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Sample records for aegean sea region

  1. Assessment of ENSEMBLES regional climate models for the representation of monthly wind characteristics in the Aegean Sea (Greece): Mean and extremes analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulou, Christina; Tolika, Konstantia; Tegoulias, Ioannis; Velikou, Kondylia; Vagenas, Christos

    2013-04-01

    The main scope of the present study is the assessment of the ability of three of the most updated regional climate models, developed under the frame of the European research project ENSEMBLES (http://www.ensembles-eu.org/), to simulate the wind characteristics in the Aegean Sea in Greece. The examined models are KNMI-RACMO2, MPI-MREMO, and ICTP - RegCM3. They all have the same spatial resolution (25x25km) and for their future projections they are using the A1B SRES emission scenarios. Their simulated wind data (speed and direction) were compared with observational data from several stations over the domain of study for a time period of 25 years, from 1980 to 2004 on a monthly basis. The primer data were available every three or six hours from which we computed the mean daily wind speed and the prevailing daily wind direction. It should be mentioned, that the comparison was made for the grid point that was the closest to each station over land. Moreover, the extreme speed values were also calculated both for the observational and the simulated data, in order to assess the ability of the models in capturing the most intense wind conditions. The first results of the study showed that the prevailing winds during the winter and spring months have a north - northeastern or a south - south western direction in most parts of the Aegean sea. The models under examination seem to capture quite satisfactorily this pattern as well as the general characteristics of the winds in this area. During summer, winds in the Aegean Sea have mainly north direction and the models have quite good agreement both in simulating this direction and the wind speed. Concerning the extreme wind speed (percentiles) it was found that for the stations in the northern Aegean all the models overestimate the extreme wind indices. For the eastern parts of the Aegean the KNMI and the MPI model underestimate the extreme wind speeds while on the other hand the ICTP model overestimates them. Finally for the

  2. The influence of Black Sea Water inflow and its synoptic time-scale variability in the North Aegean Sea hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavropoulou, Apostolia-Maria; Mantziafou, Anneta; Jarosz, Ewa; Sofianos, Sarantis

    2016-02-01

    The exchange water fluxes between the Black Sea and the North Aegean Sea through the Dardanelles Strait constitute an essential factor for the general circulation of the region. The Black Sea Water (BSW) inflow to the Aegean plays an important role in the hydrography and circulation of the basin and can affect the North Aegean deep water formation processes. Numerical experiments evaluating the influence of the time-scale variability (synoptic and seasonal) and the seasonality (period of maximum/minimum) of the Black Sea Water inflow on the dynamics of the North Aegean basin were performed. The experiments were carried out for the period from August 2008 to October 2009, using observed upper and lower-layer fluxes from the Dardanelles Strait, high-resolution atmospheric forcing, and boundary conditions derived from an operational system (ALERMO). The large-scale spatial patterns of the circulation and the seasonal variability of the North Aegean circulation show that dynamics of the basin can effectively absorb most of the Black Sea Water inflow variability. The overall cyclonic circulation of the North Aegean Sea and the predominant cyclonic and anti-cyclonic features are robust and are little affected by the different lateral fluxes. However, differences in the seasonality of the BSW inflow have an important impact in the North Aegean water column structure, while the synoptic variability observed in the Black Sea Water inflow affects the kinetic energy of the basin and the pathway of the Black Sea Water plume.

  3. Modeling of Tsunami Propagation and Inundation in the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, B.; Moore, C. W.; Kalligeris, N.; Kanoglu, U.

    2011-12-01

    Several tsunami forecasting systems have been developed based on pre-computed tsunami scenario databases with the aim to provide early warning to tsunami-prone regions worldwide. NOAA's tsunami forecasting system for the United States is such a system, based on the concept of a pre-computed tsunami scenario database consisting of 100km x 50km fault planes with a slip value of 1m, referred to as tsunami source functions. These source functions are placed along the subduction zones in several rows, covering known faults throughout the major ocean basins. Linearity of the tsunami propagation in the open ocean allows scaling and/or combination of the pre-computed tsunami source functions since propagation of tsunamis in deep sea is linear. In real time, a specific tsunami scenario can be obtained by inverting deep-ocean buoy measurements providing initial and boundary conditions for site-specific, high-resolution, nonlinear forecast models. The database can also be used to generate different scenario events to produce tsunami inundation maps for target shorelines. To date, tsunami source functions have not been computed along the subduction zones in Aegean Sea even though there are considerable number of tsunami events causing damages. Although one might argue that the possibility of such an event is rare, the coastlines are densely populated, developed, and hosts millions of tourists during the summer months. Therefore, even though the risk of an event might be small, the hazard is high. Considering the long shorelines and the general lack of public knowledge about preparedness, a tsunami event in the region would be disastrous. A database for historical tsunami events in the Aegean Sea has been compiled, providing potential source locations. This data has allowed us to create a tsunami propagation database for Aegean Sea. Once finalized, this pre-computed scenario database will be extremely useful in developing tsunami resilient communities in the region.

  4. Black Sea and Mediterranean Sea interaction: influence of the North Aegean dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Androulidakis, Yannis; Krestenitis, Yannis; Kourafalou, Vassiliki

    2013-04-01

    The brackish Black Sea Waters outflow to the Aegean Sea, through the Dardanelles Straits, affects and determines significantly the hydrodynamic and physical characteristics of the Aegean Sea. At the same time, it affects several biological parameters, like chl-a concentrations, and, therefore, the general quality of the marine environment. The investigation and mathematical simulation of the North Aegean's physical oceanography contributes to the knowledge and understanding of the buoyant waters' circulation initial conditions in the wider East Mediterranean region. The implementation and adaptation of the 3-d hydrodynamic mathematical model HYCOM (Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model) in the North Aegean Sea (1/50οx1/50o), significantly contributes to the investigation of the area's hydrodynamic circulation. HYCOM, due to its hybrid coordinate operation, can describe at a satisfactory level, all the different topography and mixing cases of the complicated N. Aegean region. In addition, the high resolution atmospheric forcing and the nesting with a data assimilated broader Mediterranean HYCOM model along the southern open boundary of the North Aegean model, benefit the quality of the results and constitutes an important tool on the description and understanding of the Black Sea influence to the region's dynamics. A fundamental objective is the application and comparison of different Dardanelles outflow parameterizations based a) on the Black Sea water budget, b) on current measurements from a telemetric station in Limnos Island, and c) on historical time series. The Black Sea Waters plume evolution and the circulation patterns are dependant on the outflow rate magnitude, the flow distribution inside the straits and the prevailing winds. The long-term simulation covers the period of the last 20 years (1990-2010), investigating several physical characteristics of the North Aegean Sea, such as the deep water masses evolution, the major Black Sea waters circulation patterns

  5. Monitoring sea level fluctuation in South Aegean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharis, Vangelis; Paradissis, Demitris; Drakatos, George; Marinou, Aggeliki; Melis, Nicolaos; Anastasiou, Demitris; Alatza, Stavroula; Papanikolaou, Xanthos

    2015-04-01

    The complexity of the geological setting of the South Aegean is well-known, among the scientific community. The subduction zone coupled with the latest unrest of the Santorini volcano, as well as the particular morphology of the earth's surface and seabed pose a poorly understood source of tsunami hazard. A sparse network of tide gauges that operate in the area for varying periods of time is strengthened by the establishment of new sensors at carefully selected locations, by the Institute of Geodynamics of the National Observatory of Athens, and the Dionyssos Satellite Observatory and the Laboratory of Higher Geodesy of the National Technical University of Athens. These new instruments, aided by a rather dense network of GNSS receivers, provide a more concrete basis for the development, testing and evaluation of a near real-time model of the sea level changes in the area. Moreover, integration with various other sensors allows to understand and assess the level of tsunami risk in the area.

  6. Assimilating Ferry Box data into the Aegean Sea model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korres, G.; Ntoumas, M.; Potiris, M.; Petihakis, G.

    2014-12-01

    Operational monitoring and forecasting of marine environmental conditions is a necessary tool for the effective management and protection of the marine ecosystem. It requires the use of multi-variable real-time measurements combined with advanced physical and ecological numerical models. Towards this, a FerryBox system was originally installed and operated in the route Piraeus-Heraklion in 2003 for one year. Early 2012 the system was upgraded and moved to a new high-speed ferry traveling daily in the same route as before. This route is by large traversing the Cretan Sea being the largest and deepest basin (2500 m) in the south Aegean Sea. The HCMR Ferry Box is today the only one in the Mediterranean and thus it can be considered as a pilot case. The analysis of FerryBox SST and SSS in situ data revealed the presence of important regional and sub-basin scale physical phenomena, such as wind-driven coastal upwelling and the presence of a mesoscale cyclone to the north of Crete. In order to assess the impact of the FerryBox SST data in constraining the Aegean Sea hydrodynamic model which is part of the POSEIDON forecasting system, the in situ data were assimilated using an advanced multivariate assimilation scheme based on the Singular Evolutive Extended Kalman (SEEK) filter, a simplified square-root extended Kalman filter that operates with low-rank error covariance matrices as a way to reduce the computational burden. Thus during the period mid-August 2012-mid January 2013 in addition to the standard assimilating parameters, daily SST data along the ferryboat route from Piraeus to Heraklion were assimilated into the model. Inter-comparisons between the control run of the system (model run that uses only the standard data set of observations) and the experiment where the observational data set is augmented with the FerryBox SST data produce interesting results. Apart from the improvement of the SST error, the additional assimilation of daily of FerryBox SST

  7. Upper Cenozoic organic-rich sequences (offshore and onshore the south Aegean sea)

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasakis, G.

    1988-08-01

    The upper Cenozoic sedimentary column of the south Aegean Sea is composed mostly of marine sediments which have been deposited after the Seravallian breakup of the south Aegean landmass. Extensive submarine coring has revealed the frequent occurrence of Quaternary dark, organic-rich layers in the cores retrieved from water depths greater than 180 m. Moreover, deep-sea drilling (DSDP leg 42A) in the south Aegean basin recovered organic-rich layers as old as late Miocene. Onshore the south Aegean Sea islands, organic-rich sediments are found at the north and south territories of the region, on Milos and Crete islands. Especially on the island of Crete and south of it, on the smaller islands of Gavdos and Koufonisi, these organic-rich sediments represent a considerable portion of the widespread upper Cenozoic sediments. Stratigraphically they cover the interval between upper Seravallian and lower Pleistocene. The organic carbon content of all these mostly calcareous lithofacies, the so-called sapropels, ranges mostly between 0.5 and 6.5%. The most reliably chronostratigraphically correlated upper Pleistocene sapropels display similar compositional characteristics across the entire basin. Certain Pleistocene and older organic-rich layers contain increased proportions of siliceous tests. However the entire range of sapropels in the region (except those within the Messinian evaporites) can be described adequately by the same lithofacies association. To demonstrate this the authors compare the lower Tortonian Faneromeni Formation on Crete with the upper Quaternary sediments from the south Aegean Sea.

  8. Source mechanism of the 2014 Aegean Sea earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Masaru

    2016-04-01

    Rapid determination of centroid moment tensor (CMT) of earthquakes, namely the source centroid location, focal mechanism, and magnitude is important for early disaster responses and issuing Tsunami warnings. In order to evaluate capability of Turkey seismic network for rapid determinations of CMT, I investigate the source mechanism of the 2014 Aegean Sea earthquake (Mw 6.9). Although this event occur out of Turkey seismic network, I obtained stable CMT solution. The CMT solution of this earthquake represents a strike-slip fault, consistent with the geometry of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF), and the source-time function indicates that this event comprised several distinct subevents. Each subevent is considered to have ruptured a different fault segment. This observation indicates the existence of a mechanical barrier, namely a NAF segment boundary, at the hypocenter. I also determined CMT solutions of background seismicity. CMT solutions of background seismicity beneath the Aegean Sea represent strike-slip or normal faulting along the NAF or its branch faults. The tensional axes of these events are oriented northeast-southwest, indicating a transtensional tectonic regime. Beneath the Sea of Marmara, the CMT solutions represent mostly strike-slip faulting, consistent with the motion of the NAF, but we identified a normal fault event with a tensional axis parallel to the strike of the NAF. This mechanism indicates that a pull-apart basin, marking a segment boundary of the NAF, is developing there. Because ruptures of a fault system and large earthquake magnitudes are strongly controlled by the fault system geometry and fault length, mapping fault segments along NAF can help to improve the accuracy of scenarios developed for future disastrous earthquakes in the Marmara region.

  9. Teleconnections, Midlatitude Cyclones and Aegean Sea Turbulent Heat Flux Variability on Daily Through Decadal Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanski, Joy; Romanou, Anastasia; Bauer, Michael; Tselioudis, George

    2013-01-01

    We analyze daily wintertime cyclone variability in the central and eastern Mediterranean during 1958-2001, and identify four distinct cyclone states, corresponding to the presence or absence of cyclones in each basin. Each cyclone state is associated with wind flows that induce characteristic patterns of cooling via turbulent (sensible and latent) heat fluxes in the eastern Mediterranean basin and Aegean Sea. The relative frequency of occurrence of each state determines the heat loss from the Aegean Sea during that winter, with largest heat losses occurring when there is a storm in the eastern but not central Mediterranean (eNOTc), and the smallest occurring when there is a storm in the central but not eastern Mediterranean (cNOTe). Time series of daily cyclone states for each winter allow us to infer Aegean Sea cooling for winters prior to 1985, the earliest year for which we have daily heat flux observations. We show that cyclone states conducive to Aegean Sea convection occurred in 1991/1992 and 1992/1993, the winters during which deep water formation was observed in the Aegean Sea, and also during the mid-1970s and the winters of 1963/1964 and 1968/1969. We find that the eNOTc cyclone state is anticorrelated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) prior to 1977/1978. After 1977/1978, the cNOTe state is anticorrelated with both the NAO and the North Caspian Pattern (NCP), showing that the area of influence of large scale atmospheric teleconnections on regional cyclone activity shifted from the eastern to the central Mediterranean during the late 1970s. A trend toward more frequent occurrence of the positive phase of the NAO produced less frequent cNOTe states since the late 1970s, increasing the number of days with strong cooling of the Aegean Sea surface waters.

  10. A new approach to the structural features of the Aegean Sea: Cellular neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, Davut; Elmas, Ali; Albora, A. Muhittin; Ucan, Osman N.

    2005-03-01

    In this study, structural features in the Aegean Sea were investigated by application of Cellular Neural Network (CNN) and Cross-Correlation methods to the gravity anomaly map. CNN is a stochastic image processing technique, which is based on template optimization using neighbourhood relationships of pixels, and probabilistic properties of two-Dimensional (2-D) input data. The performance of CNN can be evaluated by various interesting real applications in geophysics such as edge detection, data enhancement and separation of regional/residual potential anomaly maps. In this study, CNN is used in edge detection of geological bodies closer to the surface, which are masked by other structures with various depths and dimensions. CNN was first tested for (prismatic) synthetic examples and satisfactory results were obtained. Subsequently, CNN/Cross-Correlation maps and bathymetric features were evaluated together to obtain a new structural map for most of the Aegean Sea. In our structural map, the locations of the faults and basins are generally in accordance with the previous maps from restricted areas based on seismic data. In the southern and southeastern parts of the Aegean Sea, E-W trending faults cut NE-SW trending basins and faults, similar to on-shore Western Anatolia. Also, in the western, central and northern parts of the Aegean Sea, all of these structures are truncated by NE-trending faults.

  11. Modelling the impact of Black Sea water inflow on the North Aegean Sea hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzali, Margarita; Sofianos, Sarantis; Mantziafou, Anneta; Skliris, Nikolaos

    2010-06-01

    The impact of the Black Sea Water (BSW) inflow on the circulation and the water mass characteristics of the North Aegean Sea is investigated using a high-resolution 3D numerical model. Four climatological numerical experiments are performed exploring the effects of the exchange amplitude at the Dardanelles Straits in terms of the mean annual volume exchanged and the amplitude of its seasonal cycle. Larger inflow of low salinity BSW influences the water characteristics of the whole basin. The largest salinity reduction is encountered in the upper layers of the water column, and the most affected region is the northeastern part of the basin. The winter insulation character of the BSW layer (low-salinity layer) is reduced by the seasonal cycle of the inflow (minimum during winter). The maximum atmospheric cooling coincides with the minimum BSW inflow rate, weakening the vertical density gradients close to the surface and thus facilitating the vertical mixing. The inflow rate of BSW into the North Aegean Sea constitutes an essential factor for the circulation in the basin. Increased inflow rate results into considerably higher kinetic energy, stronger circulation and reinforcement of the mesoscale circulation features. Although the position of the front between BSW and waters of Levantine origin does not vary significantly with the intensity of the BSW inflow rate, the flow along the front becomes stronger and more unstable as the inflow rate increases, forming meanders and rings. The changes in the intensity of BSW inflow rate overpower the wind and thermohaline forcing and largely determine the general circulation of the North Aegean Sea.

  12. Tsunami Propagation Database for the Mediterranean and Aegean Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanoglu, U.; Hoto, O.; Kalligeris, N.; Flouri, E.; Aydin, B.; Moore, C. W.; Synolakis, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    Pre-computed tsunami scenario databases are common tools to develop long- or short-term forecasting methodologies and hazard assessment approaches for tsunami-prone regions worldwide. The benefits of such databases include the possibility of probabilistic studies (Gonzalez et al., 2009, J. Geophys. Res. 114, Article Number: C11023), inundation mapping (Barberopoulou et al., 2011, Pure Appl. Geophys. 168(11), 2133-2146), or real-time forecasting (Wei et al., 2008, Geophys. Res. Lett. 35(4), Article Number: L04609). As a result, several tsunami propagation databases have been developed including one by NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), and another by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BOM). Pre-computed tsunami scenario databases utilize different approaches. PMEL's tsunami propagation database is based on the concept of a pre-computed tsunami scenarios consisting of propagation results from 100km x 50km fault planes with a slip value of 1m referred to as tsunami source functions. PMEL's source functions are placed along the subduction zones in several rows, covering known faults throughout the major ocean basins. Linearity of the tsunami propagation in the open ocean allows scaling and/or combination of the pre-computed tsunami source functions to generate a desired scenario. The BOM database considers five earthquakes with magnitudes changing from 7.0 to 9.0 at each location with 100km intervals along the subduction zone. However, to date, no similar approach has been computed along the subduction zones in the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas, even though, historically, there have been a considerable number of tsunami events which caused damage in the region (Ambraseys and Synolakis, 2010, J. Earthquake Eng. 14 (3), 309-330, Article Number: PII 919600673). A new project was initiated between Greece and Turkey supported by General Secretariat for Research & Technology, The Ministry for Development (GSRT) of Greece and The Scientific and

  13. Major outputs of the recent multidisciplinary biogeochemical researches undertaken in the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lykousis, V.; Chronis, G.; Tselepides, A.; Price, N. B.; Theocharis, A.; Siokou-Frangou, I.; Van Wambeke, F.; Danovaro, R.; Stavrakakis, S.; Duineveld, G.; Georgopoulos, D.; Ignatiades, L.; Souvermezoglou, A.; Voutsinou-Taliadouri, F.

    2002-06-01

    The main outputs of a multidisciplinary and integrated studies are summarised. The results incorporate the latest biogeochemical researches, at basin scale, in the Aegean Sea (including thermohaline circulation studies, SPM dynamics, mass and energy fluxes, acknowledge biochemical processes in the euphotic and the benthic layer and benthic response to downward fluxes). The data were acquired within five (seasonal) research cruises, during 1997-1998. Data analysis and evaluation hence provided important new information on the functional processes of the Aegean ecosystem. In terms of water circulation, no new deep water formation in the Aegean Sea was observed, during 1997-1998, but rather intermediate water, due mainly to the mild winter conditions. All the biochemical parameters of the euphotic zone (nutrients, Particulate Organic Carbon (POC), chlorophyll- a, phytoplankton, primary and bacterial production), although high in the N. Aegean Sea reflect clearly the highly oligotrophic character of the Aegean Sea. In the N. Aegean, microbial food web was the main pathway of carbon, whereas in the S. Aegean, the food web could be classified as multivorous. An important Black Sea Water (BSW) signal was observed in the dissolved phase; this was especially pronounced in the Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC), Mn and to a lesser degree to Cd, Cu and Ni concentrations. The downward material fluxes are higher in the N. Aegean, relative to the S. Aegean. Substantially higher values of near-bottom mass fluxes were measured in the deep basins of the N. Aegean, implying significant deep lateral fluxes of POM. The N. Aegean could be classified as a "continental margin" ecosystem, whilst the S. Aegean is a typical "oceanic margin" environment. There is a close relationship and, consequently, coupling between the near-bottom mass fluxes and the accumulation rates of organic matter (OM), with the near-bottom mineralisation, bioturbation, redox potential, oxygen consumption rates, the

  14. Focal mechanism determinations of earthquakes along the North Anatolian fault, beneath the Sea of Marmara and the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Masaru; Citak, Seckin; Kalafat, Doğan

    2015-09-01

    We determined the centroid moment tensor (CMT) solutions of earthquakes that occurred along the North Anatolian fault (NAF) beneath the Sea of Marmara and the Aegean Sea, using data obtained from Turkey's broad-band seismograph network. The CMT solution of the 2014 Aegean Sea earthquake ( Mw 6.9) represents a strike-slip fault, consistent with the geometry of the NAF, and the source-time function indicates that this event comprised several distinct subevents. Each subevent is considered to have ruptured a different fault segment. This observation indicates the existence of a mechanical barrier, namely a NAF segment boundary, at the hypocenter. CMT solutions of background seismicity beneath the Aegean Sea represent strike-slip or normal faulting along the NAF or its branch faults. The tensional axes of these events are oriented northeast-southwest, indicating a transtensional tectonic regime. Beneath the Sea of Marmara, the CMT solutions represent mostly strike-slip faulting, consistent with the motion of the NAF, but we identified a normal fault event with a tensional axis parallel to the strike of the NAF. This mechanism indicates that a pull-apart basin, marking a segment boundary of the NAF, is developing there. Because ruptures of a fault system and large earthquake magnitudes are strongly controlled by the fault system geometry and fault length, mapping fault segments along NAF can help to improve the accuracy of scenarios developed for future disastrous earthquakes in the Marmara region.

  15. Severe accidents due to windsurfing in the Aegean Sea.

    PubMed

    Kalogeromitros, A; Tsangaris, H; Bilalis, D; Karabinis, A

    2002-06-01

    Windsurfing is a popular sport and has recently become an Olympic event. As an open-air water activity that requires the participant to be in perfect physical condition, windsurfers may be prone to accidents when certain basic rules or procedures are violated. The current study monitored severe injuries due to windsurfing over a period of 12 months in the Aegean Sea in Greece. Our study revealed 22 cases of severe accidents due to windsurfing, with a wide range of injuries including head injuries, spinal cord injuries, and severe fractures of the extremities. Prolonged hospitalization, severe disability and two deaths occurred as consequences of these accidents. The study examined the characteristics of these patients and the possible risk factors and conditions associated with the accidents. We also focused on the most common types of injuries and reviewed the mechanisms that may provoke them. Water sports and particularly windsurfing represent a major challenge for the emergency medical system, especially in the Aegean Sea. Hundreds of islands, kilometres of isolated coasts, millions of tourists, an extended summer period and rapidly changing weather create conditions that constantly test the efficacy of the emergency services. The development of an appropriate infrastructure and maximum control of the risk factors causing these accidents could reduce the morbidity and mortality that, unfortunately but rather predictably, accompany this popular summer activity. PMID:12131638

  16. Frequent underwater volcanism in the central Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebscher, C.; Ruhnau, M.; Dehghani, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    The extinction of the Minoan culture in the mid second millennium BCE is a well known consequence of the Plinian eruption of Thera volcano (Santorini Island). Santorini is a member of the South Aegean arc forming a chain from the Gulf of Saronikos (Susaki, Egina, Poros, Methana) at West, to an area close to the Anatolian coast at East (Kos, Nisyros and minor islands), through the central part (Milos and Santorini island groups). Underwater volcanic activity was manifested historically only once. During 1649-1650 CE the Kolumbo underwater volcano evolved about 8 km northeast of Santorini. As a consequence of this eruption volcanic ash covered the entire Aegean area and a hazardous tsunami was triggered. Here we show by means of reflection seismic and magnetic data that underwater volcanism occurred more frequently in the central Aegean Sea than previously assumed. Seismic data show that Kolumbo constitutes of five vertically stacked cones of pyroclastic sediment plus at least four smaller cones on the flank of the volcano. The formation of Kolumbo started synchronous with Santorini Island. The entire volume of the Kolumbo pyroclastic cones is estimated to more than 15 cubic-kilometers. Several small-scale cones have been detected in the Anyhdros Basin some km north-east of Kolumbo, being previously interpreted as mud volcanoes by other authors. However, the similarity of seismic and magnetic signatures of these cones and Kolumbo strongly suggest that these cones were also created by underwater volcanism. Volcanic cones, Kolumbo and Santorini are situated along a NE-SW striking graben system that evolved during five extensional tectonic pulses in the Pliocene.

  17. Anisakidae infection in fish of the Aegean Sea.

    PubMed

    Chaligiannis, Ilias; Lalle, Marco; Pozio, Edoardo; Sotiraki, Smaragda

    2012-03-23

    Nematode worms of the family Anisakidae are the causative agents of infections in humans when fish is consumed raw and of serious allergies up to the death, when fish is consumed raw or cooked by previously sensitized people. From April until November 2009, 462 fish belonging to 26 species, fished in three areas of the Aegean Sea were tested for Anisakidae larvae. Anisakidae larvae were detected in 87 (18.83%) fish of 13 species. These larvae were identified by morphology as the third-stage larvae of the genera Hysterothylacium sp. or Anisakis. Larvae of the genus Anisakis were identified by PCR-RFLP as belonging to A. simplex s.str., A. pegreffii, or as hybrids between A. simplex s.str and A. pegreffii. PMID:22030376

  18. A new contribution to the Late Quaternary tephrostratigraphy of the Mediterranean: Aegean Sea core LC21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satow, C.; Tomlinson, E. L.; Grant, K. M.; Albert, P. G.; Smith, V. C.; Manning, C. J.; Ottolini, L.; Wulf, S.; Rohling, E. J.; Lowe, J. J.; Blockley, S. P. E.; Menzies, M. A.

    2015-06-01

    Tephra layers preserved in marine sediments can contribute to the reconstruction of volcanic histories and potentially act as stratigraphic isochrons to link together environmental records. Recent developments in the detection of volcanic ash (tephra) at levels where none is macroscopically visible (so-called 'crypto-tephra') have greatly enhanced the potential of tephrostratigraphy for synchronising environmental and archaeological records by expanding the areas over which tephras are found. In this paper, crypto-tephra extraction techniques allow the recovery of 8 non-visible tephra layers to add to the 9 visible layers in a marine sediment core (LC21) from the SE Aegean Sea to form the longest, single core record of volcanic activity in the Aegean Sea. Using a novel, shard-specific methodology, sources of the tephra shards are identified on the basis of their major and trace element single-shard geochemistry, by comparison with geochemical data from proximal Mediterranean volcanic stratigraphies. The results indicate that the tephra layers are derived from 14 or 15 separate eruptions in the last ca 161 ka BP: 9 from Santorini; 2 or 3 from Kos, Yali, or Nisyros; 2 from the Campanian province; and one from Pantelleria. The attributions of these tephra layers indicate that 1) inter-Plinian eruptions from Santorini may have produced regionally significant tephra deposits, 2) marine tephrostratigraphies can provide unique and invaluable data to eruptive histories for island volcanoes, and 3) tephra from both Pantelleria and Campania may be used to correlate marine records from the Aegean Sea to those from the Tyrrhenian, Adriatic and Ionian Seas.

  19. Habitat Selection and Temporal Abundance Fluctuations of Demersal Cartilaginous Species in the Aegean Sea (Eastern Mediterranean)

    PubMed Central

    Maravelias, Christos D.; Tserpes, George; Pantazi, Maria; Peristeraki, Panagiota

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the occurrence of keystone top predators in a multispecies marine environment, such as the Mediterranean Sea, can be of considerable value to the long-term sustainable development of the fishing industry and to the protection of biodiversity. We analysed fisheries independent scientific bottom trawl survey data of two of the most abundant cartilaginous fish species (Scyliorhinus canicula, Raja clavata) in the Aegean Sea covering an 11-year sampling period. The current findings revealed a declining trend in R. clavata and S. canicula abundance from the late ′90 s until 2004. Habitats with the higher probability of finding cartilaginous fish present were those located in intermediate waters (depth: 200–400 m). The present results also indicated a preferential species' clustering in specific geographic and bathymetric regions of the Aegean Sea. Depth appeared to be one of the key determining factors for the selection of habitats for all species examined. With cartilaginous fish species being among the more biologically sensitive fish species taken in European marine fisheries, our findings, which are based on a standardized scientific survey, can contribute to the rational exploitation and management of their stocks by providing important information on temporal abundance trends and habitat preferences. PMID:22536389

  20. Trichoptera biodiversity of the Aegean and Adriatic sea basins in the republic of Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Ibrahimi, Halil; Kučinić, Mladen; Gashi, Agim; Grapci-Kotori, Linda

    2014-01-01

    We present the first preliminary inventory of Trichoptera taxa in the Aegean and Adriatic Sea basins in Kosovo that have previously received poor and fragmentary attention. Adult caddisflies were collected using ultraviolet (UV) light traps in 13 stations in areas of the Aegean Sea and Adriatic Sea drainage basins in Kosovo. Nineteen species out of 82, reported in this article, are first records for the Kosovo caddisfly fauna. Five genera are recorded for the first time in Kosovo: Brachycentrus, Ecclisopteryx, Psilopteryx, Thremma, and Oecetis. During this investigation, we found several Southeastern European endemic and rare species whose previous known distribution was limited to particular areas of this region, as well as other species whose distribution is considerably enlarged by this investigation: Polycentropus ierapetra, Polycentropus irroratus, Chaetopteryx stankovici, Drusus schmidi, Drusus tenellus, Potamophylax goulandriourum, Oecetis notata, and Notidobia melanoptera. Even though this article is a result of a limited sampling effort, it increases the number of Trichoptera taxa recorded for the Republic of Kosovo to 131.

  1. Trichoptera biodiversity of the Aegean and Adriatic sea basins in the republic of Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Ibrahimi, Halil; Kučinić, Mladen; Gashi, Agim; Grapci-Kotori, Linda

    2014-01-01

    We present the first preliminary inventory of Trichoptera taxa in the Aegean and Adriatic Sea basins in Kosovo that have previously received poor and fragmentary attention. Adult caddisflies were collected using ultraviolet (UV) light traps in 13 stations in areas of the Aegean Sea and Adriatic Sea drainage basins in Kosovo. Nineteen species out of 82, reported in this article, are first records for the Kosovo caddisfly fauna. Five genera are recorded for the first time in Kosovo: Brachycentrus, Ecclisopteryx, Psilopteryx, Thremma, and Oecetis. During this investigation, we found several Southeastern European endemic and rare species whose previous known distribution was limited to particular areas of this region, as well as other species whose distribution is considerably enlarged by this investigation: Polycentropus ierapetra, Polycentropus irroratus, Chaetopteryx stankovici, Drusus schmidi, Drusus tenellus, Potamophylax goulandriourum, Oecetis notata, and Notidobia melanoptera. Even though this article is a result of a limited sampling effort, it increases the number of Trichoptera taxa recorded for the Republic of Kosovo to 131. PMID:25434031

  2. Evolution of freshwater crab diversity in the Aegean region (Crustacea: Brachyura: Potamidae).

    PubMed

    Jesse, Ruth; Grudinski, Melanie; Klaus, Sebastian; Streit, Bruno; Pfenninger, Markus

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the influence of the palaeogeographic and climatic history of the Aegean region on the diversity of freshwater crabs of the genus Potamon and to test whether this area served as source or reservoir in species diversity. Necessary species delimitation was accomplished by phylogenetic analyses of the mitochondrial markers COX1 and ND1, partial 16S rRNA gene and the tRNALeu gene. We found 14 genetic lineages of which nine could be assigned to previously recognised species. Temporal estimates of the splitting pattern in the phylogeny of Potamon indicated that a combination of geological and climatic events influenced their diversification. Within Potamon, the lineages separated into a western group and an eastern group. This first split in the genus occurred approximately 8.3-5.5 Mya, thus possibly correlated with the Messinian salinity crisis. A likelihood approach to geographic range evolution suggested for most species, occurring in the Aegean area, an origin in the Middle East. Moreover, there were no insular endemics in the central Aegean archipelago, therefore low sea-levels during the Pleistocene glacial periods possibly enabled dispersal to these islands, but subsequent rise in sea-level did not cause speciation. Nevertheless, the diversification of most lineages occurred during the Pleistocene epoch thus coinciding with Quaternary fluctuations of the climate.

  3. Static Stress Changes Inverted from Microseismicity in Eastern Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leptokaropoulos, Konstantinos; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Orlecka-Sikora, Beata; Karakostas, Vassilios

    2014-05-01

    In this study we attempted to derive static stress field variations from the changes of earthquake production rates in Kusadasi bay and Samos island (eastern Aegean), by applying the Dieterich et al. (2000) Rate/State formulation. The calculation of stress changes from earthquake occurrence rates fluctuations should be obtained from catalogues which achieve adequate spatial and temporal resolution and well determined hypocenter coordinates. For this reason we took advantage of the data from a regional network operating since July of 2007, providing continuous monitoring of microseismicity, along with data available from seismological stations of the permanent Hellenic Unified Seismological Network (HUSN). The high accuracy and large sized regional catalogue is utilized for inverting seismicity rate changes into stress variation through a Rate/State dependent friction model. After explicitly determining the physical parameters incorporating in the modeling (reference seismicity rates, characteristic relaxation time, constitutive properties of fault zones) we investigated stress changes in both space and time regime and their possible connection with earthquake clustering and fault interactions. The main interest is focused on the June 2009 Samos Mw=5.1 event, which was followed by an intense seismic activity for several days. We attempt to reproduce and interpret stress changes both before and after the initiation of this seismic burst. The differences between the earthquake occurrence rates before and after the main shock are used as input data in a stress inversion algorithm based upon the Rate/State dependent friction concept in order to provide an estimation of stress changes. Diverse assumptions and combinations of the parameters values are tested for the model performance and sensitivity to be evaluated. The approach followed here could provide evidence of the robustness of the seismicity rate changes usage as a stress meter for both positive and negative

  4. The Etesian wind system and wind energy potential over the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafka, Stella; Xoplaki, Elena; Garcia-Bustamante, Elena; Toreti, Andrea; Zanis, Prodromos; Luterbacher, Juerg

    2013-04-01

    The Mediterranean region lies in an area of great climatic interest since it is influenced by some of the most relevant mechanisms of the global climate system. In the frame of the three Europe 2020 priorities for a smart, sustainable and inclusive economy delivering high levels of employment, productivity and social cohesion, the Mediterranean energy plan is of paramount importance at the European level, being an area with a significant potential for renewable energy from natural sources that could play an important role in responding to climate change effects over the region. We present preliminary results on a study of the Etesian winds in the past, present and future time. We investigate the variability and predictability of the wind field over the Aegean. Statistical downscaling based on several methodologies will be applied (e.g. canonical correlation analysis and multiple linear regression). Instrumental time series, Era-Interim and the 20CR reanalyses will be used. Large-scale climate drivers as well as the influence of local/regional factors and their interaction with the Etesian wind field will be addressed. Finally, the Etesian wind resources on the present and future climate will be assessed in order to identify the potential areas suitable for the establishment of wind farms and the production of wind power in the Aegean Sea.

  5. Aliphatic hydrocarbon levels in turbot and salmon farmed close to the site of the Aegean Sea oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez Pineiro, M.E.; Gonzalez-Barros, S.T.C.; Lozano, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    After the Andros Patria oil spill, the most serious oil tanker accident to occur off the coast of Galicia (N.W. Spain) was the running aground and subsequent conflagration of the Aegean Sea supertanker outside the northern Spanish port of La Coruna (December 3rd 1992). Approximately 60,000 tonnes of Brent oil were spilled into the Atlantic Ocean in the cited coastal region. Subsequently, an impropitious combination of a high tide and a change in wind direction caused the resulting slick to rapidly spread into the port. Measures aimed at cleaning up affected areas and evacuating the ca. 11,215 tonnes of oil remaining in the supertanker were immediately implemented. However, within just a few days the resulting contamination had killed some 15000 turbot juveniles and larvae, which are cultivated in fish farms close to the accident site. The environmental impact of major oil spillages has been widely studied. Several scientists have suggested that, in terms of the negative effects on the seawater quality and productive capacity of the affected maritime regions, the magnitudes of the Aegean Sea and Amoco Cadiz accidents are comparable. This paper reports variations over time of aliphatic hydrocarbon levels in turbot and Atlantic salmon sampled from fish farms close to the site of the Aegean Sea oil spill. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Progress of KOERI Tsunami Warning System for the Eastern Mediterranean, Aegean and Black Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necmioglu, Ocal; Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Ozer Sozdinler, Ceren; Yilmazer, Mehmet; Cokacar, Tulay; Comoglu, Mustafa; Pinar, Ali; Kekovali, Kivanc

    2016-04-01

    This presentation provides a progress report on the activities of the Bogazici University / Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute - Regional Earthquake and Tsunami Monitoring Center (KOERI-RETMC) which provides services as a Candidate Tsunami Service Provider (CTSP) of ICG/NEAMTWS in the Eastern Mediterranean, Aegean and Black Seas since 1 July 2012. KOERI continues to operate 178 BB and 97 strong motion and 6 short period sensors and the regional coverage includes 77 stations from GFZ and additional 16 stations through bilateral agreements. One radar-type tide-gauge has been installed in Fethiye within the framework of "Inexpensive Device for Sea-Level Measurement" (IDSL) initiative offered as donation by the EC/JRC and planning is in progress for the possible installation of three more IDSLs in selected locations in the Aegean Sea coast of Turkey. The capabilities and the limitations of HF Radar technology for the purpose of tsunami detection in the Eastern Mediterranean has been identified and the maturity and the applicability of these systems for the possible use under the Tsunami Warning System has been determined. The development of the TsuComp as a user-friendly interface to be used in the assessment of tsunamigenic potential and as a single-point entry for message dissemination has been finalized. The work towards the creation of Tsunami Inundation Maps at the Tsunami Forecast Points in Turkey is near finalization. This work is partially funded by project ASTARTE - Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe - FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3, Grant 603839. The authors would like to thank EC/JRC and Mr. Alessandro Annunziato for their continuous support in the operational activities of RETMC and IDSL initiative.

  7. Tsunami Warning System for the Eastern Mediterranean, Aegean and Black Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necmioglu, Ocal; Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Kalafat, Dogan; Comoglu, Mustafa; Ozer Sozdinler, Ceren; Yılmazer, Mehmet; Cevdet Yalçıner, Ahmet

    2015-04-01

    Bogazici University - KOERI is providing a Tsunami Warning System to Eastern Mediterranean, Aegean and Black Seas since 1 July 2012 as a Candidate Tsunami Service Provider (CTSP) within the ICG/NEAMTWS Framework. KOERI continues to operate 129 BB and 86 strong motion and 6 short period sensors. The regional coverage includes 77 stations from GFZ and additional 16 stations through bilateral agreements. During 2014, Romania and Russian Federation have subscribed to its services thanks to 2nd Tsunami Exercise of NEAMTWS - NEAMWave14, reaching a total of 11 NEAMTWS Member States as subscribers. No further progress could have been made in 2014 in the integration of the existing national-tide gauge stations due to the updated plans of the General Command of Mapping in charge of the operation of the national tide-gauge network. Collaborative activities with EC-JRC continued where a comprehensive tsunami scenario database for the Eastern Mediterranean, Aegean and Black Seas has been produced. In addition, KOERI also participated in EC-JRCs Global Tsunami Informal Monitoring Service Project and analyzed 16 tsunamigenic events around the globe. CTSP-TR continued to participate in the Communication Test Exercises (CTE) and Regular CTEs (RegCTE), and acted as the Message Provider for the NEAMWave14 Black Sea Scenario, where Black Sea was covered fort he first time in a NEAMTWS Tsunami Exercise. New Operational Centre has been built and full integration is expected in the first half of 2015. Data preparation activities for the inundation maps at TFPs continued. KOERI also continued to improve its TWS through its involvement of EC funded FP-7 Projects ASTARTE and MARSite and currently focuses on a detailed NEAMTWS Performance Monitoring Framework with associated Key Performance Indicators. This presentation provides a status overview of the operational system while focusing on selected events, such as 12 October 2013 Mw 6.6 and 24 May 2014 Mw 6.9 Northern Aegean earthquakes

  8. Symbiosis of sea anemones and hermit crabs: different resource utilization patterns in the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafeiadou, Anna-Maria; Antoniadou, Chryssanthi; Chintiroglou, Chariton

    2012-09-01

    The small-scale distribution and resource utilization patterns of hermit crabs living in symbiosis with sea anemones were investigated in the Aegean Sea. Four hermit crab species, occupying shells of nine gastropod species, were found in symbiosis with the sea anemone Calliactis parasitica. Shell resource utilization patterns varied among hermit crabs, with Dardanus species utilizing a wide variety of shells. The size structure of hermit crab populations also affected shell resource utilization, with small-sized individuals inhabiting a larger variety of shells. Sea anemone utilization patterns varied both among hermit crab species and among residence shells, with larger crabs and shells hosting an increased abundance and biomass of C. parasitica. The examined biometric relationships suggested that small-sized crabs carry, proportionally to their weight, heavier shells and increased anemone biomass than larger ones. Exceptions to the above patterns are related either to local resource availability or to other environmental factors.

  9. Bacterial and organic matter distribution in the sediments of the Thracian Sea (NE Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Fragkioudaki, Glykeria; Tselepides, Anastasios

    2007-10-01

    Recently, black carbon has been introduced as the form of carbon that may be separated from the biologically mediated carbon cycle thereby representing the non-bioavailable fraction of the estimated organic carbon. It has been speculated that the bioavailability of organic matter may be a limiting factor for the presence of active bacteria within the sediments. In order to address this question, marine sediments were collected from the Thracian Sea (Eastern Mediterranean), a complex system impacted by riverine inputs and Black Sea water masses. In addition to counts of total bacteria, we estimated the fraction of active bacteria by using a destaining step to the DAPI staining method. Black carbon was also estimated following the thermal oxidation method in order to determine the fraction of the refractory organic matter. The fraction of black carbon to total organic carbon varied from 16% to 53% indicating that black carbon constitutes a significant pool of sedimentary organic carbon in the Thracian sea. A fraction ranging from 18% to 97% was scored as nucleoid containing cells. We did not record any significant differences in the fraction of nucleoid-containing bacteria among sediment depths ( P<0.05) indicating that there was no accumulation of dead bacterial cells with depth. The same was observed for the fraction of black carbon and bioavailable organic carbon with sediment depth ( P<0.05) indicating that benthic consumers are not the key regulators of the organic matter pool in these sediments but have a minor effect. A possible reason for these observations and for the uncoupling between the active bacterial fraction and the bioavailability of organic matter could be (i) the presence of refractory components in the estimated bioavailable organic matter and (ii) the hydrological and geological complexity of the study area. The North Aegean marginal slopes are highly unstable experiencing frequent seismic events. These events are capable of inducing sediment

  10. GPS-Constrained Microplate Kinematics and Plio-Pleistocene Tectonic Evolution of the North Anatolian Fault and North Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, W.

    2004-12-01

    Emerging evidence from Global Position System (GPS) survey measurements in the Aegean and elsewhere suggests that present-day active continental deformation occurs largely due to the relative motions of a small number of rigid blocks or microplates. However, it is not universally agreed whether the continental microplate description of the GPS data is superior to other proposed models, nor is it clear whether present-day movement patterns can be usefully extrapolated into the geologic past. Here I examine the known deformation history of the North Aegean over the past ~10 Ma and compare it with predictions based on the present-day microplate model. Agreement provides independent support for the GPS-based model and demonstrates its value in bettering our understanding of Aegean tectonics. If we knew nothing about late Cenozoic North Aegean tectonics and provisionally assumed the correctness of the Aegean microplate model of Nyst & Thatcher [2004 JGR], we would predict several features of the tectonic evolution that accord with geologic evidence. First, the North Aegean Sea would be created by extension due to SSW motion of the South Aegean and concomitant CW rotation of central Greece during the past 10 Ma. The same kinematic process would cause extension to be succeeded by strike-slip motion as the `ridge-transform-ridge' triple junction migrates WSW 24 km/Ma and the North Anatolian fault propagates into the region. The Plio-Pleistocene history of the North Aegean shows these same general features. Drilling and seismic imaging document the existence of young (< 10 Ma) and thick (up to 6 km) sedimentary sequences attributed to crustal extension by a factor of 3-4. Seismic profiling and bathymetric mapping show a mesh of roughly orthogonal faults with dip-slip offsets. Structural studies of sub-aerial exposures of these faults suggest an earlier episode of extension was followed by predominantly strike-slip motions. The plate kinematic reconstruction of late Cenozoic

  11. Physical and chemical processes of air masses in the Aegean Sea during Etesians: Aegean-GAME airborne campaign.

    PubMed

    Tombrou, M; Bossioli, E; Kalogiros, J; Allan, J D; Bacak, A; Biskos, G; Coe, H; Dandou, A; Kouvarakis, G; Mihalopoulos, N; Percival, C J; Protonotariou, A P; Szabó-Takács, B

    2015-02-15

    High-resolution measurements of gas and aerosols' chemical composition along with meteorological and turbulence parameters were performed over the Aegean Sea (AS) during an Etesian outbreak in the framework of the Aegean-GAME airborne campaign. This study focuses on two distinct Etesian patterns, with similarities inside the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) and differences at higher levels. Under long-range transport and subsidence the pollution load is enhanced (by 17% for CO, 11% for O3, 28% for sulfate, 62% for organic mass, 47% for elemental carbon), compared to the pattern with a weaker synoptic system. Sea surface temperature (SST) was a critical parameter for the MABL structure, turbulent fluxes and pollutants' distribution at lower levels. The MABL height was below 500 m asl over the eastern AS (favoring higher accumulation), and deeper over the western AS. The most abundant components of total PM1 were sulfate (40-50%) and organics (30-45%). Higher average concentrations measured over the eastern AS (131 ± 76 ppbv for CO, 62.5 ± 4.1 ppbv for O3, 5.0 ± 1.1 μg m(-3) for sulfate, 4.7 ± 0.9 μg m(-3) for organic mass and 0.5 ± 0.2 μg m(-3) for elemental carbon). Under the weaker synoptic system, cleaner but more acidic air masses prevailed over the eastern part, while distinct aerosol layers of different signature were observed over the western part. The Aitken and accumulation modes contributed equally during the long-range transport, while the Aitken modes dominated during local or medium range transport. PMID:25460953

  12. Shallow structure and recent evolution of the Aegean Sea deduced from the seismic reflection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Laure, M.; Mascle, J.

    1988-08-01

    Together with the Tyrrhenian Sea, the Aegean Sea represents one of two marine basins still developing as a consequence of the subduction of the African lithosphere beneath Europe. Despite many geophysical similarities with the Tyrrhenian Sea, the Aegean displays a specific structural segmentation characterized by two distinct domains separated by the central Aegean. To the north of the basin, the so-called North Aegean trough likely represents the western marine extension of the transtensive Anatolian transform fault zone. The northern margin of this area contains a series of disconnected, often thickly sedimented small basins that probably initiated during the late Miocene as a consequence of a dominantly north-south extension; typical uppermost Miocene (Messinian) formations can be observed on seismic grounds. To the south, the Cretan Sea shows clear evidence of important distensive events occurring during two main episodes and following two main trends; a dominantly north-south-directed extension is responsibile for most of the structural features detected along both the Cretan and southern Cyclades margins.

  13. Vertical distribution of marine cyanobacteria Synechococcus spp. in the Black, Marmara, Aegean, and eastern Mediterranean seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, Zahit

    2006-08-01

    The vertical distributions of the unicellular cyanobacteria Synechococcus were studied in several highly contrasting seas: the Black Sea, Sea of Marmara, Aegean Sea, and Mediterranean Sea. Cell abundances varied significantly on both vertical and horizontal scales in all physically and spatially discrete water masses. Epifluorescence microscope cell counts from all seas clearly showed that majority of the population remains suspended in the surface-mixed layer and decreases gradually towards the base of the euphotic zone. Surface spatial distributions in the Black Sea were heterogeneous. Salinity, rather than temperature, seemed to have the greatest impact on the surface distribution of cells in this highly eutrophic sea. Changes in abundance in the mixed layer were small compared to the abrupt changes below the halocline, especially in the Black Sea and the Sea of Marmara. In contrast to the Black Sea, the major population remains suspended above the depth of fluorescence maximum in the Aegean and eastern Mediterranean seas. Significant correlations ( r>P0.01) were observed between cell counts and physical and chemical parameters with depth in the Black Sea. In all seas, cells at subsurface chlorophyll- a maximum layer (SCML) reflected brighter and longer fluorescence than those present at the surface and below. Cell size derived from flow cytometry indicated the presence of larger cells at the surface mixed layer compared to those at depth.

  14. Moment tensor inversion of the January 8, 2013 (Mw=5.7) and May 24, 2014 (Mw 6.8) North Aegean Earthquakes: seismicity and active tectonics of the North Aegean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalafat, Dogan; Kekovali, Kivanc; Pinar, Ali

    2015-04-01

    The North Aegean Sea is one of the most seismically active and deforming region between the Eurasia and Anatolia tectonic plates. On 8th January 2013 at 14:16 UTC (16:16 local time) a moderate earthquake (Mw= 5.7) occurred between the south of Gökçeada and southwest of Bozcaada Islands. The earthquake was felt at a wide area. Especially felt in the NE Greece south of Lemnos Island and NW Turkey surrounding areas, such as Çanakkale, Marmara Region and Northern Aegean coast as well as to Athens. The area is defined as the continuation of the branch of North Anatolian Fault (NAF) inside the Aegean Sea. Fault plane solution determined by this study shows that the earthquake occurred on NE-SW oriented strike slip fault segment. The aftershocks distribution also supported the rupture of the NE-SW oriented fault. Approximately 17 months later, another big earthquake occurred in the same area. On 24th May 2014, at 09:25 UTC (12:25 local time), a powerful Ml=6.7 (Mw=6.8) earthquake hit Greece and Turkey, 87 km west of Çanakkale, and totally 350 people injured in Greece and Turkey. This earthquake has been strongly felt in Greece, Turkey, Bulgaria, Romania. The main-shock occurred on a fault with a NE-SW strike, where the largest portion of the energy was released towards these directions. Therefore the earthquake was felt strongly in Çanakkale, Istanbul and Marmara region. In this study we calculated CMT solutions for main-shock and important aftershocks (M>4.0). CMT analyses were done for 50 important earthquakes. Moment tensor solutions show generally strike-slip faulting. The fault which caused earthquake, is thought to be a branch of North Anatolian Fault Zone in the North Aegean Sea. Generally, the location of the earthquakes and orientation of the NE-SW nodal planes are consistent with right-lateral faulting within the North Aegean Trough (NAT). The Aegean Sea is characterized by dextral strike-slip faulting along NE-SW striking faults, along fault zones formed

  15. Structure of flows in the Northern Aegean Sea from a pilot drifter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourafalou, V.; Olson, D.; Johns, W.; Kontoyiannis, H.; Zervakis, V.

    2003-04-01

    An array of thirty drifters deployed in the northern Aegean are used to consider the circulation in a complex archipelago of islands. The circulation of the Aegean is largely influenced by a combination of buoyancy from freshwaters introduced from the Black Sea via the Dardenelles Straits and from coastal rivers and by wind forcing. The latter is highly structured as the winds along the axis of the Aegean Sea are channeled between the orography of the Greek peninsula and islands. The above mechanisms are revealed in the drifter tracts. Preferred pathways that mark transport and exchange between the northern and southern parts of the basin are also evident. The drifters equipped with hourly GPS location and holly sock drogues provide information of time and space scales that have not been routinely sampled before. After a brief review of the overall circulation outlined by the array, the statistics of the turbulent field and its variation for the various subbasins are described. Of special interest are coastal plumes, motions induced as fluid passes between sub-basins, and the nature of cyclonic flows trapped within deep topographic pockets through the Aegean. An initial comparison of eddy statistics in relationship to wind events is also reported.

  16. Microbial activities at the benthic boundary layer in the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, A.; Tholosan, O.; Garcin, J.; Polychronaki, T.; Tselepides, A.; Buscail, R.; Duineveld, G.

    2003-05-01

    During the Aegean Sea component of the EU MTP-MATER project, benthic samples were acquired along a depth gradient from two continental margins in the Aegean Sea. Sampling was undertaken during spring and summer 1997 and the microbial metabolic activities measured (Vmax for aminopeptidase activity, 14C-glutamate respiration and assimilation) displayed seasonal variability even in deep-sea conditions. The metabolic rates encountered in the North Aegean (average depth 566±234 m), were approximately five-fold higher than in the deeper (1336±140 m) Southern part of the Aegean. The aminopeptidase rates, however, were the exception with higher values recorded in the more oligotrophic sediments of the Southern stations (1383±152 vs. 766±297 nmol MCA cm -2 h -1). A discrepancy in bacterial metabolism also appeared in the near bottom waters. In the Southern stations, 80% of the glutamate uptake was used for energy yielding processes and only 20% devoted to biomass production, while in the North Aegean, most of the used glutamate was incorporated into bacterial cells. During the early burial stages, bacterial mineralization rates estimated from 14C-glutamate respiration decreased drastically compared to the rates of biopolymer hydrolysis estimated by aminopeptidase assays. Thus, at the 2-cm depth layer, these rates were only 32 and up to 77% of the corresponding average values, respectively, in the superficial layer. Such a discrepancy between the evolution of these two metabolic activities is possibly due to the rapid removal of readily utilizable monomers in the surface deposits. The correlation between bacterial respiration and total organic carbon, or total organic nitrogen, is higher in the surficial sediment (0-2 and 2-4 cm) than in the underlying layer. Conversely, it is only at 4-cm depth layer that the hydrolysis rates appear correlated with organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations. This pattern confirms the drastic degradation of organic matter during the

  17. Temporal and spatial variations in provenance of Eastern Mediterranean Sea sediments: Implications for Aegean and Aeolian arc volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaver, Martijn; Djuly, Thomas; de Graaf, Stefan; Sakes, Alex; Wijbrans, Jan; Davies, Gareth; Vroon, Pieter

    2015-03-01

    The Eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMS) is the last remnant of the Tethys Ocean that has been subducted to the north since the Jurassic. Subduction has led to the formation of multiple island arcs in the EMS region where the Aeolian and Aegean arcs are currently active. The EMS is surrounded by continents and receives a large sediment input, part of which is transported down with the subducting slab into the mantle and potentially contributes a major flux to the arc volcanism. An along-arc gradient in the composition of subducting sediment has been evoked to explain the distinct geochemical signature of the easternmost volcanic centre of the Aegean arc, but direct evidence for this proposal is lacking. We present a detailed study of the mineralogical, major-, trace elements and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotope composition of 45 Neogene EMS sediment samples obtained from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) and Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drill sites and box cores to characterise their geochemical composition, distinguish provenance components and investigate the temporal and spatial variation in provenance to evaluate the potential changing contribution of subducted EMS sediment to Aegean and Aeolian arc volcanism. Based on trace element characteristics of EMS sediments, we can distinguish four provenance components. Nile sediment and Sahara dust are the main components, but contributions from the Tethyan ophiolite belt and arc volcanic rocks in the north are also recognised. Pliocene and Quaternary EMS sediment records a strong geochemical gradient where Nile River sediment entering the EMS in the east is progressively diluted by Sahara Desert dust towards the west. Pre-Messinian samples, however, have a remarkably homogeneous composition with Nile sediment characteristics. We relate this rapid increase in Sahara dust contribution to a late Miocene climate shift leading to decreased Nile runoff and aridification of the Sahara region. EMS sediment has a restricted range in Pb isotopes

  18. On dense water formation in shelves of the Aegean Sea during the year 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salusti, Ettore; Bellacicco, Marco; Anagnostou, Christos; Rinaldi, Eleonora; Tripsanas, Efthymios

    2015-04-01

    We here investigate the role of the rather virgin year 1987, when some modern data are available but before the main EMT event. A combination of field, satellite and numerical model temperature and salinity data from PROTHEUS, as well as a coupled ocean-atmosphere model, are used to implement theoretical models. After its formation over a sloping shelf of some important points in the Aegean Sea, due to the strong cold winter winds, a dense water patch can either have a dramatic downflow or can start a slow geostrophic descent along shelves and then following isobaths, best described by streamtube models. The most important, among these shelves characterized by a strong air sea interaction, have been identified from satellite data. The Northernmost shelves are those north of the island of Samothrace and in the Northern Thermaikos Gulf. In agreement with the field measuraments of Georgopoulos et al. (1987) also the shallow shelf between Limnos and Goceada was a source of very dense water, as well as thr shelf between Lesbos and the Turkish coast. Most probably also the shelves around the Cycladic Plateau were affected by strong winds and contributed to the Aegean Sea deep water formation. In addition, other theoretical models of wind-induced coastal upwelling allow to infer temperature and salinity information of dense water dynamics along the shallow coasts and shelves of the Aegean Sea. All this allows a heuristic application of classical T/S diagrams to estimate Northern Aegean dense water evolution and spreading, that nicely supports the early ideas of Zervakis et al. (2000). A complex situation about the Cycladic Plateau dynamics is also analyzed in correlation with sediment locations. Indeed seismic-reflection profiles confirm the presence of a contourite location along the northeast Cyclades Plateau shelves. All this interestingly opens novel prospective about the dense water coastal formation shelves. In synthesis such field, numerical and satellite data

  19. Large-scale bioprospecting of cyanobacteria, micro- and macroalgae from the Aegean Sea.

    PubMed

    Montalvão, Sofia; Demirel, Zeliha; Devi, Prabha; Lombardi, Valter; Hongisto, Vesa; Perälä, Merja; Hattara, Johannes; Imamoglu, Esra; Tilvi, Supriya Shet; Turan, Gamze; Dalay, Meltem Conk; Tammela, Päivi

    2016-05-25

    Marine organisms constitute approximately one-half of the total global biodiversity, being rich reservoirs of structurally diverse biofunctional components. The potential of cyanobacteria, micro- and macroalgae as sources of antimicrobial, antitumoral, anti-inflammatory, and anticoagulant compounds has been reported extensively. Nonetheless, biological activities of marine fauna and flora of the Aegean Sea have remained poorly studied when in comparison to other areas of the Mediterranean Sea. In this study, we screened the antimicrobial, antifouling, anti-inflammatory and anticancer potential of in total 98 specimens collected from the Aegean Sea. Ethanol extract of diatom Amphora cf capitellata showed the most promising antimicrobial results against Candida albicans while the extract of diatom Nitzschia communis showed effective results against Gram-positive bacterium, S. aureus. Extracts from the red alga Laurencia papillosa and from three Cystoseira species exhibited selective antiproliferative activity against cancer cell lines and an extract from the brown alga Dilophus fasciola showed the highest anti-inflammatory activity as measured in primary microglial and astrocyte cell cultures as well as by the reduction of proinflammatory cytokines. In summary, our study demonstrates that the Aegean Sea is a rich source of species that possess interesting potential for developing industrial applications. PMID:26902670

  20. Bacterial pollution, activity and heterotrophic diversity of the northern part of the Aegean Sea, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Çiftçi Türetken, Pelin S; Altuğ, Gülşen

    2016-02-01

    Isolation and characterization studies of marine heterotrophic bacteria are important to describe and understand eco-metobolism of the marine environments. In this study, diversity and community structures of the culturable heterotrophic bacteria, metabollicaly active bacteria and bacterial pollution in the coastal and offshore areas of Gökçeada Island, in the Northern Aegean Sea, Turkey were investigated from March 2012 to November 2013. The primary hydrographic parameters were recorded in situ. The frequency of the metabolically active bacteria was determined by using a modified staining technique. The indicator bacteria were determined by using membrane filtration technique; 126 bacteria isolates, 24 of them first records for this region, were identified using an automated micro-identification system, VITEK2 Compact30. The results showed that detected bacterial community profiles were significantly different when compared with previous studies conducted in polluted marine areas of Turkey. High frequency of faecal bacteria detected at station 2 indicated that increasing human activities and terrestrial pollution sources are shaping factors for possible risks, regarding recreational uses of this region, in the summer seasons.

  1. Assessing the salinity effect on planktonic foraminiferal Mg/Ca: Evidence from Aegean Sea core-top samples (Eastern Mediterranean).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontakiotis, G.; Antonarakou, A.; Mortyn, P. G.; Triantaphyllou, M. V.; Martínez-Botí, M. À.; Dermitzakis, M. D.

    2009-04-01

    Recent work across the Mediterranean Sea has illustrated a salinity (S) effect on planktonic foraminiferal Mg/Ca, which potentially confounds the use of this as a temperature (T) proxy for paleoceanographic reconstructions. As a likely illustration of this, recent downcore work revealed Mg/Ca values that were unreasonably high to be explained by T variations alone over the last deglaciation and throughout the Holocene. Modern biochemical and oceanographic studies highlight the Aegean Sea as an especially sensitive part of the Mediterranean that is closely connected to global climatic variability. Especially focused on T and S variations in the upper hundred meters of the water column, where energy storage and heat transport occur, we analyse planktonic foraminiferal Mg/Ca from a series of Aegean core tops, spanning a strong S gradient and little T range along a N-S transect. The aim is to isolate and quantify the S influence on the Mg/Ca tracer as well as possible in a field study from the region. We have specifically targeted the tropical spinose species Globigerinoides ruber, since it is the most ubiquitous species in the eastern Mediterranean and generally occurs in a wide range of T and S conditions. From our initially high core-top Mg/Ca measurements, we estimated how much of this was "excess", defined by amount of Mg/Ca exceeding that predicted using modern observed average summer T and a G. ruber calibration equation from the Western Equatorial Pacific (WEP). We then determined excess S values by subtracting WEP salinity values from those observed in our core-top locations. We observed that our results were in close agreement with those previously found for the Mediterranean as a whole, such that excess Mg/Ca is positively correlated with excess S. In the present study we expand on previous core-top results for the Aegean Sea in order to confirm and better quantify the S effect on G. ruber Mg/Ca signatures, such that paleo-records from this region will be

  2. Reconstructing Holocene sea surface salinity changes in the Northern Aegean Sea: evidence from morphological variations of Emiliania huxleyi-coccoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrle, Jens O.; Gebühr, Christina; Bollmann, Jörg; Giesenberg, Annika; Kranzdorf, Philip

    2013-04-01

    The Aegean Sea is a key area for our understanding of the impact of changes in the hydrological cycle on ocean circulation in the Mediterranean Sea. The Aegean Sea appears to be very sensitive to climate changes in Europe because of its small volume and the position between high- and low-latitude climate regimes. Therefore, it is assumed to record environmental change, especially changes in sea surface water salinity (SSS) without a significant time lag with respect to the forcing process (Rohling et al., 2002). However, up to date, SSS cannot be easily reconstructed from geological archives because several assumptions need to be made that lead to a significant error of the salinity estimates (e.g. Rohling, 2000). Here, we present the first high resolution SSS reconstruction from a Holocene sediment core based on a recently developed transfer function using the morphological variation of Emiliania huxleyi coccoliths (Bollmann & Herrle 2007, Bollmann et al., 2009). The core is located in the northern Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean Basin) and covers the time period 3 -11ka ago. Sea surface water salinity in the Aegean Sea has varied in concert with temperature oscillations as recorded in Greenland ice cores (iGISP2 ice core δ18O record) with a periodicity of about 900 years (Schulz & Paull, 2002). Four major SSS events can be identified at about 3.9, 4.7, 6.4, 7.4, and 8.2 ka in the northern Aegean Sea that correlate with increases in GISP2 δ18O (Schulz & Paull, 2002) as well as decreasing percentages of tree pollen studied at the same core expect for 3.9 ka (Kotthoff et al., 2008). The most prominent salinity increase occurred during the short-lived 8.2 kyr cold event (e.g., Rohling & Pälike, 2005), which was most likely triggered by a melt-water related perturbation of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning and associated decrease of ocean heat transport to the North Atlantic. We suggest that the salinity fluctuations in the northern Aegean Sea are related to

  3. Focal mechanisms in the southern Aegean from temporary seismic networks - implications for the regional stress field and ongoing deformation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friederich, W.; Brüstle, A.; Küperkoch, L.; Meier, T.; Lamara, S.; Egelados Working Group

    2014-05-01

    The lateral variation of the stress field in the southern Aegean plate and the subducting Hellenic slab is determined from recordings of seismicity obtained with the CYCNET and EGELADOS networks in the years from 2002 to 2007. First motions from 7000 well-located microearthquakes were analysed to produce 540 well-constrained focal mechanisms. They were complemented by another 140 derived by waveform matching of records from larger events. Most of these earthquakes fall into 16 distinct spatial clusters distributed over the southern Aegean region. For each cluster, a stress inversion could be carried out yielding consistent estimates of the stress field and its spatial variation. At crustal levels, the stress field is generally dominated by a steeply dipping compressional principal stress direction except in places where coupling of the subducting slab and overlying plate come into play. Tensional principal stresses are generally subhorizontal. Just behind the forearc, the crust is under arc-parallel tension whereas in the volcanic areas around Kos, Columbo and Astypalea tensional and intermediate stresses are nearly degenerate. Further west and north, in the Santorini-Amorgos graben and in the area of the islands of Mykonos, Andros and Tinos, tensional stresses are significant and point around the NW-SE direction. Very similar stress fields are observed in western Turkey with the tensional axis rotated to NNE-SSW. Intermediate-depth earthquakes below 100 km in the Nisyros region indicate that the Hellenic slab experiences slab-parallel tension at these depths. The direction of tension is close to east-west and thus deviates from the local NW-oriented slab dip presumably owing to the segmentation of the slab. Beneath the Cretan sea, at shallower levels, the slab is under NW-SE compression. Tensional principal stresses in the crust exhibit very good alignment with extensional strain rate principal axes derived from GPS velocities except in volcanic areas, where both

  4. Exploration of the Black, Aegean, and Mediterranean Seas Aboard E/V Nautilus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, K. L.; Ballard, R. D.; Brennan, M. L.; Raineault, N. A.; Shank, T. M.; Mayer, L. A.; Roman, C.; Mitchell, G. A.; Coleman, D. F.

    2012-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, the Exploration Vessel (E/V) Nautilus undertook a two-month expedition to the Black, Aegean, and Mediterranean Seas. The primary goal of the Nautilus is to create a focus of international leadership for the development and integration of leading-edge technologies, educational programs, field operations, and public outreach programs for ocean exploration, in partnership with the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration, National Geographic Society, Office of Naval Research, and corporate partners. To do so, the program uses a complement of deep submergence vehicle systems and telepresence technologies to engage scientists, educators and the public, both at sea and ashore, allowing them to become integral members of the on-board exploration team. When discoveries are made, experts ashore are notified and brought aboard virtually within a short period of time to help guide shipboard response before the ship moves on. The 2012 expedition is comprised of four areas of interest. Extensive sidescan mapping took place off the Turkish coasts of the southern Black Sea and eastern Aegean Sea, and was followed by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives on targets of archaeological, geological, and biological interest. In the Black Sea, additional work was done on the porewater chemistry of the sediments in the oxic, suboxic, and anoxic zones. Nautilus returned to the Anaximander Seamounts, including Kazan, Amserdam, Thessaloniki, and Athina, to further explore active and formerly active seep sites located in 2010. Finally, based on biological and geological discoveries made on Eratosthenes Seamount in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, we returned to further study chemosynthetic vent communities and tectonic processes.;

  5. Particulate and dissolved primary production along a pronounced hydrographic and trophic gradient (Turkish Straits System-NE Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagaria, A.; Psarra, S.; Gogou, A.; Tuğrul, S.; Christaki, U.

    2013-06-01

    The rates of particulate (PPp) and dissolved primary production (PPd) were estimated along a trajectory of variable environmental regimes formed in a narrow shelf area, following the course of Black Sea water masses (BSW) passing through the Turkish Straits System (TSS) into the NE Aegean Sea (BS-AS outflow). Seven stations in total were sampled, covering a transect from the eastern edge of the Marmara Sea basin to the NE Aegean Sea, during two consecutive cruises performed in October 2008 within the framework of the EU SESAME project. Along the BS-AS outflow, depth-integrated over the surface BSW layer PPp decreased considerably from 91 to < 16 mg C m- 2 h- 1 whereas PPd increased from 3 to 10 mg C m- 2 h- 1. As a consequence, the relative importance of PPd over total production (percentage extracellular release, PER) increased from 6% (± 3% sd) in the Marmara Sea to 37% (± 4% sd) in the NE Aegean Sea. Total chlorophyll a concentration gradually decreased and phytoplankton community size-structure was modified, with pico-phytoplankton, that originally represented 35% (± 9% sd) in the Marmara Sea, gradually becoming dominant in the NE Aegean (77% ± 2% sd), substituting large nano- and micro-phytoplankton cells (> 5 μm). This study showed that PER increased along a gradient from mesotrophy to oligotrophy, probably due to nutrient deficiency constraining phytoplankton growth and was closely related to phytoplankton size-structure. In the oligotrophic NE Aegean Sea, phytoplankton exudation was a significant source of dissolved organic carbon for heterotrophic prokaryotes.

  6. Volcano-tectonic evolution of the polygenetic Kolumbo submarine volcano/Santorini (Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübscher, Christian; Ruhnau, M.; Nomikou, P.

    2015-01-01

    Here we show for the first time the 3D-structural evolution of an explosive submarine volcano by means of reflection seismic interpretation. Four to five vertically stacked circular and cone-shaped units consisting mainly of volcaniclastics build the Kolumbo underwater volcano which experienced its first eruption > 70 ka ago and its last explosive eruption 1650 AD, 7 km NE of Santorini volcano (southern Aegean Sea). The summed volume of volcaniclastics is estimated to range between 13-22 km3. The entire Kolumbo volcanic complex has a height of ≥ 1 km and a diameter of ≥ 11 km. All volcaniclastic units reveal the same transparent reflection pattern strongly suggesting that explosive underwater volcanism was the prevalent process. Growth faults terminate upwards at the base of volcaniclastic units, thus representing a predictor to an eruption phase. Similarities in seismic reflection pattern between Kolumbo and near-by volcanic cones imply that the smaller cones evolved through explosive eruptions as well. Hence, the central Aegean Sea experienced several more explosive eruptions (≥ 23) than previously assumed, thus justifying further risk assessment. However, the eruption columns from the smaller volcanic cones did not reach the air and- consequently - no sub-aerial pyroclastic surge was created. The Anydros basin that hosts Kolumbo volcanic field opened incrementally NW to SE and parallel to the Pliny and Strabo trends during four major tectonic pulses prior to the onset of underwater volcanism.

  7. Living benthic foraminifera as an environmental proxy in coastal ecosystems: A case study from the Aegean Sea (Greece, NE Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukousioura, Olga; Dimiza, Margarita D.; Triantaphyllou, Maria V.; Hallock, Pamela

    2011-12-01

    Kastro Gulf, in the vicinity of the primary sewage outfall. The results of this study document the sensitivity of benthic foraminiferal assemblages, and particularly A. lobifera populations , to sewage pollution in the Aegean Sea. These observations are consistent with studies from other biogeographic regions where the FORAM Index, which is based upon this genus and associated mixotrophic taxa, has been used as a water-quality indicator. This observation is particularly noteworthy because A. lobifera is an invasive species in the Mediterranean.

  8. Distribution of organotin compounds in the bivalves of the Aegean Sea, Greece.

    PubMed

    Chandrinou, S; Stasinakis, A S; Thomaidis, N S; Nikolaou, A; Wegener, J W

    2007-02-01

    Five bivalve species--Mytilus galloprovinciallis (Mediterranean mussels), Venus gallina (stripped venus), Modiola barbatus L. (bearded horse mussels), Pecten jacobeus (scallops) and Callista chione (hard clams)--were collected from seven areas in Aegean Sea, Greece, between August 2001 and January 2003 and analyzed for organotins (OTs). The concentrations (as geometric means) found were 17.1 ng g-1 for tributyltin (TBT), 18.8 ng g-1 for dibutytltin (DBT), 7.8 ng g-1 for monobutyltin (MBT) and 13.0 ng g-1 for triphenyltin (TPhT) (wet weight), which are at similar or lower levels than those reported worldwide. Studying OTs distribution between different bivalve species, lower concentrations were observed in mediterranean mussels, possibly due to their growth in water column (grown on sea net pens in mussel farms), in contrast to the free-ranging species, collected from fishing grounds. Concentrations of the OTs in the examined bivalves varied seasonally. PMID:17067676

  9. Model simulation of the drift and spread of the Aegean Sea oil spill near La Coruna

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, P.

    1994-12-31

    On the 3 December 1992 the Greek oil tanker Aegean Sea ran aground at Torre de Hercules near the entrance to the Ria de Coruna and La Coruna harbor, Spain. The 291 m tanker of 114,036-dwt carrying 79,096 tons of Brent type crude oil, broke up and exploded. Practically all of the oil was released into the sea. Over 200 km of shore was affected. A two-dimensional depth-integrated model on a .25 ft. x .25 ft. grid was implemented with the capability of predicting wind driven movements in the area of La Coruna. It is driven by meteorological analysis from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMRWF) global numerical weather prediction model.

  10. Flux measurements in the surface Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer over the Aegean Sea, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kostopoulos, V E; Helmis, C G

    2014-10-01

    Micro-meteorological measurements within the surface Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer took place at the shoreline of two islands at northern and south-eastern Aegean Sea of Greece. The primary goal of these experimental campaigns was to study the momentum, heat and humidity fluxes over this part of the north-eastern Mediterranean Sea, characterized by limited spatial and temporal scales which could affect these exchanges at the air-sea interface. The great majority of the obtained records from both sites gave higher values up to factor of two, compared with the estimations from the most widely used parametric formulas that came mostly from measurements over open seas and oceans. Friction velocity values from both campaigns varied within the same range and presented strong correlation with the wind speed at 10 m height while the calculated drag coefficient values at the same height for both sites were found to be constant in relation with the wind speed. Using eddy correlation analysis, the heat flux values were calculated (virtual heat fluxes varied from -60 to 40 W/m(2)) and it was found that they are affected by the limited spatial and temporal scales of the responding air-sea interaction mechanism. Similarly, the humidity fluxes appeared to be strongly influenced by the observed intense spatial heterogeneity of the sea surface temperature.

  11. Food-web traits of the North Aegean Sea ecosystem (Eastern Mediterranean) and comparison with other Mediterranean ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsagarakis, K.; Coll, M.; Giannoulaki, M.; Somarakis, S.; Papaconstantinou, C.; Machias, A.

