Science.gov

Sample records for ae source location

  1. Effective AE source location of damages in the wind turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, D. J.; Han, B. H.

    2012-05-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) has emerged as a powerful nondestructive tool to detect preexisting defects or to characterize failure mechanisms. Recently, this technique or this kind of principle, that is an in-situ monitoring of inside damages of materials or structures, becomes increasingly popular for monitoring the integrity of large structures like a huge wind blade. Therefore, it is required to find a symptom of damage propagation before catastrophic failure through a continuous monitoring. In this study, we have tried to develop a source location algorithm for damage identification on the part of real wind turbine blade. First, it was focused to understand the activities of acoustic emission events generated from the glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) structures such as a wind blade. Secondly, this study aims to identify and locate the damages from blade specimens. In this work, the activities of AE signals generated from external artificial sources was evaluated and located by new developed source location algorithm. The results show that new suggested source location algorithm was much higher performance than conventional source location method.

  2. Locating the Accretion Footprint on a Herbig Ae Star: MWC 480

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C. A.; Hamaguchi, K.; Schneider, G.; Stecklum, B.; Woodgate, B. E.; McCleary, J. E.; Williger, G. M.; Sitko, M. L.; Menard, F.; Henning, Th.; Brittain, S.; Troutmann, M.; Donehew, B.; Hines, D.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R. W.; Rudy, R. J.; Day, A. M.; Shenoy, A.; Wilner, D.; Silverston, M.; Bouret, J.-C.; Clampin, M.; Petre, R.

    2011-01-01

    Accretion is a fundamental process which establishes the dynamics of the protoplanetary disk and the final properties of the forming star. In solar-type stars, the star-disk coupling is determined by the magnetic field structure, which is responsible for funneling material from the disk midplane to higher latitudes on the star. Here, we use pan-chromatic data for the Herbig Ae star MWC 480 to address whether similar processes occur in intermediate-mass stars. MWC 480 has X-ray emission typical of actively accreting Herbig Ae stars, but with 5-9 x more photoelectric absorption than expected from optical and FUV data. We consider 3 sources for the absorption: the disk absorption in a wind or jet, and accretion. While we detect the disk in scattered light in are-analysis of archival HST data. the data are consistent with grazing illumination of the dust disk. We find that MWC 480's disk is stratified, geometrically thin, and is not responsible for the observed photoelectric absorption. MWC 480 drives a bipolar jet, but with a mass loss rate which is low compared to other Herbig Ae stars, where the outflow is more favorably oriented and enhanced photoelectric absorption is not seen. This excludes a jet or wind origin for the enhanced photoelectric absorption. We compare MWC 480's 0 VI emission with other Herbig Ae stars. The distribution of the emission in inclination, and lack of a correlation of profile shape and system inclination excludes equatorially-confined accretion for the FUSE Herbig Ae stars. The photoelectric absorption data further suggest that the accretion footprint on MWC 480 and other Herbig Ae stars is located at high temperate, rather than polar, latitudes. These findings support the presence of funneled accretion in MWC 480 and Herbig Ae stars, strengthening the parallel to T Tauri stars.

  3. Acoustic emission source location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promboon, Yajai

    The objective of the research program was development of reliable source location techniques. The study comprised two phases. First, the research focused on development of source location methods for homogeneous plates. The specimens used in the program were steel railroad tank cars. Source location methods were developed and demonstrated for empty and water filled tanks. The second phase of the research was an exploratory study of source location method for fiber reinforced composites. Theoretical analysis and experimental measurement of wave propagation were carried out. This data provided the basis for development of a method using the intersection of the group velocity curves for the first three wave propagation modes. Simplex optimization was used to calculate the location of the source. Additional source location methods have been investigated and critically examined. Emphasis has been placed on evaluating different methods for determining the time of arrival of a wave. The behavior of wave in a water filled tank was studied and source location methods suitable for use in this situation have been examined through experiment and theory. Particular attention is paid to the problem caused by leaky Lamb waves. A preliminary study into the use of neural networks for source location in fiber reinforced composites was included in the research program. A preliminary neural network model and the results from training and testing data are reported.

  4. Summary of detection, location, and characterization capabilities of AE for continuous monitoring of cracks in reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hutton, P.H.; Kurtz, R.J.; Friesel, M.A.; Pappas, R.A.; Skorpik, J.R.; Dawson, J.F.

    1984-10-01

    The objective of the program is to develop acoustic emission (AE) methods for continuous monitoring of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate crack growth. The approach involves three phases: develop relationships to identify crack growth AE signals and to use identified crack growth AE data to estimate flaw severity; evaluate and refine AE/flaw relationships through fatigue testing a heavy section vessel under simulated reactor conditions; and demonstrate continuous AE monitoring on a nuclear power reactor system.

  5. Source Identification and Location Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weir, Donald; Bridges, James; Agboola, Femi; Dougherty, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Mr. Weir presented source location results obtained from an engine test as part of the Engine Validation of Noise Reduction Concepts program. Two types of microphone arrays were used in this program to determine the jet noise source distribution for the exhaust from a 4.3 bypass ratio turbofan engine. One was a linear array of 16 microphones located on a 25 ft. sideline and the other was a 103 microphone 3-D "cage" array in the near field of the jet. Data were obtained from a baseline nozzle and from numerous nozzle configuration using chevrons and/or tabs to reduce the jet noise. Mr. Weir presented data from two configurations: the baseline nozzle and a nozzle configuration with chevrons on both the core and bypass nozzles. This chevron configuration had achieved a jet noise reduction of 4 EPNdB in small scale tests conducted at the Glenn Research Center. IR imaging showed that the chevrons produced significant improvements in mixing and greatly reduced the length of the jet potential core. Comparison of source location data from the 1-D phased array showed a shift of the noise sources towards the nozzle and clear reductions of the sources due to the noise reduction devices. Data from the 3-D array showed a single source at a frequency of 125 Hz. located several diameters downstream from the nozzle exit. At 250 and 400 Hz., multiple sources, periodically spaced, appeared to exist downstream of the nozzle. The trend of source location moving toward the nozzle exit with increasing frequency was also observed. The 3-D array data also showed a reduction in source strength with the addition of chevrons. The overall trend of source location with frequency was compared for the two arrays and with classical experience. Similar trends were observed. Although overall trends with frequency and addition of suppression devices were consistent between the data from the 1-D and the 3-D arrays, a comparison of the details of the inferred source locations did show differences. A

  6. Acoustic Emission Source Location Using a Distributed Feedback Fiber Laser Rosette

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenzhu; Zhang, Wentao; Li, Fang

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an approach for acoustic emission (AE) source localization in a large marble stone using distributed feedback (DFB) fiber lasers. The aim of this study is to detect damage in structures such as those found in civil applications. The directional sensitivity of DFB fiber laser is investigated by calculating location coefficient using a method of digital signal analysis. In this, autocorrelation is used to extract the location coefficient from the periodic AE signal and wavelet packet energy is calculated to get the location coefficient of a burst AE source. Normalization is processed to eliminate the influence of distance and intensity of AE source. Then a new location algorithm based on the location coefficient is presented and tested to determine the location of AE source using a Delta (Δ) DFB fiber laser rosette configuration. The advantage of the proposed algorithm over the traditional methods based on fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) include the capability of: having higher strain resolution for AE detection and taking into account two different types of AE source for location. PMID:24141266

  7. Point Source Location Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, J. Allen

    1986-11-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of point source location accuracy and sensitivity as a function of focal plane geometry, optical blur spot, and location algorithm. Five specific blur spots are treated: gaussian, diffraction-limited circular aperture with and without central obscuration (obscured and clear bessinc, respectively), diffraction-limited rectangular aperture, and a pill box distribution. For each blur spot, location accuracies are calculated for square, rectangular, and hexagonal detector shapes of equal area. The rectangular detectors are arranged on a hexagonal lattice. The two location algorithms consist of standard and generalized centroid techniques. Hexagonal detector arrays are shown to give the best performance under a wide range of conditions.

  8. Continuous wavelet transform analysis and modal location analysis acoustic emission source location for nuclear piping crack growth monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd, Shukri; Holford, Karen M.; Pullin, Rhys

    2014-02-12

    Source location is an important feature of acoustic emission (AE) damage monitoring in nuclear piping. The ability to accurately locate sources can assist in source characterisation and early warning of failure. This paper describe the development of a novelAE source location technique termed 'Wavelet Transform analysis and Modal Location (WTML)' based on Lamb wave theory and time-frequency analysis that can be used for global monitoring of plate like steel structures. Source location was performed on a steel pipe of 1500 mm long and 220 mm outer diameter with nominal thickness of 5 mm under a planar location test setup using H-N sources. The accuracy of the new technique was compared with other AE source location methods such as the time of arrival (TOA) techniqueand DeltaTlocation. Theresults of the study show that the WTML method produces more accurate location resultscompared with TOA and triple point filtering location methods. The accuracy of the WTML approach is comparable with the deltaT location method but requires no initial acoustic calibration of the structure.

  9. Structural health monitoring of liquid-filled tanks: a Bayesian approach for location of acoustic emission sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zárate, Boris A.; Pollock, Adrian; Momeni, Sepand; Ley, Obdulia

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a well-established nondestructive testing method for assessing the condition of liquid-filled tanks. Often the tank can be tested without the need for accurate location of AE sources. But sometimes, accurate location is required, such as in the case of follow-up inspections after AE has indicated a significant defect. Traditional computed location techniques that considered only the wave traveling through the shell of the tank have not proved reliable when applied to liquid-filled tanks. This because AE sensors are often responding to liquid-borne waves, that are not considered in the traditional algorithms. This paper describes an approach for locating AE sources on the wall of liquid filled tanks that includes two novel aspects: (i) the use of liquid-borne waves, and (ii) the use of a probabilistic algorithm. The proposed algorithm is developed within a Bayesian framework that considers uncertainties in the wave velocities and the time of arrival. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo is used to estimate the distribution of the AE source location. This approach was applied on a 102 inch diameter (29 000 gal) railroad tank car by estimating the source locations from pencil lead break with waveforms recorded. Results show that the proposed Bayesian approach for source location can be used to calculate the most probable region of the tank wall where the AE source is located.

  10. An efficient closed-form solution for acoustic emission source location in three-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xibing; Dong, Longjun

    2014-02-15

    This paper presents an efficient closed-form solution (ECS) for acoustic emission(AE) source location in three-dimensional structures using time difference of arrival (TDOA) measurements from N receivers, N ≥ 6. The nonlinear location equations of TDOA are simplified to linear equations. The unique analytical solution of AE sources for unknown velocity system is obtained by solving the linear equations. The proposed ECS method successfully solved the problems of location errors resulting from measured deviations of velocity as well as the existence and multiplicity of solutions induced by calculations of square roots in existed close-form methods.

  11. Acoustic emission source location in complex structures using full automatic delta T mapping technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jumaili, Safaa Kh.; Pearson, Matthew R.; Holford, Karen M.; Eaton, Mark J.; Pullin, Rhys

    2016-05-01

    An easy to use, fast to apply, cost-effective, and very accurate non-destructive testing (NDT) technique for damage localisation in complex structures is key for the uptake of structural health monitoring systems (SHM). Acoustic emission (AE) is a viable technique that can be used for SHM and one of the most attractive features is the ability to locate AE sources. The time of arrival (TOA) technique is traditionally used to locate AE sources, and relies on the assumption of constant wave speed within the material and uninterrupted propagation path between the source and the sensor. In complex structural geometries and complex materials such as composites, this assumption is no longer valid. Delta T mapping was developed in Cardiff in order to overcome these limitations; this technique uses artificial sources on an area of interest to create training maps. These are used to locate subsequent AE sources. However operator expertise is required to select the best data from the training maps and to choose the correct parameter to locate the sources, which can be a time consuming process. This paper presents a new and improved fully automatic delta T mapping technique where a clustering algorithm is used to automatically identify and select the highly correlated events at each grid point whilst the "Minimum Difference" approach is used to determine the source location. This removes the requirement for operator expertise, saving time and preventing human errors. A thorough assessment is conducted to evaluate the performance and the robustness of the new technique. In the initial test, the results showed excellent reduction in running time as well as improved accuracy of locating AE sources, as a result of the automatic selection of the training data. Furthermore, because the process is performed automatically, this is now a very simple and reliable technique due to the prevention of the potential source of error related to manual manipulation.

  12. Codes for sound-source location in nontonotopic auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Middlebrooks, J C; Xu, L; Eddins, A C; Green, D M

    1998-08-01

    We evaluated two hypothetical codes for sound-source location in the auditory cortex. The topographical code assumed that single neurons are selective for particular locations and that sound-source locations are coded by the cortical location of small populations of maximally activated neurons. The distributed code assumed that the responses of individual neurons can carry information about locations throughout 360 degrees of azimuth and that accurate sound localization derives from information that is distributed across large populations of such panoramic neurons. We recorded from single units in the anterior ectosylvian sulcus area (area AES) and in area A2 of alpha-chloralose-anesthetized cats. Results obtained in the two areas were essentially equivalent. Noise bursts were presented from loudspeakers spaced in 20 degrees intervals of azimuth throughout 360 degrees of the horizontal plane. Spike counts of the majority of units were modulated >50% by changes in sound-source azimuth. Nevertheless, sound-source locations that produced greater than half-maximal spike counts often spanned >180 degrees of azimuth. The spatial selectivity of units tended to broaden and, often, to shift in azimuth as sound pressure levels (SPLs) were increased to a moderate level. We sometimes saw systematic changes in spatial tuning along segments of electrode tracks as long as 1.5 mm but such progressions were not evident at higher sound levels. Moderate-level sounds presented anywhere in the contralateral hemifield produced greater than half-maximal activation of nearly all units. These results are not consistent with the hypothesis of a topographic code. We used an artificial-neural-network algorithm to recognize spike patterns and, thereby, infer the locations of sound sources. Network input consisted of spike density functions formed by averages of responses to eight stimulus repetitions. Information carried in the responses of single units permitted reasonable estimates of sound-source

  13. Locating Microseism Sources in Offshore Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, X.; Clayton, R. W.

    2007-12-01

    We use the broadband stations from the S. California network to locate the apparent origin of secondary microseisms energy (5-8 Hz band). The procedure is to grid the offshore region and using each grid point as the source point, predict the response of a Rayleigh wave at each station. These predicted waveforms are then correlated with the data over a time window that is typically a 1/2 hour in length and composited at the grid point. The length of the time window controls a tradeoff between the spatial-temporal resolution of the sources and the robustness on the image. The procedure is valid for multiple sources. This results show that during periods of high microseism activity the sources are distinct at several locations in a region approximately 50-100 km offshore. For an 11/09/2002 Southern Ocean storm, for example, two zones parallel to each other and perpendicular to the coast are imaged.

  14. Locating POPs Sources with Tree Bark.

    PubMed

    Peverly, Angela A; Salamova, Amina; Hites, Ronald A

    2015-12-01

    Locating sources of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to the atmosphere can sometimes be difficult. We suggest that tree bark makes an excellent passive atmospheric sampler and that spatial analysis of tree bark POPs concentrations can often pinpoint their sources. This is an effective strategy because tree bark is lipophilic and readily adsorbs and collects POPs from the atmosphere. As such, tree bark is an ideal sampler to find POPs sources globally, regionally, or locally. This article summarizes some work on this subject with an emphasis on kriged maps and a simple power-law model, both of which have been used to locate sources. Three of the four examples led directly to the pollutant's manufacturing plant. PMID:25629888

  15. AE sources of droplet SCC testing in type 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiwa, Mitsuharu; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Yamawaki, Hisashi; Ito, Kaita; Enoki, Manabu

    2014-02-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) and optical video microscope (VMS) monitoring was proposed to investigate the stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steels of work-hardened (WH) and solution heat treatment (ST) specimen caused by a small magnesium-chloride droplet. The crack propagation length could measure clearly under the droplet with coved glass by VMS. The cracks velocities of WH were 3.2-5.2 ×10 μm/ks and it propagated almost continuously. That of ST were 2.1-3.8 ×10 μm/ks and it propagated similar to WH. AE signals were generated at early stage of SCC testing, after that they were generated discontinuously in WH. None of AE signals were detected in ST. The detected AE signals were synchronized with bubbling from pitting and on the crack in a droplet observed by high magnification VMS. With the SEM observations, cracking bottom of pitting and small pitting on the crack were observed at the bubbling position. It could be concluded that the detected AE signals were mainly attributed to the bubbling from the pitting.

  16. Acoustic emission non-destructive testing of structures using source location techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Beattie, Alan G.

    2013-09-01

    The technology of acoustic emission (AE) testing has been advanced and used at Sandia for the past 40 years. AE has been used on structures including pressure vessels, fire bottles, wind turbines, gas wells, nuclear weapons, and solar collectors. This monograph begins with background topics in acoustics and instrumentation and then focuses on current acoustic emission technology. It covers the overall design and system setups for a test, with a wind turbine blade as the object. Test analysis is discussed with an emphasis on source location. Three test examples are presented, two on experimental wind turbine blades and one on aircraft fire extinguisher bottles. Finally, the code for a FORTRAN source location program is given as an example of a working analysis program. Throughout the document, the stress is on actual testing of real structures, not on laboratory experiments.

  17. Locating industrial VOC sources with aircraft observations.

    PubMed

    Toscano, P; Gioli, B; Dugheri, S; Salvini, A; Matese, A; Bonacchi, A; Zaldei, A; Cupelli, V; Miglietta, F

    2011-05-01

    Observation and characterization of environmental pollution, focussing on Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), in a high-risk industrial area, are particularly important in order to provide indications on a safe level of exposure, indicate eventual priorities and advise on policy interventions. The aim of this study is to use the Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME) method to measure VOCs, directly coupled with atmospheric measurements taken on a small aircraft environmental platform, to evaluate and locate the presence of VOC emission sources in the Marghera industrial area. Lab analysis of collected SPME fibres and subsequent analysis of mass spectrum and chromatograms in Scan Mode allowed the detection of a wide range of VOCs. The combination of this information during the monitoring campaign allowed a model (Gaussian Plume) to be implemented that estimates the localization of emission sources on the ground. PMID:21376441

  18. Acoustic emission source location on large plate-like structures using a local triangular sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljets, Dirk; Chong, Alex; Wilcox, Steve; Holford, Karen

    2012-07-01

    A new acoustic emission (AE) source location method was developed for large plate-like structures, which evaluates the location of the source using a combined time of flight and modal source location algorithm. Three sensors are installed in a triangular array with a sensor to sensor distance of just a few centimeters. The direction from the sensor array to the AE source can be established by analysing the arrival times of the A0 component of the signal to the three sensors whilst the distance can be evaluated using the separation of S0 and A0 mode at each sensor respectively. The close positioning of the sensors allows the array to be installed in a single housing. This simplifies mounting, wiring and calibration procedures for non-destructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. Furthermore, this array could reduce the number of sensors needed to monitor large structures compared to other methods. An automatic wave mode identification method is also presented.

  19. AE 941.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    AE 941 [Arthrovas, Neoretna, Psovascar] is shark cartilage extract that inhibits angiogenesis. AE 941 acts by blocking the two main pathways that contribute to the process of angiogenesis, matrix metalloproteases and the vascular endothelial growth factor signalling pathway. When initial development of AE 941 was being conducted, AEterna assigned the various indications different trademarks. Neovastat was used for oncology, Psovascar was used for dermatology, Neoretna was used for ophthalmology and Arthrovas was used for rheumatology. However, it is unclear if these trademarks will be used in the future and AEterna appears to only be using the Neovastat trademark in its current publications regardless of the indication. AEterna Laboratories signed commercialisation agreements with Grupo Ferrer Internacional SA of Spain and Medac GmbH of Germany in February 2001. Under the terms of the agreement, AEterna has granted exclusive commercialisation and distribution rights to AE 941 in oncology to Grupo Ferrer Internacional for the Southern European countries of France, Belgium, Spain, Greece, Portugal and Italy. It also has rights in Central and South America. Medac GmbH will have marketing rights in Germany, the UK, Scandinavia, Switzerland, Austria, Ireland, the Netherlands and Eastern Europe. In October 2002, AEterna Laboratories announced that it had signed an agreement with Australian healthcare products and services company Mayne Group for marketing AE 941 (as Neovastat) in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and Mexico. In March 2003, AEterna Laboratories announced it has signed an agreement with Korean based LG Life Sciences Ltd for marketing AE 941 (as Neovastat) in South Korea. The agreement provides AEterna with upfront and milestone payments, as well as a return on manufacturing and sales of AE 941. AEterna Laboratories had granted Alcon Laboratories an exclusive worldwide licence for AE 941 for ophthalmic products. However, this licence has been terminated. In

  20. Acoustic emission source location and damage detection in a metallic structure using a graph-theory-based geodesic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangadharan, R.; Prasanna, G.; Bhat, M. R.; Murthy, C. R. L.; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2009-11-01

    A geodesic-based approach using Lamb waves is proposed to locate the acoustic emission (AE) source and damage in an isotropic metallic structure. In the case of the AE (passive) technique, the elastic waves take the shortest path from the source to the sensor array distributed in the structure. The geodesics are computed on the meshed surface of the structure using graph theory based on Dijkstra's algorithm. By propagating the waves in reverse virtually from these sensors along the geodesic path and by locating the first intersection point of these waves, one can get the AE source location. The same approach is extended for detection of damage in a structure. The wave response matrix of the given sensor configuration for the healthy and the damaged structure is obtained experimentally. The healthy and damage response matrix is compared and their difference gives the information about the reflection of waves from the damage. These waves are backpropagated from the sensors and the above method is used to locate the damage by finding the point where intersection of geodesics occurs. In this work, the geodesic approach is shown to be suitable to obtain a practicable source location solution in a more general set-up on any arbitrary surface containing finite discontinuities. Experiments were conducted on aluminum specimens of simple and complex geometry to validate this new method.

  1. Acoustic Emission tomography based on simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique to visualize the damage source location in Q235B steel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Xu, Feiyun; Xu, Bingsheng

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic Emission (AE) tomography based on Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (SART), which combines the traditional location algorithm with the SART algorithm by using AE events as its signal sources, is a new visualization method for inspecting and locating the internal damages in the structure. In this paper, the proposed method is applied to examine and visualize two man-made damage source locations in the Q235B steel plate to validate its effectiveness. Firstly, the Q235B steel plate with two holes specimen is fabricated and the pencil lead break (PLB) signal is taken as the exciting source for AE tomography.Secondly, A 6-step description of the SART algorithm is provided and the three dimensional(3D)image contained the damage source locations is visualized by using the proposed algorithm in terms of a locally varying wave velocity distribution. It is shown that the AE tomography based on SART has great potential in the application of structure damage detection. Finally, to further improve the quality of 3D imaging, the Median Filter and the Adaptive Median Filter are used to reduce the noises resulting from AE tomography. The experiment results indicate that Median Filter is the optimal method to remove Salt & Pepper noises.

  2. Accelerated food source location in aging Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Egenriether, Sada M; Chow, Eileen S; Krauth, Nathalie; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M

    2015-10-01

    Adequate energy stores are essential for survival, and sophisticated neuroendocrine mechanisms evolved to stimulate foraging in response to nutrient deprivation. Food search behavior is usually investigated in young animals, and it is not known how aging alters this behavior. To address this question in Drosophila melanogaster, we compared the ability to locate food by olfaction in young and old flies using a food-filled trap. As aging is associated with a decline in motor functions, learning, and memory, we expected that aged flies would take longer to enter the food trap than their young counterparts. Surprisingly, old flies located food with significantly shorter latency than young ones. Robust food search behavior was associated with significantly lower fat reserves and lower starvation resistance in old flies. Food-finding latency (FFL) was shortened in young wild-type flies that were starved until their fat was depleted but also in heterozygous chico mutants with reduced insulin receptor activity and higher fat deposits. Conversely, food trap entry was delayed in old flies with increased insulin signaling. Our results suggest that the difference in FFL between young and old flies is linked to age-dependent differences in metabolic status and may be mediated by reduced insulin signaling. PMID:26102220

  3. Three precise gamma-ray burst source locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The precise source regions of three moderately intense gamma ray bursts are derived. These events were observed with the first interplanetary burst sensor network. The optimum locations of the detectors, widely separated throughout the inner solar system, allowed for high accuracy, over-determined source fields of size 0.7 to 7.0 arc-min(2). All three locations are at fairly high galactic latitude in regions of low source confusion; none can be identified with a steady source object. Archived photographs were searched for optical transients that are able to be associated with these source fields; one such association was made.

  4. 48 CFR 319.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 319.202-2 Locating small business sources. (a) OPDIVs shall foster, to the extent practicable, maximum participation by small businesses in HHS...

  5. 48 CFR 319.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 319.202-2 Locating small business sources. (a) OPDIVs shall foster, to the extent practicable, maximum participation by small businesses in HHS...

  6. 48 CFR 319.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 319.202-2 Locating small business sources. (a) OPDIVs shall foster, to the extent practicable, maximum participation by small businesses in HHS...

  7. 48 CFR 2919.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS AND SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS CONCERNS Policies 2919.202-2 Locating small business sources. Any procurement conducted on an unrestricted basis will include solicitations...

  8. 48 CFR 19.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 19.202-2 Locating small business sources. The contracting officer must, to the extent practicable, encourage maximum participation by small...

  9. 48 CFR 2919.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS AND SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS CONCERNS Policies 2919.202-2 Locating small business sources. Any procurement conducted on an unrestricted basis will include solicitations...

  10. 48 CFR 19.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 19.202-2 Locating small business sources. The contracting officer must, to the extent practicable, encourage maximum participation by small...

  11. 48 CFR 319.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 319.202-2 Locating small business sources. (a) OPDIVs... small business concerns that can compete for the proposed requirement—see FAR 19.202, 10.001(2)(v),...

  12. 48 CFR 319.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 319.202-2 Locating small business sources. (a) OPDIVs... small business concerns that can compete for the proposed requirement—see FAR 19.202, 10.001(2)(v),...

  13. 48 CFR 19.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 19.202-2 Locating small business sources. The contracting officer must, to the extent practicable, encourage maximum participation by small...

  14. 48 CFR 2919.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locating small business... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS AND SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS CONCERNS Policies 2919.202-2 Locating small business sources. Any procurement conducted on an unrestricted basis will include solicitations...

  15. Locating an atmospheric contamination source using slow manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenbo; Haller, George; Baik, Jong-Jin; Ryu, Young-Hee

    2009-04-01

    Finite-size particle motion in fluids obeys the Maxey-Riley equations, which become singular in the limit of infinitesimally small particle size. Because of this singularity, finding the source of a dispersed set of small particles is a numerically ill-posed problem that leads to exponential blowup. Here we use recent results on the existence of a slow manifold in the Maxey-Riley equations to overcome this difficulty in source inversion. Specifically, we locate the source of particles by projecting their dispersed positions on a time-varying slow manifold, and by advecting them on the manifold in backward time. We use this technique to locate the source of a hypothetical anthrax release in an unsteady three-dimensional atmospheric wind field in an urban street canyon.

  16. Hyperbolic source location of crack related acoustic emission in bone.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, John; Creedon, Leo; Hession, John; Muir, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Little work has been done on the localization of microcracks in bone using acoustic emission. Microcrack localization is useful to study the fracture process in bone and to prevent fractures in patients. Locating microcracks that occur before fracture allows one to predict where fracture will occur if continued stress is applied to the bone. Two source location algorithms were developed to locate microcracks on rectangular bovine bone samples. The first algorithm uses a constant velocity approach which has some difficulty dealing with the anisotropic nature of bone. However, the second algorithm uses an iterative technique to estimate the correct velocity for the acoustic emission source location being located. In tests with simulated microcracks, the constant velocity algorithm achieves a median error of 1.78 mm (IQR 1.51 mm) and the variable velocity algorithm improves this to a median error of 0.70 mm (IQR 0.79 mm). An experiment in which the bone samples were loaded in a three point bend test until they fractured showed a good correlation between the computed location of detected microcracks and where the final fracture occurred. Microcracks can be located on bovine bone samples using acoustic emission with good accuracy and precision. PMID:23363217

  17. Shallow-water sparsity-cognizant source-location mapping.

    PubMed

    Forero, Pedro A; Baxley, Paul A

    2014-06-01

    Using passive sonar for underwater acoustic source localization in a shallow-water environment is challenging due to the complexities of underwater acoustic propagation. Matched-field processing (MFP) exploits both measured and model-predicted acoustic pressures to localize acoustic sources. However, the ambiguity surface obtained through MFP contains artifacts that limit its ability to reveal the location of the acoustic sources. This work introduces a robust scheme for shallow-water source localization that exploits the inherent sparse structure of the localization problem and the use of a model characterizing the acoustic propagation environment. To this end, the underwater acoustic source-localization problem is cast as a sparsity-inducing stochastic optimization problem that is robust to model mismatch. The resulting source-location map (SLM) yields reduced ambiguities and improved resolution, even at low signal-to-noise ratios, when compared to those obtained via classical MFP approaches. An iterative solver based on block-coordinate descent is developed whose computational complexity per iteration is linear with respect to the number of locations considered for the SLM. Numerical tests illustrate the performance of the algorithm. PMID:24907812

  18. Providing Source-Location Privacy in Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Ren, Jian

    Wireless sensor networks (WSN) have been widely used in many areas for unattended event monitoring. Mainly due to lack of a protected physical boundary, wireless communications are vulnerable to unauthorized detection, interception and and even node capture. Privacy is becoming one of the major issues that jeopardize the successful deployment and survivability of wireless sensor networks. While confidentiality of the message can be ensured through content encryption, it is much more difficult to adequately address the source-location privacy. For WSN, source-location privacy service is further complicated by the fact that the sensor nodes consist of low-cost and low-power radio devices, computationally intensive cryptographic algorithms (such as public-key cryptosystems) and large scale broadcasting-based protocols are not suitable for WSN. In this paper, we propose a two-step routing strategy for the messages to be routed from the actual source node to the SINK node through either a single, or multiple, randomly selected intermediate node(s) away from the source node so that it is to make it infeasible for the adversaries to trace back to the source node through hop-by-hop routing analysis. In the first protocol, the messages will be routed to a single intermediate node. This scheme can provide very good local source-location privacy. We also propose routing through multiple randomly selected intermediate nodes based on angle and quadrant to further improve the performance and security. While providing source-location privacy for WSN, our simulation results demonstrate that the proposed schemes are very efficient in energy consumption, and transmission latency. The proposed schemes can also assurance high message delivery ratio. Therefore, they can be used for many practical applications.

  19. An information-theoretic approach to microseismic source location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prange, Michael D.; Bose, Sandip; Kodio, Ousmane; Djikpesse, Hugues A.

    2015-04-01

    There has been extensive work on seismic source localization, going as far back as Geiger's 1912 paper, that is based on least-squares fitting of arrival times. The primary advantage of time-based methods over waveform-based methods (e.g. reverse-time migration and beam forming) is that simulated arrival times are considerably more reliable than simulated waveforms, especially in the context of an uncertain velocity model, thereby yielding more reliable estimates of source location. However, time-based methods are bedeviled by the unsolved challenges of accurate time picking and labelling of the seismic phases in the waveforms for each event. Drawing from Woodward's canonical 1953 text on the application of information theory to radar applications, we show that time-based methods can be applied directly to waveform data, thus capturing the advantages of time-based methods without being impacted by the aforementioned hindrances. We extend Woodward's approach to include an unknown distortion on wavelet amplitude and phase, showing that the related marginalization integrals can be analytically evaluated. We also provide extensions for correlation-based location methods such as relative localization and the S-P method. We demonstrate this approach through applications to microseismic event location, presenting formulations and results for both absolute and relative localization approaches, with receiver arrays either in a borehole or on the surface. By properly quantifying uncertainty in our location estimates, our formulations provide an objective measure for ranking the accuracy of microseismic source location methodologies.

  20. Locating and estimating air emissions from sources of nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    To assist groups interested in inventorying air emissions of various potentially toxic substances, EPA is preparing a series of documents such as this to compile available information on sources and emissions of these substances. This document deals specifically with nickel. Its intended audience includes Federal, State and local air pollution personnel and others interested in locating potential emitters of nickel and in making gross estimates of air emissions therefrom. This document presents information on (1) the types of sources that may emit nickel, (2) process variations and release points that may be expected within these sources, and (3) available emissions information indicating the potential for nickel release into the air from each operation.

  1. Inversely tracking indoor airborne particles to locate their release sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tengfei (Tim); Li, Hongzhu; Wang, Shugang

    2012-08-01

    Airborne particles can have numerous adverse effects on human health. Knowing the release locations of airborne particulate sources is helpful in minimizing pollutant exposure. This paper describes a proposal to locate indoor particulate sources by two inverse models: the quasi-reversibility (QR) model and the zone prescription of contaminant sources with the Lagrangian-reversibility (LR) model. The QR model reverses the time marching direction of the Eulerian governing equation and replaces the second-order diffusion term with a fourth-order stabilization term. The zone prescription LR model traces individual particulate motion in a Lagrangian reference frame after reversing the flow field. The particle trajectories are solved backward to the initial release once the conservative forces acting on particles are reversed. The tracked particles are proposed to be placed at the zone boundary of the largest concentration contour within the domain at a given time, which is provided as the initially known information. By connecting all particles at t = 0, a zone is formed that can prescribe the actual contaminant source. This study finds that both models can accurately locate particulate sources released instantaneously at a spot. The QR model performs slightly better than the LR model but is much more computationally demanding.

  2. Modeling of Jovian Hectometric Radiation Source Locations: Ulysses Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Reiner, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    The Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment on Ulysses has provided unique high latitude measurements of Jovian hectometric radiation (HOM) during its encounter with Jupiter in February 1992. URAP was the first radio instrument in the Jovian environment with radio direction-finding capability, which was previously used to determine the HOM source locations in the Jovian magnetosphere. These initial source location determinations were based on several assumptions, including the neglect of refractive effects, which may be tested. We have, for the first time, combined the measured incident ray-direction at the spacecraft with a model magnetosphere to directly trace the rays back to the HOM source. We concentrate on the observations of HOM from high northern latitudes when Ulysses was at distances less than 15 R(sub j). The three- dimensional ray-tracing calculations presented here indicate that the HOM sources probably lie on L shells in the range 3 less than or approximately equal to L less than 7 (tilted dipole magnetic field model) consistent with previous determinations that ignored the effects of refraction. The ray-tracing results, however, indicate that wave refraction due to the Io torus and the magnetic field can significantly influence the precise source location. We show that constraints on the locations imposed by the gyroemission mechanism suggest that the lo torus density may have experienced temporal and/or spatial fluctuations during the Ulysses observations of HOM. Finally, in the cold plasma approximation we demonstrate that even if the emission were nearly linearly polarized near the source region, almost circular polarization will be observed at Ulysses, in agreement with observations.

  3. Effect of Anisotropic Velocity Structure on Acoustic Emission Source Location during True-Triaxial Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani Tabari, Mehdi; Goodfellow, Sebastian; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Although true-triaxial testing (TTT) of rocks is now more extensive worldwide, stress-induced heterogeneity due to the existence of several loading boundary effects is not usually accounted for and simplified anisotropic models are used. This study focuses on the enhanced anisotropic velocity structure to improve acoustic emission (AE) analysis for an enhanced interpretation of induced fracturing. Data from a TTT on a cubic sample of Fontainebleau sandstone is used in this study to evaluate the methodology. At different stages of the experiment the True-Triaxial Geophysical Imaging Cell (TTGIC), armed with an ultrasonic and AE monitoring system, performed several velocity surveys to image velocity structure of the sample. Going beyond a hydrostatic stress state (poro-elastic phase), the rock sample went through a non-dilatational elastic phase, a dilatational non-damaging elasto-plastic phase containing initial AE activity and finally a dilatational and damaging elasto-plastic phase up to the failure point. The experiment was divided into these phases based on the information obtained from strain, velocity and AE streaming data. Analysis of the ultrasonic velocity survey data discovered that a homogeneous anisotropic core in the center of the sample is formed with ellipsoidal symmetry under the standard polyaxial setup. Location of the transducer shots were improved by implementation of different velocity models for the sample starting from isotropic and homogeneous models going toward anisotropic and heterogeneous models. The transducer shot locations showed a major improvement after the velocity model corrections had been applied especially at the final phase of the experiment. This location improvement validated our velocity model at the final phase of the experiment consisting lower-velocity zones bearing partially saturated fractures. The ellipsoidal anisotropic velocity model was also verified at the core of the cubic rock specimen by AE event location of

  4. PM(10) source characterization at urban and highway roadside locations.

    PubMed

    Furusjö, Erik; Sternbeck, John; Cousins, Anna Palm

    2007-11-15

    Levels of PM(10) were measured at two different roadside locations in the Stockholm region in Sweden, one highway south of Stockholm and one urban street canyon in the center of the city. PM(10) samples were taken during six separate campaigns over one full year, and analyzed for 29 metals, in order to help characterize sources of PM(10). Five contributing factors were identified by multivariate receptor modeling using positive matrix factorization. Factors were classified, based on their seasonal variation and published data on metal composition of different sources, as: 1) resuspension; 2) vehicle derived; 3) road salt; 4) regional combustion and 5) long-range transport. Resuspension and long-range transport were shown to be important contributors to the PM(10) levels at both sites. In fact, long-range transport was the main contributor to the PM(10) levels at the highway roadside. The vehicle source was only of major importance at the urban roadside, where it frequently contributed between 10 and 20 microg m(-3). Brake wear was an important component in the vehicle source. Vehicle exhaust was not detected as a separate source and was not identified as a major source for PM(10). To our knowledge, this is the first study identifying brake wear as a major source of PM(10) during urban driving. PMID:17822744

  5. Acoustic emission monitoring of tensile testing of corroded and un-corroded clad aluminum 2024-T3 and characterization of effects of corrosion on AE source events and material tensile properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okafor, A. Chukwujekwu; Natarajan, Shridhar

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion damage affects structural integrity and deteriorates material properties of aluminum alloys in aircraft structures. Acoustic Emission (AE) is an effective nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique for monitoring such damages and predicting failure in large structures of an aircraft. For successful interpretation of data from AE monitoring, sources of AE and factors affecting it need to be identified. This paper presents results of AE monitoring of tensile testing of corroded and un-corroded clad Aluminum 2024-T3 test specimens, and characterization of the effects of strain-rate and corrosion damage on material tensile properties and AE source events. Effect of corrosion was studied by inducing corrosion in the test specimens by accelerated corrosion testing in a Q-Fog accelerated corrosion chamber for 12 weeks. Eight (8) masked dog-bone shaped specimens were placed in the accelerated corrosion chamber at the beginning of the test. Two (2) dog-bone shaped specimens were removed from the corrosion chamber after exposure time of 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks respectively, and subjected to tension testing till specimen failure along with AE monitoring, as well as two (2) reference samples not exposed to corrosion. Material tensile properties (yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, toughness, and elongation) obtained from tension test and AE parameters obtained from AE monitoring were analyzed and characterized. AE parameters increase with increase in exposure period of the specimens in the corrosive environment. Aluminum 2024-T3 is an acoustically silent material during tensile deformation without any damage. Acoustic emission events increase with increase of corrosion damage and with increase in strain rate above a certain value. Thus AE is suitable for structural health monitoring of corrosion damage. Ultimate tensile strength, toughness and elongation values decrease with increase of exposure period in corrosion chamber.

  6. Accurate source location from waves scattered by surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nian; Shen, Yang; Flinders, Ashton; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Accurate source locations of earthquakes and other seismic events are fundamental in seismology. The location accuracy is limited by several factors, including velocity models, which are often poorly known. In contrast, surface topography, the largest velocity contrast in the Earth, is often precisely mapped at the seismic wavelength (>100 m). In this study, we explore the use of P coda waves generated by scattering at surface topography to obtain high-resolution locations of near-surface seismic events. The Pacific Northwest region is chosen as an example to provide realistic topography. A grid search algorithm is combined with the 3-D strain Green's tensor database to improve search efficiency as well as the quality of hypocenter solutions. The strain Green's tensor is calculated using a 3-D collocated-grid finite difference method on curvilinear grids. Solutions in the search volume are obtained based on the least squares misfit between the "observed" and predicted P and P coda waves. The 95% confidence interval of the solution is provided as an a posteriori error estimation. For shallow events tested in the study, scattering is mainly due to topography in comparison with stochastic lateral velocity heterogeneity. The incorporation of P coda significantly improves solution accuracy and reduces solution uncertainty. The solution remains robust with wide ranges of random noises in data, unmodeled random velocity heterogeneities, and uncertainties in moment tensors. The method can be extended to locate pairs of sources in close proximity by differential waveforms using source-receiver reciprocity, further reducing errors caused by unmodeled velocity structures.

  7. Accurate source location from P waves scattered by surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, N.; Shen, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate source locations of earthquakes and other seismic events are fundamental in seismology. The location accuracy is limited by several factors, including velocity models, which are often poorly known. In contrast, surface topography, the largest velocity contrast in the Earth, is often precisely mapped at the seismic wavelength (> 100 m). In this study, we explore the use of P-coda waves generated by scattering at surface topography to obtain high-resolution locations of near-surface seismic events. The Pacific Northwest region is chosen as an example. The grid search method is combined with the 3D strain Green's tensor database type method to improve the search efficiency as well as the quality of hypocenter solution. The strain Green's tensor is calculated by the 3D collocated-grid finite difference method on curvilinear grids. Solutions in the search volume are then obtained based on the least-square misfit between the 'observed' and predicted P and P-coda waves. A 95% confidence interval of the solution is also provided as a posterior error estimation. We find that the scattered waves are mainly due to topography in comparison with random velocity heterogeneity characterized by the von Kάrmάn-type power spectral density function. When only P wave data is used, the 'best' solution is offset from the real source location mostly in the vertical direction. The incorporation of P coda significantly improves solution accuracy and reduces its uncertainty. The solution remains robust with a range of random noises in data, un-modeled random velocity heterogeneities, and uncertainties in moment tensors that we tested.

  8. Locating the Source of Diffusion in Large-Scale Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Pedro C.; Thiran, Patrick; Vetterli, Martin

    2012-08-01

    How can we localize the source of diffusion in a complex network? Because of the tremendous size of many real networks—such as the internet or the human social graph—it is usually unfeasible to observe the state of all nodes in a network. We show that it is fundamentally possible to estimate the location of the source from measurements collected by sparsely placed observers. We present a strategy that is optimal for arbitrary trees, achieving maximum probability of correct localization. We describe efficient implementations with complexity O(Nα), where α=1 for arbitrary trees and α=3 for arbitrary graphs. In the context of several case studies, we determine how localization accuracy is affected by various system parameters, including the structure of the network, the density of observers, and the number of observed cascades.

  9. Locating tritium sources in a research reactor building.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Masami

    2005-10-01

    Despite renovation of the D2O facility, tritium concentrations in the condensates of reactor room air showed tens of Bq mL before venting resumption on July 1997. This suggested the presence of tritium sources in the research reactor-containment building. An investigation was therefore initiated to locate the source and determine the distribution of tritium in the containment building. Air monitoring in the working area using a dish of water placed in the building suggested that the source of tritium was near the reactor core. Monitoring exhaust air from the two facilities (a cold neutron source and a D(2)O tank) showed high specific activity on the order of 10 Bq mL(-1), suggesting the presence of tritium in condensates near the reactor core. The major concern was whether the leakage of liquid deuterium (4 L) and heavy water (2 x 10(3) L) used as a moderator had occurred. The concentration of tritium in condensates has not increased over the past few years in either the exhaust line or working area, and the deuterium itself has not been found in the surrounding environment. The concentration of tritium measured using an ionization chamber after Ar decay was dependent on the thermal output of the research reactor, indicating that the tritium was produced by the irradiation process within shielding/moderator materials or cover gas with neutrons. PMID:16155451

  10. Possible Source Location of the Terrestrial Myriametric Radio Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, S. F.; Shao, X.; Frey, H. U.; Garcia, L. N.

    2013-12-01

    Fung et al. [2013] reported recently the identification of a terrestrial myriametric radio burst (TMRB) that was possibly a result from a dayside high latitude reconnection process. The TMRB was observed simultaneously by the IMAGE and Geotail satellites when the satellites were located at widely different latitudes on opposite sides of the Earth in nearly the same meridional plane. The TMRB was observed when the interplanetary field was northward. Its intensity seemed to be modulated by the IMF Bz component while the source directions (relative to the Geotail positions over the TMRB interval) also seemed to respond to the changes in the IMF By component. In this paper, we will present further observations from the IMAGE FUV data during the TMRB interval, revealing the presence of a bright proton aurora spot at the cusp foot print and thus confirming the presence of high-latitude dayside reconnection at the time. We have also performed a CCMC run-on-request of a global magnetospheric simulation for a time period over the TMRB interval. We will present the CCMC results and discuss the possible identification of the location of the TMRB source. Fung, S. F., K. Hashimoto, H. Kojima, S. A. Boardsen, L. N. Garcia, H. Matsumoto, J. L. Green, and B. W. Reinisch (2013), Terrestrial myriametric radio burst observed by IMAGE and Geotail satellites, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 118, 1101-1111, doi:10.1002/jgra.50149.

  11. Neptune's non-thermal radio emissions - Phenomenology and source locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabl, Gerald K. F.; Ladreiter, H.-P.; Rucker, Helmut O.; Kaiser, Michael L.

    1992-01-01

    During the inbound and the outbound leg of Voyager 2's encounter with Neptune, the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) experiment aboard the spacecraft detected short radio bursts at frequencies within the range of about 500-1300 kHz, and broad-banded smoothly varying emission patterns within the frequency range from about 40-800 kHz. Both emissions can be described in terms of a period of 16.1 hours determining Neptune's rotation period. Furthermore, just near closest approach, a narrow-banded smoothly varying radio component was observed occurring between 600 and 800 kHz. After giving a brief overview about some general characteristics of Neptune's nonthermal radio emission, the source locations of Neptune's emission components are determined, using an offset tilted dipole model for Neptune's magnetic field. Assuming that the emission originates near the electron gyrofrequency a geometrical beaming model is developed in order to fit the observed emission episodes.

  12. [Application of ICP-MS and ICP-AES for Studying on Source Apportionment of PM2.5 during Haze Weather in Urban Beijing].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Du, Peng; Guan, Qing; Feng, Xu; Xu, Dong-qun; Lin, Shao-bin

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the characteristics of chemical constitute and pollution sources of aerosol fine particulate matter during haze-fog day in Beijing in winter 2013. The samples of PM2.5 were collected in Beijing from January to February, 2013. The technique of ICP-MS and ICP-AES coupled with procedure of bathing-ultrasonic extraction was applied to determine the concentration of 40 elements in the aerosol samples to analyze the characteristics of elements distribution statistically. The absolute principal factor method was used to apportion the pollution sources of PM2.5 during the haze weather in Beijing city in winter 2013. The results showed that during the period of sampling, the volume concentration of Li, Mn, Pb, S etc. obeyed normal distribution approximately, and according to National Ambient Air Quality Standard issued by Ministry of Environmental Protection of the People's Republic of China, the geometric mean concentration of As was twice the annual limit of standard reference, while Pb of some aerosol samples beyond the annual limit of standard reference respectively. The mass fraction of Fe, Zn, Pb, Ti accounted for over 0.1%, while that of Mn, Cu, As, Se etc. 0.01%. These elements were primary inorganic pollutants, and especially the hazards and sources of As and Pb should be concerned. There were 6 main pollution sources were chosen by the factor analysis method, including industrial dust and human beings activities, biomass combustion and building dust, soil and sand dusts, fossil fuel, electronic waste and metal smelting, with the variance contribution rate of 40.3%, 27.0%, 9.1%, 4.9%, 4.8% and 4.6% respectively. ICP-MS and ICP-AES can be applied to analyzing multi-elements in PM2.5 accurately and quickly to facilitate source apportionment, and it indicated that the relevant pollution sources should be considered and the effect of regional transferring of haze pollution sources should be taken into account, and specific measures should be taken for

  13. Successful cuing of gender source memory does not improve location source memory.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Jason L; Starns, Jeffrey J

    2016-05-01

    In three experiments we explored cross-dimensional cuing effects in a multidimensional source encoding and retrieval paradigm. We employed a bias-controlled experimental method of source cuing at retrieval (Starns & Hicks, 2013) in an attempt to improve retrieval of location information indirectly by cuing gender information. Encoded words were situated on the left or right side of a computer monitor and associated with either a male or a female face. When multiple faces were used across the set of encoded words, reinstating the correct face at retrieval alongside an incorrect, opposite-gender face cue improved male/female source decisions for test words. However, this powerful test cue did not improve memory for the encoded location of the words, suggesting that within-dimension cuing does not produce cross-dimensional cuing. This null outcome was found when gender decisions were required (Experiments 1A and 2) or not required (Experiment 1B) prior to location decisions. Nor was cross-dimension cuing found when subjects were told to expect a source test of both gender and location information at retrieval (Experiment 2). Our findings reinforce prior work demonstrating that multiple context dimensions can be bound to item information without any direct binding between the contexts. PMID:26810799

  14. Airborne system for detection and location of radio interference sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audone, Bruno; Pastore, Alberto

    1992-11-01

    The rapid expansion of telecommunication has practically saturated every band of Radio Frequency Spectrum; a similar expansion of electrical and electronic devices has affected all radio communications which are, in some way, influenced by a large amount of interferences, either intentionally or unintentionally produced. Operational consequences of these interferences, particularly in the frequency channels used for aeronautical services, can be extremely dangerous, making mandatory a tight control of Electromagnetic Spectrum. The present paper analyzes the requirements and the problems related to the surveillance, for civil application, of the Electromagnetic Spectrum between 20 and 1000 MHz, with particular attention to the detection and location of radio interference sources; after a brief introduction and the indication of the advantages of an airborne versus ground installation, the airborne system designed by Alenia in cooperation with Italian Ministry of Post and Telecommunication, its practical implementation and the prototype installation on board of a small twin turboprop aircraft for experimentation purposes is presented. The results of the flight tests are also analyzed and discussed.

  15. A scaling relationship between AE and natural earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimitsu, N.; Kawakata, H.; Takahashi, N.

    2013-12-01

    Micro fracture which occurs during rock fracture experiments are called acoustic emission (AE), and it help us to understand detailed processes of fault growth. However, it was unclear whether AE can be considered as a small earthquake or not. Usually, the seismic moment and the corner frequency are used for characterizing source property. It has been reported that the seismic moment is inversely proportional to the cube of corner frequency for natural earthquakes (with magnitude higher than ~ -4). In this study, we examine continuity of this relationship toward smaller magnitude of AE (around magnitude -8), estimating the source parameters of AE. Previously, it was impossible to record AE waveforms by broadband transducers under tri-axial conditions due to lack of pressure seal mechanism. Here we achieved protection of broadband transducers to use them under high pressure environments. This achievement enabled us to do spectral analysis of AE. At the same time, we also achieved multi-channel continuous recording with a high sampling rate, so as not to miss some events smaller than threshold or hide some events behind the mask times by triggered recording. We prepared a cylindrical Westerly granite sample, 50 mm in diameter and 100 mm in height. Sealed nine broadband transducers (sensitive range; 100 kHz - 2000 kHz) were attached on the sample surface. High sampling recording as 20 MS/s per channel was continued, during tri-axial loading (confining pressure: 10 MPa) which was continued to be controlled even after the peak strength. More than 6000 hypocenters were estimated from all pick data during the experiment. We clustered events around the peak strength, so that their differences of hypocenter locations were shorter than 2 mm and their cross correlation values for more than four channels were higher than 0.8. Then, we analyzed two of the largest clusters. After calibrating transducer response, we obtained displacement spectra for S waves, and estimated their

  16. Source location of the narrowbanded radio bursts at Uranus - Evidence of a cusp source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Kurth, W. S.

    1990-03-01

    While Voyager 2 was inbound to Uranus, radio bursts of narrow bandwidth (less than 5 kHz) were detected between 17-116 kHz. These R-X mode bursts, designated n-bursts, were of short duration, tended to occur when the north magnetic pole tipped toward the spacecraft, and increased in occurrence with increasing solar wind density. An explicit determination of the burst source location is presented, based upon fitting the region of detection at high and low frequencies to field-aligned, symmetric cones. The region of good fits was located between the north magnetic pole and the rotational pole, corresponding approximately to the northern polar cusp.

  17. 48 CFR 2919.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... small businesses of each category with legislatively established government-wide procurement goals (e.g... businesses) to the extent practicable. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locating small...

  18. 48 CFR 2919.202-2 - Locating small business sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... small businesses of each category with legislatively established government-wide procurement goals (e.g... businesses) to the extent practicable. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locating small...

  19. Source location of the narrowbanded radio bursts at Uranus: Evidence of a cusp source

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, W.M.; Desch, M.D.; Kaiser, M.L. ); Kurth, W.S. )

    1990-03-01

    While Voyager 2 was inbound to Uranus, radio bursts of narrow bandwidth (< 5 kHz) were detected between 17-116 kHz by both the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) and Plasma Wave (PWS) experiments. These R-X mode bursts, designated n-bursts, were of short duration (about 250 msec), tended to occur when the north magnetic pole tipped toward the spacecraft, and increased in occurrence with increasing solar wind density. In this report, the authors present an explicit determination of the burst source location based upon fitting the region of detection at high and low frequencies to field-aligned, symmetric cones. The region of good fits was located between the north magnetic pole an the rotational pole, corresponding approximately to the northern polar cusp. Based upon the emission power, it is suspected that at certain times large amounts of auroral input power may originate in this cusp.

  20. The source location of certain Jovian decametric radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1983-01-01

    Evidence is presented which supports the concept that certain of the Jovian decametric radio waves originate as northern hemisphere extraordinary mode cyclotron emissions. The wave signals received by Voyager 1 near 10 MHz shortly after the closest approach to Jupiter were found to exhibit cusps in the fringe pattern which can be attributed to Faraday rotation in the Io plasma torus. At nearly the same time, the wave polarization near 1 MHz was found to exhibit a sudden reversal of its rotation sense, indicating that the wave path for those frequencies had also become perpendicular to the magnetic field at the spacecraft. It was determined that the waves came from the northern hemisphere at progressively lower altitudes with increasing frequency, and if the source is assumed to be associated with an L = 6 field line, the emission appears to have occurred near the source cyclotron frequency somewhere in the local midnight sector. The evidence indicates that the source is at the Io flux tube and that the emitted wave mode must have been extraordinary. In addition, the emitted wave polarization must have been substantially noncircular which would require a low plasma density near the source, much like that which occurs with auroral kilometric radiation at the earth.

  1. Locating Supplemental Sources of Revenue to Finance Universities in Nigeria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunla, Akin L.

    1989-01-01

    Identifies possible sources of supplemental income to finance Nigerian universities, including households and commercial and industrial firms. A consumption tax imposed on certain goods and services would generate needed funds. Also, because firms employ university graduates to earn higher profits, their turnover income should be taxed to support…

  2. Type III radio source located by Ulysses/Wind triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Fainberg, J.; Kaiser, M. L.; Stone, R. G.

    1998-02-01

    Radio triangulation from the widely separated Ulysses and Wind spacecraft is used to reconstruct the trajectory of a type III radio burst in the 3D heliosphere. The derived radio trajectory follows a (Parker) spiral path corresponding to a solar wind speed of about 200 km/s and progresses to the south of the ecliptic plane. These remote radio observations also measure the interplanetary plasma density along the path of the radio source. The derived average density-distance scale is very similar to the previously derived RAE density scale, which was determined in a different way. The results of the radio triangulation, combined with a drift rate analysis, give an average electron exciter speed of about 0.3 c. The radio source size and the brightness temperature as viewed from Ulysses and Wind are determined and compared as a function of observing frequency.

  3. 43 CFR 3746.1 - Mining locations for fissionable source materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mining locations for fissionable source... MINERAL DEVELOPMENT Fissionable Source Materials § 3746.1 Mining locations for fissionable source... (68 Stat. 921), it is clear that after enactment of said Act of August 13, 1954, valid...

  4. 43 CFR 3746.1 - Mining locations for fissionable source materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mining locations for fissionable source... MINERAL DEVELOPMENT Fissionable Source Materials § 3746.1 Mining locations for fissionable source... (68 Stat. 921), it is clear that after enactment of said Act of August 13, 1954, valid...

  5. Poynting-vector based method for determining the bearing and location of electromagnetic sources

    DOEpatents

    Simons, David J.; Carrigan, Charles R.; Harben, Philip E.; Kirkendall, Barry A.; Schultz, Craig A.

    2008-10-21

    A method and apparatus is utilized to determine the bearing and/or location of sources, such as, alternating current (A.C.) generators and loads, power lines, transformers and/or radio-frequency (RF) transmitters, emitting electromagnetic-wave energy for which a Poynting-Vector can be defined. When both a source and field sensors (electric and magnetic) are static, a bearing to the electromagnetic source can be obtained. If a single set of electric (E) and magnetic (B) sensors are in motion, multiple measurements permit location of the source. The method can be extended to networks of sensors allowing determination of the location of both stationary and moving sources.

  6. PC-based real-time acoustic source locator and sound capture system for teleconferencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morde, Ashutosh; Grove, Deborah; Utama, Robert

    2002-05-01

    A PC-based real time acoustic source locator and sound capture system has been developed. The system is implemented using Frontier Design A/D converters and the Intel Signal Processing Library directly on a 1 GHz Pentium III machine, without a DSP board. The source locator uses the cross-power spectral phase to locate a moving talker. The algorithm also uses an energy detector that minimizes incorrect location estimates by neglecting frames with high background noise. The source locator provides 8 location estimates per second. A 16-element 0.90 m linear delay-sum beamformer has also been implemented in the system as a method for selective sound capture. The ability of the source locator to detect talkers in a typical office environment is evaluated. In addition, the array response is measured. [Work supported by Intel.

  7. Damage Source Identification of Reinforced Concrete Structure Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    PubMed Central

    Panjsetooni, Alireza; Bunnori, Norazura Muhamad; Vakili, Amir Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is one of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that have been considered as the prime candidate for structural health and damage monitoring in loaded structures. This technique was employed for investigation process of damage in reinforced concrete (RC) frame specimens. A number of reinforced concrete RC frames were tested under loading cycle and were simultaneously monitored using AE. The AE test data were analyzed using the AE source location analysis method. The results showed that AE technique is suitable to identify the sources location of damage in RC structures. PMID:23997681

  8. The application of Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm to Wavelet Neural Networks for acoustic emission source location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinmin; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Li; Deng, Aideng; Bao, Yongqiang; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Yunliang

    2014-04-01

    When using acoustic emission to locate the friction fault source of rotating machinery, the effects of strong noise and waveform distortion make accurate locating difficult. Applying neural network for acoustic emission source location could be helpful. In the BP Wavelet Neural Network, BP is a local search algorithm, which falls into local minimum easily. The probability of successful search is low. We used Shuffled Frog Leaping Algorithm (SFLA) to optimize the parameters of the Wavelet Neural Network, and the optimized Wavelet Neural Network to locate the source. After having performed the experiments of friction acoustic emission's source location on the rotor friction test machine, the results show that the calculation of SFLA is simple and effective, and that locating is accurate with proper structure of the network and input parameters.

  9. 43 CFR 3746.1 - Mining locations for fissionable source materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... locations under the mining laws of the United States may be based upon a discovery of a mineral deposit..., heretofore located under the mining laws of the United States for or based upon a discovery of a mineral... MINERAL DEVELOPMENT Fissionable Source Materials § 3746.1 Mining locations for fissionable...

  10. 43 CFR 3746.1 - Mining locations for fissionable source materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... locations under the mining laws of the United States may be based upon a discovery of a mineral deposit..., heretofore located under the mining laws of the United States for or based upon a discovery of a mineral... MINERAL DEVELOPMENT Fissionable Source Materials § 3746.1 Mining locations for fissionable...

  11. Rapid estimation of tsunami source centroid location using a dense offshore observation network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, N.; Hirata, K.; Aoi, S.; Suzuki, W.; Nakamura, H.; Kunugi, T.

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a rapid method of estimating tsunami source locations using real-time ocean-bottom hydrostatic pressure data from a dense offshore observation network. We defined two characteristic locations representing the real-time tsunami disturbance and the initial sea surface height distribution. First, we defined the tsunami centroid location (TCL), which is the centroid location of the maximum absolute amplitude of the real-time ocean-bottom hydrostatic pressure changes. Second, we defined the centroid location of the absolute values of the initial sea surface height displacements. To determine whether the TCL can approximate the centroid location of the tsunami source, we examined approximately 1000 near-field synthetic tsunami scenarios and a realistic tsunami scenario of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake in the Japan Trench. From these examinations, it was confirmed that in most scenarios, the TCLs obtained within a few minutes after the occurrence of an earthquake were close to the actual corresponding tsunami source locations.

  12. Anarchy in AE Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, W. F.

    Interest in AE Aqr remains high, as evidenced by the lively discussion that took place during the workshop. In this contribution I briefly remark on the results I presented at the workshop, then address topics that were raised during the discussion. I attempt to preserve the spirit and flavor of that discussion.

  13. Locating the source of diffusion in complex networks by time-reversal backward spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhesi; Cao, Shinan; Wang, Wen-Xu; Di, Zengru; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-03-01

    Locating the source that triggers a dynamical process is a fundamental but challenging problem in complex networks, ranging from epidemic spreading in society and on the Internet to cancer metastasis in the human body. An accurate localization of the source is inherently limited by our ability to simultaneously access the information of all nodes in a large-scale complex network. This thus raises two critical questions: how do we locate the source from incomplete information and can we achieve full localization of sources at any possible location from a given set of observable nodes. Here we develop a time-reversal backward spreading algorithm to locate the source of a diffusion-like process efficiently and propose a general locatability condition. We test the algorithm by employing epidemic spreading and consensus dynamics as typical dynamical processes and apply it to the H1N1 pandemic in China. We find that the sources can be precisely located in arbitrary networks insofar as the locatability condition is assured. Our tools greatly improve our ability to locate the source of diffusion in complex networks based on limited accessibility of nodal information. Moreover, they have implications for controlling a variety of dynamical processes taking place on complex networks, such as inhibiting epidemics, slowing the spread of rumors, pollution control, and environmental protection.

  14. Locating the source of diffusion in complex networks by time-reversal backward spreading.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhesi; Cao, Shinan; Wang, Wen-Xu; Di, Zengru; Stanley, H Eugene

    2016-03-01

    Locating the source that triggers a dynamical process is a fundamental but challenging problem in complex networks, ranging from epidemic spreading in society and on the Internet to cancer metastasis in the human body. An accurate localization of the source is inherently limited by our ability to simultaneously access the information of all nodes in a large-scale complex network. This thus raises two critical questions: how do we locate the source from incomplete information and can we achieve full localization of sources at any possible location from a given set of observable nodes. Here we develop a time-reversal backward spreading algorithm to locate the source of a diffusion-like process efficiently and propose a general locatability condition. We test the algorithm by employing epidemic spreading and consensus dynamics as typical dynamical processes and apply it to the H1N1 pandemic in China. We find that the sources can be precisely located in arbitrary networks insofar as the locatability condition is assured. Our tools greatly improve our ability to locate the source of diffusion in complex networks based on limited accessibility of nodal information. Moreover, they have implications for controlling a variety of dynamical processes taking place on complex networks, such as inhibiting epidemics, slowing the spread of rumors, pollution control, and environmental protection. PMID:27078360

  15. Sequential Optimal Monitoring Network Design using Iterative Kriging for Identification of Unknown Groundwater Pollution Sources Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, O.; Datta, B.

    2011-12-01

    Identification of unknown groundwater pollution source characteristics, in terms of location, magnitude and activity duration is important for designing an effective pollution remediation strategy. Precise source characterization also becomes very important to ascertain liability, and to recover the cost of remediation from parties responsible for the groundwater pollution. Due to the uncertainties in accurately predicting the aquifer response to source flux injection, generally encountered sparsity of concentration observation data in the field, and the non uniqueness in the aquifer response to the subjected hydraulic and chemical stresses, groundwater pollution source characterization remains a challenging task. A scientifically designed pollutant concentration monitoring network becomes imperative for accurate pollutant source characterization. The efficiency of the unknown source locations identification process is largely determined by locations of monitoring wells where the pollutant concentration is observed. The proposed method combines spatial interpolation of concentration measurements and Simulated Annealing as optimization algorithm to find the optimum locations for monitoring wells. Initially, the observed concentration data at few sparsely and arbitrarily distributed wells are used to interpolate the concentration data for the aquifer study area. The concentration information is passed to the optimization algorithm (decision model) as concentration gradient which in turn finds the optimum locations for implementing the next sequence of monitoring wells. Concentration measurement data from these designed monitoring wells and already implemented monitoring network are iteratively used as feedback information for potential groundwater pollution source locations identification. The potential applicability of the developed methodology is demonstrated for an illustrative study area.

  16. Determination of Jet Noise Radiation Source Locations using a Dual Sideline Cross-Correlation/Spectrum Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. S.; Jaeger, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of our efforts is to extrapolate nearfield jet noise measurements to the geometric far field where the jet noise sources appear to radiate from a single point. To accomplish this, information about the location of noise sources in the jet plume, the radiation patterns of the noise sources and the sound pressure level distribution of the radiated field must be obtained. Since source locations and radiation patterns can not be found with simple single microphone measurements, a more complicated method must be used.

