and lower regions of the stem. It was shown that this hydraulic pulse originates from the apoplast. Water that was mobilized in the hydraulic pulses came from the saturated porous material of the conduits and their walls, suggesting that the poroelastic behaviour of xylem might be a key factor. Although likely to be a generic mechanical response, quantitative differences in the hydraulic pulse were found in different species, possibly related to differences in xylem anatomy. Importantly the hydraulic pulse was proportional to the strained volume, similar to known thigmomorphogenetic responses. It is hypothesized that the hydraulic pulse may be the signal that rapidly transmits mechanobiological information to leaves, roots, and apices. PMID:24558073

  10. Tree shoot bending generates hydraulic pressure pulses: a new long-distance signal?

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rosana; Badel, Eric; Peraudeau, Sebastien; Leblanc-Fournier, Nathalie; Beaujard, François; Julien, Jean-Louis; Cochard, Hervé; Moulia, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    When tree stems are mechanically stimulated, a rapid long-distance signal is induced that slows down primary growth. An investigation was carried out to determine whether the signal might be borne by a mechanically induced pressure pulse in the xylem. Coupling xylem flow meters and pressure sensors with a mechanical testing device, the hydraulic effects of mechanical deformation of tree stem and branches were measured. Organs of several tree species were studied, including gymnosperms and angiosperms with different wood densities and anatomies. Bending had a negligible effect on xylem conductivity, even when deformations were sustained or were larger than would be encountered in nature. It was found that bending caused transient variation in the hydraulic pressure within the xylem of branch segments. This local transient increase in pressure in the xylem was rapidly propagated along the vascular system in planta to the upper and lower regions of the stem. It was shown that this hydraulic pulse originates from the apoplast. Water that was mobilized in the hydraulic pulses came from the saturated porous material of the conduits and their walls, suggesting that the poroelastic behaviour of xylem might be a key factor. Although likely to be a generic mechanical response, quantitative differences in the hydraulic pulse were found in different species, possibly related to differences in xylem anatomy. Importantly the hydraulic pulse was proportional to the strained volume, similar to known thigmomorphogenetic responses. It is hypothesized that the hydraulic pulse may be the signal that rapidly transmits mechanobiological information to leaves, roots, and apices. PMID:24558073

  11. Transmission and full-band coherent detection of polarization-multiplexed all-optical Nyquist signals generated by Sinc-shaped Nyquist pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianjun; Chi, Nan

    2015-01-01

    All optical method is considered as a promising technique for high symbol rate Nyquist signal generation, which has attracted a lot of research interests for high spectral-efficiency and high-capacity optical communication system. In this paper, we extend our previous work and report the fully experimental demonstration of polarization-division multiplexed (PDM) all-optical Nyquist signal generation based on Sinc-shaped Nyquist pulse with advanced modulation formats, fiber-transmission and single-receiver full-band coherent detection. Using this scheme, we have successfully demonstrated the generation, fiber transmission and single-receiver full-band coherent detection of all-optical Nyquist PDM-QPSK and PDM-16QAM signals up to 125-GBaud. 1-Tb/s single-carrier PDM-16QAM signal generation and full-band coherent detection is realized, which shows the advantage and feasibility of the single-carrier all-optical Nyquist signals. PMID:26323238

  12. Transmission and full-band coherent detection of polarization-multiplexed all-optical Nyquist signals generated by Sinc-shaped Nyquist pulses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianjun; Chi, Nan

    2015-01-01

    All optical method is considered as a promising technique for high symbol rate Nyquist signal generation, which has attracted a lot of research interests for high spectral-efficiency and high-capacity optical communication system. In this paper, we extend our previous work and report the fully experimental demonstration of polarization-division multiplexed (PDM) all-optical Nyquist signal generation based on Sinc-shaped Nyquist pulse with advanced modulation formats, fiber-transmission and single-receiver full-band coherent detection. Using this scheme, we have successfully demonstrated the generation, fiber transmission and single-receiver full-band coherent detection of all-optical Nyquist PDM-QPSK and PDM-16QAM signals up to 125-GBaud. 1-Tb/s single-carrier PDM-16QAM signal generation and full-band coherent detection is realized, which shows the advantage and feasibility of the single-carrier all-optical Nyquist signals. PMID:26323238

  13. Transmission and full-band coherent detection of polarization-multiplexed all-optical Nyquist signals generated by Sinc-shaped Nyquist pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianjun; Chi, Nan

    2015-09-01

    All optical method is considered as a promising technique for high symbol rate Nyquist signal generation, which has attracted a lot of research interests for high spectral-efficiency and high-capacity optical communication system. In this paper, we extend our previous work and report the fully experimental demonstration of polarization-division multiplexed (PDM) all-optical Nyquist signal generation based on Sinc-shaped Nyquist pulse with advanced modulation formats, fiber-transmission and single-receiver full-band coherent detection. Using this scheme, we have successfully demonstrated the generation, fiber transmission and single-receiver full-band coherent detection of all-optical Nyquist PDM-QPSK and PDM-16QAM signals up to 125-GBaud. 1-Tb/s single-carrier PDM-16QAM signal generation and full-band coherent detection is realized, which shows the advantage and feasibility of the single-carrier all-optical Nyquist signals.

  14. Characterisation and measurement of signals generated by DVB-H 'GAP-filler' repeaters.

    PubMed

    Baldini, M; Barellini, A; Bogi, L; Licitra, G; Silvi, A M; Zari, A

    2009-12-01

    DVB-H (Digital Video Broadcasting Handheld) is the standard developed by DVB Project and approved by ETSI with the aim of providing the reception of DVB signals even in mobility but also data transfers and multimedia services. The introduction and development of the DVB-H system is still ongoing. In this context, this work focuses on the temporal trend of electromagnetic impact of an urban DVB-H repeater (called 'gap-filler') for exposure assessment purposes; it also describes a method for its measurement by means of narrow band instrumental chains. PMID:19858162

  15. Electronic constant current and current pulse signal generator for nuclear instrumentation testing

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Roger A.

    1994-01-01

    Circuitry for testing the ability of an intermediate range nuclear instrut to detect and measure a constant current and a periodic current pulse. The invention simulates the resistance and capacitance of the signal connection of a nuclear instrument ion chamber detector and interconnecting cable. An LED flasher/oscillator illuminates an LED at a periodic rate established by a timing capacitor and circuitry internal to the flasher/oscillator. When the LED is on, a periodic current pulse is applied to the instrument. When the LED is off, a constant current is applied. An inductor opposes battery current flow when the LED is on.

  16. Electronic constant current and current pulse signal generator for nuclear instrumentation testing

    DOEpatents

    Brown, R.A.

    1994-04-19

    Circuitry is described for testing the ability of an intermediate range nuclear instrument to detect and measure a constant current and a periodic current pulse. The invention simulates the resistance and capacitance of the signal connection of a nuclear instrument ion chamber detector and interconnecting cable. An LED flasher/oscillator illuminates an LED at a periodic rate established by a timing capacitor and circuitry internal to the flasher/oscillator. When the LED is on, a periodic current pulse is applied to the instrument. When the LED is off, a constant current is applied. An inductor opposes battery current flow when the LED is on. 1 figures.

  17. Discussion about generation mechanisms of third-order nonlinear signals in surface acoustic wave resonators based on simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Ryo; Suzuki, Takanao; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Kyoya, Haruki; Nako, Katsuhiro; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss the generation mechanisms of third-order nonlinearity in surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices on the basis of simulation results, which are obtained by a proposed method for this discussion. First, eight nonlinear terms are introduced to the piezoelectric constitutive equations, and nonlinear stress and electric flux fields are estimated using linear strain and electric fields calculated by a linear analysis, i.e., the coupling of mode simulation. Then, their contributions are embedded as voltage and current sources, respectively, in an equivalent circuit model, and nonlinear signals appearing at external ports are estimated. It is shown that eight coefficients of the nonlinear terms can be determined from a series of experiments carried out at various driving and resulting frequencies. This is because the effect of each nonlinear term on the nonlinear signal outputs changes markedly with the conditions. When the coefficients are determined properly, the simulations agree well with some measurement results under various conditions.

  18. 25 Gbit/s differential phase-shift-keying signal generation using directly modulated quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeghuzi, A. Schmeckebier, H.; Stubenrauch, M.; Bimberg, D.; Meuer, C.; Schubert, C.; Bunge, C.-A.

    2015-05-25

    Error-free generation of 25-Gbit/s differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) signals via direct modulation of InAs quantum-dot (QD) based semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is experimentally demonstrated with an input power level of −5 dBm. The QD SOAs emit in the 1.3-μm wavelength range and provide a small-signal fiber-to-fiber gain of 8 dB. Furthermore, error-free DPSK modulation is achieved for constant optical input power levels from 3 dBm down to only −11 dBm for a bit rate of 20 Gbit/s. Direct phase modulation of QD SOAs via current changes is thus demonstrated to be much faster than direct gain modulation.

  19. Low-Level Space Optimization of an AES Implementation for a Bit-Serial Fully Pipelined Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Raphael; Rettberg, Achim

    A previously developed AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) implementation is optimized and described in this paper. The special architecture for which this implementation is targeted comprises synchronous and systematic bit-serial processing without a central controlling instance. In order to shrink the design in terms of logic utilization we deeply analyzed the architecture and the AES implementation to identify the most costly logic elements. We propose to merge certain parts of the logic to achieve better area efficiency. The approach was integrated into an existing synthesis tool which we used to produce synthesizable VHDL code. For testing purposes, we simulated the generated VHDL code and ran tests on an FPGA board.

  20. Photometric variability of the Herbig Ae star HD 37806

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucinski, S. M.; Zwintz, K.; Hareter, M.; Pojmański, G.; Kuschnig, R.; Matthews, J. M.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2010-11-01

    Context. The more massive counterparts of T Tauri stars, the Herbig Ae/Be stars, are known to vary in a complex way with no variability mechanism clearly identified. Aims: We attempt to characterize the optical variability of HD 37806 (MWC 120) on time scales ranging between minutes and several years. Methods: A continuous, one-minute resolution, 21 day-long sequence of MOST (Microvariability & Oscillations of STars) satellite observations has been analyzed using wavelet, scalegram and dispersion analysis tools. The MOST data have been augmented by sparse observations over 9 seasons from ASAS (All Sky Automated Survey), by previously non-analyzed ESO (European Southern Observatory) data partly covering 3 seasons and by archival measurements dating back half a century ago. Results: Mutually superimposed flares or accretion instabilities grow in size from about 0.0003 of the mean flux on a time scale of minutes to a peak-to-peak range of <0.05 on a time scale of a few years. The resulting variability has properties of stochastic “red” noise, whose self-similar characteristics are very similar to those observed in cataclysmic binary stars, but with much longer characteristic time scales of hours to days (rather than minutes) and with amplitudes which appear to cease growing in size on time scales of tens of years. In addition to chaotic brightness variations combined with stochastic noise, the MOST data show a weakly defined cyclic signal with a period of about 1.5 days, which may correspond to the rotation of the star. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna, and on data from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) conducted by the Warsaw University Observatory, Warsaw, Poland at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  1. TGF-beta signalling in the adult neurogenic niche promotes stem cell quiescence as well as generation of new neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Mahesh; Lehner, Bernadette; Kraus, Sabrina; Sander, Paul Ramm; Marschallinger, Julia; Rivera, Francisco J; Trümbach, Dietrich; Ueberham, Uwe; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Strauss, Olaf; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Aigner, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family govern a wide range of mechanisms in brain development and in the adult, in particular neuronal/glial differentiation and survival, but also cell cycle regulation and neural stem cell maintenance. This clearly created some discrepancies in the field with some studies favouring neuronal differentiation/survival of progenitors and others favouring cell cycle exit and neural stem cell quiescence/maintenance. Here, we provide a unifying hypothesis claiming that through its regulation of neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation, TGF-β signalling might be responsible for (i) maintaining stem cells in a quiescent stage, and (ii) promoting survival of newly generated neurons and their functional differentiation. Therefore, we performed a detailed histological analysis of TGF-β1 signalling in the hippocampal neural stem cell niche of a transgenic mouse that was previously generated to express TGF-β1 under a tetracycline regulatable Ca-Calmodulin kinase promoter. We also analysed NPC proliferation, quiescence, neuronal survival and differentiation in relation to elevated levels of TGF-β1 in vitro and in vivo conditions. Finally, we performed a gene expression profiling to identify the targets of TGF-β1 signalling in adult NPCs. The results demonstrate that TGF-β1 promotes stem cell quiescence on one side, but also neuronal survival on the other side. Thus, considering the elevated levels of TGF-β1 in ageing and neurodegenerative diseases, TGF-β1 signalling presents a molecular target for future interventions in such conditions. PMID:24779367

  2. TGF-beta signalling in the adult neurogenic niche promotes stem cell quiescence as well as generation of new neurons.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Mahesh; Lehner, Bernadette; Kraus, Sabrina; Sander, Paul Ramm; Marschallinger, Julia; Rivera, Francisco J; Trümbach, Dietrich; Ueberham, Uwe; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Strauss, Olaf; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Aigner, Ludwig

    2014-07-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family govern a wide range of mechanisms in brain development and in the adult, in particular neuronal/glial differentiation and survival, but also cell cycle regulation and neural stem cell maintenance. This clearly created some discrepancies in the field with some studies favouring neuronal differentiation/survival of progenitors and others favouring cell cycle exit and neural stem cell quiescence/maintenance. Here, we provide a unifying hypothesis claiming that through its regulation of neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation, TGF-β signalling might be responsible for (i) maintaining stem cells in a quiescent stage, and (ii) promoting survival of newly generated neurons and their functional differentiation. Therefore, we performed a detailed histological analysis of TGF-β1 signalling in the hippocampal neural stem cell niche of a transgenic mouse that was previously generated to express TGF-β1 under a tetracycline regulatable Ca-Calmodulin kinase promoter. We also analysed NPC proliferation, quiescence, neuronal survival and differentiation in relation to elevated levels of TGF-β1 in vitro and in vivo conditions. Finally, we performed a gene expression profiling to identify the targets of TGF-β1 signalling in adult NPCs. The results demonstrate that TGF-β1 promotes stem cell quiescence on one side, but also neuronal survival on the other side. Thus, considering the elevated levels of TGF-β1 in ageing and neurodegenerative diseases, TGF-β1 signalling presents a molecular target for future interventions in such conditions. PMID:24779367

  3. Evaluation of anticipatory signal to steam generator pressure control program for 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pahari, S.; Hajela, S.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G.

    2012-07-01

    700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) is horizontal channel type reactor with partial boiling at channel outlet. Due to boiling, it has a large volume of vapor present in the primary loops. It has two primary loops connected with the help of pressurizer surge line. The pressurizer has a large capacity and is partly filled by liquid and partly by vapor. Large vapor volume improves compressibility of the system. During turbine trip or load rejection, pressure builds up in Steam Generator (SG). This leads to pressurization of Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS). To control pressurization of SG and PHTS, around 70% of the steam generated in SG is dumped into the condenser by opening Condenser Steam Dump Valves (CSDVs) and rest of the steam is released to the atmosphere by opening Atmospheric Steam Discharge Valves (ASDVs) immediately after sensing the event. This is accomplished by adding anticipatory signal to the output of SG pressure controller. Anticipatory signal is proportional to the thermal power of reactor and the proportionality constant is set so that SG pressure controller's output jacks up to ASDV opening range when operating at 100% FP. To simulate this behavior for 700 MWe IPHWR, Primary and secondary heat transport system is modeled. SG pressure control and other process control program have also been modeled to capture overall plant dynamics. Analysis has been carried out with 3-D neutron kinetics coupled thermal hydraulic computer code ATMIKA.T to evaluate the effect of the anticipatory signal on PHT pressure and over all plant dynamics during turbine trip in 700 MWe IPHWR. This paper brings out the results of the analysis with and without considering anticipatory signal in SG pressure control program during turbine trip. (authors)

  4. Early, local motion signals generate directional preferences in depth ordering of transparent motion.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Alexander C; Mamassian, Pascal

    2016-08-01

    Superposition of two dot clouds moving in different directions results in the perception of two transparent layers. Despite the ambiguous depth order of the layers, there are consistent preferences to perceive the layer, which is moving either rightward or downward in front of the other layer. Here we investigated the origin of these depth order biases. For this purpose, we measured the interaction with stereoscopic disparity and the influence of global and local motion properties. Motion direction and stereoscopic disparity were equally effective in determining depth order at a disparity of one arcmin. Global motion properties, such as the aperture location in the visual field or the aperture's motion direction did not affect directional biases. Local motion properties however were effective. When the moving elements were oriented lines rather than dots, the directional biases were shifted towards the direction orthogonal to the lines rather than the actual motion direction of the lines. Therefore, depth order was determined before the aperture problem was fully resolved. Varying the duration of the stimuli, we found that the time constant of the aperture problem was much lower for depth order than for perceived motion direction. Altogether, our results indicate that depth order is determined in one shot on the basis of an early motion signal, while perceived motion direction is continuously updated. Thus, depth ordering in transparent motion appears to be a surprisingly fast process, that relies on early, local motion signals and that precedes high-level motion analysis. PMID:27580044

  5. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase Generation of Electrophilic Lipid Signaling Mediators from Hydroxy Ω-3 Fatty Acids*

    PubMed Central

    Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Wenzel, Sally; Sobol, Robert W.; Holguin, Fernando; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15PGDH) is the primary enzyme catalyzing the conversion of hydroxylated arachidonic acid species to their corresponding oxidized metabolites. The oxidation of hydroxylated fatty acids, such as the conversion of prostaglandin (PG) E2 to 15-ketoPGE2, by 15PGDH is viewed to inactivate signaling responses. In contrast, the typically electrophilic products can also induce anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative responses. This study determined that hydroxylated docosahexaenoic acid metabolites (HDoHEs) are substrates for 15PGDH. Examination of 15PGDH substrate specificity was conducted in cell culture (A549 and primary human airway epithelia and alveolar macrophages) using chemical inhibition and shRNA knockdown of 15PGDH. Substrate specificity is broad and relies on the carbon position of the acyl chain hydroxyl group. 14-HDoHE was determined to be the optimal DHA substrate for 15PGDH, resulting in the formation of its electrophilic metabolite, 14-oxoDHA. Consistent with this, 14-HDoHE was detected in bronchoalveolar lavage cells of mild to moderate asthmatics, and the exogenous addition of 14-oxoDHA to primary alveolar macrophages inhibited LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression. These data reveal that 15PGDH-derived DHA metabolites are biologically active and can contribute to the salutary signaling actions of Ω-3 fatty acids. PMID:25586183

  6. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase generation of electrophilic lipid signaling mediators from hydroxy ω-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Wenzel, Sally; Sobol, Robert W; Holguin, Fernando; Freeman, Bruce A

    2015-02-27

    15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15PGDH) is the primary enzyme catalyzing the conversion of hydroxylated arachidonic acid species to their corresponding oxidized metabolites. The oxidation of hydroxylated fatty acids, such as the conversion of prostaglandin (PG) E2 to 15-ketoPGE2, by 15PGDH is viewed to inactivate signaling responses. In contrast, the typically electrophilic products can also induce anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative responses. This study determined that hydroxylated docosahexaenoic acid metabolites (HDoHEs) are substrates for 15PGDH. Examination of 15PGDH substrate specificity was conducted in cell culture (A549 and primary human airway epithelia and alveolar macrophages) using chemical inhibition and shRNA knockdown of 15PGDH. Substrate specificity is broad and relies on the carbon position of the acyl chain hydroxyl group. 14-HDoHE was determined to be the optimal DHA substrate for 15PGDH, resulting in the formation of its electrophilic metabolite, 14-oxoDHA. Consistent with this, 14-HDoHE was detected in bronchoalveolar lavage cells of mild to moderate asthmatics, and the exogenous addition of 14-oxoDHA to primary alveolar macrophages inhibited LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression. These data reveal that 15PGDH-derived DHA metabolites are biologically active and can contribute to the salutary signaling actions of Ω-3 fatty acids. PMID:25586183

  7. Anomalous diffusion in nonhomogeneous media: Power spectral density of signals generated by time-subordinated nonlinear Langevin equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakevičius, R.; Ruseckas, J.

    2015-11-01

    Subdiffusive behavior of one-dimensional stochastic systems can be described by time-subordinated Langevin equations. The corresponding probability density satisfies the time-fractional Fokker-Planck equations. In the homogeneous systems the power spectral density of the signals generated by such Langevin equations has power-law dependency on the frequency with the exponent smaller than 1. In this paper we consider nonhomogeneous systems and show that in such systems the power spectral density can have power-law behavior with the exponent equal to or larger than 1 in a wide range of intermediate frequencies.

  8. Demonstration of high-speed quadrature phase shift keying vector signal generation employing a single Mach-Zehnder modulator with phase precoding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanyi; Li, Xinying; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    We numerically and experimentally investigate high-speed quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) vector signal generation based on a single Mach-Zehnder intensity modulator employing a precoding technique. We experimentally demonstrate 16-Gbaud QPSK vector signal generation at 16-GHz carrier adopting optical carrier suppression with precoding technique, and it is the highest baud rate generated by this technology. The 16-Gbaud QPSK modulated vector signal is delivered over a 20-km large effective area fiber or 2-km single-mode fiber with a bit-error-rate less than the hard-decision forward-error-correction threshold of 3.8×10-3.

