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Sample records for aegilops tauschii coss

  1. Hypersensitive response-like reaction is associated with hybrid necrosis in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii coss.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Hosogi, Naoki; Park, Pyoyun; Takumi, Shigeo

    2010-06-25

    Hybrid speciation is classified into homoploid and polyploid based on ploidy level. Common wheat is an allohexaploid species that originated from a naturally occurring interploidy cross between tetraploid wheat and diploid wild wheat Aegilops tauschii Coss. Aegilops tauschii provides wide naturally occurring genetic variation. Sometimes its triploid hybrids with tetraploid wheat show the following four types of hybrid growth abnormalities: types II and III hybrid necrosis, hybrid chlorosis, and severe growth abortion. The growth abnormalities in the triploid hybrids could act as postzygotic hybridization barriers to prevent formation of hexaploid wheat. Here, we report on the geographical and phylogenetic distribution of Ae. tauschii accessions inducing the hybrid growth abnormalities and showed that they are widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Molecular and cytological characterization of the type III necrosis phenotype was performed. The hybrid abnormality causing accessions were widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Transcriptome analysis showed that a number of defense-related genes such as pathogenesis-related genes were highly up-regulated in the type III necrosis lines. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that cell death occurred accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species in leaves undergoing type III necrosis. The reduction of photosynthetic activity occurred prior to the appearance of necrotic symptoms on the leaves exhibiting hybrid necrosis. Taking these results together strongly suggests that an autoimmune response might be triggered by intergenomic incompatibility between the tetraploid wheat and Ae. tauschii genomes in type III necrosis, and that genetically programmed cell death could be regarded as a hypersensitive response-like cell death similar to that observed in Arabidopsis intraspecific and Nicotiana interspecific hybrids. Only Ae. tauschii accessions without such

  2. Complete chloroplast genomes of Aegilops tauschii Coss. and Ae. cylindrica Host sheds light on plasmon D evolution.

    PubMed

    Gogniashvili, Mari; Jinjikhadze, Tamar; Maisaia, Inesa; Akhalkatsi, Maia; Kotorashvili, Adam; Kotaria, Nato; Beridze, Tengiz; Dudnikov, Alexander Ju

    2016-11-01

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L., genomes AABBDD) originated in South Caucasus by allopolyploidization of the cultivated Emmer wheat T. dicoccum (genomes AABB) with the Caucasian Ae. tauschii ssp strangulata (genomes DD). Genetic variation of Ae. tauschii is an important natural resource, that is why it is of particular importance to investigate how this variation was formed during Ae. tauschii evolutionary history and how it is presented through the species area. The D genome is also found in tetraploid Ae. cylindrica Host (2n = 28, CCDD). The plasmon diversity that exists in Triticum and Aegilops species is of great significance for understanding the evolution of these genera. In the present investigation the complete nucleotide sequence of plasmon D (chloroplast DNA) of nine accessions of Ae. tauschii and two accessions of Ae. cylindrica are presented. Twenty-eight SNPs are characteristic for both TauL1 and TauL2 accessions of Ae. tauschii using TauL3 as a reference. Four SNPs are additionally observed for TauL2 lineage. The longest (27 bp) indel is located in the intergenic spacer Rps15-ndhF of SSC. This indel can be used for simple determination of TauL3 lineage among Ae. tauschii accessions. In the case of Ae. cylindrica additionally 7 SNPs were observed. The phylogeny tree shows that chloroplast DNA of TauL1 and TauL2 diverged from the TauL3 lineage. TauL1 lineage is relatively older then TauL2. The position of Ae. cylindrica accessions on Ae. tauschii phylogeny tree constructed on chloroplast DNA variation data is intermediate between TauL1 and TauL2. The complete nucleotide sequence of chloroplast DNA of Ae. tauschii and Ae. cylindrica allows to refine the origin and evolution of D plasmon of genus Aegilops.

  3. Intraspecific lineage divergence and its association with reproductive trait change during species range expansion in central Eurasian wild wheat Aegilops tauschii Coss. (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Takumi, Shigeo; Kawahara, Taihachi

    2015-09-30

    How species ranges form in landscapes is a matter of long-standing evolutionary interest. However, little is known about how natural phenotypic variations of ecologically important traits contribute to species range expansion. In this study, we examined the phylogeographic patterns of phenotypic changes in life history (seed production) and phenological (flowering time) traits during the range expansion of Aegilops tauschii Coss. from the Transcaucasus and Middle East to central Asia. Our comparative analyses of the patterns of natural variations for those traits and their association with the intraspecific lineage structure showed that (1) the eastward expansion to Asia was driven by an intraspecific sublineage (named TauL1b), (2) high seed production ability likely had an important role at the initial dispersal stage of TauL1b's expansion to Asia, and (3) the phenological change to early flowering phenotypes was one of the key adaptation events for TauL1b to further expand its range in Asia. This study provides for the first time a broad picture of the process of Ae. tauschii's eastward range expansion in which life history and phenological traits may have had respective roles in its dispersal and adaptation in Asia. The clear association of seed production and flowering time patterns with the intraspecific lineage divergence found in this study invites further genetic research to bring the mechanistic understanding of the changes in these key functional traits during range expansion within reach.

  4. [Development and study of spring bread wheat variety Pamyati Maystrenko with introgression of genetic material from synthetic hexaploid Triticum timopheevii zhuk. x Aegilops tauschii Coss].

    PubMed

    Laikova, L I; Belan, I A; Badaeva, E D; Posseeva, L P; Shepelev, S S; Shumny, V K; Pershina, L A

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic hexaploids are bridges for transferring new genes that determine resistance to stress factors from wild-type species to bread wheat. In the present work, the method of developing the spring bread wheat variety Pamyati Maystrenko and the results of its study are described. This variety was obtained using one of the immune lines produced earlier via the hybridization of the spring bread wheat variety Saratovskaya 29 with the synthetic hexaploid T. timopheevii Zhuk. x Ae. tauschii Coss. The C-staining of chromosomes in the Pamyati Maystrenko variety revealed substitutions of 2B and 6B chromosomes by the homeologous chromosomes of the G genome of T. timopheevii and the substitution of chromosome 1D by an orthologous chromosome ofAe. tauschii. It was found that this variety is characterized by resistance to leaf and stem rust, powdery mildew, and loose smut as well as by high grain and bread-making qualities. The role of the alien genetic material introgressed into the bread-wheat genome in the expression of adaptive and economically valuable traits in the Pamyati Maystrenko variety is discussed.

  5. Wheat - Aegilops introgressions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aegilops is the most closely related genus to Triticum in the tribe Triticeae. Aegilops speltoides Tausch (B genome donor) and Ae. tauschii Coss. (D genome donor) contributed two of the three genomes present in common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., 2n = 6x = 42, AABBDD genomes). The Aegilops genus c...

  6. Salt tolerance during germination and seedling growth of wild wheat Aegilops tauschii and its impact on the species range expansion

    PubMed Central

    Saisho, Daisuke; Takumi, Shigeo; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to edaphic stress may have a key role in plant species range expansion. Aegilops tauschii Coss., the common wheat’s D-genome progenitor native to the Transcaucasus-Middle East region, is a good model to study the relationships between soil salinity and plant distributions: one of its intraspecific sublineages, TauL1b, drove the long-distance eastward expansion of this species range reaching semi-arid-central Asia. Salt tolerance during germination and seedling growth was evaluated in 206 Ae. tauschii accessions by treating seeds with NaCl solutions differing in concentrations. Differences in natural variation patterns were analyzed between sublineages and associated with natural edaphic condition variables, and then compared with reproductive trait variation patterns. The natural variations observed in NaCl-induced-stress tolerance had clear geographic and genetic structure. Seedling growth significantly increased in the TauL1b accessions that were collected from salt-affected soil habitats, whereas germinability did not. Principal component analysis suggested that the NaCl-induced-stress tolerances and reproductive traits might have had a similar degree of influence on Ae. tauschii’s eastward range expansion. Adaptation to salt-affected soils through increased seedling growth was an important factor for the species’ successful colonization of the semi-arid central Asian habitats. TauL1b accessions might provide useful genetic resources for salt-tolerant wheat breeds. PMID:27929044

  7. Phenotypic and ionome profiling of Triticum aestivum x Aegilops tauschii introgression lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eighty-four single homozygous introgressions of the Aegilops tauschii D-genome in the ‘Chinese Spring’ genetic background were used to study phenotypic and ionome profiles during two years of field experiments. An augmented design was used with a repeated check of a local bread wheat cultivar was im...

  8. Introgression of stem rust resistance genes SrTA10187 and SrTA10171 from Aegilops tauschii to wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The diploid progenitor of the wheat D genome, Aegilops tauschii, has provided a wealth of genes for resistance to many diseases and insect pests of wheat. Ae. tauschii is a readily accessible pool of genes for wheat breeding as genes can be transferred to elite wheat cultivars though direct hybridi...

  9. Dissecting miRNAs in Wheat D Genome Progenitor, Aegilops tauschii

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Bala A.; Budak, Hikmet

    2016-01-01

    As the post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, microRNAs or miRNAs comprise an integral part of understanding how genomes function. Although miRNAs have been a major focus of recent efforts, miRNA research is still in its infancy in most plant species. Aegilops tauschii, the D genome progenitor of bread wheat, is a wild diploid grass exhibiting remarkable population diversity. Due to the direct ancestry and the diverse gene pool, A. tauschii is a promising source for bread wheat improvement. In this study, a total of 87 Aegilops miRNA families, including 51 previously unknown, were computationally identified both at the subgenomic level, using flow-sorted A. tauschii 5D chromosome, and at the whole genome level. Predictions at the genomic and subgenomic levels suggested A. tauschii 5D chromosome as rich in pre-miRNAs that are highly associated with Class II DNA transposons. In order to gain insights into miRNA evolution, putative 5D chromosome miRNAs were compared to its modern ortholog, Triticum aestivum 5D chromosome, revealing that 48 of the 58 A. tauschii 5D miRNAs were conserved in orthologous T. aestivum 5D chromosome. The expression profiles of selected miRNAs (miR167, miR5205, miR5175, miR5523) provided the first experimental evidence for miR5175, miR5205 and miR5523, and revealed differential expressional changes in response to drought in different genetic backgrounds for miR167 and miR5175. Interestingly, while miR5523 coding regions were present and expressed as pre-miR5523 in both T. aestivum and A. tauschii, the expression of mature miR5523 was observed only in A. tauschii under normal conditions, pointing out to an interference at the downstream processing of pre-miR5523 in T. aestivum. Overall, this study expands our knowledge on the miRNA catalog of A. tauschii, locating a subset specifically to the 5D chromosome, with ample functional and comparative insight which should contribute to and complement efforts to develop drought tolerant

  10. Genome-wide association study of drought-related resistance traits in Aegilops tauschii

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Peng; Lin, Yu; Hu, Yaodong; Liu, Kun; Mao, Shuangshuang; Li, Zhanyi; Wang, Jirui; Liu, Yaxi; Wei, Yuming; Zheng, Youliang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The D-genome progenitor of wheat (Triticum aestivum), Aegilops tauschii, possesses numerous genes for resistance to abiotic stresses, including drought. Therefore, information on the genetic architecture of A. tauschii can aid the development of drought-resistant wheat varieties. Here, we evaluated 13 traits in 373 A. tauschii accessions grown under normal and polyethylene glycol-simulated drought stress conditions and performed a genome-wide association study using 7,185 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. We identified 208 and 28 SNPs associated with all traits using the general linear model and mixed linear model, respectively, while both models detected 25 significant SNPs with genome-wide distribution. Public database searches revealed several candidate/flanking genes related to drought resistance that were grouped into three categories according to the type of encoded protein (enzyme, storage protein, and drought-induced protein). This study provided essential information for SNPs and genes related to drought resistance in A. tauschii and wheat, and represents a foundation for breeding drought-resistant wheat cultivars using marker-assisted selection. PMID:27560650

  11. MlNCD1: A novel Aegilops tauschii derived powdery mildew resistance gene identified in common wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Powdery mildew is a major fungal disease in wheat, especially in cool maritime climates. A novel Aegilops tauschii derived wheat powdery mildew resistance gene present in the germplasm line NC96BGTD1 was genetically characterized as a monogenic trait in field trials using F2 and F4-derived lines fr...

  12. Gene Space Dynamics during the Evolution of Aegilops tauschii, Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa, and Sorghum bicolor Genomes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nine different regions totaling 9.7 Mb of the 4.02 Gb Aegilops tauschii genome were sequenced using the Sanger sequencing technology and compared with orthologous Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa (rice) and Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) genomic sequences. The ancestral gene content in these regio...

  13. Identification and Analysis of RNA Editing Sites in the Chloroplast Transcripts of Aegilops tauschii L.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengxing; Liu, Hui; Ge, Lingqiao; Xing, Guangwei; Wang, Meng; Weining, Song; Nie, Xiaojun

    2016-12-30

    RNA editing is an important way to convert cytidine (C) to uridine (U) at specific sites within RNA molecules at a post-transcriptional level in the chloroplasts of higher plants. Although it has been systematically studied in many plants, little is known about RNA editing in the wheat D genome donor Aegilops tauschii L. Here, we investigated the chloroplast RNA editing of Ae. tauschii and compared it with other wheat relatives to trace the evolution of wheat. Through bioinformatics prediction, a total of 34 C-to-U editing sites were identified, 17 of which were validated using RT-PCR product sequencing. Furthermore, 60 sites were found by the RNA-Seq read mapping approach, 24 of which agreed with the prediction and six were validated experimentally. The editing sites were biased toward tCn or nCa trinucleotides and 5'-pyrimidines, which were consistent with the flanking bases of editing sites of other seed plants. Furthermore, the editing events could result in the alteration of the secondary structures and topologies of the corresponding proteins, suggesting that RNA editing might impact the function of target genes. Finally, comparative analysis found some evolutionarily conserved editing sites in wheat and two species-specific sites were also obtained. This study is the first to report on RNA editing in Aegilops tauschii L, which not only sheds light on the evolution of wheat from the point of view of RNA editing, but also lays a foundation for further studies to identify the mechanisms of C-to-U alterations.

  14. Identification and Analysis of RNA Editing Sites in the Chloroplast Transcripts of Aegilops tauschii L.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengxing; Liu, Hui; Ge, Lingqiao; Xing, Guangwei; Wang, Meng; Weining, Song; Nie, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing is an important way to convert cytidine (C) to uridine (U) at specific sites within RNA molecules at a post-transcriptional level in the chloroplasts of higher plants. Although it has been systematically studied in many plants, little is known about RNA editing in the wheat D genome donor Aegilops tauschii L. Here, we investigated the chloroplast RNA editing of Ae. tauschii and compared it with other wheat relatives to trace the evolution of wheat. Through bioinformatics prediction, a total of 34 C-to-U editing sites were identified, 17 of which were validated using RT-PCR product sequencing. Furthermore, 60 sites were found by the RNA-Seq read mapping approach, 24 of which agreed with the prediction and six were validated experimentally. The editing sites were biased toward tCn or nCa trinucleotides and 5′-pyrimidines, which were consistent with the flanking bases of editing sites of other seed plants. Furthermore, the editing events could result in the alteration of the secondary structures and topologies of the corresponding proteins, suggesting that RNA editing might impact the function of target genes. Finally, comparative analysis found some evolutionarily conserved editing sites in wheat and two species-specific sites were also obtained. This study is the first to report on RNA editing in Aegilops tauschii L, which not only sheds light on the evolution of wheat from the point of view of RNA editing, but also lays a foundation for further studies to identify the mechanisms of C-to-U alterations. PMID:28042823

  15. A 4-gigabase physical map unlocks the structure and evolution of the complex genome of Aegilops tauschii, the wheat D-genome progenitor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The current limitations in genome sequencing technology require the construction of physical maps for high-quality draft sequences of large plant genomes, such as that of Aegilops tauschii, the wheat D-genome progenitor. To construct a physical map of the Ae. tauschii genome, we fingerprinted 461,70...

  16. Fine mapping of shattering locus Br2 reveals a putative chromosomal inversion polymorphism between the two lineages of Aegilops tauschii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengzhi; Zhu, Huilan; Gill, Bikram S; Li, Wanlong

    2015-04-01

    This work laid the foundation for cloning of shattering gene Br2 and provided first line of evidence that two major Aegilops tauschii lineages are differentiated by an inversion polymorphism. Chromosome inversions often accompany population differentiation and capture local adaptation during speciation. Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome donor species of hexaploid wheat, consists of two genetically isolated lineages, L1 and L2, but little is known about the genetic mechanisms underlying the population differentiation in this diploid species. During fine mapping of the shattering gene Br2 using a large F2 population derived from a cross between TA1604 (an L1 accession) and AL8/78 (an L2 accession), we found contrasting patterns of crossover distribution in the Br2 interval and neighboring regions despite the high local gene synteny with Brachypodium distachyon and rice. Br2 was localized in a 0.08-cM interval, and 13 marker loci formed a block, where single-crossovers were completely suppressed, but double-crossovers were enriched with a recombination rate of ~11 cM/Mb. In contrast, in a neighboring region no double-crossover was recovered, but single-crossover rate reached 24 cM/Mb, which is much higher than the genome-wide average. This result suggests a putative inversion polymorphism between the parental lines in the Br2 region. Genotyping using the markers from the Br2 region divided a collection of 55 randomly sampled A. tauschii accessions into two major groups, and they are largely genetically isolated. The two groups correspond to the L1 and L2 lineages based on their geographic distribution patterns. This provides first evidence that inversions may underlie the evolution of A. tauschii lineages. The presence of inter-lineage inversions may complicate map-based cloning in A. tauschii and transfer of useful traits to wheat.

  17. Sequencing chromosome 5D of Aegilops tauschii and comparison with its allopolyploid descendant bread wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Bala A; Lucas, Stuart J; Vrána, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav; Budak, Hikmet

    2015-08-01

    Flow cytometric sorting of individual chromosomes and chromosome-based sequencing reduces the complexity of large, repetitive Triticeae genomes. We flow-sorted chromosome 5D of Aegilops tauschii, the D genome donor of bread wheat and sequenced it by Roche 454 GS FLX platform to approximately 2.2x coverage. Repetitive sequences represent 81.09% of the survey sequences of this chromosome, and Class I retroelements are the prominent type, with a particular abundance of LTR/Gypsy superfamily. Nonrepetitive sequences were assembled to cover 17.76% of the total chromosome regions. Up to 6188 nonrepetitive gene loci were predicted to be encoded by the 5D chromosome. The numbers and chromosomal distribution patterns of tRNA genes suggest abundance in tRNA(L) (ys) and tRNA(M) (et) species, while the nonrepetitive assembly reveals tRNA(A) (la) species as the most abundant type. A comparative analysis of the genomic sequences of bread wheat and Aegilops chromosome 5D indicates conservation of gene content. Orthologous unique genes, matching Aegilops 5D sequences, numbered 3730 in barley, 5063 in Brachypodium, 4872 in sorghum and 4209 in rice. In this study, we provide a chromosome-specific view into the structure and organization of the 5D chromosome of Ae. tauschii, the D genome ancestor of bread wheat. This study contributes to our understanding of the chromosome-level evolution of the wheat genome and presents a valuable resource in wheat genomics due to the recent hybridization of Ae. tauschii genome with its tetraploid ancestor.

  18. Chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite analysis of Aegilops cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Harish T; Vales, M Isabel; Watson, Christy J W; Mallory-Smith, Carol A; Mori, Naoki; Rehman, Maqsood; Zemetra, Robert S; Riera-Lizarazu, Oscar

    2005-08-01

    Aegilops cylindrica Host (2n = 4x = 28, genome CCDD) is an allotetraploid formed by hybridization between the diploid species Ae. tauschii Coss. (2n = 2x = 14, genome DD) and Ae. markgrafii (Greuter) Hammer (2n = 2x = 14, genome CC). Previous research has shown that Ae. tauschii contributed its cytoplasm to Ae. cylindrica. However, our analysis with chloroplast microsatellite markers showed that 1 of the 36 Ae. cylindrica accessions studied, TK 116 (PI 486249), had a plastome derived from Ae. markgrafii rather than Ae. tauschii. Thus, Ae. markgrafii has also contributed its cytoplasm to Ae. cylindrica. Our analysis of chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite markers also suggests that D-type plastome and the D genome in Ae. cylindrica were closely related to, and were probably derived from, the tauschii gene pool of Ae. tauschii. A determination of the likely source of the C genome and the C-type plastome in Ae. cylindrica was not possible.

  19. Physical mapping of a large plant genome using global high-information-content-fingerprinting: the distal region of the wheat ancestor Aegilops tauschii chromosome 3DS.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Physical maps employing libraries of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones are essential for comparative genomics and sequencing of large and repetitive genomes such as those of the hexaploid bread wheat. The diploid ancestor of wheat genome, Aegilops tauschii, is used as a resource for wheat...

  20. Simultaneous transfer, introgression and genomic localization of genes for resistance to stem rust race TTKSK Ug99 from Aegilops tauschii to wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat production is currently threatened by widely virulent races of the wheat stem rust fungus, Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, that are part of the TTKSK (also known as ‘Ug99’) race group. The diploid D genome donor species Aegilops tauschii (2n=2x=14, DD) is a readily accessible source of resis...

  1. Gene Space Dynamics During the Evolution of Aegilops tauschii, Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa, and Sorghum bicolor Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Massa, A. N.; Wanjugi, H.; Deal, K. R.; O'Brien, K.; You, F. M.; Maiti, R.; Chan, A. P.; Gu, Y. Q.; Luo, M. C.; Anderson, O. D.; Rabinowicz, P. D.; Dvorak, J.; Devos, K. M.

    2011-01-01

    Nine different regions totaling 9.7 Mb of the 4.02 Gb Aegilops tauschii genome were sequenced using the Sanger sequencing technology and compared with orthologous Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa (rice), and Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) genomic sequences. The ancestral gene content in these regions was inferred and used to estimate gene deletion and gene duplication rates along each branch of the phylogenetic tree relating the four species. The total gene number in the extant Ae. tauschii genome was estimated to be 36,371. The gene deletion and gene duplication rates and total gene numbers in the four genomes were used to estimate the total gene number in each node of the phylogenetic tree. The common ancestor of the Brachypodieae and Triticeae lineages was estimated to have had 28,558 genes, and the common ancestor of the Panicoideae, Ehrhartoideae, and Pooideae subfamilies was estimated to have had 27,152 or 28,350 genes, depending on the ancestral gene scenario. Relative to the Brachypodieae and Triticeae common ancestor, the gene number was reduced in B. distachyon by 3,026 genes and increased in Ae. tauschii by 7,813 genes. The sum of gene deletion and gene duplication rates, which reflects the rate of gene synteny loss, was correlated with the rate of structural chromosome rearrangements and was highest in the Ae. tauschii lineage and lowest in the rice lineage. The high rate of gene space evolution in the Ae. tauschii lineage accounts for the fact that, contrary to the expectations, the level of synteny between the phylogenetically more related Ae. tauschii and B. distachyon genomes is similar to the level of synteny between the Ae. tauschii genome and the genomes of the less related rice and sorghum. The ratio of gene duplication to gene deletion rates in these four grass species closely parallels both the total number of genes in a species and the overall genome size. Because the overall genome size is to a large extent a function of the repeated

  2. Gene space dynamics during the evolution of Aegilops tauschii, Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa, and Sorghum bicolor genomes.

    PubMed

    Massa, A N; Wanjugi, H; Deal, K R; O'Brien, K; You, F M; Maiti, R; Chan, A P; Gu, Y Q; Luo, M C; Anderson, O D; Rabinowicz, P D; Dvorak, J; Devos, K M

    2011-09-01

    Nine different regions totaling 9.7 Mb of the 4.02 Gb Aegilops tauschii genome were sequenced using the Sanger sequencing technology and compared with orthologous Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa (rice), and Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) genomic sequences. The ancestral gene content in these regions was inferred and used to estimate gene deletion and gene duplication rates along each branch of the phylogenetic tree relating the four species. The total gene number in the extant Ae. tauschii genome was estimated to be 36,371. The gene deletion and gene duplication rates and total gene numbers in the four genomes were used to estimate the total gene number in each node of the phylogenetic tree. The common ancestor of the Brachypodieae and Triticeae lineages was estimated to have had 28,558 genes, and the common ancestor of the Panicoideae, Ehrhartoideae, and Pooideae subfamilies was estimated to have had 27,152 or 28,350 genes, depending on the ancestral gene scenario. Relative to the Brachypodieae and Triticeae common ancestor, the gene number was reduced in B. distachyon by 3,026 genes and increased in Ae. tauschii by 7,813 genes. The sum of gene deletion and gene duplication rates, which reflects the rate of gene synteny loss, was correlated with the rate of structural chromosome rearrangements and was highest in the Ae. tauschii lineage and lowest in the rice lineage. The high rate of gene space evolution in the Ae. tauschii lineage accounts for the fact that, contrary to the expectations, the level of synteny between the phylogenetically more related Ae. tauschii and B. distachyon genomes is similar to the level of synteny between the Ae. tauschii genome and the genomes of the less related rice and sorghum. The ratio of gene duplication to gene deletion rates in these four grass species closely parallels both the total number of genes in a species and the overall genome size. Because the overall genome size is to a large extent a function of the repeated

  3. The sugary-type isoamylase gene from rice and Aegilops tauschii: characterization and comparison with maize and arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rahman, S; Nakamura, Y; Li, Z; Clarke, B; Fujita, N; Mukai, Y; Yamamoto, M; Regina, A; Tan, Z; Kawasaki, S; Morell, M

    2003-06-01

    Genes for an isoamylase-like debranching enzyme have been isolated from rice and Aegilops tauschii, the donor of the D genome to wheat. The structures of the genes are very similar to each other and to the maize SU1 isoamylase gene and consist of 18 exons spread over approximately 7.5 kb. Southern analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization showed the Ae. tauschii gene to be located in the proximal region of the short arm of chromosome 7D, thus showing synteny with the localization of the rice isoamylase gene on rice chromosome 8. Analysis of the expression pattern of wheat sugary isoamylase genes indicates that they are strongly expressed in the developing endosperm 6 days after flowering. Three distinct Sugary-type cDNA sequences were isolated from the wheat endosperm that are likely to correspond to the products of the three genomes. The deduced amino acid sequence of rice and wheat Sugary-type isoamylase is compared with other sequences available in the database and the results demonstrate that there are three types of isoamylase sequences in plants: those containing 18 exons (the Sugary-type isoamylase gene), those containing 21 exons, and those containing only 1 exon. It is possible that different combinations of isoamylase genes are expressed in different tissues.

  4. Quantitative trait locus analysis for spikelet shape-related traits in wild wheat progenitor Aegilops tauschii: Implications for intraspecific diversification and subspecies differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Hitoshi; Takumi, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    Wild diploid wheat Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome progenitor of common wheat, carries large genetic variation in spikelet and grain morphology. Two differentiated subspecies of Ae. tauschii, subspecies tauschii and strangulata, have been traditionally defined based on differences in spikelet morphology. Here, we first assessed six spikelet shape-related traits among 199 Ae. tauschii accessions, and found that the accessions belonging to TauL1major lineage produced significantly longer spikes, higher spikelet density, and shorter, narrower spikelets than another major lineage, TauL2, in which the strangulata accessions are included. Next, we performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of the spikelet and grain shape using three mapping populations derived from interlineage crosses between TauL1 and TauL2 to identify the genetic loci for the morphological variations of the spikelet and grain shape in Ae. tauschii. Three major QTL regions for the examined traits were detected on chromosomes 3D, 4D and 7D. The 3D and 4D QTL regions for several spikelet shape-related traits were conserved in the three mapping populations, which indicated that the 3D and 4D QTLs contribute to divergence of the two major lineages. The 7D QTLs were found only in a mapping population from a cross of the two subspecies, suggesting that these 7D QTLs may be closely related to subspecies differentiation in Ae. tauschii. Thus, QTL analysis for spikelet and grain morphology may provide useful information to elucidate the evolutionary processes of intraspecific differentiation. PMID:28264068

  5. Quantitative trait locus analysis for spikelet shape-related traits in wild wheat progenitor Aegilops tauschii: Implications for intraspecific diversification and subspecies differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Ryo; Okamoto, Yuki; Hatano, Hitoshi; Takumi, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    Wild diploid wheat Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome progenitor of common wheat, carries large genetic variation in spikelet and grain morphology. Two differentiated subspecies of Ae. tauschii, subspecies tauschii and strangulata, have been traditionally defined based on differences in spikelet morphology. Here, we first assessed six spikelet shape-related traits among 199 Ae. tauschii accessions, and found that the accessions belonging to TauL1major lineage produced significantly longer spikes, higher spikelet density, and shorter, narrower spikelets than another major lineage, TauL2, in which the strangulata accessions are included. Next, we performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of the spikelet and grain shape using three mapping populations derived from interlineage crosses between TauL1 and TauL2 to identify the genetic loci for the morphological variations of the spikelet and grain shape in Ae. tauschii. Three major QTL regions for the examined traits were detected on chromosomes 3D, 4D and 7D. The 3D and 4D QTL regions for several spikelet shape-related traits were conserved in the three mapping populations, which indicated that the 3D and 4D QTLs contribute to divergence of the two major lineages. The 7D QTLs were found only in a mapping population from a cross of the two subspecies, suggesting that these 7D QTLs may be closely related to subspecies differentiation in Ae. tauschii. Thus, QTL analysis for spikelet and grain morphology may provide useful information to elucidate the evolutionary processes of intraspecific differentiation.

  6. Fine mapping of Hch1, the causal D-genome gene for hybrid chlorosis in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Kana; Nishijima, Ryo; Sakaguchi, Kohei; Takumi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid chlorosis, one of the reproductive barriers between tetraploid wheat and its D-genome progenitor, Aegilops tauschii, inhibits normal growth of synthetic wheat hexaploids. Hybrid chlorosis appears to be due to an epistatic interaction of two loci from the AB and D wheat genomes. Our previous study assigned the causal D-genome gene for hybrid chlorosis, Hch1, to the short arm of chromosome 7D. Here, we constructed a fine map of 7DS near Hch1 using 280 F2 individuals from a cross of two wheat synthetic lines, one showing normal growth and the other showing hybrid chlorosis. The hybrid chlorosis phenotype was controlled by a single dominant allele of the Hch1 locus in the synthetic hexaploids. Hch1 was closely linked to four new markers within 0.2 cM, and may be localized near or within the two Ae. tauschii scaffolds containing the linked markers on 7DS. Comparative analysis of the Hch1 chromosomal region for Ae. tauschii, barley and Brachypodium showed that a local inversion occurred in the region proximal to Hch1 during the divergence between barley and Ae. tauschii, and that the Hch1 region on wheat 7DS is syntenic to Brachypodium chromosome 1. These observations provide useful information for further studies toward map-based cloning of Hch1.

  7. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of a novel glutenin gene (Dy10.1t) from Aegilops tauschii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanzhen; Li, Qiaoyun; Yan, Yueming; Zheng, Jigang; An, Xueli; Xiao, Yinghua; Wang, Aili; Pei, Yuhe; Wang, Haibo; Hsam, Sai L K; Zeller, Friedrich J

    2006-07-01

    A novel y-type high molecular mass glutenin subunit (HMM-GS) possessing a mobility that is slightly slower than that of the subunit Dy10 obtained by SDS-PAGE, named Dy10.1t, in the wild wheat Aegilops tauschii was identified by 1- and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The gene encoding the HMM subunit Dy10.1t was amplified with allele-specific PCR primers, and the amplified products were cloned and sequenced. The coding domain of the Dy10.1t subunit gene consisted of 1980 bp encoding a protein of 658 residues with an M rs of 68 611 Da, which was similar to the M rs determined by MALDI-TOF-MS. The deduced amino acid sequence indicated that Dy10.1t subunit displayed a greater similarity to the Dy12 subunit, differing by only 8 amino acid substitutions. Six coding region single-nucleotide polymorphisms were discovered in the Dy10.1t gene by multiple alignments (1 per 330 bp), 1 in the N-terminal domain and the others in the central repeats. Five of them resulted in residue substitutions, whereas 3 created enzyme site changes. The homology and neighbour-joining trees constructed from code domain sequences of 20 x- and y-type glutenin genes from different Triticum species separated into 2 halves, which corresponded to the x-type and y-type HMM glutenin alleles. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Glu-1 gene duplication event probably occurred at about 16.83 million years ago, whereas the divergence times of A, B, and D genomes within x-type and y-type halves were before 7.047 and 10.54 million years ago, respectively.

  8. Inheritance and molecular mapping of new green bug resistance genes in wheat germ plasms derived from Aegilops tauschii.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L C; Smith, C M; Fritz, A; Boyko, E; Voothuluru, P; Gill, B S

    2005-09-01

    Molecular mapping of genes for crop resistance to the green bug, Schizaphis graminum Rondani, will facilitate selection of green bug resistance in breeding through marker-assisted selection and provide information for map-based gene cloning. In the present study, microsatellite marker and deletion line analyses were used to map green bug resistance genes in five newly identified wheat germ plasms derived from Aegilops tauschii. Our results indicate that the Gb genes in these germ plasms are inherited as single dominant traits. Microsatellite markers X wmc 157 and X gdm 150 flank G bx 1 at 2.7 and 3.3 cM, respectively. Xwmc 671 is proximately linked to G ba, G bb, G bc and G bd at 34.3, 5.4, 13.7, 7.9 cM, respectively. X barc 53 is linked distally to G ba and G bb at 20.7 and 20.2 cM, respectively. X gdm 150 is distal to G bc at 17.9 cM, and X wmc 157 is distal to G bd at 1.9 cM. G bx 1, G ba, G bb, G bc, G bd and the previously characterized G bz are located in the distal 18% region of wheat chromosome 7 DL. G bd appears to be a new green bug resistance gene different from G bx 1 or G bz. G bx 1, G bz G ba, G bb, G bc and G bd are either allelic or linked to Gb 3.

  9. Characterization of morphology and resistance to Blumeria graminis of winter triticale monosomic addition lines with chromosome 2D of Aegilops tauschii.

    PubMed

    Majka, M; Kwiatek, M; Belter, J; Wiśniewska, H

    2016-10-01

    Allocation of the chromosome 2D of Ae. tauschii in triticale background resulted in changes of its organization, what is related to varied expression of genes determining agronomically important traits. Monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs) are crucial for transfer of genes from wild relatives into cultivated varieties. This kind of genetic stocks is used for physical mapping of specific chromosomes and analyzing alien genes expression. The main aim of our study is to improve hexaploid triticale by transferring D-genome chromatin from Aegilops tauschii × Secale cereale (2n = 4x = 28, DDRR). In this paper, we demonstrate the molecular cytogenetics analysis and SSR markers screening combined with phenotype analysis and evaluation of powdery mildew infection of triticale monosomic addition lines carrying chromosome 2D of Ae. tauschii. We confirmed the inheritance of chromosome 2D from the BC2F4 to the BC2F6 generation of triticale hybrids. Moreover, we unveiled a high variable region on the short arm of chromosome 2D, where chromosome rearrangements were mapped. These events had direct influence on plant height of hybrids what might be connected with changes at Rht8 loci. We obtained 20 semi-dwarf plants of BC2F6 generation carrying 2D chromosome with the powdery mildew resistance, without changes in spike morphology, which can be used in the triticale breeding programs.

  10. Physical mapping resources for large plant genomes: radiation hybrids for wheat D-genome progenitor Aegilops tauschii

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Development of a high quality reference sequence is a daunting task in crops like wheat with large (~17Gb), highly repetitive (>80%) and polyploid genome. To achieve complete sequence assembly of such genomes, development of a high quality physical map is a necessary first step. However, due to the lack of recombination in certain regions of the chromosomes, genetic mapping, which uses recombination frequency to map marker loci, alone is not sufficient to develop high quality marker scaffolds for a sequence ready physical map. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping, which uses radiation induced chromosomal breaks, has proven to be a successful approach for developing marker scaffolds for sequence assembly in animal systems. Here, the development and characterization of a RH panel for the mapping of D-genome of wheat progenitor Aegilops tauschii is reported. Results Radiation dosages of 350 and 450 Gy were optimized for seed irradiation of a synthetic hexaploid (AABBDD) wheat with the D-genome of Ae. tauschii accession AL8/78. The surviving plants after irradiation were crossed to durum wheat (AABB), to produce pentaploid RH1s (AABBD), which allows the simultaneous mapping of the whole D-genome. A panel of 1,510 RH1 plants was obtained, of which 592 plants were generated from the mature RH1 seeds, and 918 plants were rescued through embryo culture due to poor germination (<3%) of mature RH1 seeds. This panel showed a homogenous marker loss (2.1%) after screening with SSR markers uniformly covering all the D-genome chromosomes. Different marker systems mostly detected different lines with deletions. Using markers covering known distances, the mapping resolution of this RH panel was estimated to be <140kb. Analysis of only 16 RH lines carrying deletions on chromosome 2D resulted in a physical map with cM/cR ratio of 1:5.2 and 15 distinct bins. Additionally, with this small set of lines, almost all the tested ESTs could be mapped. A set of 399 most informative RH

  11. Physical mapping resources for large plant genomes: radiation hybrids for wheat D-genome progenitor Aegilops tauschii.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Simons, Kristin; Iqbal, Muhammad J; de Jiménez, Monika Michalak; Bassi, Filippo M; Ghavami, Farhad; Al-Azzam, Omar; Drader, Thomas; Wang, Yi; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Gu, Yong Q; Denton, Anne; Lazo, Gerard R; Xu, Steven S; Dvorak, Jan; Kianian, Penny M A; Kianian, Shahryar F

    2012-11-05

    Development of a high quality reference sequence is a daunting task in crops like wheat with large (~17Gb), highly repetitive (>80%) and polyploid genome. To achieve complete sequence assembly of such genomes, development of a high quality physical map is a necessary first step. However, due to the lack of recombination in certain regions of the chromosomes, genetic mapping, which uses recombination frequency to map marker loci, alone is not sufficient to develop high quality marker scaffolds for a sequence ready physical map. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping, which uses radiation induced chromosomal breaks, has proven to be a successful approach for developing marker scaffolds for sequence assembly in animal systems. Here, the development and characterization of a RH panel for the mapping of D-genome of wheat progenitor Aegilops tauschii is reported. Radiation dosages of 350 and 450 Gy were optimized for seed irradiation of a synthetic hexaploid (AABBDD) wheat with the D-genome of Ae. tauschii accession AL8/78. The surviving plants after irradiation were crossed to durum wheat (AABB), to produce pentaploid RH1s (AABBD), which allows the simultaneous mapping of the whole D-genome. A panel of 1,510 RH1 plants was obtained, of which 592 plants were generated from the mature RH1 seeds, and 918 plants were rescued through embryo culture due to poor germination (<3%) of mature RH1 seeds. This panel showed a homogenous marker loss (2.1%) after screening with SSR markers uniformly covering all the D-genome chromosomes. Different marker systems mostly detected different lines with deletions. Using markers covering known distances, the mapping resolution of this RH panel was estimated to be <140kb. Analysis of only 16 RH lines carrying deletions on chromosome 2D resulted in a physical map with cM/cR ratio of 1:5.2 and 15 distinct bins. Additionally, with this small set of lines, almost all the tested ESTs could be mapped. A set of 399 most informative RH lines with an average

  12. Expansion of the gamma-gliadin gene family in Aegilops and Triticum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The gamma-gliadins are considered to be the oldest of the gliadin family of storage proteins in Aegilops/Triticum. However, the expansion of this multigene family has not been studied in an evolutionary perspective. Results We have cloned 59 gamma-gliadin genes from Aegilops and Triticum species (Aegilops caudata L., Aegilops comosa Sm. in Sibth. & Sm., Aegilops mutica Boiss., Aegilops speltoides Tausch, Aegilops tauschii Coss., Aegilops umbellulata Zhuk., Aegilops uniaristata Vis., and Triticum monococcum L.) representing eight different genomes: Am, B/S, C, D, M, N, T and U. Overall, 15% of the sequences contained internal stop codons resulting in pseudogenes, but this percentage was variable among genomes, up to over 50% in Ae. umbellulata. The most common length of the deduced protein, including the signal peptide, was 302 amino acids, but the length varied from 215 to 362 amino acids, both obtained from Ae. speltoides. Most genes encoded proteins with eight cysteines. However, all Aegilops species had genes that encoded a gamma-gliadin protein of 302 amino acids with an additional cysteine. These conserved nine-cysteine gamma-gliadins may perform a specific function, possibly as chain terminators in gluten network formation in protein bodies during endosperm development. A phylogenetic analysis of gamma-gliadins derived from Aegilops and Triticum species and the related genera Lophopyrum, Crithopsis, and Dasypyrum showed six groups of genes. Most Aegilops species contained gamma-gliadin genes from several of these groups, which also included sequences from the genera Lophopyrum, Crithopsis, and Dasypyrum. Hordein and secalin sequences formed separate groups. Conclusions We present a model for the evolution of the gamma-gliadins from which we deduce that the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of Aegilops/Triticum-Dasypyrum-Lophopyrum-Crithopsis already had four groups of gamma-gliadin sequences, presumably the result of two rounds of duplication of

  13. Production of aneuhaploid and euhaploid sporocytes by meiotic restitution in fertile hybrids between durum wheat Langdon chromosome substitution lines and Aegilops tauschii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianquan; Chen, Qijiao; Yuan, Zhongwei; Xiang, Zhiguo; Zheng, Youliang; Liu, Dengcai

    2008-10-01

    Fertile F(1) hybrids were obtained between durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) Langdon (LDN) and its 10 disomic substitution (LDN DS) lines with Aegilops tauschii accession AS60 without embryo rescue. Selfed seedset rates for hybrids of LDN with AS60 were 36.87% and 49.45% in 2005 and 2006, respectively. Similar or higher selfed seedset rates were observed in the hybrids of 1D (1A), 1D (1B), 3D (3A), 4D (4B), 7D (7A), and 2D (2B) with AS60, while lower in hybrids of 3D (3B) + 3BL, 5D (5A) + 5AL, 5D (5B) + 5B and 6D (6B) + 6BS with AS60 compared with the hybrids of LDN with AS60. Observation of male gametogenesis showed that meiotic restitution, both first-division restitution (FDR) and single-division meiosis (SDM) resulted in the formation of functional unreduced gametes, which in turn produced seeds. Both euhaploid and aneuhaploid gametes were produced in F(1) hybrids. This suggested a strategy to simultaneously transfer and locate major genes from the ancestral species T. turgidum or Ae. tauschii. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the aneuhaploid rates between the F(1) hybrids of LDN and LDN DS lines with AS60, suggesting that meiotic pairing between the two D chromosomes in the hybrids of LDN DS lines with AS60 did not promote the formation of aneuhaploid gametes.

  14. Dysfunction of mitotic cell division at shoot apices triggered severe growth abortion in interspecific hybrids between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Hitoshi; Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Matsuda, Ryusuke; Shitsukawa, Naoki; Park, Pyoyun; Takumi, Shigeo

    2012-06-01

    Common wheat is an allohexaploid species, derived through endoreduplication of an interspecific triploid hybrid produced from a cross between cultivated tetraploid wheat and the wild diploid relative Aegilops tauschii. Hybrid incompatibilities, including hybrid necrosis, have been observed in triploid wheat hybrids. A limited number of A. tauschii accessions show hybrid lethality in triploid hybrids crossed with tetraploid wheat as a result of developmental arrest at the early seedling stage, which is termed severe growth abortion (SGA). Despite the potential severity of this condition, the genetic mechanisms underlying SGA are not well understood. Here, we conducted comparative analyses of gene expression profiles in crown tissues to characterize developmental arrest in triploid hybrids displaying SGA. A number of defense-related genes were highly up-regulated, whereas many transcription factor genes, such as the KNOTTED1-type homeobox gene, which function in shoot apical meristem (SAM) and leaf primordia, were down-regulated in the crown tissues of SGA plants. Transcript accumulation levels of cell cycle-related genes were also markedly reduced in SGA plants, and no histone H4-expressing cells were observed in the SAM of SGA hybrid plants. Our findings demonstrate that SGA shows unique features among other types of abnormal growth phenotypes, such as type II and III necrosis.

  15. Fine mapping and genetic association analysis of Net2, the causative D-genome locus of low temperature-induced hybrid necrosis in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Kouhei; Nishijima, Ryo; Iehisa, Julio Cesar Masaru; Takumi, Shigeo

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid necrosis has been observed in many interspecific hybrids from crosses between tetraploid wheat and the wheat D-genome donor Aegilops tauschii. Type II necrosis is a kind of hybrid incompatibility that is specifically characterized by low-temperature induction and growth suppression. Two complementary genes, Net1 on the AB genome and Net2 on the D genome, putatively control type II necrosis in ABD triploids and synthetic hexaploid wheat. Toward map-based cloning of Net2, a fine map around the Net2 region on 2DS was constructed in this study. Using the draft genome sequence of Ae. tauschii and the physical map of the barley genome, the Net2 locus was mapped within a 0.6 cM interval between two closely linked markers. Although local chromosomal rearrangements were observed in the Net2-corresponding region between the barley/Brachypodium and Ae. tauschii genomes, the two closely linked markers were significantly associated with type II necrosis in Ae. tauschii. These results suggest that these markers will aid efficient selection of Net2 non-carrier individuals from the Ae. tauschii population and intraspecific progeny, and could help with introgression of agriculturally important genes from Ae. tauschii to common wheat.

  16. Sequencing and comparative analyses of Aegilops tauschii chromosome arm 3DS revealed rapid evolution of Triticeae genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD) is an allohexaploid species derived from multiple rounds of interspecific hybridizations. A high-quality genome assembly of diploid Ae. tauschii, the donor of the wheat D genome, will provide a useful platform to study polyploid wheat evolution. A combination...

  17. Annotation-based genome-wide SNP discovery in the large and complex Aegilops tauschii genome using next-generation sequencing without a reference genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many plants have large and complex genomes with an abundance of repeated sequences. Many plants are also polyploid. Both of these attributes typify the genome architecture in the tribe Triticeae, whose members include economically important wheat, rye and barley. Large genome sizes, an abundance of repeated sequences, and polyploidy present challenges to genome-wide SNP discovery using next-generation sequencing (NGS) of total genomic DNA by making alignment and clustering of short reads generated by the NGS platforms difficult, particularly in the absence of a reference genome sequence. Results An annotation-based, genome-wide SNP discovery pipeline is reported using NGS data for large and complex genomes without a reference genome sequence. Roche 454 shotgun reads with low genome coverage of one genotype are annotated in order to distinguish single-copy sequences and repeat junctions from repetitive sequences and sequences shared by paralogous genes. Multiple genome equivalents of shotgun reads of another genotype generated with SOLiD or Solexa are then mapped to the annotated Roche 454 reads to identify putative SNPs. A pipeline program package, AGSNP, was developed and used for genome-wide SNP discovery in Aegilops tauschii-the diploid source of the wheat D genome, and with a genome size of 4.02 Gb, of which 90% is repetitive sequences. Genomic DNA of Ae. tauschii accession AL8/78 was sequenced with the Roche 454 NGS platform. Genomic DNA and cDNA of Ae. tauschii accession AS75 was sequenced primarily with SOLiD, although some Solexa and Roche 454 genomic sequences were also generated. A total of 195,631 putative SNPs were discovered in gene sequences, 155,580 putative SNPs were discovered in uncharacterized single-copy regions, and another 145,907 putative SNPs were discovered in repeat junctions. These SNPs were dispersed across the entire Ae. tauschii genome. To assess the false positive SNP discovery rate, DNA containing putative SNPs was

  18. Accelerated Senescence and Enhanced Disease Resistance in Hybrid Chlorosis Lines Derived from Interspecific Crosses between Tetraploid Wheat and Aegilops tauschii

    PubMed Central

    Tosa, Yukio; Yoshida, Kentaro; Park, Pyoyun; Takumi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid chlorosis, a type of hybrid incompatibility, has frequently been reported in inter- and intraspecific crosses of allopolyploid wheat. In a previous study, we reported some types of growth abnormalities such as hybrid necrosis and observed hybrid chlorosis with mild or severe abnormalities in wheat triploids obtained in crosses between tetraploid wheat cultivar Langdon and four Ae. tauschii accessions and in their derived synthetic hexaploids. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying hybrid chlorosis are not well understood. Here, we compared cytology and gene expression in leaves to characterize the abnormal growth in wheat synthetics showing mild and severe chlorosis. In addition, we compared disease resistance to wheat blast fungus. In total 55 and 105 genes related to carbohydrate metabolism and 53 and 89 genes for defense responses were markedly up-regulated in the mild and severe chlorosis lines, respectively. Abnormal chloroplasts formed in the mesophyll cells before the leaves yellowed in the hybrid chlorosis lines. The plants with mild chlorosis showed increased resistance to wheat blast and powdery mildew fungi, although significant differences only in two, third internode length and maturation time, out of the examined agricultural traits were found between the wild type and plants showing mild chlorosis. These observations suggest that senescence might be accelerated in hybrid chlorosis lines of wheat synthetics. Moreover, in wheat synthetics showing mild chlorosis, the negative effects on biomass can be minimized, and they may show substantial fitness under pathogen-polluted conditions. PMID:25806790

  19. Molecular characterization of the celiac disease epitope domains in α-gliadin genes in Aegilops tauschii and hexaploid wheats (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhenze; Wang, Congyan; Wang, Ke; Wang, Shunli; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhao; Ma, Wujun; Yan, Yueming

    2010-11-01

    Nineteen novel full-ORF α-gliadin genes and 32 pseudogenes containing at least one stop codon were cloned and sequenced from three Aegilops tauschii accessions (T15, T43 and T26) and two bread wheat cultivars (Gaocheng 8901 and Zhongyou 9507). Analysis of three typical α-gliadin genes (Gli-At4, Gli-G1 and Gli-Z4) revealed some InDels and a considerable number of SNPs among them. Most of the pseudogenes were resulted from C to T change, leading to the generation of TAG or TAA in-frame stop codon. The putative proteins of both Gli-At3 and Gli-Z7 genes contained an extra cysteine residue in the unique domain II. Analysis of toxic epitodes among 19 deduced α-gliadins demonstrated that 14 of these contained 1-5 T cell stimulatory toxic epitopes while the other 5 did not contain any toxic epitopes. The glutamine residues in two specific ployglutamine domains ranged from 7 to 27, indicating a high variation in length. According to the numbers of 4 T cell stimulatory toxic epitopes and glutamine residues in the two ployglutamine domains among the 19 α-gliadin genes, 2 were assigned to chromosome 6A, 5 to chromosome 6B and 12 to chromosome 6D. These results were consistent with those from wheat cv. Chinese Spring nulli-tetrasomic and phylogenetic analysis. Secondary structure prediction showed that all α-gliadins had high content of β-strands and most of the α-helixes and β-strands were present in two unique domains. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that α-gliadin genes had a high homology with γ-gliadin, B-hordein, and LMW-GS genes and they diverged at approximate 39 MYA. Finally, the five α-gliadin genes were successfully expressed in E. coli, and their expression amount reached to the maximum after 4 h induced by IPTG, indicating that the α-gliadin genes can express in a high level under the control of T(7) promoter.

  20. Radiation hybrid maps of the D-genome of Aegilops tauschii and their application in sequence assembly of large and complex plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Seetan, Raed; Mergoum, Mohamed; Tiwari, Vijay K; Iqbal, Muhammad J; Wang, Yi; Al-Azzam, Omar; Šimková, Hana; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Dvorak, Jan; Gu, Yong Q; Denton, Anne; Kilian, Andrzej; Lazo, Gerard R; Kianian, Shahryar F

    2015-10-16

    The large and complex genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L., ~17 Gb) requires high resolution genome maps with saturated marker scaffolds to anchor and orient BAC contigs/ sequence scaffolds for whole genome assembly. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping has proven to be an excellent tool for the development of such maps for it offers much higher and more uniform marker resolution across the length of the chromosome compared to genetic mapping and does not require marker polymorphism per se, as it is based on presence (retention) vs. absence (deletion) marker assay. In this study, a 178 line RH panel was genotyped with SSRs and DArT markers to develop the first high resolution RH maps of the entire D-genome of Ae. tauschii accession AL8/78. To confirm map order accuracy, the AL8/78-RH maps were compared with:1) a DArT consensus genetic map constructed using more than 100 bi-parental populations, 2) a RH map of the D-genome of reference hexaploid wheat 'Chinese Spring', and 3) two SNP-based genetic maps, one with anchored D-genome BAC contigs and another with anchored D-genome sequence scaffolds. Using marker sequences, the RH maps were also anchored with a BAC contig based physical map and draft sequence of the D-genome of Ae. tauschii. A total of 609 markers were mapped to 503 unique positions on the seven D-genome chromosomes, with a total map length of 14,706.7 cR. The average distance between any two marker loci was 29.2 cR which corresponds to 2.1 cM or 9.8 Mb. The average mapping resolution across the D-genome was estimated to be 0.34 Mb (Mb/cR) or 0.07 cM (cM/cR). The RH maps showed almost perfect agreement with several published maps with regard to chromosome assignments of markers. The mean rank correlations between the position of markers on AL8/78 maps and the four published maps, ranged from 0.75 to 0.92, suggesting a good agreement in marker order. With 609 mapped markers, a total of 2481 deletions for the whole D-genome were detected with an average

  1. Genetic structure of Aegilops cylindrica Host in its native range and in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Harish T; Vales, M Isabel; Mallory-Smith, Carol; Riera-Lizarazu, Oscar

    2009-10-01

    Chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite markers were used to study genetic diversity and genetic structure of Aegilops cylindrica Host collected in its native range and in adventive sites in the USA. Our analysis suggests that Ae. cylindrica, an allotetraploid, arose from multiple hybridizations between Ae. markgrafii (Greuter) Hammer. and Ae. tauschii Coss. presumably along the Fertile Crescent, where the geographic distributions of its diploid progenitors overlap. However, the center of genetic diversity of this species now encompasses a larger area including northern Iraq, eastern Turkey, and Transcaucasia. Although the majority of accessions of Ae. cylindrica (87%) had D-type plastomes derived from Ae. tauschii, accessions with C-type plastomes (13%), derived from Ae. markgrafii, were also observed. This corroborates a previous study suggesting the dimaternal origin of Ae. cylindrica. Model-based and genetic distance-based clustering using both chloroplast and nuclear markers indicated that Ae. tauschii ssp. tauschii contributed one of its D-type plastomes and its D genome to Ae. cylindrica. Analysis of genetic structure using nuclear markers suggested that Ae. cylindrica accessions could be grouped into three subpopulations (arbitrarily named N-K1, N-K2, and N-K3). Members of the N-K1 subpopulation were the most numerous in its native range and members of the N-K2 subpopulation were the most common in the USA. Our analysis also indicated that Ae. cylindrica accessions in the USA were derived from a few founder genotypes. The frequency of Ae. cylindrica accessions with the C-type plastome in the USA (approximately 24%) was substantially higher than in its native range of distribution (approximately 3%) and all C-type Ae. cylindrica in the USA except one belonged to subpopulation N-K2. The high frequency of the C-type plastome in the USA may reflect a favorable nucleo-cytoplasmic combination.

  2. Novel x-type high-molecular-weight glutenin genes from Aegilops tauschii and their implications on the wheat origin and evolution mechanism of Glu-D1-1 proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanzhen; Li, Xiaohui; Wang, Aili; An, Xueli; Zhang, Qian; Pei, Yuhe; Gao, Liyan; Ma, Wujun; Appels, Rudi; Yan, Yueming

    2008-01-01

    Two new x-type high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits with similar size to 1Dx5, designated 1Dx5*t and 1Dx5.1*t in Aegilops tauschii, were identified by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, and MALDI-TOF-MS. The coding sequences were isolated by AS-PCR and the complete ORFs were obtained. Allele 1Dx5*t consists of 2481 bp encoding a mature protein of 827 residues with deduced Mr of 85,782 Da whereas 1Dx5.1*t comprises 2526 bp encoding 842 residues with Mr of 87,663 Da. The deduced Mr's of both genes were consistent with those determined by MALDI-TOF-MS. Molecular structure analysis showed that the repeat motifs of 1Dx5*t were correspondingly closer to the consensus compared to 1Dx5.1*t and 1Dx5 subunits. A total of 11 SNPs (3 in 1Dx5*t and 8 in 1Dx5.1*t) and two indels in 1Dx5*t were identified, among which 8 SNPs were due to C-T or A-G transitions (an average of 73%). Expression of the cloned ORFs and N-terminal sequencing confirmed the authenticities of the two genes. Interestingly, several hybrid clones of 1Dx5*t expressed a slightly smaller protein relative to the authentic subunit present in seed proteins; this was confirmed to result from a deletion of 180 bp through illegitimate recombination as well as an in-frame stop codon. Network analysis demonstrated that 1Dx5*t, 1Dx2t, 1Dx1.6t, and 1Dx2.2* represent a root within a network and correspond to the common ancestors of the other Glu-D-1-1 alleles in an associated star-like phylogeny, suggesting that there were at least four independent origins of hexaploid wheat. In addition to unequal homologous recombination, duplication and deletion of large fragments occurring in Glu-D-1-1 alleles were attributed to illegitimate recombination.

  3. Introgression of wheat DNA markers from A, B and D genomes in early generation progeny of Aegilops cylindrica Host x Triticum aestivum L. hybrids.

    PubMed

    Schoenenberger, N; Felber, F; Savova-Bianchi, D; Guadagnuolo, R

    2005-11-01

    Introgression from allohexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L., AABBDD) to allotetraploid jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host, CCDD) can take place in areas where the two species grow in sympatry and hybridize. Wheat and Ae. cylindrica share the D genome, issued from the common diploid ancestor Aegilops tauschii Coss. It has been proposed that the A and B genome of bread wheat are secure places to insert transgenes to avoid their introgression into Ae. cylindrica because during meiosis in pentaploid hybrids, A and B genome chromosomes form univalents and tend to be eliminated whereas recombination takes place only in D genome chromosomes. Wheat random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fragments, detected in intergeneric hybrids and introgressed to the first backcross generation with Ae. cylindrica as the recurrent parent and having a euploid Ae. cylindrica chromosome number or one supernumerary chromosome, were assigned to wheat chromosomes using Chinese Spring nulli-tetrasomic wheat lines. Introgressed fragments were not limited to the D genome of wheat, but specific fragments of A and B genomes were also present in the BC1. Their presence indicates that DNA from any of the wheat genomes can introgress into Ae. cylindrica. Successfully located RAPD fragments were then converted into highly specific and easy-to-use sequence characterised amplified regions (SCARs) through sequencing and primer design. Subsequently these markers were used to characterise introgression of wheat DNA into a BC1S1 family. Implications for risk assessment of genetically modified wheat are discussed.