    2010-06-01

    A mass-balance trophic model was built to describe the food-web traits of the North Aegean Sea (Strymonikos Gulf and Thracian Sea, Greece, Eastern Mediterranean) during the mid-2000s and to explore the impacts of fishing. This is the first food-web model representing the Aegean Sea, and results were presented and discussed in comparison to other previous ecosystems modelled from the western and the central areas of the basin (South Catalan and North-Central Adriatic Seas). Forty functional groups were defined, covering the entire trophic spectrum from lower to higher trophic levels. Emphasis was placed on commercial invertebrates and fish. The potential ecological role of the invasive ctenophore, Mnemiopsis leidyi, and several vulnerable groups (e.g., dolphins) was also explored. Results confirmed the spatial productivity patterns known for the Mediterranean Sea showing, for example, that the total biomass is highest in N.C. Adriatic and lowest in N. Aegean Sea. Accordingly, food-web flows and several ecosystem indicators like the mean transfer efficiency were influenced by these patterns. Nevertheless, all three systems shared some common features evidencing similarities of Mediterranean Sea ecosystems such as dominance of the pelagic fraction in terms of flows and strong benthic-pelagic coupling of zooplankton and benthic invertebrates through detritus. The importance of detritus highlighted the role of the microbial food-web, which was indirectly considered through detritus dynamics. Ciliates, mesozooplankton and several benthic invertebrate groups were shown as important elements of the ecosystem linking primary producers and detritus with higher trophic levels in the N. Aegean Sea. Adult anchovy was shown as the most important fish group in terms of production, consumption and overall effect on the rest of the ecological groups in the model, in line with results from the Western Mediterranean Sea. The five fishing fleets considered (both artisanal and

  12. Holocene Climatic Optimum centennial-scale paleoceanography in the NE Aegean (Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantaphyllou, Maria V.; Gogou, Alexandra; Dimiza, Margarita D.; Kostopoulou, Sofia; Parinos, Constantine; Roussakis, Grigoris; Geraga, Maria; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Fleitmann, Dominik; Zervakis, Vassilis; Velaoras, Dimitris; Diamantopoulou, Antonia; Sampatakaki, Angeliki; Lykousis, Vassilis

    2016-02-01

    Combined micropaleontological and geochemical analyses of the high-sedimentation gravity core M-4G provided new centennial-scale paleoceanographic data for sapropel S1 deposition in the NE Aegean Sea during the Holocene Climatic Optimum. Sapropel layer S1a (10.2-8.0 ka) was deposited in dysoxic to oxic bottom waters characterized by a high abundance of benthic foraminiferal species tolerating surface sediment and/or pore water oxygen depletion (e.g., Chilostomella mediterranensis, Globobulimina affinis), and the presence of Uvigerina mediterranea, which thrives in oxic mesotrophic-eutrophic environments. Preservation of organic matter (OM) is inferred based on high organic carbon as well as loliolide and isololiolide contents, while the biomarker record and the abundances of eutrophic planktonic foraminifera document enhanced productivity. High inputs of terrigenous OM are attributed to north Aegean borderland riverine inputs. Both alkenone-based sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and δO18 G. bulloides records indicate cooling at 8.2 ka (S1a) and ~7.8 ka (S1 interruption). Sapropelic layer S1b (7.7-6.4 ka) is characterized by rather oxic conditions; abundances of foraminiferal species tolerant to oxygen depletion are very low compared with the U. mediterranea rise. Strongly fluctuating SSTs demonstrate repeated cooling and associated dense water formation, with a major event at 7.4 ka followed by cold spells at 7.0, 6.8, and 6.5 ka. The prominent rise of the carbon preference index within the S1b layer indicates the delivery of less degraded terrestrial OM. The increase of algal biomarkers, labile OM-feeding foraminifera and eutrophic planktonic species pinpoints an enhanced in situ marine productivity, promoted by more efficient vertical convection due to repeated cold events. The associated contributions of labile marine OM along with fresher terrestrial OM inputs after ~7.7 ka imply sources alternative/additional to the north Aegean riverine borderland sources for

  13. Biodiversity of zoobenthic hard-substrate sublittoral communities in the Eastern Mediterranean (North Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadou, Chryssanthi; Chintiroglou, Chariton

    2005-03-01

    The spatial dispersion of zoobenthos from sublittoral hard substrate communities in the northern part of the Aegean Sea has been studied during summer 1997 and 1998. Material was collected by SCUBA diving, by totally scraping off five replicate quadrates (400 cm 2 each) at three depth levels (15, 30, 40 m) from six sites located in Chalkidiki peninsula, plus one in Kavala Gulf. The examination of the 19,343 living specimens collected revealed the presence of 314 species. Though the multivariate analyses showed high similarity between stations, the structure of this sciaphilic algal community seems to have an increased spatial heterogeneity. Four distinct facies were recorded in accordance with the occurrence of different algal forms, the degree of hard substrate inclination and the water clarity. A short review on the biodiversity of sublittoral communities in the Mediterranean revealed the affinity between the western and the eastern basin and also among the photophilic and the sciaphilic algal communities.

  14. Macrofauna biodiversity of mussel bed assemblages in Thermaikos Gulf (northern Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chintiroglou, Chariton-Charles; Damianidis, Panagiotis; Antoniadou, Chryssanthi; Lantzouni, Marina; Vafidis, Dimitris

    2004-02-01

    Biomonitoring of mussel bed assemblages can provide valuable information about the impact of pollution on hard substrate assemblages. This study of Mytilus galloprovincialis mussel beds in Thermaikos Gulf (northern Aegean Sea) deals with the spatial and temporal structure of the associated fauna. Samples were collected and abiotic factors were measured in two successive years. Common biocoenotic methods were employed to analyze the data. The samples could be separated into three groups, with summer and winter samples being clearly different. A total of 100 species were found: polychaetes and crustaceans were the most dominant taxa. The assemblage shows high diversity with respect to species abundance. Biotic interactions within the assemblage appear to influence its composition, although the total evenness remains unaffected in space and time. The M. galloprovincialis assemblages can be found in clean as well as in polluted waters and, therefore, are of great interest in biomonitoring studies.

  15. Geodynamic features along the Christianna-Santorini-Kolumbo tectonic line (South Aegean Sea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Carey, Steve; Bejelou, Konstantina; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Kilias, Stefanos; Camilli, Rich; Escartin, Javier; Bell, Kathrine; Parks, Michelle

    2013-04-01

    Numerous oceanographic surveys have been conducted in Santorini Volcanic Group (South Aegean Sea) since 2001, revealing the spectacular morphology of the seafloor (multibeam data) and the sub-seafloor stratigraphic horizons (seismic profiles). Technological advancements in seafloor exploration such as ROVs and a submersible, enabled us to observe products of submarine volcanism that were previously inaccessible. In addition, gravity and box coring, geological and biological samples have been collected from selected areas for further analysis. The offshore geophysical survey in Santorini shows that recent volcanism occurred along a NE-SW tectonic zone named as Christianna-Santorini-Kolumbo (CSK) line. Christiana islets and three newly discovered submarine volcanic domes, with small colonies of yellow, presumably sulfur-reducing hydrothermal bacteria, occur in the southwestern part of the line. The presently active intra caldera volcanic domes of Palea and Nea Kameni islands and the low temperature (17-24°C) vent mounds covered by yellowish bacterial mat occupy the middle part of the line. The Santorini vent field is linked with the Kolumbo normal fault onshore which is likely controlling the pathways of hydrothermal circulation within the caldera. The most prominent feature at the NE part of this zone, is Kolumbo submarine volcanic chain which is extended 20Km with several volcanic domes aligned along this direction. The Kolumbo volcano had an explosive eruption in 1650 that killed 70 people on Santorini. The hydrothermal vent field in the crater floor of Kolumbo consists dominantly of active and inactive sulfide-sulfate structures in the form of vertical spires and pinnacles, mounds and flanges along a NE-SW trend, with temperatures up to 220°C and vigorous CO2 gas emission. For several years, the highest frequency of earthquakes was concentrated mainly in the vicinity of Kolumbo volcano. However, during 2011-2012 both seismic and geodetic unrest began abruptly

  16. Centennial-scale paleoceanography during sapropel S1 deposition in the NE Aegean (Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantaphyllou, Maria; Gogou, Alexandra; Dimiza, Margarita; Kostopoulou, Sofia; Parinos, Constantine; Roussakis, Grigoris; Geraga, Maria; Skampa, Elisavet; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Fleitmann, Dominik; Zervakis, Vassilis; Velaoras, Dimitris; Diamantopoulou, Antonia; Sampatakaki, Angeliki; Lykousis, Vassilis

    2016-04-01

    Combined micropaleontological and geochemical analyses in the high-sedimentation gravity core M-4G, provided new centennial scale paleoceanographic data for the sapropel S1 deposition in the NE Aegean Sea. Sapropel layer S1a (10.2-8.0 ka) is deposited in dysoxic to oxic bottom waters; sediments are characterized by the high abundance of benthic foraminifers Chilostomella mediterranensis and Globobulimina affinis that are able to tolerate surface sediment and/or pore water oxygen depletion and the presence of the oxic mesotrophic-eutrophic U. mediterranea. Adequate preservation of organic matter is proven by the high organic carbon and loliolide and isololiolide contents, whereas the biomarker record and the abundances of eutrophic planktonic foraminifera document enhanced productivity. Both alkenone-based SSTs and δO18 G. bulloides records indicate coolings at 8.2 ka (S1a) and at ~7.8 ka (S1 interruption). Sapropelic layer S1b (7.7-6.4 ka) is characterized by rather oxic conditions marked by the prominent increase of U. mediterranea. The highly fluctuating SSTs demonstrate repeated coolings and associated dense water formation; major event at 7.4 ka, followed by cold spells at 7.0, 6.8, 6.5 ka. Besides, the increase of algal biomarkers, labile organic matter-feeding foraminifera and eutrophic planktonic species pinpoints rise in in situ marine productivity, which is enhanced by more efficient vertical convection due to repeated cold events. The associated contributions of labile marine organic matter (OM) along with fresher terrestrial OM inputs after ~7.7 ka BP imply alternative/ additional than the north Aegean riverine borderland sources for the influx of organic matter at the south Limnos Basin, also related to the inflow of highly productive Marmara/Black Sea waters

  17. Performance of Statistical Temporal Downscaling Techniques of Wind Speed Data Over Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhan Guler, Hasan; Baykal, Cuneyt; Ozyurt, Gulizar; Kisacik, Dogan

    2016-04-01

    Wind speed data is a key input for many meteorological and engineering applications. Many institutions provide wind speed data with temporal resolutions ranging from one hour to twenty four hours. Higher temporal resolution is generally required for some applications such as reliable wave hindcasting studies. One solution to generate wind data at high sampling frequencies is to use statistical downscaling techniques to interpolate values of the finer sampling intervals from the available data. In this study, the major aim is to assess temporal downscaling performance of nine statistical interpolation techniques by quantifying the inherent uncertainty due to selection of different techniques. For this purpose, hourly 10-m wind speed data taken from 227 data points over Aegean Sea between 1979 and 2010 having a spatial resolution of approximately 0.3 degrees are analyzed from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) The Climate Forecast System Reanalysis database. Additionally, hourly 10-m wind speed data of two in-situ measurement stations between June, 2014 and June, 2015 are considered to understand effect of dataset properties on the uncertainty generated by interpolation technique. In this study, nine statistical interpolation techniques are selected as w0 (left constant) interpolation, w6 (right constant) interpolation, averaging step function interpolation, linear interpolation, 1D Fast Fourier Transform interpolation, 2nd and 3rd degree Lagrange polynomial interpolation, cubic spline interpolation, piecewise cubic Hermite interpolating polynomials. Original data is down sampled to 6 hours (i.e. wind speeds at 0th, 6th, 12th and 18th hours of each day are selected), then 6 hourly data is temporally downscaled to hourly data (i.e. the wind speeds at each hour between the intervals are computed) using nine interpolation technique, and finally original data is compared with the temporally downscaled data. A penalty point system based on

  18. Subduction and slab tearing dynamics constrained by thermal anomalies in the Anatolia-Aegean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Vincent; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Jolivet, Laurent; Loiselet, Christelle; Bouchot, Vincent

    2015-04-01

    Most previous geodynamic studies treat subduction zones with backward migration (rollback), slab tearing or slab breakoff by numerical or laboratory experiments and by integrating seismicity, tomography data and geochemical studies. Here we investigate these processes in the Aegean-Anatolian domain and particularly the western side of Turkey (western Anatolia) by incorporating thermal regime of the crust, and in particular the geothermal fields as anomalies that could reflect the thermal state of Aegean subduction zone at depth. This domain is characterized by 1) extensional crustal deformation which progressively localized during the Aegean slab retreat from late Eocene to Present, enabling the development of a hot backarc domain; this extension accelerated between 15 and 8 Ma coeval with a fast rotation of the Hellenides and 2) since the latest Miocene, extension is coupled with the development of the North Anatolian Fault that accommodates the westward escape of the Anatolian block. Both the acceleration of extension in the Middle Miocene and the recent escape of Anatolia have been proposed to result from several slab tearing events, the first one being located below western Turkey and the Eastern Aegean Sea, a second one below eastern Turkey and a last one below the Corinth Rift (Faccenna et al., 2006; Jolivet et al., 2013). The distribution of magmatism and mineral resources has been suggested to be largely controlled by these retreat and tearing events (Menant et al., submitted). The development of a widespread active geothermal province in western Anatolia is unlikely to simply result from the Quaternary magmatism whose volcanism part has a too limited extent. Conversely, the long wavelength east-west variation of surface heat flow density could reflect deep thermal processes in the lower crust and/or deeper, and we thus look for possible connections with larger-scale mantle dynamics. We use the distribution of thermal anomalies at different scales and the 3

  19. Foraminifera eco-biostratigraphy of the southern Evoikos outer shelf, central Aegean Sea, during MIS 5 to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drinia, Hara; Antonarakou, Assimina; Tsourou, Theodora; Kontakiotis, George; Psychogiou, Maria; Anastasakis, George

    2016-09-01

    The South Evoikos Basin is a marginal basin in the Aegean Sea which receives little terrigenous supply and its sedimentation is dominated by hemipelagic processes. Late Quaternary benthic and planktonic foraminifera from core PAG-155 are investigated in order to understand their response to the glacial-interglacial cycles in this region. The quantitative analysis of planktonic foraminifera, coupled with accelerator mass spectrometry (14C-AMS) radiocarbon date measurements, provide an integrated chrono-stratigraphic time framework over the last 90 ka (time interval between late Marine Isotopic Stages 5 and 1; MIS5-MIS1). The temporary appearance and disappearance as well as several abundance peaks in the quantitative distribution of selected climate-sensitive planktonic species allowed the identification of several eco-bioevents, useful to accurately mark the boundaries of the eco-biozones widely recognized in the Mediterranean records and used for large-scale correlations. The established bio-ecozonation scheme allows a detailed palaecological reconstruction for the late Pleistocene archive in the central Aegean, and furthermore provides a notable contribution for palaeoclimatic studies, facilitating intercorrelations between various oceanographic basins. The quantitative analyses of benthic foraminifera identify four distinct assemblages, namely Biofacies: Elphidium spp., Haynesina spp. Biofacies, characterized by neritic species, dominated during the transition from MIS 5 to MIS 4; Cassidulina laevigata/carinata Biofacies dominated till 42 ka (transgressive trend from MIS 4 to MIS 3); Bulimina gibba Biofacies dominated from 42 ka to 9.5 ka (extensive regression MIS 3,2 through lowstand and early transgression; beginning of MIS 1); Bulimina marginata, Uvigerina spp. Biofacies dominated from 9.5 ka to the present (late transgression through early highstand; MIS 1)., This study showed that the South Evoikos Basin which is characterized by its critical depths and

  20. Long-Term Marine Traffic Monitoring for Environmental Safety in the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakopoulos, T.; Gyftakis, S.; Charou, E.; Perantonis, S.; Nivolianitou, Z.; Koromila, I.; Makrygiorgos, A.

    2015-04-01

    The Aegean Sea is characterized by an extremely high marine safety risk, mainly due to the significant increase of the traffic of tankers from and to the Black Sea that pass through narrow straits formed by the 1600 Greek islands. Reducing the risk of a ship accident is therefore vital to all socio-economic and environmental sectors. This paper presents an online long-term marine traffic monitoring work-flow that focuses on extracting aggregated vessel risks using spatiotemporal analysis of multilayer information: vessel trajectories, vessel data, meteorological data, bathymetric / hydrographic data as well as information regarding environmentally important areas (e.g. protected high-risk areas, etc.). A web interface that enables user-friendly spatiotemporal queries is implemented at the frontend, while a series of data mining functionalities extracts aggregated statistics regarding: (a) marine risks and accident probabilities for particular areas (b) trajectories clustering information (c) general marine statistics (cargo types, etc.) and (d) correlation between spatial environmental importance and marine traffic risk. Towards this end, a set of data clustering and probabilistic graphical modelling techniques has been adopted.

  1. Sea cliff erosion in the eastern part of the North Aegean coastline, Northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Xeidakis, George S; Delimani, P K; Skias, S G

    2006-01-01

    The coastal zone is an area where many human activities are taking place. Erosion of the coast obstructs, in various ways, these activities creating occasionally serious socioeconomic and environmental problems. In this paper the coastal erosion problems encountered in the eastern Greek part of the North Aegean Sea Coast, a stretch of about 51 km long adjacent to the city of Alexandroupolis, are discussed. Given the observed type and location of erosion and other sea-action phenomena, the coast under study is divided in two parts/stretches. The western stretch, where the city of Alexandroupolis is presently extending, presents, mainly, cliff erosion problems and retreat of the coastline, very serious in some sections; whereas, the eastern stretch (to the east of the city) exhibits deposition and progression seawards due to the abundance of sediments supplied by Evros river delta. A classification of the coastline according to its relief, geologic material, erosion characteristics and rate, slope failure phenomena as well as the wave energy potential, is presented together with suggestions for case-appropriate mitigation and protection measures regarding the coastal erosion problems. The paper is focusing on the cliff erosion phenomena, since varying in height coastal cliffs made of soft rocks, cover the major part of the investigated coastline (western stretch).

  2. The Sponge Community of a Subtidal Area with Hydrothermal Vents: Milos Island, Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pansini, M.; Morri, C.; Bianchi, C. N.

    2000-11-01

    Sponges were sampled by SCUBA diving at six subtidal rocky sites, three of which were close to hydrothermal vents, a common feature on the sea-floor off the south-east coast of Milos. Twenty-five species (2 Calcarea and 23 Demospongiae) were found, few compared with the 589 recorded for the Mediterranean, but an important addition to the scant information on the sponge fauna of the Aegean Sea. The number of species found at vent sites was consistently higher than that found at non-vent sites, but no vent-obligate species could be identified. However, Geodia cydonium and three species of Cliona ( C. copiosa, C. nigricans and C. rhodensis) showed a tendency to colonize vent areas. The former might take advantage of increased silica availability, the latter of the enhanced deposition of carbonates near vents. Substratum cover by sponges (estimated from wire-framed photographs of 0·7 m 2), varied greatly both among and within sites, mostly according to slope. Most sponge species preferred vertical to overhanging, shaded substrata. Proximity to vents seemed to have little or no influence on sponge cover, notwithstanding a primary effect on species diversity.

  3. Radioactivity and metal concentrations in marine sediments associated with mining activities in Ierissos Gulf, North Aegean Sea, Greece.

    PubMed

    Pappa, F K; Tsabaris, C; Ioannidou, A; Patiris, D L; Kaberi, H; Pashalidis, I; Eleftheriou, G; Androulakaki, E G; Vlastou, R

    2016-10-01

    Marine sediment samples were collected from Ierissos Gulf, N Aegean Sea, close to the coastal mining facilities. Measurements of radionuclide and metal concentrations, mineral composition and grain size distribution were performed. The concentrations of (226)Ra, (235)U and trace metals showed enhanced values in the port of Stratoni compared with those obtained near to Ierissos port. The dose rates received by marine biota were also calculated by the ERICA Assessment Tool and the results indicated no significant radiological risk. PMID:27474903

  4. Assessment of SMOS Salinity and SST in the Aegean Sea (Greece) and correlations with MODIS SST measurements. Exploring the SSS and SST correlation to 137Cs inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykioti, Olga; Florou, Heleni

    2014-05-01

    . Additionally, for the same coordinates and for the same acquisition dates, we have retrieved SST (both at 4μm and 11μm) from MODIS Level 2 Ocean products. MODIS satellites provide nearly daily ocean color and SST measurements at 1km resolution with day and night coverage. Therefore, separate correlations are performed for AQUA or TERRA and day or night passes (when data exist). Despite significant differences in spatial resolution and acquisition time in the day, results show high correlation coefficients (r2 above 80%) between SMOS and MODIS SST. Concluding, concerning SSS in regional seas such as the Aegean Sea, SMOS presents significant problems and difficulties to overcome. SSS comparisons with the corresponding AQUARIUS ones are foreseen. Concerning SST, values are highly correlated to similar ones from other satellite systems such as MODIS. Considering that SMOS acquisitions are insensitive to cloud cover and despite the relatively low spatial resolution, they present a considerable advantage compared to optical systems. This ongoing study is being carried out in NOA and NCSR "D" in the frame of the coordinated ESA Cat-1 Project AOSMOS.4681 which is acknowledged.

  5. Polychaetes associated with the sciaphilic alga community in the northern Aegean Sea: spatial and temporal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadou, C.; Nicolaidou, A.; Chintiroglou, C.

    2004-10-01

    Polychaete biodiversity has received little attention despite its importance in biomonitoring. This study describes polychaete diversity, and its spatial and temporal variability in infralittoral, hard substrate assemblages. Seven stations were chosen in the central area of the northern Aegean Sea. At each station, one to three depth levels were set (15, 30 and 40 m). Five replicates were collected by scuba diving with a quadrat sampler (400 cm2) from each station and depth level during summer for the spatial analysis, and seasonally for the study of temporal changes. Common biocoenotic methods were employed (estimation of numerical abundance, mean dominance, frequency, Margalef's richness, Shannon-Weaver index and Pielou's evenness). A total of 5,494 individuals, belonging to 79 species, were counted and classified. Diversity indices were always high. Clustering and multidimensional scaling techniques indicated a high heterogeneity of the stations, although these were all characterized by the sciaphilic alga community. A clear seasonal pattern was not detectable. Summer and autumn samples discriminate, while winter and spring form an even group. The abundance/biomass comparison indicated a dominance of k-strategy patterns, characteristic of stable communities.

  6. A review of tectonics and sedimentation in a forearc setting: Hellenic Thrace Basin, North Aegean Sea and Northern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelis, A. G.; Boutelier, D.; Catuneanu, O.; Seymour, K. St.; Zelilidis, A.

    2016-04-01

    Exposure of the forearc region of the North Aegean Sea, Greece, offers insight into evolving convergent margins. The sedimentary fill of the Thrace Basin during the Late Eocene to Oligocene time provides a record of subduction-driven processes, such as growth of magmatic arcs and construction of accretionary complexes. This large sediment repository received sediment from two sources. The southern (outboard) basin margin reflects the active influence of the exhumed accretionary prism (e.g. Pindic Cordillera or Biga peninsula), while the northern (inboard) margin records the effect of the magmatic arc in the Rhodope region. The forearc basin sedimentary fills shoal upward into shallow-marine strata but are dominated mainly by deep-marine facies. The depositional trend and stacking pattern are dominated by progradational patterns. This trend, which is observed in both basin margins, is related to tectonic deformation rather than sea-level fluctuations. Additional evidence for this tectonic uplift comes from the backstripping analysis. The accretionary complex provided material into the forearc basin. This material was transported northeast and formed a sand-rich turbidity system that evolved upslope into shallow-marine deposits. Stratigraphic data indicate that this turbidity system exhibits a successive landward (inboard) migration of the depocenter. Provenance data utilizing sandstone petrography, conglomerate clast composition, and bulk-rock geochemistry suggest that this system reflects an increased influx of mafic material into the basin. Volcanic arc-derived material was transported south and east and accumulated in deep-marine settings. Both stratigraphic and provenance data indicate a seaward (outboard) migration of the basin depocenter and a significant increase in felsic detritus into the forearc.

  7. a Structural and Thermochronological Study of Santorini Detachment in Santorini Island, Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsellos, A.; Foster, D. A.; Min, K. K.; Kamenov, G. D.; Kidd, W. S.; Garver, J. I.; Kyriakopoulos, K.

    2012-12-01

    Extension in the Aegean has been very prominent since early Miocene expressed by a series of detachments, opening of the Cretan basin, arc expansion and plutons, with a peak of extensional activity at 10-16 Ma across the south Aegean. In Santorini, which is the southernmost Cyclades island and closest to the forearc, intrusion of an unexposed pluton to a depth equivalent to modern sea level took place at about 9.5 Ma (Skarpelis et al., 1992). In this study, Zircon fission-track (ZFT) and apatite (U-Th)/He (AHe) data from the Athinios metamorphic rocks exposed in Santorini caldera distinguish an upper metamorphic cooling unit associated with Early-Middle Eocene exhumation (46.3 ± 2.8 Ma, ZFT; 49.34 ± 2.9 Ma, AHe) from a lower metamorphic unit of Middle-Late Miocene (10.9 ± 0.7 Ma, ZFT; 9.4 ± 0.3 Ma, AHe) exhumation ages. The upper unit shows mineral lineations that range from N-S to NE-SW trending while the lower unit shows lineations ranging from N-S to NW-SE trending. U-Pb (LA-MC-ICP-MS) zircon data from mica-schists in the lower Santorini metamorphic unit show a prominent Pan-African signature similar to the Phyllite-quartzite unit (PQU) rocks exposed along the forearc in Kythera, Peloponnese and western Crete. The NW-SE stretching lineations in the lower unit imply an arc-parallel extension. Similar arc-parallel extension took place between 10-13 in PQU rocks in the west Crete-Kythera-south Peloponnese area (Marsellos et al., 2010). The lower unit shows ductile structures affected by top to the S shearing while the upper unit by top to the N shearing. A 3D projection of the mineral lineation dip angles along N-S direction shows a C' shear band of top to the N shearing that has affected the entire structural stack. Early brittle structures, which appear to be re-oriented normal faults, and show top to the S displacement. Later normal faults show similar shear sense. A tectonic model that could explain the above structures shows that initial exhumation of the

  8. Late Quaternary stratigraphic and tectonic evolution of the northeastern Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isler, Ekrem Bursin

    The late Quaternary--Recent stratigraphic and tectonic evolution of the NE Aegean Sea, between the Islands of Bozcaada and Lesbos and the Biga Peninsula, is examined using ˜1600 km of seismic reflection and side scan profiles and six cores collected during cruises in 1998, 2000, 2002, and 2003. Detailed examination of the seismic reflection profiles showed that several vertically stacked depositional sequences developed within three NE-SW trending basins. These depositional sequences exhibit oblique- to complex oblique-sigmoid internal seismic reflection configuration and are separated from one another by shelf-crossing unconformities. The chronology of the depositional sequences is constrained by seven radiocarbon and two U/Th dates on in situ shell samples extracted from five cores. Sedimentation rates calculated by using these dates range between 19 cm/kyr and 30 cm/kyr. The ages and the stacked architecture of the depositional sequences, together with the correlations with the oxygen isotopic stages and global sea-level curve reveal that these seaward-prograded delta sequences were developed in a sufficiently rapidly subsiding shelf environment during successive global eustatic sea-level falls associated with late Quaternary glaciations. The progradation of the depositional sequences decelerated and eventually halted shortly after the subsequent major transgressions during which the shelf-crossing unconformities were generated. The terrigenous materials transported throughout the development of the depositional sequences originated from the Tuzla, Karamenderes, and Dumbek rivers draining the Biga Peninsula. Seismic reflection profiles showed no evidence for a major E--W-trending fault system, suggesting that the western continuation of the central strand of the North Anatolian Transform Fault does not exit into the Aegean Sea at Ezine. Detailed mapping of the seismic data showed that two major faults, A1 and beta8, constitute the main fault system in the study

  9. Internal wave measurements on the Cycladic Plateau of the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, Matthew H.; Gregg, Michael C.; Zervakis, Vassilis; Kontoyiannis, Harialos

    2012-01-01

    The internal wave climate in the southern Aegean Sea is examined with an array of two bottom-mounted acoustic Doppler current profilers and three profiling moorings deployed on the northern continental slope of the Cretan Sea for 3 months. Frequency spectra indicate an extremely weak internal wave continuum, about 4-10 times weaker than the Garrett-Munk and Levine reference levels. Spectra are instead dominated by semidiurnal internal tides and near-inertial waves, which are examined in detail by bandpass filtering. In the semidiurnal band, a barotropic tidal flow of ≈2 cm s-1 is observed, with a pronounced spring/neap modulation in phase with the lunar fortnightly cycle. One to two days following several of these spring tide periods, a distinct internal tide featuring 10-20 m vertical displacements and 15-20 cm s-1baroclinic velocities is detectable propagating upward and to the southeast. Time-mean energy increases a factor of 2-5 within about 100 m from the bottom, implying generation and/or scattering from the bottom, whose slope is nearly critical to semidiurnal internal waves over much of the array. Several strong, downward propagating near-inertial events are also seen, each of which occurs following a period of work done by the wind on the mixed layer as estimated from a nearby surface mooring. The high-frequency internal wave continuum is more temporally constant but increases substantially toward the end of the deployment. Significant but unexplained differences in kinetic energy occur between successive spring tide periods in the case of the internal tides and between successive wind events in the case of the near-inertial signals. Substantial variability is observed in the low-frequency flows, which likely contributes to the time variability of the internal wave signals.

  10. Evolution and fluxes of 137Cs in the Black Sea/Turkish Straits System/North Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfanti, R.; Özsoy, E.; Kaberi, H.; Schirone, A.; Salvi, S.; Conte, F.; Tsabaris, C.; Papucci, C.

    2014-07-01

    The vertical profiles of 137Cs were determined in the North Aegean, Marmara and Black Seas, to assess inventories and fluxes of the radionuclide in these basins. The inventory of 137Cs in the Western Black Sea integrated from the surface down to 400 m water depth is 3.4 ± 0.1 kBq m- 2, which is surprisingly close to the amount determined in 1988, decay corrected to 2007 (2.9 ± 0.1 kBq m- 2). On the other hand, based on the comparison of profiles roughly 20 years apart, it is estimated that about 1 kBq m- 2 has been transferred from above the halocline to depths below the halocline, emphasizing the effective redistribution of tracers within the same period. We estimate that about 12 TBq y- 1 of 137Cs presently leaves the Black Sea with the upper layer flow through the Bosphorus and only 2 TBq y- 1 is returned with the lower layer inflow of Mediterranean water from the Marmara Sea. Accounting for river fluxes, estimated on the order of 2 TBq y- 1 few years after the Chernobyl accident, and possibly decreased by now, we can thus estimate a net rate of loss of about 8-10 TBq y- 1. Investigating the effective redistribution in the upper water column, the supply by the inflowing Mediterranean water alone does not explain the increase of 137Cs concentration and inventory at intermediate depths in the Western Black Sea. The most important mechanism transferring 137Cs and dissolved contaminants from the surface water to the sub-pycnocline layer appears to be the turbulent entrainment of a larger quantity of Black Sea water into the inflowing plume of Mediterranean water through mixing processes on the southwestern shelf and continental slope following its exit from the Bosphorus. This process produces an extra export of some10 TBq y- 1 of 137Cs from the surface to the sub-pycnocline depths of the Black Sea, a quantity comparable in magnitude to the total export out from the basin. It is the entrainment flux resulting from the mixing, and the further advection and

  11. Ductile nappe stacking and refolding in the Cycladic Blueschist Unit: insights from Sifnos Island (south Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravadinou, Eirini; Xypolias, Paraskevas; Chatzaras, Vasileios; Iliopoulos, Ioannis; Gerogiannis, Nikolaos

    2016-10-01

    New geological and structural mapping combined with kinematic and amphibole chemistry analyses is used to investigate the deformation history of the Cycladic Blueschist Unit (CBU) on Sifnos Island (Cyclades, Aegean Sea). We concentrate on north Sifnos, an area characterized by exceptionally well-preserved eclogites and blueschists. Our data show that the early, main phase (D2) of ductile deformation in the CBU occurred synchronous with the transition from prograde to close-to-peak retrograde conditions. This deformation phase took place at middle Eocene and is related to ESE-directed thrusting that emplaced the metavolcano-sedimentary subunit over the Marble subunit. The subsequent exhumation-related (D3) deformation is characterized by gently NE-plunging folds and NE-directed contractional shear zones that formed parallel to the axial planes of folds. NE-directed shearing occurred under blueschist and transitional blueschist-/greenschist-facies conditions during late Eocene-Oligocene and caused the restacking of the early nappe pile. We suggest that a mechanism of ductile extrusion of the CBU in a tectonic setting of net compression could explain better the recorded exhumation-related deformation than a mechanism of syn- and post-orogenic extension. Our new kinematic results in combination with previous works in the Cyclades area reveal a regional scale change in tectonic transport direction from (W)NW-(E)SE at Late Cretaceous-middle Eocene to (E)NE-(W)SW at late Eocene-Oligocene times. The observed change in transport direction may be governed by the relative motion of Africa with respect to Europe during Alpine orogeny.

  12. Ductile nappe stacking and refolding in the Cycladic Blueschist Unit: insights from Sifnos Island (south Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravadinou, Eirini; Xypolias, Paraskevas; Chatzaras, Vasileios; Iliopoulos, Ioannis; Gerogiannis, Nikolaos

    2015-10-01

    New geological and structural mapping combined with kinematic and amphibole chemistry analyses is used to investigate the deformation history of the Cycladic Blueschist Unit (CBU) on Sifnos Island (Cyclades, Aegean Sea). We concentrate on north Sifnos, an area characterized by exceptionally well-preserved eclogites and blueschists. Our data show that the early, main phase (D2) of ductile deformation in the CBU occurred synchronous with the transition from prograde to close-to-peak retrograde conditions. This deformation phase took place at middle Eocene and is related to ESE-directed thrusting that emplaced the metavolcano-sedimentary subunit over the Marble subunit. The subsequent exhumation-related (D3) deformation is characterized by gently NE-plunging folds and NE-directed contractional shear zones that formed parallel to the axial planes of folds. NE-directed shearing occurred under blueschist and transitional blueschist-/greenschist-facies conditions during late Eocene-Oligocene and caused the restacking of the early nappe pile. We suggest that a mechanism of ductile extrusion of the CBU in a tectonic setting of net compression could explain better the recorded exhumation-related deformation than a mechanism of syn- and post-orogenic extension. Our new kinematic results in combination with previous works in the Cyclades area reveal a regional scale change in tectonic transport direction from (W)NW-(E)SE at Late Cretaceous-middle Eocene to (E)NE-(W)SW at late Eocene-Oligocene times. The observed change in transport direction may be governed by the relative motion of Africa with respect to Europe during Alpine orogeny.

  13. Oil Spill Dispersion Forecasting System for the Region of Installation of the Burgas Alexandroulopis Pipeline Outlet(N.E. Aegean) in the Framework of ``DIAVLOS'' Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzali, M.; Sofianos, S.; Kallos, G.; Mantziafou, A.; Zafeirakou, A.; Dermisis, V.; Koutitas, Ch.; Zervakis, V.

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the project DIAVLOS, a 48-hours oil spill dispersion forecasting system was developed and implemented in the Northern Aegean Sea aiming at oil spill dispersion management at the Burgas-Alexandroupolis oil-pipe terminal (N.E. Aegean Sea). The system is based on wind, wave and ocean circulation models coupled with the operational systems ALERMO and SKIRON of the University of Athens and an oil-spill dispersion model. The various components of the system were successfully developed, improved through sensitivity tests and coupled to form an operational oil spill dispersion forecasting system, available at an independent and interactive web-site (http://diavlos.oc.phys.uoa.gr), in order to be used by interested authorities. The system was also tested against field observations of special drifting floats that monitor the trajection and spreading of oil spills. It gives satisfactory results and in most cases the forecasting error is quite small, allowing the operational use of the system. Additionally, high-resolution atmospheric and oceanic forecasting in the region is provided, to facilitate operations to contain oil spill spreading/beaching.

  14. Oblique opening of Skyros Basin in the North Aegean Sea, based on Morphotectonic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolaou, Dimitris; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Livanos, Isidoros; Papantoniou, George; Rousakis, Grigoris; Lampridou, Danai

    2015-04-01

    Detailed analysis of swath bathymetry and seismic reflection profiling has revealed the morphotectonic structure of the Skyros Basin in North Aegean Sea (Greece). The overall geometry of the basin is shaped by a major slope discontinuity, separating the continental platform from the continental slope at depths between 200-400m. The basin forms an equilateral triangle. Its base is 50km long NW-SE trending at the southwest, parallel to the Skyros Island, whereas its pic is located at the northeast, north of Lesvos Island. The basin comprises 9 sub-basins at depths varying from 1200m at the southwest to 600m to the northeast and is structurally divided into three parts: i) the eastern part forms a longitudinal semi-graben with one sub-basin trending ENE-WSW of 45km length, but only 5-8 Km width at depths varing between 600-700m. This sub-basin is bounded to the south by a marginal fault of >1.5km throw but with unknown horizontal displacement. ii) the central part that forms the predominant part of the triangle with 45 Km long NW-SE trending base and 70km long axis at the NE-SW direction. The central part corresponds to an assymetric graben with a 70km long major marginal fault with >1500m throw along its southern slopes and a 70 km long antithetic fault with >400m throw along its northern slopes. It comprises 5 sub-basins with depths ranging between 950-700m, bounded by important E-W trending strike slip fault zones, characterized by flower structures, with minor vertical components ranging from a few meters up to 200m. iii) the western part of the basin trends NW-SE, is 55 Km long and 25 Km wide, revealing a NW-SE tectonic graben. It comprises two sub-basins, oriented NW-SE separated by an intermediate transverse fault zone. The throw of the western marginal faults offshore Skyros Island exceeds 1200m, whereas the throw of the parallel faults creating the NW-SE tectonic graben is limited to a few hundreds meters. It should be emphasized that the Alpine basement was

  15. The advance of Kos Plateau Tuff ignimbrite into the marine realm of the Kalymnos Basin, SE Aegean Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markakis, Emmanouil; Anastasakis, George

    2013-04-01

    The 161 ka Kos Plateau Tuff (KPT) eruption is considered to be the largest explosive Quaternary event in the eastern Mediterranean. It produced pumice rafts followed by "non-welded ignimbrites" that are up to 30m thick, especially widespread on Kos island and covering an area of > 80 Km2 that includes mainly islands and present marine regions. Pyroclastic flows travelled from the proposed vent, that lies between and around Yali and Nisyros islands, across present land and sea, the total volume of the tuff has been estimated as at least 100km3. KPT products principally consist of rhyolitic ash and pumice. Post 2010 Athens University oceanographic missions have mapped the seafloor around the volcanic islands of the SE Aegean Sea. Here we present new data on seafloor morphology and Upper Quaternary seafloor stratigraphy of the Kalymnos basin that extends over an area over 70km2 and map the advance and deposition of the KPT that was previously unknown in this region. The Kalymnos basin is roughly triangular in shape and essentially consists of two sedimentation depocenters: a) a roughly elliptical 400 m deep northern segment that is developed sub-parallel to Kalymnos Island and its W-SW shelf; b) a rather physiographically complex western sector developed NE of Astipalea island and reaching depths of over 620m. High resolution sparker profiles from the west Kos-Kalymnos shelf reveal an outstanding seismic stratigraphy of stacked and prograded coastal clinoform packets capped by erosional transgressive surfaces that record Quaternary eustatic lowstands deposits of sea level with clinoforms developing during forced regression and the erosional surfaces during transgression. We show that a massive gravity flow deposit is intercalated with the shelf sediments. Above it low sea level MIS 6 and 2 sedimentary sequences are fully developed and below stage 8-10 sediments are erratically preserved over stages 12 and 16 sediments. This gravity flow deposit swept across the shelf

  16. Molecular spectrum of α-globin gene mutations in the Aegean region of Turkey: first observation of three α-globin gene mutations in the Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Onay, Hüseyin; Aykut, Ayça; Karaca, Emin; Durmaz, Asude; Solmaz, Aslı Ece; Çoğulu, Özgür; Aydınok, Yeşim; Vergin, Canan; Özkınay, Ferda

    2015-07-01

    Molecular test results of 231 individuals referred to our molecular genetics laboratory for analysis of α-globin gene mutations between the years 2007 and 2013 were evaluated. Analysis of α-thalassemia gene mutations was performed using reverse dot-blot hybridisation, which includes 21 common mutations. Twelve distinct α-thalassemia mutations and 23 different genotypes have been detected in the Aegean region of Turkey. The most frequent mutations were -α3.7 (52.28 %), -(α)20.5 (14.74 %), --MED (10.53 %), and αPA-1α (8.77 %). Three α-thalassemia mutations (αcd142α, --SEA, and αICα), which are more prevalent in Southeast Asia, are identified for the first time in Turkey in this study. We find that a broad spectrum of α-thalassemia mutations is present in the Aegean region of Turkey. The results obtained in this study may help inform decisions in the design and implementation of prevention strategies and diagnostic approaches.

  17. April 16, 2015 Crete Island Earthquake (Mw=5.9) Series and its Seismotectonic Significance, Southern Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalçın, Hilal; Kürçer, Akın; Gülen, Levent

    2016-04-01

    The active deformation of the southern Aegean Sea is a result of the northward motion of the African and Arabian Plates with respect to the Eurasian Plate in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. The Hellenic subduction zone plays a key role in the active tectonics of the region. On 16 April, 2015, a moderate earthquake occurred on the eastern part of Hellenic arc (south of Crete island), with a moment magnitude of Mw=5.9. A series of aftershocks were occurred within four months following the mainshock, which have magnitudes varying from Mw = 3.4 to 5.4. Source parameters of the 16 April 2015 earthquake have been modeled in order to reveal the regional stress tensor and the tectonic style of the region. In this study, the source parameters of the main shock and 36 aftershocks that have magnitudes M≥3.4 have been determined and modeled by seismic moment tensor waveform inversion method developed by Sokos and Zahradnik (2006) algorithm using the near-field and regional waveforms. The depth of earthquakes are varied from 2 to 61 km. Stress tensor can describe reliably principle stress axes (σ1, σ2, σ3), their relative size and stress field variations. Stress tensor inversions have been carried out using the Micheal method (1984, 1987). In this study, 16 April 2015 Crete Earthquake mainshock (Mw=5.9), a total of 36 earthquake moment tensor solutions that belong to the Crete earthquake sequence and 24 earthquake moment tensor solutions of previous main shocks in the region have been compiled and used in the stress inversion calculation. Orientations of σ1, σ2 and σ3 were computed and the principal directions are projected onto a lower hemisphere Wulff net. The best fit was attained for Phi = 0.38+/‑0.13609 and indicated that the stress regime revealed strike-slip faulting with reverse component and for the azimuth and plunge pair of (-161.6°, 21.7°) for σ1, (-11.1°, 65.4°) for σ2 and (103.8°, 10.9°) for σ3. At the final step of the study, Gutenberg and

  18. April 16, 2015 Crete Island Earthquake (Mw=5.9) Series and its Seismotectonic Significance, Southern Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalçın, Hilal; Kürçer, Akın; Gülen, Levent

    2016-04-01

    The active deformation of the southern Aegean Sea is a result of the northward motion of the African and Arabian Plates with respect to the Eurasian Plate in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. The Hellenic subduction zone plays a key role in the active tectonics of the region. On 16 April, 2015, a moderate earthquake occurred on the eastern part of Hellenic arc (south of Crete island), with a moment magnitude of Mw=5.9. A series of aftershocks were occurred within four months following the mainshock, which have magnitudes varying from Mw = 3.4 to 5.4. Source parameters of the 16 April 2015 earthquake have been modeled in order to reveal the regional stress tensor and the tectonic style of the region. In this study, the source parameters of the main shock and 36 aftershocks that have magnitudes M≥3.4 have been determined and modeled by seismic moment tensor waveform inversion method developed by Sokos and Zahradnik (2006) algorithm using the near-field and regional waveforms. The depth of earthquakes are varied from 2 to 61 km. Stress tensor can describe reliably principle stress axes (σ1, σ2, σ3), their relative size and stress field variations. Stress tensor inversions have been carried out using the Micheal method (1984, 1987). In this study, 16 April 2015 Crete Earthquake mainshock (Mw=5.9), a total of 36 earthquake moment tensor solutions that belong to the Crete earthquake sequence and 24 earthquake moment tensor solutions of previous main shocks in the region have been compiled and used in the stress inversion calculation. Orientations of σ1, σ2 and σ3 were computed and the principal directions are projected onto a lower hemisphere Wulff net. The best fit was attained for Phi = 0.38+/-0.13609 and indicated that the stress regime revealed strike-slip faulting with reverse component and for the azimuth and plunge pair of (-161.6°, 21.7°) for σ1, (-11.1°, 65.4°) for σ2 and (103.8°, 10.9°) for σ3. At the final step of the study, Gutenberg and

  19. Pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables from the Aegean region, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bakırcı, Gözde Türköz; Yaman Acay, Dilek Bengü; Bakırcı, Fatih; Ötleş, Semih

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate pesticide residues in fruits and vegetables from the Aegean region of Turkey. A total of 1423 samples of fresh fruit and vegetables were collected from 2010 to 2012. The samples were analysed to determine the concentrations of 186 pesticide residues. The analyses utilized ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) and gas chromatography with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD) confirmed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after a multi-residue extraction procedure (the QuEChERS method). The results were evaluated according to maximum residue limits (MRLs) for each commodity and pesticide by Turkish Regulation. All pomegranate, cauliflower and cabbage samples were pesticides-free. A total of 754 samples contained detectable residues at or below MRLs, and 48 (8.4%) of the fruit samples and 83 (9.8%) of the vegetable samples contained pesticide residues above MRLs. MRL values were most often exceeded in arugula, cucumber, lemon, and grape commodities. All detected pesticides in apricot, carrot, kiwifruit and leek were below the MRLs. Acetamiprid, chlorpyriphos and carbendazim were the most detected pesticide residues. PMID:24799252

  20. Numerical simulations of tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions at Karymskoye lake (Kamchatka, Russia) and Kolumbo volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvrová, M.; Paris, R.; Kelfoun, K.; Nomikou, P.

    2014-02-01

    Increasing human activities along the coasts of the world provoke the necessity to assess tsunami hazard from different sources (earthquakes, landslides, volcanic activity). In this paper, we simulate tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions from (1) a submerged vent in a shallow water lake (Karymskoye Lake, Kamchatka), and (2) from Kolumbo submarine volcano (7 km NE of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece). The 1996 tsunami in Karymskoye lake is a well-documented example and thus serves as a case study for validating the calculations. The numerical model reproduces realistically the tsunami run-ups measured onshore. Systematic numerical study of tsunamis generated by explosions of the Kolumbo volcano is then conducted for a wide range of energies. Results show that in case of reawakening, the Kolumbo volcano might represent a significant tsunami hazard for the northern, eastern and southern coasts of Santorini, even for small-power explosions.

  1. Numerical simulations of tsunami generated by underwater volcanic explosions at Karymskoye lake (Kamchatka, Russia) and Kolumbo volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvrová, M.; Paris, R.; Kelfoun, K.; Nomikou, P.

    2013-11-01

    Increasing human activities along the coasts of the world arise the necessity to assess tsunami hazard from different sources (earthquakes, landslides, volcanic activity). In this paper, we simulate tsunamis generated by underwater volcanic explosions from (1) a submerged vent in a shallow water lake (Karymskoye Lake, Kamchatka), and (2) from Kolumbo submarine volcano (7 km NE of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece). The 1996 tsunami in Karymskoye lake is a well-documented example and thus serves as a case-study for validating the calculations. The numerical model reproduces realistically the tsunami runups measured onshore. Systematic numerical study of tsunamis generated by explosions of Kolumbo volcano is then conducted for a wide range of energies. Results show that in case of reawakening, Kolumbo volcano might represent a significant tsunami hazard for the northern, eastern and southern coasts of Santorini, even for small-power explosions.

  2. Implementation of a reduced order Kalman filter to assimilate ocean color data into a coupled physical-biochemical model of the North Aegean Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaroni, Sofia; Tsiaras, Kostas; Economou-Amilli, Athena; Petihakis, George; Politikos, Dimitrios; Triantafyllou, George

    2013-04-01

    Within the framework of the European project OPEC (Operational Ecology), a data assimilation system was implemented to describe chlorophyll-a concentrations of the North Aegean, as well the impact on the European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) biomass distribution provided by a bioenergetics model, related to the density of three low trophic level functional groups of zooplankton (heterotrophic flagellates, microzooplankton and mesozooplankton). The three-dimensional hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model comprises two on-line coupled sub-models: the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) and the European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM). The assimilation scheme is based on the Singular Evolutive Extended Kalman (SEEK) filter and its variant that uses a fixed correction base (SFEK). For the initialization, SEEK filter uses a reduced order error covariance matrix provided by the dominant Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF) of model. The assimilation experiments were performed for year 2003 using SeaWiFS chlorophyll-a data during which the physical model uses the atmospheric forcing obtained from the regional climate model HIRHAM5. The assimilation system is validated by assessing the relevance of the system in fitting the data, the impact of the assimilation on non-observed biochemical parameters and the overall quality of the forecasts.

  3. Recurrent intrusions of transitional waters of Eastern Mediterranean origin in the Cretan Sea as a tracer of Aegean Sea dense water formation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velaoras, Dimitris; Krokos, George; Theocharis, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    Available temperature and salinity data in the Cretan Sea from 1955 up to 2014 as well as literature sources were revisited in order to trace the appearance of low salinity, temperature, oxygen and nutrient-rich waters inside the basin at depths below the intermediate layer. First appearing as far back as 1961 in literature, these waters were found originating in the layers that separate intermediate and deep waters of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMed) and were named Transitional Mediterranean Water (TMW) in the 1990s. Data analysis showed that the appearance of TMW in the Cretan Sea is a recurrent phenomenon connected to water mass exchanges between the Aegean Sea and the EMed. In particular, the inflow of TMW in the Cretan basin acts as compensation for the outflow of equally dense or denser masses from the Aegean. This export is a result of dense water formation (DWF) events taking place inside the Aegean Sea triggering TMW compensatory inflow into the Cretan Sea through the Cretan Straits. In this context, TMW intrusions in the Cretan basin can be used as a tracer of DWF in the Aegean Sea while the depth of the intrusion can provide valuable information about the intensity of the DWF event. The importance of TMW intrusions is not solely restricted to the tracing and evaluation of DWF events but could additionally expand to the impact on local ecological processes as TMW is a nutrient carrier for the oligotrophic Cretan Sea. It is obvious that this low salinity, temperature and oxygen layer is what was later named TMW. The core temperature, salinity and oxygen values reported by Miller (1974) fall within the range of values observed during the PELAGOS project in 1994, as noted in Section 'Presence of low salinity water masses below the intermediate layer in the Cretan Sea during the EMT event'. Using the same dataset provided by MEDATLAS 2002 database, a salinity transect along the Cretan Sea is reconstructed in Fig. 5. The bottle data originate from the

  4. Old stories and lost pieces of the Eastern Mediterranean puzzle: a new approach to the tectonic evolution of the Western Anatolia and the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaltırak, Cenk; Engin Aksu, Ali; Hall, Jeremy; Elitez, İrem

    2015-04-01

    During the last 20 or so years, the tectonic evolution of Aegean Sea and Western Anatolia has been dominantly explained by back-arc extension and escape tectonics along the North Anatolian Fault. Various datasets have been considered in the construction of general tectonic models, including the geometry of fault patterns, paleomagnetic data, extensional directions of the core complexes, characteristic changes in magmatism and volcanism, the different sense of Miocene rotation between the opposite sides of the Aegean Sea, and the stratigraphy and position of the Miocene and Pliocene-Quaternary basins. In these models, the roles of the Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone, the Trakya-Eskişehir Fault Zone, the Anaximander Mountains and Isparta Angle have almost never been taken into consideration. The holistic evaluation of numerous land and marine researches in the Aegean Sea and western Anatolia suggest the following evolutionary stages: 1. during the early Miocene, Greece and western Anatolia were deformed under the NE-SW extensional tectonics associated with the back-arc extension, when core complexes and supra-detachment basins developed, 2. following the collision of the Anaximander Mountains and western Anatolia in early Miocene , the Isparta Angle locked this side of the western arc by generating a triangle-shaped compressional structure, 3. while the Isparta Angle penetrated into the Anatolia, the NE-striking Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone in the west and NW-striking Trakya-Eskişehir Fault Zone in the north developed along the paleo-tectonic zones , 4. the formation of these two tectonic structures allowed the counterclockwise rotation of the western Anatolia in the middle Miocene and this rotation removed the effect of the back-arc extension on the western Anatolian Block, 5. the counterclockwise rotation developed with the early westward escape of the Western Anatolian reached up to 35-40o and Trakya-Eskişehir Fault Zone created a total dextral displacement of about 200

  5. Time-Domain Moment Tensors for shallow ( h ≤ 40 km) earthquakes in the broader Aegean Sea for the years 2006 and 2007: The database of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roumelioti, Zafeiria; Kiratzi, Anastasia; Benetatos, Christoforos

    2011-03-01

    We present a catalog of moment tensor (MT) solutions and moment magnitudes, Mw, for 119 shallow ( h ≤ 40 km) earthquakes in Greece and its surrounding lands (34°N-42°N, 19°E-30°E) for the years 2006 and 2007, computed with the 1D Time-Domain Moment Tensor inversion method (TDMT_INV code of Dreger, 2003). Magnitudes range from 3.2 ≤ Mw ≤ 5.7. Green's functions (GF) have been pre-computed to build a library, for a number of velocity profiles applicable to the broader Aegean Sea region, to be used in the inversion of observed broad band waveforms (10-50 s). All MT solutions are the outcome of a long series of tests of different reported source locations and hypocenter depths. Quality factors have been assigned to each MT solution based on the number of stations used in the inversion and the goodness of fit between observed and synthetic waveforms. In general, the focal mechanisms are compatible with previous knowledge on the seismotectonics of the Aegean area. The new data provide evidence for strike-slip faulting along NW-SE trending structures at the lower part of Axios basin, close to the heavily industrialized, and presently subsiding, region of the city of Thessaloniki. Normal faulting along E-W trending planes is observed at the Strimon basin, and in Orfanou Gulf in northern Greece. A sequence of events in the east Aegean Sea close to the coastline with western Anatolia sheds light on an active structure bounding the north coastline of Psara-Chios Islands about 20-25 km in length exhibiting right lateral strike-slip faulting.

  6. Aquatic animal resources in Prehistoric Aegean, Greece.

    PubMed

    Mylona, Dimitra

    2014-12-01

    This paper explores the early stages in the history of fishing in the Aegean Sea in Greece, and highlights its formative phases and its specific characteristics in different points in time. This is testified by various physical remains, such as fish bones, fishing tools, and representations in art, which are gathered in the course of archaeological research. The aquatic resources in the Aegean Sea have been exploited and managed for millennia by communities that lived near the water and often made a living from it. The earliest evidence for a systematic, intensive exploitation of marine resources in the Aegean Sea dates to the Mesolithic, eleven millennia ago. In the Neolithic period, the adoption of a sedentary, agro-pastoral way of life led to a reduction in the intensity of fishing and shellfish gathering. Its importance as an economic resource remained high only in certain regions of rich, eutrophic waters. In the Bronze Age, an era of social complexity and centralized economy, the exploitation of aquatic, mostly marine, resources became a complex, multi-faceted activity which involved subsistence, industry and ideology. The range of preferred fish and invertebrate species, the fishing technology, and the processing of fish and shellfish in order to produce elaborate foods or prestige items are all traceable aspects of the complex relationship between humans and the aquatic resources throughout the prehistory of fishing and shellfish gathering in the Aegean area. The broadening of collaboration between archaeology and physical sciences offers new means to explore these issues in a more thorough and nuanced manner. PMID:25984485

  7. Growth and feeding patterns of European anchovy ( Engraulis encrasicolus) early life stages in the Aegean Sea (NE Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán, Ignacio A.; Folkvord, Arild; Palomera, Isabel; Quílez-Badía, Gemma; Kallianoti, Fotini; Tselepides, Anastasios; Kallianotis, Argyris

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to describe inter- and intra-annual variations in the environmental characteristics of the North-eastern Aegean Sea and to relate these changes to the egg and larval distributions, growth and feeding of larval anchovy ( Engraulis encrasicolus). Four cruises, two in July and two in September in 2003 and 2004 were performed. The distributions of eggs and larvae were associated with i) salinity fronts related to the Black Sea Water and ii) shallow areas of high productivity over the continental shelf, some of them with high riverine influence. The first published description of the anchovy larval diet in the Eastern Mediterranean was conducted in individuals ranging from 2.2 to 17 mm standard length. The number of non-empty guts was relatively high (between 20% and 30%), and the diet was described through 15 main items. The mean size of the prey increased with larval size, and was generally dominated by prey widths smaller than 80 μm (mainly the nauplii and copepodite stages of copepods). Small larvae positively selected copepod nauplii. As larvae grew, they shifted to larger copepod stages. At all sizes, larvae rejected abundant taxa like cladocerans. The average trophic level calculated for anchovy of all size ranges was 2.98 ± 0.16 (SE). Growth rates varied from 0.41 to 0.75 mm d -1, with the highest growth rates generally observed in September. Variability in the Black Sea Water influence and the recorded inter- and intra-annual changes in primary and secondary production, combined with marked changes in temperature over the first 20 m depth, are used to frame the discussion regarding the observed significant differences in growth rates in terms of both length and weight.

  8. Palaeomagnetic Results From Minoan Ash Deposits (Rv Vema) Cores V10-50 And V10-58 South Aegean Sea: A Comparison With Santorini Minoan Pumice Deposits.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downey, W. S.

    Palaeomagnetic and anisotropy measurements were carried out on Minoan ash deposits ob-tained from the deep-sea cores, (V10-50 and V10-58), South Aegean Sea. Three distinct layers have been reported within the ash deposit in core (V10-50). Based primarily on grain-size differences, a link to three separate eruptive phases of Santorini has been suggested. Magnetic results were una-ble to resolve any differences between these layers which suggests that the eruption may have been a 'single event'. Some magnetic parameters indicate that the final ignimbrite phase of the eruption of Santorini is most likely to have been responsible for the bulk of the deep-sea ash deposits, alt-hough a contribution from the first phase (phreatomagmatic and/or Plinian air-fall) cannot be ex-cluded. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate a primary sedimentary fabric and quiet depositional conditions for V10-50 ash sediment. A more disturbed petrofabric is ob-served for V10-58 suggesting, bottom current activity and/or slumping. The mean palaeomagnetic inclination calculated from appropriate V10-50 results is:- 60.2° ± 4.3° (corrected for anisotropy and geographical location differences of sites). This is statistically identical to values obtained for burnt mud brick from destruction sites in eastern Crete but different to the mean palaeomagnetic inclina-tion obtained for central Cretan sites. A comparison with the secular variation (inclination) data for the Balkan region and for Greece, suggests that the eruption/s of Santorini occurred in the period between ~1540 and 1500 BC.

  9. Marine pollution risk in a coastal city: use of an eco-genotoxic tool as a stress indicator in mussels from the Eastern Aegean Sea.

    PubMed

    Kacar, Asli; Pazi, Idil; Gonul, Tolga; Kucuksezgin, Filiz

    2016-08-01

    Coastal areas, such as bays, estuaries, and harbors, are heavily polluted since these areas are the settlements to which toxic chemicals from industrial and domestic wastes are discharged. The genetic damage was evaluated using bioindicator mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis caused by toxic chemicals (metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) in İzmir and Çandarlı Bays (the Eastern Aegean Sea) through comet assay. Three sampling sites from the two bays were selected and the study was conducted during the spring and autumn periods. The highest levels of DNA damage expressed as %Tail-DNA were observed in İzmir Bay (34.60 % Tail-DNA) in the spring. Analysis of the correlation between PAHs and metals in mussels and %T-DNA in the hemolymph and gill cells showed a statistically significant positive correlation between %T-DNA and ∑PAH, chromium (p < 0.05). This study determined the pollution level of the İzmir and Çandarlı Bays by using the DNA damage to the mussel, which can identify the effects of environmental pollutants at the cellular levels. These results confirm that comet assay can be used to determine the temporal and spatial differences of DNA damage, and as a suitable tool for the measurement of genotoxicity in regions with low pollutant concentrations. PMID:27146544

  10. Marine pollution risk in a coastal city: use of an eco-genotoxic tool as a stress indicator in mussels from the Eastern Aegean Sea.

    PubMed

    Kacar, Asli; Pazi, Idil; Gonul, Tolga; Kucuksezgin, Filiz

    2016-08-01

    Coastal areas, such as bays, estuaries, and harbors, are heavily polluted since these areas are the settlements to which toxic chemicals from industrial and domestic wastes are discharged. The genetic damage was evaluated using bioindicator mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis caused by toxic chemicals (metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) in İzmir and Çandarlı Bays (the Eastern Aegean Sea) through comet assay. Three sampling sites from the two bays were selected and the study was conducted during the spring and autumn periods. The highest levels of DNA damage expressed as %Tail-DNA were observed in İzmir Bay (34.60 % Tail-DNA) in the spring. Analysis of the correlation between PAHs and metals in mussels and %T-DNA in the hemolymph and gill cells showed a statistically significant positive correlation between %T-DNA and ∑PAH, chromium (p < 0.05). This study determined the pollution level of the İzmir and Çandarlı Bays by using the DNA damage to the mussel, which can identify the effects of environmental pollutants at the cellular levels. These results confirm that comet assay can be used to determine the temporal and spatial differences of DNA damage, and as a suitable tool for the measurement of genotoxicity in regions with low pollutant concentrations.

  11. Submarine canyon, slope, and shelf sedimentation in an upper Eocene-Oligocene progradational system (Limnos Island, north Aegean Sea, Greece)

    SciTech Connect

    Roussos, N.

    1988-08-01

    The only well-exposed outcrops of a post-Alpine late Eocene-Oligocene basin in the north Aegean Sea are at Limnos Island. These mostly consist of typical slope deposits overlain by remnants of shallow marine shelf and continental (braided-river) deposits. Three main slope lithofacies are distinguished. Canyon deposits consist of thick-bedded, massive, and pebbly sandstones (facies B), conglomerates (facies A), pebbly mudstone where the matrix shows flow (facies F), rock falls (nummulitic limestones), and zones of slump folds in sandstones (facies F). Channelized facies of massive sandstones, classical turbidites, and thin interbeds of sandstone and mudstone (facies E - probably overbank or levee deposits) are associated with canyon deposits. Pelagic and hemipelagic slope deposits consist of mudstone (facies G) and thin-bedded sandstone (facies D) with occasional small to medium-scale slump folds. These mud-rich slope deposits are incised by several channels filled with conglomerates, thick massive sandstones with well-developed dish structures, and turbidites interbedded with thin layers of mudstone (facies C). This unit composes a typical thinning and fining-upward sequence.

  12. Assessing enigmatic boulder deposits in NE Aegean Sea: importance of historical sources as tool to support hydrodynamic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacchi, M.; Rovere, A.; Zouros, N.; Firpo, M.

    2012-04-01

    Due to their importance in the assessment of coastal hazards, several studies have focused on geomorphological and sedimentological field evidence of catastrophic wave impacts related to historical tsunami events. Among them, many authors used boulder fields as important indicators of past tsunamis, especially in the Mediterranean Sea. The aim of this study was to understand the mechanism of deposition of clusters of large boulders, consisting of beachrock slabs, which were found on the southern coasts of Lesvos Island (NE Aegean Sea). Methods to infer the origin of boulder deposits (tsunami vs. storm wave) are often based on hydrodynamic models even if different environmental complexities are difficult to be incorporated into numerical models. In this study, hydrodynamic equations did not provide unequivocal indication of the mechanism responsible for boulder deposition in the study area. Further analyses, ranging from geomorphologic to seismotectonic data, indicated a tsunami as the most likely cause of displacement of the boulders but still do not allow to totally exclude the extreme storm origin. Additional historical investigations (based on tsunami catalogues, historical photos and aged inhabitants interviews) indicated that the boulders are likely to have been deposited by the tsunami triggered by the 6.7 Ms Chios-Karaburum earthquake of 1949 or, alternatively, by minor effects of the destructive tsunami produced by 1956's Amorgos Island earthquake. Results of this study point out that, at Mediterranean scale, to flank numerical models with the huge amount of the available historical data become a crucial tool in terms of prevention policies related to catastrophic coastal events.

  13. Hydrodynamic features of the South Aegean Sea as derived from Argo T/ S and dissolved oxygen profiles in the area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassis, Dimitris; Krasakopoulou, Evangelia; Korres, Gerasimos; Petihakis, George; Triantafyllou, George S.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the hydrodynamic picture of the South Aegean Sea is examined through an analysis of recent measurements in its sub-basins, the Myrtoan and Cretan Sea. Both sub-basins play an important role in the water circulation, exchange, and formation processes that affect the dynamics of the whole Eastern Mediterranean. For the first time, Bio-Argo floats were deployed in the area under the Greek Argo Research Infrastructure coordination. The acquired profiles cover an almost 2-year period (November 2013-July 2015) and are compared with previous Argo profiles and the re-processed time-series data recorded from the E1-M3A POSEIDON observatory operating in the area since 2007. The spatio-temporal distribution of the physical and chemical properties in each sub-basin is examined. Dense water formation events are revealed in the northern part (Myrtoan), while the wider area can be characterized as pre-conditioned. In the Cretan basin, a strong inter-annual variability of the salinity field at intermediate and deep layers is observed that is associated with water exchange from its open boundaries. Furthermore, comparison of the dissolved oxygen (DO) distribution with physical water properties within both the mixed layer, and at greater depths, indicated that relatively high but still under-saturated DO values are more likely to be associated with convection events. Finally, an updated picture of the physical properties and the DO distribution is presented based on the last 5 years of measurements and the recent introduction of Bio-Argo floats with DO sensors in the area.

  14. Geographic patterns of elemental deposition in the Aegean region of Turkey indicated by the lichen, Xanthoria parietina (L.) Th. Fr.

    PubMed

    Yenisoy-Karakaş, S; Tuncel, S G

    2004-08-15

    Lichen samples from different parts of the world have been known to accumulate elements to a greater degree than higher plants, if they are exposed to these elements from the atmosphere or from water and sediments. It has been hypothesized that lichens can be used to monitor air pollution around point and area emission sources. Local variation (variation in substrate, age and morphology of lichen samples) of element concentrations would not be large enough to affect the concentration patterns in large areas. We tested this hypothesis in the Aegean region of Turkey, which is very urbanized and industrialized. No such study has been conducted before in this part of the country. A total of 234 samples of the lichen Xanthoria parietina were collected from a 51,800-km2 area. Samples were washed and analyzed by INAA and ICP-AES for 35 elements. The range of the concentrations for most of the elements on a local scale was an order of magnitude lower than for the element concentrations on a regional scale. The mean local coefficient of variance (CV) was found to be 15, providing that the local variation did not affect the concentration of elements in the sampling region. According to cluster analysis, 8 (As, Hg, Pb, Sb, Fe, Mn, Na and K) elements are indicative of important local pollution locations and their zone of impact in the region. By mapping the concentrations of eight indicative elements in lichen Xanthoria parietina of the Aegean region, it was possible to relate deposition to the existence of known sources of pollution in certain areas. Location of pollution sources such as iron-steel plants, and coal burning in the cities, industrial activity and two important coal-fired power plants generally corresponded with locations of highest element accumulations in the lichens.

  15. Total and inorganic arsenic levels in some marine organisms from Izmir Bay (Eastern Aegean Sea): a risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Kucuksezgin, Filiz; Gonul, Lutfi Tolga; Tasel, Didem

    2014-10-01

    The arsenic compounds in marine biota were evaluated from Izmir Bay (Eastern Aegean) and found that inorganic arsenic occurred as a minor fraction. No information is available on the annual variations of arsenic in important edible biota species from Izmir Bay. Fish and mussel samples were taken from different regions of Izmir Bay between 2009 and 2011 (n=854 individual specimens). The average percentages of inorganic arsenic to total arsenic for all biota samples were 3.43±3.38% with a range of 0.11-11.8%. The importance of speciation analysis for arsenic is supported by our work, because arsenic is ubiquitous in the ecosystem, and flexible toxicity of arsenic is based on chemical form. The average total As levels in Mullus barbatus were 6 times higher than Diplodus annularis and Mytilus galloprovincialis. This study also revealed that spatial variation influenced the arsenic levels in the fish samples and the highest concentrations of arsenic were found in Gediz site. Our study showed that estimated daily intakes of arsenic via consumption of flesh fish and shell fish were below the BMDL0.5 values established by FAO/WHO. PMID:25048921

  16. Zircon U-Pb, O, and Hf isotopic constraints on Mesozoic magmatism in the Cyclades, Aegean Sea, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Bin; Bröcker, Michael; Ireland, Trevor; Holden, Peter; Kinsley, Leslie P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Compared to the well-documented Cenozoic magmatic and metamorphic rocks of the Cyclades, Aegean Sea, Greece, the geodynamic context of older meta-igneous rocks occurring in the marble-schist sequences and mélanges of the Cycladic Blueschist Unit is as yet not fully understood. Here, we report O-Hf isotopic compositions of zircons ranging in age from ca. 320 Ma to ca. 80 Ma from metamorphic rocks exposed on the islands of Andros, Ios, Sifnos, and Syros with special emphasis on Triassic source rocks. Ion microprobe (SHRIMP II) single spot oxygen isotope analysis of pre-Cretaceous zircons from various felsic gneisses and meta-gabbros representing both the marble-schist sequences and the mélanges of the study area yielded a large range in δ18O values, varying from 2.7 ‰ to 10.1 ‰ VSMOW, with one outlier at -0.4 %. Initial ɛHf values (-12.5 to +15.7) suggest diverse sources for melts formed between Late Carboniferous to Late Cretaceous time that record derivation from mantle and reworked older continental crust. In particular, variable δ18O and ɛHf( t) values for Triassic igneous zircons suggest that magmatism of this age is more likely rift- than subduction-related. The significant crustal component in 160 Ma meta-gabbros from Andros implies that some Jurassic gabbroic rocks of the Hellenides are not part of SSZ-type (supra-subduction zone) ophiolites that are common elsewhere along the margin of the Pelagonian zone.

  17. Simulating anchovy's full life cycle in the northern Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean): A coupled hydro-biogeochemical-IBM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politikos, D.; Somarakis, S.; Tsiaras, K. P.; Giannoulaki, M.; Petihakis, G.; Machias, A.; Triantafyllou, G.

    2015-11-01

    A 3-D full life cycle population model for the North Aegean Sea (NAS) anchovy stock is presented. The model is two-way coupled with a hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model (POM-ERSEM). The anchovy life span is divided into seven life stages/age classes. Embryos and early larvae are passive particles, but subsequent stages exhibit active horizontal movements based on specific rules. A bioenergetics model simulates the growth in both the larval and juvenile/adult stages, while the microzooplankton and mesozooplankton fields of the biogeochemical model provide the food for fish consumption. The super-individual approach is adopted for the representation of the anchovy population. A dynamic egg production module, with an energy allocation algorithm, is embedded in the bioenergetics equation and produces eggs based on a new conceptual model for anchovy vitellogenesis. A model simulation for the period 2003-2006 with realistic initial conditions reproduced well the magnitude of population biomass and daily egg production estimated from acoustic and daily egg production method (DEPM) surveys, carried out in the NAS during June 2003-2006. Model simulated adult and egg habitats were also in good agreement with observed spatial distributions of acoustic biomass and egg abundance in June. Sensitivity simulations were performed to investigate the effect of different formulations adopted for key processes, such as reproduction and movement. The effect of the anchovy population on plankton dynamics was also investigated, by comparing simulations adopting a two-way or a one-way coupling of the fish with the biogeochemical model.

  18. Source of the tsunami generated by the 1650 AD eruption of Kolumbo submarine volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvrova, Martina; Paris, R.; Nomikou, P.; Kelfoun, K.; Leibrandt, S.; Tappin, D. R.; McCoy, F. W.

    2016-07-01

    The 1650 AD explosive eruption of Kolumbo submarine volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece) generated a destructive tsunami. In this paper we propose a source mechanism of this poorly documented tsunami using both geological investigations and numerical simulations. Sedimentary evidence of the 1650 AD tsunami was found along the coast of Santorini Island at maximum altitudes ranging between 3.5 m a.s.l. (Perissa, southern coast) and 20 m a.s.l. (Monolithos, eastern coast), corresponding to a minimum inundation of 360 and 630 m respectively. Tsunami deposits consist of an irregular 5 to 30 cm thick layer of dark grey sand that overlies pumiceous deposits erupted during the Minoan eruption and are found at depths of 30-50 cm below the surface. Composition of the tsunami sand is similar to the composition of the present-day beach sand but differs from the pumiceous gravelly deposits on which it rests. The spatial distribution of the tsunami deposits was compared to available historical records and to the results of numerical simulations of tsunami inundation. Different source mechanisms were tested: earthquakes, underwater explosions, caldera collapse, and pyroclastic flows. The most probable source of the 1650 AD Kolumbo tsunami is a 250 m high water surface displacement generated by underwater explosion with an energy of ~ 2 × 1016 J at water depths between 20 and 150 m. The tsunamigenic explosion(s) occurred on September 29, 1650 during the transition between submarine and subaerial phases of the eruption. Caldera subsidence is not an efficient tsunami source mechanism as short (and probably unrealistic) collapse durations (< 5 min) are needed. Pyroclastic flows cannot be discarded, but the required flux (106 to 107 m3 · s- 1) is exceptionally high compared to the magnitude of the eruption.

  19. Source of the tsunami generated by the 1650 AD eruption of Kolumbo submarine volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvrova, Martina; Paris, Raphael; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Tappin, Dave

    2016-04-01

    The 1650 AD explosive eruption of Kolumbo submarine volcano (Aegean Sea, Greece) generated a destructive tsunami. In this paper we propose a source mechanism of this poorly documented tsunami using both geological investigations and numerical simulations. Sedimentary evidences of the 1650 AD tsunami were found along the coast of Santorini Island at maximum altitudes ranging between 3.5 m a.s.l. (Perissa, southern coast) and 20 m a.s.l. (Monolithos, eastern coast), corresponding to a minimum inundation of 360 and 630 m respectively. Tsunami deposits correspond to an irregular 5 to 30 cm thick layer of dark grey sand intercalated in soil at depths between 30 and 50 cm. Composition of the tsunami sand is similar to the composition of the present-day beach and clearly differs from the pumiceous gravelly soil. Spatial distribution of the tsunami deposits was confronted to available historical records and to the results of numerical simulations of tsunami inundation. Different scenarios of source mechanism were tested: earthquakes, underwater explosions, caldera collapse, and pyroclastic flows. The most probable source of the 1650 AD Kolumbo tsunami is a 250 m high water surface displacement generated by underwater explosion with an energy of ~2 E15 J at water depths between 20 and 150 m. The tsunamigenic explosion(s) occurred on September 29, 1650 during the transition between submarine and subaerial phases. Caldera subsidence is not an efficient source of tsunami, as short (and probably unrealistic) collapse durations (< 5 minutes) are needed. Pyroclastic flows cannot be discarded, but the required flux (E6 to E7 m³.s-1) is exceptionally high compared to the magnitude of the eruption.

  20. Radiometric dating of sediment cores from a hydrothermal vent zone off Milos Island in the Aegean Sea.

    PubMed

    Ugur, Aysun; Miquel, Juan-Carlos; Fowler, Scott W; Appleby, Peter

    2003-05-20

    Sediment cores from a hydrothermal vent zone off Milos Island in the Aegean Sea were dated using the 210Pb method. The average unsupported 210Pb inventory in the cores was calculated to be 3256 Bq m(-2). The corresponding mean annual 210Pb flux of 105 Bq m(-2) year(-1) is comparable to estimates of the atmospheric flux given in the literature. 210Pb fluxes calculated from the unsupported 210Pb inventories in cores are also comparable with the 210Pb vertical fluxes determined from settling particles off the coast of Milos Island. The highest unsupported 210Pb concentrations (89 Bq kg(-1)) were measured in the sediments nearest to the hydrothermal vent area suggesting that the sedimentation rate is lowest at this site. Direct gamma measurements of 210Pb were used to date three sediment cores that are located at different distances from the vent zone: one is in the immediate vicinity of the vent; and others are outside the zone. Sedimentation rates for these cores, calculated using the CRS and CIC models, ranged from 0.088+/-0.008 cm year(-1) to 0.14+/-0.01 cm year(-1). Where both models were applicable, the results given by the two methods were in good agreement. 137Cs concentrations in all three cores generally declined with depth but showed no clear signal of either the period of maximum fallout from weapons testing or the Chernobyl accident. 210Po activities were also measured and the maximum 210Po concentration was in the sediment surface layer (166 Bq kg(-1)).

  1. Impact of recent Global Digital Bathymetry and Topography Models on geoid modelling: Results from two case studies in Balearic and Aegean Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delikaraoglou, D.; Mintourakis, I.; Kallianou, F.

    2009-04-01

    geoid modelling of archipelagic (island) areas. We have concentrated in two test regions: (a) the Catalano-Balearic Sea (South of Spain in the NW Meditteranean), where adequate marine and land gravity data allow a detailed evaluation of our processing methodologies and their results and, (b) the Aegean Sea where the presence of many islands in varying distances from the mainland Greece and located on the continental shelf and/or divided by steep sea floor topography present some unique challenges for any high resolution geoid modelling efforts. For both test regions, we generated a combined DEM (C-DEM) using the IFREMER and SRTM 30 arcsec bathymetric data for the sea areas and SRTM 3 arcsec data for the surrounding land areas. In this contribution, we discuss various computational aspects relating to the so-called "Direct Topographical Effect" (DTE) and the "Indirect Topographical Effect" (ITE), the two most significant topographical effects that have to be evaluated when a precise geoid is being compiled. In addition, we outline the evaluation and the impact of the results obtained, especially with regard to the differences in the geoid models when different elevation data are used, and point out the main limitations and possibilities for further improvements in the use of the aforementioned satellite and terrestrial data for regional and local geoid mapping in coastal and island regions. Keywords: IFREMER, SRTM, terrain effects, free-air gravity anomalies, geoid modelling,Digital Bathymetry Models.