  9. Second generation biological signal processor. Final progress report, February 15, 1993--February 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The Biological Information Signal Processor (BISP) is a VLSI ASIC implementation of the dynamic programming methods favored for direct sequence-to-sequence comparison in order to discover local as well as global similarities. These methods, based on the local algorithm of Smith and Waterman provide the most mathematically robust solution to the problem of sequence alignment (determination of the optimal character-to-character registration between the two sequence, including relative insertions and deletions, indels). BISP provides a complete implementation of the standard Smith and Waterman algorithm in a systolic array that allows full parameterization and several novel extensions to the algorithm. BISP operates at supercomputer speeds from a VME board on a Sun workstation. Each VME array provides a complete systolic pipeline for comparison and multiple arrays can be combined linearly in order to increase the pipeline length. Overall performance is a function of the IO speed of the pipelined disk-resident data and the length of the array.

  10. Detection, Evaluation, and Optimization of Optical Signals Generated by Fiber Optic Bragg Gratings Under Dynamic Excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Lekki, John; Lock, James A.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic response of a fiber optic Bragg grating to mechanical vibrations is examined both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical expressions describing the consequences of changes in the grating's reflection spectrum are derived for partially coherent beams in an interferometer. The analysis is given in terms of the dominant wavelength, optical bandwidth, and optical path difference of the interfering signals. Changes in the reflection spectrum caused by a periodic stretching and compression of the grating were experimentally measured using an unbalanced Michelson interferometer, a Michelson interferometer with a non-zero optical path difference. The interferometer's sensitivity to changes in dominant wavelength of the interfering beams was measured as a function of interferometer unbalance and was compared to theoretical predictions. The theoretical analysis enables the user to determine the optimum performance for an unbalanced interferometer.

  11. Acoustic signals generated in piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate elements by direct bombardment with xenon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyachi, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Kuraza, G.; Fujii, M.; Nagashima, A.; Hasebe, N.; Kobayashi, M. N.; Kobayashi, S.; Miyajima, M.; Mori, K.; Okudaira, O.; Yamashita, N.; Shibata, H.; Murakami, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Okada, N.

    2006-12-01

    Acoustic signals were observed with a lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) element that was directly irradiated with a 368 MeV/n xenon beam. Using an array comprising PZT elements, the energy loss in the PZT was studied. These elements are sensitive to an energy deposit of 100 nJ. A series of values of output voltage vs. integrated thickness of PZT was represented along a line similar to the ionization loss calculated by the Bethe-Bloch formula. The induced voltage was attributed to several processes—ionization, thermal, elastic, and piezoelectric processes. This study describes the possible applications of the PZT element as an active medium for calorimeters and a monitor for hypervelocity impact of space dust.

  12. A scaling relationship between AE and natural earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimitsu, N.; Kawakata, H.; Takahashi, N.

    2013-12-01

    Micro fracture which occurs during rock fracture experiments are called acoustic emission (AE), and it help us to understand detailed processes of fault growth. However, it was unclear whether AE can be considered as a small earthquake or not. Usually, the seismic moment and the corner frequency are used for characterizing source property. It has been reported that the seismic moment is inversely proportional to the cube of corner frequency for natural earthquakes (with magnitude higher than ~ -4). In this study, we examine continuity of this relationship toward smaller magnitude of AE (around magnitude -8), estimating the source parameters of AE. Previously, it was impossible to record AE waveforms by broadband transducers under tri-axial conditions due to lack of pressure seal mechanism. Here we achieved protection of broadband transducers to use them under high pressure environments. This achievement enabled us to do spectral analysis of AE. At the same time, we also achieved multi-channel continuous recording with a high sampling rate, so as not to miss some events smaller than threshold or hide some events behind the mask times by triggered recording. We prepared a cylindrical Westerly granite sample, 50 mm in diameter and 100 mm in height. Sealed nine broadband transducers (sensitive range; 100 kHz - 2000 kHz) were attached on the sample surface. High sampling recording as 20 MS/s per channel was continued, during tri-axial loading (confining pressure: 10 MPa) which was continued to be controlled even after the peak strength. More than 6000 hypocenters were estimated from all pick data during the experiment. We clustered events around the peak strength, so that their differences of hypocenter locations were shorter than 2 mm and their cross correlation values for more than four channels were higher than 0.8. Then, we analyzed two of the largest clusters. After calibrating transducer response, we obtained displacement spectra for S waves, and estimated their

  13. Sensitive SERS detection of DNA methyltransferase by target triggering primer generation-based multiple signal amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yu, Chuanfeng; Han, Huixia; Zhao, Caisheng; Zhang, Xiaoru

    2016-07-15

    A novel and sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) method is proposed for the assay of DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity and evaluation of inhibitors by developing a target triggering primer generation-based multiple signal amplification strategy. By using of a duplex substrate for Dam MTase, two hairpin templates and a Raman probe, multiple signal amplification mode is achieved. Once recognized by Dam MTase, the duplex substrate can be cleaved by Dpn I endonuclease and two primers are released for triggering the multiple signal amplification reaction. Consequently, a wide dynamic range and remarkably high sensitivity are obtained under isothermal conditions. The detection limit is 2.57×10(-4)UmL(-1). This assay exhibits an excellent selectivity and is successfully applied in the screening of inhibitors for Dam MTase. In addition, this novel sensing system is potentially universal as the recognition element can be conveniently designed for other target analytes by changing the substrate of DNA MTase. PMID:26926592

  14. Optogenetic drive of neocortical pyramidal neurons generates fMRI signals that are correlated with spiking activity

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, I.; Knoblich, U.; Desai, M.; Bernstein, J.; Graybiel, A.M.; Boyden, E.S.; Buckner, R.L.; Moore, C.I.

    2013-01-01

    Local fluctuations in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal serve as the basis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Understanding the correlation between distinct aspects of neural activity and the BOLD response is fundamental to the interpretation of this widely used mapping signal. Analysis of this question requires the ability to precisely manipulate the activity of defined neurons. To achieve such control, we combined optogenetic drive of neocortical neurons with high-resolution (9.4 T) rodent fMRI and detailed analysis of neurophysiological data. Light-driven activation of pyramidal neurons resulted in a positive BOLD response at the stimulated site. To help differentiate the neurophysiological correlate(s) of the BOLD response, we employed light trains of the same average frequency, but with periodic and Poisson distributed pulse times. These different types of pulse trains generated dissociable patterns of single-unit, multi-unit and local field potential (LFP) activity, and of BOLD signals. The BOLD activity exhibited the strongest correlation to spiking activity with increasing rates of stimulation, and, to a first approximation, was linear with pulse delivery rate, while LFP activity showed a weaker correlation. These data provide an example of a strong correlation between spike rate and the BOLD response. PMID:23523914

  15. Perturbations of GPS signals by the ionospheric irregularities generated due to HF-heating at triple of electron gyrofrequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milikh, Gennady; Gurevich, Alex; Zybin, Kiril; Secan, Jim

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this letter is to present the first experimental evidence of perturbations of GPS signals by the electron density irregularities caused by the HF-heating of the F2 region of the ionosphere. The experiments were conducted using the HAARP heater having the radiating frequency f which matches 3 f B , i.e., triple the local electron gyro frequency. Such frequency is expected to generate super small irregularities of the electron density which can scatter GPS signals. It was found that the differential phase of the probe GPS signals changed abruptly in about 10 s after the start of the HF-heating, and then oscillated with the heating period 20 s. The oscillations lasted for 4-5 minutes and then disappeared, presumably when the resonance condition f = 3 f B was not satisfied, although the HF-heating continued. The phase oscillations indicate the presence of small scale irregularities of the electron density caused by the HF-heating at the frequency matching 3 f B .

  16. Border collision bifurcations and power spectral density of chaotic signals generated by one-dimensional discontinuous piecewise linear maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feltekh, Kais; Jemaa, Zouhair Ben; Fournier-Prunaret, Danièle; Belghith, Safya

    2014-08-01

    Recently, many papers have appeared which study the power spectral density (PSD) of signals issued from some specific maps. This interest in the PSD is due to the importance of frequency in the telecommunications and transmission security. With the large number of wireless systems, the availability of frequencies for transmission and reception is increasingly uncommon for wireless communications. Also, guided media have limitations related to the bandwidth of a signal. In this paper, we investigate some properties associated to the border-collision bifurcations in a one-dimensional piecewise-linear map with three slopes and two parameters. We derive analytical expressions for the autocorrelation sequence, power spectral density (PSD) of chaotic signals generated by our piecewise-linear map. We prove the existence of strong relation between different types of the power spectral density (low-pass, high-pass or band-stop) and the parameters. We also find a relation between the type of spectrum and the order of attractive cycles which are located after the border collision bifurcation between chaos and cycles.

  17. Brain-Generated Estradiol Drives Long-Term Optimization of Auditory Coding to Enhance the Discrimination of Communication Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tremere, Liisa A.; Pinaud, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    Auditory processing and hearing-related pathologies are heavily influenced by steroid hormones in a variety of vertebrate species including humans. The hormone estradiol has been recently shown to directly modulate the gain of central auditory neurons, in real-time, by controlling the strength of inhibitory transmission via a non-genomic mechanism. The functional relevance of this modulation, however, remains unknown. Here we show that estradiol generated in the songbird homologue of the mammalian auditory association cortex, rapidly enhances the effectiveness of the neural coding of complex, learned acoustic signals in awake zebra finches. Specifically, estradiol increases mutual information rates, coding efficiency and the neural discrimination of songs. These effects are mediated by estradiol’s modulation of both rate and temporal coding of auditory signals. Interference with the local action or production of estradiol in the auditory forebrain of freely-behaving animals disrupts behavioral responses to songs, but not to other behaviorally-relevant communication signals. Our findings directly show that estradiol is a key regulator of auditory function in the adult vertebrate brain. PMID:21368039

  18. Dual-primer self-generation SERS signal amplification assay for PDGF-BB using label-free aptamer.

    PubMed

    Ye, SuJuan; Zhai, XiaoMo; Wu, YanYing; Kuang, ShaoPing

    2016-05-15

    Highly sensitive detection of proteins, especially those associated with cancers, is essential to biomedical research as well as clinical diagnosis. In this work, a simple and novel one-two-three signal amplification surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) method for the detection of protein is fabricated by using label-free aptamer and dual-primer self-generation. Platelet-derived growth factor B-chain (PDGF-BB) is selected as the model protein. The one-two-three cascade DNA amplification means one target-aptamer binding event, two hairpin DNA switches and three DNA amplification reactions. This strategy possesses some remarkable features compared to conventional signal amplification methods: (i) A smart probe including a label-free aptamer is fabricated, for suitable hybridization without hindering the affinity of the aptamer toward its target. (ii) Using the unique structure switch of the aptamer and cooperator, a one-two-three working mode is developed to amplify the SERS signal. The amplification efficiency is enhanced. Given the unique and attractive characteristics, a simple and universal strategy is designed to accomplish ultrasensitive detection of proteins. The detection limit of PDGF-BB via SERS detection is 0.42 pM, with the linear range from 1.0×10(-12)M to 10(-8)M. It is potentially universal because the aptamer can be easily designed for biomolecules whose aptamers undergo similar conformational changes. PMID:26703991

  19. Applications of high resolution ICP-AES in the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.G.; Giglio, J.J.; Goodall, P.S.; Cummings, D.G.

    1998-07-01

    Application of high resolution ICP-AES to selected problems of importance in the nuclear industry is a growing field. The advantages in sample preparation time, waste minimization and equipment cost are considerable. Two examples of these advantages are presented in this paper, burnup analysis of spent fuel and analysis of major uranium isotopes. The determination of burnup, an indicator of fuel cycle efficiency, has been accomplished by the determination of {sup 139}La by high resolution inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (HR-ICP-AES). Solutions of digested samples of reactor fuel rods were introduced into a shielded glovebox housing an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and the resulting atomic emission transmitted to a high resolution spectrometer by a 31 meter fiber optic bundle. Total and isotopic U determination by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is presented to allow for the calculation of burnup for the samples. This method of burnup determination reduces the time, material, sample handling and waste generated associated with typical burnup determinations which require separation of lanthanum from the other fission products with high specific activities. Work concerning an alternative burnup indicator, {sup 236}U, is also presented for comparison. The determination of {sup 235}U:{sup 238}U isotope ratios in U-Zr fuel alloys is also presented to demonstrate the versatility of HR-ICP-AES.

  20. Towards leakage resiliency: memristor-based AES design for differential power attack mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khedkar, Ganesh; Donahue, Colin; Kudithipudi, Dhireesha

    2014-05-01

    Side-channel attacks (SCAs), specifically differential power attacks (DPA), target hardware vulnerabilities of cryptosystems. Next generation computing systems, integrated with emerging technologies such as RRAM, offer unique opportunities to mitigate DPAs with their inherent device characteristics. We propose two different approaches to mitigate DPA attacks using memristive hardware. The first approach, obfuscates the power profile using dual RRAM modules. The power profile stays almost uniform for any given data access. This is achieved by realizing a memory and its complementary module in RRAM hardware. Balancing logic, which ensures the parallel access, is implemented in CMOS. The power consumed with the dual-RRAM balancing is an order lower than the corresponding pure CMOS implementation. The second exploratory approach, uses a novel neuromemristive architecture to compute an AES transformation and mitigate DPAs. Both the proposed approaches were tested on a 128-bit AES algorithm. A customized simulation framework, integrating CAD tools, is developed to mount the DPA attacks. In both the designs, the attack mounted on the baseline architectures (CMOS only) was successful and full key was recovered. However, DPA attacks mounted on the dual RRAM modules and neuromemristive hardware modules of an AES cryptoprocessor yielded no successful keys, demonstrating their resiliency to DPA attacks.

  1. C-Myc regulation by costimulatory signals modulates the generation of CD8+ memory T cells during viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Mohammad; Song, Jianyong; Fino, Kristin; Wang, Youfei; Sandhu, Praneet; Song, Xinmeng; Norbury, Christopher; Ni, Bing; Fang, Deyu; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Song, Jianxun

    2016-01-01

    The signalling mechanisms of costimulation in the development of memory T cells remain to be clarified. Here, we show that the transcription factor c-Myc in CD8+ T cells is controlled by costimulatory molecules, which modulates the development of memory CD8+ T cells. C-Myc expression was dramatically reduced in Cd28−/− or Ox40−/− memory CD8+ T cells, and c-Myc over-expression substantially reversed the defects in the development of T-cell memory following viral infection. C-Myc regulated the expression of survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis, which promoted the generation of virus-specific memory CD8+ T cells. Moreover, over-expression of survivin with bcl-xL, a downstream molecule of NF-κB and intracellular target of costimulation that controls survival, in Cd28−/− or Ox40−/− CD8+ T cells, reversed the defects in the generation of memory T cells in response to viral infection. These results identify c-Myc as a key controller of memory CD8+ T cells from costimulatory signals. PMID:26791245

  2. Quantifying internally generated and externally forced climate signals at regional scales in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Kewei; Zhang, Xuebin; Church, John A.; Hu, Jianyu

    2015-11-01

    The Earth's climate evolves because of both internal variability and external forcings. Using Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models, here we quantify the ratio of externally forced variance to total variance on interannual and longer time scales for regional surface air temperature (SAT) and sea level, which depends on the relative strength of externally forced signal compared to internal variability. The highest ratios are found in tropical areas for SAT but at high latitudes for sea level over the historical period when ocean dynamics and global mean thermosteric contributions are considered. Averaged globally, the ratios over a fixed time interval (e.g., 30 years) are projected to increase during the 21st century under the business-as-usual scenario (RCP8.5). In contrast, under two mitigation scenarios (RCP2.6 and RCP4.5), the ratio declines sharply by the end of the 21st century for SAT, but only declines slightly or stabilizes for sea level, indicating a slower response of sea level to climate mitigation.

  3. Comparative analysis of brain EEG signals generated from the right and left hand while writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardesai, Neha; Jamali Mahabadi, S. E.; Meng, Qinglei; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides a comparative analysis of right handed people and left handed people when they write with both their hands. Two left handed and one right handed subject were asked to write their respective names on a paper using both, their left and right handed, and their brain signals were measured using EEG. Similarly, they were asked to perform simple mathematical calculations using both their hand. The data collected from the EEG from writing with both hands is compared. It is observed that though it is expected that the right brain only would contribute to left handed writing and vice versa, it is not so. When a right handed person writes with his/her left hand, the initial instinct is to go for writing with the right hand. Hence, both parts of the brain are active when a subject writes with the other hand. However, when the activity is repeated, the brain learns to expect to write with the other hand as the activity is repeated and then only the expected part of the brain is active.

  4. Paralog of the formylglycine-generating enzyme--retention in the endoplasmic reticulum by canonical and noncanonical signals.

    PubMed

    Gande, Santosh Lakshmi; Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Schmidt, Bernhard; Pringle, Thomas H; von Figura, Kurt; Dierks, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    Formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE) catalyzes in newly synthesized sulfatases the oxidation of a specific cysteine residue to formylglycine, which is the catalytic residue required for sulfate ester hydrolysis. This post-translational modification occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and is an essential step in the biogenesis of this enzyme family. A paralog of FGE (pFGE) also localizes to the ER. It shares many properties with FGE, but lacks formylglycine-generating activity. There is evidence that FGE and pFGE act in concert, possibly by forming complexes with sulfatases and one another. Here we show that human pFGE, but not FGE, is retained in the ER through its C-terminal tetrapeptide PGEL, a noncanonical variant of the classic KDEL ER-retention signal. Surprisingly, PGEL, although having two nonconsensus residues (PG), confers efficient ER retention when fused to a secretory protein. Inducible coexpression of pFGE at different levels in FGE-expressing cells did not significantly influence the kinetics of FGE secretion, suggesting that pFGE is not a retention factor for FGE in vivo. PGEL is accessible at the surface of the pFGE structure. It is found in 21 mammalian species with available pFGE sequences. Other species carry either canonical signals (eight mammals and 26 nonmammals) or different noncanonical variants (six mammals and six nonmammals). Among the latter, SGEL was tested and found to also confer ER retention. Although evolutionarily conserved for mammalian pFGE, the PGEL signal is found only in one further human protein entering the ER. Its consequences for KDEL receptor-mediated ER retrieval and benefit for pFGE functionality remain to be fully resolved. PMID:18266766

  5. A study of signal generation and charge collection in a-Si:H diodes for radiation imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Fujieda, I.

    1990-10-01

    Its high radiation resistivity and large-area capability are the expected advantages of this material together with its ability to provide a front-end readout electronics in the vicinity of the sensor element. Electrons and holes created by incoming charged particles, X-rays, {gamma} rays, are drifted by the electric field inside a-Si:H diodes and this carrier movement induces signal charges on electrodes. Charge collection and signal generation process are analyzed in terms of carrier mobilities, lifetimes and electric field. Charge collection in thick a-Si:H diodes is often limited by deep-level trapping of carriers during transit and a finite charge integration time required for single particle counting in some applications and sometimes by volume recombination of carriers for detecting heavily-ionizing particles such as {alpha} particles. The charge collection process is also strongly affected by the non-uniform electric field profiles in a-Si:H diodes caused by the fixed space charges inside the material under reverse-bias. Signal generation due to a weak light pulse irradiating each end of a thick diode is measured as a function of a reverse-bias and it gives a valuable information about the fixed space charges. Field profiles can be manipulated by either doping, electrode geometry, or combination of both to improve the charge collection process. One can apply a higher reverse-bias on a diode with an equivalent thickness by providing buffer layers at each end of the diode and thus suppressing soft breakdown phenomena. X-ray detection with a good sensitivity is demonstrated by an a-Si:H photodiode coupled to an evaporated CsI scintillator. The scintillation quality of evaporated CsI layers can be made almost identical to its single crystal counterpart. Fields of a-Si:H radiation detector application include high energy physics, medical imaging, materials science and life science. 78 refs., 68 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. NMR signal enhancement for hyperpolarized fluids continuously generated in hydrogenation reactions with parahydrogen.