  17. Determination of Jet Noise Radiation Patterns and Source Locations using 2-Dimensional Intensity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeger, S. M.; Allen, C. S.

    1999-01-01

    Contents include the following: (1) Outline Jet Noise extrapolation to far field. (2) Two dimensional sound intensity. (3) Anechoic chamber cold jet test. (4) Results: Intensity levels. Vector maps. Source location centroids. Directivity. and (5) Conclusions.

  18. Detection and Location of Gamma-Ray Sources with a Modulating Coded Mask

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dale N.; Stromswold, David C.; Wunschel, Sharon C.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Hansen, Randy R.

    2006-01-31

    This paper presents methods of detecting and locating a concelaed nuclear gamma-ray source with a coded aperture mask. Energetic gamma rays readily penetrate moderate amounts of shielding material and can be detected at distances of many meters. The detection of high energy gamma-ray sources is vitally important to national security for several reasons, including nuclear materials smuggling interdiction, monitoring weapon components under treaties, and locating nuclear weapons and materials in the possession terrorist organizations.

  19. Solid state sensor for locating and imaging sources of gamma and x-radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.; Brucker, G.J.; Bechtel, E.

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes the design and characterization of a directional Solid State Detector (SSD) that generates images of radiation point sources and scatter patterns from irradiated targets, thus accurately identifying their locations. Previous papers demonstrated that other types of directional radiation sensors, such as Ionization Chambers, Geiger-Mueller and Scintillation Counters, can be designed to detect and locate arrays of gamma ray and x-ray point sources and broad scatter patterns.

  20. Identification of contaminant point source in surface waters based on backward location probability density function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei Ping; Jia, Yafei

    2010-04-01

    A backward location probability density function (BL-PDF) method capable of identifying location of point sources in surface waters is presented in this paper. The relation of forward location probability density function (FL-PDF) and backward location probability density, based on adjoint analysis, is validated using depth-averaged free-surface flow and mass transport models and several surface water test cases. The solutions of the backward location PDF transport equation agreed well to the forward location PDF computed using the pollutant concentration at the monitoring points. Using this relation and the distribution of the concentration detected at the monitoring points, an effective point source identification method is established. The numerical error of the backward location PDF simulation is found to be sensitive to the irregularity of the computational meshes, diffusivity, and velocity gradients. The performance of identification method is evaluated regarding the random error and number of observed values. In addition to hypothetical cases, a real case was studied to identify the source location where a dye tracer was instantaneously injected into a stream. The study indicated the proposed source identification method is effective, robust, and quite efficient in surface waters; the number of advection-diffusion equations needed to solve is equal to the number of observations.

  1. Locating and quantifying gas emission sources using remotely obtained concentration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Bill; Jonathan, Philip; González del Cueto, Fernando; Randell, David; Kosut, Oliver

    2013-08-01

    We describe a method for detecting, locating and quantifying sources of gas emissions to the atmosphere using remotely obtained gas concentration data; the method is applicable to gases of environmental concern. We demonstrate its performance using methane data collected from aircraft. Atmospheric point concentration measurements are modelled as the sum of a spatially and temporally smooth atmospheric background concentration, augmented by concentrations due to local sources. We model source emission rates with a Gaussian mixture model and use a Markov random field to represent the atmospheric background concentration component of the measurements. A Gaussian plume atmospheric eddy dispersion model represents gas dispersion between sources and measurement locations. Initial point estimates of background concentrations and source emission rates are obtained using mixed ℓ2 - ℓ1 optimisation over a discretised grid of potential source locations. Subsequent reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo inference provides estimated values and uncertainties for the number, emission rates and locations of sources unconstrained by a grid. Source area, atmospheric background concentrations and other model parameters, including plume model spreading and Lagrangian turbulence time scale, are also estimated. We investigate the performance of the approach first using a synthetic problem, then apply the method to real airborne data from a 1600 km2 area containing two landfills, then a 225 km2 area containing a gas flare stack.

  2. Network-based evaluation of infrasound source location at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, K. F.; Fee, D.; Rowell, C. R.; Johnson, J. B.; Yokoo, A.; Matoza, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    An important step in advancing the science and application of volcano infrasound is improved source location and characterization. Here we evaluate different network-based infrasonic source location methods, primarily srcLoc and semblance, using data collected at Sakurajima Volcano, Japan in July 2013. We investigate these methods in 2- and 3-dimensions to assess the necessity of considering 3-D sensor and vent locations. In addition, we compare source locations found using array back azimuth projection from dual arrays. The effect of significant local topography on source location will also be evaluated. Preliminary analysis indicates periods of high- and low-level activity, suggesting different processes occurring in the upper conduit and vent. Network processing will be applied to determine signal versus noise, a technique which illuminates when the volcano is producing infrasound, to further investigate these processes. We combine this with other methods to identify the number and style of eruptions. By bringing together source location, timing of activity level, type of activity (such as tremor, explosions, etc.), and number of events, we aim to improve understanding of the activity and associated infrasound signals at Sakurajima Volcano.

  3. Effective dose equivalent for point gamma sources located 10 cm near the body.

    PubMed

    Xu, X George; Bushart, Sean; Anderson, Ralph

    2006-08-01

    The key component in the so-called EPRI effective dose equivalent (EDE) methodology is an algorithm that utilizes two dosimeters (instead of multiple dosimeters) to predict the EDE for external photon exposures. The exposure scenarios that were previously studied in deriving the algorithm include parallel photon beams and point sources 33 cm from the body surface. The motivation for this study was the need to investigate source locations within 33 cm from the body so the method is more widely applicable. The ORNL stylized mathematical human phantoms and the MCNP code were used to calculate organ doses in this study. This paper presents the EDE data for point gamma sources at 0.3, 1.0, and 1.5 MeV, respectively, which are located at 10 cm from the surface of the body. The results and analyses show that the locations ranging from the overhead to the foot have resulted in conservative ratios except for two general regions near the front upper thigh and directly overhead. If all locations considered in this study were averaged for each photon energy, the overall ratio is on the conservative side. These data suggest that the EPRI EDE methodology is still valid for sources located 10 cm from the body, although the chance for resulting in a non-conservative estimate of the EDE has increased in comparison with the sources located at 30 cm from the body. Finally, this paper provides recommendations on how to apply the EPRI EDE methodology. PMID:16832191

  4. Macro-fiber composite piezoelectric rosettes for acoustic source location in complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Howard; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco

    2007-04-01

    An approach based upon the employment of piezoelectric transducer rosettes is proposed for passive damage or impact location in anisotropic or geometrically-complex structures. The rosettes are comprised of rectangular Macro-Fiber Composite (MFC) transducers which exhibit a highly directive response to ultrasonic guided waves. The MFC response to flexural (A 0) motion is decomposed into axial and transverse sensitivity factors, which allow extraction of the direction of an incoming wave using rosette principles. The wave source location in a plane is then simply determined by intersecting the wave directions detected by two rosettes. The rosette approach is applicable to anisotropic or geometrically-complex structures where conventional time-of-flight source location is challenging due to the direction-dependent wave velocity. The performance of the rosettes for source location is validated through pencil-lead breaks performed on an aluminum plate, an anisotropic CFRP laminate, and a complex CFRP-honeycomb sandwich panel.

  5. Correlation of Earthquake Locations with Volumetric Source Components in TauTona Gold Mine, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, D. L.; Boettcher, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the source characteristics of earthquakes in TauTona Gold Mine, South Africa, to test if the location of earthquakes relative to mining structures is correlated with significant isotropic source behavior. Earthquakes are well monitored in TauTona Mine, where underground near-source stations record smaller events and higher frequency energy than can generally be observed using surface stations. Our dataset includes -4 < Mw < 4 earthquakes recorded at hypocentral distances of tens of meters to a few kilometers. The locations of structures in the mine, including faults, dikes, tunnels, and stopes, are well known from detailed geologic mapping and surveyed mine plans. We use data collected between 2004 and 2009 from the in-mine array (1-6 kHz), the Natural Earthquake Laboratory in South African Mines (NELSAM) project stations (6-12 kHz), and a short-term PASSCAL experiment (200 Hz) to study source mechanism variability and correlation with mapped structures within the mine. Previous studies of earthquakes in mines suggest a relationship between earthquake size and isotropic moment tensor source characteristics. In TauTona Mine, earthquakes with significant implosive source characteristics tend to be infrequent, larger events (Mw > 1.5), whereas earthquakes with significant explosive source characteristics tend to be smaller (Mw < 0). A possible model for this variability in source behavior relates earthquake size to earthquake location relative to mining and natural structures. Larger events are more likely to produce closure of tunnels and stopes within the mine, whereas the smallest recorded explosive events can be interpreted as opening cracks that form at the edges of mining structures. Double-couple type sources occur throughout the full magnitude range, and are often located along mapped faults and dikes. We focus our analysis on earthquakes located near the NELSAM stations in the deepest part of the mine, and on earthquakes located at depths

  6. Source location of the smooth high-frequency radio emissions from Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Calvert, W.

    1989-01-01

    The source location of the smooth high-frequency radio emissions from Uranus has been determined. Specifically, by fitting the signal dropouts which occurred as Voyager traversed the hollow center of the emission pattern to a symmetrical cone centered on the source magnetic field direction at the cyclotron frequency, a southern-hemisphere (nightside) source was found at approximately 56 deg S, 219 deg W. The half-angle for the hollow portion of the emission pattern was found to be 13 deg.

  7. Precise source location of the anomalous 1979 March 5 gamma ray transient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.

    1981-01-01

    Refinements in the source direction analysis of the observations of the unusual gamma ray transient are presented. The final results from the interplanetary gamma ray burst network produce a 0.1 arc sq. min. error box. It is nested inside the initially determined 2 arc sq min. source region. This smaller source location is within both the optical and X-ray contours of N49 although not positioned at either contour center.

  8. Bayesian statistics applied to the location of the source of explosions at Stromboli Volcano, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saccorotti, G.; Chouet, B.; Martini, M.; Scarpa, R.

    1998-01-01

    We present a method for determining the location and spatial extent of the source of explosions at Stromboli Volcano, Italy, based on a Bayesian inversion of the slowness vector derived from frequency-slowness analyses of array data. The method searches for source locations that minimize the error between the expected and observed slowness vectors. For a given set of model parameters, the conditional probability density function of slowness vectors is approximated by a Gaussian distribution of expected errors. The method is tested with synthetics using a five-layer velocity model derived for the north flank of Stromboli and a smoothed velocity model derived from a power-law approximation of the layered structure. Application to data from Stromboli allows for a detailed examination of uncertainties in source location due to experimental errors and incomplete knowledge of the Earth model. Although the solutions are not constrained in the radial direction, excellent resolution is achieved in both transverse and depth directions. Under the assumption that the horizontal extent of the source does not exceed the crater dimension, the 90% confidence region in the estimate of the explosive source location corresponds to a small volume extending from a depth of about 100 m to a maximum depth of about 300 m beneath the active vents, with a maximum likelihood source region located in the 120- to 180-m-depth interval.

  9. Clinical epidemiology of human AE in Europe.

    PubMed

    Vuitton, D A; Demonmerot, F; Knapp, J; Richou, C; Grenouillet, F; Chauchet, A; Vuitton, L; Bresson-Hadni, S; Millon, L

    2015-10-30

    This review gives a critical update of the situation regarding alveolar echinococcosis (AE) in Europe in humans, based on existing publications and on findings of national and European surveillance systems. All sources point to an increase in human cases of AE in the "historic endemic areas" of Europe, namely Germany, Switzerland, Austria and France and to the emergence of human cases in countries where the disease had never been recognised until the end of the 20th century, especially in central-eastern and Baltic countries. Both increase and emergence could be only due to methodological biases; this point is discussed in the review. One explanation may be given by changes in the animal reservoir of the parasite, Echinococcus multilocularis (increase in the global population of foxes in Europe and its urbanisation, as well as a possible increased involvement of pet animals as definitive infectious hosts). The review also focuses onto 2 more original approaches: (1) how changes in therapeutic attitudes toward malignant and chronic inflammatory diseases may affect the epidemiology of AE in the future in Europe, since a recent survey of such cases in France showed the emergence of AE in patients with immune suppression since the beginning of the 21st century; (2) how setting a network of referral centres in Europe based on common studies on the care management of patients might contribute to a better knowledge of AE epidemiology in the future. PMID:26346900

  10. An analytic method to determine the effect of source modeling errors on the apparent location and direction of biological sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Munck, J. C.; van Dijk, B. W.; Spekreijse, H.

    1988-02-01

    Evoked potentials (EPs) and electroencephalograms (EEGs) can be used to determine the location, the direction, and strength of electrical brain activity. For this purpose mathematical models are used which describe regions in the head with different conductivity. In most models, the sources are described by mathematical (current) point dipoles. However, EPs and EEGs are generated with more extensive cortical areas. In this study an analytic method is described to calculate the effect of source extension on the potential distribution measured at the scalp and also on the difference between the location of the extended source and the location of the equivalent point dipole. General formulas are derived which express in spherical harmonics the potential distribution that results from a circularly symmetric extended source. It is shown that for sources that obey specific symmetries the influence of source extension on the potential distribution is a fourth-order effect in the distance between electrode and the origin (the middle point of the head), and a second-order effect in the extension. It is also shown that for such sources the error in localization (i.e., the distance between the position of the equivalent dipole and the center of the extended source) is zero when Geselowitz's method [IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. BME-12, 164 (1965)] is used. Because in volume conductor models the relation between source and potential is given by Poisson's equation, it is suggested by the authors that the results of the present study may be extended to applications in other fields of physics as well.

  11. Descent of tremor source locations before the 2014 phreatic eruption of Ontake volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiso, Masashi; Matsubayashi, Hirotoshi; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    On 27 September 2014, Ontake volcano, in central Japan, suddenly erupted without precursory activity. We estimated and tracked the source locations of volcanic tremor associated with the eruption at high temporal resolution, using a method based on the spatial distribution of tremor amplitudes. Although the tremor source locations were not well constrained in depth, their epicenters were well located beneath the erupted crater and the summit. Tremor sources were seen to descend approximately 2 km over a period of several minutes prior to the beginning of the eruption. Detailed analysis of the time series of tremor amplitudes suggests that this descent is a robust feature. Our finding may be an important constraint for modeling the 2014 eruption of Ontake volcano as well as for monitoring activities on this and other volcanoes.

  12. Characterization of Source and Wave Propagation Effects of Volcano-seismic Events and Tremor Using the Amplitude Source Location Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Londono, J. M.; López, C. M.; Ruiz, M. C.; Mothes, P. A.; Maeda, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We propose application of the amplitude source location (ASL) method to characterize source and wave propagation effects of volcano-seismic events and tremor observed at different volcanoes. We used this method to estimate the source location and source amplitude from high-frequency (5-10 Hz) seismic amplitudes under the assumption of isotropic S-wave radiation. We estimated the cumulative source amplitude (Is) as the offset value of the time-integrated envelope of the vertical seismogram corrected for geometrical spreading and medium attenuation in the 5-10 Hz band. We studied these parameters of tremor signals associated with eruptions and explosion events at Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador; long-period (LP) events at Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador; and LP events at Nevado del Ruiz volcano, Colombia. We identified two types of eruption tremor at Tungurahua; noise-like inharmonic waveforms and harmonic oscillatory signals. We found that Is increased linearly with increasing source amplitude for explosion events and LP events, and that Is increased exponentially with increasing source amplitude for inharmonic eruption tremor signals. The source characteristics of harmonic eruption tremor signals differed from those of inharmonic tremor signals. The Is values we estimated for inharmonic eruption tremor were consistent with previous estimates of volumes of tephra fallout. The linear relationship between the source amplitude and Is for LP events can be explained by the wave propagation effects in the diffusion model for multiple scattering assuming a diffusion coefficient of 105 m2/s and an intrinsic Q factor of around 50. The resultant mean free path is approximately 100 m. Our results suggest that Cotopaxi and Nevado del Ruiz volcanoes have similar highly scattering and attenuating structures. Our approach provides a systematic way to compare the size of volcano-seismic signals observed at different volcanoes. The scaling relations among source parameters that we identified

  13. Strength Restoration of Cracked Sandstone and Coal under a Uniaxial Compression Test and Correlated Damage Source Location Based on Acoustic Emissions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaowei; Zhang, Nong; Zheng, Xigui; Pan, Dongjiang

    2015-01-01

    Underground rock masses have shown a general trend of natural balance over billions of years of ground movement. Nonetheless, man-made underground constructions disturb this balance and cause rock stability failure. Fractured rock masses are frequently encountered in underground constructions, and this study aims to restore the strength of rock masses that have experienced considerable fracturing under uniaxial compression. Coal and sandstone from a deep-buried coal mine were chosen as experimental subjects; they were crushed by uniaxial compression and then carefully restored by a chemical adhesive called MEYCO 364 with an innovative self-made device. Finally, the restored specimens were crushed once again by uniaxial compression. Axial stress, axial strain, circumferential strain, and volumetric strain data for the entire process were fully captured and are discussed here. An acoustic emission (AE) testing system was adopted to cooperate with the uniaxial compression system to provide better definitions for crack closure thresholds, crack initiation thresholds, crack damage thresholds, and three-dimensional damage source locations in intact and restored specimens. Several remarkable findings were obtained. The restoration effects of coal are considerably better than those of sandstone because the strength recovery coefficient of the former is 1.20, whereas that of the latter is 0.33, which indicates that MEYCO 364 is particularly valid for fractured rocks whose initial intact peak stress is less than that of MEYCO 364. Secondary cracked traces of restored sandstone almost follow the cracked traces of the initial intact sandstone, and the final failure is mainly caused by decoupling between the adhesive and the rock mass. However, cracked traces of restored coal only partially follow the traces of intact coal, with the final failure of the restored coal being caused by both bonding interface decoupling and self-breakage in coal. Three-dimensional damage source

  14. Strength Restoration of Cracked Sandstone and Coal under a Uniaxial Compression Test and Correlated Damage Source Location Based on Acoustic Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaowei; Zhang, Nong; Zheng, Xigui; Pan, Dongjiang

    2015-01-01

    Underground rock masses have shown a general trend of natural balance over billions of years of ground movement. Nonetheless, man-made underground constructions disturb this balance and cause rock stability failure. Fractured rock masses are frequently encountered in underground constructions, and this study aims to restore the strength of rock masses that have experienced considerable fracturing under uniaxial compression. Coal and sandstone from a deep-buried coal mine were chosen as experimental subjects; they were crushed by uniaxial compression and then carefully restored by a chemical adhesive called MEYCO 364 with an innovative self-made device. Finally, the restored specimens were crushed once again by uniaxial compression. Axial stress, axial strain, circumferential strain, and volumetric strain data for the entire process were fully captured and are discussed here. An acoustic emission (AE) testing system was adopted to cooperate with the uniaxial compression system to provide better definitions for crack closure thresholds, crack initiation thresholds, crack damage thresholds, and three-dimensional damage source locations in intact and restored specimens. Several remarkable findings were obtained. The restoration effects of coal are considerably better than those of sandstone because the strength recovery coefficient of the former is 1.20, whereas that of the latter is 0.33, which indicates that MEYCO 364 is particularly valid for fractured rocks whose initial intact peak stress is less than that of MEYCO 364. Secondary cracked traces of restored sandstone almost follow the cracked traces of the initial intact sandstone, and the final failure is mainly caused by decoupling between the adhesive and the rock mass. However, cracked traces of restored coal only partially follow the traces of intact coal, with the final failure of the restored coal being caused by both bonding interface decoupling and self-breakage in coal. Three-dimensional damage source

  15. Quantification of Methane Source Locations and Emissions in AN Urban Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosson, E.; Richardson, S.; Tan, S. M.; Whetstone, J.; Bova, T.; Prasad, K. R.; Davis, K. J.; Phillips, N. G.; Turnbull, J. C.; Shepson, P. B.; Cambaliza, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    The regulation of methane emissions from urban sources such as landfills and waste-water treatment facilities is currently a highly debated topic in the US and in Europe. This interest is fueled, in part, by recent measurements indicating that urban emissions are a significant source of Methane (CH4) and in fact may be substantially higher than current inventory estimates(1). As a result, developing methods for locating and quantifying emissions from urban methane sources is of great interest to industries such as landfill and wastewater treatment facility owners, watchdog groups, and the governmental agencies seeking to evaluate or enforce regulations. In an attempt to identify major methane source locations and emissions in Boston, Indianapolis, and the Bay Area, systematic measurements of CH4 concentrations and meteorology data were made at street level using a vehicle mounted cavity ringdown analyzer. A number of discrete sources were detected at concentration levels in excess of 15 times background levels. Using Gaussian plume models as well as tomographic techniques, methane source locations and emission rates will be presented. In addition, flux chamber measurements of discrete sources such as those found in natural gas leaks will also be presented. (1) Wunch, D., P.O. Wennberg, G.C. Toon, G. Keppel-Aleks, and Y.G. Yavin, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from a North American Megacity, Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 36, L15810, doi:10.1029/2009GL)39825, 2009.

  16. Accounting for uncertainty in location when detecting point sources using infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J. M.; Waterman, J. R.

    2016-07-01

    This work derives the modeling and detection theory required to predict the performance of an infrared focal plane array in detecting point source targets. Specifically, we focus on modeling the uncertainty associated with the location of the point source on the array. In the process we derive several new expressions related to pixel-averaged detection performance under a variety of problem assumptions. The resulting predictions are compared to standard approaches where the location is assumed fixed and known. It is further shown how to incorporate these predictions into multi-frame detection strategies.

  17. East Asia Dust Source Location Using the Naval Research Laboratory's 1-km Dust Enhancement Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, A. L.; Curtis, C. A.; Miller, S. D.; Richardson, K.; Westphal, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    In the effort to predict dust storms and their effects on local, regional and global scales an often cited uncertainty is the precise location of dust sources. Many approaches have been used to identify major dust source regions in East Asia. These approaches include analysis of station data for frequency of dust storms, drifting dust, dusty day, wind speed, and PM10 total suspended particulates. Some approaches emphasize the location of land surface type (Gobi, sandy desert, and loess) and geomorphological setting/features (basins, plateaus, alluvial fans, dry rivers, or oases). Other approaches use remote sensing to locate areas of high dust activity using the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer Aerosol Index (TOMS AI) data, to correlate Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) vegetation cover with dust storm frequency, or to track dust storm event origination by analyzing Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) images. It is also customary for researchers to combine two or more of these approaches to identify dust source regions. In this paper we use a novel approach to locate dust sources in East Asia. Utilizing the Naval Research Laboratory's satellite derived 1-km Dust Enhancement Product (DEP) imagery we can readily distinguish elevated dust over land from other components of the scene and individual dust plumes are readily seen. The high resolution of the DEP allows the many small, eroding point sources (measuring 1-10s km across) that form individual plumes to be located. Five years (2007 - 2011) of East Asia DEP imagery have been analyzed. Dust source frequency plots will be shown highlighting the most active dust source areas in East Asia. Our results show the most active point sources are located along the slopes and around the rim of large basins. Within basins, on plateaus and in valleys point sources are concentrated in smaller depressions relative to the surrounding topography. Point sources are also associated with the action of

  18. Identifying pollutant source directions using multiple analysis methods at a rural location in New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Min-Suk; Schwab, James J.; Chen, Wei-Nai; Lin, Chuan-Yao; Rattigan, Oliver V.; Demerjian, Kenneth L.

    2011-05-01

    We identify the directionality of sources contributing to observed pollutant concentrations at a rural site through the use of the analysis methods of Conditional Probability Function (CPF) and the Source Direction Probability (SDP). Input data consists of hourly averaged PM 2.5 mass, Organic Mass (OM) from Organic Carbon (OC), optical Elemental Carbon (optical EC), SO 2, CO, NOy, O 3 concentrations and metrological data from Pinnacle State Park site in rural New York State for the period of Dec 2004 to Dec 2008. These measured pollutants are coupled with on-site wind data to identify the directionality of the sources; which are then compared to known stationary source locations from the EPA Air Data web site. Although the CPF plot of the O 3 showed no distinct directionality source area, the Pinnacle State Park site was frequently impacted by plumes of relatively high PM 2.5 mass, SO 2, CO, NOy, optical EC and OM concentrations. Further analysis of the enhanced pollution occurrence frequency from the eastern sector revealed two peaks in the time-of-day distribution of elevated CO, NOy, and optical EC, which provides additional information on the sources. This contrasts with the enhanced pollution occurrence frequency from the south for CO, OM, and optical EC, which shows a single morning peak in its time-of-day distribution and indicates a somewhat more distant, but common source for these carbon-containing pollutants. PM 2.5 mass corresponds to the source areas related to emission facilities listed in the EPA Emissions Inventory, which is further confirmed by correlation and analysis of aerosol optical depth (AOD) data from Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on board Terra and Aqua satellites. We present evidence that most of the high pollution episodes likely arise from emission sources located several hundred kilometers from the site, indicating mid-long range transport of pollutants to this location.

  19. Locating a compact odor source using a four-channel insect electroantennogram sensor.

    PubMed

    Myrick, A J; Baker, T C

    2011-03-01

    Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using an array of live insects to detect concentrated packets of odor and infer the location of an odor source (∼15 m away) using a backward Lagrangian dispersion model based on the Langevin equation. Bayesian inference allows uncertainty to be quantified, which is useful for robotic planning. The electroantennogram (EAG) is the biopotential developed between the tissue at the tip of an insect antenna and its base, which is due to the massed response of the olfactory receptor neurons to an odor stimulus. The EAG signal can carry tens of bits per second of information with a rise time as short as 12 ms (K A Justice 2005 J. Neurophiol. 93 2233-9). Here, instrumentation including a GPS with a digital compass and an ultrasonic 2D anemometer has been integrated with an EAG odor detection scheme, allowing the location of an odor source to be estimated by collecting data at several downwind locations. Bayesian inference in conjunction with a Lagrangian dispersion model, taking into account detection errors, has been implemented resulting in an estimate of the odor source location within 0.2 m of the actual location. PMID:21160116

  20. Source location of the smooth high-frequency radio emissions from Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, W.M.; Calvert, W. )

    1989-05-01

    The source location of the smooth high-frequency (SHF) radio emissions from Uranus has been determined using a technique differing from those applied previously. Specifically, by fitting the signal dropouts which occurred as Voyager traversed the hollow center for the emission pattern to a symmetrical cone centered on the source magnetic field direction at the cyclotron frequency, a southern-hemisphere (nightside) source was found at approximately 56{degree} S, 219{degree} W. The half-angle for the hollow portion of the emission pattern was found to be 13{degree}.

  1. Fracture source location in thin plates using the wavelet transform of dispersive waves.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H; Jang, Y S

    2000-01-01

    A new signal processing approach was presented for acoustic emission source location using the dispersive waves in a thin plate. For wave propagation in dispersive media, the accuracy of source location can be improved by using the arrival times of a single frequency component in the output signals at an array of sensors. The wavelet transform (WT) was used to resolve this problem. By utilizing the time-frequency data of the WT, the frequency-dependent arrival time traveling with the group velocity was shown to be easily determined. Experiments were performed using a lead break as the simulated fracture source on the surface of an aluminum plate. Two plate modes corresponding to the S(0) and A(0) Lamb waves were identified, and their group velocities were accurately measured. The source location results based on the WT method agreed well with the true locations. The WT method was also compared with the cross correlation technique, and both methods provide similar results. PMID:18238588

  2. The global compendium of Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Moritz U. G.; Sinka, Marianne E.; Duda, Kirsten A.; Mylne, Adrian; Shearer, Freya M.; Brady, Oliver J.; Messina, Jane P.; Barker, Christopher M.; Moore, Chester G.; Carvalho, Roberta G.; Coelho, Giovanini E.; Van Bortel, Wim; Hendrickx, Guy; Schaffner, Francis; Wint, G. R. William; Elyazar, Iqbal R. F.; Teng, Hwa-Jen; Hay, Simon I.

    2015-01-01

    Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus are the main vectors transmitting dengue and chikungunya viruses. Despite being pathogens of global public health importance, knowledge of their vectors’ global distribution remains patchy and sparse. A global geographic database of known occurrences of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus between 1960 and 2014 was compiled. Herein we present the database, which comprises occurrence data linked to point or polygon locations, derived from peer-reviewed literature and unpublished studies including national entomological surveys and expert networks. We describe all data collection processes, as well as geo-positioning methods, database management and quality-control procedures. This is the first comprehensive global database of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus occurrence, consisting of 19,930 and 22,137 geo-positioned occurrence records respectively. Both datasets can be used for a variety of mapping and spatial analyses of the vectors and, by inference, the diseases they transmit. PMID:26175912

  3. Lights, camera, A&E.

    PubMed

    Gould, Mark

    Channel 4 series 24 Hours in A&E was one of the television highlights of 2011. Filmed at King's College Hospital in London, it showed the reality of life in an A&E department and may have improved the public's understanding of nursing. PMID:22324233

  4. Gene flow between wheat and wild relatives: empirical evidence from Aegilops geniculata, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis

    PubMed Central

    Arrigo, Nils; Guadagnuolo, Roberto; Lappe, Sylvain; Pasche, Sophie; Parisod, Christian; Felber, François

    2011-01-01

    Gene flow between domesticated species and their wild relatives is receiving growing attention. This study addressed introgression between wheat and natural populations of its wild relatives (Aegilops species). The sampling included 472 individuals, collected from 32 Mediterranean populations of three widespread Aegilops species (Aegilops geniculata, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis) and compared wheat field borders to areas isolated from agriculture. Individuals were characterized with amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting, analysed through two computational approaches (i.e. Bayesian estimations of admixture and fuzzy clustering), and sequences marking wheat-specific insertions of transposable elements. With this combined approach, we detected substantial gene flow between wheat and Aegilops species. Specifically, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis showed significantly more admixed individuals close to wheat fields than in locations isolated from agriculture. In contrast, little evidence of gene flow was found in Ae. geniculata. Our results indicated that reproductive barriers have been regularly bypassed during the long history of sympatry between wheat and Aegilops. PMID:25568015

  5. Characteristics of Love and Rayleigh waves in ambient noise: wavetype ratio, source location and seasonal behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juretzek, C.; Perleth, M.; Hadziioannou, C.

    2015-12-01

    Ambient seismic noise has become an important source of signal for tomography and monitoring purposes. Better understanding of the noise field characteristics is crucial to further improve noise applications. Our knowledge about the common and different origins of Love and Rayleigh waves in the microseism bands is still limited. This applies in particular to constraints on source locations and source mechanisms of Love waves. Here, 3-component beamforming is used to distinguish between the differently polarized wave types present in the noise field recorded at several arrays across Europe. The focus lies on frequencies around the primary and secondary microseismic bands. We compare characteristics of Love and Rayleigh wave noise, such as source directions and frequency content. Further, Love to Rayleigh wave ratios are measured at each array, and a dependence on direction is observed. We constrain the corresponding source regions of both wave types by backprojection. By using a full year of data in 2013, we are able to track the seasonal changes in our observations of Love-to-Rayleigh ratio and source locations.

  6. Estimation of source apportionment and potential source locations of PM 2.5 at a west coastal IMPROVE site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, InJo; Hopke, Philip K.

    Particle composition data for PM 2.5 samples collected at Kalmiopsis Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) site in southwestern Oregon from March 2000 to May 2004 were analyzed to provide source identification and apportionment. A total of 493 samples were collected and 32 species were analyzed by particle induced X-ray emission, proton elastic scattering analysis, photon-induced X-ray fluorescence, ion chromatography, and thermal optical reflectance methods. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was used to estimate the source profiles and their mass contributions. The PMF modeling identified nine sources. In the Kalmiopsis site, the average mass was apportioned to wood/field burning (38.4%), secondary sulfate (26.9%), airborne soil including Asian dust (8.6 %), secondary nitrate (7.6%), fresh sea salt (5.8%), OP-rich sulfate (4.9%), aged sea salt (4.5 %), gasoline vehicle (1.9%), and diesel emission (1.4%). The potential source contribution function (PSCF) was then used to help identify likely locations of the regional sources of pollution. The PSCF map for wood/field burning indicates there is a major potential source area in the Siskiyou County and eastern Oregon. The potential source locations for secondary sulfate are found in western Washington, northwestern Oregon, and the near shore Pacific Ocean where there are extensive shipping lanes. It was not possible to extract a profile directly attributable to ship emissions, but indications of their influence are seen in the secondary sulfate and aged sea salt compositions.

  7. Source location impact on relative tsunami strength along the U.S. West Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, L.; Bromirski, P. D.; Miller, A. J.; Arcas, D.; Flick, R. E.; Hendershott, M. C.

    2015-07-01

    Tsunami propagation simulations are used to identify which tsunami source locations would produce the highest amplitude waves on approach to key population centers along the U.S. West Coast. The reasons for preferential influence of certain remote excitation sites are explored by examining model time sequences of tsunami wave patterns emanating from the source. Distant bathymetric features in the West and Central Pacific can redirect tsunami energy into narrow paths with anomalously large wave height that have disproportionate impact on small areas of coastline. The source region generating the waves can be as little as 100 km along a subduction zone, resulting in distinct source-target pairs with sharply amplified wave energy at the target. Tsunami spectral ratios examined for transects near the source, after crossing the West Pacific, and on approach to the coast illustrate how prominent bathymetric features alter wave spectral distributions, and relate to both the timing and magnitude of waves approaching shore. To contextualize the potential impact of tsunamis from high-amplitude source-target pairs, the source characteristics of major historical earthquakes and tsunamis in 1960, 1964, and 2011 are used to generate comparable events originating at the highest-amplitude source locations for each coastal target. This creates a type of "worst-case scenario," a replicate of each region's historically largest earthquake positioned at the fault segment that would produce the most incoming tsunami energy at each target port. An amplification factor provides a measure of how the incoming wave height from the worst-case source compares to the historical event.

  8. Multiband array detection and location of seismic sources recorded by dense seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, Natalia; Satriano, Claudio; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Bernard, Pascal; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-06-01

    We present a new methodology for detection and space-time location of seismic sources based on multiscale, frequency-selective coherence of the wave field recorded by dense large-scale seismic networks and local antennas. The method is designed to enhance coherence of the signal statistical features across the array of sensors and consists of three steps: signal processing, space-time imaging, and detection and location. The first step provides, for each station, a simplified representation of seismic signal by extracting multiscale non-stationary statistical characteristics, through multiband higher-order statistics or envelopes. This signal processing scheme is designed to account for a priori unknown transients, potentially associated with a variety of sources (e.g. earthquakes, tremors), and to prepare data for a better performance in posterior steps. Following space-time imaging is carried through 3-D spatial mapping and summation of station-pair time-delay estimate functions. This step produces time-series of 3-D spatial images representing the likelihood that each pixel makes part of a source. Detection and location is performed in the final step by extracting the local maxima from the 3-D spatial images. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method in detecting and locating seismic sources associated with low signal-to-noise ratio on an example of the aftershock earthquake records from local stations of International Maule Aftershock Deployment in Central Chile. The performance and potential of the method to detect, locate and characterize the energy release associated with possibly mixed seismic radiation from earthquakes and low-frequency tectonic tremors is further tested on continuous data from southwestern Japan.

  9. Multi-band array detection and location of seismic sources recorded by dense seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, Natalia; Satriano, Claudio; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Bernard, Pascal; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-02-01

    We present a new methodology for detection and space-time location of seismic sources based on multi-scale, frequency-selective coherence of the wave field recorded by dense large-scale seismic networks and local antennas. The method is designed to enhance coherence of the signal statistical features across the array of sensors and consists of three steps: signal processing, space-time imaging, and detection and location. The first step provides, for each station, a simplified representation of seismic signal by extracting multi-scale non-stationary statistical characteristics, through multi-band higher-order statistics or envelopes. This signal processing scheme is designed to account for a priori unknown transients, potentially associated with a variety of sources (e.g., earthquakes, tremors), and to prepare data for a better performance in posterior steps. Following space-time imaging is carried through 3D spatial mapping and summation of station-pair time-delay estimate functions. This step produces time series of 3D spatial images representing the likelihood that each pixel makes part of a source. Detection and location is performed in the final step by extracting the local maxima from the 3D spatial images. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method in detecting and locating seismic sources associated with low signal-to-noise ratio on an example of the aftershock earthquake records from local stations of International Maule Aftershock Deployment in Central Chile. The performance and potential of the method to detect, locate and characterize the energy release associated with possibly mixed seismic radiation from earthquakes and low-frequency tectonic tremors is further tested on continuous data from southwestern Japan.

  10. Quantifying uncertainties in location and source mechanism for Long-Period events at Mt Etna, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchie, Léna; Saccorotti, Gilberto; Bean, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    The manifestation of Long-Period events is documented at many volcanoes worldwide. However the mechanism at their origin is still object of discussion. Models proposed so far involve (i) the resonance of fluid-filled cracks or conduits that are triggered by fluid instabilities or the brittle failure of high viscous magmas and (ii) the slow-rupture earthquakes in the shallow portion of volcanic edifices. Since LP activity usually precedes and accompanies volcanic eruption, the understanding of these sources is important in terms of hazard assessment and eruption early warning. The work is thus primarily aimed at the assessment of the uncertainties in the determination of LP source properties as a consequence of poor knowledge of the velocity structure and location errors. We used data from temporary networks deployed on Mt Etna in 2005. During August, 2005, about 13000 LP events were detected through a STA/LTA approach, and were classified into two families on the basis of waveform similarity. For each family of events, we located the source using three different approaches: (1) a single-station-location method based on the back-propagation of the polarization vector estimated from covariance analysis of three-component signals; (2) multi-channel analysis of data recorded by two seismic arrays; (3) relative locations based on inversion of differential times obtained through cross-correlation of similar waveforms. For all these three different methods, the solutions are very sensitive to the chosen velocity model. We thus iterated the location procedure for different medium properties; the preferred velocity is that for which the results obtained with the three different methods are consistent each other. For each family, we then defined a volume of possible source location and performed a full-waveform, moment tensor (MT) inversion for the entire catalog of events. In this manner, we obtained a MT solution for each grid node of the investigated volume. The MT

  11. Gravitational wave hotspots: Ranking potential locations of single-source gravitational wave emission

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Joseph; Polin, Abigail; Lommen, Andrea; Christy, B; Stappers, Ben; Finn, Lee Samuel; Jenet, F. A.

    2014-03-20

    The steadily improving sensitivity of pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) suggests that gravitational waves (GWs) from supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) systems in the nearby universe will be detectable sometime during the next decade. Currently, PTAs assume an equal probability of detection from every sky position, but as evidence grows for a non-isotropic distribution of sources, is there a most likely sky position for a detectable single source of GWs? In this paper, a collection of Galactic catalogs is used to calculate various metrics related to the detectability of a single GW source resolvable above a GW background, assuming that every galaxy has the same probability of containing an SMBHB. Our analyses of these data reveal small probabilities that one of these sources is currently in the PTA band, but as sensitivity is improved regions of consistent probability density are found in predictable locations, specifically around local galaxy clusters.

  12. Location of the effective diffusing-photon source in a strongly scattering medium.

    PubMed

    Kostko, A F; Pavlov, V A

    1997-10-20

    When a narrow laser beam illuminates a strongly scattering medium, the effective pointlike source of diffusing photons appears inside the medium. By the method worked out, which is based on measurements of the diffusive intensity of light emerging from a turbid spherical sample, the depth of this source site (the penetration depth) is determined relatively to the sample diameter, which is known accurately. By using this method of locating the effective source, we have discovered that its position inside the medium is unexpectedly deep. We obtained the penetration depth D(0) = 4.6 l* +/- 0.7 l* instead of one transport mean free path, where l* is the value of D(0) in the standard diffusion theory. Information about this source dipping is useful in diffusing-photon correlation spectroscopy because of its influence on the geometric factor calculated from the diffusion equation. PMID:18264271

  13. a Study of Microphone Arrays for the Location of Vibrational Sound Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzumoto, Andres Esteban Perez

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The original objective of the work was to develop an acoustic imaging technique, Nearfield Acoustic Holography (NAH), into a reasonably affordable practical system for in-situ applications in an industrial environment. In order to place NAH in the general context of source identification techniques, the thesis summarizes theoretical considerations about sound sources and sound fields, and the principles of different sound source location techniques used in practical situations. The development of NAH theory for planar arrays is the central point of this summary, and the different systems that apply this theory are discussed. Theoretical research and computer simulations show that, at the present state of the art, sound source reconstructions using NAH can only work in certain cases which have to be analyzed individually. The limitations of the theory are better understood when the source reconstruction is studied using the proper methodology for the inherent ill-posed inverse problem. Such as study allowed us to improve the theoretical framework, and to obtain stable source reconstructions. A reliable system for field measurements of different types of sources was not found to be feasible at present. However, it is shown that the inverse problem theory allows us to overcome some of the limitations of the current theory for field measurements. The difficulties encountered with NAH, and the study of the inverse problem, led us to attempt to develop an alternative, simpler, system which could minimize the inverse problem of source reconstruction. The system considered was a hemispherical array with analogue signal processing. Applying this principle transforms the source reconstruction problem into a re-modelling problem, reducing the inverse problem to the solution of a stable direct problem. Although the antenna could not be tested to its full potential, the initial results were not applicable for source

  14. Travel-time source-specific station correction improves location accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuntini, Alessandra; Materni, Valerio; Chiappini, Stefano; Carluccio, Roberto; Console, Rodolfo; Chiappini, Massimo

    2013-04-01

    Accurate earthquake locations are crucial for investigating seismogenic processes, as well as for applications like verifying compliance to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Earthquake location accuracy is related to the degree of knowledge about the 3-D structure of seismic wave velocity in the Earth. It is well known that modeling errors of calculated travel times may have the effect of shifting the computed epicenters far from the real locations by a distance even larger than the size of the statistical error ellipses, regardless of the accuracy in picking seismic phase arrivals. The consequences of large mislocations of seismic events in the context of the CTBT verification is particularly critical in order to trigger a possible On Site Inspection (OSI). In fact, the Treaty establishes that an OSI area cannot be larger than 1000 km2, and its larger linear dimension cannot be larger than 50 km. Moreover, depth accuracy is crucial for the application of the depth event screening criterion. In the present study, we develop a method of source-specific travel times corrections based on a set of well located events recorded by dense national seismic networks in seismically active regions. The applications concern seismic sequences recorded in Japan, Iran and Italy. We show that mislocations of the order of 10-20 km affecting the epicenters, as well as larger mislocations in hypocentral depths, calculated from a global seismic network and using the standard IASPEI91 travel times can be effectively removed by applying source-specific station corrections.

  15. Sharks need the lateral line to locate odor sources: rheotaxis and eddy chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Jayne M; Atema, Jelle

    2007-06-01

    Odor plumes are complex, dynamic, three-dimensional structures used by many animals to locate food, mates, home sites, etc. Yet odor itself has no directional properties. Animals use a variety of different senses to obtain directional information. Since most odor plumes are composed of dispersing odor patches and dissipating vorticity eddies, aquatic animals may localize odor sources by simultaneous analysis of chemical and hydrodynamic dispersal fields, a process referred to as eddy chemotaxis. This study examines the contributions of olfaction, mechanoreception and vision to odor source localization in a shark, the smooth dogfish Mustelus canis. Two parallel, turbulent plumes were created in an 8 m flume: squid rinse odor and seawater control. Minimally turbulent ;oozing' sources of odor and seawater control were physically separated from sources of major turbulence by placing a brick downstream from each oozing source, creating two turbulent wakes, one or the other flavored with food odor. This created four separate targets for the sharks to locate. Animals were tested under two light conditions (fluorescent and infrared) and in two sensory conditions (lateral line intact and lateral line lesioned by streptomycin). Intact animals demonstrated a preference for the odor plume over the seawater plume and for the source of odor/turbulence (the brick on the odor side) over the source of the odor alone (the odor-oozing nozzle). Plume and target preference and search time were not significantly affected by light condition. In the light, lesioning the lateral line increased search time but did not affect success rate or plume preference. However, lesioned animals no longer discriminated between sources of turbulent and oozing odor. In the dark, search time of lesioned animals further increased, and the few animals that located any of the targets did not discriminate between odor and seawater plumes, let alone targets. These results demonstrate for the first time that

  16. The location of the source of high-frequency solar acoustic oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Lu, Edward )

    1991-07-01

    Recently Libbrecht and Jefferies et al. have reported regular peaks in the solar oscillation power spectrum extending well above 5.3 mHz, the maximum frequency of trapped acoustic modes. Kumar et al. argued that these peaks are primarily due to the interference of traveling waves which are excited due to acoustic emission from turbulent convection. In contrast with the standing wave P-mode frequencies below 5.3 mHz, the positions of the high-frequency interference peaks (HIPs) are dependent on the location of the source of the acoustic oscillations. In the present work, Kumar et al.'s argument is strengthened, and more importantly, use is made of the above dependence to determine the acoustic source strength as a function of depth. It is found that the acoustic source profile, and thus the convective velocity, is peaked about 200 km deeper than what is expected from standard mixing length theory. 13 refs.

  17. High-precision source location of the 1978 November 19 gamma-ray burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Pizzichini, G.; Evans, W. D.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.

    1981-01-01

    The celestial source location of the November 19, 1978, intense gamma ray burst has been determined from data obtained with the interplanetary gamma-ray sensor network by means of long-baseline wave front timing instruments. Each of the instruments was designed for studying events with observable spectra of approximately greater than 100 keV, and each provides accurate event profile timing in the several millisecond range. The data analysis includes the following: the triangulated region is centered at (gamma, delta) 1950 = (1h16m32s, -28 deg 53 arcmin), at -84 deg galactic latitude, where the star density is very low and the obscuration negligible. The gamma-ray burst source region, consistent with that of a highly polarized radio source described by Hjellming and Ewald (1981), may assist in the source modeling and may facilitate the understanding of the source process. A marginally identifiable X-ray source was also found by an Einstein Observatory investigation. It is concluded that the burst contains redshifted positron annihilation and nuclear first-excited iron lines, which is consistent with a neutron star origin.

  18. Statistical study of coronal mass ejection source locations: Understanding CMEs viewed in coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuming; Chen, Caixia; Gui, Bin; Shen, Chenglong; Ye, Pinzhong; Wang, S.

    2011-04-01

    How to properly understand coronal mass ejections (CMEs) viewed in white light coronagraphs is crucial to many relative researches in solar and space physics. The issue is now particularly addressed in this paper through studying the source locations of all the 1078 Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) CMEs listed in Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop (CDAW) CME catalog during 1997-1998 and their correlation with CMEs' apparent parameters. By manually checking LASCO and Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) movies of these CMEs, we find that, except 231 CMEs whose source locations cannot be identified due to poor data, there are 288 CMEs with location identified on the frontside solar disk, 234 CMEs appearing above solar limb, and 325 CMEs without evident eruptive signatures in the field of view of EIT. On the basis of the statistical results of CMEs' source locations, there are four physical issues: (1) the missing rate of CMEs by SOHO LASCO and EIT, (2) the mass of CMEs, (3) the causes of halo CMEs, and (4) the deflections of CMEs in the corona, are exhaustively analyzed. It is found that (1) about 32% frontside CMEs cannot be recognized by SOHO, (2) the brightness of a CME at any heliocentric distance is roughly positively correlated with its speed, and the CME mass derived from the brightness is probably overestimated, (3) both projection effect and violent eruption are the major causes of halo CMEs, and especially for limb halo CMEs the latter is the primary one, and (4) most CMEs deflected toward equator near the solar minimum; these deflections can be classified into three types: the asymmetrical expansion, the nonradial ejection, and the deflected propagation.

  19. An Improved Source-Scanning Algorithm for Locating Earthquake Clusters or Aftershock Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y.; Kao, H.; Hsu, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Source-scanning Algorithm (SSA) was originally introduced in 2004 to locate non-volcanic tremors. Its application was later expanded to the identification of earthquake rupture planes and the near-real-time detection and monitoring of landslides and mud/debris flows. In this study, we further improve SSA for the purpose of locating earthquake clusters or aftershock sequences when only a limited number of waveform observations are available. The main improvements include the application of a ground motion analyzer to separate P and S waves, the automatic determination of resolution based on the grid size and time step of the scanning process, and a modified brightness function to utilize constraints from multiple phases. Specifically, the improved SSA (named as ISSA) addresses two major issues related to locating earthquake clusters/aftershocks. The first one is the massive amount of both time and labour to locate a large number of seismic events manually. And the second one is to efficiently and correctly identify the same phase across the entire recording array when multiple events occur closely in time and space. To test the robustness of ISSA, we generate synthetic waveforms consisting of 3 separated events such that individual P and S phases arrive at different stations in different order, thus making correct phase picking nearly impossible. Using these very complicated waveforms as the input, the ISSA scans all model space for possible combination of time and location for the existence of seismic sources. The scanning results successfully associate various phases from each event at all stations, and correctly recover the input. To further demonstrate the advantage of ISSA, we apply it to the waveform data collected by a temporary OBS array for the aftershock sequence of an offshore earthquake southwest of Taiwan. The overall signal-to-noise ratio is inadequate for locating small events; and the precise arrival times of P and S phases are difficult to

  20. Transport of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from an arctic glacier to downstream locations: implications for sources.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Karen Y; Yamazaki, Eriko; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Taniyasu, Sachi; Murphy, Margaret B; Horii, Yuichi; Petrick, Gert; Kallerborn, Roland; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Murano, Kentaro; Lam, Paul K S

    2013-03-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have been globally detected in various environmental matrices, yet their fate and transport to the Arctic is still unclear, especially for the European Arctic. In this study, concentrations of 17 PFAS were quantified in two ice cores (n=26), surface snow (n=9) and surface water samples (n=14) collected along a spatial gradient in Svalbard, Norway. Concentrations of selected ions (Na(+), SO4(2-), etc.) were also determined for tracing the origins and sources of PFAS. Perfluorobutanoate (PFBA), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorononanoate (PFNA) were the dominant compounds found in ice core samples. Taking PFOA, PFNA and perfluorooctane-sulfonate (PFOS) as examples, higher concentrations were detected in the middle layers of the ice cores representing the period of 1997-2000. Lower concentrations of C8-C12 perfluorocarboxylates (PFCAs) were detected in comparison with concentrations measured previously in an ice core from the Canadian Arctic, indicating that contamination levels in the European Arctic are lower. Average PFAS concentrations were found to be lower in surface snow and melted glacier water samples, while increased concentrations were observed in river water downstream near the coastal area. Perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) was detected in the downstream locations, but not in the glacier, suggesting existence of local sources of this compound. Long-range atmospheric transport of PFAS was the major deposition pathway for the glaciers, while local sources (e.g., skiing activities) were identified in the downstream locations. PMID:23376515

  1. A Method for Monitoring the Underground Mining Position Based on the Blasting Source Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiu-zhi; Wang, Zong-sheng; Zhang, Zeng-zhi; Wang, Feng-qian

    2013-01-01

    Some small and medium-sized coal mines are mining beyond their mining boundary driven by profit. The illegal activities cause many mine disasters but effective supervision is very hard to achieve, especially for underground coal mining. Nowadays, artificial blasting operation is widely used in tunneling or mining in small and medium-sized coal mines. A method for monitoring the underground mining position by monitoring the blasting source position is firstly introduced in this paper. The blasting vibration waves are picked up by the detectors and dealt by the signal acquisition sub-station, and then sent to the principal computer. The blasting source is located by the principal computer and displayed in the mine’s electronic map. The blasting source position is located in 10 seconds after the first P wave reaching the detector, whose error is registered within 20 meters by field-proven method. Auto-monitoring of the underground mining position in real-time is solved better and management level is improved using this method.

  2. Identification of efficient observers for locating spreading source in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xizhe; Zhang, Yubo; Lv, Tianyang; Yin, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the location of the spreading source of complex networks is a challenging task and plays an important role in many real problems. The hidden source can be localized based on the information gathered by a few nodes, which are called the observers. Identification of the efficient observers is critical to locate the source with high accuracy. Here we analyze several placement strategies of the observers based on centralities of nodes, including the high-degree, high-betweenness, high-clustering coefficient, high-eigenvector and high-closeness. Based on the random spreading experiments on both model and real networks, we find that the localization accuracy of these strategies is decreased with the increase of the connectivity of network, and there is no significant difference between them. Further experiments show that the coverage range of the observers may be the key factor that affects the localization accuracy. Our results can provide a route for the optimal design of placement strategies of the observer nodes.

  3. Source location and characterization of volatile organic compound emissions at a petrochemical plant in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Liang; Fang, Hung Yuan; Shu, Chi-Min

    2005-10-01

    This paper elucidated a novel approach to locating volatile organic compound (VOC) emission sources and characterizing their VOCs by database and contour plotting. The target of this survey was a petrochemical plant in Linyan, Kaohsiung County, Taiwan. Samples were taken with canisters from 25 sites inside this plant, twice per season, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The survey covered 1 whole year. By consolidated into a database, the data could be readily retrieved, statistically analyzed, and clearly presented in both table and graph forms. It followed from the cross-analysis of the database that the abundant types of VOCs were alkanes, alkenes/dienes, and aromatics, all of which accounted for 99% of total VOCs. By contour plotting, the emission sources for alkanes, aromatics, and alkenes/ dienes were successfully located. Through statistical analysis, the database could provide the range and 90% confidence interval of each species from each emission source. Both alkanes and alkene/dienes came from tank farm and naphtha cracking units and were mainly composed of C3-C5 members. Regarding aromatics, benzene, toluene, and xylenes were the primary species; they were emitted from tank farm, aromatic units, and xylene units. PMID:16295274

  4. Do locations of CME source regions relative to the HSB determine the appearance of the CME?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Luhmann, J. G.; Zhao, X. P.

    2002-05-01

    The relationship between CMEs and the coronal helmet streamer belt has been the subject of several studies. Recent studies using SOHO/LASCO observation presented a rather complicated picture of this relationship (Subramanian et al., 1999). It has been suggested that a CME may blowout, create, disturb, have no effect on or be clearly displaced from a streamer. We investigate the possibility that these different interactions may be due to the locations of the CME source regions relative to the helmet streamer belt. Estimated Helmet streamer belt configurations obtained using Potential Field Source Surface Models based on SOHO/MDI synoptic maps are compared with combined LASCO-EIT movies on the LASCO website for this study.

  5. Locating and Quantifying Broadband Fan Sources Using In-Duct Microphones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Robert P.; Walker, Bruce E.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    In-duct beamforming techniques have been developed for locating broadband noise sources on a low-speed fan and quantifying the acoustic power in the inlet and aft fan ducts. The NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced Noise Control Fan was used as a test bed. Several of the blades were modified to provide a broadband source to evaluate the efficacy of the in-duct beamforming technique. Phased arrays consisting of rings and line arrays of microphones were employed. For the imaging, the data were mathematically resampled in the frame of reference of the rotating fan. For both the imaging and power measurement steps, array steering vectors were computed using annular duct modal expansions, selected subsets of the cross spectral matrix elements were used, and the DAMAS and CLEAN-SC deconvolution algorithms were applied.

  6. Reconstruction of source location in a network of gravitational wave interferometric detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalier, Fabien; Barsuglia, Matteo; Bizouard, Marie-Anne; Brisson, Violette; Clapson, Andre-Claude; Davier, Michel; Hello, Patrice; Kreckelbergh, Stephane; Leroy, Nicolas; Varvella, Monica

    2006-10-15

    This paper deals with the reconstruction of the direction of a gravitational wave source using the detection made by a network of interferometric detectors, mainly the LIGO and Virgo detectors. We suppose that an event has been seen in coincidence using a filter applied on the three detector data streams. Using the arrival time (and its associated error) of the gravitational signal in each detector, the direction of the source in the sky is computed using a {chi}{sup 2} minimization technique. For reasonably large signals (SNR>4.5 in all detectors), the mean angular error between the real location and the reconstructed one is about 1 deg. . We also investigate the effect of the network geometry assuming the same angular response for all interferometric detectors. It appears that the reconstruction quality is not uniform over the sky and is degraded when the source approaches the plane defined by the three detectors. Adding at least one other detector to the LIGO-Virgo network reduces the blind regions and in the case of 6 detectors, a precision less than 1 deg. on the source direction can be reached for 99% of the sky.

  7. Locating the acoustic source in thin glass plate using low sampling rate data.

    PubMed

    Hoseini Sabzevari, S Amir; Moavenian, Majid

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic source localization is an important step for structural health monitoring (SHM). There are many research studies dealing with localization based on high sampling rate data. In this paper, for the first time, acoustic source is localized on an isotropic plate using low sampling rate data. Previous studies have mainly used a cluster of specific sensors to easily record high sampling rate signals containing qualitative time domain features. This paper proposes a novel technique to localize the acoustic source on isotropic plates by simply implementing a combination of two simple electret microphones and Loci of k-Tuple Distances (LkTD) from the two sensors with low sampling rate data. In fact the method proposes substitution of previous methods based on solving the system of equations and increasing the number of sensors by implementing the selection of LkTD. Unlike most previous studies, estimation of time difference of arrival (TDOA) is based on the frequency properties of the signal rather than it's time properties. An experimental set-up is prepared and experiments are conducted to validate the proposed technique by prediction of the acoustic source location. The experimental results show that TDOA estimations based on low sampling rate data can produce more accurate predictions in comparison with previous studies. It is also shown that the selection of LkTD on the plate has noticeable effects on the performance of this technique. PMID:27110914

  8. Investigation of source location determination from Magsat magnetic anomalies: The Euler method approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravat, Dhananjay

    1996-01-01

    The applicability of the Euler method of source location determination was investigated on several model situations pertinent to satellite-data scale situations as well as Magsat data of Europe. Our investigations enabled us to understand the end-member cases for which the Euler method will work with the present satellite magnetic data and also the cases for which the assumptions implicit in the Euler method will not be met by the present satellite magnetic data. These results have been presented in one invited lecture at the Indo-US workshop on Geomagnetism in Studies of the Earth's Interior in August 1994 in Pune, India, and at one presentation at the 21st General Assembly of the IUGG in July 1995 in Boulder, CO. A new method, called Anomaly Attenuation Rate (AAR) Method (based on the Euler method), was developed during this study. This method is scale-independent and is appropriate to locate centroids of semi-compact three dimensional sources of gravity and magnetic anomalies. The method was presented during 1996 Spring AGU meeting and a manuscript describing this method is being prepared for its submission to a high-ranking journal. The grant has resulted in 3 papers and presentations at national and international meetings and one manuscript of a paper (to be submitted shortly to a reputable journal).

  9. The source location of Jovian millisecond radio bursts with respect to Jupiter's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, Francoise; Calvert, Wynne

    1988-01-01

    The location of the source of the Jovian S bursts was studied by comparing the high-frequency limit of these emissions, recorded in Nancay, to the surface gyrofrequency at the foot of the magnetic field lines which intersect Io's orbit, according to the O4 magnetic field model. For this purpose, the statistical occurrence of the S bursts was examined, both in central meridian longitude versus Io phase and as a function of the relative phase of Io with respect to Jupiter. The S bursts and the Io-dependent L emissions were found to originate from approximately the same locations at Jupiter, and probably under similar conditions of excitation by Io, although the beaming of these S emissions, which is indicated by the compactness of the occurrence patterns, was somewhat narrower than for the corresponding L emissions. Also, like the L emissions, an apparent delay of up to 70 deg was found to occur between the predicted instanteneous Io flux tube and the apparent source field line. The possible origin of this 70 deg delay is discussed.

  10. Solving seismological problems using SGRAPH program: I-source parameters and hypocentral location

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F.

    2012-09-26

    SGRAPH program is considered one of the seismological programs that maintain seismic data. SGRAPH is considered unique for being able to read a wide range of data formats and manipulate complementary tools in different seismological subjects in a stand-alone Windows-based application. SGRAPH efficiently performs the basic waveform analysis and solves advanced seismological problems. The graphical user interface (GUI) utilities and the Windows facilities such as, dialog boxes, menus, and toolbars simplified the user interaction with data. SGRAPH supported the common data formats like, SAC, SEED, GSE, ASCII, and Nanometrics Y-format, and others. It provides the facilities to solve many seismological problems with the built-in inversion and modeling tools. In this paper, I discuss some of the inversion tools built-in SGRAPH related to source parameters and hypocentral location estimation. Firstly, a description of the SGRAPH program is given discussing some of its features. Secondly, the inversion tools are applied to some selected events of the Dahshour earthquakes as an example of estimating the spectral and source parameters of local earthquakes. In addition, the hypocentral location of these events are estimated using the Hypoinverse 2000 program operated by SGRAPH.

  11. Relation Between Sprite Distribution and Source Locations of VHF Pulses Derived From JEM- GLIMS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Mitsuteru; Mihara, Masahiro; Ushio, Tomoo; Morimoto, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Adachi, Toru; Suzuki, Makoto; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2015-04-01

    JEM-GLIMS is continuing the comprehensive nadir observations of lightning and TLEs using optical instruments and electromagnetic wave receivers since November 2012. For the period between November 20, 2012 and November 30, 2014, JEM-GLIMS succeeded in detecting 5,048 lightning events. A total of 567 events in 5,048 lightning events were TLEs, which were mostly elves events. To identify the sprite occurrences from the transient optical flash data, it is necessary to perform the following data analysis: (1) a subtraction of the appropriately scaled wideband camera data from the narrowband camera data; (2) a calculation of intensity ratio between different spectrophotometer channels; and (3) an estimation of the polarization and CMC for the parent CG discharges using ground-based ELF measurement data. From a synthetic comparison of these results, it is confirmed that JEM-GLISM succeeded in detecting sprite events. The VHF receiver (VITF) onboard JEM-GLIMS uses two patch-type antennas separated by a 1.6-m interval and can detect VHF pulses emitted by lightning discharges in the 70-100 MHz frequency range. Using both an interferometric technique and a group delay technique, we can estimate the source locations of VHF pulses excited by lightning discharges. In the event detected at 06:41:15.68565 UT on June 12, 2014 over central North America, sprite was distributed with a horizontal displacement of 20 km from the peak location of the parent lightning emission. In this event, a total of 180 VHF pulses were simultaneously detected by VITF. From the detailed data analysis of these VHF pulse data, it is found that the majority of the source locations were placed near the area of the dim lightning emission, which may imply that the VHF pulses were associated with the in-cloud lightning current. At the presentation, we will show detailed comparison between the spatiotemporal characteristics of sprite emission and source locations of VHF pulses excited by the parent lightning

  12. Long Period (LP) volcanic earthquake source location at Merapi volcano by using dense array technics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxian, Jean Philippe; Budi Santoso, Agus; Laurin, Antoine; Subandriyo, Subandriyo; Widyoyudo, Wiku; Arshab, Ghofar

    2015-04-01

    Since 2010, Merapi shows unusual activity compared to last decades. Powerful phreatic explosions are observed; some of them are preceded by LP signals. In the literature, LP seismicity is thought to be originated within the fluid, and therefore to be representative of the pressurization state of the volcano plumbing system. Another model suggests that LP events are caused by slow, quasi-brittle, low stress-drop failure driven by transient upper-edifice deformations. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of LP events is fundamental for better understanding the physical processes occurring in the conduit, as well as for the monitoring and the improvement of eruption forecasting. LP events recorded at Merapi have a spectral content dominated by frequencies between 0.8 and 3 Hz. To locate the source of these events, we installed a seismic antenna composed of 4 broadband CMG-6TD Güralp stations. This network has an aperture of 300 m. It is located on the site of Pasarbubar, between 500 and 800 m from the crater rim. Two multi-parameter stations (seismic, tiltmeter, S-P) located in the same area, equipped with broadband CMG-40T Güralp sensors may also be used to complete the data of the antenna. The source of LP events is located by using different approaches. In the first one, we used a method based on the measurement of the time delays between the early beginnings of LP events for each array receiver. The observed differences of time delays obtained for each pair of receivers are compared to theoretical values calculated from the travel times computed between grid nodes, which are positioned in the structure, and each receiver. In a second approach, we estimate the slowness vector by using MUSIC algorithm applied to 3-components data. From the slowness vector, we deduce the back-azimuth and the incident angle, which give an estimation of LP source depth in the conduit. This work is part of the Domerapi project funded by French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (https

  13. Location of Non-volcanic Tremors along the Cascadia Subduction Zone Using the Source- Scanning Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahbod, A.; Calvert, A.

    2009-05-01

    Due to the nature of Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS) events, a long-term study and continuous seismic and geodetic data are required for a detailed study. Here we focus on tremors that occur along the Cascadia subduction zone between southern Vancouver Island and Northern California during slow slip events in two full-life cycles starting February 2003. The origin times and hypocenters of all tremors are estimated using the Source-Scanning Algorithm (SSA) of Kao (2004). We processed more than 200 days of continuously recorded seismic data from the US roughly the same amount of information extracted from the Canadian seismograms by compiling tremor catalogs provided by the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) or by direct analysis of the waveforms. The majority of the well-located tremors in southern Vancouver Island, the Canada-US border region and northern Washington occur at a depth which ranges from 20 km to 40 km. In central and southern Washington, the depth of the well-located events gradually decreases with a westward shift of the epicenters towards the coast. Also both temporally and spatially it seems that tremors occur in locations with absent or sparse seismicity. In this study we will examine the geographical variability of ETS events as well as hypocentral migration rates and segmentation.