  4. COSS Lesson Creation Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, R. Stephen

    1999-01-01

    COSS (Crew On-Orbit System Support) is changing. Designed as computer based in-flight refresher training, it is getting good reviews and the demands on the product can be expected to increase. Last year, the lessons were written using Authorware, which had a number of limitations. The most important one was that the navigation and the layout functions were both in one package that was not easy to learn. The lesson creator had to be good at both programming and design. There were also a number of other problems, as detailed in my report last year. This year the COSS unit made the switch to embrace modularity. The navigation function is handled by a player that was custom-written using Delphi. The layout pages are now standard HTML files that can be created using any number of products. This new system gives new flexibility and unties the process from one product (and one company). The player can be re-written by a programmer without affecting the lesson pages. It is also now possible for anybody with a word-processor to make part of the HTML lesson pages and to use many of the new commercially available tools that are being designed for web pages. This summer I created a computer-based training (CBT) lesson on the IBM ThinkPad 760 ED and 760XD laptop computers that should fly on the International Space Station. I also examined the COSS system, the new player and the other new software products.

  5. [Phylogenetic relationships and intraspecific variation of D-genome Aegilops L. as revealed by RAPD analysis].

    PubMed

    Goriunova, S V; Kochieva, E Z; Chikida, N N; Pukhal'skiĭ, V A

    2004-05-01

    RAPD analysis was carried out to study the genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of polyploid Aegilops species, which contain the D genome as a component of the alloploid genome, and diploid Aegilops tauschii, which is a putative donor of the D genome for common wheat. In total, 74 accessions of six D-genome Aegilops species were examined. The highest intraspecific variation (0.03-0.21) was observed for Ae. tauschii. Intraspecific distances between accessions ranged 0.007-0.067 in Ae. cylindrica, 0.017-0.047 in Ae. vavilovii, and 0.00-0.053 in Ae. juvenalis. Likewise, Ae. ventricosa and Ae. crassa showed low intraspecific polymorphism. The among-accession difference in alloploid Ae. ventricosa (genome DvNv) was similar to that of one parental species, Ae. uniaristata (N), and substantially lower than in the other parent, Ae. tauschii (D). The among-accession difference in Ae. cylindrica (CcDc) was considerably lower than in either parent, Ae. tauschii (D) or Ae. caudata (C). With the exception of Ae. cylindrica, all D-genome species--Ae. tauschii (D), Ae. ventricosa (DvNv), Ae. crassa (XcrDcrl and XcrDcrlDcr2), Ae. juvenalis (XjDjUj), and Ae. vavilovii (XvaDvaSva)--formed a single polymorphic cluster, which was distinct from clusters of other species. The only exception, Ae. cylindrica, did not group with the other D-genome species, but clustered with Ae. caudata (C), a donor of the C genome. The cluster of these two species was clearly distinct from the cluster of the other D-genome species and close to a cluster of Ae. umbellulata (genome U) and Ae. ovata (genome UgMg). Thus, RAPD analysis for the first time was used to estimate and to compare the interpopulation polymorphism and to establish the phylogenetic relationships of all diploid and alloploid D-genome Aegilops species.

  6. Identification of PmTA1662 from Aegilops tauschii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Powdery mildew remains a significant threat to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production, and the rapid breakdown of race-specific resistance to Blumeria graminis (DC.) f. sp. tritici (Bgt) reinforces the need to identify novel sources of resistance. The D-genome progenitor species of hexaploid wheat,...

  7. Characterization of high molecular weight glutenin subunits in Thinopyrum intermedium, Th. bessarabicum, Lophopyrum elongatum, Aegilops markgrafii, and their addition lines in wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High molecular weight (HMW) glutenin subunits (GSs) play an important role in determining dough viscoelastic properties and end-use quality in cultivated wheat, and they are also excellent protein markers for genotype identification. The HMW-GSs in wheat species (Triticum ssp.) and Aegilops tauschii...

  8. Genes encoding plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-phosphoglycerate kinase of the Triticum/Aegilops complex and the evolutionary history of polyploid wheat

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shaoxing; Sirikhachornkit, Anchalee; Su, Xiujuan; Faris, Justin; Gill, Bikram; Haselkorn, Robert; Gornicki, Piotr

    2002-01-01

    The classic wheat evolutionary history is one of adaptive radiation of the diploid Triticum/Aegilops species (A, S, D), genome convergence and divergence of the tetraploid (Triticum turgidum AABB, and Triticum timopheevii AAGG) and hexaploid (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD) species. We analyzed Acc-1 (plastid acetyl-CoA carboxylase) and Pgk-1 (plastid 3-phosphoglycerate kinase) genes to determine phylogenetic relationships among Triticum and Aegilops species of the wheat lineage and to establish the timeline of wheat evolution based on gene sequence comparisons. Triticum urartu was confirmed as the A genome donor of tetraploid and hexaploid wheat. The A genome of polyploid wheat diverged from T. urartu less than half a million years ago (MYA), indicating a relatively recent origin of polyploid wheat. The D genome sequences of T. aestivum and Aegilops tauschii are identical, confirming that T. aestivum arose from hybridization of T. turgidum and Ae. tauschii only 8,000 years ago. The diploid Triticum and Aegilops progenitors of the A, B, D, G, and S genomes all radiated 2.5–4.5 MYA. Our data suggest that the Acc-1 and Pgk-1 loci have different histories in different lineages, indicating genome mosaicity and significant intraspecific differentiation. Some loci of the S genome of Aegilops speltoides and the G genome of T. timophevii are closely related, suggesting the same origin of some parts of their genomes. None of the Aegilops genomes analyzed is a close relative of the B genome, so the diploid progenitor of the B genome remains unknown. PMID:12060759

  9. [Genetics determination of wheat resistance to Puccinia graminis F. sp. tritici deriving from Aegilops cylindrica, Triticum erebuni and amphidiploid 4].

    PubMed

    Babaiants, O V; Babaiants, L T; Horash, A F; Vasil'ev, A A; Trackovetskaia, V A; Paliasn'iĭĭ, V A

    2012-01-01

    The lines of winter soft wheat developed in the Plant Breeding and Genetics Institute contain new effective introgressive Sr-genes. Line 85/06 possess SrAc1 gene, lines 47/06, 54/06, 82/06, 85/06, 87/06, 238/06, and 367/06 possess SrAc1 and SrAc2 derived from Aegilops cylindrica, line 352/06 - SrTe1 and SrTe2 from Triticum erebuni, line 12/86-04 - SrAd1 and SrAd2 from Amphidiploid 4 (Triticum dicoccoides x Triticum tauschii).

  10. Tissue-specific expression and localization of safener-induced glutathione S-transferase proteins in Triticum tauschii.

    PubMed

    Riechers, Dean E; Zhang, Qin; Xu, Fangxiu; Vaughn, Kevin C

    2003-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST; EC 2.5.1.18) gene expression was examined in the coleoptile and new leaf tissue of etiolated shoots of the diploid wheat species Triticum tauschii (Coss.) Schmal., which is considered to be a progenitor and the D-genome donor to cultivated, hexaploid bread wheat Triticum aestivum L. GST expression (mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity with a herbicide substrate) in these shoot tissues was examined in response to herbicide safener treatment. Two different antibody probes, raised against the same safener-inducible GST protein (TtGSTU1) but differing in their specificity, were utilized to determine tissue distribution and subcellular localization of GST proteins in etiolated shoots. GST transcripts, immunoreactive GST proteins, and herbicide-metabolizing activity were all highest in the coleoptile of etiolated, safener-treated T. tauschii shoots. Anti-GST immunolabeling was strongest in the outer epidermal and adjoining sub-epidermal cells in both coleoptiles and new leaves following safener treatment. Our data indicate that safeners protect grass crops from herbicide injury by dramatically inducing the expression of GST proteins in the outer cell layers of the coleoptile, which prevents the herbicide from reaching the sensitive new leaves of etiolated shoots as they emerge from the soil.

  11. Synthetic hexaploids derived from under-exploited tetraploids as a new resource for disease resistance in wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Synthetic hexaploid wheat (SHW) (2n = 6x = 42, genome AABBDD), which is developed from the hybridization between tetraploid wheat (Triticum turgidum L., 2n = 4x = 28, genome AABB) and Aegilops tauschii Coss. (2n = 2x = 14, genome DD), is a useful bridging germplasm for the introgression of desirable...

  12. Evolution of New Disease Specificity at a Single Resistance Locus in a Crop-Weed Complex: Reconstitution of the Lr21 Gene in Wheat.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Leaf-rust resistance gene Lr21, present in modern varieties of hexaploid wheat, originated in goatgrass Aegilops tauschii Coss., the D genome donor of wheat. The goatgrass donor was collected in Iran where it grows as a weed in wheat fields as part of the native agricultural ecosystem. In order to ...

  13. Genetic diversity among synthetic hexaploid wheat accessions with resistance to several fungal diseases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Synthetic hexaploid wheat (SHW) is known to be an excellent vehicle for transferring large genetic variations especially the many useful traits present in the D genome of Aegilops tauschii Coss (2n=2x=14, DD) for improvement of cultivated wheat (Triticum aestivum L., 2n=6x=42, AABBDD). The objectiv...

  14. Adult plant resistance to Puccinia triticina in a geographically diverse collection of Aegilops tauschii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite extensive genetics and breeding research, effective control of leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina Eriks., an important foliar disease of wheat, has not been achieved. This is mainly due to the widespread use of race-specific seedling resistance genes, which are rapidly overcome by new vi...

  15. An antibacterial and antifungal phenylpropanoid from Carum montanum (Coss. et Dur.) Benth. et Hook.

    PubMed

    Laouer, Hocine; Meriem, El Kolli; Prado, Soizic; Baldovini, Nicolas

    2009-12-01

    The volatile constituents of the aerial parts of Carum montanum (Coss. et Dur.) Benth. et Hook. were analysed by GC-FID and GC-MS, and the main component was isolated and identified as nothoapiole. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of this compound and of the total oil were investigated against Gram-negative (P. aeruginosa, E. coli), Gram-positive (E. faecalis, S. aureus, S. epidermitis, S. saprophyticus, S. simulans, S. lugdunensis) bacteria and on one strain of fungus (C. tropicalis).

  16. Screening The Aegilops-Triticum Group For Boron Tolerance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Boron deficient and toxic soils pose a critical problem in wheat production on a world scale. Therefore, 79 accessions from 12 diverse wild wheat (Aegilops speltoides, Ae. longissima, Ae. sharonensis, Ae. bicornis, Ae. searsii, Ae. kotschyi, Ae. peregrina ssp. cylindrostachys, Ae. peregrina ssp. eu...

  17. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of aerial parts of Ferula longipes Coss. ex Bonnier and Maury.

    PubMed

    Bouratoua, Aicha; Khalfallah, Assia; Bensouici, Chawki; Kabouche, Zahia; Alabdul Magid, Abdulmagid; Harakat, Dominique; Voutquenne-Nazabadioko, Laurence; Kabouche, Ahmed

    2017-07-16

    This is the first study on the phytochemistry and antioxidant activity of Ferula longipes Coss. ex Bonnier and Maury (Apiaceae). A new flavonoid quercetin-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside-7-O-ß-D-[2-O-caffeoyl]-glucopyranoside (1), along with 10 known compounds kaempferol-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (2), quercetin-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (3), kaempferol-3-O-ß-D-glucopyranoside-7-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (4), isorhamnetin-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside-7-O-ß-D-glucopyranoside (5), quercetin-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside-7-O-ß-D-glucopyranoside (6), isorhamnetin-3,7-di-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (7), apigenin (8), apigenin-7-O-ß-D-glucopyranoside (9), 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (10), deltoin (11) were isolated from the aerial parts of Ferula longipes Coss. Structures elucidation was performed by comprehensive 1D and 2D NMR analyses, mass spectrometry and by comparison with literature data. The compounds 1, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 10 were evaluated for their antioxidant activity, compound 1 exhibited the best antiradical activity potential and showed IC50 and A0.5 values 5.70, 7.25, 5.00, and 2.63 μg/mL towards DPPH free radical-scavenging, ABTS, CUPRAC, and reducing power assays, respectively compared with BHA, BHT and ascorbic acid which were used as positive controls.

  18. Annotation-based genome-wide SNP discovery in the large and complex Aegilops tauschii genome using next-generation sequencing without a reference genome sequence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An annotation-based, genome-wide SNP discovery pipeline is reported using NGS data for large and complex genomes without a reference genome sequence. Roche 454 shotgun reads with low genome coverage of one genotype are annotated in order to distinguish single-copy sequences and repeat junctions fr...

  19. Physical mapping resources for large plant genomes: radiation hybrids for wheat D-genome progenitor aegilops tauschii accession AL8/78

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: A high quality reference sequence can provide a complete catalog of genes of a species, the regulatory elements that control their structure and function provide the basis for understanding the role of genes in evolution and development. However, development of a high quality referenc...

  20. Radiation hybrid maps of D-genome of Aegilops tauschii and their application in sequence assembly of large and complex plant genomes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The large and complex genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L., ~17 Gb) requires high-resolution genome maps saturated with ordered markers to assist in anchoring and orienting BAC contigs/ sequence scaffolds for whole genome sequence assembly. Radiation hybrid (RH) mapping has proven to be an e...

  1. Dynamic evolution of resistance gene analogs in the orthologous genomic regions of powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW170 in Triticum dicoccoides and Aegilops tauschii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat is one of the most important staple grain crops in the world. Powdery mildew disease caused by Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici can result in significant losses in both grain yield and quality in wheat. In this study, the wheat powdery mildew resistance gene MlIW170 locus located on the short ...

  2. Rapid evolutionary dynamics in a 2.8-Mb chromosomal region containing multiple prolamin and resistance gene families in Aegilops tauschii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The prolamin (seed storage proteins high in glutamine and proline) and resistance gene families are important in domesticated bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) food uses and in defense against pathogen attacks, respectively. To better understand the evolution of these multi-gene families, the DNA se...

  3. A 4-gigbase physical map unlocks the structure and evolution of the complex genome of Aegilop tauschii, the wheat D-genome progenitor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The genomes of wheat and its relatives in the tribe Triticeae are large, containing nearly 90% repetitive DNA, and some are polyploid. These genomes can currently be completely sequenced only by the ordered-clone genome sequencing approach, which reduces the complexity of sequence assembly from th...

  4. Rapid genome mapping in nano channel array for highly complete and accurate de novo sequence assembly of the complex Aegilops tauschii genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have enabled high-throughput and low-cost generation of sequence data; however, de novo genome assembly remains a great challenge, particularly for large genomes. NGS short reads are often insufficient to create large contigs that span repeat sequences...

  5. Lr41, Lr39, and a leaf rust resistance gene from Aegilops cylindrica may be allelic and are located on wheat chromosome 2DS.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhwinder; Franks, C D; Huang, L; Brown-Guedira, G L; Marshall, D S; Gill, B S; Fritz, A

    2004-02-01

    The leaf rust resistance gene Lr41 in wheat germplasm KS90WGRC10 and a resistance gene in wheat breeding line WX93D246-R-1 were transferred to Triticum aestivum from Aegilops tauschii and Ae. cylindrica, respectively. The leaf rust resistance gene in WX93D246-R-1 was located on wheat chromosome 2D by monosomic analysis. Molecular marker analysis of F(2) plants from non-critical crosses determined that this gene is 11.2 cM distal to marker Xgwm210 on the short arm of 2D. No susceptible plants were detected in a population of 300 F(2) plants from a cross between WX93D246-R-1 and TA 4186 ( Lr39), suggesting that the gene in WX93D246-R-1 is the same as, or closely linked to, Lr39. In addition, no susceptible plants were detected in a population of 180 F(2) plants from the cross between KS90WGRC10 and WX93D246-R-1. The resistance gene in KS90WGRC10, Lr41, was previously reported to be located on wheat chromosome 1D. In this study, no genetic association was found between Lr41 and 51 markers located on chromosome 1D. A population of 110 F(3 )lines from a cross between KS90WGRC10 and TAM 107 was evaluated with polymorphic SSR markers from chromosome 2D and marker Xgdm35 was found to be 1.9 cM proximal to Lr41. When evaluated with diverse isolates of Puccinia triticina, similar reactions were observed on WX93D246-R-1, KS90WGRC10, and TA 4186. The results of mapping, allelism, and race specificity test indicate that these germplasms likely have the same gene for resistance to leaf rust.

  6. A process evaluation of a return-to-work intervention to improve Cooperation between Sick-listed employees and their Supervisors (COSS).

    PubMed

    Hoefsmit, Nicole; Boumans, Nicolle; Houkes, Inge; Nijhuis, Frans

    2016-11-22

    This is a process evaluation of an intervention to improve Cooperation regarding return-to-work (RTW) between sick-listed employees and their supervisors (COSS, which consists of a conversation roadmap, monitoring of cooperation using questionnaires and, if necessary, extra support by an occupational physician (OP). Objectives were to study (1) the adoption of COSS by a banking organization and (2) its implementation among individual employees, supervisors and OPs. We used quantitative data (online questionnaire, project administration, conversation minutes, emails) and qualitative data (semi-structured interviews). We analyzed quantitative data descriptively (by calculating sum scores, percentages, mean scores and standard deviations). The coding system to analyze the qualitative data was data-driven. The organization's representatives reported positively (e.g. fit with existing policy) and negatively (e.g. high intensity) about COSS. At least one OP (out of five) used the monitoring information. Project administration data show a modest reach of COSS among employees and supervisors. The roadmap was used by a minority (35% of the employees and 25% of the supervisors). Relatively many (40% of the employees and 100% of the supervisors who used COSS to evaluate conversations) were satisfied with COSS as a  tool to evaluate conversations with the employee/supervisor afterwards. Interview results indicate that the roadmap was considered useful in specific situations (e.g. psychological complaints). All employees and supervisors participated in the monitoring. The majority of the responding employees and supervisors received OP support and was satisfied about this support. Despite the good adoption of COSS by the organisation, it was only partially implemented by professionals, employees and supervisors. We hypothesize that our implementation approach did not fit completely with the culture at the bank. Also, the results illustrate the need for other intervention

  7. Allelic variations of α-gliadin genes from species of Aegilops section Sitopsis and insights into evolution of α-gliadin multigene family among Triticum and Aegilops.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhuo; Long, Hai; Wei, Yu-Ming; Yan, Ze-Hong; Zheng, You-Liang

    2016-04-01

    The α-gliadins account for 15-30 % of the total storage protein in wheat endosperm and play important roles in the dough extensibility and nutritional quality. On the other side, they act as a main source of toxic peptides triggering celiac disease. In this study, 37 α-gliadins were isolated from three species of Aegilops section Sitopsis. Sequence similarity and phylogenetic analyses revealed novel allelic variation at Gli-2 loci of species of Sitopsis and regular organization of motifs in their repetitive domain. Based on the comprehensive analyses of a large number of known sequences of bread wheat and its diploid genome progenitors, the distributions of four T cell epitopes and length variations of two polyglutamine domains are analyzed. Additionally, according to the organization of repeat motifs, we classified the α-gliadins of Triticum and Aegilops into eight types. Their most recent common ancestor and putative divergence patterns were further considered. This study provides new insights into the allelic variations of α-gliadins in Aegilops section Sitopsis, as well as evolution of α-gliadin multigene family among Triticum and Aegilops species.

  8. Gene flow between wheat and wild relatives: empirical evidence from Aegilops geniculata, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis

    PubMed Central

    Arrigo, Nils; Guadagnuolo, Roberto; Lappe, Sylvain; Pasche, Sophie; Parisod, Christian; Felber, François

    2011-01-01

    Gene flow between domesticated species and their wild relatives is receiving growing attention. This study addressed introgression between wheat and natural populations of its wild relatives (Aegilops species). The sampling included 472 individuals, collected from 32 Mediterranean populations of three widespread Aegilops species (Aegilops geniculata, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis) and compared wheat field borders to areas isolated from agriculture. Individuals were characterized with amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting, analysed through two computational approaches (i.e. Bayesian estimations of admixture and fuzzy clustering), and sequences marking wheat-specific insertions of transposable elements. With this combined approach, we detected substantial gene flow between wheat and Aegilops species. Specifically, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis showed significantly more admixed individuals close to wheat fields than in locations isolated from agriculture. In contrast, little evidence of gene flow was found in Ae. geniculata. Our results indicated that reproductive barriers have been regularly bypassed during the long history of sympatry between wheat and Aegilops. PMID:25568015

  9. Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Properties of Algerian Thymelaea microphylla Coss. and Dur. Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Dehimi, Khadidja; Speciale, Antonio; Saija, Antonina; Dahamna, Saliha; Raciti, Roberto; Cimino, Francesco; Cristani, Mariateresa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thymelaea microphylla Coss. et Dur. (Thymelaeaceae) (TM) is a rare medicinal plant endemic to Algeria. Leaves decoction is used in folk medicine for anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic properties. Objective: Herein, the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of different extracts from leaves and flowers of Algerian TM were evaluated. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out by in vitro cell-free assays (antioxidant/radical properties), ex vivo experiments (inhibition of prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane B2 release in human whole blood) and in vitro experiments on cell systems (cytotoxicity on peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and protective effects on human vein endothelial cells exposed to TNF-α). Results: The acetone TM extract showed significant antioxidant properties and excellent anti-inflammatory and cyclooxygenase-inhibitory activity, together with lack of toxicity on normal human blood cells; furthermore, it was able to protect endothelial cells against dysfunction induced by TNF-α, as shown by decrease in cell death, e-selectin expression and leukocyte adhesion. Conclusion: On these bases, TM leaves and flowers appear to be a good source of bioactive compounds with significant antioxidant and antiinflammatory capability, and potentially effective in prevention and treatment of pathological conditions related to oxidative stress and inflammation, such as endothelial dysfunction. SUMMARY Thymelaea microphylla leaves and flowers are a good source of bioactive compounds with significant antioxidant/free radical scavenger and antiinflammatory activity.The acetone extract from leaves and flowers of Algerian Thymelaea microphylla possesses excellent cyclooxygenase-inhibitory activity.This extract is able to protect against endothelial dysfunction, an early event in development of atherosclerosis and vascular diseases. Abbreviations used: TM: Thymelaea microphylla; BCB: Beta-carotene bleaching; AcE: Acetone extract; PGE2

  10. Inheritance of dense spike in diploid wheat and Aegilops squarrosa.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, N P; Kondratenko, E Ya; Kawahara, T

    2002-01-01

    The individuals of diploid wheat Triticum boeoticum, T. monococcum and T. sinskajae and goatgrass Aegilops squarrosa were picked out with screening the dense spike characteristics. The dense-spike accessions were discovered in diploid wheat (T. sinskajae) and Ae. squarrosa. Inheritance of the dense spike was studied. The trait was found to be controlled by a recessive gene in T. sinskajae and by an incomplete dominant gene in Ae. squarrosa. The dosage effect of dominant gene C was detected in interspecific pentaploid F1 hybrid plants T. compactum x T. palmovae (2n =35, A(u)A(b)BDD genome). The spike of pentaploid hybrid was not so dense as compared to hexaploid wheat T. compactum. This is the first report showing similarity of the expression of dominant gene C on D genome of the hexaploid wheat to that of dense spike gene in Ae. squarrosa. The existence of dense-spike accessions of Ae. squarrosa allows us to hypothesize that the origin of T. compactum is independent from that of common wheat.

  11. [Isolation and characterization of gliadins from Aegilops squarrosa seeds].

    PubMed

    Odintsova, T I; Egorov, Ts A

    1989-03-01

    The major gliadin components were isolated from the seeds of the diploid species Aegilops squarrosa, a putative source of polyploid wheat D-genome. The isolation procedure included gel-filtration and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The purified proteins were characterized by electrophoretic mobility in polyacrylamide gel using acid Al-lactate system and a system containing sodium dodecyl sulfate. The amino acid composition of isolated omega-gliadins was determined. Using covalent chromatography on thiopropyl-Sepharose 6B it was found that omega-gliadins of A. squarrosa contain no SH-groups and/or S-S-bonds. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of A. squarrosa gliadins were determined. omega-Gliadins were found to contain three types of N-terminal amino acid sequences, one of which, SRQ, in hexaploid wheat is encoded by 1B chromosome. It was shown that some omega-gliadins of A. squarrosa have blocked N-terminal amino acids. The major component of the gamma-fraction was found to contain an N-terminal sequence of gamma 2 type encoded in polyploid wheat by 1D chromosome. Gliadins with electrophoretic mobility in the beta-zone of the spectrum possess the N-terminal sequence of alpha-type. The results obtained are discussed in terms of the origin of polyploid wheat genomes.

  12. Study of improving the quality of bread and wheat-aegilops hybrids with the biotechnological ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbarzada, Aygun; Hasanova, Sudaba

    2016-08-01

    The great need of the people to bread demands to increase high qualitative grain plants. At present time for solving these problem different methods of biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology are widely used in the process of selection. To investigate biochemical peculiarities of wheat-aegilops hybrids and to define the correlative relation between these characteristics. To investigate the technological peculiarities of wheat- aegilops hybrids and to define the relation between their main biochemical and technological characteristics. The conclusion of this investigation showed the followings- the wheat-aegilops hybrids according to their morphological and biochemical characteristics have approached to wheats. The electrophoretic spectres of the wheat- aegilops hybrids which have stable for their morphological characteristics are homogeny and heterogenic. Hereditarily some group protein components have passed to their tribes from their parents. But spontaneous hybridisation results in taking part the components of other unknown wheats in these electrophoretic spectres. There is a relation between the electrophoretic spectres and the indications of the grain quality.

  13. A cryptic wheat–Aegilops triuncialis translocation with leaf rust resistance gene Lr58

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genes transferred to crop plants from wild species are often associated with deleterious traits. Using molecular markers, we detected a cryptic introgression with a leaf rust resistance gene transferred from Aegilops triuncialis L. into common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). One agronomically desirabl...

  14. Introgression of a new stem rust resistance gene from Aegilops markgrafii into wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In a prior study, we reported that an Alcedo/Aegilops markgrafii disomic addition line, AIII(D) (2n=44), was resistant to three races of the Ug99 lineage and five North American races of stem rust pathogen in wheat and the resistance originated from the alien chromosome. In this study, our objectiv...

  15. Effects of acacia (Acacia auriculaeformis A. Cunn)-associated fungi on mustard (Brassica juncea (L.) Coss. var. foliosa Bailey) growth in Cd- and Ni-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Jiang, M; Cao, L; Zhang, R

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of Acacia auriculaeformis-associated fungi on the growth of mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Coss. var. foliosa Bailey] in Cd- and Ni-contaminated soils and design novel plant-fungi associations for bioremediation purpose. Endophytic Trichoderma H8 and rhizosphere Aspergillus G16 were applied for rhizoremediation of Cd-, Ni-, and Cd-Ni combination-contaminated soils through association with B. juncea (L.) Coss. var. foliosa. Compared with the noninoculated control plants, inoculation with Trichoderma H8 produced 109%, 41% and 167% more fresh weight (FW) plant yields in the Cd-, Ni-, and Cd-Ni-contaminated soils, respectively (P < 0.05). Similarly, plants inoculated with Aspergillus G16 produced 109%, 47% and 44% more FW plant yields in these contaminated soils, respectively. Plants co-inoculated with these two strains produced 118%, 100% and 178% more FW plant yields, respectively. The inoculations also increased the translocation factors and metal bioconcentration factors. The efficiency of phytoextraction for B. juncea (L.) Coss. var. foliosa was enhanced after inoculating with Acacia-associated fungi. The use of plant-fungi association may be a promising strategy to remediate metal-contaminated soils.

  16. Mineral composition of different parts of Capparis ovata Desf. var. canescens (Coss.) Heywood growing wild in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Musa

    2005-01-01

    Major and minor mineral contents of young shoots, flower buds, caperberries (fruit), and seeds of Capparis ovata Desf. var. canescens (Coss.) Heywood, used as a pickling product in Turkey, were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Twenty-one minerals were assayed in samples. All materials contained high amounts of Ca, K, Mg, Na, P, Pb, and Zn. The highest levels of Ca (598.34-16,947.1 ppm), K (3,093.1-28,163.9 ppm), Na (57.9-444.3 ppm), P (1,690.5-4,153.9 ppm), and Zn (21.1-35.6 ppm) were found in flower buds. The content of K was high in most cases and ranged from 28,163.9 ppm (flower bud) to 3,093.1 ppm (caper seed). Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Li, Ni, Pb, and Se contents of caper plant organs were found to be very low. Consequently, caper parts were rich in minerals, and they may be valuable for food uses. The results may also be useful for the evaluation of nutritional information.

  17. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of the essential oils of Ferula vesceritensis Coss et Dur. leaves, endemic in Algeria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The biological importance of members of genus Ferula promoted us to investigate the leaves of Ferula vesceritensis Coss et Dur. (endemic plant) previously not investigated. This study presents the chemical composition and antibacterial activities of the hydrodistilled oils. Results Volatile components of the leaves of F. vesceritensis have been studied by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry to afford 23 compounds. The major components were found to be 5,9-tetradecadiyne (24.72%), germacrene D (24.51%), farnesene (8.57%), and α-bisabolene (8.57%). The antimicrobial activities of the essential oils were evaluated by disk diffusion method and tested against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The volatile oil showed a strong antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella pneumonia. Conclusions These results reinforce the previous studies showing that the genus Ferula is considered as a good source of essential oils. The results presented here can be considered as the first information on the antimicrobial properties of F. vesceritensis. PMID:22937773

  18. Identification of ecogeographical gaps in the Spanish Aegilops collections with potential tolerance to drought and salinity.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Rosa María; Parra-Quijano, Mauricio; Iriondo, Jose María

    2017-01-01

    Drought, one of the most important abiotic stress factors limiting biomass, significantly reduces crop productivity. Salinization also affects the productivity of both irrigated and rain-fed wheat crops. Species of genus Aegilops can be considered crop wild relatives (CWR) of wheat and have been widely used as gene sources in wheat breeding, especially in providing resistance to pests and diseases. Five species (Ae. biuncialis, Ae. geniculata, Ae. neglecta, Ae. triuncialis and Ae. ventricosa) are included in the Spanish National Inventory of CWRs. This study aimed to identify ecogeographic gaps in the Spanish Network on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (PGRFA) with potential tolerance to drought and salinity. Data on the Spanish populations of the target species collected and conserved in genebanks of the Spanish Network on PGRFA and data on other population occurrences in Spain were compiled and assessed for their geo-referencing quality. The records with the best geo-referencing quality values were used to identify the ecogeographical variables that might be important for Aegilops distribution in Spain. These variables were then used to produce ecogeographic land characterization maps for each species, allowing us to identify populations from low and non-represented ecogeographical categories in ex situ collections. Predictive characterization strategy was used to identify 45 Aegilops populations in these ecogeographical gaps with potential tolerance to drought and salinity conditions. Further efforts are being made to collect and evaluate these populations.

  19. Identification of a major QTL controlling the content of B-type starch granules in Aegilops

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Thomas; Rejab, Nur Ardiyana; Griffiths, Simon; Leigh, Fiona; Leverington-Waite, Michelle; Simmonds, James; Uauy, Cristobal; Trafford, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Starch within the endosperm of most species of the Triticeae has a unique bimodal granule morphology comprising large lenticular A-type granules and smaller near-spherical B-type granules. However, a few wild wheat species (Aegilops) are known to lack B-granules. Ae. peregrina and a synthetic tetraploid Aegilops with the same genome composition (SU) were found to differ in B-granule number. The synthetic tetraploid had normal A- and B-type starch granules whilst Ae. peregrina had only A-granules because the B-granules failed to initiate. A population segregating for B-granule number was generated by crossing these two accessions and was used to study the genetic basis of B-granule initiation. A combination of Bulked Segregant Analysis and QTL mapping identified a major QTL located on the short arm of chromosome 4S that accounted for 44.4% of the phenotypic variation. The lack of B-granules in polyploid Aegilops with diverse genomes suggests that the B-granule locus has been lost several times independently during the evolution of the Triticeae. It is proposed that the B-granule locus is susceptible to silencing during polyploidization and a model is presented to explain the observed data based on the assumption that the initiation of B-granules is controlled by a single major locus per haploid genome. PMID:21227932

  20. Divergent distribution of the sensor kinase CosS in non-thermotolerant campylobacter species and its functional incompatibility with the response regulator CosR of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sunyoung; Miller, William G; Ryu, Sangryeol; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2014-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems are commonly composed of a sensor histidine kinase and a cognate response regulator, modulating gene expression in response to environmental changes through a phosphorylation-dependent process. CosR is an OmpR-type response regulator essential for the viability of Campylobacter jejuni, a major foodborne pathogenic species causing human gastroenteritis. Although CosR is a response regulator, its cognate sensor kinase has not been identified in C. jejuni. In this study, DNA sequence analysis of the cosR flanking regions revealed that a gene encoding a putative sensor kinase, which we named cosS, is prevalent in non-thermotolerant Campylobacter spp., but not in thermotolerant campylobacters. Phosphorylation assays indicated that C. fetus CosS rapidly autophosphorylates and then phosphorylates C. fetus CosR, suggesting that the CosRS system constitutes a paired two-component signal transduction system in C. fetus. However, C. fetus CosS does not phosphorylate C. jejuni CosR, suggesting that CosR may have different regulatory cascades between thermotolerant and non-thermotolerant Campylobacter species. Comparison of CosR homolog amino acid sequences showed that the conserved phosphorylation residue (D51), which is present in all non-thermotolerant Campylobacter spp., is absent from the CosR homologs of thermotolerant Campylobacter species. However, C. jejuni CosR was not phosphorylated by C. fetus CosS even after site-directed mutagenesis of N51D, implying that C. jejuni CosR may possibly function phosphorylation-independently. In addition, the results of cosS mutational analysis indicated that CosS is not associated with the temperature dependence of the Campylobacter spp. despite its unique divergent distribution only in non-thermotolerant campylobacters. The findings in this study strongly suggest that thermotolerant and non-thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. have different signal sensing mechanisms associated with the Cos

  1. Genotyping-by-sequencing facilitates a high resolution consensus linkage map for Aegilops umbellulata, a wild relative of cultivated wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High density genetic maps are useful to precisely localize QTL or genes that might be used to improve traits of nutritional and/or economical importance in crops. However, high-density genetic maps are lacking for most wild relatives of crop species including wheat. Aegilops umbelluata is a wild rel...

  2. Introgression of leaf rust and stripe rust resistance from Sharon goatgrass (Aegilops sharonensis Eig) into bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Leaf rust and stripe rust are devastating wheat diseases, causing significant yield losses in many regions of the world. The use of resistant varieties is the most efficient way to protect wheat crops from these diseases. Sharon goatgrass (Aegilops sharonensis or AES), which is a diploid wild relati...

  3. Molecular marker-assisted alien gene introgression of Sr39 for wheat stem rust resistance derived from Aegilops speltoides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), stem rust resistance gene Sr39, derived from Aegilops speltoides, is highly effective against multiple stem rust races including Ug99. However, the gene has not been used in wheat breeding because it is located on a large 2S chromosomal segment in the current transl...

  4. Study of the repeatability of histone genes in the ploidy series of wheat and Aegilops

    SciTech Connect

    Vakhitov, V.A.; Kulikov, A.M.

    1986-10-01

    The hDNA content and number of histone genes in the genomes of different wheat and Aegilops species have been determined by molecular hybridization of DNA with /sup 125/I-histone DNA of Drosophila (L-repeat) on nitrocellulose filters. It has been demonstrated that the proportion of hDNA in the total DNA of diploid and polyploid wheat species is (1.3-7.7) x 10/sup -3/% (57-850 genes), and in the ploidy series of Aegilops species (2.0-8.0) x 10/sup -3/% (89-780 genes). The repeatability of the histone genes generally increases at each ploidy level in the species with higher DNA content. At the same time, it has been demonstrated that the DNA content is not the only factor determining repeatability of the histone genes, as some diploid and allopolyploid species have similar number of these genes. It has been concluded that genetic mechanisms are involved in the regulation of the number of histone genes.

  5. Addition of Aegilops U and M Chromosomes Affects Protein and Dietary Fiber Content of Wholemeal Wheat Flour.

    PubMed

    Rakszegi, Marianna; Molnár, István; Lovegrove, Alison; Darkó, Éva; Farkas, András; Láng, László; Bedő, Zoltán; Doležel, Jaroslav; Molnár-Láng, Márta; Shewry, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Cereal grain fiber is an important health-promoting component in the human diet. One option to improve dietary fiber content and composition in wheat is to introduce genes from its wild relatives Aegilops biuncialis and Aegilops geniculata. This study showed that the addition of chromosomes 2U(g), 4U(g), 5U(g), 7U(g), 2M(g), 5M(g), and 7M(g) of Ae. geniculata and 3U(b), 2M(b), 3M(b), and 7M(b) of Ae. biuncialis into bread wheat increased the seed protein content. Chromosomes 1U(g) and 1M(g) increased the proportion of polymeric glutenin proteins, while the addition of chromosomes 1U(b) and 6U(b) led to its decrease. Both Aegilops species had higher proportions of β-glucan compared to arabinoxylan (AX) than wheat lines, and elevated β-glucan content was also observed in wheat chromosome addition lines 5U, 7U, and 7M. The AX content in wheat was increased by the addition of chromosomes 5U(g), 7U(g), and 1U(b) while water-soluble AX was increased by the addition of chromosomes 5U, 5M, and 7M, and to a lesser extent by chromosomes 3, 4, 6U(g), and 2M(b). Chromosomes 5U(g) and 7M(b) also affected the structure of wheat AX, as shown by the pattern of oligosaccharides released by digestion with endoxylanase. These results will help to map genomic regions responsible for edible fiber content in Aegilops and will contribute to the efficient transfer of wild alleles in introgression breeding programs to obtain wheat varieties with improved health benefits. Key Message: Addition of Aegilops U- and M-genome chromosomes 5 and 7 improves seed protein and fiber content and composition in wheat.

  6. Addition of Aegilops U and M Chromosomes Affects Protein and Dietary Fiber Content of Wholemeal Wheat Flour

    PubMed Central

    Rakszegi, Marianna; Molnár, István; Lovegrove, Alison; Darkó, Éva; Farkas, András; Láng, László; Bedő, Zoltán; Doležel, Jaroslav; Molnár-Láng, Márta; Shewry, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Cereal grain fiber is an important health-promoting component in the human diet. One option to improve dietary fiber content and composition in wheat is to introduce genes from its wild relatives Aegilops biuncialis and Aegilops geniculata. This study showed that the addition of chromosomes 2Ug, 4Ug, 5Ug, 7Ug, 2Mg, 5Mg, and 7Mg of Ae. geniculata and 3Ub, 2Mb, 3Mb, and 7Mb of Ae. biuncialis into bread wheat increased the seed protein content. Chromosomes 1Ug and 1Mg increased the proportion of polymeric glutenin proteins, while the addition of chromosomes 1Ub and 6Ub led to its decrease. Both Aegilops species had higher proportions of β-glucan compared to arabinoxylan (AX) than wheat lines, and elevated β-glucan content was also observed in wheat chromosome addition lines 5U, 7U, and 7M. The AX content in wheat was increased by the addition of chromosomes 5Ug, 7Ug, and 1Ub while water-soluble AX was increased by the addition of chromosomes 5U, 5M, and 7M, and to a lesser extent by chromosomes 3, 4, 6Ug, and 2Mb. Chromosomes 5Ug and 7Mb also affected the structure of wheat AX, as shown by the pattern of oligosaccharides released by digestion with endoxylanase. These results will help to map genomic regions responsible for edible fiber content in Aegilops and will contribute to the efficient transfer of wild alleles in introgression breeding programs to obtain wheat varieties with improved health benefits. Key Message: Addition of Aegilops U- and M-genome chromosomes 5 and 7 improves seed protein and fiber content and composition in wheat. PMID:28932231

  7. Biochemical evaluation of sulfur and nitrogen assimilation potential of mustard (Brassica juncea L. Czern. & Coss.) under application of slow-release sulfur fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, A; Abraham, G; Abdin, M Z

    2001-01-01

    Pot experiments were conducted to study the efficacy of a slow sulfur-releasing fertilizer, sulfur glass fritz (SGF 1), on growth, photosynthesis, and sulfur, and nitrogen assimilation potentials of brown mustard (Brassicajuncea L. Czern. & Coss. cv. Pusa Jaikisan). Growth as indicated by biomass accumulation slowed down in response to the application of sulfur glass fritz. A similar trend was observed in the case of photosynthesis rate. The activity of two marker enzymes, ATP-sulfurylase and nitrate reductase, showed very low levels of activity, indicating poor assimilation of sulfur and nitrogen by the plant under sulfur glass fritz. It is therefore concluded that the release of sulfur by sulfur glass fritz is too slow and that the initial nonavailability of sulfur to the plants could lead to suboptimization of both sulfur- and nitrogen-assimilating enzymes. These factors may contribute to low rates of photosynthesis and poor growth.

  8. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of soft tissues and bone in children, adolescents, and young adults: experiences of the CWS and COSS study groups.

    PubMed

    Dantonello, Tobias M; Int-Veen, Christoph; Leuschner, Ivo; Schuck, Andreas; Furtwaengler, Rhoikos; Claviez, Alexander; Schneider, Dominik T; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bielack, Stefan S; Koscielniak, Ewa

    2008-06-01

    Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (MCS) is a rare tumor with a strong tendency toward late recurrences leading to reported 10-year survival rates below 50%. The recommended treatment is resection with wide margins; the effectiveness of chemo- and radiotherapy remain poorly defined. As reports about MCS in young patients are scarce, treatment and outcomes of children/adolescents/young adults in the CWS and COSS studies were investigated. Since 1977, 15 of >7000 CWS and COSS patients

  9. Low temperature-induced necrosis shows phenotypic plasticity in wheat triploid hybrids.

    PubMed

    Takumi, Shigeo; Mizuno, Nobuyuki

    2011-10-01

    Hybrid necrosis sometimes appears in triploid hybrids between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii Coss. Two types of hybrid necrosis (type II and type III) were observed when cultivar Langdon was used as female parent for hybrid production. Type II necrosis symptoms occurred only under low temperature conditions, whereas bushy and dwarf phenotypes were observed under normal temperature conditions. The developmental plasticity might be related to a temperature-responsive alteration of meristematic activity at the crown tissue of triploid hybrids. Epistatic interaction between the AB and D genomes induced not only upregulation of a number of defense-related genes, but also extensive changes in plant architecture in the type II necrosis hybrids. Such phenotypic plasticity was also observed in other cross combinations between cultivated tetraploid wheat and type II necrosis-induced Ae. tauschii accessions. Wild tetraploid wheat, Triticum turgidum subspecies dicoccoides, did not induce type II necrosis in the triploid hybrids, indicating the possibility of identifying the chromosomal location of a causal gene for type II necrosis in the AB genome.

  10. Evidence of natural hybridization between Aegilops geniculata and wheat under field conditions in Central Spain.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Iñigo; Escorial, María Concepción; García-Baudín, José María; Chueca, María Cristina

    2006-01-01

    This study deals with hybrids between Aegilops geniculata and bread wheat, Triticum aestivum L., detected in two Ae. geniculata populations in the "Meseta Central", Spain's central plateau where wheat is a major crop. Morphological traits and pentaploid chromosome numbers were used to identify hybrids in 2004 and 2005. The frequency of hybridization under natural conditions was calculated for one of these populations. Six hybrids were detected from a sample of 3158 seeds from this population. The hybrids were mainly sterile but seed set can be found. This study extends the range of documented hybridization to include central Spain. The potential risks associated with natural hybridization in the context of transgenic wheat cultivation are discussed.

  11. [Hybrids of Aegilops cylindrica Host with Triticum durum Desf. and T. aestivum L].

    PubMed

    Avsenin, V I; Motsnyĭ, A I; Rybalka, A I; Faĭt, V I

    2003-01-01

    The hybrids of durum and bread wheat with Ae. cylindrica have been obtained without using an embryo rescue technique. The hybrid output (of pollinated flower number) in the field conditions scored 1.0, 15.3 and 10.0% in the crosses T. durum x Ae. cylindrica, Ae. cylindrica x T. durum and T. aestivum x Ae. cylindrica, respectively. A high level of meiotic chromosome pairing between homologous D genomes of bread wheat and Aegilops has been revealed (c = 80.0-83.7%). The possibility of homoeological pairing between wheat and Ae. cylindrica chromosomes has been shown. Herewith, the correlation between the levels of homological and homoeological pairing is absent. The possibilities of genetic material interchange, including between the tetraploid species, as well as the using of Ae. cylindrica cytoplasm for durum wheat breeding are discussed.

  12. Tandem repeats on an eco-geographical scale: outcomes from the genome of Aegilops speltoides.

    PubMed

    Raskina, Olga; Brodsky, Leonid; Belyayev, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    The chromosomal pattern of tandem repeat fractions of repetitive DNA is one of the most important characteristics of a species. In the present research, we aimed to detect and evaluate the level of intraspecific variability in the chromosomal distribution of species-specific Spelt 1 and Aegilops-Triticum-specific Spelt 52 tandem repeats in Aegilops speltoides and in closely related diploid and polyploid species. There is a distinct eco-geographical gradient in Spelt 1 and Spelt 52 blocks abundance in Ae. speltoides. In marginal populations, the number of Spelt 1 chromosomal blocks could be 12-14 times lower than in the center of the species distribution. Also, in related diploid species, the abundance of Spelt 52 correlates with evolutionary proximity to Ae. speltoides. Finally, the B- and G-genomes of allopolyploid wheats have Spelt 1 chromosomal distribution patterns similar to those of the types of Ae. speltoides with poor and rich contents of Spelt 1, respectively. The observed changes in numbers of blocks of Spelt 1 and Spelt 52 tandem repeats along the eco-geographical gradient may due to their depletion in the marginal populations as a result of increased recombination frequency under stressful conditions. Alternatively, it may be accumulation of tandem repeats in conducive climatic/edaphic environments in the center of the species' geographical distribution. Anyway, we observe a bidirectional shift of repetitive DNA genomic patterns on the population level leading to the formation of population-specific chromosomal patterns of tandem repeats. The appearance of a new chromosomal pattern is considered an important factor in promoting the emergence of interbreeding barriers.

  13. [RAPD analysis of the intraspecific and interspecific variation and phylogenetic relationships of Aegilops L. species with the U genome].

    PubMed

    Goriunova, S V; Chikida, N N; Kochieva, E Z

    2010-07-01

    RAPD analysis was used to study the genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships of polyploid Aegilops species with the U genome. In total, 115 DNA samples of eight polyploid species containing the U genome and the diploid species Ae. umbellulata (U) were examined. Substantial interspecific polymorphism was observed for the majority of the polyploid species with the U genome (interspecific differences, 0.01-0,2; proportion of polymorphic loci, 56.6-88.2%). Aegilops triuncialis was identified as the only alloploid species with low interspecific polymorphism (interspecific differences, 0-0.01, P = 50%) in the U-genome group. The U-genome Aegilops species proved to be separated from other species of the genus. The phylogenetic relationships were established for the U-genome species. The greatest separation within the U-genome group was observed for the US-genome species Ae. kotschyi and Ae. variabilis. The tetraploid species Ae. triaristata and Ae. columnaris, which had the UX genome, and the hexaploid species Ae. recta (UXN) were found to be related to each other and separate from the UM-genome species. A similarity was observed between the U M-genome species Ae. ovata and Ae. biuncialis, which had the UM genome, and the ancestral diploid U-genome species Ae. umbellulata. The UC-genome species Ae. triuncialis was rather separate and slightly similar to the UX-genome species.

  14. Chromosome Isolation by Flow Sorting in Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and Their Allotetraploid Hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, István; Kubaláková, Marie; Šimková, Hana; Cseh, András; Molnár-Láng, Márta; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential of flow cytometry for chromosome sorting in two wild diploid wheats Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and their natural allotetraploid hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata. Flow karyotypes obtained after the analysis of DAPI-stained chromosomes were characterized and content of chromosome peaks was determined. Peaks of chromosome 1U could be discriminated in flow karyotypes of Ae. umbellulata and Ae. biuncialis and the chromosome could be sorted with purities exceeding 95%. The remaining chromosomes formed composite peaks and could be sorted in groups of two to four. Twenty four wheat SSR markers were tested for their position on chromosomes of Ae. umbellulata and Ae. comosa using PCR on DNA amplified from flow-sorted chromosomes and genomic DNA of wheat-Ae. geniculata addition lines, respectively. Six SSR markers were located on particular Aegilops chromosomes using sorted chromosomes, thus confirming the usefulness of this approach for physical mapping. The SSR markers are suitable for marker assisted selection of wheat-Aegilops introgression lines. The results obtained in this work provide new opportunities for dissecting genomes of wild relatives of wheat with the aim to assist in alien gene transfer and discovery of novel genes for wheat improvement. PMID:22132127

  15. Plasmon analyses of Triticum (wheat) and Aegilops: PCR–single-strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analyses of organellar DNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Zhi; Miyashita, Naohiko T.; Tsunewaki, Koichiro

    1997-01-01

    To investigate phylogenetic relationships among plasmons in Triticum and Aegilops, PCR–single-strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analyses were made of 14.0-kb chloroplast (ct) and 13.7-kb mitochondrial (mt)DNA regions that were isolated from 46 alloplasmic wheat lines and one euplasmic line. These plasmons represent 31 species of the two genera. The ct and mtDNA regions included 10 and 9 structural genes, respectively. A total of 177 bands were detected, of which 40.6% were variable. The proportion of variable bands in ctDNA (51.1%) was higher than that of mtDNA (28.9%). The phylogenetic trees of plasmons, derived by two different models, indicate a common picture of plasmon divergence in the two genera and suggest three major groups of plasmons (Einkorn, Triticum, and Aegilops). Because of uniparental plasmon transmission, the maternal parents of all but one polyploid species were identified. Only one Aegilops species, Ae. speltoides, was included in the Triticum group, suggesting that this species is the plasmon and B and G genome donor of all polyploid wheats. ctDNA variations were more intimately correlated with vegetative characters, whereas mtDNA variations were more closely correlated with reproductive characters. Plasmon divergence among the diploids of the two genera largely paralleled genome divergence. The relative times of origin of the polyploid species were inferred from genetic distances from their putative maternal parents. PMID:9405654

  16. Chromosome isolation by flow sorting in Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and their allotetraploid hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata.

    PubMed

    Molnár, István; Kubaláková, Marie; Šimková, Hana; Cseh, András; Molnár-Láng, Márta; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates the potential of flow cytometry for chromosome sorting in two wild diploid wheats Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and their natural allotetraploid hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata. Flow karyotypes obtained after the analysis of DAPI-stained chromosomes were characterized and content of chromosome peaks was determined. Peaks of chromosome 1U could be discriminated in flow karyotypes of Ae. umbellulata and Ae. biuncialis and the chromosome could be sorted with purities exceeding 95%. The remaining chromosomes formed composite peaks and could be sorted in groups of two to four. Twenty four wheat SSR markers were tested for their position on chromosomes of Ae. umbellulata and Ae. comosa using PCR on DNA amplified from flow-sorted chromosomes and genomic DNA of wheat-Ae. geniculata addition lines, respectively. Six SSR markers were located on particular Aegilops chromosomes using sorted chromosomes, thus confirming the usefulness of this approach for physical mapping. The SSR markers are suitable for marker assisted selection of wheat-Aegilops introgression lines. The results obtained in this work provide new opportunities for dissecting genomes of wild relatives of wheat with the aim to assist in alien gene transfer and discovery of novel genes for wheat improvement.

  17. Safeners coordinately induce the expression of multiple proteins and MRP transcripts involved in herbicide metabolism and detoxification in Triticum tauschii seedling tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Xu, Fangxiu; Lambert, Kris N; Riechers, Dean E

    2007-04-01

    Chemicals called safeners protect cereal crops from herbicide toxicity. Proteomic methods (2-D PAGE and LC-MS/MS) were utilized to identify safener- and/or herbicide-regulated proteins in three tissues (root, leaf, and coleoptile) of Triticum tauschii seedlings to better understand a safener's mechanism of action. Growth experiments showed that the safener cloquintocet-mexyl protected seedlings from injury by the herbicide dimethenamid. In total, 29 safener-induced and 10 herbicide-regulated proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS. These proteins were classified into two major categories based on their expression patterns, and were further classified into several functional groups. Surprisingly, mutually exclusive sets of proteins were identified following herbicide or safener treatment, suggesting that different signaling pathways may be recruited. Safener-responsive proteins, mostly involved in xenobiotic detoxification, also included several new proteins that had not been previously identified as safener-responsive, whereas herbicide-regulated proteins belonged to several classes involved in general stress responses. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) transcripts were highly induced by safeners and two MRP genes were differentially expressed. Our results indicate that safeners protect T. tauschii seedlings from herbicide toxicity by coordinately inducing proteins involved in an entire herbicide detoxification pathway mainly in the coleoptile and root, thereby protecting new leaves from herbicide injury.

  18. UHPLC-PDA-ESI/HRMS/MSn Analysis of Anthocyanins, Flavonol Glycosides, and Hydroxycinnamic Acid Derivatives in Red Mustard Greens (Brassica juncea Coss Variety)

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Long-Ze; Sun, Jianghao; Chen, Pei; Harnly, James

    2013-01-01

    An UHPLC-PDA-ESI/HRMS/MSn profiling method was used for a comprehensive study of the phenolic components of red mustard greens (Brassica juncea Coss variety) and identified 67 anthocyanins, 102 flavonol glycosides, and 40 hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. The glycosylation patterns of the flavonoids were assigned on the basis of direct comparison of the parent flavonoid glycosides with reference compounds. The putative identifications were obtained from tandem mass data analysis and confirmed by the retention time, elution order, and UV–vis and high-resolution mass spectra. Further identifications were made by comparing the UHPLC-PDA-ESI/HRMS/MSn data with those of reference compounds in the polyphenol database and in the literature. Twenty-seven acylated cyanidin 3-sophoroside-5-diglucosides, 24 acylated cyanidin 3-sophoroside-5- glucosides, 3 acylated cyanidin triglucoside-5-glucosides, 37 flavonol glycosides, and 10 hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives were detected for the first time in brassica vegetables. At least 50 of them are reported for the first time in any plant materials. PMID:21970730

  19. Use of near-infrared spectroscopy for screening the individual and total glucosinolate contents in Indian mustard seed (Brassica juncea L. Czern. & Coss.).

    PubMed

    Font, Rafael; Del Río, Mercedes; Fernández-Martínez, José M; De Haro-Bailón, Antonio

    2004-06-02

    The potential of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for screening the sinigrin, gluconapin, 4-hydroxyglucobrassicin, and total glucosinolate contents of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L. Czern. & Coss.) seed was assessed. Intact seed samples of this species were analyzed by NIRS and their reference values regressed against different spectral transformations by modified partial least-squares (MPLS) regression. The coefficients of determination (r (2)) for sinigrin, gluconapin, 4-hydroxyglucobrassicin, and total glucosinolate contents were, respectively, 0.86, 0.95, 0.33, and 0.82. The standard deviation to standard error of prediction (SEP) ratio, and SEP to standard error of laboratory ratio were for these constituents as follows: sinigrin, 2.59 and 2.70; gluconapin, 4.16 and 2.08; 4-hydroxyglucobrassicin, 1.18 and 1.40; and total glucosinolates, 2.18 and 1.60. By comparison of commercial sinigrin spectrum with the first MPLS loadings of the sinigrin equation, it can be concluded that the molecule of sinigrin has a specific signal in the seed spectrum of Brassica.

  20. [The detection of nonallelic to known genes of resistance to Tilletia caries (DC) Tul. in wheat strains from interspecific hybridization (Triticum aestivum x Aegilops cylindrica)].

    PubMed

    Babaiants, L T; Dubinina, L A; Iushchenko, G M

    2000-01-01

    It was established by hybridological analysis that winter bread wheat lines 1/74-91, 3/36-91, 5/55-91 possess single dominant gene of resistance to bunt (Tilletia caries (DC) Tul.), but lines 8/2-91, 5/43-91, 4/11-91 and 8/16-91 have two independent dominant genes for this character. These genes originated from Aegilops cylindrica are not identical to Bt1-Bt17 genes and are unknown to date. The lines were obtained from crosses between winter bread wheat variety Odeskaya polukarlikovaya and Aegilops cylindrica.

  1. Chromosome Specific Substitution Lines of Aegilops geniculata Alter Parameters of Bread Making Quality of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Gupta, Raj Kumar; Kumar, Aman; Kaur, Navneet; Kumar, Rohit; Chunduri, Venkatesh; Sharma, Nand Kishor; Chawla, Meenakshi; Sharma, Saloni; Mundey, Jaspreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Wheat cultivars with wide introgression have strongly impacted global wheat production. Aegilops geniculata (MgUg) is an important wild relative with several useful traits that can be exploited for wheat improvement. Screening of Ae. geniculata addition lines indicated a negative effect of 1Ug and the positive effect of 1Mg chromosome on wheat dough strength. Negative effect of 1Ug is probably associated with variation in number and position of the tripeptide repeat motif in the high molecular weight glutenin (HMW-G) gene. To utilize the positive potential of 1Mg chromosome, three disomic substitution lines (DSLs) 1Mg(1A), 1Mg(1B) and 1Mg(1D) were created. These lines were characterized for morphological, cytogenetic properties and biochemical signatures using FISH, 1D-, 2D-PAGE and RP-HPLC. Contribution of wheat 1A, 1B and 1D chromosomes towards dough mixing and baking parameters, chapatti quality, Fe/Zn content and glume color were identified. Observed order of variation in the dough mixing and baking parameters {1Mg(1D) ≤wheat ≤1Mg(1B) ≤1Mg(1A)} indicated that chromosome specific introgression is desirable for best utilization of wild species’ potential. PMID:27755540

  2. The 2NS Translocation from Aegilops ventricosa Confers Resistance to the Triticum Pathotype of Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, C.D.; Peterson, G.L.; Bockus, W.W.; Kankanala, P.; Dubcovsky, J.; Jordan, K.W.; Akhunov, E.; Chumley, F.; Baldelomar, F.D.; Valent, B.