    PubMed

    Barskiy, Danila A; Salnikov, Oleg G; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Koptyug, Igor V

    2015-02-12

    In the present study we analyze the factors which can lower hyperpolarization of fluids produced in a continuous flow regime by the parahydrogen-induced polarization technique. We use the findings of this analysis to examine the flow rate dependence of propane hyperpolarization produced in the heterogeneous propylene hydrogenation by parahydrogen over Rh/TiO2 catalyst. We have estimated the maximum attainable propane (1)H hyperpolarization yield and the corrected percentage of pairwise hydrogen addition in heterogeneous hydrogenation, which was found to be ∼7%. The approach developed for polarization analysis is useful for the optimization of experimental setup and reaction conditions to obtain maximum hyperpolarization for parahydrogen-based catalyst-free continuously generated fluids applicable in biomedical magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25587942

  7. Photo-generated metasurfaces for resonant and high modulation of terahertz signals.

    PubMed

    Smaali, R; Taliercio, T; Centeno, E

    2016-08-15

    We theoretically demonstrate resonant modulation of terahertz (THz) waves with photo-designed metasurfaces. Our approach bypasses the short penetration length issue of the optical pump that prevents photo-generated thick metamaterials. We propose a three-layer semiconductor system of subwavelength thickness that presents 100% modulation of the reflection (or absorption) spectra at around 1 THz when optically actuated. This resonant modulation can be dynamically monitored at high frequency by the optical pump on a broad range of frequencies of Δν/ν=100%. Appropriate 2D photo-printed patterns make the system polarization insensitive and operational for a wide range of incident angles up to 65°. PMID:27519118

  8. Frontal eye field signals that may trigger the brainstem saccade generator.

    PubMed

    Keller, Edward L; Lee, Byeong-Taek; Lee, Kyoung-Min

    2008-01-01

    Saccades are rapid shifts of gaze that normally place the line of sight on a desired target with a single smooth movement. A number of disease states have been shown to result in saccadic movements that are fragmented, but still end near target position after a multi-step sequence of saccades. Among these disorders are Parkinson's disease and late-onset Tay-Sachs disease (LOTS). We have recently shown that normal human subjects and monkeys also make some two-step saccadic responses in cognitively difficult, choice response tasks. In monkeys we have been able to record neuronal responses as the animals performed a visually guided, choice saccade task. We compared the activity of neurons in the superior colliculus (SC) and the cortical frontal eye field (FEF) during the majority of trials that were accomplished with single-step saccades with those completed with two-step saccades. Several differences in discharge pattern aligned on the first saccade were uncovered. Neurons in the rostral and caudal SC were not modulated at the time of the first saccade, but a class of FEF neurons showed a burst of activity before the first saccade. If these neurons are among those known to project to the saccade generator in the brainstem, they could trigger the onset of a saccade before the remaining machinery in the saccade generator had sufficient activity to sustain the saccade. Overall the results suggest that a delicate balance of triggering and sustaining inputs are required to produce normal single-step saccades. These neural results may also help to clarify the pathology present when fragmented saccades occur in various disease states. PMID:18718288

  9. Determination of AES Orbit Elements Using Mixed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnik, S. Ja.; Strakhova, S. L.

    An algorithm is worked out and a program is compiled for a determination of AES (artificial Earth satellite) orbit elements using both goniometrical and range-finder observations of different precision. The observations of one or several passages carried out from one or several stations can be used. A number of observational stations and a number of observations are not limited in principle. When solving this task the AES ephemerides on the moments of observations are calculated for different sets of orbit elements. A parameter F is considered which is a function of orbit elements. The parameter presents a square-mean deviation of AES ephemeris position on the moments {J;} from its observed one. The determination of real orbit elements comes to minimizing of parameter F by orbit elements using a method of deformed polyhedron. When calculating the ephemeris the amendments for 2-d, 3-d, 4-th geopotential zone harmonics are considered.

  10. An Improved Recovery Algorithm for Decayed AES Key Schedule Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsow, Alex

    A practical algorithm that recovers AES key schedules from decayed memory images is presented. Halderman et al. [1] established this recovery capability, dubbed the cold-boot attack, as a serious vulnerability for several widespread software-based encryption packages. Our algorithm recovers AES-128 key schedules tens of millions of times faster than the original proof-of-concept release. In practice, it enables reliable recovery of key schedules at 70% decay, well over twice the decay capacity of previous methods. The algorithm is generalized to AES-256 and is empirically shown to recover 256-bit key schedules that have suffered 65% decay. When solutions are unique, the algorithm efficiently validates this property and outputs the solution for memory images decayed up to 60%.

  11. A high performance hardware implementation image encryption with AES algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmani, Ali; Jafari, Mohamad; Miremadi, Seyed Sohrab

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes implementation of a high-speed encryption algorithm with high throughput for encrypting the image. Therefore, we select a highly secured symmetric key encryption algorithm AES(Advanced Encryption Standard), in order to increase the speed and throughput using pipeline technique in four stages, control unit based on logic gates, optimal design of multiplier blocks in mixcolumn phase and simultaneous production keys and rounds. Such procedure makes AES suitable for fast image encryption. Implementation of a 128-bit AES on FPGA of Altra company has been done and the results are as follow: throughput, 6 Gbps in 471MHz. The time of encrypting in tested image with 32*32 size is 1.15ms.

  12. New role for Kruppel-like factor 14 as a transcriptional activator involved in the generation of signaling lipids.

    PubMed

    de Assuncao, Thiago M; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A; Huebert, Robert C; Urrutia, Raul A; Shah, Vijay H

    2014-05-30

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  13. New Role for Kruppel-like Factor 14 as a Transcriptional Activator Involved in the Generation of Signaling Lipids*

    PubMed Central

    de Assuncao, Thiago M.; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A.; Huebert, Robert C.; Urrutia, Raul A.; Shah, Vijay H.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  14. The transcriptional repressor Blimp-1 acts downstream of BMP signaling to generate primordial germ cells in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Taro; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2016-01-15

    Segregation of the germ line from the soma is an essential event for transmission of genetic information across generations in all sexually reproducing animals. Although some well-studied systems such as Drosophila and Xenopus use maternally inherited germ determinants to specify germ cells, most animals, including mice, appear to utilize zygotic inductive cell signals to specify germ cells during later embryogenesis. Such inductive germ cell specification is thought to be an ancestral trait of Bilateria, but major questions remain as to the nature of an ancestral mechanism to induce germ cells, and how that mechanism evolved. We previously reported that BMP signaling-based germ cell induction is conserved in both the mouse Mus musculus and the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, which is an emerging model organism for functional studies of induction-based germ cell formation. In order to gain further insight into the functional evolution of germ cell specification, here we examined the Gryllus ortholog of the transcription factor Blimp-1 (also known as Prdm1), which is a widely conserved bilaterian gene known to play a crucial role in the specification of germ cells in mice. Our functional analyses of the Gryllus Blimp-1 ortholog revealed that it is essential for Gryllus primordial germ cell development, and is regulated by upstream input from the BMP signaling pathway. This functional conservation of the epistatic relationship between BMP signaling and Blimp-1 in inductive germ cell specification between mouse and cricket supports the hypothesis that this molecular mechanism regulated primordial germ cell specification in a last common bilaterian ancestor. PMID:26786211

  15. MHC class II tetramer analyses in AE37-vaccinated prostate cancer patients reveal vaccine-specific polyfunctional and long-lasting CD4(+) T-cells.

    PubMed

    Anastasopoulou, Eleftheria A; Voutsas, Ioannis F; Papamichail, Michael; Baxevanis, Constantin N; Perez, Sonia A

    2016-07-01

    Realizing the basis for generating long-lasting clinical responses in cancer patients after therapeutic vaccinations provides the means to further ameliorate clinical efficacy. Peptide cancer vaccines stimulating CD4(+) T helper cells are often promising for inducing immunological memory and persistent CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell responses. Recent reports from our clinical trial with the AE37 vaccine, which is a HER2 hybrid polypeptide, documented its efficacy to induce CD4(+) T cell immunity, which was associated with clinical improvements preferentially among HLA-DRB1*11(+) prostate cancer patients. Here, we performed in-depth investigation of the CD4(+) T cell response against the AE37 vaccine. We used the DR11/AE37 tetramer in combination with multicolor flow cytometry to identify and characterize AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells regarding memory and Tregs phenotype in HLA-DRB1*11(+) vaccinated patients. To verify vaccine-specific immunological memory in vivo, we also assessed AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells in defined CD4(+) memory subsets by cell sorting. Finally, vaccine-induced AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells were assessed regarding their functional profile. AE37-specific memory CD4(+) T cells could be detected in peptide-stimulated cultures from prostate cancer patients following vaccination even 4 y post-vaccination. The vast majority of vaccine-induced AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells exhibited a multifunctional, mostly Th1 cytokine signature, with the potential of granzyme B production. In contrast, we found relatively low frequencies of Tregs among AE37-specific CD4(+) T cells. This is the first report on the identification of vaccine-induced HER2-specific multifunctional long-lasting CD4(+) T cells in vaccinated prostate cancer patients. PMID:27622033

  16. Mapping Copper and Lead Concentrations at Abandoned Mine Areas Using Element Analysis Data from ICP-AES and Portable XRF Instruments: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeongyu; Choi, Yosoon; Suh, Jangwon; Lee, Seung-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Understanding spatial variation of potentially toxic trace elements (PTEs) in soil is necessary to identify the proper measures for preventing soil contamination at both operating and abandoned mining areas. Many studies have been conducted worldwide to explore the spatial variation of PTEs and to create soil contamination maps using geostatistical methods. However, they generally depend only on inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) analysis data, therefore such studies are limited by insufficient input data owing to the disadvantages of ICP-AES analysis such as its costly operation and lengthy period required for analysis. To overcome this limitation, this study used both ICP-AES and portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) analysis data, with relatively low accuracy, for mapping copper and lead concentrations at a section of the Busan abandoned mine in Korea and compared the prediction performances of four different approaches: the application of ordinary kriging to ICP-AES analysis data, PXRF analysis data, both ICP-AES and transformed PXRF analysis data by considering the correlation between the ICP-AES and PXRF analysis data, and co-kriging to both the ICP-AES (primary variable) and PXRF analysis data (secondary variable). Their results were compared using an independent validation data set. The results obtained in this case study showed that the application of ordinary kriging to both ICP-AES and transformed PXRF analysis data is the most accurate approach when considers the spatial distribution of copper and lead contaminants in the soil and the estimation errors at 11 sampling points for validation. Therefore, when generating soil contamination maps for an abandoned mine, it is beneficial to use the proposed approach that incorporates the advantageous aspects of both ICP-AES and PXRF analysis data. PMID:27043594

  17. Mapping Copper and Lead Concentrations at Abandoned Mine Areas Using Element Analysis Data from ICP–AES and Portable XRF Instruments: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeongyu; Choi, Yosoon; Suh, Jangwon; Lee, Seung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Understanding spatial variation of potentially toxic trace elements (PTEs) in soil is necessary to identify the proper measures for preventing soil contamination at both operating and abandoned mining areas. Many studies have been conducted worldwide to explore the spatial variation of PTEs and to create soil contamination maps using geostatistical methods. However, they generally depend only on inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP–AES) analysis data, therefore such studies are limited by insufficient input data owing to the disadvantages of ICP–AES analysis such as its costly operation and lengthy period required for analysis. To overcome this limitation, this study used both ICP–AES and portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) analysis data, with relatively low accuracy, for mapping copper and lead concentrations at a section of the Busan abandoned mine in Korea and compared the prediction performances of four different approaches: the application of ordinary kriging to ICP–AES analysis data, PXRF analysis data, both ICP–AES and transformed PXRF analysis data by considering the correlation between the ICP–AES and PXRF analysis data, and co-kriging to both the ICP–AES (primary variable) and PXRF analysis data (secondary variable). Their results were compared using an independent validation data set. The results obtained in this case study showed that the application of ordinary kriging to both ICP–AES and transformed PXRF analysis data is the most accurate approach when considers the spatial distribution of copper and lead contaminants in the soil and the estimation errors at 11 sampling points for validation. Therefore, when generating soil contamination maps for an abandoned mine, it is beneficial to use the proposed approach that incorporates the advantageous aspects of both ICP–AES and PXRF analysis data. PMID:27043594

  18. Determination of Minerals in Apples by ICP AES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, Mark

    2003-10-01

    A laboratory experiment is described that involves the elemental analysis of apples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (IICP AES). The results of the experiment allow students to predict the cold-storage stability of apples. During the experiment the sample-preparation techniques and digestion procedures involved in elemental analysis of solid organic samples are introduced and the optimization of the ICP AES is explored. The method detailed can easily be adapted for the analysis of a wider range of elements. The laboratory experiment may also be undertaken using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) with only minor modifications in the sample-preparation procedure.

  19. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR METTLER AE163 AND AE240 ELECTRONIC BALANCE (NHX/SOP-160-008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This procedure describes the process of calibrating the Mettler AE 163 and AE 240 electronic, dual range analytical balances each having an enclosed weighing pan. Weight ranges for the AE 163 are 0-30 g (0.01 mg readability) and 0-160 g (0.1 mg readability). Weight ranges for the...

  20. All-fibre photonic signal generator for attosecond timing and ultralow-noise microwave

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    High-impact frequency comb applications that are critically dependent on precise pulse timing (i.e., repetition rate) have recently emerged and include the synchronization of X-ray free-electron lasers, photonic analogue-to-digital conversion and photonic radar systems. These applications have used attosecond-level timing jitter of free-running mode-locked lasers on a fast time scale within ~100 μs. Maintaining attosecond-level absolute jitter over a significantly longer time scale can dramatically improve many high-precision comb applications. To date, ultrahigh quality-factor (Q) optical resonators have been used to achieve the highest-level repetition-rate stabilization of mode-locked lasers. However, ultrahigh-Q optical-resonator-based methods are often fragile, alignment sensitive and complex, which limits their widespread use. Here we demonstrate a fibre-delay line-based repetition-rate stabilization method that enables the all-fibre photonic generation of optical pulse trains with 980-as (20-fs) absolute r.m.s. timing jitter accumulated over 0.01 s (1 s). This simple approach is based on standard off-the-shelf fibre components and can therefore be readily used in various comb applications that require ultra-stable microwave frequency and attosecond optical timing. PMID:26531777

  1. Signal photon flux generated by high-frequency relic gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Wang, Sai; Wen, Hao

    2016-08-01

    The power spectrum of primordial tensor perturbations increases rapidly in the high frequency region if the spectral index n t > 0. It is shown that the amplitude of relic gravitational waves h t(5 × 109 Hz) varies from 10‑36 to 10‑25 while n t varies from ‑6.25 × 10‑3 to 0.87. A high frequency gravitational wave detector proposed by F.-Y. Li detects gravitational waves through observing the perturbed photon flux that is generated by interaction between relic gravitational waves and electromagnetic field. It is shown that the perturbative photon flux (5 × 109 Hz) varies from 1.40 × 10‑4 s‑1 to 2.85 × 107 s‑1 while n t varies from ‑6.25 × 10‑3 to 0.87. Correspondingly, the ratio of the transverse perturbative photon flux to the background photon flux varies from 10‑28 to 10‑16. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305181,11322545,11335012) and Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Y5KF181CJ1)

  2. Magnitude and sign of long-range correlated time series: Decomposition and surrogate signal generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Extremera, Manuel; Carpena, Pedro; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Bernaola-Galván, Pedro A.

    2016-04-01

    We systematically study the scaling properties of the magnitude and sign of the fluctuations in correlated time series, which is a simple and useful approach to distinguish between systems with different dynamical properties but the same linear correlations. First, we decompose artificial long-range power-law linearly correlated time series into magnitude and sign series derived from the consecutive increments in the original series, and we study their correlation properties. We find analytical expressions for the correlation exponent of the sign series as a function of the exponent of the original series. Such expressions are necessary for modeling surrogate time series with desired scaling properties. Next, we study linear and nonlinear correlation properties of series composed as products of independent magnitude and sign series. These surrogate series can be considered as a zero-order approximation to the analysis of the coupling of magnitude and sign in real data, a problem still open in many fields. We find analytical results for the scaling behavior of the composed series as a function of the correlation exponents of the magnitude and sign series used in the composition, and we determine the ranges of magnitude and sign correlation exponents leading to either single scaling or to crossover behaviors. Finally, we obtain how the linear and nonlinear properties of the composed series depend on the correlation exponents of their magnitude and sign series. Based on this information we propose a method to generate surrogate series with controlled correlation exponent and multifractal spectrum.

  3. Epithelial polarity--generating and integrating signals from the ECM with integrins.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Aki

    2015-06-10

    Epithelial cells are important building blocks of most tissues and the corner stone of tissue architectures that allow directional transport of nutrients, ions and waste products in and out of the body. In tissues composed of millions of cells every individual cell needs to make right decisions when to differentiate, migrate, divide or die. Tight control of such fundamental cell-level processes ensures proper tissue morphogenesis, homeostasis and function. Cellular decisions are guided by biochemical and mechanical cues from their immediate microenvironment that consists of the extracellular matrix (ECM), neighboring cells and soluble factors. Generation of two distinct surfaces one facing the outside world (the apical domain) and the other contacting the neighboring cells and basal ECM (basolateral domain) is the most fundamental property of epithelial cells. The cues from the ECM are of particular importance in this process and communication between the cells and the ECM is largely mediated by transmembrane ECM receptors. Integrins constitute the largest family of such receptors binding to the ECM. Integrins have been shown to be essential for the establishment of initial polarity cues that define the position of the basal domain and thereby govern the orientation of the forming apico-basal axis. In this review I will discuss the multifaceted roles of integrins in epithelial cells with a particular focus on recent developments unveiling the specific functions of the different integrin heterodimers in regulating epithelial cell polarization and morphogenesis. PMID:25597426

  4. Ionospheric ELF radio signal generation due to LF and/or MF radio transmissions. II - Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, P. S.; Turunen, T.; Rycroft, M. J.

    1982-10-01

    Four possible mechanisms are considered for the generation of the ELF pips reported by Cannon (1982). The mechanisms involve the heating of the auroral D region or lower E region by AM waves from one or more distant Soviet LF and/or MF radio transmitters, leading to modulation of the large electrojet current, which then radiates at 1 kHz. It is shown that the experimental data favor a mechanism entailing periodic in-phase heating of the ionosphere by two or more synchronized transmitters and that the most likely solutions involve transmissions at 173, 263, 281, and 549 kHz. A 0.6-K peak-to-peak sinusoidal electron-temperature variation superimposed on a 2-K temperature rise is predicted for the combined effect of transmitters in Kaliningrad (173 kHz), Moscow (173 and 263 kHz), and Minsk (281 and 549 kHz). The corresponding 1-kHz magnetic field variations on the ground directly below the source are estimated to be 0.09 pT, in good agreement with the experimental ELF pip field strengths.

  5. All-fibre photonic signal generator for attosecond timing and ultralow-noise microwave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-11-01

    High-impact frequency comb applications that are critically dependent on precise pulse timing (i.e., repetition rate) have recently emerged and include the synchronization of X-ray free-electron lasers, photonic analogue-to-digital conversion and photonic radar systems. These applications have used attosecond-level timing jitter of free-running mode-locked lasers on a fast time scale within ~100 μs. Maintaining attosecond-level absolute jitter over a significantly longer time scale can dramatically improve many high-precision comb applications. To date, ultrahigh quality-factor (Q) optical resonators have been used to achieve the highest-level repetition-rate stabilization of mode-locked lasers. However, ultrahigh-Q optical-resonator-based methods are often fragile, alignment sensitive and complex, which limits their widespread use. Here we demonstrate a fibre-delay line-based repetition-rate stabilization method that enables the all-fibre photonic generation of optical pulse trains with 980-as (20-fs) absolute r.m.s. timing jitter accumulated over 0.01 s (1 s). This simple approach is based on standard off-the-shelf fibre components and can therefore be readily used in various comb applications that require ultra-stable microwave frequency and attosecond optical timing.

  6. Magnitude and sign of long-range correlated time series: Decomposition and surrogate signal generation.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Extremera, Manuel; Carpena, Pedro; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Bernaola-Galván, Pedro A

    2016-04-01

    We systematically study the scaling properties of the magnitude and sign of the fluctuations in correlated time series, which is a simple and useful approach to distinguish between systems with different dynamical properties but the same linear correlations. First, we decompose artificial long-range power-law linearly correlated time series into magnitude and sign series derived from the consecutive increments in the original series, and we study their correlation properties. We find analytical expressions for the correlation exponent of the sign series as a function of the exponent of the original series. Such expressions are necessary for modeling surrogate time series with desired scaling properties. Next, we study linear and nonlinear correlation properties of series composed as products of independent magnitude and sign series. These surrogate series can be considered as a zero-order approximation to the analysis of the coupling of magnitude and sign in real data, a problem still open in many fields. We find analytical results for the scaling behavior of the composed series as a function of the correlation exponents of the magnitude and sign series used in the composition, and we determine the ranges of magnitude and sign correlation exponents leading to either single scaling or to crossover behaviors. Finally, we obtain how the linear and nonlinear properties of the composed series depend on the correlation exponents of their magnitude and sign series. Based on this information we propose a method to generate surrogate series with controlled correlation exponent and multifractal spectrum. PMID:27176287

  7. Acoustic emission source localization based on distance domain signal representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawronski, M.; Grabowski, K.; Russek, P.; Staszewski, W. J.; Uhl, T.; Packo, P.

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic emission is a vital non-destructive testing technique and is widely used in industry for damage detection, localisation and characterization. The latter two aspects are particularly challenging, as AE data are typically noisy. What is more, elastic waves generated by an AE event, propagate through a structural path and are significantly distorted. This effect is particularly prominent for thin elastic plates. In these media the dispersion phenomenon results in severe localisation and characterization issues. Traditional Time Difference of Arrival methods for localisation techniques typically fail when signals are highly dispersive. Hence, algorithms capable of dispersion compensation are sought. This paper presents a method based on the Time - Distance Domain Transform for an accurate AE event localisation. The source localisation is found through a minimization problem. The proposed technique focuses on transforming the time signal to the distance domain response, which would be recorded at the source. Only, basic elastic material properties and plate thickness are used in the approach, avoiding arbitrary parameters tuning.