  2. On the recent seismic activity in North-Eastern Aegean Sea including the Mw5.8 earthquake on 8 January 2013

    PubMed Central

    SARLIS, Nicholas V.

    2013-01-01

    In the last week of November 2012, we announced that a strong electrotelluric disturbance, which we judged to be a Seismic Electric Signal (SES) activity, was recorded at station Assiros located in Northern Greece. This disturbance was actually followed by an Mw5.8 earthquake on 8 January 2013 in North-Eastern Aegean Sea. Here we show that, by analyzing this SES activity and employing the natural time analysis of subsequent seismicity, we estimated the epicentral location, magnitude and occurrence time which are reasonably compatible with those of the Mw5.8 event. PMID:24213207

  3. Depositional environment, foraminifer content and ESR ages of Quaternary Gediz Delta Sediments (Eastern Aegean Sea, İzmir-Western Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gökçe Benli, Ekin; Aydın, Hülya; İşintek, İsmail; Engin, Birol; Şengöçmen, Berna

    2016-04-01

    Sediments and fossil content of Gediz Delta (Eastern Aegean Sea - İzmir) were examined based on the drilling core samples of the YSK-C and SK-246 drilling. W-SW part of the Delta is represented by continental delta sediments up to 6 meters and shallow marine detritic sediments up to 35 meters in the YSK-C drilling. Continental part consists of an soiled, graveled, muddy and sandy sediment in terms of rich organic substance. As for marine part, it consists of bioclast, muddy, fine graveled sand and by repetition of pebble, sand and bioclast bearing mud layers. Bioclasts comprise of bivalvia, echinoid, ostracod, gastropod, foramifer and bryozoa fragments. Benthic foraminiferal fauna determinated in the marine levels are represented by 55 bethic, 2 planktonic species. These foraminifers and bioclasts reflect that the W-SW part of the delta, has been occured in marine conditions between 8-31m deep. E-NE part of the delta is generally represented by continental sediments up to 43.5m in SK-246 drilling. In addition, it includes marine levels in 18-19 m, 23-24 m and 36-37,5 m intervals. Continental sediments of E-NE part is generally represented by calcareous and sandy mud rocks which mostly includes ash, tuff, and pebble derived from Neogene volcanic rocks. As for marine levels, it is composed of calcareous mud stones and calcareous clay stones including very thin gastropod, bivalvia and ostracod in 18- 19 and 36-37.5 meters whereas it is represented by sandy mud stones including a great deal of bentic foraminifer, bivalvia, bryozoa, echinoid, gastropod in 23-24 metres. Thus show that E-NE part of the delta is usually in continental condition but it is occasionally covered by sea. In aging studies of YSK-C core done by ESR method, age of 8-9 m interval is determined to be 11. 376 ± 0,067 Ka; however ages of 10-11m and 24-25 m intervals are revealed to be 16.466 ± 0,016 Ka and 15.344 ± 0,021 Ka respectively; finally age of 25-26 m interval is found to be 19.995 ± 0

  4. The trace-element characteristics of Aegean and Aeolian volcanic arc marine tephra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clift, Peter; Blusztajn, Jerzy

    1999-10-01

    High-silica volcanic ashes are found within deep-sea sediments throughout the Eastern Mediterranean. Although coring by Ocean Drilling Program has penetrated Lower Pliocene (˜4 Ma) sediments, few ashes older than 400 k.y. have been recovered, suggesting a young initiation to subaerial Aegean Arc volcanism. Ashes derived from the Aegean volcanic front were cored south and east of the arc, and are typified by medium-K, calc-alkaline major-element compositions, contrasting with high-K ashes from the Aeolian Arc found in the Ionian Sea and as far east as Crete. Ion microprobe analysis of individual glass shards shows that all the ashes have a light rare earth element (LREE)-enriched pattern after normalizing against a chondrite standard. Aeolian Arc-derived ashes show greater enrichment than those from the Aegean area. Within the latter set, two groups are discernible, a mildly enriched set similar to the volcanoes of the arc volcanic front, and a more enriched group corresponding to lavas from the backarc region or possible from western Anatolia. Multi-element `spider diagrams' also show a bimodal division of enriched and depleted Aegean ashes, possibly caused by source depletion due to melt extraction in the Aegean backarc followed by remelting under the volcanic front. Relative Nb depletion, a characteristic of arc volcanism, is seen to be modest in Aegean and non-existent in Aeolian ashes. Using B/Be as a proxy for the flux of material from the subducting slab, this influence is seen to be low in the Aeolian Arc but higher than at Vesuvius. B/Be is higher again in the Aegean Arc. These differences may reflect the rate of subduction in each system. Data suggest caution is required when correlating ashes solely on the basis of major elements, as alkaline ashes from the central part of the study may be derived from Italy or from the Aegean backarc.

  5. Numerical modelling of tsunami generated by the 1650 eruption of Kolumbo, South Aegean Sea, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvrova, M.; Paris, R.; Kelfoun, K.; Nomikou, P.

    2013-12-01

    Historical 1650 tsunami generated by explosion of Kolumbo volcano was investigated. Using nonlinear shallow water equations implemented in COMCOT tsunami modelling package we simulate for the tsunami generation and propagation, and compute the inundation distances inland along the nearby Santorini island. Two tsunamigenic mechanisms are tested. First, we assume a scenario of phreatomagmatic explosion. Eruption is investigated using a model for shallow underwater explosions. A systematic study is performed for explosion energy range between 1014 and 1017~J. Second, we employed a caldera collapse scenario with duration up to 2~h. The first waves hit the coast of Santorini, the most populated island in the area and also the closest one to Kolumbo ( ˜~7~km), in about 3~min. Calculated inundation distances with predicted nearshore waves amplitudes provide insights into possible tsunami impact and help to assess the tsunami hazard for this region.

  6. An integrated zircon geochronological and geochemical investigation into the Miocene plutonic evolution of the Cyclades, Aegean Sea, Greece: part 2—geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolhar, Robert; Ring, Uwe; Kemp, Anthony I. S.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Weaver, Steve D.; Woodhead, Jon D.; Uysal, I. Tonguc; Turnbull, Rose

    2012-12-01

    Zircons from 14 compositionally variable granitic rocks were examined in detail using CL image-guided micro-analysis to unravel the complex magmatic history above the southward retreating Hellenic subduction zone system in the Aegean Sea. Previously published U-Pb ages document an episodic crystallisation history from 17 to 11 Ma, with peraluminous (S-type) granitic rocks systematically older than closely associated metaluminous (I-type) granitic rocks. Zircon O- and Hf isotopic data, combined with trace element compositions, are highly variable within and between individual samples, indicative of open-system behaviour involving mantle-derived melts and evolved supracrustal sources. Pronounced compositional and thermal fluctuations highlight the role of magma mixing and mingling, in accord with field observations, and incremental emplacement of distinct melt batches coupled with variable degrees of crustal assimilation. In the course of partial fusion, more fertile supracrustal sources dominated in the earlier stages of Aegean Miocene magmatism, consistent with systematically older crystallisation ages of peraluminous granitic rocks. Differences between zircon saturation and crystallisation temperatures (deduced from zircon Ti concentrations), along with multimodal crystallisation age spectra for individual plutons, highlight the complex and highly variable physico-compositional and thermal evolution of silicic magma systems. The transfer of heat and juvenile melts from the mantle varied probably in response to episodic rollback of the subducting lithospheric slab, as suggested by punctuated crystallisation age spectra within and among individual granitic plutons.

  7. Tracing metal pollution sources of plants and soils in Güzelhisar Basin of Aegean Region, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Sezin; Görsch, Carolin; Colak Esetlili, Bihter; Esetlili, Tolga; Tepecik, Mahmut; Kurucu, Yusuf; Anac, Dilek; Düring, Rolf-Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The study area Güzelhisar Basin is 6 km far from the city Aliaga, Aegean Region in the west part of Turkey which represents a rather industrialized area having five large iron and steel mills, but also areas of agriculture. A grid system of 2.5 km to the east and 2.5 km to the west of the Güzelhisar Stream was studied. The area was grouped into three main areas as West, Middle, and East region. Every 500 meters soil samples were taken after the rainfall (April-May) in 2014 from the GPS determined points at 0-30 and 30-60 cm depth. Soil reaction of the study area was determined within the range from 5.87 to 6.61. Even though, the West and the Middle regions had weak carbonate concentrations, the East region was poor in carbonates and relatively high electrical conductivity was measured. Topsoil contamination was examined by all investigated elements with the exception of Cd. An increase in pseudo total metal contents of Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn was observed with the increasing distance from the coast with a simultaneous decrease in pH. Moreover, high plant metal concentrations [mg kg‑¹, ± sd] were detected for B [20.7 ± 23.9], Cu [7.99 ± 5.17], Mn (79.3 ± 89.2), Ni (3.50 ± 3.48), and Zn (25.5 ± 20.1). Transfer of the elements from soil to plants increased in the following order: Co < As < Cr < Pb < Mn < Ni < Cu < Zn < Cd << B.

  8. Tracing metal pollution sources of plants and soils in Güzelhisar Basin of Aegean Region, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Sezin; Görsch, Carolin; Colak Esetlili, Bihter; Esetlili, Tolga; Tepecik, Mahmut; Kurucu, Yusuf; Anac, Dilek; Düring, Rolf-Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The study area Güzelhisar Basin is 6 km far from the city Aliaga, Aegean Region in the west part of Turkey which represents a rather industrialized area having five large iron and steel mills, but also areas of agriculture. A grid system of 2.5 km to the east and 2.5 km to the west of the Güzelhisar Stream was studied. The area was grouped into three main areas as West, Middle, and East region. Every 500 meters soil samples were taken after the rainfall (April-May) in 2014 from the GPS determined points at 0-30 and 30-60 cm depth. Soil reaction of the study area was determined within the range from 5.87 to 6.61. Even though, the West and the Middle regions had weak carbonate concentrations, the East region was poor in carbonates and relatively high electrical conductivity was measured. Topsoil contamination was examined by all investigated elements with the exception of Cd. An increase in pseudo total metal contents of Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn was observed with the increasing distance from the coast with a simultaneous decrease in pH. Moreover, high plant metal concentrations [mg kg-¹, ± sd] were detected for B [20.7 ± 23.9], Cu [7.99 ± 5.17], Mn (79.3 ± 89.2), Ni (3.50 ± 3.48), and Zn (25.5 ± 20.1). Transfer of the elements from soil to plants increased in the following order: Co < As < Cr < Pb < Mn < Ni < Cu < Zn < Cd << B.

  9. Relationships between subduction and extension in the Aegean region: evidence from granite plutons of the Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, K. N.; Catlos, E. J.; Oyman, T.; Demirbilek, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Biga Peninsula is a tectonically complex region in western Turkey characterized by Tethyan sutures overprinted by extensional grabens, active fault strands of the North Anatolian Shear Zone, and numerous granitoid plutons. Two end-member models for the initiation of extension in the Biga region have been proposed, both of which focus on the role of igneous assemblages. The first model involves the emplacement of a hot mantle plume that thins and weakens crust and isostatic doming drives extension. The second has regional tensional stresses as the driving force, and magmatism is a consequence of decompression. Here we focus on understanding the timing and geochemical evolution of three granitoid plutons located in and just south of the Biga Peninsula to understand which end-member model could be applicable to the Aegean region. The Kestanbolu pluton is located north of the proposed Vardar Suture Zone, whereas the Eybek and Kozak plutons are north of the Izmir-Ankara Suture Zone. These sutures may mark regions of the closure of branches of the NeoTethyan Ocean. To better understand their sources and tectonic evolution, we acquired geochemical and geochronological data, and cathodoluminescence (CL) images of the rocks. Previously reported ages of the plutons range from Late Eocene to Middle Miocene. Here we acquired in situ (in thin section) ion microprobe U-Pb ages of zircon grains found in a range of textural relationships. Ages from the Kozak pluton range from 37.8±5.4 Ma to 10.3±2.4 Ma (238U/206Pb, ±1σ) with two ages from a single grain of 287±26 Ma and 257±18 Ma. We also found Oligocene to Late Miocene zircon grains in the Kestanbolu pluton, whereas zircons from the Eybek pluton range from 34.3±4.8 Ma to 21.2±1.7 Ma. Samples collected from the Kozak and Eybek plutons are magnesian, calc-alkalic, and metaluminous, whereas the Kestanbolu rocks are magnesian, alkali-calcic, and metaluminous with one ferroan sample and one peraluminous sample. Trace

  10. Eastern-Mediterranean ventilation variability during sapropel S1 formation, evaluated at two sites influenced by deep-water formation from Adriatic and Aegean Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippidi, A.; Triantaphyllou, M. V.; De Lange, G. J.

    2016-07-01

    Present-day bottom-water ventilation in the Eastern Mediterranean basin occurs through deep-water convection originating from the two marginal basins, i.e. Adriatic and Aegean Seas. In the paleo record, long periods of enhanced deep-water formation have been alternating with shorter periods of reduced deep-water formation. The latter is related mainly to low-latitude humid climate conditions and the enhanced deposition and preservation of organic-rich sediment units (sapropels). This study focuses on sedimentary archives of the most-recent sapropel S1, retrieved from two sites under the direct influence of the two deep-water formation areas. Restricted oxygen conditions have developed rapidly at the beginning of S1 deposition in the Adriatic site, but bottom-water conditions have not persistently remained anoxic during the full interval of sapropel deposition. In fact, the variability in intensity and persistence of sedimentary redox conditions at the two deep-water formation sites is shown to be related to brief episodes of climate cooling. In the Adriatic site, sapropel deposition appears to have been interrupted twice. The 8.2 ka event, only recovered at the Adria site, is characterized by gradually increasing suboxic to possibly intermittently oxic conditions and decreasing Corg fluxes, followed by an abrupt re-establishment of anoxic conditions. Another important event that disrupted sapropel S1 formation, has taken place at ca. 7.4 cal ka BP. The latter event has been recovered at both sites. In the Adriatic site it is followed by a period of sedimentary conditions that gradually change from suboxic to more permanently oxic, as deduced from the Mn/Al pattern. Using the same proxy for suboxic/oxic sedimentary redox conditions, we observe that conditions in the Aegean Sea site shift to more permanently oxic from the 7.4 ka event onwards. However, at both sites the accumulation and preservation of enhanced amounts of organic matter have continued under these

  11. Thermaikos Gulf Coastal System, NW Aegean Sea: an overview of water/sediment fluxes in relation to air land ocean interactions and human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulos, S. E.; Chronis, G. Th; Collins, M. B.; Lykousis, V.

    2000-04-01

    This study presents an overview of the Holocene formation and evolution of the coastal system of Thermaikos Gulf (NW Aegean Sea). The system is divided into the terrestrial sub-system and the oceanic sub-system; the former represents 90%, while the latter includes only 10% of the total area. This particular coastal zone includes the second most important socio-economic area of Greece and in the southern Balkans, the Thessaloniki region; this is in terms of population concentration (>1 million people), industry, agriculture, aquaculture, trade and services. The geomorphology of the coastal zone is controlled by sediment inputs, nearshore water circulation, and the level of wave activity. The large quantities of sediments (with yields >500 tonnes/km 2 per year), delivered annually by the main rivers (Axios, Aliakmon, Pinios, and Gallikos) and other seasonal streams are responsible for the general progradation of the coastline and the formation of the Holocene sedimentary cover over the seabed of the Gulf. Changes to the coastline can be identified on macro- and meso-time scales; the former include the evolution of the deltaic plains (at >1 km 2/year), while the latter incorporates seasonal changes along sections of the coastline (e.g. sandy spits), mostly due to the anthropogenic activities. The overall water circulation pattern in Thermaikos Gulf is characterised by northerly water movement, from the central and eastern part of the Gulf; this is compensated by southerly movement along its western part. The prevailing climate (winds and pressure systems) appears to control the surface water circulation, while near-bed current measurements reveal a general moderate (<15 cm/s) southerly flow, i.e. offshore, towards the deep water Sporades Basin. Waves approaching from southerly directions play also a role in controlling the shoreline configuration. Various human activities within the coastal system place considerable pressure on the natural evolution of the coastal

  12. New constraints on the active tectonic deformation of the Aegean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nyst, M.; Thatcher, W.

    2004-01-01

    Site velocities from six separate Global Positioning System (GPS) networks comprising 374 stations have been referred to a single common Eurasia-fixed reference frame to map the velocity distribution over the entire Aegean. We use the GPS velocity field to identify deforming regions, rigid elements, and potential microplate boundaries, and build upon previous work by others to initially specify rigid elements in central Greece, the South Aegean, Anatolia, and the Sea of Marmara. We apply an iterative approach, tentatively defining microplate boundaries, determining best fit rigid rotations, examining misfit patterns, and revising the boundaries to achieve a better match between model and data. Short-term seismic cycle effects are minor contaminants of the data that we remove when necessary to isolate the long-term kinematics. We find that present day Aegean deformation is due to the relative motions of four microplates and straining in several isolated zones internal to them. The RMS misfit of model to data is about 2-sigma, very good when compared to the typical match between coseismic fault models and GPS data. The simplicity of the microplate description of the deformation and its good fit to the GPS data are surprising and were not anticipated by previous work, which had suggested either many rigid elements or broad deforming zones that comprise much of the Aegean region. The isolated deforming zones are also unexpected and cannot be explained by the kinematics of the microplate motions. Strain rates within internally deforming zones are extensional and range from 30 to 50 nanostrain/year (nstrain/year, 10-9/year), 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than rates observed across the major microplate boundaries. Lower strain rates may exist elsewhere withi the microplates but are only resolved in Anatolia, where extension of 13 ?? 4 nstrain/ year is required by the data. Our results suggest that despite the detailed complexity of active continental deformation

  13. Hydrodynamic features of the South Aegean Sea as derived from Argo T/S and dissolved oxygen profiles in the area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassis, Dimitris; Krasakopoulou, Evangelia; Korres, Gerasimos; Petihakis, George; Triantafyllou, George S.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the hydrodynamic picture of the South Aegean Sea is examined through an analysis of recent measurements in its sub-basins, the Myrtoan and Cretan Sea. Both sub-basins play an important role in the water circulation, exchange, and formation processes that affect the dynamics of the whole Eastern Mediterranean. For the first time, Bio-Argo floats were deployed in the area under the Greek Argo Research Infrastructure coordination. The acquired profiles cover an almost 2-year period (November 2013-July 2015) and are compared with previous Argo profiles and the re-processed time-series data recorded from the E1-M3A POSEIDON observatory operating in the area since 2007. The spatio-temporal distribution of the physical and chemical properties in each sub-basin is examined. Dense water formation events are revealed in the northern part (Myrtoan), while the wider area can be characterized as pre-conditioned. In the Cretan basin, a strong inter-annual variability of the salinity field at intermediate and deep layers is observed that is associated with water exchange from its open boundaries. Furthermore, comparison of the dissolved oxygen (DO) distribution with physical water properties within both the mixed layer, and at greater depths, indicated that relatively high but still under-saturated DO values are more likely to be associated with convection events. Finally, an updated picture of the physical properties and the DO distribution is presented based on the last 5 years of measurements and the recent introduction of Bio-Argo floats with DO sensors in the area.

  14. The first isolation of Cryptococcus neoformans from Eucalyptus trees in South Aegean and Mediterranean Regions of Anatolia in Turkey despite Taurus Mountains alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Ergin, Cağri; Ilkit, Macit; Hilmioğlu, Süleyha; Kaleli, Ilknur; Gülbaba, A Gani; Demirci, Mustafa; Kaya, Selçuk

    2004-07-01

    Eucalyptus trees are widespread in subtropical parts of Turkey that have alkaline environments due to the soil structure of Taurus Mountains. In this study, the existence of Cryptococcus neoformans in eucalyptus trees in the South Aegean and Mediterranean Regions of Anatolia, Turkey, was screened between March 1998 and September 2002. Only one strain of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii (Serotype A) was isolated from 1175 eucalyptus samples including debris and flowers in culture by Guizotia abyssinica agar. The environmental niche of the isolate was Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn in the Gokova Region, in the western part of the Taurus Mountains. In this study, the existence of Cryptococcus neoformans was shown in the eucalyptus flora of Turkey despite the alkaline soil condition. PMID:15487319

  15. Molecular Basis of β-Thalassemia in the Population of the Aegean Region of Turkey: Identification of A Novel Deletion Mutation.

    PubMed

    Ozkinay, Ferda; Onay, Huseyin; Karaca, Emin; Arslan, Esra; Erturk, Biray; Ece Solmaz, Asli; Tekin, Ismihan Merve; Cogulu, Ozgur; Aydinok, Yeşim; Vergin, Canan

    2015-01-01

    β-Thalassemia (β-thal) is the most common monogenic disorder in Turkey. The aim of this study was to investigate the spectrum of β-thal mutations in the Aegean region of Turkey. The data was derived from 1171 unrelated β-thal subjects, detected in a regional reference hospital between November 2004 and December 2013. Screening for the 22 common mutations was performed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-reverse dot-blot method, and direct automated DNA sequencing for the unknown samples. Thirty-one different β-thal alleles were identified. Seven mutations, namely IVS-I-110 (G > A) (41.7%), IVS-I-1 (G > A) (8.9%), IVS-II-745 (C > G) (8.6%), codon 8 (-AA) (7.7%), IVS-II-1 (G > A) (7.2%), IVS-I-6 (T > C) (6.6%), codon 39 (C > T) (4.6%) accounted for 85.3% of the mutated alleles. Frequencies of the remaining 24 β-thal mutations were less than 2.2%; these included one novel mutation [HBB: c.206_212del (p.Leu69Profs*19)], and four others [-56 (G > C), codon 16 (-C), IVS-I (-3) (C > T) (codon 29), codon 76 (-C)] found in Turkey for the first time. The results will help to prevent severe β-thal through genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis (PND) in the Aegean region of Turkey.

  16. Tectono-stratigraphic evolution through successive extensional events of the Anydros Basin, hosting Kolumbo volcanic field at the Aegean Sea, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomikou, P.; Hübscher, C.; Ruhnau, M.; Bejelou, K.

    2016-03-01

    The structural evolution of the South Aegean Sea is little explored due to the lack of marine seismic data. Our present day understanding is mainly based on some island outcrops and GPS measurements. In this study we discuss the rather incremental opening of the Anydros Basin in the Pliocene during six major tectonic pulses and the subsequent basin fill processes by interpreting seismic data and derived time isochore maps. Between the active pulses basin floor tilting persisted on a much lower rate. Seismic data illustrate the depositional processes in the emerging Anydros Basin. The observation of onlap fill strata, divergent reflection pattern, moat channels and contourite drifts imply that deposition was controlled by turbidity and contour currents as well as the tilting basin floor. The metamorphic Attico-Cycladic basement shows a rise that aligns along an NW-SE directed axis crossing Anydros island. This axis marks a structural change of the Santorini-Amorgos Ridge and thus represents a major structural boundary. Dip angles of NE-SW trending major faults, like the Santorini-Amorgos Fault, indicate normal faulting to be the superior mechanism forming the present horst and graben environment. Hence, the area is likely to be in a state of NW-SE directed extensional stresses forming the asymmetric graben structure of Anydros. Secondary fault clusters strike the same direction but show much steeper dip angles, possibly indicating strike-slip movement or resulting from deformational stresses along the hinge zones of the normal faults. The majority of the faults we discovered are located in the area of earthquake clusters, which is another indication of recent faulting. Ring faults around Kolumbo submarine volcano, result from caldera collapse and mark the diameter of the magma chamber approximately to 20 km.

  17. Geomorphological characteristics of the onshore/offshore volcanic edifices with respect to their evolutionary stage in the South Aegean Sea, Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, S.; Nomikou, P.; Papanikolaou, D.; Alexandri, M.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanism in the South Aegean Sea first occurred about 3-4 million years ago, along four different volcanic island groups, including both onshore and recently discovered offshore volcanoes: 1) Starting from the west, the Methana group consists of the Methana stratovolcano, composed exclusively of volcaniclastics and lavas, creating cones and domes onland and the Paphsanias submarine cone in the Epidavros tectonic graben, bordered by E-W normal faults. It has a 2 km basal diameter at 400 m depth and its top rises to 150 m. 2) The Milos-Antimilos group consists of volcanic domes and calderas onland and three submarine domes to the east of Antimilos. A hydrothermal vent field is limited in the SE coastal zone of Milos, 3) The Santorini group consists of: (i) the older volcanic cones of Christianna islets and three submarine domes east of them, (ii) Santorini volcano which during the last 500 ka experienced repeated caldera collapses following Plinian eruptions and edifice rebuilding, represented by the growth of the Kamenes islands after the last catastrophic Late Bronze age eruption. (iii) a chain of about twenty submarine volcanic domes and craters in the Kolumbo zone northeast of Santorini. Kolumbo volcano is a 3 km diameter cone with a 1500 m wide crater, a crater rim as shallow as 18 m depth and a flat crater floor at 505 m depth containing an active hydrothermal vent field degassing 99% of CO2. 4) The Kos-Nisyros group at the eastern edge of the Hellenic Volcanic arc, comprises several domes and craters offshore and Nisyros volcano consists exclusively of alternating lava and pyroclastic deposits following several phases of reconstruction and caldera collapse. The rhyodacitic domes of Profitis Ilias are the latest evolutionary stage of Nisyros volcano which disrupted a pre-existed caldera and may be regarded as an earlier reconstruction phase similar to the Kameni islands at Santorini. The volcanic relief reaches 1100-1200 m in most cases. This is produced from

  18. High-Temperature Hydrothermal Vent Field of Kolumbo Submarine Volcano, Aegean Sea: Site of Active Kuroko-Type Mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurdsson, H.; Carey, S.; Alexandri, M.; Vougioukalakis, G.; Croff, K.; Roman, C.; Sakellariou, D.; Anagnostou, C.; Rousakis, G.; Ioakim, C.; Gogou, A.; Ballas, D.; Misaridis, T.; Nomikou, P.

    2006-12-01

    Kolumbo submarine volcano is located 7 km north-east of the island of Santorini in the Hellenic arc (Greece), and comprises one of about twenty submarine cones in a NE-trending rift zone. Kolumbo erupted explosively in 1649-50AD, causing 70 fatalities on Santorini. Kolumbo's crater is 1700 m in diameter, with a crater rim at 10 m below sea level and crater floor at depth of 505 m. Recent marine geological investigations, using ROVs, reveal a very active high-temperature hydrothermal vent field in the northeastern part of the Kolumbo crater floor, about 25,000 m2. Vent chimneys up to 4 m high are vigorously emitting colorless gas plumes up to 10 m high in the water column. Temperatures up to 220oC are recorded in vent fluids. Some vents are in crater- like depressions, containing debris from collapsed extinct chimneys. The entire crater floor of Kolumbo is mantled by a reddish-orange bacterial mat, and bacterial filaments of a variety of colors cling to chimneys in dense clusters. Glassy tunicates and anemones are common in lower-temperature environments on the crater floor. Most chimneys show a high porosity, with a central conduit surrounded by an open and very permeable framework of sulfides and sulfates, aiding fluid flow through the chimney walls. In the sulfate-rich samples, blades of euhedral barite and anhydrite crystals coat the outside of the chimney wall, and layers of barite alternate with sulfide in the interior. The dominant sulfides are pyrite, sphalerite, wurtzite, marcasite and galena. Crusts on extinct and lower-temperature chimneys are composed of amorphous silica, goethite and halite. Sulfur isotope composition of sulfates is virtually at sea water values, whereas the sulfides are more depleted. Elevated levels of copper, gold and silver are observed in bulk composition of chimney samples. Both the structural setting, character of the vent field and sulfide/sulfate mineralogy and geochemistry indicate on-going Kuroko-type mineralization in the

  19. New boron isotopic evidence for sedimentary and magmatic fluid influence in the shallow hydrothermal vent system of Milos Island (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shein-Fu; You, Chen-Feng; Lin, Yen-Po; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Baltatzis, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Magmatic sources may contribute a significant amount of volatiles in geothermal springs; however, their role is poorly understood in submarine hydrothermal systems worldwide. In this study, new results of B and δ11B in 41 hydrothermal vent waters collected from the shallow hydrothermal system of Milos island in the Aegean Sea were combined with previously published data from other tectonic settings and laboratory experiments to quantify the effects of phase separation, fluid/sediment interaction and magmatic contribution. Two Cl-extreme solutions were identified, high-Cl waters (Cl as high as 2000 mM) and low-Cl waters (Cl < 80 mM). Both sets of waters were characterized by high B/Cl (~ 1.2-5.3 × 10- 3 mol/mol) and extremely low δ11B (1.4-6.3‰), except for the waters with Mg content of near the seawater value and δ11B = 10.3-17.4‰. These high-Cl waters with high B/Cl and low δ11B plot close to the vent waters in sediment-hosted hydrothermal system (i.e., Okinawa Trough) or fumarole condensates from on-land volcanoes, implying B addition from sediment or magmatic fluids plays an important role. This is in agreement with fluid/sediment interactions resulting in the observed B and δ11B, as well as previously reported Br/I/Cl ratios, supporting a scenario of slab-derived fluid addition with elevated B, 11B-rich, and low Br/Cl and I/Cl, which is derived from the dehydration of subducted-sediments. The slab fluid becomes subsequently mixed with the parent magma of Milos. The deep brine reservoir is partially affected by injections of magmatic fluid/gases during degassing. The results presented here are crucial for deciphering the evolution of the brine reservoirs involved in phase separation, fluid/sediment interaction and magmatic contribution in the deep reaction zone of the Milos hydrothermal system; they also have implications in the understanding of the formation of metallic vein mineralization.

  20. Chemical speciation and ecological risk assessment of arsenic in marine sediments from Izmir Bay (Eastern Aegean Sea).

    PubMed

    Gonul, L T

    2015-12-01

    Total arsenic, arsenic(III) and (V), Fe, and Mn were measured in 17 surface sediment samples from Izmir Bay. The concentrations and ecological risk of As were characterized in the sediment affected by urban and agricultural activities. Total As ranged from 8.87 to 28.3 μg g(-1) dry weight (96.5-99.9 % as inorganic As). Distribution of total As and total As/Fe followed a different trend in sediments at all sampling sites. Arsenite (As(III)) was the most dominant form followed by As(V), while organic arsenic represented a minor constituent (0.03 to 3.49 %). The highest concentration of total As was observed at Gediz River estuary and exceeded lower threshold value (threshold effects level (TEL)). Due to the biological reduction of As(V) and abundance of Fe (oxyhydr)oxides in the sediments, most inorganic As in the Izmir Bay was present as As(III). Besides, the levels of As were >TEL and region.

  1. Tracing organic and inorganic pollution sources of agricultural crops and water resources in Güzelhisar Basin of the Aegean Region - Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Sezin; Colak Esetlili, Bihter; Esetlili, Tolga; Tepecik, Mahmut; Anac, Dilek; Düring, Rolf-Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The study area Güzelhisar Basin is 6 km far from the city Aliaga, Aegean Region in Turkey which represents a rather industrialized area having five large iron and steel factories, but also areas of agriculture. Steel industry in Aliaga is causing metal pollution. Around Güzelhisar Basin and nearby, the dominant crop fields are cotton, maize, vegetables, olive trees and vineyards. Güzelhisar stream and dam water is used for irrigation of the agricultural land. Due to contamination from metal industry in Aliaga, organic farming is not allowed in this region. Industrial activities in the region present a threat on sustainable agriculture. The region is a multi-impacted area in terms of several pollutant sources affecting soil and water quality. The overall objective of the project is to trace back plant nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, and B), hazardous substances (i. e. persistent organic pollutants), radionuclides (40K, 232Th, 226Ra/238U), and metal contents (As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) by examining the soils, agricultural crops and natural plants from Güzelhisar Basin and water and sediments from Güzelhisar stream and dam. Spatial distribution of pollution will be evaluated by regionalization methods. For this, an advanced analytical methodology will be applied which provides an understanding of sources and occurrence of the respective substances of concern. An innovative multi-tracer approach comprising organic and inorganic marker substances, will identify and quantitatively assess sources and their impact on water pollution and the pollutant pathways in this agricultural crop production system.

  2. Petroleum exploration and geology of the Aegean

    SciTech Connect

    Bartling, T.C.; Gips, J.

    1988-08-01

    The present-day Aegean Sea covers several graben and/or half-graben basins filled with more than 12,000 ft of sedimentary rocks. The normal faulting observed on seismic record sections indicates a tensional tectonic regime. There is a marked coincidence of modern basins and bathymetric highs with paleobasins and highs. A stratigraphic section of marine clastics of Eocene through Miocene-Pliocene age have been encountered in the seven wildcat wells drilled. Cretaceous-age rocks must be considered basement for petroleum exploration because, except for an area in the eastern Aegean, Cretaceous and older rocks were metamorphosed during the Alpine orogenies. The Eocene is a transgressive clastic sequence. The Oligocene is conformable with the underlying Eocene. The Miocene is predominantly a regressive clastic sequence. This series ended with evaporitic conditions. The Messinian evaporite is an excellent seismic marker and is the seal for the one producing field in the Aegean Sea. Source rocks and reservoir rocks are found in both the Eocene and the Miocene. Four of the seven wildcats drilled have encountered hydrocarbon shows. Prinos field, discovered in 1974, was put on production in 1981 and is currently producing at design capacity of 25,000 to 28,000 bbl of oil per day. Cumulative production is approximately 50 million bbl. Prinos field is only 7 mi from metamorphic basement outcrop, yet field wells have penetrated more than 10,000 ft of Tertiary marine clastics.

  3. Causes for contemporary regional sea level changes.

    PubMed

    Stammer, Detlef; Cazenave, Anny; Ponte, Rui M; Tamisiea, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    Regional sea level changes can deviate substantially from those of the global mean, can vary on a broad range of timescales, and in some regions can even lead to a reversal of long-term global mean sea level trends. The underlying causes are associated with dynamic variations in the ocean circulation as part of climate modes of variability and with an isostatic adjustment of Earth's crust to past and ongoing changes in polar ice masses and continental water storage. Relative to the coastline, sea level is also affected by processes such as earthquakes and anthropogenically induced subsidence. Present-day regional sea level changes appear to be caused primarily by natural climate variability. However, the imprint of anthropogenic effects on regional sea level-whether due to changes in the atmospheric forcing or to mass variations in the system-will grow with time as climate change progresses, and toward the end of the twenty-first century, regional sea level patterns will be a superposition of climate variability modes and natural and anthropogenically induced static sea level patterns. Attribution and predictions of ongoing and future sea level changes require an expanded and sustained climate observing system.

  4. Climate variability and socio-environmental changes in the northern Aegean (NE Mediterranean) during the last 1500 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogou, Alexandra; Triantaphyllou, Maria; Xoplaki, Elena; Izdebski, Adam; Parinos, Constantine; Dimiza, Margarita; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Luterbacher, Juerg; Kouli, Katerina; Martrat, Belen; Toreti, Andrea; Fleitmann, Dominik; Rousakis, Gregory; Kaberi, Helen; Athanasiou, Maria; Lykousis, Vasilios

    2016-04-01

    We provide new evidence on sea surface temperature (SST) variations and paleoceanographic/paleoenvironmental changes over the past 1500 years for the north Aegean Sea (NE Mediterranean). The reconstructions are based on multiproxy analyses, obtained from the high resolution (decadal to multi-decadal) marine record M2 retrieved from the Athos basin. Reconstructed SSTs show an increase from ca. 850 to 950 AD and from ca. 1100 to 1300 AD. A cooling phase of almost 1.5 °C is observed from ca. 1600 AD to 1700 AD. This seems to have been the starting point of a continuous SST warming trend until the end of the reconstructed period, interrupted by two prominent cooling events at 1832 ± 15 AD and 1995 ± 2 AD. Application of an adaptive Kernel smoothing suggests that the current warming in the reconstructed SSTs of the north Aegean might be unprecedented in the context of the past 1500 years. Internal variability in atmospheric/oceanic circulations systems as well as external forcing as solar radiation and volcanic activity could have affected temperature variations in the north Aegean Sea over the past 1500 years. The marked temperature drop of approximately ~2°C at 1832 ± 15 yr AD could be related to the 1809 ΑD 'unknown' and the 1815 AD Tambora volcanic eruptions. Paleoenvironmental proxy-indices of the M2 record show enhanced riverine/continental inputs in the northern Aegean after ca. 1450 AD. The palaeoclimatic evidence derived from M2 record is combined with a socio-environmental study of the history of the north Aegean region. We show that the cultivation of temperature-sensitive crops, i.e. walnut, vine and olive, co-occurred with stable and warmer temperatures, while its end coincided with a significant episode of cooler temperatures. Periods of agricultural growth in Macedonia coincide with periods of warmer and more stable SSTs, but further exploration is required in order to identify the causal links behind the observed phenomena. The Black Death likely

  5. Climate variability and socio-environmental changes in the northern Aegean (NE Mediterranean) during the last 1500 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogou, Alexandra; Triantaphyllou, Maria; Xoplaki, Elena; Izdebski, Adam; Parinos, Constantine; Dimiza, Margarita; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Luterbacher, Juerg; Kouli, Katerina; Martrat, Belen; Toreti, Andrea; Fleitmann, Dominik; Rousakis, Gregory; Kaberi, Helen; Athanasiou, Maria; Lykousis, Vasilios

    2016-03-01

    We provide new evidence on sea surface temperature (SST) variations and paleoceanographic/paleoenvironmental changes over the past 1500 years for the north Aegean Sea (NE Mediterranean). The reconstructions are based on multiproxy analyses, obtained from the high resolution (decadal to multi-decadal) marine record M2 retrieved from the Athos basin. Reconstructed SSTs show an increase from ca. 850 to 950 AD and from ca. 1100 to 1300 AD. A cooling phase of almost 1.5 °C is observed from ca. 1600 AD to 1700 AD. This seems to have been the starting point of a continuous SST warming trend until the end of the reconstructed period, interrupted by two prominent cooling events at 1832 ± 15 AD and 1995 ± 1 AD. Application of an adaptive Kernel smoothing suggests that the current warming in the reconstructed SSTs of the north Aegean might be unprecedented in the context of the past 1500 years. Internal variability in atmospheric/oceanic circulations systems as well as external forcing as solar radiation and volcanic activity could have affected temperature variations in the north Aegean Sea over the past 1500 years. The marked temperature drop of approximately ∼2 °C at 1832 ± 15 yr AD could be related to the 1809 ΑD 'unknown' and the 1815 AD Tambora volcanic eruptions. Paleoenvironmental proxy-indices of the M2 record show enhanced riverine/continental inputs in the northern Aegean after ca. 1450 AD. The paleoclimatic evidence derived from the M2 record is combined with a socio-environmental study of the history of the north Aegean region. We show that the cultivation of temperature-sensitive crops, i.e. walnut, vine and olive, co-occurred with stable and warmer temperatures, while its end coincided with a significant episode of cooler temperatures. Periods of agricultural growth in Macedonia coincide with periods of warmer and more stable SSTs, but further exploration is required in order to identify the causal links behind the observed phenomena. The Black Death

  6. Inferences of Integrated Lithospheric Strength from Plate-Scale Analyses of Deformation Observed in the Aegean-Anatolian Region and the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houseman, Gregory

    2016-04-01

    In the context of a comprehensive review of the rheology and strength of the lithosphere (Marine and Petroleum Geology, 2011, doi:10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2011.05.008), Evgene Burov described the difficulty of extrapolating rock deformation laws derived from laboratory experiments to the time and length scales that apply when the Earth's lithosphere is deformed. Not only does the extrapolation introduce a large uncertainty, but even the relative importance of different possible mechanisms of deformation may be uncertain. Even though lithospheric deformation has a strong conceptual and theoretical basis, it is therefore essential, as Burov argued, that deformation laws for the lithosphere must be calibrated by using observations of deformation that occurs on a lithospheric length scale and at geological strain rates. The influence of regionally varying factors like crustal thickness, geothermal gradient and tectonic environment may induce large variations in how rapidly the lithosphere may deform in response to an applied load, not least in the contrast from continent to ocean. Plates may be deformed by different loading mechanisms but, when deformation is distributed over a broad region, the strain-rate field may be approximately constant with depth and we may integrate the in-plane stress components across the thickness of the lithosphere to derive a depth-averaged constitutive law for the deformation. This approximation is the basis for the thin viscous sheet formulation of lithospheric deformation and, in combination with appropriate observations, it allows us to calibrate the integrated resistance to processes like regional extension or convergence. In this talk I will summarise what we learn about effective lithospheric rheology from two recent studies of the distribution and rates of diffuse deformation of the lithosphere in, firstly the Anatolian-Aegean region, and secondly the Central Indian Ocean. In the first case the distribution of deformation is consistent

  7. Kolumbo active seamount (Greece): A window into the Aegean mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, A. L.; Caracausi, A.; Chavagnac, V.; Nomikou, P.; Polymenakou, P.; Magoulas, A.; Mandalakis, M.; Kotoulas, G.

    2015-12-01

    Submarine volcanism is ubiquitous in active tectonic settings of the earth, but due to depth and hazardousness of these environments the study is a challenge. In May 2014, we performed a cruise in the Aegean Sea aimed to investigate the high-temperature (>200°C) hydrothermal system of Kolumbo active underwater volcano, 7 km northeast off Santorini. Last explosive eruption occurred in 1650 A.D. and killed ~70 people, so plainly the eruptive potential is real. We sampled gases discharged from seven chimneys located at ~500 m b.s.l. and we investigated their composition. The chemistry indicates that these consist of almost pure CO2 with a small atmospheric contamination. The δ13C-CO2 varies from 0 to 1.5‰ and shows a positive correlation with the concentration of He, H2, CO and CH4 as the result of chemical and isotope fractionation due to variable extents of gas-water interaction. The 3He/4He varies from 7.0 to 7.1 Ra, coherently with the fact that this ratio does not suffer any fractionation due to gas-water interaction. These values are surprisingly higher (more than 3 units Ra) than the measurements performed in gases and rocks from Santorini (Rizzo et al., 2015). They are in the typical range of arc volcanoes worldwide (7-9 Ra; Hilton et al., 2002; Di Piazza et al., 2015), indicating that the 3He/4He ratios measured at Kolumbo are likely the result of direct mantle degassing in a general extensive regime. More importantly, these ratios are the highest in all the South Aegean volcanism, which leads to consider homogeneous (and MORB-like) the He isotope composition of the mantle below the central part of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc and eastward up to Nisyros, which until this study showed the highest ratios (6.2Ra; Shimizu et al., 2005). Our results strongly emphasize the role of tectonics in the transfer of fluids from the mantle toward the surface. The complicated geodynamics status of the Aegean-Anatolian region, plays a key role in generating crustal

  8. Regional sea level change in the Thailand-Indonesia region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenoglio-Marc, L.; Becker, M. H.; Buchhaupt, C.

    2013-12-01

    It is expected that the regional sea level rise will strongly affect particular regions with direct impacts including submergence of coastal zones, rising water tables and salt intrusion into groundwaters. It can possibly also exacerbate other factors as floodings, associated to storms and hurricanes, as well as ground subsidence of anthropogenic nature. The Thailand-Vietnam-Indonesian region is one of those zones. On land, the Chao-Praya and Mekong Delta are fertile alluvial zones. The potential for sea level increases and extreme floodings due to global warming makes the Deltas a place where local, regional, and global environmental changes are converging. We investigate the relative roles of regional and global mechanisms resulting in multidecadal variations and inflections in the rate of sea level change. Altimetry and GRACE data are used to investigate the variation of land floodings. The land surface water extent is evaluated at 25 km sampling intervals over fifteen years (1993-2007) using a multisatellite methodology which captures the extent of episodic and seasonal inundations, wetlands, rivers, lakes, and irrigated agriculture, using passive and active (microwaves and visible observations. The regional sea level change is analysed during the period 1993-2012 using satellite altimetry, wind and ocean model data, tide gauge data and GPS. The rates of absolute eustatic sea level rise derived from satellite altimetry through 19-year long precise altimeter observations are in average higher than the global mean rate. Several tide gauge records indicate an even higher sea level rise relative to land. We show that the sea level change is closely linked to the ENSO mode of variability and strongly affected by changes in wind forcing and ocean circulation. We have determined the vertical crustal motion at a given tide gauge location by differencing the tide gauge sea level time-series with an equivalent time-series derived from satellite altimetry and by computing

  9. Assessing different turbulence close schemes in the North Aegean: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamoutos, Ioannis; Zervakis, Vassilis; Tragou, Elina

    2015-04-01

    The North Aegean Sea potentially constitutes one of the deep-water formation sites of the Mediterranean Sea. The production of deep water however is highly controlled by the inflow of Black Sea waters forming a thin insulating surface layer over a large part of the region. For this reason, extensive replenishment of the deeper-than-400 m basins takes place infrequently, at intervals several years long. After the recorded major deep water formation events of 1987, 1992 and 1993, several smaller magnitude formation events have been observed in the 2000s. Long stagnation periods separate successive formation events, during which turbulent exchange through the interface between the deep, secluded locally-formed water mass and the overlaid, laterally flowing water masses is the major factor determining the evolution of the deep-layer properties. In this work we test different diapycnal mixing schemes via comparing the results of long-term hindcasts of the evolution of the deep-layer properties to successive observations in three deep basins of the North Aegean. The Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS) was used for the hindcasts. All the available turbulence closure schemes - KPP, GLS and Mellor - Yamada 2.5 - were used for the experiments. A rectangular grid covering the Aegean sea was developed (longitudinal range: 22.50 E - 28.37 E, latitudinal range: 36.43 N - 41.12 N) with a 1/40 degree ( ~ 2.5 km ) resolution in both directions and 30 vertical sigma layers. The initial and boundary conditions used refer to the 1985 - 2013 period, and have been provided by GNOO. Atmospheric forcing fields from ERA - interim data set were used with spatial resolution 0.5 × 0.5 degrees and three-hour time step. The Black-sea water inflow is temporally variable and has been provided by Vladimir Maderich based on Black and Marmara Sea budgets and hydraulic control at Bosphorus and Dardanelles Straits. The preliminary results of the numerical experiments are hereby presented and discussed

  10. Upper Limit for Regional Sea Level Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jevrejeva, Svetlana; Jackson, Luke; Riva, Riccardo; Grinsted, Aslak; Moore, John

    2016-04-01

    With more than 150 million people living within 1 m of high tide future sea level rise is one of the most damaging aspects of warming climate. The latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report (AR5 IPCC) noted that a 0.5 m rise in mean sea level will result in a dramatic increase the frequency of high water extremes - by an order of magnitude, or more in some regions. Thus the flood threat to the rapidly growing urban populations and associated infrastructure in coastal areas are major concerns for society. Hence, impact assessment, risk management, adaptation strategy and long-term decision making in coastal areas depend on projections of mean sea level and crucially its low probability, high impact, upper range. With probabilistic approach we produce regional sea level projections taking into account large uncertainties associated with Greenland and Antarctica ice sheets contribution. We calculate the upper limit (as 95%) for regional sea level projections by 2100 with RCP8.5 scenario, suggesting that for the most coastlines upper limit will exceed the global upper limit of 1.8 m.

  11. Wild fire effects on floristic diversity in three thermo-Mediterranean vegetation types in a small islet of eastern Aegean sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Eleni; Kyriazopoulos, Apostolos; Korakis, George; Parissi, Zoi; Chouvardas, Dimitrios

    2014-05-01

    Sclerophyllus scrub formations, the main vegetation type in many islands of the Aegean area, are characterized by their high biodiversity. Dominant shrub species of sclerophyllus formations are well adapted to dry season conditions by various anatomical and physiological mechanisms. As a result, their biomass acts as very flammable fine fuel, and consequently wild fires are very common in these ecosystems. Wildfire effects on vegetation and biodiversity in the Mediterranean basin have been studied and the results are diverse depending mainly on vegetation type and frequency of fire. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of wildfire on floristic diversity and species composition in three thermo-Mediterranean vegetation types 1) Sacropoterium spinosum phrygana, 2) low formations of Cistus creticus and 3) low formations of Cistus creticus in abandoned terraces. The research was conducted in Enoussa islet, which is located northeastern of Chios Island, in May 2013 (one year after the fire). Vegetation sampling was performed along five transects placed in recently burned and in adjacent unburned sites of each vegetation type. The plant cover and the floristic composition were measured, while diversity, evenness and dominance indices were determined for the vegetation data. Vegetation cover and the floristic diversity were significant lower and higher respectively in burned areas in comparison to the unburned. The woody species followed by the annual grasses and the annual forbs dominated in both burned and unburned areas. However, the woody species were significantly decreased in the burned areas in all vegetation types, while the annual grasses only in the burned areas of Sacropoterium spinosum phrygana and Cistus creticus in abandoned terraces. Inversely, the annual forbs significantly increased in the burned sites of Cistus creticus formations. The highest value of Morisita-Horn Index of similarity between burned and unburned sites (beta diversity) was

  12. An integrated multi-parameter monitoring approach for the quantification and mitigation of the climate change impact on the coasts of Eastern Crete, S. Aegean Sea (Project AKTAIA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghionis, George; Alexandrakis, George; Karditsa, Aikaterini; Sifnioti, Dafni; Vousdoukas, Michalis; Andreadis, Olympos; Petrakis, Stelios; Poulos, Serafim; Velegrakis, Adonis; Kampanis, Nikolaos; Lipakis, Michalis

    2014-05-01

    associated sediment transport and beach morphodynamics, calibrated with in situ data, is used to predict beach response and vulnerability to different climate change scenarios. Finally, the socio-economic impact of the climate change on the coastal zone will be assessed and a management protocol for the coastal zone and for the mitigation of the climate change impact will be developed. The ultimate scope of the project is to benefit the society by providing current and high quality information on the consequences of the climate change, especially those related to sea-level rise, and on the available protection and mitigation measures. In addition, the technological product will help in the proper planning of the required actions and technical interventions, reducing the need for costly, incomplete and frequently redundant localized studies and the risk of unsuccessful interventions. Acknowledgements The project is supported by the Action "Cooperation 2007-2013" (09SYN-31-711 "AKTAIA") of the Operational Program "Competitiveness and Entrepreneurship" co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the General Secretariat for Research and Technology (Hellenic Ministry of Education).

  13. Neogene crustal extension in Aegean, revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Stiros, S.C. )

    1988-08-01

    The Neogene evolution of the Aegean and adjacent areas has been described as the result of homogeneous, subduction-associated lithosphere stretching by a factor near two, interrupted or not by short regional compressional intervals. However, reconsideration of some of the existing data (structural, volcanological, heat flow) and new or unpublished information from Greece, southern Bulgaria, and Yugoslavia concerning different scales, structural (tectonics of lignite and other basins), morpholtectonic (describing bulges, differential coastal movements, rotations of blocks around vertical axes, etc.), some seismic lines offshore, and aeromagnetic data suggest the following. (1) The patterns of Neogene volcanism, heat flow, and vertical motions are inconsistent with the idea of homogeneous stretching. (2) There is no evidence of features that should have accommodated the postulated level of regional extension. (3) The evolution of most Neogene basins, compressional features, and bulges in normal faulting environments most likely does not reflect cycles of regional extension-compression but of transtension-transpression associated with Mesozoic and still active shear zones and deeper processes. These data suggest that for the Aegean the uniform extension model is unsatisfactory in both large and local scale; small amounts of probably secondary extension are likely; and processes other than subduction must be anticipated.

  14. Caribbean Sea Region Pyrrhocoroidea (Hemiptera: Pyrrhocoridae, Largidae).

    PubMed

    Schaefer, C W; Stehlík, J L

    2013-08-01

    A synopsis of the Pyrrhocoridae and Largidae (Pyrrhocoroidea) of the Caribbean Sea Region is given. Three new taxa are described: Dysdercus jamaicensis jindrai Stehlík n. subsp. (Dominican Republic); Largus fumosus fumosus Stehlík n. sp. (Panama-Barro Colorado Island); and Largus fumosus nigromembranaceus Stehlík n. subsp. (Panama). Largus pallidus Halstead is downgraded to a subspecies of Largus davisi Barber, i.e., L. davisi pallidus Halstead n. stat. The following new records are provided: Dysdercus (Dysdercus) andreae (Linnaeus) from Cayman Islands; Acinocoris elegans van Doesburg from Trinidad; Fibrenus pehlkei Schmidt and Largus maculatus Schmidt from Panama; and Largus obovatus (Barber) from Haiti. Altogether, we report 20 species and 3 subspecies of Pyrrhocoridae and 13 species and 2 subspecies of Largidae from the Caribbean Sea Region.

  15. SeaWinds - Oceans, Land, Polar Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The SeaWinds scatterometer on the QuikScat satellite makes global radar measurements -- day and night, in clear sky and through clouds. The radar data over the oceans provide scientists and weather forecasters with information on surface wind speed and direction. Scientists also use the radar measurements directly to learn about changes in vegetation and ice extent over land and polar regions.

    This false-color image is based entirely on SeaWinds measurements obtained over oceans, land, and polar regions. Over the ocean, colors indicate wind speed with orange as the fastest wind speeds and blue as the slowest. White streamlines indicate the wind direction. The ocean winds in this image were measured by SeaWinds on September 20, 1999. The large storm in the Atlantic off the coast of Florida is Hurricane Gert. Tropical storm Harvey is evident as a high wind region in the Gulf of Mexico, while farther west in the Pacific is tropical storm Hilary. An extensive storm is also present in the South Atlantic Ocean near Antarctica.

    The land image was made from four days of SeaWinds data with the aid of a resolution enhancement algorithm developed by Dr. David Long at Brigham Young University. The lightest green areas correspond to the highest radar backscatter. Note the bright Amazon and Congo rainforests compared to the dark Sahara desert. The Amazon River is visible as a dark line running horizontally though the bright South American rain forest. Cities appear as bright spots on the images, especially in the U.S. and Europe.

    The image of Greenland and the north polar ice cap was generated from data acquired by SeaWinds on a single day. In the polar region portion of the image, white corresponds to the largest radar return, while purple is the lowest. The variations in color in Greenland and the polar ice cap reveal information about the ice and snow conditions present.

    NASA's Earth Science Enterprise is a long-term research and technology program designed to

  16. Migration waves to the Baltic Sea region.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, T; Laitinen, V; Salmela, E; Andersen, P; Huoponen, K; Savontaus, M-L; Lahermo, P

    2008-05-01

    In this study, the population history of the Baltic Sea region, known to be affected by a variety of migrations and genetic barriers, was analyzed using both mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomal data. Over 1200 samples from Finland, Sweden, Karelia, Estonia, Setoland, Latvia and Lithuania were genotyped for 18 Y-chromosomal biallelic polymorphisms and 9 STRs, in addition to analyzing 17 coding region polymorphisms and the HVS1 region from the mtDNA. It was shown that the populations surrounding the Baltic Sea are genetically similar, which suggests that it has been an important route not only for cultural transmission but also for population migration. However, many of the migrations affecting the area from Central Europe, the Volga-Ural region and from Slavic populations have had a quantitatively different impact on the populations, and, furthermore, the effects of genetic drift have increased the differences between populations especially in the north. The possible explanations for the high frequencies of several haplogroups with an origin in the Iberian refugia (H1, U5b, I1a) are also discussed. PMID:18294359

  17. Changes in Nitrogen to Phosphorus ratio in the Inner Saronikos Gulf (West Aegean Sea) in relation to the operation of the Sewage Treatment Plant of Athens, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psyllidou-Giouranovits, Rosa

    2013-04-01

    In this work we provide an overview of nitrogen (N) to phosphorus (P) ratio in the inner Saronikos gulf as it has changed over the last twenty five (25) years in relation to the sewage discharges from the Sewage Treatment Plant of Athens in Psittalia Island. Saronikos gulf receives effluents from Athens Metropolitan area (population over 5 million). Until 1994, domestic and industrial sewage of Athens was discharged untreated into the surface water layer of Keratsini and Elefsis bay, whereas, after 1994, the sewage of the Athens Metropolitan area were primarily treated in Psitallia Sewage Treatment Plant and discharged in the inner Saronikos Gulf. Additionally, the secondary stage of the Psittalia Sewage Plant operated in the end of 2004 affecting the nitrogen to phosphorus (DIN:P) ratio (DIN stands for nitrate+nitrite+ammonium). The treated effluent plume frorm Psittalia Sewage Treatment Plant is trapped within the seasonal pycnocline developed during May-November, whereas, during the mixing period (December-April) it reaches the sea-surface. During the last 25 years, significant temporal variation of nutrient concentrations has been observed which has revealed an increase of the DIN:P ratio near the Psittalia Sewage Treatment Plant. In the vicinity of the sewage outfall in Psittalia, DIN:P ratio in the deep layer (30m-bottom) did not show significant variation between the two periods: before and after the operation of the Sewage Treatment Plant (12.9 before the operation of the sewage treatment and 13.3 after the operation of the sewage treatment) showing that inorganic nitrogen and phosphate changed almost with the same rate. However, the limiting factor for phytoplankton growth remains nitrogen. On the contrary, significant increase of DIN:P ratio was observed in the surface layer between the two periods, during summer (stratified period). DIN:P increased from 5.9 for the period 1987-1995 (before the Sewage Treatment Plant operation) to 19.6 for the period 1995

  18. Variscan orogeny in the Black Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okay, Aral I.; Topuz, Gültekin

    2016-09-01

    Two Gondwana-derived Paleozoic belts rim the Archean/Paleoproterozoic nucleus of the East European Platform in the Black Sea region. In the north is a belt of Paleozoic passive-margin-type sedimentary rocks, which extends from Moesia to the Istanbul Zone and to parts of the Scythian Platform (the MOIS Block). This belt constituted the south-facing continental margin of the Laurussia during the Late Paleozoic. This margin was deformed during the Carboniferous by folding and thrusting and forms the Variscan foreland. In the south is a belt of metamorphic and granitic rocks, which extends from the Balkanides through Strandja, Sakarya to the Caucasus (BASSAC Block). The protoliths of the metamorphic rocks are predominantly late Neoproterozoic granites and Paleozoic sedimentary and igneous rocks, which were deformed and metamorphosed during the Early Carboniferous. There are also minor eclogites and serpentinites, mostly confined to the northern margin of the BASSAC Block. Typical metamorphism is of low pressure-high temperature type and occurred during the Early Carboniferous (Visean, 340-330 Ma) coevally with that observed in the Central Europe. Volumetrically, more than half of the crystalline belt is made up of Carboniferous-earliest Permian (335-294 Ma) granites. The type of metamorphism, its concurrent nature over 1800 km length of the BASSAC Block and voluminous acidic magmatism suggest that the thermal event probably occurred in the deep levels of a continental magmatic arc. The BASSAC arc collided with Laurussia in the mid-Carboniferous leading to the foreland deformation. The ensuing uplift in the Permian resulted in the deposition of continental red beds, which are associated with acidic magmatic rocks observed over the foreland as well as over the BASSAC Block. In the Black Sea region, there was no terminal collision of Laurussia with Gondwana during the Late Paleozoic and the Laurussia margin continued to face the Paleo-Tethyan ocean in the south.

  19. Development of a cost-effective method for nitrate and nitrite determination in leafy plants and nitrate and nitrite contents of some green leafy vegetables grown in the Aegean region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozdestan, Ozgül; Uren, Ali

    2010-05-12

    An accurate, fast, easily applicable, and cost-effective method for the determination of nitrate and nitrite was developed. This method was much more reliable than the cadmium column reduction method, which is a tedious and time-consuming procedure and not easily applicable. The principle of the method was reduction of nitrate to nitrite with cadmium acetate solution and zinc powder and then treatment with Griess reagent. Recovery of the method changed from 92.9 to 102.8%, and detection limit was found as 31.4 mg/kg. Coefficient of variation was 3.16% for intraday precision. Nitrate and nitrite contents of 10 types of leafy vegetables native to the Aegean region of Turkey were determined. Wild radish, chicory, fennel, blessed thistle, blue mallow, and chard were analyzed for the first time. Nitrate contents were found between 354.8 mg/kg for iceberg lettuce and 4653 mg/kg for wild radish. Tested vegetables contained <26.33 mg/kg nitrite. PMID:20384339

  20. Geodynamic Evolution of the Banda Sea Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaymakci, N.; Decker, J.; Orange, D.; Teas, P.; Van Heiningen, P.

    2013-12-01

    We've carried out a large on- and offshore study in Eastern Indonesia to characterize the major structures and to provide constraints on the Neogene geodynamic evolution of the Banda Sea region. The onshore portion utilized remote sensing data and published geology. We tied the onshore to the offshore using recently acquired high resolution bathymetric data (16m and 25m bin size) and 2D seismic profiles that extend from Sulawesi in the west to Irian Jaya in the east across the northern part of the Banda Arc. We interpret the northern boundary of the 'Birds Head' (BH) of Papua, the Sorong Fault, to be a sinistral strike-slip fault zone with a minimum of 48 km displacement over the last few million years. The western boundary fault of Cendrawasih Basin defines the eastern boundary of BH and corresponds to the Wandamen Peninsula which comprises high pressure metamorphic rocks, including eclogite and granulite facies rocks, with exhumation ages from 4 to 1 Ma. Earthquake focal mechanism solutions indicate that the eastern boundary of BH is linked with a large scale offshore normal fault which we suggest may be related to the exhumation of the Wandamen Peninsula. The eastern boundary of Cendrawasih Basin is defined by a large transpressive belt along which BH is decoupled from the rest of Papua / Irian Jaya. This interpretation is supported by recent GPS studies. We propose that the BH and the Pacific plate are coupled, and therefore the Birds Head is therefore completely detached from Irian Jaya. Furthermore, Aru Basin, located at the NE corner of Banda Arc, is a Fault-Fault-Transform (FFT) type triple junction. According to available literature information the Banda Sea includes three distinct basins with different geologic histories; the North Banda Sea Basin (NBSB) was opened during 12-7 Ma, Wetar-Damar Basin (WDB) during 7-3.5 Ma and Weber Basin (WB) 3-0 Ma. Our bathymetric and seismic data indicated that the NBSB and Weber Basin lack normal oceanic crust and are

  1. South Aegean Geodynamic And Tsunami Monitoring Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradissis, Demitris; Drakatos, George; Marinou, Aggeliki; Anastasiou, Demitris; Alatza, Stauroula; Zacharis, Vangelis; Papanikolaou, Xanthos; Melis, Nicolaos; Kalogeras, Ioannis; Chouliaras, Gerasimos; Evangelidis, Christos; Makropoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-04-01

    The Aegean Sea is one of the most tectonically and seismically active areas in the world, thus constituting a Natural Laboratory. For the first time, a permanent multiparametric platform of networks that combine different (both terrestrial and space oriented) techniques, is established, in order to monitor the tectonic and volcanic activity in the area and produce an on-line database available both to the scientific community and the public. This platform includes continuous GNSS networks, tide-gauge sensors, accelerometers and seismographs. All the available existing infrastructure has been upgraded, enlarged and modernized resulting in a collaborative operation. New instrumentation has been installed in carefully selected sites. All the available data are analysed using state of the art processing software. Raw data and products will be available through a project dedicated portal. The multiparametric data and results gathered will be integrated and combined with the existing archive owned by the participating institutes to produce a thoroughgoing view of the underlying geophysical processes. The island of Santorini will serve as a focused study case for the project, due to the special tectono-volcanic interest and because of the already existing dense multiparametric network. Our goal is to provide permanent infrastructure and knowledge both to enlighten ambiguous scientific hypothesis and serve as a focal point for further scientific research.

  2. Climate Impacts on Sea Turtle Breeding Phenology in Greece and Associated Foraging Habitats in the Wider Mediterranean Region.

    PubMed

    Patel, Samir H; Morreale, Stephen J; Saba, Vincent S; Panagopoulou, Aliki; Margaritoulis, Dimitris; Spotila, James R

    2016-01-01

    Sea turtles are vulnerable to climate change impacts in both their terrestrial (nesting beach) and oceanic habitats. From 1982 to 2012, air and sea surface temperatures at major high use foraging and nesting regions (n = 5) of loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) nesting in Greece have steadily increased. Here, we update the established relationships between sea surface temperature and nesting data from Zakynthos (latitude: 37.7°N), a major nesting beach, while also expanding these analyses to include precipitation and air temperature and additional nesting data from two other key beaches in Greece: Kyparissia Bay (latitude: 37.3°N) and Rethymno, Crete (latitude: 35.4°N). We confirmed that nesting phenology at Zakynthos has continued to be impacted by breeding season temperature; however, temperature has no consistent relationship with nest numbers, which are declining on Zakynthos and Crete but increasing at Kyparissia. Then using statistically downscaled outputs of 14 climate models assessed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), we projected future shifts in nesting for these populations. Based on the climate models, we projected that temperature at the key foraging and breeding sites (Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea, Crete, Gulf of Gabès and Zakynthos/Kyparissia Bay; overall latitudinal range: 33.0°-45.8°N) for loggerhead turtles nesting in Greece will rise by 3-5°C by 2100. Our calculations indicate that the projected rise in air and ocean temperature at Zakynthos could cause the nesting season in this major rookery to shift to an earlier date by as much as 50-74 days by 2100. Although an earlier onset of the nesting season may provide minor relief for nest success as temperatures rise, the overall climatic changes to the various important habitats will most likely have an overall negative impact on this population.

  3. Climate Impacts on Sea Turtle Breeding Phenology in Greece and Associated Foraging Habitats in the Wider Mediterranean Region.

    PubMed

    Patel, Samir H; Morreale, Stephen J; Saba, Vincent S; Panagopoulou, Aliki; Margaritoulis, Dimitris; Spotila, James R

    2016-01-01

    Sea turtles are vulnerable to climate change impacts in both their terrestrial (nesting beach) and oceanic habitats. From 1982 to 2012, air and sea surface temperatures at major high use foraging and nesting regions (n = 5) of loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) nesting in Greece have steadily increased. Here, we update the established relationships between sea surface temperature and nesting data from Zakynthos (latitude: 37.7°N), a major nesting beach, while also expanding these analyses to include precipitation and air temperature and additional nesting data from two other key beaches in Greece: Kyparissia Bay (latitude: 37.3°N) and Rethymno, Crete (latitude: 35.4°N). We confirmed that nesting phenology at Zakynthos has continued to be impacted by breeding season temperature; however, temperature has no consistent relationship with nest numbers, which are declining on Zakynthos and Crete but increasing at Kyparissia. Then using statistically downscaled outputs of 14 climate models assessed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), we projected future shifts in nesting for these populations. Based on the climate models, we projected that temperature at the key foraging and breeding sites (Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea, Crete, Gulf of Gabès and Zakynthos/Kyparissia Bay; overall latitudinal range: 33.0°-45.8°N) for loggerhead turtles nesting in Greece will rise by 3-5°C by 2100. Our calculations indicate that the projected rise in air and ocean temperature at Zakynthos could cause the nesting season in this major rookery to shift to an earlier date by as much as 50-74 days by 2100. Although an earlier onset of the nesting season may provide minor relief for nest success as temperatures rise, the overall climatic changes to the various important habitats will most likely have an overall negative impact on this population. PMID:27332550

  4. Climate Impacts on Sea Turtle Breeding Phenology in Greece and Associated Foraging Habitats in the Wider Mediterranean Region

    PubMed Central

    Morreale, Stephen J.; Saba, Vincent S.; Panagopoulou, Aliki; Margaritoulis, Dimitris; Spotila, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Sea turtles are vulnerable to climate change impacts in both their terrestrial (nesting beach) and oceanic habitats. From 1982 to 2012, air and sea surface temperatures at major high use foraging and nesting regions (n = 5) of loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) nesting in Greece have steadily increased. Here, we update the established relationships between sea surface temperature and nesting data from Zakynthos (latitude: 37.7°N), a major nesting beach, while also expanding these analyses to include precipitation and air temperature and additional nesting data from two other key beaches in Greece: Kyparissia Bay (latitude: 37.3°N) and Rethymno, Crete (latitude: 35.4°N). We confirmed that nesting phenology at Zakynthos has continued to be impacted by breeding season temperature; however, temperature has no consistent relationship with nest numbers, which are declining on Zakynthos and Crete but increasing at Kyparissia. Then using statistically downscaled outputs of 14 climate models assessed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), we projected future shifts in nesting for these populations. Based on the climate models, we projected that temperature at the key foraging and breeding sites (Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea, Crete, Gulf of Gabès and Zakynthos/Kyparissia Bay; overall latitudinal range: 33.0°—45.8°N) for loggerhead turtles nesting in Greece will rise by 3–5°C by 2100. Our calculations indicate that the projected rise in air and ocean temperature at Zakynthos could cause the nesting season in this major rookery to shift to an earlier date by as much as 50–74 days by 2100. Although an earlier onset of the nesting season may provide minor relief for nest success as temperatures rise, the overall climatic changes to the various important habitats will most likely have an overall negative impact on this population. PMID:27332550

  5. On how climate variability influences regional sea level change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunnabend, Sandra-Esther; Kusche, Jürgen; Rietbroek, Roelof; Forootan, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    Regional trends in sea level change are strongly influenced by climate variations, such as ENSO (El-Nino Southern Oscillation), the IOD (Indian Ocean Dipole), or the PDO (Pacific Decadal Oscillation). Hence, before computing long term regional sea level change, these sea level variations need to be taken into account as they lead to strong dependencies of computed regional sea level trends on the time period of the investigation. In this study, sea level change during the years 1993 to 2013 is analysed to identify the dominant modes of sea level change caused by climate variations. Here, two different gridded altimetry products are analysed, namely ESA's combined CCI SeaLevel v1.1 ECV product (doi: 10.5270/esa-sea_level_cci-1993_2013-v_1.1-201412), and absolute dynamic topography produced by Ssalto/Duacs and distributed by Aviso, with support from Cnes (http://www.aviso.altimetry.fr/duacs/). Reconstructions using the different decomposition techniques including the standard principle component analysis (PCA), rotated empirical orthogonal functions (REOF) and independent component analysis (ICA) method are analysed. They are compared with sea level change modelled with the global finite-element sea-ice ocean model (FESOM). The results indicate that from the applied methods, ICA is most suitable to separate the individual climate variability signals in independent modes of sea level change. This especially holds for extracting the ENSO contribution in sea level changes, which was better separated by applying ICA, from both altimetry and modelled sea level products. In addition, it is presented how modelled sea level change reflects climate variations compared to that identified in the altimetry products.

  6. Contemplating autoimmunity in the Aegean islands.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lucy S K; Ziegler, Steven; Becher, Burkhard

    2016-03-01

    The Greek island of Crete became host to lively discussions on immunoregulation as experts from around the world gathered for the 7th Aegean Conference on Autoimmunity in September 2015. PMID:26882250

  7. Baltic Earth - Earth System Science for the Baltic Sea Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Markus; Rutgersson, Anna; Lehmann, Andreas; Reckermann, Marcus

    2014-05-01

    The Baltic Sea region, defined as its river catchment basin, spans different climate and population zones, from a temperate, highly populated, industrialized south with intensive agriculture to a boreal, rural north. It encompasses most of the Scandinavian Peninsula in the west; most of Finland and parts of Russia, Belarus, and the Baltic states in the east; and Poland and small parts of Germany and Denmark in the south. The region represents an old cultural landscape, and the Baltic Sea itself is among the most studied sea areas of the world. Baltic Earth is the new Earth system research network for the Baltic Sea region. It is the successor to BALTEX, which was terminated in June 2013 after 20 years and two successful phases. Baltic Earth stands for the vision to achieve an improved Earth system understanding of the Baltic Sea region. This means that the research disciplines of BALTEX continue to be relevant, i.e. atmospheric and climate sciences, hydrology, oceanography and biogeochemistry, but a more holistic view of the Earth system encompassing processes in the atmosphere, on land and in the sea as well as in the anthroposphere shall gain in importance in Baltic Earth. Specific grand research challenges have been formulated, representing interdisciplinary research questions to be tackled in the coming years. A major means will be scientific assessments of particular research topics by expert groups, similar to the BACC approach, which shall help to identify knowledge gaps and develop research strategies. Preliminary grand challenges and topics for which Working Groups have been installed include: • Salinity dynamics in the Baltic Sea • Land-Sea biogeochemical feedbacks in the Baltic Sea region • Natural hazards and extreme events in the Baltic Sea region • Understanding sea level dynamics in the Baltic Sea • Understanding regional variability of water and energy exchange • Utility of Regional Climate Models • Assessment of Scenario Simulations

  8. The partition of regional sea level variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, Gaël; Ponte, Rui M.

    2015-09-01

    The existing altimetric record offers an unprecedented view of sea level (ζ) variability on a global scale for more than 2 decades. Optimal inference from the data involves appropriate partition of signal and noise, in terms of relevant scales, physical processes and forcing mechanisms. Such partition is achieved here through fitting a general circulation model to altimeter and other datasets to produce a "best" estimate of ζ variability directly forced by the atmosphere-the signal of primary interest here. In this context noise comes primarily from instrument errors and meso-scale eddies, as expected, but spatial smoothing effectively reduces this noise. A separate constraint is thus formulated to measure the fit to monthly, large-scale altimetric variability that unlike the daily, pointwise constraint shows a high signal-to-noise ratio. The estimate is explored to gain insight into dynamics, forcing, and other factors controlling ζ variability. Contributions from thermo-steric, halo-steric and bottom pressure terms are all important depending on region, but slopes of steric spectra (red) and bottom pressure spectra (white) are nearly invariant with latitude. Much ζ variability can be represented by a seasonal cycle and linear trend, plus a few EOFs that can be associated with known modes of climate variability and/or with topographic controls. Both wind and buoyancy forcing are important. The response is primarily basin-bound in nature, but uneven patterns of propagation across basin boundaries are clearly present, with the Pacific being able to affect large portions of the Indian and Atlantic basins, but the Atlantic affecting mostly the Arctic.

  9. Can regional climate engineering save the summer Arctic sea ice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmes, S.; Jahn, Alexandra; Kay, Jennifer E.; Holland, Marika; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

    2014-02-01

    Rapid declines in summer Arctic sea ice extent are projected under high-forcing future climate scenarios. Regional Arctic climate engineering has been suggested as an emergency strategy to save the sea ice. Model simulations of idealized regional dimming experiments compared to a business-as-usual greenhouse gas emission simulation demonstrate the importance of both local and remote feedback mechanisms to the surface energy budget in high latitudes. With increasing artificial reduction in incoming shortwave radiation, the positive surface albedo feedback from Arctic sea ice loss is reduced. However, changes in Arctic clouds and the strongly increasing northward heat transport both counteract the direct dimming effects. A 4 times stronger local reduction in solar radiation compared to a global experiment is required to preserve summer Arctic sea ice area. Even with regional Arctic dimming, a reduction in the strength of the oceanic meridional overturning circulation and a shut down of Labrador Sea deep convection are possible.

  10. Geodetic observation of sea-level change and crustal deformation in the Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, A.; Groh, A.; Dietrich, R.

    Based on tide gauge observations spanning almost 200 years, homogeneous time series of the mean relative sea level were derived for nine sites at the southern coast of the Baltic Sea. Our regionally concentrated data were complemented by long-term relative sea-level records retrieved from the data base of the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL). From these records relative sea-level change rates were derived at 51 tide gauge stations for the period between 1908 and 2007. A minimum observation time of 60 years is required for the determination of reliable sea-level rates. At present, no anthropogenic acceleration in sea-level rise is detected in the tide gauge observations in the southern Baltic. The spatial variation of the relative sea-level rates reflects the fingerprint of GIA-induced crustal uplift. Time series of extreme sea levels were also inferred from the tide gauge records. They were complemented by water level information from historic storm surge marks preserved along the German Baltic coast. Based on this combined dataset the incidence and spatial variation of extreme sea levels induced by storm surges were analysed yielding important information for hazard assessments. Permanent GPS observations were used to determine recent crustal deformation rates for 44 stations in the Baltic Sea region. The GPS derived height change rates were applied to reduce the relative sea-level changes observed by tide gauges yielding an estimate for the eustatic sea-level change. For 13 tide gauge-GPS colocation sites a mean eustatic sea-level trend of 1.3 mm/a was derived for the last 100 years.