    2016-01-01

    Wheat blast is a serious disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (Triticum pathotype) (MoT). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the 2NS translocation from Aegilops ventricosa (Zhuk.) Chennav on wheat head and leaf blast resistance. Disease phenotyping experiments were conducted in growth chamber, greenhouse, and field environments. Among 418 cultivars of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), those with 2NS had 50.4 to 72.3% less head blast than those without 2NS when inoculated with an older MoT isolate under growth chamber conditions. When inoculated with recently collected isolates, cultivars with 2NS had 64.0 to 80.5% less head blast. Under greenhouse conditions when lines were inoculated with an older MoT isolate, those with 2NS had a significant head blast reduction. With newer isolates, not all lines with 2NS showed a significant reduction in head blast, suggesting that the genetic background and/or environment may influence the expression of any resistance conferred by 2NS. However, when near-isogenic lines (NILs) with and without 2NS were planted in the field, there was strong evidence that 2NS conferred resistance to head blast. Results from foliar inoculations suggest that the resistance to head infection that is imparted by the 2NS translocation does not confer resistance to foliar disease. In conclusion, the 2NS translocation was associated with significant reductions in head blast in both spring and winter wheat. PMID:27814405

  3. The 2NS Translocation from Aegilops ventricosa Confers Resistance to the Triticum Pathotype of Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Cruz, C D; Peterson, G L; Bockus, W W; Kankanala, P; Dubcovsky, J; Jordan, K W; Akhunov, E; Chumley, F; Baldelomar, F D; Valent, B

    2016-01-01

    Wheat blast is a serious disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (Triticum pathotype) (MoT). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the 2NS translocation from Aegilops ventricosa (Zhuk.) Chennav on wheat head and leaf blast resistance. Disease phenotyping experiments were conducted in growth chamber, greenhouse, and field environments. Among 418 cultivars of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), those with 2NS had 50.4 to 72.3% less head blast than those without 2NS when inoculated with an older MoT isolate under growth chamber conditions. When inoculated with recently collected isolates, cultivars with 2NS had 64.0 to 80.5% less head blast. Under greenhouse conditions when lines were inoculated with an older MoT isolate, those with 2NS had a significant head blast reduction. With newer isolates, not all lines with 2NS showed a significant reduction in head blast, suggesting that the genetic background and/or environment may influence the expression of any resistance conferred by 2NS. However, when near-isogenic lines (NILs) with and without 2NS were planted in the field, there was strong evidence that 2NS conferred resistance to head blast. Results from foliar inoculations suggest that the resistance to head infection that is imparted by the 2NS translocation does not confer resistance to foliar disease. In conclusion, the 2NS translocation was associated with significant reductions in head blast in both spring and winter wheat.

  4. Genetic effect of the Aegilops caudata plasmon on the manifestation of the Ae. cylindrica genome.

    PubMed

    Tsunewaki, Koichiro; Mori, Naoki; Takumi, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    In the course of reconstructing Aegilops caudata from its own genome (CC) and its plasmon, which had passed half a century in common wheat (genome AABBDD), we produced alloplasmic Ae. cylindrica (genome CCDD) with the plasmon of Ae. caudata. This line, designated (caudata)-CCDD, was found to express male sterility in its second substitution backcross generation (SB2) of (caudata)-AABBCCDD pollinated three times with the Ae. cylindrica pollen. We repeatedly backcrossed these SB2 plants with the Ae. cylindrica pollen until the SB5 generation, and SB5F2 progeny were produced by self-pollination of the SB5 plants. Thirteen morphological and physiological characters, including pollen and seed fertilities, of the (caudata)-CCDD SB5F2 were compared with those of the euplasmic Ae. cylindrica. The results indicated that the male sterility expressed by (caudata)-CCDD was due to genetic incompatibility between the Ae. cylindrica genome and Ae. caudata plasmon that did not affect any other characters of Ae. cylindrica. Also, we report that the genome integrity functions in keeping the univalent transmission rate high.

  5. Molecular analysis, cytogenetics and fertility of introgression lines from transgenic wheat to Aegilops cylindrica host.

    PubMed

    Schoenenberger, Nicola; Guadagnuolo, Roberto; Savova-Bianchi, Dessislava; Küpfer, Philippe; Felber, François

    2006-12-01

    Natural hybridization and backcrossing between Aegilops cylindrica and Triticum aestivum can lead to introgression of wheat DNA into the wild species. Hybrids between Ae. cylindrica and wheat lines bearing herbicide resistance (bar), reporter (gus), fungal disease resistance (kp4), and increased insect tolerance (gna) transgenes were produced by pollination of emasculated Ae. cylindrica plants. F1 hybrids were backcrossed to Ae. cylindrica under open-pollination conditions, and first backcrosses were selfed using pollen bags. Female fertility of F1 ranged from 0.03 to 0.6%. Eighteen percent of the sown BC1s germinated and flowered. Chromosome numbers ranged from 30 to 84 and several of the plants bore wheat-specific sequence-characterized amplified regions (SCARs) and the bar gene. Self fertility in two BC1 plants was 0.16 and 5.21%, and the others were completely self-sterile. Among 19 BC1S1 individuals one plant was transgenic, had 43 chromosomes, contained the bar gene, and survived glufosinate treatments. The other BC1S1 plants had between 28 and 31 chromosomes, and several of them carried SCARs specific to wheat A and D genomes. Fertility of these plants was higher under open-pollination conditions than by selfing and did not necessarily correlate with even or euploid chromosome number. Some individuals having supernumerary wheat chromosomes recovered full fertility.

  6. An Aegilops ventricosa Translocation Confers Resistance Against Root-knot Nematodes to Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Valerie M.; Thomas, Varghese; Ferris, Howard; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Root knot nematodes (RKN; Meloidogyne spp.) cause severe losses worldwide to a wide range of crops. Crop rotations with resistant hosts can be used to control losses, but the wide host range of RKN limits this option. In this study, we found that the wheat cultivar Lassik is resistant to several isolates of the RKN species M. incognita and M. javanica, including those that can reproduce on tomato with the resistance gene Mi-1. Comparison of near-isogenic lines of wheat showed that the wheat resistance gene(s) is localized within a segment of the short arm of chromosome 2N from Aegilops ventricosa (Zhuk.) Chennav translocated into common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) chromosome arm 2AS and is associated with a highly significant decrease in RKN eggs in the roots. This RKN resistance gene has been assigned the name Rkn3. While wheat itself is tolerant of RKN infection, a microplot experiment coupled with tomato bioassays showed less RKN root galling in the tomato samples grown in soil from the previous microplots including RKN resistant wheat varieties than in those including a susceptible wheat isogenic line. This result suggests that rotation with Rkn3 resistant wheat cultivars has the potential to be a valuable component of nematode management for crops that are highly susceptible to nematode damage and for which alternative strategies are limited. PMID:27182071

  7. Cytological identification of an Aegilops variabilis chromosome carrying stripe rust resistance in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Laibin; Ning, Shunzong; Yu, Jianjun; Hao, Ming; Zhang, Lianquan; Yuan, Zhongwei; Zheng, Youliang; Liu, Dengcai

    2016-01-01

    Aegilops variabilis (UUSvSv), an important sources for wheat improvement, originated from chromosome doubling of a natural hybrid between Ae. umbellulata (UU) with Ae. longissima (SlSl). The Ae. variabilis karyotype was poorly characterized by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The FISH probe combination of pSc119.2, pTa71 and pTa-713 identified each of the 14 pairs of Ae. variabilis chromosomes. Our FISH ideogram was further used to detect an Ae. variabilis chromosome carrying stripe rust resistance in the background of wheat lines developed from crosses of the stripe rust susceptible bread wheat cultivar Yiyuan 2 with a resistant Ae. variabilis accession. Among the 15 resistant BC1F7 lines, three were 2Sv + 4Sv addition lines (2n = 46) and 12 were 2Sv(2B) or 2Sv(2D) substitution lines that were confirmed with SSR markers. SSR marker gwm148 can be used to trace 2Sv in common wheat background. Chromosome 2Sv probably carries gametocidal(Gc) gene(s) since cytological instability and chromosome structural variations, including non-homologous translocations, were observed in some lines with this chromosome. Due to the effects of photoperiod genes, substitution lines 2Sv(2D) and 2Sv(2B) exhibited late heading with 2Sv(2D) lines being later than 2Sv(2B) lines. 2Sv(2D) substitution lines were also taller and exhibited higher spikelet numbers and longer spikes. PMID:27795677

  8. Patterns of introduction and adaptation during the invasion of Aegilops triuncialis (Poaceae) into Californian serpentine soils.

    PubMed

    Meimberg, Harald; Milan, Neil F; Karatassiou, Maria; Espeland, Erin K; McKay, John K; Rice, Kevin J

    2010-12-01

    Multiple introductions can play a prominent role in explaining the success of biological invasions. One often cited mechanism is that multiple introductions of invasive species prevent genetic bottlenecks by parallel introductions of several distinct genotypes that, in turn, provide heritable variation necessary for local adaptation. Here, we show that the invasion of Aegilops triuncialis into California, USA, involved multiple introductions that may have facilitated invasion into serpentine habitats. Using microsatellite markers, we compared the polymorphism and genetic structure of populations of Ae. triuncialis invading serpentine soils in California to that of accessions from its native range. In a glasshouse study, we also compared phenotypic variation in phenological and fitness traits between invasive and native populations grown on loam soil and under serpentine edaphic conditions. Molecular analysis of invasive populations revealed that Californian populations cluster into three independent introductions (i.e. invasive lineages). Our glasshouse common garden experiment found that all Californian populations exhibited higher fitness under serpentine conditions. However, the three invasive lineages appear to represent independent pathways of adaptation to serpentine soil. Our results suggest that the rapid invasion of serpentine habitats in California may have been facilitated by the existence of colonizing Eurasian genotypes pre-adapted to serpentine soils. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Diversity of fungal endophytes in recent and ancient wheat ancestors Triticum dicoccoides and Aegilops sharonensis.

    PubMed

    Ofek-Lalzar, Maya; Gur, Yonatan; Ben-Moshe, Sapir; Sharon, Or; Kosman, Evsey; Mochli, Elad; Sharon, Amir

    2016-10-01

    Endophytes have profound impacts on plants, including beneficial effects on agriculturally important traits. We hypothesized that endophytes in wild plants include beneficial endophytes that are absent or underrepresented in domesticated crops. In this work, we studied the structure of endophyte communities in wheat-related grasses, Triticum dicoccoides and Aegilops sharonensis, and compared it to an endophyte community from wheat (T. aeastivum). Endophytes were isolated by cultivation and by cultivation-independent methods. In total, 514 intergenic spacer region sequences from single cultures were analyzed. Categorization at 97% sequence similarity resulted in 67 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that were evenly distributed between the different plant species. A narrow core community of Alternaria spp. was found in all samples, but each plant species also contained a significant portion of unique endophytes. The cultivation-independent analysis identified a larger number of OTUs than the cultivation method, half of which were singletons or doubletons. For OTUs with a relative abundance >0.5%, similar numbers were obtained by both methods. Collectively, our data show that wild grass relatives of wheat contain a wealth of taxonomically diverse fungal endophytes that are not found in modern wheat, some of which belong to taxa with known beneficial effects. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Genetic differentiation and post-glacial establishment of the geographical distribution in Aegilops caudata L.

    PubMed

    Ohta, S

    2000-08-01

    Aegilops caudata L. is a diploid wild relative of wheat distributed over the north-eastern Mediterranean from Greece to northern Iraq. To elucidate the geographical differentiation pattern, 35 accessions derived from the entire distribution area were crossed with four Tester strains. Pollen fertility in the F1 hybrids varied from 0 to 96.3% among cross combinations, closely correlating with the geographical regions where the parental accessions were collected. Based on the intraspecific hybrid sterility, the present distribution area of Ae. caudata was divided into two geographical regions effectively isolated by the mountainous region lying between West Anatolia and Central Anatolia. The western region is composed of Greece and West Anatolia, while the eastern region consists of Central Anatolia, South Anatolia, East Anatolia and northern Iraq. The present results and the facts from recent palaeopalynological works suggest that during the maximum glacial period from 18,000 BP to 16,000 BP, Ae. caudata occurred in the two isolated regions, i.e., the region surrounding the Aegean Sea and the western Levant or some sheltered habitats in the East Taurus/Zagros mountains arc, and that it migrated into Central and East Anatolia from the latter regions as the climate became warmer. Furthermore, it is also suggested that the Levant populations now occur in the eastern region of the distribution, while those occurring in the Aegean Sea region during the last glacial period now occupy the western region of the distribution.

  11. Molecular characterization and dynamic expression patterns of two types of γ-gliadin genes from Aegilops and Triticum species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shunli; Shen, Xixi; Ge, Pei; Li, Jie; Subburaj, Saminathan; Li, Xiaohui; Zeller, F J; Hsam, S L K; Yan, Yueming

    2012-11-01

    Gliadins were the major components of wheat storage proteins and determine the extensibility properties of gluten dough. In this work, 19 new full-length γ-gliadin genes were isolated from various Aegilops and Triticum species. Sequence characterization showed that a specific octapeptide and celiac disease (CD)-toxic epitope Gliγ-3 (VQGQGIIQPQQPAQL) were present in the rich glutamine domain and C-terminal non-repetitive domain, respectively. Based on the sequence features of both peptides, a new classification system for γ-gliadin gene family was established, in which γ-gliadins were classified into two types (types I and II) with each consisting of two groups. An uneven distribution of different types and groups of γ-gliadin genes was exhibited among 11 Aegilops and Triticum genomes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that types I and II genes diverged at about 14 MYA while the divergence of 4 γ-gliadin group genes occurred at around 10 MYA almost simultaneously. The γ-gliadin genes from S(l) and B genomes displayed a different transcriptional expression pattern during grain development, and rapid increasing of gliadin mRNA and proteins occurred at 15-20 DPA. In addition, genome-specific variations of CD-toxic epitopes among Aegilops and Triticum genomes were found. The A genome and its related progenitor genomes A(u) and A(m) had fewer CD epitopes than other genomes, suggesting that these genomes might be valuable gene resources to remove CD toxic peptides for wheat quality improvement.

  12. [Effect of an introgression from Aegilops cylindrica host on manifestation of productivity traits in winter common wheat F2 plants].

    PubMed

    Kozub, N A; Sozinov, I A; sozinov, A A

    2004-12-01

    The effect of introgression of a chromosome 1D segment from Aegilops cylindrica to winter common wheat on productivity traits in F2 plants was studied using storage protein loci as genetic markers. An allele of the gliadin-coding Gli-D1 locus served as a marker of the introgression. Using of two- and three-locus interaction models, it was shown that the introgression tagged with Gli-D1 affected the manifestation of productivity traits (productive tillering, grain weight per plant and grain number per plant) through interaction with other marker storage protein loci: Glu-B1, Glu-D1, and Gli-B2.

  13. Tandemly Duplicated Safener-Induced Glutathione S-Transferase Genes from Triticum tauschii Contribute to Genome- and Organ-Specific Expression in Hexaploid Wheat1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fangxiu; Lagudah, Evans S.; Moose, Stephen P.; Riechers, Dean E.

    2002-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene expression was examined in several Triticum species, differing in genome constitution and ploidy level, to determine genome contribution to GST expression in cultivated, hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum). Two tandemly duplicated tau class GST genes (TtGSTU1 and TtGSTU2) were isolated from a single bacterial artificial chromosome clone in a library constructed from the diploid wheat and D genome progenitor to cultivated wheat, Triticum tauschii. The genes are very similar in genomic structure and their encoded proteins are 95% identical. Gene-specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed differential transcript accumulation of TtGSTU1 and TtGSTU2 in roots and shoots. Expression of both genes was induced by herbicide safeners, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and abscisic acid, in the shoots of T. tauschii; however, expression of TtGSTU1 was always higher than TtGSTU2. In untreated seedlings, TtGSTU1 was expressed in both shoots and roots, whereas TtGSTU2 expression was only detected in roots. RNA gel-blot analysis of ditelosomic, aneuploid lines that are deficient for 6AS, 6BS, or 6DS chromosome arms of cultivated, hexaploid bread wheat showed differential genome contribution to safener-induced GST expression in shoots compared with roots. The GST genes from the D genome of hexaploid wheat contribute most to safener-induced expression in the shoots, whereas GSTs from the B and D genomes contribute to safener-induced expression in the roots. PMID:12226515

  14. Tandemly duplicated Safener-induced glutathione S-transferase genes from Triticum tauschii contribute to genome- and organ-specific expression in hexaploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangxiu; Lagudah, Evans S; Moose, Stephen P; Riechers, Dean E

    2002-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene expression was examined in several Triticum species, differing in genome constitution and ploidy level, to determine genome contribution to GST expression in cultivated, hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum). Two tandemly duplicated tau class GST genes (TtGSTU1 and TtGSTU2) were isolated from a single bacterial artificial chromosome clone in a library constructed from the diploid wheat and D genome progenitor to cultivated wheat, Triticum tauschii. The genes are very similar in genomic structure and their encoded proteins are 95% identical. Gene-specific reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed differential transcript accumulation of TtGSTU1 and TtGSTU2 in roots and shoots. Expression of both genes was induced by herbicide safeners, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and abscisic acid, in the shoots of T. tauschii; however, expression of TtGSTU1 was always higher than TtGSTU2. In untreated seedlings, TtGSTU1 was expressed in both shoots and roots, whereas TtGSTU2 expression was only detected in roots. RNA gel-blot analysis of ditelosomic, aneuploid lines that are deficient for 6AS, 6BS, or 6DS chromosome arms of cultivated, hexaploid bread wheat showed differential genome contribution to safener-induced GST expression in shoots compared with roots. The GST genes from the D genome of hexaploid wheat contribute most to safener-induced expression in the shoots, whereas GSTs from the B and D genomes contribute to safener-induced expression in the roots.

  15. Characterization and mapping of cryptic alien introgression from Aegilops geniculata with new leaf rust and stripe rust resistance genes Lr57 and Yr40 in wheat.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Leaf rust and stripe rust are important foliar diseases of wheat worldwide. Leaf rust and stripe rust resistant introgression lines were developed by induced homoeologous chromosome pairing between wheat chromosome 5D and 5Mg of Aegilops geniculata (UgMg). Characterization of rust resistant BC2F5 a...

  16. Development of wheat-Aegilops speltoides recombinants and simple PCR-based markers for stem rust resistance genes on the 2S#1 chromosome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wild relatives of wheat are important but underutilized resources for new rust resistance genes because linked negative traits often hinder deployment of these genes in commercial wheats. Here we report reduced alien chromatin recombinants derived from E.R. Sears' wheat-Aegilops speltoides transloca...

  17. Development of wheat-Aegilops speltoides recombinants and simple PCR-based markers for stem rust resistance genes on the 2S#1 chromosome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wild relatives of wheat are important but underutilized resources for new rust resistance genes because linked negative traits often hinder deployment of these genes in commercial wheats. Here we report reduced alien chromatin recombinants derived from E.R. Sears wheat-Aegilops speltoides translocat...

  18. Development of a diagnostic co-dominant marker for stem rust resistance gene Sr47 introgressed from Aegilops speltoides into durum wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stem rust (caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, abbreviated as Pgt) resistance gene Sr47, originally transferred from Aegilops speltoides to durum wheat (Triticum turgidum subsp. durum) line DAS15, confers a high level of resistance to Pgt race TTKSK (known as Ug99). Recently, the durum Rust...

  19. Genetic compensation abilities of Aegilops speltoides chromosomes for homoeologous B-genome chromosomes of polyploid wheat in disomic S(B) chromosome substitution lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The S genome of Aegilops speltoides is closely related to the B and G genomes of polyploid wheats. However, little work has been reported on the genetic relationships between the S-genome and B-genome chromosomes of polyploid wheat. Here we report the isolation of a set of disomic substitutions (DS)...

  20. Chromosome evolution in marginal populations of Aegilops speltoides: causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Belyayev, Alexander; Raskina, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Background Genome restructuring is an ongoing process in natural plant populations. The influence of environmental changes on the genome is crucial, especially during periods of extreme climatic fluctuations. Interactions between the environment and the organism manifest to the greatest extent at the limits of the species' ecological niche. Thus, marginal populations are expected to exhibit lower genetic diversity and higher genetic differentiation than central populations, and some models assume that marginal populations play an important role in the maintenance and generation of biological diversity. Scope In this review, long-term data on the cytogenetic characteristics of diploid Aegilops speltoides Tauch populations are summarized and discussed. This species is distributed in and around the Fertile Crescent and is proposed to be the wild progenitor of a number of diploid and polyploid wheat species. In marginal populations of Ae. speltoides, numerical chromosomal aberrations, spontaneous aneuploidy, B-chromosomes, rDNA cluster repatterning and reduction in the species-specific and tribe-specific tandem repeats have been detected. Significant changes were observed and occurred in parallel with changes in plant morphology and physiology. Conclusions Considerable genomic variation at the chromosomal level was found in the marginal populations of Ae. speltoides. It is likely that a specific combination of gene mutations and chromosomal repatterning has produced the evolutionary trend in each specific case, i.e. for a particular species or group of related species in a given period of time and in a certain habitat. The appearance of a new chromosomal pattern is considered an important factor in promoting the emergence of interbreeding barriers. PMID:23393097

  1. Genotypic variation in tetraploid wheat affecting homoeologous pairing in hybrids with Aegilops peregrina.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, H; Feldman, M

    2001-12-01

    The Ph1 gene has long been considered the main factor responsible for the diploid-like meiotic behavior of polyploid wheat. This dominant gene, located on the long arm of chromosome 5B (5BL), suppresses pairing of homoeologous chromosomes in polyploid wheat and in their hybrids with related species. Here we report on the discovery of genotypic variation among tetraploid wheats in the control of homoeologous pairing. Compared with the level of homoeologous pairing in hybrids between Aegilops peregrina and the bread wheat cultivar Chinese Spring (CS), significantly higher levels of homoeologous pairing were obtained in hybrids between Ae. peregrina and CS substitution lines in which chromosome 5B of CS was replaced by either 5B of Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides line 09 (TTD09) or 5G of Triticum timopheevii ssp. timopheevii line 01 (TIMO1). Similarly, a higher level of homoeologous pairing was found in the hybrid between Ae. peregrina and a substitution line of CS in which chromosome arm 5BL of line TTD140 substituted for 5BL of CS. It appears that the observed effect on the level of pairing is exerted by chromosome arm 5BL of T turgidum ssp. dicoccoides, most probably by an allele of Ph1. Searching for variation in the control of homoeologous pairing among lines of wild tetraploid wheat, either T turgidum ssp. dicoccoides or T timopheevii ssp. armeniacum, showed that hybrids between Ae. peregrina and lines of these two wild wheats exhibited three different levels of homoeologous pairing: low, low intermediate, and high intermediate. The low-intermediate and high-intermediate genotypes may possess weak alleles of Ph1. The three different T turgidum ssp. dicoccoides pairing genotypes were collected from different geographical regions in Israel, indicating that this trait may have an adaptive value. The availability of allelic variation at the Ph1 locus may facilitate the mapping, tagging, and eventually the isolation of this important gene.

  2. Network analysis provides insights into evolution of 5S rDNA arrays in Triticum and Aegilops.

    PubMed Central

    Allaby, R G; Brown, T A

    2001-01-01

    We have used network analysis to study gene sequences of the Triticum and Aegilops 5S rDNA arrays, as well as the spacers of the 5S-DNA-A1 and 5S-DNA-2 loci. Network analysis describes relationships between 5S rDNA sequences in a more realistic fashion than conventional tree building because it makes fewer assumptions about the direction of evolution, the extent of sexual isolation, and the pattern of ancestry and descent. The networks show that the 5S rDNA sequences of Triticum and Aegilops species are related in a reticulate manner around principal nodal sequences. The spacer networks have multiple principal nodes of considerable antiquity but the gene network has just one principal node, corresponding to the correct gene sequence. The networks enable orthologous groups of spacer sequences to be identified. When orthologs are compared it is seen that the patterns of intra- and interspecific diversity are similar for both genes and spacers. We propose that 5S rDNA arrays combine sequence conservation with a large store of mutant variations, the number of correct gene copies within an array being the result of neutral processes that act on gene and spacer regions together. PMID:11238418

  3. NAD-dependent aromatic alcohol dehydrogenase in wheats (Triticum L.) and goatgrasses (Aegilops L.): evolutionary genetics.

    PubMed

    Jaaska, V

    1984-04-01

    Evolutionary electrophoretic variation of a NAD-specific aromatic alcohol dehydrogenase, AADH-E, in wheat and goatgrass species is described and discussed in comparison with a NAD-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-A) and a NADP-dependent AADH-B studied previously. Cultivated tetraploid emmer wheats (T. turgidum s. l.) and hexaploid bread wheats (T. aestivum s. l.) are all fixed for a heterozygous triplet, E(0.58)/E(0.64). The slowest isoenzyme, E(0.58), is controlled by a homoeoallelic gene on the chromosome arm 6AL of T. aestivum cv. 'Chinese Spring' and is inherent in all diploid wheats, T. monococcum s. Str., T. boeoticum s. l. and T. urartu. The fastest isoenzyme, E(0.64), is presumably controlled by the B- and D-genome homoeoalleles of the bread wheat and is the commonest alloenzyme of diploid goat-grasses, including Ae. speltaides and Ae. tauschii. The tetraploid T. timopheevii s. str. has a particular heterozygous triplet E(0.56)/E(0.71), whereas the hexaploid T. zhukovskyi exhibited polymorphism with electromorphs characteristic of T. timopheevii and T. monococcum. Wild tetraploid wheats, T. dicoccoides and T. araraticum, showed partially homologous intraspecific variation of AADH-E with heterozygous triplets E(0.58)/E(0.64) (the commonest), E(0.58)/E(0.71), E(0.45)/E(0.58), E(0.48)/E(0.58) and E(0.56)/E(0.58) recorded. Polyploid goatgrasses of the D-genome group, excepting Ae. cylindrica, are fixed for the common triplet E(0.58)/E(0.64). Ae. cylindrica and polyploid goatgrasses of the C(u)-genome group, excepting Ae. kotschyi, are homozygous for E(0.64). Ae. kotschyi is exceptional, showing fixed heterozygosity for both AADH-E and ADH-A with unique triplets E(0.56)/E(0.64) and A(0.49)/A(0.56).

  4. [Molecular marker mapping of the gene resistant to common bunt transferred from Aegilops cylindrica into bread wheat].

    PubMed

    Galaev, A V; Babaiants, L T; Sivolap, Iu M

    2006-01-01

    Introgression lines 5/55-91 and 378/2000 of bread wheat contain the gene of resistance to Tilletia caries (DC.) Tul. transferred from Aegilops cylindrica Host. Using bulked segregant analysis with ISSR and SSR PCR the lincage of microsatellite locus Xgwm 259 with the gene of common bunt resistance has been identified in F2 population of 378/2000 x Lutestens 23397. DNA mapping made it possible to localize this highly effective gene in the intercalary region of the long arm of wheat chromosome 1B at the distance of 7.6-8.5 cM of the microsatellite Xgwm 259 locus which thus can be used in wheat breeding for selection of genotype resistance to common bunt.

  5. Genetic mechanisms of allopolyploid speciation through hybrid genome doubling: novel insights from wheat (Triticum and Aegilops) studies.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Takumi, Shigeo; Nasuda, Shuhei

    2014-01-01

    Polyploidy, which arises through complex genetic and ecological processes, is an important mode of plant speciation. This review provides an overview of recent advances in understanding why plant polyploid species are so ubiquitous and diverse. We consider how the modern framework for understanding genetic mechanisms of speciation could be used to study allopolyploid speciation that occurs through hybrid genome doubling, that is, whole genome doubling of interspecific F1 hybrids by the union of male and female unreduced gametes. We outline genetic and ecological mechanisms that may have positive or negative impacts on the process of allopolyploid speciation through hybrid genome doubling. We also discuss the current status of studies on the underlying genetic mechanisms focusing on the wheat (Triticum and Aegilops) hybrid-specific reproductive phenomena that are well known but deserve renewed attention from an evolutionary viewpoint.

  6. Allocation of the S-genome chromosomes of Aegilops variabilis Eig. carrying powdery mildew resistance in triticale (× Triticosecale Wittmack).

    PubMed

    Kwiatek, M; Belter, J; Majka, M; Wiśniewska, H

    2016-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that the powdery mildew adult plant resistance (APR) controlled by the Pm13 gene in Aegilops longissima Schweinf. & Muschl. (S(l)S(l)) has been evolutionary transferred to Aegilops variabilis Eig. (UUSS). The molecular marker analysis and the visual evaluation of powdery mildew symptoms in Ae. variabilis and the Ae. variabilis × Secale cereale amphiploid forms (2n = 6x = 42, UUSSRR) showed the presence of product that corresponded to Pm13 marker and the lower infection level compared to susceptible model, respectively. This study also describes the transfer of Ae. variabilis Eig. (2n = 4x = 28, U(v)U(v)S(v)S(v)) chromosomes, carrying powdery mildew resistance, into triticale (× Triticosecale Wittm., 2n = 6x = 42, AABBRR) using Ae. variabilis × S. cereale amphiploid forms. The individual chromosomes of Ae. variabilis, triticale 'Lamberto' and hybrids were characterized by genomic and fluorescence in situ hybridization (GISH/FISH). The chromosome configurations of obtained hybrid forms were studied at first metaphase of meiosis of pollen mother cells (PMCs) using GISH. The statistical analysis showed that the way of S-genome chromosome pairing and transmission to subsequent hybrid generations was diploid-like and had no influence on chromosome pairing of triticale chromosomes. The cytogenetic study of hybrid forms were supported by the marker-assisted selection using Pm13 marker and visual evaluation of natural infection by Blumeria graminis, that allowed to select the addition or substitution lines of hybrids carrying chromosome 3S(v) which were tolerant to the powdery mildew infection.

  7. AB-QTL analysis in winter wheat: I. Synthetic hexaploid wheat (T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides x T. tauschii) as a source of favourable alleles for milling and baking quality traits.

    PubMed

    Kunert, Antje; Naz, Ali Ahmad; Dedeck, Oliver; Pillen, Klaus; Léon, Jens

    2007-09-01

    The advanced backcross QTL (AB-QTL) strategy was utilised to locate quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for baking quality traits in two BC(2)F(3) populations of winter wheat. The backcrosses are derived from two German winter wheat cultivars, Batis and Zentos, and two synthetic, hexaploid wheat accessions, Syn022 and Syn086. The synthetics originate from hybridisations of wild emmer (T. turgidum spp. dicoccoides) and T. tauschii, rather than from durum wheat and T. tauschii and thus allowed for the first time to test for exotic QTL effects on wheat genomes A and B in addition to genome D. The investigated quality traits comprised hectolitre weight, grain hardness, flour yield Type 550, falling number, grain protein content, sedimentation volume and baking volume. One hundred and forty-nine SSR markers were applied to genotype a total of 400 BC(2)F(3) lines. For QTL detection, a mixed-model ANOVA was conducted, including the effects DNA marker, BC(2)F(3) line, environment and marker x environment interaction. Overall 38 QTLs significant for a marker main effect were detected. The exotic allele improved trait performance at 14 QTLs (36.8%), while the elite genotype contributed the favourable effect at 24 QTLs (63.2%). The favourable exotic alleles were mainly associated with grain protein content, though the greatest improvement of trait performance due to the exotic alleles was achieved for the traits falling number and sedimentation volume. At the QTL on chromosome 4B the exotic allele increased the falling number by 19.6% and at the QTL on chromosome 6D the exotic allele led to an increase of the sedimentation volume by 21.7%. The results indicate that synthetic wheat derived from wild emmer x T. tauschii carries favourable QTL alleles for baking quality traits, which might be useful for breeding improved wheat varieties by marker-assisted selection.

  8. Variations in a hotspot region of chloroplast DNAs among common wheat and Aegilops revealed by nucleotide sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chang-Hong; Terachi, Toru

    2005-08-01

    The second largest BamHI fragment (B2) of the chloroplast DNA in Triticum (wheat) and Aegilops contains a highly variable region (a hotspot), resulting in four types of B2 of different size, i.e. B2l (10.5kb), B2m (10.2kb), B2 (9.6kb) and B2s (9.4kb). In order to gain a better understanding of the molecular nature of the variations in length and explain unexpected identity among B2 of Ae. ovata, Ae. speltoides and common wheat (T. aestivum), the nucleotide sequence between a stop codon of rbcL and a HindIII site in cemA in the hotspot was determined for Ae. ovata, Ae. speltoides, Ae. caudata and Ae. mutica. The total number of nucleotides in the region was 2808, 2810, 3302, and 3594 bp, for Ae. speltoides, Ae. ovata, Ae. caudata and Ae. mutica, respectively, and the sequences were compared with the corresponding ones of Ae. crassa 4x, T. aestivum and Ae. squarrosa. Compared with the largest B2l fragment of Ae. mutica, a 791bp and a 793 bp deletion were found in Ae. speltoides and Ae. ovata, respectively, and the possible site of deletion in the two species is the same as that of T. aestivum. However, a deleted segment in Ae. ovata is 2 bp longer than that of Ae. speltoides (and T. aestivum), demonstrating that recurrent deletions had occurred in the chloroplast genomes of both species. Comparison of the sequences from Ae. caudata and Ae. crassa 4x with that of Ae. mutica revealed a 289 bp and a 61 bp deletion at the same site in Ae. caudata and Ae. crassa 4x, respectively. Sequence comparison using wild Aegilops plants showed that the large length variations in a hotspot are fixed to each species. A considerable number of polymorphisms are observed in a loop in the 3' of rbcL. The study reveals the relative importance of the large and small indels and minute inversions to account for variations in the chloroplast genomes among closely related species.

  9. Chemical interactions between plants in Mediterranean vegetation: the influence of selected plant extracts on Aegilops geniculata metabolome.

    PubMed

    Scognamiglio, Monica; Fiumano, Vittorio; D'Abrosca, Brigida; Esposito, Assunta; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Fiorentino, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    Allelopathy is the chemical mediated communication among plants. While on one hand there is growing interest in the field, on the other hand it is still debated as doubts exist at different levels. A number of compounds have been reported for their ability to influence plant growth, but the existence of this phenomenon in the field has rarely been demonstrated. Furthermore, only few studies have reported the uptake and the effects at molecular level of the allelochemicals. Allelopathy has been reported on some plants of Mediterranean vegetation and could contribute to structuring this ecosystem. Sixteen plants of Mediterranean vegetation have been selected and studied by an NMR-based metabolomics approach. The extracts of these donor plants have been characterized in terms of chemical composition and the effects on a selected receiving plant, Aegilops geniculata, have been studied both at the morphological and at the metabolic level. Most of the plant extracts employed in this study were found to have an activity, which could be correlated with the presence of flavonoids and hydroxycinnamate derivatives. These plant extracts affected the receiving plant in different ways, with different rates of growth inhibition at morphological level. The results of metabolomic analysis of treated plants suggested the induction of oxidative stress in all the receiving plants treated with active donor plant extracts, although differences were observed among the responses. Finally, the uptake and transport into receiving plant leaves of different metabolites present in the extracts added to the culture medium were observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Introgression of leaf rust and stripe rust resistance from Sharon goatgrass (Aegilops sharonensis Eig) into bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Millet, E; Manisterski, J; Ben-Yehuda, P; Distelfeld, A; Deek, J; Wan, A; Chen, X; Steffenson, B J

    2014-06-01

    Leaf rust and stripe rust are devastating wheat diseases, causing significant yield losses in many regions of the world. The use of resistant varieties is the most efficient way to protect wheat crops from these diseases. Sharon goatgrass (Aegilops sharonensis or AES), which is a diploid wild relative of wheat, exhibits a high frequency of leaf and stripe rust resistance. We used the resistant AES accession TH548 and induced homoeologous recombination by the ph1b allele to obtain resistant wheat recombinant lines carrying AES chromosome segments in the genetic background of the spring wheat cultivar Galil. The gametocidal effect from AES was overcome by using an "anti-gametocidal" wheat mutant. These recombinant lines were found resistant to highly virulent races of the leaf and stripe rust pathogens in Israel and the United States. Molecular DArT analysis of the different recombinant lines revealed different lengths of AES segments on wheat chromosome 6B, which indicates the location of both resistance genes.

  11. Transfer of useful variability of high grain iron and zinc from Aegilops kotschyi into wheat through seed irradiation approach.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shailender Kumar; Kumar, Satish; Sheikh, Imran; Malik, Sachin; Mathpal, Priyanka; Chugh, Vishal; Kumar, Sundip; Prasad, Ramasare; Dhaliwal, Harcharan Singh

    2016-01-01

    To transfer the 2S chromosomal fragment(s) of Aegilops kotschyi (2S(k)) into the bread wheat genome which could lead to the biofortification of wheat with high grain iron and zinc content. Wheat-Ae. kotschyi 2A/2S(k) substitution lines with high grain iron and zinc content were used to transfer the gene/loci for high grain Fe and Zn content into wheat using seed irradiation approach. Bread wheat plants derived from 40 krad-irradiated seeds showed the presence of univalents and multivalents during meiotic metaphase-I. Genomic in situ hybridization analysis of seed irradiation hybrid F2 seedlings showed several terminal and interstitial signals indicated the introgression of Ae. kotschyi chromosome segments. This proves the efficacy of seed radiation hybrid approach in gene transfer experiments. All the radiation-treated hybrid plants with high grain Fe and Zn content were analyzed with wheat group 2 chromosome-specific polymorphic simple sequence repeat markers to identify the introgression of small alien chromosome fragment(s). Radiation-induced hybrids showed more than 65% increase in grain iron and 54% increase in Zn contents with better harvest index than the elite wheat cultivar WL711 indicating effective and compensating translocations of 2S(k) fragments into wheat genome.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of HMW Glutenin Subunits from 1Sl Genome of Aegilops longissima Positively Affecting Wheat Breadmaking Quality

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Li, Xiaohui; Ma, Wujun; Weißgerber, H.; Zeller, Friedrich; Hsam, Sai; Yan, Yueming

    2013-01-01

    A wheat cultivar “Chinese Spring” chromosome substitution line CS-1Sl(1B), in which the 1B chromosome was substituted by 1Sl from Aegilops longissima, was developed and found to possess superior dough and breadmaking quality. The molecular mechanism of its super quality conformation is studied in the aspects of high molecular glutenin genes, protein accumulation patterns, glutenin polymeric proteins, protein bodies, starch granules, and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and PDI-like protein expressions. Results showed that the introduced HMW-GS 1Sl×2.3* and 1Sly16* in the substitution line possesses long repetitive domain, making both be larger than any known x- and y-type subunits from B genome. The introduced subunit genes were also found to have a higher level of mRNA expressions during grain development, resulting in more HMW-GS accumulation in the mature grains. A higher abundance of PDI and PDI-like proteins was observed which possess a known function of assisting disulfide bond formation. Larger HMW-GS deposited in protein bodies were also found in the substitution line. The CS substitution line is expected to be highly valuable in wheat quality improvement since the novel HMW-GS are located on chromosome 1Sl, making it possible to combine with the known superior D×5+Dy10 subunits encoded by Glu-D1 for developing high quality bread wheat. PMID:23593125

  13. Flow sorting of C-genome chromosomes from wild relatives of wheat Aegilops markgrafii, Ae. triuncialis and Ae. cylindrica, and their molecular organization

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, István; Vrána, Jan; Farkas, András; Kubaláková, Marie; Cseh, András; Molnár-Láng, Márta; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Aegilops markgrafii (CC) and its natural hybrids Ae. triuncialis (UtUtCtCt) and Ae. cylindrica (DcDcCcCc) represent a rich reservoir of useful genes for improvement of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), but the limited information available on their genome structure and the shortage of molecular (cyto-) genetic tools hamper the utilization of the extant genetic diversity. This study provides the complete karyotypes in the three species obtained after fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with repetitive DNA probes, and evaluates the potential of flow cytometric chromosome sorting. Methods The flow karyotypes obtained after the analysis of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained chromosomes were characterized and the chromosome content of the peaks on the flow karyotypes was determined by FISH. Twenty-nine conserved orthologous set (COS) markers covering all seven wheat homoeologous chromosome groups were used for PCR with DNA amplified from flow-sorted chromosomes and genomic DNA. Key Results FISH with repetitive DNA probes revealed that chromosomes 4C, 5C, 7Ct, T6UtS.6UtL-5CtL, 1Cc and 5Dc could be sorted with purities ranging from 66 to 91 %, while the remaining chromosomes could be sorted in groups of 2–5. This identified a partial wheat–C-genome homology for group 4 and 5 chromosomes. In addition, 1C chromosomes were homologous with group 1 of wheat; a small segment from group 2 indicated 1C–2C rearrangement. An extensively rearranged structure of chromosome 7C relative to wheat was also detected. Conclusions The possibility of purifying Aegilops chromosomes provides an attractive opportunity to investigate the structure and evolution of the Aegilops C genome and to develop molecular tools to facilitate the identification of alien chromatin and support alien introgression breeding in bread wheat. PMID:26043745

  14. Unreduced gamete formation in wheat × Aegilops spp. hybrids is genotype specific and prevented by shared homologous subgenomes.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Zhaleh; Mirzaghaderi, Ghader; Ahmadian, Samira; Mason, Annaliese S

    2016-05-01

    The presence of homologous subgenomes inhibited unreduced gamete formation in wheat × Aegilops interspecific hybrids. Unreduced gamete rates were under the control of the wheat nuclear genome. Production of unreduced gametes is common among interspecific hybrids, and may be affected by parental genotypes and genomic similarity. In the present study, five cultivars of Triticum aestivum and two tetraploid Aegilops species (i.e. Ae. triuncialis and Ae. cylindrica) were reciprocally crossed to produce 20 interspecific hybrid combinations. These hybrids comprised two different types: T. aestivum × Aegilops triuncialis; 2n = ABDU(t)C(t) (which lack a common subgenome) and T. aestivum × Ae. cylindrica; 2n = ABDD(c)C(c) (which share a common subgenome). The frequency of unreduced gametes in F1 hybrids was estimated in sporads from the frequency of dyads, and the frequency of viable pollen, germinated pollen and seed set were recorded. Different meiotic abnormalities recorded in the hybrids included precocious chromosome migration to the poles at metaphase I and II, laggards in anaphase I and II, micronuclei and chromosome stickiness, failure in cell wall formation, premature cytokinesis and microspore fusion. The mean frequency of restitution meiosis was 10.1 %, and the mean frequency of unreduced viable pollen was 4.84 % in T. aestivum × Ae. triuncialis hybrids. By contrast, in T. aestivum × Ae. cylindrica hybrids no meiotic restitution was observed, and a low rate of viable gametes (0.3 %) was recorded. This study present evidence that high levels of homologous pairing between the D and D(c) subgenomes may interfere with meiotic restitution and the formation of unreduced gametes. Variation in unreduced gamete production was also observed between T. aestivum × Ae. triuncialis hybrid plants, suggesting genetic control of this trait.

  15. Gametocidal Factor Transferred from Aegilops geniculata Roth Can Be Adapted for Large-Scale Chromosome Manipulations in Cereals

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatek, Michał T.; Wiśniewska, Halina; Ślusarkiewicz-Jarzina, Aurelia; Majka, Joanna; Majka, Maciej; Belter, Jolanta; Pudelska, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    Segregation distorters are curious, evolutionarily selfish genetic elements, which distort Mendelian segregation in their favor at the expense of others. Those agents include gametocidal factors (Gc), which ensure their preferential transmission by triggering damages in cells lacking them via chromosome break induction. Hence, we hypothesized that the gametocidal system can be adapted for chromosome manipulations between Triticum and Secale chromosomes in hexaploid triticale (×Triticosecale Wittmack). In this work we studied the little-known gametocidal action of a Gc factor located on Aegilops geniculata Roth chromosome 4Mg. Our results indicate that the initiation of the gametocidal action takes place at anaphase II of meiosis of pollen mother cells. Hence, we induced androgenesis at postmeiotic pollen divisions (via anther cultures) in monosomic 4Mg addition plants of hexaploid triticale (AABBRR) followed by production of doubled haploids, to maintain the chromosome aberrations caused by the gametocidal action. This approach enabled us to obtain a large number of plants with two copies of particular chromosome translocations, which were identified by the use of cytomolecular methods. We obtained 41 doubled haploid triticale lines and 17 of them carried chromosome aberrations that included plants with the following chromosome sets: 40T+Dt2RS+Dt2RL (5 lines), 40T+N2R (1), 38T+D4RS.4BL (3), 38T+D5BS-5BL.5RL (5), and 38T+D7RS.3AL (3). The results show that the application of the Gc mechanism in combination with production of doubled haploid lines provides a sufficiently large population of homozygous doubled haploid individuals with two identical copies of translocation chromosomes. In our opinion, this approach will be a valuable tool for the production of novel plant material, which could be used for gene tracking studies, genetic mapping, and finally to enhance the diversity of cereals. PMID:28396677

  16. Development of a genetic linkage map for Sharon goatgrass (Aegilops sharonensis) and mapping of a leaf rust resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Olivera, P D; Kilian, A; Wenzl, P; Steffenson, B J

    2013-07-01

    Aegilops sharonensis (Sharon goatgrass), a diploid wheat relative, is known to be a rich source of disease resistance genes for wheat improvement. To facilitate the transfer of these genes into wheat, information on their chromosomal location is important. A genetic linkage map of Ae. sharonensis was constructed based on 179 F2 plants derived from a cross between accessions resistant (1644) and susceptible (1193) to wheat leaf rust. The linkage map was based on 389 markers (377 Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) and 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci) and was comprised of 10 linkage groups, ranging from 2.3 to 124.6 cM. The total genetic length of the map was 818.0 cM, with an average interval distance between markers of 3.63 cM. Based on the chromosomal location of 115 markers previously mapped in wheat, the four linkage groups of A, B, C, and E were assigned to Ae. sharonensis (S(sh)) and homoeologous wheat chromosomes 6, 1, 3, and 2. The single dominant gene (designated LrAeSh1644) conferring resistance to leaf rust race THBJ in accession 1644 was positioned on linkage group A (chromosome 6S(sh)) and was flanked by DArT markers wpt-9881 (at 1.9 cM distal from the gene) and wpt-6925 (4.5 cM proximal). This study clearly demonstrates the utility of DArT for genotyping uncharacterized species and tagging resistance genes where pertinent genomic information is lacking.

  17. Introgression of an imidazolinone-resistance gene from winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) into jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host).

    PubMed

    Perez-Jones, Alejandro; Mallory-Smith, Carol A; Hansen, Jennifer L; Zemetra, Robert S

    2006-12-01

    Imidazolinone-resistant winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is being commercialized in the USA. This technology allows wheat growers to selectively control jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host), a weed that is especially problematic because of its close genetic relationship with wheat. However, the potential movement of the imidazolinone-resistance gene from winter wheat to jointed goatgrass is a concern. Winter wheat and jointed goatgrass have the D genome in common and can hybridize and backcross under natural field conditions. Since the imidazolinone-resistance gene (Imi1) is located on the D genome, it is possible for resistance to be transferred to jointed goatgrass via hybridization and backcrossing. To study the potential for gene movement, BC(2)S(2) plants were produced artificially using imidazolinone-resistant winter wheat (cv. FS-4) as the female parent and a native jointed goatgrass collection as the male recurrent parent. FS-4, the jointed goatgrass collection, and 18 randomly selected BC(2)S(2) populations were treated with imazamox. The percentage of survival was 100% for the FS-4, 0% for the jointed goatgrass collection and 6 BC(2)S(2) populations, 40% or less for 2 BC(2)S(2) populations, and 50% or greater for the remaining 10 BC(2)S(2) populations. Chromosome counts in BC(2)S(3) plants showed a restoration of the chromosome number of jointed goatgrass, with four out of four plants examined having 28 chromosomes. Sequencing of AHASL1D in BC(2)S(3) plants derived from BC(2)S(2)-6 revealed the sexual transmission of Imi1 from FS-4 to jointed goatgrass. Imi1 conferred resistance to the imidazolinone herbicide imazamox, as shown by the in vitro assay for acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) activity.

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of four novel LMW glutenin subunit genes from Aegilops longissima, Triticum dicoccoides and T. zhukovskyi.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chengxi; Pei, Yuhe; Zhang, Yanzhen; Li, Xiaohui; Yao, Danian; Yan, Yueming; Ma, Wujun; Hsam, S L K; Zeller, F J

    2008-04-01

    This paper reports cloning and characterisation of four novel low-molecular-weight glutenin subunit (LMW-GS) genes (designated as TzLMW-m2, TzLMW-m1, TdLMW-m1 and AlLMW-m2) from the genomic DNA of Triticum dicoccoides, T. zhukovskyi and Aegilops longissima. The coding regions of TzLMW-m2, TzLMW-m1, TdLMW-m1 and AlLMW-m2 were 1056 bp, 903 bp, 1056 bp and 1050 bp in length, encoding 350, 300, 350 and 348 amino acid residues, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences showed that the four novel genes were classified as LMW-m types and the comparison results indicated that the four genes had a more similar structure and a higher level of homology with the LMW-m genes than the LMW-s and -i types genes. However, the first cysteine residue's positions of TzLMW-m2, TdLMW-m1 and AlLMW-m2 were different from the others. Moreover, AlLMW-m2, TdLMW-m1 and TzLMW-m2 all possessed a longer repetitive domain, which was considered to be associated with good quality of wheat. The secondary structure prediction revealed that the content of beta-strand in AlLMW-m2 and TdLMW-m1 exceeded the positive control, suggesting that AlLMW-m2 and TdLMW-m1 should be considered as candidate genes that may have positive effect on dough quality. In order to investigate the evolutionary relationship of the novel genes with the other LMW-GSs, a phylogenetic tree was constructed. The results lead to a speculation that AlLMW-m2, TdLMW-m1 and TzLMW-m2 may be the middle types during the evolution of LMW-m and LMW-s.

  19. Variation and geographical distribution of the genotypes controlling the diagnostic spike morphology of two varieties of Aegilops caudata l.

    PubMed

    Ohta, S

    2001-10-01

    Aegilops caudata L. is an annual wild relative of wheat distributed over the northeastern Mediterranean basin. It consists of two taxonomic varieties, var. typica with awnless lateral spikelets and var.polyathera with awned lateral spikelets. To clarify the variation and the geographical distribution of the genotypes controlling the diagnostic spike morphology of the two taxonomic varieties, three crossing experiments were carried out. First, two varieties collected from nine sympatric populations in the Aegean islands were crossed reciprocally. All of the F1 hybrids were var. typica and the segregation ratio in the F2 generation was 3 typica: 1 polyathera. Secondly, 13 typica accessions collected from the entire distribution area of the variety were crossed with a common polyathera accession. The F1 hybrids involving eight typica accessions from Greece and West Anatolia were var. typica, while those involving five typica accessions from East Anatolia, Syria and Iraq were var. polyathera. Thirdly, the typica F1 hybrids between the Aegean and the Syrian typica accessions were backcrossed to the latter. Four of the seven BC1F1 plants obtained were var. typica, but the other three were var. polyathera. Based on these results, the following two conclusions were made. First, the awnless lateral spikelets characteristic of var. typica are due to two different genotypes: one is a dominant allele suppressing awn development on lateral spikelets and the other is a recessive allele(s) for awnless lateral spikelets with no dominant suppressor allele. Secondly, the former genotype occurs only in the western region of the distribution area of the species, while the latter occurs in the eastern region. The present results and the recent palaeopalynological evidence also suggested that var. polyathera, with more awns than var. typica, rapidly colonized Central Anatolia from the Levant or East Taurus/Zagros mountains arc after the last glacial period.

  20. [Detection of the introgression of genome elements of the Aegilops cylindrica host. into the Triticum aestivum L. genome by ISSR and SSR analysis].

    PubMed

    Galaev, A V; Babaiants, L T; Sivolap, Iu M

    2004-12-01

    To reveal sites of the donor genome in wheat crossed with Aegilops cylindrica, which acquired conferred resistance to fungal diseases, a comparative analysis of introgressive and parental forms was conducted. Two systems of PCR analysis, ISSR and SSR-PCR, were employed. Upon use of 7 ISSR primers in genotypes of 30 individual plants BC1 F9 belonging to lines 5/55-91 and 5/20-91, 19 ISSR loci were revealed and assigned to introgressive fragments of Aegilops cylindrica genome in Triticum aestivum. The 40 pairs of SSR primers allowed the detection of seven introgressive alleles; three of these alleles were located on common wheat chromosomes in the B genome, while four alleles, in the D genome. Based on data of microsatellite analysis, it was assumed that the telomeric region of the long arm of common wheat chromosome 6A also changed. ISSR and SSR methods were shown to be effective for detecting variability caused by introgression of foreign genetic material into the genome of common wheat.

  1. Potential Implications of Climate Change on Aegilops Species Distribution: Sympatry of These Crop Wild Relatives with the Major European Crop Triticum aestivum and Conservation Issues.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Marie-France; Prosperi, Jean-Marie; David, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Gene flow from crop to wild relatives is a common phenomenon which can lead to reduced adaptation of the wild relatives to natural ecosystems and/or increased adaptation to agrosystems (weediness). With global warming, wild relative distributions will likely change, thus modifying the width and/or location of co-occurrence zones where crop-wild hybridization events could occur (sympatry). This study investigates current and 2050 projected changes in sympatry levels between cultivated wheat and six of the most common Aegilops species in Europe. Projections were generated using MaxEnt on presence-only data, bioclimatic variables, and considering two migration hypotheses and two 2050 climate scenarios (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5). Overall, a general decline in suitable climatic conditions for Aegilops species outside the European zone and a parallel increase in Europe were predicted. If no migration could occur, the decline was predicted to be more acute outside than within the European zone. The potential sympatry level in Europe by 2050 was predicted to increase at a higher rate than species richness, and most expansions were predicted to occur in three countries, which are currently among the top four wheat producers in Europe: Russia, France and Ukraine. The results are also discussed with regard to conservation issues of these crop wild relatives.

  2. Potential Implications of Climate Change on Aegilops Species Distribution: Sympatry of These Crop Wild Relatives with the Major European Crop Triticum aestivum and Conservation Issues

    PubMed Central

    Prosperi, Jean-Marie; David, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Gene flow from crop to wild relatives is a common phenomenon which can lead to reduced adaptation of the wild relatives to natural ecosystems and/or increased adaptation to agrosystems (weediness). With global warming, wild relative distributions will likely change, thus modifying the width and/or location of co-occurrence zones where crop-wild hybridization events could occur (sympatry). This study investigates current and 2050 projected changes in sympatry levels between cultivated wheat and six of the most common Aegilops species in Europe. Projections were generated using MaxEnt on presence-only data, bioclimatic variables, and considering two migration hypotheses and two 2050 climate scenarios (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5). Overall, a general decline in suitable climatic conditions for Aegilops species outside the European zone and a parallel increase in Europe were predicted. If no migration could occur, the decline was predicted to be more acute outside than within the European zone. The potential sympatry level in Europe by 2050 was predicted to increase at a higher rate than species richness, and most expansions were predicted to occur in three countries, which are currently among the top four wheat producers in Europe: Russia, France and Ukraine. The results are also discussed with regard to conservation issues of these crop wild relatives. PMID:27100790

  3. Assessment of genomic and species relationships in Triticum and Aegilops by PAGE and by differential staining of seed albumins and globulins.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, K A; Kasarda, D D

    1978-11-01

    Endosperm protein components from common bread wheats (Triticum aestivum L.) and related species were extracted with aluminum lactate, pH 3.2, and examined by electrophoresis in the same buffer. Electrophoretic patterns of the albumins and globulins were compared to evaluate the possibility that a particular species might have contributed its genome to tetraploid or hexaploid wheat. Together with protein component mobilities, differential band staining with Coomassie Brilliant Blue R250 was employed to test the identity or non-identity of bands. Eight species and 63 accessions, representative of Triticum and Aegilops were tested. Considerable intraspecific variation was observed for patterns of diploid but not for tetraploid or hexaploid species. Patterns of some accessions of Triticum urartu agreed closely with major parts of the patterns of Triticum dicoccoides and T. aestivum. A fast-moving, green band was found in all accessions of T. urartu and of Triticum boeoticum, however, that was not found in those of T. dicoccoides or T. aestivum. This band was present in all accessions of Triticum araraticum and Triticum zhukovskyi. Patterns of Aegilops longissima, which has been suggested as the donor of the B genome, differed substantially from those of T. dicoccoides and T. aestivum. Finally, two marker proteins of intermediate mobility were also observed and may be used to discriminate between accessions of T. araraticum/T. zhukovskyi and those of T. dicoccoides/T. aestivum.

  4. Comparative germination responses to water potential across different populations of Aegilops geniculata and cultivar varieties of Triticum durum and Triticum aestivum.

    PubMed

    Orsenigo, S; Guzzon, F; Abeli, T; Rossi, G; Vagge, I; Balestrazzi, A; Mondoni, A; Müller, J V

    2017-03-01

    Crop Wild Relatives are often used to improve crop quality and yields because they contain genetically important traits that can contribute to stress resistance and adaptation. Seed germination of different populations of Aegilops geniculata Roth collected along a latitudinal gradient was studied under different drought stress in order to find populations suitable for improving drought tolerance in wheat. Different accessions of Aegilops neglecta Req. ex Bertol., Triticum aestivum L. and T. durum Desf. were used as comparison. Under full hydration, germination was high in all populations, but increasing drought stress led to reduced and delayed germination. Significant differences in final germination and mean time to germinate were detected among populations. Wheat, durum wheat and the southern population of Ae. geniculata were not significantly affected by drought stress, germinating similarly under all treatments. However, seed germination of the northern populations of Ae. geniculata was significantly reduced under high water stress treatment. Differences between populations of the same species could not be explained by annual rainfall across populations' distributions, but by rainfall during seed development and maturation. Differences in the germination responses to drought found here highlight the importance of source populations as criteria for genotype selection for pre-breeders.

  5. Genetic variation of jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host.) from Iran using RAPD-PCR and SDS-PAGE of seed proteins.

    PubMed

    Farkhari, M; Naghavi, M R; Pyghambari, S A; Sabokdast

    2007-09-01

    Genetic variation of 28 populations of jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host.), collected from different parts of Iran, were evaluated using both RAPD-PCR and SDS-PAGE of seed proteins. The diversity within and between populations for the three-band High Molecular Weight (HMW) subunits of glutenin pattern were extremely low. Out of 15 screened primers of RAPD, 14 primers generated 133 reproducible fragments which among them 92 fragments were polymorphic (69%). Genetic similarity calculated from the RAPD data ranged from 0.64 to 0.98. A dendrogram was prepared on the basis of a similarity matrix using the UPGMA algorithm and separated the 28 populations into two groups. Confusion can happen between populations with the same origin as well as between populations of very diverse geographical origins. Our results show that compare to seed storage protein, RAPD is suitable for genetic diversity assessment in Ae. cylindrica populations.

  6. A comparative analysis of chromosome pairing at metaphase I in interspecific hybrids between durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L.) and the most widespread Aegilops species.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, M; Garcia-Agüero, V; Benavente, E

    2010-07-01

    Homoeologous metaphase I (MI) associations in hybrids between durum wheat and its wild allotetraploid relatives Aegilops neglecta, Ae. triuncialis and Ae. ventricosa have been characterized by a genomic in situ hybridization procedure that allows simultaneous discrimination of A, B and wild species genomes. Earlier results in equivalent hybrids with the wild species Ae. cylindrica and Ae. geniculata have also been considered to comparatively assay the MI pairing pattern of the durum wheat x Aegilops interspecific combinations more likely to occur in nature. The general picture can be drawn as follows. A and B wheat genomes pair with each other less than the 2 wild constituent genomes do in any of the hybrid combinations examined. Interspecific wheat-wild associations account for 60-70% of total MI pairing in all hybrids, except in that derived from Ae. triuncialis, but the A genome is always the wheat partner most frequently involved in MI pairing with the wild homoeologues. Hybrids with Ae. cylindrica, Ae. geniculata and Ae. ventricosa showed similar reduced levels of MI association and virtually identical MI pairing patterns. However, certain recurrent differences were found when the pattern of homoeologous pairing of hybrids from either Ae. triuncialis or Ae. neglecta was contrasted to that observed in the other durum wheat hybrid combinations. In the former case, a remarkable preferential pairing between the wild species constituent genomes U(t) and C(t) seems to be the reason, whereas a general promotion of homoeologous pairing, qualitatively similar to that observed under the effect of the ph1c mutation, appears to occur in the hybrid with Ae. neglecta. It is further discussed whether the results reported here can be extrapolated to the corresponding bread wheat hybrid combinations.