  8. Generation of fluoroscopic 3D images with a respiratory motion model based on an external surrogate signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurwitz, Martina; Williams, Christopher L.; Mishra, Pankaj; Rottmann, Joerg; Dhou, Salam; Wagar, Matthew; Mannarino, Edward G.; Mak, Raymond H.; Lewis, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory motion during radiotherapy can cause uncertainties in definition of the target volume and in estimation of the dose delivered to the target and healthy tissue. In this paper, we generate volumetric images of the internal patient anatomy during treatment using only the motion of a surrogate signal. Pre-treatment four-dimensional CT imaging is used to create a patient-specific model correlating internal respiratory motion with the trajectory of an external surrogate placed on the chest. The performance of this model is assessed with digital and physical phantoms reproducing measured irregular patient breathing patterns. Ten patient breathing patterns are incorporated in a digital phantom. For each patient breathing pattern, the model is used to generate images over the course of thirty seconds. The tumor position predicted by the model is compared to ground truth information from the digital phantom. Over the ten patient breathing patterns, the average absolute error in the tumor centroid position predicted by the motion model is 1.4 mm. The corresponding error for one patient breathing pattern implemented in an anthropomorphic physical phantom was 0.6 mm. The global voxel intensity error was used to compare the full image to the ground truth and demonstrates good agreement between predicted and true images. The model also generates accurate predictions for breathing patterns with irregular phases or amplitudes.

  9. Ligand-independent TLR signals generated by ectopic overexpression of MyD88 generate local and systemic anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Zachary C.; Osada, Takuya; Glass, Oliver; Yang, Xiao Y.; Lei, Gang-jun; Lyerly, H. Kim; Clay, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    Although critical for initiating and regulating immune responses, the therapeutic use of individual cytokines as anti-cancer immunotherapeutic agents has achieved only modest clinical success. Consequently, many current strategies have focused on the use of specific immunotherapeutic agonists that engage individual receptors of innate immune networks, such as the Toll Like-Receptor (TLR) system, each resulting in specific patterns of gene expression, cytokine production and inflammatory outcome. However, these immunotherapeutics are constrained by variable cellular TLR expression and responsiveness to particular TLR agonists, as well as the specific cellular context of different tumors. We hypothesized that overexpression of MyD88, a pivotal regulator of multiple TLR signaling pathways, could circumvent these constraints and mimic coordinated TLR signaling across all cell types in a ligand independent fashion. To explore this hypothesis, we generated an adenoviral vector expressing MyD88 and demonstrate that Ad-MyD88 infection elicits extensive Th1-specific transcriptional and secreted cytokine signatures in all murine and human cell types tested in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, in vivo intratumoral injection of Ad-MyD88 into established tumor masses enhanced adaptive immune responses and inhibited local tumor immunosuppression, resulting in significantly inhibited local and systemic growth of multiple tumor types. Finally, Ad-MyD88 infection of primary human dendritic cells, tumor associated fibroblasts, and colorectal carcinoma cells elicited significant Th1-type cytokine responses, resulting in enhanced tumor cell lysis and expansion of human tumor antigen-specific T-cells. Thus, Ad-MyD88 initiated robust anti-tumor activity in established murine tumor microenvironments and in human contexts, suggesting its potential effectiveness as a clinical immunotherapeutic strategy. PMID:20823152

  10. Generation of 64 GBd 4ASK signals using a silicon-organic hybrid modulator at 80°C.

    PubMed

    Lauermann, M; Wolf, S; Hartmann, W; Palmer, R; Kutuvantavida, Y; Zwickel, H; Bielik, A; Altenhain, L; Lutz, J; Schmid, R; Wahlbrink, T; Bolten, J; Giesecke, A L; Freude, W; Koos, C

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a silicon-organic hybrid (SOH) Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) generating four-level amplitude shift keying (4ASK) signals at symbol rates of up to 64 GBd both at room temperature and at an elevated temperature of 80°C. The measured line rate of 128 Gbit/s corresponds to the highest value demonstrated for silicon-based MZM so far. We report bit error ratios of 10-10 (64 GBd BPSK), 10-5 (36 GBd 4ASK), and 4 × 10-3 (64 GBd 4ASK) at room temperature. At 80 °C, the respective bit error ratios are 10-10, 10-4, and 1.3 × 10-2. The high-temperature experiments were performed in regular oxygen-rich ambient atmosphere. PMID:27137555

  11. Gravity waves in the thermosphere observed by the AE satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S. H.; Reber, C. A.; Huang, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    Atmospheric Explorer (AE) satellite data were used to investigate the spectra characteristics of wave-like structure observed in the neutral and ionized components of the thermosphere. Power spectral analysis derived by the maximum entropy method indicate the existence of a broad spectrum of scale sizes for the fluctuations ranging from tens to thousands of kilometers.

  12. Microstructural Evolution of a C-Mn Steel During Hot Compression Above the Ae3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranas, Clodualdo M.; Shen, Yu-Jack; Rodrigues, Samuel F.; Jonas, John J.

    2016-09-01

    In order to study the microstructural evolution during deformation, hot compression tests were carried out on a 0.06 wt pct C-0.30 wt pct Mn-0.01 wt pct Si steel at temperatures above the Ae3. The volume fraction of ferrite produced dynamically increased with the applied strain and decreased with increasing temperature. The present data are used to generate an isothermal strain-temperature-transformation diagram based on the applied strain. Results of this type can be employed to predict the effect of dynamic transformation during thermomechanical processing.

  13. Raldh2 expression in optic vesicle generates a retinoic acid signal needed for invagination of retina during optic cup formation.

    PubMed

    Mic, Felix A; Molotkov, Andrei; Molotkova, Natalia; Duester, Gregg

    2004-10-01

    Three retinaldehyde dehydrogenase genes (Raldh1, Raldh2, and Raldh3) expressed in unique spatiotemporal patterns may control synthesis of retinoic acid (RA) needed for retina development. However, previous studies indicate that retina formation still proceeds normally in Raldh1-/- mouse embryos lacking RA synthesis in the dorsal neural retina at the optic cup stage. Here, we demonstrate that Raldh2-/- embryos lacking RA synthesis in the optic vesicle exhibit a failure in retina invagination needed to develop an optic cup. This was also observed in Raldh1-/-:Raldh2-/- double mutants, which develop similarly. Both mutants retain RA activity in the lens placode associated with Raldh3 expression, but this RA activity is insufficient to induce optic cup formation. Maternal RA administration at the optic vesicle stage rescues optic cup formation in Raldh2-/- and Raldh1-/-:Raldh2-/- embryos, demonstrating that Raldh1 is not required during rescue of optic cup development. The optic cup of rescued Raldh1-/-:Raldh2-/- embryos exhibits normal RA activity and this is associated with Raldh3 expression in the retina and lens. Thus, RA signaling initiates in the optic vesicle in response to Raldh2 but can be maintained during optic cup formation by a gene other than Raldh1, most likely Raldh3. Loss of optic vesicle RA signaling does not effect expression of early determinants of retina at the optic vesicle stage (Pax6, Six3, Rx, Mitf). Our findings suggest that RA functions as one of the signals needed for invagination of the retina to generate an optic cup. PMID:15366004

  14. Notch/Delta signalling is not required for segment generation in the basally branching insect Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Kainz, Franz; Ewen-Campen, Ben; Akam, Michael; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2011-11-01

    Arthropods and vertebrates display a segmental body organisation along all or part of the anterior-posterior axis. Whether this reflects a shared, ancestral developmental genetic mechanism for segmentation is uncertain. In vertebrates, segments are formed sequentially by a segmentation 'clock' of oscillating gene expression involving Notch pathway components. Recent studies in spiders and basal insects have suggested that segmentation in these arthropods also involves Notch-based signalling. These observations have been interpreted as evidence for a shared, ancestral gene network for insect, arthropod and bilaterian segmentation. However, because this pathway can play multiple roles in development, elucidating the specific requirements for Notch signalling is important for understanding the ancestry of segmentation. Here we show that Delta, a ligand of the Notch pathway, is not required for segment formation in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, which retains ancestral characteristics of arthropod embryogenesis. Segment patterning genes are expressed before Delta in abdominal segments, and Delta expression does not oscillate in the pre-segmental region or in formed segments. Instead, Delta is required for neuroectoderm and mesectoderm formation; embryos missing these tissues are developmentally delayed and show defects in segment morphology but normal segment number. Thus, what initially appear to be 'segmentation phenotypes' can in fact be due to developmental delays and cell specification errors. Our data do not support an essential or ancestral role of Notch signalling in segment generation across the arthropods, and show that the pleiotropy of the Notch pathway can confound speculation on possible segmentation mechanisms in the last common bilaterian ancestor. PMID:22028033

  15. Carnosic acid inhibits STAT3 signaling and induces apoptosis through generation of ROS in human colon cancer HCT116 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hee; Park, Ki-Woong; Chae, In Gyeong; Kundu, Juthika; Kim, Eun-Hee; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Chun, Kyung-Soo

    2016-06-01

    Carnosic acid (CA), the main antioxidant compound of Rosmarinus officinalis L., has been reported to possess anticancer activity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the anticancer effects of CA remain poorly understood. Our study revealed that CA treatment significantly reduced the viability of human colon cancer HCT116, SW480, and HT-29 cells. Treatment with CA induced apoptosis, which was associated with the induction of p53 and Bax, inhibition of Mdm2, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xl expression, activation of caspase-9, and -3, and the cleavage of PARP in HCT116 cells. CA inhibited the constitutive phosphorylation, the DNA binding and the reporter gene activity of STAT3 in HCT116 cells by blocking the phosphorylation of upstream JAK2 and Src kinases. Moreover, CA attenuated the expression of STAT3 target gene products, such as survivin, cyclin D1, D2, and D3. In STAT3-overexpressed HCT116 cells, CA inhibited cell viability and the expression of cyclin D1 and survivin. Furthermore, CA treatment induced the generation of ROS in these colon cancer cells. Pretreatment of cells with ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine abrogated the inhibitory effect of CA on the JAK2-STAT3/Src-STAT3 signaling and rescued cells from CA-induced apoptosis by blocking the induction of p53 and the cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP in HCT116 cells. However, L-buthionine-sulfoximine, a pharmacological inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased CA-induced ROS production, thereby potentiating apoptotic effect of CA. In conclusion, our study provides the first report that CA induced apoptosis in HCT116 cells via generation of ROS, induction of p53, activation of caspases, and inhibition of STAT3 signaling pathway. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26152521

  16. Up-regulation of Rho/ROCK signaling in sarcoma cells drives invasion and increased generation of protrusive forces.

    PubMed

    Rösel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan; Tolde, Ondrej; Mierke, Claudia T; Zitterbart, Daniel P; Raupach, Carina; Bicanová, Krisýtyna; Kollmannsberger, Philip; Panková, Daniela; Vesely, Pavel; Folk, Petr; Fabry, Ben

    2008-09-01

    Tumor cell invasion is the most critical step of metastasis. Determination of the mode of invasion within the particular tumor is critical for effective cancer treatment. Protease-independent amoeboid mode of invasion has been described in carcinoma cells and more recently in sarcoma cells on treatment with protease inhibitors. To analyze invasive behavior, we compared highly metastatic sarcoma cells with parental nonmetastatic cells. The metastatic cells exhibited a functional up-regulation of Rho/ROCK signaling and, similarly to carcinoma cells, an amoeboid mode of invasion. Using confocal and traction force microscopy, we showed that an up-regulation of Rho/ROCK signaling leads to increased cytoskeletal dynamics, myosin light chain localization, and increased tractions at the leading edge of the cells and that all of these contributed to increased cell invasiveness in a three-dimensional collagen matrix. We conclude that cells of mesenchymal origin can use the amoeboid nonmesenchymal mode of invasion as their primary invading mechanism and show the dependence of ROCK-mediated amoeboid mode of invasion on the increased capacity of cells to generate force. PMID:18819929

  17. Arsenic-induced cell proliferation is associated with enhanced ROS generation, Erk signaling and CyclinA expression.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Chatterjee, Raghunath; Giri, Ashok K; Mandal, Chitra; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2010-10-01

    Arsenic is a well-established human carcinogen; however molecular mechanisms to arsenic-induced carcinogenesis are complex and elusive. The present study identifies a potential biomarker of arsenic exposure, and redefines arsenic-induced signaling in stimulation of cell proliferation. The effect of arsenic exposure on gene expression was evaluated in PBMC of arsenic-exposed individuals selected from a severely affected district of West Bengal, India. A novel, un-documented biomarker of arsenic exposure, CyclinA was identified by microarray analysis from the study. Non-transformed cell lines HaCat and Int407 when exposed to clinically achievable arsenic concentration showed significant increase of CyclinA substantiating the clinical data. An associated increase in S phase population of cells in cell cycle, indicative of enhanced proliferation was also noticed. On further investigation of the pathway to arsenic-induced proliferation, we observed that arsenic resulted: ROS generation; activated Erk signaling; stimulated AP-1 activity, including immediate early genes, c-Jun and c-Fos. N-Acetyl-l-cysteine, a ROS quencher, blocked the arsenic-induced effects. Our study underlines a previously undefined mechanism by which arsenic imparts its toxicity and results in uncontrolled cell proliferation. PMID:20654705

  18. Acceptance of evidence-supported hypotheses generates a stronger signal from an underlying functionally-connected network.

    PubMed

    Whitman, J C; Takane, Y; Cheung, T P L; Moiseev, A; Ribary, U; Ward, L M; Woodward, T S

    2016-02-15

    Choosing one's preferred hypothesis requires multiple brain regions to work in concert as a functionally connected network. We predicted that a stronger network signal would underlie cognitive coherence between a hypothesis and the available evidence. In order to identify such functionally connected networks in magnetoencephalography (MEG) data, we first localized the generators of changes in oscillatory power within three frequency bands, namely alpha (7-13Hz), beta (18-24Hz), and theta (3-7Hz), with a spatial resolution of 5mm and temporal resolution of 50ms. We then used principal component analysis (PCA) to identify functionally connected networks reflecting co-varying post-stimulus changes in power. As predicted, PCA revealed a functionally connected network with a stronger signal when the evidence supported accepting the hypothesis being judged. This difference was driven by beta-band power decreases in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and midline occipital cortex. PMID:26702776

  19. Comparison Between Tsunami Signals Generated by Different Source Models and the Observed Data of the Illapel 2015 Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calisto, Ignacia; Miller, Matthew; Constanzo, Iván

    2016-04-01

    A major interplate earthquake occurred on September 16th, 2015, near Illapel, central Chile. This event generated a tsunami of moderate height, however, one which caused significant near field damage. In this study, we model the tsunami produced by some rapid and preliminary fault models with the potential to be calculated within tens of minutes of the event origin time. We simulate tsunami signals from two different heterogeneous slip models, a homogeneous source based on parameters from the global CMT Project, and furthermore we used plate coupling data from GPS observations to construct a heterogeneous fault based on a priori knowledge of the subduction zone. We compare the simulated signals with the observed tsunami at tide gauges located along the Chilean coast and at offshore DART buoys. For this event, concerning rapid response, the homogeneous source and coupling model represent the tsunami at least as well as the heterogeneous sources. We suggest that the initial heterogeneous fault models could be better constrained with continuous GPS measurements in the rupture area, and additionally DART records directly in front of the rupture area, to improve the tsunami simulation based on quickly calculated models for near coastal areas. Additionally, in terms of tsunami modeling, the source estimated from prior plate coupling information in this case is representative of the event that later occurs; placing further importance on the need to monitor subduction zones with GPS.

  20. Improvement of sensitivity of electrolyte cathode discharge atomic emission spectrometry (ELCAD-AES) for mercury using acetic acid medium.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, R

    2012-05-15

    A method has been developed to improve the sensitivity of the electrolyte cathode discharge atomic emission spectrometry (ELCAD-AES) for mercury determination. Effects of various low molecular weight organic solvents at different volume percentages as well as at different acid molarities on the mercury signal were investigated using ELCAD-AES. The addition of few percent of organic solvent, acetic acid produced significant enhancement in mercury signal. Acetic acid of 5% (v/v) with the 0.2M acidity has been found to give 500% enhancement for mercury signal in flow injection mode. Under the optimized parameters the repeatability, expressed as the percentage relative standard deviation of spectral peak area for mercury with 5% acetic acid was found to be 10% for acid blank solution and 5% for 20 ng/mL mercury standard based on multiple measurements with a multiple sample loading in flow injection mode. Limit of detection of this method was determined to be 2 ng/mL for inorganic mercury. The proposed method has been validated by determining mercury in certified reference materials, Tuna fish (IAEA-350) and Aquatic plant (BCR-060). Accuracy of the method for the mercury determination in the reference materials has been found to be between 3.5% and 5.9%. This study enhances the utility of ELCAD-AES for various types of biological and environmental materials to quantify total mercury at very low levels. PMID:22483872

  1. Supraphysiologic levels of the AML1-ETO isoform AE9a are essential for transformation.

    PubMed

    Link, Kevin A; Lin, Shan; Shrestha, Mahesh; Bowman, Melissa; Wunderlich, Mark; Bloomfield, Clara D; Huang, Gang; Mulloy, James C

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal translocation 8;21 is found in 40% of the FAB M2 subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The resultant in-frame fusion protein AML1-ETO (AE) acts as an initiating oncogene for leukemia development. AE immortalizes human CD34(+) cord blood cells in long-term culture. We assessed the transforming properties of the alternatively spliced AE isoform AE9a (or alternative splicing at exon 9), which is fully transforming in a murine retroviral model, in human cord blood cells. Full activity was realized only upon increased fusion protein expression. This effect was recapitulated in the AE9a murine AML model. Cotransduction of AE and AE9a resulted in a strong selective pressure for AE-expressing cells. In the context of AE, AE9a did not show selection for increased expression, affirming observations of human t(8;21) patient samples where full-length AE is the dominant protein detected. Mechanistically, AE9a showed defective transcriptional regulation of AE target genes that was partially corrected at high expression. Together, these results bring an additional perspective to our understanding of AE function and highlight the contribution of oncogene expression level in t(8;21) experimental models. PMID:27457952

  2. Mec1/ATR regulates the generation of single-stranded DNA that attenuates Tel1/ATM signaling at DNA ends

    PubMed Central

    Clerici, Michela; Trovesi, Camilla; Galbiati, Alessandro; Lucchini, Giovanna; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2014-01-01

    Tel1/ATM and Mec1/ATR checkpoint kinases are activated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Mec1/ATR recruitment to DSBs requires the formation of RPA-coated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which arises from 5′–3′ nucleolytic degradation (resection) of DNA ends. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mec1 regulates resection of the DSB ends. The lack of Mec1 accelerates resection and reduces the loading to DSBs of the checkpoint protein Rad9, which is known to inhibit ssDNA generation. Extensive resection is instead inhibited by the Mec1-ad mutant variant that increases the recruitment near the DSB of Rad9, which in turn blocks DSB resection by both Rad53-dependent and Rad53-independent mechanisms. The mec1-ad resection defect leads to prolonged persistence at DSBs of the MRX complex that causes unscheduled Tel1 activation, which in turn impairs checkpoint switch off. Thus, Mec1 regulates the generation of ssDNA at DSBs, and this control is important to coordinate Mec1 and Tel1 signaling activities at these breaks. PMID:24357557

  3. Small-Signal Analysis of Autonomous Hybrid Distributed Generation Systems in Presence of Ultracapacitor and Tie-Line Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Prakash K.; Mohanty, Soumya R.; Kishor, Nand

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents small-signal analysis of isolated as well as interconnected autonomous hybrid distributed generation system for sudden variation in load demand, wind speed and solar radiation. The hybrid systems comprise of different renewable energy resources such as wind, photovoltaic (PV) fuel cell (FC) and diesel engine generator (DEG) along with the energy storage devices such as flywheel energy storage system (FESS) and battery energy storage system (BESS). Further ultracapacitors (UC) as an alternative energy storage element and interconnection of hybrid systems through tie-line is incorporated into the system for improved performance. A comparative assessment of deviation of frequency profile for different hybrid systems in the presence of different storage system combinations is carried out graphically as well as in terms of the performance index (PI), ie integral square error (ISE). Both qualitative and quantitative analysis reflects the improvements of the deviation in frequency profiles in the presence of the ultracapacitors (UC) as compared to other energy storage elements.

  4. Simultaneous generation of wavelength division multiplexing PON and RoF signals using a hybrid mode-locked laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldaya, Ivan; Campuzano, Gabriel; Castañón, Gerardo

    2015-06-01

    The use of millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequencies has been proposed to overcome the imminent saturation of the ultra high frequency band, justifying research on radio over fiber (RoF) networks as an inexpensive and green solution to distribute multi-Gbps signals. Coincidently, telecommunication operators are investing a significant effort to deploy their passive optical network (PON) infrastructure closer to the users. In this work, we present a novel cost-efficient architecture based on a hybrid mode locked laser capable to simultaneously generate up-to 5 wavelength division multiplexing PON and RoF channels, being compatible with the 50-GHz ITU frequency grid. We analyze the limits of operation of our proposed architecture considering the high modal relative intensity noise induced by mode partition noise, as well as fiber impairments, such as chromatic dispersion and nonlinearities. The feasibility of generation and transmission of 5×10-Gbps PON and 5×5-Gbps RoF using orthogonal frequency division multiplexing up to 50 km has been demonstrated through realistic numerical simulations.