  14. Induced seismicity during the construction of the Gotthard Base Tunnel, Switzerland: hypocenter locations and source dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husen, Stephan; Kissling, Edi; von Deschwanden, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A series of 112 earthquakes was recorded between October 2005 and August 2007 during the excavation of the MFS Faido, the southernmost access point of the new Gotthard Base Tunnel. Earthquakes were recorded at a dense network of 11 stations, including 2 stations in the tunnel. Local magnitudes computed from Wood-Anderson-filtered horizontal component seismograms ranged from -1.0 to 2.4; the largest earthquake was strongly felt at the surface and caused considerable damage in the tunnel. Hypocenter locations obtained routinely using a regional 3-D P-wave velocity model and a constant Vp/Vs ratio 1.71 were about 2 km below the tunnel. The use of seismic velocities calibrated from a shot in the tunnel revealed that routinely obtained hypocenter locations were systematically biased to greater depth and are now relocated to be on the tunnel level. Relocation of the shot using these calibrated velocities yields a location accuracy of 25 m in longitude, 70 m in latitude, and 250 m in focal depth. Double-difference relative relocations of two clusters with highly similar waveforms showed a NW-SE striking trend that is consistent with the strike of mapped faults in the MFS Faido. Source dimensions computed using the quasidynamic model of Madariaga (Bull Seismo Soc Am 66(3):639-666, 1976) range from 50 to 170 m. Overlapping source dimensions for earthquakes within the two main clusters suggests that the same fault patch was ruptured repeatedly. The observed seismicity was likely caused by stress redistribution due to the excavation work in the MFS Faido.

  15. Induced seismicity during the construction of the Gotthard Base Tunnel, Switzerland: hypocenter locations and source dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husen, Stephan; Kissling, Edi; von Deschwanden, Angela

    2012-04-01

    A series of 112 earthquakes was recorded between October 2005 and August 2007 during the excavation of the MFS Faido, the southernmost access point of the new Gotthard Base Tunnel. Earthquakes were recorded at a dense network of 11 stations, including 2 stations in the tunnel. Local magnitudes computed from Wood-Anderson-filtered horizontal component seismograms ranged from -1.0 to 2.4; the largest earthquake was strongly felt at the surface and caused considerable damage in the tunnel. Hypocenter locations obtained routinely using a regional 3-D P-wave velocity model and a constant Vp/Vs ratio 1.71 were about 2 km below the tunnel. The use of seismic velocities calibrated from a shot in the tunnel revealed that routinely obtained hypocenter locations were systematically biased to greater depth and are now relocated to be on the tunnel level. Relocation of the shot using these calibrated velocities yields a location accuracy of 25 m in longitude, 70 m in latitude, and 250 m in focal depth. Double-difference relative relocations of two clusters with highly similar waveforms showed a NW-SE striking trend that is consistent with the strike of mapped faults in the MFS Faido. Source dimensions computed using the quasidynamic model of Madariaga (Bull Seismo Soc Am 66(3):639-666, 1976) range from 50 to 170 m. Overlapping source dimensions for earthquakes within the two main clusters suggests that the same fault patch was ruptured repeatedly. The observed seismicity was likely caused by stress redistribution due to the excavation work in the MFS Faido.

  16. (abstract) Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard

    1994-01-01

    AES is a low-cost analog of the TES downlooking modes. Because AES operates at ambient temperature, limb-viewing is not possible. The first flight of AES took place in April 1994 on the NASA P3B aircraft out of Wallops Island, VA. While planned as an engineering test flight, spectra were successfully acquired both over the Atlantic Ocean and the area of the Great Dismal Swamp on the Virginia-North Carolina border. At this writing (July 1994), a second series of flights on the NASA DC8 aircraft out of Ames RC,CA is in progress. By the time of the workshop, a third series using the NASA C130 should have been accomplished.

  17. Atmospheric Transport Modelling confining potential source location of East-Asian radionuclide detections in May 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, J. Ole; Ceranna, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The radionuclide component of the International Monitoring System (IMS) to verify compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) is in place to detect tiny traces of fission products from nuclear explosions in the atmosphere. The challenge for the interpretation of IMS radionuclide data is to discriminate radionuclide sources of CTBT relevance against emissions from nuclear facilities. Remarkable activity concentrations of Ba/La-140 occurred at the IMS radionuclide stations RN 37 (Okinawa) and RN 58 (Ussurysk) mid of May 2010. In those days also an elevated Xe-133 level was measured at RN 38 (Takasaki). Additional regional measurements of radioxenon were reported in the press and further analyzed in various publications. The radionuclide analysis gives evidence for the presence of a nuclear fission source between 10 and 12 May 2010. Backward Atmospheric Transport Modelling (ATM) with HYSPLIT driven by 0.2° ECMWF meteorological data for the IMS samples indicates that, assuming a single source, a wide range of source regions is possible including the Korean Peninsula, the Sea of Japan (East Sea), and parts of China and Russia. Further confinement of the possible source location can be provided by atmospheric backtracking for the assumed sampling periods of the reported regional xenon measurements. New studies indicate a very weak seismic event at the DPRK test site on early 12 May 2010. Forward ATM for a pulse release caused by this event shows fairly good agreement with the observed radionuclide signature. Nevertheless, the underlying nuclear fission scenario remains quite unclear and speculative even if assuming a connection between the waveform and the radionuclide event.

  18. Repetitive Long-Period Seismicity: Source Location and Mechanism Characteristics, Villarrica Volcano, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J.; Waite, G. P.

    2012-12-01

    Villarrica Volcano, Chile has an exposed magma free-surface, characterized by vigorous degassing ranging from small bubble bursts to Strombolian style slug bursting. Slug bursting events are characterized by both repetitive seismic and acoustic signals within the long-period (LP) band. We use the very repetitive nature of the low amplitude seismic LP signals to identify them with a matched filter on several persistent seismic stations, functional over the three year experiment duration. We stack the seismic and acoustic signals accompanying degassing to increase the signal to noise ratio, and tie signals measured 2010-2012 to produce a synthetic seismic network that recorded LP signals at a wide range of azimuths and distances from the source. Particle motions for most of the 21 stations were dominantly tangential, indicating the presence of a complex source geometry that deviated greatly from the logical axisymmetric geometry visible at the lave lake surface. We use the synthetic network to solve for the moment-tensor and location of the LP source, searching for the best source-time function using combinations of moment components, single force components, and both, for six different homogeneous half-space velocity models. Using the best source configuration and velocity model as a guide, we present forward models of reasonable geometries with geologic significance, including dikes, sills, pipes, and combination mechanisms to validate and test the sensitivity of the results of the free-inversion. Our results indicate that the current repetitive LP seismicity dominated by tangential particle motions is probably associated with relic fissure geometry from the last eruptive phase, and is caused by a conduit constriction through which large gas slugs pass (seismic emission) and subsequently burst at the surface (acoustic emission).

  19. Signatures of shock drivers in the solar wind and their dependence on the solar source location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    1993-01-01

    Solar wind and energetic ion observations following 40 interplanetary shocks with well-established solar source locations have been examined in order to determine whether signatures characteristic of the coronal material forming the shock driver are present. The signatures considered include magnetic-field-aligned bidirectional ion flows observed by the ISEE 3 and IMP 8 spacecraft; bidirectional solar wind electron heat fluxes; solar wind plasma proton and electron temperature depressions; low-beta plasma; enhanced, low-variance magnetic fields; and energetic ion depressions. Several shock driver signatures are commonly observed following shocks originating from within about 50 deg of central meridian, and are generally absent for other events. We conclude that shock drivers generally extend up to about 100 deg in longitude, centered on the solar source longitude. Since shocks from central meridian events are not usually associated with all the shock driver signatures examined, the absence of a driver cannot be confirmed from consideration of one of these signatures alone. We also find evidence that a few bidirectional energetic ion and solar wind electron heat flux events following shocks (in particular from far eastern sources) may occur on open field lines outside of shock drivers.

  20. Locating and estimating air emissions from sources of styrene. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D.

    1991-10-01

    To assist groups interested in inventorying air emissions of various potentially toxic substances, EPA is preparing a series of documents such as this to compile available information on sources and emission of these substances. The document deals specifically with styrene. Its intended audience includes Federal, State and local air pollution personnel and others interested in locating potential emitters of styrene and in making gross estimates of air emissions therefrom. The document presents information on: (1) the types of sources that may emit styrene; (2) process variations and release points that may be emitted within these sources; and (3) available emissions information indicating the potential for styrene releases into the air from each operation. The document is being released as an interim document pending incorporation of testing results from the U.S. EPA. The EPA is currently testing several unsaturated polyester resin fabricators who produce cultured marble bathroom fixtures. When the test results are available, the EPA will publish a final report including these data.

  1. The impact of runoff generation mechanisms on the location of critical source areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyon, S.W.; McHale, M.R.; Walter, M.T.; Steenhuis, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    Identifying phosphorus (P) source areas and transport pathways is a key step in decreasing P loading to natural water systems. This study compared the effects of two modeled runoff generation processes - saturation excess and infiltration excess - on total phosphorus (TP) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations in 10 catchment streams of a Catskill mountain watershed in southeastern New York. The spatial distribution of runoff from forested land and agricultural land was generated for both runoff processes; results of both distributions were consistent with Soil Conservation Service-Curve Number (SCS-CN) theory. These spatial runoff distributions were then used to simulate stream concentrations of TP and SRP through a simple equation derived from an observed relation between P concentration and land use; empirical results indicate that TP and SRP concentrations increased with increasing percentage of agricultural land. Simulated TP and SRP stream concentrations predicted for the 10 catchments were strongly affected by the assumed runoff mechanism. The modeled TP and SRP concentrations produced by saturation excess distribution averaged 31 percent higher and 42 percent higher, respectively, than those produced by the infiltration excess distribution. Misrepresenting the primary runoff mechanism could not only produce erroneous concentrations, it could fail to correctly locate critical source areas for implementation of best management practices. Thus, identification of the primary runoff mechanism is critical in selection of appropriate models in the mitigation of nonpoint source pollution. Correct representation of runoff processes is also critical in the future development of biogeochemical transport models, especially those that address nutrient fluxes.

  2. Source contribution of PM₂.₅ at different locations on the Malaysian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Ee-Ling, Ooi; Mustaffa, Nur Ili Hamizah; Amil, Norhaniza; Khan, Md Firoz; Latif, Mohd Talib

    2015-04-01

    This study determined the source contribution of PM2.5 (particulate matter <2.5 μm) in air at three locations on the Malaysian Peninsula. PM2.5 samples were collected using a high volume sampler equipped with quartz filters. Ion chromatography was used to determine the ionic composition of the samples and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to determine the concentrations of heavy metals. Principal component analysis with multilinear regressions were used to identify the possible sources of PM2.5. The range of PM2.5 was between 10 ± 3 and 30 ± 7 µg m(-3). Sulfate (SO4 (2-)) was the major ionic compound detected and zinc was found to dominate the heavy metals. Source apportionment analysis revealed that motor vehicle and soil dust dominated the composition of PM2.5 in the urban area. Domestic waste combustion dominated in the suburban area, while biomass burning dominated in the rural area. PMID:25652682

  3. Location, Location, Location!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsdell, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Of prime importance in real estate, location is also a key element in the appeal of romances. Popular geographic settings and historical periods sell, unpopular ones do not--not always with a logical explanation, as the author discovered when she conducted a survey on this topic last year. (Why, for example, are the French Revolution and the…

  4. Outbreaks source: A new mathematical approach to identify their possible location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscema, Massimo; Grossi, Enzo; Breda, Marco; Jefferson, Tom

    2009-11-01

    Classical epidemiology has generally relied on the description and explanation of the occurrence of infectious diseases in relation to time occurrence of events rather than to place of occurrence. In recent times, computer generated dot maps have facilitated the modeling of the spread of infectious epidemic diseases either with classical statistics approaches or with artificial “intelligent systems”. Few attempts, however, have been made so far to identify the origin of the epidemic spread rather than its evolution by mathematical topology methods. We report on the use of a new artificial intelligence method (the H-PST Algorithm) and we compare this new technique with other well known algorithms to identify the source of three examples of infectious disease outbreaks derived from literature. The H-PST algorithm is a new system able to project a distances matrix of points (events) into a bi-dimensional space, with the generation of a new point, named hidden unit. This new hidden unit deforms the original Euclidean space and transforms it into a new space (cognitive space). The cost function of this transformation is the minimization of the differences between the original distance matrix among the assigned points and the distance matrix of the same points projected into the bi-dimensional map (or any different set of constraints). For many reasons we will discuss, the position of the hidden unit shows to target the outbreak source in many epidemics much better than the other classic algorithms specifically targeted for this task. Compared with main algorithms known in the location theory, the hidden unit was within yards of the outbreak source in the first example (the 2007 epidemic of Chikungunya fever in Italy). The hidden unit was located in the river between the two village epicentres of the spread exactly where the index case was living. Equally in the second (the 1967 foot and mouth disease epidemic in England), and the third (1854 London Cholera epidemic

  5. Locating and Determining the Nature of a Persistent Hard X-Ray Source GROJ1814-12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang

    We propose to use RXTE in scanning mode to locate a persistent hard X-ray GROJ1814-12 near the Galactic plane, discovered by BATSE. Our location uncertainty is about 2 degrees in radius. Its flux level between 20-100 keV is around 30 mCrab. No flux variation is detectable by BATSE at time scales longer than a month. Candidate high energy sources within the error box are: unidentified variable EGRET source 2EG1813-12, X-ray burster 4U1812-12 and Z-source GX17+2. No persistent hard X-ray emision at this level is known from any class of the above sources. We also request a long exposure after the source is located, for a detailed spectral and timing study to determine its possible nature. Follow up ASCA observations will be proposed for a better location and X-ray spectroscopy.

  6. Stress Tolerance Variations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Diverse Ecological Sources and Geographical Locations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yan-Lin; Wang, Shi-An

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a platform organism for bioethanol production from various feedstocks and robust strains are desirable for efficient fermentation because yeast cells inevitably encounter stressors during the process. Recently, diverse S. cerevisiae lineages were identified, which provided novel resources for understanding stress tolerance variations and related shaping factors in the yeast. This study characterized the tolerance of diverse S. cerevisiae strains to the stressors of high ethanol concentrations, temperature shocks, and osmotic stress. The results showed that the isolates from human-associated environments overall presented a higher level of stress tolerance compared with those from forests spared anthropogenic influences. Statistical analyses indicated that the variations of stress tolerance were significantly correlated with both ecological sources and geographical locations of the strains. This study provides guidelines for selection of robust S. cerevisiae strains for bioethanol production from nature. PMID:26244846

  7. Experimentally determining the locations of two astigmatic images for an underwater light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pao-Keng; Liu, Jian-You; Ying, Shang-Ping

    2015-05-01

    Images formed by an underwater object from light rays refracted in the sagittal and tangential planes are located at different positions for an oblique viewing position. The overlapping of these two images from the observer's perspective will thus prevent the image-splitting astigmatism from being directly observable. In this work, we present a heuristic method to experimentally visualize the astigmatism. A point light source is used as an underwater object and the emerging wave front is recorded using a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor. The wave front is found to deform from a circular paraboloid to an elliptic paraboloid as the viewing position changes from normal to oblique. Using geometric optics, we derive an analytical expression for the image position as a function of the rotating angle of an arm used to carry the wave-front sensor in our experimental setup. The measured results are seen to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  8. Stress Tolerance Variations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Diverse Ecological Sources and Geographical Locations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Lin; Wang, Shi-An

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a platform organism for bioethanol production from various feedstocks and robust strains are desirable for efficient fermentation because yeast cells inevitably encounter stressors during the process. Recently, diverse S. cerevisiae lineages were identified, which provided novel resources for understanding stress tolerance variations and related shaping factors in the yeast. This study characterized the tolerance of diverse S. cerevisiae strains to the stressors of high ethanol concentrations, temperature shocks, and osmotic stress. The results showed that the isolates from human-associated environments overall presented a higher level of stress tolerance compared with those from forests spared anthropogenic influences. Statistical analyses indicated that the variations of stress tolerance were significantly correlated with both ecological sources and geographical locations of the strains. This study provides guidelines for selection of robust S. cerevisiae strains for bioethanol production from nature. PMID:26244846

  9. Automatic Infrasound Detection and Location of Sources in the western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Arrowsmith, S.; Hayward, C.; Stump, B. W.

    2012-12-01

    Infrasound event catalogs can be used to study the characteristics of events as well as the time varying nature of the atmosphere. Additionally, these catalogs can be used to identify sources that repeat and thus provide ground truth for atmospheric studies. We focus on the production of a western US regional infrasound catalog for the time period of April 2011 to March 2012. Data from the University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) infrasonic arrays are supplemented with data from three additional infrasound arrays in Nevada. An automated detection procedure was applied to the observations based on an adaptive F-detector (Arrowsmith et al., 2009). The detection results document significant seasonal variations in time and space; detections during the winter tend to produce higher correlations relative to those from the summer, and a seasonal variation in azimuth is observed. These results indicate that the bulletin is seasonally variable. Association of detections and event localization was done utilizing the Bayesian infrasonic source location procedure (BISL, Modrak et al., 2010), accounting for unknown atmospheric propagation effects by adding a random component to the infrasonic group velocity. The resulting infrasonic catalog consists of 963 events for the one-year time period with indication of repeated events from a number of locations. The distribution of infrasound events in this study is well matched with the infrasound hot spots identified by Walker et al. (2011) which were based on a back projection procedure applied to seismic signals from USArray Transportable Array. There are common concentrations of events in both catalogs that include New Bomb in Nevada, Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR), and Dugway Proving Ground in Utah, as well as broader areas in central Nevada and southwest Idaho. The two bulletins document that the vast majority of events occur during work hours, suggesting they are related to human activities.

  10. Visibility of Type III burst source location as inferred from stereoscopic space observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, M. Y.; Galopeau, P. H. M.; Maksimovic, M.; Rucker, H. O.

    2014-11-01

    We study solar Type III radio bursts simultaneously observed by RPWS/Cassini, URAP/Ulysses and WAVES/Wind experiments. The observations allows us to cover a large frequency bandwidth from 16MHz down to a few kHz. We consider the onset time of each burst, and estimate the corresponding intensity level. Also we measure the Langmuir frequency as observed on the dynamic spectra recorded by the Ulysses spacecraft. The distances of Wind, Ulysses and Cassini spacecraft, with regard to the Sun, were in the order of 1AU, 2.4AU and 4.5AU, respectively. The spacecraft trajectories were localized in the ecliptic plane in the case of Wind and Cassini, and for Ulysses in the southern hemisphere (i.e. heliocentric latitude higher than -50). Despite the different locations, the spectral patterns of the selected solar bursts are found to be similar between 10MHz and 2MHz but unalike at lower frequency. We discuss the variation of the intensity level as recorded by the three spacecraft. We show that the reception system of each experiment affected the way the Type III burst intensity is measured. Also we attempt to estimate the electron beam along the interplanetary magnetic field where the trajectory is an Archimedean spiral. This leads us to infer on the visibility of the source location with regard to the spacecraft position.

  11. Explosion Source Location Study Using Collocated Acoustic and Seismic Networks in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, V.; Gitterman, Y.; Arrowsmith, S.; Ben-Horin, Y.

    2013-12-01

    infrasonic phases of the two distant arrays; 2) a standard robust grid-search location procedure based on phase picks and a constant celerity for a phase (tropospheric or stratospheric) was applied; 3) a joint coordinate grid-search procedure using array waveforms and phase picks was tested, 4) the Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization (BISL) method, incorporating semi-empirical model-based prior information, was modified for array+network configuration and applied to the ground-truth events. For this purpose we accumulated data of the former observations of the air-to-ground infrasonic phases to compute station specific ground-truth Celerity-Range Histograms (ssgtCRH) and/or model-based CRH (mbCRH), which allow to essentially improve the location results. For building the mbCRH the local meteo-data and the ray-tracing modeling in 3 available azimuth ranges, accounting seasonal variations of winds directivity (quadrants North:315-45, South: 135-225, East 45-135) have been used.

  12. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, E. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Chipman, V.; Emer, D. F.; White, R. L.; Emmitt, R.; Wright, A. A.; Drellack, S.; Huckins-Gang, H.; Mercadante, J.; Floyd, M.; McGowin, C.; Cothrun, C.; Bonal, N.

    2013-12-01

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined. For Phase II of the experiment, characterization of the location is required to develop the geologic/geophysical models for the execution of the experiment. Criteria for the location are alluvium thickness of approximately 170 m and a water table below 170 m; minimal fracturing would be ideal. A P-wave mini-vibroseis survey was conducted at a potential site in alluvium to map out the subsurface geology. The seismic reflection profile consisted of 168 geophone stations, spaced 5 m apart. The mini-vibe was a 7,000-lb peak-force source, starting 57.5 m off the north end of the profile and ending 57.5 m past the southern-most geophone. The length of the profile was 835 m. The source points were placed every 5 m, equally spaced between geophones to reduce clipping. The vibroseis sweep was from 20 Hz down to 180 Hz over 8 seconds, and four sweeps were stacked at each shot location. The shot gathers show high signal-to-noise ratios with clear first arrivals across the entire spread and the suggestion of some shallow reflectors. The data were

  13. Locating ignimbrite source using volcanologic and magnetic proxies: the Afyon-Eskisehir case study (Western Anatolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrò, Alessandro; Zanella, Elena; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc; Temel, Abidin

    2013-04-01

    This study exploits volcanologic and magnetic techniques to the investigation of the Early-Middle Miocene pyroclastic sequence exposed in the ~120 x 80 km area comprised between the cities of Eskisehir to the North and Afyon to the South (Western Anatolia), in order to locate the source by combining flow directions inferred by field analysis (clasts embrication and sedimentary structures) and those obtained by the analysis of magnetic fabric on the ignimbrite deposits (anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, AMS, and anisotropy of remanent magnetization, ARM). Moreover we integrated directional flow data with preliminary isopleth and isopach maps of the air-fall deposits. The sequence belongs to the most important magmatic activity in the region, named Kırka-Afyon-Isparta Volcanism (KAIV), which originated a calc-alkaline pyroclastic sequence intercalated with some lava and breccias, and the products of an effusive activity with alkaline affinities lasted until Quaternary times. Stratigraphy points out to the presence of two main eruptive events which originated several ignimbrite units distinguished on the basis of macroscopic features (mineralogy and texture) and areal distribution of the deposits; the overall areal extension and volume of the pyroclastic products is ~8,000 km2 and ~200 km3. The oldest event generated the Akcakaya ignimbrites, which are exposed in the Northern part of the area; lacustrine sedimentary deposits separate them from the younger Demirli ignimbrites, cropping out in the Southern part of the area; both the Akcakaya and Demirli ignimbrites are overlain by lava sheets. Magnetic sampling has been carried out at 20 areal distributed localities in the two ignimbrite deposits (30 sites, 600 specimens); each section was sampled from 1 to 3 sites at different stratigraphic height. Rock magnetic measurements point out to the presence of Ti-magnetite as the main magnetic carrier. At some localities AMS fabric is vertically consistent through the

  14. Tracking the MSL-SAM methane detection source location Through Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-García, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    1. Introduction: The putative in situ detection of methane by Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on Curiosi-ty at Gale crater has garnered significant attention because of the potential implications for the presence of geological methane sources or indigenous Martian organisms [1, 2]. SAM reported detection of back-ground levels of atmospheric methane of mean value 0.69±0.25 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at the 95% confidence interval (CI). Additionally, in four sequential measurements spanning a 60-sol period, SAM observed elevated levels of methane of 7.2±2.1 ppbv (95% CI), implying that Mars is episodically producing methane from an additional unknown source. There are many major unresolved questions regard-ing this detection: 1) What are the potential sources of the methane release? 2) What causes the rapid decrease in concentration? and 3) Where is the re-lease location? 4) How spatially extensive is the re-lease? 5) For how long is CH4 released? Regarding the first question, the source of methane, is so far not identified. It could be related with geo-logical process like methane release from clathrates [3], serpentinisation [4] and volcanism [5]; or due to biological activity from methanogenesis [6]. To answer the second question, the rapid decrease in concentration, it is important to note that the photo-chemical lifetime of methane is of order 100 years, much longer than the atmospheric mixing time scale, and thus the gas should tend to be well mixed except near a source or shortly after an episodic release. The observed spike of 7 ppb from the background of <1 ppb, and then the rapid return to the background lev-el could be due to a sink (destruction) or due to at-mospheric mixing. A wind mediated erosion process of ordinary quartz crystals was proposed to produce activated quartz grains, which sequester methane by forming covalent Si-C bonds. If this process is op-erational on Mars today, which some recent prelimi-nary studies on

  15. A Review of Advancements in Particulate Matter Sampling and Analysis and its Application to Identifying Source Impacts at Receptor Locations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Time-integrated (typically 24-hr) filter-based methods (historical methods) form the underpinning of our understanding of the fate, impact of source emissions at receptor locations (source impacts), and potential health and welfare effects of particulate matter (PM) in air. Over...

  16. System for locating the sources of wideband dE/dt from lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, E. M.; Medelius, P. J.; Davis, S.

    1994-01-01

    A system has been developed to measure wideband electic field derivatives (dE/dt) at five ground stations in a 15 km x 15 km network at Kennedy Space Center. Individual station responses are normalized using digital filters. Pulse-timing resolution is improved to much less than 50-ns sample interval by interpolation using packing in the frequency domain. A time tag for each pulse is defined as the mean of the times of the rising-edge half peak, peak, and falling-edge half peak. The standard deviation in these times defines the timing error and is shown to be a function of noise and bandwidth rather than digitization rate. Each of the four unknowns for a pulse source location (x,y,z) and time of occurrence (t) is found from the five time-tag measurements using different weightings for all five combinations of the four-station hyperbolic equations. Weighting factors and errors in x,y,z and t are estimated using error propagation techniques.

  17. How drone flies (Eristalis tenax L., Syrphidae, Diptera) use floral guides to locate food sources.

    PubMed

    Dinkel, T; Lunau, K

    2001-09-01

    In this study we show how inexperienced syrphid flies, Eristalis tenax, orient on artificial flowers by means of floral guides. To test the effect of floral guides such as line and ring markings on the probability and speed of the location of a potential food source, we exploited the spontaneous proboscis reaction triggered by yellow colour stimuli. We tested whether and how fast the flies, when placed on the edge of a circular dummy flower, found a small central yellow spot and touched it with the proboscis extended. The flies found the central yellow spot more often and faster if guide lines from the margin to the yellow spot were present. The effect of guide lines was dependent on the colour of the dummy flower, and independent of the colour of the guide lines, except for yellow guide lines releasing the proboscis reaction. The effect of guide lines was stronger if the yellow spot was hidden in a 2 mm deep depression and thus not as easily visible to the flies. Ring guides had a significant effect on performance only when the intensity of the central yellow spot was low. PMID:12770188

  18. Locating pollutant emission sources with optical remote sensing measurements and an improved one-dimensional radial plume mapping technique.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-fu; Lin, Shih-Chun; Yeh, Cheng-Kai

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that there was a relatively large amount of uncertainty along the major wind direction in the results of locating emission sources using the one-dimensional radial plume mapping (RPM(1D)) technique based on optical remote sensing measurements. This paper proposes setting up an additional monitoring line that is perpendicular to the original scanning beam geometry to reduce this uncertainty. We first conducted a computer simulation study using the Gaussian dispersion model to generate the downwind concentrations of plumes from 400 source locations in a 201 m × 201 m spatial domain under various wind directions (n = 181). The optical remote sensing instrument was assumed to be at (0, 0) with two perpendicular monitoring lines, each of which had three beam segments of equal length. Each pair of the reconstructed downwind concentration profiles was then used to trace back to the source locations. The results showed that the accuracy of the method and its uncertainty were improved by using the proposed two-line RPM(1D) approach rather than the original one-line RPM(1D) approach at most simulated source locations. In a follow-up field experiment, a tracer gas was released at the coordinate of (100, 100). The release location was covered within the 0.25- to 0.5-probability area of the estimated results, and the distance between the actual and estimated source locations was 18.4 m (9.2% of the longest beam path). PMID:22382995

  19. Locating non-volcanic tremor along the San Andreas Fault using a multiple array source imaging technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryberg, T.; Haberland, C.H.; Fuis, G.S.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Shelly, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    Non-volcanic tremor (NVT) has been observed at several subduction zones and at the San Andreas Fault (SAF). Tremor locations are commonly derived by cross-correlating envelope-transformed seismic traces in combination with source-scanning techniques. Recently, they have also been located by using relative relocations with master events, that is low-frequency earthquakes that are part of the tremor; locations are derived by conventional traveltime-based methods. Here we present a method to locate the sources of NVT using an imaging approach for multiple array data. The performance of the method is checked with synthetic tests and the relocation of earthquakes. We also applied the method to tremor occurring near Cholame, California. A set of small-aperture arrays (i.e. an array consisting of arrays) installed around Cholame provided the data set for this study. We observed several tremor episodes and located tremor sources in the vicinity of SAF. During individual tremor episodes, we observed a systematic change of source location, indicating rapid migration of the tremor source along SAF. ?? 2010 The Authors Geophysical Journal International ?? 2010 RAS.

  20. Location of the Norma transient with the HEAO 1 scanning modulation collimator. [X ray source in Norma Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabbiano, G.; Gursky, H.; Schwartz, D. A.; Schwarz, J.; Bradt, H. V.; Doxsey, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A precise position has been obtained for an X-ray transient source in Norma. The location uncertainty includes a variable star previously suggested to be the optical counterpart. This transient is associated with the steady X-ray source MX 1608-52 and probably with an X-ray burst source. A binary system containing a low-mass primary and a neutron-star or black-hole secondary of a few solar masses is consistent with the observations.

  1. Finite element modelling of ultrasound, with reference to transducers and AE waves.

    PubMed

    Hill, R; Forsyth, S A; Macey, P

    2004-04-01

    Finite element (FE) modelling has a role to play in simulating elastic wave propagation associated with structural vibrations, acoustic phenomena and ultrasound problems. In this work we have used the PAFEC software [PAFEC finite element software PACSYS, Strelley Hall, Nottingham, NG8 6PE, UK]. With the advent of increased computer power and greater availability of software these simulations have become more readily available and will provide improved insight into wave propagation problems. Simulations have been undertaken of transient wave propagation in steel plates with an attached simple resonant transducer. This simulates acoustic emission (AE) propagation in plate like structures relevant to many industrial applications. Simulations for short propagation distances suggest the resonant transducer voltage signal carries information on the plate-waves propagating in the structure, overlaid with the piezoelectric resonance and some information might be extracted from the transducer signal. Looking at the wave propagation information alone, a great deal of variability is seen in the displacement profile for different source types, orientations and locations. Although users have expressed a need for calibration of the AE detection process, this idea remains problematic since the complete generation and detection system has the features of a chaotic system. Using FE modelling a method of "point calibration" might be available, for some specific AE applications such as crack growth along known paths. PMID:15047294

  2. Transport activity of chimaeric AE2-AE3 chloride/bicarbonate anion exchange proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fujinaga, Jocelyne; Loiselle, Frederick B; Casey, Joseph R

    2003-01-01

    Chloride/bicarbonate anion exchangers (AEs), found in the plasma membrane of most mammalian cells, are involved in pH regulation and bicarbonate metabolism. Although AE2 and AE3 are highly similar in sequence, AE2-transport activity was 10-fold higher than AE3 (41 versus 4 mM x min(-1) respectively), when expressed by transient transfection of HEK-293 cells. AE2-AE3 chimaeras were constructed to define the region responsible for differences in transport activity. The level of AE2 expression was approx. 30% higher than that of AE3. Processing to the cell surface, studied by chemical labelling and confocal microscopy, showed that AE2 is processed to the cell surface approx. 8-fold more efficiently than AE3. The efficiency of cell-surface processing was dependent on the cytoplasmic domain, since the AE2 domain conferred efficient processing upon the AE3 membrane domain, with a predominant role for amino acids 322-677 of AE2. AE2 that was expressed in HEK-293 cells was glycosylated, but little of AE3 was. However, AE2 expressed in the presence of the glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin, was not glycosylated, yet retained 85 +/- 8% of anion-transport activity. Therefore glycosylation has little, if any, role in the cell-surface processing or activity of AE2 or AE3. We conclude that the low anion-transport activity of AE3 in HEK-293 cells is due to low level processing to the plasma membrane, possibly owing to protein interactions with the AE3 cytoplasmic domain. PMID:12578559

  3. Characterization and applications of VLF/LF source locations from lightning using the Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitzer, Phillip M.; Christian, Hugh J.; Stewart, Mike; Burchfield, Jeff; Podgorny, Scott; Corredor, David; Hall, John; Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Franklin, Veronica

    2013-04-01

    Arrays that detect and locate the four-dimensional spacetime positions of radiation sources from lightning have largely utilized sensors sensitive to the very high frequency (VHF) regime with ˜ 15 km baselines or very low frequency/low frequency (VLF/LF) regime with ˜ 100 km baselines. This paper details initial results from the newly developed Huntsville Alabama Marx Meter Array (HAMMA), consisting of Marx meters (electric field change meters) sensitive to a frequency band ˜ 1 Hz to 400 kHz. The arrival time of HAMMA waveforms due to radiation sources from lightning are used to determine the spacetime position of these sources. The locations are compared with two well-documented and operational arrays, the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA). The standard deviation of the difference between HAMMA and NLDN locations of return strokes is 305 and 266 m in x and y, respectively, while the standard deviation of the difference between HAMMA and NALMA sources is 237, 226, and 688 m in x, y and z, respectively. We further show that NLDN intracloud locations differ in horizontal distance from the corresponding HAMMA locations by a median value of 479 m. In addition, we use HAMMA source locations to map several lightning flashes in the VLF/LF and show HAMMA sources largely map out the same electrical extent as VHF sources and provide unique insights to the properties of the discharges occurring. Finally, we show that VLF/LF sources can determine the leader polarity in several example flashes but not necessarily whether a flash comes to ground. Copyright 2013 American Geophysical Union. All rights reserved.

  4. Tracking the MSL-SAM methane detection source location Through Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-García, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    1. Introduction: The putative in situ detection of methane by Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on Curiosi-ty at Gale crater has garnered significant attention because of the potential implications for the presence of geological methane sources or indigenous Martian organisms [1, 2]. SAM reported detection of back-ground levels of atmospheric methane of mean value 0.69±0.25 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) at the 95% confidence interval (CI). Additionally, in four sequential measurements spanning a 60-sol period, SAM observed elevated levels of methane of 7.2±2.1 ppbv (95% CI), implying that Mars is episodically producing methane from an additional unknown source. There are many major unresolved questions regard-ing this detection: 1) What are the potential sources of the methane release? 2) What causes the rapid decrease in concentration? and 3) Where is the re-lease location? 4) How spatially extensive is the re-lease? 5) For how long is CH4 released? Regarding the first question, the source of methane, is so far not identified. It could be related with geo-logical process like methane release from clathrates [3], serpentinisation [4] and volcanism [5]; or due to biological activity from methanogenesis [6]. To answer the second question, the rapid decrease in concentration, it is important to note that the photo-chemical lifetime of methane is of order 100 years, much longer than the atmospheric mixing time scale, and thus the gas should tend to be well mixed except near a source or shortly after an episodic release. The observed spike of 7 ppb from the background of <1 ppb, and then the rapid return to the background lev-el could be due to a sink (destruction) or due to at-mospheric mixing. A wind mediated erosion process of ordinary quartz crystals was proposed to produce activated quartz grains, which sequester methane by forming covalent Si-C bonds. If this process is op-erational on Mars today, which some recent prelimi-nary studies on

  5. Acoustic emission characterization using AE (parameter) delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) parameter delay concept is defined as that particular measured value of a parameter at which a specified baseline level of cumulative AE activity is reached. The parameter can be from any of a broad range of elastic, plastic, viscoelastic, and fracture mechanics parameters, as well as their combinations. Such parameters include stress, load, strain, displacement, time, temperature, loading cycle, unloading stress, stress intensity factor, strain energy release rate, and crack tip plasticity zone size, while the AE activity may be AE event counts, ringdown counts, energy, event duration, etc., as well as their combinations. Attention is given to examples for the AE parameter delay concept, together with various correlations.

  6. Source amplitudes of volcano-seismic signals determined by the amplitude source location method as a quantitative measure of event size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki; Lacson, Rudy; Maeda, Yuta; Figueroa, Melquiades S.; Yamashina, Tadashi; Ruiz, Mario; Palacios, Pablo; Ortiz, Hugo; Yepes, Hugo

    2013-05-01

    The amplitude source location (ASL) method, which uses high-frequency amplitudes under the assumption of isotropic S-wave radiation, has been shown to be useful for locating the sources of various types of volcano-seismic signals. We tested the ASL method by using synthetic seismograms and examined the source amplitudes determined by this method for various types of volcano-seismic signals observed at different volcanoes. Our synthetic tests indicated that, although ASL results are not strongly influenced by velocity structure and noise, they do depend on site amplification factors at individual stations. We first applied the ASL method to volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes at Taal volcano, Philippines. Our ASL results for the largest VT earthquake showed that a frequency range of 7-12 Hz and a Q value of 50 were appropriate for the source location determination. Using these values, we systematically estimated source locations and amplitudes of VT earthquakes at Taal. We next applied the ASL method to long-period events at Cotopaxi volcano and to explosions at Tungurahua volcano in Ecuador. We proposed a practical approach to minimize the effects of site amplifications among different volcano seismic networks, and compared the source amplitudes of these various volcano-seismic events with their seismic magnitudes. We found a proportional relation between seismic magnitude and the logarithm of the source amplitude. The ASL method can be used to determine source locations of small events for which onset measurements are difficult, and thus can estimate the sizes of events over a wider range of sizes compared with conventional hypocenter determination approaches. Previously, there has been no parameter widely used to quantify the sources of volcano-seismic signals. This study showed that the source amplitude determined by the ASL method may be a useful quantitative measure of volcano-seismic event size.

  7. Nature and location of the source of plasma sheet boundary layer ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Onsager, T. G.; Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.

    1995-02-01

    Onsager et al. (1991) have put forward a model of the formation of the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) which relies on a steady source of plasma from a spatially extended plasma sheet, together with steady equatorward and earthward ExB convection of field lines due to reconnection at a downtail neutral line. This model is a synthesis of earlier proposals and it explains such features as an electron layer exterior to the ion boundary layer, ion velocity dispersion, counter streaming beams, low-speed cutoffs in the beams. It also explains the apparent evolution of the ion beams through 'kidney bean' shaped velocity-space distributions toward quasi-isotropic shells without invoking pitch angle scattering or energy diffusion. In this paper we explore two ramifications of the model. In principle we can map, as a function of time, the downtail neutral line distance and establish whether or not it is retreating during substorm recovery. We can also reconstruct the plasma distribution function near the neutral line to see if it is most consistent with mantle or plasma sheet plasma. We perform this analysis using International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) Fast Plasma Experiment (FPE) data for two plasma sheet recovery events, one on March 1, 1978, and the other on April 18, 1978. On March 1, 1978, we find evidence for an initial retreat from around 110 to 160 R(sub E) in the first 15 min; little further retreat occurs thereafter. On April 18, 1978, the neutral line location ranges from as little as 40 R(sub E) tailward of the satellite to as much as 200 R(sub E), but there is no evidence for a systematic retreat. The reconstructed ion distributions for these events are most consistent with a plasma sheet origin for the March 1 case and possibly plasma mantle or low-latitude boundary layer for the April 18 case.

  8. Surveillance of nasal and bladder cancer to locate sources of exposure to occupational carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Teschke, K; Morgan, M S; Checkoway, H; Franklin, G; Spinelli, J J; van Belle, G; Weiss, N S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To locate sources of occupational exposure to nasal and bladder carcinogens for surveillance follow up in British Columbia, Canada. METHODS: Incident cases of nasal cancer (n = 48), bladder cancer (n = 105), and population based controls (n = 159) matched for sex and age, were interviewed about their jobs, exposures, and smoking histories. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for 57 occupational groups with stratified exact methods to control for age, sex, and smoking. RESULTS: Occupational groups at increased risk of nasal cancer included: textile workers (six cases, OR 7.6); miners, drillers, and blasters (six cases, OR 3.5); welders (two cases, OR 3.5); pulp and paper workers (three cases, OR 3.1); and plumbers and pipefitters (two cases, OR 3.0). Nasal cancer ORs were not increased in occupations exposed to wood dust, possibly due to low exposures in local wood industries. Strongly increased risks of bladder cancer were found for sheet metal workers (four cases, OR 5.3), miners (19 cases, OR 4.5), gardeners (six cases, OR 3.7), and hairdressers (three cases, OR 3.2). Among occupations originally considered at risk, the following had increased risks of bladder cancer: painters (four cases, OR 2.8); laundry workers (five cases, OR 2.3); chemical and petroleum workers (15 cases, OR 1.8); machinists (eight cases, OR 1.6); and textile workers (three cases, OR 1.5). CONCLUSIONS: Occupational groups with increased risks and three or more cases with similar duties were selected for surveillance follow up. For nasal cancer, these included textile workers (five were garment makers) and pulp and paper workers (three performed maintenance tasks likely to entail stainless steel welding). For bladder cancer, these included miners (12 worked underground), machinists (five worked in traditional machining), hairdressers (three had applied hair dyes), and laundry workers (three were drycleaners). PMID:9245952

  9. BOREAS AES Campbell Scientific Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, G. Barrie; Funk, Barrie; Knapp. David E. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Canadian AES personnel collected data related to surface and atmospheric meteorological conditions over the BOREAS region. This data set contains 15-minute meteorological data from 14 automated meteorology stations located across the BOREAS region. Included in this data are parameters of date, time, mean sea level pressure, station pressure, temperature, dew point, wind speed, resultant wind speed, resultant wind direction, peak wind, precipitation, maximum temperature in the last hour, minimum temperature in the last hour, pressure tendency, liquid precipitation in the last hour, relative humidity, precipitation from a weighing gauge, and snow depth. Temporally, the data cover the period of August 1993 to December 1996. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data.

  10. Acoustic source location in the secondary mixing region of a jet-blown flap using a cross-correlation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.; Maus, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the acoustic sources in the secondary mixing region of a laboratory-scale jet-flap was made using a causality correlation technique. The processed signal of a hot-film anemometer probe was cross correlated with the output signal of a far-field microphone. Axial acoustic source strength distributions were measured for three far-field microphone locations: plus or minus 45 deg in the flyover plane and 45 deg in the sideline plane. These measurements showed that the acoustic sources in the secondary mixing region are highly directional, radiating much more effectively to the -45 deg-microphone, located below the plane of the flap surface. A relative maximum in the acoustic source strength measured for the microphones in the flyover plane occurred very near the flap trailing edge, which may be due to an edge amplification effect predicted by the theoretical work of Ffowcs Williams and Hall.

  11. Estimation of source location and ground impedance using a hybrid multiple signal classification and Levenberg-Marquardt approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Kai-Chung; Lau, Siu-Kit; Tang, Shiu-Keung

    2016-07-01

    A microphone array signal processing method for locating a stationary point source over a locally reactive ground and for estimating ground impedance is examined in detail in the present study. A non-linear least square approach using the Levenberg-Marquardt method is proposed to overcome the problem of unknown ground impedance. The multiple signal classification method (MUSIC) is used to give the initial estimation of the source location, while the technique of forward backward spatial smoothing is adopted as a pre-processer of the source localization to minimize the effects of source coherence. The accuracy and robustness of the proposed signal processing method are examined. Results show that source localization in the horizontal direction by MUSIC is satisfactory. However, source coherence reduces drastically the accuracy in estimating the source height. The further application of Levenberg-Marquardt method with the results from MUSIC as the initial inputs improves significantly the accuracy of source height estimation. The present proposed method provides effective and robust estimation of the ground surface impedance.

  12. Wide aperture arrays for locating impulsive sound sources in air and underwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Brian G.

    2006-05-01

    Passive ranging techniques are used in land-based acoustic surveillance systems and underwater sonar systems to localize sources that radiate acoustic energy into the environment. Passive ranging by wavefront curvature relies on the spherical expansion of the wavefronts as the acoustic energy propagates outwards from the source. A wide-aperture receiving array is used to sense the curvature of the wavefront by estimating the intersensor time delays as the wavefront traverses the array. The time delay estimates are used to calculate the range (which is equal to the radius of curvature of the wavefront) and bearing of the source. The wavefront curvature method is applied here to the passive ranging of sources of four different types of acoustic signals: underwater mechanical transients, underwater biological transients, continuous sound wave transmissions in air and impulsive sounds in air. The method provides precise range and bearing estimates of underwater signal sources. In comparison, large passive ranging errors are observed for in-air sources because the atmosphere is a nonstationary sound propagation medium. Atmospheric turbulence causes perturbations in the curvature of the acoustic wavefronts and leads to random fluctuations in the source position estimates on time scales ranging from seconds to minutes. Background noise at each sensor has only a small effect on the positional uncertainty of in-air sources with random fluctuations in the source position estimates occurring on subsecond time scales.

  13. The effect of contaminant source location on worker exposure in the near-wake region.

    PubMed

    Kulmala, I; Säämänen, A; Enbom, S

    1996-10-01

    The exposure of workers in the near-wake region due to a recirculating airflow was studied experimentally and numerically. A mannequin was installed in an open-ended tunnel and tracer gas was released at several locations downstream to determine the size and location of the reverse flow region. The contaminant transport into the breathing zone was found to depend strongly on the location of the release point. The airflow field was also determined numerically assuming a steady flow and using the standard k-epsilon turbulence model. After calculating the turbulent airflow field, a large number of submicrometre particles were released in different locations downstream of the mannequin to simulate the transport of gaseous contaminants. Although this method does not provide actual exposures, it does predict the tendencies in exposure variations due to different release points quite satisfactorily. PMID:8888634

  14. Comparative Analysis of Continuous Acoustic Emission (AE) Data, Acquired from 12 and 16 Bit Streaming Systems during Rock Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, J.; Goodfellow, S. D.; Nasseri, M. H.; Reyes-Montes, J. M.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    A comparative analysis of continuous acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during a triaxial compression test, using a 12-bit and a 16-bit acquisition system, is presented. A cylindrical sample (diameter 50.1 mm and length 125 mm) of Berea sandstone was triaxally deformed at a confining pressure of 15 MPa and a strain rate of 1.6E-06 s-1. The sample was loaded differentially until failure occurred at approximately σ1 = 160 MPa. AE activity was monitored for the duration of the experiment by an array of 8 broadband piezoelectric transducers coupled to the rock sample. Raw signals were amplified by 40 dB using pre-amplifiers equipped with filter modules with a frequency passband of 100 kHz to 1 MHz. The amplifiers had a split output enabling the measured signal to be fed into a 12-bit and a 16-bit acquisition system. AE waveforms were continuously recorded at 10 MS/s on 8 data acquisition channels per system. Approximately 4,500 events were harvested and source located from the continuous data for each system. P-wave arrivals were automatically picked and event locations calculated using the downhill Simplex method and a time-varying transverse isotropic velocity model based on periodical surveys across the sample. Events detected on the 12-bit and 16-bit systems were compared both in terms of their P-wave picks and their source locations. In the early stages of AE activity, there appeared to be little difference between P-wave picks and hypocenter locations from both data sets. As the experiment progressed into the post-peak stress regime, which was accompanied by an increase in AE rate and amplitude, fewer events could be harvested from the 12-bit data compared to the 16-bit data. This is linked to the observation of a higher signal-to-noise ratio on AE waveforms harvested from the 16-bit stream compared to those from the 12-bit stream, which results in an easier identification of P-wave onsets. Similarly a higher confidence in source location is expected. Analysis

  15. Source apportionment and location by selective wind sampling and Positive Matrix Factorization.

    PubMed

    Venturini, Elisa; Vassura, Ivano; Raffo, Simona; Ferroni, Laura; Bernardi, Elena; Passarini, Fabrizio

    2014-10-01

    In order to determine the pollution sources in a suburban area and identify the main direction of their origin, PM2.5 was collected with samplers coupled with a wind select sensor and then subjected to Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis. In each sample, soluble ions, organic carbon, elemental carbon, levoglucosan, metals, and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined. PMF results identified six main sources affecting the area: natural gas home appliances, motor vehicles, regional transport, biomass combustion, manufacturing activities, and secondary aerosol. The connection of factor temporal trends with other parameters (i.e., temperature, PM2.5 concentration, and photochemical processes) confirms factor attributions. PMF analysis indicated that the main source of PM2.5 in the area is secondary aerosol. This should be mainly due to regional contributions, owing to both the secondary nature of the source itself and the higher concentration registered in inland air masses. The motor vehicle emission source contribution is also important. This source likely has a prevalent local origin. The most toxic determined components, i.e., PAHs, Cd, Pb, and Ni, are mainly due to vehicular traffic. Even if this is not the main source in the study area, it is the one of greatest concern. The application of PMF analysis to PM2.5 collected with this new sampling technique made it possible to obtain more detailed results on the sources affecting the area compared to a classical PMF analysis. PMID:24488520

  16. Efficient Location of Research Reference Sources in the Field of Dance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissinger, Pat; Jay, Danielle

    More than 45 basic dance reference research sources that would be useful to students, scholars, teachers, historians, and therapists are discussed in this bibliographic essay. Aspects of dance covered include choreography, criticism, teaching principles, aesthetic theory, dance therapy, and history. Sources are grouped by type: dictionaries and…

  17. Locating and estimating air emissions from sources of lead and lead compounds

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This document describes the properties of lead and lead compounds as air pollutants, defines their production and use patterns, identifies source categories of air emissions, and provides lead emission factors. Lead is primarily used in the manufacture of lead-acid batteries, lead alloys, lead oxides in pigments, glass, lead cable coating, and a variety of lead products including ammunition and radiation shielding. Lead is emitted into the atmosphere from mining and smelting; from its use as feedstock in the production of lead alloys, lead compounds and other lead-containing products; from mobile sources; and from combustion sources. In addition to the lead and lead compound sources and emission factor data, information is provided that specifies how individual sources of lead and lead compounds may be tested to quantify air emissions.

  18. 40 CFR 55.14 - Requirements that apply to OCS sources located within 25 miles of States' seaward boundaries, by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requirements that apply to OCS sources located within 25 miles of States' seaward boundaries, by State. 55.14 Section 55.14 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF AIR REGULATIONS § 55.14 Requirements...

  19. Algorithms for locating celestial sources of X-rays and gamma flares with the aid of several spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mersov, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    An Algorithm is suggested for defining the coordinates of X-ray and Gamma Ray radiation sources by measuring the time lag of the transmission of radiation flares from various points of space in which spacecraft are located. Instances are cited where the 2-x, 3-x and 4x spacecraft are used.

  20. Infrared observations of AE Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzi, E. G.; Chincarini, G.; Tarenghi, M.

    1981-01-01

    Broadband infrared observations of the cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii are reported. The observations were obtained in the J, H, K and L filters with the InSb photometer attached to the 1-m telescope of the European Southern Observatory. The infrared energy distribution observed from 0.35 to 3.5 microns for phase 0.5 suggests a spectral type of K5 V for the secondary and a distance to the system of approximately 70 pc if an absolute magnitude of 7.3 is assumed. Monitoring of the flux at 2.2 microns reveals a variability with an amplitude of approximately 0.3 magnitude over one third of the orbital period, the nature of which is under investigation.

  1. Locating Sensors for Detecting Source-to-Target Patterns of Special Nuclear Material Smuggling: A Spatial Information Theoretic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Przybyla, Jay; Taylor, Jeffrey; Zhou, Xuesong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a spatial information-theoretic model is proposed to locate sensors for detecting source-to-target patterns of special nuclear material (SNM) smuggling. In order to ship the nuclear materials from a source location with SNM production to a target city, the smugglers must employ global and domestic logistics systems. This paper focuses on locating a limited set of fixed and mobile radiation sensors in a transportation network, with the intent to maximize the expected information gain and minimize the estimation error for the subsequent nuclear material detection stage. A Kalman filtering-based framework is adapted to assist the decision-maker in quantifying the network-wide information gain and SNM flow estimation accuracy. PMID:22163641

  2. Locating sensors for detecting source-to-target patterns of special nuclear material smuggling: a spatial information theoretic approach.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, Jay; Taylor, Jeffrey; Zhou, Xuesong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a spatial information-theoretic model is proposed to locate sensors for detecting source-to-target patterns of special nuclear material (SNM) smuggling. In order to ship the nuclear materials from a source location with SNM production to a target city, the smugglers must employ global and domestic logistics systems. This paper focuses on locating a limited set of fixed and mobile radiation sensors in a transportation network, with the intent to maximize the expected information gain and minimize the estimation error for the subsequent nuclear material detection stage. A Kalman filtering-based framework is adapted to assist the decision-maker in quantifying the network-wide information gain and SNM flow estimation accuracy. PMID:22163641

  3. Alignment of leading-edge and peak-picking time of arrival methods to obtain accurate source locations

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.; Symbalisty, E.; Fox, C.; and Vanderlinde, O.

    2009-08-01

    The location of a radiating source can be determined by time-tagging the arrival of the radiated signal at a network of spatially distributed sensors. The accuracy of this approach depends strongly on the particular time-tagging algorithm employed at each of the sensors. If different techniques are used across the network, then the time tags must be referenced to a common fiducial for maximum location accuracy. In this report we derive the time corrections needed to temporally align leading-edge, time-tagging techniques with peak-picking algorithms. We focus on broadband radio frequency (RF) sources, an ionospheric propagation channel, and narrowband receivers, but the final results can be generalized to apply to any source, propagation environment, and sensor. Our analytic results are checked against numerical simulations for a number of representative cases and agree with the specific leading-edge algorithm studied independently by Kim and Eng (1995) and Pongratz (2005 and 2007).

  4. Locating and estimating air emissions from sources of chlorobenzenes (revised March 1994). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    ;Table of Contents: Background; Emissions from Chlorobenzenes Production; Emissions from Major Uses of Chlorobenzene; Emission from the Use of Materials Containing Chlorobenzenes; Byproduct Emission -- Processes Unrelated to Production or Use of Chlorobenzenes; Ambient Air and Stationary Source Test Procedures; Potential Source Categories of Chlorobenzenes Emissions; Textile Fiber Dyeing Facilities with Annual Sales Greater Than $1 Million; and Summary of Emission Factors Listed in this Document.

  5. Location of odor sources and the affected population in Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, J.L.

    1981-08-01

    This report is divided into four sections. The first two sections contain general background information on Imperial County. The third section is a general discussion of odor sources in Imperial County, and the fourth maps the specific odor sources, the expected areas of perception, and the affected populations. this mapping is done for the Imperial Valley and each of the four Imperial County KGRA's (Known Geothermal Resource Areas) where odor from the development of the geothermal energy may affect population.

  6. Spatial location priors for Gaussian model based reverberant audio source separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Ngoc QK; Vincent, Emmanuel; Gribonval, Rémi

    2013-12-01

    We consider the Gaussian framework for reverberant audio source separation, where the sources are modeled in the time-frequency domain by their short-term power spectra and their spatial covariance matrices. We propose two alternative probabilistic priors over the spatial covariance matrices which are consistent with the theory of statistical room acoustics and we derive expectation-maximization algorithms for maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. We argue that these algorithms provide a statistically principled solution to the permutation problem and to the risk of overfitting resulting from conventional maximum likelihood (ML) estimation. We show experimentally that in a semi-informed scenario where the source positions and certain room characteristics are known, the MAP algorithms outperform their ML counterparts. This opens the way to rigorous statistical treatment of this family of models in other scenarios in the future.

  7. Technique to determine location of radio sources from measurements taken on spinning spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fainberg, J.

    1979-01-01

    The procedure developed to extract average source direction and average source size from spin-modulated radio astronomy data measured on the IMP-6 spacecraft is described. Because all measurements are used, rather than just finding maxima or minima in the data, the method is very sensitive, even in the presence of large amounts of noise. The technique is applicable to all experiments with directivity characteristics. It is suitable for onboard processing on satellites to reduce the data flow to Earth. The application to spin-modulated nonpolarized radio astronomy data is made and includes the effects of noise, background, and second source interference. The analysis was tested with computer simulated data and the results agree with analytic predictions. Applications of this method with IMP-6 radio data have led to: (1) determination of source positions of traveling solar radio bursts at large distances from the Sun; (2) mapping of magnetospheric radio emissions by radio triangulation; and (3) detection of low frequency radio emissions from Jupiter and Saturn.

  8. Identifying constituent spectra sources in multispectral images to quantify and locate cervical neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Kevin C.; Bambot, Shabbir

    2011-02-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been shown to be an effective method for detecting neoplasia. Guided Therapeutics has developed LightTouch, a non invasive device that uses a combination of reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy for identifying early cancer of the human cervix. The combination of the multispectral information from the two spectroscopic modalities has been shown to be an effective method to screen for cervical cancer. There has however been a relative paucity of work in identifying the individual spectral components that contribute to the measured fluorescence and reflectance spectra. This work aims to identify the constituent source spectra and their concentrations. We used non-negative matrix factorization (NNMF) numerical methods to decompose the mixed multispectral data into the constituent spectra and their corresponding concentrations. NNMF is an iterative approach that factorizes the measured data into non-negative factors. The factors are chosen to minimize the root-mean-squared residual error. NNMF has shown promise for feature extraction and identification in the fields of text mining and spectral data analysis. Since both the constituent source spectra and their corresponding concentrations are assumed to be non-negative by nature NNMF is a reasonable approach to deconvolve the measured multispectral data. Supervised learning methods were then used to determine which of the constituent spectra sources best predict the amount of neoplasia. The constituent spectra sources found to best predict neoplasia were then compared with spectra of known biological chromophores.

  9. Subjective Preference for Sound Sources Located on the Stage and in the Orchestra Pit of AN Opera House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, S.; Sakai, H.; Prodi, N.

    2002-11-01

    The present study investigates whether the subjective preference theory can be applied to the sound field in an opera house. Paired-comparison tests were conducted to obtain scale values of subjective preference. As the source locations of the music on the stage and in the orchestra pit were moved, listeners were asked to give their acoustical preference. The acoustical factors at each listening position were obtained from the interaural cross-correlation function and binaural impulse responses measured at each listening position. The relationship between the scale values of subjective preference and orthogonal acoustical factors ( LL, IACC, τIACC, Δt 1 for the pit source, Δt 1 for the stage, T sub for the pit source, and T sub for the stage source) was determined by using factor analysis, which shows that the preference theory is applicable. Total scores obtained from factor analysis and measured scale values are in good agreement.

  10. Application of Normal Mode Expansion to AE Waves in Finite Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, M. R.; Prosser, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    Breckenridge et al. (1975), Hsu (1985) and Pao (1978) adapted approaches from seismology to calculate the response at the surface of an infinite half-space and an infinite plate. These approaches have found use in calibrating acoustic emission (AE) transducers. However, it is difficult to extend this theoretical approach to AE testing of practical structures. Weaver and Pao (1982) considered a normal mode solution to the Lamb equations. Hutchinson (1983) pointed out the potential relevance of Mindlin's plate theory (1951) to AE. Pao (1982) reviewed Medick s (1961) classical plate theory for a point source, but rejected it as useful for AE and no one seems to have investigated its relevance to AE any further. Herein, a normal mode solution to the classical plate bending equation was investigated for its applicability to AE. The same source-time function chosen by Weaver and Pao is considered. However, arbitrary source and receiver positions are chosen relative to the boundaries of the plate. This is another advantage of the plate theory treatment in addition to its simplicity. The source does not have to be at the center of the plate as in the axisymmetric treatment. The plate is allowed to remain finite and reflections are predicted. The importance of this theory to AE is that it can handle finite plates, realistic boundary conditions, and can be extended to composite materials.

  11. Fuel from wastewater : harnessing a potential energy source in Canada through the co-location of algae biofuel production to sources of effluent, heat and CO2.

    SciTech Connect

    Passell, Howard David; Whalen, Jake; Pienkos, Philip P.; O'Leary, Stephen J.; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Moreland, Barbara D.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

    2010-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with the National Research Council (NRC) Canada and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a decision-support model that will evaluate the tradeoffs associated with high-latitude algae biofuel production co-located with wastewater, CO2, and waste heat. This project helps Canada meet its goal of diversifying fuel sources with algae-based biofuels. The biofuel production will provide a wide range of benefits including wastewater treatment, CO2 reuse and reduction of demand for fossil-based fuels. The higher energy density in algae-based fuels gives them an advantage over crop-based biofuels as the 'production' footprint required is much less, resulting in less water consumed and little, if any conversion of agricultural land from food to fuel production. Besides being a potential source for liquid fuel, algae have the potential to be used to generate electricity through the burning of dried biomass, or anaerobically digested to generate methane for electricity production. Co-locating algae production with waste streams may be crucial for making algae an economically valuable fuel source, and will certainly improve its overall ecological sustainability. The modeling process will address these questions, and others that are important to the use of water for energy production: What are the locations where all resources are co-located, and what volumes of algal biomass and oil can be produced there? In locations where co-location does not occur, what resources should be transported, and how far, while maintaining economic viability? This work is being funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and is part of a larger collaborative effort that includes sampling, strain isolation, strain characterization and cultivation being performed by the NREL and Canada's NRC. Results from the NREL / NRC collaboration including specific

  12. The AE-8 trapped electron model environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vette, James I.

    1991-01-01

    The machine sensible version of the AE-8 electron model environment was completed in December 1983. It has been sent to users on the model environment distribution list and is made available to new users by the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). AE-8 is the last in a series of terrestrial trapped radiation models that includes eight proton and eight electron versions. With the exception of AE-8, all these models were documented in formal reports as well as being available in a machine sensible form. The purpose of this report is to complete the documentation, finally, for AE-8 so that users can understand its construction and see the comparison of the model with the new data used, as well as with the AE-4 model.

  13. Can Handheld Plastic Detectors Do Both Gamma and Neutron Isotopic Identification with Directional Source Location?

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hayes

    2008-04-18

    This paper demonstrates, through MCNPX simulations, that a compact hexagonal array of detectors can be utilized to do both gamma isotopic identification (ID) along with neutron identification while simultaneously finding the direction of the source relative to the detector array. The detector array itself is composed of seven borated polyvinyl toluene (PVT) hexagonal light pipes approximately 4 inches long and with a 1.25 inch face-to-face thickness assembled in a tight configuration. The gamma ID capability is realized through judicious windowing algorithms as is the neutron spectral unfolding. By having multiple detectors in different relative positions, directional determination of the source can be realized. By further adding multiplicity counters to the neutron counts, fission events can be measured.

  14. Acoustic source location in a jet-blown flap using a cross-correlation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.; Maus, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The acoustic source strength distribution in a turbulent flow field was measured for two far field microphones at 45 deg above and below the plane of the flap surface. A processed signal from an inclined hot-film anemometry probe was cross correlated with the signal from the appropriate far field microphone. The contribution made by the sources associated with the fluctuating pressure on the flap surface to the sound received at far field microphone was estimated by cross correlating the processed signals of microphones which were embedded in the flap surface with the far field microphone signals. In addition, detailed fluid dynamic measurements were made in the flow field of the jet flap using dual sensor hot-film anemometry probes.

  15. Locating very high energy gamma-ray sources with arcminute accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akerlof, C. W.; Cawley, M. F.; Chantell, M.; Harris, K.; Lawrence, M. A.; Fegan, D. J.; Lang, M. J.; Hillas, A. M.; Jennings, D. G.; Lamb, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The angular accuracy of gamma-ray detectors is intrinsically limited by the physical processes involved in photon detection. Although a number of pointlike sources were detected by the COS B satellite, only two have been unambiguously identified by time signature with counterparts at longer wavelengths. By taking advantage of the extended longitudinal structure of VHE gamma-ray showers, measurements in the TeV energy range can pinpoint source coordinates to arcminute accuracy. This has now been demonstrated with new data analysis procedures applied to observations of the Crab Nebula using Cherenkov air shower imaging techniques. With two telescopes in coincidence, the individual event circular probable error will be 0.13 deg. The half-cone angle of the field of view is effectively 1 deg.

  16. Locating very high energy gamma ray sources with arc minute accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akerlof, C. W.; Cawley, M. F.; Chantell, M.; Fegan, D. J.; Harris, K.; Hillas, A. M.; Jennings, D. G.; Lamb, R. C.; Lawrence, M. A.; Lang, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The angular accuracy of gamma-ray detectors is intrinsically limited by the physical processes involved in photon detection. Although a number of point-like sources were detected by the COS-B satellite, only two were unambiguously identified by time signature with counterparts at longer wavelengths. By taking advantage of the extended longitudinal structure of Very High Energy gamma-ray showers, measurements in the TeV energy range can pinpoint source coordinates to arc minute accuracy. This was demonstrated using Cerenkov air shower imaging techniques. With two telescopes in coincidence, the individual event circular probable error will be 0.13 deg. The half-cone angle of the field of view is effectively 1 deg.