  7. The molecular basis of genetic diversity among cytoplasms of Triticum and Aegilops : 7. Restriction endonuclease analysis of mitochondrial DNAs from polyploid wheats and their ancestral species.

    PubMed

    Terachi, T; Ogihara, Y; Tsunewaki, K

    1990-09-01

    Many related species and strains of common wheat were compared by matching differences among their mitochondrial genomes with their "parent" nuclear genomes. We examined three species of Aegilops, section Sitopsis (Ae. bicornis, Ae. sharonensis, and Ae. speltoides), emmer wheat (Triticum dicoccoides, T. dicoccum, and T. durum), common wheat (T. spelta, T. aestivum, and T. compaction), and timopheevi wheat (T. araraticum, T. timopheevi, and T. zhukovskyi). A single source of the cytoplasm was used in all the species, except Ae. speltoides (two sources), T. araraticum (two), and T. aestivum (three). Following restriction endonuclease analyses, the mitochondrial genomes were found to comprise seven types, and a dendrogram showing their genetic relatedness was constructed, based upon the percentage of common restriction fragments. MtDNAs from T. dicoccum, T. durum, T. aestivum, and T. compactum yielded identical restriction fragment patterns; these differed from T. dicoccoides and T. spelta mtDNAs in only 2.3% of their fragments. The fragment patterns of T. timopheevi and T. zhukovskyi were identical, and these differed from T. araraticum mtDNA by only one fragment. In both the emmer-dinkel and timopheevi groups, mitochondrial genome differentiation is evident, suggesting a diphyletic origin of each group. MtDNAs from four accessions of the Sitopsis species of Aegilops differ greatly from one another, but those of Ae. bicornis, Ae. sharonensis, and Ae. searsii, belonging to the same subsection Emarginata, are relatively similar. MtDNAs of timopheevi species are identical, or nearly so, to those of Ae. speltoides accession (09), suggesting that the latter was the cytoplasm donor to the former, polyploid group. The origin of this polyploid group seems to be rather recent in that the diploid and polyploid species possess nearly identical mitochondrial genomes. We cannot determine, with precision, the cytoplasm donor to the emmer-dinkel group. However, our results do

  8. Breeding Value of Primary Synthetic Wheat Genotypes for Grain Yield

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh, Jafar; Bonnett, David; Jannink, Jean-Luc; Akdemir, Deniz; Dreisigacker, Susanne; Sorrells, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    To introduce new genetic diversity into the bread wheat gene pool from its progenitor, Aegilops tauschii (Coss.) Schmalh, 33 primary synthetic hexaploid wheat genotypes (SYN) were crossed to 20 spring bread wheat (BW) cultivars at the International Wheat and Maize Improvement Center. Modified single seed descent was used to develop 97 populations with 50 individuals per population using first back-cross, biparental, and three-way crosses. Individuals from each cross were selected for short stature, early heading, flowering and maturity, minimal lodging, and free threshing. Yield trials were conducted under irrigated, drought, and heat-stress conditions from 2011 to 2014 in Ciudad Obregon, Mexico. Genomic estimated breeding values (GEBVs) of parents and synthetic derived lines (SDLs) were estimated using a genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP) model with markers in each trial. In each environment, there were SDLs that had higher GEBVs than their recurrent BW parent for yield. The GEBVs of BW parents for yield ranged from -0.32 in heat to 1.40 in irrigated trials. The range of the SYN parent GEBVs for yield was from -2.69 in the irrigated to 0.26 in the heat trials and were mostly negative across environments. The contribution of the SYN parents to improved grain yield of the SDLs was highest under heat stress, with an average GEBV for the top 10% of the SDLs of 0.55 while the weighted average GEBV of their corresponding recurrent BW parents was 0.26. Using the pedigree-based model, the accuracy of genomic prediction for yield was 0.42, 0.43, and 0.49 in the drought, heat and irrigated trials, respectively, while for the marker-based model these values were 0.43, 0.44, and 0.55. The SYN parents introduced novel diversity into the wheat gene pool. Higher GEBVs of progenies were due to introgression and retention of some positive alleles from SYN parents. PMID:27656893

  9. Wheat curl mite resistance: interactions of mite feeding with wheat streak mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Murugan, M; Sotelo Cardona, P; Duraimurugan, P; Whitfield, A E; Schneweis, D; Starkey, S; Smith, C M

    2011-08-01

    The majority of plant viruses are dependent on arthropod vectors for spread between plants. Wheat streak mosaic virus (family Potyviridae, genus Tritimovirus, WSMV) is transmitted by the wheat curl mite, Aceria tosichella Keifer, and this virus and vector cause extensive yield losses in most major wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-growing regions of the world. Many cultivars in use are susceptible to this vector-virus complex, and yield losses of 10-99% have been documented. wheat curl mite resistance genes have been identified in goat grass, Aegilops tauschii (Coss) Schmal., and transferred to hexaploid wheat, but very few varieties contain effectively wheat curl mite resistance, due to virulent wheat curl mite populations. However, wheat curl mite resistance remains an effective strategy to reduce losses due to WSMV. The goal of our project was to identify the most effective, reproducible, and rapid method for assessing wheat curl mite resistance. We also wanted to determine whether mite resistance is affected by WSMV infection, because the pathogen and pest commonly occur together. Single and group wheat curl mite infestations produced similar amounts of leaf rolling and folding on wheat curl mite-susceptible wheat varieties that were independent of initial wheat curl mite infestation. This finding will allow accurate, efficient, large-scale screening of wheat germplasm for wheat curl mite resistance by infesting plants with sections of wheat leaf tissue containing mixed stages of wheat curl mite. The wheat curl mite-resistant breeding line 'OK05312' displayed antibiosis (reduced wheat curl mite population development). The effect of WSMV infection on wheat curl mite reproduction was genotype-dependent. Mite populations increased on infected wheat curl mite- and WSMV-susceptible plants compared with uninfected plants, but WSMV infection had no significant effect on wheat curl mite populations on resistant plants. OK05312 is a strong source of wheat curl mite

  10. Complete characterization of wheat-alien metaphase I pairing in interspecific hybrids between durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L.) and jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host).

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Marta; Benavente, Elena

    2009-05-01

    The pattern of homoeologous metaphase I (MI) pairing has been fully characterized in durum wheat x Aegilops cylindrica hybrids (2n = 4x = 28, ABC(c)D(c)) by an in situ hybridization procedure that has permitted individual discrimination of every wheat and wild constituent genome. One of the three hybrid genotypes examined carried the ph1c mutation. In all cases, MI associations between chromosomes of both species represented around two-third of total. Main results from the analysis are as follows (a) the A genome chromosomes are involved in wheat-wild MI pairing more frequently than the B genome partners, irrespective of the alien genome considered; (b) both durum wheat genomes pair preferentially with the D(c) genome of jointed goatgrass. These findings are discussed in relation to the potential of genetic transference between wheat crops and this weedy relative. It can also be highlighted that inactivation of Ph1 provoked a relatively higher promotion of MI associations involving B genome.

  11. Visualization of A- and B-genome chromosomes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) x jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host) backcross progenies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z N; Hang, A; Hansen, J; Burton, C; Mallory-Smith, C A; Zemetra, R S

    2000-12-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) and jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica) can cross with each other, and their self-fertile backcross progenies frequently have extra chromosomes and chromosome segments, presumably retained from wheat, raising the possibility that a herbicide resistance gene might transfer from wheat to jointed goatgrass. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) was used to clarify the origin of these extra chromosomes. By using T. durum DNA (AABB genome) as a probe and jointed goatgrass DNA (CCDD genome) as blocking DNA, one, two, and three A- or B-genome chromosomes were identified in three BC2S2 individuals where 2n = 29, 30, and 31 chromosomes, respectively. A translocation between wheat and jointed goatgrass chromosomes was also detected in an individual with 30 chromosomes. In pollen mother cells with meiotic configuration of 14 II + 2 I, the two univalents were identified as being retained from the A or B genome of wheat. By using Ae. markgrafii DNA (CC genome) as a probe and wheat DNA (AABBDD genome) as blocking DNA. 14 C-genome chromosomes were visualized in all BC2S2 individuals. The GISH procedure provides a powerful tool to detect the A or B-genome chromatin in a jointed goatgrass background, making it possible to assess the risk of transfer of herbicide resistance genes located on the A or B genome of wheat to jointed goatgrass.

  12. Inducing rye 1R chromosome structural changes in common wheat cv. Chinese spring by the gametocidal chromosome 2C of Aegilops cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fang; Liu, Kun-Fan; Endo, Takashi R; Wang, Dao-Wen

    2005-05-01

    To generate 1 R deletion and translocation lines, we introduced a 2C chromosome,which was derived from Aegilops cylindrica and was known to have a gametocidal function when added monosomically into common wheat cv. Chinese Spring (CS) and its derivative, into a wheat-rye 1R chromosome disomic addition line (CS-1R"). When the individuals with chromosome constitution 21" + 1R" + 2C' (2n = 45) were selfed, the 1R chromosome structural changes were found to be induced with high frequency (24.1%) among the progenies. By using C-banding and GISH analysis, we analyzed 1R structural changes in 46 F3 individuals, which came from 23 F2 plants. The rearranged 1R chromosomes could be characterized in about 85% of the F3 individuals. This included telosome 1RL (39.1%), iso-chromosome 1 RL (2.2%), whole arm translocation involving 1RL (32.6%), telosome 1RS (4.3%), iso-chromosome 1RS (4.3%), and 1R deletion mutant with break point in the long arm (2.2%). The mutant 1R lines obtained in this study will potentially be useful in mapping the chromosome locations of agronomically important genes located in 1R. This study also demonstrated that molecular markers might be used to identify wheat chromosome arm involved in translocation with 1R.

  13. Generation of amphidiploids from hybrids of wheat and related species from the genera Aegilops, Secale, Thinopyrum, and Triticum as a source of genetic variation for wheat improvement.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Csilla; Yang, Cai-yun; Kasprzak, Paul; Hubbart, Stella; Scholefield, Duncan; Mehra, Surbhi; Skipper, Emma; King, Ian; King, Julie

    2015-02-01

    We aim to improve diversity of domesticated wheat by transferring genetic variation for important target traits from related wild and cultivated grass species. The present study describes the development of F1 hybrids between wheat and related species from the genera Aegilops, Secale, Thinopyrum, and Triticum and production of new amphidiploids. Amphidiploid lines were produced from 20 different distant relatives. Both colchicine and caffeine were successfully used to double the chromosome numbers. The genomic constitution of the newly formed amphidiploids derived from seven distant relatives was determined using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). Altogether, 42 different plants were analysed, 19 using multicolour GISH separating the chromosomes from the A, B, and D genomes of wheat, as well as the distant relative, and 23 using single colour GISH. Restructuring of the allopolyploid genome, both chromosome losses and aneuploidy, was detected in all the genomes contained by the amphidiploids. From the observed chromosome numbers there is an indication that in amphidiploids the B genome of wheat suffers chromosome losses less frequently than the other wheat genomes. Phenotyping to realize the full potential of the wheat-related grass germplasm is underway, linking the analyzed genotypes to agronomically important target traits.

  14. [Chromosomal localization of the speltoidy gene, introgressed into bread wheat from Aegilops speltoides Tausch., and its interaction with the Q gene of Triticum spelta L].

    PubMed

    Simonov, A V; Pshenichnikova, T A

    2012-11-01

    The differences between bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and spelt (Triticum spelta L.) in the shape of the spike and threshing character are determined by the allelic status of one major Q gene, mapped to the long arm of chromosome 5A. This gene is a member of the APETALA2 family of transcription factors and plays an important role in domestication of wheat. In the present study, using monosomic analysis, we determined the chromosomal localization of the Q(S)gene, introgressed into bread wheat from Aegilops speltoides Tausch. and homoallelic to the Q gene. It was demonstrated that the Q(S) gene was located in chromosome 5A of the bread wheat line from the Arsenal collection. This gene conferred spike speltoidy in the line itself, as well as in its hybrids with bread wheat cultivars. The Q(S) gene dominated over the bread wheat Q gene and was equally effective in the homo-, hemi-, and heterozygous states. In hybrids between the introgression line and a number of spring spelt accessions, interaction between the Q and Q(S) genes was observed, manifested as the formation of superspeltoid spike.

  15. Impact of transgene genome location on gene migration from herbicide-resistant wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) to jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica Host).

    PubMed

    Rehman, Maqsood; Hansen, Jennifer L; Mallory-Smith, Carol A; Zemetra, Robert S

    2017-08-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) (ABD) and jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica) (CD) can cross and produce hybrids that can backcross to either parent. Such backcrosses can result in progeny with chromosomes and/or chromosome segments retained from wheat. Thus, a herbicide resistance gene could migrate from wheat to jointed goatgrass. In theory, the risk of gene migration from herbicide-resistant wheat to jointed goatgrass is more likely if the gene is located on the D genome and less likely if the gene is located on the A or B genome of wheat. BC1 populations (jointed goatgrass as a recurrent parent) were analyzed for chromosome numbers and transgene transmission rates under sprayed and non-sprayed conditions. Transgene retention in the non-sprayed BC1 generation for the A, B and D genomes was 84, 60 and 64% respectively. In the sprayed populations, the retention was 81, 59 and 74% respectively. The gene transmission rates were higher than the expected 50% or less under sprayed and non-sprayed conditions, possibly owing to meiotic chromosome restitution and/or chromosome non-disjunction. Such high transmission rates in the BC1 generation negates the benefits of gene placement for reducing the potential of gene migration from wheat to jointed goatgrass. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Engineering the 1BS chromosome arm in wheat to remove the Rf (multi) locus restoring male fertility in cytoplasms of Aegilops kotschyi, Ae. uniaristata and Ae. mutica.

    PubMed

    Hohn, Christopher E; Lukaszewski, Adam J

    2016-09-01

    By removing the Rf (multi) locus from chromosome 1BS of wheat via chromosome engineering we were able to generate a resource for the production of male sterile wheats in three new cytoplasms. Cytoplasmic male sterility is an essential component in the development of many hybrid crops. In wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) only the cytoplasm of T. timopheevi cytoplasm has been extensively tested even though many other cytoplasms are also known to produce male sterility. Among them are the cytoplasms of Ae. kotschyi, Ae. uniaristata and Ae. mutica but here male sterility manifests itself only when the 1RS.1BL rye-wheat translocation is present in the nuclear genome. The location of the male fertility restoring gene on the chromosome arm 1BS (Rf (multi) ) has recently been determined using a set of primary recombinants of chromosome arms 1RS with 1BS. Using this knowledge the same recombinants were used to create chromosome arm 1BS in wheat with a small insert from rye that removes the restorer locus. The disomic engineered chromosome 1B1:6 assures male sterility in all three cytoplasms and any standard chromosome 1B in wheat is capable of restoring it. This newly engineered chromosome in combination with the three cytoplasms of Aegilops sp extends the range of possibilities in attempts to create a viable system for hybrid wheat production.

  17. Map-based analysis of the tenacious glume gene Tg-B1 of wild emmer and its role in wheat domestication

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The domestication of wheat was instrumental in spawning the civilization of humankind, and it occurred through genetic mutations that gave rise to types with non-fragile rachises, soft glumes, and free-threshing seed. The Tg-D1 gene on chromosome 2D of Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome progenitor of ...

  18. Genome Comparisons Reveal a Dominant Mechanism of Chromosome Number Reduction in Grasses and Accelerated Genome Evolution in Triticeae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Single nucleotide polymorphism was employed in the construction of a high-resolution, expressed sequence tag (EST) map of Aegilops tauschii, the diploid source of the wheat D genome. Comparison of the map with the rice and sorghum genome sequences revealed 50 inversions and translocations; 2, 8, and...

  19. RNA-Seq Based Identification of Candidate Parasitism Genes of Cereal Cyst Nematode (Heterodera avenae) during Incompatible Infection to Aegilops variabilis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Minghui; Long, Hai; Zhao, Yun; Li, Lin; Xu, Delin; Zhang, Haili; Liu, Feng; Deng, Guangbing; Pan, Zhifen; Yu, Maoqun

    2015-01-01

    One of the reasons for the progressive yield decline observed in cereals production is the rapid build-up of populations of the cereal cyst nematode (CCN, Heterodera avenae). These nematodes secrete so-call effectors into their host plant to suppress the plant defense responses, alter plant signaling pathways and then induce the formation of syncytium after infection. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism and parasitism during incompatible infection. To gain insight into its repertoire of parasitism genes, we investigated the transcriptome of the early parasitic second-stage (30 hours, 3 days and 9 days post infection) juveniles of the CCN as well as the CCN infected tissue of the host Aegilops variabilis by Illumina sequencing. Among all assembled unigenes, 681 putative genes of parasitic nematode were found, in which 56 putative effectors were identified, including novel pioneer genes and genes corresponding to previously reported effectors. All the 681 CCN unigenes were mapped to 229 GO terms and 200 KEGG pathways, including growth, development and several stimulus-related signaling pathways. Sixteen clusters were involved in the CCN unigene expression atlas at the early stages during infection process, and three of which were significantly gene-enriched. Besides, the protein-protein interaction network analysis revealed 35 node unigenes which may play an important role in the plant-CCN interaction. Moreover, in a comparison of differentially expressed genes between the pre-parasitic juveniles and the early parasitic juveniles, we found that hydrolase activity was up-regulated in pre J2s whereas binding activity was upregulated in infective J2s. RT-qPCR analysis on some selected genes showed detectable expression, indicating possible secretion of the proteins and putative role in infection. This study provided better insights into the incompatible interaction between H. avenae and the host plant Ae. varabilis. Moreover, RNAi targets with

  20. The Molecular Basis of Genetic Diversity among Cytoplasms of TRITICUM and AEGILOPS Species. II. on the Origin of Polyploid Wheat Cytoplasms as Suggested by Chloroplast DNA Restriction Fragment Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Tsunewaki, Koichiro; Ogihara, Yasunari

    1983-01-01

    In attempts to identify the phylogenetic donors of cytoplasm to Emmer-Dinkel and Timopheevi groups of wheat (Triticum), and the Aegilops kotschyi-Ae. variabilis complex, the restriction fragment patterns of chloroplast DNAs of representative species were compared with those of their putative diploid ancestors. The following seven restriction enzymes were used; BamHI, EcoRI, HindIII, KpnI, PstI, SmaI and XhoI. The restriction fragment patterns of an Emmer and a Dinkel (common) wheat were identical with those of Ae. longissima , and different from those of Ae. aucheri, Ae. bicornis, Ae. searsii, Ae. sharonensis, Ae. speltoides, and T. urartu by 4 to 12 fragments. The restriction fragment patterns of a Timopheevi wheat were identical with those of Ae. aucheri, and different from those of all other diploids by four to nine fragments. The restriction fragment patterns of Ae. variabilis were identical to those of Ae. bicornis and Ae. searsii , and different from those of all other species. Thus, we have concluded that Ae. longissima, Ae. aucheri and Ae. bicornis (or Ae. searsii) were the cytoplasm donors to the Emmer-Dinkel and the Timopheevi groups, and the Ae. kotschyi-Ae. variabilis complex, respectively. A diphyletic origin of Emmer and Timopheevi groups is supported by the present results. PMID:17246126

  1. New insights into the origin of the B genome of hexaploid wheat: Evolutionary relationships at the SPA genomic region with the S genome of the diploid relative Aegilops speltoides

    PubMed Central

    Salse, Jérome; Chagué, Véronique; Bolot, Stéphanie; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Huneau, Cécile; Pont, Caroline; Belcram, Harry; Couloux, Arnaud; Gardais, Soazic; Evrard, Aurélie; Segurens, Béatrice; Charles, Mathieu; Ravel, Catherine; Samain, Sylvie; Charmet, Gilles; Boudet, Nathalie; Chalhoub, Boulos

    2008-01-01

    Background Several studies suggested that the diploid ancestor of the B genome of tetraploid and hexaploid wheat species belongs to the Sitopsis section, having Aegilops speltoides (SS, 2n = 14) as the closest identified relative. However molecular relationships based on genomic sequence comparison, including both coding and non-coding DNA, have never been investigated. In an attempt to clarify these relationships, we compared, in this study, sequences of the Storage Protein Activator (SPA) locus region of the S genome of Ae. speltoides (2n = 14) to that of the A, B and D genomes co-resident in the hexaploid wheat species (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD, 2n = 42). Results Four BAC clones, spanning the SPA locus of respectively the A, B, D and S genomes, were isolated and sequenced. Orthologous genomic regions were identified as delimited by shared non-transposable elements and non-coding sequences surrounding the SPA gene and correspond to 35 268, 22 739, 43 397 and 53 919 bp for the A, B, D and S genomes, respectively. Sequence length discrepancies within and outside the SPA orthologous regions are the result of non-shared transposable elements (TE) insertions, all of which inserted after the progenitors of the four genomes divergence. Conclusion On the basis of conserved sequence length as well as identity of the shared non-TE regions and the SPA coding sequence, Ae speltoides appears to be more evolutionary related to the B genome of T. aestivum than the A and D genomes. However, the differential insertions of TEs, none of which are conserved between the two genomes led to the conclusion that the S genome of Ae. speltoides has diverged very early from the progenitor of the B genome which remains to be identified. PMID:19032732

  2. Characterization and expression analysis of WOX5 genes from wheat and its relatives.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shan; Jiang, Qian-Tao; Ma, Jian; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Zhao, Quan-Zhi; Wang, Xiu-Ying; Wang, Chang-Shui; Cao, Xue; Lu, Zhen-Xiang; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yu-Ming

    2014-03-01

    The WUSCHEL (WUS)-related homeobox (WOX) gene family plays an important role in coordinating gene transcription in the early phases of embryogenesis. In this study, we isolated and characterized WOX5 from common wheat and its relatives Triticum monococcum, Triticum urartu, Aegilops speltoides, Aegilops searsii, Aegilops sharonensis, Aegilops longissima, Aegilops bicornis, Aegilops tauschii, and Triticum turgidum. The size of the characterized WOX5 alleles ranged from 1029 to 1038 bp and encompassed the complete open reading frame (ORF) as well as 5' upstream and 3' downstream sequences. Domain prediction analysis showed that the putative primary structures of wheat WOX5 protein include the highly conserved homeodomain besides the WUS-box domain and the EAR-like domain, which is/are present in some members of the WOX protein family. The full-length ORF was subcloned into a prokaryotic expression vector pET30a, and an approximate 26-kDa protein was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells with IPTG induction. The WOX5 genes from wheat-related species exhibit a similar structure to and high sequence similarity with WOX5 genes from common wheat. The degree of divergence and phylogenetic tree analysis among WOX5 alleles suggested the existence of three homoeologous copies in the A, B, or D genome of common wheat. Quantitative PCR results showed that TaWOX5 was primarily expressed in the root and calli induced by auxin and cytokinin, indicating that TaWOX5 may play a role related to root formation or development and is associated with hormone regulation in somatic embryogenesis.

  3. The chloroplast view of the evolution of polyploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Gornicki, Piotr; Zhu, Huilan; Wang, Junwei; Challa, Ghana S; Zhang, Zhengzhi; Gill, Bikram S; Li, Wanlong

    2014-11-01

    Polyploid wheats comprise four species: Triticum turgidum (AABB genomes) and T. aestivum (AABBDD) in the Emmer lineage, and T. timopheevii (AAGG) and T. zhukovskyi (AAGGA(m) A(m) ) in the Timopheevi lineage. Genetic relationships between chloroplast genomes were studied to trace the evolutionary history of the species. Twenty-five chloroplast genomes were sequenced, and 1127 plant accessions were genotyped, representing 13 Triticum and Aegilops species. The A. speltoides (SS genome) diverged before the divergence of T. urartu (AA), A. tauschii (DD) and the Aegilops species of the Sitopsis section. Aegilops speltoides forms a monophyletic clade with the polyploid Emmer and Timopheevi wheats, which originated within the last 0.7 and 0.4 Myr, respectively. The geographic distribution of chloroplast haplotypes of the wild tetraploid wheats and A. speltoides illustrates the possible geographic origin of the Emmer lineage in the southern Levant and the Timopheevi lineage in northern Iraq. Aegilops speltoides is the closest relative of the diploid donor of the chloroplast (cytoplasm), as well as the B and G genomes to Timopheevi and Emmer lineages. Chloroplast haplotypes were often shared by species or subspecies within major lineages and between the lineages, indicating the contribution of introgression to the evolution and domestication of polyploid wheats.

  4. [Molecular cytogenetic identification of Aegilops ventricosa x Aegilops cylindrica amphiploid SDAU18].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu Hai; Bao, Yin Guang; Hao, Yuan Feng; Yuan, Yuan Yuan; Zhao, Chun Hua; Wang, Qing Zhuan; Wang, Hong Gang

    2009-02-01

    SDAU18, an amphiploid of Ae.ventricosa with Ae.cylindrica, was identified by cytological analysis, seed storage protein electrophoresis, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and inoculation assessment. The results are as follows: The chromosome number of root tip cells (RTCs) of SDAU18 plants varied from 52 to 56. 28 bivalents were observed in most PMCs MI of SDAU18 with 56 chromosomes, meanwhile, a few univalents, multivalents also existed in some PMCs MI, and the average chromosome configuration was 2n = 56 = 3.21 I +19.78 II, (Ring)+6.50 II (Rod)+0.01 III +0.04 IV (Ring)R+0.01 IV (Rod). There were both Ae. ventricosa-specific bands and Ae. cylindrica-specific bands in the seed storage protein electrophoretogram of SDAU18, furthermore, SDAU18 had one novel HMW-GS not found in the parents and two novel ones not found in common wheats. By labeling the total genomic DNA of Ae. ventricosa and Ae. cylindrica as probes respectively, and using that of another parent as block, GISH of RTCs spread of SDAU18 was carried out. The green hybridization signal was observed in 14 chromosomes respectively, within 56 ones in RTCs of SDAU18. SDAU18 was immune to powdery mildew and stripe rusts. SDAU18 was an amphiploid of Ae. ventricosa with Ae. cylindrica, and had very important significance in wheat breeding and genetic improvement.

  5. Insular Organization of Gene Space in Grass Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Massa, Alicia N.; Wanjugi, Humphrey; Deal, Karin R.; You, Frank M.; Xu, Xiangyang; Gu, Yong Q.; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Anderson, Olin D.; Chan, Agnes P.; Rabinowicz, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Wheat and maize genes were hypothesized to be clustered into islands but the hypothesis was not statistically tested. The hypothesis is statistically tested here in four grass species differing in genome size, Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa, Sorghum bicolor, and Aegilops tauschii. Density functions obtained under a model where gene locations follow a homogeneous Poisson process and thus are not clustered are compared with a model-free situation quantified through a non-parametric density estimate. A simple homogeneous Poisson model for gene locations is not rejected for the small O. sativa and B. distachyon genomes, indicating that genes are distributed largely uniformly in those species, but is rejected for the larger S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii genomes, providing evidence for clustering of genes into islands. It is proposed to call the gene islands “gene insulae” to distinguish them from other types of gene clustering that have been proposed. An average S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii insula is estimated to contain 3.7 and 3.9 genes with an average intergenic distance within an insula of 2.1 and 16.5 kb, respectively. Inter-insular distances are greater than 8 and 81 kb and average 15.1 and 205 kb, in S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii, respectively. A greater gene density observed in the distal regions of the Ae. tauschii chromosomes is shown to be primarily caused by shortening of inter-insular distances. The comparison of the four grass genomes suggests that gene locations are largely a function of a homogeneous Poisson process in small genomes. Nonrandom insertions of LTR retroelements during genome expansion creates gene insulae, which become less dense and further apart with the increase in genome size. High concordance in relative lengths of orthologous intergenic distances among the investigated genomes including the maize genome suggests functional constraints on gene distribution in the grass genomes. PMID:23326580

  6. Insular organization of gene space in grass genomes.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Andrea; Müller, Hans-Georg; Massa, Alicia N; Wanjugi, Humphrey; Deal, Karin R; You, Frank M; Xu, Xiangyang; Gu, Yong Q; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Anderson, Olin D; Chan, Agnes P; Rabinowicz, Pablo; Devos, Katrien M; Dvorak, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Wheat and maize genes were hypothesized to be clustered into islands but the hypothesis was not statistically tested. The hypothesis is statistically tested here in four grass species differing in genome size, Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa, Sorghum bicolor, and Aegilops tauschii. Density functions obtained under a model where gene locations follow a homogeneous Poisson process and thus are not clustered are compared with a model-free situation quantified through a non-parametric density estimate. A simple homogeneous Poisson model for gene locations is not rejected for the small O. sativa and B. distachyon genomes, indicating that genes are distributed largely uniformly in those species, but is rejected for the larger S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii genomes, providing evidence for clustering of genes into islands. It is proposed to call the gene islands "gene insulae" to distinguish them from other types of gene clustering that have been proposed. An average S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii insula is estimated to contain 3.7 and 3.9 genes with an average intergenic distance within an insula of 2.1 and 16.5 kb, respectively. Inter-insular distances are greater than 8 and 81 kb and average 15.1 and 205 kb, in S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii, respectively. A greater gene density observed in the distal regions of the Ae. tauschii chromosomes is shown to be primarily caused by shortening of inter-insular distances. The comparison of the four grass genomes suggests that gene locations are largely a function of a homogeneous Poisson process in small genomes. Nonrandom insertions of LTR retroelements during genome expansion creates gene insulae, which become less dense and further apart with the increase in genome size. High concordance in relative lengths of orthologous intergenic distances among the investigated genomes including the maize genome suggests functional constraints on gene distribution in the grass genomes.

  7. The origin of spelt and free-threshing hexaploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Jan; Deal, Karin R; Luo, Ming-Cheng; You, Frank M; von Borstel, Keith; Dehghani, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    It is widely believed that hexaploid wheat originated via hybridization of hulled tetraploid emmer with Aegilops tauschii (genomes DD) and that the nascent hexaploid was spelt, from which free-threshing wheat evolved by mutations. To reassess the role of spelt in the evolution of Triticum aestivum, 4 disomic substitution lines of Ae. tauschii chromosome 2D in Chinese Spring wheat were developed and one of them was used to map the Tg locus, which controls glume tenacity in Ae. tauschii, relative to simple sequence repeat (SSR) and expressed sequence tag loci on wheat chromosome 2D. The segregation of SSR markers was used to assess the presence of Tg alleles in 11 accessions of spelt, both from Europe and from Asia. Ten of them had an inactive tg allele in the D genome and most had an active Tg allele in the B genome. This is consistent with spelt being derived from free-threshing hexaploid wheat by hybridization of free-threshing wheat with hulled emmer. It is proposed that the tetraploid parent of hexaploid wheat was not hulled emmer but a free-threshing form of tetraploid wheat.

  8. Genome-wide characterization of microsatellites in Triticeae species: abundance, distribution and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Pingchuan; Wang, Meng; Feng, Kewei; Cui, Licao; Tong, Wei; Song, Weining; Nie, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites are an important constituent of plant genome and distributed across entire genome. In this study, genome-wide analysis of microsatellites in 8 Triticeae species and 9 model plants revealed that microsatellite characteristics were similar among the Triticeae species. Furthermore, genome-wide microsatellite markers were designed in wheat and then used to analyze the evolutionary relationship of wheat and other Triticeae species. Results displayed that Aegilops tauschii was found to be the closest species to Triticum aestivum, followed by Triticum urartu, Triticum turgidum and Aegilops speltoides, while Triticum monococcum, Aegilops sharonensis and Hordeum vulgare showed a relatively lower PCR amplification effectivity. Additionally, a significantly higher PCR amplification effectivity was found in chromosomes at the same subgenome than its homoeologous when these markers were subjected to search against different chromosomes in wheat. After a rigorous screening process, a total of 20,666 markers showed high amplification and polymorphic potential in wheat and its relatives, which were integrated with the public available wheat markers and then anchored to the genome of wheat (CS). This study not only provided the useful resource for SSR markers development in Triticeae species, but also shed light on the evolution of polyploid wheat from the perspective of microsatellites. PMID:27561724

  9. Cytoplasmic genome substitution in wheat affects the nuclear-cytoplasmic cross-talk leading to transcript and metabolite alterations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alloplasmic lines provide a unique tool to study nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions. Three alloplasmic lines, with nuclear genomes from Triticum aestivum and harboring cytoplasm from Aegilops uniaristata, Aegilops tauschii and Hordeum chilense, were investigated by transcript and metabolite profiling to identify the effects of cytoplasmic substitution on nuclear-cytoplasmic signaling mechanisms. Results In combining the wheat nuclear genome with a cytoplasm of H. chilense, 540 genes were significantly altered, whereas 11 and 28 genes were significantly changed in the alloplasmic lines carrying the cytoplasm of Ae. uniaristata or Ae. tauschii, respectively. We identified the RNA maturation-related process as one of the most sensitive to a perturbation of the nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction. Several key components of the ROS chloroplast retrograde signaling, together with the up-regulation of the ROS scavenging system, showed that changes in the chloroplast genome have a direct impact on nuclear-cytoplasmic cross-talk. Remarkably, the H. chilense alloplasmic line down-regulated some genes involved in the determination of cytoplasmic male sterility without expressing the male sterility phenotype. Metabolic profiling showed a comparable response of the central metabolism of the alloplasmic and euplasmic lines to light, while exposing larger metabolite alterations in the H. chilense alloplasmic line as compared with the Aegilops lines, in agreement with the transcriptomic data. Several stress-related metabolites, remarkably raffinose, were altered in content in the H. chilense alloplasmic line when exposed to high light, while amino acids, as well as organic acids were significantly decreased. Alterations in the levels of transcript, related to raffinose, and the photorespiration-related metabolisms were associated with changes in the level of related metabolites. Conclusion The replacement of a wheat cytoplasm with the cytoplasm of a related species affects

  10. A Bioinformatics Approach for Detecting Repetitive Nested Motifs using Pattern Matching

    PubMed Central

    Romero, José R.; Carballido, Jessica A.; Garbus, Ingrid; Echenique, Viviana C.; Ponzoni, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The identification of nested motifs in genomic sequences is a complex computational problem. The detection of these patterns is important to allow the discovery of transposable element (TE) insertions, incomplete reverse transcripts, deletions, and/or mutations. In this study, a de novo strategy for detecting patterns that represent nested motifs was designed based on exhaustive searches for pairs of motifs and combinatorial pattern analysis. These patterns can be grouped into three categories, motifs within other motifs, motifs flanked by other motifs, and motifs of large size. The methodology used in this study, applied to genomic sequences from the plant species Aegilops tauschii and Oryza sativa, revealed that it is possible to identify putative nested TEs by detecting these three types of patterns. The results were validated through BLAST alignments, which revealed the efficacy and usefulness of the new method, which is called Mamushka. PMID:27812277

  11. A Bioinformatics Approach for Detecting Repetitive Nested Motifs using Pattern Matching.

    PubMed

    Romero, José R; Carballido, Jessica A; Garbus, Ingrid; Echenique, Viviana C; Ponzoni, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The identification of nested motifs in genomic sequences is a complex computational problem. The detection of these patterns is important to allow the discovery of transposable element (TE) insertions, incomplete reverse transcripts, deletions, and/or mutations. In this study, a de novo strategy for detecting patterns that represent nested motifs was designed based on exhaustive searches for pairs of motifs and combinatorial pattern analysis. These patterns can be grouped into three categories, motifs within other motifs, motifs flanked by other motifs, and motifs of large size. The methodology used in this study, applied to genomic sequences from the plant species Aegilops tauschii and Oryza sativa, revealed that it is possible to identify putative nested TEs by detecting these three types of patterns. The results were validated through BLAST alignments, which revealed the efficacy and usefulness of the new method, which is called Mamushka.

  12. Variation in Susceptibility to Wheat dwarf virus among Wild and Domesticated Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, Jim; Shad, Nadeem; Kvarnheden, Anders; Westerbergh, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the variation in plant response in host-pathogen interactions between wild (Aegilops spp., Triticum spp.) and domesticated wheat (Triticum spp.) and Wheat dwarf virus (WDV). The distribution of WDV and its wild host species overlaps in Western Asia in the Fertile Crescent, suggesting a coevolutionary relationship. Bread wheat originates from a natural hybridization between wild emmer wheat (carrying the A and B genomes) and the wild D genome donor Aegilops tauschii, followed by polyploidization and domestication. We studied whether the strong selection during these evolutionary processes, leading to genetic bottlenecks, may have resulted in a loss of resistance in domesticated wheat. In addition, we investigated whether putative fluctuations in intensity of selection imposed on the host-pathogen interactions have resulted in a variation in susceptibility to WDV. To test our hypotheses we evaluated eighteen wild and domesticated wheat taxa, directly or indirectly involved in wheat evolution, for traits associated with WDV disease such as leaf chlorosis, different growth traits and WDV content. The plants were exposed to viruliferous leafhoppers (Psammotettix alienus) in a greenhouse trial and evaluated at two time points. We found three different plant response patterns: i) continuous reduction in growth over time, ii) weak response at an early stage of plant development but a much stronger response at a later stage, and iii) remission of symptoms over time. Variation in susceptibility may be explained by differences in the intensity of natural selection, shaping the coevolutionary interaction between WDV and the wild relatives. However, genetic bottlenecks during wheat evolution have not had a strong impact on WDV resistance. Further, this study indicates that the variation in susceptibility may be associated with the genome type and that the ancestor Ae. tauschii may be useful as genetic resource for the improvement of WDV resistance in wheat. PMID

  13. New insights into the wheat chromosome 4D structure and virtual gene order, revealed by survey pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Helguera, Marcelo; Rivarola, Máximo; Clavijo, Bernardo; Martis, Mihaela M; Vanzetti, Leonardo S; González, Sergio; Garbus, Ingrid; Leroy, Phillippe; Šimková, Hana; Valárik, Miroslav; Caccamo, Mario; Doležel, Jaroslav; Mayer, Klaus F X; Feuillet, Catherine; Tranquilli, Gabriela; Paniego, Norma; Echenique, Viviana

    2015-04-01

    Survey sequencing of the bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genome (AABBDD) has been approached through different strategies delivering important information. However, the current wheat sequence knowledge is not complete. The aim of our study is to provide different and complementary set of data for chromosome 4D. A survey sequence was obtained by pyrosequencing of flow-sorted 4DS (7.2×) and 4DL (4.1×) arms. Single ends (SE) and long mate pairs (LMP) reads were assembled into contigs (223Mb) and scaffolds (65Mb) that were aligned to Aegilops tauschii draft genome (DD), anchoring 34Mb to chromosome 4. Scaffolds annotation rendered 822 gene models. A virtual gene order comprising 1973 wheat orthologous gene loci and 381 wheat gene models was built. This order was largely consistent with the scaffold order determined based on a published high density map from the Ae. tauschii chromosome 4, using bin-mapped 4D ESTs as a common reference. The virtual order showed a higher collinearity with homeologous 4B compared to 4A. Additionally, a virtual map was constructed and ∼5700 genes (∼2200 on 4DS and ∼3500 on 4DL) predicted. The sequence and virtual order obtained here using the 454 platform were compared with the Illumina one used by the IWGSC, giving complementary information. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. New insights into the wheat chromosome 4D structure and virtual gene order, revealed by survey pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Helguera, Marcelo; Rivarola, Máximo; Clavijo, Bernardo; Martis, Mihaela M.; Vanzetti, Leonardo S.; González, Sergio; Garbus, Ingrid; Leroy, Phillippe; Šimková, Hana; Valárik, Miroslav; Caccamo, Mario; Doležel, Jaroslav; Mayer, Klaus F.X.; Feuillet, Catherine; Tranquilli, Gabriela; Paniego, Norma; Echenique, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Survey sequencing of the bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genome (AABBDD) has been approached through different strategies delivering important information. However, the current wheat sequence knowledge is not complete. The aim of our study is to provide different and complementary set of data for chromosome 4D. A survey sequence was obtained by pyrosequencing of flow-sorted 4DS (7.2×) and 4DL (4.1×) arms. Single ends (SE) and long mate pairs (LMP) reads were assembled into contigs (223 Mb) and scaffolds (65 Mb) that were aligned to Aegilops tauschii draft genome (DD), anchoring 34 Mb to chromosome 4. Scaffolds annotation rendered 822 gene models. A virtual gene order comprising 1973 wheat orthologous gene loci and 381 wheat gene models was built. This order was largely consistent with the scaffold order determined based on a published high density map from the Ae. tauschii chromosome 4, using bin-mapped 4D ESTs as a common reference. The virtual order showed a higher collinearity with homeologous 4B compared to 4A. Additionally, a virtual map was constructed and ∼5700 genes (∼2200 on 4DS and ∼3500 on 4DL) predicted. The sequence and virtual order obtained here using the 454 platform were compared with the Illumina one used by the IWGSC, giving complementary information. PMID:25711827

  15. Complementation of sugary-1 Phenotype in Rice Endosperm with the Wheat Isoamylase1 Gene Supports a Direct Role for Isoamylase1 in Amylopectin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Akiko; Rahman, Sadequr; Utsumi, Yoshinori; Li, Zhongyi; Mukai, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Maki; Ugaki, Masashi; Harada, Kyuya; Satoh, Hikaru; Konik-Rose, Christine; Morell, Matthew; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2005-01-01

    To examine the role of isoamylase1 (ISA1) in amylopectin biosynthesis in plants, a genomic DNA fragment from Aegilops tauschii was introduced into the ISA1-deficient rice (Oryza sativa) sugary-1 mutant line EM914, in which endosperm starch is completely replaced by phytoglycogen. A. tauschii is the D genome donor of wheat (Triticum aestivum), and the introduced fragment effectively included the gene for ISA1 for wheat (TaISA1) that was encoded on the D genome. In TaISA1-expressing rice endosperm, phytoglycogen synthesis was substantially replaced by starch synthesis, leaving only residual levels of phytoglycogen. The levels of residual phytoglycogen present were inversely proportional to the expression level of the TaISA1 protein, although the level of pullulanase that had been reduced in EM914 was restored to the same level as that in the wild type. Small but significant differences were found in the amylopectin chain-length distribution, gelatinization temperatures, and A-type x-ray diffraction patterns of the starches from lines expressing TaISA1 when compared with wild-type rice starch, although in the first two parameters, the effect was proportional to the expression level of TaISA. The impact of expression levels of ISA1 on starch structure and properties provides support for the view that ISA1 is directly involved in the synthesis of amylopectin. PMID:15618430

  16. Alleviation of Cadmium Toxicity in Brassica juncea L. (Czern. & Coss.) by Calcium Application Involves Various Physiological and Biochemical Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Parvaiz; Sarwat, Maryam; Bhat, Nazir Ahmad; Wani, Mohd Rafiq; Kazi, Alvina Gul; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca) plays important role in plant development and response to various environmental stresses. However, its involvement in mitigation of heavy metal stress in plants remains elusive. In this study, we examined the effect of Ca (50 mM) in controlling cadmium (Cd) uptake in mustard (Brassica juncea L.) plants exposed to toxic levels of Cd (200 mg L−1 and 300 mg L−1). The Cd treatment showed substantial decrease in plant height, root length, dry weight, pigments and protein content. Application of Ca improved the growth and biomass yield of the Cd-stressed mustard seedlings. More importantly, the oil content of mustard seeds of Cd-stressed plants was also enhanced with Ca treatment. Proline was significantly increased in mustard plants under Cd stress, and exogenously sprayed Ca was found to have a positive impact on proline content in Cd-stressed plants. Different concentrations of Cd increased lipid peroxidation but the application of Ca minimized it to appreciable level in Cd-treated plants. Excessive Cd treatment enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase, which were further enhanced by the addition of Ca. Additionally, Cd stress caused reduced uptake of essential elements and increased Cd accumulation in roots and shoots. However, application of Ca enhanced the concentration of essential elements and decreased Cd accumulation in Cd-stressed plants. Our results indicated that application of Ca enables mustard plant to withstand the deleterious effect of Cd, resulting in improved growth and seed quality of mustard plants. PMID:25629695

  17. Variability of composition and effects of essential oils from Rhanterium adpressum Coss. & Durieu against mycotoxinogenic Fusarium strains.

    PubMed

    Elhouiti, Fatiha; Tahri, Djilali; Takhi, Djalila; Ouinten, Mohamed; Barreau, Christian; Verdal-Bonnin, Marie-Noëlle; Bombarda, Isabelle; Yousfi, Mohamed

    2017-07-13

    The antifungal potency of the essential oils of Rhanterium adpressum was evaluated against four mycotoxigenic strains of the genus Fusarium. The essential oils were obtained, separately, by hydro-distillation of the aerial parts of R. adpressum (leaves and flowers). The parts were collected during the period of bloom (3 months) for 3 years. The GC-MS analysis revealed thirty-six compounds for the essential oils, divided into four classes of chemical compounds, with variable percentages according to the month of extraction. The monoterpene hydrocarbons form the main class in these oils. On the other hand, the highest percentages of the oxygenated compounds are observed in the samples collected during the month of May. The direct contact method was used to evaluate the antifungal activity of the essential oils. The activity can be attributed to their relatively high composition of oxygenated monoterpenes. Flowers extract showed strong inhibitory activity, with very interesting concentrations of IC50 and MIC for both tests on solid and liquid medium. The effect of these oils on the production of type B trichothecenes (TCTBs) was evaluated, showing a significant inhibitory effect on TCTBs production, for both extracts (leaves and flowers). The rates of inhibition were 66-97 and 76-100% of FX, 3-ADON and 15-ADON, respectively. The inhibition of fungal biomass and the production of TCTBs depended on the used concentration of the essential oils. These results suggest that the essential oils from R. adpressum are able to control the growth of the tested strains and their subsequent production of TCTB mycotoxins.

  18. Alleviation of cadmium toxicity in Brassica juncea L. (Czern. & Coss.) by calcium application involves various physiological and biochemical strategies.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Parvaiz; Sarwat, Maryam; Bhat, Nazir Ahmad; Wani, Mohd Rafiq; Kazi, Alvina Gul; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca) plays important role in plant development and response to various environmental stresses. However, its involvement in mitigation of heavy metal stress in plants remains elusive. In this study, we examined the effect of Ca (50 mM) in controlling cadmium (Cd) uptake in mustard (Brassica juncea L.) plants exposed to toxic levels of Cd (200 mg L(-1) and 300 mg L(-1)). The Cd treatment showed substantial decrease in plant height, root length, dry weight, pigments and protein content. Application of Ca improved the growth and biomass yield of the Cd-stressed mustard seedlings. More importantly, the oil content of mustard seeds of Cd-stressed plants was also enhanced with Ca treatment. Proline was significantly increased in mustard plants under Cd stress, and exogenously sprayed Ca was found to have a positive impact on proline content in Cd-stressed plants. Different concentrations of Cd increased lipid peroxidation but the application of Ca minimized it to appreciable level in Cd-treated plants. Excessive Cd treatment enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase, which were further enhanced by the addition of Ca. Additionally, Cd stress caused reduced uptake of essential elements and increased Cd accumulation in roots and shoots. However, application of Ca enhanced the concentration of essential elements and decreased Cd accumulation in Cd-stressed plants. Our results indicated that application of Ca enables mustard plant to withstand the deleterious effect of Cd, resulting in improved growth and seed quality of mustard plants.

  19. Wheat miRNA ancestors: evident by transcriptome analysis of A, B, and D genome donors.

    PubMed

    Alptekin, Burcu; Budak, Hikmet

    2017-05-01

    MicroRNAs are critical players of post-transcriptional gene regulation with profound effects on the fundamental processes of cellular life. Their identification and characterization, together with their targets, hold great significance in exploring and exploiting their roles on a functional context, providing valuable clues into the regulation of important biological processes, such as stress tolerance or environmental adaptation. Wheat is a hardy crop, extensively harvested in temperate regions, and is a major component of the human diet. With the advent of the next generation sequencing technologies considerably decreasing sequencing costs per base-pair, genomic, and transcriptomic data from several wheat species, including the progenitors and wild relatives have become available. In this study, we performed in silico identification and comparative analysis of microRNA repertoires of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and its diploid progenitors and relatives, Aegilops sharonensis, Aegilops speltoides, Aegilops tauschii, Triticum monococcum, and Triticum urartu through the utilization of publicly available transcriptomic data. Over 200 miRNA families were identified, majority of which have not previously been reported. Ancestral relationships expanded our understanding of wheat miRNA evolution, while T. monococcum miRNAs delivered important clues on the effects of domestication on miRNA expression. Comparative analyses on wild Ae. sharonensis accessions highlighted candidate miRNAs that can be linked to stress tolerance. The miRNA repertoires of bread wheat and its diploid progenitors and relatives provide important insight into the diversification and distribution of miRNA genes, which should contribute to the elucidation of miRNA evolution of Poaceae family. A thorough understanding of the convergent and divergent expression profiles of miRNAs in different genetic backgrounds can provide unique opportunities to modulation of gene regulation for better crop

  20. The α-gliadin genes from Brachypodium distachyon L. provide evidence for a significant gap in the current genome assembly.

    PubMed

    Chen, G X; Lv, D W; Li, W D; Subburaj, S; Yu, Z T; Wang, Y J; Li, X H; Wang, K; Ye, X G; Ma, Wujun; Yan, Y M

    2014-03-01

    Brachypodium distachyon, is a new model plant for most cereal crops while gliadin is a class of wheat storage proteins related with wheat quality attributes. In the published B. distachyon genome sequence databases, no gliadin gene is found. In the current study, a number of gliadin genes in B. distachyon were isolated, which is contradictory to the results of genome sequencing projects. In our study, the B. distachyon seeds were found to have no gliadin protein expression by gel electrophoresis, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and Western blotting analysis. However, Southern blotting revealed a presence of more than ten copies of α-gliadin coding genes in B. distachyon. By means of AS-PCR amplification, four novel full-ORF α-gliadin genes, and 26 pseudogenes with at least one stop codon as well as their promoter regions were cloned and sequenced from different Brachypodium accessions. Sequence analysis revealed a few of single-nucleotide polymorphisms among these genes. Most pseudogenes were resulted from a C to T change, leading to the generation of TAG or TAA in-frame stop codon. To compare both the full-ORFs and the pseudogenes among Triticum and Triticum-related species, their structural characteristics were analyzed. Based on the four T cell stimulatory toxic epitopes and two ployglutamine domains, Aegilops, Triticum, and Brachypodium species were found to be more closely related. The phylogenetic analysis further revealed that B. distachyon was more closely related to Aegilops tauschii, Aegilops umbellulata, and the A or D genome of Triticum aestivum. The α-gliadin genes were able to express successfully in E. coli using the functional T7 promoter. The relative and absolute quantification of the transcripts of α-gliadin genes in wheat was much higher than that in B. distachyon. The abundant pseudogenes may affect the transcriptional and/or posttranscriptional level of the α-gliadin in B. distachyon.

  1. Characterization of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Genetic Variation for Preharvest Sprouting in Synthetic Backcross-Derived Wheat Lines

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, Muhammad; Ogbonnaya, Francis C.; Oman, Jason; van Ginkel, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Aegilops tauschii, the wild relative of wheat, has stronger seed dormancy, a major component of preharvest sprouting resistance (PHSR), than bread wheat. A diploid Ae. tauschii accession (AUS18836) and a tetraploid (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. durum var. Altar84) wheat were used to construct a synthetic wheat (Syn37). The genetic architecture of PHS was investigated in 271 BC1F7 synthetic backcross lines (SBLs) derived from Syn37/2*Janz (resistant/susceptible). The SBLs were evaluated in three environments over 2 years and PHS was assessed by way of three measures: the germination index (GI), which measures grain dormancy, the whole spike assay (SI), which takes into account all spike morphology, and counted visually sprouted seeds out of 200 (VI). Grain color was measured using both Chroma Meter- and NaOH-based approaches. QTL for PHSR and grain color were mapped and their additive and epistatic effects as well as their interactions with environment were estimated by a mixed linear-model approach. Single-locus analysis following composite interval mapping revealed four QTL for GI, two QTL for SI, and four QTL for VI on chromosomes 3DL and 4AL. The locus QPhs.dpiv-3D.1 on chromosome 3DL was tightly linked to the red grain color (RGC) at a distance of 5 cM. The other locus on chromosome 3D, “QPhs.dpiv-3D.2” was independent of RGC locus. Two-locus analysis detected nine QTL with main effects and 18 additive × additive interactions for GI, SI, and VI. Two of the nine main effects QTL and two epistatic QTL showed significant interactions with environments. Both additive and epistatic effects contributed to phenotypic variance in PHSR and the identified markers are potential candidates for marker-assisted selection of favorable alleles at multiple loci. SBLs derived from Ae. tauschii proved to be a promising tool to dissect, introgress, and pyramid different PHSR genes into adapted wheat genetic backgrounds. The enhanced expression of PHS resistance in SBLs enabled

  2. Comparative analysis in cereals of a key proline catabolism gene.

    PubMed

    Ayliffe, Michael A; Mitchell, Heidi J; Deuschle, Karen; Pryor, Anthony J

    2005-12-01

    Proline accumulation and catabolism play significant roles in adaptation to a variety of plant stresses including osmotic stress, drought, temperature, freezing, UV irradiation, heavy metals and pathogen infection. In this study, the gene Delta1 -pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH), which catalyzes the second step in the conversion of proline to glutamate, is characterized in a number of cereal species. P5CDH genes from hexaploid wheat, Triticum turgidum (durum wheat), Aegilops tauschii, Triticum monococcum, barley, maize and rice were shown to be conserved in terms of gene structure and sequence, present as a single copy per haploid, non-polyploid genome and located in evolutionarily conserved linkage groups. A wheat cDNA sequence was shown by yeast complementation to encode a functional P5CDH activity. A divergently-transcribed rab7 gene was identified immediately 5' of P5CDH in all grasses examined, except rice. The rab7/P5CDH intergenic region in these species, which presumably encompasses 5' regulatory elements of both genes, showed a distinct pattern of sequence evolution with sequences in juxtaposition to each ORF conserved between barley, wheat, A. tauschii and T. monococcum. More distal 5' sequence in this intergenic region showed a higher rate of divergence, with no homology observed between these regions in the wheat and barley genomes. Maize and rice showed no similarity in regions 5' of P5CDH when compared with wheat, barley, and each other, apart from a 22 bp region of conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) that is similar to a proline response element identified in the promoter of the Arabidopsis proline dehydrogenase gene. A palindromic motif similar to this cereal CNS was also identified 5' of the Arabidopsis AtP5CDH gene showing conservation of this sequence in monocot and dicot lineages.

  3. Sequencing of 15 622 gene-bearing BACs clarifies the gene-dense regions of the barley genome.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Amatriaín, María; Lonardi, Stefano; Luo, MingCheng; Madishetty, Kavitha; Svensson, Jan T; Moscou, Matthew J; Wanamaker, Steve; Jiang, Tao; Kleinhofs, Andris; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Wise, Roger P; Stein, Nils; Ma, Yaqin; Rodriguez, Edmundo; Kudrna, Dave; Bhat, Prasanna R; Chao, Shiaoman; Condamine, Pascal; Heinen, Shane; Resnik, Josh; Wing, Rod; Witt, Heather N; Alpert, Matthew; Beccuti, Marco; Bozdag, Serdar; Cordero, Francesca; Mirebrahim, Hamid; Ounit, Rachid; Wu, Yonghui; You, Frank; Zheng, Jie; Simková, Hana; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Duma, Denisa; Altschmied, Lothar; Blake, Tom; Bregitzer, Phil; Cooper, Laurel; Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Falk, Anders; Feiz, Leila; Graner, Andreas; Gustafson, Perry; Hayes, Patrick M; Lemaux, Peggy; Mammadov, Jafar; Close, Timothy J

    2015-10-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) possesses a large and highly repetitive genome of 5.1 Gb that has hindered the development of a complete sequence. In 2012, the International Barley Sequencing Consortium released a resource integrating whole-genome shotgun sequences with a physical and genetic framework. However, because only 6278 bacterial artificial chromosome (BACs) in the physical map were sequenced, fine structure was limited. To gain access to the gene-containing portion of the barley genome at high resolution, we identified and sequenced 15 622 BACs representing the minimal tiling path of 72 052 physical-mapped gene-bearing BACs. This generated ~1.7 Gb of genomic sequence containing an estimated 2/3 of all Morex barley genes. Exploration of these sequenced BACs revealed that although distal ends of chromosomes contain most of the gene-enriched BACs and are characterized by high recombination rates, there are also gene-dense regions with suppressed recombination. We made use of published map-anchored sequence data from Aegilops tauschii to develop a synteny viewer between barley and the ancestor of the wheat D-genome. Except for some notable inversions, there is a high level of collinearity between the two species. The software HarvEST:Barley provides facile access to BAC sequences and their annotations, along with the barley-Ae. tauschii synteny viewer. These BAC sequences constitute a resource to improve the efficiency of marker development, map-based cloning, and comparative genomics in barley and related crops. Additional knowledge about regions of the barley genome that are gene-dense but low recombination is particularly relevant.

  4. Generation of Wheat Transcription Factor FOX Rice Lines and Systematic Screening for Salt and Osmotic Stress Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinxia; Zhang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Yayun; Zhu, Butuo; Cao, Jian; Li, Zhanpeng; Han, Longzhi; Jia, Jizeng; Zhao, Guangyao; Sun, Xuehui

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in plant growth, development, and responses to environmental stress. In this study, we collected 1,455 full-length (FL) cDNAs of TFs, representing 45 families, from wheat and its relatives Triticum urartu, Aegilops speltoides, Aegilops tauschii, Triticum carthlicum, and Triticum aestivum. More than 15,000 T0 TF FOX (Full-length cDNA Over-eXpressing) rice lines were generated; of these, 10,496 lines set seeds. About 14.88% of the T0 plants showed obvious phenotypic changes. T1 lines (5,232 lines) were screened for salt and osmotic stress tolerance using 150 mM NaCl and 20% (v/v) PEG-4000, respectively. Among them, five lines (591, 746, 1647, 1812, and J4065) showed enhanced salt stress tolerance, five lines (591, 746, 898, 1078, and 1647) showed enhanced osmotic stress tolerance, and three lines (591, 746, and 1647) showed both salt and osmotic stress tolerance. Further analysis of the T-DNA flanking sequences showed that line 746 over-expressed TaEREB1, line 898 over-expressed TabZIPD, and lines 1812 and J4065 over-expressed TaOBF1a and TaOBF1b, respectively. The enhanced salt and osmotic stress tolerance of lines 898 and 1812 was confirmed by retransformation of the respective genes. Our results demonstrate that a heterologous FOX system may be used as an alternative genetic resource for the systematic functional analysis of the wheat genome.