  5. An information processing method for acoustic emission signal inspired from musical staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei; Wu, Chunxian

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a musical-staff-inspired signal processing method for standard description expressions for discrete signals and describing the integrated characteristics of acoustic emission (AE) signals. The method maps various AE signals with complex environments into the normalized musical space. Four new indexes are proposed to comprehensively describe the signal. Several key features, such as contour, amplitude, and signal changing rate, are quantitatively expressed in a normalized musical space. The processed information requires only a small storage space to maintain high fidelity. The method is illustrated by using experiments on sandstones and computed tomography (CT) scanning to determine its validity for AE signal processing.

  6. "Storms of crustal stress" and AE earthquake precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregori, G. P.; Poscolieri, M.; Paparo, G.; de Simone, S.; Rafanelli, C.; Ventrice, G.

    2010-02-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) displays violent paroxysms preceding strong earthquakes, observed within some large area (several hundred kilometres wide) around the epicentre. We call them "storms of crustal stress" or, briefly "crustal storms". A few case histories are discussed, all dealing with the Italian peninsula, and with the different behaviour shown by the AE records in the Cephalonia island (Greece), which is characterized by a different tectonic setting. AE is an effective tool for diagnosing the state of some wide slab of the Earth's crust, and for monitoring its evolution, by means of AE of different frequencies. The same effect ought to be detected being time-delayed, when referring to progressively lower frequencies. This results to be an effective check for validating the physical interpretation. Unlike a seismic event, which involves a much limited focal volume and therefore affects a restricted area on the Earth's surface, a "crustal storm" typically involves some large slab of lithosphere and crust. In general, it cannot be easily reckoned to any specific seismic event. An earthquake responds to strictly local rheological features of the crust, which are eventually activated, and become crucial, on the occasion of a "crustal storm". A "crustal storm" lasts typically few years, eventually involving several destructive earthquakes that hit at different times, at different sites, within that given lithospheric slab. Concerning the case histories that are here discussed, the lithospheric slab is identified with the Italian peninsula. During 1996-1997 a "crustal storm" was on, maybe elapsing until 2002 (we lack information for the period 1998-2001). Then, a quiet period occurred from 2002 until 26 May 2008, when a new "crustal storm" started, and by the end of 2009 it is still on. During the 1996-1997 "storm" two strong earthquakes occurred (Potenza and Colfiorito) - and (maybe) in 2002 also the Molise earthquake can be reckoned to this "storm". During the

  7. Analysis of low-frequency seismic signals generated during a multiple-iceberg calving event at Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, Fabian; Amundson, Jason M.; O'Neel, Shad; Truffer, Martin; Fahnestock, Mark; Fricker, Helen A.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated seismic signals generated during a large-scale, multiple iceberg calving event that occurred at Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland, on 21 August 2009. The event was recorded by a high-rate time-lapse camera and five broadband seismic stations located within a few hundred kilometers of the terminus. During the event two full-glacier-thickness icebergs calved from the grounded (or nearly grounded) terminus and immediately capsized; the second iceberg to calve was two to three times smaller than the first. The individual calving and capsize events were well-correlated with the radiation of low-frequency seismic signals (<0.1 Hz) dominated by Love and Rayleigh waves. In agreement with regional records from previously published ‘glacial earthquakes’, these low-frequency seismic signals had maximum power and/or signal-to-noise ratios in the 0.05–0.1 Hz band. Similarly, full waveform inversions indicate that these signals were also generated by horizontal single forces acting at the glacier terminus. The signals therefore appear to be local manifestations of glacial earthquakes, although the magnitudes of the signals (twice-time integrated force histories) were considerably smaller than previously reported glacial earthquakes. We thus speculate that such earthquakes may be a common, if not pervasive, feature of all full-glacier-thickness calving events from grounded termini. Finally, a key result from our study is that waveform inversions performed on low-frequency, calving-generated seismic signals may have only limited ability to quantitatively estimate mass losses from calving. In particular, the choice of source time function has little impact on the inversion but dramatically changes the earthquake magnitude. Accordingly, in our analysis, it is unclear whether the smaller or larger of the two calving icebergs generated a larger seismic signal.

  8. Differential inhibition of AE1 and AE2 anion exchangers by oxonol dyes and by novel polyaminosterol analogs of the shark antibiotic squalamine.

    PubMed

    Alper, S L; Chernova, M N; Williams, J; Zasloff, M; Law, F Y; Knauf, P A

    1998-01-01

    Oxonol and polyaminosterol drugs were examined as inhibitors of recombinant mouse AE1 and AE2 anion exchangers expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and were compared as inhibitors of AE1-mediated anion flux in red cells and in HL-60 cells that express AE2. The oxonols WW-781, diBA(5)C4, and diBA(3)C4 inhibited HL-60 cell Cl-/Cl- exchange with IC50 values from 1 to 7 microM, 100-1000 times less potent than their IC50 values for red cell Cl-/anion exchange. In Xenopus oocytes, diBA(5)C4 inhibited AE1-mediated Cl- efflux several hundred times more potently than that mediated by AE2. Several novel squalamine-related polyaminosterols were also evaluated as anion exchange inhibitors. In contrast to diBA(5)C4, polyaminosterol 1361 inhibited oocyte-expressed AE2 8-fold more potently than AE1 (IC50 0.6 versus 5.2 microM). The 3-fold less potent desulfo-analog, 1360, showed similar preference for AE2. It was found that 1361 also partially inhibited Cl- efflux from red cells, whereas neither polyaminosterol inhibited Cl efflux from HL60 cells. Thus, the oxonol diBA(5)C4 is >100-fold more potent as an inhibitor of AE1 than of AE2, whereas the polyaminosterols 1360 and 1361 are 8-fold more potent as inhibitors of AE2 than of AE1. Assay conditions and cell type influenced IC50 values for both classes of compounds. PMID:10353714

  9. Shh/Boc Signaling Is Required for Sustained Generation of Ipsilateral Projecting Ganglion Cells in the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Camacho, Cristina; Carreres, M. Isabel; Herrera, Eloisa; Okada, Ami; Bovolenta, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling is an important determinant of vertebrate retinal ganglion cell (RGC) development. In mice, there are two major RGC populations: (1) the Islet2-expressing contralateral projecting (c)RGCs, which both produce and respond to Shh; and (2) the Zic2-expressing ipsilateral projecting RGCs (iRGCs), which lack Shh expression. In contrast to cRGCs, iRGCs, which are generated in the ventrotemporal crescent (VTC) of the retina, specifically express Boc, a cell adhesion molecule that acts as a high-affinity receptor for Shh. In Boc−/− mutant mice, the ipsilateral projection is significantly decreased. Here, we demonstrate that this phenotype results, at least in part, from the misspecification of a proportion of iRGCs. In Boc−/− VTC, the number of Zic2-positive RGCs is reduced, whereas more Islet2/Shh-positive RGCs are observed, a phenotype also detected in Zic2 and Foxd1 null embryos. Consistent with this observation, organization of retinal projections at the dorsallateral geniculate nucleus is altered in Boc−/− mice. Analyses of the molecular and cellular consequences of introducing Shh into the developing VTC and Zic2 and Boc into the central retina indicate that Boc expression alone is in sufficient to fully activate the ipsilateral program and that Zic2 regulates Shh expression. Taking these data together, we propose that expression of Boc in cells from the VTC is required to sustain Zic2 expression, likely by regulating the levels of Shh signaling from the nearby cRGCs. Zic2, in turn, directly or indirectly, counteracts Shh and Islet2 expression in the VTC and activates the ipsilateral program. PMID:23678105

  10. Validation of the new trapped environment AE9/AP9/SPM at low Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, Francis F.

    2014-09-01

    The completion of the international space station (ISS) in 2011 has provided the space research community an ideal proving ground for future long duration human activities in space. Ionizing radiation measurements in ISS form the ideal tool for the validation of radiation environmental models, nuclear transport codes and nuclear reaction cross sections. Indeed, prior measurements on the space transportation system (STS; shuttle) provided vital information impacting both the environmental models and the nuclear transport code developments by indicating the need for an improved dynamic model of the low Earth orbit (LEO) trapped environment. Additional studies using thermo-luminescent detector (TLD), tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) area monitors, and computer aided design (CAD) model of earlier ISS configurations, confirmed STS observations that, as input, computational dosimetry requires an environmental model with dynamic and directional (anisotropic) behavior, as well as an accurate six degree of freedom (DOF) definition of the vehicle attitude and orientation along the orbit of ISS. At LEO, a vehicle encounters exposure from trapped particles and attenuated galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Within the trapped field, a challenge arises from properly estimating the amount of exposure acquired. There exist a number of models to define the intensities of the trapped particles during the solar quiet and active times. At active times, solar energetic particles (SEP) generated by solar flare or coronal mass ejection (CME) also contribute to the exposure at high northern and southern latitudes. Among the more established trapped models are the historic and popular AE8/AP8, dating back to the 1980s, the historic and less popular CRRES electron/proton, dating back to 1990s and the recently released AE9/AP9/SPM. The AE9/AP9/SPM model is a major improvement over the older AE8/AP8 and CRRES models. This model is derived from numerous measurements acquired over four

  11. Analysis of Micro-Seismic Signals and Source Parameters of Eruptions Generated by Rapid Decompression of Volcanic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, M. A.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2010-12-01

    Seismic evaluation of well-controlled experimental volcanic simulations offers the hope of a better understanding of source mechanisms in natural volcanic seismicity. Here, we have performed the first investigation of the dynamics of explosive volcanic eruption of magma under controlled laboratory conditions. Specifically, we analyzed the micro-seismicity generated by the rapid depressurization of volcanic rocks in a shock tube apparatus, which represents the seismic mechanism. The source parameters and the force system have been analyzed considering the relationship F=πr2 Po. Our well-constrained physical mechanism consists of the slow pressurization of the system (using Argon gas) followed by rapid depressurization of natural volcanic samples (ash, pumice and fragmented particles of pumice) contained in a steel pipe-like conduit of radius r and height ~2r. Several experiments with samples with different porosities were performed under controlled pressure conditions (ranging from 4 to 20 MPa), at room temperature. We calculated the magnitude of the vertical and downward forces and forces at the walls of the reservoir, and the kinetic energy involved during decompression and fragmentation processes from the micro-seismic signals detected at several points in the apparatus using highly dynamic piezo-film transducers. We first characterized the frequencies of the apparatus in order to distinguish in the signals between the waves produced by the natural resonance of the system due to the pressure shock and the waves generated by the rapid depressurization of the samples. In the micro-seismic records the inflation-deflation states of the pipe-like conduit and the fragmentation process after the rapid removal of the diaphragm can be recognized clearly. The decompression time is directly measured from the pressure drop curves of the system recorded by dynamic pressure transducers and correlates well with the duration of maximum amplitudes of micro-seismic waves

  12. A Novel Byte-Substitution Architecture for the AES Cryptosystem

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Fakir Sharif; Ali, Md. Liakot

    2015-01-01

    The performance of Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) mainly depends on speed, area and power. The S-box represents an important factor that affects the performance of AES on each of these factors. A number of techniques have been presented in the literature, which have attempted to improve the performance of the S-box byte-substitution. This paper proposes a new S-box architecture, defining it as ultra low power, robustly parallel and highly efficient in terms of area. The architecture is discussed for both CMOS and FPGA platforms, and the pipelined architecture of the proposed S-box is presented for further time savings and higher throughput along with higher hardware resources utilization. A performance analysis and comparison of the proposed architecture is also conducted with those achieved by the existing techniques. The results of the comparison verify the outperformance of the proposed architecture in terms of power, delay and size. PMID:26491967

  13. Paediatric unplanned reattendance rate: A&E clinical quality indicators.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, Kate; Hacking, Katie A; Simmons, Naomi; Christian, William; Syahanee, R; Shamekh, Ahmed; Prince, Nicholas J

    2013-03-01

    The new accident and emergency (A&E) unplanned reattendance rate clinical quality indicator is intended to drive reduction of avoidable reattendances. Validation data for reattendance rates in children are awaited. The aim of this three site observational study is to establish the rate and reasons for unplanned reattendance to UK paediatric A&Es. Each centre undertook retrospective case note review of children attending at least twice within 7 days. Unplanned reattendance rates at the three centres were 5.1%, 5.2% and 4.4%. Reducing unnecessary unplanned reattendances is beneficial for patients, service capacity and efficacy. This study has identified two groups for targeting reattendance reduction: parents of children returning with the same diagnosis, severity unchanged and parents who bypass primary care resources. Clear communication and early involvement of experienced clinicians are paramount. This study has indicated that a 1%-5% unplanned reattendance rate is realistic, achievable and can drive improvement in children's services. PMID:23287643

  14. A Novel Byte-Substitution Architecture for the AES Cryptosystem.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Fakir Sharif; Ali, Md Liakot

    2015-01-01

    The performance of Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) mainly depends on speed, area and power. The S-box represents an important factor that affects the performance of AES on each of these factors. A number of techniques have been presented in the literature, which have attempted to improve the performance of the S-box byte-substitution. This paper proposes a new S-box architecture, defining it as ultra low power, robustly parallel and highly efficient in terms of area. The architecture is discussed for both CMOS and FPGA platforms, and the pipelined architecture of the proposed S-box is presented for further time savings and higher throughput along with higher hardware resources utilization. A performance analysis and comparison of the proposed architecture is also conducted with those achieved by the existing techniques. The results of the comparison verify the outperformance of the proposed architecture in terms of power, delay and size. PMID:26491967

  15. Research of laser cleaning technology for steam generator tubing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Suixa; Luo, Jijun; Xu, Jun; Yuan, Bo

    2010-10-01

    Surface cleaning based on the laser-induced breakdown of gas and subsequent shock wave generation can remove small particles from solid surfaces. Accordingly, several studies in steam generator tubes of nuclear power plants were performed to expand the cleaning capability of the process. In this work, experimental apparatus of laser cleaning was designed in order to clean heat tubes in steam generator. The laser cleaning process is monitored by analyzing acoustic emission signal experimentally. Experiments demonstrate that laser cleaning can remove smaller particles from the surface of steam generator tubes better than other cleaning process. It has advantages in saving on much manpower and material resource, and it is a good cleaning method for heat tubes, which can be real-time monitoring in laser cleaning process of heat tubes by AE signal. As a green cleaning process, laser cleaning technology in equipment maintenance will be a good prospect.

  16. TDM-PON compatible generation of 10 Gbps NRZ and 1.25 Gbps UWB signals by a single light source.

    PubMed

    Malekizandi, Mohammadreza; Le, Quang Trung; Emsia, Ali; Briggmann, Dieter; Chipouline, Arkadi; Küppers, Franko

    2016-07-25

    A novel and cost-efficient technique is presented to generate non-return-to-zero (NRZ) and ultra-wideband (UWB) signals in different time slots of time division multiplexing-passive optical network (TDM-PON) by using a single chirped controlled semiconductor laser associated with an optical bandpass filter. In this technique, the chirp of the laser is controlled by different bias burst amplitudes (BBA) for different time slots. Through the proper selection of the burst amplitudes, 10 Gbps NRZ and 1.25 Gbps UWB signals are generated in different time slots. Principle of operation is discussed, the complete chirp behavior of the laser is experimentally investigated, data transmission of the generated signals is demonstrated and bit-error-rate (BER) level of 10-9 is achieved. PMID:27464153

  17. Petchienes A-E, Meroterpenoids from Ganoderma petchii.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qin-Lei; Guo, Ping-Xia; Luo, Qi; Yan, Hui; Cheng, Yong-Xian

    2015-12-01

    Petchienes A-E (1-5), five new meroterpenoids, were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma petchii. Their structures, including absolute configurations, were elucidated by means of spectroscopic and computational methods. Compound 4 was isolated as a racemic mixture, which was finally purified by chiral HPLC to yield individual (-) and (+)-antipodes. Biological evaluation showed that compounds 2 and (-)-4 could increase intracellular free calcium concentration at 10 μM in HEK-293 cells. PMID:26882654

  18. HARPS spectropolarimetry of Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubrig, S.; Ilyin, I.; Schöller, M.; Lo Curto, G.

    2013-12-01

    Our knowledge of the presence and the strength of magnetic fields in intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence stars remains very poor. We present new magnetic field measurements in six Herbig Ae/Be stars observed with HARPS in spectropolarimetric mode. We downloaded from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) archive the publically available HARPS spectra for six Herbig Ae/Be stars. Wavelength shifts between right- and left-hand side circularly polarised spectra were interpreted in terms of a longitudinal magnetic field , using the moment technique introduced by Mathys. The application of the moment technique to the HARPS spectra allowed us in addition to study the presence of the crossover effect and quadratic magnetic fields. Our search for longitudinal magnetic fields resulted in first detections of weak magnetic fields in the Herbig Ae/Be stars HD 58647 and HD 98922. Further, we confirm the previous tentative detection of a weak magnetic field in HD 104237 by Donati et al. and confirm the previous detection of a magnetic field in the Herbig Ae star HD 190073. Surprisingly, the measured longitudinal magnetic field of HD 190073, < Bz >=91±18 G at a significance level of 5σ is not in agreement with the measurement results of Alecian et al. (2013), < Bz >=-10±20 G, who applied the LSD method to exactly the same data. No crossover effect was detected for any star in the sample. Only for HD 98922 the crossover effect was found to be close to 3σ with a measured value of -4228±1443 km s-1 G. A quadratic magnetic field of the order of 10 kG was detected in HD 98922, and of ˜3.5 kG in HD 104237. Based on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility under requests MSCHOELLER 51301, 51324, 36608-36611.

  19. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession. PMID:16623137

  20. SU-E-J-73: Generation of Volumetric Images with a Respiratory Motion Model Based On An External Surrogate Signal

    SciTech Connect

    Hurwitz, M; Williams, C; Mishra, P; Dhou, S; Lewis, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion during radiotherapy treatment can differ significantly from motion observed during imaging for treatment planning. Our goal is to use an initial 4DCT scan and the trace of an external surrogate marker to generate 3D images of patient anatomy during treatment. Methods: Deformable image registration is performed on images from an initial 4DCT scan. The deformation vectors are used to develop a patient-specific linear relationship between the motion of each voxel and the trajectory of an external surrogate signal. Correlations in motion are taken into account with principal component analysis, reducing the number of free parameters. This model is tested with digital phantoms reproducing the breathing patterns of ten measured patient tumor trajectories, using five seconds of data to develop the model and the subsequent thirty seconds to test its predictions. The model is also tested with a breathing physical anthropomorphic phantom programmed to reproduce a patient breathing pattern. Results: The error (mean absolute, 95th percentile) over 30 seconds in the predicted tumor centroid position ranged from (0.8, 1.3) mm to (2.2, 4.3) mm for the ten patient breathing patterns. The model reproduced changes in both phase and amplitude of the breathing pattern. Agreement between prediction and truth over the entire image was confirmed by assessing the global voxel intensity RMS error. In the physical phantom, the error in the tumor centroid position was less than 1 mm for all images. Conclusion: We are able to reconstruct 3D images of patient anatomy with a model correlating internal respiratory motion with motion of an external surrogate marker, reproducing the expected tumor centroid position with an average accuracy of 1.4 mm. The images generated by this model could be used to improve dose calculations for treatment planning and delivered dose estimates. This work was partially funded by a research grant from Varian Medical Systems.

  1. Organized emergence of multiple-generations of teeth in snakes is dysregulated by activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signalling.

    PubMed

    Gaete, Marcia; Tucker, Abigail S

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to mammals, most reptiles constantly regenerate their teeth. In the snake, the epithelial dental lamina ends in a successional lamina, which proliferates and elongates forming multiple tooth generations, all linked by a permanent dental lamina. To investigate the mechanisms used to control the initiation of new tooth germs in an ordered sequential pattern we utilized the polyphodont (multiple-generation) corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus). We observed that the dental lamina expressed the transcription factor Sox2, a multipotent stem cell marker, whereas the successional lamina cells expressed the transcription factor Lef1, a Wnt/β-catenin pathway target gene. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in culture increased the number of developing tooth germs, in comparison to control untreated cultures. These additional tooth germs budded off from ectopic positions along the dental lamina, rather than in an ordered sequence from the successional lamina. Wnt/β-catenin activation enhanced cell proliferation, particularly in normally non-odontogenic regions of the dental lamina, which widely expressed Lef1, restricting the Sox2 domain. This suggests an expansion of the successional lamina at the expense of the dental lamina. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in cultured snake dental organs, therefore, led to changes in proliferation and to the molecular pattern of the dental lamina, resulting in loss of the organised emergence of tooth germs. These results suggest that epithelial compartments are critical for the arrangement of organs that develop in sequence, and highlight the role of Wnt/β-catenin signalling in such processes. PMID:24019968

  2. Organized Emergence of Multiple-Generations of Teeth in Snakes Is Dysregulated by Activation of Wnt/Beta-Catenin Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Gaete, Marcia; Tucker, Abigail S.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to mammals, most reptiles constantly regenerate their teeth. In the snake, the epithelial dental lamina ends in a successional lamina, which proliferates and elongates forming multiple tooth generations, all linked by a permanent dental lamina. To investigate the mechanisms used to control the initiation of new tooth germs in an ordered sequential pattern we utilized the polyphodont (multiple-generation) corn snake (Pantherophis guttatus). We observed that the dental lamina expressed the transcription factor Sox2, a multipotent stem cell marker, whereas the successional lamina cells expressed the transcription factor Lef1, a Wnt/β-catenin pathway target gene. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in culture increased the number of developing tooth germs, in comparison to control untreated cultures. These additional tooth germs budded off from ectopic positions along the dental lamina, rather than in an ordered sequence from the successional lamina. Wnt/β-catenin activation enhanced cell proliferation, particularly in normally non-odontogenic regions of the dental lamina, which widely expressed Lef1, restricting the Sox2 domain. This suggests an expansion of the successional lamina at the expense of the dental lamina. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in cultured snake dental organs, therefore, led to changes in proliferation and to the molecular pattern of the dental lamina, resulting in loss of the organised emergence of tooth germs. These results suggest that epithelial compartments are critical for the arrangement of organs that develop in sequence, and highlight the role of Wnt/β-catenin signalling in such processes. PMID:24019968

  3. A spectro-astrometric measurement of Brackett gamma emission in Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, T. S.; Brittain, S.; Stevans, M.; Kurgatt, C.