  11. What Can Sea Ice Reconstructions Tell Us About Recent Regional Trends in Sea Ice Around Antarctica?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abram, N.; Mulvaney, R.; Murphy, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite observations of recent sea ice changes around Antarctica reveal regionally heterogeneous trends, but with an overall increasing trend in Antarctic-wide sea ice extent. Proposed mechanisms to account for increasing sea ice extent around Antarctica include freshening of the ocean surface due to melting of land ice and northward wind drift associated with strengthening of the Southern Ocean westerly winds. In this study we use extended, regional reconstructions of Antarctic sea ice changes from ice core chemistry and reanalysis of the South Orkney fast ice series to examine long-term relationships between Antarctic regional sea ice changes and surface winds. The formation and breakout of fast ice at the South Orkney islands (Murphy et al., 2014) indicates that westerly wind strength is an important factor in determining spring sea ice retreat in the Weddell Sea region. In contrast, autumn sea ice formation is more strongly influenced by long-lived ocean temperature anomalies and sea ice migration from the previous year, highlighting the multiple influences that act at different times of the year to determine the overall extent of winter sea ice. To assess the hypothesized role of westerly wind changes in driving opposing patterns of recent sea ice change between the Ross Sea and Bellingshausen Sea, we also present a comparison of ice core MSA evidence for sea ice changes derived from the James Ross Island (Mulvaney et al., 2012) and Erebus Saddle (Rhodes et al., 2012) ice cores, and view this in the context of trends in the Southern Annular Mode (Abram et al., 2014) over the last 200 years. References: Abram et al., 2014. Evolution of the Southern Annular Mode over the past millennium. Nature Climate Change. doi: 10.1038/nclimate2235 Mulvaney et al., 2012. Recent Antarctic Peninsula warming relative to Holocene temperature and ice-shelf history. Nature. doi: 10.1038/nature11391 Murphy et al., 2014. Variability of sea ice in the northern Weddell Sea during

  12. Relating Regional Arctic Sea Ice and climate extremes over Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita-Scholz, Monica; Grosfeld, Klaus; Lohmann, Gerrit; Scholz, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The potential increase of temperature extremes under climate change is a major threat to society, as temperature extremes have a deep impact on environment, hydrology, agriculture, society and economy. Hence, the analysis of the mechanisms underlying their occurrence, including their relationships with the large-scale atmospheric circulation and sea ice concentration, is of major importance. At the same time, the decline in Arctic sea ice cover during the last 30 years has been widely documented and it is clear that this change is having profound impacts at regional as well as planetary scale. As such, this study aims to investigate the relation between the autumn regional sea ice concentration variability and cold winters in Europe, as identified by the numbers of cold nights (TN10p), cold days (TX10p), ice days (ID) and consecutive frost days (CFD). We analyze the relationship between Arctic sea ice variation in autumn (September-October-November) averaged over eight different Arctic regions (Barents/Kara Seas, Beaufort Sea, Chukchi/Bering Seas, Central Arctic, Greenland Sea, Labrador Sea/Baffin Bay, Laptev/East Siberian Seas and Northern Hemisphere) and variations in atmospheric circulation and climate extreme indices in the following winter season over Europe using composite map analysis. Based on the composite map analysis it is shown that the response of the winter extreme temperatures over Europe is highly correlated/connected to changes in Arctic sea ice variability. However, this signal is not symmetrical for the case of high and low sea ice years. Moreover, the response of temperatures extreme over Europe to sea ice variability over the different Arctic regions differs substantially. The regions which have the strongest impact on the extreme winter temperature over Europe are: Barents/Kara Seas, Beaufort Sea, Central Arctic and the Northern Hemisphere. For the years of high sea ice concentration in the Barents/Kara Seas there is a reduction in the number

  13. Regional Long-Term Sea Level and Sea Surface Temperature Characteristics from Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, O. B.; Knudsen, P.; Beckley, B.

    2006-07-01

    For a the large portion of the world's population liv ing in coastal zones forecasts of long- term sea lev el change is importan t for a var iety of environmen tal and socio- economic r easons. Satellite altimetry offers a unique opportunity for improving our knowledge about glob al and r egional sea level change on bo th global and reg ional scale. Joint TOPEX/PO SEIDON(T/P) +JASON-1 sea level observations and Reyno lds AVH RR sea surface temperature observ ations over th e most recen t 12 years hav e qualitativ ely been used to study regional correlations between long-term changes in sea level and sea surface temper ature. Long-term is here tak en to be lin ear signals in the 12-year time per iod Consistent in creases in both sea level and sea surface temp eratures ar e found in large parts of the world's oceans over this per iod. In the Indian Ocean and particularly th e Pacif ic Ocean , the trends in both sea level and temper ature are domin ated by the larg e changes associated w ith th e El N iño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) . Co mparison with similar trend estimates u sing only 8 years of satellite data shows the incr eased decoupling with ENSO and th e imp act of inter-annual variability on sea lev el tr end estimates.

  14. Atmospheric forcing of sea ice anomalies in the Ross Sea Polynya region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, Ethan; McDonald, Adrian; Rack, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Despite warming trends in global temperatures, sea ice extent in the southern hemisphere has shown an increasing trend over recent decades. Wind-driven sea ice export from coastal polynyas is an important source of sea ice production. Areas of major polynyas in the Ross Sea, the region with largest increase in sea ice extent, have been suggested to produce the vast amount of the sea ice in the region. We investigate the impacts of strong wind events on polynyas and the subsequent sea ice production. We utilize Bootstrap sea ice concentration (SIC) measurements derived from satellite based, Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) brightness temperature images. These are compared with surface wind measurements made by automatic weather stations of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Antarctic Meteorology Program. Our analysis focusses on the winter period defined as 1st April to 1st November in this study. Wind data was used to classify each day into characteristic regimes based on the change of wind speed. For each regime, a composite of SIC anomaly was formed for the Ross Sea region. We found that persistent weak winds near the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf are generally associated with positive SIC anomalies in the Ross Sea polynya area (RSP). Conversely we found negative SIC anomalies in this area during persistent strong winds. By analyzing sea ice motion vectors derived from SSM/I brightness temperatures, we find significant sea ice motion anomalies throughout the Ross Sea during strong wind events. These anomalies persist for several days after the strong wing event. Strong, negative correlations are found between SIC within the RSP and wind speed indicating that strong winds cause significant advection of sea ice in the RSP. This rapid decrease in SIC is followed by a more gradual recovery in SIC. This increase occurs on a time scale greater than the average persistence of strong wind events and the resulting Sea ice motion anomalies, highlighting the production

  15. Cenozoic geodynamics of the Bering Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekhovich, V. D.; Sukhov, A. N.; Sheremet, O. G.; Kononov, M. V.

    2012-05-01

    In the Early Cenozoic before origination of the Aleutian subduction zone 50-47 Ma ago, the northwestern (Asian) and northeastern (North American) parts of the continental framework of the Pacific Ocean were active continental margins. In the northwestern part, the island-arc situation, which arose in the Coniacian, remained with retention of the normal lateral series: continent-marginal sea-island arc-ocean. In the northeastern part, consumption of the oceanic crust beneath the southern margin of the continental Bering shelf also continued from the Late Cretaceous with the formation of the suprasubduction volcanic belt. The northwestern and northeastern parts of the Paleopacific were probably separated by a continuation of the Kula-Pacific Transform Fracture Zone. Change of the movement of the Pacific oceanic plates from the NNW to NW in the middle Eocene (50-47 Ma ago) was a cause of the origin of the Aleutian subduction zone and related Aleutian island arc. In the captured part of the Paleopacific (proto-Bering Sea), the ongoing displacement of North America relative to Eurasia in the middle-late Eocene gave rise to the formation of internal structural elements of the marginal sea: the imbricate nappe structure of the Shirshov Ridge and the island arc of the Bowers Ridge. The Late Cenozoic evolution was controlled by subduction beneath the Kamchatka margin and its convergence with the Kronotsky Terrane in the south. A similar convergence of the Koryak margin with the Goven Terrane occurred in the north. The Komandorsky minor oceanic basin opened in the back zone of this terrane. Paleotectonic reconstructions for 68-60, 56-52, 50-38, 30-15, and 15-6 Ma are presented.

  16. Chronology for the Aegean Late Bronze Age 1700-1400 B.C.

    PubMed

    Manning, Sturt W; Ramsey, Christopher Bronk; Kutschera, Walter; Higham, Thomas; Kromer, Bernd; Steier, Peter; Wild, Eva M

    2006-04-28

    Radiocarbon (carbon-14) data from the Aegean Bronze Age 1700-1400 B.C. show that the Santorini (Thera) eruption must have occurred in the late 17th century B.C. By using carbon-14 dates from the surrounding region, cultural phases, and Bayesian statistical analysis, we established a chronology for the initial Aegean Late Bronze Age cultural phases (Late Minoan IA, IB, and II). This chronology contrasts with conventional archaeological dates and cultural synthesis: stretching out the Late Minoan IA, IB, and II phases by approximately 100 years and requiring reassessment of standard interpretations of associations between the Egyptian and Near Eastern historical dates and phases and those in the Aegean and Cyprus in the mid-second millennium B.C. PMID:16645092

  17. The economic determinants of Greek return migration to the islands of the East Aegean.

    PubMed

    Robolis, S; Xideas, E

    1996-01-01

    "The purpose of this article is to investigate the economic determinants of Greek return migration to the islands of the East Aegean, a region comprising hundreds of islands of different size in four administrative departments....[It] examines the sensitivity of return migration flows to changes in economic variables which influence decisions to return....The purpose...is to investigate the effect on return migration not only of economic development in the host country (push factors) but also of economic development in the islands of the East Aegean (pull factors), given their isolation from the mainland and their different economic structures." (SUMMARY IN SPA AND FRE)

  18. Plate boundaries and evolution of the Solomon Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honza, E.; Davies, H. L.; Keene, J. B.; Tiffin, D. L.

    1987-09-01

    The Solomon Sea Plate was widely developed during late Oligocene, separating the proto-West Melanesian Arc from the proto-Trobriand Arc. Spreading in the Bismarck Sea and in the Woodlark Basin resulted from interaction between the Pacific and Australian Plates, specifically from the collision of the proto-West Melanesian Arc with north New Guinea, which occurred after arc reversal. This model explains the extensive Miocene, Pliocene, and Quaternary volcanism of the Papua New Guinea mainland as it related to southward subduction of the Trobriand Trough. Our interpreted plate motions are concordant with the geological evidence onshore and also with complex tectonic features in the Solomon Sea Basin Region.

  19. Regional dependence in the rapid loss of Arctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Sally; Houssais, Marie-Noëlle; Herbaut, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    The accelerating rate of sea ice decline in the Arctic, particularly in the summer months, has been well documented by previous studies. However, the methods of analysis used to date have tended to employ pre-defined regions over which to determine sea ice loss, potentially masking regional variability within these regions. Similarly, evidence of acceleration has frequently been based on decade-to-decade comparisons that do not precisely quantify the timing of the increase in rate of decline. In this study, we address this issue by quantifying the onset time of rapid loss in sea ice concentration on a point-by-point basis, using an objective method applied to satellite passive microwave data. Seasonal maps of onset time are produced, and reveal strong regional dependency, with differences of up to 20 years in onset time between the various subregions of the Arctic. In certain cases, such as the Laptev Sea, strong spatial variability is found even at the regional scale, suggesting that caution should be employed in the use of geographically-based region definitions that may be misaligned with the physical response. The earliest onset times are found in the Pacific sector, where certain areas undergo a transition ca. 1992. In contrast, onset times in the Atlantic sector are much more recent. Rates of decline prior to and following the onset of rapid decline are calculated, and suggest that the post-onset rate of loss is weakest in the Pacific sector and greatest in the Barents Sea region. Coherency is noted in the season-to-season response, both at interannual and longer time scales. Our results describe a series of spatially self-consistent regional responses, and may be useful in understanding the primary drivers of recent sea ice loss.

  20. Plant speciation in continental island floras as exemplified by Nigella in the Aegean Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Comes, Hans Peter; Tribsch, Andreas; Bittkau, Christiane

    2008-09-27

    Continental shelf island systems, created by rising sea levels, provide a premier setting for studying the effects of geographical isolation on non-adaptive radiation and allopatric speciation brought about by genetic drift. The Aegean Archipelago forms a highly fragmented complex of mostly continental shelf islands that have become disconnected from each other and the mainland in relatively recent geological times (ca <5.2 Ma). These ecologically fairly homogenous islands thus provide a suitable biogeographic context for assessing the relative influences of past range fragmentation, colonization, gene flow and drift on taxon diversification. Indeed, recent molecular biogeographic studies on the Aegean Nigella arvensis complex, combining phylogenetic, phylogeographic and population level approaches, exemplify the importance of allopatry and genetic drift coupled with restricted gene flow in driving plant speciation in this continental archipelago at different temporal and spatial scales. While the recent (Late Pleistocene) radiation of Aegean Nigella, as well as possible instances of incipient speciation (in the Cyclades), is shown to be strongly conditioned by (palaeo)geographic factors (including changes in sea level), shifts in breeding system (selfing) and associated isolating mechanisms have also contributed to this radiation. By contrast, founder event speciation has probably played only a minor role, perhaps reflecting a migratory situation typical for continental archipelagos characterized by niche pre-emption because of a long established resident flora. Overall, surveys of neutral molecular markers in Aegean Nigella have so far revealed population genetic processes that conform remarkably well to predictions raised by genetic drift theory. The challenge is now to gain more direct insights into the relative importance of the role of genetic drift, as opposed to natural selection, in the phenotypic and reproductive divergence among these Aegean plant

  1. Physical processes mediating climate change impacts on regional sea ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J.; Schrum, C.; Cannaby, H.; Daewel, U.; Allen, I.; Artioli, Y.; Bopp, L.; Butenschon, M.; Fach, B. A.; Harle, J.; Pushpadas, D.; Salihoglu, B.; Wakelin, S.

    2014-02-01

    Regional seas are exceptionally vulnerable to climate change, yet are the most directly societally important regions of the marine environment. The combination of widely varying conditions of mixing, forcing, geography (coastline and bathymetry) and exposure to the open-ocean makes these seas subject to a wide range of physical processes that mediates how large scale climate change impacts on these seas' ecosystems. In this paper we explore these physical processes and their biophysical interactions, and the effects of atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial change on them. Our aim is to elucidate the controlling dynamical processes and how these vary between and within regional seas. We focus on primary production and consider the potential climatic impacts: on long term changes in elemental budgets, on seasonal and mesoscale processes that control phytoplankton's exposure to light and nutrients, and briefly on direct temperature response. We draw examples from the MEECE FP7 project and five regional models systems using ECOSMO, POLCOMS-ERSEM and BIMS_ECO. These cover the Barents Sea, Black Sea, Baltic Sea, North Sea, Celtic Seas, and a region of the Northeast Atlantic, using a common global ocean-atmosphere model as forcing. We consider a common analysis approach, and a more detailed analysis of the POLCOMS-ERSEM model. Comparing projections for the end of the 21st century with mean present day conditions, these simulations generally show an increase in seasonal and permanent stratification (where present). However, the first order (low- and mid-latitude) effect in the open ocean projections of increased permanent stratification leading to reduced nutrient levels, and so to reduced primary production, is largely absent, except in the NE Atlantic. Instead, results show a highly heterogeneous picture of positive and negative change arising from the varying mixing and circulation conditions. Even in the two highly stratified, deep water seas (Black and Baltic Seas) the

  2. Monitoring the Dead Sea Region by Multi-Parameter Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsen, A.; Weber, M. H.; Kottmeier, C.; Asch, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Dead Sea Region is an exceptional ecosystem whose seismic activity has influenced all facets of the development, from ground water availability to human evolution. Israelis, Palestinians and Jordanians living in the Dead Sea region are exposed to severe earthquake hazard. Repeatedly large earthquakes (e.g. 1927, magnitude 6.0; (Ambraseys, 2009)) shook the whole Dead Sea region proving that earthquake hazard knows no borders and damaging seismic events can strike anytime. Combined with the high vulnerability of cities in the region and with the enormous concentration of historical values this natural hazard results in an extreme earthquake risk. Thus, an integration of earthquake parameters at all scales (size and time) and their combination with data of infrastructure are needed with the specific aim of providing a state-of-the-art seismic hazard assessment for the Dead Sea region as well as a first quantitative estimate of vulnerability and risk. A strong motivation for our research is the lack of reliable multi-parameter ground-based geophysical information on earthquakes in the Dead Sea region. The proposed set up of a number of observatories with on-line data access will enable to derive the present-day seismicity and deformation pattern in the Dead Sea region. The first multi-parameter stations were installed in Jordan, Israel and Palestine for long-time monitoring. All partners will jointly use these locations. All stations will have an open data policy, with the Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ, Potsdam, Germany) providing the hard and software for real-time data transmission via satellite to Germany, where all partners can access the data via standard data protocols.

  3. BALTEX - A science broker for the Baltic Sea Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckermann, M.; von Storch, H.; Langner, J.; Omstedt, A. T.

    2010-12-01

    BALTEX (the Baltic Sea Experiment) is an interdisciplinary research network of scientists involved in environmental research dedicated to the Baltic Sea drainage basin (including disciplines such as meteorology, hydrology, oceanography, biogeochemistry and climate research). Originally founded in 1992 as a Continental Scale Experiment in GEWEX (the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment within the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) of the World Meteorological Organization, WMO), it was intended to form a common science, communication and data platform with the overall goal to integrate efforts to gain a better understanding of the water and energy cycle in the Baltic Sea basin. BALTEX Phase II (since 2003) has extended the scope to research on regional climate change and variability, climate change impacts on biogeochemistry and water management, but also made first steps towards overarching social and political issues as cross-cutting activities in the context of the scientific objectives. An important aspect of BALTEX Phase II is a more holistic approach towards observing, understanding and modelling major environmental relevant for the entire Baltic Sea region. Parts of the BALTEX Phase II research activities thus contribute to the establishment of a high resolution integrated modelling system for Northern Europe, embedded in an Earth System Model. An outstanding product of BALTEX as a “knowledge broker” for regional political institutions is the BACC report. Following to a large extent the method of IPCC, a regional assessment report on climate change in the Baltic Sea basin was compiled, which summarizes the published scientifically legitimate knowledge on regional climate change in the Baltic Sea basin and its impacts. The assessment, known as the BACC report (BALTEX Assessment of Climate Change for the Baltic Sea Basin; BACC author team 2008, Reckermann et al., 2008) was published in 2008 as a book. A survey among climate researchers in the area

  4. Lifelong Learning and Vocational Training Programmes in Northern Aegean (Greece): Weaknesses, Possibilities and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giavrimis, Panagiotis; Papanis, Efstratios; Mitrellou, Sotiria; Nikolarea, Ekaterini

    2009-01-01

    This study presents, discusses and assesses the findings of a research into lifelong learning through Vocational Training Centres (VTCs) in the region of Northern Aegean, Greece. In the first part, the paper introduces its readers to the theoretical framework of lifelong education, whereas in the second part it makes a brief historical overview of…

  5. Forecasting skill assessment of an oil spill simulation system in the NE Aegean and atmospheric forcing perturbation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailas, Marios; Chrysagi, Eyrydice; Sofianos, Sarantis

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the predictive skill of an oil spill simulation system implemented in the Northern Aegean Sea was evaluated using field observations from surface drifters, provided in the framework of the TOSCA project. The system produces satisfactory results as in most cases the forecasting error is quite small, allowing the operational use of the forecast. In order to examine the sensitivity of the forecast to atmospheric forcing, additional simulations with perturbed atmospheric conditions were performed, using a time-shifting technique. In most experiments the differences between the simulations are relatively small, most likely due to slow oceanic response to variations in the wind fields. From the individual simulations an ensemble forecast was created, the results of which were also compared with the observations. The results suggest that by applying this method a safer forecast can be provided, especially regarding cases for which the wind-driven circulation is predominant. However, in cases where the circulation is characterized by intense velocity gradients (in the NE Aegean this is associated with the thermohaline front created by the Black Sea Water inflow), larger differences are present. They are related to imprecise representation of the location of the front. In these cases, the ensemble method produced no significant improvement since the relatively small differences between the trajectories of the ensemble members indicate that the position of the front in not significantly affected by the wind perturbations, based on the spatio-temporal scales examined. It is concluded that in regions with large spatio-temporal variability, an ensemble forecast produced by simulations generated from perturbed initial conditions could possibly lead to more robust results.

  6. Hydrocarbon production concepts for dynamic annual sea ice regions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A.T.; Poplin, J.P.; Heure, C.E.

    1995-02-01

    Petroleum production from Russian seas such as the northern Timan-Pechora Basin (Pechora Sea) and the northeastern Sakhalin island Shelf (Sea of Okhotsk) is likely to occur in the near future. Several different types of offshore structures may be needed in the Russian arctic offshore to support development activities. These structures may include: a number of production structures for offshore fields, subsea pipelines, a regional tanker terminal, and ice-breaking tankers. Dynamic first-year sea ice will be a major design consideration for offshore structures considered for use in these areas. Exxon previously performed engineering studies for petroleum development in Norton Sound off the west coast of Alaska. Norton Sound is also an area of dynamic first-year sea ice, so many of the lessons learned and much of the technology developed for that region are considered to be applicable to the Pechora Sea and the Sakhalin Shelf. Several of the concepts for production structures, pipelines, terminals, and tankers are presented along with a discussion of the related ice technology. Field and laboratory studies undertaken to collect environmental data are described along with a probabilistic load calculation procedure for structure design. More recent work by Exxon to enhance technology since the Norton Sound studies is also presented along with a discussion of recommended future work activities.

  7. Egyptian Red Sea petroleum geology and regional geophysical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Y.H.; Shalaan, A.A.; Zaki, H.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The World Bank-executed Red Sea/Gulf of Aden Regional Hydrocarbon Study Project was organized to synthesize data on the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden basins. The primary objectives were to encourage increased hydrocarbon exploration techniques basin wide, and to train national geoscientists in exploration techniques. The study was carried out be task forces for each participating country, working in Cairo under the supervision of World Bank technical personnel. In addition, biostratigraphic, paleoenvironmental, and lithostratigraphic analyses by Robertson Group and geochemical studies and BEICIP were carried out on well cuttings and core samples. The study of the Egyptian Red Sea was based on public-domain exploration data, published information, and data released by operating companies. This included reports, sections, and wireline logs from 13 well, samples from ten wells for biostratigraphic analysis, and samples from eight wells for geochemical analysis. Interpretation was carried out on 4,350 line-km of seismic data selected from a grid of 19,000 line-km of data. Four horizons were identified on a regional basis, including the sea floor, top, and near base of middle to upper Miocene evaporites, and approximate acoustic basement. The results show that the Egyptian Red Sea is similar to the better known, productive Gulf of Suez in many respects, including overall tectonic evolution and structural style, present geothermal gradients, and Miocene to Holocene stratigraphic sequence. Based in part on this similarity, the Egyptian Red Sea appears to contain the necessary elements for an attractive petroleum potential.

  8. How Changing Human Lifestyles are Shaping Europe's Regional Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mee, L. D.; Lowe, C. D.; Langmead, O.; McQuatters-Gollop, A.; Attrill, M.; Cooper, P.; Gilbert, A.; Knudsen, S.; Garnacho, E.

    2007-05-01

    European society is experiencing unprecedented changes triggered by expansion of the European Union, the fall of Communism, economic growth and the onset of globalisation. Europe's regional seas, the Baltic, Black Sea, Mediterranean and North-East Atlantic (including the North Sea), provide key goods and services to the human population but have suffered from severe degradation in past decades. Their integrity as coupled social and ecological systems depends on how humanity will anticipate potential problems and deal with its ecological footprint in the future. We report the outcome of an EU-funded 15-country, 28 institution project entitled European Lifestyles and Marine Ecosystems (ELME). Our studies were designed to inform new EU policy and legislation that incorporates Ecosystem-Based Management. ELME has modelled the key relationships between economic and social drivers (D), environmental pressures (P) and changes in the state of the environment (S) in Europe's regional seas. We examined four key issues in each sea: habitat change, eutrophication, chemical pollution and fisheries. We developed conceptual models for each regional sea and employed a novel stochastic modelling technique to examine the interrelationship between key components of the conceptual models. We used the models to examine 2-3 decade projections of current trends in D, P and S and how a number of alternative development scenarios might modify these trends. These simulations demonstrate the vulnerability of Europe's seas to human pressure. As affluence increases in countries acceding to the EU, so does the demand for marine goods and services. There are `winners' and `losers' amongst marine species; the winners are often species that are opportunistic invaders or those with low economic value. In the case of eutrophication, semi-enclosed seas such as the Baltic or Black Sea are already affected by the `legacy of the past'; nutrients that have accumulated in soils, ground waters and

  9. Earthquakes increase hydrothermal venting and nutrient inputs into the Aegean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dando, P. R.; Hughes, J. A.; Leahy, Y.; Taylor, L. J.; Zivanovic, S.

    1995-05-01

    Areas of submarine gas and water venting around the island of Milos, in the Hellenic volcanic island arc, were mapped. Water samples were collected from five stations in the geothermally active Paleohori Bay on 15 March 1992. Seismic events, of M s 5.0 and 4.4, occurred south of the Bay on 20 March and the sampling was repeated after these. Phosphate and manganese in the water column increased by 360% after the seismic activity. Analysis of water samples collected from gas and water seeps and of interstitial water from sediment cores showed that the hot sediment in the Bay was enriched in phosphate, to a mean concentration of 65 μmol l -1 in the interstitial water. The number of geothermally active areas in the Aegean, together with the extent of venting and the frequency of earthquakes suggests that the hydrothermal areas may be an important source of phosphate in this oligotrophic Sea.

  10. Modelling Sea Ice and Surface Wave Interactions in Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosekova, L.; Aksenov, Y.; Coward, A.; Williams, T.; Bertino, L.; Nurser, A. J. G.

    2015-12-01

    seasonal variability. The study is part of the EU FP7 project 'Ships and Waves Reaching Polar Regions (SWARP)', aimed at developing techniques for sea ice and waves modelling and forecasting in the MIZ in the Arctic.

  11. Droughts in the Miocene of the Black Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Iuliana; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Grothe, Arjen; Krijgsman, Wout

    2016-04-01

    Since Miocene the Black Sea has been highly sensitive to fluctuations in the hydrological cycle. These fluctuations were principally determined by Black Sea's recurrently restricted connections to the Open Ocean and by its specific paleogeographic location between the dry Mediterranean domain and more humid higher northern latitudes. To determine the nature of changes in the hydrological budget of the Black Sea occurring during the late Miocene we use compound-specific hydrogen isotope ratios on terrestrial and aquatic biomarkers extracted from two different locations: 1) the sedimentary succession of Zhelezniy Rog land based section of Taman in Russia and 2) the deep sea sedimentary succession recovered in 1975 from the Black Sea (DSDP 42B, Hole 380A). The carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of n-alkanes as well as alkenones and palynology indicate large environmental changes in the Black Sea and/or in the sources of the water entering the Black Sea during the late Miocene. The hydrogen isotopes of alkenones, showing an enrichment of more than 80 ‰ at the end of the Miocene, imply a major shift in basin hydrology, possibly resulting in severely increased salinity. These changes in hydrogen isotopic composition of the alkenones concur both with sharp shifts in reconstructed sea surface temperature and palynological assemblages. Two intervals with negative water budget were identified, most likely caused by enhanced evaporation. The older and longer dry/evaporative phase predates the Maeotian/Pontian boundary (regional stages) at ~6.1 Ma. The younger negative water budget phase is partly coeval to the Messinian salinity crisis of Mediterranean. Both shifts to highly evaporative conditions are recorded in both Taman Peninsula (Russia) and DSDP 42B 380A locations. These recurrent dryer phases were, most likely, the result of important hydrological changes over a significantly larger area around the Black Sea area during the upper Miocene.

  12. Regional patterns of sea level change in the German North Sea in a worldwide context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Thomas; Frank, Torsten; Jensen, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Sea Level Rise (SLR) is one of the major consequences we are facing in times of a warming climate and it is obvious that a higher sea level influences the heights of occurring storm surges and thus results in a higher risk of inundation for the affected coastal areas. Therefore, regional and global sea level rise are subjects to many recent scientific publications. In contrast, the mean sea level (MSL) and its variability over the last centuries in the German North Sea area have not been analysed in detail up to now. A methodology to analyse observed sea level rise (SLR) in the German Bight, the shallow south-eastern part of the North Sea, is presented. The contribution focuses on the description of the methods used to generate and analyse high quality mean sea level (MSL) time series. Parametric fitting approaches as well as non-parametric data adaptive filters, such as Singular System Analysis (SSA) are applied. For padding non-stationary sea level time series, an advanced approach named Monte-Carlo autoregressive padding (MCAP) is introduced. This approach allows the specification of uncertainties of the behaviour of smoothed time series near the boundaries. The results for the North Sea point to a weak negative acceleration of SLR since 1844 with a strong positive acceleration at the end of the 19th century, to a period of almost no SLR around the 1970s with subsequent positive acceleration and to high recent rates. The comparison between the German North Sea and a global sea level reconstruction clearly reveals the existence of different patterns of SLR. A stronger SLR in the German North Sea area is detected for a period covering some decades starting at the end of the 19th century and for another period covering the last ten to fifteen years. These findings and the indications for the natural variability of this complex system and further research topics will be discussed. This is a German Coastal Engineering Research Council (KFKI) project, funded by the

  13. Red Sea Kinematics in Relation to the Regional Tectonics Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alotaibi, T.; Furlong, K. P.

    2015-12-01

    The Red sSea extensional system started approximately 22+3 Ma. Although, there is evidence that lithospheric weakening and associated incipient extension may have taken place since 30 Ma. There is oceanic crust found in the southern part of the rift, while the northern-most part still involves continental stretching. Meantime magnetic anomalies have been observed for the southern rift, the northern rift is characterized by several deeps where magnetic anomalies have been observed as well as an indication of the transition from continental to oceanic rifting. GPS stations along the Red Sea are consistent with kinematics implied from the magnetic anomalies - an opening rate in the southern part of ~ 15 mm/yr relative to Eurasia fixed while the opening rate in the is ~8 mm/yr. This significant decreasing of the opening rate towards the north implies complexity within the Red Sea extensional system.Our purpose here is to place the Red Sea extensional kinematics within the regional tectonics context by combining constraints on the rate or style of extension within the Red Sea with tectonic activities on the adjacent continental regions. To accomplish this, we will model the extensional kinematics through time by comparing recent kinematics based on the geophysical observations with ones that based on geological observations. In terms of present-day geophysical observations, we have GPS and magnetic anomalies data, and crustal and lithospheric thickness. Geological observations primarily come from stratigraphic and structural data sets.Our overall target is to construct a tectonic model that links the timing of the change in the style and extensional rate with the tectonic activities in Afar, Gulf of Aden, Zagros, Dead Sea fault and Anatolian region.

  14. Petroleum geology of Azov-Black Sea region

    SciTech Connect

    Lukin, A.; Trofimenko, G.

    1995-08-01

    The main features of tectonics, stratigraphy, paleogeography, lithology, hydrogeology, geothermics and hydrocarbon-bearingness of Azov-Black Sea Region are characterized on the basis of present-day data. Among the most prospective petroliferous complexes one ought to mention: Paleozoic (S - D - C{sub 1}) of Near-Dobrudga foredeep, Triassic - Jurassic of the Black Sea (shelf and continental slope); Lower Cretaceous of the various parts of the Region; Upper Cretaceous of the Black Sea shelf; Paleocene-Eocene of Azov Sea. In addition certain prospects are connected with Precambrian and Paleozoic basements within conjunction zone between Eastern-Europe platform and Scythian plate. Geodynamic evolution of the Region is considered with determination of tension and compression stages and characteristic of the main regularities of diapirs, mud volcanos, swells, horsts and grabens distribution. There determined the most interesting types of hydrocarbon traps connected with various tectonic forms, river and deltaic channels, bars, conturites, carbonate reefs, etc. Paleogeothermic and paleogeodynamic reconstructions allow to determine the main phases of oil and gas accumulation. The most prospective oil-gas-bearing zones and areas are mapped.

  15. Crustal structure of the Aegean area obtained by traveltime tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Brüstle, A.; Küperkoch, L.; Friederich, W.

    2012-04-01

    The Hellenic arc and Aegean sea area are of locus of high seismicity and intense tectonic activity. Previous studies using either traveltimes of body waves or dispersion curves of surface waves show strong lateral heterogeneity of velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle under the Aegean area. Especially crustal thicknesses vary from about 20 km to 45 km. The complexity of crustal structure often requires the use of a number of one-dimensional layered models, in the calculation of synthetic seismograms for different ray traversing paths, to determine moment tensor of small-to-moderate earthquakes in this area. Using travel times from the EHB catalog data between 1980 and 1997 from International Seismological Center (Engdahl et al. 1998), Euro-Mediterranean Bulletin data between 1998 and 2008 from the Euro-Mediterranean Seismological Center (Godey et al. 2006), and additional local earthquakes recorded by the temporary stations deployed in the EGELADOS project, we derive a new three-dimensional velocity model of the crust in the Aegean area using the traveltime tomographic inversion code FMTOMO developed by Rawlinson et al. (2006). The events falling into the research area defined by 34°-40°N and 20°-29°E are firstly relocated using HypoDD (Waldhauser & Ellsworth 2000) before tomographic inversion is performed. Since the number of earthquakes is much greater than the number of stations, the source and receiver roles are interchanged to accelerate the forward calculation of traveltimes which is done by tracking the wavefront propagation with the fast marching method. The initial one-dimensional model was obtained by simultaneously inverting the data both for hypocenter locations and velocity using VELEST (Kissling et al. 1994). Checkboard resolution tests for the P waves show that anomalies of size of half a degree could be correctly recovered down to depth of 50 km. One notable feature from the preliminary inversion results for the P velocity is that the

  16. Ethiopian Red Sea petroleum geology and regional geophysical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Assefa, A. Tadesse, K.; Worku, T.; Tsadik, E.G. )

    1991-08-01

    The World Bank-executed Red Sea/Gulf of Aden Regional Hydrocarbon Study Project was organized to synthesize data on the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden basins. The primary objectives were to encourage increased hydrocarbon exploration activity within the project area by applying recent exploration techniques basin wide, and to train national geoscientists in exploration techniques. The study of the Ethiopian Red Sea and Gulf of Aden was based on public-domain exploration data, published information, and data released by operating companies. These included reports, sections and wire lines logs from eight wells, samples from seven wells for biostratigraphic analysis, and samples from five wells for geochemical analysis. Interpretation was carried out on 6,600 line-km of seismic data selected from a grid of 29,710 line-km. Four horizons were identified on a regional basis, including the sea floor, top and near base of Middle to Upper Miocene evaporites, and approximate acoustic basement. A bathymetric map, three structure-contour maps, and three interval isopach maps were prepared using digitized picks from the interpreted seismic. The results show that the Ethiopian Red Sea is similar to the better known productive Gulf of Suez in some respects, including the overall tectonic evolution and the Miocene to Holocene stratigraphic sequence. Nevertheless, significant differences result from the location of the Ethiopian Red Sea in the transition zone to the Afar area. An important difference is the development of two major en echelon trends of rifting separated by a block with limited extension in the Danakil Alps. The resulting variations in sedimentary sequence, structural style, and geothermal gradient suggest that a favorable petroleum potential may be present locally in both pre-evaporite and post-evaporite objectives.

  17. Regional variability in sea ice melt in a changing Arctic.

    PubMed

    Perovich, Donald K; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline A

    2015-07-13

    In recent years, the Arctic sea ice cover has undergone a precipitous decline in summer extent. The sea ice mass balance integrates heat and provides insight on atmospheric and oceanic forcing. The amount of surface melt and bottom melt that occurs during the summer melt season was measured at 41 sites over the time period 1957 to 2014. There are large regional and temporal variations in both surface and bottom melting. Combined surface and bottom melt ranged from 16 to 294 cm, with a mean of 101 cm. The mean ice equivalent surface melt was 48 cm and the mean bottom melt was 53 cm. On average, surface melting decreases moving northward from the Beaufort Sea towards the North Pole; however interannual differences in atmospheric forcing can overwhelm the influence of latitude. Substantial increases in bottom melting are a major contributor to ice losses in the Beaufort Sea, due to decreases in ice concentration. In the central Arctic, surface and bottom melting demonstrate interannual variability, but show no strong temporal trends from 2000 to 2014. This suggests that under current conditions, summer melting in the central Arctic is not large enough to completely remove the sea ice cover.

  18. Plate tectonics and petroleum potential of the Laptev Sea region

    SciTech Connect

    Savostin, L.; Drachev, S.; Baturin, D. )

    1991-08-01

    About 1,600 km of multichannel seismic data with simultaneous gravity and magnetic measurements were collected in the Laptev Sea during 1989. Additionally, a 100 km onshore seismic reflection profile transected the northern termination of the Verrkoyansky Mountains. Data interpretation showed the following. The tectonic patterns of the Laptev Sea region was formed as a result of two major tectonic phases. The first phase was associated with collisions between the Paleozoic passive margin of Siberia and a number of allochthonous terrains which were previously parts of the North American Paleo-Pacific plate. These tectonic events accompanied the opening of the Canadian basin and ended in the second half of the Early Cretaceous. The second phase was a result of the opening of the Makarov and the Europeo-Asiatic basins, which caused the rifting processes within the Laptev Sea Shelf. Seismic onshore data show that the orogenic sequence consists of allochthonous plates which were thrust onto the thick sedimentary cover the Siberia platform. An underthrusting sedimentary sequence is situated at depths from 3 to 5 km, which present a good possibility to reach by the drill. The geological analogy with Appalachian Mountains United States, permits one to propose a high petroleum potential for this area. A system of offshore Laptev Sea grabens consisting of a series of alternating tilted and thrusted blocks, along with intrablock pre-drift sediments, are promising as potential hydrocarbon traps. This is akin to structural setting within North Sea oil and gas province.

  19. Regional variability in sea ice melt in a changing Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Perovich, Donald K.; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline A.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the Arctic sea ice cover has undergone a precipitous decline in summer extent. The sea ice mass balance integrates heat and provides insight on atmospheric and oceanic forcing. The amount of surface melt and bottom melt that occurs during the summer melt season was measured at 41 sites over the time period 1957 to 2014. There are large regional and temporal variations in both surface and bottom melting. Combined surface and bottom melt ranged from 16 to 294 cm, with a mean of 101 cm. The mean ice equivalent surface melt was 48 cm and the mean bottom melt was 53 cm. On average, surface melting decreases moving northward from the Beaufort Sea towards the North Pole; however interannual differences in atmospheric forcing can overwhelm the influence of latitude. Substantial increases in bottom melting are a major contributor to ice losses in the Beaufort Sea, due to decreases in ice concentration. In the central Arctic, surface and bottom melting demonstrate interannual variability, but show no strong temporal trends from 2000 to 2014. This suggests that under current conditions, summer melting in the central Arctic is not large enough to completely remove the sea ice cover. PMID:26032323

  20. Modelling of the anthropogenic tritium transient and its decay product helium-3 in the Mediterranean Sea using a high-resolution regional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, M.; Dutay, J.-C.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Beranger, K.; Arsouze, T.; Beuvier, J.; Palmieri, J.; Le-vu, B.; Roether, W.

    2015-05-01

    This numerical study provides the first simulation of the anthropogenic tritium invasion and its decay product helium-3 (3He) in the Mediterranean Sea. The simulation covers the entire tritium (3H) transient generated by the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests performed in the 1950s and early 1960s and is run till 2011. Tritium, helium-3 and their derived age estimates are particularly suitable for studying intermediate and deep-water ventilation and spreading of water masses at intermediate/deep levels. The simulation is made using a high-resolution regional model NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean), in a regional configuration for the Mediterranean Sea called MED12, forced at the surface with prescribed tritium evolution derived from observations. The simulation is compared to measurements of tritium and helium-3 performed along large-scale transects in the Mediterranean Sea during the last few decades on cruises of R/V Meteor: M5/6, M31/1, M44/4, M51/2, M84/3, and R/V Poseidon: 234. The results show that the input function used for the tritium generates a realistic distribution of the main hydrographic features of the Mediterranean Sea circulation. In the eastern basin, the results highlight the weak formation of Adriatic Deep Water in the model, which explains its weak contribution to the Eastern Mediterranean Deep Water (EMDW) in the Ionian sub-basin. It produces a realistic representation of the Eastern Mediterranean Transient (EMT) signal, simulating a deep-water formation in the Aegean sub-basin at the beginning of 1993, with a realistic timing of deep-water renewal in the eastern basin.

  1. Setting Priorities for Regional Conservation Planning in the Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Micheli, Fiorenza; Levin, Noam; Giakoumi, Sylvaine; Katsanevakis, Stelios; Abdulla, Ameer; Coll, Marta; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Kark, Salit; Koutsoubas, Drosos; Mackelworth, Peter; Maiorano, Luigi; Possingham, Hugh P.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial prioritization in conservation is required to direct limited resources to where actions are most urgently needed and most likely to produce effective conservation outcomes. In an effort to advance the protection of a highly threatened hotspot of marine biodiversity, the Mediterranean Sea, multiple spatial conservation plans have been developed in recent years. Here, we review and integrate these different plans with the goal of identifying priority conservation areas that represent the current consensus among the different initiatives. A review of six existing and twelve proposed conservation initiatives highlights gaps in conservation and management planning, particularly within the southern and eastern regions of the Mediterranean and for offshore and deep sea habitats. The eighteen initiatives vary substantially in their extent (covering 0.1–58.5% of the Mediterranean Sea) and in the location of additional proposed conservation and management areas. Differences in the criteria, approaches and data used explain such variation. Despite the diversity among proposals, our analyses identified ten areas, encompassing 10% of the Mediterranean Sea, that are consistently identified among the existing proposals, with an additional 10% selected by at least five proposals. These areas represent top priorities for immediate conservation action. Despite the plethora of initiatives, major challenges face Mediterranean biodiversity and conservation. These include the need for spatial prioritization within a comprehensive framework for regional conservation planning, the acquisition of additional information from data-poor areas, species or habitats, and addressing the challenges of establishing transboundary governance and collaboration in socially, culturally and politically complex conditions. Collective prioritised action, not new conservation plans, is needed for the north, western, and high seas of the Mediterranean, while developing initial information

  2. Early farmers from across Europe directly descended from Neolithic Aegeans

    PubMed Central

    Hofmanová, Zuzana; Kreutzer, Susanne; Hellenthal, Garrett; Sell, Christian; Diekmann, Yoan; Díez-del-Molino, David; van Dorp, Lucy; López, Saioa; Kousathanas, Athanasios; Link, Vivian; Kirsanow, Karola; Cassidy, Lara M.; Martiniano, Rui; Strobel, Melanie; Scheu, Amelie; Kotsakis, Kostas; Halstead, Paul; Triantaphyllou, Sevi; Kyparissi-Apostolika, Nina; Ziota, Christina; Adaktylou, Fotini; Gopalan, Shyamalika; Bobo, Dean M.; Winkelbach, Laura; Blöcher, Jens; Unterländer, Martina; Leuenberger, Christoph; Çilingiroğlu, Çiler; Horejs, Barbara; Gerritsen, Fokke; Shennan, Stephen J.; Bradley, Daniel G.; Currat, Mathias; Veeramah, Krishna R.; Thomas, Mark G.; Papageorgopoulou, Christina; Burger, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Farming and sedentism first appeared in southwestern Asia during the early Holocene and later spread to neighboring regions, including Europe, along multiple dispersal routes. Conspicuous uncertainties remain about the relative roles of migration, cultural diffusion, and admixture with local foragers in the early Neolithization of Europe. Here we present paleogenomic data for five Neolithic individuals from northern Greece and northwestern Turkey spanning the time and region of the earliest spread of farming into Europe. We use a novel approach to recalibrate raw reads and call genotypes from ancient DNA and observe striking genetic similarity both among Aegean early farmers and with those from across Europe. Our study demonstrates a direct genetic link between Mediterranean and Central European early farmers and those of Greece and Anatolia, extending the European Neolithic migratory chain all the way back to southwestern Asia. PMID:27274049

  3. Early farmers from across Europe directly descended from Neolithic Aegeans.

    PubMed

    Hofmanová, Zuzana; Kreutzer, Susanne; Hellenthal, Garrett; Sell, Christian; Diekmann, Yoan; Díez-Del-Molino, David; van Dorp, Lucy; López, Saioa; Kousathanas, Athanasios; Link, Vivian; Kirsanow, Karola; Cassidy, Lara M; Martiniano, Rui; Strobel, Melanie; Scheu, Amelie; Kotsakis, Kostas; Halstead, Paul; Triantaphyllou, Sevi; Kyparissi-Apostolika, Nina; Urem-Kotsou, Dushka; Ziota, Christina; Adaktylou, Fotini; Gopalan, Shyamalika; Bobo, Dean M; Winkelbach, Laura; Blöcher, Jens; Unterländer, Martina; Leuenberger, Christoph; Çilingiroğlu, Çiler; Horejs, Barbara; Gerritsen, Fokke; Shennan, Stephen J; Bradley, Daniel G; Currat, Mathias; Veeramah, Krishna R; Wegmann, Daniel; Thomas, Mark G; Papageorgopoulou, Christina; Burger, Joachim

    2016-06-21

    Farming and sedentism first appeared in southwestern Asia during the early Holocene and later spread to neighboring regions, including Europe, along multiple dispersal routes. Conspicuous uncertainties remain about the relative roles of migration, cultural diffusion, and admixture with local foragers in the early Neolithization of Europe. Here we present paleogenomic data for five Neolithic individuals from northern Greece and northwestern Turkey spanning the time and region of the earliest spread of farming into Europe. We use a novel approach to recalibrate raw reads and call genotypes from ancient DNA and observe striking genetic similarity both among Aegean early farmers and with those from across Europe. Our study demonstrates a direct genetic link between Mediterranean and Central European early farmers and those of Greece and Anatolia, extending the European Neolithic migratory chain all the way back to southwestern Asia. PMID:27274049

  4. Microstructural Considerations of Transporting Sea Ice Samples from Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieb-Lappen, R.; Obbard, R. W.

    2012-12-01

    High latitude regions are at the forefront of climate change research as these regions have and will experience the greatest impact due to changing environmental conditions (e.g. Antarctic and recent Arctic stratospheric ozone holes, large temperature increases on the Antarctic Peninsula, changes in the extent and age of Arctic sea ice). One of the major challenges of polar scientific research is the preservation of frozen sea ice samples during their transport back to the laboratory and subsequent storage. Small fluctuations in temperature have been shown to have a significant effect on the microstructure of snow and ice samples. This is especially true for sea ice specimens where transport and storage temperatures are often only slightly below the eutectic point for its different constituents (i.e. salts). Furthermore, sea ice can have a 30 deg C in situ vertical temperature gradient that is lost during transport and storage. Sea ice plays a critical role in mediating the exchange of heat, gases, and chemical species across the ocean-atmosphere interface. The kinetics of these exchanges is highly dependent upon the brine channel microstructure, which is strongly coupled to temperature. To determine the degree of microstructural variation between samples shipped at different temperatures, ten samples of a single sea ice core collected in March 2012 were transported from Barrow, Alaska to Hanover, NH using two common techniques: with blue ice packs enclosed in a Styrofoam box (~ -25 deg C) and in a dry liquid nitrogen cryoshipper (~ -182 deg C). In addition, snow lying on the sea ice and blowing snow samples were collected and shipped via both techniques. All samples were then stored for analysis in a cold room maintained at ~ -33 deg C. The microstructure of both sets of samples was analyzed using x-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), with samples on a Peltier cold stage to maintain a scanning temperature of -20 deg C. We compare sea ice porosity and brine

  5. Assessment of impact of geochemical and environmental properties on the meiofauna (benthic foraminifer, ostracod, mollusc) assemblages: A case study in The Late Quaternary Sediments In The Gulf Of Izmir (Eastern Aegean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yümün, Zeki Ü.

    2016-04-01

    The drilling samples collected from varying depths at 1.00-13.00 m at four different localities of Karsiyaka, Bayrakli, Inciralti and Urla (Çesmealti) in the Gulf of Izmir were studied for their geochemical, sedimantological and micropaleontological properties. The purpose of this study is to describe the meiofauna of the sediments, to determine the pollution history of the gulf and to show the effect of the pollution on the foraminifera and ostracoda. Examination of the loose sediments reveals that the gulf has been affected by the sea for a long time, and it had a rich microfaunal assemblages. Both foraminiferal tests and ostracod carapaces have coloring, and morphological abnormalities have been determined in foraminiferal tests. Peneroplis pertusus (Forskal) and P. planatus (Fichtel and Moll) have blue and black colored tests, while morphological abnormalities were observed on the tests of Ammonia compacta Hofker, Elphidium complanatum (d'Orbigny), E. crispum (Linné), E. macellum (Fichtel and Moll). The ostracod carapaces are generally gray-black colored. Heavy metal (Cr, Mn, Zn, Co, Ni, Cu) analyses have been carried out on the sediments of the Gulf of Izmir. Heavy metal concentrations are high in Bayrakli, and low in Urla (Çesmealti). Cr, Mn and Zn values are the highest in Bayrakli, whereas Co, Ni and Cu values are the highest in Inciralti. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analyses were performed and no heavy metal was detected on the white and colored ostracod carapaces. When the white and colored ostracod carapaces are compared, the coloured ostracode carapace has higher Mg content, and also includes Fe, Al, N, Cl and K. Based on the results obtained, it is observed that the Bayrakli region have been more affected by the pollution than Urla (Çesmealti).

  6. Sub-Regional Sea Ice Preferences of Pacific Walrus in the Bering Sea Using SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacco, A.; Mahoney, A. R.; Eicken, H.; Johnson, M. A.; Ray, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Pacific walrus (O. r. divergens) uses winter sea ice in the Bering Sea for numerous parts of its natural history including courtship, foraging, and migration. Recent and predicted loss of sea ice has caused the Pacific walrus to be considered for an elevated status under the Endangered Species Act. Study of the ice conditions during this period is required to investigate changes in the Bering Sea ice pack and its effects on walrus sustainability. Using Radarsat-1 data and second-order texture statistics, a classification system was devised to separate sea ice into three distinguishable classes based on walrus needs of open water availability in the pack ice: discontinuous pack ice, continuous pack ice, and open water. Classifications are performed on sub-regional image areas to facilitate classification of heterogeneous seascapes which are thought to be distinguishable by walrus. Spatial, as well as temporal, changes in the seascape cover, based on the classification, are achieved. These results are then combined with ship-based observations of walrus to quantify walrus habitat preference. The three-class algorithm has a success rate of 94% for the discontinuous ice and continuous pack ice. Radarsat-1 images from 2004 - 2008 were analyzed for changes in seasonal and annual discontinuous ice extent. After classification, the spatial extent of discontinuous ice was found to vary throughout 2004 - 2008 in the Bering Sea shelf. Walrus are also shown to prefer discontinuous pack far from the southernmost ice edge. Maps of walrus habitat preference and persistent areas of sea ice seascapes are created and then can be used for the walrus' status consideration under the Endangered Species Act in addition to general species management issues.

  7. Attributing extreme precipitation in the Black Sea region to sea surface warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, Edmund; Semenov, Vladimir; Maraun, Douglas; Park, Wonsun; Chernokulsky, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Higher sea surface temperatures (SSTs) warm and moisten the overlying atmosphere, increasing the low-level atmospheric instability, the moisture available to precipitating systems and, hence, the potential for intense convective systems. Both the Mediterranean and Black Sea regions have seen a steady increase in summertime SSTs since the early 1980s, by over 2 K in places. This raises the question of how this SST increase has affected convective precipitation extremes in the region, and through which mechanisms any effects are manifested. In particular, the Black Sea town of Krymsk suffered an unprecedented precipitation extreme in July 2012, which may have been influenced by Black Sea warming, causing over 170 deaths. To address this question, we adopt two distinct modelling approaches to event attribution and compare their relative merits. In the first, we use the traditional probabilistic event attribution approach involving global climate model ensembles representative of the present and a counterfactual past climate where regional SSTs have not increased. In the second, we use the conditional event attribution approach, taking the 2012 Krymsk precipitation extreme as a showcase example. Under the second approach, we carry out ensemble sensitivity experiments of the Krymsk event at convection-permitting resolution with the WRF regional model, and test the sensitivity of the event to a range of SST forcings. Both experiments show the crucial role of recent Black Sea warming in amplifying the 2012 Krymsk precipitation extreme. In the conditional event attribution approach, though, the explicit simulation of convective processes provides detailed insight into the physical mechanisms behind the extremeness of the event, revealing the dominant role of dynamical (i.e. static stability and vertical motions) over thermodynamical (i.e. increased atmospheric moisture) changes. Additionally, the wide range of SST states tested in the regional setup, which would be

  8. The fate of gas hydrates in the Barents Sea and Kara Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klitzke, Peter; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Schicks, Judith; Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Cacace, Mauro; Jacquey, Antoine; Sippel, Judith; Faleide, Jan Inge

    2016-04-01

    The Barents Sea and Kara Sea are located in the European Arctic. Recent seismic lines indicate the presence of gas hydrates in the Barents Sea and Kara Sea region. Natural gas hydrates contain huge amounts of methane. Their stability is mainly sensitive to pressure and temperature conditions which make them susceptible for climate change. When not stable, large volumes of methane will be released in the water column and - depending on the water depth - may also be released into the atmosphere. Therefore, studying the evolution in time and space of the gas hydrates stability zone in the Barents Sea region is of interest for both environmental impact and energy production. In this study, we assess the gas hydrate inventory of the Barents Sea and Kara Sea under the light of increasing ocean bottom temperatures in the next 200 years. Thereby, we make use of an existing 3D structural and thermal model which resolves five sedimentary units, the crystalline crust and the lithospheric mantle. The sedimentary units are characterised by the prevailing lithology and porosity including effects of post-depositional erosion which strongly affect the local geothermal gradient. Governing equations for the conductive 3D thermal field and momentum balance have been integrated in a massively parallel finite-element-method based framework (MOOSE). The MOOSE framework provides a powerful and flexible platform to solve multiphysics problems implicitly on unstructured meshes. First we calculate the present-day steady-state 3D thermal field. Subsequently, we use the latter as initial condition to calculate the transient 3D thermal field for the next 200 years considering an ocean temperature model as upper boundary. Temperature and load distributions are then used to calculate the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone for each time step. The results show that the gas hydrate stability zone strongly varies in the region due to the local geothermal gradient changes. The latter

  9. Mantle convection in the Middle East: Reconciling Afar upwelling, Arabia indentation and Aegean trench rollback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenna, Claudio; Becker, Thorsten W.; Jolivet, Laurent; Keskin, Mehmet

    2013-08-01

    The Middle East region represents a key site within the Tethyan domain where continental break-up, collision, backarc extension and escape tectonics are kinematically linked together. We perform global mantle circulation computations to test the role of slab pull and mantle upwellings as driving forces for the kinematics of the Arabia-Anatolia-Aegean (AAA) system, evaluating different boundary conditions and mantle density distributions as inferred from seismic tomography or slab models. Model results are compared with geodetically inferred crustal motions, residual topography, and shear wave splitting measurements. The AAA velocity field with respect to Eurasia shows an anti-clockwise toroidal pattern, with increasing velocities toward the Aegean trench. The best match to these crustal motions can be obtained by combining the effect of slab pull exerted in the Aegean with a mantle upwelling underneath Afar and, more generally, with the large-scale flow associated with a whole mantle, Tethyan convection cell. Neogene volcanism for AAA is widespread, not only in the extensional or subduction settings, but also within plates, such as in Syria-Jordan-Israel and in Turkey, with geochemical fingerprints similar of those of the Afar lava. In addition, morphological features show large uplifting domains far from plate boundaries. We speculate that the tectonic evolution of AAA is related to the progressive northward entrainment of upwelling mantle material, which is itself associated with the establishment of the downwelling part of a convection cell through the segmented Tethyan slab below the northern Zagros and Bitlis collision zone. The recently established westward flow dragged Anatolia and pushed the Aegean slab south-westward, thus accelerating backarc extension. Our model reconciles Afar plume volcanism, the collision in the Bitlis mountains and northern Zagros, and the rapid increase of Aegean trench rollback in a single coherent frame of large scale mantle

  10. The lithosphere-scale density and temperature configuration beneath the Barents Sea and Kara Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klitzke, Peter; Faleide, Jan Inge; Sippel, Judith; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena

    2014-05-01

    The Barents and Kara Sea region on the European Arctic shelf is bounded by the Proterozoic East-European Craton in the south and the young Cenozoic passive margins in the north and the west. Poly-orogenic episodes in late Precambrian to late Paleozoic times have led to amalgamation of the crystalline basement, which subsequently experienced multiple phases of subsidence resulting in the formation of ultra-deep sedimentary basins. These deep basins vary strongly in their configuration across the shelf. In the southwestern Barents Sea numerous narrow and fault-bounded rift basins are defined while the eastern Barents Sea and southern Kara Sea are marked by a wide and bowl-shaped sag basin. A key to understand the evolution and the causative mechanisms behind uplift and subsidence in the Barents Sea and Kara Sea is the present-day lithospheric density configuration. In a first step, a 3D structural model was developed resolving five sedimentary units, the crystalline crust and the lithospheric mantle. To provide best constrained geometries for the resulting 3D-structural model, interpreted seismic refraction and reflection data, geological maps and previously published 3D-models were analysed and integrated. The sedimentary units were assigned lithology-dependent matrix densities and porosities to calculate bulk densities which also consider the effects of erosion, compaction but also in response to published maximum ice sheet thickness. The density configuration of the lithospheric mantle and the asthenosphere down to 250 km depth is derived using an existing velocity-density model. To calculate an initial density configuration of the crystalline crust, the concept of Pratt's isostasy is applied. Finally, the gravitational response of the corresponding 3D-model is calculated and compared with the observed gravity field to further investigate the composition of the crust and the configuration of potential high-density bodies in the deeper lithosphere. To assess the

  11. On validation of regional atmosphere and wave models for the Black Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulov, Vladimir; Shokurov, Mikhail; Chechina, Katerina; Soukissian, Takvor; Malinovsky, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Mesoscale atmospheric models MM5 and WRF adapted to the Black Sea region in Marine Hydrophysical Institute (MHI, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine) together with wave model WAM are widely using in the last decade. Black Sea meteorological and wave climate assessing, 3-5 days operational forecast, researches of various physical phenomena typical for the Black Sea coastal zone are examples of application of such regional model calculations. Therefore we made some inspection of their quality. Results of operational regional forecast of catastrophic weather events in the Black Sea region are considered. Flooding of 6-7 July 2012 in the Krasnodar Region, Russia caused a loss of more than 170 lives and huge economic damage. Hazardous storm of 11 November 2007 near the Crimean coast caused accidents and sinks of many vessels including ones carrying fuel oil and sulfur, more than 20 members of the crews were missing and severe ecological damage was suffered. However, the forecast of rainfall intensity had appeared five days before the flood at free access on the Internet website http://vao.hydrophys.org and the forecast of the wave height appeared on the same website three days before the storm. Quality of the regional forecast and its advantages over the global forecast are discussed. In situ wave data including 2D wave spectra obtained at the MHI Black Sea Research Platform in 2012-2013 over all seasons were compared with model calculations. The distance of the Platform to the shore is 0.5 km where the sea depth is 28 m. Only part of wave spectrum belonging to wave frequencies lower than 0.4 Hz was considered to filter out waves developing from the coastal line. It is concluded that scatter indexes for modeled significant wave height and mean frequency are about of 50% and 15%. Some systematic defects of model calculations are revealed but the use of the model-based forecasts could lead to significant reduction in human losses and economic damage from catastrophic

  12. Subduction erosion and accretion in the Solomon Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honza, Eiichi; Miyazaki, Teruki; Lock, Jo

    1989-03-01

    The Solomon Sea region is an area of intense tectonic activity characterized by structural complexity, a high level of seismicity and volcanism, and rapid evolution of plate boundaries. There is little accretion in the eastern New Britain Trench. Accretion gradually increases westward with thick accretion in the western New Britain Trench and in the Trobriand Subduction System. The thick accretion in the western part of the New Britain Trench may be a result of collision from the north of Finisterre-Huon block with New Guinea mainland. The present boundary of the collision is along the Ram-Markham fault. Deformation structures and present day seismicity suggest that the northern block is under compression. Accretion has occurred in the sediment filled trenches in the Solomon Sea. The scale of the accretionary wedge depends on the amount of trench-fill sediment available. It is unlikely that there is no sediment supply to the eastern part of the New Britain Trench where no accretion is observed and subduction erosion may be occurring. There are two possible mechanisms for subduction erosion of sediment; either a rapid rate of subduction relative to the supply of sediment inhibiting sediment accumulation in the trench; or horizontal tensional force superimposed on both the forearc and backarc regions of the arc. Seafloor spreading in both the Manus and Woodlark basins is fan-like with nearby poles in the western margins of the basins. This may be a reflection of a horizontally compressional field in the western part and a tensional field in the eastern part of the Solomon Sea. Therefore it is possible to conclude that the consumption of sediment in the eastern New Britain Trench is related to the horizontal tensional field superimposed on both the forearc and backarc regions of the subduction system. Imbricated thrust and overthrust faults in the western New Britain Trench and Trobriand Trough are not linear over long distance, but form wavy patterns in blocks with

  13. Regional Ocean Colour Remote Sensing Algorithm for the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieronymi, Martin; Muller, Dagmar; Krasemann, Hajo; Schonfeld, Wolfgang; Rottgers, Rudiger; Doerffer, Roland

    2015-12-01

    The Baltic Sea is a challenging study site from an optically point of view. Its partly highly absorbing waters are mainly associated with the presence of coloured dissolved organic matter and often accompanied by non-algae absorbing particles. In addition, the Baltic Sea area is characterised by massive annual surface blooms of cyanobacteria. In Europe, the Baltic Sea is a very specific and important case study with intense user interest. In the framework of different research projects as the “Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative”, the “SEOM OC Extreme Case 2 Waters”, and partly “MyOcean”, we aim to develop an optimised, error-characterised, regional ocean colour processor applicable to several satellite sensors, like MODIS, MERIS, VIIRS, and OLCI. The procedure, which is used to determine inherent optical properties and different water constituents’ concentrations from remote sensing reflectance, is an artificial Neural Network (NN). We provide first results of comparisons of in-situ data with different ocean colour products.

  14. Earthquake Scenario-Based Tsunami Wave Heights in the Eastern Mediterranean and Connected Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necmioglu, Ocal; Özel, Nurcan Meral

    2015-12-01

    We identified a set of tsunami scenario input parameters in a 0.5° × 0.5° uniformly gridded area in the Eastern Mediterranean, Aegean (both for shallow- and intermediate-depth earthquakes) and Black Seas (only shallow earthquakes) and calculated tsunami scenarios using the SWAN-Joint Research Centre (SWAN-JRC) code ( Mader 2004; Annunziato 2007) with 2-arcmin resolution bathymetry data for the range of 6.5—Mwmax with an Mw increment of 0.1 at each grid in order to realize a comprehensive analysis of tsunami wave heights from earthquakes originating in the region. We defined characteristic earthquake source parameters from a compiled set of sources such as existing moment tensor catalogues and various reference studies, together with the Mwmax assigned in the literature, where possible. Results from 2,415 scenarios show that in the Eastern Mediterranean and its connected seas (Aegean and Black Sea), shallow earthquakes with Mw ≥ 6.5 may result in coastal wave heights of 0.5 m, whereas the same wave height would be expected only from intermediate-depth earthquakes with Mw ≥ 7.0 . The distribution of maximum wave heights calculated indicate that tsunami wave heights up to 1 m could be expected in the northern Aegean, whereas in the Black Sea, Cyprus, Levantine coasts, northern Libya, eastern Sicily, southern Italy, and western Greece, up to 3-m wave height could be possible. Crete, the southern Aegean, and the area between northeast Libya and Alexandria (Egypt) is prone to maximum tsunami wave heights of >3 m. Considering that calculations are performed at a minimum bathymetry depth of 20 m, these wave heights may, according to Green's Law, be amplified by a factor of 2 at the coastline. The study can provide a basis for detailed tsunami hazard studies in the region.

  15. Potential impacts of climate change on the primary production of regional seas: A comparative analysis of five European seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Jason; Schrum, Corinna; Cannaby, Heather; Daewel, Ute; Allen, Icarus; Artioli, Yuri; Bopp, Laurent; Butenschon, Momme; Fach, Bettina A.; Harle, James; Pushpadas, Dhanya; Salihoglu, Baris; Wakelin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Regional seas are potentially highly vulnerable to climate change, yet are the most directly societally important regions of the marine environment. The combination of widely varying conditions of mixing, forcing, geography (coastline and bathymetry) and exposure to the open-ocean makes these seas subject to a wide range of physical processes that mediates how large scale climate change impacts on these seas' ecosystems. In this paper we explore the response of five regional sea areas to potential future climate change, acting via atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial vectors. These include the Barents Sea, Black Sea, Baltic Sea, North Sea, Celtic Seas, and are contrasted with a region of the Northeast Atlantic. Our aim is to elucidate the controlling dynamical processes and how these vary between and within these seas. We focus on primary production and consider the potential climatic impacts on: long term changes in elemental budgets, seasonal and mesoscale processes that control phytoplankton's exposure to light and nutrients, and briefly direct temperature response. We draw examples from the MEECE FP7 project and five regional model systems each using a common global Earth System Model as forcing. We consider a common analysis approach, and additional sensitivity experiments. Comparing projections for the end of the 21st century with mean present day conditions, these simulations generally show an increase in seasonal and permanent stratification (where present). However, the first order (low- and mid-latitude) effect in the open ocean projections of increased permanent stratification leading to reduced nutrient levels, and so to reduced primary production, is largely absent, except in the NE Atlantic. Even in the two highly stratified, deep water seas we consider (Black and Baltic Seas) the increase in stratification is not seen as a first order control on primary production. Instead, results show a highly heterogeneous picture of positive and negative change

  16. Subsatellite experiments in a coastal region of the Black sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhanov, V.; Bogatov, N.; Ermoshkin, A.; Kazakov, V.; Kemarskaya, O.; Lobanov, V.; Repina, I.; Titov, V.; Troitskaya, Yu.; Zuikova, E.

    2009-04-01

    The results of field experiments carried out in 2007, 2008 in a north-east part of the Black sea in region of city Gelendzhik, are given. Experiments targeted the development of a bottom topography remote (radar and optical) diagnostics. Experimental area is characterized by abrupt depth dumping (fall 50 - 1250 m), and irregularity of a bank vault (numerous canyons). Such bottom topography in the presence of alongshore current creates favorable conditions for hydrodynamic perturbations on thermocline and corresponding anomalies on sea surface and in atmospheric surface layer characteristics. The simultaneous measurement of atmospheric near-surface layer, sea surface and sea bulk parameters synchronously with reception of the radar image from the satellite ENVISAT was feature of the given experiment. The ground-based measurements were carried out simultaneously from high coast by means of X-band radar and from R/V "Aquanaut" (Institute of Oceanology RAS). The meteorological conditions during observations varied considerably. The wind velocity changed from 0 up to 10 m/c, heaving - from 0 up to 4 balls. The short-term atmospheric precipitations were observed. The bottom topography was measured by echo-sounder. Investigation of the hydrological characteristics was carried out by combined SVP-CTD probe. The current field was measured by ADCP. The surface wave characteristics in length range 4 mm - 1 m were measured by X and Ka radar and two-dimensional optical spectrum analyzer. Air temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind velocity and direction were measured. Sonic anemometer-thermometer for recording horizontal and vertical components of the wind and temperature fluctuations in the surface layer was used. The connection of current field heterogeneities with a bottom configuration in region of depth dumping is investigated. The correlation of radar signal with current speed in near-surface region is observed also. For example, the slicks are observed

  17. Regional diversity of amphipoda in the Caribbean Sea.

    PubMed

    Martín, Alberto; Díaz, Yusbelly; Miloslavich, Patricia; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Guerra-García, José Manuel; Ortiz, Manuel; Valencia, Bellineth; Giraldo, Alan; Klein, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    The order Amphipoda is one of the most diverse within Peracarids, and comprises 6950 described marine species. Amphipod research in the Caribbean Sea began in the late 1800s, but has increased significantly since 1980. In this study, we analized the amphipod biodiversity (Caprellidea, Gammaridea, Hyperiidea, and Ingolfiellidea) of the Caribbean Sea. For this, we compiled available data on species diversity of marine amphipods (data bases: WoRMS and OBIS and published species lists) into a comprehensive taxonomic list by country for the ecoregions of the Caribbean. Additionally, we analized the relative contribution of each country to regional diversity and the rate of discovery of new species. The Caribbean amphipod fauna is composed of 535 species within 236 genera and 73 families for the higher taxon. The Western Caribbean ecoregion holds the largest diversity (282 species), while the Eastern Caribbean recorded the lowest one (73). Mexico and Venezuela recorded the largest number of species with 266 and 206, respectively. Twelve countries had less than 50 species. The richest suborder is the Gammaridea with 381 species followed by the suborder Hyperiidea with 116. From the total of 535 amphipod species reported for the Caribbean region, 218 have the Caribbean as the holotype locality, and 132 are endemic (about 25% of the total). Areas of higher diversity seem to be concentrated along the Mexican Caribbean, Cuba and the Northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia); however, such pattern is most likely reflecting local collection efforts and taxonomic expertise rather than actual distribution. Knowledge of amphipod species is mostly limited to shallow, near-shore waters, with little infonnation available on the deep sea fauna. Regional research priorities for this group should be focused on completing shallow water coastal inventories of species in Central America and the Greater and Lesser Antilles. In addition, sampling the deep sea ecosystems should

  18. Regional diversity of amphipoda in the Caribbean Sea.

    PubMed

    Martín, Alberto; Díaz, Yusbelly; Miloslavich, Patricia; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Guerra-García, José Manuel; Ortiz, Manuel; Valencia, Bellineth; Giraldo, Alan; Klein, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    The order Amphipoda is one of the most diverse within Peracarids, and comprises 6950 described marine species. Amphipod research in the Caribbean Sea began in the late 1800s, but has increased significantly since 1980. In this study, we analized the amphipod biodiversity (Caprellidea, Gammaridea, Hyperiidea, and Ingolfiellidea) of the Caribbean Sea. For this, we compiled available data on species diversity of marine amphipods (data bases: WoRMS and OBIS and published species lists) into a comprehensive taxonomic list by country for the ecoregions of the Caribbean. Additionally, we analized the relative contribution of each country to regional diversity and the rate of discovery of new species. The Caribbean amphipod fauna is composed of 535 species within 236 genera and 73 families for the higher taxon. The Western Caribbean ecoregion holds the largest diversity (282 species), while the Eastern Caribbean recorded the lowest one (73). Mexico and Venezuela recorded the largest number of species with 266 and 206, respectively. Twelve countries had less than 50 species. The richest suborder is the Gammaridea with 381 species followed by the suborder Hyperiidea with 116. From the total of 535 amphipod species reported for the Caribbean region, 218 have the Caribbean as the holotype locality, and 132 are endemic (about 25% of the total). Areas of higher diversity seem to be concentrated along the Mexican Caribbean, Cuba and the Northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia); however, such pattern is most likely reflecting local collection efforts and taxonomic expertise rather than actual distribution. Knowledge of amphipod species is mostly limited to shallow, near-shore waters, with little infonnation available on the deep sea fauna. Regional research priorities for this group should be focused on completing shallow water coastal inventories of species in Central America and the Greater and Lesser Antilles. In addition, sampling the deep sea ecosystems should

  19. Divergence preceding island formation among Aegean insular populations of the freshwater snail genus Pseudorientalia (Caenogastropoda: Truncatelloidea).

    PubMed

    Szarowska, Magdalena; Hofman, Sebastian; Osikowski, Artur; Falniowski, Andrzej

    2014-10-01

    Freshwater snails that inhabit islands are excellent model organisms for testing relationships between geological events and phylogeography, especially in the Aegean region. Although many Aegean islands were searched in the present study, species of the genus Pseudorientalia were only found on Lesvos, Samos, and Chios. Phylogenetic relationships between specimens living on these three islands were analysed using COI and 16S rRNA molecular markers and morphological data. A high level of diversity was found between islands. Genetic distances between clades showed differences high enough for the samples from different islands to be considered distinct species (p-distance: 0.105-0.133). These results are also supported by obvious morphological differences in shell morphology between islands. The mean divergence time between the Lesvos clade and Samos/Chios clade was 24.13 ± 3.30 Mya; between the Samos and Chios clades the divergence time was 14.80 ± 1.11 Mya. Our data suggest that high divergence may have occurred between Pseudorientalia populations during the Upper and Middle Miocene, when the Aegean region was part of a united landmass. It is possible that the observed highly divergent Pseudorientalia clades are relicts of high regional diversity that existed in the past. PMID:25284387

  20. 76 FR 3089 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Alaska Region Bering Sea & Aleutian Islands...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Region Bering Sea & Aleutian Islands Crab Permits AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration... of a currently approved collection. The Crab Rationalization Program allocates Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) crab resources among harvesters, processors, and coastal communities through...

  1. 76 FR 3090 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Alaska Region; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Region; Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Crab Arbitration AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric... extension of a currently approved collection. The Crab Rationalization Program allocates Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) crab resources among harvesters, processors, and coastal communities through...

  2. Moho depth and crustal thinning in the Marmara Sea region from gravity data inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kende, Julia; Henry, Pierre; Bayrakci, Gaye; Özeren, Sinan; Grall, Céline

    2016-04-01

    With a width comparable to the brittle crust thickness, the Sea of Marmara strike-slip basin appears as an intermediate case between two much studied end-member cases of basin-width-to-brittle-crust-thickness ratio: the Dead Sea and the Death Valley. But geophysical studies have shown evidences of at least 5 km of mantle uplift under the Marmara Sea, much larger than in the two other cases. We compiled data from reflection, refraction and tomography seismic studies to correct satellite and survey vessel gravity data (acquired during MARSITE cruise of Ifremer R/V Pourquoi Pas ?) from the effect of topography and sedimentary basins. Assuming that no other crustal mass heterogeneity affects the gravity measurement, we inverted the residual, with constraints from seismic studies, to calculate the topography of the Moho. The 3D model obtained shows a mantle uplift broadly correlated with the Marmara deep basins, but the crustal thinning spreads southward further than the basin limits, This is explained by ductile flow in the lower crust between a northern zone where the thinning is closely related to the Marmara Fault strike-slip basins and a southern zone where extension appears associated with older crustal detachment systems. Finally, we estimated the extension budget in the area during the Marmara Sea formation by comparing our 3D crust volume with an initial crust of constant thickness. The increase in surface area, 2100±300 km2, is compatible with present day GPS velocity field measurement assuming steady state and an initiation of extension in the area about 5 Myr ago. We conclude that although the zone went through tectonic reorganizations during the Pliocene as the North Anatolian Fault system propagated westward, the overall extension rate in the area could have been stable, or decreasing with time, and thus should be understood in a broader geodynamic framework comprising the Aegean subduction.

  3. Modelling of the anthropogenic tritium transient and its decay product helium-3 in the Mediterranean Sea using a high-resolution regional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, M.; Dutay, J.-C.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Beranger, K.; Arsouze, T.; Beuvier, J.; Palmieri, J.; Le-vu, B.; Roether, W.

    2014-12-01

    This numerical study provides the first simulation of the anthropogenic tritium invasion and its decay product helium-3 (3He) in the Mediterranean Sea. The simulation covers the entire tritium (3H) transient generated by the atmospheric nuclear-weapon tests performed in the 1950s and early 1960s and run till 2011. Tritium, helium-3 and their derived age estimates are particularly suitable for studying intermediate and deep-water ventilation and spreading of water masses at intermediate/deep levels. The simulation is made using a high resolution regional model NEMO-MED12 forced at the surface with prescribed tritium evolution derived from observations. The simulation is compared to measurements of tritium and helium-3 performed along large-scale transects in the Mediterranean Sea during the last few decades on cruises of Meteor M5/6, M31/1, M44/4, M51/2, M84/3, and Poseidon 234. The results show that the input function used for the tritium, generates a realistic distribution of the main hydrographic features of the Mediterranean Sea circulation. In the eastern basin, the results highlight the weak formation of Adriatic Deep Water in the model, which explains its weak contribution to the Eastern Mediterranean Deep Water in the Ionian sub-basin. It produces a realistic representation of the Eastern Mediterranean Transient signal, simulating a deep-water formation in the Aegean sub-basin at the beginning of the 1993, with a realistic timing of deep-water renewal in the eastern basin. In the western basin, the unusual intense deep convection event of winter 2005 in the Gulf of Lions during the Western Mediterranean Transition is simulated. However the spreading of the recently ventilated deep water toward the South is too weak. The ventilation and spreading of the Levantine Intermediate Water from the eastern basin toward the western basin is simulated with realistic tracer-age distribution compared to observation-based estimates.