  5. Development of a D genome specific marker resource for diploid and hexaploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Drader, Thomas; Tiwari, Vijay K; Dong, Lingli; Kumar, Ajay; Huo, Naxin; Ghavami, Farhad; Iqbal, M Javed; Lazo, Gerard R; Leonard, Jeff; Gill, Bikram S; Kianian, Shahryar F; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Gu, Yong Q

    2015-08-28

    Mapping and map-based cloning of genes that control agriculturally and economically important traits remain great challenges for plants with complex highly repetitive genomes such as those within the grass tribe, Triticeae. Mapping limitations in the Triticeae are primarily due to low frequencies of polymorphic gene markers and poor genetic recombination in certain genetic regions. Although the abundance of repetitive sequence may pose common problems in genome analysis and sequence assembly of large and complex genomes, they provide repeat junction markers with random and unbiased distribution throughout chromosomes. Hence, development of a high-throughput mapping technology that combine both gene-based and repeat junction-based markers is needed to generate maps that have better coverage of the entire genome. In this study, the available genomics resource of the diploid Aegilop tauschii, the D genome donor of bread wheat, were used to develop genome specific markers that can be applied for mapping in modern hexaploid wheat. A NimbleGen array containing both gene-based and repeat junction probe sequences derived from Ae. tauschii was developed and used to map the Chinese Spring nullisomic-tetrasomic lines and deletion bin lines of the D genome chromosomes. Based on these mapping data, we have now anchored 5,171 repeat junction probes and 10,892 gene probes, corresponding to 5,070 gene markers, to the delineated deletion bins of the D genome. The order of the gene-based markers within the deletion bins of the Chinese Spring can be inferred based on their positions on the Ae. tauschii genetic map. Analysis of the probe sequences against the Chinese Spring chromosome sequence assembly database facilitated mapping of the NimbleGen probes to the sequence contigs and allowed assignment or ordering of these sequence contigs within the deletion bins. The accumulated length of anchored sequence contigs is about 155 Mb, representing ~ 3.2 % of the D genome. A specific

  6. Mapping QTL for resistance to eyespot of wheat in Aegilops longissima

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eyespot is an economically important disease of wheat caused by the soilborne fungi Oculimacula yal- lundae and O. acuformis. These pathogens infect and colonize the stem base, which results in lodging of diseased plants and reduced grain yield. Disease resistant cultivars are the most desirable co...

  7. Jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica) by imidazolinone-resistant wheat hybridization under field conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gene flow between jointed goatgrass and winter wheat is a concern because transfer of herbicide resistance genes from imidazolinone-resistant (IR) winter wheat cultivars to jointed goatgrass could restrict weed management options for this serious weed of winter wheat cropping systems. The objective...

  8. Patterns of introduction and adaptation during the invasion of Aegilops truncialis (Poaceae) into Californian serpentine soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    - Multiple introductions appear to be playing a prominent role to explain the success of biological invasions. One often cited mechanism is the prevention of a genetic bottleneck by the parallel introduction of several distinct genotypes, which in turn provides the heritable variation that can allow...

  9. Genetic lineages of the invasive Aegilops triuncialis differ in competitive response to neighboring grassland species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Competitive dynamics between native and exotic species can influence both the success of exotics in the novel environment as well as diversity and abundance of native species. Invasive species are often characterized by multiple introductions in the novel range, which can lead to differentiation in ...

  10. Glucosinolates and fatty acid, sterol, and tocopherol composition of seed oils from Capparis spinosa Var. spinosa and Capparis ovata Desf. Var. canescens (Coss.) Heywood.

    PubMed

    Matthäus, Bertrand; Ozcan, Musa

    2005-09-07

    Seed oils of 11 samples of Capparis ovata and Capparis spinosa from different locations in Turkey were characterized with regard to the composition of fatty acids, tocopherols, and sterols as well as the content of glucosinolates. The oil content of the seeds ranged from 27.3 to 37.6 g/100 g (C. spinosa) and from 14.6 to 38.0 g/100 g (C. ovata). The dominating fatty acid of both species was linoleic acid, which accounted for 26.9-55.3% in C. ovata seed oils and for 24.6-50.5% in C. spinosa seed oils. Oleic acid and its isomer, vaccenic acid, were both found in the seed oils in concentrations between 10 and 30%, respectively. The seed oils of both species were rich in tocopherols with the following composition: gamma-tocopherol, 124.3-1944.9 mg/100 g; delta-tocopherol, 2.7-269.5 mg/100 g; and alpha-tocopherol, 0.6-13.8 mg/100 g. The concentration of total sterols ranged from 4875.5 to 12189.1 mg/kg (C. ovata) and from 4961.8 to 10009.1 mg/kg (C. spinosa), respectively. In addition to sitosterol, which amounted to approximately 60% of the total amount of sterols, campesterol and stigmasterol accounted for 16 and 10% of the total sterols, respectively. The seed oils showed remarkably high contents of Delta5-avenasterol (between 138.8 and 599.4 mg/kg). The total content of glucosinolates of C. ovata and C. spinosa samples was determined as 34.5-84.6 micromol/g for C. ovata and 42.6-88.9 micromol/g for C. spinosa, respectively, on a dry weight basis, with >95% as glucocapperin.

  11. Divergent distribution of the sensor kinase CosS in non-thermophilic Campylobacter species and its functional incompatibility with the Campylobacter jejuni CosR

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two-component signal transduction system is commonly composed of a sensor histidine kinase and a response regulator, modulating gene expression in response to environmental changes through a phosphorylation-dependent process. CosR is an OmpR-type response regulator essential for the viability of Cam...

  12. Cell division and endoreduplication play important roles in stem swelling of tuber mustard (Brassica juncea Coss. var. tumida Tsen et Lee).

    PubMed

    Shi, H; Wang, L L; Sun, L T; Dong, L L; Liu, B; Chen, L P

    2012-11-01

    We investigated spatio-temporal variations in cell division and the occurrence of endoreduplication in cells of tuber mustard stems during development. Cells in the stem had 8C nuclei (C represents DNA content of a two haploid genome), since it is an allotetraploid species derived from diploid Brassica rapa (AA) and B. nigra (BB), thus indicating the occurrence of endoreduplication. Additionally, we observed a dynamic change of cell ploidy in different regions of the swollen stems, with a decrease in 4C proportion in P4-1 and a sharp increase in 8C cells that became the dominant cell type (86.33% at most) in the inner pith cells. Furthermore, cDNAs of 14 cell cycle genes and four cell expansion genes were cloned and their spatial transcripts analysed in order to understand their roles in stem development. The expression of most cell cycle genes peaked in regions of the outer pith (P2 or P3), some genes regulating S/G2 and G2/M (BjCDKB1;2, BjCYCB1;1 and BjCYCB1;2) significantly decrease in P5 and P6, while G1/S regulators (BjE2Fa, BjE2Fb and BjE2Fc) showed a relative high expression level in the inner pith (P5) where cells were undergoing endoreduplication. Coincidentally, BjXTH1and BjXTH2 were exclusively expressed in the endoreduplicated cells. Our results suggest that cells of outer pith regions (P2 and P3) mainly divide for cell proliferation, while cells of the inner pith expand through endoreduplication. Endoreduplication could trigger expression of BjXTH1 and BjXTH2 and thus function in cell expansion of the pith tissue. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  13. UHPLC-PDA-ESI/HRMS/MSn analysis of anthocyanins, flavonol glycosides, and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives in red mustard green (Brassica juncea (L) Coss variety)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An UHPLC-PDA-ESI/HRMS/MSn profiling method was used for a comprehensive study of the polyphenols in red mustard greens and identified 209 phenolic compounds: 67 anthocyanin, 102 flavonol glycosides, and 40 hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. The glycosylation patterns of the flavonoids were assigned ...

  14. The Center for Optimized Structural Studies (COSS) platform for automation in cloning, expression, and purification of single proteins and protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Mlynek, Georg; Lehner, Anita; Neuhold, Jana; Leeb, Sarah; Kostan, Julius; Charnagalov, Alexej; Stolt-Bergner, Peggy; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Pinotsis, Nikos

    2014-06-01

    Expression in Escherichia coli represents the simplest and most cost effective means for the production of recombinant proteins. This is a routine task in structural biology and biochemistry where milligrams of the target protein are required in high purity and monodispersity. To achieve these criteria, the user often needs to screen several constructs in different expression and purification conditions in parallel. We describe a pipeline, implemented in the Center for Optimized Structural Studies, that enables the systematic screening of expression and purification conditions for recombinant proteins and relies on a series of logical decisions. We first use bioinformatics tools to design a series of protein fragments, which we clone in parallel, and subsequently screen in small scale for optimal expression and purification conditions. Based on a scoring system that assesses soluble expression, we then select the top ranking targets for large-scale purification. In the establishment of our pipeline, emphasis was put on streamlining the processes such that it can be easily but not necessarily automatized. In a typical run of about 2 weeks, we are able to prepare and perform small-scale expression screens for 20-100 different constructs followed by large-scale purification of at least 4-6 proteins. The major advantage of our approach is its flexibility, which allows for easy adoption, either partially or entirely, by any average hypothesis driven laboratory in a manual or robot-assisted manner.

  15. A novel family of γ-gliadin genes are highly regulated by nitrogen supply in developing wheat grain

    PubMed Central

    Shewry, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Six wheat cultivars were grown at Rothamsted (UK) with three levels of nitrogen fertilizer (100, 200 and 350kg N/ha) in 2009 and 2010. Gene expression in developing caryopses at 21 days post-anthesis (DPA) was profiled using the Affymetrix Wheat GeneChip®. Four of 105 transcripts which were significantly upregulated by nitrogen level were annotated as γ-3 hordein and the identification of corresponding expressed sequence tags showed that they differed in sequence from previously described (typical) γ-gliadins and represented a novel form of γ-gliadin. Real-time reverse transcriptase PCR at 14, 21, 28 and 35 DPA revealed that this transcript was most abundant and most responsive to nitrogen at 21 DPA. Four novel γ-gliadin genes were isolated by PCR amplification from wheat cv. Hereward and the related species Aegilops tauschii and Triticum monococcum while three were assembled from the genomic sequence database of wheat cv. Chinese Spring (www.cerealsdb.uk.net). Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences of the seven genes showed that they shared only 44.4–46.0% identity with the sequence of a typical γ-gliadin (accession number EF15018), but 61.8–68.3% identity with the sequence of γ-3 hordein from the wild barley species Hordeum chilense (AY338065). The novel γ-gliadin genes were localized to the group 1 chromosomes (1A, 1B, 1D). PMID:23162123

  16. PGSB PlantsDB: updates to the database framework for comparative plant genome research

    PubMed Central

    Spannagl, Manuel; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Bader, Kai C.; Martis, Mihaela M.; Seidel, Michael; Kugler, Karl G.; Gundlach, Heidrun; Mayer, Klaus F.X.

    2016-01-01

    PGSB (Plant Genome and Systems Biology: formerly MIPS) PlantsDB (http://pgsb.helmholtz-muenchen.de/plant/index.jsp) is a database framework for the comparative analysis and visualization of plant genome data. The resource has been updated with new data sets and types as well as specialized tools and interfaces to address user demands for intuitive access to complex plant genome data. In its latest incarnation, we have re-worked both the layout and navigation structure and implemented new keyword search options and a new BLAST sequence search functionality. Actively involved in corresponding sequencing consortia, PlantsDB has dedicated special efforts to the integration and visualization of complex triticeae genome data, especially for barley, wheat and rye. We enhanced CrowsNest, a tool to visualize syntenic relationships between genomes, with data from the wheat sub-genome progenitor Aegilops tauschii and added functionality to the PGSB RNASeqExpressionBrowser. GenomeZipper results were integrated for the genomes of barley, rye, wheat and perennial ryegrass and interactive access is granted through PlantsDB interfaces. Data exchange and cross-linking between PlantsDB and other plant genome databases is stimulated by the transPLANT project (http://transplantdb.eu/). PMID:26527721

  17. Cloning and characterization of four B-hordein genes from Tibetan hull-less barley (Hordeum vulgare subsp. vulgare).

    PubMed

    Han, Zhao-Xue; Qian, Gang; Pan, Zhi-Fen; Deng, Guang-Bing; Wu, Fang; Tang, Ya-Wei; Qiang, Xiao-Lin; Yu, Mao-Qun

    2006-10-01

    Four B-hordein genes, designated BH1-BH4, were cloned using PCR amplification from two hull-less barley cultivars, ZQ7239 and ZQ148, collected from Tibet. The results of sequencing indicated that BH1-BH4 contained complete open reading frames (ORFs). Comparison of their predicted polypeptide sequences with the published sequences suggested that they all share the same basic protein structure. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the deduced amino-acid sequences of BH1-BH4 genes were more closely related to B-hordeins from cultivated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) than to any other prolamins from wild barley and Aegilops tauschii. Comparison of the coding regions of BH1-BH4 genes showed that BH1 had a lower sequence identity to other previously published B-hordeins than the other three B-hordeins obtained in this study. BH1 was then cloned in a bacterial expression vector based on bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. The resulting plasmid produced a 28.15 kDa protein in Escherichia coli. The potential value of B-hordein genes in grain quality improvement of hull-less barley has been discussed.

  18. Molecular Evolution of Receptor-Like Kinase Genes in Hexaploid Wheat. Independent Evolution of Orthologs after Polyploidization and Mechanisms of Local Rearrangements at Paralogous Loci1

    PubMed Central

    Feuillet, Catherine; Penger, Anja; Gellner, Klaus; Mast, Austin; Keller, Beat

    2001-01-01

    Hexaploid wheat is a young polyploid species and represents a good model to study mechanisms of gene evolution after polyploidization. Recent studies at the scale of the whole genome have suggested rapid genomic changes after polyploidization but so far the rearrangements that have occurred in terms of gene content and organization have not been analyzed at the microlevel in wheat. Here, we have isolated members of a receptor kinase (Lrk) gene family in hexaploid and diploid wheat, Aegilops tauschii, and barley (Hordeum vulgare). Phylogenetic analysis has allowed us to establish evolutionary relationships (orthology versus paralogy) between the different members of this gene family in wheat as well as with Lrk genes from barley. It also demonstrated that the sequences of the homoeologous Lrk genes evolved independently after polyploidization. In addition, we found evidence for gene loss during the evolution of wheat and barley. Analysis of large genomic fragments isolated from nonorthologous Lrk loci showed a high conservation of the gene content and gene organization at these loci on the homoeologous group 1 chromosomes of wheat and barley. Finally, sequence comparison of two paralogous fragments of chromosome 1B showed a large number of local events (sequence duplications, deletions, and insertions), which reveal rearrangements and mechanisms for genome enlargement at the microlevel. PMID:11244111

  19. Unlocking Triticeae genomics to sustainably feed the future

    PubMed Central

    Mochida, Keiichi; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The tribe Triticeae includes the major crops wheat and barley. Within the last few years, the whole genomes of four Triticeae species—barley, wheat, Tausch’s goatgrass (Aegilops tauschii) and wild einkorn wheat (Triticum urartu)—have been sequenced. The availability of these genomic resources for Triticeae plants and innovative analytical applications using next-generation sequencing technologies are helping to revitalize our approaches in genetic work and to accelerate improvement of the Triticeae crops. Comparative genomics and integration of genomic resources from Triticeae plants and the model grass Brachypodium distachyon are aiding the discovery of new genes and functional analyses of genes in Triticeae crops. Innovative approaches and tools such as analysis of next-generation populations, evolutionary genomics and systems approaches with mathematical modeling are new strategies that will help us discover alleles for adaptive traits to future agronomic environments. In this review, we provide an update on genomic tools for use with Triticeae plants and Brachypodium and describe emerging approaches toward crop improvements in Triticeae. PMID:24204022

  20. Chromosomal and genome-wide molecular changes associated with initial stages of allohexaploidization in wheat can be transit and incidental.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Xu, Liying; Zhu, Bo; Li, Mingjiu; Zhang, Huakun; Qi, Bao; Xu, Chunming; Han, Fangpu; Liu, Bao

    2011-08-01

    Genomic instability can be induced by nascent allopolyploidization in plants. However, most previous studies have not defined to what extent the allopolyploidy-induced rapid genomic instability represents a general response, and hence important to evolution, or merely incidental events occurring stochastically in a limited number of individuals. We report here that in a newly formed allohexaploid wheat line between tetraploid wheat Triticum turgidum subsp. durum (genome BBAA) and Aegilops tauschii (genome DD) a great majority of individual plants showed chromosomal stability and exhibited a genomic constitution similar to that of the present-day Triticum aestivum (genome BBAADD). In contrast, a single individual plant was identified at S(2), which exhibited chromosomal instability in both number and structure based on multicolor genomic in situ hybridization (mc-GISH) analysis. Accordingly, this plant also manifested extensive changes at the molecular level including loss and gain of DNA segments and DNA methylation repatterning. Remarkably, the chromosomal and molecular instabilities that presumably occurred at S(0) to S(1) and (or) in the F(1) hybrid were rapidly quenched by S(2) and followed by stable transgenerational inheritance. Our results suggest that these stochastic and individual-specific rapid genomic changes, albeit interesting, probably have not played a major role in the speciation and evolution of common wheat, T. aestivum.

  1. Molecular evolution and nucleotide diversity of nuclear plastid phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) gene in Triticeae (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Adderley, Shawn; Sun, Genlou

    2014-01-01

    Levels of nucleotide divergence provide key evidence in the evolution of polyploids. The nucleotide diversity of 226 sequences of pgk1 gene in Triticeae species was characterized. Phylogenetic analyses based on the pgk1 gene were carried out to determine the diploid origin of polyploids within the tribe in relation to their A(u), B, D, St, Ns, P, and H haplomes. Sequences from the Ns genome represented the highest nucleotide diversity values for both polyploid and diploid species with π=0.03343 and θ=0.03536 for polyploid Ns genome sequences and π=0.03886 and θ=0.03886 for diploid Psathyrostachys sequences, while Triticum urartu represented the lowest diversity among diploid species at π=0.0011 and θ=0.0011. Nucleotide variation of diploid Aegilops speltoides (π=0.2441, presumed the B genome donor of Triticum species) is five times higher than that (π=0.00483) of B genome in polyploid species. Significant negative Tajima's D values for the St, A(u), and D genomes along with high rates of polymorphisms and low sequence diversity were observed. Origins of the A(u), B, and D genomes were linked to T. urartu, A. speltoides, and A. tauschii, respectively. Putative St genome donor was Pseudoroegneria, while Ns and P donors were Psathyrostachys and Agropyron. H genome diploid donor is Hordeum. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Discovery, evaluation and distribution of haplotypes of the wheat Ppd-D1 gene.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiai; Song, Yanxia; Zhou, Ronghua; Ren, Zhenglong; Jia, Jizeng

    2010-02-01

    Ppd-D1 is one of the most potent genes affecting the photoperiod response of wheat (Triticum aestivum). Only two alleles, insensitive Ppd-D1a and sensitive Ppd-D1b, were known previously, and these did not adequately explain the broad adaptation of wheat to photoperiod variation. In this study, five diagnostic molecular markers were employed to identify Ppd-D1 haplotypes in 492 wheat varieties from diverse geographic locations and 55 accessions of Aegilops tauschii, the D genome donor species of wheat. Six Ppd-D1 haplotypes, designated I-VI, were identified. Types II, V and VI were considered to be more ancient and types I, III and IV were considered to be derived from type II. The transcript abundances of the Ppd-D1 haplotypes showed continuous variation, being highest for haplotype I, lowest for haplotype III, and correlating negatively with varietal differences in heading time. These haplotypes also significantly affected other agronomic traits. The distribution frequency of Ppd-D1 haplotypes showed partial correlations with both latitudes and altitudes of wheat cultivation regions. The evolution, expression and distribution of Ppd-D1 haplotypes were consistent evidentially with each other. What was regarded as a pair of alleles in the past can now be considered a series of alleles leading to continuous variation.

  3. High-throughput physical map anchoring via BAC-pool sequencing.

    PubMed

    Cviková, Kateřina; Cattonaro, Federica; Alaux, Michael; Stein, Nils; Mayer, Klaus Fx; Doležel, Jaroslav; Bartoš, Jan

    2015-04-11

    Physical maps created from large insert DNA libraries, typically cloned in BAC vector, are valuable resources for map-based cloning and de novo genome sequencing. The maps are most useful if contigs of overlapping DNA clones are anchored to chromosome(s), and ordered along them using molecular markers. Here we present a novel approach for anchoring physical maps, based on sequencing three-dimensional pools of BAC clones from minimum tilling path. We used physical map of wheat chromosome arm 3DS to validate the method with two different DNA sequence datasets. The first comprised 567 genes ordered along the chromosome arm based on syntenic relationship of wheat with the sequenced genomes of Brachypodium, rice and sorghum. The second dataset consisted of 7,136 SNP-containing sequences, which were mapped genetically in Aegilops tauschii, the donor of the wheat D genome. Mapping of sequence reads from individual BAC pools to the first and the second datasets enabled unambiguous anchoring 447 and 311 3DS-specific sequences, respectively, or 758 in total. We demonstrate the utility of the novel approach for BAC contig anchoring based on mass parallel sequencing of three-dimensional pools prepared from minimum tilling path of physical map. The existing genetic markers as well as any other DNA sequence could be mapped to BAC clones in a single in silico experiment. The approach reduces significantly the cost and time needed for anchoring and is applicable to any genomic project involving the construction of anchored physical map.

  4. Unlocking Triticeae genomics to sustainably feed the future.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Keiichi; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2013-12-01

    The tribe Triticeae includes the major crops wheat and barley. Within the last few years, the whole genomes of four Triticeae species-barley, wheat, Tausch's goatgrass (Aegilops tauschii) and wild einkorn wheat (Triticum urartu)-have been sequenced. The availability of these genomic resources for Triticeae plants and innovative analytical applications using next-generation sequencing technologies are helping to revitalize our approaches in genetic work and to accelerate improvement of the Triticeae crops. Comparative genomics and integration of genomic resources from Triticeae plants and the model grass Brachypodium distachyon are aiding the discovery of new genes and functional analyses of genes in Triticeae crops. Innovative approaches and tools such as analysis of next-generation populations, evolutionary genomics and systems approaches with mathematical modeling are new strategies that will help us discover alleles for adaptive traits to future agronomic environments. In this review, we provide an update on genomic tools for use with Triticeae plants and Brachypodium and describe emerging approaches toward crop improvements in Triticeae.

  5. bex-db: Bioinformatics workbench for comprehensive analysis of barley-expressed genes

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Sakai, Hiroaki; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Fuminori; Nakamura, Shingo; Itoh, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Wu, Jianzhong

    2013-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is one of the world’s most important cereal crops. Although its large and complex genome has held back barley genomics for quite a while, the whole genome sequence was released in 2012 by the International Barley Genome Sequencing Consortium (IBSC). Moreover, more than 30,000 barley full-length cDNAs (FLcDNAs) are now available in the public domain. Here we present the Barley Gene Expression Database (bex-db: http://barleyflc.dna.affrc.go.jp/bexdb/index.html) as a repository of transcriptome data including the sequences and the expression profiles of barley genes resulting from microarray analysis. In addition to FLcDNA sequences, bex-db also contains partial sequences of more than 309,000 novel expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Users can browse the data via keyword, sequence homology and expression profile search options. A genome browser was also developed to display the chromosomal locations of barley FLcDNAs and wheat (Triticum aestivum) transcripts as well as Aegilops tauschii gene models on the IBSC genome sequence for future comparative analysis of orthologs among Triticeae species. The bex-db should provide a useful resource for further genomics studies and development of genome-based tools to enhance the progress of the genetic improvement of cereal crops. PMID:24399916

  6. A review of the occurrence of Grain softness protein-1 genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Morris, Craig F; Geng, Hongwei; Beecher, Brian S; Ma, Dongyun

    2013-12-01

    Grain softness protein-1 (Gsp-1) is a small, 495-bp intronless gene found throughout the Triticeae tribe at the distal end of group 5 chromosomes. With the Puroindolines, it constitutes a key component of the Hardness locus. Gsp-1 likely plays little role in grain hardness, but has direct interest due to its utility in phylogeny and its role in arabinogalactan peptides. Further role(s) remain to be identified. In the polyploid wheats, Triticum aestivum and T. turgidum, the gene is present in a homoeologous series. Since its discovery, there have been conflicting reports and data as to the number of Gsp-1 genes and the level of sequence polymorphism. Little is known about allelic variation within a species. In the simplest model, a single Gsp-1 gene is present in each wheat and Aegilops tauschii genome. The present review critically re-examines the published and some unpublished data (sequence available in the NCBI nucleotide and MIPS Wheat Genome Databases). A number of testable hypotheses are identified, and include the level of polymorphism that may represent (and define) different Gsp-1 alleles, the existence of a fourth Gsp-1 gene, and the apparent, at times, high level of naturally-occurring or artifactual gene chimeras. In summary, the present data provide firm evidence for at most, three Gsp-1 genes in wheat, although there are numerous data that suggest a more complex model.

  7. Types and rates of sequence evolution at the high-molecular-weight glutenin locus in hexaploid wheat and its ancestral genomes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yong Qiang; Salse, Jérôme; Coleman-Derr, Devin; Dupin, Adeline; Crossman, Curt; Lazo, Gerard R; Huo, Naxin; Belcram, Harry; Ravel, Catherine; Charmet, Gilles; Charles, Mathieu; Anderson, Olin D; Chalhoub, Boulos

    2006-11-01

    The Glu-1 locus, encoding the high-molecular-weight glutenin protein subunits, controls bread-making quality in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum) and represents a recently evolved region unique to Triticeae genomes. To understand the molecular evolution of this locus region, three orthologous Glu-1 regions from the three subgenomes of a single hexaploid wheat species were sequenced, totaling 729 kb of sequence. Comparing each Glu-1 region with its corresponding homologous region from the D genome of diploid wheat, Aegilops tauschii, and the A and B genomes of tetraploid wheat, Triticum turgidum, revealed that, in addition to the conservation of microsynteny in the genic regions, sequences in the intergenic regions, composed of blocks of nested retroelements, are also generally conserved, although a few nonshared retroelements that differentiate the homologous Glu-1 regions were detected in each pair of the A and D genomes. Analysis of the indel frequency and the rate of nucleotide substitution, which represent the most frequent types of sequence changes in the Glu-1 regions, demonstrated that the two A genomes are significantly more divergent than the two B genomes, further supporting the hypothesis that hexaploid wheat may have more than one tetraploid ancestor.

  8. Mechanism of haploidy-dependent unreductional meiotic cell division in polyploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiwen; Xu, Steven S; Zhu, Xianwen

    2010-06-01

    Unreductional meiotic cell division (UMCD) generates unreduced gametes and leads to polyploidy. The tetraploid wheat "Langdon" (LDN) undergoes normal meiosis, but its polyhaploid undergoes UMCD. Here, we found that sister kinetochores oriented syntelically at meiosis I in LDN, but amphitelically in LDN polyhaploid and the interspecific hybrid of LDN with Aegilops tauschii. We also observed that sister centromere cohesion persisted until anaphase II in LDN, LDN polyhaploid, and the interspecific hybrid. Meiocytes with all chromosomes oriented amphitelically underwent UMCD in LDN polyhaploid, and the interspecific hybrid, suggesting the tension created by the amphitelic orientation of sister kinetochores and persistence of centromeric cohesion between sister chromatids at meiosis I contribute to the onset of UMCD. Most likely, some ploidy-regulated genes were responsible for kinetochore orientation at meiosis I in LDN and LDN-derived polyhaploids. In addition, we found sister kinetochores of synapsed chromosomes oriented syntelically, whereas asynapsed chromosomes oriented either amphitelically or syntelically. Thus, synapsis probably is another factor for the coordination of kinetochore orientation in LDN.

  9. High Transferability of Homoeolog-Specific Markers between Bread Wheat and Newly Synthesized Hexaploid Wheat Lines

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Deying; Luo, Jiangtao; Li, Zenglin; Chen, Gang; Zhang, Lianquan; Ning, Shunzong; Yuan, Zhongwei; Zheng, Youliang; Hao, Ming; Liu, Dengcai

    2016-01-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum, 2n = 6x = 42, AABBDD) has a complex allohexaploid genome, which makes it difficult to differentiate between the homoeologous sequences and assign them to the chromosome A, B, or D subgenomes. The chromosome-based draft genome sequence of the ‘Chinese Spring’ common wheat cultivar enables the large-scale development of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based markers specific for homoeologs. Based on high-confidence ‘Chinese Spring’ genes with known functions, we developed 183 putative homoeolog-specific markers for chromosomes 4B and 7B. These markers were used in PCR assays for the 4B and 7B nullisomes and their euploid synthetic hexaploid wheat (SHW) line that was newly generated from a hybridization between Triticum turgidum (AABB) and the wild diploid species Aegilops tauschii (DD). Up to 64% of the markers for chromosomes 4B or 7B in the SHW background were confirmed to be homoeolog-specific. Thus, these markers were highly transferable between the ‘Chinese Spring’ bread wheat and SHW lines. Homoeolog-specific markers designed using genes with known functions may be useful for genetic investigations involving homoeologous chromosome tracking and homoeolog expression and interaction analyses. PMID:27611704

  10. Draft genome of the wheat A-genome progenitor Triticum urartu.

    PubMed

    Ling, Hong-Qing; Zhao, Shancen; Liu, Dongcheng; Wang, Junyi; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Chi; Fan, Huajie; Li, Dong; Dong, Lingli; Tao, Yong; Gao, Chuan; Wu, Huilan; Li, Yiwen; Cui, Yan; Guo, Xiaosen; Zheng, Shusong; Wang, Biao; Yu, Kang; Liang, Qinsi; Yang, Wenlong; Lou, Xueyuan; Chen, Jie; Feng, Mingji; Jian, Jianbo; Zhang, Xiaofei; Luo, Guangbin; Jiang, Ying; Liu, Junjie; Wang, Zhaobao; Sha, Yuhui; Zhang, Bairu; Wu, Huajun; Tang, Dingzhong; Shen, Qianhua; Xue, Pengya; Zou, Shenhao; Wang, Xiujie; Liu, Xin; Wang, Famin; Yang, Yanping; An, Xueli; Dong, Zhenying; Zhang, Kunpu; Zhang, Xiangqi; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Dvorak, Jan; Tong, Yiping; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Li, Zhensheng; Wang, Daowen; Zhang, Aimin; Wang, Jun

    2013-04-04

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD) is one of the most widely cultivated and consumed food crops in the world. However, the complex polyploid nature of its genome makes genetic and functional analyses extremely challenging. The A genome, as a basic genome of bread wheat and other polyploid wheats, for example, T. turgidum (AABB), T. timopheevii (AAGG) and T. zhukovskyi (AAGGA(m)A(m)), is central to wheat evolution, domestication and genetic improvement. The progenitor species of the A genome is the diploid wild einkorn wheat T. urartu, which resembles cultivated wheat more extensively than do Aegilops speltoides (the ancestor of the B genome) and Ae. tauschii (the donor of the D genome), especially in the morphology and development of spike and seed. Here we present the generation, assembly and analysis of a whole-genome shotgun draft sequence of the T. urartu genome. We identified protein-coding gene models, performed genome structure analyses and assessed its utility for analysing agronomically important genes and for developing molecular markers. Our T. urartu genome assembly provides a diploid reference for analysis of polyploid wheat genomes and is a valuable resource for the genetic improvement of wheat.

  11. Development and discrimination of 12 double ditelosomics in tetraploid wheat cultivar DR147.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Wang, Changyou; Fu, Shulan; Guo, Xiang; Yang, Baoju; Chen, Chunhuan; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Yajuan; Liu, Xinlun; Han, Fangpu; Ji, Wanquan

    2014-02-01

    As an important group in Triticum, tetraploid wheat plays a significant role in the research of wheat evolution. Several complete aneuploid sets of common wheat have provided valuable tools for genetic and breeding studies, while similar aneuploids of tetraploid wheat are still not well developed. Here, 12 double ditelosomics developed in Triticum turgidum L. var. durum cultivar DR147 (excluding dDT2B and dDT3A) were reported. Hybrids between DR147 and the original double-ditelosomic dDT2B of Langdon lost vigor and died prematurely after the three-leaf stage; therefore, the dDT2B line was not obtained. The cytogenetic behaviors and phenotypic characteristics of each line were detailedly described. To distinguish the entire chromosome complement of tetraploid wheat, the DR147 karyotype was established by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), using the Aegilops tauschii clone pAsl and the barley clone pHvG38 as probes. FISH using a cereal-specific centromere repeat (6C6) probe suggested that all the lines possessed four telosomes, except for 4AS of double-ditelosomic dDT4A, which carried a small segment of the long arm. On the basis of the idiogram of DR147, these lines were successfully discriminated by FISH using the probes pAsl and pHvG38 and were then accurately designated.

  12. Reconciling the evolutionary origin of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    El Baidouri, Moaine; Murat, Florent; Veyssiere, Maeva; Molinier, Mélanie; Flores, Raphael; Burlot, Laura; Alaux, Michael; Quesneville, Hadi; Pont, Caroline; Salse, Jérôme

    2017-02-01

    The origin of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum; AABBDD) has been a subject of controversy and of intense debate in the scientific community over the last few decades. In 2015, three articles published in New Phytologist discussed the origin of hexaploid bread wheat (AABBDD) from the diploid progenitors Triticum urartu (AA), a relative of Aegilops speltoides (BB) and Triticum tauschii (DD). Access to new genomic resources since 2013 has offered the opportunity to gain novel insights into the paleohistory of modern bread wheat, allowing characterization of its origin from its diploid progenitors at unprecedented resolution. We propose a reconciled evolutionary scenario for the modern bread wheat genome based on the complementary investigation of transposable element and mutation dynamics between diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid wheat. In this scenario, the structural asymmetry observed between the A, B and D subgenomes in hexaploid bread wheat derives from the cumulative effect of diploid progenitor divergence, the hybrid origin of the D subgenome, and subgenome partitioning following the polyploidization events. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Wheat Genotypes With Combined Resistance to Wheat Curl Mite, Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus, Wheat Mosaic Virus, and Triticum Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wen-Po; Rojas, Lina Maria Aguirre; Khalaf, Luaay Kahtan; Zhang, Guorong; Fritz, Allan K; Whitfield, Anna E; Smith, C Michael

    2017-01-13

    The wheat curl mite, Aceria tosichella Keifer, (WCM) is a global pest of bread wheat that reduces yields significantly. In addition, WCM carries Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, family Potyviridae, genus Tritimovirus), the most significant wheat virus in North America; High Plains wheat mosaic virus (HPWMoV, genus Emaravirus, formerly High plains virus); and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, family Potyviridae, genus Poacevirus). Viruses carried by WCM have reduced wheat yields throughout the U.S. Great Plains for >50 yr, with average yield losses of 2-3% and occasional yield losses of 7-10%. Acaricides are ineffective against WCM, and delayed planting of winter wheat is not feasible. Five wheat breeding lines containing Cmc4, a WCM resistance gene from Aegilops tauschii, and Wsm2, a WSMV resistance gene from wheat germplasm CO960293-2 were selected from the breeding process and assessed for phenotypic reaction to WCM feeding, population increase, and the degree of WSMV, HPWMoV, and TriMV infection. Experiments determined that all five lines are resistant to WCM biotype 1 feeding and population increase, and that two breeding lines contain resistance to WSMV, HPWMoV, and TriMV infection as well. These WCM-, WSMV-, HPWMoV-, and TriMV-resistant genotypes can be used improve management of wheat yield losses from WCM-virus complexes.

  14. Comparison of gene expression profiles and responses to zinc chloride among inter- and intraspecific hybrids with growth abnormalities in wheat and its relatives.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Kiyofumi; Iehisa, Julio C M; Nishijima, Ryo; Takumi, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    Hybrid necrosis is a well-known reproductive isolation mechanism in plant species, and an autoimmune response is generally considered to trigger hybrid necrosis through epistatic interaction between disease resistance-related genes in hybrids. In common wheat, the complementary Ne1 and Ne2 genes control hybrid necrosis, defined as type I necrosis. Two other types of hybrid necrosis (type II and type III) have been observed in interspecific hybrids between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii. Another type of hybrid necrosis, defined here as type IV necrosis, has been reported in F1 hybrids between Triticum urartu and some accessions of Triticum monococcum ssp. aegilopoides. In types I, III and IV, cell death occurs gradually starting in older tissues, whereas type II necrosis symptoms occur only under low temperature. To compare comprehensive gene expression patterns of hybrids showing growth abnormalities, transcriptome analysis of type I and type IV necrosis was performed using a wheat 38k oligo-DNA microarray. Defense-related genes including many WRKY transcription factor genes were dramatically up-regulated in plants showing type I and type IV necrosis, similarly to other known hybrid abnormalities, suggesting an association with an autoimmune response. Reactive oxygen species generation and necrotic cell death were effectively inhibited by ZnCl2 treatment in types I, III and IV necrosis, suggesting a significant association of Ca(2+) influx in upstream signaling of necrotic cell death in wheat hybrid necrosis.

  15. Nucleotide diversity maps reveal variation in diversity among wheat genomes and chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A genome-wide assessment of nucleotide diversity in a polyploid species must minimize the inclusion of homoeologous sequences into diversity estimates and reliably allocate individual haplotypes into their respective genomes. The same requirements complicate the development and deployment of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in polyploid species. We report here a strategy that satisfies these requirements and deploy it in the sequencing of genes in cultivated hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum, genomes AABBDD) and wild tetraploid wheat (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides, genomes AABB) from the putative site of wheat domestication in Turkey. Data are used to assess the distribution of diversity among and within wheat genomes and to develop a panel of SNP markers for polyploid wheat. Results Nucleotide diversity was estimated in 2114 wheat genes and was similar between the A and B genomes and reduced in the D genome. Within a genome, diversity was diminished on some chromosomes. Low diversity was always accompanied by an excess of rare alleles. A total of 5,471 SNPs was discovered in 1791 wheat genes. Totals of 1,271, 1,218, and 2,203 SNPs were discovered in 488, 463, and 641 genes of wheat putative diploid ancestors, T. urartu, Aegilops speltoides, and Ae. tauschii, respectively. A public database containing genome-specific primers, SNPs, and other information was constructed. A total of 987 genes with nucleotide diversity estimated in one or more of the wheat genomes was placed on an Ae. tauschii genetic map, and the map was superimposed on wheat deletion-bin maps. The agreement between the maps was assessed. Conclusions In a young polyploid, exemplified by T. aestivum, ancestral species are the primary source of genetic diversity. Low effective recombination due to self-pollination and a genetic mechanism precluding homoeologous chromosome pairing during polyploid meiosis can lead to the loss of diversity from large chromosomal regions. The

  16. Comprehensive analyses of the annexin gene family in wheat.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Tang, Yimiao; Gao, Shiqing; Su, Shichao; Hong, Lin; Wang, Weiwei; Fang, Zhaofeng; Li, Xueyin; Ma, Jinxiu; Quan, Wei; Sun, Hui; Li, Xia; Wang, Yongbo; Liao, Xiangzheng; Gao, Jiangang; Zhang, Fengting; Li, Lei; Zhao, Changping

    2016-05-28

    Annexins are an evolutionarily conserved multigene family of calcium-dependent phospholipid binding proteins that play important roles in stress resistance and plant development. They have been relatively well characterized in model plants Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa), but nothing has been reported in hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barely (Hordeum vulgare), which are the two most economically important plants. Based on available genomic and transcriptomic data, 25 and 11 putative annexin genes were found through in silico analysis in wheat and barley, respectively. Additionally, eight and 11 annexin genes were identified from the draft genome sequences of Triticum urartu and Aegilops tauschii, progenitor for the A and D genome of wheat, respectively. By phylogenetic analysis, annexins in these four species together with other monocots and eudicots were classified into six different orthologous groups. Pi values of each of Ann1-12 genes among T. aestivum, T. urartu, A. tauschii and H. vulgare species was very low, with the exception of Ann2 and Ann5 genes. Ann2 gene has been under positive selection, but Ann6 and Ann7 have been under purifying selection among the four species in their evolutionary histories. The nucleotide diversities of Ann1-12 genes in the four species were 0.52065, 0.59239, 0.60691 and 0.53421, respectively. No selective pressure was operated on annexin genes in the same species. Gene expression patterns obtained by real-time PCR and re-analyzing the public microarray data revealed differential temporal and spatial regulation of annexin genes in wheat under different abiotic stress conditions such as salinity, drought, cold and abscisic acid. Among those genes, TaAnn10 is specifically expressed in the anther but fails to be induced by low temperature in thermosensitive genic male sterile lines, suggesting that specific down-regulation of TaAnn10 is associated with conditional male sterility in wheat

  17. Mapping of novel powdery mildew resistance gene Pm53 introgressed from Aegilops speltoides into soft red winter wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Powdery mildew of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a major fungal disease in many areas of the world, caused by Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici (Bgt). Host plant resistance is the preferred form of disease prevention because it is both economical and environmentally benign. Identification of new resi...

  18. Genetic mapping of MlUM15: an Aegilops neglecta-derived powdery mildew resistance gene in common wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Powdery mildew, caused by Blumeria graminis DC f. sp. tritici, is a major fungal disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in cool and humid climates. Race-specific host plant resistance is a reliable, economical, and environmentally benign form of disease prevention. The identification of molecular m...

  19. [Detection of the introgression of genome elements of Aegilops cylindrica Host. into Triticum aestivum L. genome with ISSR-analysis].

    PubMed

    Galaev, A V; Babaiants, L T; Sivolap, Iu M

    2003-01-01

    Comparative analysis of introgressive and parental forms of wheat was carried out to reveal the sites of donor genome with new loci of resistance to fungal diseases. By ISSR-method 124 ISSR-loci were detected in the genomes of 18 individual plants of introgressive line 5/20-91; 17 of them have been related to introgressive fragments of Ae. cylindrica genome in T. aestivum. It was shown that ISSR-method is effective for detection of the variability caused by introgression of alien genetic material to T. aestivum genome.

  20. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of a durum wheat Aegilops speltoides chromosome translocation conferring resistance to stem rust

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stem rust is a serious disease of wheat that has caused historical epidemics, but it has not been a threat in recent decades in North America due to the eradication of the alternate host and deployment of resistant cultivars. However, the recent emergence of Ug99 (or race TTKS) poses a threat to glo...

  1. Structural organization of the barley D-hordein locus in comparison with its orthologous regions of wheat genomes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yong Qiang; Anderson, Olin D; Londeorë, Cynthia F; Kong, Xiuying; Chibbar, Ravindra N; Lazo, Gerard R

    2003-12-01

    D hordein, a prolamin storage protein of barley endosperms, is highly homologous to the high molecular weight (HWM) glutenin subunits, which are the major determinants of bread-making quality in wheat flour. In hexaploid wheat (AABBDD), each genome contains two paralogous copies of HMW-glutenin genes that encode the x- and y-type HMW-glutenin subunits. Previously, we reported the sequence analysis of a 102-kb genomic region that contains the HMW-glutenin locus of the D genome from Aegilops tauschii, the donor of the D genome of hexaploid wheat. Here, we present the sequence analysis of a 120-kb D-hordein region of the barley genome, a more distantly related member of the Triticeae grass tribe. Comparative sequence analysis revealed that gene content and order are generally conserved. Genes included in both of these orthologous regions are arranged in the following order: a Xa21-like receptor kinase, an endosperm globulin, an HMW prolamin, and a serine (threonine) protein kinase. However, in the wheat D genome, a region containing both the globulin and HMW-glutenin gene was duplicated, indicating that this duplication event occurred after the separation of the wheat and barley genomes. The intergenic regions are divergent with regard to the sequence and structural organization. It was found that different types of retroelements are responsible for the intergenic structure divergence in the wheat and barley genomes. In the barley region, we identified 16 long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons in three distinct nested clusters. These retroelements account for 63% of the contig sequence. In addition, barley D hordein was compared with wheat HMW glutenins in terms of cysteine residue conservation and repeat domain organization.

  2. High mature grain phytase activity in the Triticeae has evolved by duplication followed by neofunctionalization of the purple acid phosphatase phytase (PAPhy) gene

    PubMed Central

    Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The phytase activity in food and feedstuffs is an important nutritional parameter. Members of the Triticeae tribe accumulate purple acid phosphatase phytases (PAPhy) during grain filling. This accumulation elevates mature grain phytase activities (MGPA) up to levels between ~650 FTU/kg for barley and 6000 FTU/kg for rye. This is notably more than other cereals. For instance, rice, maize, and oat have MGPAs below 100 FTU/kg. The cloning and characterization of the PAPhy gene complement from wheat, barley, rye, einkorn, and Aegilops tauschii is reported here. The Triticeae PAPhy genes generally consist of a set of paralogues, PAPhy_a and PAPhy_b, and have been mapped to Triticeae chromosomes 5 and 3, respectively. The promoters share a conserved core but the PAPhy_a promoter have acquired a novel cis-acting regulatory element for expression during grain filling while the PAPhy_b promoter has maintained the archaic function and drives expression during germination. Brachypodium is the only sequenced Poaceae sharing the PAPhy duplication. As for the Triticeae, the duplication is reflected in a high MGPA of ~4200 FTU/kg in Brachypodium. The sequence conservation of the paralogous loci on Brachypodium chromosomes 1 and 2 does not extend beyond the PAPhy gene. The results indicate that a single-gene segmental duplication may have enabled the evolution of high MGPA by creating functional redundancy of the parent PAPhy gene. This implies that similar MGPA levels may be out of reach in breeding programs for some Poaceae, e.g. maize and rice, whereas Triticeae breeders should focus on PAPhy_a. PMID:23918958

  3. High mature grain phytase activity in the Triticeae has evolved by duplication followed by neofunctionalization of the purple acid phosphatase phytase (PAPhy) gene.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Claus Krogh; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holme, Inger Bæksted; Holm, Preben Bach; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik

    2013-08-01

    The phytase activity in food and feedstuffs is an important nutritional parameter. Members of the Triticeae tribe accumulate purple acid phosphatase phytases (PAPhy) during grain filling. This accumulation elevates mature grain phytase activities (MGPA) up to levels between ~650 FTU/kg for barley and 6000 FTU/kg for rye. This is notably more than other cereals. For instance, rice, maize, and oat have MGPAs below 100 FTU/kg. The cloning and characterization of the PAPhy gene complement from wheat, barley, rye, einkorn, and Aegilops tauschii is reported here. The Triticeae PAPhy genes generally consist of a set of paralogues, PAPhy_a and PAPhy_b, and have been mapped to Triticeae chromosomes 5 and 3, respectively. The promoters share a conserved core but the PAPhy_a promoter have acquired a novel cis-acting regulatory element for expression during grain filling while the PAPhy_b promoter has maintained the archaic function and drives expression during germination. Brachypodium is the only sequenced Poaceae sharing the PAPhy duplication. As for the Triticeae, the duplication is reflected in a high MGPA of ~4200 FTU/kg in Brachypodium. The sequence conservation of the paralogous loci on Brachypodium chromosomes 1 and 2 does not extend beyond the PAPhy gene. The results indicate that a single-gene segmental duplication may have enabled the evolution of high MGPA by creating functional redundancy of the parent PAPhy gene. This implies that similar MGPA levels may be out of reach in breeding programs for some Poaceae, e.g. maize and rice, whereas Triticeae breeders should focus on PAPhy_a.

  4. Coverage and consistency: bioinformatics aspects of the analysis of multirun iTRAQ experiments with wheat leaves.

    PubMed

    Pascovici, Dana; Gardiner, Donald M; Song, Xiaomin; Breen, Edmond; Solomon, Peter S; Keighley, Tim; Molloy, Mark P

    2013-11-01

    The hexaploid genome of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) is large (17 Gb) and repetitive, and this has delayed full sequencing and annotation of the genome, which is a prerequisite for effective quantitative proteomics analysis. Aware of these constraints we investigated the most effective approaches for shotgun proteomic analyses of bread wheat that would support large-scale quantitative comparisons using iTRAQ reagents. We used a data set that was generated by two-dimensional LC-MS of iTRAQ labeled peptides from wheat leaves. The main items considered in this study were the choice of sequence database for matching LC-MS data, the consistency of identification when multiple LC-MS runs were acquired, and the options for downstream functional analysis to generate useful insight. For peptide identification we examined the extensive NCBInr plant database, a smaller composite cereals database, the Brachypodium distachyon model plant genome, the EST-based SuperWheat database, as well as the genome sequence from the recently sequenced D-genome progenitor Aegilops tauschii. While the most spectra were assigned by using the SuperWheat database, this extremely large database could not be readily manipulated for the robust protein grouping that is required for large-scale, multirun quantitative experiments. We demonstrated a pragmatic alternative of using the composite cereals database for peptide spectra matching. The stochastic aspect of protein grouping across LC-MS runs was investigated using the smaller composite cereals database where we found that attaching the Brachypodium best BLAST hit reduced this problem. Further, assigning quantitation to the best Brachypodium locus yielded promising results enabling integration with existing downstream data mining and functional analysis tools. Our study demonstrated viable approaches for quantitative proteomics analysis of bread wheat samples and shows how these approaches could be similarly adopted for analysis of other

  5. Map-based analysis of the tenacious glume gene Tg-B1 of wild emmer and its role in wheat domestication.

    PubMed

    Faris, Justin D; Zhang, Zengcui; Chao, Shiaoman

    2014-06-01

    The domestication of wheat was instrumental in spawning the civilization of humankind, and it occurred through genetic mutations that gave rise to types with non-fragile rachises, soft glumes, and free-threshing seed. Wild emmer (Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides), the tetraploid AB-genome progenitor of domesticated wheat has genes that confer tenacious glumes (Tg) that underwent genetic mutations to give rise to free-threshing wheat. Here, we evaluated disomic substitution lines involving chromosomes 2A and 2B of wild emmer accessions substituted for homologous chromosomes in tetraploid and hexaploid backgrounds. The results suggested that both chromosomes 2A and 2B of wild emmer possess genes that inhibit threshability. A population of recombinant inbred lines derived from the tetraploid durum wheat variety Langdon crossed with a Langdon - T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides accession PI 481521 chromosome 2B disomic substitution line was used to develop a genetic linkage map of 2B, evaluate the genetics of threshability, and map the gene derived from PI 481521 that inhibited threshability. A 2BS linkage map comprised of 58 markers was developed, and markers delineated the gene to a 2.3 cM interval. Comparative analysis with maps containing the tenacious glume gene Tg-D1 on chromosome arm 2 DS from Aegilops tauschii, the D genome progenitor of hexaploid wheat, revealed that the gene inhibiting threshability in wild emmer was homoeologous to Tg-D1 and therefore designated Tg-B1. Comparative analysis with rice and Brachypodium distachyon indicated a high level of divergence and poorly conserved colinearity, particularly near the Tg-B1 locus. These results provide a foundation for further studies involving Tg-B1, which, together with Tg-D1, had profound influences on wheat domestication.

  6. RFLP mapping of a Hordeum bulbosum gene highly expressed in pistils and its relationship to homoeologous loci in other Gramineae species.

    PubMed

    Gudu, S.; Laurie, A.; Kasha, J.; Xia, J.; Snape, W.

    2002-08-01

    A cDNA sequence (Hbc8-2) isolated from pistils of the self-incompatible species Hordeum bulbosum was analysed for expression pattern and genetic map location. Hbc8-2 was expressed just prior to anthesis in mature pistils, and expression was maintained at a high level throughout anthesis. The same expression pattern was found in self-incompatible rye ( Secale cereale), but no expression was detected in the self-compatible cereals wheat ( Triticum aestivum) or barley ( Hordeum vulgare) at comparable stages of development. However, three wheat expressed sequence tags from a pre-anthesis library had high homology to Hbc8-2. Southern blot analyses using Hbc8-2 as a probe detected hybridising bands in the genomes of various Gramineae species including rye, barley, bread wheat, wild wheat relatives ( Aegilops tauschii and Ae. speltoides), oats ( Avena fatua and A. strigosa), rice ( Oryza sativa) and maize ( Zea mays). This suggests that Hbc8-2-like sequences are present in many species but that high levels of expression may be associated with self-incompatibility. Hbc8-2 was mapped on the long arms of chromosome 2H(b) of H. bulbosum, 2R of rye, and 2B and 2D of wheat and was assigned to chromosome 2H of barley using wheat/barley addition lines. On a H. bulbosum genetic map, Xhbc8-2 was located between Xbcd266 and Xpsr87, while in rye and wheat it was located in a 13.2-cM interval between Xpsr331 and Xpsr932, consistent with previous comparative mapping studies of these species. Mapping in rye suggested that Hbc8-2 is probably proximal to the Z self-incompatibility locus which was previously shown to be tightly linked to Xbcd266.

  7. Line differences in Cor/Lea and fructan biosynthesis-related gene transcript accumulation are related to distinct freezing tolerance levels in synthetic wheat hexaploids.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Hirokazu; Iehisa, Julio C M; Shimosaka, Etsuo; Takumi, Shigeo

    2015-03-15

    In common wheat, cultivar differences in freezing tolerance are considered to be mainly due to allelic differences at two major loci controlling freezing tolerance. One of the two loci, Fr-2, is coincident with a cluster of genes encoding C-repeat binding factors (CBFs), which induce downstream Cor/Lea genes during cold acclimation. Here, we conducted microarray analysis to study comprehensive changes in gene expression profile under long-term low-temperature (LT) treatment and to identify other LT-responsive genes related to cold acclimation in leaves of seedlings and crown tissues of a synthetic hexaploid wheat line. The microarray analysis revealed marked up-regulation of a number of Cor/Lea genes and fructan biosynthesis-related genes under the long-term LT treatment. For validation of the microarray data, we selected four synthetic wheat lines that contain the A and B genomes from the tetraploid wheat cultivar Langdon and the diverse D genomes originating from different Aegilops tauschii accessions with distinct levels of freezing tolerance after cold acclimation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed increased transcript levels of the Cor/Lea, CBF, and fructan biosynthesis-related genes in more freezing-tolerant lines than in sensitive lines. After a 14-day LT treatment, a significant difference in fructan accumulation was observed among the four lines. Therefore, the fructan biosynthetic pathway is associated with cold acclimation in development of wheat freezing tolerance and is another pathway related to diversity in freezing tolerance, in addition to the CBF-mediated Cor/Lea expression pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Diversification of the celiac disease α-gliadin complex in wheat: a 33-mer peptide with six overlapping epitopes, evolved following polyploidization.

    PubMed

    Ozuna, Carmen V; Iehisa, Julio C M; Giménez, María J; Alvarez, Juan B; Sousa, Carolina; Barro, Francisco

    2015-06-01

    The gluten proteins from wheat, barley and rye are responsible both for celiac disease (CD) and for non-celiac gluten sensitivity, two pathologies affecting up to 6-8% of the human population worldwide. The wheat α-gliadin proteins contain three major CD immunogenic peptides: p31-43, which induces the innate immune response; the 33-mer, formed by six overlapping copies of three highly stimulatory epitopes; and an additional DQ2.5-glia-α3 epitope which partially overlaps with the 33-mer. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and Sanger sequencing of α-gliadin genes from diploid and polyploid wheat provided six types of α-gliadins (named 1-6) with strong differences in their frequencies in diploid and polyploid wheat, and in the presence and abundance of these CD immunogenic peptides. Immunogenic variants of the p31-43 peptide were found in most of the α-gliadins. Variants of the DQ2.5-glia-α3 epitope were associated with specific types of α-gliadins. Remarkably, only type 1 α-gliadins contained 33-mer epitopes. Moreover, the full immunodominant 33-mer fragment was only present in hexaploid wheat at low abundance, probably as the result of allohexaploidization events from subtype 1.2 α-gliadins found only in Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome donor of hexaploid wheat. Type 3 α-gliadins seem to be the ancestral type as they are found in most of the α-gliadin-expressing Triticeae species. These findings are important for reducing the incidence of CD by the breeding/selection of wheat varieties with low stimulatory capacity of T cells. Moreover, advanced genome-editing techniques (TALENs, CRISPR) will be easier to implement on the small group of α-gliadins containing only immunogenic peptides.

  9. Characterization and Expression Analysis of Phytoene Synthase from Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Flowerika; Alok, Anshu; Kumar, Jitesh; Thakur, Neha; Pandey, Ashutosh; Pandey, Ajay Kumar; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Tiwari, Siddharth

    2016-01-01

    Phytoene synthase (PSY) regulates the first committed step of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in plants. The present work reports identification and characterization of the three PSY genes (TaPSY1, TaPSY2 and TaPSY3) in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The TaPSY1, TaPSY2, and TaPSY3 genes consisted of three homoeologs on the long arm of group 7 chromosome (7L), short arm of group 5 chromosome (5S), and long arm of group 5 chromosome (5L), respectively in each subgenomes (A, B, and D) with a similarity range from 89% to 97%. The protein sequence analysis demonstrated that TaPSY1 and TaPSY3 retain most of conserved motifs for enzyme activity. Phylogenetic analysis of all TaPSY revealed an evolutionary relationship among PSY proteins of various monocot species. TaPSY derived from A and D subgenomes shared proximity to the PSY of Triticum urartu and Aegilops tauschii, respectively. The differential expression of TaPSY1, TaPSY2, and TaPSY3 in the various tissues, seed development stages, and stress treatments suggested their role in plant development, and stress condition. TaPSY3 showed higher expression in all tissues, followed by TaPSY1. The presence of multiple stress responsive cis-regulatory elements in promoter region of TaPSY3 correlated with the higher expression during drought and heat stresses has suggested their role in these conditions. The expression pattern of TaPSY3 was correlated with the accumulation of β-carotene in the seed developmental stages. Bacterial complementation assay has validated the functional activity of each TaPSY protein. Hence, TaPSY can be explored in developing genetically improved wheat crop.

  10. Genotype-by-sequencing facilitates genetic mapping of a stem rust resistance locus in Aegilops umbellulata, a wild relative of cultivated wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Wild relatives of wheat play a significant role in wheat improvement as a source of genetic diversity. Stem rust disease of wheat causes significant yield losses at the global level and stem rust pathogen race TTKSK (Ug99) is virulent to most previously deployed resistance genes. Therefo...

  11. Analysis of ATP6 sequence diversity in the Triticum-Aegilops group of species reveals the crucial role of rearrangement in mitochondrial genome evolution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mutation and chromosomal rearrangements are the two main forces of increasing genetic diversity for natural selection to act upon, and ultimately drive the evolutionary process. Although genome evolution is a function of both forces, simultaneously, the ratio of each can be varied among different ge...

  12. Cytological characterization of a thermo-sensitive cytoplasmic male-sterile wheat line having K-type cytoplasm of Aegilops kotschyi.