    2012-07-01

    In T Tauri stars, the Brackett γ line strength is a reliable indicator of accretion luminosity. Among intermediate mass young stars, Herbig Ae stars also show this correlation, but in Herbig Be stars the Brγ line flux significantly overpredicts accretion luminosity. This Brγ excess in Herbig Be stars is thought to arise from a spatially extended outflow. Using commissioning data from the LUCIFER spectrograph on the 8.4-meter Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), we present a spectro-astrometric study of two Herbig Ae/Be stars, the HAe star MWC480 and the HBe star HD 259431. In both stars, an extended Brγ source can be ruled out down to 0.001 arcsec at the 1σ level. Using currently accepted parallax values of 137 ± 25 pc and 173 ± 37 pc, this implies a lack of spatially extended structure beyond 0.131 ± 0.024 AU for MWC 480 and 0.166 ± 0.036 AU for HD 259431. Spectro-astrometric precision depends on both the signal-to-noise and the angular resolution of an observation. To confidently rule out an extended Brγ source as the origin of the Brγ excess, either a repeat of these observations with the LBT's AO enabled, or an 81× increase in observing time, is needed.

  4. The Hsp90 chaperone controls the biogenesis of L7Ae RNPs through conserved machinery

    PubMed Central

    Boulon, Séverine; Marmier-Gourrier, Nathalie; Pradet-Balade, Bérengère; Wurth, Laurence; Verheggen, Céline; Jády, Beáta E.; Rothé, Benjamin; Pescia, Christina; Robert, Marie-Cécile; Kiss, Tamás; Bardoni, Barbara; Krol, Alain; Branlant, Christiane; Allmang, Christine; Bertrand, Edouard; Charpentier, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins of the L7Ae family are at the heart of many essential ribonucleoproteins (RNPs), including box C/D and H/ACA small nucleolar RNPs, U4 small nuclear RNP, telomerase, and messenger RNPs coding for selenoproteins. In this study, we show that Nufip and its yeast homologue Rsa1 are key components of the machinery that assembles these RNPs. We observed that Rsa1 and Nufip bind several L7Ae proteins and tether them to other core proteins in the immature particles. Surprisingly, Rsa1 and Nufip also link assembling RNPs with the AAA + adenosine triphosphatases hRvb1 and hRvb2 and with the Hsp90 chaperone through two conserved adaptors, Tah1/hSpagh and Pih1. Inhibition of Hsp90 in human cells prevents the accumulation of U3, U4, and telomerase RNAs and decreases the levels of newly synthesized hNop58, hNHP2, 15.5K, and SBP2. Thus, Hsp90 may control the folding of these proteins during the formation of new RNPs. This suggests that Hsp90 functions as a master regulator of cell proliferation by allowing simultaneous control of cell signaling and cell growth. PMID:18268104

  5. ASASSN-14ae: a tidal disruption event at 200 Mpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Shappee, B. J.; Grupe, D.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Brimacombe, J.; Brown, J. S.; Davis, A. B.; Jencson, J.; Pojmanski, G.; Szczygieł, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    ASASSN-14ae is a candidate tidal disruption event (TDE) found at the centre of SDSS J110840.11+340552.2 (d ≃ 200 Mpc) by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN). We present ground-based and Swift follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations of the source, finding that the transient had a peak luminosity of L ≃ 8 × 1043 erg s-1 and a total integrated energy of E ≃ 1.7 × 1050 erg radiated over the ˜5 months of observations presented. The blackbody temperature of the transient remains roughly constant at T ˜ 20 000 K while the luminosity declines by nearly 1.5 orders of magnitude during this time, a drop that is most consistent with an exponential, L ∝ e-t/t 0 with t0 ≃ 39 d. The source has broad Balmer lines in emission at all epochs as well as a broad He II feature emerging in later epochs. We compare the colour and spectral evolution to both supernovae and normal AGN to show that ASASSN-14ae does not resemble either type of object and conclude that a TDE is the most likely explanation for our observations. At z = 0.0436, ASASSN-14ae is the lowest-redshift TDE candidate discovered at optical/UV wavelengths to date, and we estimate that ASAS-SN may discover 0.1-3 of these events every year in the future.

  6. Compact and Secure Design of Masked AES S-Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri, Babak; Salmasizadeh, Mahmoud; Moradi, Amir; Tabandeh, Mahmoud; Shalmani, Mohammad T. Manzuri

    Composite field arithmetic is known as an alternative method for lookup tables in implementation of S-box block of AES algorithm. The idea is to breakdown the computations to lower order fields and compute the inverse there. Recently this idea have been used both for reducing the area in implementation of S-boxes and masking implementations of AES algorithm. The most compact design using this technique is presented by Canright using only 92 gates for an S-box block. In another approach, IAIK laboratory has presented a masked implementation of AES algorithm with higher security comparing common masking methods using Composite field arithmetic. Our work in this paper is to use basic ideas of the two approaches above to get a compact masked S-box. We shall use the idea of masking inversion of IAIK's masked S-box but we will rewrite the equations using normal basis. We arrange the terms in these equations in a way that the optimized functions in Canright's compact S-box can be used for our design. An implementation of IAIK's masked S-box is also presented using Canright's polynomial functions to have a fair comparison between our design and IAIK's design. Moreover, we show that this design which uses two special normal basis for GF(16) and GF(4) is the smallest. We shall also prove the security of this design using some lemmas.

  7. Why does A&E attract newly qualified registered nurses?

    PubMed

    Cronin, Gerard; Cronin, Camille

    2006-04-01

    Workforce planning is a particular buzzword that nurse managers must grapple with and now must understand. They must develop strategies to ensure the life and growth of a department while incorporating numerous government targets to ensure the service reaches quality, achieves and meets predetermined goals. To do all this that manager needs a workforce. The recruitment of nursing staff to a specialist area such as Accident & Emergency (A&E) requires a level of creativity and sustained effort. Newly qualified registered nurse working in A&E have, in the past, been considered to be an unusual group of staff to apply to work in A&E. However, many health service managers receive applications from staff in this category and are often encouraged to recruit newly qualified registered nurse's rather than pay for agency workers. Using a qualitative approach this paper explores the key reasons why newly qualified registered nurses choose to work in an Accident & Emergency environment. Data was collected from a sample of 25 newly qualified registered nurses and analysed thematically. Five themes are presented: challenge, teamwork, diversity, support, and learning. These themes have implications for Accident and Emergency units and human resource and workforce planning departments. PMID:16464593

  8. Photonic frequency-quadrupling and balanced pre-coding technologies for W-band QPSK vector mm-wave signal generation based on a single DML

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanyi; Yang, Chao; Chi, Nan; Yu, Jianjun

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel scheme for high-frequency quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) photonic vector signal generation based on a single directly modulated laser (DML) employing photonic frequency quadrupling and balanced pre-coding technologies. In order to realize frequency quadrupling, a wavelength selective switch (WSS) is intruded in our experiment. The intruded WSS combined with DML can not only realize high-frequency vector signal generation but also simplify the architecture. We experimentally demonstrate 1-or 2-Gbaud QPSK vector signal generation at 88 GHz based on our proposed scheme. The generated 1-Gbaud balanced pre-coded QPSK vector signal is transmitted 0.5-m wireless distance with the bit-error-ratio (BER) below hard-decision forward-error-correction (HD-FEC) threshold of 3.8×10-3. To our knowledge, this is the first time to demonstrate W-band mm-wave vector signal based on a single DML with quadrupling frequency and pre-coding technologies.

  9. Field-programmable gate array based arbitrary signal generator and oscilloscope for use in slow light and storage of light experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Stanko N.; Batić, Viktor; Panić, Bratimir; Jelenković, Branislav M.

    2013-06-01

    We present a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) based device that simultaneously generates two arbitrary analog voltage signals with the maximum sample rate of 1.25 MHz and acquires two analog voltage signals with the maximum sample rate of 2.5 MHz. All signals are synchronized with internal FPGA clock. The personal computer application developed for controlling and communicating with FPGA chip provides the shaping of the output signals by mathematical expressions and real-time monitoring of the input signals. The main advantages of FPGA based digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital cards are high speed, rapid reconfigurability, friendly user interface, and low cost. We use this module in slow light and storage of light experiments performed in Rb buffer gas cell.

  10. Dopamine-Signaled Reward Predictions Generated by Competitive Excitation and Inhibition in a Spiking Neural Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Chorley, Paul; Seth, Anil K.

    2011-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons in the mammalian substantia nigra display characteristic phasic responses to stimuli which reliably predict the receipt of primary rewards. These responses have been suggested to encode reward prediction-errors similar to those used in reinforcement learning. Here, we propose a model of dopaminergic activity in which prediction-error signals are generated by the joint action of short-latency excitation and long-latency inhibition, in a network undergoing dopaminergic neuromodulation of both spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity and neuronal excitability. In contrast to previous models, sensitivity to recent events is maintained by the selective modification of specific striatal synapses, efferent to cortical neurons exhibiting stimulus-specific, temporally extended activity patterns. Our model shows, in the presence of significant background activity, (i) a shift in dopaminergic response from reward to reward-predicting stimuli, (ii) preservation of a response to unexpected rewards, and (iii) a precisely timed below-baseline dip in activity observed when expected rewards are omitted. PMID:21629770

  11. mtDNA germ line variation mediated ROS generates retrograde signaling and induces pro-cancerous metabolic features

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajnish Kumar; Srivastava, Archita; Kalaiarasan, Ponnusamy; Manvati, Siddharth; Chopra, Rupali; Bamezai, Rameshwar N. K.

    2014-01-01

    mtDNA non-synonymous germ line variation (G10398A; p.A114T) has remained equivocal with least mechanistic understanding in showing an association with cancer. This has necessitated showing in-vitro how an over-expression within mitochondria of either of the variants produces higher intracellular ROS, resulting in differential anchorage dependent and independent growth. Both these features were observed to be relatively higher in ND3:114T variant. An elevated amount of intracellular carbonylated proteins and a reduced activity of a key glycolytic enzyme, Pyruvate kinase M2, along with high glucose uptake and lactate production were other pro-cancerous features observed. The retrograde signaling through surplus ROS was generated by post-ND3 over-expression regulated nuclear gene expression epigenetically, involving selectively the apoptotic-DDR-pathways. The feature of ND3 over-expression, inducing ROS mediated pro-cancerous features in the cells in in vitro, was replicated in a pilot study in a limited number of sporadic breast tumors, suggesting the importance of mitochondrial germ-line variant(s) in enabling the cells to acquire pro-cancerous features. PMID:25300428

  12. Generation of a Homozygous Transgenic Rat Strain Stably Expressing a Calcium Sensor Protein for Direct Examination of Calcium Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Szebényi, Kornélia; Füredi, András; Kolacsek, Orsolya; Pergel, Enikő; Bősze, Zsuzsanna; Bender, Balázs; Vajdovich, Péter; Tóvári, József; Homolya, László; Szakács, Gergely; Héja, László; Enyedi, Ágnes; Sarkadi, Balázs; Apáti, Ágota; Orbán, Tamás I.

    2015-01-01

    In drug discovery, prediction of selectivity and toxicity require the evaluation of cellular calcium homeostasis. The rat is a preferred laboratory animal for pharmacology and toxicology studies, while currently no calcium indicator protein expressing rat model is available. We established a transgenic rat strain stably expressing the GCaMP2 fluorescent calcium sensor by a transposon-based methodology. Zygotes were co-injected with mRNA of transposase and a CAG-GCaMP2 expressing construct, and animals with one transgene copy were pre-selected by measuring fluorescence in blood cells. A homozygous rat strain was generated with high sensor protein expression in the heart, kidney, liver, and blood cells. No pathological alterations were found in these animals, and fluorescence measurements in cardiac tissue slices and primary cultures demonstrated the applicability of this system for studying calcium signaling. We show here that the GCaMP2 expressing rat cardiomyocytes allow the prediction of cardiotoxic drug side-effects, and provide evidence for the role of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and its beneficial pharmacological modulation in cardiac reperfusion. Our data indicate that drug-induced alterations and pathological processes can be followed by using this rat model, suggesting that transgenic rats expressing a calcium-sensitive protein provide a valuable system for pharmacological and toxicological studies. PMID:26234466

  13. Third-order effects in resonant sum-frequency-generation signals at electrified metal/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Patrick; Muglali, Mutlu; Rohwerder, Michael; Erbe, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Vibrational sum-frequency-generation (SFG) spectroscopy experiments at electrified interfaces involve incident laser radiation at frequencies in the IR and near-IR/visible regions as well as a static electric field on the surface. Here we show that mixing the three fields present on the surface can result in third-order effects in resonant SFG signals. This was achieved for closed packed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with molecular groups of high optical nonlinearity and surface potentials similar to those typically applied in cyclic voltammograms. Broadband SFG spectroscopy was applied to study a hydrophobic well-ordered araliphatic SAM on a Au(111) surface using a thin-layer analysis cell for spectro-electrochemical investigations in a 100 mM NaOH electrolyte solution. Resonant contributions were experimentally separated from non-resonant contributions of the Au substrate and theoretically analyzed using a fitting function including third-order terms. The resulting ratio of third-order to second-order susceptibilities was estimated to be [Formula: see text](10(-10)) m/V. PMID:24235781

  14. Implementation of a miniature sized, battery powered electrophysiological signal-generator for testing multi-channel recording equipments.

    PubMed

    Máthé, Kálmán; Tóth, Attila; Petykó, Zoltán; Szabó, Imre; Czurkó, András

    2007-09-15

    Testing electrophysiological recording equipments is an important task in multi-channel extracellular in vivo electrophysiology. In this paper, a miniature, battery powered multi-channel electrophysiological signal-generator (ESG) is described that was designed for this purpose. The device is based on a Xilinx CPLD (Complex Programmable Logic Device) and it is powered by a 3V lithium coin battery. It is a useful tool for calibration and testing the performance, quality and parameters of the recording equipments used for acquiring EEG, field potentials, ECG, EMG, and multiple unit activity. The device is ideally suited to identify instances when errors interfere with the proper recording, and repair of wiring or service of the equipment is needed. Two versions of the device are described; one is for 16 (ESG16), and another is for 32 channels (ESG32). Both versions provide amplitude and time calibration, as well as cross-talk and CMRR (common mode rejection ratio) testing for the recording equipment. PMID:17624440

  15. Spectroscopic signatures of magnetospheric accretion in Herbig Ae/Be stars. I. The case of HD 101412

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöller, M.; Pogodin, M. A.; Cahuasquí, J. A.; Drake, N. A.; Hubrig, S.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.; Savanov, I. S.; Wolff, B.; González, J. F.; Mysore, S.; Ilyin, I.; Järvinen, S. P.; Stelzer, B.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Models of magnetically-driven accretion and outflows reproduce many observational properties of T Tauri stars. This concept is not well established for the more massive Herbig Ae/Be stars. Aims: We intend to examine the magnetospheric accretion in Herbig Ae/Be stars and search for rotational modulation using spectroscopic signatures, in this first paper concentrating on the well-studied Herbig Ae star HD 101412. Methods: We used near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the magnetic Herbig Ae star HD 101412 to test the magnetospheric character of its accretion disk/star interaction. We reduced and analyzed 30 spectra of HD 101412, acquired with the CRIRES and X-shooter spectrographs installed at the VLT (ESO, Chile). The spectroscopic analysis was based on the He iλ10 830 and Paγ lines, formed in the accretion region. Results: We found that the temporal behavior of these diagnostic lines in the near-infrared spectra of HD 101412 can be explained by rotational modulation of line profiles generated by accreting gas with a period P = 20.53d±1.68d. The discovery of this period, about half of the magnetic rotation period Pm = 42.076d previously determined from measurements of the mean longitudinal magnetic field, indicates that the accreted matter falls onto the star in regions close to the magnetic poles intersecting the line-of-sight two times during the rotation cycle. We intend to apply this method to a larger sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programme IDs 087.C-0124(A), 088.C-0218(A,B,C,E), 090.C-0331(A), and 092.C-0126(A).

  16. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) or Automated Export System (AES) record. 758.1 Section 758.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated Export System record)...

  17. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS § 758.1 The Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated... AES record requirements. When an exemption from filing the Shipper's Export Declaration or...

  18. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) or Automated Export System (AES) record. 758.1 Section 758.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated Export System record)...

  19. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) or Automated Export System (AES) record. 758.1 Section 758.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated Export System record)...

  20. 76 FR 4089 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Automated Export System (AES) Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... Census Bureau Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Automated Export System (AES) Program... INFORMATION: I. Abstract The Automated Export System (AES), is the instrument used for collecting export trade... provisions for preparing and filing the AES record. These data are used in the development of U.S....

  1. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) or Automated Export System (AES) record. 758.1 Section 758.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated Export System record)...

  2. TURBO-AE: An Aeroelastic Code for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program is developing new technologies to increase the fuel efficiency of commercial aircraft engines, improve the safety of engine operation, and reduce engine emissions and noise. With the development of new designs for ducted fans, compressors, and turbines to achieve these goals, a basic aeroelastic requirement is that there should be no flutter or high resonant blade stresses in the operating regime. To verify the aeroelastic soundness of these designs, we need an accurate prediction and analysis code. Such a two-dimensional viscous propulsion aeroelastic code, named TURBO-AE, is being developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The TURBO-AE aeroelastic code is based on a three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic Euler/Navier-Stokes turbomachinery code TURBO, developed under a grant from NASA Lewis. TURBO-AE can model viscous flow effects that play an important role in certain aeroelastic problems, such as flutter with flow separation (or stall flutter) and flutter in the presence of shock and boundary-layer interaction. The structural dynamics representation of the blade in the TURBO-AE code is based on a normal mode representation. A finite element analysis code, such as NASTRAN, is used to calculate in-vacuum vibration modes and the associated natural frequency. A work-per-cycle approach is used to determine aeroelastic (flutter) stability. With this approach, the motion of the blade is prescribed to be a harmonic vibration in a specified in vacuum normal mode. The aerodynamic forces acting on the vibrating blade and the work done by these forces on the vibrating blade during a cycle of vibration are calculated. If positive work is being done on the blade by the aerodynamic forces, the blade is dynamically unstable, since it will extract energy from the flow, leading to an increase in the amplitude of the blade's oscillation. Initial calculations have been done for a configuration representative of the Energy

  3. BDNF-induced nitric oxide signals in cultured rat hippocampal neurons: time course, mechanism of generation, and effect on neurotrophin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Kolarow, Richard; Kuhlmann, Christoph R. W.; Munsch, Thomas; Zehendner, Christoph; Brigadski, Tanja; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2014-01-01

    BDNF and nitric oxide signaling both contribute to plasticity at glutamatergic synapses. However, the role of combined signaling of both pathways at the same synapse is largely unknown. Using NO imaging with diaminofluoresceine in cultured hippocampal neurons we analyzed the time course of neurotrophin-induced NO signals. Application of exogenous BDNF, NT-4, and NT-3 (but not NGF) induced NO signals in the soma and in proximal dendrites of hippocampal neurons that were sensitive to NO synthase activity, TrkB signaling, and intracellular calcium elevation. The effect of NO signaling on neurotrophin secretion was analyzed in BDNF-GFP, and NT-3-GFP transfected hippocampal neurons. Exogenous application of the NO donor sodium-nitroprusside markedly inhibited neurotrophin secretion. However, endogenously generated NO in response to depolarization and neurotrophin stimulation, both did not result in a negative feedback on neurotrophin secretion. These results suggest that a negative feedback of NO signaling on synaptic secretion of neurotrophins operates only at high intracellular levels of nitric oxide that are under physiological conditions not reached by depolarization or BDNF signaling. PMID:25426021

  4. Comparative Analysis of Continuous Acoustic Emission (AE) Data, Acquired from 12 and 16 Bit Streaming Systems during Rock Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, J.; Goodfellow, S. D.; Nasseri, M. H.; Reyes-Montes, J. M.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    A comparative analysis of continuous acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during a triaxial compression test, using a 12-bit and a 16-bit acquisition system, is presented. A cylindrical sample (diameter 50.1 mm and length 125 mm) of Berea sandstone was triaxally deformed at a confining pressure of 15 MPa and a strain rate of 1.6E-06 s-1. The sample was loaded differentially until failure occurred at approximately σ1 = 160 MPa. AE activity was monitored for the duration of the experiment by an array of 8 broadband piezoelectric transducers coupled to the rock sample. Raw signals were amplified by 40 dB using pre-amplifiers equipped with filter modules with a frequency passband of 100 kHz to 1 MHz. The amplifiers had a split output enabling the measured signal to be fed into a 12-bit and a 16-bit acquisition system. AE waveforms were continuously recorded at 10 MS/s on 8 data acquisition channels per system. Approximately 4,500 events were harvested and source located from the continuous data for each system. P-wave arrivals were automatically picked and event locations calculated using the downhill Simplex method and a time-varying transverse isotropic velocity model based on periodical surveys across the sample. Events detected on the 12-bit and 16-bit systems were compared both in terms of their P-wave picks and their source locations. In the early stages of AE activity, there appeared to be little difference between P-wave picks and hypocenter locations from both data sets. As the experiment progressed into the post-peak stress regime, which was accompanied by an increase in AE rate and amplitude, fewer events could be harvested from the 12-bit data compared to the 16-bit data. This is linked to the observation of a higher signal-to-noise ratio on AE waveforms harvested from the 16-bit stream compared to those from the 12-bit stream, which results in an easier identification of P-wave onsets. Similarly a higher confidence in source location is expected. Analysis

  5. The importance of structured noise in the generation of self-organizing tissue patterns through contact-mediated cell–cell signalling

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael; Baum, Buzz; Miodownik, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Lateral inhibition provides the basis for a self-organizing patterning system in which distinct cell states emerge from an otherwise uniform field of cells. The development of the microchaete bristle pattern on the notum of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, has long served as a popular model of this process. We recently showed that this bristle pattern depends upon a population of dynamic, basal actin-based filopodia, which span multiple cell diameters. These protrusions establish transient signalling contacts between non-neighbouring cells, generating a type of structured noise that helps to yield a well-ordered and spaced pattern of bristles. Here, we develop a general model of protrusion-based patterning to analyse the role of noise in this process. Using a simple asynchronous cellular automata rule-based model we show that this type of structured noise drives the gradual refinement of lateral inhibition-mediated patterning, as the system moves towards a stable configuration in which cells expressing the inhibitory signal are near-optimally packed. By analysing the effects of introducing thresholds required for signal detection in this model of lateral inhibition, our study shows how filopodia-mediated cell–cell communication can generate complex patterns of spots and stripes, which, in the presence of signalling noise, align themselves across a patterning field. Thus, intermittent protrusion-based signalling has the potential to yield robust self-organizing tissue-wide patterns without the need to invoke diffusion-mediated signalling. PMID:21084342

  6. Detection and characterization of debris avalanche and pyroclastic flow dynamics from the simulation of the seismic signal they generate: application to Montserrat, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Mangeney, A.; Moretti, L.; Stutzmann, E.; Calder, E. S.; Smith, P. J.; Capdeville, Y.; Le Friant, A.; Cole, P.; Luckett, R.; Robertson, R.