  17. Revision of earthquake hypocenter locations in GEOFON bulletin data using global source-specific station terms technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooshiri, N.; Saul, J.; Heimann, S.; Tilmann, F. J.; Dahm, T.

    2015-12-01

    The use of a 1D velocity model for seismic event location is often associated with significant travel-time residuals. Particularly for regional stations in subduction zones, where the velocity structure strongly deviates from the assumed 1D model, residuals of up to ±10 seconds are observed even for clear arrivals, which leads to strongly biased locations. In fact, due to mostly regional travel-time anomalies, arrival times at regional stations do not match the location obtained with teleseismic picks, and vice versa. If the earthquake is weak and only recorded regionally, or if fast locations based on regional stations are needed, the location may be far off the corresponding teleseismic location. In this case, implementation of travel-time corrections may leads to a reduction of the travel-time residuals at regional stations and, in consequence, significantly improve the relative location accuracy. Here, we have extended the source-specific station terms (SSST) technique to regional and teleseismic distances and adopted the algorithm for probabilistic, non-linear, global-search earthquake location. The method has been applied to specific test regions using P and pP phases from the GEOFON bulletin data for all available station networks. By using this method, a set of timing corrections has been calculated for each station varying as a function of source position. In this way, an attempt is made to correct for the systematic errors, introduced by limitations and inaccuracies in the assumed velocity structure, without solving for a new earth model itself. In this presentation, we draw on examples of the application of this global SSST technique to relocate earthquakes from the Tonga-Fiji subduction zone and from the Chilean margin. Our results have been showing a considerable decrease of the root-mean-square (RMS) residual in earthquake location final catalogs, a major reduction of the median absolute deviation (MAD) of the travel

  18. Source Apportionment of Particle Bound Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons at an Industrial Location in Agra, India

    PubMed Central

    Lakhani, Anita

    2012-01-01

    16 US EPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were quantified in total suspended ambient particulate matter (TSPM) collected from an industrial site in Agra (India) using gas chromatography. The major industrial activities in Agra are foundries that previously used coal and coke as fuel in cupola furnaces. These foundries have now switched over to natural gas. In addition, use of compressed natural gas has also been promoted and encouraged in automobiles. This study attempts to apportion sources of PAH in the ambient air and the results reflect the advantages associated with the change of fuel. The predominant PAHs in TSPM include high molecular weight (HMW) congeners BghiP, DbA, IP, and BaP. The sum of 16 priority PAHs had a mean value of 72.7 ± 4.7 ng m−3. Potential sources of PAHs in aerosols were identified using diagnostic ratios and principal component analysis. The results reflect a blend of emissions from diesel and natural gas as the major sources of PAH in the city along with contribution from emission of coal, coke, and gasoline. PMID:22606062

  19. Long-term particle measurements in Finnish Arctic: Part II - Trend analysis and source location identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laing, James R.; Hopke, Philip K.; Hopke, Eleanor F.; Husain, Liaquat; Dutkiewicz, Vincent A.; Paatero, Jussi; Viisanen, Yrjö.

    2014-05-01

    Forty-seven years (1964-2010) of weekly trace metal and major ion concentrations in total suspended particle samples from Kevo, Finland were analyzed for long-term trends and by source identification methods. Significant long-term decreasing trends were detected for most species. The largest decreases over the 47 years were Sb (-3.90% yr-1), Pb (-3.87% yr-1), Mn (-3.45% yr-1), Cd (-3.42% yr-1), and Ca (-3.13% yr-1). As, Pb, and Cd concentrations at Kevo were consistent with the reported time-trends of European emissions inventories. Pb concentrations at Kevo have dramatically decreased (92%) in the past 47 years due to the reduced use of leaded gasoline in automobiles. Back-trajectory analysis suggests that the main source areas of anthropogenic species (V, Cd, Mn, Mo, Sb, Tl, W) were predominantly in Eastern Europe, European Russia, and the Baltics. Markers of stationary fuel combustion (V, Mn, Mo, Sb, Se, and Tl) pointed towards source regions in the Pechora Basin and Ural industrial areas in Russia, and near gas and oil fields in western Kazakhstan.

  20. Source apportionment of particle bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at an industrial location in Agra, India.

    PubMed

    Lakhani, Anita

    2012-01-01

    16 U.S. EPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were quantified in total suspended ambient particulate matter (TSPM) collected from an industrial site in Agra (India) using gas chromatography. The major industrial activities in Agra are foundries that previously used coal and coke as fuel in cupola furnaces. These foundries have now switched over to natural gas. In addition, use of compressed natural gas has also been promoted and encouraged in automobiles. This study attempts to apportion sources of PAH in the ambient air and the results reflect the advantages associated with the change of fuel. The predominant PAHs in TSPM include high molecular weight (HMW) congeners BghiP, DbA, IP, and BaP. The sum of 16 priority PAHs had a mean value of 72.7 ± 4.7 ng m(-3). Potential sources of PAHs in aerosols were identified using diagnostic ratios and principal component analysis. The results reflect a blend of emissions from diesel and natural gas as the major sources of PAH in the city along with contribution from emission of coal, coke, and gasoline. PMID:22606062

  1. Improvements in mining induced microseismic source locations at the Lucky Friday mine using an automated whole-waveform analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, Douglas A.; Sprenke, Kenneth F.

    1992-09-01

    For years, severe rockburst problems at the Lucky Friday mine in northern Idaho have been a persistent safety hazard and an impediment to production. An MP250 based microseismic monitoring system, which uses simple voltage threshold picking of first arrivals, has been used in this mine since 1973 to provide source locations and energy estimates of seismic events. Recently, interest has been expressed in developing a whole waveform microseismic monitoring system for the mine to provide more accurate source locations and information about source characteristics. For this study, we have developed a prototype whole-waveform microseismic monitoring system based on a 80386 computer equipped with a 50 kHz analog-digital convertor board. The software developed includes a data collection program, a data analysis program, and an event detection program. Whole-waveform data collected and analyzed using this system during a three-day test have been employed to investigate sources of error in the hypocenter location process and to develop an automatic phase picker appropriate for microseismic events. Comparison of hypocenter estimates produced by the MP250 system to those produced by the whole-waveform system shows that significant timing errors are common in the MP250 system and that these errors caused a large part of the scatter evident in the daily activity plots produced at the mine. Simulations and analysis of blast data show that analytical control over the solutions is strongly influenced by the array geometry. Within the geophone array, large errors in the velocity model or moderate timing errors may result in small changes in the solution, but outside the array, the solution is very sensitive to small changes in the data. Our whole-waveform detection program picks event onset times and determines event durations by analysis of a segmented envelope function (SEF) derived from the microseismic signal. The detection program has been tested by comparing its arrival time

  2. Locating single-point sources from arrival times containing large picking errors (LPEs): the virtual field optimization method (VFOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xi-Bing; Wang, Ze-Wei; Dong, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microseismic monitoring systems using local location techniques tend to be timely, automatic and stable. One basic requirement of these systems is the automatic picking of arrival times. However, arrival times generated by automated techniques always contain large picking errors (LPEs), which may make the location solution unreliable and cause the integrated system to be unstable. To overcome the LPE issue, we propose the virtual field optimization method (VFOM) for locating single-point sources. In contrast to existing approaches, the VFOM optimizes a continuous and virtually established objective function to search the space for the common intersection of the hyperboloids, which is determined by sensor pairs other than the least residual between the model-calculated and measured arrivals. The results of numerical examples and in-site blasts show that the VFOM can obtain more precise and stable solutions than traditional methods when the input data contain LPEs. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of LPEs on objective functions to determine the LPE-tolerant mechanism, velocity sensitivity and stopping criteria of the VFOM. The proposed method is also capable of locating acoustic sources using passive techniques such as passive sonar detection and acoustic emission.

  3. Locating single-point sources from arrival times containing large picking errors (LPEs): the virtual field optimization method (VFOM).

    PubMed

    Li, Xi-Bing; Wang, Ze-Wei; Dong, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microseismic monitoring systems using local location techniques tend to be timely, automatic and stable. One basic requirement of these systems is the automatic picking of arrival times. However, arrival times generated by automated techniques always contain large picking errors (LPEs), which may make the location solution unreliable and cause the integrated system to be unstable. To overcome the LPE issue, we propose the virtual field optimization method (VFOM) for locating single-point sources. In contrast to existing approaches, the VFOM optimizes a continuous and virtually established objective function to search the space for the common intersection of the hyperboloids, which is determined by sensor pairs other than the least residual between the model-calculated and measured arrivals. The results of numerical examples and in-site blasts show that the VFOM can obtain more precise and stable solutions than traditional methods when the input data contain LPEs. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of LPEs on objective functions to determine the LPE-tolerant mechanism, velocity sensitivity and stopping criteria of the VFOM. The proposed method is also capable of locating acoustic sources using passive techniques such as passive sonar detection and acoustic emission. PMID:26754955

  4. Locating single-point sources from arrival times containing large picking errors (LPEs): the virtual field optimization method (VFOM)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi-Bing; Wang, Ze-Wei; Dong, Long-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microseismic monitoring systems using local location techniques tend to be timely, automatic and stable. One basic requirement of these systems is the automatic picking of arrival times. However, arrival times generated by automated techniques always contain large picking errors (LPEs), which may make the location solution unreliable and cause the integrated system to be unstable. To overcome the LPE issue, we propose the virtual field optimization method (VFOM) for locating single-point sources. In contrast to existing approaches, the VFOM optimizes a continuous and virtually established objective function to search the space for the common intersection of the hyperboloids, which is determined by sensor pairs other than the least residual between the model-calculated and measured arrivals. The results of numerical examples and in-site blasts show that the VFOM can obtain more precise and stable solutions than traditional methods when the input data contain LPEs. Furthermore, we discuss the impact of LPEs on objective functions to determine the LPE-tolerant mechanism, velocity sensitivity and stopping criteria of the VFOM. The proposed method is also capable of locating acoustic sources using passive techniques such as passive sonar detection and acoustic emission. PMID:26754955

  5. BAC libraries of Triticum urartu, Aegilops speltoides and Ae. tauschii, the diploid ancestors of polyploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Akhunov, E D; Akhunova, A R; Dvorák, J

    2005-11-01

    Triticum urartu, Aegilops speltoides and Ae. tauschii are respectively the immediate diploid sources, or their closest relatives, of the A, B and D genomes of polyploid wheats. Here we report the construction and characterization of arrayed large-insert libraries in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) vector, one for each of these diploid species. The libraries are equivalent to 3.7, 5.4 and 4.1 of the T. urartu, Ae. speltoides, Ae. tauschii genomes, respectively. The predicted levels of genome coverage were confirmed by library hybridization with single-copy genes. The libraries were used to estimate the proportion of known repeated nucleotide sequences and gene content in each genome by BAC-end sequencing. Repeated sequence families previously detected in Triticeae accounted for 57, 61 and 57% of the T. urartu, Ae. speltoides and Ae. tauschii genomes, and coding regions accounted for 5.8, 4.5 and 4.8%, respectively. PMID:16177898

  6. Arcsec source location measurements in gamma-ray astronomy from a lunar observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David G.; Hughes, E. B.

    1990-01-01

    The physical processes typically used in the detection of high energy gamma-rays do not permit good angular resolution, which makes difficult the unambiguous association of discrete gamma-ray sources with objects emitting at other wavelengths. This problem can be overcome by placing gamma-ray detectors on the moon and using the horizon as an occulting edge to achieve arcsec resolution. For the purpose of discussion, this concept is examined for gamma rays above about 20 MeV for which pair production dominates the detection process and locally-generated nuclear gamma rays do not contribute to the background.

  7. On the preferred source location for the convective amplification of ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Richard B.; Thorne, Richard M.

    1993-01-01

    The propagation, growth, and absorption of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (EMICs) in the Pc1 range are studied using the HOTRAY ray tracing program for a realistic distribution of thermal plasma (H+, He+, O+), which is assumed to be in diffusive equilibrium inside the plasmasphere and collisionless in the low-density region outside the plasmapause. It is demonstrated that there are two principal source regions for the growth of EMIC waves. The theoretical results are related to the most recent satellite and ground-based observations.

  8. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF FIVE INTEGRAL SOURCES LOCATED TOWARD THE SCUTUM ARM

    SciTech Connect

    Bodaghee, A.; Tomsick, J. A.; Rodriguez, J.

    2012-07-01

    Results are presented for XMM-Newton observations of five hard X-ray sources discovered by INTEGRAL in the direction of the Scutum Arm. Each source received {approx}>20 ks of effective exposure time. We provide refined X-ray positions for all five targets enabling us to pinpoint the most likely counterpart in optical/infrared archives. Spectral and timing information (much of which is provided for the first time) allow us to give a firm classification for IGR J18462-0223 and to offer tentative classifications for the others. For IGR J18462-0223, we discovered a coherent pulsation period of 997 {+-} 1 s, which we attribute to the spin of a neutron star in a highly obscured (N{sub H} =2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}) high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB). This makes IGR J18462-0223 the seventh supergiant fast X-ray transient candidate with a confirmed pulsation period. IGR J18457+0244 is a highly absorbed (N{sub H} =8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}) source in which the possible detection of an iron line suggests an active galactic nucleus (AGN) of type Sey-2 situated at z = 0.07(1). A periodic signal at 4.4 ks could be a quasi-periodic oscillation which would make IGR J18457+0244 one of a handful of AGNs in which such features have been claimed, but a slowly rotating neutron star in an HMXB cannot be ruled out. IGR J18482+0049 represents a new obscured HMXB candidate with N{sub H} =4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}. We tentatively propose that IGR J18532+0416 is either an AGN or a pulsar in an HMXB system. The X-ray spectral properties of IGR J18538-0102 are consistent with the AGN classification that has been proposed for this source.

  9. Gamma-ray burst locations from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, M. N.; Meegan, C. A.; Roberts, F. E.; Fishman, G. J.; Wilson, R. B.; Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G. N.

    1992-01-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) consists of eight anisotropic gamma-ray spectrometers at the corners of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. BATSE monitors the full sky from a fixed orientation and determines the direction of gamma-ray bursts with an accuracy appropriate for studying the bursts' celestial distribution. We describe the calculation of gamma-ray burst directions from measurements made by BATSE. We present a sample of calculated directions from BATSE's measurement of solar flaxes and compare the calculated directions with the solar direction. We describe the systematic errors apparent in these data and discuss ongoing efforts to correct them.

  10. Surface Properties Associated With Dust Storm Plume's Point-Source Locations In The Border Region Of The US And Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleiweiss, M. P.; DuBois, D. W.; Flores, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    Dust storms in the border region of the Southwest US and Northern Mexico are a serious problem for air quality (PM10 exceedances), health (Valley Fever is pandemic in the region) and transportation (road closures and deadly traffic accidents). In order to better understand the phenomena, we are attempting to identify critical characteristics of dust storm sources so that, possibly, one can perform more accurate predictions of events and, thus, mitigate some of the deleterious effects. Besides the emission mechanisms for dust storm production that are tied to atmospheric dynamics, one must know those locations whose source characteristics can be tied to dust production and, therefore, identify locations where a dust storm is eminent under favorable atmospheric dynamics. During the past 13 years, we have observed, on satellite imagery, more than 500 dust events in the region and are in the process of identifying the source regions for the dust plumes that make up an event. Where satellite imagery exists with high spatial resolution (less than or equal to 250m), dust 'plumes' appear to be made up of individual and merged plumes that are emitted from a 'point source' (smaller than the resolution of the imagery). In particular, we have observed events from the ASTER sensor whose spatial resolution is 15m as well as Landsat whose spatial resolution is 30m. Tying these source locations to surface properties such as NDVI, albedo, and soil properties (percent sand, silt, clay, and gravel; soil moisture; etc.) will identify regions with enhanced capability to produce a dust storm. This, along with atmospheric dynamics, will allow the forecast of dust events. The analysis of 10 events from the period 2004-2013, for which we have identified 1124 individual plumes, will be presented.

  11. Metamaterials-based sensor to detect and locate nonlinear elastic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliozzi, Antonio S.; Miniaci, Marco; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.; Scalerandi, Marco

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, acoustic metamaterials have attracted increasing scientific interest for very diverse technological applications ranging from sound abatement to ultrasonic imaging, mainly due to their ability to act as band-stop filters. At the same time, the concept of chaotic cavities has been recently proposed as an efficient tool to enhance the quality of nonlinear signal analysis, particularly in the ultrasonic/acoustic case. The goal of the present paper is to merge the two concepts in order to propose a metamaterial-based device that can be used as a natural and selective linear filter for the detection of signals resulting from the propagation of elastic waves in nonlinear materials, e.g., in the presence of damage, and as a detector for the damage itself in time reversal experiments. Numerical simulations demonstrate the feasibility of the approach and the potential of the device in providing improved signal-to-noise ratios and enhanced focusing on the defect locations.

  12. Metamaterials-based sensor to detect and locate nonlinear elastic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gliozzi, Antonio S.; Scalerandi, Marco; Miniaci, Marco; Bosia, Federico; Pugno, Nicola M.

    2015-10-19

    In recent years, acoustic metamaterials have attracted increasing scientific interest for very diverse technological applications ranging from sound abatement to ultrasonic imaging, mainly due to their ability to act as band-stop filters. At the same time, the concept of chaotic cavities has been recently proposed as an efficient tool to enhance the quality of nonlinear signal analysis, particularly in the ultrasonic/acoustic case. The goal of the present paper is to merge the two concepts in order to propose a metamaterial-based device that can be used as a natural and selective linear filter for the detection of signals resulting from the propagation of elastic waves in nonlinear materials, e.g., in the presence of damage, and as a detector for the damage itself in time reversal experiments. Numerical simulations demonstrate the feasibility of the approach and the potential of the device in providing improved signal-to-noise ratios and enhanced focusing on the defect locations.

  13. UTILIZING RESULTS FROM INSAR TO DEVELOP SEISMIC LOCATION BENCHMARKS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR SEISMIC SOURCE STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    M. BEGNAUD; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    Obtaining accurate seismic event locations is one of the most important goals for monitoring detonations of underground nuclear teats. This is a particular challenge at small magnitudes where the number of recording stations may be less than 20. Although many different procedures are being developed to improve seismic location, most procedures suffer from inadequate testing against accurate information about a seismic event. Events with well-defined attributes, such as latitude, longitude, depth and origin time, are commonly referred to as ground truth (GT). Ground truth comes in many forms and with many different levels of accuracy. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) can provide independent and accurate information (ground truth) regarding ground surface deformation and/or rupture. Relating surface deformation to seismic events is trivial when events are large and create a significant surface rupture, such as for the M{sub w} = 7.5 event that occurred in the remote northern region of the Tibetan plateau in 1997. The event, which was a vertical strike slip even appeared anomalous in nature due to the lack of large aftershocks and had an associated surface rupture of over 180 km that was identified and modeled using InSAR. The east-west orientation of the fault rupture provides excellent ground truth for latitude, but is of limited use for longitude. However, a secondary rupture occurred 50 km south of the main shock rupture trace that can provide ground truth with accuracy within 5 km. The smaller, 5-km-long secondary rupture presents a challenge for relating the deformation to a seismic event. The rupture is believed to have a thrust mechanism; the dip of the fimdt allows for some separation between the secondary rupture trace and its associated event epicenter, although not as much as is currently observed from catalog locations. Few events within the time period of the InSAR analysis are candidates for the secondary rupture. Of these, we have

  14. Sound frequency-invariant neural coding of a frequency-dependent cue to sound source location.

    PubMed

    Jones, Heath G; Brown, Andrew D; Koka, Kanthaiah; Thornton, Jennifer L; Tollin, Daniel J

    2015-07-01

    The century-old duplex theory of sound localization posits that low- and high-frequency sounds are localized with two different acoustical cues, interaural time and level differences (ITDs and ILDs), respectively. While behavioral studies in humans and behavioral and neurophysiological studies in a variety of animal models have largely supported the duplex theory, behavioral sensitivity to ILD is curiously invariant across the audible spectrum. Here we demonstrate that auditory midbrain neurons in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) also encode ILDs in a frequency-invariant manner, efficiently representing the full range of acoustical ILDs experienced as a joint function of sound source frequency, azimuth, and distance. We further show, using Fisher information, that nominal "low-frequency" and "high-frequency" ILD-sensitive neural populations can discriminate ILD with similar acuity, yielding neural ILD discrimination thresholds for near-midline sources comparable to behavioral discrimination thresholds estimated for chinchillas. These findings thus suggest a revision to the duplex theory and reinforce ecological and efficiency principles that hold that neural systems have evolved to encode the spectrum of biologically relevant sensory signals to which they are naturally exposed. PMID:25972580

  15. Location and release time identification of pollution point source in river networks based on the Backward Probability Method.

    PubMed

    Ghane, Alireza; Mazaheri, Mehdi; Mohammad Vali Samani, Jamal

    2016-09-15

    The pollution of rivers due to accidental spills is a major threat to environment and human health. To protect river systems from accidental spills, it is essential to introduce a reliable tool for identification process. Backward Probability Method (BPM) is one of the most recommended tools that is able to introduce information related to the prior location and the release time of the pollution. This method was originally developed and employed in groundwater pollution source identification problems. One of the objectives of this study is to apply this method in identifying the pollution source location and release time in surface waters, mainly in rivers. To accomplish this task, a numerical model is developed based on the adjoint analysis. Then the developed model is verified using analytical solution and some real data. The second objective of this study is to extend the method to pollution source identification in river networks. In this regard, a hypothetical test case is considered. In the later simulations, all of the suspected points are identified, using only one backward simulation. The results demonstrated that all suspected points, determined by the BPM could be a possible pollution source. The proposed approach is accurate and computationally efficient and does not need any simplification in river geometry and flow. Due to this simplicity, it is highly recommended for practical purposes. PMID:27219462

  16. On the location of microseismic sources in instable rock slope areas: heterogeneous vs. homogenous 3D velocity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coviello, Velio; Manconi, Andrea; Occhiena, Cristina; Arattano, Massimo; Scavia, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Rock-falls are one of the most common and hazardous phenomena occurring in mountainous areas. The formation of cracks in rocks is often accompanied by a sudden release of energy, which propagates in form of elastic waves and can be detected by a suitable transducer array. Therefore, geophones are among the most effective monitoring devices to investigate eventual precursors of rock-fall phenomena. However, the identification of an efficient procedure to forecast rock-fall occurrence in space and time is still an open challenge. In this study, we aim at developing an efficient procedure to locate microseismic sources relevant to cracking mechanisms, and thus gather indications on eventual precursors of rock-fall phenomena. Common seismic location tools usually implement homogeneous or multilayered velocity models but, in case of high slope gradients and heavily fractured rock masses, these simplifications may lead to errors on the correct estimation of the source location. Thus, we analyzed how the consideration of 3D material properties on the propagation medium may influence the location. In the framework of the Alcotra 2007-2013 Project MASSA (Medium And Small Size rock-fall hazard Assessment), a monitoring system composed by 8 triaxial geophones was installed in 2010 at the J.A. Carrel hut (3829 m a.s.l., Matterhorn, NW Italian Alps) and during the first year of operation the network recorded more than 600 natural events that exceeded a fixed threshold [1]. Despite the harsh environmental conditions of the study area, eighteen points distributed as uniformly as possible in space were selected for hammering. The artificial source dataset of known coordinates was used to constrain a 3D heterogeneous velocity model through a Simultaneous Iterative Reconstructive Technique. In order to mitigate the intrinsic uncertainties of the inversion procedure, bootstrapping was performed to extend the dataset and a statistical analysis was issued to improve the model

  17. Determining the seismic source mechanism and location for an explosive eruption with limited observational data: Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Phillip B.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Power, John

    2011-02-01

    Waveform inversions of the very-long-period components of the seismic wavefield produced by an explosive eruption that occurred on 11 January, 2006 at Augustine Volcano, Alaska constrain the seismic source location to near sea level beneath the summit of the volcano. The calculated moment tensors indicate the presence of a volumetric source mechanism. Systematic reconstruction of the source mechanism shows the source consists of a sill intersected by either a sub-vertical east-west trending dike or a sub-vertical pipe and a weak single force. The trend of the dike may be controlled by the east-west trending Augustine-Seldovia arch. The data from the network of broadband sensors is limited to fourteen seismic traces, and synthetic modeling confirms the ability of the network to recover the source mechanism. The synthetic modeling also provides a guide to the expected capability of a broadband network to resolve very-long-period source mechanisms, particularly when confronted with limited observational data.

  18. Determining the seismic source mechanism and location for an explosive eruption with limited observational data: Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, P.B.; Chouet, B.A.; Power, J.

    2011-01-01

    Waveform inversions of the very-long-period components of the seismic wavefield produced by an explosive eruption that occurred on 11 January, 2006 at Augustine Volcano, Alaska constrain the seismic source location to near sea level beneath the summit of the volcano. The calculated moment tensors indicate the presence of a volumetric source mechanism. Systematic reconstruction of the source mechanism shows the source consists of a sill intersected by either a sub-vertical east-west trending dike or a sub-vertical pipe and a weak single force. The trend of the dike may be controlled by the east-west trending Augustine-Seldovia arch. The data from the network of broadband sensors is limited to fourteen seismic traces, and synthetic modeling confirms the ability of the network to recover the source mechanism. The synthetic modeling also provides a guide to the expected capability of a broadband network to resolve very-long-period source mechanisms, particularly when confronted with limited observational data. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, Emily; Snelson, Catherine M; Chipman, Veraun D; Emer, Dudley; White, Bob; Emmit, Ryan; Wright, Al; Drellack, Sigmund; Huckins-Gang, Heather; Mercadante, Jennifer; Floyd, Michael; McGowin, Chris; Cothrun, Chris; Bonal, Nedra

    2013-12-05

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined.

  20. Seismic swarm associated with the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Alaska: earthquake locations and source parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Natalia G.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Hansen, Roger A.

    2011-01-01

    An energetic seismic swarm accompanied an eruption of Kasatochi Volcano in the central Aleutian volcanic arc in August of 2008. In retrospect, the first earthquakes in the swarm were detected about 1 month prior to the eruption onset. Activity in the swarm quickly intensified less than 48 h prior to the first large explosion and subsequently subsided with decline of eruptive activity. The largest earthquake measured as moment magnitude 5.8, and a dozen additional earthquakes were larger than magnitude 4. The swarm exhibited both tectonic and volcanic characteristics. Its shear failure earthquake features were b value = 0.9, most earthquakes with impulsive P and S arrivals and higher-frequency content, and earthquake faulting parameters consistent with regional tectonic stresses. Its volcanic or fluid-influenced seismicity features were volcanic tremor, large CLVD components in moment tensor solutions, and increasing magnitudes with time. Earthquake location tests suggest that the earthquakes occurred in a distributed volume elongated in the NS direction either directly under the volcano or within 5-10 km south of it. Following the MW 5.8 event, earthquakes occurred in a new crustal volume slightly east and north of the previous earthquakes. The central Aleutian Arc is a tectonically active region with seismicity occurring in the crusts of the Pacific and North American plates in addition to interplate events. We postulate that the Kasatochi seismic swarm was a manifestation of the complex interaction of tectonic and magmatic processes in the Earth's crust. Although magmatic intrusion triggered the earthquakes in the swarm, the earthquakes failed in context of the regional stress field.

  1. Seismic swarm associated with the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Alaska: Earthquake locations and source parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, N.A.; Prejean, S.; Hansen, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    An energetic seismic swarm accompanied an eruption of Kasatochi Volcano in the central Aleutian volcanic arc in August of 2008. In retrospect, the first earthquakes in the swarm were detected about 1 month prior to the eruption onset. Activity in the swarm quickly intensified less than 48 h prior to the first large explosion and subsequently subsided with decline of eruptive activity. The largest earthquake measured as moment magnitude 5.8, and a dozen additional earthquakes were larger than magnitude 4. The swarm exhibited both tectonic and volcanic characteristics. Its shear failure earthquake features were b value = 0.9, most earthquakes with impulsive P and S arrivals and higher-frequency content, and earthquake faulting parameters consistent with regional tectonic stresses. Its volcanic or fluid-influenced seismicity features were volcanic tremor, large CLVD components in moment tensor solutions, and increasing magnitudes with time. Earthquake location tests suggest that the earthquakes occurred in a distributed volume elongated in the NS direction either directly under the volcano or within 5-10 km south of it. Following the MW 5.8 event, earthquakes occurred in a new crustal volume slightly east and north of the previous earthquakes. The central Aleutian Arc is a tectonically active region with seismicity occurring in the crusts of the Pacific and North American plates in addition to interplate events. We postulate that the Kasatochi seismic swarm was a manifestation of the complex interaction of tectonic and magmatic processes in the Earth's crust. Although magmatic intrusion triggered the earthquakes in the swarm, the earthquakes failed in context of the regional stress field. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Characterizing and locating air pollution sources in a complex industrial district using optical remote sensing technology and multivariate statistical modeling.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pao-Erh Paul; Yang, Jen-Chih Rena; Den, Walter; Wu, Chang-Fu

    2014-09-01

    Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are most frequent environmental nuisance complaints in urban areas, especially where industrial districts are nearby. Unfortunately, identifying the responsible emission sources of VOCs is essentially a difficult task. In this study, we proposed a dynamic approach to gradually confine the location of potential VOC emission sources in an industrial complex, by combining multi-path open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (OP-FTIR) measurement and the statistical method of principal component analysis (PCA). Close-cell FTIR was further used to verify the VOC emission source by measuring emitted VOCs from selected exhaust stacks at factories in the confined areas. Multiple open-path monitoring lines were deployed during a 3-month monitoring campaign in a complex industrial district. The emission patterns were identified and locations of emissions were confined by the wind data collected simultaneously. N,N-Dimethyl formamide (DMF), 2-butanone, toluene, and ethyl acetate with mean concentrations of 80.0 ± 1.8, 34.5 ± 0.8, 103.7 ± 2.8, and 26.6 ± 0.7 ppbv, respectively, were identified as the major VOC mixture at all times of the day around the receptor site. As the toxic air pollutant, the concentrations of DMF in air samples were found exceeding the ambient standard despite the path-average effect of OP-FTIR upon concentration levels. The PCA data identified three major emission sources, including PU coating, chemical packaging, and lithographic printing industries. Applying instrumental measurement and statistical modeling, this study has established a systematic approach for locating emission sources. Statistical modeling (PCA) plays an important role in reducing dimensionality of a large measured dataset and identifying underlying emission sources. Instrumental measurement, however, helps verify the outcomes of the statistical modeling. The field study has demonstrated the feasibility of

  3. Locating the sources of an invasive pest, grape phylloxera, using a mitochondrial DNA gene genealogy.

    PubMed

    Downie, D A

    2002-10-01

    Range expansions through human introductions have increased with global commerce and have led to the extinction of native species, alterations in community structure and pest status of the invasive species. Inferring the evolutionary history of invasive species can help to build a firmer footing for management tactics. This study used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence comparisons of samples collected from the native and introduced ranges of a pest herbivore of cultivated grapes, grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch, Phylloxeridae) to infer the sources and pattern of introductions into worldwide viticulture. Introductions into viticulture from its native North American range first occurred in the mid-19th century. The pattern of spread has suggested a focus of introduction into France, but independent introductions may have occurred elsewhere. The results show that the introduced population represents a limited subsample of the native genetic diversity. The data suggest that most grape phylloxera in viticulture, including all European, have originated in the northeastern USA where the grape species Vitis riparia dominates. There was evidence for independent introductions into South Africa and California. Most California haplotypes were most closely related to native grape phylloxera from the Atlantic Coast on V. vulpina. It is likely that subsequent spread from California into Australia, New Zealand and Peru has occurred. PMID:12296945

  4. Plasma assisted growth of MoO3 films on different substrate locations relative to sublimation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rabindar K.; Saini, Sujit K.; Kumar, Prabhat; Singh, Megha; Reddy, G. B.

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, we reported the role of substrate locations relative to source on the growth of MoO3 films deposited on Ni coated glass substrates using plasma assisted sublimation process (PASP). According to the XRD and SEM results, substrate location is very crucial factor to control the morphology of MoO3 films and the best nanostructure growth (in terms of alignments and features) is obtained in case of Sample B (in which substrate is placed on source). The structural results point out that all films exhibit only orthorhombic phase of molybdenum oxide (i.e. α-MoO3)but the most preferential growth is recorded in Sample B due to the presence of intense peaks crossponding to only (0 k 0) family of crystal planes (k = 2, 4,6..). The Raman analysis again confirms the orthorhombic nature of MoO3 NFs and details of vibrational bondsin Sample B have been given in the present report. The MoO3 NFs show intense PL emission in wavelength range of 300-700 nm with three peaks located at 415, 490, and 523 nm in accordance to the improved crystallinity in Sample B.

  5. Location and source mechanism of the Karlsruhe earthquake of 24 September 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    On 24 September 2014, a ML 2.3 earthquake occurred southwest of the urban area of Karlsruhe, Germany, which was felt by a few people (maximum intensity I 0 = III). It was the first seismic event in this highly populated area since an I 0 = VII earthquake in 1948. Data of 35 permanent and temporary seismometers were analysed to localise the event and to determine the focal mechanism to compare it to previous seismicity. Restricting the data to P- and S-phases from 18 nearby stations and optimising the local earth model result in an epicentre in the southwest of the city at 48.986°N/8.302°E and in a hypocentral depth of 10 km. To calculate the focal mechanism, 22 P- and 5 SH-polarities were determined that constrain a stable left lateral strike-slip focal mechanism with a minor thrusting component and nodal planes striking NE-SW and NW-SE. The epicentre lies in the vicinity of the I 0 = VII earthquake of 1948. Both events are part of the graben-parallel flower structure beneath the Upper Rhine Graben, parallel to the active Rastatt source zone, which runs 5 km further east and included the epicentre of the 1933 Rastatt I 0 = VII earthquake. The focal mechanisms of the 2014 and 1948 earthquakes show NE-SW striking nodal planes that dip to the southeast. However, for the 1948 event, a normal faulting mechanism was determined earlier. Taking the uncertainty of the epicentre and focal mechanism in 1948 and its fault dimensions into account, both events might have happened on the same fault plane.

  6. Location and source mechanism of the Karlsruhe earthquake of 24 September 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    On 24 September 2014, a ML 2.3 earthquake occurred southwest of the urban area of Karlsruhe, Germany, which was felt by a few people (maximum intensity I 0 = III). It was the first seismic event in this highly populated area since an I 0 = VII earthquake in 1948. Data of 35 permanent and temporary seismometers were analysed to localise the event and to determine the focal mechanism to compare it to previous seismicity. Restricting the data to P- and S-phases from 18 nearby stations and optimising the local earth model result in an epicentre in the southwest of the city at 48.986°N/8.302°E and in a hypocentral depth of 10 km. To calculate the focal mechanism, 22 P- and 5 SH-polarities were determined that constrain a stable left lateral strike-slip focal mechanism with a minor thrusting component and nodal planes striking NE-SW and NW-SE. The epicentre lies in the vicinity of the I 0 = VII earthquake of 1948. Both events are part of the graben-parallel flower structure beneath the Upper Rhine Graben, parallel to the active Rastatt source zone, which runs 5 km further east and included the epicentre of the 1933 Rastatt I 0 = VII earthquake. The focal mechanisms of the 2014 and 1948 earthquakes show NE-SW striking nodal planes that dip to the southeast. However, for the 1948 event, a normal faulting mechanism was determined earlier. Taking the uncertainty of the epicentre and focal mechanism in 1948 and its fault dimensions into account, both events might have happened on the same fault plane.

  7. Acoustic Emission Source Location in Unidirectional Carbon-Fibre-Reinforced Plastic Plates Using Virtually Trained Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Caprino, G.; Lopresto, V.; Leone, C.; Papa, I.

    2010-06-02

    Acoustic emission source location in a unidirectional carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic plate was attempted employing Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technology. The acoustic emission events were produced by a lead break, and the response wave received by piezoelectric sensors, type VS150-M resonant at 150 kHz. The waves were detected by a Vallen AMSY4 eight-channel instrumentation. The time of arrival, determined through the conventional threshold crossing technique, was used to measure the dependence of wave velocity on fibre orientation. A simple empirical formula, relying on classical lamination and suggested by wave propagation theory, was able to accurately model the experimental trend. Based on the formula, virtual training and testing data sets were generated for the case of a plate monitored by three transducers, and adopted to select two potentially effective ANN architectures. For final validation, experimental tests were carried out, positioning the source at predetermined points evenly distributed within the plate area. A very satisfactory correlation was found between the actual source locations and the ANN predictions.

  8. AES analysis of barium fluoride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashin, G. N.; Makhnjuk, V. I.; Rumjantseva, S. M.; Shchekochihin, Ju. M.

    1993-06-01

    AES analysis of thin films of metal fluorides is a difficult problem due to charging and decomposition of such films under electron bombardment. We have developed a simple algorithm for a reliable quantitative AES analysis of metal fluoride thin films (BaF 2 in our work). The relative AES sensitivity factors for barium and fluorine were determined from BaF 2 single-crystal samples. We have investigated the dependence of composition and stability of barium fluoride films on the substrate temperature during film growth. We found that the instability of BaF 2 films grown on GaAs substrates at high temperatures (> 525°C) is due to a loss of fluorine. Our results show that, under the optimal electron exposure conditions, AES can be used for a quantitative analysis of metal fluoride thin films.

  9. Shifting primary energy source and NOx emission location with plug-in hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karman, Deniz

    2011-06-01

    Plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs) present an interesting technological opportunity for using non-fossil primary energy in light duty passenger vehicles, with the associated potential for reducing air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions, to the extent that the electric power grid is fed by non-fossil sources. This perspective, accompanying the article by Thompson et al (2011) in this issue, will touch on two other studies that are directly related: the Argonne study (Elgowainy et al 2010) and a PhD thesis from Utrecht (van Vliet 2010). Thompson et al (2011) have examined air quality effects in a case where the grid is predominantly fossil fed. They estimate a reduction of 7.42 tons/day of NOx from motor vehicles as a result of substituting electric VMTs for 20% of the light duty gasoline vehicle miles traveled. To estimate the impact of this reduction on air quality they also consider the increases in NOx emissions due to the increased load on electricity generating units. The NOx emission increases are estimated as 4.0, 5.5 and 6.3 tons for the Convenience, Battery and Night charging scenarios respectively. The net reductions are thus in the 1.1-3.4 tons/day range. The air quality modelling results presented show that the air quality impact from a ground-level ozone perspective is favorable overall, and while the effect is stronger in some localities, the difference between the three scenarios is small. This is quite significant and suggests that localization of the NOx emissions to point sources has a more pronounced effect than the absolute reductions achieved. Furthermore it demonstrates that localization of NOx emissions to electricity generating units by using PHEVs in vehicle traffic has beneficial effects for air quality not only by minimizing direct human exposure to motor vehicle emissions, but also due to reduced exposure to secondary pollutants (i.e. ozone). In an electric power grid with a smaller share of fossil fired generating units, the beneficial

  10. Fuel from Wastewater - Harnessing a Potential Energy Source in Canada through the Co-location of Algae Biofuel Production to Sources of Effluent, Heat and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klise, G. T.; Roach, J. D.; Passell, H. D.; Moreland, B. D.; O'Leary, S. J.; Pienkos, P. T.; Whalen, J.

    2010-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with the National Research Council (NRC) Canada and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a decision-support model that will evaluate the tradeoffs associated with high-latitude algae biofuel production co-located with wastewater, CO2, and waste heat. This project helps Canada meet its goal of diversifying fuel sources with algae-based biofuels. The biofuel production will provide a wide range of benefits including wastewater treatment, CO2 reuse and reduction of demand for fossil-based fuels. The higher energy density in algae-based fuels gives them an advantage over crop-based biofuels as the “production” footprint required is much less, resulting in less water consumed and little, if any conversion of agricultural land from food to fuel production. Besides being a potential source for liquid fuel, algae have the potential to be used to generate electricity through the burning of dried biomass, or anaerobically digested to generate methane for electricity production. Co-locating algae production with waste streams may be crucial for making algae an economically valuable fuel source, and will certainly improve its overall ecological sustainability. The modeling process will address these questions, and others that are important to the use of water for energy production: What are the locations where all resources are co-located, and what volumes of algal biomass and oil can be produced there? In locations where co-location does not occur, what resources should be transported, and how far, while maintaining economic viability? This work is being funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and is part of a larger collaborative effort that includes sampling, strain isolation, strain characterization and cultivation being performed by the NREL and Canada’s NRC. Results from the NREL / NRC collaboration including specific

  11. Shifting primary energy source and NOx emission location with plug-in hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karman, Deniz

    2011-06-01

    Plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEVs) present an interesting technological opportunity for using non-fossil primary energy in light duty passenger vehicles, with the associated potential for reducing air pollutant and greenhouse gas emissions, to the extent that the electric power grid is fed by non-fossil sources. This perspective, accompanying the article by Thompson et al (2011) in this issue, will touch on two other studies that are directly related: the Argonne study (Elgowainy et al 2010) and a PhD thesis from Utrecht (van Vliet 2010). Thompson et al (2011) have examined air quality effects in a case where the grid is predominantly fossil fed. They estimate a reduction of 7.42 tons/day of NOx from motor vehicles as a result of substituting electric VMTs for 20% of the light duty gasoline vehicle miles traveled. To estimate the impact of this reduction on air quality they also consider the increases in NOx emissions due to the increased load on electricity generating units. The NOx emission increases are estimated as 4.0, 5.5 and 6.3 tons for the Convenience, Battery and Night charging scenarios respectively. The net reductions are thus in the 1.1-3.4 tons/day range. The air quality modelling results presented show that the air quality impact from a ground-level ozone perspective is favorable overall, and while the effect is stronger in some localities, the difference between the three scenarios is small. This is quite significant and suggests that localization of the NOx emissions to point sources has a more pronounced effect than the absolute reductions achieved. Furthermore it demonstrates that localization of NOx emissions to electricity generating units by using PHEVs in vehicle traffic has beneficial effects for air quality not only by minimizing direct human exposure to motor vehicle emissions, but also due to reduced exposure to secondary pollutants (i.e. ozone). In an electric power grid with a smaller share of fossil fired generating units, the beneficial

  12. ASASSN-14ae: a tidal disruption event at 200 Mpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holoien, T. W.-S.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Shappee, B. J.; Grupe, D.; Basu, U.; Beacom, J. F.; Brimacombe, J.; Brown, J. S.; Davis, A. B.; Jencson, J.; Pojmanski, G.; Szczygieł, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    ASASSN-14ae is a candidate tidal disruption event (TDE) found at the centre of SDSS J110840.11+340552.2 (d ≃ 200 Mpc) by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae (ASAS-SN). We present ground-based and Swift follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations of the source, finding that the transient had a peak luminosity of L ≃ 8 × 1043 erg s-1 and a total integrated energy of E ≃ 1.7 × 1050 erg radiated over the ˜5 months of observations presented. The blackbody temperature of the transient remains roughly constant at T ˜ 20 000 K while the luminosity declines by nearly 1.5 orders of magnitude during this time, a drop that is most consistent with an exponential, L ∝ e-t/t 0 with t0 ≃ 39 d. The source has broad Balmer lines in emission at all epochs as well as a broad He II feature emerging in later epochs. We compare the colour and spectral evolution to both supernovae and normal AGN to show that ASASSN-14ae does not resemble either type of object and conclude that a TDE is the most likely explanation for our observations. At z = 0.0436, ASASSN-14ae is the lowest-redshift TDE candidate discovered at optical/UV wavelengths to date, and we estimate that ASAS-SN may discover 0.1-3 of these events every year in the future.

  13. Near-Infrared Image Reconstruction of Newborns' Brains: Robustness to Perturbations of the Source/Detector Location.

    PubMed

    Ahnen, L; Wolf, M; Hagmann, C; Sanchez, S

    2016-01-01

    The brain of preterm infants is the most vulnerable organ and can be severely injured by cerebral ischemia. We are working on a near-infrared imager to early detect cerebral ischemia. During imaging of the brain, movements of the newborn infants are inevitable and the near-infrared sensor has to be able to function on irregular geometries. Our aim is to determine the robustness of the near-infrared image reconstruction to small variations of the source and detector locations. In analytical and numerical simulations, the error estimations for a homogeneous medium agree well. The worst case estimates of errors in reduced scattering and absorption coefficient for distances of r=40 mm are acceptable for a single source-detector pair. The optical properties of an inhomogeneity representing an ischemia are reconstructed correctly within a homogeneous medium, if the error in placement is random. PMID:26782235

  14. Microseismic monitoring of soft-rock landslide: contribution of a 3D velocity model for the location of seismic sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floriane, Provost; Jean-Philippe, Malet; Cécile, Doubre; Julien, Gance; Alessia, Maggi; Agnès, Helmstetter

    2015-04-01

    Characterizing the micro-seismic activity of landslides is an important parameter for a better understanding of the physical processes controlling landslide behaviour. However, the location of the seismic sources on landslides is a challenging task mostly because of (a) the recording system geometry, (b) the lack of clear P-wave arrivals and clear wave differentiation, (c) the heterogeneous velocities of the ground. The objective of this work is therefore to test whether the integration of a 3D velocity model in probabilistic seismic source location codes improves the quality of the determination especially in depth. We studied the clay-rich landslide of Super-Sauze (French Alps). Most of the seismic events (rockfalls, slidequakes, tremors...) are generated in the upper part of the landslide near the main scarp. The seismic recording system is composed of two antennas with four vertical seismometers each located on the east and west sides of the seismically active part of the landslide. A refraction seismic campaign was conducted in August 2014 and a 3D P-wave model has been estimated using the Quasi-Newton tomography inversion algorithm. The shots of the seismic campaign are used as calibration shots to test the performance of the different location methods and to further update the 3D velocity model. Natural seismic events are detected with a semi-automatic technique using a frequency threshold. The first arrivals are picked using a kurtosis-based method and compared to the manual picking. Several location methods were finally tested. We compared a non-linear probabilistic method coupled with the 3D P-wave model and a beam-forming method inverted for an apparent velocity. We found that the Quasi-Newton tomography inversion algorithm provides results coherent with the original underlaying topography. The velocity ranges from 500 m.s-1 at the surface to 3000 m.s-1 in the bedrock. For the majority of the calibration shots, the use of a 3D velocity model

  15. Development of a Persistent Reactive Treatment Zone for Containment of Sources Located in Lower-Permeability Strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marble, J.; Carroll, K. C.; Brusseau, M. L.; Plaschke, M.; Brinker, F.

    2013-12-01

    Source zones located in relatively deep, low-permeability formations provide special challenges for remediation. Application of permeable reactive barriers, in-situ thermal, or electrokinetic methods would be expensive and generally impractical. In addition, the use of enhanced mass-removal approaches based on reagent injection (e.g., ISCO, enhanced-solubility reagents) is likely to be ineffective. One possible approach for such conditions is to create a persistent treatment zone for purposes of containment. This study examines the efficacy of this approach for containment and treatment of contaminants in a lower permeability zone using potassium permanganate (KMnO4) as the reactant. A localized 1,1-dichloroethene (DCE) source zone is present in a section of the Tucson International Airport Area (TIAA) Superfund Site. Characterization studies identified the source of DCE to be located in lower-permeability strata adjacent to the water table. Bench-scale studies were conducted using core material collected from boreholes drilled at the site to measure DCE concentrations and determine natural oxidant demand. The reactive zone was created by injecting ~1.7% KMnO4 solution into multiple wells screened within the lower-permeability unit. The site has been monitored for ~8 years to characterize the spatial distribution of DCE and permanganate. KMnO4 continues to persist at the site, demonstrating successful creation of a long-term reactive zone. Additionally, the footprint of the DCE contaminant plume in groundwater has decreased continuously with time. This project illustrates the application of ISCO as a reactive-treatment system for lower-permeability source zones, which appears to effectively mitigate persistent mass flux into groundwater.

  16. 40 CFR Table 2d to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Compression Ignition Stationary RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ignition Stationary RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP Emissions 2d Table 2d to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63... Stationary RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP Emissions As stated in §§ 63.6600 and 63.6640, you must comply with the following emission and operating limitations for existing compression ignition stationary...

  17. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Compression Ignition Stationary Rice Located at Major Sources of HAP...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ignition Stationary Rice Located at Major Sources of HAP Emissions 2c Table 2c to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63... Stationary Rice Located at Major Sources of HAP Emissions As stated in §§ 63.6600 and 63.6640, you must comply with the following requirements for existing compression ignition stationary RICE: For...

  18. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Compression Ignition Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requirements for Existing Compression Ignition Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions and Existing Spark Ignition Stationary RICE â¤500 HP Located at a Major Source of HAP Emissions 2c Table 2c to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63 Protection of Environment...

  19. Phylodynamic analysis of the dissemination of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Liao, Huanan; Tee, Kok Keng; Hase, Saiki; Uenishi, Rie; Li, Xiao-Jie; Kusagawa, Shigeru; Thang, Pham Hong; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Pybus, Oliver G; Takebe, Yutaka

    2009-08-15

    To estimate the epidemic history of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in Vietnam and adjacent Guangxi, China, we determined near full-length nucleotide sequences of CRF01_AE from a total of 33 specimens collected in 1997-1998 from different geographic regions and risk populations in Vietnam. Phylogenetic and Bayesian molecular clock analyses were performed to estimate the date of origin of CRF01_AE lineages. Our study reconstructs the timescale of CRF01_AE expansion in Vietnam and neighboring regions and suggests that the series of CRF01_AE epidemics in Vietnam arose by the sequential introduction of founder strains into new locations and risk groups. CRF01_AE appears to have been present among heterosexuals in South-Vietnam for more than a decade prior to its epidemic spread in the early 1990s. In the late 1980s, the virus spread to IDUs in Southern Vietnam and subsequently in the mid-1990s to IDUs further north. Our results indicate the northward dissemination of CRF01_AE during this time. PMID:19540543

  20. Locating sources of surf zone pollution: a mass budget analysis of fecal indicator bacteria at Huntington Beach, California.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Ha; Grant, Stanley B; McGee, Charles D; Sanders, Brett F; Largier, John L

    2004-05-01

    The surf zone is the unique environment where ocean meets land and a place of critical ecological, economic, and recreational importance. In the United States, this natural resource is increasingly off-limits to the public due to elevated concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria and other contaminants, the sources of which are often unknown. In this paper, we describe an approach for calculating mass budgets of pollutants in the surf zone from shoreline monitoring data. The analysis reveals that fecal indicator bacteria pollution in the surf zone at several contiguous beaches in Orange County, California, originates from well-defined locations along the shore, including the tidal outlets of the Santa Ana River and Talbert Marsh. Fecal pollution flows into the ocean from the Santa Ana River and Talbert Marsh outlets during ebb tides and from there is transported parallel to the shoreline by wave-driven surf zone currents and/or offshore tidal currents, frequently contaminating >5 km of the surf zone. The methodology developed here for locating and quantifying sources of surf zone pollution should be applicable to a wide array of contaminants and coastal settings. PMID:15180059

  1. Interaural sound pressure level differences associated with sound-source locations in the frontal hemifield of the domestic cat.

    PubMed

    Martin, R L; Webster, W R

    1989-04-01

    Interaural sound pressure level differences (ILDs) associated with a range of sound-source azimuths and elevations in the frontal hemifields of four cats were measured for each of seven pure-tone stimuli ranging in frequency from 2-32 kHz. The overall pattern of ILD across location at each frequency was remarkably similar in all cats. At 2, 4 and 8 kHz the relationships of ILD to azimuth and elevation were generally monotonic with ILD increasing with increasing azimuth. At 12 kHz and above, however, non-monotonic relationships developed and circumscribed regions of particularly large, positive and negative ILDs were apparent. That ILDs associated with many sound-source locations on the near side of the head are negative in sign has not been widely noted in the previous literature. The data obtained in this study were compared with those from previous studies and the acoustical mechanisms likely to have contributed to production of the observed ILDs were considered. Some implications of the data for auditory localization in three-dimensional space were discussed. PMID:2708168

  2. Spatial variability and source apportionment of PM2.5 across multiple sampling locations in southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, F.; Xie, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Chengdu Plain, which is located in the west of the Sichuan Basin, is the largest plain and the fastest-growing area in southwest China. The Chengdu Plain is considered one of the hotspot areas in China. The pollution pattern in this area is unique due to the hilly topography, humid and stagnant weather. To investigate the composition and major sources of the ambient PM2.5, a one-year observation was performed at five sites in the Chengdu Plain during August, 2013 to August, 2014. The five sites contained three urban background sites and two rural background sites. Samples were analyzed for major water-soluble ions, organic carbon (OC), element carbon (EC), and trace elements. The Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model based on the combined data from five locations was applied to identify and quantify the likely sources. The annual mean mass concentration of PM2.5 in Chengdu Plain was 81 μg·m-3 with the maximum in winter and the minimum in summer. Eight main factors were identified for the PM2.5 fraction: vehicle emission, secondary nitrate, biomass burning and waste incineration emission, secondary sulfate, Mo-related manufacturing, fugitive dust, coal combustion and industry pollution. The five-site annual mean contributions of each source were 13%, 19%, 9%, 25%, 2%, 13%, 9% and 10%,respectively, to PM2.5, while exhibiting large spatial variability. The contribution of secondary sulfate to the PM2.5 mass was largest at all sites, indicating severe secondary pollution in the region. Biomass burning and waste incineration emission made larger proportion at rural sites than that of urban sites, while the vehicle emission was larger at urban sites. The Enrichment factors for Cd, Zn, Pb, As, Cu and Mo in PM2.5 were larger than 100 indicated that those elements were largely from anthropogenic origins. Cd, As and Cu can mainly originate from nonferrous metal industry, while Mo may mainly generated from ferromolybdenum and Mo powder manufacture. The

  3. Consumption of added sugars among US children and adults by food purchase location and food source123

    PubMed Central

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D

    2014-01-01

    Background: The proposed changes to the Nutrition Facts Label by the US Food and Drug Administration will include information on added sugars for the first time. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the sources of added sugars in the diets of a representative sample of US children and adults by food purchase location and food source (eg, food group). Design: This cross-sectional study among 31,035 children, adolescents, and adults aged ≥6 y from the 2003–2004, 2005–2006, 2007–2008, and 2009–2010 NHANES used data from a 24-h dietary recall to evaluate consumption of added sugars. Food locations of origin were identified as stores (supermarket or grocery store), quick-service restaurants/pizza (QSRs), full-service restaurants (FSRs), schools, and others (eg, vending machines or gifts). Added sugars consumption by food purchase location was evaluated by age, family income-to-poverty ratio, and race-ethnicity. Food group sources of added sugars were identified by using the National Cancer Institute food categories. Results: Added sugars accounted for ∼14.1% of total dietary energy. Between 65% and 76% of added sugars came from stores, 6% and 12% from QSRs, and 4% and 6% from FSRs, depending on age. Older adults (aged ≥51 y) obtained a significantly greater proportion of added sugars from stores than did younger adults. Lower-income adults obtained a significantly greater proportion of added sugars from stores than did higher-income adults. Intake of added sugars did not vary by family income among children/adolescents. Soda and energy and sports drinks were the largest food group sources of added sugars (34.4%), followed by grain desserts (12.7%), fruit drinks (8.0%), candy (6.7%), and dairy desserts (5.6%). Conclusions: Most added sugars came from foods obtained from stores. The proposed changes to the Nutrition Facts Label should capture the bulk of added sugars in the US food supply, which suggests that the recommended changes have the potential to

  4. Sodium Intakes of US Children and Adults from Foods and Beverages by Location of Origin and by Specific Food Source

    PubMed Central

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D.

    2013-01-01

    Sodium intakes, from foods and beverages, of 22,852 persons in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES 2003–2008) were examined by specific food source and by food location of origin. Analyses were based on a single 24-h recall. Separate analyses were conducted for children (6–11 years of age), adolescents (12–19), and adults (20–50 and ≥51 years). Grouping of like foods (e.g., food sources) used a scheme proposed by the National Cancer Institute, which divides foods/beverages into 96 food subgroups (e.g., pizza, yeast breads or cold cuts). Food locations of origin were stores (e.g., grocery, convenience and specialty stores), quick-service restaurant/pizza (QSR), full-service restaurant (FSR), school, or other. Food locations of sodium were also evaluated by race/ethnicity amongst adults. Stores provided between 58.1% and 65.2% of dietary sodium, whereas QSR and FSR together provided between 18.9% and 31.8% depending on age. The proportion of sodium from QSR varied from 10.1% to 19.9%, whereas that from FSR varied from 3.4% to 13.3%. School meals provided 10.4% of sodium for 6–11 year olds and 6.0% for 12–19 year olds. Pizza from QSR, the top away from home food item, provided 5.4% of sodium in adolescents. QSR pizza, chicken, burgers and Mexican dishes combined provided 7.8% of total sodium in adult diets. Most sodium came from foods purchased in stores. Food manufacturers, restaurants, and grocery stores all have a role to play in reducing the amount of sodium in the American diet. PMID:23760055

  5. Location of Body Wave Microseism Sources Using Three-Component Data From a Large Aperture Seismic Array in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Koper, K. D.; Burlacu, R.; Ni, S.; Wang, F.

    2015-12-01

    From September 2013 through October 2014 up to 100 Guralp CMG-3 broadband seismometers were deployed in the WT-Array (WTA) in northwest China. The aperture of WTA is about 700 km, with an average station spacing of approximately 50 km. Here, we process continuous, three-component WTA data to detect and locate body wave microseism sources in four distinct period bands: 1.0-2.5 s, 2.5-5 s, 5-10 s, and 10-20 s. We back-project vertical component data through a 1D reference Earth model (AK135) to a global grid of hypothetical source locations, assuming P-wave (30o-90o), PP-wave (60o-180o), and S-wave (30o-75o) propagation. At the same time, we rotate the horizontals and back-project the radial and transverse components of the wavefield. For each frequency band, grid point, and assumed origin time, the array power is calculated from the amplitude of a windowed, filtered, and tapered time domain beam constructed with fourth-root stacking. We find strong P-wave and S-wave noise sources in the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans. Shorter period sources (2.5-5 s) are mainly observed in the North Pacific Ocean, while both short and long period (2.5-20 s) sources are observed in the North Atlantic Ocean. Median power plots for each month during September 2013 through October 2014 show distinct seasonal variations. The energy peaks in the North Atlantic are visible from November to March and strong energy is also observed in the North Pacific from October to April. We also observe PP-waves in the Southern Ocean, especially for May-August 2014. Using classical f-k analysis and plane-wave propagation, we are able to confirm the back-projection results. To improve our understanding of body wave microseism generation, we compare the observed P, S, and PP wave microseism locations with the predictions of significant wave height and wave-wave interactions derived from the WAVEWATCH III ocean model.From September 2013 through October 2014 up to 100 Guralp CMG-3 broadband

  6. Locating sources of hazardous gas emissions using dual pollution rose plots and open path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sung, Lung-Yu; Shie, Ruei-Hou; Lu, Chia-Jung

    2014-01-30

    A new approach employing two pollution rose plots to locate the sources of multiple hazardous gas emissions was proposed and tested in an industrial area. The data used for constructing the pollution rose plots were obtained from two side-by-side measurements of open-path Fourier Transform Infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometers during one week of continuous analysis on the rooftop of a semiconductor plant. Hazardous gases such as CF4, C2F6, CH3OH, NH3, NO2, and SF6 were found and quantified at the ppb level by both OP-FTIR measurement sites. The data of the top 20% highest concentrations and associated wind directions were used to construct the pollution rose plots. Pollution source probability contours for each compound were constructed using the probability-product of directional probability from two pollution rose plots. Hot spots for SF6, CF4, NO2, and C2F6 pointed to the stack area of the plant, but the sources of CH3OH and NH3 were found outside of this plant. The influences of parameters for this approach such as the variation in wind direction, lower limit concentration threshold and the nearby buildings were discussed. PMID:24333712

  7. Étude comparative des techniques d'analyse par fluorescence X à dispersion d'énergie (ED-XRF) et à dispersion de longueur d'onde (WD-XRF), et par spectrométrie d'émission atomique à source plasma couplée par induction (ICP-AES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, A.; Benyaïch, F.; Bounakhla, M.; Bilal, E.; Moutte, J.; Gruffat, J. J.; Zahry, F.

    2004-11-01

    Dans ce travail, nous présentons une étude comparative des techniques d'analyse par fluorescence X à dispersion d'énergie (ED-XRF) et à dispersion de longueur d'onde (WD-XRF), et par spectrométrie d'émission atomique à source plasma couplée par induction (ICP-AES). Les résultats de la calibration des spectromètres à dispersion d'énergie, à excitation par sources radioactives (55Fe, 109Cd et 241Am) et à excitation secondaire (cible secondaire Mo et Cu) du Centre National pour l'Energie, les Sciences et les Techniques Nucléaires (CNESTEN, Rabat, Maroc) sur des échantillons étalons de références de l'Agence International de l'Energie Atomique (AIEA) et du Community Bureau of Référence (BCR) ont été comparés aux résultats d'analyse des mêmes échantillons étalons par la spectrométrie X à dispersion de longueur d'onde (WD-XRF) et par spectrométrie d'émission atomique à source plasma couplé par induction (ICP-AES) au département GENERIC du centre SPIN à l'Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne (France). Les trois techniques d'analyse utilisées donnent des résultats comparables pour le dosage des éléments majeurs, alors que pour les traces on note des déviations importantes à cause des effets de matrice qui sont difficiles à corriger dans le cas de la fluorescence X.

  8. Recovery the release history and source location of a pollutant in groundwater using data collected in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanini, A.; Cupola, F.

    2013-12-01

    This work shows the application of an innovative procedure that is able to simultaneously identify the release history and the source location of a pollutant injection in groundwater using a dataset obtained experimentally. The methodology follows a geostatistical approach and it requires a preliminary delineation of a probably source area. The dataset was provided through an experimental installation developed at the hydraulic laboratory of the University of Parma (DICATeA). The equipment represents a 2-D unconfined aquifer controlled through two constant head levels (upstream and downstream); it consists of a Plexiglas sandbox filled with a porous medium (1 mm glass beads). An injector was placed inside the porous medium and sodium fluorescein salt was used as tracer during the tests. The standard test consists of releasing a constant and known concentration with a variable flow rate. The injection rate and the mean flow rate inside the sandbox are stored by means of a data acquisition system, meanwhile the concentration distribution inside the sandbox is observed through the processing of side wall images collected by means of a digital camera. The digital camera and the sandbox are placed in a dark room lightened by blue light in order to excite the fluorescein and easily evaluate the concentration distribution. A Matlab routine was developed to cut and to correct images by a projective transformation in order to obtain pictures with same size and orientation. Each pixel of the image has known coordinates on the sandbox. After a calibration process, the relationships between the luminosity of the emitted fluorescence and the tracer concentration have been identified in each pixel of the picture and consequently in each point of the domain. Initially a series of simple tests (with constant injection) were carried out with the aim at validating the experimental equipment comparing the observed data to those collected through the images, such as mass balance or

  9. The accretion column of AE Aqr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Claudia; Costa, D. Joaquim; Luna, Gerardo; Lima, Isabel J.; Silva, Karleyne M. G.; De Araujo, Jose Carlos N.; Coelho, Jaziel

    2016-07-01

    AE Aqr is a magnetic cataclysmic variable, whose white dwarf rotates at the very fast rate of 33 s modulating the flux from high-energies to optical wavelengths. There are many studies of the origin of its emission, which consider emission from a rotating magnetic field or from an accretion column. Recently, MAGIC observations have discarded AE Aqr emission in very high energy gamma-rays discarding non-thermal emission. Furthermore, soft and hard X-ray data from Swift and NuSTAR were fitted using thermal models. Here we present the modelling of AE Aqr X-ray spectra and light curve considering the emission of a magnetic accretion column using the Cyclops code. The model takes into consideration the 3D geometry of the system, allowing to properly represent the white-dwarf auto eclipse, the pre-shock column absorption, and the varying density and temperature of a tall accretion column.

  10. Identification of Unknown Interface Locations in a Source/Shield System Using the Mesh Adaptive Direct Search Method

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2012-06-20

    The Levenberg-Marquardt (or simply Marquardt) and differential evolution (DE) optimization methods were recently applied to solve inverse transport problems. The Marquardt method is fast but convergence of the method is dependent on the initial guess. While it has been shown to work extremely well at finding an optimum independent of the initial guess, the DE method does not provide a global optimal solution in some problems. In this paper, we apply the Mesh Adaptive Direct Search (MADS) algorithm to solve the inverse problem of material interface location identification in one-dimensional spherical radiation source/shield systems, and we compare the results obtained by MADS to those obtained by Levenberg-Marquardt and DE.

  11. Differential attack on mini-AES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajeng Gemellia, Asadini Dwi; Indarjani, Santi

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents the results of differential attack on Mini-AES algorithm. The differential trails are constructed using all combinations of propagation ratio without repetition. To give practical results, we implement the key extraction for differential characteristics which have the highest and lowest probability as a comparison. Based on total propagation ratio and complexity resulted, Mini-AES algorithms are vulnerable to differential attack. The best differential characteristic is the differential characteristic using a single active s-box with the propagation ratio of 8 / 16.