    PubMed

    Meng, Liying; Liu, Zihan; Zhang, Lingli; Hu, Gan; Song, Xiyue

    2016-12-01

    Male sterility is an important tool for obtaining crop heterosis. A thermo-sensitive cytoplasmic male-sterile (TCMS) line was developed recently using a new method based on tiller regeneration. In the present study, we explored the critical growth stages required to maintain thermo-sensitive male sterility in TCMS lines and found that fertility is associated with abnormal tapetal and microspore development. We investigated the fertility and cytology of temperature-treated plant anthers at various developmental stages. TCMS line KTM3315A exhibited thermo-sensitive male sterility in Zadoks growth stages 41-49 and 58-59. Morphologically, the line exhibited thermo-sensitive male sterility at 3-9 days before heading and at 3-6 days before flowering, and it was partially restored in three locations during spring and summer. TCMS line KTM3315A plants exhibited premature tapetal programmed cell death (PCD) from the early uninucleate stage of microspore development until the tapetal cells degraded completely. Microspore development was then blocked and the pollen abortion type was stainable abortion. Thus, male fertility in the line KTM3315A is sensitive to temperature and premature tapetal PCD is the main cause of pollen abortion, where it determines the starting period and affects male fertility conversion in K-type TCMS lines at certain temperatures.

  13. Cytological characterization of a thermo-sensitive cytoplasmic male-sterile wheat line having K-type cytoplasm of Aegilops kotschyi

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Liying; Liu, Zihan; Zhang, Lingli; Hu, Gan; Song, Xiyue

    2016-01-01

    Male sterility is an important tool for obtaining crop heterosis. A thermo-sensitive cytoplasmic male-sterile (TCMS) line was developed recently using a new method based on tiller regeneration. In the present study, we explored the critical growth stages required to maintain thermo-sensitive male sterility in TCMS lines and found that fertility is associated with abnormal tapetal and microspore development. We investigated the fertility and cytology of temperature-treated plant anthers at various developmental stages. TCMS line KTM3315A exhibited thermo-sensitive male sterility in Zadoks growth stages 41–49 and 58–59. Morphologically, the line exhibited thermo-sensitive male sterility at 3–9 days before heading and at 3–6 days before flowering, and it was partially restored in three locations during spring and summer. TCMS line KTM3315A plants exhibited premature tapetal programmed cell death (PCD) from the early uninucleate stage of microspore development until the tapetal cells degraded completely. Microspore development was then blocked and the pollen abortion type was stainable abortion. Thus, male fertility in the line KTM3315A is sensitive to temperature and premature tapetal PCD is the main cause of pollen abortion, where it determines the starting period and affects male fertility conversion in K-type TCMS lines at certain temperatures. PMID:28163591

  14. Test Review: Abikoff, H., & Gallagher, R. (2009). "Children's Organizational Skills Scales." North Tonawanda, NY: Multi-Health Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Fatih; Delen, Erhan; Ritter, Nicola L.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a review of the Children's Organizational Skills Scales (COSS) which were designed to assess how children organize their time, materials, and actions to accomplish important tasks at home and school. The scale quantifies children's skills in organization, time management, and planning (OTMP). The COSS is a multi-informant…

  15. Test Review: Abikoff, H., & Gallagher, R. (2009). "Children's Organizational Skills Scales." North Tonawanda, NY: Multi-Health Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaya, Fatih; Delen, Erhan; Ritter, Nicola L.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a review of the Children's Organizational Skills Scales (COSS) which were designed to assess how children organize their time, materials, and actions to accomplish important tasks at home and school. The scale quantifies children's skills in organization, time management, and planning (OTMP). The COSS is a multi-informant…

  16. The gamma-gliadin multigene family in common wheat (Triticum aestivum) and its closely related species.

    PubMed

    Qi, Peng-Fei; Wei, Yu-Ming; Ouellet, Thérèse; Chen, Qing; Tan, Xin; Zheng, You-Liang

    2009-04-21

    The unique properties of wheat flour primarily depend on gluten, which is the most important source of protein for human being. gamma-Gliadins have been considered to be the most ancient of the wheat gluten family. The complex family structure of gamma-gliadins complicates the determination of their function. Moreover, gamma-gliadins contain several sets of celiac disease epitopes. However, no systematic research has been conducted yet. A total of 170 gamma-gliadin genes were isolated from common wheat and its closely related species, among which 138 sequences are putatively functional. The ORF lengths of these sequences range from 678 to 1089 bp, and the repetitive region is mainly responsible for the size heterogeneity of gamma-gliadins. The repeat motif P(Q/L/S/T/I/V/R/A)F(S/Y/V/Q/I/C/L)P(R/L/S/T/H/C/Y)Q1-2(P(S/L/T/A/F/H)QQ)1-2is repeated from 7 to 22 times. Sequence polymorphism and linkage disequilibrium analyses show that gamma-gliadins are highly diverse. Phylogenic analyses indicate that there is no obvious discrimination between Sitopsis and Ae. tauschii at the Gli-1 loci, compared with diploid wheat. According to the number and placement of cysteine residues, we defined nine cysteine patterns and 17 subgroups. Alternatively, we classified gamma-gliadins into two types based on the length of repetitive domain. Amino acid composition analyses indicate that there is a wide range of essential amino acids in gamma-gliadins, and those gamma-gliadins from subgroup SG-10 and SG-12 and gamma-gliadins with a short repetitive domain are more nutritional. A screening of toxic epitopes shows that gamma-gliadins with a pattern of C9 and gamma-gliadins with a short repetitive domain almost lack any epitopes. gamma-Gliadin sequences in wheat and closely related Aegilops species are diverse. Each group/subgroup contributes differently to nutritional quality and epitope content. It is suggested that the genes with a short repetitive domain are more nutritional and valuable

  17. Molecular and phylogenetic characterization of the homoeologous EPSP Synthase genes of allohexaploid wheat, Triticum aestivum (L.).

    PubMed

    Aramrak, Attawan; Kidwell, Kimberlee K; Steber, Camille M; Burke, Ian C

    2015-10-23

    5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is the sixth and penultimate enzyme in the shikimate biosynthesis pathway, and is the target of the herbicide glyphosate. The EPSPS genes of allohexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum, AABBDD) have not been well characterized. Herein, the three homoeologous copies of the allohexaploid wheat EPSPS gene were cloned and characterized. Genomic and coding DNA sequences of EPSPS from the three related genomes of allohexaploid wheat were isolated using PCR and inverse PCR approaches from soft white spring "Louise'. Development of genome-specific primers allowed the mapping and expression analysis of TaEPSPS-7A1, TaEPSPS-7D1, and TaEPSPS-4A1 on chromosomes 7A, 7D, and 4A, respectively. Sequence alignments of cDNA sequences from wheat and wheat relatives served as a basis for phylogenetic analysis. The three genomic copies of wheat EPSPS differed by insertion/deletion and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), largely in intron sequences. RT-PCR analysis and cDNA cloning revealed that EPSPS is expressed from all three genomic copies. However, TaEPSPS-4A1 is expressed at much lower levels than TaEPSPS-7A1 and TaEPSPS-7D1 in wheat seedlings. Phylogenetic analysis of 1190-bp cDNA clones from wheat and wheat relatives revealed that: 1) TaEPSPS-7A1 is most similar to EPSPS from the tetraploid AB genome donor, T. turgidum (99.7 % identity); 2) TaEPSPS-7D1 most resembles EPSPS from the diploid D genome donor, Aegilops tauschii (100 % identity); and 3) TaEPSPS-4A1 resembles EPSPS from the diploid B genome relative, Ae. speltoides (97.7 % identity). Thus, EPSPS sequences in allohexaploid wheat are preserved from the most two recent ancestors. The wheat EPSPS genes are more closely related to Lolium multiflorum and Brachypodium distachyon than to Oryza sativa (rice). The three related EPSPS homoeologues of wheat exhibited conservation of the exon/intron structure and of coding region sequence, but contained significant sequence

  18. [Molecular-genetic analysis of wheat (T. aestivum L.) genome with introgression of Ae. cylindrica Host genetic elements].

    PubMed

    Galaev, A V; Sivolap, Iu M

    2005-01-01

    Wheat-aegilops hybrid plants Triticum aestivum L. (2n = 42) x Aegilops cylindrica Host (2n = 28) were investigated with using microsatellite markers. In two BC1F9 lines some genome modifications connected with losing DNA fragments of initial variety or appearing of Aegilops genome elements were detected. In some investigated hybrids new amplicons lacking in parental plants were found. Substitution of wheat chromosomes for aegilops chromosomes was not revealed. Analysis of microsatellite loci in BC2F5 plants showed stable introgression of aegilops genetic elements into wheat; elimination of some transferred aegilops DNA fragments in the course of backcrossing; decreasing size of introgressive elements after backcrossing. Introgressive lines were classified according to genome changes.

  19. Esophageal Spasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... or gastroesophageal reflux disease: A systematic review. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2015;13:251. Coss-Adame E, et al. ... esophageal (noncardiac) chest pain: An expert review. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2014;12:1224. Castell DO. Chest ...

  20. Molecular diversity of α-gliadin expressed genes in genetically contrasted spelt (Triticum aestivum ssp. spelta) accessions and comparison with bread wheat (T. aestivum ssp. aestivum) and related diploid Triticum and Aegilops species.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Benjamin; Bertin, Pierre; Mingeot, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The gluten proteins of cereals such as bread wheat (Triticum aestivum ssp. aestivum) and spelt (T. aestivum ssp. spelta) are responsible for celiac disease (CD). The α-gliadins constitute the most immunogenic class of gluten proteins as they include four main T-cell stimulatory epitopes that affect CD patients. Spelt has been less studied than bread wheat and could constitute a source of valuable diversity. The objective of this work was to study the genetic diversity of spelt α-gliadin transcripts and to compare it with those of bread wheat. Genotyping data from 85 spelt accessions obtained with 19 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to select 11 contrasted accessions, from which 446 full open reading frame α-gliadin genes were cloned and sequenced, which revealed a high allelic diversity. High variations among the accessions were highlighted, in terms of the proportion of α-gliadin sequences from each of the three genomes (A, B and D), and their composition in the four T-cell stimulatory epitopes. An accession from Tajikistan stood out, having a particularly high proportion of α-gliadins from the B genome and a low immunogenic content. Even if no clear separation between spelt and bread wheat sequences was shown, spelt α-gliadins displayed specific features concerning e.g. the frequencies of some amino acid substitutions. Given this observation and the variations in toxicity revealed in the spelt accessions in this study, the high genetic diversity held in spelt germplasm collections could be a valuable resource in the development of safer varieties for CD patients.

  1. Genome-wide association for grain morphology in synthetic hexaploid wheats using digital imaging analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Grain size and shape greatly influence grain weight which ultimately enhances grain yield in wheat. Digital imaging (DI) based phenomic characterization can capture the three dimensional variation in grain size and shape than has hitherto been possible. In this study, we report the results from using digital imaging of grain size and shape to understand the relationship among different components of this trait, their contribution to enhance grain weight, and to identify genomic regions (QTLs) controlling grain morphology using genome wide association mapping with high density diversity array technology (DArT) and allele-specific markers. Results Significant positive correlations were observed between grain weight and grain size measurements such as grain length (r = 0.43), width, thickness (r = 0.64) and factor from density (FFD) (r = 0.69). A total of 231 synthetic hexaploid wheats (SHWs) were grouped into five different sub-clusters by Bayesian structure analysis using unlinked DArT markers. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay was observed among DArT loci > 10 cM distance and approximately 28% marker pairs were in significant LD. In total, 197 loci over 60 chromosomal regions and 79 loci over 31 chromosomal regions were associated with grain morphology by genome wide analysis using general linear model (GLM) and mixed linear model (MLM) approaches, respectively. They were mainly distributed on homoeologous group 2, 3, 6 and 7 chromosomes. Twenty eight marker-trait associations (MTAs) on the D genome chromosomes 2D, 3D and 6D may carry novel alleles with potential to enhance grain weight due to the use of untapped wild accessions of Aegilops tauschii. Statistical simulations showed that favorable alleles for thousand kernel weight (TKW), grain length, width and thickness have additive genetic effects. Allelic variations for known genes controlling grain size and weight, viz. TaCwi-2A, TaSus-2B, TaCKX6-3D and TaGw2-6A, were also associated

  2. The Harmonizing Outcome Measures for Eczema (HOME) roadmap: a methodological framework to develop core sets of outcome measurements in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Jochen; Apfelbacher, Christian; Spuls, Phyllis I; Thomas, Kim S; Simpson, Eric L; Furue, Masutaka; Chalmers, Joanne; Williams, Hywel C

    2015-01-01

    Core outcome sets (COSs) are consensus-derived minimum sets of outcomes to be assessed in a specific situation. COSs are being increasingly developed to limit outcome-reporting bias, allow comparisons across trials, and strengthen clinical decision making. Despite the increasing interest in outcomes research, methods to develop COSs have not yet been standardized. The aim of this paper is to present the Harmonizing Outcomes Measures for Eczema (HOME) roadmap for the development and implementation of COSs, which was developed on the basis of our experience in the standardization of outcome measurements for atopic eczema. Following the establishment of a panel representing all relevant stakeholders and a research team experienced in outcomes research, the scope and setting of the core set should be defined. The next steps are the definition of a core set of outcome domains such as symptoms or quality of life, followed by the identification or development and validation of appropriate outcome measurement instruments to measure these core domains. Finally, the consented COS needs to be disseminated, implemented, and reviewed. We believe that the HOME roadmap is a useful methodological framework to develop COSs in dermatology, with the ultimate goal of better decision making and promoting patient-centered health care.

  3. Computerized Operator Support System – Phase II Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Thomas A.; Boring, Ronald L.; Lew, Roger T.; Thomas, Kenneth D.

    2015-02-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) prototype for nuclear control room process control is proposed and discussed. The COSS aids operators in addressing rapid plant upsets that would otherwise result in the shutdown of the power plant and interrupt electrical power generation, representing significant costs to the owning utility. In its current stage of development the prototype demonstrates four advanced functions operators can use to more efficiently monitor and control the plant. These advanced functions consist of: (1) a synthesized and intuitive high level overview display of system components and interrelations, (2) an enthalpy-based mathematical chemical and volume control system (CVCS) model to detect and diagnose component failures, (3) recommended strategies to mitigate component failure effects and return the plant back to pre-fault status, and (4) computer-based procedures to walk the operator through the recommended mitigation actions. The COSS was demonstrated to a group of operators and their feedback was collected. The operators responded positively to the COSS capabilities and features and indicated the system would be an effective operator aid. The operators also suggested several additional features and capabilities for the next iteration of development. Future versions of the COSS prototype will include additional plant systems, flexible computer-based procedure presentation formats, and support for simultaneous component fault diagnosis and dual fault synergistic mitigation action strategies to more efficiently arrest any plant upsets.

  4. Communities of solution: partnerships for population health.

    PubMed

    Griswold, Kim S; Lesko, Sarah E; Westfall, John M

    2013-01-01

    Communities of solution (COSs) are the key principle for improving population health. The 1967 Folsom Report explains that the COS concept arose from the recognition that complex political and administrative structures often hinder problem solving by creating barriers to communication and compromise. A 2012 reexamination of the Folsom Report resurrects the idea of the COS and presents 13 grand challenges that define the critical links among community, public health, and primary care and call for ongoing demonstrations of COSs grounded in patient-centered care. In this issue, examples of COSs from around the country demonstrate core principles and propose visions of the future. Essential themes of each COS are the crossing of "jurisdictional boundaries," community-led or -oriented initiatives, measurement of outcomes, and creating durable connections with public health.

  5. A COMPUTERIZED OPERATOR SUPPORT SYSTEM PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas A. Ulrich; Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Ken Thomas

    2015-03-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) is proposed for use in nuclear power plants to assist control room operators in addressing time-critical plant upsets. A COSS is a collection of technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. A prototype COSS was developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, piping and instrumentation diagram system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the Human System Simulation Laboratory.

  6. Human Factors and Technical Considerations for a Computerized Operator Support System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Thomas Anthony; Lew, Roger Thomas; Medema, Heather Dawne; Boring, Ronald Laurids; Thomas, Kenneth David

    2015-09-01

    A prototype computerized operator support system (COSS) has been developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based on four underlying elements consisting of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, PI&D system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. At this point, the prototype simulates an interface to a sensor validation module and a fault diagnosis module. These two modules will be fully integrated in the next version of the prototype. The initial version of the prototype is now operational at the Idaho National Laboratory using the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). The HSSL is a full-scope, full-scale glass top simulator capable of simulating existing and future nuclear power plant main control rooms. The COSS is interfaced to the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor (gPWR) simulator with industry-typical control board layouts. The glass top panels display realistic images of the control boards that can be operated by touch gestures. A section of the simulated control board was dedicated to the COSS human-system interface (HSI), which resulted in a seamless integration of the COSS into the normal control room environment. A COSS demonstration scenario has been developed for the prototype involving the Chemical & Volume Control System (CVCS) of the PWR simulator. It involves a primary coolant leak outside of containment that would require tripping the reactor if not mitigated in a very short timeframe. The COSS prototype presents a series of operator screens that provide the needed information and soft controls to successfully mitigate the event.

  7. Core Outcome Sets and Multidimensional Assessment Tools for Harmonizing Outcome Measure in Chronic Pain and Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Ulrike; Neustadt, Katrin; Kopkow, Christian; Schmitt, Jochen; Sabatowski, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Core Outcome Sets (COSs) are a set of domains and measurement instruments recommended for application in any clinical trial to ensure comparable outcome assessment (both domains and instruments). COSs are not exclusively recommended for clinical trials, but also for daily record keeping in routine care. There are several COS recommendations considering clinical trials as well as multidimensional assessment tools to support daily record keeping in low back pain. In this article, relevant initiatives will be described, and implications for research in COS development in chronic pain and back pain will be discussed. PMID:27589816

  8. Toward a Climate OSSE for NASA Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, S. S.; Collins, W. D.; Feldman, D.; Field, R. D.; Ming, Y.; Pawson, S.; Sanderson, B.; Schmidt, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    In the Continuity Study, the National Academy of Sciences advised that future space missions be rated according to five categories: the importance of a well-defined scientific objective, the utility of the observation in addressing the scientific objective, the quality with which the observation can be made, the probability of the mission's success, and the mission's affordability. The importance, probability, and affordability are evaluated subjectively by scientific consensus, by engineering review panels, and by cost models; however, the utility and quality can be evaluated objectively by a climate observation system simulation experiment (COSSE). A discussion of the philosophical underpinnings of a COSSE for NASA Earth Sciences will be presented. A COSSE is built upon a perturbed physics ensemble of a sophisticated climate model that can simulate a mission's prospective observations and its well-defined quantitative scientific objective and that can capture the uncertainty associated with each. A strong correlation between observation and scientific objective after consideration of physical uncertainty leads to a high quality. Persistence of a high correlation after inclusion of the proposed measurement error leads to a high utility. There are five criteria that govern that nature of a particular COSSE: (1) whether the mission's scientific objective is one of hypothesis testing or climate prediction, (2) whether the mission is empirical or inferential, (3) whether the core climate model captures essential physical uncertainties, (4) the level of detail of the simulated observations, and (5) whether complementarity or redundancy of information is to be valued. Computation of the quality and utility is done using Bayesian statistics, as has been done previously for multi-decadal climate prediction conditioned on existing data. We advocate for a new program within NASA Earth Sciences to establish a COSSE capability. Creation of a COSSE program within NASA Earth

  9. Core Outcome Sets and Multidimensional Assessment Tools for Harmonizing Outcome Measure in Chronic Pain and Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Ulrike; Neustadt, Katrin; Kopkow, Christian; Schmitt, Jochen; Sabatowski, Rainer

    2016-08-29

    Core Outcome Sets (COSs) are a set of domains and measurement instruments recommended for application in any clinical trial to ensure comparable outcome assessment (both domains and instruments). COSs are not exclusively recommended for clinical trials, but also for daily record keeping in routine care. There are several COS recommendations considering clinical trials as well as multidimensional assessment tools to support daily record keeping in low back pain. In this article, relevant initiatives will be described, and implications for research in COS development in chronic pain and back pain will be discussed.

  10. Sialadenitis without sialolithiasis: Prospective outcomes after sialendoscopy-assisted salivary duct surgery.

    PubMed

    Delagnes, Elise A; Aubin-Pouliot, Annick; Zheng, Melissa; Chang, Jolie L; Ryan, William R

    2017-05-01

    To prospectively assess symptoms before and after sialendoscopy-assisted salivary duct surgery (SASDS) in patients with symptomatic sialadenitis without sialolithiasis. Prospective cohort study. Patients with chronic obstructive sialadenitis without sialolithiasis (COSWS) completed the Chronic Obstructive Sialadenitis Symptoms (COSS) questionnaire prior to SASDS and 3 months postoperatively. Of 80 consecutive patients in a 20-month period, 20 surveyed patients underwent SASDS for COSWS in 37 symptomatic glands. Major symptom improvement (> 10 COSS score reduction) was reported in 24 of 37 (65%) of all glands, including 14 of 21 (67%) of radioactive iodine (RAI)-induced cases and 10 of 13 (77%) of idiopathic sialadenitis cases. A significant reduction in postoperative mean COSS scores was seen overall (12.6 points, standard deviation [SD] 19.3, P < 0.05 to a post-SASDS mean score of 26.6). However, 19 of 37 (51%) glands demonstrated postoperative COSS scores above 25, denoting persistent disease. Mean COSS score reductions in RAI-induced sialadenitis (12.4 points, SD 22.7, P < 0.05) and idiopathic sialadenitis (16.3 points, SD 13.7, P < 0.005) groups were significant, with post-SASDS COSS mean scores of 30.6 (SD 19.8) and 20.8 (SD 13.8), respectively. Ducts with stenoses treated with dilation or sialodochoplasty showed significant COSS improvements of 21.1 (SD 17.9) and 12.4 points (SD 10.7), respectively (P < 0.05). In a multivariate analysis, both the presence of stenosis and sialodochoplasty were independent predictors of complete or partial resolution (post-COSS score < 25) and major symptom improvement (P < 0.05). SASDS provides short-term symptom reduction in patients with COSWS; particularly in RAI-induced and idiopathic sialadenitis, and in duct stenosis amenable to dilation or sialodochoplasty. However, approximately half of the glands did not achieve meaningful symptom resolution. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:1073-1079, 2017. © 2016 The

  11. From chitin to bioactive chitooligosaccharides and conjugates: access to lipochitooligosaccharides and the TMG-chitotriomycin.

    PubMed

    Despras, Guillaume; Alix, Aurélien; Urban, Dominique; Vauzeilles, Boris; Beau, Jean-Marie

    2014-10-27

    The direct and chemoselective N-transacylation of peracetylated chitooligosaccharides (COSs), readily obtained from chitin, to give per-N-trifluoroacetyl derivatives offers an attractive route to size-defined COSs and derived glycoconjugates. It involves the use of various acceptor building blocks and trifluoromethyl oxazoline dimer donors prepared with efficiency and highly reactive in 1,2-trans glycosylation reactions. This method was applied to the preparation of the important symbiotic glycolipids which are highly active on plants and to the TMG-chitotriomycin, a potent and specific inhibitor of insect, fungal, and bacterial N-acetylglucosaminidases.

  12. 15 CFR 23.2 - Contact person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Contact person. 23.2 Section 23.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce USE OF PENALTY MAIL IN THE LOCATION AND RECOVERY OF MISSING CHILDREN § 23.2 Contact person. Tim Coss, Office of Administrative Services...

  13. 15 CFR 23.2 - Contact person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Contact person. 23.2 Section 23.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce USE OF PENALTY MAIL IN THE LOCATION AND RECOVERY OF MISSING CHILDREN § 23.2 Contact person. Tim Coss, Office of Administrative Services...

  14. 15 CFR 23.2 - Contact person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contact person. 23.2 Section 23.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce USE OF PENALTY MAIL IN THE LOCATION AND RECOVERY OF MISSING CHILDREN § 23.2 Contact person. Tim Coss, Office of Administrative Services...

  15. 15 CFR 23.2 - Contact person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Contact person. 23.2 Section 23.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce USE OF PENALTY MAIL IN THE LOCATION AND RECOVERY OF MISSING CHILDREN § 23.2 Contact person. Tim Coss, Office of Administrative Services...

  16. 15 CFR 23.2 - Contact person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Contact person. 23.2 Section 23.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce USE OF PENALTY MAIL IN THE LOCATION AND RECOVERY OF MISSING CHILDREN § 23.2 Contact person. Tim Coss, Office of Administrative Services...

  17. 77 FR 5177 - Schedule of Fees for Consular Services, Department of State and Overseas Embassies and Consulates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... referred to as the Cost of Service Study or ``CoSS,'' which is the activity-based costing model that the... by email or through the submission process at www.regulations.gov . The Department analyzed the 1,797...

  18. Physical mapping of a large plant genome using global high-information content fingerprinting: a distal region of wheat chromosome 3DS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Physical maps employing libraries of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones are essential for comparative genomics and sequencing of large and repetitive genomes such as those of wheat. We report the use of the Ae. tauschii, the diploid ancestor of the wheat D genome, for the construction of t...

  19. Determination of Inorganic Cations and Anions in Chitooligosaccharides by Ion Chromatography with Conductivity Detection.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lidong; Li, Xiuhuan; Fan, Li; Zheng, Li; Wu, Miaomiao; Zhang, Shanxue; Huang, Qiliang

    2017-02-22

    Chitooligosaccharides (COSs) are a promising drug candidate and food ingredient because they are innately biocompatible, non-toxic, and non-allergenic to living tissues. Therefore, the impurities in COSs must be clearly elucidated and precisely determined. As for COSs, most analytical methods focus on the determination of the average degrees of polymerization (DPs) and deacetylation (DD), as well as separation and analysis of the single COSs with different DPs. However, little is known about the concentrations of inorganic cations and anions in COSs. In the present study, an efficient and sensitive ion chromatography coupled with conductivity detection (IC-CD) for the determination of inorganic cations Na⁺, NH₄⁺, K⁺, Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and chloride, acetate and lactate anions was developed. Detection limits were 0.01-0.05 μM for cations and 0.5-0.6 μM for anions. The linear range was 0.001-0.8 mM. The optimized analysis was carried out on IonPac CS12A and IonPac AS12A analytical column for cations and anions, respectively, using isocratic elution with 20 mM methanesulfonic acid and 4 mM sodium hydroxide aqueous solution as the mobile phase at a 1.0 mL/min flow rate. Quality parameters, including precision and accuracy, were fully validated and found to be satisfactory. The fully validated IC-CD method was readily applied for the quantification of various cations and anions in commercial COS technical concentrate.

  20. Determination of Inorganic Cations and Anions in Chitooligosaccharides by Ion Chromatography with Conductivity Detection

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lidong; Li, Xiuhuan; Fan, Li; Zheng, Li; Wu, Miaomiao; Zhang, Shanxue; Huang, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Chitooligosaccharides (COSs) are a promising drug candidate and food ingredient because they are innately biocompatible, non-toxic, and non-allergenic to living tissues. Therefore, the impurities in COSs must be clearly elucidated and precisely determined. As for COSs, most analytical methods focus on the determination of the average degrees of polymerization (DPs) and deacetylation (DD), as well as separation and analysis of the single COSs with different DPs. However, little is known about the concentrations of inorganic cations and anions in COSs. In the present study, an efficient and sensitive ion chromatography coupled with conductivity detection (IC-CD) for the determination of inorganic cations Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and chloride, acetate and lactate anions was developed. Detection limits were 0.01–0.05 μM for cations and 0.5–0.6 μM for anions. The linear range was 0.001–0.8 mM. The optimized analysis was carried out on IonPac CS12A and IonPac AS12A analytical column for cations and anions, respectively, using isocratic elution with 20 mM methanesulfonic acid and 4 mM sodium hydroxide aqueous solution as the mobile phase at a 1.0 mL/min flow rate. Quality parameters, including precision and accuracy, were fully validated and found to be satisfactory. The fully validated IC-CD method was readily applied for the quantification of various cations and anions in commercial COS technical concentrate. PMID:28241416

  1. Effect of chitooligosaccharides with different degrees of acetylation on wheat seedlings under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ping; Li, Kecheng; Liu, Song; Xing, Ronge; Qin, Yukun; Yu, Huahua; Zhou, Miaomiao; Li, Pengcheng

    2015-08-01

    In this study, chitooligosaccharides (COSs) with varying degrees of acetylation (DAs) were applied to wheat seedlings in order to investigate their effect on the plants' defence response under salt stress. The results showed that treatment with exogenous COSs that had different DAs could promote the growth of plants, decrease the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), improve the photosynthetic efficiency and enhance the activities of antioxidant enzymes. The mRNA expression level examination of several salt stress response genes suggested that COS could protect plants from the damage of salt stress by adjusting intracellular ion concentration and enhancing the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Furthermore, COS with DA 50% was the most effective in alleviating salt stress to wheat seedlings, which indicated that the activity of COS was closely related with its DAs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Surgical treatment of the internal carotid artery atherosclerotic occlusion].

    PubMed

    Galkin, P V; Gushcha, A O; Antonov, G I

    2014-01-01

    Internal carotid artery occlusion is the cause of carotid territory transient ischemic attacks or infarction approximately in 15% of patients. Extracranial-lntracranial (EC-IC) Bypass Study and Carotid Occlusion Surgery Study (COSS) failed to show a benefit of EC-IC bypass over medical therapy in patients with symptomatic carotid artery occlusion. Weak sides of COSS were investigators reliance on post hoc analysis, use of specific thresholds in the definition of impaired cerebral hemodynamics and high perioperative morbidity. In selected subset of patients with medically refractory ischemic symptoms, EC-IC bypass, can provide benefit from surgery performed with sufficiently low perioperative morbidity. The potential of functional and cognitive improvement after cerebral revascularization needs further investigation.

  3. Using electric pulse and laser to trigger a sharp and nonvolatile change of lateral photovoltage in nano-carbon film

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Zhikai; Zhou, Peiqi; Huang, Xu; Mei, Chunlian; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Hui

    2016-03-28

    A greatly enhanced lateral photovoltage (LPV) triggered by electric pulse has been observed in nano-carbon oxide semiconductor (COS) structures. The original maximal output signal of lateral photovoltage achieved in these structures is 9.8 mV. However, by combining the application of a 60 V voltage pulse with laser illumination, the LPV can reach a very high value of 183 mV and the change ratio after 60 V pulse is nearly 1800%. In addition, the states of these light and electric-pulse triggered COSs are permanently changed, showing a non-volatile characteristic. We attribute this phenomenon to the trapping effect of stimulated electrons in COSs. The work suggests an approach for tailoring LPV-based devices by electric pulse and will be useful for the development of electric pulse modulated photodetectors.

  4. From pico to nano: biofunctionalization of cube-octameric silsesquioxanes by peptides and miniproteins.

    PubMed

    Fabritz, Sebastian; Hörner, Sebastian; Könning, Doreen; Empting, Martin; Reinwarth, Michael; Dietz, Christian; Glotzbach, Bernhard; Frauendorf, Holm; Kolmar, Harald; Avrutina, Olga

    2012-08-21

    Polyhedral silsesquioxanes are considered valuable conjugation scaffolds. Nevertheless, only a few examples of silsesquioxane-assembled peptide oligomers have been reported to date. We developed a new bioorthogonal cube-octameric silsesquioxane (COSS) scaffold bearing eight aminooxy coupling sites allowing for the conjugation of diverse peptides via oxime ligation. We found that the coupling efficacy depends on the ligand in view of steric hindrance and electrostatic repulsion. For the first time scaffold-based conjugation of cystine-knot miniproteins having a backbone of about thirty amino acids was successfully accomplished without loss of bioactivity. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provided further knowledge on the size of COSS verifying them as picoscaffolds growing upon bioconjugation to nano-dimension.

  5. A Computuerized Operator Support System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Tom Ulrich; Richard Villim

    2013-08-01

    A report was published by the Idaho National Laboratory in September of 2012, entitled Design to Achieve Fault Tolerance and Resilience, which described the benefits of automating operator actions for transients. The report identified situations in which providing additional automation in lieu of operator actions would be advantageous. It recognized that managing certain plant upsets is sometimes limited by the operator’s ability to quickly diagnose the fault and to take the needed actions in the time available. Undoubtedly, technology is underutilized in the nuclear power industry for operator assistance during plant faults and operating transients. In contrast, other industry sectors have amply demonstrated that various forms of operator advisory systems can enhance operator performance while maintaining the role and responsibility of the operator as the independent and ultimate decision-maker. A computerized operator support system (COSS) is proposed for use in nuclear power plants to assist control room operators in addressing time-critical plant upsets. A COSS is a collection of technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. The COSS does not supplant the role of the operator, but rather provides rapid assessments, computations, and recommendations to reduce workload and augment operator judgment and decision-making during fast-moving, complex events. This project proposes a general model for a control room COSS that addresses a sequence of general tasks required to manage any plant upset: detection, validation, diagnosis, recommendation, monitoring, and recovery. The model serves as a framework for assembling a set of technologies that can be interrelated to assist with each of these tasks. A prototype COSS has been developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based

  6. A Computuerized Operator Support System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Thomas; Ronald Boring; Roger Lew; Tom Ulrich; Richard Villim

    2013-11-01

    A report was published by the Idaho National Laboratory in September of 2012, entitled Design to Achieve Fault Tolerance and Resilience, which described the benefits of automating operator actions for transients. The report identified situations in which providing additional automation in lieu of operator actions would be advantageous. It recognized that managing certain plant upsets is sometimes limited by the operator’s ability to quickly diagnose the fault and to take the needed actions in the time available. Undoubtedly, technology is underutilized in the nuclear power industry for operator assistance during plant faults and operating transients. In contrast, other industry sectors have amply demonstrated that various forms of operator advisory systems can enhance operator performance while maintaining the role and responsibility of the operator as the independent and ultimate decision-maker. A computerized operator support system (COSS) is proposed for use in nuclear power plants to assist control room operators in addressing time-critical plant upsets. A COSS is a collection of technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. The COSS does not supplant the role of the operator, but rather provides rapid assessments, computations, and recommendations to reduce workload and augment operator judgment and decision-making during fast-moving, complex events. This project proposes a general model for a control room COSS that addresses a sequence of general tasks required to manage any plant upset: detection, validation, diagnosis, recommendation, monitoring, and recovery. The model serves as a framework for assembling a set of technologies that can be interrelated to assist with each of these tasks. A prototype COSS has been developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The prototype is based

  7. Proposal of a new lateral high-voltage n-channel MOS structure with a reduced parasitic output capacitance for a level-shift circuit integrated in 800 V-class high-voltage ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaji, Masaharu; Jonishi, Akihiro; Sumida, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Yoshio

    2015-04-01

    A new 800 V-class lateral high-voltage n-channel MOS (HVNMOS) structure with a markedly reduced parasitic capacitance (Coss) has been developed for integration in a high-voltage gate driver IC. In our new HVNMOS, a 40% Coss reduction from that of a conventional HVNMOS can be achieved by using two n-type drift regions divided by a p-type diffusion layer. We have confirmed that a 12% shorter I/O propagation delay time can be achieved by using the new HVNMOS of the high-voltage IC (HVIC) test chip. In this paper, the design concept of the developed HVNMOS is presented with the simulation and experimental results.

  8. A Research Program in Computer Technology. 1983 Annual Technical Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    Gabriel Robins Kathie Patten Thomas Lipkis Richard Stokey William Swartout David Wilczynski The Consul project is exploring the use of knowledge-based...Assistants: Support Staff: Thomas S. Kaczmarek Haym Hirsh Kathie Patten Gabriel Robins 2.1 PROBLEM BEING SOLVED The goal of the CUE project is to provide...Ian Merritt Jeff LaCoss Jerry Wills 7.1 INTRODUCTION The Wideband Communications (WBC) project at ISI is one of several groups involved in the joint

  9. Cooling the Collective Motion of Trapped Ions to Initialize a Quantum Register

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-13

    electronic states. We find that heating of the modes of relative ion motion is substantially suppressed relative to that of the center-of-mass modes...computation [1] provides a gen- eral framework for fundamental investigations into sub- jects such as entanglement, quantum measurement , and quantum...tential fstd ­ V0 cossVT td 1 U0 to the (elliptical) ring electrode relative to the end cap electrodes. If several ions are trapped and cooled, they

  10. Size effects of chitooligomers on the growth and photosynthetic characteristics of wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Li, Kecheng; Liu, Song; Xing, Ronge; Yu, Huahua; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Pengcheng

    2016-03-15

    In this study, nine chitooligomers (COSs) including seven single COSs (chitobiose to chitooctaose) and two COS fractions with narrow degrees of polymerization (DPs) (DP8-10, DP10-12) were prepared and applied to wheat seedlings to investigate the size effects of COSs on the growth and photosynthesis parameters of wheat seedlings. The results showed that the activities of COS were closely related to their DPs, and DP>3 was necessary to insure a significant promotion effect on the growth and photosynthesis. Moreover, chitoheptaose exhibited the optimal activity compared with other COS samples. After 7 days of chitoheptaose treatment, the growth parameters of wheat seedlings could be significantly improved and the contents of soluble sugar, soluble protein and chlorophyll were increased by 59.4%, 22.0% and 20.3%, respectively. In addition, chitoheptaose could significantly enhance the net photosynthetic rate of wheat seedlings with the values of Fv/Fo, qP and Rfd increased by 11.0%, 18.6% and 14.7%, respectively, while NPQ was decreased obviously, which might resulted in the promotion of light utilization efficiency and the growth of wheat seedlings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Acetylated Chitosan Oligosaccharides Act as Antagonists against Glutamate-Induced PC12 Cell Death via Bcl-2/Bax Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Cui; Gao, Lixia; Zhang, Yiran; Wang, Wei; Yu, Guangli; Guan, Huashi; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Chunxia

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan oligosaccharides (COSs), depolymerized products of chitosan composed of β-(1→4) d-glucosamine units, have broad range of biological activities such as antitumour, antifungal, and antioxidant activities. In this study, peracetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (PACOs) and N-acetylated chitosan oligosaccharides (NACOs) were prepared from the COSs by chemcal modification. The structures of these monomers were identified using NMR and ESI-MS spectra. Their antagonist effects against glutamate-induced PC12 cell death were investigated. The results showed that pretreatment of PC12 cells with the PACOs markedly inhibited glutamate-induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. The PACOs were better glutamate antagonists compared to the COSs and the NACOs, suggesting the peracetylation is essential for the neuroprotective effects of chitosan oligosaccharides. In addition, the PACOs pretreatment significantly reduced lactate dehydrogenase release and reactive oxygen species production. It also attenuated the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Further studies indicated that the PACOs inhibited glutamate-induced cell death by preventing apoptosis through depressing the elevation of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3 activation. These results suggest that PACOs might be promising antagonists against glutamate-induced neural cell death. PMID:25775423

  12. The Initial Development of a Computerized Operator Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Roger Lew; Ronald L Boring; Thomas A Ulrich; Ken Thomas

    2014-08-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) is a collection of resilient software technologies to assist operators in monitoring overall nuclear power plant performance and making timely, informed decisions on appropriate control actions for the projected plant condition. The COSS provides rapid assessments, computations, and recommendations to reduce workload and augment operator judgment and decision-making during fast- moving, complex events. A prototype COSS for a chemical volume control system at a nuclear power plant has been developed in order to demonstrate the concept and provide a test bed for further research. The development process identified four underlying elements necessary for the prototype, which consist of a digital alarm system, computer-based procedures, piping and instrumentation diagram system representations, and a recommender module for mitigation actions. An operational prototype resides at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) using the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). Several human-machine interface (HMI) considerations are identified and incorporated in the prototype during this initial round of development.

  13. Compact, Automated Centrifugal Slide-Staining System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S. F.

    2004-01-01

    The Directional Acceleration Vector-Driven Displacement of Fluids (DAVD-DOF) system, under development at the time of reporting the information for this article, would be a relatively compact, automated, centrifugally actuated system for staining blood smears and other microbiological samples on glass microscope slides in either a microgravitational or a normal Earth gravitational environment. The DAVD-DOF concept is a successor to the centrifuge-operated slide stainer (COSS) concept, which was reported in Slide-Staining System for Microgravity or Gravity (MSC-22949), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 64. The COSS includes reservoirs and a staining chamber that contains a microscope slide to which a biological sample is affixed. The staining chamber is sequentially filled with and drained of staining and related liquids from the reservoirs by use of a weighted plunger to force liquid from one reservoir to another at a constant level of hypergravity maintained in a standard swing-bucket centrifuge. In the DAVD-DOF system, a staining chamber containing a sample would also be sequentially filled and emptied, but with important differences. Instead of a simple microscope slide, one would use a special microscope slide on which would be fabricated a network of very small reservoirs and narrow channels connected to a staining chamber (see figure). Unlike in the COSS, displacement of liquid would be effected by use of the weight of the liquid itself, rather than the weight of a plunger.

  14. Targeted introgression of a wheat stem rust resistance gene by DNA marker-assisted chromosome engineering genetics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), stem rust resistance gene Sr39, derived from Aegilops speltoides Tausch, is highly resistant to multiple stem rust races including TTKSK (Ug99). However, the gene has not been used in wheat breeding because of linkage drag associated with the large 2S chromosome segm...

  15. Weed-suppressive bacteria to reduce annual grass weeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.), medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae [L.] Nevski) and jointed goatgrass (Aegilops cylindrica L.) are exotic, annual grasses that negatively affect cereal production in cropland; reduce protein-rich forage for cattle; choke out native plants in the shrub-steppe habi...

  16. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of wheat introgression lines carrying the stem rust resistance gene Sr39.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis Pers.:Pers. f.sp. tritici Eriks. and Henn., poses a serious threat to global wheat production because of the emergence of Pgt-TTKSK (Ug99). The TTKSK resistant gene Sr39 was derived from Aegilops speltoides through chromosome translocation. In this study, we ch...

  17. Synthesis and characterization of advanced durum wheat hybrids and addition lines with thinopyrum chromosomes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L., 2n = 4x = 28; AABB genomes) is a natural hybrid – an allotetraploid between two wild species, Triticum urartu Tumanian (AA genome) and Aegilops speltoides Tausch (BB genome). As shown earlier, even at the allotetraploid level, durum wheat can tolerate chromosomal ...

  18. Accelerated evolution of the mitochondrial genome in an alloplasmic line of durum wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat is not only an important crop but also an excellent plant species for nuclear mitochondrial interaction studies. To investigate the level of sequence changes introduced into the mitochondrial genome under the alloplasmic conditions, three mitochondrial genomes of Triticum-Aegilops species w...

  19. Physical mapping of DNA markers linked to stem rust resistance gene Sr47 in durum wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In durum wheat (Triticum turgidum subsp. durum), the gene Sr47 derived from Aegilops speltoides conditions resistance to race TTKSK (Ug99) of stem rust pathogen (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici). Sr47 is carried on small interstitial translocation chromosomes (Ti2BL-2SL-2BL·2BS) in which the Ae. s...

  20. Protein Electrophoretic Profiles and the Origin of the B Genome of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, B. Lennart

    1972-01-01

    Protein electrophoretic profiles cast doubt upon the prevalent theory that the B genome of the polyploid wheats was derived from a species of Aegilops. They suggest, instead, that the wild tetraploid wheats comprise a complex, whose components were derived from various combinations of diploid Triticum types, which evidently include the B-genome type. Images PMID:4504349

  1. Slender wheatgrass is susceptible to smut caused by Ustilago phrygica from Turkey

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Slender wheatgrass (Elymus trachycaulus subsp. trachycaulus), is a native North American grass that is used as a livestock forage. Ustilago phrygica, a systemic ovary-smut fungus, is native to Turkey and West Asia, and is pathogenic on Aegilops spp. and Taeniatherum caput-medusae subsp. asperum (med...

  2. NADH dehydrogenase: a new molecular marker for homoeology group 4 in Triticeae. A map of the 4RS chromosome arm in rye.

    PubMed

    Figueiras, A M; Zaragoza, C; Gallego, F J; Benito, C

    1991-12-01

    Structural gene loci encoding the monomeric isozymes nicotin adenin dinucleotide dehydrogenase (NADH dehydrogenase or NDH) have been located on the 4AL, 4Bα, and 4DS chromosome arms of Triticum aestivum cv "Chinese Spring", on the 4RS chromosome arm of Secale cereale cultivars "Imperial", "King II", "Dakold," and "Ailes," on the 4S(1) S/7S(1) chromosome of Aegilops longissima, the 4E of Elytrigia elongata, and the CSU-A of Aegilops umbellulata. All the results support the homoeologous relationships among these chromosomes in the five species studied. In addition, a map of the 4RS chromosome arm in cv "Ailes" has been realized, linking loci Pgm-1 (located on the 4RS chromosome arm) and Ndh-1 (17.91 cM), with an estimated distance between both loci and the centromere of 20.00 cM and 32.12 cM, respectively.

  3. Phylogeny of cultivated and wild wheat species using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Pinar; Onde, Sertac; Severcan, Feride

    2015-01-01

    Within the last decade, an increasing amount of genetic data has been used to clarify the problems inherent in wheat taxonomy. The techniques for obtaining and analyzing these data are not only cumbersome, but also expensive and technically demanding. In the present study, we introduce infrared spectroscopy as a method for a sensitive, rapid and low cost phylogenetic analysis tool for wheat seed samples. For this purpose, 12 Triticum and Aegilops species were studied by Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis clearly revealed that the lignin band (1525-1505 cm-1) discriminated the species at the genus level. However, the species were clustered according to their genome commonalities when the whole spectra were used (4000-650 cm-1). The successful differentiation of Triticum and its closely related genus Aegilops clearly demonstrated the power of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy as a suitable tool for phylogenetic research.

  4. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA using amplified fragment length polymorphism markers of isonuclear allocytoplasmic male sterile wheat accessions and their maintainer lines.

    PubMed

    Ejaz, M; Qidi, Z; Gaisheng, Z; Qunzhu, W; Xinbo, Z

    2013-10-30

    To produce a good F1 hybrid variety wheat crop, it is necessary to explore novel cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) lines and their maintainer line. This study aimed to identify cytoplasmic variation in three isonuclear-alloplasmic male sterile lines Aegilops kotschyi (Ae.kots) -90-110, Aegilops ventricosa (Ae.ven) -90-110, and Triticum spelta (T.spelta) -90-110 and their maintainer line, A-90-110, at the molecular level. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was isolated using a combination of centrifugation and density gradient ultracentrifugation, sucrose sedimentation, lysis with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), potassium proteinase, and phenol/chloroform extraction methods. To detect mtDNA purity, specific primers were designed for nuclear (β-actin) and mitochondrial (COXIII) genes. Results indicated that the mtDNA was pure, and therefore suitable for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and genetic analysis. Comparative analysis of mtDNA was conducted using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. Reproducible polymorphisms were detected between the Aegilops and Triticum species and the male sterile lines. Four specific primers were screened from 64 AFLP marker primers, which provided the molecular basis for further studies investigating specific cytoplasmic male sterility characteristics.

  5. An immunochemical approach to species relationship in Triticum and some related species.

    PubMed

    Bozzini, A; Cantagalli, P; Piazzi, S E; Sordi, S

    1970-01-01

    An immunological reaction, precipitation in gel, was produced using a rabbit antiserum directed to a specific protein constantly present in bread wheats (T. aestivum, genome AABBDD), but absent in durum wheat (T. durum Desf., genome AABB). This protein was isolated in the soluble-protein fraction of bread wheat caryopses by combined biochemical and immunological techniques.The availability of such a specific anti-bread wheat serum made possible the analysis of a series of varieties and species of wheat and of some closely related (Secale, Aegilops) and less closely related (Hordeum, Haynaldia) taxa to determine whether the protein was present or absent. Hordeum vulgare, Haynaldia villosa, Triticum monoccocum and Triticum turgidum gave a negative result, while positive results were obtained in T. aestivum, T. timopheevi, T. zhukovskyi, Secale cereale, Aegilops speltoides, Ae. mutica, Ae. comosa, Ae. caudata, Ae. umbellulata, Ae. squarrosa, and also in the artificial amphiploids (Ae. speltoides x T. monococcum) and (Ae. caudata x T. monococcum).It is concluded that these results agree closely with the classification of Triticum proposed by MacKey in 1966. The investigated protein not only permits the differentiation of T. aestivum from T. turgidum, but also T. turgidum from T. timopheevi at tetraploid level and T. monococcum from all the diploid species of Aegilops.

  6. Genetic Fingerprinting of Wheat and Its Progenitors by Mitochondrial Gene orf256

    PubMed Central

    El-Shehawi, Ahmed M.; Fahmi, Abdelmeguid I.; Sayed, Samy M.; Elseehy, Mona M.

    2012-01-01

    orf256 is a wheat mitochondrial gene associated with cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) that has different organization in various species. This study exploited the orf256 gene as a mitochondrial DNA marker to study the genetic fingerprint of Triticum and Aegilops species. PCR followed by sequencing of common parts of the orf256 gene were employed to determine the fingerprint and molecular evolution of Triticum and Aegilops species. Although many primer pairs were used, two pairs of orf256 specific primers (5:-94/C: 482, 5:253/C: 482), amplified DNA fragments of 576 bp and 230 bp respectively in all species were tested. A common 500 bp of nine species of Triticum and Aegilops were aligned and showed consistent results with that obtained from other similar chloroplast or nuclear genes. Base alignment showed that there were various numbers of base substitutions in all species compared to S. cereal (Sc) (the outgroup species). Phylogenetic relationship revealed similar locations and proximity on phylogenetic trees established using plastid and nuclear genes. The results of this study open a good route to use unknown function genes of mitochondria in studying the molecular relationships and evolution of wheat and complex plant genomes. PMID:24970134

  7. Genome-wide identification and evolutionary analyses of bZIP transcription factors in wheat and its relatives and expression profiles of anther development related TabZIP genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueyin; Gao, Shiqing; Tang, Yimiao; Li, Lei; Zhang, Fengjie; Feng, Biane; Fang, Zhaofeng; Ma, Lingjian; Zhao, Changping

    2015-11-18

    Among the largest and most diverse transcription factor families in plants, basic leucine zipper (bZIP) family participate in regulating various processes, including floral induction and development, stress and hormone signaling, photomorphogenesis, seed maturation and germination, and pathogen defense. Although common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most widely cultivated and consumed food crops in the world, there is no comprehensive analysis of bZIPs in wheat, especially those involved in anther development. Previous studies have demonstrated wheat, T. urartu, Ae. tauschii, barley and Brachypodium are evolutionarily close in Gramineae family, however, the real evolutionary relationship still remains mysterious. In this study, 187 bZIP family genes were comprehensively identified from current wheat genome. 98, 96 and 107 members of bZIP family were also identified from the genomes of T.urartu, Ae.tauschii and barley, respectively. Orthology analyses suggested 69.4 % of TubZIPs were orthologous to 68.8 % of AetbZIPs and wheat had many more in-paralogs in the bZIP family than its relatives. It was deduced wheat had a closer phylogenetic relationship with barley and Brachypodium than T.urartu and Ae.tauschii. bZIP proteins in wheat, T.urartu and Ae.tauschii were divided into 14 subgroups based on phylogenetic analyses. Using Affymetrix microarray data, 48 differentially expressed TabZIP genes were identified to be related to anther development from comparison between the male sterility line and the restorer line. Genes with close evolutionary relationship tended to share similar gene structures. 15 of 23 selected TabZIP genes contained LTR elements in their promoter regions. Expression of 21 among these 23 TabZIP genes were obviously responsive to low temperature. These 23 TabZIP genes all exhibited distinct tissue-specific expression pattern. Among them, 11 TabZIP genes were predominantly expressed in anther and most of them showed over

  8. Report from the kick-off meeting of the Cochrane Skin Group Core Outcome Set Initiative (CSG-COUSIN).

    PubMed

    Schmitt, J; Deckert, S; Alam, M; Apfelbacher, C; Barbaric, J; Bauer, A; Chalmers, J; Chosidow, O; Delamere, F; Doney, E; Eleftheriadou, V; Grainge, M; Johannsen, L; Kottner, J; Le Cleach, L; Mayer, A; Pinart, M; Prescott, L; Prinsen, C A C; Ratib, S; Schlager, J G; Sharma, M; Thomas, K S; Weberschock, T; Weller, K; Werner, R N; Wild, T; Wilkes, S R; Williams, H C

    2016-02-01

    A major obstacle of evidence-based clinical decision making is the use of nonstandardized, partly untested outcome measurement instruments. Core Outcome Sets (COSs) are currently developed in different medical fields to standardize and improve the selection of outcomes and outcome measurement instruments in clinical trials, in order to pool results of trials or to allow indirect comparison between interventions. A COS is an agreed minimum set of outcomes that should be measured and reported in all clinical trials of a specific disease or trial population. The international, multidisciplinary Cochrane Skin Group Core Outcome Set Initiative (CSG-COUSIN) aims to develop and implement COSs in dermatology, thus making trial evidence comparable and, herewith, more useful for clinical decision making. The inaugural meeting of CSG-COUSIN was held on 17-18 March 2015 in Dresden, Germany, as the exclusive theme of the Annual Cochrane Skin Group Meeting. In total, 29 individuals representing a broad mix of different stakeholder groups, professions, skills and perspectives attended. This report provides a description of existing COS initiatives in dermatology, highlights current methodological challenges in COS development, and presents the concept, aims and structure of CSG-COUSIN.

  9. When Is a New Scale not a New Scale? The Case of the Bergen Shopping Addiction Scale and the Compulsive Online Shopping Scale.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Mark D; Andreassen, Cecilie S; Pallesen, Ståle; Bilder, Robert M; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Aboujaoude, Elias

    2016-01-01

    Manchiraju et al. (International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, 1-15, 2016) published the Compulsive Online Shopping Scale (COSS) in the International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction (IJMHA). To develop their measure of compulsive online shopping, Manchiraju and colleagues adapted items from the seven-item Bergen Shopping Addiction Scale (BSAS) and its' original 28-item item pool. Manchiraju et al. did not add or remove any of the original seven items, and did not substantially change the content of any of the 28 items on which the BSAS was based. They simply added the word "online" to each existing item. Given that the BSAS was specifically developed to take into account the different ways in which people now shop and to include both online and offline shopping, there does not seem to be a good rationale for developing an online version of the BSAS. It is argued that the COSS is not really an adaptation of the BSAS but an almost identical instrument based on the original 28-item pool.

  10. A Simplified Mass-Transfer Model for Visual Pigments in Amphibian Retinal-Cone Outer Segments

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Paul W.; Howle, Laurens E.; Murray, Mark M.; Corless, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    When radiolabeled precursors and autoradiography are used to investigate turnover of protein components in photoreceptive cone outer segments (COSs), the labeled components—primarily visual pigment molecules (opsins)—are diffusely distributed along the COS. To further assess this COS labeling pattern, we derive a simplified mass-transfer model for quantifying the contributions of advective and diffusive mechanisms to the distribution of opsins within COSs of the frog retina. Two opsin-containing regions of the COS are evaluated: the core axial array of disks and the plasmalemma. Numerical solutions of the mass-transfer model indicate three distinct stages of system evolution. In the first stage, plasmalemma diffusion is dominant. In the second stage, the plasmalemma density reaches a metastable state and transfer between the plasmalemma and disk region occurs, which is followed by an increase in density that is qualitatively similar for both regions. The final stage consists of both regions slowly evolving to the steady-state solution. Our results indicate that autoradiographic and cognate approaches for tracking labeled opsins in the COS cannot be effective methodologies for assessing new disk formation at the base of the COS. PMID:21281566

  11. Quantification of genetic relationships among A genomes of wheats.

    PubMed

    Brandolini, A; Vaccino, P; Boggini, G; Ozkan, H; Kilian, B; Salamini, F

    2006-04-01

    The genetic relationships of A genomes of Triticum urartu (Au) and Triticum monococcum (Am) in polyploid wheats are explored and quantified by AFLP fingerprinting. Forty-one accessions of A-genome diploid wheats, 3 of AG-genome wheats, 19 of AB-genome wheats, 15 of ABD-genome wheats, and 1 of the D-genome donor Ae. tauschii have been analysed. Based on 7 AFLP primer combinations, 423 bands were identified as potentially A genome specific. The bands were reduced to 239 by eliminating those present in autoradiograms of Ae. tauschii, bands interpreted as common to all wheat genomes. Neighbour-joining analysis separates T. urartu from T. monococcum. Triticum urartu has the closest relationship to polyploid wheats. Triticum turgidum subsp. dicoccum and T. turgidum subsp. durum lines are included in tightly linked clusters. The hexaploid spelts occupy positions in the phylogenetic tree intermediate between bread wheats and T. turgidum. The AG-genome accessions cluster in a position quite distant from both diploid and other polyploid wheats. The estimates of similarity between A genomes of diploid and polyploid wheats indicate that, compared with Am, Au has around 20% higher similarity to the genomes of polyploid wheats. Triticum timo pheevii AG genome is molecularly equidistant from those of Au and Am wheats.

  12. Degradation of chlorinated organic solvents in aqueous percarbonate system using zeolite supported nano zero valent iron (Z-nZVI) composite.

    PubMed

    Danish, Muhammad; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Naqvi, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Chlorinated organic solvents (COSs) are extensively detected in contaminated soil and groundwater that pose long-term threats to human life and environment. In order to degrade COSs effectively, a novel catalytic composite of natural zeolite-supported nano zero valent iron (Z-nZVI) was synthesized in this study. The performance of Z-nZVI-catalyzed sodium percarbonate (SPC) in a heterogeneous Fenton-like system was investigated for the degradation of COSs such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) and trichloroethylene (TCE). The surface characteristics and morphology of the Z-nZVI composite were tested using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total pore volume, specific surface area, and pore size of the natural zeolite and the Z-nZVI composite were measured using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. SEM and TEM analysis showed significant elimination of aggregation and well dispersion of iron nano particles on the framework of natural zeolite. The BET N2 measurement analysis indicated that the surface area of the Z-nZVI composite was 72.3 m(2)/g, much larger than that of the natural zeolite (0.61 m(2)/g). For the contaminant analysis, the samples were extracted with n-hexane and analyzed through gas chromatograph. The degradation of 1,1,1-TCA and TCE in the Z-nZVI-catalyzed percarbonate system were 48 and 39 % respectively, while strong augmentation was observed up to 83 and 99 %, respectively, by adding the reducing agent (RA), hydroxyl amine (NH2OH•HCl). Probe tests validated the presence of OH(●) and O2 (●-) which were responsible for 1,1,1-TCA and TCE degradation, whereas both free radicals were strengthened with the addition of RA. In conclusion, the Z-nZVI/SPC oxidation with reducing agent shows potential technique for degradation of groundwater contaminated by 1,1,1-TCA and TCE.

  13. Evidence for cytoplasmic control of in vitro microspore embryogenesis in the anther culture of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Sági, L; Barnabás, B

    1989-12-01

    Anthers were cultured from two sets of seven lines of hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with different cytoplasms, the euplasmic nucleus donors, 'Siete Cerros 66' and 'Penjamo 62', as well as their six alloplasmic lines derived from wild relative species of the genera Triticum and Aegilops. Significant cytoplasmic and nuclear effects but no cytoplasmic-nuclear interaction were found for embryogenic anther response, with the best performance of 'Penjamo 62' in Ae. kotschyi cytoplasm. Plant regeneration was not affected significantly by the cytoplasmic background of the lines cultured. The possible genetic implications of the observed cytoplasmic and nuclear influences on the in vitro haploid induction of wheat are discussed.