    2011-12-01

    Gravitational instabilities such as debris avalanches or pyroclastic flows represent one of the major natural hazards for populations who live in mountainous or volcanic areas. Detection and understanding of the dynamics of these events is crucial for risk assessment. Furthermore, during an eruption, a series of explosions and gravitational flows can occur, making it difficult to retrieve the characteristics of the individual gravitational events such as their volume, velocity, etc. In this context, the seismic signal generated by these events provides a unique tool to extract information on the history of the eruptive process and to validate gravitational flow models. We analyze here a series of events including explosions, debris avalanche and pyroclastic flows occurring in Montserrat in December 1997. This seismic signal is composed of six main pulses. The characteristics of the seismic signals generated by pyroclastic flows (amplitude, emergent onset, frequency spectrum, etc.) are described and linked to the volume of the individual events estimated from past field surveys. As a first step, we simulate the waveform of each event by assuming that the generation process reduces to a simple force applied at the surface of the topography. Going further, we perform detailed numerical simulation of the Boxing Day debris avalanche and of the following pyroclastic flow using a landslide model able to take into account the 3D topography. The stress field generated by the gravitational flows on the topography is then applied as surface boundary condition in a wave propagation model, making it possible to simulate the seismic signal generated by the avalanche and pyroclastic flow. Comparison between the simulated signal and the seismic signal recorded at the Puerto Rico seismic station located 450 km away from the source, show that this method allows us to reproduce the low frequency seismic signal and to constrain the volume and frictional behavior of the individual

  7. Acoustic Emission Signals in Thin Plates Produced by Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Gorman, Michael R.; Humes, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) signals created by impact sources in thin aluminum and graphite/epoxy composite plates were analyzed. Two different impact velocity regimes were studied. Low-velocity (less than 0.21 km/s) impacts were created with an airgun firing spherical steel projectiles (4.5 mm diameter). High-velocity (1.8 to 7 km/s) impacts were generated with a two-stage light-gas gun firing small cylindrical nylon projectiles (1.5 mm diameter). Both the impact velocity and impact angle were varied. The impacts did not penetrate the aluminum plates at either low or high velocities. For high-velocity impacts in composites, there were both impacts that fully penetrated the plate as well as impacts that did not. All impacts generated very large amplitude AE signals (1-5 V at the sensor), which propagated as plate (extensional and/or flexural) modes. In the low-velocity impact studies, the signal was dominated by a large flexural mode with only a small extensional mode component detected. As the impact velocity was increased within the low velocity regime, the overall amplitudes of both the extensional and flexural modes increased. In addition, a relative increase in the amplitude of high-frequency components of the flexural mode was also observed. Signals caused by high-velocity impacts that did not penetrate the plate contained both a large extensional and flexural mode component of comparable amplitudes. The signals also contained components of much higher frequency and were easily differentiated from those caused by low-velocity impacts. An interesting phenomenon was observed in that the large flexural mode component, seen in every other case, was absent from the signal when the impact particle fully penetrated through the composite plates.

  8. Mid-IR Spectra Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Herbig Ae/Be stars are intermediate mass pre-main sequence stars, the higher mass analogues to the T Tauri stars. Because of their higher mass, they are expected form more rapidly than the T Tauri stars. Whether the Herbig Ae/Be stars accrete only from collapsing infalling envelopes or whether accrete through geometrically flattened viscous accretion disks is of current debate. When the Herbig Ae/Be stars reach the main sequence they form a class called Vega-like stars which are known from their IR excesses to have debris disks, such as the famous beta Pictoris. The evolutionary scenario between the pre-main sequence Herbig Ae/Be stars and the main sequence Vega-like stars is not yet revealed and it bears on the possibility of the presence of Habitable Zone planets around the A stars. Photometric studies of Herbig Ae/Be stars have revealed that most are variable in the optical, and a subset of stars show non-periodic drops of about 2 magnitudes. These drops in visible light are accompanied by changes in their colors: at first the starlight becomes reddened, and then it becomes bluer, the polarization goes from less than 0.1 % to roughly 1% during these minima. The theory postulated by V. Grinnin is that large cometary bodies on highly eccentric orbits occult the star on their way to being sublimed, for systems that are viewed edge-on. This theory is one of several controversial theories about the nature of Herbig Ae/Be stars. A 5 year mid-IR spectrophotometric monitoring campaign was begun by Wooden and Butner in 1992 to look for correlations between the variations in visible photometry and mid-IR dust emission features. Generally the approximately 20 stars that have been observed by the NASA Ames HIFOGS spectrometer have been steady at 10 microns. There are a handful, however, that have shown variable mid-IR spectra, with 2 showing variations in both the continuum and features anti-correlated with visual photometry, and 3 showing variations in the emission

  9. Low-latitude thermospheric neutral winds determined from AE-E measurements of the 6300-A nightglow at solar maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrage, M. D.; Abreu, V. J.; Fesen, C. G.

    1990-01-01

    Atmosphere Explorer E (AE-E) measurements of the O(1D) 6300-A emission in the nighttime equatorial thermosphere are used to infer the height of the F2 layer peak as a function of latitude and local time. The investigation is conducted both for northern hemisphere winter solstice and for spring equinox, under solar maximum conditions. The layer heights are used to derive magnetic meridional components of the transequatorial neutral wind, in conjunction with the MSIS-86 model and previous Jicamarca incoherent scatter measurements of the zonal electric field. The AE-E wind estimates indicate a predominant summer to winter flow for the winter solstice case. Comparisons are made with the empirical horizontal wind model HWM87 and with winds generated by the thermospheric general circulation model. The model predictions and experimental results are generally in good agreement, confirming the applicability of visible airglow data to studies of the global neutral wind pattern.

  10. Numerical and experimental characterizations of low frequency MEMS AE sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Ozevin, Didem

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, new MEMS Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors are introduced. The transduction principle of the sensors is capacitance due to gap change. The sensors are numerically modeled using COMSOL Multiphysics software in order to estimate the resonant frequencies and capacitance values, and manufactured using MetalMUMPS process. The process includes thick metal layer (20 μm) made of nickel for freely vibration layer and polysilicon layer as the stationary layer. The metal layer provides a relatively heavy mass so that the spring constant can be designed high for low frequency sensor designs in order to increase the collapse voltage level (proportional to the stiffness), which increases the sensor sensitivity. An insulator layer is deposited between stationary layer and freely vibration layer, which significantly reduces the potential of stiction as a failure mode. As conventional AE sensors made of piezoelectric materials cannot be designed for low frequencies (<300 kHz) with miniature size, the MEMS sensor frequencies are tuned to 50 kHz and 200 kHz. The each sensor contained several parallel-connected cells with an overall size of approximately 250μm × 500 μm. The electromechanical characterizations are performed using high precision impedance analyzer and compared with the numerical results, which indicate a good fit. The initial mechanical characterization tests in atmospheric pressure are conducted using pencil lead break simulations. The proper sensor design reduces the squeeze film damping so that it does not require any vacuum packaging. The MEMS sensor responses are compared with similar frequency piezoelectric AE sensors.

  11. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling.

    PubMed

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2(.)) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. PMID:26225731

  12. Using patient passports to improve A&E asthma care.

    PubMed

    Newell, Karen; Bunce, Rebecca; Hume, Shenagh

    The asthma patient passport (APP) is a patient-specific asthma plan that details what to do when asthma is out of control. It helps patients who have severe, difficult-to-manage asthma, and health professionals when these patients present at accident and emergency. This article shows that, while the APP acts as a patient's advocate, it also facilitates accessing emergency care by making it more streamlined. Case studies explore why people with asthma have avoided going to A&E, putting their lives at risk, and provide an insight into how difficult it can be for people to navigate the healthcare system when they are at their most vulnerable. PMID:26021030

  13. AES XPS study of chromium carbides and chromium iron carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detroye, M.; Reniers, F.; Buess-Herman, C.; Vereecken, J.

    1999-04-01

    The nature of chromium rich carbides which precipitate at grain boundaries in steels is still not perfectly understood. We performed a multitechnique approach on model chromium carbide and chromium-iron carbide samples: Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and High Energy Electron Diffraction (HEED) were used to characterise the samples. Significant chemical shifts were observed for the Cr, Fe and C XPS peaks in the M 7C 3 compound (M stands for metal), indicating unambiguously that the compound formed is a mixed iron-chromium carbide.

  14. Artificial epi-Retinal Prosthesis (AeRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doorish, John F.

    2006-09-01

    There are several research projects going on around the world, which are attempting to develop a prosthetic device to restore sight to the blind. This paper describes the efforts of Second Sight of New York, Inc. The device being developed is called an Artificial epi-Retinal Prosthesis (AeRP), which is basically a small optical computer that fits into the intraocular space of the eye. The AeRP is designed to draw light into the device by specially designed fibre optics. The light is ‘digitized’ by the fibre optic system and then directed to individual photodiode cells making up concentric cylinders thus providing several hundred photodiode cells in the device. The produced electrical stimulation from each cell is then delivered to the retinal ganglion cells by a specially designed delivery system utilizing electrically conducting polymer strands (ECP), which sit on an ‘umbrella’ at the back of the device. The retinal ganglion cells receive the electrical stimulation, which would then be transmitted through the visual system of the brain. There are several innovations in this approach as compared to the other projects. They include, first the design, which will allow for a high number of PC to produce electrical stimulation that will stimulate multiple RGC per PC; the use of the ECP strands has not been used in such an approach before this. Tests have revealed that nerve cells have a good affinity for the material of the ECP. The use of the ECP as well as the fact that the AeRP is completely photovoltaic, with no external power sources, implies that there will not be high heat build-up in the back of the eye, which might damage RGC. A smaller version of the AeRP called the Mini epi-Retinal Prosthesis (MeRP) is the subject of a complimentary paper. It is being built now and will be tested in cell culture studies to determine the efficacy of the design and materials. No actual implants have been performed yet.

  15. Repressing Notch Signaling and Expressing TNFα Are Sufficient to Mimic Retinal Regeneration by Inducing Müller Glial Proliferation to Generate Committed Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Clay; Ackerman, Kristin M.; Lahne, Manuela; Hobgood, Joshua S.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal damage in teleosts, unlike mammals, induces robust Müller glia-mediated regeneration of lost neurons. We examined whether Notch signaling regulates Müller glia proliferation in the adult zebrafish retina and demonstrated that Notch signaling maintains Müller glia in a quiescent state in the undamaged retina. Repressing Notch signaling, through injection of the γ-secretase inhibitor RO4929097, stimulates a subset of Müller glia to reenter the cell cycle without retinal damage. This RO4929097-induced Müller glia proliferation is mediated by repressing Notch signaling because inducible expression of the Notch Intracellular Domain (NICD) can reverse the effect. This RO4929097-induced proliferation requires Ascl1a expression and Jak1-mediated Stat3 phosphorylation/activation, analogous to the light-damaged retina. Moreover, coinjecting RO4929097 and TNFα, a previously identified damage signal, induced the majority of Müller glia to reenter the cell cycle and produced proliferating neuronal progenitor cells that committed to a neuronal lineage in the undamaged retina. This demonstrates that repressing Notch signaling and activating TNFα signaling are sufficient to induce Müller glia proliferation that generates neuronal progenitor cells that differentiate into retinal neurons, mimicking the responses observed in the regenerating retina. PMID:25339752

  16. Analysis of the seismic signals generated by controlled single-block rockfalls on soft clay shales sediments: the Rioux Bourdoux slope experiment (French Alps).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibert, Clément; Provost, Floriane; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Bourrier, Franck; Berger, Frédéric; Bornemann, Pierrick; Borgniet, Laurent; Tardif, Pascal; Mermin, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the dynamics of rockfalls is critical to mitigate the associated hazards but is made very difficult by the nature of these natural disasters that makes them hard to observe directly. Recent advances in seismology allow to determine the dynamics of the largest landslides on Earth from the very low-frequency seismic waves they generate. However, the vast majority of rockfalls that occur worldwide are too small to generate such low-frequency seismic waves and thus these methods cannot be used to reconstruct their dynamics. However, if seismic sensors are close enough, these events will generate high-frequency seismic signals. Unfortunately we cannot yet use these high-frequency seismic records to infer parameters synthetizing the rockfall dynamics as the source of these waves is not well understood. One of the first steps towards understanding the physical processes involved in the generation of high-frequency seismic waves by rockfalls is to study the link between the dynamics of a single block propagating along a well-known path and the features of the seismic signal generated. We conducted controlled releases of single blocks of limestones in a gully of clay-shales (e.g. black marls) in the Rioux Bourdoux torrent (French Alps). 28 blocks, with masses ranging from 76 kg to 472 kg, were released. A monitoring network combining high-velocity cameras, a broadband seismometer and an array of 4 high-frequency seismometers was deployed near the release area and along the travel path. The high-velocity cameras allow to reconstruct the 3D trajectories of the blocks, to estimate their velocities and the position of the different impacts with the slope surface. These data are compared to the seismic signals recorded. As the distance between the block and the seismic sensors at the time of each impact is known, we can determine the associated seismic signal amplitude corrected from propagation and attenuation effects. We can further compare the velocity, the

  17. Identification of a Novel CRF01_AE/CRF07_BC Recombinant Form in Men Who Have Sex with Men in Sichuan, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Wei, Huamian; Xu, Weisi; Yin, Qianqian; Feng, Yi; Liang, Shu; Shao, Yiming; Ma, Liying

    2016-07-01

    A novel second-generation CCR5-tropic HIV-1 recombinant virus (XC2014EU09) was identified here, which was isolated from a HIV-positive man who had sex with men (MSM) in Sichuan, China. Phylogenic analyses showed that XC2014EU09 was composed of two well-established circulating recombinant forms (CRF01_AE and CRF07_BC). Different from the other four reported CRF01_AE/CRF07_BC recombinant forms, three recombinant breakpoints of XC2014EU09 with four fragments were observed in the vpr, env, and nef genes, respectively, as follows: ICRF01_AE (636-5,843 nt), IICRF07_BC (5,844-8,393 nt), IIICRF01_AE (8,394-9,119 nt), and IVCRF07_BC (9,120-9,600 nt). The emergence of CRF01_AE/CRF07_BC recombinant strain indicates the increasing complexity of the HIV-1 epidemic among the MSM group in China. PMID:26943897

  18. Generation of multi-channel high-speed physical random numbers originated from two chaotic signals of mutually coupled semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X.; Wu, Z. M.; Wu, J. G.; Deng, T.; Fan, L.; Zhong, Z. Q.; Chen, J. J.; Xia, G. Q.

    2015-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel technique to generate multi-channel high-speed physical random numbers (PRNs) by taking two chaotic signal outputs from mutually coupled semiconductor lasers (MC-SLs) as entropy sources. First, through controlling the operation parameters of the MC-SL system, two time-delay signature (TDS) suppressed chaotic signals can be obtained. Next, each of these two chaotic signals is sampled by an 8 bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC) with a sampling rate of 10 GHz, and then a bitwise exclusive-OR (XOR) operation on the corresponding bits in samples of the chaotic signal and its time delayed signal is implemented to obtain 8 bit XOR data. Furthermore, through selecting the five least significant bits (LSBs) of 8 bit XOR data to form 5 bit Boolean sequences, two sets of PRN streams with a rate up to 50 Gbits s-1 are generated and successfully pass the NIST statistical tests. Finally, merging these two sets of 50 Gbits s-1 PRN streams by an interleaving operation, another set of the 100 Gbits s-1 PRN stream, which meets all the quality criteria of NIST statistical tests, is also acquired.

  19. Decryption-decompression of AES protected ZIP files on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Tan Nhat; Pham, Phong Hong; Nguyen, Duc Huu; Nguyen, Thuy Thanh; Le, Hung Duc

    2011-10-01

    AES is a strong encryption system, so decryption-decompression of AES encrypted ZIP files requires very large computing power and techniques of reducing the password space. This makes implementations of techniques on common computing system not practical. In [1], we reduced the original very large password search space to a much smaller one which surely containing the correct password. Based on reduced set of passwords, in this paper, we parallel decryption, decompression and plain text recognition for encrypted ZIP files by using CUDA computing technology on graphics cards GeForce GTX295 of NVIDIA, to find out the correct password. The experimental results have shown that the speed of decrypting, decompressing, recognizing plain text and finding out the original password increases about from 45 to 180 times (depends on the number of GPUs) compared to sequential execution on the Intel Core 2 Quad Q8400 2.66 GHz. These results have demonstrated the potential applicability of GPUs in this cryptanalysis field.

  20. Quantification of AES depth profiles by the MRI model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovač, Janez; Zalar, Anton; Praček, Borut

    2003-02-01

    The main physical effects that contribute to interface broadening in the sputter depth profiles of polycrystalline metallic multilayer structures were studied by comparison of measured and simulated AES depth profiles. An algorithm based on the so-called mixing-roughness-information depth (MRI) model was used to simulate AES depth profiles of Ni/Cr multilayer structures with different roughnesses of the initial surfaces. The simulated depth profiles were compared with measurements performed at two different depth profiling parameters on the Ni/Cr and Al/Ni/Cr multilayer structures with an initial surface roughness of about 1.0 and 21.5 nm, respectively. The comparison of simulated and measured depth profiles enabled us to separate and estimate different contributions to the interface broadening, as well as their dependence on the sputter depth. We found that roughness was the dominant factor related to depth resolution with respect to the information depth and atomic mixing contribution. The values of roughness introduced into the simulation algorithm coincided well with the values measured by AFM at the initial surface and after depth profiling. The results showed the capability of the simulation procedure based on the MRI model to separate and evaluate different contributions to the depth resolution.

  1. The spectrum and variability of radio emission from AE Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abada-Simon, Meil; Lecacheux, Alain; Bastian, Tim S.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; Dulk, George A.

    1993-01-01

    The first detections of the magnetic cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii at millimeter wavelengths are reported. AE Aqr was detected at wavelengths of 3.4 and 1.25 mm. These data are used to show that the time-averaged spectrum is generally well fitted by a power law S(nu) varies as nu exp alpha, where alpha is approximately equal to 0.35-0.60, and that the power law extends to millimeter wavelengths, i.e., the spectral turnover is at a frequency higher than 240 GHz. It is suggested that the spectrum is consistent with that expected from a superposition of flarelike events where the frequency distribution of the initial flux density is a power law f (S0) varies as S0 exp -epsilon, with index epsilon approximately equal to 1.8. Within the context of this model, the high turnover frequency of the radio spectrum implies magnetic field strengths in excess of 250 G in the source.