  4. Shallow Drilling In The Salton Sea Region, The Thermal Anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R. L.; Kasameyer, P. W.; Younker, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    During two shallow thermal drilling programs, thermal measurements were obtained in 56 shallow (76.2 m) and one intermediate (457.3 m) depth holes located both onshore and offshore along the southern margin of the Salton Sea in the Imperial Valley, California. These data complete the surficial coverage of the thermal anomaly, revealing the shape and lateral extent of the hydrothermal system. The thermal data show the region of high thermal gradients to extend only a short distance offshore to the north of the Quaternary volcanic domes which are exposed along the southern shore of the Salton Sea. The thermal anomaly has an arcuate shape, about 4 km wide and 12 km long. Across the center of the anomaly, the transition zone between locations exhibiting high thermal gradients and those exhibiting regional thermal gradients is quite narrow. Thermal gradients rise from near regional (0.09 C/m) to extreme (0.83 C/m) in only 2.4 km. The heat flow in the central part of the anomaly is >600 mW/m{sup 2} and in some areas exceeds 1200 mW/m{sup 2}. The shape of the thermal anomaly is asymmetric with respect to the line of volcanoes previously thought to represent the center of the field, with its center line offset south of the volcanic buttes. There is no broad thermal anomaly associated with the magnetic high that extends offshore to the northeast from the volcanic domes. These observations of the thermal anomaly provide important constraints for models of the circulation of the hydrothermal system. Thermal budgets based on a simple model for this hydrothermal system indicate that the heat influx rate for local ''hot spots'' in the region may be large enough to account for the rate of heat flux from the entire Salton Trough.

  5. Regional Reanalysis over the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieger, J. R.; Zhang, J.; Liu, F.; Shulski, M.; Tao, W.; Zhang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Potential future oil development in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas is accompanied by the threat of oil spills. In the event of a spill, time is of the essence in directing mitigation, cleanup, and recovery efforts, and thus improving the predictability of oil spill transport is of great importance. As the surface wind field is the primary factor in driving ocean currents, and thus the dispersal of any accompanying oil, accurate modeling of the surface winds is essential in enhancing the prediction of oil spill transport. As such, a study of the mesoscale meteorology of the Beaufort/Chukchi region has been conducted in an effort to ensure the accurate simulation of near-surface winds, which will thereby lead to improved prediction of oil spill dispersal. The final product of this effort is a long-term, high-quality, high-resolution reanalysis of the region's mesoscale meteorology that will be used to drive oil spill transport models. The Beaufort/Chukchi region represents a highly complex geographical environment. It comprises highly varying topography, ranging from the sharp peaks of the Brooks Range to the broad flatlands of the North Slope, and is characterized by a constantly changing sea ice presence in the ocean. The atmospheric environment is equally complex, with extremes of cold and wind a fixture of the region's climatology. Together, these present a great challenge to the accurate modeling of the Beaufort/Chukchi regional meteorology, and correspondingly of the associated surface winds. In addition, due to its remote nature, observations are sparse throughout the area, further complicating efforts to accurately initialize and simulate atmospheric conditions in the region, and making it all the more important to fully utilize any available observations through data assimilation. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and its variational data assimilation system were used to conduct numerical simulations of the region's mesoscale

  6. Sensitivity of modeled atmospheric nitrogen species and nitrogen deposition to variations in sea salt emissions in the North Sea and Baltic Sea regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Daniel; Matthias, Volker; Bieser, Johannes; Aulinger, Armin; Quante, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Coarse sea salt particles are emitted ubiquitously from the ocean surface by wave-breaking and bubble-bursting processes. These particles impact the atmospheric chemistry by affecting the condensation of gas-phase species and, thus, indirectly the nucleation of new fine particles, particularly in regions with significant air pollution. In this study, atmospheric particle concentrations are modeled for the North Sea and Baltic Sea regions in northwestern Europe using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system and are compared to European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurement data. The sea salt emission module is extended by a salinity-dependent scaling of the sea salt emissions because the salinity in large parts of the Baltic Sea is very low, which leads to considerably lower sea salt mass emissions compared to other oceanic regions. The resulting improvement in predicted sea salt concentrations is assessed. The contribution of surf zone emissions is considered separately. Additionally, the impacts of sea salt particles on atmospheric nitrate and ammonium concentrations and on nitrogen deposition are evaluated. The comparisons with observational data show that sea salt concentrations are commonly overestimated at coastal stations and partly underestimated farther inland. The introduced salinity scaling improves the predicted Baltic Sea sea salt concentrations considerably. The dates of measured peak concentrations are appropriately reproduced by the model. The impact of surf zone emissions is negligible in both seas. Nevertheless, they might be relevant because surf zone emissions were cut at an upper threshold in this study. Deactivating sea salt leads to minor increases in NH3 + NH4+ and HNO3 + NO3- and a decrease in NO3- concentrations. However, the overall effect on NH3 + NH4+ and HNO3 + NO3- concentrations is smaller than the deviation from the measurements. Nitrogen wet deposition is underestimated by the model at most

  7. Shallow drilling in the Salton Sea region: The thermal anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R.L.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.

    1988-11-10

    During two shallow thermal drilling programs, thermal measurements were obtained in 56 shallow (76.2 m) and one intermediate (457.3 m) depth holes located both onshore and offshore along the southern margin of the Salton Sea in the Imperial Valley, California. These data complete the surficial coverage of the thermal anomaly, revealing the shape and lateral extent of the hydrothermal system. The thermal data show the region of high thermal gradients to extend only a short distance offshore to the north of the Quaternary volcanic domes which are exposed along the southern shore of the Salton Sea. The central thermal anomaly has an arcuate shape, about 4 km wide and 12 km long. Across the center of the anomaly, the transition zone between locations exhibiting high thermal gradients and those exhibiting regional thermal gradients is quite narrow. Thermal gradients rise from near regional (0.09 /sup 0/C/m) to extreme (0.83 /sup 0/C/m) in only 2.4 km. The heat flow in the central part of the anomaly is greater than 600 mW/m/sup 2/ and in the two local anomalies exceeds 1200 mW/m/sup 2/. The shape of the thermal anomaly is asymmetric with respect to the line of volcanoes previously thought to represent the center of the field, with its center line offset south of the volcanic buttes. There is no broad thermal anomaly associated with the magnetic high that extends offshore to the northeast from the volcanic domes.

  8. Regional Sea Level Variation: California Coastal Subsidence (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blewitt, G.; Hammond, W. C.; Nerem, R.

    2013-12-01

    Satellite altimetry over the last two decades has measured variations in geocentric sea level (GSL), relative to the Earth system center of mass, providing valuable data to test models of physical oceanography and the effects of global climate change. The societal impacts of sea level change however relate to variations in local sea level (LSL), relative to the land at the coast. Therefore, assessing the impacts of sea level change requires coastal measurements of vertical land motion (VLM). Indeed, ΔLSL = ΔGSL - ΔVLM, with subsidence mapping 1:1 into LSL. Measurements of secular coastal VLM also allow tide-gauge data to test models of GSL over the last century in some locations, which cannot be provided by satellite data. Here we use GPS geodetic data within 15 km of the US west coast to infer regional, secular VLM. A total of 89 GPS stations met the criteria that time series span >4.5 yr, and do not have obvious non-linear variation, as may be caused by local instability. VLM rates for the GPS stations are derived in the secular reference frame ITRF2008, which aligns with the Earth system center of mass to ×0.5 mm/yr. We find that regional VLM has different behavior north and south of the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ). The California coast has a coherent regional pattern of subsidence averaging 0.5 mm/yr, with an increasing trend to the north. This trend generally matches GIA model predictions. Around San Francisco Bay, the observed coastal subsidence of 1.0 mm/yr coherently decreases moving away from the Pacific Ocean to very small subsidence on the east shores of the bay. This gradient is likely caused by San Andreas-Hayward Fault tectonics, and possibly by differential surface loading across the bay and Sacramento-San Joachim River Delta. Thus in addition to the trend in subsidence from GIA going northward along the California coast, tectonics may also play a role where the plate boundary fault system approaches the coast. In contrast, we find that VLM

  9. Anomalous dispersion of sea ice in the Fram Strait region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielski, A.; Badin, G.; Kaleschke, L.

    2015-03-01

    The single-particle dispersion of sea ice in the Fram Strait region is investigated using ice drift buoys deployed from 2002 to 2009 within the Fram Strait Cyclones and the Arctic Climate System Study campaigns. A new method to estimate the direction of the mean flow, based on a satellite drift product, is introduced. As a result, the bias in the dispersion introduced by the mean flow is eliminated considering only the displacements of the buoys in the cross-stream direction. Results show an absolute dispersion growing quadratically in time for the first 3 days and an anomalous dispersion regime exhibiting a strongly self-similar scaling following a 5/4 power law for time scales larger than 6 days persisting over the whole time series of length 32 days. The non-Gaussian distribution of the velocity fluctuations with a skewness of -0.15 and a kurtosis of 7.33 as well as the slope of the Lagrangian frequency spectrum between -2 and -1 are in agreement with the anomalous diffusion regime. Comparison with data from the International Arctic Buoy Program yields similar results with an anomalous dispersion starting after 10 days and persisting over the whole time series of length 50 days. The results suggest the presence of deformation and shear acting on the sea ice dispersion. The high correlation between the cross-stream displacements and the cross-stream wind velocities shows the important role of the wind as a source for the anomalous dispersion.

  10. Quaternary tectonic and sedimentary history of the shelf area between the Saros and Edremit Troughs, NE Aegean Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpar, B.

    2009-04-01

    On the basis of new swath bathymetric and high-resolution sparker reflection data, Quaternary tectonic and sedimentary history of the Aegean continental shelf area between the gulfs of Saros and Edremit was investigated. These gulfs accommodate two complex neotectonic structures which control the major geodynamic processes in the region; these are the northern and middle strands of the North Anatolian fault (NAF), respectively. A mature erosion surface, partially intersected by some vertical faults, can indeed be interpreted from the clear reflections over the Miocene basement, which is represented by various folded layers. This acoustical surface forms the base level of deposition for the studied shelf area and overlain by various depositional basins elongated between the gulfs of Saros and Edremit. Depending on the global sea level changes, water exchange between the seas of Mediterranean and Marmara, and partly on some terrestrial inputs, these basins have been developed. Sea-level decreased during the glacial stages while the Mediterranean conditions prevailed during the interglacial stages. As evidenced from the formation of the Pleistocene coastal terraces in the Canakkale (Dardanelles) Strait region and under the control of compressional forces along the NAF zone a regional uplift of 0.2-0.9 mm per year is another major component in the tectonic history. The depositional units over the mature Pliocene erosion surface were mainly controlled by the fluvial discharges of the Karamenderes paleo-river and some others during the postglacial times, by sea-level oscillations which determined the proximity of basins to river mouths, and by oceanographic conditions. A rise in basement has been traced at 60-65 m below the modern sea level which has been played an important role in the sediment transportation occurred at the exit of the Canakkale Strait. The folded layers above the acoustical basement coincide with the development of the transpressional Anafartalar

  11. Tertiary paleomagnetism of regions around the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, M.; Haston, R.; Lin, Jin-Lu; Richter, B.; Schmidtke, E.; Almasco, J.

    Paleomagnetic data from the Philippine Sea Plate (PSP) reveal a history of plate-wide clockwise (CW) rotation and northerly translation since the late Eocene about a nearby pole to the east. The motion has generated left lateral oblique convergence between the Philippine Sea Plate and S.E. Asia. Paleomagnetic data from Luzon in the northern Philippines show early Miocene CCW rotation followed by late Miocene CW rotation. In contrast, the Southern and Central Philippines display early Miocene CW rotation and unrotated late Miocene directions. These results define two different paleomagnetic domains with distinct post early Miocene histories. Pre-Miocene CCW rotation is suggested by data from Zambales, the Visayas and the Celebes Sea. In Borneo, a history of Tertiary CCW rotation has been found in Sarawak, and Sabah. Conflicting results have been reported from Kalimantan, some show no rotation with respect to Eurasia, while others give CCW rotations. In the Malaysian peninsula, the Segamat basalts and Kuantan dykes, of probable late Cretaceous early Tertiary age show CCW rotations similar to those seen in Sarawak. To the north peninsular Thailand, CW rotations have been found in two Miocene non-marine basins. Late Tertiary basalts from Northern and Central Thailand yield similar CW rotations while coeval flows on the Khorat plateau in Eastern Thailand are unrotated. The tectonic implications of the results remain problematical. In particular, the relative importance of true plate rotations and localized rotation of upper crustal blocks in distributed shear zones is unclear. The substantial region of CCW rotation in Borneo, the Celebes Sea and the Philippines is consistent with the broad features of the Holloway model, although the timing of the rotations precludes simple coherent rotation. The model must also be modified to include the effect of the left lateral oblique convergence between the PSP and Eurasia. The CW rotations seen in peninsular Thailand and Malaysia

  12. Modeling of the anthropogenic tritium transient, and its decay product Helium-3, in the Mediterranean Sea, using a high-resolution regional model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, Mohamed; Dutay, Jean-Claude; Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Beranger, Karine; Arsouze, Thomas; Beuvier, Jonathan; Palmieri, Julien; Le-Vu, Briac; Roether, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    This numerical study provides, for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea, a simulation of the anthropogenic tritium invasion and its decay product helium-3. The simulation is starting in 1950 and go up to 2011. It thus covers a 60-year period spanning the entire tritium transient generated by the atmospheric nuclear-weapon tests performed in the 1950s and early 1960s. The tritium is known as a passive tracer, which allows a good representation/signature of the upper water stratification, as well as, the high mixing in convection areas and the spreading at intermediate/deep levels. The tracer simulation is done using a high resolution regional model NEMO-MED12 (Beuvier et al., JGR, 2012) with at surface prescribed tritium concentration according to the temporal evolution derived from observations (see Roether et al., OS, 2013). Several measurement of tritium and helium-3 performed along large scale transects in the Mediterranean Sea during the last decades allow a comparison of the simulated results with numerous in situ sections from cruises of Meteor M5/6, M31/1, M44/4, M51/2, M84/3, and Poseidon 234. The results show that the parameterization used for the tritium boundary conditions generates realistic results. Besides we calculate the tracer-age distributions according to the relationship between tritium and its radioactive decay product helium-3. In the eastern basin, the tracer simulation results highlight the weak formation of Adriatic Deep Water (ADW) in the Adriatic Sea followed by a week contribution to the Eastern Mediterranean Deep Water (EMDW) in the Ionian sub-basin while it shows a good representation of the Eastern Mediterranean Transient (EMT) signal from the Aegean Sea followed by a great contribution to the EMDW. In the western basin, the particularly intense deep convection event of winter 2005 in the Gulf of Lions during the Western Mediterranean Transition (WMT) is well simulated. However the spreading of the recently ventilated deep water to

  13. Evolutionary processes in a continental island system: molecular phylogeography of the Aegean Nigella arvensis alliance (Ranunculaceae) inferred from chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Bittkau, C; Comes, H P

    2005-11-01

    Continental shelf island systems, created by rising sea levels, provide a premier setting for studying the effects of past fragmentation, dispersal, and genetic drift on taxon diversification. We used phylogeographical (nested clade) and population genetic analyses to elucidate the relative roles of these processes in the evolutionary history of the Aegean Nigella arvensis alliance (= 'coenospecies'). We surveyed chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) variation in 455 individuals from 47 populations (nine taxa) of the alliance throughout its core range in the Aegean Archipelago and surrounding mainland areas of Greece and Turkey. The study revealed the presence of three major lineages, with largely nonoverlapping distributions in the Western, Central, and Eastern Aegean. There is evidence supporting the idea that these major lineages evolved in situ from a widespread (pan-Aegean) ancestral stock as a result of multiple fragmentation events, possibly due to the influence of post-Messinian sea flooding, Pleistocene eustatic changes and corresponding climate fluctuations. Over-sea dispersal and founder events appear to have played a rather insignificant role in the group's history. Rather, all analytical approaches identified the alliance as an organism group with poor seed dispersal capabilities and a susceptibility to genetic drift. In particular, we inferred that the observed level of cpDNA differentiation between Kikladian island populations of Nigella degenii largely reflects population history, (viz. Holocene island fragmentation) and genetic drift in the near absence of seed flow since their time of common ancestry. Overall, our cpDNA data for the N. arvensis alliance in general, and N. degenii in particular, indicate that historical events were important in determining the phylogeographical patterns seen, and that genetic drift has historically been relatively more influential on population structure than has cytoplasmic gene flow.

  14. Sensitivity of modeled atmospheric nitrogen species to variations in sea salt emissions in the North and Baltic Sea regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, D.; Matthias, V.; Bieser, J.; Aulinger, A.; Quante, M.

    2015-10-01

    Coarse sea salt particles are emitted ubiquitously from the oceans' surfaces by wave breaking and bubble bursting processes. These particles impact atmospheric chemistry by affecting condensation of gas-phase species and nucleation of new fine particles, particularly in regions with high air pollution. In this study, atmospheric particle concentrations are modeled for the North and Baltic Sea regions, Northwestern Europe, using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system and evaluated against European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) measurement data. As model extension, sea salt emissions are scaled by water salinity because of low salinity in large parts of the Baltic Sea and in certain river estuaries. The resulting improvement in predicted sea salt concentrations is assessed. The contribution of surf zone emissions is separately considered. Additionally, the impact of sea salt particles on atmospheric nitrate, ammonium and sulfate concentrations is evaluated. The comparisons show that sea salt concentrations are commonly overestimated at coastal stations and partly underestimated when going inland. The introduced salinity scaling improves predicted Baltic Sea sea salt concentrations considerably. Dates of measured peak concentrations are appropriately reproduced by the model. The impact of surf zone emissions is negligible in both seas. Nevertheless, they might be relevant because surf zone emissions were cut at an upper threshold in this study. Deactivating sea salt leads to a minor increase of NH4+ and NO3- and a minor decrease of SO42- concentrations. However, the overall effect is very low and lower than the deviation from measurements. Size resolved measurements of Na+, NH4+, NO3-, and SO42- are needed for a more detailed analysis on the impact of sea salt particles.

  15. Variability of the Amundsen Sea Low and the Associated Regional Sea Ice Trends in the AO-UMUKCA Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jrrar, Amna; Abraham, N. Luke; Holland, David; Pyle, John A.

    2015-04-01

    Significant Sea ice loss in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas, and regional warming in West Antarctica and the Antarctica Peninsula have been observed over the past few decades. These changes are affected by the presence of the Amundsen Sea Low (ASL), a quasi-stationary area of climatological low pressure that exists over the South Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean between the Antarctic Peninsula and the Ross Sea. Previous studies have shown that the circulation in the ASL sector region is strongly influenced by large-scale patterns of atmospheric variability, such as the southern annular mode (SAM) and El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Studies have also demonstrated a deepening of the ASL, particularly in austral spring and to a lesser extent autumn, the former related to decreases in the underlying cyclone central pressures and the latter previously suggested as due to stratospheric ozone depletion. However, two recent studies have demonstrated that surface warming related to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) reduces the surface pressure in the Amundsen Sea and contributes to the observed dipole-like sea-ice redistribution between the Ross and Amundsen-Bellingshausen seas and to the Antarctic Peninsula warming. We use the recently developed atmosphere-ocean chemistry-climate model AO-UMUKCA to investigate factors affecting the variability of the ASL and subsequently sea ice trends in the Amundsen-Bellingshausen seas. We use output from two simulations, a pre-industrial control integration forced with 1850s climate, and a time slice integration forced with 2000s climate. The control integration is used to estimate the internal variability of ASL, and in calculating the modeled sea ice trends in absence of external forcing. We investigate whether changes in the ASL, and subsequently sea ice trends are linked to variability in tropical sea surface temperatures. The different combinations of SAM-ENSO phase are also studied and linked to changes in

  16. Arc-continent collision in Banda Sea region

    SciTech Connect

    Bowin, C.; Purdy, G.M.; Johnston, C.; Shor, G.; Lawver, L.; Hartono, H.M.S.; Jezek, P.

    1980-06-01

    A 2-month marine geophysical study of the Banda arc region was conducted in late 1976 using the R/V Atlantis II of WHOI' and the R/V Thomas Washington of SIO; 19 seismic refraction lines were successfully completed. Oceanic crust underlies the Banda Sea and Weber Deep. Continental crust 35 to 40 km thick underlies the Australian Shelf. Thick continental crust is also present beneath the Timor and Aru Troughs. Low-amplitude magnetic anomalies are present over the Australian Shelf and extend to near the western edge of the Banda outer arc and, together with the presence of metamorphic rocks, suggest that continental crust may extend to the eastern lip of the Weber Deep. Continuous seismic reflection profiling shows the Australian Shelf sedimentary sequence dipping beneath the accretionary prisms of the outer Banda arc at the Timor and Seram Troughs: the tectonic front of the subduction zone lies along the axis of these troughs. The bathymetric profile on the outer flank of the Timor and Seram Troughs is unusual in that the profile asymptotically approaches a shallow depth near sea level and no outer rise is present as at oceanic trenches. It is concluded that the Outer Banda arc from Buru around to Timor, and possibly to Sumba, contained Australian continental crustal blocks and fragments prior to its collision with the Australian margin in the last 3 to 6 m.y. Continuous convergence following the addition of a thick Australian margin sedimentary sequence to the south Banda subduction zone has led to deformation being distributed over the width of the arc and not simply being taken up on a single thrust surface. This scenario helps reconcile the geologic relations on Timor, Seram, and Buru with the structural continuity of the Timor Trough with the Java Trench. 30 figures, 1 table.

  17. Diversity and distribution of deep-sea shrimps in the Ross Sea region of Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Basher, Zeenatul; Bowden, David A; Costello, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Although decapod crustaceans are widespread in the oceans, only Natantia (shrimps) are common in the Antarctic. Because remoteness, depth and ice cover restrict sampling in the South Ocean, species distribution modelling is a useful tool for evaluating distributions. We used physical specimen and towed camera data to describe the diversity and distribution of shrimps in the Ross Sea region of Antarctica. Eight shrimp species were recorded: Chorismus antarcticus; Notocrangon antarcticus; Nematocarcinus lanceopes; Dendrobranchiata; Pasiphaea scotiae; Pasiphaea cf. ledoyeri; Petalidium sp., and a new species of Lebbeus. For the two most common species, N. antarcticus and N. lanceopes, we used maximum entropy modelling, based on records of 60 specimens and over 1130 observations across 23 sites in depths from 269 m to 3433 m, to predict distributions in relation to environmental variables. Two independent sets of environmental data layers at 0.05° and 0.5° resolution respectively, showed how spatial resolution affected the model. Chorismus antarcticus and N. antarcticus were found only on the continental shelf and upper slopes, while N. lanceopes, Lebbeus n. sp., Dendrobranchiata, Petalidium sp., Pasiphaea cf. ledoyeri, and Pasiphaea scotiae were found on the slopes, seamounts and abyssal plain. The environmental variables that contributed most to models for N. antarcticus were depth, chlorophyll-a concentration, temperature, and salinity, and for N. lanceopes were depth, ice concentration, seabed slope/rugosity, and temperature. The relative ranking, but not the composition of these variables changed in models using different spatial resolutions, and the predicted extent of suitable habitat was smaller in models using the finer-scale environmental layers. Our modelling indicated that shrimps were widespread throughout the Ross Sea region and were thus likely to play important functional role in the ecosystem, and that the spatial resolution of data needs to be

  18. Diversity and distribution of deep-sea shrimps in the Ross Sea region of Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Basher, Zeenatul; Bowden, David A; Costello, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Although decapod crustaceans are widespread in the oceans, only Natantia (shrimps) are common in the Antarctic. Because remoteness, depth and ice cover restrict sampling in the South Ocean, species distribution modelling is a useful tool for evaluating distributions. We used physical specimen and towed camera data to describe the diversity and distribution of shrimps in the Ross Sea region of Antarctica. Eight shrimp species were recorded: Chorismus antarcticus; Notocrangon antarcticus; Nematocarcinus lanceopes; Dendrobranchiata; Pasiphaea scotiae; Pasiphaea cf. ledoyeri; Petalidium sp., and a new species of Lebbeus. For the two most common species, N. antarcticus and N. lanceopes, we used maximum entropy modelling, based on records of 60 specimens and over 1130 observations across 23 sites in depths from 269 m to 3433 m, to predict distributions in relation to environmental variables. Two independent sets of environmental data layers at 0.05° and 0.5° resolution respectively, showed how spatial resolution affected the model. Chorismus antarcticus and N. antarcticus were found only on the continental shelf and upper slopes, while N. lanceopes, Lebbeus n. sp., Dendrobranchiata, Petalidium sp., Pasiphaea cf. ledoyeri, and Pasiphaea scotiae were found on the slopes, seamounts and abyssal plain. The environmental variables that contributed most to models for N. antarcticus were depth, chlorophyll-a concentration, temperature, and salinity, and for N. lanceopes were depth, ice concentration, seabed slope/rugosity, and temperature. The relative ranking, but not the composition of these variables changed in models using different spatial resolutions, and the predicted extent of suitable habitat was smaller in models using the finer-scale environmental layers. Our modelling indicated that shrimps were widespread throughout the Ross Sea region and were thus likely to play important functional role in the ecosystem, and that the spatial resolution of data needs to be

  19. Diversity and Distribution of Deep-Sea Shrimps in the Ross Sea Region of Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Basher, Zeenatul; Bowden, David A.; Costello, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Although decapod crustaceans are widespread in the oceans, only Natantia (shrimps) are common in the Antarctic. Because remoteness, depth and ice cover restrict sampling in the South Ocean, species distribution modelling is a useful tool for evaluating distributions. We used physical specimen and towed camera data to describe the diversity and distribution of shrimps in the Ross Sea region of Antarctica. Eight shrimp species were recorded: Chorismus antarcticus; Notocrangon antarcticus; Nematocarcinus lanceopes; Dendrobranchiata; Pasiphaea scotiae; Pasiphaea cf. ledoyeri; Petalidium sp., and a new species of Lebbeus. For the two most common species, N. antarcticus and N. lanceopes, we used maximum entropy modelling, based on records of 60 specimens and over 1130 observations across 23 sites in depths from 269 m to 3433 m, to predict distributions in relation to environmental variables. Two independent sets of environmental data layers at 0.05° and 0.5° resolution respectively, showed how spatial resolution affected the model. Chorismus antarcticus and N. antarcticus were found only on the continental shelf and upper slopes, while N. lanceopes, Lebbeus n. sp., Dendrobranchiata, Petalidium sp., Pasiphaea cf. ledoyeri, and Pasiphaea scotiae were found on the slopes, seamounts and abyssal plain. The environmental variables that contributed most to models for N. antarcticus were depth, chlorophyll-a concentration, temperature, and salinity, and for N. lanceopes were depth, ice concentration, seabed slope/rugosity, and temperature. The relative ranking, but not the composition of these variables changed in models using different spatial resolutions, and the predicted extent of suitable habitat was smaller in models using the finer-scale environmental layers. Our modelling indicated that shrimps were widespread throughout the Ross Sea region and were thus likely to play important functional role in the ecosystem, and that the spatial resolution of data needs to be

  20. Characteristics of convective boundary layer over the Arabian sea region

    SciTech Connect

    Parasnis, S.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Convective Boundary Layer (CBL) over the oceanic regions plays an important role in regulating the transport of energy and moisture upward into the atmosphere from the surface. CBL structure over the Arabian sea region has been explored using the aerological soundings at two ships viz. SHIRSHOV (12.5{degrees}N, 68{degrees}E ) and OKEAN (14.5{degrees} N, 66{degrees} E) during MONSOON-77. Conserved variable analysis of the mean data sets obtained during the period of 29 June - 16 July, 1977 revealed salient features of the CBL over these regions. The vertical gradients of saturation point parameters viz. virtual potential temperature ({Theta}{sub v}), equivalent potential temperature ({Theta}{sub e}), saturated equivalent potential temperature ({Theta}{sub es}), saturation pressure deficit (P*) and the mixing ratio (q) were used to characterize the different sublayers such as subcloud layer, cloud layer and inversion/stable layer. The mean cloud base was around 950 hPa and the subcloud layer has nearly constant {Theta}{sub v}. The moist layer was associated with unstable {Theta}{sub es} with nearly constant value of P* ({approximately} -40 hPa). This cloud layer was capped by the stable (over OKEAN). The {Theta}{sub e} minimum over OKEAN was observed at 650 hPa (50 hPa above the CBL top) indicating that at some time the convection had reached deeper levels. The {Theta}{sub e} -q diagrams showed a characteristic mixing line up through the cloud and stable layer to the top of CBL. The low level stability analysis using the {Theta}{sub e} and {Theta}{sub es} profiles indicated conditions favorable for shallow convection over OKEAN and for deep convection over SHIRSHOV. The above characteristic features could be attributed to the prevailing weather conditions at OKEAN and SHIRSHOV. The results are discussed.

  1. 15 CFR 918.5 - Eligibility, qualifications, and responsibilities-Sea Grant Regional Consortia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-State approach to solving problems or meeting needs relating to ocean, Great Lakes, and coastal... above as evaluated by a site review team composed of members of the Sea Grant Review Panel, the Office... Regional Consortium candidate's Sea Grant Program must be relevant to regional opportunities and...

  2. Regional seasonal forecasts of the Arctic sea ice in two coupled climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevallier, Matthieu; Guémas, Virginie; Salas y Mélia, David; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    The predictive capabilities of two state-of-the-art coupled atmosphere-ocean global climate models (CNRM-CM5.1 and EC-Earth v2.3) in seasonal forecasting of the Arctic sea ice will be presented with a focus on regional skill. 5-month hindcasts of September sea ice area in the Arctic peripherial seas (Barents-Kara seas, Laptev-East Siberian seas, Chukchi sea and Beaufort sea) and March sea ice area in the marginal ice zones (Barents, Greenland, Labrador, Bering and Okhotsk sea) have been produced over the period 1990-2009. Systems mainly differ with respect to the initialization strategy, the ensemble generation techniques and the sea ice components. Predictive skill, assessed in terms of actual and potential predictability, is comparable in the two systems for both summer and winter hindcasts. Most interestingly, the multi-model prediction is often better than individual predictions in several sub-basins, including the Barents sea in the winter and most shelf seas in the summer. Systematic biases are also reduced using the multi-model predictions. Results from this study show that a regional zoom of global seasonal forecasts could be useful for operational needs. This study also show that the multi-model approach may be the step forward in producing accurate and reliable seasonal forecasts based on coupled global climate models.

  3. Arctic sea ice 1973-1987 - Seasonal, regional, and interannual variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Cavalieri, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    The seasonal, regional, and interannual variations in the Northern-Hemisphere sea-ice cover were investigated for the time period 1973-1987, using data derived from the Nimbus-5 ESMR and the Nimbus-7 SMMR. The records show an average seasonal cycle of sea-ice cover, ranging from a summer minimum of 8.5 x 10 to the 6th sq km in September to a winter maximum of 15 x 10 to the 6th sq km in March, with considerable interannual variability found both regionally and hemispherically. Some regions (e.g., the Baffin Bay/Davis Strait, were found to exhibit upward trends in sea-ice extents, while other regions (e.g., the Kara Sea and the Barents Sea) exhibited downward trend. However, the record for the Northern Hemisphere overall showed no significant trend over the 1973-1987 period, giving no evidence of consistent warming or cooling of the north polar region.

  4. Focal Mechanisms at the convergent plate boundary in Southern Aegean, Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshou, Alexandra; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Drakatos, George; Evangelidis, Christos; Karakostas, Vasilios; Vallianatos, Filippos; Makropoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-05-01

    Greece is characterized by high seismicity, mainly due to the collision between the European and the African lithospheric plates and the dextral strike slip motion along the North Anatolia Fault zone and North Aegean Trough. The subduction of the Eastern Mediterranean oceanic plate along the Hellenic Arc under the Aegean microplate along with the accompanied roll back of the descending slab is considered the main tectonic feature of the region (Papazachos and Comninakis 1971; Makropoulos and Burton 1984; Papazachos et al. 2000a, b). The divergent motion between the Aegean block and mainland Europe is indicated by an extension zone in the northern Aegean, with Crete and Aegean diverging from mainland Europe at a rate of about 3.5 cm yr-1 with Africa moving northward relative to Europe at a rate of about 1 cm yr-1 (Dewey et al., 1989; Papazachos et al., 1998; Mc-Clusky et al., 2000; Reilinger et al., 2006). In this tectonically complicated area diverge types of deformation are manifested, in addition to the dominant subduction processes. Aiming to shed more light in the seismotectonic properties and faulting seismological data from the Hellenic Unified Seismological Network (HUSN) were selected and analyzed for determining focal mechanisms using the method of moment tensor inversion, additional to the ones being available from the routine moment tensor solutions and several publications. Thus, 31 new fault plane solutions for events with magnitude M>4.0, are presented in this study, by using the software of Ammon (Randall et al., 1995). For this scope the data from at least 4 stations were used with an adequate azimuthal coverage and with an epicentral distance not more than 350 km. The preparation of the data includes the deconvolution of instruments response, then the velocity was integrated to displacement and finally the horizontal components were rotated to radial and transverse. Following, the signal was inverted using the reflectivity method of Kennett (1983

  5. Investigations at regional scales of reconstruct sea level variability over the past 50 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, M.; Meyssignac, B.; Llovel, W.; Cazenave, A. A.; Rogel, P.

    2010-12-01

    Sea level rise is a major consequence of global warming, which threatens many low-lying, highly populated coastal regions of the world. In such regions, sea level rise amplifies other stresses due to natural phenomena (e.g., sediment load-induced ground subsidence in deltaic areas, vertical ground motions due to tectonics, volcanism and post-glacial rebound, etc.) or human activities (e.g., ground subsidence due to ground water pumping and/or oil extraction, urbanisation, etc.). Observations for the recent decades from tide gauges and satellite altimetry show that sea level rise is far from being geographically uniform. Here we present an analysis of decadal / multi-decadal sea level variations in a number of selected regions: Tropical Pacific, Indian Ocean, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean region. For that purpose, we use a reconstruction of past sea level -last 50 years- based on the joint statistical analysis of tide gauge records and gridded sea level from an ocean circulation model. We highlight the sea level trends over the past 50 years in each region. Comparison between reconstructed sea-level trends with tide gauge records at sites not included in the reconstruction shows general good agreement, suggesting that regional trend patterns infer from the reconstruction are realistic (in addition, reconstructed sea-level agrees well with altimeter measurements since 1993). We find above-global average sea level rise since 1950 at several islands in the Eastern Tropical Pacific (Funafuti, Samoa, Kiribati, Cook Islands). Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analyses are performed for each region to describe accurately the spatio-temporal interannual variability. We also compute spatial trend patterns in thermal expansion to determine which part of the observed regional sea level variability can be attributed to change in ocean temperature.

  6. Regional variability of a projected sea ice-free Arctic during the summer months

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laliberté, F.; Howell, S. E. L.; Kushner, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Climate projections of sea ice retreat under anthropogenic climate change at the regional scale and in summer months other than September have largely not been evaluated. Information at this level of detail is vital for future planning of safe Arctic marine activities. Here the timing of when Arctic waters will be reliably ice free across Arctic regions from June to October is presented. It is shown that during this century regions along the Northern Sea Route and Arctic Bridge will be more reliably ice free than regions along the Northwest Passage and the Transpolar Sea Route, which will retain substantial sea ice cover past midcentury. Moreover, ice-free conditions in the Arctic will likely be confined to September for several decades to come in many regions. Projections using a selection of models that accounts for agreement of models in each region and calendar month with observations yield similar conclusions.

  7. Deglacial sea-level history of the Sunda Shelf region, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stattegger, K.; Tjallingii, R. H.

    2011-12-01

    A unique relative sea-level record of intertidal deposits from incised valley infill was retrieved from the paleo-Mekong and the paleo-North Sunda rivers in the southwestern South China Sea. This flooding history from the Sunda-Shelf system is presently the only sea-level record recovered from siliciclastic coastal deposits that covers the complete deglacial sea-level history of the last 20000 years. Three meltwater pulses (MWP) mark periods of highly accelerated sea-level rise in comparison to the average rate of 0.93 cm/yr. Initial MWP 0 (19400 - 18700 cal yr BP) was the first step of deglacial sea-level rise with a rate of 1.57 cm/yr. MWP 1A (14800 - 14200 cal yr BP), and MWP 1C (8800 - 8200 cal yr BP) have highly accelerated rates up to 5 cm/yr, whereas there is no evidence of MWP 1B around 11300 cal yr BP. Sea-level rise decreased sharply after 8200 cal yr BP when sea level stood at -7 m and modern shorelines evolved. Mid-Holocene highstand above +1.4 m was reached between 6400 and 5200 cal yr BP with a peak value of +1.5 m. These results improve the present perception of eustatic deglacial sea-level rise. The relative contributions of ice melt from the northern hemisphere and Antarctic ice sheets providing the huge water-volumes of MWPs need to be clarified.

  8. A misleading(?) similarity of indentor corners; Aegean-Anatolia versus the Himalaya syntaxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, M.; Schneider, D.; Grasemann, B.; Accel, T.

    2006-12-01

    An appealing similarity of indentor corner-type geodynamic features in diffuse plate boundaries can be seen in the comparison of eastern Tibet/Namcha Barwa syntaxis (the termination of the main Himalaya) with the Aegean/Anatolian region (the termination of the easternmost Alpine Belt). Short-timescale measurements (seismological, GPS) show both regions are dynamic tectonic features that punctuate the ends of collisional orogens. Both regions are foci of elevated seismicity and, most strikingly, involve dramatic continental "escape tectonics" that boast some of the globe's highest angular velocities (surface vorticity) for continents that, moreover, have almost mirror-image symmetry. Finally, both regions are the progeny of protracted Tertiary orogenesis and exhume world-class high pressure deep crustal rocks. Beyond here, however, the appealing similarity of these apparent indentor corners ends; the Aegean/Anatolian region owes its exciting modern geodynamics to accelerated subducting slab retreat and, in stark contrast to the India-Asia collision, has limited net plate convergence. Furthermore, the renowned Aegean exhumation owes little to erosion and evacuation of material by intense surface processes, and extreme relief since the Miocene has been largely absent. Our data from Project ACCEL (this meeting) and many other studies highlight that the retreating slab governs displacement velocities for collisional plate boundaries whose lengths are short; most of the presently observed Aegean angular velocity enabled Anatolian escape and is certainly due to rapid slab retreat since at least the Miocene. The orogen preserves other equivalent, now diminished or terminated, examples of accelerated slab retreat such as the Appenines/Calabrian Arc and the Eastern Alps/Carpathians, indicative of the spatial and temporal transience of these slab retreat sites. These features would appear to be short term indentor corners. The indentor corners of the eastern and western

  9. Incidence of mandibular fractures in black sea region of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Şener, İsmail; Şenel, Erman; Özkan, Nilüfer; Yilmaz, Nergiz

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to review the incidence of mandibular fractures in the Black Sea Region of Turkey and to present our treatment protocol. Material and Methods Data were collected regarding age, sex, etiology, time distribution, site of the fracture and the associated injuries and evaluated. These patients were treated at Ondokuz Mayıs University Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery between 2003 and 2010. Data were collected from patient files in the archive and were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 software. Results A total of 82 patients with 133 mandibular fractures were included in this study. After the follow up period of the patients, the results were achieved from 58 (70.7%) males and 24 (29.3%) females, whose ages ranged from 5 to 72 years and the mean age was 29. Fractures were most seen in 2008 and the busiest month was August. Falls (40.2%) were the major causes of mandibular fractures followed by traffic accidents and violence. The mandibular anatomical sites of higher fracture incidence were: condyle (34.6%), body and symphysis. The number of the fractures and injuries which were seen in other places such as zygomatic arch, alveolar process, tongue, upper and lower lips, orbita, arms was 14. 53 (64.6%) patients were treated by closed reduction, whereas 13 (15.8%) patients were treated by open reduction. Conclusions We concluded that our results were widely similar with the studies in developing countries. Socio-economic factors, cultures, geographic conditions and education could affect the etiology of the mandibular fractures and cause different results between the studies conducted in different countries. Key words:Mandibular fractures, etiology, trauma, treatment, complication. PMID:26330940

  10. Baltic Sea Ice Regional Indices and their relationship with atmospheric circulation patterns and maritime navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sztobryn, M.; Kowalska, B.

    2009-04-01

    The Baltic navigation and urban activities of the coastal communities around the Baltic Sea depended always very much on the ice conditions in the sea. The sea ice occurs different in form and amount, depending on the sea area and the winter season. The aim of the work was the investigation of influence of atmospheric circulation patterns on sea ice condition of Baltic Sea (by the sea ice regional indices). The atmospheric circulation patterns were represented by the German Weather Service's - Grosswetterlagen. The relationship between the ice severity indices and icebreakers activities (number of cases, in which the Swedish and Finnish icebreakers assisted the ships) were investigated. The work was done under the Seaman project (Norwegian Financial Mechanism)

  11. Monitoring seismic velocity changes caused by the 2014 Northern Aegean earthquake using continuous ambient noise records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelidis, Christos; Daskalakis, Emmanouil; Tsogka, Chrysoula

    2016-04-01

    The 24 May 2014 Northern Aegean earthquake (6.9 Mw), an event on the Northern Aegean Trough (NAT), ruptured on two different fault segments with a total ruptured length of ~100 km. For the second delayed segment, rupture propagated eastward from the hypocenter for ˜65 km with a supershear velocity (5.5 km/s). Low-aftershock seismicity on the supershear segment implies a simple and linear fault geometry there. An effort to monitor temporal seismic velocity changes across the ruptured area of the Northern Aegean earthquake is underway. In recent years, neighboring seismic broadband stations near active faults have been successfully used to detect such changes. The crosscorrelation functions (CCF) of ambient noise records between stations yields the corresponding traveltimes for those inter-station paths. Moreover, the auto-correlation functions (ACF) at each station produce the seismic responce for a coincident source and receiver position. Possible temporal changes of the measured traveltimes from CCFs and ACFs correspond to seismic velocity changes. Initially, we investigate the characteristics and sources of the ambient seismic noise as recorded at permanent seismic stations installed around NAT at the surrounding islands and in mainland Greece and Turkey. The microseismic noise levels show a clear seasonal variation at all stations. The noise levels across the double frequency band (DF; period range 4-8 s) reflect the local sea-weather conditions within a range of a few hundred kilometers. Three years of continuous seismic records framing the main shock have been analysed from ~15 stations within a radius of 100 km from the epicentre. We observe a clear decrease of seismic velocities most likely corresponding to the co-seismic shaking. The spatial variation of this velocity drop is imaged from all inter-station paths that correspond to CCF measurements and for station sites that correspond to ACF measurements. Thus, we explore a possible correlation between co

  12. The regional geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Baltic Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Haselton, T.M. ); Brangulis, A.P.; Margulis, L.S. ); Kanev, S. )

    1991-08-01

    The Baltic Sea is roughly equivalent in size to the North Sea. Like the North Sea, is has an excellent oil prone source rock present over most of the area. In the entire Baltic Sea about 40 wells have been drilled. During the 1980s, exploration was carried out in the Soviet, Polish, and East German sectors of the Baltic Sea by Petrobaltic. Twenty-eight wells were drilled, 14 of which tested hydrocarbons. Two wells have been drilled in Danish waters and 11 in Swedish waters - all dry holes. Most of the Baltic Sea is included in the Baltic syneclise. In the deepest part of the basin a full Paleozoic and Mesozoic section is present. Major structural features are associated with reactivation of old basement faults. Most hydrocarbon discoveries are associated with structural arches. Exploration targets are Cambrian sandstones and Ordovician and Silurian reefs. The major discoveries are the B3 field in Poland and the D6 field offshore Lithuania and Kaliningrad, both of which have in-place reserves of around 100 million bbl. The Teisseyre-Tornquist line to the southwest represents the plate boundary between the East European platform and Europe. Repeated strike slip movements along this zone result in a complex pattern of extensional and compressional features in the Danish and German sectors. Primary exploration targets include Permian carbonates and sandstones as well as older zones. Gas has been tested in the German sector onshore.

  13. Nestedness in centipede (Chilopoda) assemblages on continental islands (Aegean, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simaiakis, Stylianos Michail; Martínez-Morales, Miguel Angel

    2010-05-01

    In natural ecosystems, species assemblages among isolated ecological communities such as continental islands often show a nested pattern in which biotas of sites with low species richness are non-random subsets of biotas of richer sites. The distribution of centipede (Chilopoda) species in the central and south Aegean archipelago was tested for nestedness. To achieve this aim we used distribution data for 53 species collected on 24 continental Aegean islands (Kyklades and Dodekanisa). Based on the first-order jackknife estimator, most of islands were comprehensively surveyed. In order to quantify nestedness, we used the nestedness temperature calculator (NTC) as well as the nestedness metric based on overlap and decreasing Fill (NODF). NTC indicated that data exhibited a high degree of nestedness in the central and south Aegean island complexes. As far as the Kyklades and Dodekanisa are concerned, NTC showed less nested centipede structures than the 24 islands. Likewise, NODF revealed a significant degree of nestedness in central and south Aegean islands. It also showed that biotas matrices without singletons were more nested than the complete ones (Aegean, Kyklades and Dodekanisa). The two commonest centipede taxa (lithobiomorphs and geophilomorphs) contributed differently to centipede assemblages. In the Kyklades and Dodekanisa, geophilomorphs did not show a reliable nested arrangement unlike lithobiomorphs. In relation to the entire data set, nestedness was positively associated with the degree of isolation. In the Kyklades altitudinal range best explained nestedness patterns, while in Dodekanisa habitat heterogeneity proved to be more important for the centipede communities. Island area does not seem to be a significant explanatory variable. Some of our results from the Kyklades were critically compared with those for terrestrial isopod and land snail nested assemblages from the same geographical area. The complex geological and palaeogeographical history of

  14. Regional patterns of low-frequency sea level variability: case of the Japan/East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusenkova, Olga

    An increasing trend is detected in globally averaged sea level derived from satellite altimetry measurements for the last two decades. Sea level trends in the North Pacific can be attributed to steric expansion, mostly due to the temperature increase, while the spatial distribution resembles the negative phase of Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The latter is attributed to water redistribution caused by circulation (Fukumore, Wang, 2013). As for the East Asia marginal seas, there are strong positive sea level trends in the subtropical areas but only weak positive or even negative trends in the subarctic areas (Marcos et al., 2012). Strong seasonal sea level oscillations, with amplitude of 15-25 cm, occur simultaneously in the entire Japan/East Sea, with maxima and minima in October and March, respectively (Choi et al., 2004; Trusenkova et al., 2010). The timing of the extremes can be explained by maximum inflow of warm water through the Korea Strait in October and strong winter cooling. This study is focused on low-frequency sea level variability in the Japan/East Sea, beyond the steric effects. To this purpose, AVISO 0.25 dergee gridded weekly sea level anomalies (SLA) for the period from October 1992 onwards are low-pass filtered, with the cut-off period of 1.3 years. Decomposition to Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF) yields the leading mode of synchronous, weak but statistically significant, quasi-biennial oscillations in the entire Sea. They also manifest interannual and decadal variability but no linear trend. This mode should be attributed to variation of water volume in the sea, i.e. transport imbalance through the straits. The strong SLA are timed with the strong anomalies of the inflow transport in the Korea Strait. An out-of-phase relationship of sea level with PDO was found and explained by transport variations in the Korea Strait (Gordon and Giulivi, 2004). However, the alternating out-of-phase and in-phase regimes are detected when the altimetry

  15. A three-step model to assess shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills: the South Aegean (Crete) as an analogue for confined marine basins.

    PubMed

    Alves, Tiago M; Kokinou, Eleni; Zodiatis, George

    2014-09-15

    This study combines bathymetric, geomorphological, geological data and oil spill predictions to model the impact of oil spills in two accident scenarios from offshore Crete, Eastern Mediterranean. The aim is to present a new three-step method of use by emergency teams and local authorities in the assessment of shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills. The three-step method comprises: (1) real-time analyses of bathymetric, geomorphological, geological and oceanographic data; (2) oil dispersion simulations under known wind and sea current conditions; and (3) the compilation of final hazard maps based on information from (1) and (2) and on shoreline susceptibility data. The results in this paper show that zones of high to very-high susceptibility around the island of Crete are related to: (a) offshore bathymetric features, including the presence of offshore scarps and seamounts; (b) shoreline geology, and (c) the presence near the shore of sedimentary basins filled with unconsolidated deposits of high permeability. Oil spills, under particular weather and oceanographic conditions, may quickly spread and reach the shoreline 5-96 h after the initial accident. As a corollary of this work, we present the South Aegean region around Crete as a valid case-study for confined marine basins, narrow seaways, or interior seas around island groups. PMID:25113103

  16. A three-step model to assess shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills: the South Aegean (Crete) as an analogue for confined marine basins.

    PubMed

    Alves, Tiago M; Kokinou, Eleni; Zodiatis, George

    2014-09-15

    This study combines bathymetric, geomorphological, geological data and oil spill predictions to model the impact of oil spills in two accident scenarios from offshore Crete, Eastern Mediterranean. The aim is to present a new three-step method of use by emergency teams and local authorities in the assessment of shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills. The three-step method comprises: (1) real-time analyses of bathymetric, geomorphological, geological and oceanographic data; (2) oil dispersion simulations under known wind and sea current conditions; and (3) the compilation of final hazard maps based on information from (1) and (2) and on shoreline susceptibility data. The results in this paper show that zones of high to very-high susceptibility around the island of Crete are related to: (a) offshore bathymetric features, including the presence of offshore scarps and seamounts; (b) shoreline geology, and (c) the presence near the shore of sedimentary basins filled with unconsolidated deposits of high permeability. Oil spills, under particular weather and oceanographic conditions, may quickly spread and reach the shoreline 5-96 h after the initial accident. As a corollary of this work, we present the South Aegean region around Crete as a valid case-study for confined marine basins, narrow seaways, or interior seas around island groups.

  17. SEA BREEZE REGIMES IN THE NEW YORK CITY REGION - MODELING AND RADAR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    MICHAEL,P.; MILLER,M.; TONGUE,J.S.

    1998-01-11

    The evolution of the sea breeze front in the region where New York and New Jersey meet can be different from that in adjacent regions. Bornstein (1994) and Reiss et al. (1996) have reported observations that show the sea breeze front advancing more slowly in this region than over Long Island and central New Jersey. While in the southern section of New Jersey a single, classical sea breeze development occurs. This paper presents results from model simulations, surface observations and remote sensing using the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D).

  18. On the regional characteristics of past and future sea-level change (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermann, A.; McGregor, S.

    2010-12-01

    Global sea-level rise due to the thermal expansion of the warming oceans and freshwater input from melting glaciers and ice-sheets is threatening to inundate low-lying islands and coast-lines worldwide. At present global mean sea level rises at 3.1 ± 0.7 mm/yr with an accelerating tendency. However, the magnitude of recent decadal sea-level trends varies greatly spatially attaining values of up to 10 mm/yr in some areas of the western tropical Pacific. Identifying the causes of recent regional sea-level trends and understanding the patterns of future projected sea-level change is of crucial importance. Using a wind-forced simplified dynamical ocean model, we show that the regional features of recent decadal and multidecadal sea-level trends in the tropical Indo-Pacific can be attributed to changes in the prevailing wind-regimes. Furthermore it is demonstrated that within an ensemble of ten state-of-the art coupled general circulation models, forced by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the next century, wind-induced re-distributions of upper-ocean water play a key role in establishing the spatial characteristics of projected regional sea-level rise. Wind-related changes in near- surface mass and heat convergence near the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Kiribati, the Cook Islands and French Polynesia oppose, but can not cancel the regional signal of global mean sea-level rise.

  19. Three-dimensional instantaneous dynamics modeling of present-day Aegean subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glerum, Anne; Thieulot, Cedric; Pranger, Casper; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Fraters, Menno; Spakman, Wim

    2015-04-01

    The Aegean region (Eastern Mediterranean) is exemplary of the interaction between crustal tectonics, plate motion, subduction and mantle flow: African subduction underneath the region has been continuous for at least the last 100 My, leading to about 2100-2500 km of subducted lithosphere residing in the mantle (van Hinsbergen et al., 2005). During this subduction, decoupled upper continental and oceanic crust accreted into a wedge of stacked nappes. In turn, these nappes have been significantly extended, predominantly during the last 25 My, due to the retreat of the African slab relative to Eurasia (van Hinsbergen and Schmid, 2012). As a first step to better understanding the coupling of the tectonic evolution of the crust and the underlying mantle dynamics, we are developing 3-D numerical models of the instantaneous dynamics of the present-day Aegean subduction system using the finite element code ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012). The instantaneous models are set up with initial slab geometries derived from tomography and realistic plate boundary configurations and incorporate the major crustal weak zones of the overriding plate. Our modeling results in predictions of flow fields and stress, strain rate and rotation rate fields for the present-day tectonic setting of the Aegean region. By comparing our various model predictions to the widely available observations, such as focal mechanisms, GPS velocities and seismic anisotropy, we aim at an improved understanding of how mantle flow, subduction morphology and possibly slab segmentation, as well as the rheological behavior of the overriding plate, control present-day tectonic deformation. We expect to show preliminary results of this comparison. Kronbichler, M., Heister, T. and Bangerth, W. (2012), High Accuracy Mantle Convection Simulation through Modern Numerical Methods, Geophysical Journal International, 191, 12-29. Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J., Hafkenscheid, E., Spakman, W., Meulenkamp, J. E. and Wortel, R. (2005

  20. Regional and Global Mean Sea Level Variability Over the Modern Instrumental Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponte, R. M.; Wunsch, C.; Heimbach, P.

    2008-12-01

    The possibility of sea level rise in the context of global climate change has received much attention in recent years. Determination of sea level rise and its causes, either globally or regionally, must however cope with other signals in the sea level record. A comprehensive look at sea level variability over the modern instrumental period (1992-present) is made possible by the 3-dimensional, time-dependent ocean state estimates produced under ECCO-GODAE. Such estimates involve a least-squares optimization that produces a "best" fit of the MITgcm to most available ocean data, including several altimetric missions and all in-situ hydrography. The estimated regional sea level patterns exhibit interannual and longer period variability that can easily mask expected long-term trends in mean sea level. Both steric and mass changes contribute to sea level change at regional and global levels, and thermal and haline effects are evident over the full water column, stressing the need for surface-to-bottom measurements. Spatial patterns of variability are not simply related to a passive ocean response to heating and cooling but involve changes in its 3-dimensional circulation. Uncertainties in mean sea level estimates remain large given the possibility of systematic errors in all datasets, including the atmospheric surface fluxes. Various ways of improving model formulation and implementation of data constraints relevant for determining global mean quantities are examined.

  1. Learning through EC directive based SEA in spatial planning? Evidence from the Brunswick Region in Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Thomas B.; Kidd, Sue; Jha-Thakur, Urmila; Gazzola, Paola; Peel, Deborah

    2009-11-15

    This paper presents results of an international comparative research project, funded by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Academy for Sustainable Communities (ASC) on the 'learning potential of appraisal (strategic environmental assessment - SEA) in spatial planning'. In this context, aspects of 'single-loop' and 'double-loop' learning, as well as of individual, organisational and social learning are discussed for emerging post-EC Directive German practice in the planning region (Zweckverband) of Brunswick (Braunschweig), focusing on four spatial plan SEAs from various administrative levels in the region. It is found that whilst SEA is able to lead to plan SEA specific knowledge acquisition, comprehension, application and analysis ('single-loop learning'), it is currently resulting only occasionally in wider synthesis and evaluation ('double-loop learning'). Furthermore, whilst there is evidence that individual and occasionally organisational learning may be enhanced through SEA, most notably in small municipalities, social learning appears to be happening only sporadically.

  2. Regional Arctic sea ice variations as predictor for winter climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenigk, Torben; Caian, Mihaela; Nikulin, Grigory; Schimanke, Semjon

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal prediction skill of winter mid and high northern latitudes climate from sea ice variations in eight different Arctic regions is analyzed using detrended ERA-interim data and satellite sea ice data for the period 1980-2013. We find significant correlations between ice areas in both September and November and winter sea level pressure, air temperature and precipitation. The prediction skill is improved when using November sea ice conditions as predictor compared to September. This is particularly true for predicting winter NAO-like patterns and blocking situations in the Euro-Atlantic area. We find that sea ice variations in Barents Sea seem to be most important for the sign of the following winter NAO—negative after low ice—but amplitude and extension of the patterns are modulated by Greenland and Labrador Seas ice areas. November ice variability in the Greenland Sea provides the best prediction skill for central and western European temperature and ice variations in the Laptev/East Siberian Seas have the largest impact on the blocking number in the Euro-Atlantic region. Over North America, prediction skill is largest using September ice areas from the Pacific Arctic sector as predictor. Composite analyses of high and low regional autumn ice conditions reveal that the atmospheric response is not entirely linear suggesting changing predictive skill dependent on sign and amplitude of the anomaly. The results confirm the importance of realistic sea ice initial conditions for seasonal forecasts. However, correlations do seldom exceed 0.6 indicating that Arctic sea ice variations can only explain a part of winter climate variations in northern mid and high latitudes.

  3. 21st century Mediterranean sea level rise: Steric and atmospheric pressure contributions from a regional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimplis, Michael N.; Marcos, Marta; Somot, Samuel

    2008-09-01

    An Atmosphere-Ocean Regional Climate Model coupled over the Mediterranean basin and forced by river runoff and influxes from the Atlantic Ocean and the Black Sea is used to obtain estimates of sea level rise in the region during the 21st century. Changes in temperature and salinity under the A2 emission scenario, which corresponds to a high level of anthropogenic gas concentration in the atmosphere, are investigated in the different sub-basins and are used to compute the steric sea level change in the region. Significant spatial variability is observed. This model projects a maximum steric sea level rise of 25 cm. The mean steric sea level rise value predicted is around 13 cm with lower values in the eastern Mediterranean and higher values at the western Mediterranean. Coastal sea level rise values are found to be smaller, although this is partly due to the smaller range of vertical integration in the computation of sea level changes. Warming and salinification of the intermediate waters are also predicted to occur simultaneously thus partly compensating each other. The effects of atmospheric pressure changes are added to the steric sea level obtained from the model giving up to 2 mbars and thus also compensating some of the thermal expansion. Circulation changes will in certain areas also add up to 6 cm of sea level rise. There is no predicted seasonal bias in the sea level rise indicating that the seasonal cycles will remain unaffected. These results are derived from a single model and therefore can only been seen as part of a methodological study. Similar investigations should be applied to a range of models and scenarios in order to obtain a range of the future sea level change in the Mediterranean basin and its associated uncertainties.

  4. Zircon crytallization and recycling in the magma chamber of the rhyolitic Kos Plateau Tuff (Aegean arc)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bachman, O.; Charlier, B.L.A.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to most large-volume silicic magmas in continental arcs, which are thought to evolve as open systems with significant assimilation of preexisting crust, the Kos Plateau Miff magma formed dominantly by crystal fractionation of mafic parents. Deposits from this ??? 60 km3 pyroclastic eruption (the largest known in the Aegean arc) lack xenocrystic zircons [secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) U-Pb ages on zircon cores never older than 500 ka] and display Sr-Nd whole-rock isotopic ratios within the range of European mantle in an area with exposed Paleozoic and Tertiary continental crust; this evidence implies a nearly closed-system chemical differentiation. Consequently, the age range provided by zircon SIMS U-Th-Pb dating is a reliable indicator of the duration of assembly and longevity of the silicic magma body above its solidus. The age distribution from 160 ka (age of eruption by sanidine 40Ar/39Ar dating; Smith et al., 1996) to ca. 500 ka combined with textural characteristics (high crystal content, corrosion of most anhydrous phenocrysts, but stability of hydrous phases) suggest (1) a protracted residence in the crust as a crystal mush and (2) rejuvenation (reduced crystallization and even partial resorption of minerals) prior to eruption probably induced by new influx of heat (and volatiles). This extended evolution chemically isolated from the surrounding crust is a likely consequence of the regional geodynamics because the thinned Aegean microplate acts as a refractory container for magmas in the dying Aegean subduction zone (continent-continent subduction). ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  5. Zircon crystallization and recycling in the magma chamber of the rhyolitic Kos Plateau Tuff (Aegean arc)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bachman, O.; Charlier, B.L.A.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to most large-volume silicic magmas in continental arcs, which are thought to evolve as open systems with significant assimilation of preexisting crust, the Kos Plateau Tuff magma formed dominantly by crystal fractionation of mafic parents. Deposits from this ~60 km3 pyroclastic eruption (the largest known in the Aegean arc) lack xenocrystic zircons [secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) U-Pb ages on zircon cores never older than 500 ka] and display Sr-Nd whole-rock isotopic ratios within the range of European mantle in an area with exposed Paleozoic and Tertiary continental crust; this evidence implies a nearly closed-system chemical differentiation. Consequently, the age range provided by zircon SIMS U-Th-Pb dating is a reliable indicator of the duration of assembly and longevity of the silicic magma body above its solidus. The age distribution from 160 ka (age of eruption by sanidine 40Ar/39Ar dating; Smith et al., 1996) to ca. 500 ka combined with textural characteristics (high crystal content, corrosion of most anhydrous phenocrysts, but stability of hydrous phases) suggest (1) a protracted residence in the crust as a crystal mush and (2) rejuvenation (reduced crystallization and even partial resorption of minerals) prior to eruption probably induced by new influx of heat (and volatiles). This extended evolution chemically isolated from the surrounding crust is a likely consequence of the regional geodynamics because the thinned Aegean microplate acts as a refractory container for magmas in the dying Aegean subduction zone (continent-continent subduction).

  6. Magnetotelluric Investigation of the South Aegean Volcanic Arc, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisperi, Despina; Romano, Gerardo; Smirnov, Maxim; Kouli, Maria; Perrone, Angela; Makris, John P.; Vallianatos, Filippos

    2014-05-01

    The South Aegean Volcanic Arc (SAVA) is a chain of volcanic islands in the South Aegean resulting from the subduction of the African tectonic plate beneath the Eurasian plate. It extends from Methana, northwest, to the Island of Nisyros southeast (450 km total length). SAVA comprises a series of dormant and historically active volcanoes, with the most prominent to be Aegina, Methana, Milos, Santorini, Kolumbo, Kos and Nisyros. The aim of the ongoing research project "MagnetoTellurics in studying Geodynamics of the hEllenic ARc (MT-GEAR)" is to contribute to the investigation of the geoelectric structure of Southern Aegean, and particularly to attempt to image the Hellenic Subduction Zone. In this context, onshore magnetotelluric (MT) measurements were recently carried out on the central and eastern part of SAVA (Milos, Santorini, Nisyros and Kos Islands). Data were collected using two MT systems running simultaneously plus a remote reference station installed in Omalos plateau (Western Crete). Robust MT data analysis of the broad-band MT soundings and the resulting model of the conductivity structure of the South Aegean Volcanic Arc is presented. The research is co-funded by the European Social Fund (ESF) and National Resources under the Operational Programme 'Education and Lifelong Learning (EdLL) within the context of the Action 'Supporting Postdoctoral Researchers' in the framework of the project title "MagnetoTellurics in studying Geodynamics of the hEllenic ARc (MT-GEAR)".

  7. PREFACE: Donald D Harrington Symposium on the Geology of the Aegean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catlos, Elizabeth J.

    2008-03-01

    This volume of the IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Sciences presents a selection of papers given at the Donald D Harrington Symposium on the Geology of the Aegean held on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin on April 28-30, 2008. Donald D Harrington was born in Illinois in 1899 and moved westward after serving in the Army Air Corps during World War I. Mr Harrington took a position as a landman with Marlin Oil Company in Oklahoma. When the Texas Panhandle oil boom hit in 1926, he moved to Amarillo, Texas, where he met Sybil Buckingham—the granddaughter of one of Amarillo's founding families. They married in 1935 and went on to build one of the most successful independent oil and gas operations in Texas history. The couple created the Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation in 1951 to support worthy causes such as museums, medical research, education, and the arts. At the Harrington Symposium on the Geology of the Aegean, researchers presented papers organized under five general themes: (1) the geology of Aegean in general (2) the geologic history of specific domains within the Aegean (Cyclades, Menderes, Kazdag, Rhodope, Crete, southern Balkans, etc) (3) the dynamic tectonic processes that occur within the Aegean (4) its geo-archeological history, natural history and hazards and (5) comparisons of the Aegean to regions elsewhere (e.g., Basin and Ranges; Asian extensional terranes). The Aegean is a locus of dynamic research in a variety of fields, and the symposium provided an opportunity for geologists from a range of disciplines to interact and share new results and information about their research in the area. At the opening reception in the Harry S Ransom Center, Dr Clark Burchfiel (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA) provided a keynote address on the outstanding geologic problems of the Aegean region. His paper in this volume outlines a framework for future studies. We also call attention to a paper in this volume by Dr Y

  8. Pleistocene sand ramp deposits in the Aegean (Cyclades, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draganits, E.; Zuschin, M.; Gier, S.; Bickel, L.

    2010-05-01

    Yellowish calcarenite is found abundantly on Despotiko, a small, unpopulated island in the central Aegean. Up to several meters thick layers of this sandstone is found as discordant cover above greenschist to amphibolite grade metamorphic rocks of the Attic-Cycladic Crystalline of the Central Hellenides. In some cases reddish soil is found below the sandstone. The calcarenite preferably fills preexisting relief of the underlying crystalline, therefore the thickest occurrences are found in the intermittent creeks. The sandstone can be traced from below sea-level up to around 90 m altitudes with abundant occurrences, but is most common at the north and northwest coast of the island. Generally, the sandstone layers and the internal lamination are parallel or at shallow angles to the slopes of the underlying crystalline without forming any morphological terraces. In some cases continuous layers of the sandstone can be traced for more than 20 m altitude. Cross-bedding has been observed in very rare cases and dips steeply towards the SE. The calcarenite (locally called "lithos poros") is strongly dominated by marine bioclasts (Corallinaceae, foraminifera, gastropod and bivalve fragments, etc.) with only minor siliciclastic components hardly exceeding 20%. The grains well-rounded and well-sorted with rain sizes range between medium sand to granule sizes. Based on the sandstone distribution in a high range of altitudes, sedimentary structures (e.g. pin-stripe lamination, high-angle cross bedding, rhizoliths, occurrence of terrestrial gastropod shells and correlation with almost identical sandstones in the Mediterranean) we conclude an aeolian origin and probably Pleistocene age of this sandstone. Horizons containing dm-sized, angular metamorphic clasts within well-rounded and well-sorted aeolian layers point to interaction of wind-blown and talus processes. Therefore these sediments are interpreted as sand ramps that formed during increased aeolian activity during the

  9. Regional Changes in the Sea Ice Cover and Ice Production in the Antarctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comiso, Josefino C.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal polynyas around the Antarctic continent have been regarded as sea ice factories because of high ice production rates in these regions. The observation of a positive trend in the extent of Antarctic sea ice during the satellite era has been intriguing in light of the observed rapid decline of the ice extent in the Arctic. The results of analysis of the time series of passive microwave data indicate large regional variability with the trends being strongly positive in the Ross Sea, strongly negative in the Bellingshausen/Amundsen Seas and close to zero in the other regions. The atmospheric circulation in the Antarctic is controlled mainly by the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and the marginal ice zone around the continent shows an alternating pattern of advance and retreat suggesting the presence of a propagating wave (called Antarctic Circumpolar Wave) around the circumpolar region. The results of analysis of the passive microwave data suggest that the positive trend in the Antarctic sea ice cover could be caused primarily by enhanced ice production in the Ross Sea that may be associated with more persistent and larger coastal polynyas in the region. Over the Ross Sea shelf, analysis of sea ice drift data from 1992 to 2008 yields a positive rate-of-increase in the net ice export of about 30,000 km2 per year. For a characteristic ice thickness of 0.6 m, this yields a volume transport of about 20 km3/year, which is almost identical, within error bars, to our estimate of the trend in ice production. In addition to the possibility of changes in SAM, modeling studies have also indicated that the ozone hole may have a role in that it causes the deepening of the lows in the western Antarctic region thereby causing strong winds to occur offthe Ross-ice shelf.

  10. A Regional Model for Seasonal Sea Ice Prediction in the Pacific Sector of the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, X.; Li, Y.; Chen, D.; Zhang, Q.; Li, C.; Niu, F.; Sun, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The recent results from a linear Markov model for seasonal prediction of pan-Arctic sea ice concentration (SIC) show that sea ice in the Pacific sector has the lowest predictability compared to other regions. One reason could be that the climate variability in the Atlantic sector is so dominant that other signals in the Arctic climate system do not appear in the leading modes used for model construction. This study develops a regional Markov model to improve seasonal forecasting of SIC in the Pacific sector. The model climate system consists of various combinations of the monthly mean series of SIC, sea surface temperature (SST), surface air temperature (SAT), pressure/geopotential height fields and winds at pressure levels. Multivariate empirical orthogonal functions (MEOF) and rotated MEOF are applied to each set of data to reduce the model dimensions. After a series of experiments, the final model configuration selects 23 rotated MEOF modes from a data matrix of three variables (SIC, SST and SAT). This regional model shows considerable improvement in the prediction skill in the Pacific sector in all seasons. The anomaly correlation skill increases by 0.2 at 1- to 4-month leads in the Bering Sea, and by 0.1 at 1- to 10-month leads in the Sea of Okhotsk. In general, the model performs better in summer and fall than in winter and spring. On average, the correlation skill can reach 0.6 at a 2-month (4-month) lead in the Bering Sea (the Sea of Okhotsk).

  11. Nonlinear trends and multi-year cycles in regional and global sea level records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. C.; Grinsted, A.; Jevrejeva, S.; Holgate, S.

    2007-12-01

    We analyze the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) database of sea level time series using a method based on Monte Carlo Singular Spectrum Analysis (MC-SSA). We remove 2-30 year quasi- periodic oscillations and determine the nonlinear long-term trends for 12 large ocean regions. Our global sea level trend estimate of 2.4 ± 1.0 mm/yr for the period from 1993 to 2000 is comparable with the 2.6 ± 0.7 mm/yr sea level rise calculated from TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter measurements. However, we show that over the last 100 years the rate of 2.5 ± 1.0 mm/yr occurred between 1920 and 1945, is likely to be as large as the 1990s, and resulted in a mean sea level rise of 48 mm. We evaluate errors in sea level using two independent approaches, the robust bi-weight mean and variance, and a novel "virtual station" approach that utilizes geographic locations of stations. Results suggest that a region cannot be adequately represented by a simple mean curve with standard error, assuming all stations are independent, as multi-year cycles within regions are very significant. Additionally, much of the between-region mismatch errors are due to multi-year cycles in the global sea level that limit the ability of simple means to capture sea level accurately. We demonstrate that variability in sea level records over periods 2-30 years has increased during the past 50 years in most ocean basins.

  12. Land subsidence and relative sea-level rise in the southern Chesapeake Bay region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eggleston, Jack; Pope, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The southern Chesapeake Bay region is experiencing land subsidence and rising water levels due to global sea-level rise; land subsidence and rising water levels combine to cause relative sea-level rise. Land subsidence has been observed since the 1940s in the southern Chesapeake Bay region at rates of 1.1 to 4.8 millimeters per year (mm/yr), and subsidence continues today. This land subsidence helps explain why the region has the highest rates of sea-level rise on the Atlantic Coast of the United States. Data indicate that land subsidence has been responsible for more than half the relative sea-level rise measured in the region. Land subsidence increases the risk of flooding in low-lying areas, which in turn has important economic, environmental, and human health consequences for the heavily populated and ecologically important southern Chesapeake Bay region. The aquifer system in the region has been compacted by extensive groundwater pumping in the region at rates of 1.5- to 3.7-mm/yr; this compaction accounts for more than half of observed land subsidence in the region. Glacial isostatic adjustment, or the flexing of the Earth’s crust in response to glacier formation and melting, also likely contributes to land subsidence in the region.

  13. The analysis of temporal variations in regional models of the Sargasso Sea from GEOS-3 altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, R. S.; Coleman, R.; Hirsch, B.

    1978-01-01

    The dense coverage of short pulse mode GEOS-3 altimeter data in the western North Atlantic provides a basis for studying time variations in the sea surface heights in the Sargasso Sea. Two techniques are utilized: the method of regional models, and the analysis of overlapping passes. An 88 percent correlation is obtained between the location of cyclonic eddies obtained from infrared imagery and sea surface height minima in the altimeter models. This figure drops to 59 percent in the case of correlations with maxima and minima of surface temperature fields. The analysis of overlapping passes provides a better picture of instantaneous sea state through wavelengths greater than 30 km. The variability of the Sargasso Sea through wavelengths between 150 km and 5000 km is estimated at + or - 28 cm. This value is in reasonable agreement with oceanographic estimates and is compatible with the eddy kinetic energy of a wind driven circulation.

  14. Contaminants and sea ducks in Alaska and the circumpolar region.

    PubMed

    Henny, C J; Rudis, D D; Roffe, T J; Robinson-Wilson, E

    1995-05-01

    We review nesting sea duck population declines in Alaska during recent decades and explore the possibility that contaminants may be implicated. Aerial surveys of the surf scoter (Melanitta perspicillata), white-winged scoter (M. fusca), black scoter (M. nigra), oldsqaw (Clangula hyemalis), spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri), and Steller's eider (Polysticta stellei) show long-term breeding population declines, especially the latter three species. The spectacled eider was recently classified threatened under the Endangered Species Act. In addition, three other diving ducks, which commonly winter in coastal areas, have declined from unknown causes. Large die-offs of all three species of scoters during molt, a period of high energy demand, were documented in August 1990, 1991, and 1992 at coastal reefs in southeastern Alaska. There was no evidence of infectious diseases in those scoters. The die-offs may or may not be associated with the long-term declines. Many scoters had elevated renal concentrations of cadmium (high of 375 micrograms/g dry weight [dw]). Effects of cadmium in sea ducks are not well understood. Selenium concentrations in livers of nesting white-winged scoters were high; however, the eggs they laid contained less selenium than expected based on relationships for freshwater bird species. Histological evaluation found a high prevalence of hepatocellular vacuolation (49%), a degenerative change frequently associated with sublethal toxic insult. Cadmium and selenium mean liver concentrations were generally higher in those birds with more severe vacuolation; however, relationships were not statistically significant. We do not know if sea duck population declines are related to metals or other contaminants. PMID:7556023

  15. Contaminants and sea ducks in Alaska and the circumpolar region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Rudis, D.D.; Roffe, T.J.; Robinson-Wilson, E.

    1995-01-01

    We review nesting sea duck population declines in Alaska during recent decades and explore the possibility that contaminants may be implicated. Aerial surveys of the surf scoter (Melanitta perspicillata) , white-winged scoter (M. fusca) , black scoter (M. nigra) , oldsquaw (Clangula hyemalis) , spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri) , and Steller's eider (Polysticta stelleri) show long-term breeding population declines, especially the latter three species. The spectacled eider was recently classified threatened under the Endangered Species Act. In addition, three other diving ducks, which commonly winter in coastal areas, have declined from unknown causes. Large die-offs of all three species of scoters during molt, a period of high energy demand, were documented in August 1990, 1991, and 1992 at coastal reefs in southeastern Alaska. There was no evidence of infectious diseases in those scoters. The die-offs may or may not be associated with the long-term declines. Many scoters had elevated renal concentrations of cadmium (high of 375 ?g/g dry weight [dw]). Effects of cadmium in sea ducks are not well understood. Selenium concentrations in livers of nesting white-winged scoters were high ; however, the eggs they laid contained less selenium than expected based on relationships for freshwater bird species. Histological evaluation found a high prevalence of hepatocellular vacuolation (49%) , a degenerative change frequently associated with sublethal toxic insult. Cadmium and selenium mean liver concentrations were generally higher in those birds with more severe vacuolation ; however, relationships were not statistically significant. We do not know if sea duck population declines are related to metals or other contaminants.