  14. Investigation on the mineral contents of capers (Capparis spp.) seed oils growing wild in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M Musa

    2008-09-01

    Minor and major mineral contents of seed oils of Capparis ovata Desf. var. canescens (Coss.) Heywood and Capparis spinosa var. spinosa used as pickling products in Turkey were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The seed oils contained Al, P, Na, Mg, Fe, and Ca, in addition to fatty acids. The highest mineral concentrations measured were 14.91-118.81 mg/kg Al, 1,489.34-11,523.74 mg/kg P, 505.78-4,489.51 mg/kg Na, 102.15-1,655.33 mg/kg Mg, 78.83-298.14 mg/kg Fe, and 1.04-76.39 mg/kg Ca. The heavy metal concentrations were less than the limit of detection in all oil samples. The results may also be useful for the evaluation of nutritional information.

  15. Fixed-base flywheel storage systems for electric-utility applications: An assessment of economic viability and R and D priorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olszewski, M.; Steele, R. S.

    1983-02-01

    Electric utility side meter storage options were assessed for the daily 2 h peaking spike application. The storage options considered included compressed air, batteries, and flywheels. The potential role for flywheels in this application was assessed and research and development (R and D) priorities were established for fixed base flywheel systems. Results of the worth cost analysis indicate that where geologic conditions are favorable, compressed air energy storage (CAES) is a strong competitor against combustion turbines. Existing battery and flywheel systems rated about equal, both being, at best, marginally uncompetitive with turbines. Advanced batteries, if existing cost and performance goals are met, could be competitive with CAES. A three task R and D effort for flywheel development appears warranted. The first task, directed at reducing fabrication coss and increasing performance of a chopped fiber, F-glass, solid disk concept, could produce a competitive flywheel system.

  16. Correlation between the Chemical and Genetic Relationships among Thymus saturejoides Genotypes Cultured under in vitro and in vivo Environments.

    PubMed

    Nordine, Aicha; Udupa, Sripada M; Iraqi, Driss; Meksem, Khalid; Hmamouchi, Mohamed; ElMeskaoui, Abdelmalek

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the in vitro and in vivo essential oil (EO) composition and genetic variability in six micropropagated genotypes of Thymus saturejoides Coss., a Mediterranean medicinal and aromatic plant, were analyzed by GC/MS and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Yield and composition of the EO varied between genotypes. Cluster analysis based on RAPD data and EO grouped the six genotypes in three groups in both culture conditions, thus showing considerable intraspecific genetic and chemical variations. Applying the Mantel test, the result showed a significant correlation between the two proximity matrices RAPD and EO obtained from in vitro genotypes, whereas this correlation was not observed when using the EO obtained from the in vivo genotypes.

  17. Multiple relapses in high-grade osteosarcoma: when to stop aggressive therapy?

    PubMed

    Tamamyan, Gevorg; Dominkus, Martin; Lang, Susanna; Diakos, Christopher; Mittheisz, Edda; Horcher, Ernst; Holter, Wolfgang; Zoubek, Andreas; Bielack, Stefan; Kager, Leo

    2015-03-01

    The prognosis after relapse of high-grade osteosarcoma is poor and complete resection of all tumors is essential for survival. A 6-year old was diagnosed with high-grade osteosarcoma and treated according to the COSS-96 protocol. Within 5 years from initial diagnosis, five osteosarcoma relapses occurred and every time it was possible to achieve complete surgical remission. Additional treatments included chemotherapy and dendritic cell-based cancer immune therapy. Since the end of therapy of the 5th relapse, he is alive for 11½ years. Our experience further supports that aggressive surgery can help to achieve long-term survival even in patients with multiple osteosarcoma relapses. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The application of ethephon (an ethylene releaser) increases growth, photosynthesis and nitrogen accumulation in mustard (Brassica juncea L.) under high nitrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Khan, N A; Mir, M R; Nazar, R; Singh, S

    2008-09-01

    Ethephon (2-chloroethyl phosphonic acid), an ethylene-releasing compound, influences growth and photosynthesis of mustard (Brassica juncea L. Czern & Coss.). We show the effect of nitrogen availability on ethylene evolution and how this affects growth, photosynthesis and nitrogen accumulation. Ethylene evolution in the control with low N (100 mg N kg(-1) soil) was two-times higher than with high N (200 mg N kg(-1) soil). The application of 100-400 microl x l(-1) ethephon post-flowering, i.e. 60 days after sowing, on plants receiving low or high N further increased ethylene evolution. Leaf area, relative growth rate (RGR), photosynthesis, leaf nitrate reductase (NR) activity and leaf N reached a maximum with application of 200 microl x l(-1) ethephon and high N. The results suggest that the application of ethephon influences growth, photosynthesis and N accumulation, depending on the amount of nitrogen in the soil.

  19. Salt stress-induced modulations in the shoot proteome of Brassica juncea genotypes.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Peerzada Yasir; Ahmad, Altaf; Ganie, Arshid Hussain; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern and Coss] is cultivated mainly in the northwestern agroclimatic region of India and suffers huge losses in productivity due to salinization. In an effort to figure out adaptation strategies of Indian mustard to salt stress, we conducted a comparative proteome analysis of shoots of its two genotypes, with contrasting sensitivity to salt stress. Differential expression of 21 proteins was observed during the two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE). The identified salt-stress-responsive proteins were associated with different functional processes including osmoregulation, photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, ion homeostasis, protein synthesis and stabilization, energy metabolism, and antioxidant defense system. Salt-tolerant genotype (CS-52) showed a relatively higher expression of proteins involved in turgor regulation, stabilization of photosystems and proteins, and salt compartmentalization, as compared to salt-sensitive genotype (Pusa Varuna). Our results suggest that modulating the expression of salt-responsive proteins can pave the way for developing salt tolerance in the Indian mustard plants.

  20. National Dam Safety Program. Brown Lake Dam (MO 31251), Upper Mississippi - Kaskaskia - ST. Louis Basin, Franklin County, Missouri. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    rop’i rt. thtt the, h.i qh-st I eve] exper ienced by the lake was about 2.5 eet b)e ow thue ele-vation of thtoa p ii IIw’ay crest. d. Post Construction...Chne. Mr. Porter reported that nof post conft runtion changes have bet ’n -iade ii !itv’’ Lit1’v( elhat. wot ild aiffoct. t h, structural stab ility of...tlw’ dam. Aup’ b~ ’pta tho ;,pet’ s ettlIeme nt o f t he dlarn t hait. ha ocupe iv,0(CU n ’ v ci’ r~ 1 onf I- ii (I 1-~ na q t in 1 crCoss i ncg. P

  1. Materials Organization, Planning, and Homework Completion in Middle School Students with ADHD: Impact on Academic Performance.

    PubMed

    Langberg, Joshua M; Epstein, Jeffery N; Girio, Erin L; Becker, Stephen P; Vaughn, Aaron J; Altaye, Mekibib

    2011-06-01

    This study evaluated the homework functioning of middle school students with ADHD to determine what aspects are most predictive of school grades and the best source (e.g., parents or teachers) for obtaining this information. Students with ADHD in grades 5-8 (N = 57) and their parents and teachers completed the Children's Organization Skills Scales (COSS) to measure materials organization, planning, and time-management, and parents completed the Homework Problems Checklist (HPC) to examine homework completion and homework materials management behaviors. Regression analyses revealed that parent-rated homework materials management and teacher-rated memory and materials management were the best predictors of school grades. These findings suggest that organization of materials is a critical component of the homework completion process for students with ADHD and an important target for intervention. Teachers were the best source of information regarding materials organization and planning, whereas parents were a valuable source of information for specific homework materials management problems.

  2. Increasing access to care for Brazos Valley, Texas: a rural community of solution.

    PubMed

    Garney, Whitney R; Drake, Kelly; Wendel, Monica L; McLeroy, Kenneth; Clark, Heather R; Ryder, Byron

    2013-01-01

    Compared with their urban counterparts, rural populations face substantial disparities in terms of health care and health outcomes, particularly with regard to access to health services. To address ongoing inequities, community perspectives are increasingly important in identifying health issues and developing local solutions that are effective and sustainable. This article has been developed by both academic and community representatives and presents a brief case study of the evolution of a regional community of solution (COS) servicing a 7-county region called the Brazos Valley, Texas. The regional COS gave rise to multiple, more localized COSs that implemented similar strategies designed to address access to care within rural communities. The regional COS, known as the Brazos Valley Health Partnership, was a result of a 2002 health status assessment that revealed that rural residents face poorer access to health services and their care is often fragmented. Their localized strategy, called a health resource center, was created as a "one-stop shop" where multiple health and social service providers could be housed to deliver services to rural residents. Initially piloted in Madison County, the resource center model was expanded into Burleson, Grimes, and Leon Counties because of community buy-in at each of these sites. The resource center concept allowed service providers, who previously were able to offer services only in more populous areas, to expand into the rural communities because of reduced overhead costs. The services provided at the health resource centers include transportation, information and referral, and case management along with others, depending on the location. To ensure successful ongoing operations and future planning of the resource centers, local oversight bodies known as health resource commissions were organized within each of the rural communities to represent local COSs. Through collaboration with local entities, these partnerships have

  3. [Epilepsy as a cause of removal from the Armed Forces].

    PubMed

    Cossío Díaz, José Ramón

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the First Chamber of the Supreme Court of Justice decided two important cases where the Ministers were urged to evaluate whether a provision of the Social Security Institute for the Mexican Armed Forces Statute making“epilepsy and other forms of seizures or equivalents” a cause of removal from the Army on the basis of “uselessness in the service” violates the equality and non-discrimination principle laid down in article 1 of the Federal Constitution. Four Supreme Court Ministers declared that the provision was constitutional. Justice Minister Cossío Díaz disagreed and wrote a separate opinion where he holds that the aforementioned provision is unconstitutional, since its excessively wide and undetermined language opens the door to declarations of “uselessness for the service” without ensuring this rests in every case in a genuine incapacity to develop a job in the Army.Before reaching this conclusion Justice Minister Cossío asked for information to the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery. It was on these basis that he sustained that the aforementioned legal provision does not satisfy an adequate means-end correlation, since it allows the Army to withdraw from service –on the basis of “uselessness”–persons whose medical condition is sometimes episodic; others curable; others, if not curable, pharmaceutically controlled; and, in cases where it does limit the kinds of activity, that the person can develop, it does so in a way that can only be determined by an intensely individualized basis.

  4. Synthesis, crystal structure, herbicidal activities and 3D-QSAR study of some novel 1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-a]pyridine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing-Hai; Xu, Xiao-Yan; Tan, Cheng-Xia; Weng, Jian-Quan; Xin, Jia-Hua; Chen, Jie

    2015-02-01

    1,2,4-Triazolo[4,3-a]pyridine derivatives represent a new series of compounds that possess good herbicidal activity against Echinochloa crusgalli (L.) Beauv., Setaria faberii, Digitaria sanguinalis (L.) Scop., Brassica juncea Coss., Amaranthus retroflexus L. and Eclipta prostrata L. A total of 23 novel 1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-a]pyridine derivatives were synthesised and identified by (1) H NMR, IR, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, mass-spectroscopic and elemental analysis, and their herbicidal activities were tested against E. crusgalli (L.) Beauv., S. faberii, D. sanguinalis (L.) Scop., B. juncea Coss., A. retroflexus L. and E. prostrata L. at 150 g a.i. ha(-1) . It was found that the title compound 8-chloro-3-(4-propylphenyl)-[1,2,4]-triazolo[4,3-a]pyridine possesses high herbicidal activity and a broad spectrum against the 22 test weeds, with an inhibition effect of about 50% at a dosage of 37.5 g a.i. ha(-1) , and is safe for corn, cotton and rice at a dosage of 150 g a.i. ha(-1) . Furthermore, comparative molecular field analysis contour models were established to study the structure-activity relationship of the title compounds. It is possible that, with further structure modification, 1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-a]pyridine derivatives, which possess good herbicidal activities, may become novel lead compounds for the development of herbicides against dicotyledonous weeds. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. The Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) - the first trial of a German version.

    PubMed

    Berth, Hendrik; Petrowski, Katja; Balck, Friedrich

    2007-02-20

    Preoperative anxiety influences the result of the treatment in patients. To assess preoperative anxiety the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) [1] was developed. The APAIS measures anxiety and the need-for-information with 6 items, with good reliability and validity. This article presents the first test of the German version of this screening instrument. The German version of the APAIS was tested on 68 patients questioned before surgery on the lower extremities in the Orthopaedic Department of a University Hospital. From 68 patients, 47 (69%) were female and the average age was 55 years. Besides the APAIS, several additional questionnaires with similar or divergent content were administered for testing the convergent and discriminant validity of the APAIS (HADS, SCL-9-K, KASA, COSS, STOA). The two scales anxiety and need-for-information could be replicated by a factor analysis and had high reliability (anxiety: Cronbachs Alpha = 0.92; need-for-information: Cronbachs Alpha = 0.86). As expected the scales of the APAIS correlated highly with different standard questionnaires which measure anxiety (KASA, STOA) and low with questionnaires of divergent contents (HADS depression, COSS). The APAIS-scales are independent of sex, age or previous surgeries. Patients with a higher need-for-information show higher anxiety (r=0.59) prior to surgery. During its first trial the German version of the APAIS proved to be a reliable and valid instrument. Furthermore, it is a good screening instrument to assess preoperative anxiety and need-for-information in clinical practice, especially due to its brevity. In further studies the predictive validity has to be examined in large heterogeneous samples.

  6. The Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) - the first trial of a German version

    PubMed Central

    Berth, Hendrik; Petrowski, Katja; Balck, Friedrich

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Preoperative anxiety influences the result of the treatment in patients. To assess preoperative anxiety the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS) [1] was developed. The APAIS measures anxiety and the need-for-information with 6 items, with good reliability and validity. This article presents the first test of the German version of this screening instrument. Methods: The German version of the APAIS was tested on 68 patients questioned before surgery on the lower extremities in the Orthopaedic Department of a University Hospital. From 68 patients, 47 (69%) were female and the average age was 55 years. Besides the APAIS, several additional questionnaires with similar or divergent content were administered for testing the convergent and discriminant validity of the APAIS (HADS, SCL-9-K, KASA, COSS, STOA). Results: The two scales anxiety and need-for-information could be replicated by a factor analysis and had high reliability (anxiety: Cronbachs Alpha = 0.92; need-for-information: Cronbachs Alpha = 0.86). As expected the scales of the APAIS correlated highly with different standard questionnaires which measure anxiety (KASA, STOA) and low with questionnaires of divergent contents (HADS depression, COSS). The APAIS-scales are independent of sex, age or previous surgeries. Patients with a higher need-for-information show higher anxiety (r=0.59) prior to surgery. Conclusions: During its first trial the German version of the APAIS proved to be a reliable and valid instrument. Furthermore, it is a good screening instrument to assess preoperative anxiety and need-for-information in clinical practice, especially due to its brevity. In further studies the predictive validity has to be examined in large heterogeneous samples. PMID:19742298

  7. Development of a core outcome set for clinical trials in squamous cell carcinoma: study protocol for a systematic review of the literature and identification of a core outcome set using a Delphi survey.

    PubMed

    Schlessinger, Daniel I; Iyengar, Sanjana; Yanes, Arianna F; Chiren, Sarah G; Godinez-Puig, Victoria; Chen, Brian R; Kurta, Anastasia O; Schmitt, Jochen; Deckert, Stefanie; Furlan, Karina C; Poon, Emily; Cartee, Todd V; Maher, Ian A; Alam, Murad; Sobanko, Joseph F

    2017-07-12

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a common skin cancer that poses a risk of metastasis. Clinical investigations into SCC treatment are common, but the outcomes reported are highly variable, omitted, or clinically irrelevant. The outcome heterogeneity and reporting bias of these studies leave clinicians unable to accurately compare studies. Core outcome sets (COSs) are an agreed minimum set of outcomes recommended to be measured and reported in all clinical trials of a given condition or disease. Although COSs are under development for several dermatologic conditions, work has yet to be done to identify core outcomes specific for SCC. Outcome extraction for COS generation will occur via four methods: (1) systematic literature review; (2) patient interviews; (3) other published sources; and (4) input from stakeholders in medicine, pharmacy, and other relevant industries. The list of outcomes will be revaluated by the Measuring PRiority Outcome Variables via Excellence in Dermatologic surgery (IMPROVED) Steering Committee. Delphi processes will be performed separately by expert clinicians and patients to condense the list of outcomes generated. A consensus meeting with relevant stakeholders will be conducted after the Delphi exercise to further select outcomes, taking into account participant scores. At the end of the meeting, members will vote and decide on a final recommended set of core outcomes. The Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials (COMET) organization and the Cochrane Skin Group - Core Outcome Set Initiative (CSG-COUSIN) will serve as advisers throughout the COS generation process. Comparison of clinical trials via systematic reviews and meta-analyses is facilitated when investigators study outcomes that are relevant and similar. The aim of this project is to develop a COS to guide use for future clinical trials.

  8. Effects of chitooligosaccharides on human red blood cell morphology and membrane protein structure.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, João C; Eaton, Peter; Nascimento, Henrique; Belo, Luís; Rocha, Susana; Vitorino, Rui; Amado, Francisco; Gomes, Joana; Santos-Silva, Alice; Pintado, Manuela E; Malcata, F Xavier

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies of chitosan have increased the interest in its conversion to chitooligosaccharides (COSs) because these compounds are water-soluble and have potential use in several biomedical applications. Furthermore, such oligomers may be more advantageous than chitosans because of their much higher absorption profiles at the intestinal level, which permit their facilitated access to systemic circulation and potential distribution throughout the entire human body. In that perspective, it is important to clarify their effect on blood further, namely, on human red blood cells (RBCs). The aim of this work was thus to study the effect of two COS mixtures with different molecular weight (MW) ranges, <3 and <5 kDa, at various concentrations (5.0-0.005 mg/mL) on human RBCs. The interactions of these two mixtures with RBC membrane proteins and with hemoglobin were assessed, and the RBC morphology and surface structure were analyzed by optical microscopy (OM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In the presence of either COS mixture, no significant hemolysis was observed; however, at COS concentrations >0.1 mg/mL, changes in membrane binding hemoglobin were observed. Membrane protein changes were also observed with increasing COS concentration, including a reduction in both alpha- and beta-spectrin and in band 3 protein, and the development of three new protein bands: peroxiredoxin 2, calmodulin, and hemoglobin chains. Morphologic evaluation by OM showed that at high concentrations COSs interact with RBCs, leading to RBC adhesion, aggregation, or both. An increase in the roughness of the RBC surface with increasing COS concentration was observed by AFM. Overall, these findings suggest that COS damage to RBCs was dependent on the COS MW and concentration, and significant damage resulted from either a higher MW or a greater concentration (>0.1 mg/mL).

  9. Wheat domestication: lessons for the future.

    PubMed

    Charmet, Gilles

    2011-03-01

    Wheat was one of the first crops to be domesticated more than 10,000 years ago in the Middle East. Molecular genetics and archaeological data have allowed the reconstruction of plausible domestication scenarios leading to modern cultivars. For diploid einkorn and tetraploid durum wheat, a single domestication event has likely occurred in the Karacadag Mountains, Turkey. Following a cross between tetraploid durum and diploid T. tauschii, the resultant hexaploid bread wheat was domesticated and disseminated around the Caucasian region. These polyploidisation events facilitated wheat domestication and created genetic bottlenecks, which excluded potentially adaptive alleles. With the urgent need to accelerate genetic progress to confront the challenges of climate change and sustainable agriculture, wild ancestors and old landraces represent a reservoir of underexploited genetic diversity that may be utilized through modern breeding methods. Understanding domestication processes may thus help identifying new strategies. Copyright © 2011 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Genome-Wide Analysis of Stowaway-Like MITEs in Wheat Reveals High Sequence Conservation, Gene Association, and Genomic Diversification1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yaakov, Beery; Ben-David, Smadar; Kashkush, Khalil

    2013-01-01

    The diversity and evolution of wheat (Triticum-Aegilops group) genomes is determined, in part, by the activity of transposable elements that constitute a large fraction of the genome (up to 90%). In this study, we retrieved sequences from publicly available wheat databases, including a 454-pyrosequencing database, and analyzed 18,217 insertions of 18 Stowaway-like miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE) families previously characterized in wheat that together account for approximately 1.3 Mb of sequence. All 18 families showed high conservation in length, sequence, and target site preference. Furthermore, approximately 55% of the elements were inserted in transcribed regions, into or near known wheat genes. Notably, we observed significant correlation between the mean length of the MITEs and their copy number. In addition, the genomic composition of nine MITE families was studied by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis in 40 accessions of Triticum spp. and Aegilops spp., including diploids, tetraploids, and hexaploids. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction data showed massive and significant intraspecific and interspecific variation as well as genome-specific proliferation and nonadditive quantities in the polyploids. We also observed significant differences in the methylation status of the insertion sites among MITE families. Our data thus suggest a possible role for MITEs in generating genome diversification and in the establishment of nascent polyploid species in wheat. PMID:23104862

  11. Recurrent deletions of puroindoline genes at the grain hardness locus in four independent lineages of polyploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanlong; Huang, Li; Gill, Bikram S

    2008-01-01

    Polyploidy is known to induce numerous genetic and epigenetic changes but little is known about their physiological bases. In wheat, grain texture is mainly determined by the Hardness (Ha) locus consisting of genes Puroindoline a (Pina) and b (Pinb). These genes are conserved in diploid progenitors but were deleted from the A and B genomes of tetraploid Triticum turgidum (AB). We now report the recurrent deletions of Pina-Pinb in other lineages of polyploid wheat. We analyzed the Ha haplotype structure in 90 diploid and 300 polyploid accessions of Triticum and Aegilops spp. Pin genes were conserved in all diploid species and deletion haplotypes were detected in all polyploid Triticum and most of the polyploid Aegilops spp. Two Pina-Pinb deletion haplotypes were found in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum; ABD). Pina and Pinb were eliminated from the G genome, but maintained in the A genome of tetraploid Triticum timopheevii (AG). Subsequently, Pina and Pinb were deleted from the A genome but retained in the A(m) genome of hexaploid Triticum zhukovskyi (A(m)AG). Comparison of deletion breakpoints demonstrated that the Pina-Pinb deletion occurred independently and recurrently in the four polyploid wheat species. The implications of Pina-Pinb deletions for polyploid-driven evolution of gene and genome and its possible physiological significance are discussed.

  12. Recurrent Deletions of Puroindoline Genes at the Grain Hardness Locus in Four Independent Lineages of Polyploid Wheat1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanlong; Huang, Li; Gill, Bikram S.

    2008-01-01

    Polyploidy is known to induce numerous genetic and epigenetic changes but little is known about their physiological bases. In wheat, grain texture is mainly determined by the Hardness (Ha) locus consisting of genes Puroindoline a (Pina) and b (Pinb). These genes are conserved in diploid progenitors but were deleted from the A and B genomes of tetraploid Triticum turgidum (AB). We now report the recurrent deletions of Pina-Pinb in other lineages of polyploid wheat. We analyzed the Ha haplotype structure in 90 diploid and 300 polyploid accessions of Triticum and Aegilops spp. Pin genes were conserved in all diploid species and deletion haplotypes were detected in all polyploid Triticum and most of the polyploid Aegilops spp. Two Pina-Pinb deletion haplotypes were found in hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum; ABD). Pina and Pinb were eliminated from the G genome, but maintained in the A genome of tetraploid Triticum timopheevii (AG). Subsequently, Pina and Pinb were deleted from the A genome but retained in the Am genome of hexaploid Triticum zhukovskyi (AmAG). Comparison of deletion breakpoints demonstrated that the Pina-Pinb deletion occurred independently and recurrently in the four polyploid wheat species. The implications of Pina-Pinb deletions for polyploid-driven evolution of gene and genome and its possible physiological significance are discussed. PMID:18024553

  13. Molecular Variation in Chloroplast DNA Regions in Ancestral Species of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, N. T.; Mori, N.; Tsunewaki, K.

    1994-01-01

    Restriction map variation in two 5-6-kb chloroplast DNA regions of five diploid Aegilops species in the section Sitopsis and two wild tetraploid wheats, Triticum dicoccoides and Triticum araraticum, was investigated with a battery of four-cutter restriction enzymes. A single accession each of Triticum durum, Triticum timopheevi and Triticum aestivum was included as a reference. More than 250 restriction sites were scored, of which only seven sites were found polymorphic in Aegilops speltoides. No restriction site polymorphisms were detected in all of the other diploid and tetraploid species. In addition, six insertion/deletion polymorphisms were detected, but they were mostly unique or species-specific. Estimated nucleotide diversity was 0.0006 for A. speltoides, and 0.0000 for all the other investigated species. In A. speltoides, none of Tajima's D values was significant, indicating no clear deviation from the neutrality of molecular polymorphisms. Significant non-random association was detected for three combinations out of 10 possible pairs between polymorphic restriction sites in A. speltoides. Phylogenetic relationship among all the plastotypes (plastid genotype) suggested the diphyletic origin of T. dicoccoides and T. araraticum. A plastotype of one A. speltoides accession was identical to the major type of T. araraticum (T. timopheevi inclusively). Three of the plastotypes found in the Sitopsis species are very similar, but not identical, to that of T. dicoccoides, T. durum and T. aestivum. PMID:7916310

  14. Beta-amylase gene variability in introgressive wheat lines.

    PubMed

    Antonyuk, Maksym; Navalikhina, Anastasiia; Ternovska, Tamara

    2017-05-01

    Variability of the beta-amylase gene in bread wheat, artificial amphidiploids, and derived introgression wheat lines was analyzed. Variation in homeologous beta-amylase sequences caused by the presence of MITE (Miniature Inverted-Repeat Transposable Element) and its footprint has been identified in bread wheat. The previously unknown location of MITE in Triticum urartu and T. aestivum L. beta-amylase gene has been found. These species have a MITE sequence in the third intron of beta-amylase, as opposed to Aegilops comosa and a number of other Triticeae species, which have it in the fourth intron. These two MITEs from Ae. comosa and T. aestivum were shown to have low identity scores. Miosa, an artificial amphidiploid, which has the M genome from Ae. comosa was shown to lose the MITE sequences. This loss might be caused by genomic shock due to allopolyploidization.

  15. Gametocidal chromosomes enhancing chromosome aberration in common wheat induced by 5-azacytidine.

    PubMed

    Su, W-Y; Cong, W-W; Shu, Y-J; Wang, D; Xu, G-H; Guo, C-H

    2013-07-08

    The gametocidal (Gc) chromosome from Aegilops spp induces chromosome mutation, which is introduced into common wheat as a tool of chromosome manipulation for genetic improvement. The Gc chromosome functions similar to a restriction-modification system in bacteria, in which DNA methylation is an important regulator. We treated root tips of wheat carrying Gc chromosomes with the hypomethylation agent 5-azacytidine; chromosome breakage and micronuclei were observed in these root tips. The frequency of aberrations differed in wheat containing different Gc chromosomes, suggesting different functions inducing chromosome breakage. Gc chromosome 3C caused the greatest degree of chromosome aberration, while Gc chromosome 3C(SAT) and 2C caused only slight chromosome aberration. Gc chromosome 3C induced different degrees of chromosome aberration in wheat varieties Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring and Norin 26, demonstrating an inhibition function in common wheat.

  16. Revisiting Pivotal-Differential Genome Evolution in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Mirzaghaderi, Ghader; Mason, Annaliese S

    2017-08-01

    An interesting and possibly unique pattern of genome evolution following polyploidy can be observed among allopolyploids of the Triticum and Aegilops genera (wheat group). Most polyploids in this group are presumed to share a common unaltered (pivotal) subgenome (U, D, or A) together with one or two modified (differential) subgenomes, a status that has been referred to as 'pivotal-differential' genome evolution. In this review we discuss various mechanisms that could be responsible for this evolutionary pattern, as well as evidence for and against the putative evolutionary mechanisms involved. We suggest that, in light of recent advances in genome sequencing and related technologies in the wheat group, the time has come to reopen the investigation into pivotal-differential genome evolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. New cytoplasmic male sterility sources in common wheat: Their genetical and breeding considerations.

    PubMed

    Panayotov, I

    1980-07-01

    Nuclei from Triticum aestivum L. cultivars 'Penjamo 62' and 'Siete Cerros 66' were introduced into the cytoplasms of different species of Aegilops and some subspecies (varieties) of T. dicoccoides by backcrossing. The sterile alloplasmic lines obtained were compared with the normal cultivars used as the recurrent pollen parents. According to the cytoplasmic effect, these cytoplasms were subdivided into three main groups. The first group possesses C(u) type cytoplasm, the second one possesses M type and the third group includes S, C and G type. Promising male sterile cytoplasms for hybrid wheat production were found in Ae. mutica, Ae. triuncialis and T. dicoccoides var. 'spontaneovillosum'. Based on these results and other information some conjectures were made concerning hybrid wheat breeding and phylogenetic differentiations of the cytoplasm.

  18. The dynamics of histone H3 modifications is species-specific in plant meiosis.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Cecilia; Pradillo, Mónica; Corredor, Eduardo; Cuñado, Nieves

    2013-07-01

    Different histone modifications often modify DNA-histone interactions affecting both local and global structure of chromatin, thereby providing a vast potential for functional responses. Most studies have focused on the role of several modifications in gene transcription regulation, being scarce on other aspects of eukaryotic chromosome structure during cell division, mainly in meiosis. To solve this issue we have performed a cytological analysis to determine the chromosomal distribution of several histone H3 modifications throughout all phases of both mitosis and meiosis in different plant species. We have chosen Aegilops sp. and Secale cereale (monocots) and Arabidopsis thaliana (dicots) because they differ in their phylogenetic affiliation as well as in content and distribution of constitutive heterochromatin. In the species analyzed, the patterns of H3 acetylation and methylation were held constant through mitosis, including modifications associated with "open chromatin". Likewise, the immunolabeling patterns of H3 methylation remained invariable throughout meiosis in all cases. On the contrary, there was a total loss of acetylated H3 immunosignals on condensed chromosomes in both meiotic divisions, but only in monocot species. Regarding the phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10, present on condensed chromosomes, although we did not observe any difference in the dynamics, we found slight differences between the chromosomal distribution of this modification between Arabidopsis and cereals (Aegilops sp. and rye). Thus far, in plants chromosome condensation throughout cell division appears to be associated with a particular combination of H3 modifications. Moreover, the distribution and dynamics of these modifications seem to be species-specific and even differ between mitosis and meiosis in the same species.

  19. Molecular characterization and evolutionary origins of farinin genes in Brachypodium distachyon L.

    PubMed

    Subburaj, Saminathan; Luo, Nana; Lu, Xiaobing; Li, Xiaohui; Cao, Hui; Hu, Yingkao; Li, Jiarui; Yan, Yueming

    2016-08-01

    Farinins are one of the oldest members of the gluten family in wheat and Aegilops species, and they influence dough properties. Here, we performed the first detailed molecular genetic study on farinin genes in Brachypodium distachyon L., the model species for Triticum aestivum. A total of 51 b-type farinin genes were cloned and characterized, including 27 functional and 24 non-functional pseudogenes from 14 different B. distachyon accessions. All genes were highly similar to those previously reported from wheat and Aegilops species. The identification of deduced amino acid sequences showed that b-type farinins across Triticeae genomes could be classified as b1-, b2-, b3-, and b4-type farinins; however, B. distachyon had only b3- and b4-type farinins. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that farinin genes are transcribed into mRNA in B. distachyon at much lower levels than in Triticeae, despite the presence of cis-acting elements in promoter regions. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that Brachypodium farinins may have closer relationships with common wheat and further confirmed four different types of b-type farinins in Triticeae and Brachypodium genomes, corresponding to b1, b2, b3 (group 1), and b4 (group 2). A putative evolutionary origin model of farinin genes in Brachypodium, Triticum, and the related species suggests that all b-type farinins diverged from their common ancestor ~3.2 million years ago (MYA). The b3 and b4 types could be considered older in the farinin family. The results explain the loss of b1- and b2-type farinin alleles in Brachypodium.

  20. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Is Susceptible to the Parasitic Angiosperm Striga hermonthica, a Major Cereal Pathogen in Africa.

    PubMed

    Vasey, R A; Scholes, J D; Press, M C

    2005-11-01

    ABSTRACT Striga hermonthica is a parasitic weed endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. It most commonly parasitizes sorghum, maize, pearl millet, and upland rice, lowering yields and affecting the welfare of over 100 million people, principally subsistence farmers. Cereal crops with complete resistance to this pathogen have not been reported. In southern and eastern Africa, where Striga spp. are endemic, 5.6 million ha of wheat are cultivated annually. Despite this, there are only isolated field reports of wheat infected with Striga spp. It is not clear whether this is due to resistance in this cereal or to environmental factors. In this article, we examined the ability of root exudates from five cultivars of wheat (Chablis, Cadenza, Hereward, Riband, and Brigadier) to trigger germination of S. hermonthica seed. A study of the development of S. hermonthica on two cultivars of wheat (Hereward and Chablis) and on a range of ancestral relatives of wheat (Triticum and Aegilops spp.) then was conducted. Last, the effect of Striga spp. on host growth and yield was examined using wheat cv. Chablis and compared with that of a highly susceptible sorghum cultivar (CSH-1). Wheat was able to support the germination, attachment, and subsequent development of Striga spp. All wheat cultivars and ancestral species of modern wheat (Triticum and Aegilops spp.) were susceptible to S. hermonthica. In addition, in wheat, infection severely lowered plant height (-24%) and biomass accumulation (-33%); a small parasite biomass elicited a large host response. In conclusion, wheat is highly susceptible to S. hermonthica and, in light of global climate change, this may have implications for wheat-producing areas of Africa.

  1. Contrasting patterns of evolution of 45S and 5S rDNA families uncover new aspects in the genome constitution of the agronomically important grass Thinopyrum intermedium (Triticeae).

    PubMed

    Mahelka, Václav; Kopecky, David; Baum, Bernard R

    2013-09-01

    We employed sequencing of clones and in situ hybridization (genomic and fluorescent in situ hybridization [GISH and rDNA-FISH]) to characterize both the sequence variation and genomic organization of 45S (herein ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region) and 5S (5S gene + nontranscribed spacer) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) families in the allohexaploid grass Thinopyrum intermedium. Both rDNA families are organized within several rDNA loci within all three subgenomes of the allohexaploid species. Both families have undergone different patterns of evolution. The 45S rDNA family has evolved in a concerted manner: internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences residing within the arrays of two subgenomes out of three got homogenized toward one major ribotype, whereas the third subgenome contained a minor proportion of distinct unhomogenized copies. Homogenization mechanisms such as unequal crossover and/or gene conversion were coupled with the loss of certain 45S rDNA loci. Unlike in the 45S family, the data suggest that neither interlocus homogenization among homeologous chromosomes nor locus loss occurred in 5S rDNA. Consistently with other Triticeae, the 5S rDNA family in intermediate wheatgrass comprised two distinct array types-the long- and short-spacer unit classes. Within the long and short units, we distinguished five and three different types, respectively, likely representing homeologous unit classes donated by putative parental species. Although the major ITS ribotype corresponds in our phylogenetic analysis to the E-genome species, the minor ribotype corresponds to Dasypyrum. 5S sequences suggested the contributions from Pseudoroegneria, Dasypyrum, and Aegilops. The contribution from Aegilops to the intermediate wheatgrass' genome is a new finding with implications in wheat improvement. We discuss rDNA evolution and potential origin of intermediate wheatgrass.

  2. SLA-aware differentiated QoS in elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Anuj; Vyas, Upama; Bhatia, Vimal; Prakash, Shashi

    2017-07-01

    The quality of service (QoS) offered by optical networks can be improved by accurate provisioning of service level specifications (SLSs) included in the service level agreement (SLA). A large number of users coexisting in the network require different services. Thus, a pragmatic network needs to offer a differentiated QoS to a variety of users according to the SLA contracted for different services at varying costs. In conventional wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) optical networks, service differentiation is feasible only for a limited number of users because of its fixed-grid structure. Newly introduced flex-grid based elastic optical networks (EONs) are more adaptive to traffic requirements as compared to the WDM networks because of the flexibility in their grid structure. Thus, we propose an efficient SLA provisioning algorithm with improved QoS for these flex-grid EONs empowered by optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (O-OFDM). The proposed algorithm, called SLA-aware differentiated QoS (SADQ), employs differentiation at the level of routing, spectrum allocation, and connection survivability. The proposed SADQ aims to accurately provision the SLA using such multilevel differentiation with an objective to improve the spectrum utilization from the network operator's perspective. SADQ is evaluated for three different CoSs under various traffic demand patterns and for different ratios of the number of requests belonging to the three considered CoSs. We propose two new SLA metrics for the improvement of functional QoS requirements, namely, security, confidentiality and survivability of high class of service (CoS) traffic. Since, to the best of our knowledge, the proposed SADQ is the first scheme in optical networks to employ exhaustive differentiation at the levels of routing, spectrum allocation, and survivability in a single algorithm, we first compare the performance of SADQ in EON and currently deployed WDM networks to assess the

  3. Common Sound Scenarios: A Context-Driven Categorization of Everyday Sound Environments for Application in Hearing-Device Research.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Florian; Smeds, Karolina; Schmidt, Erik; Christensen, Eva Kümmel; Norup, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Evaluation of hearing-device signal-processing features is performed for research and development purposes, but also in clinical settings. Most people agree that the benefit experienced in a hearing-device user's daily life is most important, but laboratory tests are popular since they can be performed uniformly for all participants in a study using sensitive outcome measures. In order to design laboratory tests that have the potential of indicating real-life benefit, there is a need for more information about the acoustic environments and listening situations encountered by hearing-device users as well as by normal-hearing people. To investigate the acoustic environments and listening situations people encounter, and to provide a structured framework of common sound scenarios (CoSS) that can be used for instance when designing realistic laboratory tests. A literature search was conducted. Extracted acoustic environments and listening situations were categorized using a context-based approach. A set of common sound scenarios was established based on the findings from the literature. A number of publications providing data on encountered acoustic environments and listening situations were identified. Focus was on studies including informants who reported or recorded information in field trials. Nine relevant references were found. In combination with data collected at our laboratory, 187 examples of acoustic environments or listening situations were found. Based on the extracted data, a categorization approach based on context (intentions and tasks) was used when creating CoSS. Three intention categories, "speech communication," "focused listening," and "nonspecific" were divided into seven task categories. In each task category, two sound scenarios were described, creating in total 14 common sound scenarios. The literature search showed a general lack of studies investigating acoustic environments and listening situations, in particular studies where normal

  4. The grain Hardness locus characterized in a diverse wheat panel (Triticum aestivum L.) adapted to the central part of the Fertile Crescent: genetic diversity, haplotype structure, and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Shaaf, Salar; Sharma, Rajiv; Baloch, Faheem Shehzad; Badaeva, Ekaterina D; Knüpffer, Helmut; Kilian, Benjamin; Özkan, Hakan

    2016-06-01

    Wheat belongs to the most important crops domesticated in the Fertile Crescent. In this region, fortunately, locally adapted wheat landraces are still present in farmers' fields. This material might be of immense value for future breeding programs. However, especially wheat germplasm adapted to the central part of the Fertile Crescent has been poorly characterized for allelic variation at key loci of agricultural importance. Grain hardness is an important trait influencing milling and baking quality of wheat. This trait is mainly determined by three tightly linked genes, namely, Puroindoline a (Pina), Puroindoline b (Pinb), and Grain softness protein-1 (Gsp-1), at the Hardness (Ha-D) locus on chromosome 5DS. To investigate genetic diversity and haplotype structure, we resequenced 96 diverse wheat lines at Pina-D1, Pinb-D1, Gsp-A1, Gsp-B1, and Gsp-D1. Three types of null alleles were identified using diagnostic primers: the first type was a multiple deletion of Pina-D1, Pinb-D1, and Gsp-D1 (Pina-D1k), the second was a Pina-D1 deletion (Pina-D1b); and the third type was a deletion of Gsp-D1, representing a novel null allele designated here as Gsp-D1k. Sequence analysis resulted in four allelic variants at Pinb-D1 and five at Gsp-A1, among them Gsp-A1-V was novel. Pina-D1, Gsp-B1 and Gsp-D1 sequences were monomorphic. Haplotype and phylogenetic analysis suggested that (1) bread wheat inherited its 5DS telomeric region probably from wild diploid Ae. tauschii subsp. tauschii found within an area from Transcaucasia to Caspian Iran; and that (2) the Ha-A and Ha-B homoeoloci were most closely related to sequences of wild tetraploid T. dicocco ides. This study provides a good overview of available genetic diversity at Pina-D1, Pinb-D1, and Gsp-1, which can be exploited to extend the range of grain texture traits in wheat.

  5. Stabilization of Pb²⁺ and Cu²⁺ contaminated firing range soil using calcined oyster shells and waste cow bones.

    PubMed

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Cheong, Kyung Hoon; Khim, Jeehyeong; Wazne, Mahmoud; Hyun, Seunghun; Park, Jeong-Hun; Chang, Yoon-Young; Ok, Yong Sik

    2013-05-01

    Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) contamination at army firing ranges poses serious environmental and health risks to nearby communities necessitating an immediate and prompt remedial action. In this study, a novel mixture of calcined oyster shells (COSs) and waste cow bones (WCBs) was utilized to immobilize Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) in army firing range soils. The effectiveness of the treatment was evaluated based on the Korean Standard leaching test. The treatment results showed that Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) immobilization in the army firing range soil was effective in significantly reducing Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) leachability upon the combined treatment with COS and WCB. A drastic reduction in Pb(2+) (99%) and Cu(2+) leachability (95%) was obtained as compared to the control sample, upon treatment with 5 wt.% COS and 5 wt.% WCB. The combination treatment of COS and WCB was more effective for Pb immobilization, than the treatment with COS or WCB alone. The 5 wt.% COS alone treatment resulted in 95% reduction in Cu(2+) leachability. The SEM-EDX results suggested that Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) immobilization was most probably associated with the formation of ettringite, pozzolanic reaction products and pyromorphite-like phases at the same time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimization of chelators to enhance uranium uptake from tailings for phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Jagetiya, Bhagawatilal; Sharma, Anubha

    2013-04-01

    A greenhouse experiment was set up to investigate the ability of citric acid (CA), oxalic acid (OA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and EDTA for phytoremediation of uranium tailings by Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. et Coss]. Uranium tailings were collected from Umra mining region and mixed with 75% of garden soil which yielded a 25:75 mixture. Prepared pots were divided into four sets and treated with following different concentrations - 0.1, 0.5, 2.5 and 12.5 mmol kg(-1) soil additions for each of the four chelators. Control pots which were not treated with chelators. Experiments were conducted in completely randomized block design with triplicates. The optimum concentrations of these chelators were found on the basis of biomass production, tolerance and accumulation potential. The data collected were expressed statistically. EDTA produced maximum growth depression whereas, minimum occurred in the case of NTA. Maximum U uptake (3.5-fold) in the roots occurred at 2.5 mmol of CA, while NTA proved to be the weakest for the same purpose. Severe toxicity in the form of reduced growth and plant death was recorded at 12.5 mmol of each chelator. Minimum growth inhibition produced by chelators occurred in NTA which was followed by OA, moderate in CA and maximum was traced in EDTA applications. Chelator strengthened U uptake in the present study follows the order: CA>EDTA>OA>NTA.

  7. The military health system: a community of solutions for medical education, health care delivery, and public health.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Robert P; Saguil, Aaron; Seehusen, Dean A; Reamy, Brian V; Stephens, Mark B

    2013-01-01

    Multiple strategies have been proposed to improve health care in the United States. These include the development of communities of solution (COSs), implementation of patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), and lengthening family medicine residency training. There is scant literature on how to build and integrate these ideal models of care, and no literature about how to build a model of care integrating all 3 strategies is available. The Military Health System has adopted the PCMH model and will offer some 4-year family medicine residency positions starting in 2013. Lengthening residency training to 4 years represents an unprecedented opportunity to weave experiential COS instruction throughout a family physician's graduate medical education, providing future family physicians the skills needed to foster a COS in their future practice. This article describes our COS effort to synergize 3 aspects of modern military medicine: self-defined community populations, the transition to the PCMH model, and the initiation of the 4-year length of training pilot program in family medicine residency training. In this way we provide a starting point and general how-to guide that can be used to create a COS integrated with other current concepts in medicine.

  8. Salt-induced modulation in growth, photosynthesis and antioxidant system in two varieties of Brassica juncea

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Arif Shafi; Ahmad, Aqil; Hayat, Shamsul; Fariduddin, Qazi

    2013-01-01

    The present study was carried out to examine salt-induced modulation in growth, photosynthetic characteristics and antioxidant system in two cultivars of Brassica juncea Czern and Coss varieties (Varuna and RH-30). The surface sterilized seeds of these varieties were sown in the soil amended with different levels (2.8, 4.2 or 5.6 dsm−1) of sodium chloride under a simple randomized block design. The salt treatment significantly decreased growth, net photosynthetic rate and its related attributes, chlorophyll fluorescence, SPAD value of chlorophyll, leaf carbonic anhydrase activity and leaf water potential, whereas electrolyte leakage, proline content, and activity of catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymes increased in both the varieties at 30 d stage of growth. The variety Varuna was found more resistant than RH-30 to the salt stress and possessed higher values for growth, photosynthetic attributes and antioxidant enzymes. Out of the graded concentrations (2.8, 4.2 or 5.6 dsm−1) of sodium chloride, 2.8 sm−1 was least toxic and 5.6 dsm−1 was most harmful. The variation in the responses of these two varieties to salt stress is attributed to their differential photosynthetic traits, SPAD chlorophyll value and antioxidant capacity, which can be used as potential markers for screening mustard plants for salt tolerance. PMID:23961235

  9. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of the essential oil and fatty acids of the flowers of Rhanterium adpressum.

    PubMed

    Hamia, Chahrazed; Gourine, Nadhir; Boussoussa, Hadjer; Saidi, Mokhtar; Gaydou, Emile M; Yousfi, Mohamed

    2013-08-01

    The essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of the flowers of Rhanterium adpressum Coss. & Durieu was analyzed using GC and GC-MS. The essential oil was very rich in monoterpene compounds. The major components identified were the monoterpene hydrocarbons: camphene (21.8%), myrcene (19.3%) and alpha-pinene (17.4%). Other compounds, including limonene, beta-pinene and terpinol-4-ol, were present in low content (4-6%). The composition of the fatty acids in the lipid extract obtained from the flowers was also investigated by GC and GC-MS. The main fatty acids identified were palmitic (47.4%), oleic (12.9%) and stearic acids (10.6%). The total phenolic contents and the antioxidant activities were also evaluated for both extracts. The total phenolic contents were determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and the antioxidant activities were measured using three different assays: DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) free radical scavenging activity, FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant potential) and a molybdenum assay. As a result of these tests, the lipid extract exhibited the highest antioxidant activities in comparison with the essential oil extract.

  10. Genome evolution of intermediate wheatgrass as revealed by EST-SSR markers developed from its three progenitor diploid species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Richard R-C; Larson, Steve R; Jensen, Kevin B; Bushman, B Shaun; DeHaan, Lee R; Wang, Shuwen; Yan, Xuebing

    2015-02-01

    Intermediate wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium (Host) Barkworth & D.R. Dewey), a segmental autoallohexaploid (2n = 6x = 42), is not only an important forage crop but also a valuable gene reservoir for wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) improvement. Throughout the scientific literature, there continues to be disagreement as to the origin of the different genomes in intermediate wheatgrass. Genotypic data obtained from newly developed EST-SSR primers derived from the putative progenitor diploid species Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh) Á. Löve (St genome), Thinopyrum bessarabicum (Savul. & Rayss) Á. Löve (J = J(b) = E(b)), and Thinopyrum elongatum (Host) D. Dewey (E = J(e) = E(e)) indicate that the V genome of Dasypyrum (Coss. & Durieu) T. Durand is not one of the three genomes in intermediate wheatgrass. Based on all available information in the literature and findings in this study, the genomic designation of intermediate wheatgrass should be changed to J(vs)J(r)St, where J(vs) and J(r) represent ancestral genomes of present-day J(b) of Th. bessarabicum and J(e) of Th. elongatum, with J(vs) being more ancient. Furthermore, the information suggests that the St genome in intermediate wheatgrass is most similar to the present-day St found in diploid species of Pseudoroegneria from Eurasia.

  11. [Constitutional analysis of Mexican Official Norm NOM-174-SSA1-1998 for the handling of obesity].

    PubMed

    Cossío Díaz, José Ramón

    2013-01-01

    The First Chamber of the Mexican Supreme Court of Justice decided, by a majority of four votes, on a case where it had to be evaluated if some articles of a Mexican Official Norm (NOM) on obesity violated human rights. The majority in the chamber concluded that the restrictions went against Medics' prescribing or therapeutic rights, and therefore their freedom to work. Justice Cossío Díaz voted against the judgment and wrote a separate opinion where he holds, first of all, that the prescribing right works as a guideline for the medical profession and is not an essential element of the freedom to work. Secondly, he points out that the freedom to work is not an absolute right, for it has certain limits permitted by the Constitution. Consequently, experts' opinions should have been consulted for them to be able to determine if the NOM´s requirements were in accordance with the Constitution. Finally, he considers that the judgment should have introduced a balancing test between freedom to work and the patient's health rights, since this last-mentioned right was what the NOM intended to protect.

  12. The cervical spine of professional front-row rugby players: correlation between degenerative changes and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hogan, B A; Hogan, N A; Vos, P M; Eustace, S J; Kenny, P J

    2010-06-01

    Injuries to the cervical spine (C-spine) are among the most serious in rugby and are well documented. Front-row players are particularly at risk due to repetitive high-intensity collisions in the scrum. This study evaluates degenerative changes of the C-spine and associated symptomatology in front-row rugby players. C-spine radiographs from 14 professional rugby players and controls were compared. Players averaged 23 years of playing competitive rugby. Two consultant radiologists performed a blind review of radiographs evaluating degeneration of disc spaces and apophyseal joints. Clinical status was assessed using a modified AAOS/NASS/COSS cervical spine outcomes questionnaire. Front-row rugby players exhibited significant radiographic evidence of C-spine degenerative changes compared to the non-rugby playing controls (P < 0.005). Despite these findings the rugby players did not exhibit increased symptoms. This highlights the radiologic degenerative changes of the C-spine of front-row rugby players. However, these changes do not manifest themselves clinically or affect activities of daily living.

  13. CH2M Hill cleared in tunnel explosion case

    SciTech Connect

    Krizan, W.G.; Bradford, H.; Schriener, J.

    1993-09-06

    One of the most critical issues in industry is whether architects and engineers should be held responsible for construction safety on jobsites. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration says yes under certain conditions. But the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission has overturned one application of that view on appeal in a controversial case. It involves a unit of Denver-based CH2M Hill Cos.'s role as program manager for the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District (MMSD) on its $2.2-billion water pollution abatement program. On May 5, 1989, OSHA cited CH2M Hill Central Inc. for 46 willful safety violations in connection with a 1988 methane tunnel explosion that killed three supervisors of contractor S.A. Healy Co., Chicago, Healy was charged with 68 violations. Healy encountered methane while boring CT-7, a two-mile crosstown tunnel. It evacuated the site, but didn't follow the evacuation plan. It failed to shut down all nonessential equipment and the supervisors returned after waiting only 17 minutes instead of the one hour minimum. CH2M Hill's citations and proposed $460,000 fine for violating OSHA's construction standards were for having 45 pieces of unapproved electrical equipment in the tunnel and improper ventilation equipment. CH2M Hill claimed the standards did not apply to it because the firm did not engage in construction work, exercise substantial supervision over the construction work performed by the contractor or create or control the hazardous condition.

  14. Comparative study on the effect of chemicals on Alternaria blight in Indian mustard--a multi-location study in India.

    PubMed

    Meena, P D; Chattopadhyay, C; Kumar, A; Awasthi, R P; Singh, R; Kaur, S; Thomas, L; Goyal, P; Chand, P

    2011-05-01

    High severity of Altemaria blight disease is a major constraint in production of rapeseed-mustard in India. The aim of this study was to investigate the suppressive potential of chemicals viz., zinc sulphate, borax, sulphur, potash and calcium sulphate, aqueous extracts viz., Eucalyptus globosus (50 g l-1) leaf extract and garlic (Allium sativum) bulb (20 g l-1) extract, cow urine and bio-agents Trichoderma harzianum, Pseudomonas fluorescence in comparison with the recommended chemical fungicide (mancozeb), against foliar disease Alternaria blight of Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. and Coss] under five different geographical locations of India. Mancozeb recorded the lowest mean severity (leaf: 33.1%; pod: 26.3%) of Alternaria blight with efficacy of garlic bulb extract alone (leaf = 34.4%; pod = 27.3%) or in combination with cow urine (leaf = 34.2%; pod = 28.6%) being statistically at par with the recommended chemical fungicide. Chemicals also proved effective in reducing Alternaria blight severity on leaves and pods of Indian mustard (leaf = 36.3-37.9%; pod = 27.5-30.1%). The effective treatments besides providing significant reduction in disease severity also enabled increase in dry seed yield of the crop (mancozeb = 2052 kg ha-1; garlic = 2006 kg ha-1; control = 1561 kg ha-1).

  15. Role of short-term memory in loudness comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellermeier, Wolfgang; Werner, Birgit

    2003-04-01

    In an earlier study of the auditory discrimination of time-varying noise bursts [Ellermeier and Schrödl, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 2596 (2000)], listeners were found to place greater weight on the beginning and end of the sounds than on the middle portion. To investigate whether this outcome is due to primacy and recency effects in short-term memory which tend to be sensitive to manipulations of the inter-stimulus interval (ISI), the ISI separating the two noise bursts in a 2IFC task was varied systematically. Six participants performed loudness comparisons on 1-s samples of white noise randomly changing in level every 100 ms. In different blocks of trials, the two noise bursts to be compared were either separated by a 500-ms or a 2-s ISI. COSS analysis [Berg, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 86, 1743-1746 (1989)] of the overall loudness judgments revealed elevated weights for the beginning and end of the noises, as in the earlier study. These weighting patterns were largely unaffected by the manipulation of ISI, suggesting that the temporal weights found characterize loudness integration in general, and are not just due to idiosyncrasies of the timing used in the 2IFC procedure.

  16. Chitooligosaccharides as novel ingredients of fermented foods.

    PubMed

    Vela Gurovic, M S; Dello Staffolo, M; Montero, M; Debbaudt, A; Albertengo, L; Rodríguez, M S

    2015-11-01

    Chitooligosaccharides (COSs) have been clinically evaluated for their immunostimulating effects after oral intake. Similar to dietary supplements, prebiotics and biopreservatives, these water-soluble bioactives are easily incorporated into dairy products and beverages. Notwithstanding, the use of COS in fermented foods would be limited by its antimicrobial properties. In order to study the interaction with yoghurts as a model of fermented food, the effects of COS on chemical composition, viability, morphology and metabolism of lactic acid bacteria, fatty acid profiles and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) were assessed over 28 days and after chemical digestion. There were no significant differences between the nutritional composition of controls and yoghurts supplemented with concentrations up to 0.1% w/w of COS. However, the acidification of milk decreased at 0.5% (p < 0.05) and the formation of yoghurt failed at 3.0%, without affecting viable counts. Lipid hydrolysis of yoghurts supplemented with 0.1% COS was not affected by chemical digestion. No significant differences were found between CLA percentages of controls and supplemented yoghurts after digestion. Although the nutritional composition, fatty acids and viable counts were not significantly modified after COS supplementation, the present study shows that COS diminishes bacterial acidification at concentrations higher than 0.1%, thus limiting the amounts that could be added to yoghurt.

  17. Regularities and symmetries in atomic structure and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pain, Jean-Christophe

    2013-09-01

    The use of statistical methods for the description of complex quantum systems was primarily motivated by the failure of a line-by-line interpretation of atomic spectra. Such methods reveal regularities and trends in the distributions of levels and lines. In the past, much attention was paid to the distribution of energy levels (Wigner surmise, random-matrix model…). However, information about the distribution of the lines (energy and strength) is lacking. Thirty years ago, Learner found empirically an unexpected law: the logarithm of the number of lines whose intensities lie between 2kI0 and 2k+1I0, I0 being a reference intensity and k an integer, is a decreasing linear function of k. In the present work, the fractal nature of such an intriguing regularity is outlined and a calculation of its fractal dimension is proposed. Other peculiarities are also presented, such as the fact that the distribution of line strengths follows Benford's law of anomalous numbers, the existence of additional selection rules (PH coupling), the symmetry with respect to a quarter of the subshell in the spin-adapted space (LL coupling) and the odd-even staggering in the distribution of quantum numbers, pointed out by Bauche and Cossé.

  18. Structural basis of chitin oligosaccharide deacetylation.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Eduardo; Albesa-Jové, David; Biarnés, Xevi; Moerschbacher, Bruno M; Guerin, Marcelo E; Planas, Antoni

    2014-07-01

    Cell signaling and other biological activities of chitooligosaccharides (COSs) seem to be dependent not only on the degree of polymerization, but markedly on the specific de-N-acetylation pattern. Chitin de-N-acetylases (CDAs) catalyze the hydrolysis of the acetamido group in GlcNAc residues of chitin, chitosan, and COS. A major challenge is to understand how CDAs specifically define the distribution of GlcNAc and GlcNH2 moieties in the oligomeric chain. We report the crystal structure of the Vibrio cholerae CDA in four relevant states of its catalytic cycle. The two enzyme complexes with chitobiose and chitotriose represent the first 3D structures of a CDA with its natural substrates in a productive mode for catalysis, thereby unraveling an induced-fit mechanism with a significant conformational change of a loop closing the active site. We propose that the deacetylation pattern exhibited by different CDAs is governed by critical loops that shape and differentially block accessible subsites in the binding cleft of CE4 enzymes.