  2. Role of endogenous TRPC6 channels in Ca2+ signal generation in A7r5 smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Soboloff, Jonathan; Spassova, Maria; Xu, Wen; He, Li-Ping; Cuesta, Natalia; Gill, Donald L

    2005-12-01

    The ubiquitously expressed canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) ion channels are considered important in Ca2+ signal generation, but their mechanisms of activation and roles remain elusive. Whereas most studies have examined overexpressed TRPC channels, we used molecular, biochemical, and electrophysiological approaches to assess the expression and function of endogenous TRPC channels in A7r5 smooth muscle cells. Real time PCR and Western analyses reveal TRPC6 as the only member of the diacylglycerol-responsive TRPC3/6/7 subfamily of channels expressed at significant levels in A7r5 cells. TRPC1, TRPC4, and TRPC5 were also abundant. An outwardly rectifying, nonselective cation current was activated by phospholipase C-coupled vasopressin receptor activation or by the diacylglycerol analogue, oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG). Introduction of TRPC6 small interfering RNA sequences into A7r5 cells by electroporation led to 90% reduction of TRPC6 transcript and 80% reduction of TRPC6 protein without any detectable compensatory changes in the expression of other TRPC channels. The OAG-activated nonselective cation current was similarly reduced by TRPC6 RNA interference. Intracellular Ca2+ measurements using fura-2 revealed that thapsigargin-induced store-operated Ca2+ entry was unaffected by TRPC6 knockdown, whereas vasopressin-induced Ca2+ entry was suppressed by more than 50%. In contrast, OAG-induced Ca2+ transients were unaffected by TRPC6 knockdown. Nevertheless, OAG-induced Ca2+ entry bore the hallmarks of TRPC6 function; it was inhibited by protein kinase C and blocked by the Src-kinase inhibitor, 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine (PP2). Importantly, OAG-induced Ca2+ entry was blocked by the potent L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitor, *nimodipine. Thus, TRPC6 activation probably results primarily in Na ion entry and depolarization, leading to activation of L-type channels as the mediators of Ca2+ entry. Calculations reveal that even

  3. Evidence for particle acceleration in AE Aqr from radio and X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Jager, O. C.

    1991-01-01

    The novalike cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii shows evidence for radio synchrotron emission from expanding magnetized clouds. The radio and UV flare timescales are similar indicating that the central engine is located close to the white dwarf. A collisionless shock may develop above the polar cap, which may explain the observed temperature. Protons and ions accelerated up to energies of more than 1 TeV can diffuse away from the central engine, enter magnetized clouds, and generate waves which in turn heat and accelerate electrons. An embarrassing situation exists where reprocessed optical and X-ray pulsations (33 s) are observed, but the expected direct X-ray pulse from the white dwarf is absent. The standard theory for CVs cannot explain this, and one possible explanation is that a beam of relativistic protons and ions from the polar cap may give the observed reprocessed optical to X-rays in a thick target fixed in the system.

  4. [Determination of trace elements in radix ophiopogonis by HG-ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Lou, Qi-Zheng; Xu, Run-Sheng

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, a method of microwave digestion technique for the contents determination of trace elements Ni, Zn, Mn, Cu, Mg, Fe, Ca and Pb in radix ophiopogonis by hydride generation inductively coupled plasma atomic emition spectrometry (HG-ICP-AES) was reported. Its recovery ratio obtained by standard addition method ranged between 97.8% and 102.5%, and its RSD was lower than 4.0%. The results of the determination show that radix ophiopogonis is rich in the inorganic elements such as Fe, and the content of Zn in radix ophiopogonis of Zhejiang is much higher in radix ophiopogonis of Sichun. The result will provide scientific data for the study on the elements in radix ophiopogonis and on their relativity of medicine efficacy. PMID:17763797

  5. Use of Multiband Acousto-optic Filters for Spectrally Encoded Signals Generation in Incoherent Optical Communication Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byshevski-Konopko, O. A.; Proklov, V. V.; Filatov, A. L.; Lugovskoi, A. V.; Korablev, E. M.

    New acousto-optical (AO) coder of spectrally optical signals for optical code division multiple access systems (O-CDMA) was proposed and investigated. The coder was developed on a base of multi-frequency acousto-optical filter (MAOF). Control RF signals for MAOF were synthesized taking into account intermodulation distortions and interferences between different carrier frequencies incoming to MAOF. An industrial LED was used under system investigation.

  6. Transformation of AeIn4 Indides (Ae = Ba, Sr) into an AeAu2In2 Structure Type Through Gold Substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jing-Cao; Corbett, John D.

    2007-04-17

    The title compounds were prepared from the elements by high-temperature solid-state synthesis techniques. X-ray structural analyses shows that BaAu{sub 2}In{sub 2} (1) and SrAu{sub 2}In{sub 2} (2) crystallize in a new orthorhombic structure, Pnma, Z = 4 (a = 8.755(2), 8.530(2) {angstrom}; b = 4.712(1), 4.598(1) {angstrom}; c = 12.368(3), 12.283(4) {angstrom}, respectively). Gold substitutes for 50% of the indium atoms in the tetragonal BaIn{sub 4} and monoclinic SrIn{sub 4} parents to give this new and more flexible orthorhombic structure. The Ae atoms in this structure are contained within chains of hexagonal prisms built of alternating In and Au that have additional augmenting atoms around their waists from further condensation of parallel displaced chains. The driving forces for these structural changes are in part the shorter Au-In distances (2.72 and 2.69 {angstrom}) relative to d(In-In) in the parents, presumably because of relativistic contractions with Au. Generalities about such centered prismatic building blocks and their condensation modes in these and related phases are described. Band structure calculations (EHTB) demonstrate that the two compounds are metallic, which is confirmed by measurements of the resistivity of 1 and the magnetic susceptibilities of both.

  7. Tumor-Induced STAT3 Signaling in Myeloid Cells Impairs Dendritic Cell Generation by Decreasing PKCβII Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Farren, Matthew R.; Carlson, Louise M.; Netherby, Colleen S.; Lindner, Inna; Li, Pui-Kai; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Abrams, Scott I.; Lee, Kelvin P.

    2014-01-01

    A major mechanism by which cancers escape control by the immune system is by blocking the differentiation of myeloid cells into dendritic cells (DCs), immunostimulatory cells that activate anti-tumor T cells. Tumor-dependent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling in myeloid progenitor cells is thought to cause this block in their differentiation. In addition, a signaling pathway through protein kinase C βII (PKCβII) is essential for the differentiation of myeloid cells into DCs. Here, we found in humans and mice that breast cancer cells substantially decreased the abundance of PKCβII in myeloid progenitor cells through a mechanism involving the enhanced activation of STAT3 signaling by soluble, tumor-derived factors (TDFs). STAT3 bound to previously undescribed negative regulatory elements within the promoter of PRKCB, which encodes PKCβII. We also found a previously undescribed counter-regulatory mechanism through which the activity of PKCβII inhibited tumor-dependent STAT3 signaling by decreasing the abundance of cell-surface receptors, such as cytokine and growth factor receptors, that are activated by TDFs. Together, these data suggest that a previously unrecognized crosstalk mechanism between the STAT3 and PKCβII signaling pathways provides the molecular basis for the tumor-induced blockade in the differentiation of myeloid cells, and suggest that enhancing PKCβII activity may be a therapeutic strategy to alleviate cancer-mediated suppression of the immune system. PMID:24550541

  8. A high-resolution spectropolarimetric survey of Herbig Ae/Be stars - I. Observations and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alecian, E.; Wade, G. A.; Catala, C.; Grunhut, J. H.; Landstreet, J. D.; Bagnulo, S.; Böhm, T.; Folsom, C. P.; Marsden, S.; Waite, I.

    2013-02-01

    This is the first in a series of papers in which we describe and report the analysis of a large survey of Herbig Ae/Be stars in circular spectropolarimetry. Using the ESPaDOnS and Narval high-resolution spectropolarimeters at the Canada-France-Hawaii and Bernard Lyot Telescopes, respectively, we have acquired 132 circularly polarized spectra of 70 Herbig Ae/Be stars and Herbig candidates. The large majority of these spectra are characterized by a resolving power of about 65 000, and a spectral coverage from about 3700 Å to 1 μm. The peak signal-to-noise ratio per CCD pixel ranges from below 100 (for the faintest targets) to over 1000 (for the brightest). The observations were acquired with the primary aim of searching for magnetic fields in these objects. However, our spectra are suitable for a variety of other important measurements, including rotational properties, variability, binarity, chemical abundances, circumstellar environment conditions and structure, etc. In this paper, we describe the sample selection, the observations and their reduction, and the measurements that will comprise the basis of much of our following analysis. We describe the determination of fundamental parameters for each target. We detail the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) that we have applied to each of our spectra, including the selection, editing and tuning of the LSD line masks. We describe the fitting of the LSD Stokes I profiles using a multicomponent model that yields the rotationally broadened photospheric profile (providing the projected rotational velocity and radial velocity for each observation) as well as circumstellar emission and absorption components. Finally, we diagnose the longitudinal Zeeman effect via the measured circular polarization, and report the longitudinal magnetic field and Stokes V Zeeman signature detection probability. As an appendix, we provide a detailed review of each star observed.

  9. Analysis of behavior of focusing error signals generated by astigmatic method when a focused spot moves beyond the radius of a land-groove-type optical disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Masahisa; Nakatani, Hidehiko; Nakai, Kenya; Ohmaki, Masayuki

    2015-09-01

    We theoretically calculate behaviors of focusing error signals generated by an astigmatic method in a land-groove-type optical disk. The focusing error signal from the land does not coincide with that from the groove. This behavior is enhanced when a focused spot of an optical pickup moves beyond the radius of the optical disk. A gain difference between the slope sensitivities of focusing error signals from the land and the groove is an important factor with respect to stable focusing servo control. In our calculation, the format of digital versatile disc-random access memory (DVD-RAM) is adopted as the land-groove-type optical disk model, and the dependences of the gain difference on various factors are investigated. The gain difference strongly depends on the optical intensity distribution of the laser beam in the optical pickup. The calculation method and results in this paper will be reflected in newly developed land-groove-type optical disks.

  10. Latitudinal variation of thermospheric hydrogen near solstice from AE-D observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanatani, S.; Breig, E. L.

    1988-01-01

    Variations of thermospheric neutral atomic hydrogen with latitude during a solstice season near solar minimum were investigated using data acquired with the polar-orbiting AE-D satellite. Hydrogen concentrations at low latitude were found to be comparable to those found from observations with the AE-E satellite, but were slightly higher than concentrations derived from the 1983 mass spectrometer incoherent scatter atmospheric model. Results confirm the general summer-to-winter density increase, large latitudinal gradients in the summer hemisphere, and the winter enhancement of hydrogen observed in AE-C nighttime measurements. The AE-D data, however, show a small polar depression in hydrogen concentration at high winter latitudes, attributed to atmospheric dynamics following auroral heating. The density gradients observed by AE-D in the summer hemisphere were in sharp contrast to the more constant horizontal daytime profiles reported from OGO-6 and previous AE-C measurements, indicating the possibility of local time effects.

  11. Rational chemical design of the next generation of molecular imaging probes based on physics and biology: mixing modalities, colors and signals

    PubMed Central

    Longmire, Michelle R.; Ogawa, Mikako; Choyke, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, numerous in vivo molecular imaging probes have been developed. As a consequence, much has been published on the design and synthesis of molecular imaging probes focusing on each modality, each type of material, or each target disease. More recently, second generation molecular imaging probes with unique, multi-functional, or multiplexed characteristics have been designed. This critical review focuses on (i) molecular imaging using combinations of modalities and signals that employ the full range of the electromagnetic spectra, (ii) optimized chemical design of molecular imaging probes for in vivo kinetics based on biology and physiology across a range of physical sizes, (iii) practical examples of second generation molecular imaging probes designed to extract complementary data from targets using multiple modalities, color, and comprehensive signals (277 references). PMID:21607237

  12. High-sweeping-speed optically synchronized dual-channel terahertz-signal generator for driving a superconducting tunneling mixer and its application to active gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyoung-Hwan; Shimizu, Naofumi; Kohjiro, Satoshi; Kikuchi, Ken'ichi; Wakatsuki, Atsushi; Kukutsu, Naoya; Kado, Yuichi

    2009-10-12

    We propose a high-sweeping-speed optically synchronized dual-channel terahertz (THz) signal generator for an active gas-sensing system with a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer. The generator can sweep a frequency range from 200 to 500 GHz at a speed of 375 GHz/s and a frequency resolution of 500 MHz. With the developed gas-sensing system, a gas-absorption-line measurement was successfully carried out with N(2)O gas in that frequency range. PMID:20372575

  13. Modulation of Smad signaling by non-TGFβ components in myofibroblast generation during wound healing in corneal stroma.

    PubMed

    Saika, Shizuya; Yamanaka, Osamu; Okada, Yuka; Sumioka, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Corneal scarring/fibrosis disturbs normal transparency and curvature of the tissue and thus impairs vision. The lesion is characterized by appearance of myofibroblasts, the key player of the fibrogenic reaction, and excess accumulation of extracellular matrix. Inflammatory/fibrogenic growth factors or cytokines expressed in inflammatory cells that infiltrate into injured tissues play a pivotal role in fibrotic tissue formation. In this article the pathogenesis of fibrosis/scarring in the corneal stroma is reviewed focusing on the roles of myofibroblast, the key player in corneal stromal wound healing and fibrosis, and cytoplasmic signals activated by the fibrogenic cytokine, transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). Although it is established that TGFβ/Smad signal is essential to the process of keratocyte-myofibroblast transformation in a healing corneal stroma post-injury. This article emphasizes the involvement of non-TGFβ molecular mechanisms in modulating Smad signal. We focus on the roles of matricellular proteins, i.e., osteopontin and tenascin C, and as cellular components, the roles of transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel receptors are discussed. Our intent is to draw attention to the possibility of signal transduction cascade modulation (e.g., Smad signal and mitogen-activated protein kinases, by gene transfer and other related technology) as being beneficial in a clinical setting to reduce or even prevent corneal stromal tissue fibrosis/scarring and inflammation. PMID:26675402

  14. NPS alternate techsat satellite, design project for AE-4871

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This project was completed as part of AE-4871, Advanced Spacecraft Design. The intent of the course is to provide experience in the design of all the major components in a spacecraft system. Team members were given responsibility for the design of one of the six primary subsystems: power, structures, propulsion, attitude control, telemetry, tracking and control (TT&C), and thermal control. In addition, a single member worked on configuration control, launch vehicle integration, and a spacecraft test plan. Given an eleven week time constraint, a preliminary design of each subsystem was completed. Where possible, possible component selections were also made. Assistance for this project came principally from the Naval Research Laboratory's Spacecraft Technology Branch. Specific information on components was solicited from representatives in industry. The design project centers on a general purpose satellite bus that is currently being sought by the Strategic Defense Initiative.

  15. Report on the Development of the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES).

    PubMed

    Nechvatal, J; Barker, E; Bassham, L; Burr, W; Dworkin, M; Foti, J; Roback, E

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated a process to select a symmetric-key encryption algorithm to be used to protect sensitive (unclassified) Federal information in furtherance of NIST's statutory responsibilities. In 1998, NIST announced the acceptance of 15 candidate algorithms and requested the assistance of the cryptographic research community in analyzing the candidates. This analysis included an initial examination of the security and efficiency characteristics for each algorithm. NIST reviewed the results of this preliminary research and selected MARS, RC™, Rijndael, Serpent and Twofish as finalists. Having reviewed further public analysis of the finalists, NIST has decided to propose Rijndael as the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES). The research results and rationale for this selection are documented in this report. PMID:27500035

  16. Report on the Development of the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)

    PubMed Central

    Nechvatal, James; Barker, Elaine; Bassham, Lawrence; Burr, William; Dworkin, Morris; Foti, James; Roback, Edward

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated a process to select a symmetric-key encryption algorithm to be used to protect sensitive (unclassified) Federal information in furtherance of NIST’s statutory responsibilities. In 1998, NIST announced the acceptance of 15 candidate algorithms and requested the assistance of the cryptographic research community in analyzing the candidates. This analysis included an initial examination of the security and efficiency characteristics for each algorithm. NIST reviewed the results of this preliminary research and selected MARS, RC™, Rijndael, Serpent and Twofish as finalists. Having reviewed further public analysis of the finalists, NIST has decided to propose Rijndael as the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES). The research results and rationale for this selection are documented in this report.

  17. Hedgehog targets in the Drosophila embryo and the mechanisms that generate tissue-specific outputs of Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Biehs, Brian; Kechris, Katerina; Liu, Songmei; Kornberg, Thomas B

    2010-11-01

    Paracrine Hedgehog (Hh) signaling regulates growth and patterning in many Drosophila organs. We mapped chromatin binding sites for Cubitus interruptus (Ci), the transcription factor that mediates outputs of Hh signal transduction, and we analyzed transcription profiles of control and mutant embryos to identify genes that are regulated by Hh. Putative targets that we identified included several Hh pathway components, mostly previously identified targets, and many targets that are novel. Every Hh target we analyzed that is not a pathway component appeared to be regulated by Hh in a tissue-specific manner; analysis of expression patterns of pathway components and target genes provided evidence of autocrine Hh signaling in the optic primordium of the embryo. We present evidence that tissue specificity of Hh targets depends on transcription factors that are Hh-independent, suggesting that `pre-patterns' of transcription factors partner with Ci to make Hh-dependent gene expression position specific. PMID:20978080

  18. Optical Mass Flow Diagnostics in Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauley, P. Wilson; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.

    2015-09-01

    We examine a broad range of mass flow diagnostics in a large sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars (HAEBES) using high resolution optical spectra. The Hβ and He i 5876 Å lines show the highest incidence of P Cygni (30%) and inverse P Cygni (14%) morphologies, respectively. The Fe ii 4924 Å line also shows a large incidence of P Cygni profiles (11%). We find support for many of the conclusions reached in a study based on the analysis of the He i λ10830 line in a large sample of HAEBES. Namely, HAEBES exhibit smaller fractions of both blueshifted absorption (i.e., mass outflow) and redshifted absorption (i.e., mass infall or accretion) than their lower mass cousins, the classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs). In particular, the optical data supports the conclusion that HAEBES displaying redshifted absorption, in general, show maximum redshifted absorption velocities that are smaller fractions of their stellar escape velocities than is found for CTTSs. This suggests that HAEBE accretion flows are originating deeper in the gravitational potentials of their stars than in CTTS systems. In addition, we find a lack of inner disk wind signatures in the blueshifted absorption objects; only stellar wind signatures are clearly observed. These findings, along with the lack of detected magnetic fields around HAEBES, support the idea that large magnetospheres are not prevalent around HAEBES and that accretion flows are instead mediated by significantly smaller magnetospheres with relatively smaller truncation radii (e.g., 1-2 R*). Redshifted absorption is much more common around Herbig Ae stars than Be stars, suggesting that Herbig Be stars may accrete via a boundary layer rather than along magnetic field lines.

  19. Evaluation of the Surface Roughness using AE method with Air Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, T.; Takata, S.; Hino, T.; Yoshida, K.

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to find the development for the evaluation of the surface roughness by the Acoustic Emission (AE) method with air blowing. We paid attention to the AE wave due to air blowing on the specimen plate with different surface roughness. The relationship between the AE wave and surface roughness of specimen plates was investigated. As the result, there is large and continuous difference in the Root Mean Square (RMS) value of their AE waveform. The RMS value decreases by increasing of the surface roughness of specimen plates. It suggested that this characteristic has the possibility to establish a new method of nondestructive surface roughness testing.

  20. AGE-RAGE signal generates a specific NF-κB RelA “barcode” that directs collagen I expression

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yunqian; Kim, Ji-Min; Park, Hal-Sol; Yang, Annie; Islam, Celia; Lakatta, Edward G.; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are sugar-modified biomolecules that accumulate in the body with advancing age, and are implicated in the development of multiple age-associated structural and functional abnormities and diseases. It has been well documented that AGEs signal via their receptor RAGE to activate several cellular programs including NF-κB, leading to inflammation. A large number of stimuli can activate NF-κB; yet different stimuli, or the same stimulus for NF-κB in different cellular settings, produce a very different transcriptional landscape and physiological outcome. The NF-κB barcode hypothesis posits that cellular network dynamics generate signal-specific post-translational modifications, or a “barcode” to NF-κB, and that a signature “barcode” mediates a specific gene expression pattern. In the current study, we established that AGE-RAGE signaling results in NF-κB activation that directs collagen Ia1 and Ia2 expression. We further demonstrated that AGE-RAGE signal induces phosphorylation of RelA at three specific residues, T254, S311, and S536. These modifications are required for transcription of collagen I genes and are a consequence of cellular network dynamics. The increase of collagen content is a hallmark of arterial aging, and our work provides a potential mechanistic link between RAGE signaling, NF-κB activation, and aging-associated arterial alterations in structure and function. PMID:26729520