  16. Contaminants and sea ducks in Alaska and the circumpolar region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, Charles J.; Rudis, Deborah D.; Roffe, Thomas J.; Robinson-Wilson, Everett

    1995-01-01

    We review nesting sea duck population declines in Alaska during recent decades and explore the possibility that contaminants may be implicated. Aerial surveys of the surf scoter (Melanitta perspicillata), white-winged scoter (M. fusca), black scoter (M. nigra), oldsquaw (Clangula hyemalis), spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri), and Steller's eider (Polysticta stelleri) show long-term breeding population declines, especially the latter three species. The spectacled eider was recently classified threatened under the Endangered Species Act. In addition, three other diving ducks, which commonly winter in coastal areas, have declined from unknown causes. Large die-offs of all three species of scoters during molt, a period of high energy demand, were documented in August 1990, 1991, and 1992 at coastal reefs in southeastern Alaska. There was no evidence of infectious diseases in those scoters. The die-offs may or may not be associated with the long-term declines. Many scoters had elevated renal concentrations of cadmium (high of 375 μg/g dry weight [dw]). Effects of cadmium in sea ducks are not well understood. Selenium concentrations in livers of nesting white-winged scoters were high; however, the eggs they laid contained less selenium than expected based on relationships for freshwater bird species. Histological evaluation found a high prevalence of hepatocellular vacuolation (49%), a degenerative change frequently associated with sublethal toxic insult. Cadmium and selenium mean liver concentrations were generally higher in those birds with more severe vacuolation; however, relationships were not statistically significant. We do not know if sea duck population declines are related to metals or other contaminants.

  17. SEA monitoring in Swedish regional transport infrastructure plans - Improvement opportunities identified in practical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, K.; Balfors, B.; Folkeson, L.; Nilsson, M.

    2010-11-15

    Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) requires monitoring in order to identify unforeseen adverse effects and to enable appropriate remedial action to be taken. Guidelines on how to monitor significant environmental impacts have been developed but experience from practice is limited. This paper presents a study of environmental monitoring in Swedish regional transport infrastructure planning. The result shows that essentially no environmental monitoring is currently performed. Monitoring of the plans merely involves checking the implementation of projects and performing an economic account. At present, a new planning period has commenced for the regional transport infrastructure plans. To obtain an iterative SEA process for the new plan with integrated SEA monitoring, the following means are suggested: reinforcement of practitioners' incentives to plan and perform monitoring; integration of monitoring in the SEA process; pre-determined impact thresholds that prompt remedial action; and more efficient use of monitoring results.

  18. 15 CFR 918.5 - Eligibility, qualifications, and responsibilities-Sea Grant Regional Consortia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-State approach to solving problems or meeting needs relating to ocean, Great Lakes, and coastal... Consortium candidate must have achieved recognition as an intellectual and practical leader in marine science... Regional Consortium candidate's Sea Grant Program must be relevant to regional opportunities and...

  19. Post-Miocene extension in Central Anatolia; It's linkage to Aegean extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojay, Bora; Özsayın, Erman

    2013-04-01

    Post-Miocene extension in Central Anatolia; It's linkage to Aegean extension Anatolian Plate, -where Central Anatolia situated on-, escapes westward onto African plate along Eastern Mediterranean-Cyprus subduction zone, sliding by North and East Anatolian faults. Central Anatolia is bounded by dextral North Anatolian Fault from north, Taurides from south and it is fragmented by strike slip faults evolving under N-S compression in east and by Aegean horst and grabens evolving under N-S extension in west. To be able to delineate and understand the deformational order in Central Anatolia and its linkage to Aegean region, various sectors with the Anatolia are chosen, namely, Ankara region (Beypazarı to Kazan Miocene basins), Eskişehir region (Mihallıçık to İnönü Miocene basins) in Central Anatolia, Gediz-Alaşehir Graben and Efes areas in Western Anatolia are selected. To sum up, in a wide region from Central Anatolia to Western Anatolia, i. Unconformities btw uppermost Late Miocene and Plio-Quaternary, and btw Plio-Quaternary and Quaternary are clearly identified in both regions, ii) ENE-WSW to N-S compression (intense post-Late Miocene - pre-Pliocene folding) with almost E-W extension operates during post-Miocene (during Pliocene) is followed by a short lived strike slip deformation during Early Pliocene, and finally by NW-SE to WNW-ESE oriented multi directional extension during post-Plio-Quaternary. And in Gediz-Alaşehir Graben and Efes (western Anatolia); a continuous NNE-SSW to NE-SW multi directed extension since post-Late Miocene following almost N-S compression (post-Early Miocene) operated. Dextral strike slip faulting with normal components and normal faulting with right lateral strike slip components are recorded on same fault planes, iii) Quaternary normal faulting post dates folding, reverse and strike slip faulting in both regions. However, right lateral strike slip faulting is recorded to the NW tip of the normal faults like Efes, Manisa and

  20. Geotectonic regionalization and evolution of East China Sea and northern South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.

    1986-07-01

    An analysis of geologic, geophysical, aeromagnetic, and drilling data suggests the marine basins on both sides of the fault along the western border of the East China Sea and the Beiwei-Shenhu fault in the South China Sea are different geotectonically, with respect to the nature of basement and the evolution of the Cenozoic sedimentary basins. Northwest of the faults, basement underlying these marine basins is formed of an extension to the Caledonian South China tectonic belt, where the Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary sedimentary basins is characterized by continental rifting. During the Neogene, the sedimentary basins evolved through continued bulk subsidence. In the shelf basin of the East China Sea, southeast of the faults, the Paleogene to lower Miocene sequence is characterized by geosynclinal sedimentation. During the Neogene to early Pleistocene orogeny, upper Miocene to Pilocene deposits were compressed into a series of bar-shaped folds, accompanied by reverse faulting. This series is apparently a marine northeastern extension of the Himalayan tectonic foldbelt west of the meridional valley of Taiwan. The tectonic foldbelt extends northeast to the Goshimg Islands in the southwest Sea of Japan, and Tsushima Island in the Korea Strait. Coastal mountains in eastern Taiwan are an independent tectonic element adjacent to the western Pacific basin. Geologic and geophysical data suggest this tectonic element consists of remnant Neogene crustal fragments of oceanic type. The meridional valley in eastern Taiwan, which separates this element from the Himalayan Taiwan tectonic foldbelt of continental crust, is an A-shaped subduction belt, downthrust beneath the Pacific plate during the Neogene. This belt extends to the south, and may connect to the presently easterly downthrusting Manila Trench. The buoyancy of the continental crust in Taiwan is obstructing the process of subduction downthrusting in the north.

  1. The SeaDataNet data products: regional temperature and salinity historical data collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoncelli, Simona; Coatanoan, Christine; Bäck, Orjan; Sagen, Helge; Scoy, Serge; Myroshnychenko, Volodymyr; Schaap, Dick; Schlitzer, Reiner; Iona, Sissy; Fichaut, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Temperature and Salinity (TS) historical data collections covering the time period 1900-2013 were created for each European marginal sea (Arctic Sea, Baltic Sea, Black Sea, North Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea) within the framework of SeaDataNet2 (SDN) EU-Project and they are now available as ODV collections through the SeaDataNet web catalog at http://sextant.ifremer.fr/en/web/seadatanet/. Two versions have been published and they represent a snapshot of the SDN database content at two different times: V1.1 (January 2014) and V2 (March 2015). A Quality Control Strategy (QCS) has been developped and continuously refined in order to improve the quality of the SDN database content and to create the best product deriving from SDN data. The QCS was originally implemented in collaboration with MyOcean2 and MyOcean Follow On projects in order to develop a true synergy at regional level to serve operational oceanography and climate change communities. The QCS involved the Regional Coordinators, responsible of the scientific assessment, the National Oceanographic Data Centers (NODC) and the data providers that, on the base of the data quality assessment outcome, checked and eventually corrected anomalies in the original data. The QCS consists of four main phases: 1) data harvesting from the central CDI; 2) file and parameter aggregation; 3) quality check analysis at regional level; 4) analysis and correction of data anomalies. The approach is iterative to facilitate the upgrade of SDN database content and it allows also the versioning of data products with the release of new regional data collections at the end of each QCS loop. SDN data collections and the QCS will be presented and the results summarized.

  2. Regional dependence in the timing of onset of rapid decline in Arctic sea ice concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, S.; Houssais, M.-N.; Herbaut, C.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic sea ice concentration from satellite passive microwave measurements is analyzed to assess the form and timing of the onset of decline of recent ice loss, and the regional dependence of the response. The timing of the onset is estimated using an objective method, and suggests differences of up to 20 years between the various subregions. A clear distinction can be drawn between the recent onset times of the Atlantic sector (beginning in 2003) and the much earlier onset times associated with the Pacific sector, where the earliest transition to rapid loss is found in 1992. Rates of decline prior to and following the transition points are calculated, and suggest that the postonset rate of loss is greatest in the Barents Sea, and weakest in the Pacific sector. Covariability between the seasons is noted in the SIC response, both at interannual and longer time scales. For two case regions, potential mechanisms for the onset time transitions are briefly analyzed. In the Barents Sea, the onset time coincides with a redistribution of the pathways of ice circulation in the region, while along the Alaskan coast, the propagation of the regional signal can be traced in the age of the sea ice. The results presented here indicate a series of spatially self-consistent regional responses, and may be useful in understanding the primary drivers of recent sea ice loss.

  3. Biogeography of the Lord Howe Rise region, Tasman Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przeslawski, Rachel; Williams, Alan; Nichol, Scott L.; Hughes, Michael G.; Anderson, Tara J.; Althaus, Franziska

    2011-04-01

    The two principal aims of this study were to synthesise physical and biological information to characterise the Lord Howe Rise (LHR) region and to use recent survey collections of benthic invertebrates (mostly large benthic epifauna) to describe its biogeography at regional and sub-regional scales. The LHR region is large (1.95 million km 2), spans tropical and cool temperate latitudes (18.4 to 40.3°S), and is influenced by several ocean currents, notably the East Australian Current and the Tasman Front. Our analyses revealed that biological patterns were related to two groups of geomorphic morphotypes found in this topographically complex region: subdued bathymetric features (expansive soft sediment basins and plateaus) and raised bathymetric features (scattered seamounts, guyots, knolls, and pinnacles). Raised bathymetric features in the LHR region were more likely to support richer and more abundant epifaunal assemblages dominated by suspension feeding invertebrates on hard substrata compared to subdued features which were dominated by infauna and detritivores in soft sediments. However, this trend does not apply to all raised bathymetric features (e.g., Gifford Guyot), with variations in depth, elevation, latitude, and particularly substrata affected the composition of biological assemblages. In addition, some demersal fishes, ophiuroids, and other benthic invertebrates showed distinct north-south delineations that coincide with the influence of the Tasman Front and thermal gradients. While the lack of spatially- and temporally- replicated data in the region limits our interpretation of survey data, paleo-environmental processes and examples from other regions provide some indication of how dispersal influences migration, speciation, and endemism in the LHR region. Although our current knowledge is limited, it is hoped that this review will help inform future studies in the area, as equitable examination of biological, geological, and oceanographic

  4. Climatology of Extreme Winds in the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas/Alaska Region Using the North American Regional Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegall, S. T.; Zhang, J.

    2009-12-01

    The high-resolution (32km, 3-hourly) North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) surface winds were used to examine the detailed structures of the distribution and evolution of the surface wind across the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas/Alaska region. First the NARR surface winds were verified against the station observations over the study area and the comparisons indicate that NARR essentially captures the distribution of the observed winds in summer. However, an obvious bias exists in winter, when the easterly component of the bimodal pattern is overestimated, while the westerly component is underestimated, particularly in January. Then we used the NARR surface wind data to examine the wind field climatological features, interannual variability and long-term change over the study area by analyzing the monthly maximums, 99th, 95th, 90th, and 50th percentile wind speeds (m/s) for each month of the year from 1979-2006. Decadal differences (i.e. the difference from 2000-2006 and 1990-1999 and 1990-1999 and 1980-1989) were also investigated to understand the long-term change in the area's surface winds. The results indicated that the maximum wind speeds in the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas have lower values from January through May. Then there is a progression northward of the higher wind speeds beginning in the Bering Strait in June and continuing into the Chukchi/Beaufort Seas during July-October; in November and December the maximum winds in the area start to decrease with a southward migration into the Chukchi Sea and eventually back through the Bering Strait into the Bering Sea, which is coincident with the sea ice retreat and advance in the area. The yearly variance of the wind speeds follow a similar northward and southward migration while the highest variance happened in October. The decadal differences mainly show a large increase in the maximum winds speeds in September and October in the Chukchi Sea.

  5. Historical whaling records reveal major regional retreat of Antarctic sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotté, Cédric; Guinet, Christophe

    2007-02-01

    Several studies have provided evidence of a reduction of the Antarctic sea ice extent. However, these studies were conducted either at a global scale or at a regional scale, and possible inter-regional differences were not analysed. Using the long-term whaling database we investigated circum-Antarctic changes in summer sea ice extent from 1931 to 1987. Accounting for bias inherent in the whaling method, this analysis provides new insight into the historical ice edge reconstruction and inter-regional differences. We highlight a reduction of the sea ice extent occurring in the 1960s, mainly in the Weddell sector where the change ranged from 3° to 7.9° latitude through summer. Although the whaling method may not be appropriate for detecting fine-scale change, these results provide evidence for a heterogeneous circumpolar change of the sea ice extent. The shift is temporally and spatially consistent with other environmental changes detected in the Weddell sector and also with a shift in the Southern Hemisphere annular mode. The large reduction of the sea ice extent has probably influenced the ecosystem of the Weddell Sea, particularly the krill biomass.

  6. Holocene deposits in the Mangyshlak Peninsula, North Caspian Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrodnykh, Yu. P.; Deliya, S. V.; Romanyuk, B. F.; Fedorov, V. I.; Sorokin, V. M.; Luksha, V. L.

    2014-07-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the data of high-precision seismoacoustic profiling, drilling and sampling of deposits using seabed corers, biostratigraphic studies, and radiocarbon age data was performed for the first time for Mangyshlak sediments in several bottom sites of the North Caspian. It was found that the Mangyshlak sediments comprise numerous linearly stretched depressions of 5-10 m in depth (morphologically similar to modern substeppe ilmen areas in the Volga River delta), which are covered by the Novocaspian sedimentary cover, and river incisions (among them the largest Volga River valley). In addition, the Mangyshlak sediments comprise the deltaic alluvial fans of different sizes along the shelf zone of the North Caspian. Analysis of mollusks and biogenic remains indicates that accumulation of the Mangyshlak sediments occurred in freshwater and slightly salty water environments under various hydrodynamic and hydrochemical conditions. According to radiocarbon dating of organic matter, the Mangyshlak sediments formed during sea regression in the range of 10-8 ka (isotopic age) or 11.5-8.5 ka (calendar age). Several types of sediments are distinguished: clayey-carbonate sediments, enriched with organic matter up to the formation of sapropel and peat, accumulated at the lowest sea level; weakly calcareous silty-clayey silts, formed during the subsequent intense filling of paleodepressions with terrigenous material. The features of the mineral composition of sediments are as follows: polymineral composition of clayey material with a high proportion of hydromica and disordered mixed-layered formations, a high content of minerals of the epidote group, amphiboles, and other accessory minerals. All of this indicates a genetic relationship between the Mangyshlak sediments and the Volga terrigenous material.

  7. Timing and regional patterns of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice from passive microwave satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaus, M.; Arndt, S.; Willmes, S.; Dierking, W.

    2015-12-01

    The timing and regional distribution of surface properties of Antarctic sea ice is crucial for the atmosphere-ocean interaction and characterizes the mass and energy budgets of sea ice. Therefore, it is important to map and analyze changes and trends of the related processes and parameters. Since Antarctic sea ice is covered with snow during most of the year, inter-annual and regional variations in summer surface melt can be described through the timing of snowmelt onset. So far, the melt onset was described through the amplitude of diurnal freeze-thaw cycles detected by microwave brightness temperatures using a fixed threshold. However, other studies reveal that the strength of the diurnal variations is differing between the perennial snowpack characterized by strong snow metamorphism and the thinner and less complex seasonal snow cover. Therefore, we present two complementary approaches to improve the existing melt onset algorithms: (1) We consider regional differences of the diurnal variations in the brightness temperature. (2) We combine brightness temperature measured at different polarizations and frequencies in order to describe also subsurface melt processes. Our analysis includes a comparison with autonomous measurements from snow buoys and previous studies on snow melt onset detection of Antarctic sea ice. In doing so, we derive a distinct latitudinal dependence of the surface and subsurface snow melt onset. The major part of the East-Antarctic sea ice is dominated by lateral and bottom melt with negligible diurnal surface variations. Although a positive trend in sea-ice extent and concentration of Antarctic sea ice is observed, our melt onset time series do not indicate a significant trend from 1988/89 to 2014/15. Instead its inter-annual variability is not changing over time. From the assumed dynamically induced sea-ice growth in the Southern Ocean we expect an increasing importance of surface freeze-thaw cycles.

  8. Global and regional factors contributing to the past and future sea level rise in the Northern Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarascia, Luca; Lionello, Piero

    2013-07-01

    This study aims at discussing evolution of Sea Level (SL) in the Northern Adriatic Sea for the 20th and 21st century. A Linear Regression Model (LRM) which aims at describing the effect of regional processes, is built and validated. This LRM computes the North Adriatic mean SL variations using three predictors: the Mean Sea Level Pressure (MSLP) in the Gulf of Venice, the mean Sea Temperature (ST) of the water column in the South Adriatic and the Upper Level Salinity (ULS) in the central part of the basin. SL data are provided by monthly values recorded at 7 tide gauges distributed along the Italian and Croatian coasts (available at the PSMSL, Permanent Service of Mean Sea Level). MSLP data are provided by the EMULATE data set. Mediterranean ST and ULS data are extracted from the MEDATLAS/2002 database. The study shows that annual SL variations at Northern Adriatic stations are very coherent, so that the Northern Adriatic SL can be reconstructed since 1905 on the basis of only two stations: Venice and Trieste. The LRM is found to be robust, very successful at explaining interannual SL variations and consistent with the physical mechanisms responsible for SL evolution. Results show that observed SL in the 20th century has a large trend, which cannot be explained by this LRM, and it is interpreted as the superposition of land movement and a remote cause (such as polar ice melting). When the LRM is used with the MSLP, ST and ULS from climate model projections for the end of the 21st century (A1B scenario), it produces an SL rise in the range from 2.3 to 14.1 cm, with a best estimate of 8.9 cm. However, results show that the behavior of the remotely forced SL rise is the main source of future SL uncertainty and extrapolating its present trend to the future would expand the range of SL uncertainty from 14 to 49 cm.

  9. BIAS: A Regional Management of Underwater Sound in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Sigray, Peter; Andersson, Mathias; Pajala, Jukka; Laanearu, Janek; Klauson, Aleksander; Tegowski, Jaroslaw; Boethling, Maria; Fischer, Jens; Tougaard, Jakob; Wahlberg, Magnus; Nikolopoulos, Anna; Folegot, Thomas; Matuschek, Rainer; Verfuss, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Management of the impact of underwater sound is an emerging concern worldwide. Several countries are in the process of implementing regulatory legislations. In Europe, the Marine Strategy Framework Directive was launched in 2008. This framework addresses noise impacts and the recommendation is to deal with it on a regional level. The Baltic Sea is a semienclosed area with nine states bordering the sea. The number of ships is one of the highest in Europe. Furthermore, the number of ships is estimated to double by 2030. Undoubtedly, due to the unbound character of noise, an efficient management of sound in the Baltic Sea must be done on a regional scale. In line with the European Union directive, the Baltic Sea Information on the Acoustic Soundscape (BIAS) project was established to implement Descriptor 11 of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive in the Baltic Sea region. BIAS will develop tools, standards, and methodologies that will allow for cross-border handling of data and results, measure sound in 40 locations for 1 year, establish a seasonal soundscape map by combining measured sound with advanced three-dimensional modeling, and, finally, establish standards for measuring continuous sound. Results from the first phase of BIAS are presented here, with an emphasis on standards and soundscape mapping as well as the challenges related to regional handling.

  10. The shape of the Aegean MCC's, Insights from 3D numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pourhiet, L.; Denèle, Y.; Huet, B.; Jolivet, L.

    2010-12-01

    The Aegean sea is a back arc basin in which the continental lithosphere has been stretched through the tertiary leaving several diachronous belts of Metamorphic Core Complexes (MCCs). The Aegean MCCs present two classes of shapes. Some are elongated in the direction of the lineation (A-type e.g. Naxos, Paros..) while the others are elongated in a direction normal to the lineation (B-type e.g. Tinos, Evvia ...). While it is well established from 1 and 2D modeling that MCC's forms when the lower crust is weak, the reason for the diversity of shape remains an open question. The A-type domes are not only elongated in shape; their P-T-t paths indicate a clear phase of warming during the exhumation and they also present migmatites (which are not observed in the other islands). Several hypothesis may be drawn. The elongated domes could result from 1) the competition of boudinage versus normal constriction folding, 2) lateral variation of the thickness or the temperature of the crust resulting in local buoyant instability (R-T instability) or 3) lateral gradient of deformation. This contribution presents the preliminary results obtained with thermo-mechanical models in which we test the influence of a local plutonic intrusions, along strike variation of extensional rate, and lateral boundary condition (normal shortening or extension) on the shape of the domes. As this problem is inherently three dimensional, the models were computed on our computer cluster using Gale/Underworld an ALE method with visco-plastic temperature dependent rheologies.

  11. 78 FR 60892 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Proposed Oil and Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning... addition of the map entitled ``Chukchi Sea Planning Area for Information and Nominations Lease Sale 237... Lease Sale 237 in the Chukchi Sea Planning Area, scheduled to be held in 2016, as included in...

  12. Response of the Arabian Sea to global warming and associated regional climate shift.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Prasanna; Roshin, Raj P; Narvekar, Jayu; Kumar, P K Dinesh; Vivekanandan, E

    2009-12-01

    The response of the Arabian Sea to global warming is the disruption in the natural decadal cycle in the sea surface temperature (SST) after 1995, followed by a secular warming. The Arabian Sea is experiencing a regional climate-shift after 1995, which is accompanied by a five fold increase in the occurrence of "most intense cyclones". Signatures of this climate-shift are also perceptible over the adjacent landmass of India as: (1) progressively warmer winters, and (2) decreased decadal monsoon rainfall. The warmer winters are associated with a 16-fold decrease in the decadal wheat production after 1995, while the decreased decadal rainfall was accompanied by a decline of vegetation cover and increased occurrence of heat spells. We propose that in addition to the oceanic thermal inertia, the upwelling-driven cooling provided a mechanism that offset the CO(2)-driven SST increase in the Arabian Sea until 1995.

  13. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate interactions and active tectonics of the Anatolian Plate and surrounding regions in the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. Nafi

    1987-01-01

    The primary effort in this study during the past year has been directed along two separate lines: (1) expanding finite element models to include the entire Anatolian plate, the Aegean Sea and the Northeastern Mediterranean Sea, and (2) investigating the relationship between fault geometry and earthquake activity for the North Anatolian and similar strike-slip faults (e.g., San Andreas Fault). Both efforts are designed to provide an improved basis for interpreting the Crustal Dynamics measurements NASA has planned for this region. The initial phases of both investigations have been completed and the results are being prepared for publication. These investigations are described briefly.

  14. Yemeni Red Sea and Gulf of Aden petroleum geology and regional geophysical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sanabani, M.; Said, F.M. )

    1991-08-01

    The World Bank-executed Red Sea/Gulf of Aden Regional Hydrocarbon Study Project was organized to synthesize data on the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden basins. The study of Yemeni Red Sea and Gulf of Aden was based on public-domain exploration data, published information, and data released by operating companies. These included reports, sections, and wireline logs from 15 well, samples from 15 wells for biostratigraphic analysis, and samples from 11 wells for geochemical analysis. Interpretation was carried out on 7,419 line-km of seismic data selected from a grid of 21,623 line-km of data. Four horizons were identified on a regional basis in the Red Sea area, including the sea floor, top, and near base of middle to upper Miocene evaporites, and approximate acoustic basement, as well as equivalent series in the Gulf of Aden. Bathymetric, structure-contour, and interval isopach maps were prepared using digitized picks from the interpreted seismic. Examples of each of these interpreted results will be on display. The results show that the Yemeni Red Sea is similar to the better known, productive Gulf of Suez in its tectonic evolution, and in its Miocene to Holocene stratigraphic sequence. Surface shows on the east side of the southern Red Sea in the Yemeni part of the basin suggest that this area contain the necessary elements for several attractive petroleum plays. The Yemeni Red Sea appears to contain the necessary elements for an attractive petroleum potential. The Yemeni Gulf of Aden, on the other hand, shows an attractive potential chiefly in pre-rift Mesozoic to Eocene units, with more limited potential in Oligocene to younger units.

  15. The implementation of sea ice model on a regional high-resolution scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Siva; Zakharov, Igor; Bobby, Pradeep; McGuire, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The availability of high-resolution atmospheric/ocean forecast models, satellite data and access to high-performance computing clusters have provided capability to build high-resolution models for regional ice condition simulation. The paper describes the implementation of the Los Alamos sea ice model (CICE) on a regional scale at high resolution. The advantage of the model is its ability to include oceanographic parameters (e.g., currents) to provide accurate results. The sea ice simulation was performed over Baffin Bay and the Labrador Sea to retrieve important parameters such as ice concentration, thickness, ridging, and drift. Two different forcing models, one with low resolution and another with a high resolution, were used for the estimation of sensitivity of model results. Sea ice behavior over 7 years was simulated to analyze ice formation, melting, and conditions in the region. Validation was based on comparing model results with remote sensing data. The simulated ice concentration correlated well with Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) and Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI-SAF) data. Visual comparison of ice thickness trends estimated from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity satellite (SMOS) agreed with the simulation for year 2010-2011.

  16. Renal tubular dysfunction in children living in the Aral Sea Region

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, K; Chiba, M; Hashizume, M; Kunii, O; Sasaki, S; Shimoda, T; Yamashiro, Y; Caypil, W; Dauletbaev, D

    2003-01-01

    Background: The Aral Sea region is a natural area seriously polluted by human activities. Recent surveillance revealed the increased prevalence of diverse chronic diseases in children. Aims: To investigate the function of renal tubules, which are most at risk of damage as a result of heavy metal intoxication, in children of the Aral Sea region. Methods: A group of 205 children living in Kazalinsk, close to the Aral Sea, and a group of 187 children living in Zhanakorgan, far from the Aral Sea, were examined by means of random urine samples. Both urinary N-acetyl-ß-D-glucosaminidase (NAG; U/mmol Cr) and ß2 microglobulin (BMG; µg/mmol Cr) were calculated for each subject. Results: Mean urinary NAG and BMG were both significantly higher in Kazalinsk than in Zhanakorgan (NAG: 0.77 (0.58) and 0.62 (0.37) U/mmol Cr; BMG: 41.8 (54.8) and 22.5 (20.4) µg/mmol Cr, respectively; mean (SD), p < 0.01). The number of children with abnormal values of NAG (>1.5 U/mmol Cr) was significantly more prevalent in Kazalinsk than in Zhanakorgan (7.9% and 2.6%, respectively, p < 0.05). Conclusion: Renal tubular function of children around the Aral Sea region is profoundly impaired. This should be taken into account when considering the health problems of this area. PMID:14612357

  17. Two centuries of observed atmospheric variability and change over the North Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stendel, Martin; van den Besselaar, Else; Hannachi, Abdel; Kent, Elizabeth; Lefebvre, Christiana; Rosenhagen, Gudrun; Schenk, Frederik; van der Schrier, Gerard; Woollings, Tim

    2016-04-01

    In the upcoming North Sea Region Climate Change Assessment (NOSCCA), we present a synthesis of current knowledge about past, present and possible future climate change in the North Sea region. A climate change assessment from published scientific work has been conducted as a kind of regional IPCC report, and a book has been produced that will be published by Springer in 2016. In the framework of the NOSCCA project, we examine past and present studies of variability and changes in atmospheric variables within the North Sea region over the instrumental period, roughly the past 200 years, based on observations and reanalyses. The variables addressed in this presentation are large-scale circulation, pressure and wind, surface air temperature, precipitation and radiative properties (clouds, solar radiation, and sunshine duration). While air temperature over land, not unexpectedly, has increased everywhere in the North Sea region, with strongest trends in spring and in the north of the region, a precipitation increase has been observed in the north and a decrease in the south of the region. This pattern goes along with a north-eastward shift of storm tracks and is in agreement with climate model projections under enhanced greenhouse gas concentrations. For other variables, it is not obvious which part of the observed changes may be due to anthropogenic activities and which is internally forced. It remains also unclear to what extent atmospheric circulation over the North Sea region is influenced by distant factors, in particular Arctic sea-ice decline in recent decades. There are indications of an increase in the number of deep cyclones (but not in the total number of cyclones), while storminess since the late 19th century shows no robust trends. The persistence of circulation types appears to have increased over the last century, and consequently, there is an indication for 'more extreme' extreme events. However, changes in extreme weather events are difficult to assess

  18. Curie Depth Analysis of the Salton Sea Region, Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickus, Kevin; Hussein, Musa

    2016-02-01

    Aeromagnetic data were analyzed to determine the bottom of magnetic bodies that might be related to the Curie point depth (CPD) by 2D spectral and 3D inversion methods within the Salton Trough and the surrounding region in southern California. The bottom of the magnetic bodies for 55 × 55 km windows varied in depth between 11 and 23 km in depth using 2D spectral methods. Since the 55 × 55 km square window may include both shallow and deep source, a 3D inversion method was used to provide better resolution of the bottom of the magnetic bodies. The 3D models indicate the depth to the bottom of the magnetic bodies varied between 5 and 23 km. Even though both methods produced similar results, the 3D inversion method produced higher resolution of the CPD depths. The shallowest depths (5-8 km) occur along and west of the Brawley Seismic Zone and the southwestern portion of the Imperial Valley. The source of these shallow CPD values may be related to geothermal systems including hydrothermal circulation and/or partially molten material. Additionally, shallow CPD depths (7-12 km) were found in a northwest-trending zone in the center of the Salton Trough. These depths coincide with previous seismic analyses that indicated a lower crustal low velocity region which is believed to be caused by partially molten material. Lower velocity zones in several regions may be related to fracturing and/or hydrothermal fluids. If the majority of these shallow depths are related to temperature, they are likely associated with the CPD, and the partially molten material extends over a wider zone than previously known. Greater depths within the Salton Trough coincide with the base of basaltic material and/or regions of intense metamorphism intruded by mafic material in the middle/lower crust.

  19. Regional to Global Assessments of Phytoplankton Dynamics From The SeaWiFS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, David; Behrenfeld, Michael; Maritorena, Stephanie; McClain, Charles R.; Antoine, David; Bailey, Sean W.; Bontempi, Paula S.; Boss, Emmanuel S.; Dierssen, Heidi M.; Doney, Scott C.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Evans, Robert H.; Feldman, Gene C.; Fields, Erik; Franz, Bryan A.; Kuring, Norman A.; Mengelt, Claudia; Nelson, Norman B.; Patt, Fred S.; Robinson, Wayne D.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Swan, C. M.; Werdell, Paul J.; Westberry, T. K.; Wilding, John G.; Yoder, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic production of organic matter by microscopic oceanic phytoplankton fuels ocean ecosystems and contributes roughly half of the Earth's net primary production. For 13 years, the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) mission provided the first consistent, synoptic observations of global ocean ecosystems. Changes in the surface chlorophyll concentration, the primary biological property retrieved from SeaWiFS, have traditionally been used as a metric for phytoplankton abundance and its distribution largely reflects patterns in vertical nutrient transport. On regional to global scales, chlorophyll concentrations covary with sea surface temperature (SST) because SST changes reflect light and nutrient conditions. However, the oceanmay be too complex to be well characterized using a single index such as the chlorophyll concentration. A semi-analytical bio-optical algorithm is used to help interpret regional to global SeaWiFS chlorophyll observations from using three independent, well-validated ocean color data products; the chlorophyll a concentration, absorption by CDM and particulate backscattering. First, we show that observed long-term, global-scale trends in standard chlorophyll retrievals are likely compromised by coincident changes in CDM. Second, we partition the chlorophyll signal into a component due to phytoplankton biomass changes and a component caused by physiological adjustments in intracellular chlorophyll concentrations to changes in mixed layer light levels. We show that biomass changes dominate chlorophyll signals for the high latitude seas and where persistent vertical upwelling is known to occur, while physiological processes dominate chlorophyll variability over much of the tropical and subtropical oceans. The SeaWiFS data set demonstrates complexity in the interpretation of changes in regional to global phytoplankton distributions and illustrates limitations for the assessment of phytoplankton dynamics using chlorophyll

  20. Using existing data and focused surveys to highlight Cuvier's beaked whales favourable areas: a case study in the central Tyrrhenian Sea.

    PubMed

    Gannier, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the necessary elements to implement strategic mitigation in order to avoid Cuvier's beaked whale (CBW) strandings linked to intense sound sources, such as military active sonars, in the Mediterranean Sea. A careful review of stranding data and the analysis of existing survey results are required to highlight the main characters of the species regional distribution. Focused and repeated surveys are needed to confirm that possible favourable areas, such as the Balearic, Tyrrhenian or Aegean Seas, are really favourable CBW habitats. These surveys should be carried out with sea states 0 to 1 in order to minimize the risk of false absence data. Among the regions of interest, the central Tyrrhenian Sea was surveyed with a 12 m sailboat in 2007 and 2008. With 907 km of effective effort, a mean sighting rate of 1.9 CBW school/100 km was obtained, which is amongst the highest densities recorded in the Mediterranean. PMID:20546808

  1. Freshening of the South Indian Ocean during the Argo period: observations, causes, and impact on regional sea level change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovel, William; Lee, Tong

    2015-04-01

    Steric sea level change has been identified as one of the major contributors to the regional sea level changes. This contribution varies in space and time. Temperature (thermosteric) contribution to sea level has been found to be generally more important than salinity (halosteric) effect. Based on temperature and salinity data from Argo floats during 2005-2013 and coincident sea level measurements from satellite altimetry, we found that the central-eastern part of the South Indian Ocean stood out in the entire world ocean as a region that had a more dominant halosteric contribution to sea level change. The conspicuously large halosteric contribution was associated with a freshening in the upper few hundred meters. Neither local atmospheric forcing nor halosteric signal transmitted from the Pacific can explain this freshening. An observed strengthening of the Indonesian throughflow since early 2007 and the enhanced precipitation in the Indonesian Seas inferred from various precipitation estimates compounded by strong tidal mixing are the likely causes of the freshening of the South Indian Ocean. The findings also have implications to the potential influence of regional water cycle and ocean currents in the maritime Continent region to sea level changes in the South Indian Ocean prior to the Argo era and sea level projection in the future in response to climate change. Sustained measurements of sea surface salinity from satellites will significantly enhance our capability to study the impact of regional water cycle in the Maritime Continent region to related changes in the marginal seas and the Indian Ocean.

  2. The influence of regional Arctic sea-ice decline on stratospheric and tropospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Christine; Bracegirdle, Thomas; Shuckburgh, Emily; Haynes, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Arctic sea-ice extent has rapidly declined over the past few decades, and most climate models project a continuation of this trend during the 21st century in response to greenhouse gas forcing. A number of recent studies have shown that this sea-ice loss induces vertically propagating Rossby waves, which weaken the stratospheric polar vortex and increase the frequency of sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs). SSWs have been shown to increase the probability of a negative NAO in the following weeks, thereby driving anomalous weather conditions over Europe and other mid-latitude regions. In contrast, other studies have shown that Arctic sea-ice loss strengthens the polar vortex, increasing the probability of a positive NAO. Sun et al. (2015) suggest these conflicting results may be due to the region of sea-ice loss considered. They find that if only regions within the Arctic Circle are considered in sea-ice projections, the polar vortex weakens; if only regions outwith the Arctic Circle are considered, the polar vortex strengthens. This is because the anomalous Rossby waves forced in the former/latter scenario constructively/destructively interfere with climatological Rossby waves, thus enhancing/suppressing upward wave propagation. In this study, we investigate whether Sun et al.'s results are robust to a different model. We also divide the regions of sea-ice loss they considered into further sub-regions, in order to examine the regional differences in more detail. We do this by using the intermediate complexity climate model, IGCM4, which has a well resolved stratosphere and does a good job of representing stratospheric processes. Several simulations are run in atmosphere only mode, where one is a control experiment and the others are perturbation experiments. In the control run annually repeating historical mean surface conditions are imposed at the lower boundary, whereas in each perturbation run the model is forced by SST perturbations imposed in a specific

  3. Sea ice dynamics as a control for halogen deposition in polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spolaor, Andrea; Plane, John M. C.; Vallelonga, Paul; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Cozzi, Giulio; Turetta, Clara; Kohler, Jack; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Barbante, Carlo

    2013-04-01

    Bromine and iodine chemistry is extremely active at the sea ice margins of both polar regions, with enhanced concentrations of BrO and IO in the air column compared to the open ocean surface or snow-covered land. So-called "Bromine explosions" occur principally over first-year sea ice close to the sea ice edge, and are the major source of reactive bromine in the polar atmosphere. This results in an increase of bromide (Br-) deposited to the snowpack, compared with the Br-Na sea water mass ratio. The main source of iodine is phytoplankton, which colonize the underside of sea ice, producing iodocarbons and probably I2. Though it has been discovered that atmospheric iodine around Antarctica is produced from algae growing on the underside of the relatively thin/seasonal sea ice, satellite measurements do not show exceptional iodine activity above Arctic sea ice. However, in opposition to Antarctica, boundary layer observations show relatively small atmospheric IO concentrations downwind of ice-free open ocean, including leads and polynias. Analysis of bromine and iodine has been carried out in the Talos Dome ice core (Antarctica) which covers the last 215 ky, and in a shallow/firn core drilled at the summit of the Holtedahlfonna glacier (Northern Spitsbergen, Svalbard), covering the last 10 years. Talos Dome Br- is positively correlated with temperature and negatively correlated with sodium (Na). Based on the Br-/Na seawater ratio, bromide is depleted in the ice during glacial periods and enriched during interglacial periods. Total iodine, consisting of iodide (I-) and iodate (IO3-), peaks during glacials with lower values during interglacial periods. Although iodate is believed to be the most stable iodine species in atmospheric aerosols, it was present only in the ice core only during glacial maxima. Glacial-interglacial changes in the multi-year sea ice extent will almost certainly alter the distance between the sea ice edge and Antarctic plateau, which will

  4. Pelagic-benthic coupling and diagenesis of nucleic acids in a deep-sea continental margin and an open-slope system of the Eastern Mediterranean.

    PubMed

    Dell'anno, Antonio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Stavrakakis, Spyros; Lykousis, Vasilis; Danovaro, Roberto

    2005-10-01

    Downward fluxes of nucleic acids adsorbed onto settling particles play a key role in the supply of organic phosphorus and genetic material to the ocean interior. However, information on pelagic-benthic coupling, diagenesis, and processes controlling nucleic acid preservation in deep-sea sediments is practically nonexistent. In this study, we compared nucleic acid fluxes, sedimentary DNA and RNA concentrations, and the enzymatically hydrolyzable fraction of DNA in a bathyal continental margin (North Aegean Sea) and an open-sea system (South Aegean Sea) of the Eastern Mediterranean. The two systems displayed contrasting patterns of nucleic acid fluxes, which increased significantly with depth in the North Aegean Sea and decreased with depth in the South Aegean Sea. These results suggest that in continental margin and open-ocean systems different processes control the nucleic acid supply to the sea floor. Differences in nucleic acid fluxes were reflected by nucleic acid concentrations in the sediments, which reached extremely high values in the North Aegean Sea. In this system, a large fraction of DNA may be buried, as suggested by the large fraction of DNA resistant to nuclease degradation and by estimates of burial efficiency (ca. eight times higher in the North than in the South Aegean Sea). Overall, the results reported here suggest that the preservation of DNA in deeper sediment layers may be favored in benthic systems characterized by high sedimentation rates.

  5. Timing and regional patterns of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice from passive microwave satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Stefanie; Willmes, Sascha; Dierking, Wolfgang; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    The better understanding of temporal variability and regional distribution of surface melt on Antarctic sea ice is crucial for the understanding of atmosphere-ocean interactions and the determination of mass and energy budgets of sea ice. Since large regions of Antarctic sea ice are covered with snow during most of the year, observed inter-annual and regional variations of surface melt mainly represents melt processes in the snow. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms that drive snowmelt, both at different times of the year and in different regions around Antarctica. In this study we combine two approaches for observing both surface and volume snowmelt by means of passive microwave satellite data. The former is achieved by measuring diurnal differences of the brightness temperature TB at 37 GHz, the latter by analyzing the ratio TB(19GHz)/TB(37GHz). Moreover, we use both melt onset proxies to divide the Antarctic sea ice cover into characteristic surface melt patterns from 1988/89 to 2014/15. Our results indicate four characteristic melt types. On average, 43% of the ice-covered ocean shows diurnal freeze-thaw cycles in the surface snow layer, resulting in temporary melt (Type A), less than 1% shows continuous snowmelt throughout the snowpack, resulting in strong melt over a period of several days (Type B), 19% shows Type A and B taking place consecutively (Type C), and for 37% no melt is observed at all (Type D). Continuous melt is primarily observed in the outflow of the Weddell Gyre and in the northern Ross Sea, usually 20 days after the onset of temporary melt. Considering the entire data set, snowmelt processes and onset do not show significant temporal trends. Instead, areas of increasing (decreasing) sea-ice extent have longer (shorter) periods of continuous snowmelt.

  6. Avian influenza virus wild bird surveillance in the Azov and Black Sea regions of Ukraine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Azov and Black Sea basins are transcontinental migration routes of wild birds from Northern Asia and Europe to the Mediterranean, Africa and Southwest Asia. These regions constitute an area of transit, stops during migration, and nesting of many migratory bird species with a very high level of ...

  7. Unpolarized emissivity of thin oil films over anisotropic Gaussian seas in infrared window regions.

    PubMed

    Pinel, Nicolas; Bourlier, Christophe; Sergievskaya, Irina

    2010-04-10

    In this paper, we derive the unpolarized infrared (IR) emissivity of thin oil films over anisotropic Gaussian seas from a refined physical surface spectrum model of damping due to oil. Since the electromagnetic wavelength is much smaller than the surface mean curvature radius and than the surface root mean square height, the Kirchhoff-tangent plane approximation, reduced to the geometric optics approximation, can be used. The surface can then be replaced by its local infinite tangent plane at each point of each rough surface. The multiple reflections at each interface are ignored (i.e., for both the upper air/oil interface and the lower oil/sea interface of the contaminated sea). Nevertheless, the multiple reflections between the upper and the lower interfaces of the oil film are taken into account, by assuming a locally flat and planar thin oil film, which forms a local Fabry-Perot interferometer. This means that the Fresnel reflection coefficient of a single interface can be substituted for the equivalent Fresnel reflection coefficient of the air/oil/sea film, calculated by considering an infinite number of reflections inside the layer. Comparisons of the emissivity between a clean sea and a contaminated sea are presented, with respect to emission angle, wind speed, wind direction, oil film thickness, oil type, and wavelength. Thus, oil detection, characterization, and quantization are investigated in the IR window regions.

  8. Regional Sea Level Changes Projected by the NASA/GISS Atmosphere-Ocean Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Gary L.; Gornitz, Vivien; Miller, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Sea level has been rising for the past century, and inhabitants of the Earth's coastal regions will want to understand and predict future sea level changes. In this study we present results from new simulations of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) global atmosphere-ocean model from 1950 to 2099. Model results are compared with observed sea level changes during the past 40 years at 17 coastal stations around the world. Using observed levels of greenhouse gases between 1950 and 1990 and a compounded 0.5% annual increase in Co2 after 1990, model projections show that global sea level measured from 1950 will rise by 61 mm in the year 2000, by 212 mm in 2050, and by 408 mm in 2089. By 2089, two thirds of the global sea level rise will be due to thermal expansion and one third will be due to ocean mass changes. The spatial distribution of sea level rise is different than that projected by rigid lid ocean models.

  9. Foraminiferal stable isotope constraints on salinity changes in the deglacial and early Holocene Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana Krupinski, Nadine; Filipsson, Helena; Bokhari-Friberg, Yasmin; Knudsen, Karen-Luise; Mackensen, Andreas; Groeneveld, Jeroen; Austin, William

    2015-04-01

    The northern European Baltic Sea shows evidence of strong coupling with North Atlantic climate over recent glacial-interglacial cycles, but existing climate proxy evidence from regional sediment records suggest that the coupling may occur through non-linear processes. High-resolution regional climate records in Europe and from the Baltic Sea are critical for evaluating this coupling and the regional sensitivity to North Atlantic and global climate signals. However, evaluating the drivers and mechanisms of proposed links between the North Atlantic and Baltic Sea climate has often been hampered by a lack of long, continuous, high-resolution climate records from this area. New high-resolution sediment cores collected by IODP/ECORD Expedition 347 (Baltic Sea Paleoenvironment) allow such records to be generated, including foraminiferal geochemistry records of Baltic Sea hydrographic conditions during the most recent deglaciation and early Holocene (~19-7 cal. ka). The dramatic changes in salinity, sea level, circulation, temperature, and oxygenation during this period, e.g. through massive meltwater release from proglacial lakes and the early Holocene inundation of the Baltic by seawater highlight these non-linear links between the Baltic and North Atlantic. This work uses benthic foraminiferal stable isotope records (δ18O and δ13C) from sites in the western Baltic (M0059, Lillebælt, early Holocene marine stage (Littorina Sea)) and Kattegat (M0060, Anholt, deglaciation) to constrain salinity changes during these intervals. Because of the dramatic changes in salinity this region experiences today and during the study periods, oxygen isotope records (δ18O) here primarily reflect a signal of changing salinity, with a reduced temperature effect. Early δ18O results from the western Baltic (M0059) show a trend of declining δ18O/salinity during the first several kyr of the Littorina Sea stage, in agreement with previous work indicating declining salinity due to gradual

  10. Contribution of Regional Climate Drivers to Future Winter Sea-Level Changes in the Baltic Sea Estimated by Statistical Methods and Simulations of Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hünicke, B.; Zorita, E.

    2008-12-01

    A statistical downscaling approach is applied to the output of different global climate model simulations driven by SRES A2 future scenarios of greenhouse gas concentrations to estimate the contribution of changes in the atmospheric circulation and in precipitation to regional future winter sea-level changes. The method is based on observed statistical relationships between Sea level as predictand and large-scale climate fields as predictors. The approach is applied to the Baltic Sea as it is one of the largest brackish seas in the world and a clear example for a complex coupled ocean-atmosphere land system with a complex coastline and bathymetry. Recent studies indicated that Baltic Sea level variations on decadal and longer time scales are strongly influenced by atmospheric forcings, but the influence of different large-scale forcing factors on sea level vary geographically. While the decadal sea level variations in the northern and eastern Baltic gauges are strongly influenced by the atmospheric circulation, the decadal variations in the southern Baltic Sea can be (statistically) better explained by area-averaged precipitation. The results indicate that future trends in sea-level rise caused by these forcing are larger than the past variability. Using sea level pressure as predictor for the central and eastern Baltic Sea level stations, three climate models lead to 21st century future trends in the range of the order of 1 to 2 mm/year. Using precipitation as predictor for the stations in the Southern Baltic Coast all five models lead to significant trends with a range of the order of 0.4 mm/year. These numbers are smaller, but of the order of magnitude as the predicted future global sea level rise. Nevertheless, these estimations comprise only a partial contribution of selected large-scale regional predictors and an estimation of the total regional sea-level rise has to consider other regional factors such as the isostatic contribution to relative sea

  11. Regional sea level seasonal cycle within the Gulf of Cadiz from radar altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Enri, Jesus; Laiz, Irene; Tejedor, Begoña; Aboitiz, Alazne; Villares, Pilar

    2013-04-01

    AVISO sea level anomaly weekely maps from radar altimetry were retrieved for the Gulf of Cadiz (GoC) (1997-2008), along with maps of Dynamic Atmospheric Correction (DAC), atmospheric pressure at sea level and satellite Sea Surface Temperature (SST). Data were averaged in time to obtain maps of monthly mean time series in order to analyze the seasonal variability of sea level and its main forcing agents along the GoC. Moreover, a very high resolution climatology for the region was combined with the SST maps to explore the steric contribution with enough spatial resolution near the coast. The AVISO sea level anomaly monthly maps were initially de-corrected using the DAC product and then corrected using the inverted barometer method. Atmospheric pressure explained more than 55% of the sea level variance offshore and between 35-45% within the continental shelf. The amplitude of the pressure-adjusted sea level semiannual signal was considerably reduced, confirming its meteorological origin. The steric contribution on the pressure-adjusted sea level was addressed by considering local, open ocean, basin-wide and continental shelf steric effects. The open ocean contribution explained the highest percentage of variance all over the basin with the exception of the western shelf, where the best results were obtained with the local contribution. After correcting for the best steric contribution, the amplitude of the remaining offshore annual signal was negligible (0.5-1.0 ± 1 cm). As for the continental shelves, 2-3 cm (± 0.5-1 cm) of the annual signal remained unexplained, probably due to local effects related with the shelves dynamics.

  12. Global and regional sea level change during the 20th century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Manfred; Schröter, Jens

    2014-11-01

    Sea level variations prior to the launch of satellite altimeters are estimated by analyzing historic tide gauge records. Recently, a number of groups have reconstructed sea level by applying EOF techniques to fill missing observations. We complement this study with alternative methods. In a first step gaps in 178 records of sea level change are filled using the pattern recognition capabilities of artificial neural networks. Afterward satellite altimetry is used to extrapolate local sea level change to global fields. Patterns of sea level change are compared to prior studies. Global mean sea level change since 1900 is found to be 1.77±0.38 mm yr-1 on average. Local trends are essentially positive with the highest values found in the western tropical Pacific and in the Indian Ocean east of Madagascar where it reaches about +6 mm yr-1. Regions with negative trends are spotty with a minimum value of about -2 mm yr-1 south of the Aleutian Islands. Although the acceleration found for the global mean, +0.0042 ± 0.0092 mm yr-2, is not significant, local values range from -0.1 mm yr-2 in the central Indian Ocean to +0.1 mm yr-2 in the western tropical Pacific and east of Japan. These extrema are associated with patterns of sea level change that differ significantly from the first half of the analyzed period (i.e., 1900-1950) to the second half (1950-2000). We take this as an indication of long period oceanic processes that are superimposed to the general sea level rise.

  13. Improvement of Global and Regional Mean Sea Level Trends Derived from all Altimetry Missions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablain, Michael; Benveniste, Jérôme; Faugere, Yannice; Larnicol, Gilles; Cazenave, Anny; Johannessen, Johnny A.; Stammer, Detlef; Timms, Gary

    2012-07-01

    The global mean sea level (GMSL) has been calculated on a continual basis since January 1993 using data from satellite altimetry missions. The global mean sea level (MSL) deduced from TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and Jason-2 is increasing with a global trend of 3.2 mm from 1993 to 2010 applying the post glacial rebound (MSL Aviso website http://www.jason.oceanobs.com/msl). Besides, the regional sea level trends bring out an inhomogeneous repartition of the ocean elevation with local MSL slopes ranging from +/- 8 mm/year. A study published in 2009 [Ablain et al., 2009] has shown that the global MSL trend uncertainty was estimated at +/-0.6 mm/year with a confidence interval of 90%. The main sources of errors at global and regional scales are due to the orbit calculation and the wet troposphere correction. But others sea-level components have also a significant impact on the long-term stability of MSL as for instance the stability of instrumental parameters and the atmospheric corrections. Thanks to recent studies performed in Sea Level Essential Climate Variable Project in the frame of the Climate Change Initiative, an ESA Programme, in addition to activities performed within the SALP/CNES, strong improvements have been provided for the estimation of the global and regional MSL trends. In this paper, we propose to describe them; they concern the orbit calculation thanks to new gravity fields, the atmospheric corrections thanks to ERA-interim reanalyses, the wet troposphere corrections thanks to the stability improvement, and also empirical corrections allowing us to link regional time series together better. These improvements are described at global and regional scale for all the altimetry missions.

  14. Internal and external forcing of sea level variability in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Denis L.; Landerer, Felix W.

    2015-11-01

    The variability of sea level in the Black Sea is forced by a combination of internal and external processes of atmospheric, oceanic, and terrestrial origin. We use a combination of satellite altimetry and gravity, tide gauge, river discharge, and atmospheric re-analysis data to provide a comprehensive up-to-date analysis of sea level variability in the Black Sea and to quantify the role of different environmental factors that force the variability. The Black Sea is part of a large-scale climatic system that includes the Mediterranean and the North Atlantic. The seasonal sea level budget shows similar contributions of fresh water fluxes (precipitation, evaporation, and river discharge) and the Black Sea outflow, while the impact of the net surface heat flux is smaller although not negligible. We find that the nonseasonal sea level time series in the Black and Aegean seas are significantly correlated, the latter leading by 1 month. This lag is attributed to the adjustment of sea level in the Black Sea to externally forced changes of sea level in the Aegean Sea and to the impact of river discharge. The nonseasonal sea level budget in the Black Sea is dominated by precipitation and evaporation over the sea itself, but external processes such as river discharge and changes in the outflow can also cause some large synoptic-scale sea level anomalies. Sea level is strongly coupled to terrestrial water storage over the Black Sea drainage basin, which is modulated by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). We show that during the low/high NAO southwesterly/northeasterly winds near the Strait of Gibraltar and southerly/northerly winds over the Aegean Sea are able to dynamically increase/decrease sea level in the Mediterranean and Black seas, respectively.

  15. Occurrence, sources and transport pathways of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbons in deep-sea sediments of the eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parinos, C.; Gogou, A.; Bouloubassi, I.; Pedrosa-Pàmies, R.; Hatzianestis, I.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.; Rousakis, G.; Velaoras, D.; Krokos, G.; Lykousis, V.

    2013-09-01

    Surface sediments collected from deep basins (1018-4087 m depth) of the eastern Mediterranean Sea (Ionian Sea, southern Aegean Sea and northwestern Levantine Sea) were analyzed for aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as tracers of natural and anthropogenic inputs. Concentrations of total aliphatic hydrocarbons, n-alkanes and the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of aliphatic hydrocarbons varied significantly, ranging from 1.34 to 49.2 μg g-1, 145 to 4810 ng g-1 and 0.73 to 36.7 μg g-1, respectively, while concentrations of total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranged between 11.6 and 223 ng g-1. Molecular profiles of determined hydrocarbons reflect a mixed contribution from both natural and anthropogenic sources in deep-sea sediments of the eastern Mediterranean Sea, i.e., terrestrial plant waxes, degraded petroleum products, unburned fossil fuels and combustion of grass, wood and coal. Hydrocarbon mixtures display significant variability amongst sub-regions, reflecting differences in the relative importance of inputs from various sources and phase associations/transport pathways of individual hydrocarbons that impact on their overall distribution and fate. Hydrocarbon concentrations correlated significantly with the organic carbon content of sediments, indicating that the latter exerts an important control on their transport and ultimate accumulation in deep basins. Additionally, water masses' circulation characteristics also seem to influence the regional features and distribution patterns of hydrocarbons. Our findings highlight the role of deep basins/canyons as repositories of both natural and anthropogenic chemical species.

  16. Regional mesoscale air-sea coupling impacts and extreme meteorological events role on the Mediterranean Sea water budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebeaupin Brossier, Cindy; Bastin, Sophie; Béranger, Karine; Drobinski, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    The Mediterranean Sea water budget (MWB) is a key parameter, as it controls the Mediterranean Sea water loss and thus the Atlantic Water inflow and the Mediterranean general circulation. More accurately, the MWB controls the net flow through the Strait of Gibraltar, which implies both inflow and outflow. Generally considered at the basin scale and over long-term periods, the MWB is in fact characterized by a large variability in space and time, induced by the complex topography of the region, mesoscale processes and (short) intense events in the ocean and atmosphere compartments. In this study, we use an ocean-atmosphere coupled system at mesoscale able to represent such phenomena, to evaluate the MWB atmospheric components: Evaporation (E) and Precipitation (P). We compare two companion regional simulations: an uncoupled atmospheric run using the ERA-interim Sea Surface Temperature (SST) reanalysis and a coupled run using the MORCE system with the two-way coupling between the NEMO-MED12 eddy-resolving ocean model and the non-hydrostatic Weather Research and Forecasting atmospheric model. We first evaluate the SST validity against satellite data and evidence the coupled system ability in representing SST mesoscale structures, characteristics of the Mediterranean circulation and of small-scale ocean processes, despite a colder mean value and a lower amplitude of the annual cycle. Then, the comparison aims to examine the coupled processes effects (meaning the impacts of the interactive high-resolution and high-frequency SST) on E and P and on their variability. The comparison highlights that the SST is the controlling factor for E and P budgets, with reduction by 6 and 3 % in the coupled run compared to the uncoupled run, respectively. The modifications propagate until 750 km inland far from the Mediterranean coast, as towards the Atlantic Ocean and the Black Sea. This indicates that coupling plays a major role in distributing water at mesoscale. The coupling

  17. Temporal variations in regional models of the Sargasso Sea from GEOS-3 altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, R. S.; Coleman, R.; Hirsch, B.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers temporal variations in regional models of the Sargasso sea from GEOS-3 telemetry. The methods of regional models and the analysis of overlapping passes are utilized, and short-wave maxima and minima in the regional surface models are examined for correlations with surface and remote sensed infrared temperature data supplemented with subsurface expendable bathythermograph data (XBT). The analysis of overlapping passes provide a better picture of instanteneous sea surface height (SSH) variability through wavelengths greater than 30 km. Correlation studies with cyclonic and anticyclonic ocean eddies from infrared imagery and XBT data indicate satisfactory agreement with equivalent SSH features 98% of the time if the time varying factors are allowed for.

  18. Sea surface temperature 1871-2099 in 38 cells in the Caribbean region.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Charles; Rioja-Nieto, Rodolfo

    2005-09-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) data with monthly resolution are provided for 38 cells in the Caribbean Sea and Bahamas region, plus Bermuda. These series are derived from the HadISST1 data set for historical time (1871-1999) and from the HadCM3 coupled climate model for predicted SST (1950-2099). Statistical scaling of the forecast data sets are performed to produce confluent SST series according to a now established method. These SST series are available for download. High water temperatures in 1998 killed enormous amounts of corals in tropical seas, though in the Caribbean region the effects at that time appeared less marked than in the Indo-Pacific. However, SSTs are rising in accordance with world-wide trends and it has been predicted that temperature will become increasingly important in this region in the near future. Patterns of SST rise within the Caribbean region are shown, and the importance of sub-regional patterns within this biologically highly interconnected area are noted.

  19. Delineating sea surface water quality regions from remotely sensed data using textural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriakidis, Phaedon C.; Vasios, George K.; Kitsiou, Dimitra

    2015-06-01

    The delineation of ocean regions with similar water quality characteristics is an all important component of the study of marine environment with direct implications for management actions. Marine eutrophication constitutes an important facet of ocean water quality, and pertains to the natural process representing excessive algal growth due to nutrient supply of marine systems. Remote sensing technology provides the de-facto means for marine eutrophication assessment over large regions of the ocean, with increasingly high spatial and temporal resolutions. In this work, monthly measurements of sea water quality variables - chlorophyll, nitrates, phosphates, dissolved oxygen - obtained from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) with spatial resolution 0.125 degrees for the East Mediterranean region over the period January 1999 to December 2010, are used to define regions or zones of similar eutrophication levels. A novel variant of the K-medoids clustering algorithm is proposed, whereby the spatial association of the different variables (multivariate textural information) is explicitly accounted for in terms of the multivariate variogram; i.e., a measure of joint dissimilarity between different variables as a function of geographical distance. Similar water quality regions are obtained for various months and years, focusing on the spring season and on the qualitative comparison of the traditional and proposed classification methods. The results indicate that the proposed clustering method yields more physically meaningful clusters due to the incorporation of the multivariate textural information.

  20. Satellite observations of seasonal and regional variability of particulate organic carbon concentration in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramska, Malgorzata; Białogrodzka, Jagoda

    2016-04-01

    The Nordic and Barents Seas are of special interest for research on climate change, since they are located on the main pathway of the heat transported from low to high latitudes. Barents Sea is known to be an important area for formation of deep water and significant uptake from the atmosphere and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). This region is characterized by supreme phytoplankton blooms and large amount of carbon is sequestered here due to biological processes. It is important to monitor the biological variability in this region in order to derive in depth understanding whether the size of carbon reservoirs and fluxes may vary as a result of climate change. In this presentation we analyze the 17 years (1998-2014) of particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration derived from remotely sensed ocean color. POC concentrations in the Barents Sea are among the highest observed in the global ocean with monthly mean concentrations in May exceeding 300 mg m-3. The seasonal amplitude of POC concentration in this region is larger when compared to other regions in the global ocean. Our results indicate that the seasonal increase in POC concentration is observed earlier in the year and higher concentrations are reached in the southeastern part of the Barents Sea in comparison to the southwestern part. Satellite data indicate that POC concentrations in the southern part of the Barents Sea tend to decrease in recent years, but longer time series of data are needed to confirm this observation. This work was funded by the Norway Grants (NCBR contract No. 201985, project NORDFLUX). Partial support for MS comes from the Institute of Oceanology (IO PAN).

  1. Satellite observations of seasonal and regional variability of particulate organic carbon concentration in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramska, Malgorzata; Białogrodzka, Jagoda

    2016-04-01

    The Nordic and Barents Seas are of special interest for research on climate change, since they are located on the main pathway of the heat transported from low to high latitudes. Barents Sea is known to be an important area for formation of deep water and significant uptake from the atmosphere and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). This region is characterized by supreme phytoplankton blooms and large amount of carbon is sequestered here due to biological processes. It is important to monitor the biological variability in this region in order to derive in depth understanding whether the size of carbon reservoirs and fluxes may vary as a result of climate change. In this presentation we analyze the 17 years (1998-2014) of particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration derived from remotely sensed ocean color. POC concentrations in the Barents Sea are among the highest observed in the global ocean with monthly mean concentrations in May exceeding 300 mg m‑3. The seasonal amplitude of POC concentration in this region is larger when compared to other regions in the global ocean. Our results indicate that the seasonal increase in POC concentration is observed earlier in the year and higher concentrations are reached in the southeastern part of the Barents Sea in comparison to the southwestern part. Satellite data indicate that POC concentrations in the southern part of the Barents Sea tend to decrease in recent years, but longer time series of data are needed to confirm this observation. This work was funded by the Norway Grants (NCBR contract No. 201985, project NORDFLUX). Partial support for MS comes from the Institute of Oceanology (IO PAN).

  2. Added value of high-resolution regional climate model over the Bohai Sea and Yellow Sea areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Delei; von Storch, Hans; Geyer, Beate

    2016-04-01

    Added value from dynamical downscaling has long been a crucial and debatable issue in regional climate studies. A 34 year (1979-2012) high-resolution (7 km grid) atmospheric hindcast over the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea (BYS) has been performed using COSMO-CLM (CCLM) forced by ERA-Interim reanalysis data (ERA-I). The accuracy of CCLM in surface wind reproduction and the added value of dynamical downscaling to ERA-I have been investigated through comparisons with the satellite data (including QuikSCAT Level2B 12.5 km version 3 (L2B12v3) swath data and MODIS images) and in situ observations, with adoption of quantitative metrics and qualitative assessment methods. The results revealed that CCLM has a reliable ability to reproduce the regional wind characteristics over the BYS areas. Over marine areas, added value to ERA-I has been detected in the coastal areas with complex coastlines and orography. CCLM was better able to represent light and moderate winds but has even more added value for strong winds relative to ERA-I. Over land areas, the high-resolution CCLM hindcast can add value to ERA-I in reproducing wind intensities and direction, wind probability distribution and extreme winds mainly at mountain areas. With respect to atmospheric processes, CCLM outperforms ERA-I in resolving detailed temporal and spatial structures for phenomena of a typhoon and of a coastal atmospheric front; CCLM generates some orography related phenomena such as a vortex street which is not captured by ERA-I. These added values demonstrate the utility of the 7-km-resolution CCLM for regional and local climate studies and applications. The simulation was constrained with adoption of spectral nudging method. The results may be different when simulations are considered, which are not constrained by spectral nudging.

  3. Tropical Marginal Seas: Priority Regions for Managing Marine Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, A. David; Williams, Alan; Young, Jock; Ceccarelli, Daniela; Dunstan, Piers; Brewin, Robert J. W.; Watson, Reg; Brinkman, Richard; Cappo, Mike; Duggan, Samantha; Kelley, Russell; Ridgway, Ken; Lindsay, Dhugal; Gledhill, Daniel; Hutton, Trevor; Richardson, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Tropical marginal seas (TMSs) are natural subregions of tropical oceans containing biodiverse ecosystems with conspicuous, valued, and vulnerable biodiversity assets. They are focal points for global marine conservation because they occur in regions where human populations are rapidly expanding. Our review of 11 TMSs focuses on three key ecosystems - coral reefs and emergent atolls, deep benthic systems, and pelagic biomes - and synthesizes, illustrates, and contrasts knowledge of biodiversity, ecosystem function, interaction between adjacent habitats, and anthropogenic pressures. TMSs vary in the extent that they have been subject to human influence - from the nearly pristine Coral Sea to the heavily exploited South China and Caribbean Seas - but we predict that they will all be similarly complex to manage because most span multiple national jurisdictions. We conclude that developing a structured process to identify ecologically and biologically significant areas that uses a set of globally agreed criteria is a tractable first step toward effective multinational and transboundary ecosystem management of TMSs.

  4. Tropical marginal seas: priority regions for managing marine biodiversity and ecosystem function.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, A David; Williams, Alan; Young, Jock; Ceccarelli, Daniela; Dunstan, Piers; Brewin, Robert J W; Watson, Reg; Brinkman, Richard; Cappo, Mike; Duggan, Samantha; Kelley, Russell; Ridgway, Ken; Lindsay, Dhugal; Gledhill, Daniel; Hutton, Trevor; Richardson, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Tropical marginal seas (TMSs) are natural subregions of tropical oceans containing biodiverse ecosystems with conspicuous, valued, and vulnerable biodiversity assets. They are focal points for global marine conservation because they occur in regions where human populations are rapidly expanding. Our review of 11 TMSs focuses on three key ecosystems-coral reefs and emergent atolls, deep benthic systems, and pelagic biomes-and synthesizes, illustrates, and contrasts knowledge of biodiversity, ecosystem function, interaction between adjacent habitats, and anthropogenic pressures. TMSs vary in the extent that they have been subject to human influence-from the nearly pristine Coral Sea to the heavily exploited South China and Caribbean Seas-but we predict that they will all be similarly complex to manage because most span multiple national jurisdictions. We conclude that developing a structured process to identify ecologically and biologically significant areas that uses a set of globally agreed criteria is a tractable first step toward effective multinational and transboundary ecosystem management of TMSs.

  5. Modelling the thermosteric contribution to global and regional sea-level rise during the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singarayer, Joy; Stone, Emma; Whipple, Matthew; Lunt, Dan; Bouttes, Nathaelle; Gregory, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Global sea level during the last interglacial is likely to have been between 5.5 and 9m above present (Dutton and Lambeck, 2012). Recent calculations, taking into account latest NEEM ice core information, suggest that Greenland would probably not have contributed more than 2.2m to this (Stone et al, 2013), implying a considerable contribution from Antarctica. Previous studies have suggested a significant loss from the West Antarctic ice-sheet (e.g. Holden et al, 2010), which could be initiated following a collapse of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and resultant warming in the Southern Ocean. Here, model simulations with FAMOUS and HadCM3 have been performed of the last interglacial under various scenarios of reduced Greenland and Antarctic ice-sheet configurations, and with and without collapsed AMOC. Thermal expansion and changes in regional density structure (resulting from ocean circulation changes) can also influence sea level, in addition to ice mass effects discussed thus far. The HadCM3 and FAMOUS simulations will be used to estimate the contribution to global and regional sea level change in interglacials from the latter two factors using a similar methodology to the IPCC TAR/AR4 estimations of future sea level rise (Gregory and Lowe, 2000). The HadCM3 and FAMOUS both have a rigid lid in their ocean model, and consequently a fixed ocean volume. Thermal expansion can, however, be calculated as a volume change from in-situ density (a prognostic variable from the model). Relative sea surface topography will then be estimated from surface pressure gradients and changes in atmospheric pressure. Dutton A., and Lambeck K., 2013. Ice Volume and Sea Level During the Last Interglacial. Science, 337, 216-219 Gregory J.M. and Lowe J.A., 2000. Predictions of global and regional sea-level using AOGCMs with and without flux adjustment. GRL, 27, 3069-3072 Holden P. et al., 2010. Interhemispheric coupling, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and warm

  6. The Solomon Sea eddy activity from a 1/36° regional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djath, Bughsin; Babonneix, Antoine; Gourdeau, Lionel; Marin, Frédéric; Verron, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    In the South West Pacific, the Solomon Sea exhibits the highest levels of eddy kinetic energy but relatively little is known about the eddy activity in this region. This Sea is directly influenced by a monsoonal regime and ENSO variability, and occupies a strategical location as the Western Boundary Currents exiting it are known to feed the warm pool and to be the principal sources of the Equatorial UnderCurrent. During their transit in the Solomon Sea, meso-scale eddies are suspected to notably interact and influence these water masses. The goal of this study is to give an exhaustive description of this eddy activity. A dual approach, based both on altimetric data and high resolution modeling, has then been chosen for this purpose. First, an algorithm is applied on nearly 20 years of 1/3° x 1/3° gridded SLA maps (provided by the AVISO project). This allows eddies to be automatically detected and tracked, thus providing some basic eddy properties. The preliminary results show that two main and distinct types of eddies are detected. Eddies in the north-eastern part shows a variability associated with the mean structure, while those in the southern part are associated with generation/propagation processes. However, the resolution of the AVISO dataset is not very well suited to observe fine structures and to match with the numerous islands bordering the Solomon Sea. For this reason, we will confront these observations with the outputs of a 1/36° resolution realistic model of the Solomon Sea. The high resolution numerical model (1/36°) indeed permits to reproduce very fine scale features, such as eddies and filaments. The model is two-way embedded in a 1/12° regional model which is itself one-way embedded in the DRAKKAR 1/12° global model. The NEMO code is used as well as the AGRIF software for model nestings. Validation is realized by comparison with AVISO observations and available in situ data. In preparing the future wide-swath altimetric SWOT mission that is

  7. Red Sea and Gulf of Aden petroleum geology and regional geophysical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sikander, A.H. ); Allen, R.B. ); Abouzakhm, A.G.

    1991-08-01

    The World Bank-executed Red Sea/Gulf of Aden Regional Hydrocarbon Study Project was organized to synthesize data on the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden basins. The primary objectives were to encourage increased hydrocarbon exploration activity within the project area by applying recent exploration techniques basin wide, and to train national geoscientists in exploration techniques. The study was based on public-domain exploration data, published information, and data released by operating companies. This included reports, sections, and wireline logs from most of the offshore wells, and samples for biostratigraphic and geochemical analysis. Interpretation was carried out on seismic data selected from basinwide grids. Four horizons were identified on a regional basis in the Red Sea, including the sea floor, top, and near base of middle to upper Miocene evaporite, and approximate acoustic basement, and an equivalent of horizons were identified in the Gulf of Aden. The results of the syntheses show that the hydrocarbon potential of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden is variable. The Red Sea shows an attractive potential in much of the basin in Miocene to Holocene synrift to post-rift units. This may locally include either lower to middle Miocene sub-evaporite syn-rift units or Pliocene to Holocene superrift units, depending on variations in structural development and sedimentation and thermal history. In addition, sub-rift units of Mesozoic to Paleogene age show an attractive potential in some areas. The primary potential in the Gulf of Aden, on the other hand, may be in Mesozoic to Eocene sub-rift units, with only limited potential in Oligocene and younger units.

  8. Emerging Persistent Organic Pollutants in Chinese Bohai Sea and Its Coastal Regions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yawei; Pan, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Emerging persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have widely aroused public concern in recent years. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and perfluorooctane sulfonyl fluoride/perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (POSF/PFOS) had been newly listed in Stockholm Convention in 2009, and short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) were listed as candidate POPs. Bohai Sea is located in the arms of numbers of industrial cities, the semienclosed location of which makes it an ideal sink of emerging pollutants. In the present paper, latest contamination status of emerging POPs in Bohai Sea was reviewed. According to the literature data, Bohai Sea areas are not heavily contaminated by emerging POPs (PBDE: 0.01–720 ng/g; perfluorinated compounds: 0.1–304 ng/g; SCCPs: 64.9–5510 ng/g; HBCDs: nd-634 ng/g). Therefore, humans are not likely to be under serious risk of emerging POPs exposure through consuming seafood from Bohai Sea. However, the ubiquitous occurrence of emerging POPs in Bohai Sea region might indicate that more work should be done to expand the knowledge about potential risk of emerging POPs pollution. PMID:24688410

  9. Two centuries of observed atmospheric variability and change over the North Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stendel, Martin; van den Besselaar, Else; Hannachi, Abdel; Kent, Elizabeth; Lefebvre, Christiana; van Oldenborgh, Geert Jan; Rosenhagen, Gudrun; Schenk, Frederik; van der Schrier, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Situated in northwestern Europe, the North Sea region is under influence of air masses from subtropical to arctic origin, and thus exhibits significant natural climate variability. As the land areas surrounding the North Sea are densely populated, climate change is an important issue in terms of e.g. coastal protection, fishery and trade. This study is part of the NOSCCA initiative (North Sea Region Climate Change Assessment) and presents observed variability and changes in atmospheric parameters during the last roughly 200 years. Circulation patterns show considerable decadal variability. In recent decades, a northward shift of storm tracks and increased cyclonic activity has been observed. There is also an indication of increased persistence of weather types. The wind climate is dominated by large multidecadal variability, and no robust long-term trends can be identified in the available datasets. There is a clear positive trend in near-surface temperatures, in particular during spring and winter. Over the region as a whole, no clear long-term precipitation trends are visible, although regional indications exist for an increased risk of extreme precipitation events.

  10. Estimating shipping emissions in the region of the Sea of Marmara, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Deniz, Cengiz; Durmuşoğlu, Yalçin

    2008-02-01

    Ship emissions are significantly increasing globally and have remarkable impact on air quality on sea and land. These emissions contribute serious adverse health and environmental effects. Territorial waters, inland seas and ports are the regions most affected by ship emissions. As an inland sea the Sea of Marmara is an area that has too much ship traffic. Since the region of the Marmara is highly urbanized, emissions from ships affect human health and the overall environment. In this paper exhaust gas emissions from ships in the Sea of Marmara and the Turkish Straits are calculated by utilizing the data acquired in 2003. Main engine types, fuel types, operations types, navigation times and speeds of vessels are taken into consideration in the study. Total emissions from ships in the study area were estimated as 5,451,224 t y(-1) for CO(2), 111,039 t y(-1) for NO(x), 87,168 t y(-1) for SO(2), 20,281 t y(-1) for CO, 5801 t y(-1) for VOC, 4762 t y(-1) for PM. The shipping emissions in the region are equivalent to 11% of NO(x) 0.1% of CO and 0.12% of PM of the corresponding total emissions in Turkey. The shipping emissions in the area are 46% of NO(x), 25% of PM and 1.5% of CO of road traffic emissions in Turkey data between which and correspond to a higher level than aircraft emissions and rail emissions in Turkey.