  12. Lunar Pickup Ions Observed by ARTEMIS: Spatial and Temporal Distribution and Constraints on Species and Source Locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halekas, Jasper S.; Poppe, A. R.; Delory, G. T.; Sarantos, M.; Farrell, W. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    ARTEMIS observes pickup ions around the Moon, at distances of up to 20,000 km from the surface. The observed ions form a plume with a narrow spatial and angular extent, generally seen in a single energy/angle bin of the ESA instrument. Though ARTEMIS has no mass resolution capability, we can utilize the analytically describable characteristics of pickup ion trajectories to constrain the possible ion masses that can reach the spacecraft at the observation location in the correct energy/angle bin. We find that most of the observations are consistent with a mass range of approx. 20-45 amu, with a smaller fraction consistent with higher masses, and very few consistent with masses below 15 amu. With the assumption that the highest fluxes of pickup ions come from near the surface, the observations favor mass ranges of approx. 20-24 and approx. 36-40 amu. Although many of the observations have properties consistent with a surface or near-surface release of ions, some do not, suggesting that at least some of the observed ions have an exospheric source. Of all the proposed sources for ions and neutrals about the Moon, the pickup ion flux measured by ARTEMIS correlates best with the solar wind proton flux, indicating that sputtering plays a key role in either directly producing ions from the surface, or producing neutrals that subsequently become ionized.

  13. Source contributions to PM2.5 and PM10 at an urban background and a street location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keuken, M. P.; Moerman, M.; Voogt, M.; Blom, M.; Weijers, E. P.; Röckmann, T.; Dusek, U.

    2013-06-01

    The contribution of regional, urban and traffic sources to PM2.5 and PM10 in an urban area was investigated in this study. The chemical composition of PM2.5 and PM10 was measured over a year at a street location and up- and down-wind of the city of Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The 14C content in EC and OC concentrations was also determined, to distinguish the contribution from "modern" carbon (e.g., biogenic emissions, biomass burning and wildfires) and fossil fuel combustion. It was concluded that the urban background of PM2.5 and PM10 is dominated by the regional background, and that primary and secondary PM emission by urban sources contribute less than 15%. The 14C analysis revealed that 70% of OC originates from modern carbon and 30% from fossil fuel combustion. The corresponding percentages for EC are, respectively 17% and 83%. It is concluded that in particular the urban population living in street canyons with intense road traffic has potential health risks. This is due to exposure to elevated concentrations of a factor two for EC from exhaust emissions in PM2.5 and a factor 2-3 for heavy metals from brake and tyre wear, and re-suspended road dust in PM10. It follows that local air quality management may focus on local measures to street canyons with intense road traffic.

  14. Three-dimensional location and waveform analysis of microseismicity in multi-anvil experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ronde, A. A.; Dobson, D. P.; Meredith, P. G.; Boon, S. A.

    2007-12-01

    We present an acoustic emission (AE) monitoring technique to study high-pressure (P > 1 GPa) microseismicity in multi-anvil rock deformation experiments. The application of this technique is aimed at studying fault mechanisms of deep-focus earthquakes that occur during subduction at depths up to 650 km. AE monitoring in multi-anvil experiments is challenging because source locations need to be resolved to a submillimetre scale due to the small size of the experimental assembly. AEs were collected using an 8-receiver array, located on the back truncations of the tungsten carbide anvils. Each receiver consists of a 150-1000 kHz bandwidth PZT transducer assembly. Data were recorded and processed using a high-speed AMSY-5 acquisition system from Vallen-Systems, allowing waveform collection at a 10 MHz sampling rate for each event signal. 3-D hypocentre locations in the assembly are calculated using standard seismological algorithms. The technique was used to monitor fault development in 3 mm long × 1.5 mm diameter olivine cores during axisymmetric compression and extension. The faults were generated during cold compression to ~2 GPa confining pressure. Subsequent AEs at 2-6 GPa and 900 °C were found to locate near these pre-existing faults and exhibit high pressure stick-slip behaviour.

  15. Identifying sources of ozone to three rural locations in Nevada, USA, using ancillary gas pollutants, aerosol chemistry, and mercury.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthieu B; Fine, Rebekka; Pierce, Ashley M; Gustin, Mae S

    2015-10-15

    Ozone (O3) is a secondary air pollutant of long standing and increasing concern for environmental and human health, and as such, the US Environmental Protection Agency will revise the National Ambient Air Quality Standard of 75 ppbv to ≤ 70 ppbv. Long term measurements at the Great Basin National Park (GBNP) indicate that O3 in remote areas of Nevada will exceed a revised standard. As part of the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative, measurements of O3 and other air pollutants were made at 3 remote sites between February 2012 and March 2014, GBNP, Paradise Valley (PAVA), and Echo Peak (ECHO). Exceptionally high concentrations of each air pollutant were defined relative to each site as mixing ratios that exceeded the 90th percentile of all hourly data. Case studies were analyzed for all periods during which mean daily O3 exceeded the 90th percentile concurrently with a maximum 8-h average (MDA8) O3 that was "exceptionally high" for the site (65 ppbv at PAVA, 70 ppbv at ECHO and GBNP), and of potential regulatory significance. An MDA8 ≥ 65 ppbv occurred only five times at PAVA, whereas this occurred on 49 and 65 days at GBNP and ECHO, respectively. The overall correlation between O3 and other pollutants was poor, consistent with the large distance from significant primary emission sources. Mean CO at these locations exceeded concentrations reported for background sites in 2000. Trajectory residence time calculations and air pollutant concentrations indicate that exceedances at GBNP and ECHO were promoted by air masses originating from multiple sources, including wildfires, transport of pollution from southern California and the marine boundary layer, and transport of Asian pollution plumes. Results indicate that the State of Nevada will exceed a revised O3 standard due to sources that are beyond their control. PMID:25957787

  16. Fibre intake and incident colorectal cancer depending on fibre source, sex, tumour location and Tumour, Node, Metastasis stage.

    PubMed

    Vulcan, Alexandra; Brändstedt, Jenny; Manjer, Jonas; Jirström, Karin; Ohlsson, Bodil; Ericson, Ulrika

    2015-09-28

    Studies on fibre intake and incident colorectal cancer (CRC) indicate inverse associations. Differences by tumour stage have not been examined. We examined associations between fibre intake and its sources, and incidental CRC. Separate analyses were carried out on the basis of sex, tumour location and the Tumour, Node, Metastasis (TNM) classification. The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study is a population-based cohort study, including individuals aged 45-74 years. Dietary data were collected through a modified diet history method. The TNM classification was obtained from pathology/clinical records and re-evaluated. Among 27 931 individuals (60% women), we found 728 incident CRC cases during 428 924 person-years of follow-up. Fibre intake was inversely associated with CRC risk (P(trend) = 0.026). Concerning colon cancer, we observed borderline interaction between fibre intake and sex (P = 0.052) and significant protective association restricted to women (P(trend) = 0.013). Intake of fruits and berries was inversely associated with colon cancer in women (P(trend) = 0.022). We also observed significant interactions between intakes of fibre (P = 0.048) and vegetables (P = 0.039) and sex on rectal cancer, but no significant associations were seen between intake of fibre, or its sources, in either of the sexes. Except for inverse associations between intake of fibre-rich cereal products and N0- and M0-tumours, we did not observe significant associations with different TNM stages. Our findings suggest different associations between fibre intake and CRC depending on sex, tumour site and fibre source. High fibre intake, especially from fruits and berries, may, above all, prevent tumour development in the colon in women. No clear differences by TNM classification were detected. PMID:26281852

  17. Matt Rogers on AES Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Matt

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy and AES Energy Storage recently agreed to a $17.1M conditional loan guarantee commitment. This project will develop the first battery-based energy storage system to provide a more stable and efficient electrical grid for New York State's high-voltage transmission network. Matt Rogers is the Senior Advisor to the Secretary for Recovery Act Implementation.

  18. Matt Rogers on AES Energy Storage

    ScienceCinema

    Rogers, Matt

    2013-05-29

    The Department of Energy and AES Energy Storage recently agreed to a $17.1M conditional loan guarantee commitment. This project will develop the first battery-based energy storage system to provide a more stable and efficient electrical grid for New York State's high-voltage transmission network. Matt Rogers is the Senior Advisor to the Secretary for Recovery Act Implementation.

  19. Magnetic fields in Herbig Ae stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubrig, S.; Schöller, M.; Yudin, R. V.

    2004-12-01

    Herbig Ae stars are young A-type stars in the pre-main sequence evolutionary phase with masses of ˜1.5-3 M⊙. They show rather intense surface activity (Dunkin et al. \\cite{Du97}, MNRAS, 290, 165) and infrared excess related to the presence of circumstellar disks. Because of their youth, primordial magnetic fields inherited from the parent molecular cloud may be expected, but no direct evidence for the presence of magnetic fields on their surface, except in one case (Donati et al. \\cite{Do97}, MNRAS, 291, 658), has been found until now. Here we report observations of optical circular polarization with FORS 1 at the VLT in the three Herbig Ae stars HD 139614, HD 144432 and HD 144668. A definite longitudinal magnetic field at 4.8 σ level, =-450±93 G, has been detected in the Herbig Ae star HD 139614. This is the largest magnetic field ever diagnosed for a Herbig Ae star. A hint of a weak magnetic field is found in the other two Herbig Ae stars, HD 144432 and HD 144668, for which magnetic fields are measured at the ˜1.6 σ and ˜2.5 σ level respectively. Further, we report the presence of circular polarization signatures in the Ca II K line in the V Stokes spectra of HD 139614 and HD 144432, which appear unresolved at the low spectral resolution achievable with FORS 1. We suggest that models involving accretion of matter from the disk to the star along a global stellar magnetic field of a specific geometry can account for the observed Zeeman signatures. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO programme No. 072.D-0377).

  20. Sources of Caffeine in Diets of US Children and Adults: Trends by Beverage Type and Purchase Location

    PubMed Central

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D.

    2016-01-01

    New sources of caffeine, besides coffee and tea, have been introduced into the US food supply. Data on caffeine consumption age and purchase location can help guide public health policy. National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) were used to estimate population-level caffeine intakes, using data from 24-h dietary recall. First, caffeine intakes by age-group and beverage type were estimated using the most recent 2011–2012 data (n = 7456). Second, fourteen years trends in caffeine consumption, overall and by beverage type, were evaluated for adults and children. Trend analyses were conducted by age groups. Last, trends in caffeine intakes by purchase location and beverage type were estimated. In 2011–2012, children aged four to eight years consumed the least caffeine (15 mg/day), and adults aged 51–70 years consumed the most (213 mg/day). The population mean (age ≥ four years) was 135 mg/day, driven largely by coffee (90 mg/day), tea (25 mg/day), and soda (21 mg/day). For the 14–19 years and 20–34 years age-groups, energy drinks contributed 6 mg/day (9.9%) and 5 mg/day (4.5%), respectively. The bulk of caffeine came from store-bought coffee and tea. Among both children and adults combined, caffeine intakes declined from 175 mg/day (1999–2000) to 142 mg/day (2011–2012), largely driven by a drop in caffeine from soda (41 mg/day to 21 mg/day). Store-bought coffee and tea remain principal drivers of caffeine intake in the US. Sodas and energy drinks make minor contributions to overall caffeine intakes. PMID:26978391

  1. Sources of Caffeine in Diets of US Children and Adults: Trends by Beverage Type and Purchase Location.

    PubMed

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D

    2016-01-01

    New sources of caffeine, besides coffee and tea, have been introduced into the US food supply. Data on caffeine consumption age and purchase location can help guide public health policy. National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) were used to estimate population-level caffeine intakes, using data from 24-h dietary recall. First, caffeine intakes by age-group and beverage type were estimated using the most recent 2011-2012 data (n = 7456). Second, fourteen years trends in caffeine consumption, overall and by beverage type, were evaluated for adults and children. Trend analyses were conducted by age groups. Last, trends in caffeine intakes by purchase location and beverage type were estimated. In 2011-2012, children aged four to eight years consumed the least caffeine (15 mg/day), and adults aged 51-70 years consumed the most (213 mg/day). The population mean (age ≥ four years) was 135 mg/day, driven largely by coffee (90 mg/day), tea (25 mg/day), and soda (21 mg/day). For the 14-19 years and 20-34 years age-groups, energy drinks contributed 6 mg/day (9.9%) and 5 mg/day (4.5%), respectively. The bulk of caffeine came from store-bought coffee and tea. Among both children and adults combined, caffeine intakes declined from 175 mg/day (1999-2000) to 142 mg/day (2011-2012), largely driven by a drop in caffeine from soda (41 mg/day to 21 mg/day). Store-bought coffee and tea remain principal drivers of caffeine intake in the US. Sodas and energy drinks make minor contributions to overall caffeine intakes. PMID:26978391

  2. Properties of AE indices derived from real-time global simulation and their implications for solar wind-magnetosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, K.; Shimazu, H.; Fujita, S.; Watari, S.; Kunitake, M.; Shinagawa, H.; Tanaka, T.

    2008-03-01

    Real-time magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere (S-M-I) coupling system was used to calculate auroral electrojet (AE) indices. This simulation reproduces the magnetic field configurations in the magnetosphere, magnetospheric convection, and field-aligned currents (FACs) using the upstream boundary conditions with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), solar wind speed, temperature, and proton number density measured by the ACE spacecraft. The electrical potential at 3 RE (Earth radii) from the center of the Earth is mapped on the ionosphere. The ionospheric currents are deduced from Ohm's law to match the divergence of Pedersen and Hall currents from FACs. The AE indices are obtained from the magnetic field perturbation caused by the simulated ionospheric currents. We compared the simulated AE indices for 247 d with the AE indices deduced from the magnetic variations at up to 12 stations located around the auroral latitude. The results show that the simulated AE reproduces the observed AE indices well. Of the 247 d, 64% had cross-correlation coefficients of more than 0.5. We also found that the simulated AE indices do not correlate well with the observed AE indices when the standard deviations of variations in the observed AE indices are less than 100 nT. When variations in the AE indices are small, some of the short-period perturbations of the electromagnetic energy flowing from the solar wind into the magnetosphere is absorbed or filtered in the real S-M-I coupling system by some mechanism that is not included in our MHD simulation and that the resulting fluctuation in the AE indices is damped compared with the simulation.

  3. Location of and landing on a source of human body odour by female Culex quinquefasciatus in still and moving air

    PubMed Central

    LACEY, EMERSON S.; CARDÉ, RING T.

    2014-01-01

    The orientation to and landing on a source of human odour by female Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae) is observed in a wind tunnel without an airflow or with a laminar airflow of 0.2 m s-1. Odours from human feet are collected by ‘wearing’ clean glass beads inside a stocking and presenting beads in a Petri dish in a wind tunnel. Mosquitoes are activated by brief exposure to a 1 L min-1 jet of 4% CO2 positioned 10 cm from the release cage. In moving air at 0.2 m s-1, a mean of 3.45 ± 0.49 landings are observed in 10 min trials (5 mosquitoes per trial), whereas 6.50 ± 0.96 landings are recorded in still air. Furthermore, 1.45 ± 0.31mosquitoes are recorded on beads at any one time in moving air (a measure of individuals landing versus one landing multiple times) compared to 3.10 ± 0.31 in still air. Upwind flight to beads in moving air is demonstrated by angular headings of flight immediately prior to landing, whereas approaches to beads in still air are oriented randomly. The mean latency until first landing is 226.7 ± 17.98 s in moving air compared to 122.5 ± 24.18 in still air. Strategies used to locate a prospective host at close range in still air are considered. PMID:26472918

  4. VLBI FOR GRAVITY PROBE B. VI. THE ORBIT OF IM PEGASI AND THE LOCATION OF THE SOURCE OF RADIO EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, R. R.; Bartel, N.; Bietenholz, M. F.; Lebach, D. E.; Ratner, M. I.; Shapiro, I. I.; Lestrade, J.-F.

    2012-07-01

    We present a physical interpretation for the locations of the sources of radio emission in IM Pegasi (IM Peg, HR 8703), the guide star for the NASA/Stanford relativity mission Gravity Probe B. This emission is seen in each of our 35 epochs of 8.4 GHz very long baseline interferometry observations taken from 1997 to 2005. We found that the mean position of the radio emission is at or near the projected center of the primary to within about 27% of its radius, identifying this active star as the radio emitter. The positions of the radio brightness peaks are scattered across the disk of the primary and slightly beyond, preferentially along an axis with position angle, P.A. = -38 Degree-Sign {+-} 8 Degree-Sign , which is closely aligned with the sky projections of the orbit normal (P.A. = -49.{sup 0}5 {+-} 8.{sup 0}6) and the expected spin axis of the primary. Comparison with simulations suggests that brightness peaks are 3.6{sup +0.4}{sub -0.7} times more likely to occur (per unit surface area) near the pole regions of the primary (latitude, |{lambda}| {>=} 70 Degree-Sign ) than near the equator (|{lambda}| {<=} 20 Degree-Sign ), and to also occur close to the surface with {approx}2/3 of them at altitudes not higher than 25% of the radius of the primary.

  5. AES Water Architecture Study Interim Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The mission of the Advanced Exploration System (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) is to develop advanced water recovery systems in order to enable NASA human exploration missions beyond low earth orbit (LEO). The primary objective of the AES WRP is to develop water recovery technologies critical to near term missions beyond LEO. The secondary objective is to continue to advance mid-readiness level technologies to support future NASA missions. An effort is being undertaken to establish the architecture for the AES Water Recovery System (WRS) that meets both near and long term objectives. The resultant architecture will be used to guide future technical planning, establish a baseline development roadmap for technology infusion, and establish baseline assumptions for integrated ground and on-orbit environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) definition. This study is being performed in three phases. Phase I of this study established the scope of the study through definition of the mission requirements and constraints, as well as indentifying all possible WRS configurations that meet the mission requirements. Phase II of this study focused on the near term space exploration objectives by establishing an ISS-derived reference schematic for long-duration (>180 day) in-space habitation. Phase III will focus on the long term space exploration objectives, trading the viable WRS configurations identified in Phase I to identify the ideal exploration WRS. The results of Phases I and II are discussed in this paper.

  6. Directionality of ambient noise on the Juan de Fuca plate: implications for source locations of the primary and secondary microseisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Ritzwoller, Michael H.

    2015-04-01

    Based on cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise computed using 61 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) within the Juan de Fuca (JdF) plate from the Cascadia Initiative experiment and 42 continental stations near the coast of the western United States, we investigate the locations of generation of the primary (11-20 s period) and secondary (5-10 s period) microseisms in the northern Pacific Ocean by analysing the directionality and seasonality of the microseism (Rayleigh wave) signals received in this region. We conclude that (1) the ambient noise observed across the array is much different in the primary and secondary microseism bands, both in its azimuthal content and seasonal variation. (2) The principal secondary microseism signals propagate towards the east, consistent with their generation in deep waters of the North Pacific, perhaps coincident both with the region of observed body wave excitation and the predicted wave-wave interaction region from recent studies. (3) The primary microseism, as indicated by observations of the azimuthal dependence of the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave as well as observations of precursory arrivals, derives significantly from the shallow waters of the eastern Pacific near to the JdF plate but also has a component generated at greater distance of unknown origin. (4) These observations suggest different physical mechanisms for generating the two microseisms: the secondary microseisms are likely to be generated by non-linear wave-wave interaction over the deep Pacific Ocean, while the primary microseism may couple directly into the solid earth locally in shallow waters from ocean gravity waves. (5) Above 5 s period, high quality empirical Green's functions are observed from cross-correlations between deep water OBSs and continental stations, which illustrates that microseisms propagate efficiently from either deep or shallow water source regions onto the continent and are well recorded by continental seismic stations.

  7. Nonlinear Kalman Filtering for acoustic emission source localization in anisotropic panels.

    PubMed

    Dehghan Niri, E; Farhidzadeh, A; Salamone, S

    2014-02-01

    Nonlinear Kalman Filtering is an established field in applied probability and control systems, which plays an important role in many practical applications from target tracking to weather and climate prediction. However, its application for acoustic emission (AE) source localization has been very limited. In this paper, two well-known nonlinear Kalman Filtering algorithms are presented to estimate the location of AE sources in anisotropic panels: the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF). These algorithms are applied to two cases: velocity profile known (CASE I) and velocity profile unknown (CASE II). The algorithms are compared with a more traditional nonlinear least squares method. Experimental tests are carried out on a carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite panel instrumented with a sparse array of piezoelectric transducers to validate the proposed approaches. AE sources are simulated using an instrumented miniature impulse hammer. In order to evaluate the performance of the algorithms, two metrics are used: (1) accuracy of the AE source localization and (2) computational cost. Furthermore, it is shown that both EKF and UKF can provide a confidence interval of the estimated AE source location and can account for uncertainty in time of flight measurements. PMID:23972569

  8. FORTRAN codes to implement enhanced local wave number technique to determine the depth and location and shape of the causative source using magnetic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, B. N. P.; Srivastava, Shalivahan

    2008-12-01

    The total field magnetic anomaly is analyzed to compute the depth and location and geometry of the causative source using two FORTRAN source codes, viz., FRCON1D and ELW. No assumption on the nature of source geometry, susceptibility contrast, etc. has been made. The source geometry is estimated by computing the structural index from previously determined depth and location. A detailed procedure is outlined for using these codes through a theoretical anomaly. The suppression of high-frequency noise in the observed data is tackled by designing a box-car window with cosine termination. The termination criterion is based on the peak position of the derivative operator computed for a pre-assumed depth of a shallow source below which the target is situated. The applicability of these codes has been demonstrated by analyzing a total field aeromagnetic anomaly of the Matheson area of northern Ontario, Canada.

  9. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30... DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of... data and defense services shall be reported directly to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls...

  10. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30... DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of... data and defense services shall be reported directly to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls...

  11. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30... DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of... data and defense services shall be reported directly to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls...

  12. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30... DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of... data and defense services shall be reported directly to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls...

  13. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30... DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of... data and defense services shall be reported directly to the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls...

  14. Artificial epi-Retinal Prosthesis (AeRP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doorish, John F.

    2006-09-01

    There are several research projects going on around the world, which are attempting to develop a prosthetic device to restore sight to the blind. This paper describes the efforts of Second Sight of New York, Inc. The device being developed is called an Artificial epi-Retinal Prosthesis (AeRP), which is basically a small optical computer that fits into the intraocular space of the eye. The AeRP is designed to draw light into the device by specially designed fibre optics. The light is ‘digitized’ by the fibre optic system and then directed to individual photodiode cells making up concentric cylinders thus providing several hundred photodiode cells in the device. The produced electrical stimulation from each cell is then delivered to the retinal ganglion cells by a specially designed delivery system utilizing electrically conducting polymer strands (ECP), which sit on an ‘umbrella’ at the back of the device. The retinal ganglion cells receive the electrical stimulation, which would then be transmitted through the visual system of the brain. There are several innovations in this approach as compared to the other projects. They include, first the design, which will allow for a high number of PC to produce electrical stimulation that will stimulate multiple RGC per PC; the use of the ECP strands has not been used in such an approach before this. Tests have revealed that nerve cells have a good affinity for the material of the ECP. The use of the ECP as well as the fact that the AeRP is completely photovoltaic, with no external power sources, implies that there will not be high heat build-up in the back of the eye, which might damage RGC. A smaller version of the AeRP called the Mini epi-Retinal Prosthesis (MeRP) is the subject of a complimentary paper. It is being built now and will be tested in cell culture studies to determine the efficacy of the design and materials. No actual implants have been performed yet.

  15. Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Testing and Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2002-08-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (the Department) has completed an Environmental Assessment for the Future Location of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Power System Assembly and Test. Operations Currently Located at the Mound Site. Based on the analysis in the environmental assessment, the Department has determined that the proposed action, the relocation of the Department's heat source and radioisotope power system operations, does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  16. The spectrum and variability of radio emission from AE Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abada-Simon, Meil; Lecacheux, Alain; Bastian, Tim S.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; Dulk, George A.

    1993-01-01

    The first detections of the magnetic cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii at millimeter wavelengths are reported. AE Aqr was detected at wavelengths of 3.4 and 1.25 mm. These data are used to show that the time-averaged spectrum is generally well fitted by a power law S(nu) varies as nu exp alpha, where alpha is approximately equal to 0.35-0.60, and that the power law extends to millimeter wavelengths, i.e., the spectral turnover is at a frequency higher than 240 GHz. It is suggested that the spectrum is consistent with that expected from a superposition of flarelike events where the frequency distribution of the initial flux density is a power law f (S0) varies as S0 exp -epsilon, with index epsilon approximately equal to 1.8. Within the context of this model, the high turnover frequency of the radio spectrum implies magnetic field strengths in excess of 250 G in the source.

  17. BOREAS AES READAC Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, G. Barrie; Funk, Barry; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Canadian AES personnel collected and processed data related to surface atmospheric meteorological conditions over the BOREAS region. This data set contains 15-minute meteorological data from one READAC meteorology station in Hudson Bay, Saskatchewan. Parameters include day, time, type of report, sky condition, visibility, mean sea level pressure, temperature, dewpoint, wind, altimeter, opacity, minimum and maximum visibility, station pressure, minimum and maximum air temperature, a wind group, precipitation, and precipitation in the last hour. The data were collected non-continuously from 24-May-1994 to 20-Sep-1994. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data.

  18. BOREAS AES MARSII Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, G. Barrie; Funk, Barry; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Canadian AES personnel collected several data sets related to surface and atmospheric meteorological conditions over the BOREAS region. This data set contains 15-minute meteorological data from six MARSII meteorology stations in the BOREAS region in Canada. Parameters include site, time, temperature, dewpoint, visibility, wind speed, wind gust, wind direction, two cloud groups, precipitation, and station pressure. Temporally, the data cover the period of May to September 1994. Geo-graphically, the stations are spread across the provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data.

  19. Trends of investigations on atomic analytical emission spectrometry (AES) in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salkauskas, Julius

    2003-11-01

    The main trends, results and methods of the investigations in AES are reviewed. The majority of the papers were devoted to the regularities and processes in electric discharges applied as spectra excitation sources. For this task the methods of plasma diagnostics, computer simulation, Fourier analysis of the noises, fluctuation as well as the correlation methods were developed and applied in AES. Lately much attention was paid to the metrological problems in spectrochemistry and analytical chemistry. At present the methods of inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy are implemented.

  20. Exosat observations of the 5 March 1979 gamma-ray burst source location (GBS 0526-66)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, R. E.; Staubert, R.; Brinkmann, W.; Pedersen, H.; Parmar, A. N.

    1987-01-01

    A two day observation of the March 5, 1979 gamma-ray burst location (GBS 0526-66) with the European X-ray satellite Exosat is reported. These observations were performed on December 30, 1984 and January 3, 1985 in coordination with a worldwide burst watch of this location by a variety of instruments sensitive in the optical, radio, and X-ray wavelength ranges. No bursts were seen by Exosat.

  1. Source locations of teleseismic P, SV, and SH waves observed in microseisms recorded by a large aperture seismic array in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiaoxia; Koper, Keith D.; Burlacu, Relu; Ni, Sidao; Wang, Fuyun; Zou, Changqiao; Wei, Yunhao; Gal, Martin; Reading, Anya M.

    2016-09-01

    Transversely polarized seismic waves are routinely observed in ambient seismic energy across a wide range of periods, however their origin is poorly understood because the corresponding source regions are either undefined or weakly constrained, and nearly all models of microseism generation incorporate a vertically oriented single force as the excitation mechanism. To better understand the origin of transversely polarized energy in the ambient seismic wavefield we make the first systematic attempt to locate the source regions of teleseismic SH waves observed in microseismic (2.5-20 s) noise. We focus on body waves instead of surface waves because the source regions can be constrained in both azimuth and distance using conventional array techniques. To locate microseismic sources of SH waves (as well as SV and P waves) we continuously backproject the vertical, radial, and transverse components of the ambient seismic wavefield recorded by a large-aperture array deployed in China during 2013-2014. As expected, persistent P wave sources are observed in the North Atlantic, North Pacific, and Indian Oceans, mainly at periods of 2.5-10 s, in regions with the strong ocean wave interactions needed to produce secondary microseisms. SV waves are commonly observed to originate from locations indistinguishable from the P wave sources, but with smaller signal-to-noise ratios. We also observe SH waves with about half or less the signal-to-noise ratio of SV waves. SH source regions are definitively located in deep water portions of the Pacific, away from the sloping continental shelves that are thought to be important for the generation of microseismic Love waves, but nearby regions that routinely generate teleseismic P waves. The excitation mechanism for the observed SH waves may therefore be related to the interaction of P waves with small-wavelength bathymetric features, such as seamounts and basins, through some sort of scattering process.

  2. 40 CFR Table 2d to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Stationary RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP Emissions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requirements for Existing Stationary RICE Located at Area Sources of HAP Emissions 2d Table 2d to Subpart ZZZZ of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR...

  3. Historical Thinking in Information Rich Environments: An Exploration of Eighth Grade Students' Actions Locating and Analyzing Digital Historical Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    List, Jonathan S.

    2012-01-01

    This study uses a bounded case to investigate how students engage in historical inquiry using digital historical sources. Drawing on research and theory related to historical thinking, digital history and new literacies, this study explores how students located historical documents in an online archive and then analyzed those documents given…

  4. The inner zone electron model AE-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teague, M. J.; Vette, J. I.

    1972-01-01

    A description is given of the work performed in the development of the inner radiation zone electron model, AE-5. A complete description of the omnidirectional flux model is given for energy thresholds E sub T in the range 4.0 E sub T/(MeV) 0.04 and for L values in the range 2.8 L 1.2 for an epoch of October 1967. Confidence codes for certain regions of B-L space and certain energies are given based on data coverage and the assumptions made in the analysis. The electron model programs that can be supplied to a user are referred to. One of these, a program for accessing the model flux at arbitrary points in B-L space and arbitrary energies, includes the latest outer zone electron model and proton model. The model AE-5, is based on data from five satellites, OGO 1, OGO 3, 1963-38C, OV3-3, and Explorer 26, spanning the period December 1964 to December 1967.

  5. Atomic physics measurements using an ECR ion source located on a 350-kV high-voltage platform

    SciTech Connect

    Dunford, R.W.; Berry, H.G.; Liu, C.J.; Hass, M.; Pardo, R.C.; Raphaelian, M.L.A.; Zabransky, B.J.

    1988-01-01

    We report on a new atomic physics facility at the Argonne PII ECR ion source which was built for the Uranium Upgrade of the ATLAS heavy-ion accelerator. An important feature of our ECR ion source is that it is on a high-voltage platform which provides beam energies of up to 350q keV, where q is the charge of the ion. We discuss the experimental program in progress at this ion source which includes measurements of state-selective electron capture cross sections, photon and electron spectroscopy, studies of quasi-molecular collisions, and polarization studies using an optically pumped Na target. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Contribution of a 3D velocity model and of beam forming method for the location of microseismic sources generated in soft rock landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Floriane; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Helmstetter, Agnès; Doubre, Cécile; Gance, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Microseismicity monitoring has proven to be an important tool for a better understanding of the deformation occurring in slow-sliding landslides. However locating the seismic sources generated by a landslide remains a challenging problem due to (1) the small sizes of the landslide, (b) the heterogenous and time-changing petro-physical properties of the landslide material, (c) the complexity of the recorded signals with unclear discriminations of the wave onsets, and (d) the difficulties to install and maintain a dense seismological network on-site close to the seismic sources. We studied the seismic sources generated by the deformation of the clay-rich Super-Sauze landslide (South French Alps). Previous studies show that the most active zone is the uphill part of the landslide within a zone of 300x300m2. Two seismic antennas have been installed on the sides of this zone and a seismic campaign was conducted to build a 3D velocity model of the area. Calibration shots were performed to test the performance of the location method. We show that the use of a 3D velocity model integrated in a beam forming location method slightly improves the accuracy of the shot location epicenter. However, this approach does not help to interpret with confidence the location of the natural events because the horizontal error remains larger than 50m for more than 50% of the shots. Nevertheless, adding station corrections and constraining the grid search area with additional informations based on the signal and the landslide behavior such as SNR, seismic event typology, and surface kinematics of the landslide allow obtaining reliable results. More than 70% of the calibration shots could be located with a horizontal error of less than 40m. The lack of sensor installed in depth as well as the the lack of calibration shots realized at different depths does not permit us to identify the depth of the sources.

  7. Fault location and source process of the Boumerdes, Algeria, earthquake inferred from geodetic and strong motion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmane, Fethi; Campillo, Michel; Cotton, Fabrice

    2005-01-01

    The Boumerdes earthquake occurred on a fault whose precise location, offshore the Algerian coast, was unknown. Geodetic data are used to determine the absolute position of the fault. The fault might emerge at about 15 km offshore. Accelerograms are used to infer the space-time history of the rupture using a two-step inversion in the spectral domain. The observed strong motion records agree with the synthetics for the fault location inferred from geodetic data. The fault plane ruptured for about 18 seconds. The slip distribution on the fault indicates one asperity northwest of the hypocenter with maximum slip amplitude about 3 m. This asperity is probably responsible for most of the damage. Another asperity with slightly smaller slip amplitude is located southeast of the hypocenter. The rupture stops its westward propagation close to the Thenia fault, a structure almost perpendicular to the main fault.

  8. AE measurements for evaluation of defects in FRP pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Masanori; Takatsu, Takashi

    1995-11-01

    AE (acoustic emission) measurement was conducted in a series of pressuring tests of FRP pressure vessels in order to examine its applicability to the safety evaluation of vessels. Tested vessels were commercial FRP pressure vessels fabricated by filament winding of high strength glass fibers, impregnated epoxy resin, on a Al alloy liner. At the final stage of fabrication, they were subjected to autofrettage, an overpressuring treatment to produce compressive residual stresses in metal liner. AE measurement results showed a strong Kaiser`s effect and high felicity ratios. In a virgin vessel, very few AE signals were detected below the autofrettage pressure. Vessels containing artificial defects showed distinct increase in AE signals at the level of test pressure. AE origin map were obtained by triangular-zone calculation. Discussions are directed, in particular, to the selection of threshold and to the applicability of AE measurement to the in-service inspection of FRP pressure vessel.

  9. Underwater Measurement of the Sound-Intensity Vector: its Use in Locating Sound Sources, and in Measuring the Sound Power of Stationary and Living Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei

    Instrumentation was developed to measure the components of the sound-intensity vector (i.e. sound-power flow per unit area) in water using the cross-spectral method. This consists of a probe with four closely-spaced hydrophones in a tetrahedral arrangement, and associated equipment including three two-channel FFT analyzers. The hydrophones are closely spaced (i.e. less than a tenth of a wavelength apart) to permit accurate measurement of the intensity vector at a point in space, over a reasonable frequency range. For the probe used in the dissertation research, the frequency range extends up to about 13 kHz. The accuracy of the prototype probe in measuring the direction of a sound source without noise interference, is shown to be within +/-2 degrees. Tests were conducted in a water tank to test the accuracy of direction finding with different types of acoustic interference: (a) boundary reverberation, (b) ambient background noise and (c) another sound source. It is shown that a source can be detected with good accuracy when the pressure level signal-to-noise ratio is -2dB. Several techniques can be used to separate the directions of multiple sound sources, i.e. (a) spectral weighting, (b) spectral subtraction and (c) solving systems of nonlinear equations based on vector intensity and pressure measurements. The first two are demonstrated in the dissertation. The direction-finding ability of the vector probe was used to determine the sound power of a moving source, the probe being used to track the source and simultaneously to measure its sound intensity. The sound power of the moving source is compared to the sound power of the source: (a) estimated from the measured voltage applied to the hydrophone and the typical transmitting response curve supplied by the hydrophone manufacturer, and (b) measured when the source is stationary. In the first comparison, the sound power of the moving source is about 14% or 0.5dB larger and in the second it is about 18% or 0.7d

  10. PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅ sources at an insular location in the western Mediterranean by using source apportionment techniques.

    PubMed

    Pey, Jorge; Alastuey, Andrés; Querol, Xavier

    2013-07-01

    PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅ chemical composition has been determined at a suburban insular site in the Balearic Islands (Spain) during almost one and a half year. As a result, 200 samples with more than 50 chemical parameters analyzed have been obtained. The whole database has been analyzed by two receptor modelling techniques (Principal Component Analysis and Positive Matrix Factorisation) in order to identify the main PM sources. After that, regression analyses with respect to the PM mass concentrations were conducted to quantify the daily contributions of each source. Four common sources were identified by both receptor models: secondary nitrate coupled with vehicular emissions, secondary sulphate influenced by fuel-oil combustion, aged marine aerosols and mineral dust. In addition, PCA isolated harbour emissions and a mixed anthropogenic factor containing industrial emissions; whereas PMF isolated an additional mineral factor interpreted as road dust+harbour emissions, and a vehicular abrasion products factor. The use of both methodologies appeared complementary. Nevertheless, PMF sources by themselves were better differentiated. Besides these receptor models, a specific methodology to quantify African dust was also applied. The combination of these three source apportionment tools allowed the identification of 8 sources, being 4 of them mineral (African, regional, urban and harbour dusts). As a summary, 29% of PM₁₀ was attributed to natural sources (African dust, regional dust and sea spray), whereas the proportion diminished to 11% in PM₂.₅. Furthermore, the secondary sulphate source, which accounted for about 22 and 32% of PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅, is strongly linked to the aged polluted air masses residing over the western Mediterranean in the warm period. PMID:23611951

  11. Study of the precision of the gamma-ray burst source locations obtained with the Ulysses/PVO/CGRO network

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, T.L. ); Hurley, K.C. ); Sommer, M. ); Boer, M.; Niel, M. ); Fishman, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C.; Paciesas, W.S.; Wilson, R.B. ); Laros, J.G.; Klebesadel, R.W. )

    1994-07-01

    The interplanetary gamma-ray burst network of the [ital Ulysses], [ital Compton]-[ital GRO], and [ital Pioneer]-[ital Venus] [ital Orbiter] missions has made source localizations with fractional-arc-minute precision for a number of events, and with auxiliary data, will provide useful annular-segment loci for many more. These studies have, thus far, yielded one possible counterpart, a [ital Rosat] x-ray association with the 92 May 1 burst. Similar to the historic 1978 November 19 burst/[ital Einstein] association, this possibility gives hope that network studies will provide a fundamental source clue for classical' bursts, just as a second supernova remnant in a network-defined source field has done for sgr events.

  12. Energy efficiency analysis and implementation of AES on an FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, David

    The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) was developed by Joan Daemen and Vincent Rjimen and endorsed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology in 2001. It was designed to replace the aging Data Encryption Standard (DES) and be useful for a wide range of applications with varying throughput, area, power dissipation and energy consumption requirements. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are flexible and reconfigurable integrated circuits that are useful for many different applications including the implementation of AES. Though they are highly flexible, FPGAs are often less efficient than Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs); they tend to operate slower, take up more space and dissipate more power. There have been many FPGA AES implementations that focus on obtaining high throughput or low area usage, but very little research done in the area of low power or energy efficient FPGA based AES; in fact, it is rare for estimates on power dissipation to be made at all. This thesis presents a methodology to evaluate the energy efficiency of FPGA based AES designs and proposes a novel FPGA AES implementation which is highly flexible and energy efficient. The proposed methodology is implemented as part of a novel scripting tool, the AES Energy Analyzer, which is able to fully characterize the power dissipation and energy efficiency of FPGA based AES designs. Additionally, this thesis introduces a new FPGA power reduction technique called Opportunistic Combinational Operand Gating (OCOG) which is used in the proposed energy efficient implementation. The AES Energy Analyzer was able to estimate the power dissipation and energy efficiency of the proposed AES design during its most commonly performed operations. It was found that the proposed implementation consumes less energy per operation than any previous FPGA based AES implementations that included power estimations. Finally, the use of Opportunistic Combinational Operand Gating on an AES cipher

  13. Discovery of radio emission from AE Aquarii

    SciTech Connect

    Bookbinder, J.A.; Lamb, D.Q.

    1987-12-01

    VLA 1.4-GHz and 4.9-GHz observations of six DQ Her cataclysmic variables, obtained in the C/D hybrid configuration with 50-MHz bandwidth, 7-sec time resolution, and limiting flux density about 200 microJy on July 21, 1984, are reported. Variable radio emission with time scale less than 5 min, circular polarization less than 15 percent, and flux density 3-5 mJy at 1.4 GHz and 8-16 mJy at 4.9 GHz is detected from AE Aqr. This emission is tentatively attributed to synchrotron emission from mildly relativistic electrons, powered by the MHD torque coupling the magnetic white dwarf to either (1) a secondary with a strong magnetic field or (2) an accretion disk. 20 references.

  14. Discovery of radio emission from AE Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookbinder, J. A.; Lamb, D. Q.

    1987-01-01

    VLA 1.4-GHz and 4.9-GHz observations of six DQ Her cataclysmic variables, obtained in the C/D hybrid configuration with 50-MHz bandwidth, 7-sec time resolution, and limiting flux density about 200 microJy on July 21, 1984, are reported. Variable radio emission with time scale less than 5 min, circular polarization less than 15 percent, and flux density 3-5 mJy at 1.4 GHz and 8-16 mJy at 4.9 GHz is detected from AE Aqr. This emission is tentatively attributed to synchrotron emission from mildly relativistic electrons, powered by the MHD torque coupling the magnetic white dwarf to either (1) a secondary with a strong magnetic field or (2) an accretion disk.

  15. Fault location and source process of the 2003 Boumerdes, Algeria, earthquake inferred from geodetic and strong motion data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmane, F.; Campillo, M.; Cotton, F.

    2004-12-01

    The Boumerdes earthquake occurred on a fault which precise location, offshore the algerian coast, was unknown. Geodetic data consist of GPS measurements, levelling points and coastal uplifts. They are first used to determine the absolute position of the fault. We performed a series of inversions assuming different positions and chose the model giving the smallest misfit. According to this analysis, the fault emerge at about 15 km offshore. Accelerograms are then used to infer the space-time history of rupture on the fault plane using a two-step inversion in the spectral domain. The observed strong motion records are in good agreement with the synthetics for the fault location inferred from geodetic data. The fault plane ruptured for about 16 seconds. The slip distribution on the fault indicates one asperity north-west of the hypocenter with a maximum slip amplitude larger than 2.5 m. Another asperity with slightly smaller slip amplitude is located south-east of the hypocenter. The rupture seems to stop its propagation westward when it encounters the Thenia fault, a structure almost perpendicular to the main fault. We computed the spatial distribution of ground motion predicted by this fault model and compared it with the observed damages.

  16. Relating landscape characteristics to non-point source pollution in mine waste-located watersheds using geospatial techniques.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Huaguo; Ji, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Landscape characteristics of a watershed are important variables that influence surface water quality. Understanding the relationship between these variables and surface water quality is critical in predicting pollution potential and developing watershed management practices to eliminate or reduce pollution risk. To understand the impacts of landscape characteristics on water quality in mine waste-located watersheds, we conducted a case study in the Tri-State Mining District which is located in the conjunction of three states (Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma). Severe heavy metal pollution exists in that area resulting from historical mining activities. We characterized land use/land cover over the last three decades by classifying historical multi-temporal Landsat imagery. Landscape metrics such as proportion, edge density and contagion were calculated based on the classified imagery. In-stream water quality data over three decades were collected, including lead, zinc, iron, cadmium, aluminum and conductivity which were used as key water quality indicators. Statistical analyses were performed to quantify the relationship between landscape metrics and surface water quality. Results showed that landscape characteristics in mine waste-located watersheds could account for as much as 77% of the variation of water quality indicators. A single landscape metric alone, such as proportion of mine waste area, could be used to predict surface water quality; but its predicting power is limited, usually accounting for less than 60% of the variance of water quality indicators. PMID:16551489

  17. An unsupervised pattern recognition approach for AE data originating from fatigue tests on polymer-composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, D. D.; Ramasso, E.; Placet, V.; Zhang, S.; Boubakar, L.; Zerhouni, N.

    2015-12-01

    This work investigates acoustic emission generated during tension fatigue tests carried out on a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite specimen. Since massive fatigue data processing, especially noise reduction, remains an important challenge in AE data analysis, a Mahalanobis distance-based noise modeling has been proposed in the present work to tackle this problem. A sequential feature selection based on Davies-Bouldin index has been implemented for fast dimensionality reduction. An unsupervised classifier offline-learned from quasi-static data is then used to classify the data to different AE sources with the possibility to dynamically accommodate with unseen ones. With an efficient proposed noise removal and automatic separation of AE events, this pattern discovery procedure provides an insight into fatigue damage development in composites in the presence of millions of AE events.

  18. Multiple Lookup Table-Based AES Encryption Algorithm Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jin; Liu, Wenyi; Zhang, Huixin

    Anew AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) encryption algorithm implementation was proposed in this paper. It is based on five lookup tables, which are generated from S-box(the substitution table in AES). The obvious advantages are reducing the code-size, improving the implementation efficiency, and helping new learners to understand the AES encryption algorithm and GF(28) multiplication which are necessary to correctly implement AES[1]. This method can be applied on processors with word length 32 or above, FPGA and others. And correspondingly we can implement it by VHDL, Verilog, VB and other languages.

  19. MAGIC search for VHE γ-ray emission from AE Aquarii in a multiwavelength context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksić, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Bangale, P.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Doert, M.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Idec, W.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Krause, J.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lozano, I.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nakajima, D.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Persic, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Preziuso, S.; Puljak, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, T.; Saito, K.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Storz, J.; Strzys, M.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Zanin, R.

    2014-08-01

    Context. It has been claimed that the nova-like cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii (AE Aqr) is a very-high-energy (VHE, E> 100 GeV) source both on observational and theoretical grounds. Aims: We search for VHE γ-ray emission from AE Aqr during different states of the source at several wavelengths to confirm or rule out previous claims of detection of γ-ray emission from this object. Methods: We report on observations of AE Aqr performed by MAGIC. The source was observed during 12 h as part of a multiwavelength campaign carried out between May and June 2012 covering the optical, X-ray, and γ-ray ranges. Besides MAGIC, the other facilities involved were the KVA, Skinakas, and Vidojevica telescopes in the optical and Swift in X-rays. We calculated integral upper limits coincident with different states of the source in the optical. We computed upper limits to the pulsed emission limiting the signal region to 30% of the phaseogram and we also searched for pulsed emission at different frequencies applying the Rayleigh test. Results: AE Aqr was not detected at VHEs during the multiwavelength campaign. We establish integral upper limits at the 95% confidence level for the steady emission assuming the differential flux proportional to a power-law function dφ/ dE ∝ E- Γ, with a Crab-like photon spectral index of Γ = 2.6. The upper limit above 200 GeV is 6.4 × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 and above 1 TeV is 7.4 × 10-13 cm-2 s-1. We obtained an upper limit for the pulsed emission of 2.6 × 10-12 cm-2 s-1 for energies above 200 GeV. Applying the Rayleigh test for pulsed emission at different frequencies we did not find any significant signal. Conclusions: Our results indicate that AE Aqr is not a VHE γ-ray emitter at the level of emission previously claimed. We have established the most constraining upper limits for the VHE γ-ray emission of AE Aqr.

  20. A Basic Positron Emission Tomography System Constructed to Locate a Radioactive Source in a Bi-dimensional Space.

    PubMed

    Montaño-Zetina, Luis Manuel; Villalobos-Mora, Omar

    2016-01-01

    A simple Positron Emission Tomography (PET) prototype has been constructed to fully characterize its basic working principles. The PET prototype was created by coupling plastic scintillator crystals to photomultipliers or PMT's which are placed at opposing positions to detect two gamma rays emitted from a radioactive source, of which is placed in the geometric center of the PET set-up. The prototype consists of four detectors placed geometrically in a 20 cm diameter circle, and a radioactive source in the center. By moving the radioactive source centimeters from the center the system one is able to detect the displacement by measuring the time of flight difference between any two PMT's and, with this information, the system can calculate the virtual position in a graphical interface. In this way, the prototype reproduces the main principles of a PET system. It is capable to determine the real position of the source with intervals of 4 cm in 2 lines of detection taking less than 2 min. PMID:26863081

  1. Photochemical oxidation and dispersion of gaseous sulfur compounds from natural and anthropogenic sources around a coastal location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sang-Keun; Shon, Zang-Ho; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    The photochemical oxidation and dispersion of reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs: H 2S, CH 3SH, DMS, CS 2, and DMDS) emitted from anthropogenic (A) and natural (N) sources were evaluated based on a numerical modeling approach. The anthropogenic emission concentrations of RSCs were measured from several sampling sites at the Donghae landfill (D-LF) (i.e., source type A) in South Korea during a series of field campaigns (May through December 2004). The emissions of natural RSCs in a coastal study area near the D-LF (i.e., source type N) were estimated from sea surface DMS concentrations and transfer velocity during the same study period. These emission data were then used as input to the CALPUFF dispersion model, revised with 34 chemical reactions for RSCs. A significant fraction of sulfur dioxide (SO 2) was produced photochemically during the summer (about 34% of total SO 2 concentrations) followed by fall (21%), spring (15%), and winter (5%). Photochemical production of SO 2 was dominated by H 2S (about 55% of total contributions) and DMS (24%). The largest impact of RSCs from source type A on SO 2 concentrations occurred around the D-LF during summer. The total SO 2 concentrations produced from source type N around the D-LF during the summer (a mean SO 2 concentration of 7.4 ppbv) were significantly higher than those (≤0.3 ppbv) during the other seasons. This may be because of the high RSC and SO 2 emissions and their photochemistry along with the wind convergence.

  2. Passive Effluent Diffusion in a Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer: An Airborne Approach to Locating Sources and Estimating Their Emission Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suard, Maxime

    We studied the near field dispersion of natural gas plumes leaking from transmission lines and diffusing in a convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL), with the intent of providing an aerial system of leak detection and pinpointing, as well as quantitative leak rate estimation. We used high frequency measurements of methane and ethane concentrations on a fixed wing aircraft using high rate spectroscopic gas concentration measurements. We looked for characteristics of the effluent concentration field which can be related to the distance from the effluent source, and developed an empirical approach to effluent source position estimation from airborne effluent concentration measurements. From a mass-balance approach we developed a practical method of effluent leak rate estimation based on airborne effluent concentration measurements. Since gathering experimental data was costly and time-expensive, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) results were also investigated. Results showed that analysis of effluent concentration variability is likely to provide information about the position of the effluent source. The developed leak rate estimation method provided encouraging results showing that such an approach is able to yield relatively accurate leak rate estimates. LES results proved to be very useful as they helped to provide guidelines for experiments as well as to deepen our understanding of the diffusion dynamics of turbulent effluent plumes.

  3. An impact source localization technique for a nuclear power plant by using sensors of different types.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Chul; Park, Jin-Ho; Choi, Kyoung-Sik

    2011-01-01

    In a nuclear power plant, a loose part monitoring system (LPMS) provides information on the location and the mass of a loosened or detached metal impacted onto the inner surface of the primary pressure boundary. Typically, accelerometers are mounted on the surface of a reactor vessel to localize the impact location caused by the impact of metallic substances on the reactor system. However, in some cases, the number of accelerometers is not sufficient to estimate the impact location precisely. In such a case, one of useful methods is to utilize other types of sensor that can measure the vibration of the reactor structure. For example, acoustic emission (AE) sensors are installed on the reactor structure to detect leakage or cracks on the primary pressure boundary. However, accelerometers and AE sensors have a different frequency range. The frequency of interest of AE sensors is higher than that of accelerometers. In this paper, we propose a method of impact source localization by using both accelerometer signals and AE signals, simultaneously. The main concept of impact location estimation is based on the arrival time difference of the impact stress wave between different sensor locations. However, it is difficult to find the arrival time difference between sensors, because the primary frequency ranges of accelerometers and AE sensors are different. To overcome the problem, we used phase delays of an envelope of impact signals. This is because the impact signals from the accelerometer and the AE sensor are similar in the whole shape (envelope). To verify the proposed method, we have performed experiments for a reactor mock-up model and a real nuclear power plant. The experimental results demonstrate that we can enhance the reliability and precision of the impact source localization. Therefore, if the proposed method is applied to a nuclear power plant, we can obtain the effect of additional installed sensors. PMID:20851393

  4. PDS 144: THE FIRST CONFIRMED Herbig Ae-Herbig Ae WIDE BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Hornbeck, J. B.; Williger, G. M.; Lauroesch, J. T.; Grady, C. A.; Perrin, M. D.; Grogin, N. A.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Tofflemire, B. M.; Brown, A.; Holtzman, J. A.; Arraki, K.; Hamaguchi, K.; Woodgate, B.; Petre, R.; Bonfield, D. G.; Daly, B.

    2012-01-01

    PDS 144 is a pair of Herbig Ae stars that are separated by 5.''35 on the sky. It has previously been shown to have an A2Ve Herbig Ae star viewed at 83 Degree-Sign inclination as its northern member and an A5Ve Herbig Ae star as its southern member. Direct imagery revealed a disk occulting PDS 144 N-the first edge-on disk observed around a Herbig Ae star. The lack of an obvious disk in direct imagery suggested PDS 144 S might be viewed face-on or not physically associated with PDS 144 N. Multi-epoch Hubble Space Telescope imagery of PDS 144 with a 5 year baseline demonstrates PDS 144 N and S are comoving and have a common proper motion with TYC 6782-878-1. TYC 6782-878-1 has previously been identified as a member of Upper Sco sub-association A at d = 145 {+-} 2 pc with an age of 5-10 Myr. Ground-based imagery reveals jets and a string of Herbig-Haro knots extending 13' (possibly further) which are aligned to within 7 Degree-Sign {+-} 6 Degree-Sign on the sky. By combining proper motion data and the absence of a dark mid-plane with radial velocity data, we measure the inclination of PDS 144 S to be i = 73 Degree-Sign {+-} 7 Degree-Sign . The radial velocity of the jets from PDS 144 N and S indicates they, and therefore their disks, are misaligned by 25 Degree-Sign {+-} 9 Degree-Sign . This degree of misalignment is similar to that seen in T Tauri wide binaries.

  5. PDS 144: The First Confirmed Herbig Ae-Herbig Ae Wide Binary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornbeck, J. B.; Grady, C. A.; Perrin, M. D.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Tofflemire, B. M.; Brown, A.; Holtzman, J. A.; Arraki, K.; Hamaguchi, K.; Woodgate, B.; Petre, R.; Daly, B.; Grogin, N. A.; Bonfield, D. G.; Williger, G. M.; Lauroesch, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    PDS 144 is a pair of Herbig Ae stars that are separated by 5.35" on the sky. It has previously been shown to have an A2Ve Herbig Ae star viewed at 83 deg inclination as its northern member and an A5Ve Herbig Ae star as its southern member. Direct imagery revealed a disk occulting PDS 144 N - the first edge-on disk observed around a Herbig Ae star. The lack of an obvious disk in direct imagery suggested PDS 144 S might be viewed face-on or not physically associated with PDS 144 N. Multi-epoch HST imagery of PDS 144 with a 5 yr baseline demonstrates PDS 144 N & S are comoving and have a common proper motion with TYC 6782-878-1. TYC 6782-878-1 has previously been identified as a member of Upper Sco sub-association A at d = 145 +/- 2 pc with an age of 5 - 10 Myr. Ground-based imagery reveals jets and a string of HH knots extending 13' (possibly further) which are aligned to within 7 deg +/- 6 deg on the sky. By combining proper motion data and the absence of a dark mid-plane with radial velocity data, we measure the inclination of PDS 144 S to be i = 73 deg +/- 7 deg. The radial velocity of the jets from PDS 144 N & S indicates they, and therefore their disks, are misaligned by 25 deg +/- 9 deg.. This degree of misalignment is similar to that seen in T-Tauri wide binaries.

  6. Particle sized-resolved source apportionment of primary and secondary organic tracer compounds at urban and rural locations in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Drooge, B. L.; Grimalt, J. O.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) was fractionated in six aerodynamic sizes, > 7.2, 7.2-3, 3-1.5, 1.5-1, 1-0.5, < 0.5 μm, using a cascade impactor. These fractions were collected at urban and rural sites during warm and cold seasons. Analysis of the organic tracer compounds by gas-chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry showed that the composition in the smallest size fractions (< 0.5 μm) was more uniform than in the larger sizes (7.2 > PM > 0.5 μm). Thus, markers of photochemically synthesized organic compounds or combustion sources, either biomass burning or traffic emissions, were predominantly observed in the fraction < 0.5 μm whereas the larger particles were composed of mixed sources from combustion processes, vegetation emissions, soil re-suspension, road dust, urban life-style activities and photochemically synthesized organic compounds. Important seasonal differences were observed at the rural site. In the < 0.5 μm fraction these were related to strong predominance of biomass burning in the cold period and photochemically transformed biogenic organic compounds in the warm period. In the 7.2 > PM > 0.5 μm fractions the differences involved predominant soil-sourced compounds in the warm period and mixed combustion sources, photochemical products and vegetation emissions in the cold. Multivariate Curve Resolution Alternating Least Squares showed that these organic aerosols essentially originated from six source components. Four of them reflected primary emissions related with either natural products, e.g. vegetation emissions and up whirled soil dust, or anthropogenic contributions, e.g. combustion products and compounds related with urban life-style activities, mainly vehicular exhausts and tobacco smoking. Two secondary organic aerosol components were identified. They accumulated in the smallest (< 0.5 μm) or in the larger fractions (> 0.5 μm) and involved strong or mild photochemical transformations of vegetation precursor molecules

  7. Particle size-resolved source apportionment of primary and secondary organic tracer compounds at urban and rural locations in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Drooge, B. L.; Grimalt, J. O.

    2015-07-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) was fractionated in six aerodynamic sizes, > 7.2, 7.2-3, 3-1.5, 1.5-1, 1-0.5 and < 0.5 μm, using a cascade impactor. These fractions were collected at urban and rural sites during warm and cold seasons. Organic tracer compounds, such as levoglucosan, isoprene, pinene oxidation products, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and quinones, were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. These analyses showed that the composition in the smallest size fractions (< 0.5 μm) was more uniform than in the larger sizes (7.2> PM > 0.5 μm). Thus, markers of photochemically synthesized organic compounds or combustion sources, either biomass burning or traffic emissions, were predominantly observed in the fraction < 0.5 μm, whereas the larger particles were composed of mixed sources from combustion processes, vegetation emissions, soil resuspension, road dust, urban lifestyle activities and photochemically synthesized organic compounds. Important seasonal differences were observed at the rural site. In the < 0.5 μm fraction these were related to a strong predominance of biomass burning in the cold period and photochemically transformed biogenic organic compounds in the warm period. In the 7.2 > PM > 0.5 μm fractions the differences involved predominantly soil-sourced compounds in the warm period and mixed combustion sources, photochemical products and vegetation emissions in the cold. Multivariate curve resolution/alternating least squares showed that these organic aerosols essentially originated from six source components. Four of them reflected primary emissions related to either natural products, e.g., vegetation emissions and upwhirled soil dust, or anthropogenic contributions, e.g., combustion products and compounds related to urban lifestyle activities like vehicular exhaust and tobacco smoking. Two secondary organic aerosol components were identified. They accumulated in the smallest (< 0.5 μm) or in the larger

  8. Joint inversion of seismic velocities and source location without rays using the truncated Newton and the adjoint-state method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virieux, J.; Bretaudeau, F.; Metivier, L.; Brossier, R.

    2013-12-01

    Simultaneous inversion of seismic velocities and source parameters have been a long standing challenge in seismology since the first attempts to mitigate trade-off between very different parameters influencing travel-times (Spencer and Gubbins 1980, Pavlis and Booker 1980) since the early development in the 1970s (Aki et al 1976, Aki and Lee 1976, Crosson 1976). There is a strong trade-off between earthquake source positions, initial times and velocities during the tomographic inversion: mitigating these trade-offs is usually carried empirically (Lemeur et al 1997). This procedure is not optimal and may lead to errors in the velocity reconstruction as well as in the source localization. For a better simultaneous estimation of such multi-parametric reconstruction problem, one may take benefit of improved local optimization such as full Newton method where the Hessian influence helps balancing between different physical parameter quantities and improving the coverage at the point of reconstruction. Unfortunately, the computation of the full Hessian operator is not easily computed in large models and with large datasets. Truncated Newton (TCN) is an alternative optimization approach (Métivier et al. 2012) that allows resolution of the normal equation H Δm = - g using a matrix-free conjugate gradient algorithm. It only requires to be able to compute the gradient of the misfit function and Hessian-vector products. Traveltime maps can be computed in the whole domain by numerical modeling (Vidale 1998, Zhao 2004). The gradient and the Hessian-vector products for velocities can be computed without ray-tracing using 1st and 2nd order adjoint-state methods for the cost of 1 and 2 additional modeling step (Plessix 2006, Métivier et al. 2012). Reciprocity allows to compute accurately the gradient and the full Hessian for each coordinates of the sources and for their initial times. Then the resolution of the problem is done through two nested loops. The model update Δm is

  9. Brominated flame retardants and polychlorinated biphenyls in human breast milk from several locations in India: potential contaminant sources in a municipal dumping site.

    PubMed

    Devanathan, Gnanasekaran; Subramanian, Annamalai; Sudaryanto, Agus; Takahashi, Shin; Isobe, Tomohiko; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated the status of contamination of organohalogen compounds (OCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and brominated flame retardant (BFRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) in human milk samples from several locations in India. The levels of OCs were significantly higher in the milk of mothers living in and near municipal dumping site than other locations indicating that the open dumping sites for municipal wastes act as potential sources of these contaminants in India. The PCB concentrations observed in this study tended to decrease compared to those in the matched locations reported previously, probably due to the restriction of technical PCB usage in India. PBDE levels in human milk were two to three folds lower than those of PCBs in all the sampling locations investigated. Congener profiles of PCBs and PBDEs were different between samples from the dumping site mothers and general populations in other areas suggesting the presence of region-specific sources and pathways. HBCDs were detected in human milk from only two sites, with much lower concentrations and detection frequencies compared to PCBs and PBDEs. When hazard quotients (HQs) of PCBs and PBDEs were estimated for infant health risk, the HQs in some milk samples from the dumping site exceeded the threshold value (HQ>1) of PCBs, indicating the potential risk for infants in the specific site. PMID:22208746

  10. Controls of tectonics and sediment source locations on along-strike variations in transgressive deposits on the northern California margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spinelli, G.A.; Field, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    We identify two surfaces in the shallow subsurface on the Eel River margin offshore northern California, a lowstand erosion surface, likely formed during the last glacial maximum, and an overlying surface likely formed during the most recent transgression of the shoreline. The lowstand erosion surface, which extends from the inner shelf to near the shelfbreak and from the Eel River to Trinidad Head (???80 km), truncates underlying strata on the shelf. Above the surface, inferred transgressive coastal and estuarine sedimentary units separate it from the transgressive surface on the shelf. Early in the transgression, Eel River sediment was likely both transported down the Eel Canyon and dispersed on the slope, allowing transgressive coastal sediment from the smaller Mad River to accumulate in a recognizable deposit on the shelf. The location of coastal Mad River sediment accumulation was controlled by the location of the paleo-Mad River. Throughout the remainder of the transgression, dispersed sediment from the Eel River accumulated an average of 20 m of onlapping shelf deposits. The distribution and thickness of these transgressive marine units was strongly modified by northwest-southeast trending folds. Thick sediment packages accumulated over structural lows in the lowstand surface. The thinnest sediment accumulations (0-10 m) were deposited over structural highs along faults and uplifting anticlines. The Eel margin, an active margin with steep, high sediment-load streams, has developed a thick transgressive systems tract. On this margin sediment accumulates as rapidly as the processes of uplift and downwarp locally create and destroy accommodation space. Sequence stratigraphic models of tectonically active margins should account for variations in accommodation space along margins as well as across them. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. 15 CFR 758.2 - Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Automated Export System (AES). 758.2... CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS § 758.2 Automated Export System (AES). The Census Bureau's Foreign Trade Statistics Regulations (FTSR) (15 CFR Part 30) contain provisions for filing Shipper's Export Declarations...

  12. 15 CFR 758.2 - Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Automated Export System (AES). 758.2... CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS § 758.2 Automated Export System (AES). The Census Bureau's Foreign Trade Statistics Regulations (FTSR) (15 CFR Part 30) contain provisions for filing Shipper's Export Declarations...

  13. 15 CFR 758.2 - Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Automated Export System (AES). 758.2... CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS § 758.2 Automated Export System (AES). The Census Bureau's Foreign Trade Statistics Regulations (FTSR) (15 CFR part 30) contain provisions for filing Shipper's Export Declarations...

  14. 15 CFR 758.2 - Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Automated Export System (AES). 758.2... CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS § 758.2 Automated Export System (AES). The Census Bureau's Foreign Trade Statistics Regulations (FTSR) (15 CFR Part 30) contain provisions for filing Shipper's Export Declarations...