  11. BALTEX—an interdisciplinary research network for the Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reckermann, Marcus; Langner, Joakim; Omstedt, Anders; von Storch, Hans; Keevallik, Sirje; Schneider, Bernd; Arheimer, Berit; Markus Meier, H. E.; Hünicke, Birgit

    2011-10-01

    BALTEX is an environmental research network dealing with the Earth system of the entire Baltic Sea drainage basin. Important elements include the water and energy cycle, climate variability and change, water management and extreme events, and related impacts on biogeochemical cycles. BALTEX was founded in 1993 as a GEWEX continental-scale experiment and is currently in its second 10 yr phase. Phase I (1993-2002) was primarily dedicated to hydrological, meteorological and oceanographic processes in the Baltic Sea drainage basin, hence mostly dealt with the physical aspects of the system. Scientific focus was on the hydrological cycle and the exchange of energy between the atmosphere, the Baltic Sea and the surface of its catchment. The BALTEX study area was hydrologically defined as the Baltic Sea drainage basin. The second 10 yr phase of BALTEX (Phase II: 2003-12) has strengthened regional climate research, water management issues, biogeochemical cycles and overarching efforts to reach out to stakeholders and decision makers, as well as to foster communication and education. Achievements of BALTEX Phase II have been the establishment of an assessment report of regional climate change and its impacts on the Baltic Sea basin (from hydrological to biological and socio-economic), the further development of regional physical climate models and the integration of biogeochemical and ecosystem models. BALTEX features a strong infrastructure, with an international secretariat and a publication series, and organizes various workshops and conferences. This article gives an overview of the BALTEX programme, with an emphasis on Phase II, with some examples from BALTEX-related research.

  12. Large-Scale Covariability Between Aerosol and Precipitation Over the 7-SEAS Region: Observations and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Zhang, Chidong; Jeong, Myeong Jae; Gautam, Ritesh; Bettenhausen, Corey; Sayer, Andrew M.; Hansell, Richard A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Jiang, Jonathan H.

    2012-01-01

    One of the seven scientific areas of interests of the 7-SEAS field campaign is to evaluate the impact of aerosol on cloud and precipitation (http://7-seas.gsfc.nasa.gov). However, large-scale covariability between aerosol, cloud and precipitation is complicated not only by ambient environment and a variety of aerosol effects, but also by effects from rain washout and climate factors. This study characterizes large-scale aerosol-cloud-precipitation covariability through synergy of long-term multi ]sensor satellite observations with model simulations over the 7-SEAS region [10S-30N, 95E-130E]. Results show that climate factors such as ENSO significantly modulate aerosol and precipitation over the region simultaneously. After removal of climate factor effects, aerosol and precipitation are significantly anti-correlated over the southern part of the region, where high aerosols loading is associated with overall reduced total precipitation with intensified rain rates and decreased rain frequency, decreased tropospheric latent heating, suppressed cloud top height and increased outgoing longwave radiation, enhanced clear-sky shortwave TOA flux but reduced all-sky shortwave TOA flux in deep convective regimes; but such covariability becomes less notable over the northern counterpart of the region where low ]level stratus are found. Using CO as a proxy of biomass burning aerosols to minimize the washout effect, large-scale covariability between CO and precipitation was also investigated and similar large-scale covariability observed. Model simulations with NCAR CAM5 were found to show similar effects to observations in the spatio-temporal patterns. Results from both observations and simulations are valuable for improving our understanding of this region's meteorological system and the roles of aerosol within it. Key words: aerosol; precipitation; large-scale covariability; aerosol effects; washout; climate factors; 7- SEAS; CO; CAM5

  13. Improvement of global and regional mean sea level derived from satellite altimetry multi missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablain, M.; Faugere, Y.; Larnicol, G.; Picot, N.; Cazenave, A.; Benveniste, J.

    2012-04-01

    With the satellite altimetry missions, the global mean sea level (GMSL) has been calculated on a continual basis since January 1993. 'Verification' phases, during which the satellites follow each other in close succession (Topex/Poseidon--Jason-1, then Jason-1--Jason-2), help to link up these different missions by precisely determining any bias between them. Envisat, ERS-1 and ERS-2 are also used, after being adjusted on these reference missions, in order to compute Mean Sea Level at high latitudes (higher than 66°N and S), and also to improve spatial resolution by combining all these missions together. The global mean sea level (MSL) deduced from TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and Jason-2 provide a global rate of 3.2 mm from 1993 to 2010 applying the post glacial rebound (MSL aviso website http://www.jason.oceanobs.com/msl). Besides, the regional sea level trends bring out an inhomogeneous repartition of the ocean elevation with local MSL slopes ranging from + 8 mm/yr to - 8 mm/year. A study published in 2009 [Ablain et al., 2009] has shown that the global MSL trend unceratainty was estimated at +/-0.6 mm/year with a confidence interval of 90%. The main sources of errors at global and regional scales are due to the orbit calculation and the wet troposphere correction. But others sea-level components have also a significant impact on the long-term stability of MSL as for instance the stability of instrumental parameters and the atmospheric corrections. Thanks to recent studies performed in the frame of the SALP project (supported by CNES) and Sea-level Climate Change Initiative project (supported by ESA), strong improvements have been provided for the estimation of the global and regional MSL trends. In this paper, we propose to describe them; they concern the orbit calculation thanks to new gravity fields, the atmospheric corrections thanks to ERA-interim reanalyses, the wet troposphere corrections thanks to the stability improvement, and also empirical corrections

  14. Timing Aegean extension: Evidence from in situ U-Pb geochronology and cathodoluminescence imaging of granitoids from NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Karen N.; Catlos, Elizabeth J.; Oyman, Tolga; Demirbilek, Mehmet

    2013-11-01

    The Biga Peninsula of NW Turkey hosts granitoid plutons that record the timing of extension in the Aegean region. Here we focus on three plutons, the Kozak, Eybek, and Kestanbol and apply new methods to obtain a detailed tectonic history of their generation and exhumation. In situ (in thin section) ion microprobe zircon geochronology and color cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging of zircon grains and whole thin sections show these granites experienced magma mixing, brittle deformation, and significant fluid-rock interactions. Zircon ages range from the Late Eocene to Late Miocene with two ages from a single grain that are Permian. The Late Eocene-Early Oligocene ages record the end stages of subduction during the closure of a branch of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean, whereas Late Oligocene-Late Miocene ages record the plutons' extension and exhumation. We present a model in which Kozak, Eybek, and Kestanbol magmas were initially generated by fluid-flux melting from dehydration of the subducting Anatolide-Tauride block, as evidenced by the Late Eocene to Early Oligocene ages. Late Oligocene ages document the initiation of extension in the Biga Peninsula region and correlate to ages timing exhumation of the Kazdağ Massif. Early Miocene ages indicate continued Aegean extension in the southern Biga Peninsula region at this time.

  15. Dynamic analysis on coastline and sea reclamation in the region around Bohai based on remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangyang; Gao, Zhiqiang; Ning, Jicai; Lu, Qingshui

    2014-10-01

    With 2 periods of standard false-color images as data sources, using remote sensing and GIS technology, dynamic change information extraction of the coastline and sea reclamation was completed in the region around Bohai through visual interpretation and artificial vectorization, and then this kind of information was studied deeply. The conclusions are as follows: 1) From 2000 to 2010, coastline of the region around Bohai shows an increasing trend, advancing to the sea rapidly; coastline change of the Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan area is maximum; the advancing of coastlines of Liaoning and Shandong Province to the sea is obvious; human factors are key factors for the above change . 2) From 2000 to 2010, the sea reclamation area of the region around Bohai is rapidly increasing, the increase of Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan region is the largest relatively and that of Shandong Province is the smallest; from the structure point of view, the area of sea reclamation for building ports is the largest and that of tideland reclamation is the smallest; different regions have different structures; social and natural factors together determine the evolution of sea reclamation. 3) To some extent, sea reclamation contributes to the increase in length of the coastline; different use types of sea reclamation have different influences on the coastline changes.

  16. Influence of regional tectonics on halokinesis in the Nordkapp Basin, Barents Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, K.T.; Johansen, J.T.; Vendeville, B.C.

    1996-12-31

    Seismic analysis of salt structures in the Nordkapp Basin, a deep salt basin in the southern Barents Sea, combined with experimental modeling suggests that regional tectonics closely controlled diapiric growth. Diapirs formed in the Early Triassic during basement-involved regional extension. The diapirs then rose rapidly by passive growth and exhausted their source layer. Regional extension in the Middle-Late Triassic triggered down-to-the-basin gravity gliding, which laterally shortened the diapirs. This squeezed salt out of diapir stems, forcing diapirs to rise, extrude, and form diapir overhangs. After burial under more than 1000 m of Upper Triassic-Lower Cretaceous sediments, the diapirs were rejuvenated by a Late Cretaceous episode of regional extension and gravity gliding, which deformed their thick roofs. After extension, diapirs stopped rising and were buried under 1500 m of lower Tertiary sediments. Regional compression of the Barents Sea region in the middle Tertiary caused one more episode of diapiric rise. Diapirs in the Nordkapp Basin are now extinct.

  17. The Caspian Sea regionalism in a globalized world: Energy security and regional trajectories of Azerbaijan and Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedjazi, Babak

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation is fundamentally about the formation of new regional spaces in Central Eurasia viewed from a dynamic, comparative and historical approach. Analyzing the global-local economic and political interactions and their consequences on resource rich countries of the Caspian Sea enable us to reframe security as a central element of the new global order. In this respect, the dissertation examines how two particular states, Azerbaijan and Iran, respond to the changing global security environment and optimize their capacity to absorb or control change. Here, security as I conceive is multidimensional and engages various social, political and economic domains. My research is articulated along three hypotheses regarding the formation of a new regional space and its consequences on territorial polarization and interstate rivalry. These hypotheses, respectively and cumulatively, elucidate global and domestic contexts of regional space formation, regional strategic and discursive trajectories, and regional tensions of global/local interactions. In order to empirically test these hypotheses, a series of thirty interviews were conducted by the author with local and foreign business representatives, civilian and government representatives, and corroborated by economic data collected from the International Energy Agency. The findings of the research validate the primary assumption of the dissertation that Azerbaijan and Iran have chosen the regional scale to address discrepancies between their aspired place in the new world order and the reality of their power and international status. Extending the argument for structural scarcity of oil towards contenders, this dissertation concludes that the Caspian oil has become a fundamental element of the regional discourse. The mismatch between the rhetoric of sovereign rights and energy security on one side and the reality of regional countries' powerlessness and their need to reach international markets on the other side are

  18. Climatological aspects of mesoscale cyclogenesis over the Ross Sea and Ross Ice shelf regions of Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, J.F.; Bromwich, D.H.

    1994-11-01

    A one-year (1988) statistical study of mesoscale cyclogenesis near Terra Nova Bay and Byrd Glacier, Antarctica, was conducted using high-resolution digital satellite imagery and automatic weather station data. Results indicate that on average two (one) mesoscale cyclones form near Terra Nova Bay (Byrd Glacier) each week, confirming these two locations as mesoscale cyclogeneis areas. The maximum (minimum) weekly frequency of mesoscale cyclones occurred during the summer (winter). The satellite survey of mesoscale vortices was extended over the Ross Sea and Ross Ice Shelf. Results suggest southern Marie Byrd Land as another area of mesoscale cyclone formation. Also, frequent mesoscale cyclonic activity was noted over the Ross Sea and Ross Ice Shelf, where, on average, six and three mesoscale vortices were observed each week, respectively, with maximum (minimum) frequency during summer (winter) in both regions. The majority (70-80%) of the vortices were of comma-cloud type and were shallow. Only around 10% of the vortices near Terra Nova Bay and Byrd Glacier were classified as deep vortices, while over the Ross Sea and Ross Ice Shelf around 20% were found to be deep. The average large-scale pattern associated with cyclogenesis days near Terra Nova Bay suggests a slight decrease in the sea level pressure and 500-hPa geopotential height to the northwest of this area with respect to the annual average. This may be an indication of the average position of synoptic-scale cyclones entering the Ross Sea region. Comparison with a similar study but for 1984-85 shows that the overall mesoscale cyclogenesis activity was similar during the three years, but 1985 was found to be the year with greater occurrence of {open_quotes}significant{close_quotes} mesoscales cyclones. The large-scale pattern indicates that this greater activity is related to a deeper circumpolar trough and 500-hPa polar vortex for 1985 in comparison to 1984 and 1988. 64 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Quantifying and Projecting Relative Sea-Level Rise At The Regional Scale: The Bangladesh Sea-Level Project (BanD-AID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, C. K.; Kuo, C. Y.; Guo, J.; Shang, K.; Tseng, K. H.; Wan, J.; Calmant, S.; Ballu, V.; Valty, P.; Kusche, J.; Hossain, F.; Khan, Z. H.; Rietbroek, R.; Uebbing, B.

    2014-12-01

    The potential for accelerated sea-level rise under anthropogenic warming is a significant societal problem, in particular in world's coastal deltaic regions where about half of the world's population resides. Quantifying geophysical sources of sea-level rise with the goal of improved projection at local scales remains a complex and challenging interdisciplinary research problem. These processes include ice-sheet/glacier ablations, steric sea-level, solid Earth uplift or subsidence due to GIA, tectonics, sediment loading or anthropogenic causes, hydrologic imbalance, and human processes including water retention in reservoirs and aquifer extraction. The 2013 IPCC AR5 concluded that the observed and explained geophysical causes of global geocentric sea-level rise, 1993-2010, is closer towards closure. However, the discrepancy reveals that circa 1.3→37.5% of the observed sea-level rise remains unexplained. This relatively large discrepancy is primarily attributable to the wide range of estimates of respective contributions of Greenland and Antarctic ice-sheets and mountain/peripheral glaciers to sea-level rise. Understanding and quantifying the natural and anthropogenic processes governing solid Earth (land, islands and sea-floor) uplift or subsidence at the regional and local scales remain elusive to enable addressing coastal vulnerability due to relative sea-level rise hazards, such as the Bangladesh Delta. This study focuses on addressing coastal vulnerability of Bangladesh, a Belmont Forum/IGFA project, BanD-AID (http://Belmont-SeaLevel.org). Sea-level rise, along with tectonic, sediment load and groundwater extraction induced land uplift/subsidence, have exacerbated Bangladesh's coastal vulnerability, affecting 150 million people in one of the world's most densely populated regions. Here we present preliminary results using space geodetic observations, including satellite radar and laser altimetry, GRACE gravity, tide gauge, hydrographic, and GPS/InSAR observed

  20. Prophage-Encoded Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A: Regulation of Production in Staphylococcus aureus Strains Representing Different Sea Regions

    PubMed Central

    Zeaki, Nikoleta; Budi Susilo, Yusak; Pregiel, Anna; Rådström, Peter; Schelin, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the nature of the link between the staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) gene and the lifecycle of Siphoviridae bacteriophages, including the origin of strain variation regarding SEA production after prophage induction. Five strains representing three different genetic lines of the sea region were studied under optimal and prophage-induced growth conditions and the Siphoviridae lifecycle was followed through the phage replicative form copies and transcripts of the lysogenic repressor, cro. The role of SOS response on prophage induction was addressed through recA transcription in a recA-disruption mutant. Prophage induction was found to increase the abundance of the phage replicative form, the sea gene copies and transcripts and enhance SEA production. Sequence analysis of the sea regions revealed that observed strain variances were related to strain capacity for prophage induction, rather than sequence differences in the sea region. The impact of SOS response activation on the phage lifecycle was demonstrated by the absence of phage replicative form copies in the recA-disruption mutant after prophage induction. From this study it emerges that all aspects of SEA-producing strain, the Siphoviridae phage and the food environment must be considered when evaluating SEA-related hazards. PMID:26690218

  1. Substantial primary production in the land-remote region of the central and northern Scotia Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, M. J.; Atkinson, A.; Korb, R. E.; Venables, H. J.; Pond, D. W.; Gordon, M.

    2012-01-01

    The Scotia Sea area has high productivity relative to the Southern Ocean as a whole, but this displays strong latitudinal and longitudinal gradients. Elucidating the extent of these from a single cruise is problematic, given the high variability of bloom timing and location in this region. Therefore, this study used data from transects across the central Scotia Sea in spring, summer and autumn of 2006, 2008 and 2009, combined with satellite data, to obtain a larger-scale appreciation of the latitudinal contrasts in phytoplankton standing stock and primary production across the region. Concentrations of nitrate, phosphate and particularly silicic acid increased towards the south of the transect with the latter showing a step change at the Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Front (SACCF). Changes in seasonal nutrient concentrations indicated increasing phytoplankton uptake north of ˜57°S that peaked at ˜53°S in the Georgia Basin. Based on seasonal depletions of nitrate relative to phosphate, the highest relative nitrate uptake occurred northwest of South Georgia on the periphery of the Georgia Basin, indicating efficient nitrate use here due to iron-replete conditions. An integrative approach to examine these gradients was with the use of 10-year satellite climatology data. These showed that the lowest mean chlorophyll a (chl- a) values were in the central/northern Scotia Sea, but these were still substantial values, 67% of values within the Georgia Basin bloom. Cruise data on chl- a and on microplankton biomass from cell counts support this finding of substantial biomass in the central Scotia Sea; since these averaged half of values in the iron-fertilised bloom of the Georgia Basin downstream of South Georgia. Given that our transect was nearly 1000 km long and in parts was land remote with low iron concentrations, the relatively high production in the central and northern Scotia Sea is surprising. Iron levels may be maintained here by efficient recycling

  2. Potential Inundation in the San Francisco Bay Region Due to Rising Sea Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, N.

    2009-12-01

    An increase in the rate of sea level rise is one of the primary impacts of projected global climate change. To assess potential inundation associated with a continued acceleration of sea level rise, the highest resolution elevation data available were assembled from various sources and mosaicked to cover the land surfaces of the San Francisco Bay region. Next, to quantify high water levels throughout the Bay, a hydrodynamic model of the San Francisco Estuary was driven by a projection of hourly water levels near the Golden Gate Bridge. This projection was based on a combination of climate model outputs and empirical models and incorporates astronomical, storm surge, El Niño, and long-term sea level rise influences. Based on the resulting data, maps of areas vulnerable to inundation were produced, corresponding to specific amounts of sea level rise and recurrence intervals. These maps portray areas where inundation will likely be an increasing concern. In the North Bay, wetland survival and developed fill areas are at risk. In Central and South bays, a key feature is the bay-ward periphery of developed areas that would be newly vulnerable to inundation. Nearly all municipalities adjacent to South Bay face this risk to some degree. For the Bay as a whole, as early as 2050 under this scenario, the one-year peak event nearly equals the 100-year peak event in 2000. Maps of vulnerable areas are presented and some implications discussed.

  3. Characterization of Bacterial Communities in Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents from Three Oceanic Regions.

    PubMed

    He, Tianliang; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2016-04-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are considered to be one of the most spectacular ecosystems on Earth. Microorganisms form the basis of the food chain in vents controlling the vent communities. However, the diversity of bacterial communities in deep-sea hydrothermal vents from different oceans remains largely unknown. In this study, the pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene was used to characterize the bacterial communities of the venting sulfide, seawater, and tubeworm trophosome from East Pacific Rise, South Atlantic Ridge, and Southwest Indian Ridge, respectively. A total of 23,767 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were assigned into 42 different phyla. Although Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were the predominant phyla in all vents, differences of bacterial diversity were observed among different vents from three oceanic regions. The sulfides of East Pacific Rise possessed the most diverse bacterial communities. The bacterial diversities of venting seawater were much lower than those of vent sulfides. The symbiotic bacteria of tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae were included in the bacterial community of vent sulfides, suggesting their significant ecological functions as the primary producers in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems. Therefore, our study presented a comprehensive view of bacterial communities in deep-sea hydrothermal vents from different oceans. PMID:26626941

  4. Characterization of Bacterial Communities in Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vents from Three Oceanic Regions.

    PubMed

    He, Tianliang; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2016-04-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are considered to be one of the most spectacular ecosystems on Earth. Microorganisms form the basis of the food chain in vents controlling the vent communities. However, the diversity of bacterial communities in deep-sea hydrothermal vents from different oceans remains largely unknown. In this study, the pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene was used to characterize the bacterial communities of the venting sulfide, seawater, and tubeworm trophosome from East Pacific Rise, South Atlantic Ridge, and Southwest Indian Ridge, respectively. A total of 23,767 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were assigned into 42 different phyla. Although Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were the predominant phyla in all vents, differences of bacterial diversity were observed among different vents from three oceanic regions. The sulfides of East Pacific Rise possessed the most diverse bacterial communities. The bacterial diversities of venting seawater were much lower than those of vent sulfides. The symbiotic bacteria of tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae were included in the bacterial community of vent sulfides, suggesting their significant ecological functions as the primary producers in the deep-sea hydrothermal vent ecosystems. Therefore, our study presented a comprehensive view of bacterial communities in deep-sea hydrothermal vents from different oceans.

  5. Plate boundaries in the Woodlark Basin and Solomon Sea Region, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodliffe, A. M.; Cameron, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Solomon Sea and Woodlark Basin region of eastern Papua New Guinea is a tectonically complex region between the obliquely converging Pacific and Australian plates. Despite numerous marine geophysical surveys in the region, the exact nature of the tectonic boundaries between the Solomon Sea and the Woodlark Basin remains controversial. Marine geophysical data collected in the last decade provides additional insight into this region and clearly defines the boundaries of the Solomon Sea, Trobriand, Woodlark, and Australian plates. Multibeam bathymetry data collected in 2004 along the Trobriand Trough, together with seismic profiles across the trough, show a prominent deformation front in the trench that defines the southern boundary of the Solomon Sea plate. Petrologic data from volcanoes to the south of this boundary indicate that they have a subduction affinity. Heat flow profiles to the south of the plate boundary show a clear subduction signature. At the eastern termination of the Trobriand Trough the plate boundary forms a triple junction with the NE-SW trending Nubaru strike-slip fault. To the NE this major fault separates the Solomon Sea plate from the Woodlark plate. The morphology of this fault and a CMT solution indicate that it is right-lateral. To the SW the Nubaru strike-slip fault passes to the south of the Trobriand Trough, forming the southern boundary of the Trobriand plate (with the Trobriand Trough as the northern boundary). Further west the trend of the strike slip fault becomes more ENE-WSW. A significant extension component is evident as the fault passes to the north of Egum Graben and meets the Woodlark Basin spreading system at the current rifting to seafloor spreading transition directly to the east of Moresby Seamount. The revised tectonic model for this region has important implications for tectonic reconstructions that include an active rifting to spreading transition and prominent core complexes. In the past, models have assumed a

  6. Child health and environmental pollution in the Aral Sea region in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Zetterström, R

    1999-05-01

    Environmental pollutants, which may occur in breast milk and in various food products and drinking water, and which are also transferred to the foetus, constitute a severe threat to the health of infants and children. Among such compounds, various organochlorines, such as pesticides for the control of parasites (DDTs, HCHs), and products of industry and agriculture, such as dioxins and dioxin-like compounds (PCBs), are much discussed, in addition to organic mercury and heavy metals, such as lead and cadmium. The consequences of acute exposure to PCB have been documented in Japan following the ingestion of rice oil contaminated by PCBs. In Sweden birthweight has been found to be reduced and the perinatal mortality rate higher than expected in regions with high consumption of fatty fish from the Baltic Sea. In addition, from studies around Lake Michigan, it has been shown that children who have been exposed to PCBs in utero have retarded cognitive development. In the Aral Sea basin in Central Asia people have been subjected to long-term exposure to various pesticides, which have been distributed over the cotton fields in huge quantities. Organochlorines are resistant to breakdown in nature, thus they enter the food chain, eventually entering the human diet, and they may also be inhaled from dust. Such compounds accumulate in the foetus by placental transport and continue to do so postnatally if the infants are breastfed, as they may be present in high concentrations in human milk. The health of children living in the Aral Sea region is reported to be poor, with high morbidity and mortality and a high rate of chronic diseases and retarded mental and physical development. However, in addition to being subjected to environmental pollution, these children also suffer from health hazards related to poverty. Through epidemiological studies it may be possible to obtain information about to what extent exposure to environmental pollution from organochlorines contributes to

  7. Earthquake swarms reveal submarine magma unrest induced by distant mega-earthquakes: Andaman Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špičák, Aleš; Vaněk, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about earthquake-triggered magma intrusions or eruptions of submarine volcanoes. The analysis of teleseismic earthquake occurrence performed in this study offers a tool to address such enigmatic and inaccessible processes. In the past ten years, the Andaman Sea region repeatedly became a site of shallow earthquake swarms that followed distant mega-earthquakes by days to weeks. The MW 9.1 December 26, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake was followed by two earthquake swarms about 600 km northward in the Andaman Sea region, delayed by 30 and 35 days, respectively. Earthquakes of one of these seismic episodes, the extensive January 2005 earthquake swarm, migrated laterally at a rate of about 0.25 km per hour during the swarm evolution. The strong Indian Ocean MW 8.6 and 8.2 April 11, 2012 earthquake doublet west of Northern Sumatra was followed by an earthquake swarm approximately 800 km northward in the Andaman Sea region, delayed by 13 days. All the three swarms that followed the 2004 and 2012 mega-earthquakes occurred beneath distinct seamounts and seafloor ridges. Based on the observations of migration of earthquakes during the swarm and swarm occurrence beneath distinct highs at the seafloor, we conclude that these earthquake swarms probably resulted as a consequence of magma unrest induced by static and/or dynamic stress changes following the distant mega-earthquakes. Repeated occurrence of such a phenomenon suggests that the arc magma reservoirs beneath the Andaman Sea have recently reached some form of criticality and are vulnerable to even small stress changes. The Andaman seafloor could thus become a site of submarine volcanic eruptions in near future and deserves close attention of Earth scientists.

  8. Environmental pollution and child health in the Aral Sea region in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Jensen, S; Mazhitova, Z; Zetterström, R

    1997-11-01

    The deterioration of human health with increasing infant mortality rate, declining life expectancy at birth and increasing prevalence of serious infectious diseases in Russia and other former Soviet Republics is thought to be due to a combination of several factors such as inadequate nutrition, poor sanitation, collapse of the health care system and pollution from Soviet agriculture and industries. In the Aral Sea region in Kazakhstan, the environmental problems are of near catastrophic proportions. As a result of the implementation of a massive irrigation scheme to support the cotton fields in the former desert land, the water flow to the Aral Sea was reduced to less than half. Industrial pollutants such as PCB-compounds and heavy metals, but also the use of large quantities of pesticides to control parasites and weeds have accumulated not only in water, but also in soil and have been deposited over large areas by atmospheric transport to enter the food chain leading to humans. In a study of 15 children and of an additional 12 children referred from the region of the Aral Sea to the National Children's Rehabilitation Center in Almaty with symptoms and signs of 'ecological disease', we have found that the concentration of PCB compounds in the blood lipids is elevated in relation to healthy Swedish children. In addition, the blood lipid concentration of the beta-isomer of the hexachlorocyclohexanes was extremely high and of DDT-compounds was elevated up to 20 times. The concentrations of lead in red blood cells was moderately elevated and that of cadmium slightly elevated compared to the findings in Stockholm children. To study the role of these pollutants in the diseases found in children from the Aral Sea region accurate epidemiological studies have to be performed.

  9. The Antarctic region as a marine biodiversity hotspot for echinoderms: Diversity and diversification of sea cucumbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark O'Loughlin, P.; Paulay, Gustav; Davey, Niki; Michonneau, François

    2011-03-01

    The Antarctic region is renowned for its isolated, unusual, diverse, and disharmonic marine fauna. Holothuroids are especially diverse, with 187 species (including 51 that are undescribed) recorded south of the Antarctic Convergence. This represents ˜4% of the documented Antarctic marine biota, and ˜10% of the world's holothuroid diversity. We present evidence that both inter-regional speciation with southern cold-temperate regions and intra-regional diversification has contributed to species richness. The Antarctic fauna is isolated, with few shallow-water Antarctic species known from north of the Convergence, yet several species show recent transgression of this boundary followed by genetic divergence. Interchange at longer time scales is evidenced by the scarcity of endemic genera (10 of 55) and occurrence of all six holothuroid orders within the region. While most Antarctic holothuroid morphospecies have circum-polar distributions, mtDNA sequence data demonstrate substantial geographic differentiation in many of these. Thus, most of the 37 holothuroid species recorded from shelf/slope depths in the Weddell Sea have also been found in collections from Prydz Bay and the Ross Sea. Yet 17 of 28 morphospecies and complexes studied show allopatric differentiation around the continent, on average into three divergent lineages each, suggesting that morphological data fails to reflect the level of differentiation. Interchange and local radiation of colonizers appear to have rapidly built diversity in the Antarctic, despite the potential of cold temperatures (and associated long generation times) to slow the rate of evolution.

  10. Beringian Sea Level and Marine Climate History: Investigations into Regional & Global Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigham-Grette, J.; Driscoll, N.; Keigwin, L.; Lundeen, Z.; Hill, J.; Cook, M.; Donnelly, J.

    2003-12-01

    Glacial-interglacial cycles have imposed on the Bering Strait region some of the most radical changes in paleogeography documented in the Northern Hemisphere. Only 20,000 years ago during the last glaciation when sea level was about 130 m below present, the Bering Land Bridge separated the deeper Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean from the Arctic Ocean by more than 1000 kilometers of herb-dominated tundra. Missing from existing literature are studies of how the Bering and Chukchi seas participate in controlling Beringian and global climate. Fluctuations in sea level caused the rapid migration of shorelines changing gradients in temperature and moisture with considerable downwind effects based on regional terrestrial records. The greatest east-west heterogeneity across Beringia occurred during warm (flooded) or warming (partially flooded) periods of late Pleistocene summers, when the cool maritime influence bifurcated the relatively warm continental interior. Oceanographic changes were also radically influenced by changes in sea level across the Bering Straits that regulated the northward flow of Pacific waters into the Arctic Ocean and North Atlantic. Especially important in our collective research is an understanding of how the flow of water through the Bering Strait may have influenced documented changes in thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic (e.g., Younger Dryas) by changing the flux of fresher Pacific water into the Arctic Ocean. On board the USCGC Healy in the summer of 2002, we collected from -2800m to -50 m water depth, a set of nearly 100 different marine cores measuring over 500 meters in total length. Some are up to 21 meters long, from -1300 m water depth, the longest cores taken in this part of the western Arctic. Specific cores appear to hold a high-resolution record of the deglacial and Holocene history in this region and a few of the cores likely contain sediments back to nearly 140,000 yrs BP. We also learned that the stratigraphic

  11. A Review of Recent Updates of Sea-Level Projections at Global and Regional Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slangen, A. B. A.; Adloff, F.; Jevrejeva, S.; Leclercq, P. W.; Marzeion, B.; Wada, Y.; Winkelmann, R.

    2016-06-01

    Sea-level change (SLC) is a much-studied topic in the area of climate research, integrating a range of climate science disciplines, and is expected to impact coastal communities around the world. As a result, this field is rapidly moving, and the knowledge and understanding of processes contributing to SLC is increasing. Here, we discuss noteworthy recent developments in the projection of SLC contributions and in the global mean and regional sea-level projections. For the Greenland Ice Sheet contribution to SLC, earlier estimates have been confirmed in recent research, but part of the source of this contribution has shifted from dynamics to surface melting. New insights into dynamic discharge processes and the onset of marine ice sheet instability increase the projected range for the Antarctic contribution by the end of the century. The contribution from both ice sheets is projected to increase further in the coming centuries to millennia. Recent updates of the global glacier outline database and new global glacier models have led to slightly lower projections for the glacier contribution to SLC (7-17 cm by 2100), but still project the glaciers to be an important contribution. For global mean sea-level projections, the focus has shifted to better estimating the uncertainty distributions of the projection time series, which may not necessarily follow a normal distribution. Instead, recent studies use skewed distributions with longer tails to higher uncertainties. Regional projections have been used to study regional uncertainty distributions, and regional projections are increasingly being applied to specific regions, countries, and coastal areas.

  12. A Review of Recent Updates of Sea-Level Projections at Global and Regional Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slangen, A. B. A.; Adloff, F.; Jevrejeva, S.; Leclercq, P. W.; Marzeion, B.; Wada, Yoshihide; Winkelmann, R.

    2016-01-01

    Sea-level change (SLC) is a much-studied topic in the area of climate research, integrating a range of climate science disciplines, and is expected to impact coastal communities around the world. As a result, this field is rapidly moving, and the knowledge and understanding of processes contributing to SLC is increasing. Here, we discuss noteworthy recent developments in the projection of SLC contributions and in the global mean and regional sea-level projections. For the Greenland Ice Sheet contribution to SLC, earlier estimates have been confirmed in recent research, but part of the source of this contribution has shifted from dynamics to surface melting. New insights into dynamic discharge processes and the onset of marine ice sheet instability increase the projected range for the Antarctic contribution by the end of the century. The contribution from both ice sheets is projected to increase further in the coming centuries to millennia. Recent updates of the global glacier outline database and new global glacier models have led to slightly lower projections for the glacier contribution to SLC (7-17 cm by 2100), but still project the glaciers to be an important contribution. For global mean sea-level projections, the focus has shifted to better estimating the uncertainty distributions of the projection time series, which may not necessarily follow a normal distribution. Instead, recent studies use skewed distributions with longer tails to higher uncertainties. Regional projections have been used to study regional uncertainty distributions, and regional projections are increasingly being applied to specific regions, countries, and coastal areas.

  13. Regional waveform inversion of 2004 February 11 and 2007 February 09 Dead Sea earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elenean, K. M. Abou; Aldamegh, K. S.; Zharan, H. M.; Hussein, H. M.

    2009-01-01

    Two felt moderate size earthquakes with local magnitudes 5.2 on 2004 February 11 and 4.4 on 2007 February 09 occurred to the east of the Dead Sea and along the northern part of the Arava/Araba fault (ARF), respectively. Being well recorded by the national seismic networks operating on the Dead Sea region, they offer a good opportunity to update the crustal model, revealing the tectonic process and present-day stress field on the Dead Sea region. The observed group velocity dispersion of Rayleigh and Love waves picked from the broad-band records for the 2004 and 2007 main shocks are used to update the Jordan Seismological Observatory model, which shows a good match between the observed and theoretical dispersion. Our updated model shows small traveltime residuals during our location process and yields a high variance reduction for our regional waveform inversion. The earthquake hypocentre, determined from the observed P- and S-wave traveltime data, and regional waveform inversion indicate a source depth of ~14 and ~12 km for the 2004 and 2007 main shocks, respectively. Focal mechanism obtained from both first motion polarities of local-regional observations and moment tensor inversion of regional observations of 2004 earthquake reveal a mainly normal faulting, with minor strike-slip component, along WNW-ESE fault, whose orientation is nearly consistent with the transverse Zarqa Ma'in fault. However, the focal mechanism of 2007 main shock shows left-lateral, strike-slip faulting along a near-vertical, near-NNE-SSW striking fault plane whose orientation is in good agreement with the surface expression of the observed northern ARF. The focal mechanism for a felt foreshock of 2007 earthquake indicates a similar left-lateral strike-slip fault with a slight normal component. Moment tensors estimated from regional waveforms indicate predominantly double-couple mechanisms for the three studied events. These results can be used to calibrate ground motions, evaluate 3-D

  14. Effects of fragmentation on genetic diversity in island populations of the Aegean wall lizard Podarcis erhardii (Lacertidae, Reptilia).

    PubMed

    Hurston, H; Voith, L; Bonanno, J; Foufopoulos, J; Pafilis, P; Valakos, E; Anthony, N

    2009-08-01

    Landbridge islands offer unique opportunities for understanding the effects of fragmentation history on genetic variation in island taxa. The formation of islands by rising sea levels can be likened to a population bottleneck whose magnitude and duration is determined by island area and time since isolation, respectively. The Holocene landbridge islands of the Aegean Sea (Greece) were formed since the last glacial maximum and constitute an ideal system for disentangling the effects of island area, age and geographic isolation on genetic variability. Of the many reptile species inhabiting this island system, the Aegean wall lizard Podarcis erhardii is an excellent indicator of fragmentation history due to its widespread distribution and poor over-water dispersal abilities. In this study, we utilize a detailed record of Holocene fragmentation to investigate the effects of island history on wall lizard mitochondrial and nuclear microsatellite diversity. Findings show that the spatial distribution of mitochondrial haplotypes reflects historical patterns of fragmentation rather than geographic proximity per se. In keeping with neutral bottleneck theory, larger and younger islands retain more nuclear genetic variation than smaller, older islands. Conversely, there is no evidence of an effect of isolation by distance or effect of distance to the nearest larger landmass on genetic variability, indicating little gene flow between islands. Lastly, population-specific measures of genetic differentiation are inversely correlated with island area, suggesting that smaller islands exhibit greater divergence due to their greater susceptibility to drift. Taken together, these results suggest that both island area and time since isolation are important predictors of genetic variation and that these patterns likely arose through the progressive fragmentation of ancestral diversity and the ensuing cumulative effects of drift.

  15. Uncertainty in future regional sea level rise due to internal climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Aixue; Deser, Clara

    2013-06-01

    level rise (SLR) is an inescapable consequence of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, with potentially harmful effects on human populations in coastal and island regions. Observational evidence indicates that global sea level has risen in the 20th century, and climate models project an acceleration of this trend in the coming decades. Here we analyze rates of future SLR on regional scales in a 40-member ensemble of climate change projections with the Community Climate System Model Version 3. This unique ensemble allows us to assess uncertainty in the magnitude of 21st century SLR due to internal climate variability alone. We find that simulated regional SLR at mid-century can vary by a factor of 2 depending on location, with the North Atlantic and Pacific showing the greatest range. This uncertainty in regional SLR results primarily from internal variations in the wind-driven and buoyancy-driven ocean circulations.

  16. Revisiting the contemporary sea-level budget on global and regional scales.

    PubMed

    Rietbroek, Roelof; Brunnabend, Sandra-Esther; Kusche, Jürgen; Schröter, Jens; Dahle, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Dividing the sea-level budget into contributions from ice sheets and glaciers, the water cycle, steric expansion, and crustal movement is challenging, especially on regional scales. Here, Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity observations and sea-level anomalies from altimetry are used in a joint inversion, ensuring a consistent decomposition of the global and regional sea-level rise budget. Over the years 2002-2014, we find a global mean steric trend of 1.38 ± 0.16 mm/y, compared with a total trend of 2.74 ± 0.58 mm/y. This is significantly larger than steric trends derived from in situ temperature/salinity profiles and models which range from 0.66 ± 0.2 to 0.94 ± 0.1 mm/y. Mass contributions from ice sheets and glaciers (1.37 ± 0.09 mm/y, accelerating with 0.03 ± 0.02 mm/y(2)) are offset by a negative hydrological component (-0.29 ± 0.26 mm/y). The combined mass rate (1.08 ± 0.3 mm/y) is smaller than previous GRACE estimates (up to 2 mm/y), but it is consistent with the sum of individual contributions (ice sheets, glaciers, and hydrology) found in literature. The altimetric sea-level budget is closed by coestimating a remaining component of 0.22 ± 0.26 mm/y. Well above average sea-level rise is found regionally near the Philippines (14.7 ± 4.39 mm/y) and Indonesia (8.3 ± 4.7 mm/y) which is dominated by steric components (11.2 ± 3.58 mm/y and 6.4 ± 3.18 mm/y, respectively). In contrast, in the central and Eastern part of the Pacific, negative steric trends (down to -2.8 ± 1.53 mm/y) are detected. Significant regional components are found, up to 5.3 ± 2.6 mm/y in the northwest Atlantic, which are likely due to ocean bottom pressure variations.

  17. Revisiting the contemporary sea-level budget on global and regional scales

    PubMed Central

    Brunnabend, Sandra-Esther; Kusche, Jürgen; Schröter, Jens; Dahle, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Dividing the sea-level budget into contributions from ice sheets and glaciers, the water cycle, steric expansion, and crustal movement is challenging, especially on regional scales. Here, Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity observations and sea-level anomalies from altimetry are used in a joint inversion, ensuring a consistent decomposition of the global and regional sea-level rise budget. Over the years 2002–2014, we find a global mean steric trend of 1.38 ± 0.16 mm/y, compared with a total trend of 2.74 ± 0.58 mm/y. This is significantly larger than steric trends derived from in situ temperature/salinity profiles and models which range from 0.66 ± 0.2 to 0.94 ± 0.1 mm/y. Mass contributions from ice sheets and glaciers (1.37 ± 0.09 mm/y, accelerating with 0.03 ± 0.02 mm/y2) are offset by a negative hydrological component (−0.29 ± 0.26 mm/y). The combined mass rate (1.08 ± 0.3 mm/y) is smaller than previous GRACE estimates (up to 2 mm/y), but it is consistent with the sum of individual contributions (ice sheets, glaciers, and hydrology) found in literature. The altimetric sea-level budget is closed by coestimating a remaining component of 0.22 ± 0.26 mm/y. Well above average sea-level rise is found regionally near the Philippines (14.7 ± 4.39 mm/y) and Indonesia (8.3 ± 4.7 mm/y) which is dominated by steric components (11.2 ± 3.58 mm/y and 6.4 ± 3.18 mm/y, respectively). In contrast, in the central and Eastern part of the Pacific, negative steric trends (down to −2.8 ± 1.53 mm/y) are detected. Significant regional components are found, up to 5.3 ± 2.6 mm/y in the northwest Atlantic, which are likely due to ocean bottom pressure variations. PMID:26811469

  18. Revisiting the contemporary sea-level budget on global and regional scales.

    PubMed

    Rietbroek, Roelof; Brunnabend, Sandra-Esther; Kusche, Jürgen; Schröter, Jens; Dahle, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Dividing the sea-level budget into contributions from ice sheets and glaciers, the water cycle, steric expansion, and crustal movement is challenging, especially on regional scales. Here, Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity observations and sea-level anomalies from altimetry are used in a joint inversion, ensuring a consistent decomposition of the global and regional sea-level rise budget. Over the years 2002-2014, we find a global mean steric trend of 1.38 ± 0.16 mm/y, compared with a total trend of 2.74 ± 0.58 mm/y. This is significantly larger than steric trends derived from in situ temperature/salinity profiles and models which range from 0.66 ± 0.2 to 0.94 ± 0.1 mm/y. Mass contributions from ice sheets and glaciers (1.37 ± 0.09 mm/y, accelerating with 0.03 ± 0.02 mm/y(2)) are offset by a negative hydrological component (-0.29 ± 0.26 mm/y). The combined mass rate (1.08 ± 0.3 mm/y) is smaller than previous GRACE estimates (up to 2 mm/y), but it is consistent with the sum of individual contributions (ice sheets, glaciers, and hydrology) found in literature. The altimetric sea-level budget is closed by coestimating a remaining component of 0.22 ± 0.26 mm/y. Well above average sea-level rise is found regionally near the Philippines (14.7 ± 4.39 mm/y) and Indonesia (8.3 ± 4.7 mm/y) which is dominated by steric components (11.2 ± 3.58 mm/y and 6.4 ± 3.18 mm/y, respectively). In contrast, in the central and Eastern part of the Pacific, negative steric trends (down to -2.8 ± 1.53 mm/y) are detected. Significant regional components are found, up to 5.3 ± 2.6 mm/y in the northwest Atlantic, which are likely due to ocean bottom pressure variations. PMID:26811469

  19. Simulation of bombe radiocarbon transient in the Mediterranean Sea using a high-resolution regional model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayache, Mohamed; Dutay, Jean-claude; Mouchet, Anne; Tisnérat-Laborde, Nadine; Houma-Bachari, Fouzia; Louanchi, Ferial; jean-baptiste, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The radiocarbon isotope of carbon "14C", which a half-life of 5730 years, is continually formed naturally in the atmosphere by the neutron bombardment of 14N atoms. However, in the 1950s and early1960s, the atmospheric testing of thermonuclear weapons added a large amount of 14C into the atmosphere. The gradual infusion and spread of this "bomb" 14C through the oceans has provided a unique opportunity to gain insight into the specific rates characterizing the carbon cycle and ocean ventilations on such timescales. This numerical study provides, for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea, a simulation of the anthropogenic 14C invasion covers a 70-years period spanning the entire 14C generated by the bomb test, by using a high resolution regional model NEMO-MED12 (1/12° of horizontal resolution). This distribution and evolution of Δ14C of model is compared with recent high resolution 14C measurements obtained from surface water corals (Tisnérat-Laborde et al, 2013). In addition to providing constraints on the air-sea transfer of 14C, our work provides information on the thermohaline circulation and the ventilation of the deep waters to constrain the degree to which the NEMO-MED12 can reproduce correctly the main hydrographic features of the Mediterranean Sea circulation and its variations estimated from corals 14C time series measurements. This study is part of the work carried out to assess the robustness of the NEMO-MED12 model, which will be used to study the evolution of the climate and its effect on the biogeochemical cycles in the Mediterranean Sea, and to improve our ability to predict the future evolution of the Mediterranean Sea under the increasing anthropogenic pressure.

  20. Model Representation of Last Decade Regional Changes of Arctic Snow on Sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricker, R.; Castro-Morales, K.; Gerdes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Present changes that Arctic snow on sea ice experience due to a warming climate have important implications to the sea ice component, precipitation, heat and radiation budgets. In this study, we analyzed the regional distribution and changes, from 2000 to 2013, of Arctic snow depth simulated with a coupled sea ice-general circulation model. For validation, we compared the modeled snow depths (hs_mod) with airborne snow depth measurements from NASA's Operation IceBridge (hs_OIB) from 2009 to 2013. As in many current sea-ice models, our model configuration consist on a single-layer snow scheme and lack of explicit snow redistribution processes. The snow is accumulated proportionally to the prescribed sea-ice thickness distribution. Despite the simple scheme, our results show that the hs_mod latitudinal distribution in the western Arctic is in good agreement to the OIB observations. The hs_mod is generally thicker than hs_OIB: for latitudes dominated by first-year ice (between 67° N and 76° N) hs_mod is on average 1.1±7.9 cm thicker than hs_OIB, while for multi-year ice dominated latitudes (> 76° N), hs_mod is on average 3.0±8.8 cm thicker than hs_OIB. By 2013, the Arctic-wide hs decreased 21 % with respect to the hs multi-annual mean (2000 to 2013) occurring mainly in first-year ice dominated areas. In a simple snow mass budget, our results show that 65 % of the yearly accumulated snow is lost by sublimation and snowmelt due to the heat transfer between the snow/ice interface and the atmosphere. Despite the yearly recovery of snow in winter, the long-term reduction in the summer sea-ice extent ultimately affects the maximum accumulation of snow in spring. Compared to snow reduction estimates from snow radar measurements, the model results underestimate this loss, and we suggest that this is partially due to the lack of explicit snow redistribution processes in the model, ratifying the need to include these in current sea-ice models to improve the snow

  1. High Arctic sea ice conditions influence marine birds wintering in Low Arctic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane Tranquilla, Laura; Hedd, April; Burke, Chantelle; Montevecchi, William A.; Regular, Paul M.; Robertson, Gregory J.; Stapleton, Leslie Ann; Wilhelm, Sabina I.; Fifield, David A.; Buren, Alejandro D.

    2010-09-01

    Ocean climate change is having profound biological effects in polar regions. Such change can also have far-reaching downstream effects in sub-polar regions. This study documents an environmental relationship between High Arctic sea ice changes and mortality events of marine birds in Low Arctic coastal regions. During April 2007 and March 2009, hundreds of beached seabird carcasses and moribund seabirds were found along the east and northeast coasts of Newfoundland, Canada. These seabird "wrecks" (i.e. dead birds on beaches) coincided with a period of strong, persistent onshore winds and heavily-accumulated sea ice that blocked bays and trapped seabirds near beaches. Ninety-two percent of wreck seabirds were Thick-billed Murres ( Uria lomvia). Body condition and demographic patterns of wreck murres were compared to Thick-billed Murres shot in the Newfoundland murre hunt. Average body and pectoral masses of wreck carcasses were 34% and 40% lighter (respectively) than shot murres, indicating that wreck birds had starved. The acute nature of each wreck suggested that starvation and associated hypothermia occurred within 2-3 days. In 2007, first-winter murres (77%) dominated the wreck. In 2009, there were more adults (78%), mostly females (66%). These results suggest that spatial and temporal segregation in ages and sexes can play a role in differential survival when stochastic weather conditions affect discrete areas where these groups aggregate. In wreck years, southward movement of Arctic sea ice to Low Arctic latitudes was later and blocked bays longer than in most other years. These inshore conditions corresponded with recent climate-driven changes in High Arctic ice break-up and ice extent; coupled with local weather conditions, these ice conditions appeared to be the key environmental features that precipitated the ice-associated seabird wrecks in the Low Arctic region.

  2. Segmented Hellenic slab rollback driving Aegean deformation and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachpazi, M.; Laigle, M.; Charalampakis, M.; Diaz, J.; Kissling, E.; Gesret, A.; Becel, A.; Flueh, E.; Miles, P.; Hirn, A.

    2016-01-01

    The NE dipping slab of the Hellenic subduction is imaged in unprecedented detail using teleseismic receiver function analysis on a dense 2-D seismic array. Mapping of slab geometry for over 300 km along strike and down to 100 km depth reveals a segmentation into dipping panels by along-dip faults. Resolved intermediate-depth seismicity commonly attributed to dehydration embrittlement is shown to be clustered along these faults. Large earthquakes occurrence within the upper and lower plate and at the interplate megathrust boundary show a striking correlation with the slab faults suggesting high mechanical coupling between the two plates. Our results imply that the general slab rollback occurs here in a differential piecewise manner imposing its specific stress and deformation pattern onto the overriding Aegean plate.

  3. Sustainable use of water in the Aegean Islands.

    PubMed

    Gikas, Petros; Tchobanoglous, George

    2009-06-01

    Water demands in the Aegean Islands have increased steadily over the last decade as a result of a building boom for new homes, hotels, and resorts. The increase in water demand has resulted in the disruption of past sustainable water management practices. At present, most freshwater needs are met through the use of the limited groundwater, desalinated seawater, and freshwater importation. Wastewater reclamation, not used extensively, can serve as an alternative source of water, for a variety of applications now served with desalinated and imported water. Three alternative processes: desalination, importation, and water reclamation are compared with respect to cost, energy requirements and long-term sustainability. Based on the comparisons made, water reclamation and reuse should be components of any long-term water resources management strategy.

  4. An integrated approach to teaching Aegean archaeology and archaeological science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitcairn, Erica Glenn

    Outlined here is a course that would serve as an introduction to archaeological science, specifically within the context of Aegean Prehistory. The main objective of this course is to expose students early in their archaeological careers to a variety of methods and questions, and to depart from the culture-historical perspective that typifies introductory survey courses. The class structure is equal parts lecture and discussion, moving between learning how the methods work and evaluating case studies. All graded assignments build on one another, guiding the students through designing their own research project. The ultimate goals of the assignments are to build key writing and professional skills, develop a basic understanding of research design, and to instill confidence that the student can contribute to the production of knowledge, whatever field he or she decides to pursue.

  5. Sustainable use of water in the Aegean Islands.

    PubMed

    Gikas, Petros; Tchobanoglous, George

    2009-06-01

    Water demands in the Aegean Islands have increased steadily over the last decade as a result of a building boom for new homes, hotels, and resorts. The increase in water demand has resulted in the disruption of past sustainable water management practices. At present, most freshwater needs are met through the use of the limited groundwater, desalinated seawater, and freshwater importation. Wastewater reclamation, not used extensively, can serve as an alternative source of water, for a variety of applications now served with desalinated and imported water. Three alternative processes: desalination, importation, and water reclamation are compared with respect to cost, energy requirements and long-term sustainability. Based on the comparisons made, water reclamation and reuse should be components of any long-term water resources management strategy. PMID:19243876

  6. Timing and regional patterns of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice from passive microwave satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Stefanie; Willmes, Sascha; Dierking, Wolfgang; Nicolaus, Marcel

    2016-08-01

    An improved understanding of the temporal variability and the spatial distribution of snowmelt on Antarctic sea ice is crucial to better quantify atmosphere-ice-ocean interactions, in particular sea-ice mass and energy budgets. It is therefore important to understand the mechanisms that drive snowmelt, both at different times of the year and in different regions around Antarctica. In this study, we combine diurnal brightness temperature differences (dTB(37 GHz)) and ratios (TB(19 GHz)/TB(37 GHz)) to detect and classify snowmelt processes. We distinguish temporary snowmelt from continuous snowmelt to characterize dominant melt patterns for different Antarctic sea-ice regions from 1988/1989 to 2014/2015. Our results indicate four characteristic melt types. On average, 38.9 ± 6.0% of all detected melt events are diurnal freeze-thaw cycles in the surface snow layer, characteristic of temporary melt (Type A). Less than 2% reveal immediate continuous snowmelt throughout the snowpack, i.e., strong melt over a period of several days (Type B). In 11.7 ± 4.0%, Type A and B take place consecutively (Type C), and for 47.8 ± 6.8% no surface melt is observed at all (Type D). Continuous snowmelt is primarily observed in the outflow of the Weddell Gyre and in the northern Ross Sea, usually 17 days after the onset of temporary melt. Comparisons with Snow Buoy data suggest that also the onset of continuous snowmelt does not translate into changes in snow depth for a longer period but might rather affect the internal stratigraphy and density structure of the snowpack. Considering the entire data set, the timing of snowmelt processes does not show significant temporal trends.

  7. Regional sea level change in response to ice mass loss in Greenland, the West Antarctic and Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunnabend, S.-E.; Schröter, J.; Rietbroek, R.; Kusche, J.

    2015-11-01

    Besides the warming of the ocean, sea level is mainly rising due to land ice mass loss of the major ice sheets in Greenland, the West Antarctic, and the Alaskan Glaciers. However, it is not clear yet how these land ice mass losses influence regional sea level. Here, we use the global Finite Element Sea-ice Ocean Model (FESOM) to simulate sea surface height (SSH) changes caused by these ice mass losses and combine it with the passive ocean response to varying surface loading using the sea level equation. We prescribe rates of fresh water inflow, not only around Greenland, but also around the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and the mountain glaciers in Alaska with approximately present-day amplitudes of 200, 100, and 50 Gt/yr, respectively. Perturbations in sea level and in freshwater distribution with respect to a reference simulation are computed for each source separately and in their combination. The ocean mass change shows an almost globally uniform behavior. In the North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean, mass is redistributed toward coastal regions. Steric sea level change varies locally in the order of several centimeters on advective timescales of decades. Steric effects to local sea level differ significantly in different coastal locations, e.g., at North American coastal regions the steric effects may have the same order of magnitude as the mass driven effect, whereas at the European coast, steric effects remain small during the simulation period.

  8. Faunistic Composition, Ecological Properties, and Zoogeographical Composition of the Elateridae (Coleoptera) Family in the Western Black Sea Region of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Kabalak, Mahmut; Sert, Osman

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to understand the faunistic composition, ecological properties, and zoogeographical composition of the family Elateridae (Coleoptera) of the Western Black Sea region of Turkey. As a result, 44 species belonging to 5 subfamilies and 19 genera were identified. After adding species reported in the literature to the analysis, the fauna in the research area consists of 6 subfamilies, 23 genera and 72 species. Most of the Elateridae fauna of the Western Black Sea region were classified in the subfamilies Elaterinae and Dendrometrinae. The genus Athous was the most species-rich genus. The species composition of the Elateridae fauna of the Western Black Sea region partially overlaps with the known Elateridae fauna of Turkey. The Western Black Sea region shares the most species with the European part of the Western Palaearctic region, including many of those in the Elateridae family, compared to other regions. Comparisons of the three geographical regions of Turkey show that fauna composition, ecological properties, and zoogeographical compositions of the Middle and Western Black Sea regions are more similar to each other than to those of the Central Anatolian region. PMID:24787627

  9. Much ado about SEA/SA monitoring: The performance of English Regional Spatial Strategies, and some German comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Hanusch, Marie Glasson, John

    2008-11-15

    Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) seeks to better integrate environmental considerations into the preparation and decision-making process of plans and programmes with a view to promoting sustainable development. Further to application of the European Directive 2001/42/EC (SEA Directive) in 2004, the body of practical SEA experience, and parallel research, has increased steadily. Yet there is a crucial element of SEA which cannot build on much experience but whose importance will grow over time - namely that of SEA monitoring. The paper explores the application of SEA monitoring for English Regional Spatial Strategies (RSSs). It briefly introduces the role of SEA monitoring and its legal requirements, the English approach of integrating SEA into Sustainability Appraisal (SA) and the nature of the current English Regional Planning context. The main part presents the research findings and discusses how practitioners cope with the challenges of SEA/SA monitoring - with guiding questions: why, what, who, how, when, and with what outcomes? Reflecting that monitoring is just about to start, the paper draws on measures envisaged for monitoring in the SA reports prepared for RSS, and on expert interviews. It identifies monitoring trends and highlights workable approaches as well as shortcomings. For a critical reflection the findings are mirrored briefly with SEA monitoring approaches of German Regional Plans. Although it is still early days for such monitoring, the findings indicate that there is a danger that some of the specific requirements and objectives of SEA/SA monitoring are not fully met, mainly due to insufficient databases, inappropriate institutional conditions and limited personnel and financial resources. Some recommendations are offered in conclusion.

  10. Scientific support by the BONUS+ projects for the sustainability of the Baltic Sea Region: the case of the HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan.

    PubMed

    Kononen, Kaisa; Andrusaitis, Andris; Sirola, Maija

    2014-02-01

    The synthesis of the BONUS+ research is introduced. The HELCOM Baltic Sea Action Plan is examined as a case to illustrate the potentials and challenges in building the science-policy making interface on a macro regional level. The projects address environmental challenges in the Baltic Sea as defined by the Baltic Sea Action Plan, or consider the environmental governance and decision making within the Baltic Sea context in general. Eutrophication, biodiversity, hazardous substances, maritime activities, and the environment governance are addressed, as are cross cutting issues, such as the impact of climate change, maritime spatial planning and impacts of future development on ecosystem services. The projects contributed to relevant policy developments: 37 consultations carried out at EU level, 49 modifications to policy documents and action plans, 153 suggestions for the efficacy of pertinent public policies and governance, and in 570 occasions, scientists working in BONUS+ projects served as members or observers in scientific and stakeholder committees.

  11. Radioactive contamination of the Arctic Region, Baltic Sea, and the Sea of Japan from activities in the former Soviet Union

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.J.

    1992-09-01

    Contamination of the Arctic regions of northern Europe and Russia, as well as the Sea of Japan, may become a potential major hazard to the ecosystem of these large areas. Widespread poor radioactive waste management practices from nuclear fuel cycle activities in the former Soviet Union have resulted in direct discharges to this area as well as multiple sources that may continue to release additional radioactivity. Information on the discharges of radioactive materials has become more commonplace in the last year, and a clearer picture is emerging of the scale of the contamination. Radioactivity in the Arctic oceans is now reported to be four times higher than would be derived from fallout from weapons tests. Although the characteristics and extent of the contamination are not well known, it has been stated that the contamination in the Arctic may range from 1 to 3.5 billion curies. As yet, no scientific sampling or measurement program has occurred that can verify the amount or extent of the contamination, or its potential impact on the ecosystem.

  12. Radioactivity and heavy metal levels in hazelnut growing in the Eastern Black Sea Region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cevik, U; Celik, N; Celik, A; Damla, N; Coskuncelebi, K

    2009-09-01

    The Eastern Black Sea Region of Turkey is one of the main hazelnut producers in Turkey and in the world. Since this region was contaminated by the Chernobyl accident in 1986, a comprehensive study was planned and carried out to determine the radioactivity level in hazelnut growing region. The dose due to consumption of hazelnut by the public was estimated and it was shown that this dose imposes no threat to human health. In addition, heavy metal analysis was performed in the samples and the amount of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb were also detected. The results showed that the concentrations of heavy metal are below the daily intake recommended by the international organizations.

  13. Active geodynamics of the Marmara Sea region: How to combine all geophysical observations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabulut, Hayrullah; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Lengliné, Olivier; Bouchon, Michel

    2016-04-01

    The Marmara Sea region is presently hosting a major seismic gap along the North Anatolian Fault (NAF). The region is located at the western termination of a unique sequence of large earthquakes initiated by the 1939 Mw 7.9 Erzincan earthquake and propagated westwards over 1000 km. Understanding the active geodynamics of the Marmara region is essential to assess the seismic behaviour of the Main Marmara Fault (MMF) and its related structures. We therefore have taken an initiative to give a comprehensive view of the regional lithosphere and the geomechanical response of the fault trying to combine all important geophysical observations. Using the broadband seismic data acquired between 2007-2015, we computed crustal seismic velocity distribution (from ambient noise tomography), crustal thickness map (from receiver function analysis) and uppermost mantle velocity distribution (from Pn tomography). The vast amount of data provides a good spatial coverage of the region and high resolution of images. Along the Main Marmara Fault (MMF), we present the seismicity below the Marmara Sea for the period the 2006-2015 to provide insights on the seismic response of the fault. The analysis shows that the seismic behaviour is varying along the fault. In addition, long term repeating earthquakes are searched along the MMF and found in the western part of the MMF. In the light of accurate and extensive observations, several open questions emerge from this compilation: Is the cumulated seismic moment released by the repeaters comparable to tectonic rate of the fault in the region? Are there any correlations between the rheology of the crust and the seismic response of the fault? Is there an influence of the fault asymmetry on the fault rupture?

  14. A 21-Year Record of Arctic Sea Ice Extents and Their Regional, Seasonal, and Monthly Variability and Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, Claire L.; Cavalieri, Donald J.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Satellite passive-microwave data have been used to calculate sea ice extents over the period 1979-1999 for the north polar sea ice cover as a whole and for each of nine regions. Over this 21-year time period, the trend in yearly average ice extents for the ice cover as a whole is -32,900 +/- 6,100 sq km/yr (-2.7 +/- 0.5 %/decade), indicating a reduction in sea ice coverage that has decelerated from the earlier reported value of -34,000 +/- 8,300 sq km/yr (-2.8 +/- 0.7 %/decade) for the period 1979-1996. Regionally, the reductions are greatest in the Arctic Ocean, the Kara and Barents Seas, and the Seas of Okhotsk and Japan, whereas seasonally, the reductions are greatest in summer, for which season the 1979-1999 trend in ice extents is -41,600 +/- 12,900 sq km/ yr (-4.9 +/- 1.5 %/decade). On a monthly basis, the reductions are greatest in July and September for the north polar ice cover as a whole, in September for the Arctic Ocean, in June and July for the Kara and Barents Seas, and in April for the Seas of Okhotsk and Japan. Only two of the nine regions show overall ice extent increases, those being the Bering Sea and the Gulf of St. Lawrence.For neither of these two regions is the increase statistically significant, whereas the 1079 - 1999 ice extent decreases are statistically significant at the 99% confidence level for the north polar region as a whole, the Arctic Ocean, the Seas of Okhotsk and Japan, and Hudson Bay.

  15. Levels of organochlorine pesticide residues in butter samples collected from the Black Sea Region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Abdurrahman; Dervisoglu, Muhammed; Guvenc, Dilek; Gul, Osman; Yazici, Fehmi; Atmaca, Enes

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the levels of 9 organochlorine compounds (aldrin, hexachlorobenzene, 2,4-DDE, 4,4-DDE, 2,4-DDT, 4,4-DDT, and α-, β-, and γ-HCH) in butter samples collected in the Eastern, Middle and Western Black Sea Regions of Turkey between October 2009 and June 2010. The liquid-liquid extraction method was used to extract the organochlorine compounds from the samples and the measurements were performed by using a gas chromatograph-electron capture detector system. DDT metabolites, aldrin, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and α-, and γ-HCH were not detected in the samples but β-HCH was detected in 3 of a total of 88 samples. In the first period, only one sample from the West Black Sea Region was β-HCH positive (0.014 mg kg(-1)). The other β-HCH positive samples collected in Middle and West Black Sea Regions in the second period had a concentration of 0.066 and 0.019 mg kg(-1), respectively. All concentrations of the detected compounds exceeded the legal limits of 0.003 mg kg(-1) for β-HCH, as prescribed by the Turkish Food Codex, and therefore pose a potential health risk for consumers. The contamination detected is most likely due to the past usage of β-HCH in agriculture and its long term persistence in the environment. These results strongly suggest that further research should be focused on the detection of pesticide residues in agricultural areas across the nation.

  16. Preliminary report on shallow research drilling in the Salton Sea region

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R.L.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.

    1988-01-14

    During two shallow thermal drilling programs, thermal measurements were obtained in 56 shallow (76.2 m) and one intermediate (457.3 m) depth holes located both onshore and offshore along the southern margin of the Salton Sea in the Imperial Valley, California. These data complete the surficial coverage of the thermal anomaly, revealing the shape and lateral extent of the hydrothermal system. The thermal data show the region of high thermal gradients to extend only a short distance offshore to the north of the Quaternary volcanic domes which are exposed along the southern shore of the Salton Sea. The central thermal anomaly has an arcuate shape, about 4 km wide and 12 km long. Across the center of the anomaly, the transition zone between locations exhibiting high thermal gradients and those exhibiting regional thermal gradients is quite narrow. Thermal gradients rise from near regional (0.09/degree/C/m) to extreme (0.83/degree/C/m) in only 2.4 km. The heat flow in the central part of the anomaly is greater than 600 mW/m/sup 2/ and in some areas exceeds 1200 mW/m/sup 2/. The shape of the thermal anomaly is asymmetric with respect to the line of volcanoes previously thought to represent the center of the field, with its center line offset south of the volcanic buttes. There is no broad thermal anomaly associated with the magnetic high that extends offshore to the northeast from the volcanic domes.

  17. Orientation of hatchling loggerhead sea turtles to regional magnetic fields along a transoceanic migratory pathway.

    PubMed

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Eastwood, Brian S; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2011-08-01

    Young loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) from the east coast of Florida, USA, undertake a transoceanic migration around the North Atlantic Gyre, the circular current system that flows around the Sargasso Sea. Previous experiments indicated that loggerhead hatchlings, when exposed to magnetic fields replicating those that exist at five widely separated locations along the migratory pathway, responded by swimming in directions that would, in each case, help turtles remain in the gyre and advance along the migratory route. In this study, hatchlings were exposed to several additional magnetic fields that exist along or outside of the gyre's northern boundary. Hatchlings responded to fields that exist within the gyre currents by swimming in directions consistent with their migratory route at each location, whereas turtles exposed to a field that exists north of the gyre had an orientation that was statistically indistinguishable from random. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that loggerhead turtles entering the sea for the first time possess a navigational system in which a series of regional magnetic fields sequentially trigger orientation responses that help steer turtles along the migratory route. By contrast, hatchlings may fail to respond to fields that exist in locations beyond the turtles' normal geographic range.

  18. Tropical marginal seas: priority regions for managing marine biodiversity and ecosystem function.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, A David; Williams, Alan; Young, Jock; Ceccarelli, Daniela; Dunstan, Piers; Brewin, Robert J W; Watson, Reg; Brinkman, Richard; Cappo, Mike; Duggan, Samantha; Kelley, Russell; Ridgway, Ken; Lindsay, Dhugal; Gledhill, Daniel; Hutton, Trevor; Richardson, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Tropical marginal seas (TMSs) are natural subregions of tropical oceans containing biodiverse ecosystems with conspicuous, valued, and vulnerable biodiversity assets. They are focal points for global marine conservation because they occur in regions where human populations are rapidly expanding. Our review of 11 TMSs focuses on three key ecosystems-coral reefs and emergent atolls, deep benthic systems, and pelagic biomes-and synthesizes, illustrates, and contrasts knowledge of biodiversity, ecosystem function, interaction between adjacent habitats, and anthropogenic pressures. TMSs vary in the extent that they have been subject to human influence-from the nearly pristine Coral Sea to the heavily exploited South China and Caribbean Seas-but we predict that they will all be similarly complex to manage because most span multiple national jurisdictions. We conclude that developing a structured process to identify ecologically and biologically significant areas that uses a set of globally agreed criteria is a tractable first step toward effective multinational and transboundary ecosystem management of TMSs. PMID:24128091

  19. Orientation of hatchling loggerhead sea turtles to regional magnetic fields along a transoceanic migratory pathway.

    PubMed

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Eastwood, Brian S; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2011-08-01

    Young loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) from the east coast of Florida, USA, undertake a transoceanic migration around the North Atlantic Gyre, the circular current system that flows around the Sargasso Sea. Previous experiments indicated that loggerhead hatchlings, when exposed to magnetic fields replicating those that exist at five widely separated locations along the migratory pathway, responded by swimming in directions that would, in each case, help turtles remain in the gyre and advance along the migratory route. In this study, hatchlings were exposed to several additional magnetic fields that exist along or outside of the gyre's northern boundary. Hatchlings responded to fields that exist within the gyre currents by swimming in directions consistent with their migratory route at each location, whereas turtles exposed to a field that exists north of the gyre had an orientation that was statistically indistinguishable from random. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that loggerhead turtles entering the sea for the first time possess a navigational system in which a series of regional magnetic fields sequentially trigger orientation responses that help steer turtles along the migratory route. By contrast, hatchlings may fail to respond to fields that exist in locations beyond the turtles' normal geographic range. PMID:21753042

  20. Nutrient abatement potential and abatement costs of waste water treatment plants in the Baltic Sea region.

    PubMed

    Hautakangas, Sami; Ollikainen, Markku; Aarnos, Kari; Rantanen, Pirjo

    2014-04-01

    We assess the physical potential to reduce nutrient loads from waste water treatment plants in the Baltic Sea region and determine the costs of abating nutrients based on the estimated potential. We take a sample of waste water treatment plants of different size classes and generalize its properties to the whole population of waste water treatment plants. Based on a detailed investment and operational cost data on actual plants, we develop the total and marginal abatement cost functions for both nutrients. To our knowledge, our study is the first of its kind; there is no other study on this issue which would take advantage of detailed data on waste water treatment plants at this extent. We demonstrate that the reduction potential of nutrients is huge in waste water treatment plants. Increasing the abatement in waste water treatment plants can result in 70 % of the Baltic Sea Action Plan nitrogen reduction target and 80 % of the Baltic Sea Action Plan phosphorus reduction target. Another good finding is that the costs of reducing both nutrients are much lower than previously thought. The large reduction of nitrogen would cost 670 million euros and of phosphorus 150 million euros. We show that especially for phosphorus the abatement costs in agriculture would be much higher than in waste water treatment plants.

  1. Comparison and validation of global and regional ocean forecasting systems for the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xueming; Wang, Hui; Liu, Guimei; Régnier, Charly; Kuang, Xiaodi; Wang, Dakui; Ren, Shihe; Jing, Zhiyou; Drévillon, Marie

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the performance of two operational ocean forecasting systems, the global Mercator Océan (MO) Operational System, developed and maintained by Mercator Océan in France, and the regional South China Sea Operational Forecasting System (SCSOFS), by the National Marine Environmental Forecasting Center (NMEFC) in China, have been examined. Both systems can provide science-based nowcast/forecast products of temperature, salinity, water level, and ocean circulations. Comparison and validation of the ocean circulations, the structures of temperature and salinity, and some mesoscale activities, such as ocean fronts, typhoons, and mesoscale eddies, are conducted based on observed satellite and in situ data obtained in 2012 in the South China Sea. The results showed that MO performs better in simulating the ocean circulations and sea surface temperature (SST), and SCSOFS performs better in simulating the structures of temperature and salinity. For the mesoscale activities, the performance of SCSOFS is better than MO in simulating SST fronts and SST decrease during Typhoon Tembin compared with the previous studies and satellite data; but model results from both of SCSOFS and MO show some differences from satellite observations. In conclusion, some recommendations have been proposed for both forecast systems to improve their forecasting performance in the near future based on our comparison and validation.

  2. Bioavailability of dissolved organic carbon linked with the regional carbon cycle in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Shuchai; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    The regional carbon cycle on continental shelves has created great interest recently due to the enigma of whether these areas are a carbon sink or a source. It is vital for a precise carbon cycle model to take the bioavailability of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) into account, as it impacts the sink and source capacity, especially on dynamic shelves such as the East China Sea. Nine bio-decomposition experiments were carried out to assess differences in the bioavailability of DOC. Samples were collected from different water masses in the East China Sea, such as the Coastal Current, the Taiwan Current, and the Kuroshio Current, as well as from the Changjiang (Yangtze River), the main contributor of terrestrial DOC in the East China Sea. This study aimed to quantify and qualify bioavailable DOC (BDOC) in the East China Sea. Both the degradation constant of BDOC and the carbon output from microorganisms have been quantitatively evaluated. Qualitatively, excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectra (EEMs) were used to evaluate the intrinsic reasons for BDOC variation. By using EEMs in conjunction with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), five individual fluorescent components were identified in this study: three humic-like and two protein-like components (P1, P2). The highest P1 and P2 fluorescence intensities were recorded in the coastal water during a phytoplankton algal bloom, while the lowest intensities were recorded in the Changjiang estuary. Quantitatively, BDOC observed during the incubation ranged from 0 to 26.1 μM. The DOC degradation rate constant varied from 0 to 0.027 (d-1), and was lowest in the Changjiang and highest in algal bloom water and warm shelf water (the Taiwan current). The Taiwan Current and mixed shelf water were the major contributors of BDOC flux to the open ocean, and the East China Sea was a net source of BDOC to the ocean. The results verified the importance of BDOC in regional carbon cycle modeling. Combining the data of BDOC and EEMs

  3. Assessing Sea Level Rise Impacts on the Surficial Aquifer in the Kennedy Space Center Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, H.; Wang, D.; Hagen, S. C.; Medeiros, S. C.; Warnock, A. M.; Hall, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Global sea level rise in the past century due to climate change has been seen at an average rate of approximately 1.7-2.2 mm per year, with an increasing rate over the next century. The increasing SLR rate poses a severe threat to the low-lying land surface and the shallow groundwater system in the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, resulting in saltwater intrusion and groundwater induced flooding. A three-dimensional groundwater flow and salinity transport model is implemented to investigate and evaluate the extent of floods due to rising water table as well as saltwater intrusion. The SEAWAT model is chosen to solve the variable-density groundwater flow and salinity transport governing equations and simulate the regional-scale spatial and temporal evolution of groundwater level and chloride concentration. The horizontal resolution of the model is 50 m, and the vertical domain includes both the Surficial Aquifer and the Floridan Aquifer. The numerical model is calibrated based on the observed hydraulic head and chloride concentration. The potential impacts of sea level rise on saltwater intrusion and groundwater induced flooding are assessed under various sea level rise scenarios. Based on the simulation results, the potential landward movement of saltwater and freshwater fringe is projected. The existing water supply wells are examined overlaid with the projected salinity distribution map. The projected Surficial Aquifer water tables are overlaid with data of high resolution land surface elevation, land use and land cover, and infrastructure to assess the potential impacts of sea level rise. This study provides useful tools for decision making on ecosystem management, water supply planning, and facility management.

  4. Regional differences of relative sea level changes in the Northwest Atlantic: Historical trends and future projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guoqi; Ma, Zhimin; Bao, Huizhi; Slangen, Aimée.

    2014-01-01

    Mean sea level is one of the most important indicators for climate variability and change. Here, we use tide-gauge data and satellite measurements to examine recent trends in the mean relative sea level (RSL) in the Northwest Atlantic. We then combine model output and satellite observations to provide sea level projections in the 21st century. The mean RSL trend based on historical tide-gauge data shows large regional variations, from 2 to 4 mm/yr (above the global mean RSL rise rate) in the southeast to -2 mm/yr in the northwest along East Canada. This spatial difference can to a large degree be attributed to that in the vertical land motion measured by the Global Positioning System (GPS). The combination of altimeter-measured sea level change with the GPS data can approximately account for tide-gauge measurements at most stations over 1993-2011. When the GPS data are used, the projected mean RSL rise between 1980-1999 and 2090-2099 ranges from 38 to 63 cm along the Scotia-Fundy and Newfoundland coasts and smaller along Labrador, the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence, and the St. Lawrence Estuary. In spite of considerable uncertainties the ocean steric and dynamical effect is the dominant contributor (35-70 cm) to the RSL rise along the Canadian east coast. The land-ice (glaciers and ice sheets) melt contributes to the RSL rise by 10-15 cm except at Nain where it is negligible. The effect of the vertical land uplift is large (40-50 cm) at Nain, Sept-iles and Rimouski, significantly reducing the magnitude of the RSL rise.