  15. A Grammar Sketch of the Kaki Ae Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clifton, John M.

    Kaki Ae is a non-Austronesian language spoken by about 300 people on the south coast of Papua New Guinea, at best distantly related to any other language in that area. A brief grammar sketch of the language is presented, including discussion of the phonology, sentences, phrases, words, and morpheme categories. Kaki Ae phonemics include 11…

  16. Array analysis methods for detection, classification and location of seismic sources: a first evaluation for aftershock analysis using dense temporary post-seismic array network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, N.; Satriano, C.; Vilotte, J.; Bernard, P.

    2012-12-01

    Detection, separation, classification and location of distributed non stationary seismic sources in broadband noisy environment is an important problem in seismology, in particular for monitoring the high-level post-seismic activity following large subduction earthquakes, like the off-shore Maule (Mw 8.8, 2010) earthquake in Central Chile. Multiple seismic arrays, and local antenna, distributed over a region allow exploiting frequency selective coherence of the signals that arrive at widely-separated array stations, leading to improved detection, convolution blind source separation, and location of distributed non stationary sources. We present here first results on the investigation of time-frequency adaptive array analysis techniques for detection and location of broadband distributed seismic events recorded by the dense temporary seismic network (International Maule Aftershock Deployment, IMAD) installed for monitoring the high-level seismic activity following the 27 February 2010 Maule earthquake (Mw 8.8). This seismic network is characterized by a large aperture, with variable inter-station distances, corroborated with a high level of distributed near and far field seismic source activity and noise. For this study, we first extract from the post-seismic network a number of seismic arrays distributed over the region covered by this network. A first aspect is devoted to passive distributed seismic sources detection, classification and separation. We investigate a number of narrow and wide band signal analysis methods both in time and time-frequency domains for energy arrival detection and tracking, including time adaptive higher order statistics, e.g. like kurtosis, and multiband band-pass filtering, together with adaptive time-frequency transformation and extraction techniques. We demonstrate that these techniques provide superior resolution and robustness than classical STA/LTA techniques in particular in the case of distributed sources with potential signal

  17. The May 29 2008 earthquake aftershock sequence within the South Iceland Seismic Zone: Fault locations and source parameters of aftershocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsdottir, B.; Parsons, M.; White, R. S.; Gudmundsson, O.; Drew, J.

    2010-12-01

    The mid-Atlantic plate boundary breaks up into a series of segments across Iceland. The South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) is a complex transform zone where left-lateral E-W shear between the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone and the Eastern Volcanic Zone is accommodated by bookshelf faulting along N-S lateral strike-slip faults. The SISZ is also a transient feature, migrating sideways in response to the southward propagation of the Eastern Volcanic Zone. Sequences of large earthquakes (M > 6) lasting from days to years and affecting most of the seismic zone have occurred repeatedly in historical time (last 1100 years), separated by intervals of relative quiescence lasting decades to more than a century. On May 29 2008, a Mw 6.1 earthquake struck the western part of the South Iceland Seismic Zone, followed within seconds by a slightly smaller event on a second fault ~5 km further west. Aftershocks, detected by a temporal array of 11 seismometers and three permanent Icelandic Meteorological Office stations were located using an automated Coalescence Microseismic Mapping technique. The epicenters delineate two major and several smaller N-S faults as well as an E-W zone of activity stretching further west into the Reykjanes Peninsula Rift Zone. Fault plane solutions show both right lateral and oblique strike slip mechanisms along the two major N-S faults. The aftershocks deepen from 3-5 km in the north to 8-9 km in the south, suggesting that the main faults dip southwards. The faulting is interpreted to be driven by the local stress due to transform motion between two parallel segments of the divergent plate boundary crossing Iceland.

  18. Mitigation of nonpoint source pesticide contamination in a artificial wetland located at the outlet of a vineyard catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payraudeau, S.; Gregoire, C.; Imfeld, G.

    2009-04-01

    The use of artificial wetlands for mitigating nonpoint source pesticide contamination from surface water runoff of agricultural origin represents an innovative approach, whose potential should be evaluated. The EU LIFE project ArtWET assesses the application of ecological bioengineering methods based on various types of artificial wetlands throughout Europe. In this framework, this study focused on the mitigation of pesticides in a storm basin (320 m2; 1500m3; planted with Phragmites australis Cav.) collecting runoff from a vineyard catchment area (42 ha; Rouffach, Alsace, France) over the cultural period (March to October 2008), and whose the hydraulic design has been modified in order to enhance the mitigation process. Discharge measurements and water samples collections were carried out in parallel at the inflow and the outflow of the basin for 17 runoff events in order to evaluate the load of 17 pesticides. Among the target pesticides, Glyphosate, AMPA, its metabolites, and Diuron predominated and runoff event pesticides loads strongly varied throughout cultural period. The depletion of the Glyphosate and AMPA concentration values recorded over the runoff event between the inflow and outflow of the system exceeded 70 %, and reached 90% when considering the total loads over the runoff event. The high mitigation capacity observed in the storm water wetland was likely due to both degradation and sorption processes. Current efforts focus on characterizing the variability over the cropping season of the wetland system performance in terms of reduction of pesticide loads in relationship with the biogeochemical conditions within the storm basin.

  19. Complementary Detection of Multiple Electrical Sources in Tissue Using Acoustoelectric Effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohui; Challoo, Rajab; Peng, Hu; Leung, Chung S; Witte, Russell S

    2016-09-01

    Accurate 3-D mapping of multiple bioelectric sources in nerve fibers with high spatial resolution is challenging for the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of neural abnormalities. Ultrasound current source density imaging exploits the acoustoelectric (AE) effect, an interaction between electrical current and acoustic pressure waves propagating through a conducting material, and has distinct advantages over conventional electrophysiology (i.e., without ultrasound) for mapping electrical current flow in tissue. Ultrasound current source density imaging and two complementary Wheatstone bridge circuits were used to simultaneously detect two separate current flows induced in tissue phantoms. It has been found that the addition and subtraction of AE signals acquired by two circuits are independent components, regardless of whether the two sources are positioned at the same or different depths. In the ultrasound field, the AE signal from the bridge circuits is stronger, with a higher signal-to-noise ratio, than without a bridge circuit. Both experimental and simulated AE images depend on the magnitude and direction of the current, as well as the geometry (shape and thickness) and location of the current sources in the ultrasound field (2.25-MHz transducer). The experimental results are consistent with simulations consisting of multiple current sources. Real-time 3-D ultrasound current source density images of multiple current flows co-registered with convention pulse echo ultrasound potentially facilitate monitoring of neurologic disorders. PMID:27374926

  20. Spatial distribution of source locations for particulate nitrate and sulfate in the upper-midwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weixiang; Hopke, Philip K.; Zhou, Liming

    Two back-trajectory analysis methods designed to be used with multiple site data, simplified quantitative transport bias analysis (SQTBA) and residence time weighted concentration (RTWC), were applied to nitrate and sulfate concentration data from two rural sites (the Mammoth Cave National Park and the Great Smoky Mountain National Park) and five urban sites (Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Indianapolis, and St. Louis) for an intensive investigation on the spatial patterns of origins for these two species in the upper-midwestern area. The study was made by dividing the data into five categories: all sites and all seasons, rural sites in summer, rural sites in winter, urban sites in summer, and urban sites in winter. A general conclusion was that the origins of the nitrate in these seven sites were mainly in the upper-midwestern areas, while the sulfate in these seven sites were mainly from the Ohio and Tennessee River Valley areas. The upper-midwestern areas are regions of high ammonia emissions rather than high NO x emissions. In the winter, metropolitan areas showed the highest nitrate emission potential suggesting the importance of local NO x emissions. In the summer, ammonia emissions from fertilizer application in the lower midwestern area made a significant contribution to nitrate in the rural sites of this study. The impact of the wind direction prevalence on the source spatial patterns was observed by comparing the urban and rural patterns of the summer. The differences between the results of two methods are discussed and suggestions for applying these methods are also provided.

  1. Characterization of Aes nuclear foci in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Itatani, Yoshiro; Sonoshita, Masahiro; Kakizaki, Fumihiko; Okawa, Katsuya; Stifani, Stefano; Itoh, Hideaki; Sakai, Yoshiharu; Taketo, M Mark

    2016-01-01

    Amino-terminal enhancer of split (Aes) is a member of Groucho/Transducin-like enhancer (TLE) family. Aes is a recently found metastasis suppressor of colorectal cancer (CRC) that inhibits Notch signalling, and forms nuclear foci together with TLE1. Although some Notch-associated proteins are known to form subnuclear bodies, little is known regarding the dynamics or functions of these structures. Here, we show that Aes nuclear foci in CRC observed under an electron microscope are in a rather amorphous structure, lacking surrounding membrane. Investigation of their behaviour during the cell cycle by time-lapse cinematography showed that Aes nuclear foci dissolve during mitosis and reassemble after completion of cytokinesis. We have also found that heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70) is an essential component of Aes foci. Pharmacological inhibition of the HSC70 ATPase activity with VER155008 reduces Aes focus formation. These results provide insight into the understanding of Aes-mediated inhibition of Notch signalling. PMID:26229111

  2. Cause of the exceptionally high AE average for 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestes, A.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we focus on the year of 2003 when the AE index was extremely high (AE=341nT, with peak intensity more than 2200nT), this value is almost 100 nT higher when compared with others years of the cycle 23. Interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and plasma data are compared with geomagnetic AE and Dst indices to determine the causes of exceptionally high AE average value. Analyzing the solar wind parameters we found that the annual average speed value was extremely high, approximately 542 km/s (peak value ~1074 km/s). These values were due to recurrent high-speed solar streams from large coronal holes, which stretch to the solar equator, and low-latitude coronal holes, which exist for many solar rotations. AE was found to increase with increasing solar wind speed and decrease when solar wind speed decrease. The cause of the high AE activity during 2003 is the presence of the high-speed corotating streams that contain large-amplitude Alfvén waves throughout the streams, which resulted in a large number of HILDCAAs events. When plasma and field of solar wind impinge on Earth's magnetosphere, the southward field turnings associated with the wave fluctuations cause magnetic reconnection and consequential high levels of AE activity and very long recovery phases on Dst, sometimes lasting until the next stream arrives.

  3. Temporal Patterns of Abundance of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and Mitochondrial DNA Analysis of Ae. albopictus in the Central African Republic

    PubMed Central

    Kamgang, Basile; Ngoagouni, Carine; Manirakiza, Alexandre; Nakouné, Emmanuel; Paupy, Christophe; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2013-01-01

    The invasive Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) was first reported in central Africa in 2000, in Cameroon, with the indigenous mosquito species Ae. aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Today, this invasive species is present in almost all countries of the region, including the Central African Republic (CAR), where it was first recorded in 2009. As invasive species of mosquitoes can affect the distribution of native species, resulting in new patterns of vectors and concomitant risk for disease, we undertook a comparative study early and late in the wet season in the capital and the main cities of CAR to document infestation and the ecological preferences of the two species. In addition, we determined the probable geographical origin of invasive populations of Ae. albopictus with two mitochondrial DNA genes, COI and ND5. Analysis revealed that Ae. aegypti was more abundant earlier in the wet season and Ae. albopictus in the late wet season. Used tyres were the most heavily colonized productive larval habitats for both species in both seasons. The invasive species Ae. albopictus predominated over the resident species at all sites in which the two species were sympatric. Mitochondrial DNA analysis revealed broad low genetic diversity, confirming recent introduction of Ae. albopictus in CAR. Phylogeographical analysis based on COI polymorphism indicated that the Ae. albopictus haplotype in the CAR population segregated into two lineages, suggesting multiple sources of Ae. albopictus. These data may have important implications for vector control strategies in central Africa. PMID:24349596

  4. Calibration and operational data for a compact photodiode detector useful for monitoring the location of moving sources of positron emitting radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsland, M. G.; Dehnel, M. P.; Johansson, S.; Rajander, J.; Solin, O.; Theroux, J.; Stewart, T. M.; Christensen, T.; Hollinger, C.

    2013-04-01

    D-Pace has developed a compact cost-effective gamma detector system based on technology licensed from TRIUMF [1]. These photodiode detectors are convenient for detecting the presence of positron emitting radioisotopes, particularly for the case of transport of radioisotopes from a PET cyclotron to hotlab, or from one location to another in an automated radiochemistry processing unit. This paper describes recent calibration experiments undertaken at the Turku PET Centre for stationary and moving sources of F18 and C11 in standard setups. The practical diagnostic utility of using several of these devices to track the transport of radioisotopes from the cyclotron to hotlab is illustrated. For example, such a detector system provides: a semi-quantitative indication of total activity, speed of transport, location of any activity lost en route and effectiveness of follow-up system flushes, a means of identifying bolus break-up, feedback useful for deciding when to change out tubing.

  5. Calibration and operational data for a compact photodiode detector useful for monitoring the location of moving sources of positron emitting radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Marsland, M. G.; Dehnel, M. P.; Theroux, J.; Christensen, T.; Hollinger, C.; Johansson, S.; Rajander, J.; Solin, O.; Stewart, T. M.

    2013-04-19

    D-Pace has developed a compact cost-effective gamma detector system based on technology licensed from TRIUMF. These photodiode detectors are convenient for detecting the presence of positron emitting radioisotopes, particularly for the case of transport of radioisotopes from a PET cyclotron to hotlab, or from one location to another in an automated radiochemistry processing unit. This paper describes recent calibration experiments undertaken at the Turku PET Centre for stationary and moving sources of F18 and C11 in standard setups. The practical diagnostic utility of using several of these devices to track the transport of radioisotopes from the cyclotron to hotlab is illustrated. For example, such a detector system provides: a semi-quantitative indication of total activity, speed of transport, location of any activity lost en route and effectiveness of follow-up system flushes, a means of identifying bolus break-up, feedback useful for deciding when to change out tubing.

  6. Automated Estimating System (AES), Version 5. 1, User's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.K.; Holder, D.A.

    1992-08-01

    This document describes Version 5.1 of the Automated Estimating System (AES), a personal computer-based software package. The AES is designed to aid in the creation, updating, and reporting of project cost estimates for the Estimating and Scheduling Department of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Engineering Division. AES provides formatted input screens to guide the user though the estimate creation/update process and provides several standardized reports that allow cost to be sorted and summarized in many different formats and at several levels of aggregation.

  7. BOREAS AES Five-Day Averaged Surface Meteorological and Upper Air Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Strub, Richard; Newcomer, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) provided BOREAS with hourly and daily surface meteorological data from 23 of the AES meteorological stations located across Canada and upper air data from 1 station at The Pas, Manitoba. Due to copyright restrictions on the full resolution surface meteorological data, this data set contains 5-day average values for the surface parameters. The upper air data are provided in their full resolution form. The 5-day averaging was performed in order to create a data set that could be publicly distributed at no cost. Temporally, the surface meteorological data cover the period of January 1975 to December 1996 and the upper air data cover the period of January 1961 to November 1996. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-staff data. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  8. Application of a Persistent Dissolved-phase Reactive Treatment Zone for Mitigation of Mass Discharge from Sources Located in Lower-Permeability Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Marble, J.C.; Brusseau, M.L.; Carroll, K.C.; Plaschke, M.; Fuhrig, L.; Brinker, F.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the development and effectiveness of a persistent dissolved-phase treatment zone, created by injecting potassium permanganate solution, for mitigating discharge of contaminant from a source zone located in a relatively deep, low-permeability formation. A localized 1,1-dichloroethene (DCE) source zone comprising dissolved- and sorbed-phase mass is present in lower permeability strata adjacent to a sand/gravel unit in a section of the Tucson International Airport Area (TIAA) Superfund Site. The results of bench-scale studies conducted using core material collected from boreholes drilled at the site indicated that natural oxidant demand was low, which would promote permanganate persistence. The reactive zone was created by injecting a permanganate solution into multiple wells screened across the interface between the lower-permeability and higher-permeability units. The site has been monitored for nine years to characterize the spatial distribution of DCE and permanganate. Permanganate continues to persist at the site, and a substantial and sustained decrease in DCE concentrations in groundwater has occurred after the permanganate injection.. These results demonstrate successful creation of a long-term, dissolved-phase reactive-treatment zone that reduced mass discharge from the source. This project illustrates the application of in-situ chemical oxidation as a persistent dissolved-phase reactive-treatment system for lower-permeability source zones, which appears to effectively mitigate persistent mass discharge into groundwater. PMID:26300570

  9. Locating Desired Source Rocks by Using Shallow Ground Penetrating Radar and Seismic Survey Methods in western Washington, Pacific Northwest of the U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakir, R.; Meng, X.; Butler, Q.; Jenkins, J.; Keck, J.; Walsh, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Washington State Department of Natural Resources (WADNR) manages 2.1 million acres of forested state trust lands in Washington. WADNR sells timber and other agricultural products to help fund local services and the construction of institutions such as public schools and universities. Quality of rocks used as a surface on the roads built to access the timber is the essential and selecting appropriate rock quarry locations is challenging. Traditional borehole drilling methods only provide information from discrete locations. The study was conducted in the Capitol Forest area of western Washington. In our previous study, we suggested that a combination of P-wave seismic and ground penetrating radar (GPR) can be a rapid, comprehensive and cost effective alternative for identifying desired rock sources. In this study, we further improved upon that method and accomplished the following: 1) rock quality at a relatively fine resolution was distinguished and 2) the spatial variability of the rock was identified. Both 450 MHz and 80 MHz GPR antennas were used to obtain high resolution radargrams in the near-surface zone with 5m maximum penetration depth and lower resolution radargrams in the deeper subsurface zone with about 20m maximum penetration depth. We then correlated the GPR radargrams with P-wave velocities using the refraction survey data as well as S-wave velocities, estimated using Multi-Channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) survey data. Additionally, nearby test pits and boreholes (maximum depth = 15 meters) were used to confirm the geophysical measurements. Our study results demonstrate that the combination of GPR, using the two antennas, and seismic surveys provides very useful subsurface information regarding quality and spatial distribution of the rocks beneath the overburden. Subsurface images gathered from these combined geophysical methods do assist quarry operators to rapidly locate the desired rock sources.

  10. 15 CFR Appendix B to Part 30 - AES Filing Codes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false AES Filing Codes B Appendix B to Part 30 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS Pt. 30, App. B Appendix B to Part 30—AES Filing Codes Part I—Method of Transportation...

  11. A Spectro-Astrometric Measurement of Brackett Gamma Emission in Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Thomas; Brittain, S.

    2012-01-01

    In T Tauri stars, the Brackett-gamma line strength is a reliable indicator of accretion luminosity. Among intermediate mass young stars, Herbig Ae stars also show this correlation, but in Herbig Be stars the Br-gamma line flux significantly overpredicts accretion luminosity. This Br-gamma excess in Herbig Be stars is thought to arise from a spatially extended outflow. Using commissioning data from the LUCIFER spectrograph on the 8.4-meter Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), we present a spectro-astrometric study of two Herbig Ae/Be stars, the HAe star MWC480 and the HBe star HD 259431. In both stars, an extended Br-gamma source can be ruled out down to 0.001'' at the 1σ level. We discuss the implication of our limits on the extension of the Br-gamma emission and possible ways forward.

  12. Radio continuum observations of the Herbig Ae/Be stars HD 163296 and HR 5999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. A.; Perez, M. R.; Yusef-Zadeh, F.

    1993-01-01

    Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the two bright Herbig Ae/Be stars HD 163296 and HR 5999 have been carried out at lambda 3.6 and 20 cm. We report the detection of a radio source at lambda 3.6 cm that may be associated with HD 163296. From the peak flux density of 0.39 mJy/beam area, we estimate a mass-loss rate of 1.8 x 10(exp -8) solar mass/yr if the flux is due to free-free emission in an ionized wind with spherical symmetry, assuming a terminal wind velocity of 200 km/s. HR 5999 was not detected at either wavelength. We discuss the results in terms of the stellar-driven and accretion-driven scenarios for line and wind formation in Herbig Ae/Be stars.

  13. Locating radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas by implementing a reverse ray tracing technique in the RadBall™ technology.

    PubMed

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Stanley, Steven; Holmes, Christopher; Lennox, Kathryn; Oldham, Mark; Clift, Corey; Thomas, Andrew; Adamovics, John

    2012-02-01

    RadBall™ is a novel technology that can locate unknown radioactive hazards within contaminated areas, hot cells, and gloveboxes. The device consists of a colander-like outer tungsten collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer semisphere. The collimator has a number of small holes; as a result, specific areas of the polymer are exposed to radiation, becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer semisphere is imaged in an optical computed tomography scanner that produces a high resolution three-dimensional map of optical attenuation coefficients. A subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data, using a reverse ray tracing technique, provides information on the spatial distribution of gamma-ray sources in a given area, forming a three-dimensional characterization of the area of interest. The RadBall™ technology and its reverse ray tracing technique were investigated using known radiation sources at the Savannah River Site's Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory and unknown sources at the Savannah River National Laboratory's Shielded Cells facility. PMID:22217592

  14. The Use of LiDAR Elevation Data and Satellite Imagery to Locate Critical Source Areas to Diffuse Pollution in Agricultural Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, Ariane; Michaud, Aubert; Thériault, Georges; Beaudin, Isabelle; Rodrigue, Jean-François; Denault, Jean-Thomas; Desjardins, Jacques; Côté, Noémi

    2013-04-01

    In Quebec / Canada, water quality improvement in rural areas greatly depends on the reduction of diffuse pollution. Indeed, point source pollution has been reduced significantly in Canada in recent years by creating circumscribed pits for manure and removing animals from stream. Diffuse pollution differs from point source pollution because it is spread over large areas. In agricultural areas, sediment loss by soil and riverbank erosion along with loss of nutrients (phosphorus, nitrogen, etc.) and pesticides from fields represent the main source of non-point source pollution. The factor mainly responsible for diffuse pollution in agricultural areas is surface runoff occurring in poorly drained areas in fields. The presence of these poorly drained areas is also one of the most limiting factors in crop productivity. Thus, a reconciliation of objectives at the farm (financial concern for farmers) and off-farm concerns (environmental concern) is possible. In short, drainage, runoff, erosion, water quality and crop production are all interconnected issues that need to be tackled together. Two complementary data sources are mainly used in the diagnosis of drainage, surface runoff and erosion : elevation data and multispectral satellite images. In this study of two watersheds located in Québec (Canada), LiDAR elevation data and satellite imagery (QuickBird, Spot and Landsat) were acquired. The studied territories have been partitioned in hydrologic response units (HRUs) according to sub-basins, soils, elevation (topographic index) and land use. These HRUs are afterwards used in a P index software (P-Edit) that calculates the quantities of sediments and phosphorus exported from each HRUs. These exports of sediments and phosphorus are validated with hydrometric and water quality data obtain in two sub-basins and are also compared to soil brightness index derived from multispectral images. This index is sensitive to soil moisture and thus highlights areas where the soil is

  15. Data on milk dioxin contamination linked with the location of fodder croplands allow to hypothesize the origin of the pollution source in an Italian valley.

    PubMed

    Desiato, Rosanna; Bertolini, Silvia; Baioni, Elisa; Crescio, Maria Ines; Scortichini, Giampiero; Ubaldi, Alessandro; Sparagna, Bruno; Cuttica, Giancarlo; Ru, Giuseppe

    2014-11-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) have similar toxic, endocrine-disrupting, and carcinogenic activity. They are classified as persistent organic pollutants accumulating in the environment and the tissues of living organisms. High concentrations of PCDD/F and dl-PCB have been detected in bovine milk collected in a Piedmont valley (Northwestern Italy) since 2004. This geographic study describes the local distribution of pollution from PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs. Since their presence in animal products could be traced back to the ingestion of contaminated fodder, dioxin levels in cow milk were related to the distribution of fodder cropland parcels. Specifically, the aim of the study was to determine, through an exploratory approach, whether the contamination was consistent with one common point source of contamination or different scattered sources. Data for PCDD/F and dl-PCB concentrations in the bulk milk from 27 herds, sampled over a 4-year period (2004-2007), were matched to the georeferenced land parcels the dairy farmers used for growing fodder. Isopleth maps of dioxin concentrations were estimated with ordinary kriging. The highest level of pollution for both PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs was geographically juxtaposed: in both instances, the location of the local steel plant was within this extremely highly polluted area. The study results support the hypothesis for one common point source of contamination in the valley. The exploratory spatial analysis applied in this research may provide a valuable, novel approach to straightforward identification of a highly likely source of dioxin contamination of dairy products (even in the absence of top soil contamination data). PMID:25194902

  16. A method based on acoustic emission for locating debris cloud impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhidong; Pang, Baojun

    2009-12-01

    Due to the threat of impact to spacecraft from space debris and meteoroid, space debris and meteoroid shields have been raised and used in many spacecrafts. In order to conduct an assessment of spacecraft module-wall damage impacted by debris cloud created by space debris and meteoroid high-velocity impact on the shields, it's necessary to develop a location method for the debris cloud impact. The method based on virtual wave front for acoustic emission source location has been investigated and extended to locate the impact position of the debris cloud. Debris cloud hypervelocity impact experiments were conducted by using a two-stage light gas gun, the experimental results indicate that: The signals induced by debris cloud contain a0, s0, s2 mode wave, the virtual wave front location method can be extended to locate the impact position of the debris cloud effectively, the AE signals contain more high frequency components than AE signals created by single projectile impact event. The results provide a reference for the development of the sensor systems to detect impacts on spacecraft.

  17. A method based on acoustic emission for locating debris cloud impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhidong; Pang, Baojun

    2010-03-01

    Due to the threat of impact to spacecraft from space debris and meteoroid, space debris and meteoroid shields have been raised and used in many spacecrafts. In order to conduct an assessment of spacecraft module-wall damage impacted by debris cloud created by space debris and meteoroid high-velocity impact on the shields, it's necessary to develop a location method for the debris cloud impact. The method based on virtual wave front for acoustic emission source location has been investigated and extended to locate the impact position of the debris cloud. Debris cloud hypervelocity impact experiments were conducted by using a two-stage light gas gun, the experimental results indicate that: The signals induced by debris cloud contain a0, s0, s2 mode wave, the virtual wave front location method can be extended to locate the impact position of the debris cloud effectively, the AE signals contain more high frequency components than AE signals created by single projectile impact event. The results provide a reference for the development of the sensor systems to detect impacts on spacecraft.

  18. Cable-fault locator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cason, R. L.; Mcstay, J. J.; Heymann, A. P., Sr.

    1979-01-01

    Inexpensive system automatically indicates location of short-circuited section of power cable. Monitor does not require that cable be disconnected from its power source or that test signals be applied. Instead, ground-current sensors are installed in manholes or at other selected locations along cable run. When fault occurs, sensors transmit information about fault location to control center. Repair crew can be sent to location and cable can be returned to service with minimum of downtime.

  19. Coupled HBO and NBO Variations in the Z Source GX 5-1: Inner Accretion Disk as the Location of QPOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, K.; Rao, A. R.; Choi, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    The simultaneous and coupled evolution of horizontal branch oscillation (HBO) and normal branch oscillation (NBO) in Z-type sources suggests that the production of HBO is connected to NBO and is caused by changes in the physical/radiative properties of the inner accretion disk, although there is a lack of substantial spectral evidence to support this. In this Letter, we present the results of an analysis of an RXTE observation of the Z source GX 5-1, where the 6 Hz NBO is simultaneously detected along with an HBO at 51 Hz. The variations in the intensity and the associated power density spectrum indicate that the HBO and NBO are strongly coupled, originating from the same location in the inner accretion disk. The absence of HBO and NBO in the lower energy bands, an increase in the rms amplitude with energy, and a smooth transition among them suggest that they are produced in the hot inner regions of the accretion disk. Based on a spectral analysis, we found a signature of changing or physically modified inner disk front during the coupled HBO and NBO evolution. We explore the various models to explain the observed phenomenon and propose that the NBO is affiliated to the oscillations in the thick/puffed-up inner region of the accretion disk.

  20. COUPLED HBO AND NBO VARIATIONS IN THE Z SOURCE GX 5-1: INNER ACCRETION DISK AS THE LOCATION OF QPOs

    SciTech Connect

    Sriram, K.; Choi, C. S.; Rao, A. R.

    2011-12-20

    The simultaneous and coupled evolution of horizontal branch oscillation (HBO) and normal branch oscillation (NBO) in Z-type sources suggests that the production of HBO is connected to NBO and is caused by changes in the physical/radiative properties of the inner accretion disk, although there is a lack of substantial spectral evidence to support this. In this Letter, we present the results of an analysis of an RXTE observation of the Z source GX 5-1, where the 6 Hz NBO is simultaneously detected along with an HBO at 51 Hz. The variations in the intensity and the associated power density spectrum indicate that the HBO and NBO are strongly coupled, originating from the same location in the inner accretion disk. The absence of HBO and NBO in the lower energy bands, an increase in the rms amplitude with energy, and a smooth transition among them suggest that they are produced in the hot inner regions of the accretion disk. Based on a spectral analysis, we found a signature of changing or physically modified inner disk front during the coupled HBO and NBO evolution. We explore the various models to explain the observed phenomenon and propose that the NBO is affiliated to the oscillations in the thick/puffed-up inner region of the accretion disk.

  1. Acoustic emissions (AE) during failure of granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlmayr, Gernot; Or, Dani

    2014-05-01

    The release of shallow landslides and other geological mass movements is the result of progressive failure accumulation. Mechanical failure in disordered geologic materials occurs in intermittent breakage episodes marking the disintegration or rearrangement of load-bearing elements. Abrupt strain energy release in such breakage episodes is associated with generation of elastic waves measurable as high-frequency (kHz range) acoustic emissions (AE). The close association of AE with progressive failure events hold a promise for using such noninvasive methods to assess the mechanical state of granular Earth materials or for the development early warning methods for shallow landslides. We present numerical simulations that incorporate damage accumulation and associated stress redistribution using a fiber-bundle model. The stress released from element failure (fibers) is redistributed to the surrounding elements and eventually triggers larger failure avalanches. AE signals generated from such events and eventually hitting a virtual sensor are modeled using visco-elastic wave propagation laws. The model captures the characteristic saw-tooth shape of the observed stress-strain curves obtained from strain-controlled experiments with glass beads, including large intermittent stress release events that stem from cascading failure avalanches. The model also reproduces characteristics of AE signatures and yield a good agreement between simulation results and experimental data. Linking mechanical and AE information in the proposed modeling framework offer a solid basis for interpretation of measured field data.

  2. Characterization and treatment of water used for human consumption from six sources located in the Cameron/Tuba City abandoned uranium mining area.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Visnja; Kollar, Robert; Nad, Karlo; Mikelic, Ivanka Lovrencic; Kollar, Iris

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was the characterization and improvement of the quality of water used for human consumption of unregulated/regulated water sources located in the Cameron/Tuba City abandoned uranium mining area (NE Arizona, western edge of the Navajo Nation). Samples were collected at six water sources which included regulated sources: Wind Mill (Tank 3T-538), Badger Springs and Paddock Well as well as unregulated sources: Willy Spring, Water Wall and Water Hole. Samples taken from Wind Mill, Water Wall and Water Hole were characterized with high turbidity and color as well as high level of manganese, iron and nickel and elevated value of molybdenum. High level of iron was also found in Badger Spring, Willy Spring, and Paddock Well. These three water sources were also characterized with elevated values of fluoride and vanadium. Significant amounts of zinc were found in Water Wall and Water Hole samples. Water Wall sample was also characterized with high level of Cr(VI). Compared to primary or secondary Navajo Nation Environmental Protection Agency (NNEPA) water quality standard the highest enrichment was found for turbidity (50.000 times), color (up to 1.796 times) and manganese (71 times), Cr(VI) (17.5 times), iron (7.4 times) and arsenic (5.2 times). Activities of (226)Ra and (238)U in water samples were still in agreement with the maximum contaminant levels. In order to comply with NNEPA water quality standard water samples were subjected to electrochemical treatment. This method was selected due to its high removal efficiency for heavy metals and uranium, lower settlement time, production of smaller volume of waste mud and higher stability of waste mud compared to physico-chemical treatment. Following the treatment, concentrations of heavy metals and activities of radionuclides in all samples were significantly lower compared to NNEPA or WHO regulated values. The maximum removal efficiencies for color, turbidity, arsenic, manganese, molybdenum and

  3. Determination of AES Orbit Elements Using Mixed Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnik, S. Ja.; Strakhova, S. L.

    An algorithm is worked out and a program is compiled for a determination of AES (artificial Earth satellite) orbit elements using both goniometrical and range-finder observations of different precision. The observations of one or several passages carried out from one or several stations can be used. A number of observational stations and a number of observations are not limited in principle. When solving this task the AES ephemerides on the moments of observations are calculated for different sets of orbit elements. A parameter F is considered which is a function of orbit elements. The parameter presents a square-mean deviation of AES ephemeris position on the moments {J;} from its observed one. The determination of real orbit elements comes to minimizing of parameter F by orbit elements using a method of deformed polyhedron. When calculating the ephemeris the amendments for 2-d, 3-d, 4-th geopotential zone harmonics are considered.

  4. An Improved Recovery Algorithm for Decayed AES Key Schedule Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsow, Alex

    A practical algorithm that recovers AES key schedules from decayed memory images is presented. Halderman et al. [1] established this recovery capability, dubbed the cold-boot attack, as a serious vulnerability for several widespread software-based encryption packages. Our algorithm recovers AES-128 key schedules tens of millions of times faster than the original proof-of-concept release. In practice, it enables reliable recovery of key schedules at 70% decay, well over twice the decay capacity of previous methods. The algorithm is generalized to AES-256 and is empirically shown to recover 256-bit key schedules that have suffered 65% decay. When solutions are unique, the algorithm efficiently validates this property and outputs the solution for memory images decayed up to 60%.

  5. A high performance hardware implementation image encryption with AES algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmani, Ali; Jafari, Mohamad; Miremadi, Seyed Sohrab

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes implementation of a high-speed encryption algorithm with high throughput for encrypting the image. Therefore, we select a highly secured symmetric key encryption algorithm AES(Advanced Encryption Standard), in order to increase the speed and throughput using pipeline technique in four stages, control unit based on logic gates, optimal design of multiplier blocks in mixcolumn phase and simultaneous production keys and rounds. Such procedure makes AES suitable for fast image encryption. Implementation of a 128-bit AES on FPGA of Altra company has been done and the results are as follow: throughput, 6 Gbps in 471MHz. The time of encrypting in tested image with 32*32 size is 1.15ms.

  6. Determination of Minerals in Apples by ICP AES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, Mark

    2003-10-01

    A laboratory experiment is described that involves the elemental analysis of apples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (IICP AES). The results of the experiment allow students to predict the cold-storage stability of apples. During the experiment the sample-preparation techniques and digestion procedures involved in elemental analysis of solid organic samples are introduced and the optimization of the ICP AES is explored. The method detailed can easily be adapted for the analysis of a wider range of elements. The laboratory experiment may also be undertaken using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) with only minor modifications in the sample-preparation procedure.

  7. NHEXAS PHASE I REGION 5 STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR METTLER AE163 AND AE240 ELECTRONIC BALANCE (NHX/SOP-160-008)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This procedure describes the process of calibrating the Mettler AE 163 and AE 240 electronic, dual range analytical balances each having an enclosed weighing pan. Weight ranges for the AE 163 are 0-30 g (0.01 mg readability) and 0-160 g (0.1 mg readability). Weight ranges for the...

  8. Co-located monogenetic eruptions ~200 kyr apart driven by tapping vertically separated mantle source regions, Chagwido, Jeju Island, Republic of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenna, Marco; Németh, Károly; Cronin, Shane J.; Sohn, Young Kwan; Smith, Ian E. M.; Wijbrans, Jan

    2015-05-01

    -developed paleosol represents at least 200 kyr between the two co-located eruptions. The distinctive magma compositions show that each eruption tapped an independent region within the same underlying mantle source. These observations show that contrary to most assumptions of monogenetic volcanism, an already "tapped" source region may become fertile again through mantle convection/migration and eruptions can thus be expected from old vent sites in long-lived volcanic fields.

  9. ISO spectroscopy of disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acke, B.; van den Ancker, M. E.

    2004-10-01

    We have investigated the infrared spectra of all 46 Herbig Ae/Be stars for which spectroscopic data are available in the ISO data archive. Our quantitative analysis of these spectra focuses on the emission bands at 3.3, 6.2, ``7.7'', 8.6 and 11.2 micron, linked to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the nanodiamond-related features at 3.4 and 3.5 micron, the amorphous 10 micron silicate band and the crystalline silicate band at 11.3 micron. We have detected PAH emission in 57% of the Herbig stars in our sample. Although for most of these sources the PAH spectra are similar, there are clear examples of differences in the PAH spectra within our sample which can be explained by differences in PAH size, chemistry and/or ionization. Amorphous silicate emission was detected in the spectra of 52% of the sample stars, amorphous silicate absorption in 13%. We have detected crystalline silicate emission in 11 stars (24% of our sample), of which four (9%) also display strong PAH emission. We have classified the sample sources according to the strength of their mid-IR energy distribution. The systems with stronger mid-infared (20-100 μm) excesses relative to their near-infrared (1-5 μm) excess display significantly more PAH emission than those with weaker mid-infrared excesses. There are no pronounced differences in the behaviour of the silicate feature between the two groups. This provides strong observational support for the disk models by \\citet{dullemond01}, in which systems with a flaring disk geometry display a strong mid-infrared excess, whereas those with disks that are strongly shadowed by the puffed-up inner rim of the disk only display modest amounts of mid-infrared emission. Since the silicates are expected to be produced mainly in the warm inner disk regions, no large differences in silicate behaviour are expected between the two groups. In contrast to this, the PAH emission is expected to be produced mainly in the part of the disk atmosphere that is

  10. Estimation of The Radiation Environment Based On The NASA Ap-8 and Ae-8 Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Thomas; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the earth's trapped radiation environment, as described by the NASA models AP-8 and AE-8. We include a description of the sources and structure of the trapped radiation belts, and their dependence on external factors. After describing how to use the models to predict the environment, we present data from various space missions, and compare those data to the models. This shows the limits and strengths of the models. Finally, we describe alternative models of the trapped radiation belts, and discuss why they have not been widely adopted yet.

  11. Studies of the flickering in cataclysmic variables. VI. The location of the flickering light source in HT Cassiopeiae, V2051 Ophiuchi, IP Pegasi and UX Ursae Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, A.

    2000-07-01

    The scatter in the light curves of four eclipsing cataclysmic variables (CVs) is analyzed in order to find constraints for the location of the flickering light source in these systems. In all cases the ``scatter curves'' contain well defined eclipses which begin and end exactly at the phases of eclipse ingress and egress of individual system components: In HT Cas, V2051 Oph and UX UMa the scatter eclipse coincides with the white dwarf eclipse, in IP Peg with the hot spot eclipse. Moreover, in V2051 Oph, IP Peg and UX UMa the scatter is enhanced during phases of visibility of the hot spot. Together with similar results from earlier investigations these findings leave little doubt that the flickering in CVs can originate in two regions: the innermost accretions disk with the boundary layer and the white dwarf surface, and the region of impact of the stream of transferred matter from the secondary star upon the accretion disk. Two different techniques (termed `single' and `ensemble' method) to measure the scatter curves of CVs are advocated in the literature. A critical comparison of these techniques is performed. It is found that the `ensemble' method yields reasonable results only under specific circumstances.

  12. Super-Sonograms and graphical seismic source locations: Facing the challenge of real-time data processing in an OSI SAMS installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joswig, Manfred

    2010-05-01

    The installation and operation of an OSI seismic aftershock monitoring system (SAMS) is bound by strict time constraints: 30+ small arrays must be set up within days, and data screening must cope with the daily seismogram input. This is a significant challenge since any potential, single ML -2.0 aftershock from a potential nuclear test must be detected and discriminated against a variety of higher-amplitude noise bursts. No automated approach can handle this task to date; thus some 200 traces of 24/7 data must be screened manually with a time resolution sufficient to recover signals of just a few sec duration, and with tiny amplitudes just above the threshold of ambient noise. Previous tests confirmed that this task can not be performed by time-domain signal screening via established seismological processing software, e.g. PITSA, SEISAN, or GEOTOOLS. Instead, we introduced 'SonoView', a seismic diagnosis tool based on a compilation of array traces into super-sonograms. Several hours of cumulative array data can be displayed at once on a single computer screen - without sacrifying the necessary detectability of few-sec signals. Then 'TraceView' will guide the analyst to select the relevant traces with best SNR, and 'HypoLine' offers some interactive, graphical location tools for fast epicenter estimates and source signature identifications. A previous release of this software suite was successfully applied at IFE08 in Kasakhstan, and supported the seismic sub-team of OSI in its timely report compilation.

  13. Gravity waves in the thermosphere observed by the AE satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S. H.; Reber, C. A.; Huang, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    Atmospheric Explorer (AE) satellite data were used to investigate the spectra characteristics of wave-like structure observed in the neutral and ionized components of the thermosphere. Power spectral analysis derived by the maximum entropy method indicate the existence of a broad spectrum of scale sizes for the fluctuations ranging from tens to thousands of kilometers.

  14. Supraphysiologic levels of the AML1-ETO isoform AE9a are essential for transformation.

    PubMed

    Link, Kevin A; Lin, Shan; Shrestha, Mahesh; Bowman, Melissa; Wunderlich, Mark; Bloomfield, Clara D; Huang, Gang; Mulloy, James C

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomal translocation 8;21 is found in 40% of the FAB M2 subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The resultant in-frame fusion protein AML1-ETO (AE) acts as an initiating oncogene for leukemia development. AE immortalizes human CD34(+) cord blood cells in long-term culture. We assessed the transforming properties of the alternatively spliced AE isoform AE9a (or alternative splicing at exon 9), which is fully transforming in a murine retroviral model, in human cord blood cells. Full activity was realized only upon increased fusion protein expression. This effect was recapitulated in the AE9a murine AML model. Cotransduction of AE and AE9a resulted in a strong selective pressure for AE-expressing cells. In the context of AE, AE9a did not show selection for increased expression, affirming observations of human t(8;21) patient samples where full-length AE is the dominant protein detected. Mechanistically, AE9a showed defective transcriptional regulation of AE target genes that was partially corrected at high expression. Together, these results bring an additional perspective to our understanding of AE function and highlight the contribution of oncogene expression level in t(8;21) experimental models. PMID:27457952

  15. Eldercare Locator

    MedlinePlus

    ... page content Skip Navigation Department of Health and Human Services Your Browser ... Welcome to the Eldercare Locator, a public service of the U.S. Administration on Aging connecting you to services for older ...

  16. "Storms of crustal stress" and AE earthquake precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregori, G. P.; Poscolieri, M.; Paparo, G.; de Simone, S.; Rafanelli, C.; Ventrice, G.

    2010-02-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) displays violent paroxysms preceding strong earthquakes, observed within some large area (several hundred kilometres wide) around the epicentre. We call them "storms of crustal stress" or, briefly "crustal storms". A few case histories are discussed, all dealing with the Italian peninsula, and with the different behaviour shown by the AE records in the Cephalonia island (Greece), which is characterized by a different tectonic setting. AE is an effective tool for diagnosing the state of some wide slab of the Earth's crust, and for monitoring its evolution, by means of AE of different frequencies. The same effect ought to be detected being time-delayed, when referring to progressively lower frequencies. This results to be an effective check for validating the physical interpretation. Unlike a seismic event, which involves a much limited focal volume and therefore affects a restricted area on the Earth's surface, a "crustal storm" typically involves some large slab of lithosphere and crust. In general, it cannot be easily reckoned to any specific seismic event. An earthquake responds to strictly local rheological features of the crust, which are eventually activated, and become crucial, on the occasion of a "crustal storm". A "crustal storm" lasts typically few years, eventually involving several destructive earthquakes that hit at different times, at different sites, within that given lithospheric slab. Concerning the case histories that are here discussed, the lithospheric slab is identified with the Italian peninsula. During 1996-1997 a "crustal storm" was on, maybe elapsing until 2002 (we lack information for the period 1998-2001). Then, a quiet period occurred from 2002 until 26 May 2008, when a new "crustal storm" started, and by the end of 2009 it is still on. During the 1996-1997 "storm" two strong earthquakes occurred (Potenza and Colfiorito) - and (maybe) in 2002 also the Molise earthquake can be reckoned to this "storm". During the

  17. Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti and Aedes (Howardina) cozumelensis in Yucatán State, México, with a summary of published collection records for Ae. cozumelensis

    PubMed Central

    García-Rejón, Julián E.; López-Uribe, Mildred P.; Loroño-Pino, María Alba; Arana-Guardia, Roger; Puc-Tinal, Maria; López-Uribe, Genny M.; Coba-Tún, Carlos; Baak-Baak, Carlos M.; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Reyes-Solis, Guadalupe C.; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Black IV, William C.; Beaty, Barry J.; Eisen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    We collected mosquito immatures from artificial containers during 2010–2011 from 26 communities, ranging in size from small rural communities to large urban centers, located in different parts of Yucatán State in southeastern México. The arbovirus vector Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti was collected from all 26 examined communities, and nine of the communities also yielded another container-inhabiting Aedes mosquito: Aedes (Howardina) cozumelensis. The communities from which Ae. cozumelensis were collected were all small, rural communities (<6,000 inhabitants) in the north-central part of Yucatán State. These new collection records for Ae. cozumelensis demonstrate that this mosquito has a far broader geographic range in the Yucatán Peninsula than previously known. Ae. cozumelensis immatures were collected from both residential premises and cemeteries, with specimens recovered from rock holes as well as various artificial containers including metal cans, flower vases, buckets, tires and a water storage tank. The co-occurrence with Ae. aegypti in small rural communities poses intriguing questions regarding linkages between these mosquitoes, including the potential for direct competition for larval development sites. Additional studies are needed to determine how commonly Ae. cozumelensis feeds on human blood and whether it is naturally infected with arboviruses or other pathogens of medical or veterinary importance. We also summarize the published records for Ae. cozumelensis, which are restricted to collections from México’s Yucatán Peninsula and Belize, and uniformly represent geographic locations where Ae. aegypti can be expected to occur. PMID:23181861

  18. Two reduced form air quality modeling techniques for rapidly calculating pollutant mitigation potential across many sources, locations and precursor emission types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Kristen M.; Napelenok, Sergey L.; Jang, Carey; Phillips, Sharon; Hubbell, Bryan J.; Fulcher, Charles M.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the computational cost of running regional-scale numerical air quality models, reduced form models (RFM) have been proposed as computationally efficient simulation tools for characterizing the pollutant response to many different types of emission reductions. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed two types of reduced form models based upon simulations of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. One is based on statistical response surface modeling (RSM) techniques using a multidimensional kriging approach to approximate the nonlinear chemical and physical processes. The second approach is based on using sensitivity coefficients estimated with the Decoupled Direct Method in 3 dimensions (CMAQ-DDM-3D) in a Taylor series approximation for the nonlinear response of the pollutant concentrations to changes in emissions from specific sectors and locations. Both types of reduced form models are used to estimate the changes in O3 and PM2.5 across space associated with emission reductions of NOx and SO2 from power plants and other sectors in the eastern United States. This study provides a direct comparison of the RSM- and DDM-3D-based tools in terms of: computational cost, model performance against brute force runs, and model response to changes in emission inputs. For O3, the DDM-3D RFM had slightly better performance on average for low to moderate emission cuts compared to the kriging-based RSM, but over-predicted O3 disbenefits from cuts to mobile source NOx in very urban areas. The RSM approach required more up-front computational cost and produced some spurious O3 increases in response to reductions in power plant emissions. However the RSM provided more accurate predictions for PM2.5 and for predictions of very large emission cuts (e.g. -60 to -90%). This comparison indicates that there are some important differences in the output of the two approaches that should be taken under consideration when interpreting results for a

  19. A spectro-astrometric measurement of Brackett gamma emission in Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, T. S.; Brittain, S.; Stevans, M.; Kurgatt, C.

    2012-07-01

    In T Tauri stars, the Brackett γ line strength is a reliable indicator of accretion luminosity. Among intermediate mass young stars, Herbig Ae stars also show this correlation, but in Herbig Be stars the Brγ line flux significantly overpredicts accretion luminosity. This Brγ excess in Herbig Be stars is thought to arise from a spatially extended outflow. Using commissioning data from the LUCIFER spectrograph on the 8.4-meter Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), we present a spectro-astrometric study of two Herbig Ae/Be stars, the HAe star MWC480 and the HBe star HD 259431. In both stars, an extended Brγ source can be ruled out down to 0.001 arcsec at the 1σ level. Using currently accepted parallax values of 137 ± 25 pc and 173 ± 37 pc, this implies a lack of spatially extended structure beyond 0.131 ± 0.024 AU for MWC 480 and 0.166 ± 0.036 AU for HD 259431. Spectro-astrometric precision depends on both the signal-to-noise and the angular resolution of an observation. To confidently rule out an extended Brγ source as the origin of the Brγ excess, either a repeat of these observations with the LBT's AO enabled, or an 81× increase in observing time, is needed.

  20. Differential inhibition of AE1 and AE2 anion exchangers by oxonol dyes and by novel polyaminosterol analogs of the shark antibiotic squalamine.

    PubMed

    Alper, S L; Chernova, M N; Williams, J; Zasloff, M; Law, F Y; Knauf, P A

    1998-01-01

    Oxonol and polyaminosterol drugs were examined as inhibitors of recombinant mouse AE1 and AE2 anion exchangers expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and were compared as inhibitors of AE1-mediated anion flux in red cells and in HL-60 cells that express AE2. The oxonols WW-781, diBA(5)C4, and diBA(3)C4 inhibited HL-60 cell Cl-/Cl- exchange with IC50 values from 1 to 7 microM, 100-1000 times less potent than their IC50 values for red cell Cl-/anion exchange. In Xenopus oocytes, diBA(5)C4 inhibited AE1-mediated Cl- efflux several hundred times more potently than that mediated by AE2. Several novel squalamine-related polyaminosterols were also evaluated as anion exchange inhibitors. In contrast to diBA(5)C4, polyaminosterol 1361 inhibited oocyte-expressed AE2 8-fold more potently than AE1 (IC50 0.6 versus 5.2 microM). The 3-fold less potent desulfo-analog, 1360, showed similar preference for AE2. It was found that 1361 also partially inhibited Cl- efflux from red cells, whereas neither polyaminosterol inhibited Cl efflux from HL60 cells. Thus, the oxonol diBA(5)C4 is >100-fold more potent as an inhibitor of AE1 than of AE2, whereas the polyaminosterols 1360 and 1361 are 8-fold more potent as inhibitors of AE2 than of AE1. Assay conditions and cell type influenced IC50 values for both classes of compounds. PMID:10353714

  1. A Novel Byte-Substitution Architecture for the AES Cryptosystem

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Fakir Sharif; Ali, Md. Liakot

    2015-01-01

    The performance of Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) mainly depends on speed, area and power. The S-box represents an important factor that affects the performance of AES on each of these factors. A number of techniques have been presented in the literature, which have attempted to improve the performance of the S-box byte-substitution. This paper proposes a new S-box architecture, defining it as ultra low power, robustly parallel and highly efficient in terms of area. The architecture is discussed for both CMOS and FPGA platforms, and the pipelined architecture of the proposed S-box is presented for further time savings and higher throughput along with higher hardware resources utilization. A performance analysis and comparison of the proposed architecture is also conducted with those achieved by the existing techniques. The results of the comparison verify the outperformance of the proposed architecture in terms of power, delay and size. PMID:26491967

  2. Paediatric unplanned reattendance rate: A&E clinical quality indicators.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, Kate; Hacking, Katie A; Simmons, Naomi; Christian, William; Syahanee, R; Shamekh, Ahmed; Prince, Nicholas J

    2013-03-01

    The new accident and emergency (A&E) unplanned reattendance rate clinical quality indicator is intended to drive reduction of avoidable reattendances. Validation data for reattendance rates in children are awaited. The aim of this three site observational study is to establish the rate and reasons for unplanned reattendance to UK paediatric A&Es. Each centre undertook retrospective case note review of children attending at least twice within 7 days. Unplanned reattendance rates at the three centres were 5.1%, 5.2% and 4.4%. Reducing unnecessary unplanned reattendances is beneficial for patients, service capacity and efficacy. This study has identified two groups for targeting reattendance reduction: parents of children returning with the same diagnosis, severity unchanged and parents who bypass primary care resources. Clear communication and early involvement of experienced clinicians are paramount. This study has indicated that a 1%-5% unplanned reattendance rate is realistic, achievable and can drive improvement in children's services. PMID:23287643

  3. A Novel Byte-Substitution Architecture for the AES Cryptosystem.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Fakir Sharif; Ali, Md Liakot

    2015-01-01

    The performance of Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) mainly depends on speed, area and power. The S-box represents an important factor that affects the performance of AES on each of these factors. A number of techniques have been presented in the literature, which have attempted to improve the performance of the S-box byte-substitution. This paper proposes a new S-box architecture, defining it as ultra low power, robustly parallel and highly efficient in terms of area. The architecture is discussed for both CMOS and FPGA platforms, and the pipelined architecture of the proposed S-box is presented for further time savings and higher throughput along with higher hardware resources utilization. A performance analysis and comparison of the proposed architecture is also conducted with those achieved by the existing techniques. The results of the comparison verify the outperformance of the proposed architecture in terms of power, delay and size. PMID:26491967

  4. Petchienes A-E, Meroterpenoids from Ganoderma petchii.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qin-Lei; Guo, Ping-Xia; Luo, Qi; Yan, Hui; Cheng, Yong-Xian

    2015-12-01

    Petchienes A-E (1-5), five new meroterpenoids, were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma petchii. Their structures, including absolute configurations, were elucidated by means of spectroscopic and computational methods. Compound 4 was isolated as a racemic mixture, which was finally purified by chiral HPLC to yield individual (-) and (+)-antipodes. Biological evaluation showed that compounds 2 and (-)-4 could increase intracellular free calcium concentration at 10 μM in HEK-293 cells. PMID:26882654

  5. HARPS spectropolarimetry of Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubrig, S.; Ilyin, I.; Schöller, M.; Lo Curto, G.

    2013-12-01

    Our knowledge of the presence and the strength of magnetic fields in intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence stars remains very poor. We present new magnetic field measurements in six Herbig Ae/Be stars observed with HARPS in spectropolarimetric mode. We downloaded from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) archive the publically available HARPS spectra for six Herbig Ae/Be stars. Wavelength shifts between right- and left-hand side circularly polarised spectra were interpreted in terms of a longitudinal magnetic field , using the moment technique introduced by Mathys. The application of the moment technique to the HARPS spectra allowed us in addition to study the presence of the crossover effect and quadratic magnetic fields. Our search for longitudinal magnetic fields resulted in first detections of weak magnetic fields in the Herbig Ae/Be stars HD 58647 and HD 98922. Further, we confirm the previous tentative detection of a weak magnetic field in HD 104237 by Donati et al. and confirm the previous detection of a magnetic field in the Herbig Ae star HD 190073. Surprisingly, the measured longitudinal magnetic field of HD 190073, < Bz >=91±18 G at a significance level of 5σ is not in agreement with the measurement results of Alecian et al. (2013), < Bz >=-10±20 G, who applied the LSD method to exactly the same data. No crossover effect was detected for any star in the sample. Only for HD 98922 the crossover effect was found to be close to 3σ with a measured value of -4228±1443 km s-1 G. A quadratic magnetic field of the order of 10 kG was detected in HD 98922, and of ˜3.5 kG in HD 104237. Based on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility under requests MSCHOELLER 51301, 51324, 36608-36611.

  6. Compact and Secure Design of Masked AES S-Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri, Babak; Salmasizadeh, Mahmoud; Moradi, Amir; Tabandeh, Mahmoud; Shalmani, Mohammad T. Manzuri

    Composite field arithmetic is known as an alternative method for lookup tables in implementation of S-box block of AES algorithm. The idea is to breakdown the computations to lower order fields and compute the inverse there. Recently this idea have been used both for reducing the area in implementation of S-boxes and masking implementations of AES algorithm. The most compact design using this technique is presented by Canright using only 92 gates for an S-box block. In another approach, IAIK laboratory has presented a masked implementation of AES algorithm with higher security comparing common masking methods using Composite field arithmetic. Our work in this paper is to use basic ideas of the two approaches above to get a compact masked S-box. We shall use the idea of masking inversion of IAIK's masked S-box but we will rewrite the equations using normal basis. We arrange the terms in these equations in a way that the optimized functions in Canright's compact S-box can be used for our design. An implementation of IAIK's masked S-box is also presented using Canright's polynomial functions to have a fair comparison between our design and IAIK's design. Moreover, we show that this design which uses two special normal basis for GF(16) and GF(4) is the smallest. We shall also prove the security of this design using some lemmas.

  7. Why does A&E attract newly qualified registered nurses?

    PubMed

    Cronin, Gerard; Cronin, Camille

    2006-04-01

    Workforce planning is a particular buzzword that nurse managers must grapple with and now must understand. They must develop strategies to ensure the life and growth of a department while incorporating numerous government targets to ensure the service reaches quality, achieves and meets predetermined goals. To do all this that manager needs a workforce. The recruitment of nursing staff to a specialist area such as Accident & Emergency (A&E) requires a level of creativity and sustained effort. Newly qualified registered nurse working in A&E have, in the past, been considered to be an unusual group of staff to apply to work in A&E. However, many health service managers receive applications from staff in this category and are often encouraged to recruit newly qualified registered nurse's rather than pay for agency workers. Using a qualitative approach this paper explores the key reasons why newly qualified registered nurses choose to work in an Accident & Emergency environment. Data was collected from a sample of 25 newly qualified registered nurses and analysed thematically. Five themes are presented: challenge, teamwork, diversity, support, and learning. These themes have implications for Accident and Emergency units and human resource and workforce planning departments. PMID:16464593

  8. SPITZER'S VIEW ON AROMATIC AND ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION IN HERBIG Ae STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Acke, B.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Bouwman, J.; Juhasz, A.; Henning, Th.; Van den Ancker, M. E.; Meeus, G.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2010-07-20

    The chemistry of astronomical hydrocarbons, responsible for the well-known infrared emission features detected in a wide variety of targets, remains enigmatic. Here we focus on the group of young intermediate-mass Herbig Ae stars. We have analyzed the aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features in the infrared spectra of a sample of 53 Herbig Ae stars, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. We confirm that the PAH-to-stellar luminosity ratio is higher in targets with a flared dust disk. However, a few sources with a flattened dust disk still show relatively strong PAH emission. Since PAH molecules trace the gas disk, this indicates that gas disks may still be flared, while the dust disk has settled due to grain growth. There are indications that the strength of the 11.3 {mu}m feature also depends on dust disk structure, with flattened disks being less bright in this feature. We confirm that the CC bond features at 6.2 and 7.8 {mu}m shift to redder wavelengths with decreasing stellar effective temperature. Moreover, we show that this redshift is accompanied by a relative increase of aliphatic CH emission and a decrease of the aromatic 8.6 {mu}m CH feature strength. Cool stars in our sample are surrounded by hydrocarbons with a high aliphatic/aromatic CH ratio and a low aromatic CH/CC ratio, and vice versa for the hot stars. We conclude that, while the overall hydrocarbon emission strength depends on the dust disk's geometry, the relative differences seen in the IR emission features in disks around Herbig Ae stars are mainly due to chemical differences of the hydrocarbon molecules induced by the stellar UV field. Strong UV flux reduces the aliphatic component and emphasizes the spectral signature of the aromatic molecules in the IR spectra.

  9. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) or Automated Export System (AES) record. 758.1 Section 758.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated Export System record)...

  10. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CLEARANCE REQUIREMENTS § 758.1 The Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated... AES record requirements. When an exemption from filing the Shipper's Export Declaration or...

  11. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) or Automated Export System (AES) record. 758.1 Section 758.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated Export System record)...

  12. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) or Automated Export System (AES) record. 758.1 Section 758.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated Export System record)...

  13. 76 FR 4089 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Automated Export System (AES) Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... Census Bureau Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Automated Export System (AES) Program... INFORMATION: I. Abstract The Automated Export System (AES), is the instrument used for collecting export trade... provisions for preparing and filing the AES record. These data are used in the development of U.S....

  14. 15 CFR 758.1 - The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) or Automated Export System (AES) record. 758.1 Section 758.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations... (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. (a) The Shipper's Export Declaration (SED) or Automated Export System (AES) record. The SED (Form 7525-V, Form 7525-V-Alt, or Automated Export System record)...

  15. TURBO-AE: An Aeroelastic Code for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhle, Milind A.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST) program is developing new technologies to increase the fuel efficiency of commercial aircraft engines, improve the safety of engine operation, and reduce engine emissions and noise. With the development of new designs for ducted fans, compressors, and turbines to achieve these goals, a basic aeroelastic requirement is that there should be no flutter or high resonant blade stresses in the operating regime. To verify the aeroelastic soundness of these designs, we need an accurate prediction and analysis code. Such a two-dimensional viscous propulsion aeroelastic code, named TURBO-AE, is being developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The TURBO-AE aeroelastic code is based on a three-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic Euler/Navier-Stokes turbomachinery code TURBO, developed under a grant from NASA Lewis. TURBO-AE can model viscous flow effects that play an important role in certain aeroelastic problems, such as flutter with flow separation (or stall flutter) and flutter in the presence of shock and boundary-layer interaction. The structural dynamics representation of the blade in the TURBO-AE code is based on a normal mode representation. A finite element analysis code, such as NASTRAN, is used to calculate in-vacuum vibration modes and the associated natural frequency. A work-per-cycle approach is used to determine aeroelastic (flutter) stability. With this approach, the motion of the blade is prescribed to be a harmonic vibration in a specified in vacuum normal mode. The aerodynamic forces acting on the vibrating blade and the work done by these forces on the vibrating blade during a cycle of vibration are calculated. If positive work is being done on the blade by the aerodynamic forces, the blade is dynamically unstable, since it will extract energy from the flow, leading to an increase in the amplitude of the blade's oscillation. Initial calculations have been done for a configuration representative of the Energy

  16. Properties of the near-field term and its effect on polarisation analysis and source locations of long-period (LP) and very-long-period (VLP) seismic events at volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokmer, Ivan; Bean, Christopher J.

    2010-04-01

    Seismicity that originates within volcanic magmatic and hydrothermal plumbing systems is characterised by wavelengths that are often comparable to or longer than the source-receiver distance. The effect of such a near-field configuration must be explored when analysing these signals. Herein, we summarise properties of near-field observations for both a single force and moment-tensor seismic sources. We show radiation patterns of the near-, intermediate- and far-field terms for the source types that are most likely candidates for long- (LP) and very-long-period (VLP) volcanic seismicity, including: a single force, compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD), a tensile crack and a pipe-like source. We find that the deviation of the first motion polarisation from the radial direction is significant in all planes except one whose normal is parallel to the symmetry axis (if there is one) of the source mechanism. However, this deviation is less pronounced (or even negligible), when there is a considerable volumetric component in the source (as in the case of a tensile crack or pipe). Our location test shows that the accuracy of locations obtained using the semblance or cross-correlation techniques is very significantly affected by the near-field geometry. This effect is especially pronounced for shallow sources, such as often encountered on volcanoes, and decreases with increasing source depth. Hence, in practical applications on volcanoes, 3D full waveform numerical simulation (including topography and structural heterogeneities) should be used in order to both validate location techniques and as an interpretational aid to reduce misinterpretations of location results.

  17. Einstein X-ray observations of Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damiani, F.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the X-ray emission from Herbig Ae/Be stars, using the full set of Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) observations. Of a total of 31 observed Herbig stars, 11 are confidently identified with X-ray sources, with four additonal dubious identifications. We have used maximum likelihood luminosity functions to study the distribution of X-ray luminosity, and we find that Be stars are significantly brighter in X-rays than Ae stars and that their X-ray luminosity is independent of projected rotational velocity v sin i. The X-ray emission is instead correlated with stellar bolometric luminosity and with effective temperature, and also with the kinetic luminosity of the stellar wind. These results seem to exclude a solar-like origin for the X-ray emission, a possibility suggested by the most recent models of Herbig stars' structure, and suggest an analogy with the X-ray emission of O (and early B) stars. We also observe correlations between X-ray luminosity and the emission at 2.2 microns (K band) and 25 microns, which strengthen the case for X-ray emission of Herbig stars originating in their circumstellar envelopes.

  18. Sodium Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics Imaging Polarimetry of Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, M D; Graham, J R; Lloyd, J P; Kalas, P; Gates, E L; Gavel, D T; Pennington, D M; Max, C E

    2004-01-08

    The future of high-resolution ground-based optical and infrared astronomy requires the successful implementation of laser guide star adaptive optics systems. We present the first science results from the Lick Observatory sodium beacon laser guide star system. By coupling this system to a near-infrared (J;H;Ks bands) dual-channel imaging polarimeter, we achieve very high sensitivity to light scattered in the circumstellar enviroment of Herbig Ae/Be stars on scales of 100-300 AU. Observations of LkH{alpha} 198 reveal a highly polarized, biconical nebula 10 arcseconds in diameter (6000 AU) . We also observe a polarized jet-like feature associated with the deeply embedded source LkH{alpha} 198-IR. The star LkH{alpha} 233 presents a narrow, unpolarized dark lane dividing its characteristic butterfly-shaped polarized reflection nebulosity. This linear structure is oriented perpendicular to an optical jet and bipolar cavity and is consistent with the presence of an optically thick circumstellar disk blocking our direct view of the star. These data suggest that the evolutionary picture developed for the lower-mass T Tauri stars is also relevant to the Herbig Ae/Be stars and demonstrate the ability of laser guide star adaptive optics systems to obtain scientific results competitive with natural guide star adaptive optics or space-based telescopes.

  19. Mutation Conferring Apical-Targeting Motif on AE1 Exchanger Causes Autosomal Dominant Distal RTA

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Andrew C.; Su, Ya; Yiu, Vivian; Cuthbert, Alan W.; Trachtman, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in SLC4A1 that mislocalize its product, the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger AE1, away from its normal position on the basolateral membrane of the α-intercalated cell cause autosomal dominant distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). We studied a family exhibiting dominant inheritance and defined a mutation (AE1-M909T) that affects the C terminus of AE1, a region rich in potential targeting motifs that are incompletely characterized. Expression of AE1-M909T in Xenopus oocytes confirmed preservation of its anion exchange function. Wild-type GFP-tagged AE1 localized to the basolateral membrane of polarized MDCK cells, but AE1-M909T localized to both the apical and basolateral membranes. Wild-type AE1 trafficked directly to the basolateral membrane without apical passage, whereas AE1-M909T trafficked to both cell surfaces, implying the gain of an apical-targeting signal. We found that AE1-M909T acquired class 1 PDZ ligand activity that the wild type did not possess. In summary, the AE1-M909T mutation illustrates the role of abnormal targeting in dRTA and provides insight into C-terminal motifs that govern normal trafficking of AE1. PMID:22518001

  20. Mutation conferring apical-targeting motif on AE1 exchanger causes autosomal dominant distal RTA.

    PubMed

    Fry, Andrew C; Su, Ya; Yiu, Vivian; Cuthbert, Alan W; Trachtman, Howard; Karet Frankl, Fiona E

    2012-07-01

    Mutations in SLC4A1 that mislocalize its product, the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger AE1, away from its normal position on the basolateral membrane of the α-intercalated cell cause autosomal dominant distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). We studied a family exhibiting dominant inheritance and defined a mutation (AE1-M909T) that affects the C terminus of AE1, a region rich in potential targeting motifs that are incompletely characterized. Expression of AE1-M909T in Xenopus oocytes confirmed preservation of its anion exchange function. Wild-type GFP-tagged AE1 localized to the basolateral membrane of polarized MDCK cells, but AE1-M909T localized to both the apical and basolateral membranes. Wild-type AE1 trafficked directly to the basolateral membrane without apical passage, whereas AE1-M909T trafficked to both cell surfaces, implying the gain of an apical-targeting signal. We found that AE1-M909T acquired class 1 PDZ ligand activity that the wild type did not possess. In summary, the AE1-M909T mutation illustrates the role of abnormal targeting in dRTA and provides insight into C-terminal motifs that govern normal trafficking of AE1. PMID:22518001

  1. Mid-IR Spectra Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Herbig Ae/Be stars are intermediate mass pre-main sequence stars, the higher mass analogues to the T Tauri stars. Because of their higher mass, they are expected form more rapidly than the T Tauri stars. Whether the Herbig Ae/Be stars accrete only from collapsing infalling envelopes or whether accrete through geometrically flattened viscous accretion disks is of current debate. When the Herbig Ae/Be stars reach the main sequence they form a class called Vega-like stars which are known from their IR excesses to have debris disks, such as the famous beta Pictoris. The evolutionary scenario between the pre-main sequence Herbig Ae/Be stars and the main sequence Vega-like stars is not yet revealed and it bears on the possibility of the presence of Habitable Zone planets around the A stars. Photometric studies of Herbig Ae/Be stars have revealed that most are variable in the optical, and a subset of stars show non-periodic drops of about 2 magnitudes. These drops in visible light are accompanied by changes in their colors: at first the starlight becomes reddened, and then it becomes bluer, the polarization goes from less than 0.1 % to roughly 1% during these minima. The theory postulated by V. Grinnin is that large cometary bodies on highly eccentric orbits occult the star on their way to being sublimed, for systems that are viewed edge-on. This theory is one of several controversial theories about the nature of Herbig Ae/Be stars. A 5 year mid-IR spectrophotometric monitoring campaign was begun by Wooden and Butner in 1992 to look for correlations between the variations in visible photometry and mid-IR dust emission features. Generally the approximately 20 stars that have been observed by the NASA Ames HIFOGS spectrometer have been steady at 10 microns. There are a handful, however, that have shown variable mid-IR spectra, with 2 showing variations in both the continuum and features anti-correlated with visual photometry, and 3 showing variations in the emission

  2. Dust and Gas Depletion in the Disk around Herbig Ae Star Oph IRS 48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Joanna; Herczeg, G.; Andrews, S.; van Dishoeck, E.; Wilner, D.; Rosenfeld, K.; Pontoppidan, K.

    2012-05-01

    The processes that form transition disks - disks with depleted inner regions - are not well understood although possible scenarios include planet formation, grain growth and photoevaporation. Disks with well characterized dust holes are rare but even less is known about the corresponding gas structure, which should be diagnostic of the underlying physics. We present new resolved gas and dust observations of the Herbig Ae star Oph IRS 48. An extremely large 30 AU radius gas hole is seen directly in our VLT CRIRES observations of the fundamental band of CO at 4.7 micron. A hole of similar size was also previosuly detected in warm dust at 20 microns. However, PAH molecules, usually a gas tracer, are located within the hole. Our new high spatial resolution SMA imaging (0.3'') unexpectedly reveals a smaller hole in the millimeter dust grains. We will discuss the implications of this complex disk structure and the potential formation scenarios.

  3. Evidence for particle acceleration in AE Aqr from radio and X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Jager, O. C.

    1991-01-01

    The novalike cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii shows evidence for radio synchrotron emission from expanding magnetized clouds. The radio and UV flare timescales are similar indicating that the central engine is located close to the white dwarf. A collisionless shock may develop above the polar cap, which may explain the observed temperature. Protons and ions accelerated up to energies of more than 1 TeV can diffuse away from the central engine, enter magnetized clouds, and generate waves which in turn heat and accelerate electrons. An embarrassing situation exists where reprocessed optical and X-ray pulsations (33 s) are observed, but the expected direct X-ray pulse from the white dwarf is absent. The standard theory for CVs cannot explain this, and one possible explanation is that a beam of relativistic protons and ions from the polar cap may give the observed reprocessed optical to X-rays in a thick target fixed in the system.

  4. Interdependence between Cooling Rate, Microstructure and Porosity in Mg Alloy AE42

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liang; Rhee, Hongjoo; Felicelli, Sergio D.; Sabau, Adrian S; Berry, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Porosity is a major concern in the production of light metal parts. This work aims to identify some of the mechanisms of microporosity formation during the gravity-poured castings of magnesium alloy AE42. Two graphite plate molds and a ceramic cylindrical mold were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates. Temperature data during cooling was acquired with type K thermocouples at 60 Hz at two or three locations of each casting. The microstructure of samples extracted from the regions of measured temperature was then characterized with optical metallography. The results of this study revealed the existence of oxide film defects, similar to those observed in aluminum alloys. The cooling rates showed significant effect on the formation of porosity.

  5. Constraining the source location of the 30 May 2015 (Mw 7.9) Bonin deep-focus earthquake using seismogram envelopes of high-frequency P waveforms: Occurrence of deep-focus earthquake at the bottom of a subducting slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Shunsuke; Maeda, Takuto; Furumura, Takashi; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the source location of the 30 May 2015 (Mw 7.9) deep-focus Bonin earthquake was constrained using P wave seismograms recorded across Japan. We focus on propagation characteristics of high-frequency P wave. Deep-focus intraslab earthquakes typically show spindle-shaped seismogram envelopes with peak delays of several seconds and subsequent long-duration coda waves; however, both the main shock and aftershock of the 2015 Bonin event exhibited pulse-like P wave propagations with high apparent velocities (~12.2 km/s). Such P wave propagation features were reproduced by finite-difference method simulations of seismic wave propagation in the case of slab-bottom source. The pulse-like P wave seismogram envelopes observed from the 2015 Bonin earthquake show that its source was located at the bottom of the Pacific slab at a depth of ~680 km, rather than within its middle or upper regions.

  6. Numerical and experimental characterizations of low frequency MEMS AE sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Ozevin, Didem

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, new MEMS Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors are introduced. The transduction principle of the sensors is capacitance due to gap change. The sensors are numerically modeled using COMSOL Multiphysics software in order to estimate the resonant frequencies and capacitance values, and manufactured using MetalMUMPS process. The process includes thick metal layer (20 μm) made of nickel for freely vibration layer and polysilicon layer as the stationary layer. The metal layer provides a relatively heavy mass so that the spring constant can be designed high for low frequency sensor designs in order to increase the collapse voltage level (proportional to the stiffness), which increases the sensor sensitivity. An insulator layer is deposited between stationary layer and freely vibration layer, which significantly reduces the potential of stiction as a failure mode. As conventional AE sensors made of piezoelectric materials cannot be designed for low frequencies (<300 kHz) with miniature size, the MEMS sensor frequencies are tuned to 50 kHz and 200 kHz. The each sensor contained several parallel-connected cells with an overall size of approximately 250μm × 500 μm. The electromechanical characterizations are performed using high precision impedance analyzer and compared with the numerical results, which indicate a good fit. The initial mechanical characterization tests in atmospheric pressure are conducted using pencil lead break simulations. The proper sensor design reduces the squeeze film damping so that it does not require any vacuum packaging. The MEMS sensor responses are compared with similar frequency piezoelectric AE sensors.

  7. Estimating locations and total magnetization vectors of compact magnetic sources from scalar, vector, or tensor magnetic measurements through combined Helbig and Euler analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, J.D.; Nabighian, M.N.; Smith, D.V.; Li, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The Helbig method for estimating total magnetization directions of compact sources from magnetic vector components is extended so that tensor magnetic gradient components can be used instead. Depths of the compact sources can be estimated using the Euler equation, and their dipole moment magnitudes can be estimated using a least squares fit to the vector component or tensor gradient component data. ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  8. Using patient passports to improve A&E asthma care.

    PubMed

    Newell, Karen; Bunce, Rebecca; Hume, Shenagh

    The asthma patient passport (APP) is a patient-specific asthma plan that details what to do when asthma is out of control. It helps patients who have severe, difficult-to-manage asthma, and health professionals when these patients present at accident and emergency. This article shows that, while the APP acts as a patient's advocate, it also facilitates accessing emergency care by making it more streamlined. Case studies explore why people with asthma have avoided going to A&E, putting their lives at risk, and provide an insight into how difficult it can be for people to navigate the healthcare system when they are at their most vulnerable. PMID:26021030

  9. AES XPS study of chromium carbides and chromium iron carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detroye, M.; Reniers, F.; Buess-Herman, C.; Vereecken, J.

    1999-04-01

    The nature of chromium rich carbides which precipitate at grain boundaries in steels is still not perfectly understood. We performed a multitechnique approach on model chromium carbide and chromium-iron carbide samples: Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and High Energy Electron Diffraction (HEED) were used to characterise the samples. Significant chemical shifts were observed for the Cr, Fe and C XPS peaks in the M 7C 3 compound (M stands for metal), indicating unambiguously that the compound formed is a mixed iron-chromium carbide.

  10. Determination of the AES attitude from the angular velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasberg, P. E.; Pivovarov, M. L.

    1984-10-01

    A nonlinear algorithm that could be used for the AES satellite to determine its motions relative to its mass center using rate sensor data is presented. The calculations are performed relative to absolute geocentric and satellite body coordinate systems. A transfer matrix of cosines relates positions and velocities in one system to positions and velocities in the other. The orientation algorithm is obtained with a matrix kinematic equation solved by a least squares technique. Sample calculations for the Intercosmos 17 satellite, employing sun sensor and magnetometer data, show the algorithm's capabilities for generating the satellite variations in the orbital coordinate system. Yaw, roll and pitch data are obtained.

  11. Geospatial simulation: an open-source, model-independent geospatial tool for managing point-based environmental models at multiple spatial locations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many point-based models have been designed to simulate hydrology, gas flux, nutrient dynamics, and/or plant growth processes at a single point on the landscape. However, these environmental processes are known to be spatially variable. Simulations at different spatial locations therefore require adj...

  12. Decryption-decompression of AES protected ZIP files on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Tan Nhat; Pham, Phong Hong; Nguyen, Duc Huu; Nguyen, Thuy Thanh; Le, Hung Duc

    2011-10-01

    AES is a strong encryption system, so decryption-decompression of AES encrypted ZIP files requires very large computing power and techniques of reducing the password space. This makes implementations of techniques on common computing system not practical. In [1], we reduced the original very large password search space to a much smaller one which surely containing the correct password. Based on reduced set of passwords, in this paper, we parallel decryption, decompression and plain text recognition for encrypted ZIP files by using CUDA computing technology on graphics cards GeForce GTX295 of NVIDIA, to find out the correct password. The experimental results have shown that the speed of decrypting, decompressing, recognizing plain text and finding out the original password increases about from 45 to 180 times (depends on the number of GPUs) compared to sequential execution on the Intel Core 2 Quad Q8400 2.66 GHz. These results have demonstrated the potential applicability of GPUs in this cryptanalysis field.

  13. Quantification of AES depth profiles by the MRI model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovač, Janez; Zalar, Anton; Praček, Borut

    2003-02-01

    The main physical effects that contribute to interface broadening in the sputter depth profiles of polycrystalline metallic multilayer structures were studied by comparison of measured and simulated AES depth profiles. An algorithm based on the so-called mixing-roughness-information depth (MRI) model was used to simulate AES depth profiles of Ni/Cr multilayer structures with different roughnesses of the initial surfaces. The simulated depth profiles were compared with measurements performed at two different depth profiling parameters on the Ni/Cr and Al/Ni/Cr multilayer structures with an initial surface roughness of about 1.0 and 21.5 nm, respectively. The comparison of simulated and measured depth profiles enabled us to separate and estimate different contributions to the interface broadening, as well as their dependence on the sputter depth. We found that roughness was the dominant factor related to depth resolution with respect to the information depth and atomic mixing contribution. The values of roughness introduced into the simulation algorithm coincided well with the values measured by AFM at the initial surface and after depth profiling. The results showed the capability of the simulation procedure based on the MRI model to separate and evaluate different contributions to the depth resolution.

  14. Development and evaluation of a decision-supporting model for identifying the source location of microbial intrusions in real gravity sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minyoung; Choi, Christopher Y; Gerba, Charles P

    2013-09-01

    Assuming a scenario of a hypothetical pathogenic outbreak, we aimed this study at developing a decision-support model for identifying the location of the pathogenic intrusion as a means of facilitating rapid detection and efficient containment. The developed model was applied to a real sewer system (the Campbell wash basin in Tucson, AZ) in order to validate its feasibility. The basin under investigation was divided into 14 sub-basins. The geometric information associated with the sewer network was digitized using GIS (Geological Information System) and imported into an urban sewer network simulation model to generate microbial breakthrough curves at the outlet. A pre-defined amount of Escherichia coli (E. coli), which is an indicator of fecal coliform bacteria, was hypothetically introduced into 56 manholes (four in each sub-basin, chosen at random), and a total of 56 breakthrough curves of E. coli were generated using the simulation model at the outlet. Transport patterns were classified depending upon the location of the injection site (manhole), various known characteristics (peak concentration and time, pipe length, travel time, etc.) extracted from each E. coli breakthrough curve and the layout of sewer network. Using this information, we back-predicted the injection location once an E. coli intrusion was detected at a monitoring site using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). The results showed that ANNs identified the location of the injection sites with 57% accuracy; ANNs correctly recognized eight out of fourteen expressions with relying on data from a single detection sensor. Increasing the available sensors within the basin significantly improved the accuracy of the simulation results (from 57% to 100%). PMID:23770478

  15. NHD INDEXED LOCATIONS FOR GRTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    GRTS locational data for nonpoint source projects. GRTS locations are coded onto route.drain (Transport and Coastline Reach) feature of NHD to create Point Events and Linear Events. GRTS locations are coded onto region.rch (Waterbody Reach) feature of NHD to create NHD Waterbody ...

  16. The AE9/AP9/SPM Next Generation Radiation Specification Models - Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul; Johnston, William Robert; Huston, Stuart; Guild, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    The AE9/AP9/SPM model has now been released to the global satellite design community, with a recent update to version 1.2. We are working on incorporating new data sources, such as AZUR and NASA's Van Allen Probes, while also addressing critiques raised by the science and engineering communities. In particular, we are investigating discrepancies for protons at low altitude and electrons at geostationary altitudes. Finally, we are scoping out architectural improvements to enable features requested by industry: improved stitching between the plasma and radiation models, local time dependence in the plasma model, longitude dependence in the electron radiation model, and solar cycle variation in the low altitude protons. We provide a brief update on the status of the model, discrepancy investigations, and plans for the future.

  17. Rickenyls A-E, antioxidative terphenyls from the fungus Hypoxylon rickii (Xylariaceae, Ascomycota).

    PubMed

    Kuhnert, Eric; Surup, Frank; Herrmann, Jennifer; Huch, Volker; Müller, Rolf; Stadler, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Our screening efforts for new natural products with interesting bioactivity have revealed the neotropical ascomycete Hypoxylon rickii as a prolific source. We isolated five secondary metabolites with a p-terphenyl backbone from the mycelial extract of a fermentation of this fungus in 70 l scale by using RP-HPLC, which were named rickenyls A-E (1-5). Their structures were elucidated by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, complemented by HRESIMS. Two of the compounds contained a quinone core structure in ortho (2) and para-position (5), respectively. We obtained 2 spontaneously and by lead tetraacetate oxidation from 1. All compounds were screened for antimicrobial, antioxidative and cytotoxic activities. Rickenyl A (1) exhibited strong antioxidative effects and moderate cytotoxic activity against various cancer cell lines. PMID:26296745

  18. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Compression Ignition Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 63... subpart. 3 Sources can petition the Administrator pursuant to the requirements of 40 CFR 63.6(g) for... as necessary.3 Minimize the engine's time spent at idle and minimize the engine's startup time...

  19. 40 CFR Table 2c to Subpart Zzzz of... - Requirements for Existing Compression Ignition Stationary RICE Located at a Major Source of HAP...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Stationary Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Pt. 63... subpart. 3 Sources can petition the Administrator pursuant to the requirements of 40 CFR 63.6(g) for... as necessary.3 Minimize the engine's time spent at idle and minimize the engine's startup time...

  20. ACTRIS ACSM intercomparison - Part 2: Intercomparison of ME-2 organic source apportionment results from 15 individual, co-located aerosol mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, R.; Crenn, V.; Setyan, A.; Belis, C. A.; Canonaco, F.; Favez, O.; Riffault, V.; Slowik, J. G.; Aas, W.; Aijälä, M.; Alastuey, A.; Artiñano, B.; Bonnaire, N.; Bozzetti, C.; Bressi, M.; Carbone, C.; Coz, E.; Croteau, P. L.; Cubison, M. J.; Esser-Gietl, J. K.; Green, D. C.; Gros, V.; Heikkinen, L.; Herrmann, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Lunder, C. R.; Minguillón, M. C.; Močnik, G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Petralia, E.; Poulain, L.; Priestman, M.; Ripoll, A.; Sarda-Estève, R.; Wiedensohler, A.; Baltensperger, U.; Sciare, J.; Prévôt, A. S. H.

    2015-06-01

    Chemically resolved atmospheric aerosol data sets from the largest intercomparison of the Aerodyne aerosol chemical speciation monitors (ACSMs) performed to date were collected at the French atmospheric supersite SIRTA. In total 13 quadrupole ACSMs (Q-ACSM) from the European ACTRIS ACSM network, one time-of-flight ACSM (ToF-ACSM), and one high-resolution ToF aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) were operated in parallel for about 3 weeks in November and December~2013. Part 1 of this study reports on the accuracy and precision of the instruments for all the measured species. In this work we report on the intercomparison of organic components and the results from factor analysis source apportionment by positive matrix factorisation (PMF) utilising the multilinear engine 2 (ME-2). Except for the organic contribution of mass-to-charge ratio m/z 44 to the total organics (f44), which varied by factors between 0.6 and 1.3 compared to the mean, the peaks in the organic mass spectra were similar among instruments. The m/z 44 differences in the spectra resulted in a variable f44 in the source profiles extracted by ME-2, but had only a minor influence on the extracted mass contributions of the sources. The presented source apportionment yielded four factors for all 15 instruments: hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), cooking-related organic aerosol (COA), biomass burning-related organic aerosol (BBOA) and secondary oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA). ME-2 boundary conditions (profile constraints) were optimised individually by means of correlation to external data in order to achieve equivalent / comparable solutions for all ACSM instruments and the results are discussed together with the investigation of the influence of alternative anchors (reference profiles). A comparison of the ME-2 source apportionment output of all 15 instruments resulted in relative standard deviations (SD) from the mean between 13.7 and 22.7 % of the source's average mass contribution depending on the

  1. Transformation of AeIn4 Indides (Ae = Ba, Sr) into an AeAu2In2 Structure Type Through Gold Substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jing-Cao; Corbett, John D.

    2007-04-17

    The title compounds were prepared from the elements by high-temperature solid-state synthesis techniques. X-ray structural analyses shows that BaAu{sub 2}In{sub 2} (1) and SrAu{sub 2}In{sub 2} (2) crystallize in a new orthorhombic structure, Pnma, Z = 4 (a = 8.755(2), 8.530(2) {angstrom}; b = 4.712(1), 4.598(1) {angstrom}; c = 12.368(3), 12.283(4) {angstrom}, respectively). Gold substitutes for 50% of the indium atoms in the tetragonal BaIn{sub 4} and monoclinic SrIn{sub 4} parents to give this new and more flexible orthorhombic structure. The Ae atoms in this structure are contained within chains of hexagonal prisms built of alternating In and Au that have additional augmenting atoms around their waists from further condensation of parallel displaced chains. The driving forces for these structural changes are in part the shorter Au-In distances (2.72 and 2.69 {angstrom}) relative to d(In-In) in the parents, presumably because of relativistic contractions with Au. Generalities about such centered prismatic building blocks and their condensation modes in these and related phases are described. Band structure calculations (EHTB) demonstrate that the two compounds are metallic, which is confirmed by measurements of the resistivity of 1 and the magnetic susceptibilities of both.

  2. Evaluation of the new radiation belt AE9/AP9/SPM model for a cislunar mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, Francis F.; Walker, Steven A.; Santos Koos, Lindsey M.

    2014-09-01

    Space mission planners continue to experience challenges associated with human space flight. Concerned with the omnipresence of harmful ionizing radiation in space, at the mission design stage, mission planners must evaluate the amount of exposure the crew of a spacecraft is subjected to during the transit trajectory from low Earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous orbit (GEO) and beyond (free space). The Earth's geomagnetic field is located within the domain of LEO-GEO and, depending on latitude, extends out some 40,000-60,000 km. This field contains the Van Allen trapped electrons, protons, and low-energy plasmas, such as the nuclei of hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and to a lesser degree other atoms. In addition, there exist the geomagnetically attenuated energetic galactic cosmic rays (GCR). These particles are potentially harmful to improperly shielded crew members and onboard subsystems. Mitigation strategies to limit the exposure due to free space GCR and sporadic solar energetic particles (SEP) such as flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) must also be exercised beyond the trapped field. Presented in this work is the exposure analysis for a multi-vehicle mission planned for the epoch of February 2020 from LEO to the Earth-moon Lagrange-point two (L2), located approximately 63,000 km beyond the orbit of the Earth-moon binary system. Space operation at L2 provides a gravitationally stable orbit for a vehicle and partially eliminates the need for periodic thrust-vectoring to maintain orbital stability. In the cislunar (Earth-moon) space of L2, the mission trajectory and timeline in this work call for a cargo vehicle to rendezvous with a crew vehicle. This is followed by 15 days of space activities at L2 while the cargo and crew vehicles are docked after which the crew returns to Earth. The mission epoch of 2020 is specifically chosen as it is anticipated that the next solar minimum (i.e. end of cycle 24) in the Sun's approximate 11 years cycle will take place around

  3. Latitudinal variation of thermospheric hydrogen near solstice from AE-D observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanatani, S.; Breig, E. L.

    1988-01-01

    Variations of thermospheric neutral atomic hydrogen with latitude during a solstice season near solar minimum were investigated using data acquired with the polar-orbiting AE-D satellite. Hydrogen concentrations at low latitude were found to be comparable to those found from observations with the AE-E satellite, but were slightly higher than concentrations derived from the 1983 mass spectrometer incoherent scatter atmospheric model. Results confirm the general summer-to-winter density increase, large latitudinal gradients in the summer hemisphere, and the winter enhancement of hydrogen observed in AE-C nighttime measurements. The AE-D data, however, show a small polar depression in hydrogen concentration at high winter latitudes, attributed to atmospheric dynamics following auroral heating. The density gradients observed by AE-D in the summer hemisphere were in sharp contrast to the more constant horizontal daytime profiles reported from OGO-6 and previous AE-C measurements, indicating the possibility of local time effects.

  4. Static and wind tunnel near-field/far-field jet noise measurements from model scale single-flow baseline and suppressor nozzles. Volume 1: Noise source locations and extrapolation of static free-field jet noise data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeck, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    A test was conducted in the Boeing Large Anechoic Chamber to determine static jet noise source locations of six baseline and suppressor nozzle models, and establish a technique for extrapolating near field data into the far field. The test covered nozzle pressure ratios from 1.44 to 2.25 and jet velocities from 412 to 594 m/s at a total temperature of 844 K.

  5. A high voltage power supply for the AE-C and D low energy electron experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A description is given of the electrical and mechanical design and operation of high voltage power supplies for space flight use. The supply was used to generate the spiraltron high voltage for low energy electron experiment on AE-C and D. Two versions of the supply were designed and built; one design is referred to as the low power version (AE-C) and the other as the high power version (AE-D). Performance is discussed under all operating conditions.

  6. NPS alternate techsat satellite, design project for AE-4871

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This project was completed as part of AE-4871, Advanced Spacecraft Design. The intent of the course is to provide experience in the design of all the major components in a spacecraft system. Team members were given responsibility for the design of one of the six primary subsystems: power, structures, propulsion, attitude control, telemetry, tracking and control (TT&C), and thermal control. In addition, a single member worked on configuration control, launch vehicle integration, and a spacecraft test plan. Given an eleven week time constraint, a preliminary design of each subsystem was completed. Where possible, possible component selections were also made. Assistance for this project came principally from the Naval Research Laboratory's Spacecraft Technology Branch. Specific information on components was solicited from representatives in industry. The design project centers on a general purpose satellite bus that is currently being sought by the Strategic Defense Initiative.

  7. Effects of Auger electron elastic scattering in quantitative AES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Aleksander

    1987-09-01

    The Monte Carlo algorithm was developed for simulating the trajectories of electrons elastically scattered in the solid. The distribution of scattering angles was determined using the partial wave expansion method. This algorithm was used to establish the influence of Auger electron elastic collisions on the results of quantitative AES analysis. The calculations were performed for the most pronounced KLL, L 3 MM and M 5NN Auger transitions. It turned out that due to the elastic collisions the Auger electron signal is decreased by up to 10%. The corresponding decreased of the escape depth of Auger electrons reaches 30% as compared with the value derived from the inelastic mean free path. The values of the inelastic mean free path resulting from the overalyer method may be strongly affected by elastic scattering of Auger electrons.

  8. Report on the Development of the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES).

    PubMed

    Nechvatal, J; Barker, E; Bassham, L; Burr, W; Dworkin, M; Foti, J; Roback, E

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated a process to select a symmetric-key encryption algorithm to be used to protect sensitive (unclassified) Federal information in furtherance of NIST's statutory responsibilities. In 1998, NIST announced the acceptance of 15 candidate algorithms and requested the assistance of the cryptographic research community in analyzing the candidates. This analysis included an initial examination of the security and efficiency characteristics for each algorithm. NIST reviewed the results of this preliminary research and selected MARS, RC™, Rijndael, Serpent and Twofish as finalists. Having reviewed further public analysis of the finalists, NIST has decided to propose Rijndael as the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES). The research results and rationale for this selection are documented in this report. PMID:27500035

  9. STS-80 Payload WSF-3 in Hanger AE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In NASA's Building AE on Cape Canaveral Air Station, preparation of the Wake Shield Facility-3 (WSF-3) continues as workers install Get Away Special canisters for ballast on the spacecraft. The WSF-3 represents the third flight since 1994 of the disk- shaped satellite primarily designed to generate an ultravacuum in space in which to grow advanced semiconductor high-purity thin films. The WSF-3 is one of the primary payloads scheduled to fly aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia on Mission STS-80, targeted to lift off around Nov. 8. On this mission, the WSF-3 will fly free of the orbiter for about three days. It will be deployed from the orbiter and retrieved using the Remote Manipulator System robotic arm.

  10. Report on the Development of the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)

    PubMed Central

    Nechvatal, James; Barker, Elaine; Bassham, Lawrence; Burr, William; Dworkin, Morris; Foti, James; Roback, Edward

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) initiated a process to select a symmetric-key encryption algorithm to be used to protect sensitive (unclassified) Federal information in furtherance of NIST’s statutory responsibilities. In 1998, NIST announced the acceptance of 15 candidate algorithms and requested the assistance of the cryptographic research community in analyzing the candidates. This analysis included an initial examination of the security and efficiency characteristics for each algorithm. NIST reviewed the results of this preliminary research and selected MARS, RC™, Rijndael, Serpent and Twofish as finalists. Having reviewed further public analysis of the finalists, NIST has decided to propose Rijndael as the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES). The research results and rationale for this selection are documented in this report.

  11. NGC 5548: LACK OF A BROAD Fe K{alpha} LINE AND CONSTRAINTS ON THE LOCATION OF THE HARD X-RAY SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, L. W.; Elvis, M.; Krongold, Y.; Liu, Y.; Mathur, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present an analysis of the co-added and individual 0.7-40 keV spectra from seven Suzaku observations of the Sy 1.5 galaxy NGC 5548 taken over a period of eight weeks. We conclude that the source has a moderately ionized, three-zone warm absorber, a power-law continuum, and exhibits contributions from cold, distant reflection. Relativistic reflection signatures are not significantly detected in the co-added data, and we place an upper limit on the equivalent width of a relativistically broad Fe K{alpha} line at EW {<=} 26 eV at 90% confidence. Thus NGC 5548 can be labeled as a 'weak' type 1 active galactic nucleus (AGN) in terms of its observed inner disk reflection signatures, in contrast to sources with very broad, strong iron lines such as MCG-6-30-15, which are likely much fewer in number. We compare physical properties of NGC 5548 and MCG-6-30-15 that might explain this difference in their reflection properties. Though there is some evidence that NGC 5548 may harbor a truncated inner accretion disk, this evidence is inconclusive, so we also consider light bending of the hard X-ray continuum emission in order to explain the lack of relativistic reflection in our observation. If the absence of a broad Fe K{alpha} line is interpreted in the light-bending context, we conclude that the source of the hard X-ray continuum lies at radii r{sub s} {approx}> 100 r{sub g}. We note, however, that light-bending models must be expanded to include a broader range of physical parameter space in order to adequately explain the spectral and timing properties of average AGNs, rather than just those with strong, broad iron lines.

  12. Optical Mass Flow Diagnostics in Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauley, P. Wilson; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.

    2015-09-01

    We examine a broad range of mass flow diagnostics in a large sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars (HAEBES) using high resolution optical spectra. The Hβ and He i 5876 Å lines show the highest incidence of P Cygni (30%) and inverse P Cygni (14%) morphologies, respectively. The Fe ii 4924 Å line also shows a large incidence of P Cygni profiles (11%). We find support for many of the conclusions reached in a study based on the analysis of the He i λ10830 line in a large sample of HAEBES. Namely, HAEBES exhibit smaller fractions of both blueshifted absorption (i.e., mass outflow) and redshifted absorption (i.e., mass infall or accretion) than their lower mass cousins, the classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs). In particular, the optical data supports the conclusion that HAEBES displaying redshifted absorption, in general, show maximum redshifted absorption velocities that are smaller fractions of their stellar escape velocities than is found for CTTSs. This suggests that HAEBE accretion flows are originating deeper in the gravitational potentials of their stars than in CTTS systems. In addition, we find a lack of inner disk wind signatures in the blueshifted absorption objects; only stellar wind signatures are clearly observed. These findings, along with the lack of detected magnetic fields around HAEBES, support the idea that large magnetospheres are not prevalent around HAEBES and that accretion flows are instead mediated by significantly smaller magnetospheres with relatively smaller truncation radii (e.g., 1-2 R*). Redshifted absorption is much more common around Herbig Ae stars than Be stars, suggesting that Herbig Be stars may accrete via a boundary layer rather than along magnetic field lines.

  13. Evaluation of the Surface Roughness using AE method with Air Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, T.; Takata, S.; Hino, T.; Yoshida, K.

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to find the development for the evaluation of the surface roughness by the Acoustic Emission (AE) method with air blowing. We paid attention to the AE wave due to air blowing on the specimen plate with different surface roughness. The relationship between the AE wave and surface roughness of specimen plates was investigated. As the result, there is large and continuous difference in the Root Mean Square (RMS) value of their AE waveform. The RMS value decreases by increasing of the surface roughness of specimen plates. It suggested that this characteristic has the possibility to establish a new method of nondestructive surface roughness testing.

  14. HIGH-RESOLUTION MID-INFRARED IMAGING OF THE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS OF HERBIG Ae/Be STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Marinas, N.; Telesco, C. M.; Packham, C.; Fisher, R. S.

    2011-08-20

    We have imaged the circumstellar environments of 17 Herbig Ae/Be stars at 12 and 18 {mu}m using MICHELLE on Gemini North and T-ReCS on Gemini South. Our sample contained eight Group I sources, those having large rising near- to far-infrared (IR) fluxes, and nine Group II sources, those having more modest mid-IR fluxes relative to their near-IR flux (in the classification of Meeus et al.). We have resolved extended emission from all Group I sources in our target list. The majority of these sources have radially symmetric mid-IR emission extending from a radius of 10 AU to hundreds of AU. Only one of the nine Group II sources is resolved at the FWHM level, with another two Group II sources resolved at fainter levels. Models by Dullemond et al. explain the observed spectral energy distribution of Group II sources using self-shadowed cold disks. If this is the case for all the Group II sources, we do not expect to detect extended emission with this study, since the IR emission measured should arise from a region only a few AU in size, which is smaller than our resolution. The fact that we do resolve some of the Group II sources implies that their disks are not completely flat, and might represent an intermediate stage. We also find that none of the more massive (>3 M{sub sun}) Herbig Ae/Be stars in our sample belongs to Group I, which may point to a relationship between stellar mass and circumstellar dust evolution. Disks around more massive stars might evolve faster so that stars are surrounded by a more evolved flat disk by the time they become optically visible, or they might follow a different evolutionary path altogether.

  15. A study of noise source location on a model scale augmentor wing using correlation techniques. [noise measurement of far field noise by wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilby, J. F.; Scharton, T. D.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation, conducted on a model-scale augmentor wing to identify the sources of far-field noise, is examined. The measurement procedure followed in the investigation involved the cross-correlation of far field sound pressures with fluctuating pressures on the surface of the augmentor flap and shroud. In addition pressures on the surfaces of the augmentor were cross-correlated. The results are interpreted as showing that the surface pressure fluctuations are mainly aerodynamic in character and are convected in the downstream direction with a velocity which is dependent on the jet exhaust velocity. However the far field sound levels in the mid and high frequency ranges are dominated by jet noise. There is an indication that in the low frequency range trailing edge noise, associated with interaction of the jet flow and the flap trailing edge, plays a significant role in the radiated sound field.

  16. Integrated magnetic, gravity, and GPR surveys to locate the probable source of hydrocarbon contamination in Sharm El-Sheikh area, south Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsy, Mona; Rashed, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Sharm El-Sheikh waters were suddenly hit by hydrocarbon spills which created a serious threat to the prosperous tourism industry in and around the city. Analysis of soil samples, water samples, and seabed samples collected in and around the contaminated bay area showed anomalous levels of hydrocarbons. An integrated geophysical investigation, using magnetic, gravity, and ground penetrating radar geophysical tools, was conducted in the headland overlooking the contaminated bay in order to delineate the possible subsurface source of contamination. The results of the geophysical investigations revealed three underground manmade reinforced concrete tanks and a complicated network of buried steel pipes in addition to other unidentified buried objects. The depths and dimensions of the discovered objects were determined. Geophysical investigations also revealed the presence of a north-south oblique slip fault running through the eastern part of the studied area. Excavations, conducted later on, confirmed the presence of one of the tanks delineated by the geophysical surveys.

  17. Method and system for determining depth distribution of radiation-emitting material located in a source medium and radiation detector system for use therein

    DOEpatents

    Benke, Roland R.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2003-03-04

    A method, system and a radiation detector system for use therein are provided for determining the depth distribution of radiation-emitting material distributed in a source medium, such as a contaminated field, without the need to take samples, such as extensive soil samples, to determine the depth distribution. The system includes a portable detector assembly with an x-ray or gamma-ray detector having a detector axis for detecting the emitted radiation. The radiation may be naturally-emitted by the material, such as gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, or emitted when the material is struck by other radiation. The assembly also includes a hollow collimator in which the detector is positioned. The collimator causes the emitted radiation to bend toward the detector as rays parallel to the detector axis of the detector. The collimator may be a hollow cylinder positioned so that its central axis is perpendicular to the upper surface of the large area source when positioned thereon. The collimator allows the detector to angularly sample the emitted radiation over many ranges of polar angles. This is done by forming the collimator as a single adjustable collimator or a set of collimator pieces having various possible configurations when connected together. In any one configuration, the collimator allows the detector to detect only the radiation emitted from a selected range of polar angles measured from the detector axis. Adjustment of the collimator or the detector therein enables the detector to detect radiation emitted from a different range of polar angles. The system further includes a signal processor for processing the signals from the detector wherein signals obtained from different ranges of polar angles are processed together to obtain a reconstruction of the radiation-emitting material as a function of depth, assuming, but not limited to, a spatially-uniform depth distribution of the material within each layer. The detector system includes detectors having

  18. CD34+ stromal cells/fibroblasts/fibrocytes/telocytes as a tissue reserve and a principal source of mesenchymal cells. Location, morphology, function and role in pathology.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Flores, L; Gutiérrez, R; García, M P; Sáez, F J; Díaz-Flores, L; Valladares, F; Madrid, J F

    2014-07-01

    We review the morphofunctional characteristics of CD34+ stromal fibroblastic/fibrocytic cells (CD34+ SFCs) and report our observations. We consider the following aspects of CD34+ SFCs: A) The confusing terms applied to this cell type, often combining the prefix CD34 with numerous names, including fibroblasts, fibrocytes, dendrocytes, keratocytes, telocytes and stromal, dendritic, adventitial, supraadventitial, perivascular, paravascular and delimiting cells; B) Changes in their immunophenotype, e.g., loss of CD34 expression and gain of other markers, such as those defining mesenchymal and derivate cells (myofibroblasts, osteoblasts, chondroblasts, adipocytes); C) Morphology (elongated or triangular cell body and thin, moniliform, bipolar or multipolar cytoplasmic processes), immunohistochemistry (co-expression of and changes in molecular expression) and structure (characteristics of nucleus and cytoplasmic organelles, and points of contact and junctions in quiescent and activated stages by light and electron microscopy); D) Location and distribution in the vessels (adventitia or external layer), in the tissues (connective, adipose, blood, muscle and nervous) and in the organs and systems (skin, oral cavity and oropharynx, respiratory, digestive, urinary, male, female, endocrine and lymphoid systems, serosal and synovial membranes, heart, eye and meninges); E) Origin from the mesoderm and cranial neural crest in the embryo, and from stem cells (themselves or other cells) and/or peripheral blood pluripotent stem cells (circulating progenitor cells) in post-natal life; F) Functions, such as synthesis of different molecules, progenitor of mesenchymal cells, immunomodulation, parenchymal regulation (growth, maturation and differentiation of adjacent cells), induction of angiogenesis, scaffolding support of other cells and phagocytic properties. Since CD34+ SFCs are the main reservoir of tissue mesenchymal cells (great mesenchymal potential, probably higher than that

  19. Infrared imaging and millimetre continuum mapping of Herbig Ae/Be and FU Orionis stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Th.; Burkert, A.; Launhardt, R.; Leinert, Ch.; Stecklum, B.

    1998-08-01

    The goal of this paper is a detailed analysis of the dusty environment of Herbig Ae/Be stars and FU Orionis objects. For this purpose we mapped 22 regions at 1.3 mm wavelength containing 25 target objects. We found that it is indispensable to perform mapping in contrast to pointed On-On measurements in order to obtain the correct distribution of cold material around young stellar objects and to relate 1.3 mm flux densities to individual sources. To get reliable information about the structure and shape of the dust configurations and their relation to the stellar sources, we superimposed the millimetre maps on near-infrared images. The comparison of the data demonstrated that some of the Herbig Ae/Be stars are not associated with the peak of the millimetre emission. This is obviously the case for V 376 Cas/LkHα 198, MWC 137, CoD-42(deg) 11721, and V 1685 Cyg/V 1686 Cyg. We found two different morphologies of the dust envelopes: 6 regions show a compact structure, whereas 12 regions are characterized by a core/envelope structure. The ``disk'' objects AB Aur and HD 163296 show only a compact core and are not surrounded by an extended envelope. We did not detect HK Ori, HD 250550, LkHα 25, and V 1515 Cyg which all have low IRAS luminosities. Based on the flux densities derived from the millimetre maps, we estimated characteristic physical parameters like density and mass assuming optically thin emission. The total masses of the circumstellar regions around the Herbig Ae/Be stars with core/envelope structure and with ``genuine" point-like millimetre sources are 80+/-60 Msun\\ and 0.15+/-0.15 Msun, respectively. The lowest and highest masses of the circumstellar material were found around AB Aur (0.03 Msun) and CoD-42(deg) 11721 (1100 Msun), respectively. The average densities in the cores range from 10(5) to 10(8) cm(-3) . The densities of the extended envelopes are of the order of 10(4) to 10(5) cm(-3) . In addition, we combined the measured millimetre flux densities

  20. High-resolution 25 μm Imaging of the Disks around Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, M.; Maaskant, K.; Okamoto, Y. K.; Kataza, H.; Yamashita, T.; Miyata, T.; Sako, S.; Fujiyoshi, T.; Sakon, I.; Fujiwara, H.; Kamizuka, T.; Mulders, G. D.; Lopez-Rodriguez, E.; Packham, C.; Onaka, T.

    2015-05-01

    We imaged circumstellar disks around 22 Herbig Ae/Be stars at 25 μm using Subaru/COMICS and Gemini/T-ReCS. Our sample consists of an equal number of objects from each of the two categories defined by Meeus et al.; 11 group I (flaring disk) and II (flat disk) sources. We find that group I sources tend to show more extended emission than group II sources. Previous studies have shown that the continuous disk is difficult to resolve with 8 m class telescopes in the Q band due to the strong emission from the unresolved innermost region of the disk. This indicates that the resolved Q-band sources require a hole or gap in the disk material distribution to suppress the contribution from the innermost region of the disk. As many group I sources are resolved at 25 μm, we suggest that many, but not all, group I Herbig Ae/Be disks have a hole or gap and are (pre-)transitional disks. On the other hand, the unresolved nature of many group II sources at 25 μm supports the idea that group II disks have a continuous flat disk geometry. It has been inferred that group I disks may evolve into group II through the settling of dust grains into the mid-plane of the protoplanetary disk. However, considering the growing evidence for the presence of a hole or gap in the disk of group I sources, such an evolutionary scenario is unlikely. The difference between groups I and II may reflect different evolutionary pathways of protoplanetary disks. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, via the time exchange program between Subaru and the Gemini Observatory. The Subaru Telescope is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Brevibacterium linens AE038-8, an Extremely Arsenic-Resistant Bacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Maizel, Daniela; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Brown, Steven D.; Ferrero, Marcela; Rosen, Barry

    2015-04-16

    To understand the arsenic biogeocycles in the groundwaters at Tucumán, Argentina, we isolated Brevibacterium linens sp. strain AE38-8, obtained from arsenic-contaminated well water. This strain is extremely resistant to arsenicals and has arsenic resistance (ars) genes in its genome. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. linens AE38-8.

  2. Phylogenetic and temporal dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CRF01_AE in China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jingrong; Xin, Ruolei; Yu, Shuangqing; Bai, Lishi; Wang, Weishi; Wu, Tingchen; Su, Xueli; Lu, Hongyan; Pang, Xinghuo; Yan, Hong; Feng, Xia; He, Xiong; Zeng, Yi

    2013-01-01

    To explore the epidemic history of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in China, 408 fragments of gag gene sequences of CRF01_AE sampled in 2002-2010 were determined from different geographical regions and risk populations in China. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the CRF01_AE sequences can be grouped into four clusters, suggesting that at least four genetically independent CRF01_AE descendants are circulating in China, of which two were closely related to the isolates from Thailand and Vietnam. Cluster 1 has the most extensive distribution in China. In North China, cluster 1 and cluster 4 were mainly transmitted through homosexuality.The real substance of the recent HIV-1 epidemic in men who have sex with men(MSM) of North China is a rapid spread of CRF01_AE, or rather two distinctive natives CRF01_AE.The time of the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) of four CRF01_AE clusters ranged from the years 1990.9 to 2003.8 in different regions of China. This is the first phylogenetic and temporal dynamics study of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in China. PMID:23365653

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Brevibacterium linens AE038-8, an Extremely Arsenic-Resistant Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Maizel, Daniela; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Brown, Steven D.; Ferrero, Marcela A.

    2015-01-01

    To understand the arsenic biogeocycles in the groundwaters at Tucumán, Argentina, we isolated Brevibacterium linens sp. strain AE38-8, obtained from arsenic-contaminated well water. This strain is extremely resistant to arsenicals and has arsenic resistance (ars) genes in its genome. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. linens AE38-8. PMID:25883298

  4. Genetic effect of the Aegilops caudata plasmon on the manifestation of the Ae. cylindrica genome.

    PubMed

    Tsunewaki, Koichiro; Mori, Naoki; Takumi, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    In the course of reconstructing Aegilops caudata from its own genome (CC) and its plasmon, which had passed half a century in common wheat (genome AABBDD), we produced alloplasmic Ae. cylindrica (genome CCDD) with the plasmon of Ae. caudata. This line, designated (caudata)-CCDD, was found to express male sterility in its second substitution backcross generation (SB2) of (caudata)-AABBCCDD pollinated three times with the Ae. cylindrica pollen. We repeatedly backcrossed these SB2 plants with the Ae. cylindrica pollen until the SB5 generation, and SB5F2 progeny were produced by self-pollination of the SB5 plants. Thirteen morphological and physiological characters, including pollen and seed fertilities, of the (caudata)-CCDD SB5F2 were compared with those of the euplasmic Ae. cylindrica. The results indicated that the male sterility expressed by (caudata)-CCDD was due to genetic incompatibility between the Ae. cylindrica genome and Ae. caudata plasmon that did not affect any other characters of Ae. cylindrica. Also, we report that the genome integrity functions in keeping the univalent transmission rate high. PMID:25832746

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Brevibacterium linens AE038-8, an Extremely Arsenic-Resistant Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Maizel, Daniela; Utturkar, Sagar M; Brown, Steven D; Ferrero, Marcela A; Rosen, Barry P

    2015-01-01

    To understand the arsenic biogeocycles in the groundwaters at Tucumán, Argentina, we isolated Brevibacterium linens sp. strain AE38-8, obtained from arsenic-contaminated well water. This strain is extremely resistant to arsenicals and has arsenic resistance (ars) genes in its genome. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of B. linens AE38-8. PMID:25883298

  6. Experimental study on AE characteristics of three-point-bending concrete beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bing; Liu Juanyu

    2004-03-01

    In this research, acoustic emission (AE) characteristics of three-point-bending concrete beams were investigated during the entire loading period. It was found that the relative notch depth significantly influenced AE characteristics. The occurrence of AE events decreased greatly with an increase of the relative notch depth. The influences of different fibers in concrete on AE characteristics were investigated as well. The experimental results indicated that the Weibull function can be used to describe quantitatively the influences of the relative notch depth and fibers on AE characteristics, fracture characteristics, and brittleness of concrete. The two parameters, {theta} and m, of the Weibull function depended on the geometry of the concrete specimens and the brittleness of concrete, respectively.

  7. Spectral Analysis and Classification of Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Jesús; Calvet, Nuria; Briceño, César; Hartmann, Lee; Berlind, Perry

    2004-03-01

    We present an analysis of the optical spectra of 75 early-type emission-line stars, many of which have been classified previously as Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) stars. Accurate spectral types were derived for 58 members of the sample; high continuum veiling, contamination by nonphotospheric absorption features, or a composite binary spectrum prevented accurate spectral typing for the rest. Approximately half of our sample exhibited [O I] λ6300 forbidden-line emission down to our detection limit of 0.1 Å equivalent width; a third of the sample exhibited Fe II emission (multiplet 42). A subset of 11 of the HAeBe sample showed abnormally strong Fe II absorption; 75% of this subset are confirmed UX Ori objects. Combining our spectral typing results with photometry from the literature, we confirm previous findings of high values of total-to-selective extinction (RV~5) in our larger sample, suggesting significant grain growth in the environments of HAeBe stars. With this high value of RV, the vast majority of HAeBe stars appear younger than with the standard RV=3.1 extinction law and are more consistent with being pre-main-sequence objects.

  8. Universal quantification of elastic scattering effects in AES and XPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Aleksander

    1996-09-01

    Elastic scattering of photoelectrons in a solid can be accounted for in the common formalism of XPS by introducing two correction factors, βeff and Qx. In the case of AES, only one correction factor, QA, is required. As recently shown, relatively simple analytical expressions for the correction factors can be derived from the kinetic Boltzmann equation within the so-called "transport approximation". The corrections are expressed here in terms of the ratio of the transport mean free path (TRMFP) to the inelastic mean free path (IMFP). Since the available data for the TRMFP are rather limited, it was decided to complete an extensive database of these values. They were calculated in the present work for the same elements and energies as in the IMFP tabulation published by Tanuma et al. An attempt has been made to derive a predictive formula providing the ratios of the TRMFP to the IMFP. Consequently, a very simple and accurate algorithm for calculating the correction factors βeff, Qx and QA has been developed. This algorithm can easily be generalized to multicomponent solids. The resulting values of the correction factors were found to compare very well with published values resulting from Monte Carlo calculations.

  9. Remarks on the definition of the backscattering factor in AES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, Aleksander

    2002-03-01

    It has been shown that the backscattering factor in AES can be defined as an integral of the product of the excitation depth distribution function and the emission depth distribution function. First function describes the number of ionizations as a function of depth while the second function describes the escape probability of Auger electrons created at different depths. The backscattering factor calculated from such definition is found to depend on the Auger electron emission angle. For emission angles up to 40° with respect to surface normal, this dependence is not pronounced. However, influence of the emission angle on the backscattering factor may be substantial at glancing emission angles. Values of the backscattering factor calculated from the proposed algorithm assuming the emission angle equal to 40° differ noticeably from values resulting from the Shimizu expression. The deviation may reach 18% at primary electron energy of 2000 eV. Furthermore, the backscattering factor may become smaller than unity at primary energies close to the ionization energy. This effect has been suggested in earlier studies.

  10. AES based secure low energy adaptive clustering hierarchy for WSNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, K. R.; Sarma, N. V. S. N.

    2013-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) provide a low cost solution in diversified application areas. The wireless sensor nodes are inexpensive tiny devices with limited storage, computational capability and power. They are being deployed in large scale in both military and civilian applications. Security of the data is one of the key concerns where large numbers of nodes are deployed. Here, an energy-efficient secure routing protocol, secure-LEACH (Low Energy Adaptive Clustering Hierarchy) for WSNs based on the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is being proposed. This crypto system is a session based one and a new session key is assigned for each new session. The network (WSN) is divided into number of groups or clusters and a cluster head (CH) is selected among the member nodes of each cluster. The measured data from the nodes is aggregated by the respective CH's and then each CH relays this data to another CH towards the gateway node in the WSN which in turn sends the same to the Base station (BS). In order to maintain confidentiality of data while being transmitted, it is necessary to encrypt the data before sending at every hop, from a node to the CH and from the CH to another CH or to the gateway node.

  11. The (BETA) Pictoris Phenomenon Among Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C. A.; Perez, M. R.; Talavera, A.; Bjorkman, K. S.; deWinter, D.; The, P.-S.; Molster, F. J.; vandenAncker, M. E.; Sitko, M. L.; Morrison, N. D.; Beaver, M. L.; McCollum, B.; Castelaz, M. W.

    1996-01-01

    We present a survey of high dispersion UV and optical spectra of Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) and related stars. We find accreting, circumstellar gas over the velocity range +100 to +400 km/s, and absorption profiles similar to those seen toward Beta Pic, in 36% of the 33 HAeBe stars with IUE data as well as in 3 non-emission B stars. We also find evidence of accretion in 7 HAeBe stars with optical data only. Line profile variability appears ubiquitous. As a group, the stars with accreting gas signatures have higher v sin i than the stars with outflowing material, and tend to exhibit large amplitude (greater than or equal to 1(sup m)) optical light variations. All of the program stars with polarimetric variations that are anti-correlated with the optical light, previously interpreted as the signature of a dust disk viewed close to equator-on, also show spectral signatures of accreting gas. These data imply that accretion activity in HAeBe stars is preferentially observed when the line of sight transits the circumstellar dust disk. Our data imply that the spectroscopic signatures of accreting circumstellar material seen in Beta Pic are not unique to that object, but instead are consistent with interpretation of Beta Pic as a comparatively young A star with its associated circumstellar disk.

  12. A Selective Encryption Algorithm Based on AES for Medical Information

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ju-Young; Chon, Ki-Hwan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The transmission of medical information is currently a daily routine. Medical information needs efficient, robust and secure encryption modes, but cryptography is primarily a computationally intensive process. Towards this direction, we design a selective encryption scheme for critical data transmission. Methods We expand the advandced encrytion stanard (AES)-Rijndael with five criteria: the first is the compression of plain data, the second is the variable size of the block, the third is the selectable round, the fourth is the optimization of software implementation and the fifth is the selective function of the whole routine. We have tested our selective encryption scheme by C++ and it was compiled with Code::Blocks using a MinGW GCC compiler. Results The experimental results showed that our selective encryption scheme achieves a faster execution speed of encryption/decryption. In future work, we intend to use resource optimization to enhance the round operations, such as SubByte/InvSubByte, by exploiting similarities between encryption and decryption. Conclusions As encryption schemes become more widely used, the concept of hardware and software co-design is also a growing new area of interest. PMID:21818420

  13. Stormwater Drains and Catch Basins as Sources for Production of Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Arana-Guardia, Roger; Baak-Baak, Carlos M.; Loroño-Pino, María Alba; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Beaty, Barry J.; Eisen, Lars; García-Rejón, Julián E.

    2014-01-01

    We present data showing that structures serving as drains and catch basins for stormwater are important sources for production of the mosquito arbovirus vectors Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus in Mérida City, México. We examined 1,761 stormwater drains – located in 45 different neighborhoods spread across the city – over dry and wet seasons from March 2012–March 2013. Of the examined stormwater drains, 262 (14.9%) held water at the time they were examined and 123 yielded mosquito immatures. In total, we collected 64,560 immatures representing nine species. The most commonly encountered species were Cx. quinquefasciatus (n=39,269) and Ae. aegypti (n=23,313). Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus were collected during all 11 months when we found water-filled stormwater drains, and both were found in stormwater drains located throughout Mérida City. We also present data for associations between structural characteristics of stormwater drains or water-related characteristics and the abundance of mosquito immatures. In conclusion, stormwater drains produce massive numbers of Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus across Mérida City, both in the wet and dry seasons, and represent non-residential development sites that should be strongly considered for inclusion in the local mosquito surveillance and control program. PMID:24582840

  14. Regional location in western China

    SciTech Connect

    Cogbill, A.H.; Steck, L.K.

    1996-10-01

    Accurately locating seismic events in western China using only regional seismic stations is a challenge. Not only is the number of seismic stations available for locating events small, but most stations available to researchers are often over 10{degree} distant. Here the authors describe the relocation, using regional stations, of both nuclear and earthquake sources near the Lop Nor test site in western China. For such relocations, they used the Earthquake Data Reports provided by the US Geological Survey (USGS) for the reported travel times. Such reports provide a listing of all phases reported to the USGS from stations throughout the world, including many stations in the People`s Republic of China. LocSAT was used as the location code. The authors systematically relocated each event int his study several times, using fewer and fewer stations at reach relocation, with the farther stations being eliminated at each step. They found that location accuracy, judged by comparing solutions from few stations to the solution provided using all available stations, remained good typically until fewer than seven stations remained.With a good station distribution, location accuracy remained surprisingly good (within 7 km) using as few as 3 stations. Because these relocations were computed without good station corrections and without source-specific station corrections (that is, path corrections), they believe that such regional locations can be substantially improved, largely using static station corrections and source-specific station corrections, at least in the Lop nor area, where sources have known locations. Elsewhere in China, one must rely upon known locations of regionally-recorded explosions. Locating such sources is clearly one of the major problems to be overcome before one can provide event locations with any assurance from regional stations.

  15. Fracture in Westerly granite under AE feedback and constant strain rate loading: Nucleation, quasi-static propagation, and the transition to unstable fracture propagation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, B.D.; Young, R.P.; Lockner, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    New observations of fracture nucleation are presented from three triaxial compression experiments on intact samples of Westerly granite, using Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring. By conducting the tests under different loading conditions, the fracture process is demonstrated for quasi-static fracture (under AE Feedback load), a slowly developing unstable fracture (loaded at a 'slow' constant strain rate of 2.5 ?? 10-6/s) and an unstable fracture that develops near instantaneously (loaded at a 'fast' constant strain rate of 5 ?? 10-5/s). By recording a continuous ultrasonic waveform during the critical period of fracture, the entire AE catalogue can be captured and the exact time of fracture defined. Under constant strain loading, three stages are observed: (1) An initial nucleation or stable growth phase at a rate of ??? 1.3 mm/s, (2) a sudden increase to a constant or slowly accelerating propagation speed of ??? 18 mm/s, and (3) unstable, accelerating propagation. In the ??? 100 ms before rupture, the high level of AE activity (as seen on the continuous record) prevented the location of discrete AE events. A lower bound estimate of the average propagation velocity (using the time-to-rupture and the existing fracture length) suggests values of a few m/s. However from a low gain acoustic record, we infer that in the final few ms, the fracture propagation speed increased to 175 m/s. These results demonstrate similarities between fracture nucleation in intact rock and the nucleation of dynamic instabilities in stick slip experiments. It is suggested that the ability to constrain the size of an evolving fracture provides a crucial tool in further understanding the controls on fracture nucleation. ?? Birkha??user Verlag, Basel, 2006.

  16. Relating jet structure to photometric variability: the Herbig Ae star HD 163296

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbroek, L. E.; Podio, L.; Dougados, C.; Cabrit, S.; Sitko, M. L.; Sana, H.; Kaper, L.; de Koter, A.; Klaassen, P. D.; Mulders, G. D.; Mendigutía, I.; Grady, C. A.; Grankin, K.; van Winckel, H.; Bacciotti, F.; Russell, R. W.; Lynch, D. K.; Hammel, H. B.; Beerman, L. C.; Day, A. N.; Huelsman, D. M.; Werren, C.; Henden, A.; Grindlay, J.

    2014-03-01

    Herbig Ae/Be stars are intermediate-mass pre-main sequence stars surrounded by circumstellar dust disks. Some are observed to produce jets, whose appearance as a sequence of shock fronts (knots) suggests a past episodic outflow variability. This "jet fossil record" can be used to reconstruct the outflow history. We present the first optical to near-infrared (NIR) spectra of the jet from the Herbig Ae star HD 163296, obtained with VLT/X-shooter. We determine the physical conditions in the knots and also their kinematic "launch epochs". Knots are formed simultaneously on either side of the disk, with a regular interval of ~16 yr. The velocity dispersion versus jet velocity and the energy input are comparable between both lobes. However, the mass-loss rate, velocity,and shock conditions are asymmetric. We find Ṁjet/Ṁacc ~ 0.01-0.1, which is consistent with magneto-centrifugal jet launching models. No evidence of any dust is found in the high-velocity jet, suggesting a launch region within the sublimation radius (<0.5 au). The jet inclination measured from proper motions and radial velocities confirms that it is perpendicular to the disk. A tentative relation is found between the structure of the jet and the photometric variability of the central source. Episodes of NIR brightening were previously detected and attributed to a dusty disk wind. We report for the first time significant optical fadings lasting from a few days up to a year, coinciding with the NIR brightenings. These are very likely caused by dust lifted high above the disk plane, and this supports the disk wind scenario. The disk wind is launched at a larger radius than the high-velocity atomic jet, although their outflow variability may have a common origin. No significant relation between outflow and accretion variability could be established. Our findings confirm that this source undergoes periodic ejection events, which may be coupled with dust ejections above the disk plane. Based on observations

  17. The characteristics of the IR emission features in the spectra of Herbig Ae stars: evidence for chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, C.; Bouwman, J.; Lahuis, F.; van Kerckhoven, C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Henning, T.

    2008-06-01

    Context: Infrared (IR) spectra provide a prime tool to study the characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in regions of star formation. Herbig Ae/Be stars are a class of young pre-main sequence stellar objects of intermediate mass. They are known to have varying amounts of natal cloud material still present in their direct vicinity. Aims: We characterise the IR emission bands, due to fluorescence by PAH molecules, in the spectra of Herbig Ae/Be stars and link observed variations to spatial aspects of the mid-IR emission. Methods: We analysed two PAH dominated spectra from a sample of 15 Herbig Ae/Be stars observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Results: We derived profiles of the major PAH bands by subtracting appropriate continua. The shape and the measured band characteristics show pronounced variations between the two Spitzer spectra investigated. Those variations parallel those found between three infrared space observatory (ISO) spectra of other, well-studied, Herbig Ae/Be stars. The derived profiles are compared to those from a broad sample of sources, including reflection nebulae, planetary nebulae, H II regions, young stellar objects, evolved stars and galaxies. The Spitzer and ISO spectra exhibit characteristics commonly interpreted respectively as interstellar matter-like (ISM), non-ISM-like, or a combination of the two. Conclusions: We argue that the PAH emission detected from the sources exhibiting a combination of ISM-like and non-ISM-like characteristics indicates the presence of two dissimilar, spatially separated, PAH families. As the shape of the individual PAH band profiles reflects the composition of the PAH molecules involved, this demonstrates that PAHs in subsequent, evolutionary linked stages of star formation are different from those in the general ISM, implying active chemistry. None of the detected PAH emission can be associated with the (unresolved) disk and is thus associated with the circumstellar (natal

  18. Dipole Well Location

    1998-08-03

    The problem here is to model the three-dimensional response of an electromagnetic logging tool to a practical situation which is often encountered in oil and gas exploration. The DWELL code provide the electromagnetic fields on the axis of a borehole due to either an electric or a magnetic dipole located on the same axis. The borehole is cylindrical, and is located within a stratified formation in which the bedding planes are not horizontal. The anglemore » between the normal to the bedding planes and the axis of the borehole may assume any value, or in other words, the borehole axis may be tilted with respect to the bedding planes. Additionally, all of the formation layers may have invasive zones of drilling mud. The operating frequency of the source dipole(s) extends from a few Hertz to hundreds of Megahertz.« less

  19. Dipole Well Location

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Gregory

    1998-08-03

    The problem here is to model the three-dimensional response of an electromagnetic logging tool to a practical situation which is often encountered in oil and gas exploration. The DWELL code provide the electromagnetic fields on the axis of a borehole due to either an electric or a magnetic dipole located on the same axis. The borehole is cylindrical, and is located within a stratified formation in which the bedding planes are not horizontal. The angle between the normal to the bedding planes and the axis of the borehole may assume any value, or in other words, the borehole axis may be tilted with respect to the bedding planes. Additionally, all of the formation layers may have invasive zones of drilling mud. The operating frequency of the source dipole(s) extends from a few Hertz to hundreds of Megahertz.

  20. Characterization of atmospheric contaminant sources using adaptive evolutionary algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervone, Guido; Franzese, Pasquale; Grajdeanu, Adrian

    2010-10-01

    The characteristics of an unknown source of emissions in the atmosphere are identified using an Adaptive Evolutionary Strategy (AES) methodology based on ground concentration measurements and a Gaussian plume model. The AES methodology selects an initial set of source characteristics including position, size, mass emission rate, and wind direction, from which a forward dispersion simulation is performed. The error between the simulated concentrations from the tentative source and the observed ground measurements is calculated. Then the AES algorithm prescribes the next tentative set of source characteristics. The iteration proceeds towards minimum error, corresponding to convergence towards the real source. The proposed methodology was used to identify the source characteristics of 12 releases from the Prairie Grass field experiment of dispersion, two for each atmospheric stability class, ranging from very unstable to stable atmosphere. The AES algorithm was found to have advantages over a simple canonical ES and a Monte Carlo (MC) method which were used as benchmarks.