  5. Dynamics and impacts of eddy-driven air-sea interaction in a regional air-sea coupled model for the US West Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, H.; Miller, A. J.; Norris, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The US West Coast coastal oceans feature energetic mesoscale eddies. The associated sea surface temperature (SST) and surface current modify the wind stress, leading to significant dynamic feedback on to the air-sea coupled system. Dynamics of the interaction and impacts on the regional coastal climate are however not well understood; this is an important research question for regional modeling studies for the coastal climate. A high-resolution (7km) SCOAR regional air-sea coupled climate model is used to investigate this question by implementing a novel model coupling technique that separates spatial scale of air-sea interaction. It allows the large-scale coupling effect to be preserved while suppressing the eddy-driven coupling via interactive spatial smoothing of SST and surface current. When the eddy-induced surface current is allowed to modify the wind stress, the eddy kinetic energy (EKE) is reduced by 42%, and this is primarily due to enhanced surface eddy drag. In contrast, the eddy-induced SST-wind coupling has little impact on the EKE. Eddies also modify the Ekman pumping; the resultant Ekman pumping velocity due to surface current attenuates the amplitude of eddies while the SST-induced Ekman pumping affects the propagation of eddies. Rectified change in time-mean SST is determined by the altered offshore temperature advection by the mean and eddy currents, but the magnitude of the mean SST change is greater with the eddy-induced current effect. The subsequent influence on the downstream winter rainfall variability on the US West Coast is stronger with the eddy-induced SST effect because of the proximity of SST anomalies to the coasts. The strong dynamical response in the coastal climate system to the eddy-driven air-sea interaction suggests that the fine-scale air-sea coupling should be better represented in the regional climate modeling studies for the coastal environments and the marine weather.

  6. Biogenic carbon and nitrogen export in a deep-convection region: simulations in the Labrador Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ru Cheng; Deibel, Don; Rivkin, Richard B.; Vézina, Alain F.

    2004-03-01

    The Labrador Sea is a major sink of anthropogenic CO 2 due to deep-water formation in winter. To investigate the relative importance of different forms of export flux, we used a physical-biogeochemical model to simulate the vertical fluxes of particulate and dissolved biogenic carbon as a function of winter convection, food web dynamics and zooplankton vertical migration. The C:N ratio of these export fluxes was simulated based on trophic dynamics and bacterial activity. The model was run using winter convection and seasonal mixed layer evolution extracted from multi-year physical data collected in the central Labrador Sea. Comparisons between model output and data from the Labrador Sea and other systems indicate that the model provides a realistic picture of carbon and nitrogen pools and fluxes. Our results suggest that on an annual basis, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export by deep, vertical convection is greater than that of the sinking flux of POC. Furthermore, the C:N ratio of exported dissolved organic matter (DOM) is higher than that of the particle sinking flux, resulting in 23% more carbon exported than would be estimated if predictions were made from the Redfield ratio (e.g., 11.4 vs. 7.0 for DOM and particulate organic matter, respectively, at the bottom of the euphotic zone and 17.2 vs. 9.3 at 1000 m depth). The active export of carbon by the respiration and mortality of migrating zooplankton amounts to 19% of sinking flux annually, but only 6% of total carbon export because of the high rates of DOC export in deep-water formation regions. Our model simulations indicate that non-Redfield ratio DOC export characterizes the function of the biological pump in deep-water formation regions.

  7. Dispersal and behavior of pacific halibut hippoglossus stenolepis in the bering sea and Aleutian islands region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seitz, A.C.; Loher, T.; Norcross, B.L.; Nielsen, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, it is assumed that eastern Pacific halibut Hippoglossus stenolepis belong to a single, fully mixed population extending from California through the Bering Sea, in which adult halibut disperse randomly throughout their range during their lifetime. However, we hypothesize that hali but dispersal is more complex than currently assumed and is not spatially random. To test this hypo thesis, we studied the seasonal dispersal and behavior of Pacific halibut in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands (BSAI). Pop-up Archival Transmitting tags attached to halibut (82 to 154 cm fork length) during the summer provided no evidence that individuals moved out of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands region into the Gulf of Alaska during the mid-winter spawning season, supporting the concept that this region contains a separate spawning group of adult halibut. There was evidence for geographically localized groups of halibut along the Aleutian Island chain, as all of the individuals tagged there displayed residency, with their movements possibly impeded by tidal currents in the passes between islands. Mid-winter aggregation areas of halibut are assumed to be spawning grounds, of which 2 were previously unidentified and extend the species' presumed spawning range ~1000 km west and ~600 km north of the nearest documented spawning area. If there are indeed independent spawning groups of Pacific halibut in the BSAI, their dynamics may vary sufficiently from those of the Gulf of Alaska, so that specifically accounting for their relative segregation and unique dynamics within the larger population model will be necessary for correctly predicting how these components may respond to fishing pressure and changing environmental conditions.?? Inter-Research 2011.

  8. Regional carbon and CO2 budgets of North Sea tidal estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volta, C.; Laruelle, G. G.; Regnier, P.

    2016-07-01

    This study presents the first regional application of the generic estuarine reactive-transport model C-GEM (Carbon-Generic Estuary Model) that is here combined with high-resolution databases to produce a carbon and CO2 budget for all tidal estuaries discharging into the North Sea. Steady-state simulations are performed for yearly-averaged conditions to quantify the carbon processing in the six main tidal estuaries Elbe, Ems, Humber, Scheldt, Thames, and Weser, which show contrasted physical and biogeochemical dynamics and contribute the most to the regional filter. The processing rates derived from these simulations are then extrapolated to the riverine carbon loads of all the other North Sea catchments intercepted by smaller tidal estuarine systems. The Rhine-Meuse estuarine system is also included in the carbon budget and overall, we calculate that the export of organic and inorganic carbon from tidal estuaries to the North sea amounts to 44 and 409 Gmol C yr-1, respectively, while 41 Gmol C are lost annually through CO2 outgassing. The carbon is mostly exported from the estuaries in its inorganic form (>90%), a result that reflects the low organic/inorganic carbon ratio of the riverine waters, as well as the very intense decomposition of organic carbon within the estuarine systems. Our calculations also reveal that with a filtering capacity of 15% for total carbon, the contribution of estuaries to the CO2 outgassing is relatively small. Organic carbon dynamics is dominated by heterotrophic degradation, which also represents the most important contribution to the estuarine CO2 evasion. Nitrification only plays a marginal role in the CO2 dynamics, while the contribution of riverine oversaturated waters to the CO2 outgassing is generally significant and strongly varies across systems.

  9. Simulation of 1986 South China Sea Monsoon with a Regional Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, W. -K.; Lau, W. K.-M.; Jia, Y.; Juang, H.; Wetzel, P.; Qian, J.; Chen, C.

    1999-01-01

    A Regional Land-Atmosphere Climate Simulation System (RELACS) project is being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. One of the major goals of RELACS is to use a regional scale model with improved physical processes and in particular land-related processes, to understand the role of the land surface and its interaction with convection and radiation as well as the water/energy cycles in the IndoChina/South China Sea (SCS) region. The Penn State/NCAR MM5 atmospheric modeling system, a state of the art atmospheric numerical model designed to simulate regional weather and climate, has been successfully coupled to the Parameterization for Land-Atmosphere-Cloud Exchange (PLACE) land surface model. The original MM5 model (without PLACE) includes the option for either a simple slab soil model or a five-layer soil model (MRF) in which the soil moisture availability evolves over time. However, the MM5 soil models do not include the effects of vegetation, and thus important physical processes such as evapotranspiration and interception are precluded. The PLACE model incorporates vegetation type and has been shown in international comparisons to accurately predict evapotranspiration and runoff over a wide variety of land surfaces. The coupling of MM5 and PLACE creates a numerical modeling system with the potential to more realistically simulate atmosphere and land surface processes including land-sea interaction, regional circulations such as monsoons, and flash flood events. In addition, the Penn State/NCAR MM5 atmospheric modeling system has been: (1) coupled to the Goddard Ice Microphysical scheme; (2) coupled to a turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) scheme; (3) modified to ensure cloud budget balance; and (4) incorporated initialization with the Goddard EOS data sets at NASA/Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres. The improved MM5 with two nested domains (60 and 20 km horizontal resolution) was used to simulate convective activity over IndoChina and the South China Sea

  10. Toward breeding new land-sea plant hybrid species irrigable with seawater for dry regions

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    A plant species growing in sea or coastal saltmarsh is greatly tolerant to high concentrations of salts, and a plant species growing in desert or dry regions is highly tolerant to drought. Breeding a new plant hybrid species from both species by means of cellular grafting, genome fusion or nuclear transfer would generate, at least in theory, a hybrid plant species that should be strongly tolerant to harsh aridity and salinity and would be potentially irrigable with seawater. Such prospective species can be used for example as a fodder, biofuel crop or stabilizer species to protect soil from wind erosion and sandy storms in dry regions. Breeding such species would change the surface of the world and help to solve major challenges of starvation, malnutrition and poverty. Here, I propose potential approaches that would be worthy of investigation toward this purpose. PMID:25806436

  11. The Health Status of the Reproductive System in Women Living In the Aral Sea Region.

    PubMed

    Turdybekova, Yasminur G; Dosmagambetova, Raushan S; Zhanabayeva, Symbat U; Bublik, Gena V; Kubayev, Alik B; Ibraibekov, Zhanbolat G; Kopobayeva, Irina L; Kultanov, Berikbay Zh

    2015-09-15

    In order to assess women's reproductive health in the Kyzylorda region (the Aral Sea) of Kazakhstan, 1406 women were involved in an integrated clinical-functional and laboratory examination, given regional and environmental ecological factors. The high level of endocrine gynecological pathology is indicated in the examined women. In both examined zones, there is a late menarche over 16 years old, which is 39%. It is indicated a trend towards younger age of menopause onset. Inflammatory diseases of the female genital organs affect a third of the examined women. In the zone of ecological disaster, every fourth woman has fetal losses, cases of spontaneous pregnancy termination and/or non-developing pregnancies in anamnesis, which can be repeated many times. PMID:27275273

  12. Sea breeze regimes in the New York City region - modeling and radar observations

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, P.; Miller, M.; Tongue, J.S.

    1998-04-01

    During spring and summer, the well known sea breeze circulations can strongly influence airport operations, air-quality, energy utilization, marine activities and infrastructure. The geographic configuration of the New York City region presents a special challenge to atmospheric prediction and analysis. The New Jersey and Long Island coasts are at approximate right angles to each other, additionally Long Island is separated from the mainland of Connecticut by Long Island Sound. The various bodies of water in the region (Atlantic Ocean, Long Island Sound, New York Harbor, Jamaica Bay, etc.) have different surface temperatures. In addition the urbanization of the New York areas can modify atmospheric flows. This paper will present results from model simulations, surface observations and remote sensing using the Weather Surveillance Radar - 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D).

  13. Toward breeding new land-sea plant hybrid species irrigable with seawater for dry regions.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    A plant species growing in sea or coastal saltmarsh is greatly tolerant to high concentrations of salts, and a plant species growing in desert or dry regions is highly tolerant to drought. Breeding a new plant hybrid species from both species by means of cellular grafting, genome fusion or nuclear transfer would generate, at least in theory, a hybrid plant species that should be strongly tolerant to harsh aridity and salinity and would be potentially irrigable with seawater. Such prospective species can be used for example as a fodder, biofuel crop or stabilizer species to protect soil from wind erosion and sandy storms in dry regions. Breeding such species would change the surface of the world and help to solve major challenges of starvation, malnutrition and poverty. Here, I propose potential approaches that would be worthy of investigation toward this purpose. PMID:25806436

  14. Causes of the 1998 Bartin river flood in Western Black Sea region of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Celik, Huseyin E; Aydin, Abdurrahim; Ozturk, Tolga; Dagci, Mehmet

    2006-05-01

    A vast flood in the Western Black Sea region of Turkey in May 1998 caused great loss of life and significant damage. Communication network, transportation, and construction cost of the disaster was estimated around US $500 million. Since flood area was relatively large, only Bartin river watershed were analysed and investigated within the scope of this study. It is very common having intense summer showers, which results in floods and landslides in the region. Land use changes in Turkey are rapid; therefore, actual land use format and its recent change were determined using remote sensing. Geographic Information System (GIS) was employed to evaluate the data collected in the area. Prolonged rainfall on saturated soil by antecedent rainfall; misuse of land both in upper and lower watersheds are main reasons affecting the formation of such a flood in Bartin river watershed.

  15. The Health Status of the Reproductive System in Women Living In the Aral Sea Region

    PubMed Central

    Turdybekova, Yasminur G.; Dosmagambetova, Raushan S.; Zhanabayeva, Symbat U.; Bublik, Gena V.; Kubayev, Alik B.; Ibraibekov, Zhanbolat G.; Kopobayeva, Irina L.; Kultanov, Berikbay Zh.

    2015-01-01

    In order to assess women’s reproductive health in the Kyzylorda region (the Aral Sea) of Kazakhstan, 1406 women were involved in an integrated clinical-functional and laboratory examination, given regional and environmental ecological factors. The high level of endocrine gynecological pathology is indicated in the examined women. In both examined zones, there is a late menarche over 16 years old, which is 39%. It is indicated a trend towards younger age of menopause onset. Inflammatory diseases of the female genital organs affect a third of the examined women. In the zone of ecological disaster, every fourth woman has fetal losses, cases of spontaneous pregnancy termination and/or non-developing pregnancies in anamnesis, which can be repeated many times. PMID:27275273

  16. Region descriptors for automatic classification of small sea targets in infrared video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouthaan, Martijn M.; van den Broek, Sebastiaan P.; Hendriks, Emile A.; Schwering, Piet B. W.

    2011-03-01

    We evaluate the performance of different key-point detectors and region descriptors when used for automatic classification of small sea targets in infrared video. In our earlier research performed on this subject as well as in other literature, many different region descriptors have been proposed. However, it is unclear which methods are most applicable to use on the type of infrared imagery as used onboard naval ships. The key-point detector should detect points of interest that can be used to effectively describe the objects in the imagery. On the basis of the detected key points, the descriptors should discriminate between different classes of small sea targets while being robust to differences in viewing conditions. We propose a similarity measure based on the distance between key-point location and the Euclidean distance between descriptors to quantify the similarity of images. For performance evaluation, we use the receiver operator characteristic as the criterion to rank the evaluated methods. We compare the Harris-, blob- and scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) detectors and the square neighborhood, steerable filters, invariant moments, and SIFT descriptors. We conclude that the Harris detector combined with the square neighborhood of size 19×19 or the SIFT descriptor results in the best classification performance for our data set.

  17. Mitochondrial control region haplotypes of the South American sea lion Otaria flavescens (Shaw, 1800).

    PubMed

    Artico, L O; Bianchini, A; Grubel, K S; Monteiro, D S; Estima, S C; Oliveira, L R de; Bonatto, S L; Marins, L F

    2010-09-01

    The South American sea lion, Otaria flavescens, is widely distributed along the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of South America. However, along the Brazilian coast, there are only two nonbreeding sites for the species (Refúgio de Vida Silvestre da Ilha dos Lobos and Refúgio de Vida Silvestre do Molhe Leste da Barra do Rio Grande), both in Southern Brazil. In this region, the species is continuously under the effect of anthropic activities, mainly those related to environmental contamination with organic and inorganic chemicals and fishery interactions. This paper reports, for the first time, the genetic diversity of O. flavescens found along the Southern Brazilian coast. A 287-bp fragment of the mitochondrial DNA control region (D-loop) was analyzed. Seven novel haplotypes were found in 56 individuals (OFA1-OFA7), with OFA1 being the most frequent (47.54%). Nucleotide diversity was moderate (π = 0.62%) and haplotype diversity was relatively low (67%). Furthermore, the median joining network analysis indicated that Brazilian haplotypes formed a reciprocal monophyletic clade when compared to the haplotypes from the Peruvian population on the Pacific coast. These two populations do not share haplotypes and may have become isolated some time back. Further genetic studies covering the entire species distribution are necessary to better understand the biological implications of the results reported here for the management and conservation of South American sea lions.

  18. Toxic and essential elements in butter from the Black Sea region, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dervisoglu, Muhammet; Gul, Osman; Yazici, Fehmi; Guvenc, Dilek; Atmaca, Enes; Aksoy, Abdurrahman

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 88 randomly selected samples of butter produced in the Black Sea region of Turkey were purchased from different retail markets during different periods and investigated for toxic and essential elements content. Quantitative analyses of elements in the samples were performed using an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Mean concentrations of As, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se and Zn in the butter samples were 18.93, 100.32, 384.66, 4199.1, 887.47, 168.64, 56.13, 16.34 and 384.66 µg kg(-1), respectively. Cd and Co were detected in 19 (mean content 0.29 µg kg(-1)) and 81 (mean content 3.81 µg kg(-1)) samples of 88 butter samples, respectively. However, the dietary intake of these elements by the population of the Black Sea region is currently well below the dietary reference intake (DRI) and provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) levels of essential and toxic elements.

  19. Potential new production in two upwelling regions of the western Arabian Sea: Estimation and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xiaomei; Zhan, Haigang; Du, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Using satellite-derived and in situ data, the wind-driven potential new production (nitrate supply) for the 300 km wide coastal band in two upwelling regions of the western Arabian Sea (AS) during the southwest monsoon is estimated. The upward nitrate flux to the euphotic zone is generally based on the physical processes of coastal transport (Ekman transport and geostrophic transport) and offshore Ekman pumping. The coastal geostrophic current in the western AS influences the upwelling intensity and latitudinal distributions of nitrate supply. The Oman and Somalia upwelling regions have similar level of potential new production (nitrate supply) during the summer monsoon, while the satellite estimates of primary production off Oman are 2 times greater than those off Somalia. The much higher potential f-ratio in the Somalia upwelling region indicates that the primary production could be limited by availability of other macronutrients (e.g., silicate). The correlation analysis of the primary production and the aerosol optical thickness shows that the Oman upwelling region displays a stronger coupling between the atmospheric deposition and the phytoplankton abundance. The high summertime dust levels in the atmosphere are suggested to contribute to the high primary production in the Oman upwelling region.

  20. Polyphased rifting to post-breakup evolution of the Coral Sea region, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulois, Cédric; Pubellier, Manuel; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Delescluse, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    region underwent thermal subsidence through the Middle Eocene prior the first regional compressional episode (Late Eocene to Oligocene). Rift-megacycles, although poorly dated, are probably pulsed, implying that internal sequences are of specific nature and age and are bounded by unconformities. The controlling factors may include the distribution of underlying basement highs and the response to regional stress variation driven by plate motion. In particular, the set of unconformities is thought to mark a series of uplift episodes that characterise the initiation of the rifting, or else seafloor spreading and subsidence (tectonic/thermal) during each specific rift megacycle. The current study more specifically shows that: (1) the early rifting phases of the crust (R1 and R2) were controlled by pre-existing continental features whereas the late Coral Sea propagator (R3) cut through the rifted margin independently from earlier structural trends. This last rifting is also more restricted to the area near the continent-ocean transition. (2) the set of rifted basins of the northern margin of the Coral Sea are now underthrusted below the Owen Stanley Basin initially located northward.

  1. Paleoecology of late-glacial peats from the bering land bridge, Chukchi Sea shelf region, northwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, S.A.; Short, S.K.; Phillips, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Insect fossils and pollen from late Pleistocene nonmarine peat layers were recovered from cores from the shelf region of the Chukchi Sea at depths of about 50 m below sea level. The peats date to 11,300-11,000 yr B.P. and provide a limiting age for the regional Pleistocene-Holocene marine transgression. The insect fossils are indicative of arctic coastal habitats like those of the Mackenzie Delta region (mean July temperatures = 10.6-14??C) suggesting that 11,000 yr ago the exposed Chukchi Sea shelf had a climate substantially warmer than modern coastal regions of the Alaskan north slope. The pollen spectra are consistent with the age assignment to the Birch Interval (14,000-9000 yr B.P.). The data suggest a meadow-like graminoid tundra with birch shrubs and some willow shrubs growing in sheltered areas. ?? 1992.

  2. Climatic variability of river outflow in the Pantanal region and the influence of sea surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Carlos Batista; Silva, Maria Elisa Siqueira; Ambrizzi, Tércio

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates possible linear relationships between climate, hydrology, and oceanic surface variability in the Pantanal region (in South America's central area), over interannual and interdecadal time ranges. In order to verify the mentioned relations, lagged correlation analysis and linear adjustment between river discharge at the Pantanal region and sea surface temperature were used. Composite analysis for atmospheric fields, air humidity flux divergence, and atmospheric circulation at low and high levels, for the period between 1970 and 2003, was analyzed. Results suggest that the river discharge in the Pantanal region is linearly associated with interdecadal and interannual oscillations in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, making them good predictors to continental hydrological variables. Considering oceanic areas, 51 % of the annual discharge in the Pantanal region can be linearly explained by mean sea surface temperature (SST) in the Subtropical North Pacific, Tropical North Pacific, Extratropical South Pacific, and Extratropical North Atlantic over the period. Considering a forecast approach in seasonal scale, 66 % of the monthly discharge variance in Pantanal, 3 months ahead of SST, is explained by the oceanic variables, providing accuracy around 65 %. Annual discharge values in the Pantanal region are strongly related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) variability (with 52 % of linear correlation), making it possible to consider an interdecadal variability and a consequent subdivision of the whole period in three parts: 1st (1970-1977), 2nd (1978-1996), and 3rd (1997-2003) subperiods. The three subperiods coincide with distinct PDO phases: negative, positive, and negative, respectively. Convergence of humidity flux at low levels and the circulation pattern at high levels help to explain the drier and wetter subperiods. During the wetter 2nd subperiod, the air humidity convergence at low levels is much more evident than during the other two

  3. Survival and arm abscission are linked to regional heterothermy in an intertidal sea star.

    PubMed

    Pincebourde, Sylvain; Sanford, Eric; Helmuth, Brian

    2013-06-15

    Body temperature is a more pertinent variable to physiological stress than ambient air temperature. Modeling and empirical studies on the impacts of climate change on ectotherms usually assume that body temperature within organisms is uniform. However, many ectotherms show significant within-body temperature heterogeneity. The relationship between regional heterothermy and the response of ectotherms to sublethal and lethal conditions remains underexplored. We quantified within-body thermal heterogeneity in an intertidal sea star (Pisaster ochraceus) during aerial exposure at low tide to examine the lethal and sublethal effects of temperatures of different body regions. In manipulative experiments, we measured the temperature of the arms and central disc, as well as survival and arm abscission under extreme aerial conditions. Survival was related strongly to central disc temperature. Arms were generally warmer than the central disc in individuals that survived aerial heating, but we found the reverse in those that died. When the central disc reached sublethal temperatures of 31-35°C, arms reached temperatures of 33-39°C, inducing arm abscission. The absolute temperature of individual arms was a poor predictor of arm abscission, but the arms lost were consistently the hottest at the within-individual scale. Therefore, the vital region of this sea star may remain below the lethal threshold under extreme conditions, possibly through water movement from the arms to the central disc and/or evaporative cooling, but at the cost of increased risk of arm abscission. Initiation of arm abscission seems to reflect a whole-organism response while death occurs as a result of stress acting directly on central disc tissues. PMID:23720798

  4. Recent Rifting Events in the Southern Red Sea and Regional Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, J.; Xu, W.; Jonsson, S.

    2014-12-01

    During the last decades, several rifting events on land have been observed along divergent plate boundaries, separating plates up to several meters in a few weeks. These events are typically accompanied by short-term seismic swarms (<15 days) and normal faulting, and are in some cases followed by eruptions as well. These on land rifting events represent, however, a very limited portion (< 2%) of global intrusions that take place in most cases along mid-ocean ridge systems. Here we focus on the southern Red Sea area, which is a part of the triple junction separating the Nubian, Somalian and Arabian plates where several earthquake swarms were recorded from 2000 to 2014. In three cases, these swarms were followed by eruptions within a year, at Jebel at Tair (2007) and in the Zubair Archipelago (40 km south) were two new volcanic islands developed in 2011 and 2013. Without the surface eruptions, these intrusive events may have remained unnoticed. Together the surface evidence of volcanic activity and recorded seismic swarms during the past two decades allow for a better definition of the overall magmatic activity in the southern Red Sea. We further discuss the possibility that Zubair, which is an emerged portion of a shallow 20 km-long by 5 km-wide NNW-SSE oriented platform, may be the surface expression of an active spreading center, comparable in size with other on land spreading centers. The recent concentration of activity at Zubair developed in a context of high regional magmatic and tectonic activity, including the rifting episode at Dabbahu (2005-2011), the rifting event in the Gulf of Aden (2010-2011) and the 2011 Nabro volcano eruption. Preliminary analysis of regional structural features and volcano lineaments suggest distinct intrusion paths and faulting running parallel to the three main active rift zone axes, and also along a dominant NE-SW oriented preexisting regional fault zones affecting the entire triple junction area.

  5. Survival and arm abscission are linked to regional heterothermy in an intertidal sea star.

    PubMed

    Pincebourde, Sylvain; Sanford, Eric; Helmuth, Brian

    2013-06-15

    Body temperature is a more pertinent variable to physiological stress than ambient air temperature. Modeling and empirical studies on the impacts of climate change on ectotherms usually assume that body temperature within organisms is uniform. However, many ectotherms show significant within-body temperature heterogeneity. The relationship between regional heterothermy and the response of ectotherms to sublethal and lethal conditions remains underexplored. We quantified within-body thermal heterogeneity in an intertidal sea star (Pisaster ochraceus) during aerial exposure at low tide to examine the lethal and sublethal effects of temperatures of different body regions. In manipulative experiments, we measured the temperature of the arms and central disc, as well as survival and arm abscission under extreme aerial conditions. Survival was related strongly to central disc temperature. Arms were generally warmer than the central disc in individuals that survived aerial heating, but we found the reverse in those that died. When the central disc reached sublethal temperatures of 31-35°C, arms reached temperatures of 33-39°C, inducing arm abscission. The absolute temperature of individual arms was a poor predictor of arm abscission, but the arms lost were consistently the hottest at the within-individual scale. Therefore, the vital region of this sea star may remain below the lethal threshold under extreme conditions, possibly through water movement from the arms to the central disc and/or evaporative cooling, but at the cost of increased risk of arm abscission. Initiation of arm abscission seems to reflect a whole-organism response while death occurs as a result of stress acting directly on central disc tissues.

  6. Towards a unified modeling system of predicting the transport of radionuclides in coastal sea regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kyung Tae; Brovchenko, Igor; Maderich, Vladimir; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Qiao, Fangli

    2016-04-01

    We present in this talk a recent progress in developing a unified modeling system of predicting three-dimensional transport of radionuclides coupled with multiple-scale circulation, wave and suspended sediment modules, keeping in mind the application to coastal sea regions with non-uniform distribution of suspended and bed sediments of both cohesive and non-cohesive types. The model calculates the concentration fields of dissolved and particulate radionuclides in bottom sediment as well as in water column. The transfer of radioactivity between the water column and the pore water in the upper layer of the bottom sediment is governed by diffusion processes. The phase change between dissolved and particulate radionuclides is written in terms of absorption/desorption rates and distribution coefficients. The dependence of distribution coefficients is inversely proportional to the sediment particle size. The hydrodynamic numerical model SELFE that solves equations for the multiple-scale circulation, the wave action and sand transport on the unstructured grids has been used as a base model. We have extended the non-cohesive sediment module of SELFE to the form applicable to mixture of cohesive and non-cohesive sedimentary regimes by implementing an extended form of erosional rate and a flocculation model for the determination of settling velocity of cohesive flocs. Issues related to the calibration of the sediment transport model in the Yellow Sea are described. The radionuclide transport model with one-step transfer kinetics and single bed layer has been initially developed and then applied to Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. The model has been in this study verified through the comparison with measurements of 137Cs concentration in bed sediments. Preliminary application to the Yellow and East China Seas with a hypothetical release scenario are described. On-going development of the radionuclide transport model using two-step transfer kinetics and multiple bed layers

  7. Using GRACE and altimetry to assess the regional sea level budget in the Indian Ocean and Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietbroek, Roelof; Uebbing, Bernd; Kusche, Jürgen; Brunnabend, Sandra-Esther

    2016-04-01

    There are a variety of factors driving present-day sea level rise. On one hand, mass loss from Greenland, Antarctica, and the world's glaciers, cause regionally varying sea level increase. While on the other hand, volumetric expansion due to ocean heating, induce long term trends as well as short term fluctuations. In addition, internal ocean mass fluctuations, and vertical land motion play a considerable role on regional to local scales. On such scales, quantifying the regional sea level budget is more challenging compared to the global average, due to increased errors and complex coastal processes. A combination of GRACE gravimetry and radar altimetry allows the separation of the volumetric contribution from the mass contribution. Here, we also resolve for a finer separation into the various contributions (Greenland, Antarctica, etc.), which requires a more sophisticated approach. We use a simultaneous inversion of GRACE and satellite altimetry data over the years 2002-2014, to separate the sea level budget in the Indian Ocean. For this means, known spatial patterns for the different contributions are prescribed while their individual time variations are estimated from the data. Characteristics of sea level variations in the Indian Ocean (total trend of 3.8 mm/yr) are compared with the global mean sea level budget (2.7 mm/yr). The Bay of Bengal will then serve as an example for a further regionalization of the inversion approach. We find a total sea level in the Bay of Bengal region ranging from 3.8 mm/yr to 5.8 mm./yr, depending on the chosen averaging area and inversion set up. The contributions from the ice sheets and glaciers stand at 1.5 mm/yr, whereas terrestrial hydrology has a negative contribution of about -0.3 mm/yr. The most variable contribution is caused by steric effects whose trend ranges from 1.5 to 3 mm/yr.

  8. Seismological Segmentation of Halmahera Thrust, Molucca Sea Region, based on Large Earthquake Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiddiqi, H. A.; Widiyantoro, S.; Nugraha, A. D.; Ramdhan, M.; Wiyono, S. H.; Wandono, W.

    2015-12-01

    The Molucca Sea region in eastern Indonesia is a complex tectonic region, where the arc-arc collision between the Sangihe and Halmahera arcs takes place. Two recent largest earthquakes occurred in this area are Mw 7.5, January 2007, and Mw 7.2, November 2014, that occurred 90 km to the north from the 2007 earthquake site. Both earthquakes occurred along the Halmahera thrust, however, the aftershock of the two events occurred in separated parts of the same fault. In this study, we aim to investigate the segmentation of the seismogenic zone in Molucca Sea by using seismological analysis. We employed teleseismic double-difference relocation using P- and S-wave arrival times from the Meteorological, Climatological, and Geophysical Agency of Indonesia (BMKG) and the International Seismological Centre (ISC) catalog. We used a 3D velocity model for the Indonesian region. Our relocation result revealed that aftershocks of the two events did not overlap each other. Although they have similar focal mechanisms with NNE-SSW direction, the aftershock patterns were different. While the 2014 event aftershock distribution is consistent with the strike direction inferred from the focal mechanism, the 2007 event aftershocks occurred in NEE-SWW direction. Furthermore we analyzed the spatial variation in b-value for different time ranges. The b-value analysis also showed two separated segments of low b-value anomaly around both events for each time range. We envisage that stress regime directions and geometries of the fault are different for both aftershock clusters. For this reason we analyzed focal mechanism data and found that fault segment around the 2014 event is steeper than that related to the 2007 event. We applied focal mechanism inversion to obtain the direction of stress and fault orientation, and found different stress directions for the two segments. While the northern part segment has maximum stress with SSE direction, the stress in the southern part is rotated in SE

  9. Hindcast storm events in the Bering Sea for the St. Lawrence Island and Unalakleet Regions, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erikson, Li H.; McCall, Robert T.; van Rooijen, Arnold; Norris, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This study provides viable estimates of historical storm-induced water levels in the coastal communities of Gambell and Savoonga situated on St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea, as well as Unalakleet located at the head of Norton Sound on the western coast of Alaska. Gambell, Savoonga, and Unalakleet are small Native Villages that are regularly impacted by coastal storms but where little quantitative information about these storms exists. The closest continuous water-level gauge is at Nome, located more than 200 kilometers from both St. Lawrence Island and Unalakleet. In this study, storms are identified and quantified using historical atmospheric and sea-ice data and then used as boundary conditions for a suite of numerical models. The work includes storm-surge (temporary rise in water levels due to persistent strong winds and low atmospheric pressures) modeling in the Bering Strait region, as well as modeling of wave runup along specified sections of the coast in Gambell and Unalakleet. Modeled historical water levels are used to develop return periods of storm surge and storm surge plus wave runup at key locations in each community. It is anticipated that the results will fill some of the data void regarding coastal flood data in western Alaska and be used for production of coastal vulnerability maps and community planning efforts.

  10. Geological and geomechanical properties of the carbonate rocks at the eastern Black Sea Region (NE Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersoy, Hakan; Yalçinalp, Bülent; Arslan, Mehmet; Babacan, Ali Erden; Çetiner, Gözde

    2016-11-01

    Turkey located in the Alpine-Himalayan Mountain Belt has 35% of the natural stone reserves of the world and has good quality marble, limestone, travertine and onyx reserves especially in the western regions of the country. The eastern Black Sea Region with a 1.4 million meters cubes reserve has a little role on the natural stone production in the country. For this reason, this paper deals with investigation on the potential of carbonate stone in the region and determination of the geological and geo-mechanical properties of these rocks in order to provide economic contribution to the national economy. While the study sites are selected among the all carbonate rock sites, the importance as well as the representative of the sites were carefully considered for the region. After representative samples were analyzed for major oxide and trace element compositions to find out petrochemical variations, the experimental program conducted on rock samples for determination of both physical and strength properties of the carbonate rocks. The results of the tests showed that there are significant variations in the geo-mechanical properties of the studied rock groups. The density values vary from 2.48 to 2.70 gr/cm3, water absorption by weight values range from 0.07 to 1.15% and the apparent porosity of the carbonate rocks are between 0.19 and 3.29%. However, the values of the UCS shows variation from 36 to 80 MPa. Tensile and bending strength values range from 3.2 to 7.5 MPa and 6.0-9.2 MPa respectively. Although the onyx samples have the lowest values of apparent porosity and water absorption by weight, these samples do not have the highest values of UCS values owing to occurrence of the micro-cracks. The UCS values of the rock samples were also found after cycling tests However, the limestone samples have less than 5% deterioration after freezing-thawing and wetting-drying tests, but travertine and onyx samples have more than 15% deterioration. Exception of the apparent

  11. Reconciling data using Markov Chain Monte Carlo: An application to the Yellow Sea - Korean Peninsula region

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M E; Franz, G A; Ramirez, A L

    2004-08-30

    In an effort to build seismic models that are most consistent with multiple data sets, we have applied a new probabilistic inverse technique. This method uses a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm to sample models from a prior distribution and test them against multiple data types to generate a posterior distribution. While computationally expensive, this approach has several advantages over a single deterministic model, notably the reconciliation of different data types that constrain the model, the proper handling of uncertainties, and the ability to include prior information. We also benefit from the advantage of forward modeling rather than inverting the data. Here, we use this method to determine the crust and upper mantle structure of the Yellow Sea and Korean Peninsula (YSKP) region. We discuss the data sets, parameterization and starting model, outline the technique and its implementation, observe the behavior of the inversion, and demonstrate some of the advantages of this approach.

  12. Morphometric variability of Arctodiaptomus salinus (Copepoda) in the Mediterranean-Black Sea region.

    PubMed

    Anufriieva, Elena V; Shadrin, Nickolai V

    2015-11-18

    Inter-species variability in morphological traits creates a need to know the range of variability of characteristics in the species for taxonomic and ecological tasks. Copepoda Arctodiaptomus salinus, which inhabits water bodies across Eurasia and North Africa, plays a dominant role in plankton of different water bodies-from fresh to hypersaline. This work assesses the intra- and inter-population morphometric variability of A. salinus in the Mediterranean-Black Sea region and discusses some observed regularities. The variability of linear body parameters and proportions was studied. The impacts of salinity, temperature, and population density on morphological characteristics and their variability can manifest themselves in different ways at the intra- and inter-population levels. A significant effect of salinity, pH and temperature on the body proportions was not found. Their intra-population variability is dependent on temperature and salinity. Sexual dimorphism of A. salinus manifests in different linear parameters, proportions, and their variability. There were no effects of temperature, pH and salinity on the female/male parameter ratio. There were significant differences in the body proportions of males and females in different populations. The influence of temperature, salinity, and population density can be attributed to 80%-90% of intra-population variability of A. salinus. However, these factors can explain less than 40% of inter-population differences. Significant differences in the body proportions of males and females from different populations may suggest that some local populations of A. salinus in the Mediterranean-Black Sea region are in the initial stages of differentiation.

  13. Diva software, a tool for European regional seas and Ocean climatologies production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouberdous, M.; Troupin, C.; Barth, A.; Alvera-Azcàrate, A.; Beckers, J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Diva (Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis) is a software based on a method designed to perform data-gridding (or analysis) tasks, with the assets of taking into account the intrinsic nature of oceanographic data, i.e., the uncertainty on the in situ measurements and the anisotropy due to advection and irregular coastlines and topography. The Variational Inverse Method (VIM, Brasseur et al., 1996) implemented in Diva consists in minimizing a variational principle which accounts for the differences between the observations and the reconstructed field, the influence of the gradients and variability of the reconstructed field. The resolution of the numerical problem is based on finite-element method, which allows a great numerical efficiency and the consideration of complicated contours. Along with the analysis, Diva provides also error fields (Brankart and Brasseur, 1998; Rixen et al., 2000) based on the data coverage and noise. Diva is used for the production of climatologies in the pan-European network SeaDataNet. SeaDataNet is connecting the existing marine data centres of more than 30 countries and set up a data management infrastructure consisting of a standardized distributed system. The consortium has elaborated integrated products, using common procedures and methods. Among these, it uses the Diva software as reference tool for climatologies computation for various European regional seas, the Atlantic and the global ocean. During the first phase of the SeaDataNet project, a number of additional tools were developed to make easier the climatologies production for the users. Among these tools: the advection constraint during the field reconstruction through the specification of a velocity field on a regular grid, forcing the analysis to align with the velocity vectors; the Generalized Cross Validation for the determination of analysis parameters (signal-to-noise ratio); the creation of contours at selected depths; the detection of possible outliers; the

  14. Seasonal Storminess in the North Pacific, Bering Sea, and Alaskan Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shippee, N. J.; Atkinson, D. E.; Walsh, J. E.; Partain, J.; Gottschalck, J.; Marra, J.

    2012-12-01

    Annually, extra-tropical cyclones present a high impact natural hazard to the North Pacific, Bering Sea, and Alaskan regions. In these regions, extensive subsistence and commercial fishing, new oil and gas field development, tourism, growing interest in and exploitation of new commercial shipping potential, and increasing military and Coast Guard activity, all represent potential parties impacted by storms in these waters. It is of interest to many parties to begin developing capacity to provide some indication of storm activity at a monthly- to seasonal-outlook (30 to 90 days) timeframe. Using storm track data from NOAA's Climate Prediction Center for the North Pacific and Alaskan region, an experimental seasonal storminess outlook product, using eigen-based methods similar to the operational seasonal temperature and precipitation products currently produced at NOAA CPC, has been created and tested in hindcast mode using predicted states of ENSO, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), the Pacific-North American Pattern (PNA), and the Arctic Oscillation (AO). A sample of the seasonal storminess outlook product will be shown along with a discussion of the utility of individual teleconnection patterns in the generation of the product.

  15. Two regimes of cloud water over the Okhotsk Sea and the adjacent regions around Japan in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Teruhisa; Iwasaki, Toshiki

    2015-03-01

    This study derived two regimes of cloud water with a dipole structure between over the Okhotsk Sea and over the adjacent regions around Japan in summer by using a climate index for cool summer. When the Okhotsk high develops, clouds are confined to a thin low-level layer owing to the enhanced stability in the lower atmosphere induced by the downward motion associated with the Okhotsk high. The resulting optically thin clouds allow more downward shortwave radiation to reach the surface of the Okhotsk Sea. In contrast, the low-level easterly winds blowing toward the Japanese Islands and the Eurasian continent enhance cloud formation. This is due to the convergence of the water vapor flux induced by the easterly winds associated with the Okhotsk high and the southerly winds associated with the Baiu frontal zone and the Pacific high and due to the orographic uplift of air mass. When a cyclonic circulation occurs over the Okhotsk Sea, a thick layer of low-level clouds extending close to the sea surface is formed. The convergence of the water vapor flux over the subarctic sea surface temperature (SST) frontal zone and the cool SST promote fog formation, and upward motion associated with the cyclonic circulation supports the high cloud water content from the lower to the upper troposphere. The resulting optically thick clouds reduce the downward shortwave radiation at the surface of the Okhotsk Sea. Over the regions around Japan, water vapor flux diverges owing to dry air originating from land and cloud water decreases.

  16. Influence of Arctic Sea Ice Extent on Polar Cloud Fraction and Vertical Structure and Implications for Regional Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Strey, Sara T.; Spinhirne, James; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Recent satellite lidar measurements of cloud properties spanning a period of 5 years are used to examine a possible connection between Arctic sea ice amount and polar cloud fraction and vertical distribution. We find an anticorrelation between sea ice extent and cloud fraction with maximum cloudiness occurring over areas with little or no sea ice. We also find that over ice!free regions, there is greater low cloud frequency and average optical depth. Most of the optical depth increase is due to the presence of geometrically thicker clouds over water. In addition, our analysis indicates that over the last 5 years, October and March average polar cloud fraction has increased by about 7% and 10%, respectively, as year average sea ice extent has decreased by 5% 7%. The observed cloud changes are likely due to a number of effects including, but not limited to, the observed decrease in sea ice extent and thickness. Increasing cloud amount and changes in vertical distribution and optical properties have the potential to affect the radiative balance of the Arctic region by decreasing both the upwelling terrestrial longwave radiation and the downward shortwave solar radiation. Because longwave radiation dominates in the long polar winter, the overall effect of increasing low cloud cover is likely a warming of the Arctic and thus a positive climate feedback, possibly accelerating the melting of Arctic sea ice.

  17. The Influence of Arctic Sea Ice Extent on Polar Cloud Fraction and Vertical Structure and Implications for Regional Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Strey, Sara T.; Spinhirne, James; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Recent satellite lidar measurements of cloud properties spanning a period of five years are used to examine a possible connection between Arctic sea ice amount and polar cloud fraction and vertical distribution. We find an anti-correlation between sea ice extent and cloud fraction with maximum cloudiness occurring over areas with little or no sea ice. We also find that over ice free regions, there is greater low cloud frequency and average optical depth. Most of the optical depth increase is due to the presence of geometrically thicker clouds over water. In addition, our analysis indicates that over the last 5 years, October and March average polar cloud fraction has increased by about 7 and 10 percent, respectively, as year average sea ice extent has decreased by 5 to 7 percent. The observed cloud changes are likely due to a number of effects including, but not limited to, the observed decrease in sea ice extent and thickness. Increasing cloud amount and changes in vertical distribution and optical properties have the potential to affect the radiative balance of the Arctic region by decreasing both the upwelling terrestrial longwave radiation and the downward shortwave solar radiation. Since longwave radiation dominates in the long polar winter, the overall effect of increasing low cloud cover is likely a warming of the Arctic and thus a positive climate feedback, possibly accelerating the melting of Arctic sea ice.

  18. Lithofacies variability in the Lower Khvalynian sediments of the North Caspian Sea region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makshaev, Radik; Svitoch, Aleksandr

    2016-04-01

    The Early Khvalynian period (~15 500-12 500 cal years B.P.) is characterized by continuous dynamic changes in North Caspian Sea region environment, which has been confirmed by numerous data obtained during the lithofacies analysis of its key sections. Lithofacies complex of the North Caspian Sea region contains four subfacies - clayey, laminated, sandy-clayey and aleurite-clayey. Clayey facie is characterized by absolutely clayey structure with massive nonlamellated or subfissile dark-brown clays and rarely contains thin aleurite layers. This subfacie is one of the most widespread in the North Caspian Sea region. Clayey facies are typical for the most of the key sections in the Middle Volga (Bykovo, Torgun, Rovnoe, Novoprivolnoe, Chapaevka), Lower Volga (Svetly Yar) and on the left side of the Volga River valley (Verkhny Baskunchak, Krivaya Loshchina, Bolshoy Liman). Deep paleodepressions of the Lower Volga and the left side of the Volga River valley are also characterized by the maximum of the average clays thickness, which can reach up to 10 m. Sandy-clayey subfacie is characterized by stratified structure with horizontal and lenticular lamination of clays with sandy-aleuritic interlayers. The average thickness of sand layers is 2-5 cm. At most of the key sections thickness of clay layers is up to twice larger than the sands layers and only on depressions' periphery can be exceeded by some terrigenous interlayers. Sandy-aleuritic parts of clays have different mineral structure. Light suite is dominated by quartz and feldspar with some debris of heavy minerals, glauconite and calcite. Fraction of the heavy minerals contains titano ferrite, epidote, granite, zircon, amphibole, rutile, disthene, tourmaline, sillimanite. Layered subfacie is the most abundant among the chocolate clays and is widespread in the Lower Volga River region and the Ural River valley, but sporadic in Kalmykia and the Volga Delta. Sandy-clayey and aleurit-clayey subfacies have rare

  19. 137Cs and (239+240)Pu levels in the Asia-Pacific regional seas.

    PubMed

    Duran, E B; Povinec, P P; Fowler, S W; Airey, P L; Hong, G H

    2004-01-01

    137Cs and (239+240)Pu data in seawater, sediment and biota from the regional seas of Asia-Pacific extending from 50 degrees N to 60 degrees S latitude and 60 degrees E to 180 degrees E longitude based on the Asia-Pacific Marine Radioactivity Database (ASPAMARD) are presented and discussed. 137Cs levels in surface seawater have been declining to its present median value of about 3 Bq/m3 due mainly to radioactive decay, transport processes, and the absence of new significant inputs. (239+240)Pu levels in surface seawater are much lower, with a median of about 6 mBq/m3. (239+240)Pu appears to be partly scavenged by particles and is therefore more readily transported down the water column. As with seawater, (239+240)Pu concentrations are lower than 137Cs in surface sediment. The median 137Cs concentration in surface sediment is 1.4 Bq/kg dry, while that of (239+240)Pu is only 0.2 Bq/kg dry. The vertical profiles of both 137Cs and (239+240)Pu in the sediment column of coastal areas are different from deep seas which can be attributed to the higher sedimentation rates and additional contribution of run-offs from terrestrial catchment areas in the coastal zone. Comparable data for biota are far less extensive than those for seawater and sediment. The median 137Cs concentration in fish (0.2 Bq/kg wet) is higher than in crustaceans (0.1 Bq/kg wet) or mollusks (0.1 Bq/kg wet). Benchmark values (as of 2001) for 137Cs and (239+240)Pu concentrations in seawater, sediment and biota are established to serve as reference values against which the impact of future anthropogenic inputs can be assessed. ASPAMARD represents one of the most comprehensive compilations of available data on 137Cs and (239+240)Pu in particular, and other anthropogenic as well as natural radionuclides in seawater, sediment and biota from the Asia-Pacific regional seas. PMID:15245845

  20. An improved earthquake catalogue in the Marmara Sea region, Turkey, using massive template matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrullo, Emanuela; Lengliné, Olivier; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Karabulut, Hayrullah; Bouchon, Michel

    2016-04-01

    After the 1999 Izmit earthquake, the Main Marmara Fault (MMF) represents a 150 km unruptured segment of the North Anatolian Fault located below the Marmara Sea. One of the principal issue for seismic hazard assessment in the region is to know if the MMF is totally or partially locked and where the nucleation of the major forthcoming event is going to take place. The area is actually one of the best-instrumented fault systems in Europe. Since year 2007, various seismic networks both broadband, short period and OBS stations were deployed in order to monitor continuously the seismicity along the MMF and the related fault systems. A recent analysis of the seismicity recorded during the 2007-2012 period has provided new insights on the recent evolution of this important regional seismic gap. This analysis was based on events detected with STA/LTA procedure and manually picked P and S wave arrivals times (Schmittbuhl et al., 2015). In order to extend the level of details and to fully take advantage of the dense seismic network we improved the seismic catalog using an automatic earthquake detection technique based on a template matching approach. This approach uses known earthquake seismic signals in order to detect newer events similar to the tested one from waveform cross-correlation. To set-up the methodology and verify the accuracy and the robustness of the results, we initially focused in the eastern part of the Marmara Sea (Cinarcik basin) and compared new detection with those manually identified. Through the massive analysis of cross-correlation based on the template scanning of the continuous recordings, we construct a refined catalog of earthquakes for the Marmara Sea in 2007-2014 period. Our improved earthquake catalog will provide an effective tool to improve the catalog completeness, to monitor and study the fine details of the time-space distribution of events, to characterize the repeating earthquake source processes and to understand the mechanical state of

  1. The impact of shipping emissions on air pollution in the greater North Sea region - Part 2: Scenarios for 2030

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthias, V.; Aulinger, A.; Backes, A.; Bieser, J.; Geyer, B.; Quante, M.; Zeretzke, M.

    2016-01-01

    Scenarios for future shipping emissions in the North Sea have been developed in the framework of the Clean North Sea Shipping project. The effects of changing NOx and SO2 emissions were investigated with the CMAQ chemistry transport model for the year 2030 in the North Sea area. It has been found that, compared to today, the contribution of shipping to the NO2 and O3 concentrations will increase due to the expected enhanced traffic by more than 20 and 5 %, respectively, by 2030 if no regulation for further emission reductions is implemented in the North Sea area. PM2.5 will decrease slightly because the sulfur contents in ship fuels will be reduced as international regulations foresee. The effects differ largely between regions, seasons and date of the implementation of stricter regulations for NOx emissions from newly built ships.

  2. Inferences on the Mesozoic evolution of the North Aegean from the isotopic record of the Chalkidiki block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kydonakis, Konstantinos; Brun, Jean-Pierre; Poujol, Marc; Monié, Patrick; Chatzitheodoridis, Elias

    2016-07-01

    The Chalkidiki block is a major domain in the North Aegean that, contrary to other domains in the region, largely escaped thermal perturbations during Tertiary extension. As a result, the Chalkidiki block is an ideal candidate to glean information related to the timing of Mesozoic thermal events using appropriate geochronological techniques. We have undertaken a laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) study (U-Th-Pb on monazites and U-Pb on zircons) coupled with 40Ar/39Ar dating on nine samples from various structural levels within the thrust system of the Chalkidiki block. The eastern, and structurally lower part of the system revealed a complete isotopic reset of Carboniferous - Early Triassic monazites coeval with partial monazite destruction, REE-mobilisation and formation of apatite-allanite-epidote coronas at ~ 132 Ma, a reaction that is commonly observed in amphibolite-facies rocks. These coronas formed after crystallisation of garnet (i.e., at T > 580 °C) and, in all probability, either close to the peak-temperature conditions (~ 620 °C) on a prograde path or during retrogression between the peak-temperature and the low-temperature boundary of the amphibolite facies. Cooling of these rocks and arrival at mid-crustal levels occurred at 95-100 Ma. By contrast, the western, and structurally uppermost part of the system went through the same event by 120-125 Ma. Further structural considerations with respect to medium-temperature geochronology data imply that syn-metamorphic thrusting must have ceased by early Late Cretaceous. We emphasize that, with the sole exception of the Chalkidiki block, no pre-45 Ma medium-temperature geochronology data are preserved in other North Aegean domains, a feature that is clearly related to the extension-induced thermal perturbation of the region during the Tertiary.

  3. Regional scenarios of sea level rise and impacts on Basque (Bay of Biscay) coastal habitats, throughout the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chust, Guillem; Caballero, Ainhoa; Marcos, Marta; Liria, Pedro; Hernández, Carlos; Borja, Ángel

    2010-03-01

    Global climate models have predicted a rise on mean sea level of between 0.18 m and 0.59 m by the end of the 21st Century, with high regional variability. The objectives of this study are to estimate sea level changes in the Bay of Biscay during this century, and to assess the impacts of any change on Basque coastal habitats and infrastructures. Hence, ocean temperature projections for three climate scenarios, provided by several atmosphere-ocean coupled general climate models, have been extracted for the Bay of Biscay; these are used to estimate thermosteric sea level variations. The results show that, from 2001 to 2099, sea level within the Bay of Biscay will increase by between 28.5 and 48.7 cm, as a result of regional thermal expansion and global ice-melting, under scenarios A1B and A2 of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. A high-resolution digital terrain model, extracted from LiDAR, data was used to evaluate the potential impact of the estimated sea level rise to 9 coastal and estuarine habitats: sandy beaches and muds, vegetated dunes, shingle beaches, sea cliffs and supralittoral rock, wetlands and saltmarshes, terrestrial habitats, artificial land, piers, and water surfaces. The projected sea level rise of 48.7 cm was added to the high tide level of the coast studied, to generate a flood risk map of the coastal and estuarine areas. The results indicate that 110.8 ha of the supralittoral area will be affected by the end of the 21st Century; these are concentrated within the estuaries, with terrestrial and artificial habitats being the most affected. Sandy beaches are expected to undergo mean shoreline retreats of between 25% and 40%, of their width. The risk assessment of the areas and habitats that will be affected, as a consequence of the sea level rise, is potentially useful for local management to adopt adaptation measures to global climate change.

  4. Stochastic strong ground motion simulations for the intermediate-depth earthquakes of the south Aegean subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kkallas, Harris; Papazachos, Konstantinos; Boore, David; Margaris, Vasilis

    2015-04-01

    We have employed the stochastic finite-fault modelling approach of Motazedian and Atkinson (2005), as described by Boore (2009), for the simulation of Fourier spectra of the Intermediate-depth earthquakes of the south Aegean subduction zone. The stochastic finite-fault method is a practical tool for simulating ground motions of future earthquakes which requires region-specific source, path and site characterizations as input model parameters. For this reason we have used data from both acceleration-sensor and broadband velocity-sensor instruments from intermediate-depth earthquakes with magnitude of M 4.5-6.7 that occurred in the south Aegean subduction zone. Source mechanisms for intermediate-depth events of north Aegean subduction zone are either collected from published information or are constrained using the main faulting types from Kkallas et al. (2013). The attenuation parameters for simulations were adopted from Skarladoudis et al. (2013) and are based on regression analysis of a response spectra database. The site amplification functions for each soil class were adopted from Klimis et al., (1999), while the kappa values were constrained from the analysis of the EGELADOS network data from Ventouzi et al., (2013). The investigation of stress-drop values was based on simulations performed with the EXSIM code for several ranges of stress drop values and by comparing the results with the available Fourier spectra of intermediate-depth earthquakes. Significant differences regarding the strong-motion duration, which is determined from Husid plots (Husid, 1969), have been identified between the for-arc and along-arc stations due to the effect of the low-velocity/low-Q mantle wedge on the seismic wave propagation. In order to estimate appropriate values for the duration of P-waves, we have automatically picked P-S durations on the available seismograms. For the S-wave durations we have used the part of the seismograms starting from the S-arrivals and ending at the

  5. Regional forecasting system of marine state and variability of dynamical processes in the easternmost part of the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordzadze, Avtandil; Demetrashvili, Demuri

    2014-05-01

    The regional forecasting system for the easternmost part of the Black Sea developed at M. Nodia Institute of Geophysics of I. Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University under the EU framework projects ARENA and ECOOP is a part of the Black Sea basin-scale Nowcasting/Forecasting System. A core of the regional forecasting system is a baroclinic regional model of Black Sea dynamics with 1 km spacing based on hydrostatic primitive equations of ocean hydrothermodynamics, which are written in z-coordinates for deviations of thermodynamic values from their standard vertical distributions. To solve the problem the two-cycle method of splitting the model equation system with respect to both physical processes and coordinate planes and lines is used. The regional model of M. Nodia Institute of Geophysics is nested in the basin-scale model of Black Sea dynamics of Marine Hydrophysical Institute (Sevastopol/Ukraine). The regional forecasting system provides 3 days' forecasts of current, temperature and salinity for the easternmost part of the Black Sea, which is limited to the Caucasian and Turkish coastal lines and the western liquid boundary coinciding with the meridian 39.080E. Data needed on liquid and upper boundaries, also the 3-D initial hydrophysical fields for the easternmost regional area are provided in near operative mode from Marine hydrophysical Institute via Internet. These data on the liquid boundary are values of velocity components, temperature and salinity predicted by the basin-scale model of Black Sea dynamics of Marine Hydrophysical Institute and on the sea surface 2-D meteorological boundary fields - wind stress, heat fluxes, evaporation and precipitation rates predicted by the regional atmospheric model ALADIN are used. The analysis of the results of modeling and forecast of dynamic processes developed for 2010-2014 showed that the easternmost water area of the Black Sea is a dynamically very active zone, where continuously there are processes of generation

  6. Reconstruction of regional mean sea level anomalies from tide gauges using the neural network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, M.; Schroeter, J.

    2009-04-01

    Regional mean sea level anomalies (SLA) are estimated from tide gauge values directly using the neural network approach. A neural network is an artificial neural system, a computational model inspired by the notion of neurophysical processes. It consists of several processing elements called neurons, which are interconnected with each other exchanging information. In this presentation a backpropagation network (BPN) is used. In this type of network the neurons are ordered into layers: an input layer on the top, one or more hidden layers below and an output layer at the bottom. The connection strength between the neurons are estimated in a training phase, i.e. the BNP learns from given examples. For our purpose 56 tide gauges are selected from the PSMSL data set that comply with the following conditions: 1) there are more than 11 annual mean values given in [1993,2005] 2) more than 50 annual mean values are given in [1900,2007] and 3) the tide gauge is neighboured by at least one ocean point on a 1x1 degree grid. The selected tide gauges are GIA corrected using the Peltier ICE5G_VM4_L90 dataset available on the PSMSL web site. For each ocean region (trop. Indian, ... South Atlantic to Global Ocean) a separate BPN is trained that uses all tide gauges to compute the regional mean SLA's. To avoid possible problems with the local reference frame all computations are done in the space of temporal derivatives. Beyond that, this makes the data more suitable for the BPN because it better limits the possible range of the numerical values. Furthermore, known regional mean target values are needed to train the BPN. These are derived from gridded satellite altimetry data either processed by GFZ Potsdam (TOPEX/Poseidon data only) and/or the dataset available on the CSIRO sea level web side (combined TOPEX and Jason data). Although every tide gauge has more then 50 years of data, many values are missing, especially prior to 1950. To fill these data gaps at the input layer of the

  7. Patterns of sperm-specific histone variation in sea stars and sea urchins: primary structural homologies in the N-terminal region of spermatogenic H1.

    PubMed

    Massey, C B; Watts, S A

    1992-04-15

    An electrophoretic characterization of histones from pyloric caeca, testes, and sperm of Asterias vulgaris revealed a sperm/testes-specific variant of histone H1 significantly larger than its somatic counterpart from pyloric caeca. Additional proteins were observed in H1 regions of acetic acid-urea polyacrylamide gels in testicular extracts. Sperm or testis-specific variants of H2B observed in sea urchins were not found in the sea star. Evidence presented suggests that sperm- or testes-specific H1 species of intermediate mobility may arise from a single, slow-migrating H1 species (SpH1). Although an increase in nonspecific DNA binding by nuclear proteins must occur during the process of spermatogenesis, different organisms exhibit various patterns of sperm-specific protein mediating differential binding during the process. Sperm-specific variants of both H1 and H2B histones are observed in sea urchins, while the only variant observed in sea stars during spermatogenesis is SpH1. Sequencing of the N-terminus of SpH1 from A. vulgaris revealed a repeating tetrapeptide in residues 3-6 and 8-11 (Ser-Pro-Arg-Lys and Ser-Pro-Lys-Lys, respectively), homologous to repeats in the N-termini of sperm-specific H1s from sea urchins. Primary structure within critical, variable regions of molecules responsible for nonspecific DNA binding appear conserved in many organisms. The occurrence of repeating tetrapeptides in SpH1 and other DNA binding proteins suggests that such domains may function similarly in various chromatins undergoing regulated or reversible condensation. PMID:1583456

  8. Patterns of sperm-specific histone variation in sea stars and sea urchins: primary structural homologies in the N-terminal region of spermatogenic H1.

    PubMed

    Massey, C B; Watts, S A

    1992-04-15

    An electrophoretic characterization of histones from pyloric caeca, testes, and sperm of Asterias vulgaris revealed a sperm/testes-specific variant of histone H1 significantly larger than its somatic counterpart from pyloric caeca. Additional proteins were observed in H1 regions of acetic acid-urea polyacrylamide gels in testicular extracts. Sperm or testis-specific variants of H2B observed in sea urchins were not found in the sea star. Evidence presented suggests that sperm- or testes-specific H1 species of intermediate mobility may arise from a single, slow-migrating H1 species (SpH1). Although an increase in nonspecific DNA binding by nuclear proteins must occur during the process of spermatogenesis, different organisms exhibit various patterns of sperm-specific protein mediating differential binding during the process. Sperm-specific variants of both H1 and H2B histones are observed in sea urchins, while the only variant observed in sea stars during spermatogenesis is SpH1. Sequencing of the N-terminus of SpH1 from A. vulgaris revealed a repeating tetrapeptide in residues 3-6 and 8-11 (Ser-Pro-Arg-Lys and Ser-Pro-Lys-Lys, respectively), homologous to repeats in the N-termini of sperm-specific H1s from sea urchins. Primary structure within critical, variable regions of molecules responsible for nonspecific DNA binding appear conserved in many organisms. The occurrence of repeating tetrapeptides in SpH1 and other DNA binding proteins suggests that such domains may function similarly in various chromatins undergoing regulated or reversible condensation.

  9. The organic sea surface microlayer in the upwelling region off Peru and implications for air-sea exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Galgani, L.

    2015-07-01

    The sea surface microlayer (SML) is at the very surface of the ocean, linking the hydrosphere with the atmosphere, and central to a range of global biogeochemical and climate-related processes. The presence and enrichment of organic compounds in the SML have been suggested to influence air-sea gas exchange processes as well as the emission of primary organic aerosols. Among these organic compounds, primarily of plankton origin, are dissolved exopolymers, specifically polysaccharides and proteins, and gel particles, such as Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) and Coomassie Stainable Particles (CSP). These organic substances often accumulate in the surface ocean when plankton productivity is high. Here, we report results obtained in December 2012 during the SOPRAN Meteor 91 cruise to the highly productive, coastal upwelling regime off Peru. Samples were collected from the SML and from ~ 20 cm below, and were analyzed for polysaccharidic and proteinaceous compounds, gel particles, total and dissolved organic carbon, bacterial and phytoplankton abundance. Our study provides insight to the physical and biological control of organic matter enrichment in the SML, and discusses the potential role of organic matter in the SML for air-sea exchange processes.

  10. On the Role of Arctic Sea Ice Deformations: An Evaluation of the Regional Arctic System Model Results with Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, Robert; Maslowski, Wieslaw; Roberts, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The atmosphere - sea ice - ocean fluxes and their contribution to rapid changes in the Arctic system are not well understood and generally are not resolved by global climate models (GCMs). While many significant model refinements have been made in the recent past, including the representation of sea ice rheology, surface albedo and ice-albedo feedback, other processes such as sea ice deformations, still require further studies and model advancements. Of particular potential interest here are linear kinematic features (LKFs), which control winter air-sea heat exchange and affect buoyancy forces in the ocean. Their importance in Arctic climate change, especially under an increasing first-year ice cover, is yet to be determined and their simulation requires representation of processes currently at sub-grid scale of most GCMs. To address some of the GCM limitations and to better understand the role of LKFs in air-sea exchange we use the Regional Arctic System Model (RASM), which allows high spatio-temporal resolution and regional focus on the Arctic. RASM is a fully coupled regional climate model, developed to study dynamic and thermodynamic processes and their coupling across the atmosphere-sea ice-ocean interface. It consists of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) atmospheric model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP), the Community Ice Model (CICE) and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) land hydrology model. The sea ice component has been upgraded to the Los Alamos Community Ice Model version 5.1 (CICE5.1), which allows either Elastic-Viscous-Plastic (EVP) or a new anisotropic (EPA) rheology. RASM's domain is pan-Arctic, with the ocean and sea ice components configured at an eddy-permitting horizontal resolution of 1/12-degree as well as 1/48-degree, for limited simulations. The atmosphere and land model components are configured at 50-km grids. All the components are coupled at a 20-minute time step. Results from multiple RASM simulations are analyzed and

  11. Hydro-engineering and environmental problems in Poti Black Sea region and ways of their solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghinadze, Ivane; Pkhakadze, Manana; Kodua, Manoni; Gagoshidze, Shalva

    2016-04-01

    (The article was published with support of the Shota Rustaveli National Science Foundation) Work is dedicated to the development of hydro-engineering and environmental protection measures in the Black Sea regions, the main Georgian port of Poti at the mouth of the Rioni, which will minimize the region geomorphological changes caused by the influence of natural and anthropogenic factors, and will over a long period protect coastal areas of these regions from washouts and large scale silting processes. The research objects are: 1. Poti seashore, which has retreated for hundreds of meters, promoted with the existence of underwater canyon along the southern pier of the port; 2. The Rioni river watershed dam, the tail race of which in time was subjected to destruction and substantial washout. Currently the stability of the dam is endangered; 3. "City Canal" - the Rioni river old bed, which is greatly silted up and is virtually unable to perform its function - to feed Poti seashore with solid matter. The work for the hydrodynamics solutions using high-precision mathematical methods. In particular, for the establishment of coastal longshore migrations of sediment and deformations of the coastal zone is used finite element method, Crank-Nicolson scheme and method of upper relaxation in the calculation of wave propagation in the estuarine areas of the Rioni River uses direct and asymptotic (particularly WKB) Methods of mathematical analysis. The results obtained using these models will be put as a base of development of such engineering measures and design proposals which: a) will provide sustained increase of Poti coastal line on the basis of working out of exploitation regimes of the Rioni watershed hydro complex and as a result of performing additional engineering measures in "City Canal"; b) will thoroughly protect the Rioni watershed hydro complex dam tail-water from destruction and washouts. The packets of mathematical programs and analytical methods of calculation

  12. Unravelling environmental conditions during the Holocene in the Dead Sea region using multiple archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambeau, Claire; van Leeuwen, Jacqueline; van der Knaap, Pim; Gobet, Erika

    2016-04-01

    For the most arid parts of the Southern Levant (roughly corresponding to modern Jordan, Israel and Palestine), environmental reconstructions are impeded by the limited number of archives, and the frequent contradictions between individual palaeoenvironmental records. The Southern Levant is characterised by steep climate gradients; local conditions presently range from arid to dry Mediterranean, with limits that may have fluctuated during the Holocene. This further complicates the determination of site-specific past environmental conditions. Understanding past climate and environmental evolution through time, at a local level, is however crucial to compare these with societal evolution during the Holocene, which features major cultural developments such as cereal cultivation, animal domestication, water management, as well as times of preferential settlement growth or site abandonment. This contribution proposes to examine the different archives available for the Dead Sea region, paying special attention to the most recent pollen data obtained from the area. It will particularly critically compare local to regional-scale information, and try to decipher the main evolutions of environmental conditions during the Holocene in arid and semi-arid Southern Levant.

  13. Radionuclides in ornithogenic sediments as evidence for recent warming in the Ross Sea region, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yaguang; Xu, Liqiang; Liu, Xiaodong; Emslie, Steven D

    2016-07-01

    Radionuclides including (210)Pb, (226)Ra and (137)Cs were analyzed in eight ornithogenic sediment profiles from McMurdo Sound, Ross Sea region, East Antarctica. Equilibration between (210)Pb and (226)Ra were reached in all eight profiles, enabling the determination of chronology within the past two centuries through the Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) model. Calculated fluxes of both (210)Pb and (137)Cs varied drastically among four of the profiles (MB4, MB6, CC and CL2), probably due to differences in their sedimentary environments. In addition, we found the flux data exhibiting a clear decreasing gradient in accordance with their average deposition rate, which was in turn related to the specific location of the profiles. We believe this phenomenon may correspond to global warming of the last century, since warming-induced surface runoff would bring more inflow water and detritus to the coring sites, thus enhancing the difference among the profiles. To verify this hypothesis, the deposition rate against age of the sediments was calculated based on their determined chronology, which showed ascending trends in all four profiles. The significant increase in deposition rates over the last century is probably attributable to recent warming, implying a potential utilization of radionuclides as environmental indicators in this region.

  14. Fatal poisoning of chilhood in the Eastern Black Sea region of Turkey (2009-2013).

    PubMed

    Karadeniz, Hulya; Birincioglu, Ismail; Turna, Ozgur; Ketenci, Huseyin Cetin; Beyhun, Nazım Ercument

    2015-08-01

    Poisoning is a major problem worldwide among children. Nonetheless, the offending agent, the associated morbidity and mortality vary from place to place and show changes over a period of time. The aim of this study was to investigate the medico-legal paediatric autopsies of childhood poisonings in the Eastern Black Sea Region of Turkey. Reports of autopsies performed between 2009 and 2013 in the Morgue Department of the Council of Forensic Medicine. All medico-legal paediatric autopsies in Trabzon (n:1049) were retrospectively examined. The study comprised an investigation into 62 deaths from poisoning in children aged 0-18 years. The parameters of age, sex, toxic substance category and origin were evaluated. Poisoning accounted for 5.9% of the deaths of children aged 0-18 years. Of the 62 cases, 32 (51.6%) were male and 30 (48.4%) were female, giving a female to male ratio of 1/1.1. The primary causes of fatal poisoning in children were carbon monoxide (64.5%, n = 40), followed by drugs (16.1%, n = 10), insecticides (9.7%, n = 6), mushrooms (6.5%, n = 4), and snake venom (3.2%, n = 2). The results of this study implicated carbon monoxide poisoning as a serious risk factor for mortality in our region. Childhood poisoning may be prevented by public education and simple precautions in general.

  15. Spatial distribution of carbonaceous aerosol in the southeastern Baltic Sea region (event of grass fires)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudoitis, Vadimas; Byčenkienė, Steigvilė; Plauškaitė, Kristina; Bozzetti, Carlo; Fröhlich, Roman; Mordas, Genrik; Ulevičius, Vidmantas

    2016-05-01

    The aerosol chemical composition in air masses affected by large vegetation fires transported from the Kaliningrad region (Russia) and southeast regions (Belarus and Ukraine) during early spring (March 2014) was characterized at the remote background site of Preila, Lithuania. In this study, the chemical composition of the particulate matter was studied by high temporal resolution instruments, including an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) and a seven-wavelength aethalometer. Air masses were transported from twenty to several hundred kilometres, arriving at the measurement station after approximately half a day of transport. The concentration-weighted trajectory analysis suggests that organic aerosol particles are mainly transported over the Baltic Sea and the continent (southeast of Belarus). Results show that a significant fraction of the vegetation burning organic aerosol is transformed into oxidised forms in less than a half-day. Biomass burning aerosol (BBOA) was quantified from the ACSM data using a positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis, while its spatial distribution was evaluated using air mass clustering approach.

  16. Radionuclides in ornithogenic sediments as evidence for recent warming in the Ross Sea region, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yaguang; Xu, Liqiang; Liu, Xiaodong; Emslie, Steven D

    2016-07-01

    Radionuclides including (210)Pb, (226)Ra and (137)Cs were analyzed in eight ornithogenic sediment profiles from McMurdo Sound, Ross Sea region, East Antarctica. Equilibration between (210)Pb and (226)Ra were reached in all eight profiles, enabling the determination of chronology within the past two centuries through the Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) model. Calculated fluxes of both (210)Pb and (137)Cs varied drastically among four of the profiles (MB4, MB6, CC and CL2), probably due to differences in their sedimentary environments. In addition, we found the flux data exhibiting a clear decreasing gradient in accordance with their average deposition rate, which was in turn related to the specific location of the profiles. We believe this phenomenon may correspond to global warming of the last century, since warming-induced surface runoff would bring more inflow water and detritus to the coring sites, thus enhancing the difference among the profiles. To verify this hypothesis, the deposition rate against age of the sediments was calculated based on their determined chronology, which showed ascending trends in all four profiles. The significant increase in deposition rates over the last century is probably attributable to recent warming, implying a potential utilization of radionuclides as environmental indicators in this region. PMID:26999368

  17. A wrench and inversion model for structures in the Timor Sea region, northwest Austrialia

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A.W.

    1996-01-01

    A structural model is developed for part of the Timor Sea region, northwest Australia, involving multiple strike-slip episodes, and significant changes in the regional or local stress regimes. It is interpreted that both normal and reverse faults have existed since at least the Permian, and have changed their sense of movement in response to changing stress fields, with latest changes occurring as a result of Tertiary collision of the Australian and Eurasian Plates. Both 2-D and 3-D seismic data sets are used to demonstrate development of conventional simple strike-slip models into complex multi-episode models incorporating through-going and abandoned faults. After only three episodes of fault movement, one of which involves inversion, the fault linkages and structural history can become very difficult to unravel. The Jabiru Oil Field is shown to have developed at the intersection of orthogonal faults, with resultant restraining fault bend geometry. Failure to identify a large part of the field for several years after discovery may be attributed to misinterpretation of reversal of fault throw with depth (resulting from inversion), and to lack of appreciation of the significance of abandoned faults. Factors including fault abandonment, fault dips steepening with depth (including sideways concave faults), fault inversion, and trap seal development on inverted and abandoned faults may have a significant influence on the way petroleum traps are mapped and the trapping capacity of seals.

  18. A wrench and inversion model for structures in the Timor Sea region, northwest Austrialia

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A.W.

    1996-12-31

    A structural model is developed for part of the Timor Sea region, northwest Australia, involving multiple strike-slip episodes, and significant changes in the regional or local stress regimes. It is interpreted that both normal and reverse faults have existed since at least the Permian, and have changed their sense of movement in response to changing stress fields, with latest changes occurring as a result of Tertiary collision of the Australian and Eurasian Plates. Both 2-D and 3-D seismic data sets are used to demonstrate development of conventional simple strike-slip models into complex multi-episode models incorporating through-going and abandoned faults. After only three episodes of fault movement, one of which involves inversion, the fault linkages and structural history can become very difficult to unravel. The Jabiru Oil Field is shown to have developed at the intersection of orthogonal faults, with resultant restraining fault bend geometry. Failure to identify a large part of the field for several years after discovery may be attributed to misinterpretation of reversal of fault throw with depth (resulting from inversion), and to lack of appreciation of the significance of abandoned faults. Factors including fault abandonment, fault dips steepening with depth (including sideways concave faults), fault inversion, and trap seal development on inverted and abandoned faults may have a significant influence on the way petroleum traps are mapped and the trapping capacity of seals.

  19. Assigning king eiders to wintering regions in the Bering Sea using stable isotopes of feathers and claws

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oppel, S.; Powell, A.N.

    2008-01-01

    Identification of wintering regions for birds sampled during the breeding season is crucial to understanding how events outside the breeding season may affect populations. We assigned king eiders captured on breeding grounds in northern Alaska to 3 broad geographic wintering regions in the Bering Sea using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes obtained from head feathers. Using a discriminant function analysis of feathers obtained from birds tracked with satellite transmitters, we estimated that 88 % of feathers were assigned to the region in which they were grown. We then assigned 84 birds of unknown origin to wintering regions based on their head feather isotope ratios, and tested the utility of claws for geographic assignment. Based on the feather results, we estimated that similar proportions of birds in our study area use each of the 3 wintering regions in the Bering Sea. These results are in close agreement with estimates from satellite telemetry and show the usefulness of stable isotope signatures of feathers in assigning marine birds to geographic regions. The use of claws is currently limited by incomplete understanding of claw growth rates. Data presented here will allow managers of eiders, other marine birds, and marine mammals to assign animals to regions in the Bering Sea based on stable isotope signatures of body tissues. ?? Inter-Research 2008.

  20. Measurements of regional-scale aerosol impacts on cloud microphysics over the East China Sea: Possible influences of warm sea surface temperature over the Kuroshio ocean current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, M.; Takegawa, N.; Moteki, N.; Kondo, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Kita, K.; Matsui, H.; Oshima, N.; Kajino, M.; Nakajima, T. Y.

    2012-09-01

    Cloud microphysical properties and aerosol concentrations were measured aboard an aircraft over the East China Sea and Yellow Sea in April 2009 during the Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia (A-FORCE) experiment. We sampled stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds over the ocean in 9 cases during 7 flights 500-900 km off the east coast of Mainland China. In this study we report aerosol impacts on cloud microphysical properties by focusing on regional characteristics of two key parameters, namely updraft velocity and aerosol size distribution. First, we show that the cloud droplet number concentration (highest 5%, Nc_max) correlates well with the accumulation-mode aerosol number concentration (Na) below the clouds. We then show that Nc_maxcorrelates partly with near-surface stratification evaluated as the difference between the sea surface temperature (SST) and 950-hPa temperature (SST - T950). Cold air advection from China to the East China Sea was found to bring not only a large number of aerosols but also a dry and cold air mass that destabilized the atmospheric boundary layer, especially over the warm Kuroshio ocean current. Over this high-SST region