  1. High-dispersion absorption-line spectroscopy of AE Aqr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarría, J.; Smith, Robert Connon; Costero, R.; Zharikov, S.; Michel, R.

    2008-07-01

    High-dispersion time-resolved spectroscopy of the unique magnetic cataclysmic variable AE Aqr is presented. A radial velocity analysis of the absorption lines yields K2 = 168.7 +/- 1kms-1. Substantial deviations of the radial velocity curve from a sinusoid are interpreted in terms of intensity variations over the secondary star's surface. A complex rotational velocity curve as a function of orbital phase is detected which has a modulation frequency of twice the orbital frequency, leading to an estimate of the binary inclination angle that is close to 70°. The minimum and maximum rotational velocities are used to indirectly derive a mass ratio of q = 0.6 and a radial velocity semi-amplitude of the white dwarf of K1 = 101 +/- 3kms-1. We present an atmospheric temperature indicator, based on the absorption-line ratio of FeI and CrI lines, whose variation indicates that the secondary star varies from K0 to K4 as a function of orbital phase. The ephemeris of the system has been revised, using more than 1000 radial velocity measurements, published over nearly five decades. From the derived radial velocity semi-amplitudes and the estimated inclination angle, we calculate that the masses of the stars are M1 = 0.63 +/- 0.05Msolar M2 = 0.37 +/- 0.04Msolar, and their separation is a = 2.33 +/- 0.02Rsolar. Our analysis indicates the presence of a late-type star whose radius is larger, by a factor of nearly 2, than the radius of a normal main-sequence star of the same mass. Finally, we discuss the possibility that the measured variations in the rotational velocity, temperature and spectral type of the secondary star as functions of orbital phase may, like the radial velocity variations, be attributable to regions of enhanced absorption on the star's surface.

  2. Photometric variability of the Herbig Ae star HD 37806

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucinski, S. M.; Zwintz, K.; Hareter, M.; Pojmański, G.; Kuschnig, R.; Matthews, J. M.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2010-11-01

    Context. The more massive counterparts of T Tauri stars, the Herbig Ae/Be stars, are known to vary in a complex way with no variability mechanism clearly identified. Aims: We attempt to characterize the optical variability of HD 37806 (MWC 120) on time scales ranging between minutes and several years. Methods: A continuous, one-minute resolution, 21 day-long sequence of MOST (Microvariability & Oscillations of STars) satellite observations has been analyzed using wavelet, scalegram and dispersion analysis tools. The MOST data have been augmented by sparse observations over 9 seasons from ASAS (All Sky Automated Survey), by previously non-analyzed ESO (European Southern Observatory) data partly covering 3 seasons and by archival measurements dating back half a century ago. Results: Mutually superimposed flares or accretion instabilities grow in size from about 0.0003 of the mean flux on a time scale of minutes to a peak-to-peak range of <0.05 on a time scale of a few years. The resulting variability has properties of stochastic “red” noise, whose self-similar characteristics are very similar to those observed in cataclysmic binary stars, but with much longer characteristic time scales of hours to days (rather than minutes) and with amplitudes which appear to cease growing in size on time scales of tens of years. In addition to chaotic brightness variations combined with stochastic noise, the MOST data show a weakly defined cyclic signal with a period of about 1.5 days, which may correspond to the rotation of the star. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission jointly operated by Dynacon Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna, and on data from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) conducted by the Warsaw University Observatory, Warsaw, Poland at the Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  3. Global temperature constraints on Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus persistence and competence for dengue virus transmission

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is a disease that has undergone significant expansion over the past hundred years. Understanding what factors limit the distribution of transmission can be used to predict current and future limits to further dengue expansion. While not the only factor, temperature plays an important role in defining these limits. Previous attempts to analyse the effect of temperature on the geographic distribution of dengue have not considered its dynamic intra-annual and diurnal change and its cumulative effects on mosquito and virus populations. Methods Here we expand an existing modelling framework with new temperature-based relationships to model an index proportional to the basic reproductive number of the dengue virus. This model framework is combined with high spatial and temporal resolution global temperature data to model the effects of temperature on Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus persistence and competence for dengue virus transmission. Results Our model predicted areas where temperature is not expected to permit transmission and/or Aedes persistence throughout the year. By reanalysing existing experimental data our analysis indicates that Ae. albopictus, often considered a minor vector of dengue, has comparable rates of virus dissemination to its primary vector, Ae. aegypti, and when the longer lifespan of Ae. albopictus is considered its competence for dengue virus transmission far exceeds that of Ae. aegypti. Conclusions These results can be used to analyse the effects of temperature and other contributing factors on the expansion of dengue or its Aedes vectors. Our finding that Ae. albopictus has a greater capacity for dengue transmission than Ae. aegypti is contrary to current explanations for the comparative rarity of dengue transmission in established Ae. albopictus populations. This suggests that the limited capacity of Ae. albopictus to transmit DENV is more dependent on its ecology than vector competence. The recommendations, which we

  4. Application of microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometry (MP-AES) for environmental monitoring of industrially contaminated sites in Hyderabad city.

    PubMed

    Kamala C T; Balaram V; Dharmendra V; Satyanarayanan M; Subramanyam K S V; Krishnaiah A

    2014-11-01

    Recently introduced microwave plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (MP-AES) represents yet another and very important addition to the existing array of modern instrumental analytical techniques. In this study, an attempt is made to summarize the performance characteristics of MP-AES and its potential as an analytical tool for environmental studies with some practical examples from Patancheru and Uppal industrial sectors of Hyderabad city. A range of soil, sediment, water reference materials, particulate matter, and real-life samples were chosen to evaluate the performance of this new analytical technique. Analytical wavelengths were selected considering the interference effects of other concomitant elements present in different sample solutions. The detection limits for several elements were found to be in the range from 0.05 to 5 ng/g. The trace metals analyzed in both the sectors followed the topography with more pollution in the low-lying sites. The metal contents were found to be more in ground waters than surface waters. Since a decade, the pollutants are transfered from Patancheru industrial area to Musi River. After polluting Nakkavagu and turning huge tracts of agricultural lands barren besides making people residing along the rivulet impotent and sick, industrialists of Patancheru are shifting the effluents to downstream of Musi River through an 18-km pipeline from Patancheru. Since the effluent undergoes primary treatment at Common Effluent Treatment Plant (CETP) at Patanchru and travels through pipeline and mixes with sewage, the organic effluents will be diluted. But the inorganic pollutants such as heavy and toxic metals tend to accumulate in the environmental segments near and downstreams of Musi River. The data generated by MP-AES of toxic metals like Zn, Cu, and Cr in the ground and surface waters can only be attributed to pollution from Patancheru since no other sources are available to Musi River. PMID:25086712

  5. Development and characterization of wheat-Ae. searsii Robertsonian translocations and a recombinant chromosome conferring resistance to stem rust.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxuan; Jin, Yue; Rouse, Matthew; Friebe, Bernd; Gill, Bikram; Pumphrey, Michael O

    2011-05-01

    The emergence of a new highly virulent race of stem rust (Puccinia graminis tritici), Ug99, rapid evolution of new Ug99 derivative races overcoming resistance of widely deployed genes, and spread towards important wheat growing areas now potentially threaten world food security. Exploiting novel genes effective against Ug99 from wild relatives of wheat is one of the most promising strategies for the protection of the wheat crop. A new source of resistance to Ug99 was identified in the short arm of the Aegilops searsii chromosome 3S(s) by screening wheat- Ae. searsii introgression libraries available as individual chromosome and chromosome arm additions to the wheat genome. For transferring this resistance gene into common wheat, we produced three double-monosomic chromosome populations (3A/3S(s), 3B/3S(s) and 3D/3S(s)) and then applied integrated stem rust screening, molecular maker analysis, and cytogenetic analysis to identify resistant wheat-Ae. searsii Robertsonian translocation. Three Robertsonian translocations (T3AL·3S(s)S, T3BL·3S(s)S and T3DL·3S(s)S) and one recombinant (T3DS-3S(s)S·3S(s)L) with stem rust resistance were identified and confirmed to be genetically compensating on the basis of genomic in situ hybridization, analysis of 3A, 3B, 3D and 3S(s)S-specific SSR/STS-PCR markers, and C-banding. In addition, nine SSR/STS-PCR markers of 3S(s)S-specific were developed for marker-assisted selection of the resistant gene. Efforts to reduce potential linkage drag associated with 3S(s)S of Ae. searsii are currently under way. PMID:21347655

  6. Automated Estimating System (AES), Version 5.1, User`s manual. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.K.; Holder, D.A.

    1992-08-01

    This document describes Version 5.1 of the Automated Estimating System (AES), a personal computer-based software package. The AES is designed to aid in the creation, updating, and reporting of project cost estimates for the Estimating and Scheduling Department of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Engineering Division. AES provides formatted input screens to guide the user though the estimate creation/update process and provides several standardized reports that allow cost to be sorted and summarized in many different formats and at several levels of aggregation.

  7. Automated Estimating System (AES): Version 6.1: User`s manual. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.K.; Holder, D.A.

    1996-03-01

    This document describes Version 6.1 of the Automated Estimating System (AES), a personal computer-based software package. The AES is designed to aid in the creation, updating, and reporting of project cost estimates for the Estimating and Scheduling Engineering Department of Central Engineering Services of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems,Inc. AES provides formatted input screens to guide the user through the estimate creation/update process and provides several standardized reports that allow cost to be sorted and summarized in many different formats and at several levels of aggregation.

  8. Application of TURBO-AE to Flutter Prediction: Aeroelastic Code Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyniak, Daniel; Simons, Todd A.; Stefko, George (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The TURBO-AE program has been evaluated by comparing the obtained results to cascade rig data and to prediction made from various in-house programs. A high-speed fan cascade, a turbine cascade, a turbine cascade and a fan geometry that shower flutter in torsion mode were analyzed. The steady predictions for the high-speed fan cascade showed the TURBO-AE predictions to match in-house codes. However, the predictions did not match the measured blade surface data. Other researchers also reported similar disagreement with these data set. Unsteady runs for the fan configuration were not successful using TURBO-AE .

  9. Cross-correlation analysis of the AE index and the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, C.-I.; Tsurutani, B.; Kawasaki, K.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1973-01-01

    A cross-correlation study between magnetospheric activity (the AE index) and the southward-directed component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is made for a total of 792 hours (33 days) with a time resolution of about 5.5 min. The peak correlation tends to occur when the interplanetary data are shifted approximately 40 min later with respect to the AE index data. Cross-correlation analysis is conducted on some idealized wave forms to illustrate that this delay between southward turning of the IMF and the AE index should not be interpreted as being the duration of the growth phase.

  10. Revealing the sub-AU asymmetries of the inner dust rim in the disk around the Herbig Ae star R Coronae Austrinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, S.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Malbet, F.; Meilland, A.; Natta, A.; Schertl, D.; Stee, P.; Weigelt, G.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Unveiling the structure of the disks around intermediate-mass pre-main-sequence stars (Herbig Ae/Be stars) is essential for our understanding of the star and planet formation process. In particular, models predict that in the innermost AU around the star, the dust disk forms a “puffed-up” inner rim, which should result in a strongly asymmetric brightness distribution for disks seen under intermediate inclination. Aims: Our aim is to constrain the sub-AU geometry of the inner disk around the Herbig Ae star R CrA and search for the predicted asymmetries. Methods: Using the VLTI/AMBER long-baseline interferometer, we obtained 24 near-infrared (H- and K-band) spectro-interferometric observations on R CrA. Observing with three telescopes in a linear array configuration, each data set samples three equally spaced points in the visibility function, providing direct information about the radial intensity profile. In addition, the observations cover a wide position angle range (~97°), also probing the position angle dependence of the source brightness distribution. Results: In the derived visibility function, we detect the signatures of an extended (Gaussian FWHM ~ 25 mas) and a compact component (Gaussian FWHM ~ 5.8 mas), with the compact component contributing about two-thirds of the total flux (both in H- and K-band). The brightness distribution is highly asymmetric, as indicated by the strong closure phases (up to ~40°) and the detected position angle dependence of the visibilities and closure phases. To interpret these asymmetries, we employ various geometric as well as physical models, including a binary model, a skewed ring model, and a puffed-up inner rim model with a vertical or curved rim shape. For the binary and vertical rim model, no acceptable fits could be obtained. On the other hand, the skewed ring model and the curved puffed-up inner rim model allow us to simultaneously reproduce the measured visibilities and closure phases. From these

  11. 40 CFR 174.530 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein in cotton; temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein... thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein in cotton; temporary exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein in or on the food commodities of cotton, cotton; cotton,...

  12. 40 CFR 174.530 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein in cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein... Cry2Ae protein in cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein in or on the food and feed commodities of cotton; cotton, undelinted seed;...

  13. 40 CFR 174.530 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein in cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein... Cry2Ae protein in cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein in or on the food and feed commodities of cotton; cotton, undelinted seed;...

  14. 40 CFR 174.530 - Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein in cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein... Cry2Ae protein in cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Ae protein in or on the food and feed commodities of cotton; cotton, undelinted seed;...

  15. Molecular oxygen measurements at 200 km from AE-D near winter solstice, 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayser, D. C.; Potter, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    Utilizing the fly-through mode, the open source neutral mass spectrometer on Atmosphere Explorer-D (AE-D) has measured O2 densities, as well as N2 densities and in situ neutral temperatures, at midmorning during winter solstice over the latitude range 90 degrees S to 90 degrees N. The expected seasonal variation in N2 was found at 200 km together with a more complex behavior in molecular oxygen than might be expected from a diffusive equilibrium model with constant lower boundary values. Under geomagnetically quiet conditions the equatorial 200 km value of O2 was about 1.7 x 10 to the 8th/cu cm. A local maximum in the 200 km O2 densities was found near 70 degrees N, where an average quiet time value was 2.5 x 10 to the 8th/cu cm, implying a 120 km density of 8.3 x 10 to the 10th/cu cm. The in situ temperature measurements confirm the presence of higher temperatures near 70 degrees N latitude, even during geomagnetically quiet conditions.

  16. Linear spectropolarimetry across the optical spectrum of Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababakr, K. M.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Vink, J. S.

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of spectropolarimetric observations of 12 Herbig Ae/Be objects. Our data have the largest spectropolarimetric wavelength coverage, 4560-9480 Å, published to date. A change in linear polarization across the H α line, is detected in all objects. Such a line effect reveals the fact that stellar photons are scattered off free electrons that are not distributed in a spherically symmetric volume, suggesting the presence of small discs around these accreting objects. Thanks to the large wavelength coverage, we can report that H α is the spectral line in the optical wavelength range that is most sensitive to revealing deviations from spherical symmetry, and the one most likely to show a line effect across the polarization in such cases. Few other spectral lines display changes in polarization across the line. In addition, H α is the only line which shows an effect across its absorption component in some sources. We present a scenario explaining this finding and demonstrate that the detection of the line effect strongly relies on the number of photons scattered into our line of sight. We highlight the special case of R Mon, which is the only object in our sample to show many lines with a polarization effect, which is much stronger than in all other objects. Given that the object and its nebulosity is spatially resolved, we argue that this is due to scattering of the stellar and emission spectrum off circumstellar dust.

  17. AN IONIZED OUTFLOW FROM AB AUR, A HERBIG AE STAR WITH A TRANSITIONAL DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez, Luis F.; Zapata, Luis A.; Ortiz-León, Gisela N.; Loinard, Laurent; Dzib, Sergio A.; Macías, Enrique; Anglada, Guillem

    2014-09-20

    AB Aur is a Herbig Ae star with a transitional disk. Transitional disks present substantial dust clearing in their inner regions, most probably because of the formation of one or more planets, although other explanations are still viable. In transitional objects, accretion is found to be about an order of magnitude smaller than in classical full disks. Since accretion is believed to be correlated with outflow activity, centimeter free-free jets are expected to be present in association with these systems, at weaker levels than in classical protoplanetary (full) systems. We present new observations of the centimeter radio emission associated with the inner regions of AB Aur and conclude that the morphology, orientation, spectral index, and lack of temporal variability of the centimeter source imply the presence of a collimated, ionized outflow. The radio luminosity of this radio jet is, however, about 20 times smaller than that expected for a classical system of similar bolometric luminosity. We conclude that centimeter continuum emission is present in association with stars with transitional disks, but at levels than are becoming detectable only with the upgraded radio arrays. On the other hand, assuming that the jet velocity is 300 km s{sup –1}, we find that the ratio of mass loss rate to accretion rate in AB Aur is ∼0.1, similar to that found for less evolved systems.

  18. [Analysis of metallic elements in refractory tantalum-niobium slag by ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Hui; Zheng, Shi-Li; Xu, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Yip

    2009-03-01

    A new method for analysing the contents of many metalic elements, such as Ta, Nb, Sn, Ti, W, Fe, Mn, Al, Pb, Ce, Y, Sc, Pr, Sm, Nd, U, Th etc, in refractory tantalum-niobium slag by ICP-AES was developed. The samples processing procedures involve two steps, being first decomposed by potassium carbonate and boric acid at 950 degrees C for 15 min, then leached by hydrochloride and tartaric acid at 90 degrees C for 30 min. The interference of flux and tin matrix in analyzing the other elements was eliminated by the utilization of matrix matching method. This method showed satisfactory precision and accuracy with the RSDs between 0.27% and 5.48% and the recovery rates between 94.0% and 109.6%. The analysis results indicated that highly valuable metals of Sn, Ta, Nb, Ti, W and Ce are rich in the refractory tantalum-niobium slag, showing that it has the great potential for comprehensive utilization. However, the analysis result also showed that the slag is a radioactive pollution source due to a small amount of U and Th. This method is simple and fast, and has the advantage of analyzing many elements simultaneously. The accurate analytic results provided a basis for the future researches on the comprehensive utilization of refractory tantalum-niobium slag. PMID:19455829

  19. Characterization of Maize Amylose-extender (ae) Mutant Starches. Part II: Structures and Properties of Starch Residues Remaining After Enzymatic Hydrolyis at Boiling-water Temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GEMS-0067 maize ae-line starch developed by Truman State University and the Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) Project consisted of 39.4%-43.2% resistant-starch (RS), which was larger than the existing ae-line starches of H99ae, OH43ae, B89ae, and B84ae (11.5%-19.1%) as reported in part I of the s...

  20. Using a Delphi approach to develop a strategy for A&E in defence nursing.

    PubMed

    Kenward, Gary; Berry, Andy; Despres, Julian; McLeod, Judith

    The Armed Forces has seen an increase in the number of operational deployments overseas and a greater demand for Accident and Emergency (A&E) trained nurses. This article describes a modified Delphi study used to contribute to the development of a strategy for emergency nursing in the Defence Nursing Services. Twenty-eight A&E specialists took part and the key issues raised were recruitment and retention, staff development, new roles, research priorities, increased internal recruitment of A&E nurses to meet operational demands, and the need for a structured career pathway to help retention. The most pressing areas requiring research were evaluation of the nurse practitioner role, clinical competencies and managing heat injuries in the operational setting. The modified Delphi study provided a valuable and detailed insight into the challenges and aspirations of the military A&E nursing cadre and has assisted in developing a strategy for emergency nursing. PMID:17353829

  1. 12. PWD Drawing 10,0005(463AE1)(1936), 'Electrical Lighting and Power' Mare ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. PWD Drawing 10,000-5(463A-E-1)(1936), 'Electrical Lighting and Power' - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Battery Test Office & Storage Facility, California Avenue & E Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  2. AOTF-echelle spectrometer for air-ICP-AES continuous emission monitoring of heavy metals and actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, David P.; Zamzow, Daniel S.; Eckels, David E.; Miller, George P.

    1999-02-01

    A spectrometer system consisting of a quartz acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) and an echelle grating has been assembled and tested for ICP-AES continuous emission monitoring of heavy metal and actinide elements in stack exhaust offgases introduced into an air plasma. The AOTF is a rapidly tunable bandpass filter that is used to select a small wavelength range (0.1 to 0.6 nm) of optical emission from the air plasma; the echelle grating provides high dispersion, yielding a spectral resolution of approximately 0.004 to 0.008 nm from 200 to 425 nm. The AOTF-echelle spectrometer, equipped with a photodiode array or CCD, provides rapid sequential multielement analysis capabilities. It is much more compact and portable than commercial ICP-AES echelle spectrometers, allowing use of the system in field and on-line process monitoring applications. Data will be presented that detail the resolution, detection limits, capabilities, and performance of the AOTF-echelle spectrometer for continuous emission monitoring of heavy metals (As, Be, Cd, Cr, Hg, and Pb) and actinides (including U isotopes). The potential use of the AOTF-echelle spectrometer with other emission sources and for other monitoring applications will be discussed.

  3. Spectral Characteristics of Continuous Acoustic Emission (AE) Data from Laboratory Rock Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, J. William; Goodfellow, Sebastian; Reyes-Montes, Juan; Nasseri, Farzine; Young, R. Paul

    2016-04-01

    Continuous acoustic emission (AE) data recorded during rock deformation tests facilitates the monitoring of fracture initiation and propagation due to applied stress changes. Changes in the frequency and energy content of AE waveforms have been previously observed and were associated with microcrack coalescence and the induction or mobilisation of large fractures which are naturally associated with larger amplitude AE events and lower-frequency components. The shift from high to low dominant frequency components during the late stages of the deformation experiment, as the rate of AE events increases and the sample approaches failure, indicates a transition from the micro-cracking to macro-cracking regime, where large cracks generated result in material failure. The objective of this study is to extract information on the fracturing process from the acoustic records around sample failure, where the fast occurrence of AE events does not allow for identification of individual AE events and phase arrivals. Standard AE event processing techniques are not suitable for extracting this information at these stages. Instead the observed changes in the frequency content of the continuous record can be used to characterise and investigate the fracture process at the stage of microcrack coalescence and sample failure. To analyse and characterise these changes, a detailed non-linear and non-stationary time-frequency analysis of the continuous waveform data is required. Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and Hilbert Spectral Analysis (HSA) are two of the techniques used in this paper to analyse the acoustic records which provide a high-resolution temporal frequency distribution of the data. In this paper we present the results from our analysis of continuous AE data recorded during a laboratory triaxial deformation experiment using the combined EMD and HSA method.

  4. [SSR mapping of stripe rust resistance gene from Ae. tauschii].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Quan; Jia, Ji-Zeng; Yang, Hong; Zhang, Bao-Shi

    2008-04-01

    A dominant wheat stripe rust resistance gene, temporarily designated as YrY201, was identified in an accession Y201 of Aegilops tauschii. By bulk segregation analysis, three microsatellite markers Xgwm273b, Xgwm37 and Wmc14 were found to be linked to YrY201 with genetic distance of 11.5, 5.8 and 10.9 cM , respectively. According to the locations of the linked markers, the resistance gene was located on chromosome 7DL. Based on the chromosomal location and the resistance pattern of the gene, we proposed that YrY201 was a novel stripe rust resistance gene, and could be selected by marker-assisted selection. PMID:18424421

  5. Impact of primary and secondary organic sources on the oxidative potential of quasi-ultrafine particles (PM0.25) at three contrasting locations in the Los Angeles Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffari, Arian; Hasheminassab, Sina; Wang, Dongbin; Shafer, Martin M.; Schauer, James J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the changing contribution of primary and secondary sources on the oxidative potential of particulate matter (PM) in a real-world urban atmosphere, 7 sets of quasi-ultrafine particles (PM0.25) were collected at three contrasting locations in the Los Angeles Basin, California, USA. Samples were collected in the coastal area of Long Beach during the morning rush hour period, representing fresh primary emissions from nearby freeways and the LA port; in central Los Angeles during midday, representing a mixture of fresh primary emissions and early products of photochemical secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation; and at a downwind site (Upland) during afternoon, when the impacts of photochemically aged secondary PM are significant. Chemical composition showed distinctive trends, with the lowest fraction of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and other organic tracers of SOA formation (e.g. organic acids) at Long Beach, and the lowest abundance of organic tracers of primary vehicular emissions (such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and hopanes) at Upland. A molecular marker-based chemical mass balance (MM-CMB) model indicated that 72% of the total organic carbon at Long Beach was comprised of primary vehicular sources (combined heavy duty and light duty vehicles), while the vehicular fraction was found to be 50% and 39% at Los Angeles and Upland, respectively. Regression analysis suggested that at Long Beach, the variation in oxidative potential of PM0.25 (quantified using a macrophage-based reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay) was mainly driven by mobile vehicular emissions and the water-insoluble fraction of the organic carbon. In contrast, at Upland, where photochemical processing and secondary aerosol formation was the highest, WSOC and secondary organics were the major drivers of the oxidative potential variation. The multivariate regression analysis also indicated that as much as 58% of the overall spatial and temporal variation in the oxidative

  6. Pan-information Location Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X. Y.; Guo, W.; Huang, L.; Hu, T.; Gao, W. X.

    2013-11-01

    A huge amount of information, including geographic, environmental, socio-economic, personal and social network information, has been generated from diverse sources. Most of this information exists separately and is disorderly even if some of it is about the same person, feature, phenomenon or event. Users generally need to collect related information from different sources and then utilize them in applications. An automatic mechanism, therefore, for establishing a connection between potentially-related information will profoundly expand the usefulness of this huge body of information. A connection tie is semantic location describing semantically concepts and attributes of locations as well as relationships between locations, since 80% of information contains some kind of geographic reference but not all of geographic reference has explicit geographic coordinates. Semantic location is an orthogonal form of location representation which can be represented as domain ontology or UML format. Semantic location associates various kinds of information about a same object to provide timely information services according to users' demands, habits, preferences and applications. Based on this idea, a Pan-Information Location Map (PILM) is proposed as a new-style 4D map to associates semantic location-based information dynamically to organize and consolidate the locality and characteristics of corresponding features and events, and delivers on-demand information with a User-Adaptive Smart Display (UASD).

  7. Ae Behavior of Smart Stress Memory Patch after Variable Amplitude Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Y.; Nambu, S.; Enoki, M.

    Recently, the structural health monitoring becomes increasingly great important to assure the ease and safety of our life, and it is required significantly to develop non-destructive evaluation for structures such as bridges and tunnels. Some sacrificed specimens have been developed to evaluate the fatigue damage of structures such as fatigue cycles and residual lifetime, but it can be applied only when the stress history is known beforehand. These fatigue sensors need no cable and can be used at low cost in contrast to strain gage. In previous study, a smart stress memory patch was developed as a new fatigue sensor. The patch can measure simultaneously the maximum stress, stress amplitude and the number of fatigue cycles by crack length measurement and Kaiser effect of Acoustic Emission (AE). The crack growth behavior under constant amplitude (CA) loading has been investigated, and AE behavior also has been evaluated only after CA loading. However, AE characteristics after variable amplitude (VA) loading in service are extremely important. Moreover, it is very important to control AE behavior of the smart patch in order to evaluate the applied stress using Kaiser effect. In this study, fatigue test with single overload was investigated to evaluate its influence. Moreover, effect of crack length and heat treatment on AE behavior was also investigated. Finally, AE behavior of the patch was evaluated after fatigue CA loading with overload or VA loading with log-normal distribution and overload.

  8. The structure and organization of the human erythroid anion exchanger (AE1) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sahr, K.E.; Taylor, W.M.; Daniels, B.P.

    1994-12-01

    The AE1 (anion exchanger, band 3) protein is expressed in erythrocytes and in the A-type intercalated cells of the kidney distal collecting tubule. In both cell types it mediates the electroneutral transport of chloride and bicarbonate ions across the lipid bilayer, and, in erythrocytes, it also serves as the critical attachment site of the peripheral membrane skeleton. We have characterized the human AE1 gene using overlapping clones isolated from a phage library of human genomic DNA. The gene spans {approximately}20 kb and consists of 20 exons separated by 19 introns. The structure of the human AE1 gene corresponds closely with that of the previously characterized mouse AE1 gene, with a high degree of conservation of exon/intron junctions, as well as exon and intron nucleotide sequences. The putative upstream and internal promoter sequences of the human AE1 gene used in erythroid and kidney cells, respectively, are described. We also report the nucleotide sequence of the entire 3{prime} noncoding region of exon 20, which was lacking in the published cDNA sequences. In addition, we have characterized 9 Alu repeat elements found within the body of the human AE1 gene that are members of 4 related subfamilies that appear to have entered the genome at different times during primate evolution. 59 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. AE Geomagnetic Index Predictability for High Speed Solar Wind Streams: A Wavelet Decomposition Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guarnieri, Fernando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Hajra, Rajkumar; Echer, Ezequiel; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    High speed solar wind streams cause geomagnetic activity at Earth. In this study we have applied a wavelet interactive filtering and reconstruction technique on the solar wind magnetic field components and AE index series to allowed us to investigate the relationship between the two. The IMF Bz component was found as the most significant solar wind parameter responsible by the control of the AE activity. Assuming magnetic reconnection associated to southward directed Bz is the main mechanism transferring energy into the magnetosphere, we adjust parameters to forecast the AE index. The adjusted routine is able to forecast AE, based only on the Bz measured at the L1 Lagrangian point. This gives a prediction approximately 30-70 minutes in advance of the actual geomagnetic activity. The correlation coefficient between the observed AE data and the forecasted series reached values higher than 0.90. In some cases the forecast reproduced particularities observed in the signal very well.The high correlation values observed and the high efficacy of the forecasting can be taken as a confirmation that reconnection is the main physical mechanism responsible for the energy transfer during HILDCAAs. The study also shows that the IMF Bz component low frequencies are most important for AE prediction.

  10. High-resolution Mid-infrared Imaging of the Circumstellar Disks of Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariñas, N.; Telesco, C. M.; Fisher, R. S.; Packham, C.

    2011-08-01

    We have imaged the circumstellar environments of 17 Herbig Ae/Be stars at 12 and 18 μm using MICHELLE on Gemini North and T-ReCS on Gemini South. Our sample contained eight Group I sources, those having large rising near- to far-infrared (IR) fluxes, and nine Group II sources, those having more modest mid-IR fluxes relative to their near-IR flux (in the classification of Meeus et al.). We have resolved extended emission from all Group I sources in our target list. The majority of these sources have radially symmetric mid-IR emission extending from a radius of 10 AU to hundreds of AU. Only one of the nine Group II sources is resolved at the FWHM level, with another two Group II sources resolved at fainter levels. Models by Dullemond et al. explain the observed spectral energy distribution of Group II sources using self-shadowed cold disks. If this is the case for all the Group II sources, we do not expect to detect extended emission with this study, since the IR emission measured should arise from a region only a few AU in size, which is smaller than our resolution. The fact that we do resolve some of the Group II sources implies that their disks are not completely flat, and might represent an intermediate stage. We also find that none of the more massive (>3 M sun) Herbig Ae/Be stars in our sample belongs to Group I, which may point to a relationship between stellar mass and circumstellar dust evolution. Disks around more massive stars might evolve faster so that stars are surrounded by a more evolved flat disk by the time they become optically visible, or they might follow a different evolutionary path altogether. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (United Kingdom), the National

  11. Synthesis, Crystal and Electronic Structures of the Pnictides AE3TrPn3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga; Pn = P, As)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stoyko, Stanislav; Voss, Leonard; He, Hua; Bobev, Svilen

    2015-09-24

    New ternary arsenides AE3TrAs3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga) and their phosphide analogs Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3 have been prepared by reactions of the respective elements at high temperatures. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that Sr3AlAs3 and Ba3AlAs3 adopt the Ba3AlSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oC56, space group Cmce, Z = 8). This structure is also realized for Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3. Likewise, the compounds Sr3GaAs3 and Ba3GaAs3 crystallize with the Ba3GaSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oP56, space group Pnma, Z = 8). Both structures are made up of isolated pairs of edge-shared AlPn4 and GaPn4 tetrahedra (Pn = pnictogen, i.e.,more » P or As), separated by the alkaline-earth Sr2+ and Ba2+ cations. In both cases, there are no homoatomic bonds, hence, regardless of the slightly different atomic arrangements, both structures can be rationalized as valence-precise [AE2+]3[Tr3+][Pn3-]3, or rather [AE2+]6[Tr2Pn6]12-, i.e., as Zintl phases.« less

  12. Transmembrane protein 139 (TMEM139) interacts with human kidney isoform of anion exchanger 1 (kAE1).

    PubMed

    Nuiplot, Nalin-On; Junking, Mutita; Duangtum, Natapol; Khunchai, Sasiprapa; Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai; Akkarapatumwong, Varaporn

    2015-08-01

    Human kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) mediates Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanges at the basolateral membrane of the acid-secreting α-intercalated cells. Mutations in SLC4A1 gene encoding kAE1 are associated with distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). Several studies have shown that impaired trafficking of the mutant kAE1 is an important molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of dRTA. Proteins involved in kAE1 trafficking were identified but the mechanism resulting in dRTA remained unclear. Thus, this study attempted to search for additional proteins interacting with C-terminal of kAE1 (Ct-kAE1) and involved in kAE1 trafficking to cell membrane. Transmembrane protein 139 (TMEM139) was identified as a protein interacting with Ct-kAE1 by yeast two-hybrid screening. The interaction between kAE1 and TMEM139 was confirmed by affinity co-purification, co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-based protein fragment complementation assay (PCA). In addition, flow cytometry results showed that suppression of endogenous TMEM139 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) and over-expression of TMEM139 in HEK293T cells could reduce and increase membrane localization of kAE1, respectively. The presented data demonstrate that TMEM139 interacts with kAE1 and promotes its intracellular trafficking. PMID:26049106

  13. Novel AE1 mutations in recessive distal renal tubular acidosis. Loss-of-function is rescued by glycophorin A.

    PubMed

    Tanphaichitr, V S; Sumboonnanonda, A; Ideguchi, H; Shayakul, C; Brugnara, C; Takao, M; Veerakul, G; Alper, S L

    1998-12-15

    The AE1 gene encodes band 3 Cl-/HCO3- exchangers that are expressed both in the erythrocyte and in the acid-secreting, type A intercalated cells of the kidney. Kidney AE1 contributes to urinary acidification by providing the major exit route for HCO3- across the basolateral membrane. Several AE1 mutations cosegregate with dominantly transmitted nonsyndromic renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). However, the modest degree of in vitro hypofunction exhibited by these dRTA-associated mutations fails to explain the disease phenotype in light of the normal urinary acidification associated with the complete loss-of-function exhibited by AE1 mutations linked to dominant spherocytosis. We report here novel AE1 mutations linked to a recessive syndrome of dRTA and hemolytic anemia in which red cell anion transport is normal. Both affected individuals were triply homozygous for two benign mutations M31T and K56E and for the loss-of-function mutation, G701D. AE1 G701D loss-of-function was accompanied by impaired trafficking to the Xenopus oocyte surface. Coexpression with AE1 G701D of the erythroid AE1 chaperonin, glycophorin A, rescued both AE1-mediated Cl- transport and AE1 surface expression in oocytes. The genetic and functional data both suggest that the homozygous AE1 G701D mutation causes recessively transmitted dRTA in this kindred with apparently normal erythroid anion transport. PMID:9854053

  14. NASA, Navy, and AES/York sea ice concentration comparison of SSM/I algorithms with SAR derived values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentz, R. R.; Wackerman, C. C.; Shuchman, R. A.; Onstott, R. G.; Gloersen, Per; Cavalieri, Don; Ramseier, Rene; Rubinstein, Irene; Comiso, Joey; Hollinger, James

    1991-01-01

    Previous research studies have focused on producing algorithms for extracting geophysical information from passive microwave data regarding ice floe size, sea ice concentration, open water lead locations, and sea ice extent. These studies have resulted in four separate algorithms for extracting these geophysical parameters. Sea ice concentration estimates generated from each of these algorithms (i.e., NASA/Team, NASA/Comiso, AES/York, and Navy) are compared to ice concentration estimates produced from coincident high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. The SAR concentration estimates are produced from data collected in both the Beaufort Sea and the Greenland Sea in March 1988 and March 1989, respectively. The SAR data are coincident to the passive microwave data generated by the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I).

  15. 40 CFR 141.703 - Sampling locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 141.703 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Source Water Monitoring Requirements § 141.703 Sampling locations. (a) Systems required to conduct source water...

  16. 40 CFR 141.703 - Sampling locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 141.703 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Source Water Monitoring Requirements § 141.703 Sampling locations. (a) Systems required to conduct source water...

  17. 40 CFR 141.703 - Sampling locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 141.703 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for Cryptosporidium Source Water Monitoring Requirements § 141.703 Sampling locations. (a) Systems required to conduct source water...

  18. METHOD OF LOCATING GROUNDS

    DOEpatents

    Macleish, K.G.

    1958-02-11

    ABS>This patent presents a method for locating a ground in a d-c circult having a number of parallel branches connected across a d-c source or generator. The complete method comprises the steps of locating the ground with reference to the mildpoint of the parallel branches by connecting a potentiometer across the terminals of the circuit and connecting the slider of the potentiometer to ground through a current indicating instrument, adjusting the slider to right or left of the mildpoint so as to cause the instrument to indicate zero, connecting the terminal of the network which is farthest from the ground as thus indicated by the potentiometer to ground through a condenser, impressing a ripple voltage on the circuit, and then measuring the ripple voltage at the midpoint of each parallel branch to find the branch in which is the lowest value of ripple voltage, and then measuring the distribution of the ripple voltage along this branch to determine the point at which the ripple voltage drops off to zero or substantially zero due to the existence of a ground. The invention has particular application where a circuit ground is present which will disappear if the normal circuit voltage is removed.

  19. Prognostic assessment in COPD without lung function: the B-AE-D indices.

    PubMed

    Boeck, Lucas; Soriano, Joan B; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; Blasi, Francesco; Kostikas, Konstantinos; Boersma, Wim; Milenkovic, Branislava; Louis, Renaud; Lacoma, Alicia; Djamin, Remco; Aerts, Joachim; Torres, Antoni; Rohde, Gernot; Welte, Tobias; Martinez-Camblor, Pablo; Rakic, Janko; Scherr, Andreas; Koller, Michael; van der Palen, Job; Marin, Jose M; Alfageme, Inmaculada; Almagro, Pere; Casanova, Ciro; Esteban, Cristobal; Soler-Cataluña, Juan J; de-Torres, Juan P; Miravitlles, Marc; Celli, Bartolome R; Tamm, Michael; Stolz, Daiana

    2016-06-01

    Several composite markers have been proposed for risk assessment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, choice of parameters and score complexity restrict clinical applicability. Our aim was to provide and validate a simplified COPD risk index independent of lung function.The PROMISE study (n=530) was used to develop a novel prognostic index. Index performance was assessed regarding 2-year COPD-related mortality and all-cause mortality. External validity was tested in stable and exacerbated COPD patients in the ProCOLD, COCOMICS and COMIC cohorts (total n=2988).Using a mixed clinical and statistical approach, body mass index (B), severe acute exacerbations of COPD frequency (AE), modified Medical Research Council dyspnoea severity (D) and copeptin (C) were identified as the most suitable simplified marker combination. 0, 1 or 2 points were assigned to each parameter and totalled to B-AE-D or B-AE-D-C. It was observed that B-AE-D and B-AE-D-C were at least as good as BODE (body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnoea, exercise capacity), ADO (age, dyspnoea, airflow obstruction) and DOSE (dyspnoea, obstruction, smoking, exacerbation) indices for predicting 2-year all-cause mortality (c-statistic: 0.74, 0.77, 0.69, 0.72 and 0.63, respectively; Hosmer-Lemeshow test all p>0.05). Both indices were COPD specific (c-statistic for predicting COPD-related 2-year mortality: 0.87 and 0.89, respectively). External validation of B-AE-D was performed in COCOMICS and COMIC (c-statistic for 1-year all-cause mortality: 0.68 and 0.74; c-statistic for 2-year all-cause mortality: 0.65 and 0.67; Hosmer-Lemeshow test all p>0.05).The B-AE-D index, plus copeptin if available, allows a simple and accurate assessment of COPD-related risk. PMID:27103389

  20. Reduced DIDS-sensitive chloride conductance in Ae1-/- mouse erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alper, Seth L.; Vandorpe, David H.; Peters, Luanne L.; Brugnara, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The resting membrane potential of the human erythrocyte is largely determined by a constitutive Cl- conductance ∼100-fold greater than the resting cation conductance. The 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS)-sensitive electroneutral Cl- transport mediated by the human erythroid Cl-/HCO3- exchanger, AE1 (SLC4A1, band 3) is ≥10,000-fold greater than can be accounted for by the Cl- conductance of the red cell. The molecular identities of conductive anion pathways across the red cell membrane remain poorly defined. We have examined red cell Cl- conductance in the Ae1-/- mouse as a genetic test of the hypothesis that Ae1 mediates DIDS-sensitive Cl- conductance in mouse red cells. We report here that wildtype mouse red cell membrane potential resembles that of human red cells in the predominance of its Cl- conductance. We show with four technical approaches that the DIDS-sensitive component of erythroid Cl- conductance is reduced or absent from Ae1-/- red cells. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Ae1 anion exchanger polypeptide can operate infrequently in a conductive mode. However, the fragile red cell membrane of the Ae1-/- mouse red cell exhibits reduced abundance or loss of multiple polypeptides. Thus, loss of one or more distinct, DIDS-sensitive anion channel polypeptide(s) from the Ae1-/- red cell membrane cannot be ruled out as an explanation for the reduced DIDS-sensitive anion conductance. PMID:18329299

  1. Crustal stress, seismicity, acoustic emission (AE), and tectonics: the Kefallinì;a (Greece) case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregori, G. P.; Poscolieri, M.; Paparo, G.; Ventrice, G.; de Simone, S.; Rafanelli, C.

    2009-04-01

    New inferences - confirming previous results (see references)- are presented dealing with a few years Acoustic Emission (AE) records collected at Kefallinìa (Ionian Islands, Greece). A physical distinction between HF (high frequency) vs. LF (low frequency) AE is required. Step-wise changes of the AE underground conductivity are evidenced, and can be suitably handled. "Smooth" results concern (i) the annual variation, (ii) some long-lasting stress "solitons" crossing through the area, and (iii) tidal effects. In particular, every AE station can be operated like a monitoring station both for Earth's tides and for the free oscillations of the Earth. In addition, Kefallinìa exhibits a much peculiar groundwater circulation, in which conduit flow is dominant, that originates a specific (and unique) AE effect. By means of AE time-series analysis, "extreme" or "catastrophic" events can be also monitored and possibly related to relevant tectonic occurrences (either earthquakes, or maybe other occasional phenomena). They can be investigated, and have a regional - rather than local - character. Therefore, every interpretation based on a single station record - being biased by some arbitrariness - can only result indicative. A standardized procedure and software is proposed for routine AE data handling and analysis. References.: Lagios et al., 2004. In Proc. SCI 2004 (The 8th World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatic), Orlando, Florida, July 1004, 6 pp. Poscolieri et al., 2006. In. G. Cello and B. D. Malamud, (eds), 2006. Geol. Soc. London, Special Publ., 261, 63-78. Poscolieri et al., 2006a. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 961-971.

  2. Prognostic assessment in COPD without lung function: the B-AE-D indices

    PubMed Central

    Boeck, Lucas; Blasi, Francesco; Kostikas, Konstantinos; Boersma, Wim; Milenkovic, Branislava; Louis, Renaud; Lacoma, Alicia; Djamin, Remco; Aerts, Joachim; Torres, Antoni; Rohde, Gernot; Welte, Tobias; Martinez-Camblor, Pablo; Rakic, Janko; Scherr, Andreas; Koller, Michael; van der Palen, Job; Marin, Jose M.; Alfageme, Inmaculada; Almagro, Pere; Casanova, Ciro; Esteban, Cristobal; Soler-Cataluña, Juan J.; de-Torres, Juan P.; Miravitlles, Marc; Celli, Bartolome R.; Tamm, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Several composite markers have been proposed for risk assessment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, choice of parameters and score complexity restrict clinical applicability. Our aim was to provide and validate a simplified COPD risk index independent of lung function. The PROMISE study (n=530) was used to develop a novel prognostic index. Index performance was assessed regarding 2-year COPD-related mortality and all-cause mortality. External validity was tested in stable and exacerbated COPD patients in the ProCOLD, COCOMICS and COMIC cohorts (total n=2988). Using a mixed clinical and statistical approach, body mass index (B), severe acute exacerbations of COPD frequency (AE), modified Medical Research Council dyspnoea severity (D) and copeptin (C) were identified as the most suitable simplified marker combination. 0, 1 or 2 points were assigned to each parameter and totalled to B-AE-D or B-AE-D-C. It was observed that B-AE-D and B-AE-D-C were at least as good as BODE (body mass index, airflow obstruction, dyspnoea, exercise capacity), ADO (age, dyspnoea, airflow obstruction) and DOSE (dyspnoea, obstruction, smoking, exacerbation) indices for predicting 2-year all-cause mortality (c-statistic: 0.74, 0.77, 0.69, 0.72 and 0.63, respectively; Hosmer–Lemeshow test all p>0.05). Both indices were COPD specific (c-statistic for predicting COPD-related 2-year mortality: 0.87 and 0.89, respectively). External validation of B-AE-D was performed in COCOMICS and COMIC (c-statistic for 1-year all-cause mortality: 0.68 and 0.74; c-statistic for 2-year all-cause mortality: 0.65 and 0.67; Hosmer–Lemeshow test all p>0.05). The B-AE-D index, plus copeptin if available, allows a simple and accurate assessment of COPD-related risk. PMID:27103389

  3. Significance of large-scale circulation in magnetic storm characteristics with application to AE-C neutral composition data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Hedin, A. E.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of a magnetic storm in February 1974 leads to the following conclusions: (1) Wind-induced diffusion leads to depletion of O and He and enhancements of Ar at high latitudes. (2) The same process increases O and He and decreases Ar at low latitudes. (3) There is substantial agreement between theory and neutral composition data from the AE-C closed source neutral mass spectrometer; the low-latitude enhancements of O and He, in magnitude comparable to or even larger than those of N2 and Ar, are observed, which is characteristic for the circulation mechanism. (4) To achieve agreement with the composition measurements, a heat input rate of 1.7 ergs/sq cm s is required above 120 km. (5) Changes in the neutral composition associated with the annual variations have significant effects on the magnetic storm dynamics.

  4. Supplemental site inspection for Air Force Plant 59, Johnson City, New York, Volume 2: Appendices A-E

    SciTech Connect

    Nashold, B.; Rosenblatt, D.; Tomasko, D.

    1995-08-01

    This summary describes a Supplemental Site Inspection (SSI) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at Air Force Plant 59 (AFP 59) in Johnson City, New York. All required data pertaining to this project were entered by ANL into the Air Force-wide Installation Restoration Program Information System (IRPIMS) computer format and submitted to an appropriate authority. The work was sponsored by the United States Air Force as part of its Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Previous studies had revealed the presence of contaminants at the site and identified several potential contaminant sources. Argonne`s study was conducted to answer questions raised by earlier investigations. This volume consists of appendices A-E, containing field data and data validation.

  5. Investigating mixel errors inherent in SSM/I data processed with the AES/York sea ice concentration algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Sokol, J.L.; LeDrew, E.F.; Piwowar, J.M.

    1997-08-01

    Since 1972 passive microwave sensors have been used to monitor cryospheric variables due to their all weather imaging capabilities and near-global coverage. The low spatial resolution employed by passive sensors can result in mixer errors. Mixel errors are pixels contaminated with a mixture of land and water, occurring when the sensor passes over land cover transition areas. Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) data from 1987-1994 was processed with the AES/York sea ice concentration algorithm and analyzed to investigate the interference which is inherent in data. In this investigation, the mixel phenomena was most evident in late summer images when the ice extent is at a minimum. After the shoreline had been dilated one pixel in width, an average of 77.8% of the mixel errors in the images are reduced. By identifying this major source of mixel errors in the sea ice concentration images, correction procedures can be developed to improve data accuracy.

  6. Auroral energy deposition and neutral composition changes observed simultaneously by ESRO 4 and AE-C at different altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinks, H.; Mayr, H. G.; Kayser, D. C.; Potter, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    Neutral composition data obtained simultaneously from ESRO 4 and AE-C during geomagnetically disturbed conditions at different altitudes (160 and 230 km) are used to investigate the atmospheric response to geomagnetic storms and to infer information regarding the excitation mechanism. The data are compared with a theoretical model that estimates the composition effects in terms of wind induced diffusion. A parametric study was conducted bearing on the influence of energy deposition at different altitudes and with varying latitudinal extent. In one of the observed events the composition effects at 160 km are substantially smaller than at 230 km for which we inferred by comparison with the theory that the energy mainly was deposited at 150 km altitude over a wide latitude range. Another event required energy deposition at somewhat lower altitudes near 120 km with a more localized energy source. Significant variations of the turbopause level were not necessary to explain the observed variations.

  7. LLNL Location and Detection Research

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S C; Harris, D B; Anderson, M L; Walter, W R; Flanagan, M P; Ryall, F

    2003-07-16

    We present two LLNL research projects in the topical areas of location and detection. The first project assesses epicenter accuracy using a multiple-event location algorithm, and the second project employs waveform subspace Correlation to detect and identify events at Fennoscandian mines. Accurately located seismic events are the bases of location calibration. A well-characterized set of calibration events enables new Earth model development, empirical calibration, and validation of models. In a recent study, Bondar et al. (2003) develop network coverage criteria for assessing the accuracy of event locations that are determined using single-event, linearized inversion methods. These criteria are conservative and are meant for application to large bulletins where emphasis is on catalog completeness and any given event location may be improved through detailed analysis or application of advanced algorithms. Relative event location techniques are touted as advancements that may improve absolute location accuracy by (1) ensuring an internally consistent dataset, (2) constraining a subset of events to known locations, and (3) taking advantage of station and event correlation structure. Here we present the preliminary phase of this work in which we use Nevada Test Site (NTS) nuclear explosions, with known locations, to test the effect of travel-time model accuracy on relative location accuracy. Like previous studies, we find that the reference velocity-model and relative-location accuracy are highly correlated. We also find that metrics based on travel-time residual of relocated events are not a reliable for assessing either velocity-model or relative-location accuracy. In the topical area of detection, we develop specialized correlation (subspace) detectors for the principal mines surrounding the ARCES station located in the European Arctic. Our objective is to provide efficient screens for explosions occurring in the mines of the Kola Peninsula (Kovdor, Zapolyarny

  8. Assimilation and implications of AE-9/AP-9 in the design process of JPL missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Soria-Santacruz Pich, M.; Jun, I.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA AE-8/AP-8 has been the standard geospace environment specification for decades. This model describes the energetic particle environment around the Earth and is currently the default model used in the design of space missions at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Moreover, the model plays a critical role in the determination of the shielding and survivability of the satellites orbiting our planet. A recent update supported by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO), the AE-9/AP-9 model, was released in September 2012 and included many improvements like increased spatial resolution and the specification of the uncertainty due to instrument errors or space weather variability. A current effort at JPL is in place with the objective of making a decision within the Laboratory on the transition from AE-8/AP-8 to the new AE-9/AP-9. In this study we present the results of this effort, which involves the comparison between both versions of the model for different satellite orbits, the comparison between AE-9/AP-9 and in-situ satellite data from the Van Allen Probes and the OSTM/Jason 2 satellite, and the implications of adopting the new model for spacecraft design in terms of survivability, shielding, single event effects, and spacecraft charging.

  9. MEASURING THE STELLAR ACCRETION RATES OF HERBIG Ae/Be STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Donehew, Brian; Brittain, Sean E-mail: sbritt@clemson.edu

    2011-02-15

    The accretion rate of young stars is a fundamental characteristic of these systems. While accretion onto T Tauri stars has been studied extensively, little work has been done on measuring the accretion rate of their intermediate-mass analogs, the Herbig Ae/Be stars. Measuring the stellar accretion rate of Herbig Ae/Bes is not straightforward both because of the dearth of metal absorption lines available for veiling measurements and the intrinsic brightness of Herbig Ae/Be stars at ultraviolet wavelengths where the brightness of the accretion shock peaks. Alternative approaches to measuring the accretion rate of young stars by measuring the luminosity of proxies such as the Br {gamma} emission line have not been calibrated. A promising approach is the measurement of the veiling of the Balmer discontinuity. We present measurements of this veiling as well as the luminosity of Br {gamma}. We show that the relationship between the luminosity of Br {gamma} and the stellar accretion rate for classical T Tauri stars is consistent with Herbig Ae stars but not Herbig Be stars. We discuss the implications of this finding for understanding the interaction of the star and disk for Herbig Ae/Be stars.

  10. Search for gamma-ray emissions from AE Aquarii with Fermi LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Rea, Nanda; De Ona Wilhelmi, Emma; Torres, Diego F.; Hou, Xian

    2016-07-01

    AE Aquarii is a cataclysmic variable with the fastest known rotating magnetized white dwarf (P_{spin} = 33.08 s). We report on deep searches for gamma-ray emission and pulsations from AE Aquarii in seven years of Fermi-LAT Pass 8 data. Using different X-ray observations spanning 20 years, we substantially extended the timing ephemeris of AE Aquarii. A spin phase jump was discovered between MJD 55122.5 - 56078.64 by X-ray timing analysis. Using the extended timing ephemeris, we searched for gamma-ray pulsations at the spin period and its first harmonic. No gamma-ray pulsation were detected above 3 sigma significance. Neither steady gamma-ray emission nor gamma-ray variability of AE Aquarii were detected by Fermi-LAT. We impose the most restrictive upper limit on the gamma-ray emission from AE Aquarii to date, as 1.23×10^{-12} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} in 0.1-300 GeV range providing constrains on models.

  11. Characterization of the extremely arsenic-resistant Brevibacterium linens strain AE038-8 isolated from contaminated groundwater in Tucumán, Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maizel, Daniela; Blum, Jodi S.; Ferrero, Marcela A.; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Brown, Steven D.; Rosen, Barry P.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    Brevibacterium linens AE038-8, isolated from As-contaminated groundwater in Tucumán (Argentina), is highly resistant to arsenic oxyanions, being able to tolerate up to 1 M As(V) and 75 mM As(III) in a complex medium. Strain AE038-8 was also able to reduce As(V) to As(III) when grown in complex medium but paradoxically it could not do this in a defined minimal medium with sodium acetate and ammonium sulfate as carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. No oxidation of As(III) to As(V) was observed under any conditions. Three copies of the ars operon comprising arsenic resistance genes were found on B. linens AE038-8 genome. In addition to the well known arsC, ACR3 andarsR, two copies of the arsO gene of unknown function were detected.

  12. The evolution of the jet from Herbig Ae star HD 163296 from 1999 to 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, H. M.; Schneider, P. C.; Li, Z.-Y.

    2013-04-01

    Young A and B stars, the so-called Herbig Ae/Be stars (HAeBe), are surrounded by active accretion disks and drive outflows. We study the jet HH 409, which is launched from the HAeBe star HD 163296, using new and archival observations from Chandra and HST/STIS. In X-rays we can show that the central source is not significantly extended. The approaching jet, but not the counterjet, is detected in Lyα. In addition, there is red-shifted Lyα emission extended in the same direction as the jet, which is also absent in the counterjet. We can rule out an accretion or disk-wind origin for this feature. In the optical we find the knots B and B2 in the counterjet. Knot B has been observed previously, so we can derive its proper motion of (0.37 ± 0.01)'' yr-1. Its electron density is 3000 cm-3, thus the cooling time scale is only a few months, so the knot needs to be reheated continuously. The shock speed derived from models of Hα and forbidden emission lines decreased from 50 km s-1 in 1999 to 30 km s-1 in 2011 because the shock front loses energy as it travels along the jet. Knot B2 is observed at a similar position in 2011 to where knot B was in 1999, but shows a lower ionization fraction and higher mass loss rate, proving that there are variations in the jet launching conditions.

  13. ISO-LWS observations of Herbig Ae/Be stars. I. Fine structure lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzetti, D.; Tommasi, E.; Giannini, T.; Nisini, B.; Benedettini, M.; Pezzuto, S.; Strafella, F.; Barlow, M.; Clegg, P. E.; Cohen, M.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Liseau, R.; Molinari, S.; Palla, F.; Saraceno, P.; Smith, H. A.; Spinoglio, L.; White, G. J.

    1999-06-01

    We present the results of the first spectrophotometric survey of a sample of eleven Herbig Ae/Be stars (HAEBE) obtained with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The [OI] 63mu m and the [CII] 158mu m lines are observed in all the investigated sources, while the [OI] 145mu m transition, due to its relative faintness, sometimes remains undetected. By comparing line intensity ratios with model predictions, photodissociation, due to the UV photons from the central star, results the dominating excitation mechanism although contributions of C-shocks to the [OI] emission cannot be ruled out. A clear example for the presence of a photodissociation region (PDR) illuminated by an HAEBE is shown by LWS spectroscopic mapping of NGC 7129. Some diagnostic probes of the radiation field and density are provided for the objects in our sample: these substantially agree with the known characteristics of both the star and its circumstellar environment, although the observed ratio [OI]63/[OI]145 tends to be smaller than predicted by PDR models. The most likely explanation for this behaviour is self-absorption at 63mu m by cold atomic oxygen. Fine structure lines of the ionised species [OIII], [NII] were detected whenever the star had a spectral type of B0 or earlier; in particular, around the star CoD-42(deg) 11721, besides a compact HII region, evidence is given for an extended low electron density ionised region. Finally, molecular line emission is associated with stars powering a CO outflow, and clumpy PDR models, better than C-shock models, predict for them relative cooling (CO vs OI and CO vs OH) similar to the observed ones. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States and with the participation of ISAS and NASA}

  14. A New Method of Using Sensor Arrays for Gas Leakage Location Based on Correlation of the Time-Space Domain of Continuous Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xu; Zhang, Yu; Li, Yibo; Gong, Xiaoyue; Jin, Shijiu

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a time-space domain correlation-based method for gas leakage detection and location. It acquires the propagated signal on the skin of the plate by using a piezoelectric acoustic emission (AE) sensor array. The signal generated from the gas leakage hole (which diameter is less than 2 mm) is time continuous. By collecting and analyzing signals from different sensors’ positions in the array, the correlation among those signals in the time-space domain can be achieved. Then, the directional relationship between the sensor array and the leakage source can be calculated. The method successfully solves the real-time orientation problem of continuous ultrasonic signals generated from leakage sources (the orientation time is about 15 s once), and acquires high accuracy location information of leakage sources by the combination of multiple sets of orientation results. According to the experimental results, the mean value of the location absolute error is 5.83 mm on a one square meter plate, and the maximum location error is generally within a ±10 mm interval. Meanwhile, the error variance is less than 20.17. PMID:25860070

  15. Comparison of NASA Team2 and AES-York Ice Concentration Algorithms Against Operational Ice Charts From the Canadian Ice Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shokr, Mohammed; Markus, Thorsten

    2006-01-01

    Ice concentration retrieved from spaceborne passive-microwave observations is a prime input to operational sea-ice-monitoring programs, numerical weather prediction models, and global climate models. Atmospheric Environment Service (AES)- York and the Enhanced National Aeronautics and Space Administration Team (NT2) are two algorithms that calculate ice concentration from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager observations. This paper furnishes a comparison between ice concentrations (total, thin, and thick types) output from NT2 and AES-York algorithms against the corresponding estimates from the operational analysis of Radarsat images in the Canadian Ice Service (CIS). A new data fusion technique, which incorporates the actual sensor's footprint, was developed to facilitate this study. Results have shown that the NT2 and AES-York algorithms underestimate total ice concentration by 18.35% and 9.66% concentration counts on average, with 16.8% and 15.35% standard deviation, respectively. However, the retrieved concentrations of thin and thick ice are in much more discrepancy with the operational CIS estimates when either one of these two types dominates the viewing area. This is more likely to occur when the total ice concentration approaches 100%. If thin and thick ice types coexist in comparable concentrations, the algorithms' estimates agree with CIS'S estimates. In terms of ice concentration retrieval, thin ice is more problematic than thick ice. The concept of using a single tie point to represent a thin ice surface is not realistic and provides the largest error source for retrieval accuracy. While AES-York provides total ice concentration in slightly more agreement with CIS'S estimates, NT2 provides better agreement in retrieving thin and thick ice concentrations.

  16. Synthesis, Crystal and Electronic Structures of the Pnictides AE3TrPn3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga; Pn = P, As)

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyko, Stanislav; Voss, Leonard; He, Hua; Bobev, Svilen

    2015-09-24

    New ternary arsenides AE3TrAs3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga) and their phosphide analogs Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3 have been prepared by reactions of the respective elements at high temperatures. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that Sr3AlAs3 and Ba3AlAs3 adopt the Ba3AlSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oC56, space group Cmce, Z = 8). This structure is also realized for Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3. Likewise, the compounds Sr3GaAs3 and Ba3GaAs3 crystallize with the Ba3GaSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oP56, space group Pnma, Z = 8). Both structures are made up of isolated pairs of edge-shared AlPn4 and GaPn4 tetrahedra (Pn = pnictogen, i.e., P or As), separated by the alkaline-earth Sr2+ and Ba2+ cations. In both cases, there are no homoatomic bonds, hence, regardless of the slightly different atomic arrangements, both structures can be rationalized as valence-precise [AE2+]3[Tr3+][Pn3-]3, or rather [AE2+]6[Tr2Pn6]12-, i.e., as Zintl phases.

  17. Location, Location, Location: Development of Spatiotemporal Sequence Learning in Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkham, Natasha Z.; Slemmer, Jonathan A.; Richardson, Daniel C.; Johnson, Scott P.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated infants' sensitivity to spatiotemporal structure. In Experiment 1, circles appeared in a statistically defined spatial pattern. At test 11-month-olds, but not 8-month-olds, looked longer at a novel spatial sequence. Experiment 2 presented different color/shape stimuli, but only the location sequence was violated during test;…

  18. In situ mapping of the effect of additional mutations on starch granule structure in amylose-extender (ae) maize kernels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongli; Wellner, Nikolaus; Parker, Mary L; Morris, Victor J; Cheng, Fang

    2015-03-15

    Optical (KI/I2-staining, polarised) and FTIR microscopy has been used to monitor starch granule structure within wild-type (wt), GEMS-0067 and waxy-amylose-extender (wx-ae) maize mutant kernels. In the GEMS-0067 mutant containing the high amylose modifier (HAM) gene(s) plus the recessive ae gene, structural heterogeneity characteristic of the ae mutation was reduced markedly. However, enhanced variation in granule shape and size was observed distributed spatially within the kernel, which appears to be related to new heterogeneity in internal starch granule structure. In wx-ae starch mutants the ae gene led to heterogeneity of starch granule structure equivalent to that in single ae mutants, plus new structural heterogeneity coincident with novel induced variation in granule size and shape. PMID:25542125

  19. Dust emission features in 3-micron spectra of Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, T. Y.; Tokunaga, A. T.; Strom, S. E.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to low- and medium-resolution spectra in the 3-micron region of 24 Herbig Ae/Be stars obtained in a search for organic features from the dust around young stars. The 3.29-micron emission feature from aromatic hydrocarbons was detected in three objects: Lk H-alpha 25, XY Per, and AS 310. Two other stars, HD 245185 and HK Ori, may have weak features. About 20 percent of the Herbig Ae/Be surveyed to date have firmly detected 3.29-micron features. The available data indicate that the 3.29-micron feature is more extended around Herbig Ae/Be stars of earlier spectral type, possibly due to dehydrogenization or destruction of the aromatics near these stars. It is suggested that the total number of aromatics excited by the stars is also greater around the earlier-type objects.

  20. Winter Refuge for Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus Mosquitoes in Hanoi during Winter

    PubMed Central

    Tsunoda, Takashi; Cuong, Tran Chi; Dong, Tran Duc; Yen, Nguyen Thi; Le, Nguyen Hoang; Phong, Tran Vu; Minakawa, Noboru

    2014-01-01

    Dengue occurs throughout the year in Hanoi, Vietnam, despite winter low temperatures <10°C. During July 2010 to March 2012, we surveyed monthly for Aedes larvae and pupae in 120 houses in 8 Hanoi districts. Aedes albopictus preferred discarded containers in summer and pupal density drastically decreased in winter. Aedes aegypti preferred concrete tanks and this preference increased in winter. Even in winter, the lowest water temperature found in concrete tanks was >14°C, exceeding the developmental zero point of Ae. aegypti. Although jars, drums and concrete tanks were the dominant containers previously (1994–97) in Hanoi, currently the percentage of residences with concrete tanks was still high while jars and drums were quite low. Our study showed that concrete tanks with broken lids allowing mosquitoes access were important winter refuge for Ae. aegypti. We also indicate a concern about concrete tanks serving as foci for Ae. aegypti to expand their distribution in cooler regions. PMID:24752230