  19. Materials Organization, Planning, and Homework Completion in Middle School Students with ADHD: Impact on Academic Performance

    PubMed Central

    Langberg, Joshua M.; Epstein, Jeffery N.; Girio, Erin L.; Becker, Stephen P.; Vaughn, Aaron J.; Altaye, Mekibib

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the homework functioning of middle school students with ADHD to determine what aspects are most predictive of school grades and the best source (e.g., parents or teachers) for obtaining this information. Students with ADHD in grades 5–8 (N = 57) and their parents and teachers completed the Children’s Organization Skills Scales (COSS) to measure materials organization, planning, and time-management, and parents completed the Homework Problems Checklist (HPC) to examine homework completion and homework materials management behaviors. Regression analyses revealed that parent-rated homework materials management and teacher-rated memory and materials management were the best predictors of school grades. These findings suggest that organization of materials is a critical component of the homework completion process for students with ADHD and an important target for intervention. Teachers were the best source of information regarding materials organization and planning, whereas parents were a valuable source of information for specific homework materials management problems. PMID:23577045

  20. Molecular evolution of Wcor15 gene enhanced our understanding of the origin of A, B and D genomes in Triticum aestivum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fangfang; Si, Hongqi; Wang, Chengcheng; Sun, Genlou; Zhou, Erting; Chen, Can; Ma, Chuanxi

    2016-01-01

    The allohexaploid bread wheat originally derived from three closely related species with A, B and D genome. Although numerous studies were performed to elucidate its origin and phylogeny, no consensus conclusion has reached. In this study, we cloned and sequenced the genes Wcor15-2A, Wcor15-2B and Wcor15-2D in 23 diploid, 10 tetraploid and 106 hexaploid wheat varieties and analyzed their molecular evolution to reveal the origin of the A, B and D genome in Triticum aestivum. Comparative analyses of sequences in diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid wheats suggest that T. urartu, Ae. speltoides and Ae. tauschii subsp. strangulata are most likely the donors of the Wcor15-2A, Wcor15-2B and Wcor15-2D locus in common wheat, respectively. The Wcor15 genes from subgenomes A and D were very conservative without insertion and deletion of bases during evolution of diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid. Non-coding region of Wcor15-2B gene from B genome might mutate during the first polyploidization from Ae. speltoides to tetraploid wheat, however, no change has occurred for this gene during the second allopolyploidization from tetraploid to hexaploid. Comparison of the Wcor15 gene shed light on understanding of the origin of the A, B and D genome of common wheat. PMID:27526862

  1. Cytogenetic investigation of Triticum timopheevii (Zhuk.) Zhuk. and related species using the C-banding technique.

    PubMed

    Badaeva, E D; Filatenko, A A; Badaev, N S

    1994-11-01

    Triticum timopheevii and related species T. militinae (2n=28, A(t)G) and T. zhukovskyi (2n=42, A(m)A(t)G), hybrids T. kiharae, T. miguschovae, the amphidiploid T. timopheevii x T. tauschii (all 2n=42, A(t)GD), T. fungicidum (ABA(t)G) and T. timonovum (2n=56, A(t)A(t)GG) were analyzed using the C-banding technique. Chromosomes of the A(m) and A(t) genomes in the karyotype of T. zhukovskyi differed in their C-banding pattern. Partial substitutions of A(t)-genome chromosomes and a complete substitution of the G-genome chromosomes by homoeologous chromosomes of an unidentified tetraploid wheat species with an AB genome composition were found in the T. timonovum karyotype. A(t)- and G-genome chromosomes in the karyotypes of all studied species had similar C-banding patterns and were characterized by a low level of polymorphism. The comparative stability of the A(t) and G genomes is determined by the origin and specifity of cultivation of studied species.

  2. On the genome constitution and evolution of intermediate wheatgrass (Thinopyrum intermedium: Poaceae, Triticeae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The wheat tribe Triticeae (Poaceae) is a diverse group of grasses representing a textbook example of reticulate evolution. Apart from globally important grain crops, there are also wild grasses which are of great practical value. Allohexaploid intermediate wheatgrass, Thinopyrum intermedium (2n = 6x = 42), possesses many desirable agronomic traits that make it an invaluable source of genetic material useful in wheat improvement. Although the identification of its genomic components has been the object of considerable investigation, the complete genomic constitution and its potential variability are still being unravelled. To identify the genomic constitution of this allohexaploid, four accessions of intermediate wheatgrass from its native area were analysed by sequencing of chloroplast trnL-F and partial nuclear GBSSI, and genomic in situ hybridization. Results The results confirmed the allopolyploid origin of Thinopyrum intermedium and revealed new aspects in its genomic composition. Genomic heterogeneity suggests a more complex origin of the species than would be expected if it originated through allohexaploidy alone. While Pseudoroegneria is the most probable maternal parent of the accessions analysed, nuclear GBSSI sequences suggested the contribution of distinct lineages corresponding to the following present-day genera: Pseudoroegneria, Dasypyrum, Taeniatherum, Aegilops and Thinopyrum. Two subgenomes of the hexaploid have most probably been contributed by Pseudoroegneria and Dasypyrum, but the identity of the third subgenome remains unresolved satisfactorily. Possibly it is of hybridogenous origin, with contributions from Thinopyrum and Aegilops. Surprising diversity of GBSSI copies corresponding to a Dasypyrum-like progenitor indicates either multiple contributions from different sources close to Dasypyrum and maintenance of divergent copies or the presence of divergent paralogs, or a combination of both. Taeniatherum-like GBSSI copies are most

  3. Light- and temperature-regulated BjAPY2 may have a role in stem expansion of Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liwen; Liu, Bin; Li, Junxing; Yu, Ningning; Zou, Xiaoxia; Chen, Liping

    2015-11-01

    Tuber mustard (Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. et Coss. var. tumida Tsen et Lee) is an important vegetable crop with a characteristic of expanded stem that is edible. The underlying molecular mechanism of the stem expansion is not well understood. Here, we reported that a total of 51 differentially expressed fragments (DEFs) with three expression patterns during stem expansion of tuber mustard were identified by cDNA-AFLP analysis. Among the DEFs, DEF11 with high homology to Arabidopsis thaliana apyrase 2 (AtAPY2) that encodes an enzyme with ATPase and ADPase activity was development- and tissue-specific. DEF11 was thus renamed as BjAPY2. The expression levels of BjAPY2 increased with the stem expression and were the highest at stage IV, a developmental stage at which the stem expanded most rapidly. In contrast, the BjAPY2 expression levels in leaves were much lower and remained unchanged during leaf development and expansion, suggesting that BjAPY2 was closely associated with the expansion of stems but not of leaves in the tuber mustard. Interestingly, the expression of BjAPY2 was higher in the mustard under short-day (SD) photoperiod (8 h/16 h) than that under long-day (LD) photoperiod (16 h/8 h); similarly, the transcript levels of BjAPY2 were higher in the mustard grown at low temperature (14 °C/12 °C) than that at high temperature (26 °C /24 °C). The SD photoperiod and low temperature were two environmental conditions that favored the mustard stem expansion. Further cloning and analysis of the promoter region of BjAPY2 revealed that there were indeed several types of motifs in the promoter region, including the light and temperature responsive elements. These results suggested that BjAPY2 might play an important role during the stem expansion of the tuber mustard.

  4. Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James

    2008-11-01

    Theoretical opacities are required for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and Z-pinches depends on the opacities of mid-atomic-number elements in the 150-300 eV temperature range. These models are complex and experimental validation is crucial. For example, solar models presently disagree with helioseismology and one possible explanation is inadequate opacities. Testing these opacities requires a uniform plasma at temperatures high enough to produce the ion charge states that exist in the sun. Typical opacity experiments heat a sample using x-rays and measure the spectrally resolved transmission with a backlight. The difficulty grows as the temperature increases because the heating x-ray source must supply more energy and the backlighter source must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self emission. These problems were overcome using the dynamic hohlraum x-ray source at Sandia's Z facility to measure the transmission of a mixed Mg-Fe plasma heated above 150 eV. This capability will also advance opacity science for other high energy density plasmas. This tutorial describes opacity experiment challenges including accurate transmission measurements, plasma diagnostics, and quantitative model comparisons. The solar interior serves as a focal problem and Z facility experiments are used to illustrate the techniques. **In collaboration with C. Iglesias (LLNL), R. Mancini (U. Nevada), J.MacFarlane, I. Golovkin and P. Wang (Prism), C. Blancard, Ph. Cosse, G. Faussurier, F. Gilleron, and J.C. Pain (CEA), J. Abdallah Jr. (LANL), and G.A. Rochau and P.W. Lake (Sandia). ++Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Genome Mapping and Molecular Breeding of Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Foolad, Majid R.

    2007-01-01

    The cultivated tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum, is the second most consumed vegetable worldwide and a well-studied crop species in terms of genetics, genomics, and breeding. It is one of the earliest crop plants for which a genetic linkage map was constructed, and currently there are several molecular maps based on crosses between the cultivated and various wild species of tomato. The high-density molecular map, developed based on an L. esculentum × L. pennellii cross, includes more than 2200 markers with an average marker distance of less than 1 cM and an average of 750 kbp per cM. Different types of molecular markers such as RFLPs, AFLPs, SSRs, CAPS, RGAs, ESTs, and COSs have been developed and mapped onto the 12 tomato chromosomes. Markers have been used extensively for identification and mapping of genes and QTLs for many biologically and agriculturally important traits and occasionally for germplasm screening, fingerprinting, and marker-assisted breeding. The utility of MAS in tomato breeding has been restricted largely due to limited marker polymorphism within the cultivated species and economical reasons. Also, when used, MAS has been employed mainly for improving simply-inherited traits and not much for improving complex traits. The latter has been due to unavailability of reliable PCR-based markers and problems with linkage drag. Efforts are being made to develop high-throughput markers with greater resolution, including SNPs. The expanding tomato EST database, which currently includes ∼214 000 sequences, the new microarray DNA chips, and the ongoing sequencing project are expected to aid development of more practical markers. Several BAC libraries have been developed that facilitate map-based cloning of genes and QTLs. Sequencing of the euchromatic portions of the tomato genome is paving the way for comparative and functional analysis of important genes and QTLs. PMID:18364989

  6. Genotypic Variation in the Phytoremediation Potential of Indian Mustard for Chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diwan, Hema; Ahmad, Altaf; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2008-05-01

    The term “phytoremediation” is used to describe the cleanup of heavy metals from contaminated sites by plants. This study demonstrates phytoremediation potential of Indian mustard ( Brasicca juncea (L.) Czern. & Coss.) genotypes for chromium (Cr). Seedlings of 10 genotypes were grown hydroponically in artificially contaminated water over a range of environmentally relevant concentrations of Cr (VI), and the responses of genotypes in the presence of Cr, with reference to Cr accumulation, its phytotoxity and anti-oxidative system were investigated. The Cr accumulation potential varied largely among Indian mustard genotypes. At 100 μM Cr treatment, Pusa Jai Kisan accumulated the maximum amount of Cr (1680 μg Cr g-1 DW) whereas Vardhan accumulated the minimum (107 μg Cr g-1 DW). As the tolerance of metals is a key plant characteristic required for phytoremediation purpose, effects of various levels of Cr on biomass were evaluated as the gross effect. The extent of oxidative stress caused by Cr stress was measured as rate of lipid peroxidation. The level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) was enhanced at all Cr treatments when compared to the control. Inductions of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants were monitored as metal-detoxifying responses. All the genotypes responded to Cr-induced oxidative stress by modulating nonenzymatic antioxidants [glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (Asc)] and enzymatic antioxidants [superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and glutathione reductase (GR)]. The level of induction, however, differed among the genotypes, being at its maximum in Pusa Jai Kisan and its minimum in Vardhan. Pusa Jai Kisan was grown under natural field conditions with various Cr treatments, and Cr-accumulation capacity was studied. The results confirmed that Pusa Jai Kisan is a hyperaccumulator of Cr and hypertolerant to Cr-induced stress, which makes this genotype a viable candidate for use in the development of

  7. Interactions of Lipoidal Materials and a Pyridazinone Inhibitor of Chloroplast Development

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, J. L.; John, J. B. St.; Christiansen, M. N.; Norris, K. H.

    1971-01-01

    Formation of chloroplast pigments was inhibited, and free fatty acids accumulated in mustard (Brassica juncea [L.] Coss.) cotyledons and in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) first leaves developed after treatment with 4-chloro-5- (dimethylamino)-2- (α, α, α-trifluoro-m-tolyl) -3 (2H) -pyridazinone. The inhibitor reduced the amount of fatty acids found in polar lipids (galactolipids) of barley chloroplasts and increased the amount in nonpolar lipids while having little effect on total content of bound fatty acids. The inhibition of chlorophyll formation was circumvented by D-α-tocopherol acetate, phytol, farnesol, and squalene, and by unsaturated fatty acids and their methyl esters. The protective action can be explained partially by an interaction external to the plant whereby 4-chloro-5- (dimethylamino) -2- (α, α, α-trifluoro-m-tolyl) -3 (2H) -pyridazinone partitioned out of the aqueous phase and into the lipid phase, thus limiting availability of the inhibitor to plants. However, the amount of inhibitor reaching the cotyledons of tocopherol-protected mustard seedlngs was still in excess of the amount necessary to cause white foliage, but it failed to produce the effect. Tocopherol treatment did not prevent the 4-chloro-5- (dimethylamino) -2- (α, α, α-trifluoro-m-tolyl) -3 (2H) -pyridazinone-induced buildup of fatty acids in mustard cotyledons but did partially circumvent the effect in barley leaves. The amount of linolenic acid relative to linoleic acid was reduced in barley leaves and chloroplasts by 4-chloro-5- (dimethylamino) -2- (α, α, α-trifluoro-m-tolyl) -3 (2H) -pyridazinone action and this effect was circumvented by tocopherol. PMID:16657757

  8. [Control of anticoagulation in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation in a primary care clinical practice setting in the different autonomous communities. PAULA study].

    PubMed

    Polo García, J; Barrios Alonso, V; Escobar Cervantes, C; Prieto Valiente, L; Lobos Bejarano, J M; Vargas Ortega, D; Prieto Díaz, M Á; Alonso Moreno, F J; Barquilla García, A

    2017-04-01

    To determine the differences between regions in the level of control of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation treated with vitamin K antagonists, included in the PAULA study. Observational, and coss-sectional/retrospective study, including 139 Primary Care physicians from 99 Health Care centres in all autonomous communities (except La Rioja). Anticoagulation control was defined as the time in therapeutic range assessed by either the direct method (poor control <60%), or the Rosendaal method (poor control <65%). A total of 1,524 patients were included. Small differences in baseline characteristics of the patients were observed. Differences in the percentage of time in therapeutic range were observed, according to the Rosendaal method (mean 69.0±17.7%), from 78.1%±16.6 (Basque Country) to 61.5±14% (Balearic Islands), by the direct method (mean 63.2±17.9%) from 73.6%±16.6 (Basque Country) to 57.5±15.7% (Extremadura). When comparing regions, in those where the Primary Care physicians assumed full control without restrictions on prescription, the percentage of time in therapeutic range by the direct method was 63.89 vs. 60.95% in those with restrictions (p=.006), by Rosendaal method, 69.39% compared with 67.68% (p=.1036). There are significant differences in the level of control between some regions are still inadequate. Regions in which the Primary Care physicians assumed the management of anticoagulation and without restrictions, time in therapeutic range was somewhat higher, and showed a favourable trend for better control. These findings may have clinical implications, and deserve consideration and specific analysis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. A core outcome set for all types of cardiac surgery effectiveness trials: a study protocol for an international eDelphi survey to achieve consensus on what to measure and the subsequent selection of measurement instruments.

    PubMed

    Moza, A; Benstoem, C; Autschbach, R; Stoppe, C; Goetzenich, A

    2015-12-02

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major contributor to the burden of disease and the number one cause of death worldwide. From 1990 until today, more people died from coronary heart disease than from any other cause. CVD is regularly treated with minimally or non-minimally invasive off- or on-pump cardiothoracic surgery and several interventions related to the outcome of the surgical procedures have been evaluated in clinical trials, but heterogeneity in outcome reporting hinders comparison of interventions across trials and limits the ability of research synthesis. This problem is encountered with the introduction of core outcome sets (COSs), which should be measured and reported, as a minimum, in all clinical trials for a specific clinical field. This study protocol describes the methods used to develop a COS for all types of cardiac surgery effectiveness trials. We aim to reach consensus on what to measure in an international three-round eDelphi exercise involving adult patients in need or after cardiothoracic surgery, cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiologists, anaesthesiologists, nursing staff and researchers with expertise in this particular field of medical research. Subsequently, outcome measurement instruments (how to measure) will be determined. Recommendations on COS development given by the Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials (COMET) Initiative and the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Initiative were followed. The proposed COS aims to provide methodological guidance for future cardiothoracic surgical trials to ensure the comparability of effects of interventions across studies and enable research synthesis. This does not imply that primary outcomes should always and exclusively be those of the COS. However, to ensure the comparability of results across trials, the outcomes included in this COS should be considered for inclusion besides measuring trial-specific clinical endpoints.

  10. Thermal requirement of indian mustard (Brassica juncea) at different phonological stages under late sown condition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manoj Pratap; Lallu; Singh, N B

    2014-01-01

    Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern & Coss.] is a long day plant, which requires fairly cool climatic condition during growth and development for obtaining better seed yield. Various workers have correlated crop growth and development with energy requirement parameters, such as growing degree days (GDD), photo-thermal unit (PTU), helios thermal unit (HTU), photo-thermal index (PTI) and heat use efficiency (HUE). Therefore, GDD requirement for different phenological stages of 22 newly developed Indian mustard varieties was studies during winter (rabi) seasons of 2009-10 and 2010-11 at student instructional farm of C.S. Azad University of Agriculture and Technology, Kanpur, (Utter Pradesh). Study revealed that RH-8814, NRCDR-02 and BPR-549-9 recorded higher GDD (1703.0, 1662.9 and 1648.0), PTU (19129.8, 18694.2 and 18379.8), HTU (11397.7, 11072.2 and 10876.0), PTI (13.25, 13.14 and 13.08) and HUE (4.11, 3.84 and 3.71) at physiological maturity, while higher HUE was recorded (9.62, 8.99 and 8.91 kg ha(-1) degrees-day) at days after sowing (DAS) to 50 % flowering. On the basis of study mustard genotypes RH-8814, NRCDR-02 and BPR-549-9 were identified as most heat-tolerant, as they maintained higher values for energy related parameters. Seed yield was highly positively correlated with GDD (r = 0.61, 0.65 and 0.75), PTU (r = 0.66, 0.64 and 0.74), HTU(r = 0.79, 0.68 and 0.73) at the above these three phenological stages, while negatively correlated with PTI at anthesis and at maturity. Hence, these parents could be used in crossing programme for achieving further improvement.

  11. Cumulative effect of nitrogen and sulphur on Brassica juncea L. genotypes under NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Manzer H; Mohammad, Firoz; Khan, M Masrooor A; Al-Whaibi, Mohamed H

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, N and S assimilation, antioxidant enzymes activity, and yield were studied in N and S-treated plants of Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. & Coss. (cvs. Chuutki and Radha) under salt stress. The treatments were given as follows: (1) NaCl(90) mM+N(0)S(0) mg kg(-1) sand (control), (2) NaCl(90) mM+N(60)S(0) mg kg(-1) sand, (3) NaCl(90) mM+N(60)S(20) mg kg(-1) sand, (4) NaCl(90) mM+N(60)S(40) mg kg(-1) sand, and (5) NaCl(90) mM+N(60)S(60) mg kg(-1) sand. The combined application of N (60 mg kg(-1) sand) and S (40 mg kg(-1) sand) proved beneficial in alleviating the adverse effect of salt stress on growth attributes (shoot length plant(-1), fresh weight plant(-1), dry weight plant(-1), and area leaf(-1)), physio-biochemical parameters (carbonic anhydrase activity, total chlorophyll, adenosine triphosphate-sulphurylase activity, leaf N, K and Na content, K/Na ratio, activity of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, glutamate synthase, catalase, superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase, and content of glutathione and ascorbate), and yield attributes (pods plant(-1), seeds pod(-1), and seed yield plant(-1)). Therefore, it is concluded that combined application of N and S induced the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of Brassica. The stimulation of antioxidant enzymes activity and its synergy with N and S assimilation may be one of the important mechanisms that help the plants to tolerate the salinity stress and resulted in an improved yield.

  12. Role of micronutrients in defense to white rust and Alternaria blight infecting Indian mustard.

    PubMed

    Rathi, A S; Singh, Dhiraj; Avtar, Ram; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-03-01

    Field experiments were carried out at Oilseeds Research Area of CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar during rabi, 2008-09 to 2011-12 to find out the possible role of soil application of different micronutrients alone and in combinations in defense to white rust and Alternaria blight diseases in Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern & Coss.]. Among the sole application of micronutrients, minimum disease severity of both white rust (35.0%) and Alternaria blight (31.8%) was observed when S @ 40 kg ha in the form of Gypsum was applied as basal dose in the soil. When Gypsum was supplemented with Borax @10 kg ha(-1) or with ZnSO4 @15 kg ha(-1) the level of tolerance seems to be improved for both the diseases as compared to the sole treatment of each nutrient, i.e., ZnSO4 @ 15 kg/ha, Borax @ 10 kg ha' and Gypsum @ 250 kg ha(-1). Furthermore, minimum disease severity of both white rust (31.3 %) and Alternaria blight (26.3 %) was observed with soil application of ZnSO4 @ 15 kg ha(-1) + Borax @ 10 kg ha(-1) + Gypsum @250 kg ha(-1) as basal dose as compared to the severity of white rust (43.6%) and Alternaria blight (38.6%) in untreated check. Significant increase in seed yield (1612 kg ha(-1)) was also recorded in above mentioned treatment as compared to the yield (1337 kg ha(-1)) in untreated check. These findings will also be helpful in maintaining soil health and minimizing the losses due to both the fungal diseases for eco-friendly sustainability of Indian mustard.

  13. Generic and scientific constraints involving geoethics and geoeducation in planetary geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Frías, Jesús

    2013-04-01

    Geoscience education is a key factor in the academic, scientific and professional progress of any modern society. Geoethics is an interdisciplinary field, which involves Earth and Planetary Sciences as well as applied ethics, regarding the study of the abiotic world. These coss-cutting interactions linking scientific, societal and cultural aspects, consider our planet, in its modern approach, as a system and as a model. This new perspective is extremely important in the context of geoducation in planetary geosciences. In addition, Earth, our home planet, is the only planet in our solar system known to harbor life. This also makes it crucial to develop any scientific strategy and methodological technique (e.g. Raman spectroscopy) of searching for extraterrestrial life. In this context, it has been recently proposed [1-3] that the incorporation of the geoethical and geodiversity issues in planetary geology and astrobiology studies would enrich their methodological and conceptual character (mainly but not only in relation to planetary protection). Modern geoscience education must take into account that, in order to understand the origin and evolution of our planet, we need to be aware that the Earth is open to space, and that the study of meteorites, asteroids, the Moon and Mars is also essential for this purpose (Earth analogs are also unique sites to define planetary guidelines). Generic and scientific constraints involving geoethics and geoeducation should be incorporated into the teaching of all fundamental knowledge and skills for students and teachers. References: [1] Martinez-Frias, J. et al. (2009) 9th European Workshop on Astrobiology, EANA 09, 12-14 October 2009, Brussels, Belgiam. [2] Martinez-Frias, J., et al. (2010) 38th COSPAR Scientific Assembly. Protecting the Lunar and Martian Environments for Scientific Research, Bremen, Germany, 18-25 July. [3] Walsh et al. (2012) 43rd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, 1910.pdf

  14. PREFACE: Third Congress on Materials Science and Engineering (CNCIM-Mexico 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Coss, Romeo; Murrieta-Hernández, Gabriel; Aguayo-González, Aarón; Rubio-Rosas, Efraín; Chigo-Anota, Ernesto; Vigueras-Santiago, Enrique

    2013-06-01

    The Third Congress on Material Science and Engineering (CNCIM-México 2012), which took place in Mérida, México, from 27 February to 2 March 2012 was organized by three research groups (cuerpos académicos) from the Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán: Ingeniería Física (UADY-CA-27), Modelado y Simulación Computacional de Sistemas Físicos (UADY-CA-101) and Química Fundamental y Aplicada (UADY-CA-32), in collaboration with the Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav-Mérida). The First Congress in Material Science and Engineering (CNCIM-2010), was organized in Puebla, México in February 2010. This was followed by CNCIM-2011 held in Toluca, México in February 2011. The CNCIM-México 2012 Conference consisted of plenary talks (8), invited talks (10), oral contributions (54) and poster presentations (70). The topics of the Conference were: Synthesis and Preparation of Materials: Organic and Inorganic Characterization of Materials: Novel Methods and Techniques Applications of Materials: Environment, Medicine, Pharmacy, Technology, Food and Renewable Energy New Materials: Composites, Nanostructures, and from Natural Sources Theory: New Methods and Computer Simulations We want to thank the Organizing Committee, the Institutions and Sponsors supporting the Conference, and everyone who contributed to the organization of this meeting, for their invaluable efforts in order to guarantee the complete success of this conference. Editors Romeo de Coss Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N. (Cinvestav-Mérida) A.P. 73 Cordemex 97310, Mérida, Yucatán, México decoss@mda.cinvestav.mx Gabriel Murrieta-Hernández Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán Calle 60 No. 491-A, Centro Histórico, C.P. 97000, Mérida, Yucatán, México murrieta@uady.mx Aarón Aguayo-González Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán Calle 60 No. 491-A, Centro Histórico, C.P. 97000, Mérida, Yucatán, México aguayo@uady.mx Efraín Rubio-Rosas Benemérita Universidad Aut

  15. Evolutionary Dynamics of Retrotransposons Assessed by High-Throughput Sequencing in Wild Relatives of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Senerchia, Natacha; Wicker, Thomas; Felber, François; Parisod, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) represent a major fraction of plant genomes and drive their evolution. An improved understanding of genome evolution requires the dynamics of a large number of TE families to be considered. We put forward an approach bypassing the required step of a complete reference genome to assess the evolutionary trajectories of high copy number TE families from genome snapshot with high-throughput sequencing. Low coverage sequencing of the complex genomes of Aegilops cylindrica and Ae. geniculata using 454 identified more than 70% of the sequences as known TEs, mainly long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons. Comparing the abundance of reads as well as patterns of sequence diversity and divergence within and among genomes assessed the dynamics of 44 major LTR retrotransposon families of the 165 identified. In particular, molecular population genetics on individual TE copies distinguished recently active from quiescent families and highlighted different evolutionary trajectories of retrotransposons among related species. This work presents a suite of tools suitable for current sequencing data, allowing to address the genome-wide evolutionary dynamics of TEs at the family level and advancing our understanding of the evolution of nonmodel genomes. PMID:23595021

  16. Chromatin Ring Formation at Plant Centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Veit; Ruban, Alevtina; Houben, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We observed the formation of chromatin ring structures at centromeres of somatic rye and Arabidopsis chromosomes. To test whether this behavior is present also in other plant species and tissues we analyzed Arabidopsis, rye, wheat, Aegilops and barley centromeres during cell divisions and in interphase nuclei by immunostaining and FISH. Furthermore, structured illumination microscopy (super-resolution) was applied to investigate the ultrastructure of centromere chromatin beyond the classical refraction limit of light. It became obvious, that a ring formation at centromeres may appear during mitosis, meiosis and in interphase nuclei in all species analyzed. However, varying centromere structures, as ring formations or globular organized chromatin fibers, were identified in different tissues of one and the same species. In addition, we found that a chromatin ring formation may also be caused by subtelomeric repeats in barley. Thus, we conclude that the formation of chromatin rings may appear in different plant species and tissues, but that it is not specific for centromere function. Based on our findings we established a model describing the ultrastructure of plant centromeres and discuss it in comparison to previous models proposed for animals and plants. PMID:26913037

  17. Production of a monoclonal antibody specific for high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) in wheat and its antigenic determinant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanqian; Zhang, Xueyong; Wang, Hongmei; Pang, Binshuang

    2005-02-01

    Wheat high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) 1Bx14 and 1By15 isolated by preparative SDS-PAGE are used as antigen to immunize BALB/c mice. Subcutaneous inoculation of the antigen is performed. The intra-peritoneal injection is completed 3 days before fusion with myeloma cell (SP2/0) via PEG-1500. The fusion cells are selected by indirect enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). Positive hybrid cells are further verified three times by limit dilution of the culture cells. A hybridoma cell line is successfully obtained. The monoclonal antibody belongs to IgG1 subclass. In immunoblotting, the antibody binds to all HMW-GS of T. aestivum cultivars, but does not bind to other storage proteins in seeds of wheat. This result is consisting with the high homology in amino acid sequences among the HMW glutenin subunits in wheat. The antibody also binds to HMW-GS storage proteins in Aegilops squarrosa and T. durum (durum wheat). Furthermore, it also binds to HMW storage proteins in Secale cereale (rye), Hordeum vulgare (barley). However, it never binds seed storage proteins in other cereals such as maize, oat, rice, foxtail millet, sorghum etc. The antigen determinant recognized by the antibody has been located within hexapeptide [PGQGQQ] or / and nonapeptide [GYYPTSPQQ] in the central repetitive region of HMW-GS.

  18. Homeotic Genes and the ABCDE Model for Floral Organ Formation in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Murai, Koji

    2013-06-25

    Floral organ formation has been the subject of intensive study for over 20 years, particularly in the model dicot species Arabidopsis thaliana. These studies have led to the establishment of a general model for the development of floral organs in higher plants, the so-called ABCDE model, in which floral whorl-specific combinations of class A, B, C, D, or E genes specify floral organ identity. In Arabidopsis, class A, B, C, D, E genes encode MADS-box transcription factors except for the class A gene APETALA2. Mutation of these genes induces floral organ homeosis. In this review, I focus on the roles of these homeotic genes in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), particularly with respect to the ABCDE model. Pistillody, the homeotic transformation of stamens into pistil-like structures, occurs in cytoplasmic substitution (alloplasmic) wheat lines that have the cytoplasm of the related wild species Aegilops crassa. This phenomenon is a valuable tool for analysis of the wheat ABCDE model. Using an alloplasmic line, the wheat ortholog of DROOPING LEAF (TaDL), a member of the YABBY gene family, has been shown to regulate pistil specification. Here, I describe the current understanding of the ABCDE model for floral organ formation in wheat.

  19. Mapping of wheat mitochondrial mRNA termini and comparison with breakpoints in DNA homology among plants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Boyoung; Acero, Maria M; Bonen, Linda

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondrial DNA rearrangements occur very frequently in flowering plants and when close to genes there must be concomitant acquisition of new regulatory cis-elements. To explore whether there might be limits to such DNA shuffling, we have mapped the termini of mitochondrial mRNAs in wheat, a monocot, and compared them to the known positions for counterpart genes in the eudicot Arabidopsis. Nine genes share homologous 3' UTRs over their full-length and for six of them, the termini map very close to the site of wheat/Arabidopsis DNA rearrangements. Only one such case was seen for comparisons of 5' UTRs, and the 5' ends of mRNAs are typically more heterogeneous than 3' termini. Approximately half of the thirty-one wheat mitochondrial transcriptional units are preceded by CRTA promoter-like motifs, and of the potential stem-loop or tRNA-like structures identified as candidate RNA processing/stability signals near the 5' or 3' ends, several are shared with Arabidopsis. Comparison of the mitochondrial gene flanking sequences from normal fertile wheat (Triticum aestivum) with those of Aegilops kotschyi which is the source of mitochondria present in K-type cytoplasmic male sterile wheat, revealed six cases where mRNAs are precluded from sharing full-length homologous UTRs because of genomic reorganization events, and the presence of short repeats located at the sites of discontinuity points to a reciprocal recombination-mediated mode of rearrangement.

  20. Homeotic Genes and the ABCDE Model for Floral Organ Formation in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Floral organ formation has been the subject of intensive study for over 20 years, particularly in the model dicot species Arabidopsis thaliana. These studies have led to the establishment of a general model for the development of floral organs in higher plants, the so-called ABCDE model, in which floral whorl-specific combinations of class A, B, C, D, or E genes specify floral organ identity. In Arabidopsis, class A, B, C, D, E genes encode MADS-box transcription factors except for the class A gene APETALA2. Mutation of these genes induces floral organ homeosis. In this review, I focus on the roles of these homeotic genes in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum), particularly with respect to the ABCDE model. Pistillody, the homeotic transformation of stamens into pistil-like structures, occurs in cytoplasmic substitution (alloplasmic) wheat lines that have the cytoplasm of the related wild species Aegilops crassa. This phenomenon is a valuable tool for analysis of the wheat ABCDE model. Using an alloplasmic line, the wheat ortholog of DROOPING LEAF (TaDL), a member of the YABBY gene family, has been shown to regulate pistil specification. Here, I describe the current understanding of the ABCDE model for floral organ formation in wheat. PMID:27137382

  1. [Ability of winter wheat plants to become hardened against frost related to peculiarities of carbon dioxide exchange, biomass synthesis, and various forms of water-soluble carbohydrates].

    PubMed

    Klimov, S V; Burakhanova, E A; Alieva, G P; Suvorova, T A

    2010-01-01

    The donor-acceptor relation (DAR) in a plant under cold exposure to frost was studied in the plants of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Mironovskaya 808 cultivar and its allocytoplasmatic hybrid containing alien cytoplasm of goat grass (Aegilops ovata L.) and grown in a water culture until phenophase, from two leaves until branching. The alteration of DAR was processed by treatment of plant with solutions of diuron and paraquat the photosynthesis inhibitors, keeping plants in the dark, changing from mixotrophic to autotrophic nutrient, and also through the exchange of nutrient solution to distillate water. Determination of frost-resistance on the basis of survival percentage among frozen plants is more significant (R = 0.701-0.999) and related to the frost-resistance of leaves, the correlation P/Rd between speeds of true photosynthesis at light saturation (P) and plant dark respiration (Rd), the approximate speed of dry plant biomass alteration, the total content of water-soluble sugars, and the ratio of di- and monosaccharides (sucrose, glucose + fructose) in leaves. The importance of all the indexes mentioned above for acquiring resistance to low temperatures in plants is discussed in the present article.

  2. Photoperiod-sensitive cytoplasmic male sterility in wheat: nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibility results in differential processing of the mitochondrial orf25 gene.

    PubMed

    Ogihara, Y; Kurihara, Y; Futami, K; Tsuji, K; Murai, K

    1999-12-01

    An alloplasmic wheat line with the cytoplasm of Aegilops crassa expresses photoperiod-sensitive cytoplasmic male sterility (PCMS). Southern- and Northern-hybridization analyses showed that this line contains alterations in both the gene structure and transcription patterns of the mitochondrial gene orf25. In this study, the nucleotide sequence around the orf25 gene of Ae. crassa (CR-orf25) and common wheat (AE-orf25) was determined, and we found that the upstream region of CR-orf25 had been replaced by that of rps7 of common wheat (AE-rps7) through recombination. A novel open reading frame (orf48) is present upstream of CR-orf25. In these three genes, transcription was initiated from the consensus promoter motif of plant mitochondrial genes located in the upstream regions. Processing enzymes in Ae. crassa and common wheat cleave the respective precursor mRNAs, namely CR-orf25 and AE-rps7, at sites similar to that of the premature mitochondrial 26S rRNA. In contrast, the precursor mRNA is not effectively processed at the target sequence of CR-orf25 in the alloplasmic wheat line. Because major transcripts of the euplasmic CR-orf25 and AE-rps7 genes would result in a truncated orf48 product, one possibility is that the orf48 protein might disturb mitochondrial function at a specific stage and hence affect the expression of the PCMS trait.

  3. [Phytopathological and molecular genetic identification of brown rust resistance genes in common wheat accessions with alien genetic material].

    PubMed

    Gaĭnullin, N R; Lapochkina, I F; Zhemchuzhina, A I; Kiseleva, M I; Kolomiets, T M; Kovalenko, E D

    2007-08-01

    Brown rust resistance genes were sought in 23 resistant common wheat accessions with alien genetic material of Aegilops speltoides, Ae. triuncialis, and Triticum kiharae from the Arsenal collection. The genes were identified by common phytopathological tests and PCR analysis with STS markers directed to the known Lr genes. None of the methods identified the resistance genes in two accessions. In the other accessions, the combination of the two methods broadened the spectrum of detectable genes and, in some cases, allowed double verification of the presence of a resistance gene. Most accessions proved to contain several brown rust resistance genes, combining juvenile and adult plant ones. The accessions were found to contain gene combinations that ensured field resistance and immunity under the conditions of the Non-Chernozem region (Lr13 + Lr10 and Lr12 + Lr34). Accessions with alien genetic material contained a unique combination of five or six resistance genes. Since the accessions were rich in brown rust resistance genes, including effective ones, and carried rare combinations of these genes, they were proposed as donors to be universally employed in breeding for immunity in all regions of Russia.

  4. Cold-specific and light-stimulated expression of a wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Cor gene Wcor15 encoding a chloroplast-targeted protein.

    PubMed

    Takumi, S; Koike, A; Nakata, M; Kume, S; Ohno, R; Nakamura, C

    2003-10-01

    Wcor15, a member of the wheat cold-responsive (Cor) gene family, has been isolated and characterized. The deduced polypeptide WCOR15 (MW=14.7 kDa) showed high homology to the previously identified wheat and barley COR proteins. Southern blot analysis using diploid, tetraploid and hexaploid wheat and diploid Aegilops species showed that the wheat and related wild genomes possessed multiple copies of Wcor15 homologues. Five copies were assigned to the homologous group 2 chromosomes by nulli-tetrasomic analysis. Northern blot analysis showed that expression of Wcor15 was specifically induced by low-temperature. Homologous transcripts accumulated in leaves, and light markedly increased their steady-state levels. Bombardment-mediated transient expression analysis of a chimeric CaMV 35S::Wcor15-GFP construct showed protein-targeting to epidermal guard cell chloroplasts in excised spiderwort leaves. A promoter of Wcor15 contained at least three CRT/DRE-like sequence motifs found in Arabidopsis Cor genes and induced the reporter GUS gene expression in leaves of transgenic tobacco plants under low-temperature and light conditions. These results suggest that the functional Cor gene system involving the CRT/DRE cis-element is conserved in both monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants.

  5. PIECE 2.0: an update for the plant gene structure comparison and evolution database

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Xu, Ling; Thilmony, Roger; You, Frank M.; Gu, Yong Q.; Coleman-Derr, Devin

    2017-01-01

    PIECE (Plant Intron Exon Comparison and Evolution) is a web-accessible database that houses intron and exon information of plant genes. PIECE serves as a resource for biologists interested in comparing intron–exon organization and provides valuable insights into the evolution of gene structure in plant genomes. Recently, we updated PIECE to a new version, PIECE 2.0 (http://probes.pw.usda.gov/piece or http://aegilops.wheat.ucdavis.edu/piece). PIECE 2.0 contains annotated genes from 49 sequenced plant species as compared to 25 species in the previous version. In the current version, we also added several new features: (i) a new viewer was developed to show phylogenetic trees displayed along with the structure of individual genes; (ii) genes in the phylogenetic tree can now be also grouped according to KOG (The annotation of Eukaryotic Orthologous Groups) and KO (KEGG Orthology) in addition to Pfam domains; (iii) information on intronless genes are now included in the database; (iv) a statistical summary of global gene structure information for each species and its comparison with other species was added; and (v) an improved GSDraw tool was implemented in the web server to enhance the analysis and display of gene structure. The updated PIECE 2.0 database will be a valuable resource for the plant research community for the study of gene structure and evolution. PMID:27742820

  6. Effects of alien and intraspecies cytoplasms on manifestation of nuclear genes for wheat resistance to brown rust: II. Specificity of cytoplasm influence on different Lr genes

    SciTech Connect

    Voluevich, E.A.; Buloichik, A.A.; Palilova, A.N.

    1995-04-01

    Specificity of expression of the major nuclear genes Lr to two brown rust clones in hybrids with the same maternal cytoplasm was analyzed. It was evaluated by a resistant: susceptible ratio in the F{sub 2}. Reciprocal hybrids were obtained from the cross between the progeny of homozygous susceptible plants of the cultivar Penjamo 62 and its alloplasmatic lines carrying cytoplasms of Triticum dicoccoides var. fulvovillosum, Aegilops squarrosa var. typical, Agropyron trichophorum, and isogenic lines of the cultivar Thatcher (Th) with the Lr1, Lr9, Lr15, and Lr19 genes. It was shown that the effect of the Lr1 gene in the cytoplasm of cultivar Thatcher and in eu-, and alloplasmatic forms of Penjamo 62 was less expressed than that of other Lr genes. Cytoplasm of the alloplasmatic line (dicoccoides)-Penjamo 62 was the only exception: in the F{sub 2}, hybrids with Th (Lr1) had a higher yield of resistant forms than those with Th (Lr15). In the hybrid combinations studied, expression and/or transmission of the Lr19 gene was more significant than that of other genes. This gene had no advantages over Lr15 and Lr19 only in cytoplasm of the alloplasmatic line (squarrosa)-Penjamo 62. In certain hybrid cytoplasms, the display of the Lr1, Lr15, and Lr19 genes, in contrast to Lr9, varied with the virulence of the pathogen clones. 15 refs., 5 tabs.

  7. Spatial Pattern and Scale Influence Invader Demographic Response to Simulated Precipitation Change in an Annual Grassland Community.

    PubMed

    Skaer Thomason, Meghan J; Rice, Kevin J

    2017-01-01

    It is important to predict which invasive species will benefit from future changes in climate, and thereby identify those invaders that need particular attention and prioritization of management efforts. Because establishment, persistence, and spread determine invasion success, this prediction requires detailed demographic information. Explicit study of the impact of pattern on demographic response is particularly important for species that are naturally patchy, such as the invasive grass, Aegilops triuncialis. In the northern California Coast Range, where climate change may increase or decrease mean annual rainfall, we conducted a field experiment to understand the interaction of climate change and local-scale patterning on the demography of A. triuncialis. We manipulated precipitation (reduced, ambient, or augmented), seed density, and seeding pattern. Demographic and environmental data were collected for three years following initial seeding. Pattern and scale figure prominently in the demographic response of A. triuncialis to precipitation manipulation. Pattern interacts with precipitation and seeding density in its influence on per-plant seed output. Although per-plot seed production was highest when seeds were not aggregated, per-plant seed output was higher in aggregated patches. Results suggest aggregation of invasive A. triuncialis reduces the detrimental impact of interspecific competition in its invaded community, and that interspecific competition per se has a stronger impact than intraspecific competition.

  8. The role of adaptive trans-generational plasticity in biological invasions of plants.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Andrew R; Brown, Cynthia S; Espeland, Erin K; McKay, John K; Meimberg, Harald; Rice, Kevin J

    2010-03-01

    High-impact biological invasions often involve establishment and spread in disturbed, high-resource patches followed by establishment and spread in biotically or abiotically stressful areas. Evolutionary change may be required for the second phase of invasion (establishment and spread in stressful areas) to occur. When species have low genetic diversity and short selection history, within-generation phenotypic plasticity is often cited as the mechanism through which spread across multiple habitat types can occur. We show that trans-generational plasticity (TGP) can result in pre-adapted progeny that exhibit traits associated with increased fitness both in high-resource patches and in stressful conditions. In the invasive sedge, Cyperus esculentus, maternal plants growing in nutrient-poor patches can place disproportional number of propagules into nutrient-rich patches. Using the invasive annual grass, Aegilops triuncialis, we show that maternal response to soil conditions can confer greater stress tolerance in seedlings in the form of greater photosynthetic efficiency. We also show TGP for a phenological shift in a low resource environment that results in greater stress tolerance in progeny. These lines of evidence suggest that the maternal environment can have profound effects on offspring success and that TGP may play a significant role in some plant invasions.

  9. Identification of individual barley chromosomes based on repetitive sequences: conservative distribution of Afa-family repetitive sequences on the chromosomes of barley and wheat.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, H; Mukai, Y; Akagawa, K; Nagaki, K; Fujigaki, J; Yamamoto, M; Sasakuma, T

    1997-10-01

    The Afa-family repetitive sequences were isolated from barley (Hordeum vulgare, 2n = 14) and cloned as pHvA14. This sequence distinguished each barely chromosome by in situ hybridization. Double color fluorescence in situ hybridization using pHvA14 and 5S rDNA or HvRT-family sequence (subtelomeric sequence of barley) allocated individual barley chromosomes showing a specific pattern of pHvA14 to chromosome 1H to 7H. As the case of the D genome chromosomes of Aegilops squarrosa and common wheat (Triticum aestivum) hybridized by its Afa-family sequences, the signals of pHvA14 in barley chromosomes tended to appear in the distal regions that do not carry many chromosome band markers. In the telomeric regions these signals always placed in more proximal portions than those of HvRT-family. Based on the distribution patterns of Afa-family sequences in the chromosomes of barley and D genome chromosomes of wheat, we discuss a possible mechanism of amplification of the repetitive sequences during the evolution of Triticeae. In addition, we show here that HvRT-family also could be used to distinguish individual barley chromosomes from the patterns of in situ hybridization.

  10. Characterization of x-type high-molecular-weight glutenin promoters (x-HGP) from different genomes in Triticeae.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qian-Tao; Zhao, Quan-Zhi; Wang, Xiu-Ying; Wang, Chang-Shui; Zhao, Shan; Cao, Xue; Lan, Xiu-Jin; Lu, Zhen-Xiang; Zheng, You-Liang; Wei, Yu-Ming

    2013-12-01

    The sequences of x-type high-molecular-weight glutenin promoter (x-HGP) from 21 diploid Triticeae species were cloned and sequenced. The lengths of x-HGP varied from 897 to 955 bp, and there are 329 variable sites including 105 singleton sites and 224 polymorphic sites. Genetic distances of pairwise X-HGP sequences ranged from 0.30 to 16.40% within 21 species and four outgroup species of Hordeum. All five recognized regulatory elements emerged and showed higher conservation in the x-HGP of 21 Triticeae species. Most variations were distributed in the regions among or between regulatory elements. A 22 bp and 50 bp insertions which were the copy of adjacent region with minor change, were found in the x-HGP of Ae. speltoides and Ps. Huashanica, and could be regarded as genome specific indels. The phylogeny of media-joining network and neighbour-joining tree both supported the topology were composed of three sperate clusters. Especially, the cluster I comprising the x-HGP sequences of Aegilops, Triticum, Henrardia, Agropyron and Taeniatherum was highly supporting by both network and NJ tree. As conferring to higher level and temporal and spatial expression, x-HGP can used as the source of promoter for constructing transgenic plants which allow endosperm-specific expression of exogenous gene on higher level. In addition, the x-HGP has enough conservation and variation; so it should be valuable in phylogenetic analyses of Triticeae family members.

  11. Evolutionary dynamics of retrotransposons assessed by high-throughput sequencing in wild relatives of wheat.

    PubMed

    Senerchia, Natacha; Wicker, Thomas; Felber, François; Parisod, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) represent a major fraction of plant genomes and drive their evolution. An improved understanding of genome evolution requires the dynamics of a large number of TE families to be considered. We put forward an approach bypassing the required step of a complete reference genome to assess the evolutionary trajectories of high copy number TE families from genome snapshot with high-throughput sequencing. Low coverage sequencing of the complex genomes of Aegilops cylindrica and Ae. geniculata using 454 identified more than 70% of the sequences as known TEs, mainly long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons. Comparing the abundance of reads as well as patterns of sequence diversity and divergence within and among genomes assessed the dynamics of 44 major LTR retrotransposon families of the 165 identified. In particular, molecular population genetics on individual TE copies distinguished recently active from quiescent families and highlighted different evolutionary trajectories of retrotransposons among related species. This work presents a suite of tools suitable for current sequencing data, allowing to address the genome-wide evolutionary dynamics of TEs at the family level and advancing our understanding of the evolution of nonmodel genomes.

  12. Genome reorganization in F1 hybrids uncovers the role of retrotransposons in reproductive isolation

    PubMed Central

    Senerchia, Natacha; Felber, François; Parisod, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization leads to new interactions among divergent genomes, revealing the nature of genetic incompatibilities having accumulated during and after the origin of species. Conflicts associated with misregulation of transposable elements (TEs) in hybrids expectedly result in their activation and genome-wide changes that may be key to species boundaries. Repetitive genomes of wild wheats have diverged under differential dynamics of specific long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTR-RTs), offering unparalleled opportunities to address the underpinnings of plant genome reorganization by selfish sequences. Using reciprocal F1 hybrids between three Aegilops species, restructuring and epigenetic repatterning was assessed at random and LTR-RT sequences with amplified fragment length polymorphism and sequence-specific amplified polymorphisms as well as their methylation-sensitive counterparts, respectively. Asymmetrical reorganization of LTR-RT families predicted to cause conflicting interactions matched differential survival of F1 hybrids. Consistent with the genome shock model, increasing divergence of merged LTR-RTs yielded higher levels of changes in corresponding genome fractions and lead to repeated reorganization of LTR-RT sequences in F1 hybrids. Such non-random reorganization of hybrid genomes is coherent with the necessary repression of incompatible TE loci in support of hybrid viability and indicates that TE-driven genomic conflicts may represent an overlooked factor supporting reproductive isolation. PMID:25716787

  13. Cytogenetic and molecular identification of three Triticum aestivum-Leymus racemosus translocation addition lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Yuan, Jianhua; Bie, Tongde; Zhou, Bo; Chen, Peidu

    2009-06-01

    Chromosome 2C from Aegilops cylindrica has the ability to induce chromosome breakage in common wheat (Tritivum aestivum). In the BC(1)F(3) generation of the T. aestivum cv. Chinese Spring and a hybrid between T. aestivum-Leymus racemosus Lr.7 addition line and T. aestivum-Ae. cylindrica 2C addition line, three disomic translocation addition lines (2n = 44) were selected by mitotic chromosome C-banding and genomic in situ hybridization. We further characterized these T. aestivum-L. racemosus translocation addition lines, NAU636, NAU637 and NAU638, by chromosome C-banding, in situ hybridization using the A- and D-genome-specific bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones 676D4 and 9M13; plasmids pAs1 and pSc119.2, and 45S rDNA; as well as genomic DNA of L. racemosus as probes, in combination with double ditelosomic test cross and SSR marker analysis. The translocation chromosomes were designated as T3AS-Lr7S, T6BS-Lr7S, and T5DS-Lr7L. The translocation line T3AS-Lr7S was highly resistant to Fusarium head blight and will be useful germplasm for resistance breeding.

  14. Identification and characterization of a new member of the SINE Au retroposon family (GmAu1) in the soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., genome and its potential application.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yongjun; Li, Yong; Bai, Xi; Cai, Hua; Ji, Wei; Ji, Zuojun; Guo, Changhong; Zhu, Yanming

    2011-12-01

    A plant short interspersed element (SINE) was identified in Glycine max after re-sequencing of the soybean sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers. Detailed analysis revealed that this newly recognized SINE element consisted of a tRNA-related region, a tRNA non-related region, direct flanking repeat sequences, and a short stretch of Ts at the 3'-terminal region. These features are similar to previously characterized SINEs. To investigate the evolution of the SINE retroposon, BLASTN was used to search against genome sequences of other plants. Since it is homologous with the retroposon Au in Aegilops umbellulata (wheat) and its homology in soybean, the SINE is named as GmAu1. Genome analysis of the Glycine max var. Willimas 82 uncovered more than 847 copies of GmAu1 per haploid genome of soybean. Examination of the regions flanking the inserted GmAu1 sequences indicated a preference for introns over exons or other noncoding regions. Considering the flanking insertion sequences, 146 primers were designed in order to detect insertion mutations by a PCR-based method. Seventy-seven primers displayed polymorphism and were used to develop corresponding GmAu1-based SCAR markers. The retroposon GmAu1 and its related SCAR markers identified in this study will prove valuable to future investigations into the genetic mapping, phylogeny, and evolution of the Glycine genus.

  15. Drought stress response in wheat: physiological and molecular analysis of resistant and sensitive genotypes.

    PubMed

    Rampino, Patrizia; Pataleo, Stefano; Gerardi, Carmela; Mita, Giovanni; Perrotta, Carla

    2006-12-01

    Water deficit is a severe environmental stress and the major constraint on plant productivity with an evident effect on plant growth. The aim of this work was to study Triticum and Aegilops seedlings differing in their response to drought stress at the physiological and molecular levels. The identification of resistant and sensitive genotypes was firstly based on the relative water content (RWC) measurement. Further characterization of genotypes contrasting in their response to water stress was performed at the physiological level by determination of RWC, water loss rate (WLR) and free proline content after different hours of dehydration. Modification in the expression level of five dehydrin (DHN) genes was also analysed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Five cDNAs coding for different DHNs were identified and characterized. These genes are not expressed in the well-watered plants, but only in the stressed plants. Four of these cDNAs are related to novel DHN sequences. The results obtained clearly indicate a relation between the expression of these genes and tissue water content. In particular, in the resistant genotypes the expression of DHN genes is initiated even though tissue hydration levels are still high, indicating also in wheat the involvement of these proteins in water retention.

  16. Quantitative expression analysis of TaSOS1 and TaSOS4 genes in cultivated and wild wheat plants under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Amin; Niazi, Ali; Abolimoghadam, Ali Asghar; Zamani Babgohari, Mahboobeh; Deihimi, Tahereh; Ebrahimi, Mahmod; Akhtardanesh, Hosein; Ebrahimie, Esmail

    2013-02-01

    Salt stress is a mixture of ionic, osmotic, and oxidative stresses. The expression of TaSOS1 (a transmembrane Na(+)/H(+) antiporter) and TaSOS4 [a cytoplasmic pyridoxal (PL) kinase] genes were measured in four different salinity levels and different time courses of salinity exposure using qRT-PCR technique. Mahuti (salt tolerant) and Alamut (salt sensitive) cultivars were used as cultivated wheat, and T. boeticum and Aegilops crassa as wild wheat plants. Salt-induced expression of TaSOS1 in these wild wheat plants indicates the presence of active TaSOS1 gene on the genomes A and D. The TaSOS1 and TaSOS4 transcript levels were found to be downregulated after salt treatment in all cultivars except in A. crassa, which was in contrast with its expression pattern in roots that was being upregulated from a very low-basal expression, after salt treatments. Duncan's Multiple Range Test showed a significant difference between expression in the 200-mM NaCl concentration with the 50 and 100 mM for the TaSOS1 gene, and no significant difference for TaSOS4. Lack of significant correlation between the TaSOS1 and TaSOS4 gene expressions confirms the theory that PLP has no significant effect on the expression of the TaSOS1 gene in wheat leaves.

  17. Regulation of the wheat MAP kinase phosphatase 1 by 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, Mouna; Cotelle, Valérie; Ebel, Chantal; Zaidi, Ikram; Ormancey, Mélanie; Galaud, Jean-Philippe; Hanin, Moez

    2017-04-01

    Plant MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs) are major regulators of MAPK signaling pathways and play crucial roles in controlling growth, development and stress responses. The presence of several functional domains in plant MKPs such as a dual specificity phosphatase catalytic domain, gelsolin, calmodulin-binding and serine-rich domains, suggests that MKPs can interact with distinct cellular partners, others than MAPKs. In this report, we identified a canonical mode I 14-3-3-binding motif (574KLPSLP579) located at the carboxy-terminal region of the wheat MKP, TMKP1. We found that this motif is well-conserved among other MKPs from monocots including Hordeum vulgare, Brachypodium distachyon and Aegilops taushii. Using co-immunoprecipitation assays, we provide evidence for interaction between TMKP1 and 14-3-3 proteins in wheat. Moreover, the phosphatase activity of TMKP1 is increased in a phospho-dependent manner by either Arabidopsis or yeast 14-3-3 isoforms. TMKP1 activation by 14-3-3 proteins is enhanced by Mn(2+), whereas in the presence of Ca(2+) ions, TMKP1 activation was limited to Arabidopsis 14-3-3φ (phi), an isoform harboring an EF-hand motif. Such findings strongly suggest that 14-3-3 proteins, in conjunction with specific divalent cations, may stimulate TMKP1 activity and point-out that 14-3-3 proteins bind and regulate the activity of a MKP in eukaryotes.

  18. PIECE 2.0: an update for the plant gene structure comparison and evolution database.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Xu, Ling; Thilmony, Roger; You, Frank M; Gu, Yong Q; Coleman-Derr, Devin

    2017-01-04

    PIECE (Plant Intron Exon Comparison and Evolution) is a web-accessible database that houses intron and exon information of plant genes. PIECE serves as a resource for biologists interested in comparing intron-exon organization and provides valuable insights into the evolution of gene structure in plant genomes. Recently, we updated PIECE to a new version, PIECE 2.0 (http://probes.pw.usda.gov/piece or http://aegilops.wheat.ucdavis.edu/piece). PIECE 2.0 contains annotated genes from 49 sequenced plant species as compared to 25 species in the previous version. In the current version, we also added several new features: (i) a new viewer was developed to show phylogenetic trees displayed along with the structure of individual genes; (ii) genes in the phylogenetic tree can now be also grouped according to KOG (The annotation of Eukaryotic Orthologous Groups) and KO (KEGG Orthology) in addition to Pfam domains; (iii) information on intronless genes are now included in the database; (iv) a statistical summary of global gene structure information for each species and its comparison with other species was added; and (v) an improved GSDraw tool was implemented in the web server to enhance the analysis and display of gene structure. The updated PIECE 2.0 database will be a valuable resource for the plant research community for the study of gene structure and evolution. © Crown copyright 2016.

  19. Genome Evolution Due to Allopolyploidization in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Moshe; Levy, Avraham A.

    2012-01-01

    The wheat group has evolved through allopolyploidization, namely, through hybridization among species from the plant genera Aegilops and Triticum followed by genome doubling. This speciation process has been associated with ecogeographical expansion and with domestication. In the past few decades, we have searched for explanations for this impressive success. Our studies attempted to probe the bases for the wide genetic variation characterizing these species, which accounts for their great adaptability and colonizing ability. Central to our work was the investigation of how allopolyploidization alters genome structure and expression. We found in wheat that allopolyploidy accelerated genome evolution in two ways: (1) it triggered rapid genome alterations through the instantaneous generation of a variety of cardinal genetic and epigenetic changes (which we termed “revolutionary” changes), and (2) it facilitated sporadic genomic changes throughout the species’ evolution (i.e., evolutionary changes), which are not attainable at the diploid level. Our major findings in natural and synthetic allopolyploid wheat indicate that these alterations have led to the cytological and genetic diploidization of the allopolyploids. These genetic and epigenetic changes reflect the dynamic structural and functional plasticity of the allopolyploid wheat genome. The significance of this plasticity for the successful establishment of wheat allopolyploids, in nature and under domestication, is discussed. PMID:23135324

  20. PCR-based analysis of the intergenic spacers of the Nor loci on the A genomes of Triticum diploids and polyploids.

    PubMed

    Sallares, R; Brown, T A

    1999-02-01

    We present DNA sequence data showing population variation in the intergenic spacer (IGS) regions of the ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs) on the A genomes of 27 diploid and polyploid wheats. PCRs (polymerase chain reactions) specific for the A(m) genome gave products with five populations of Triticum monococcum but did not give products with AABB or AABBDD wheats. PCRs specific to the A(u) genome of T. urartu gave products with all the AABB and AABBDD polyploids that were tested, but not with T. monococcum. AAGG tetraploids gave products only with the A(u)-specific primers, but the AAAAGG hexaploid T. zhukovskyi gave products with both the A(u) and A(m) primers. Phylogenetic analysis showed a substantial degree of IGS divergence for both the A(m) and A(u) genomes in diploids and polyploids compared with other genomes of Triticum and Aegilops. The rate of evolution of the IGS is much greater than previously reported for the internal transcribed region of the rDNAs but the view that the IGS only gives random noise is rejected, the IGS sequences presented here reflecting the general evolutionary trends affecting the wheat genome as a whole.

  1. Soil microbial diversity and soil functioning affect competition among grasses in experimental microcosms.

    PubMed

    Bonkowski, Michael; Roy, Jacques

    2005-03-01

    A gradient of microbial diversity in soil was established by inoculating pasteurized soil with microbial populations of different complexity, which were obtained by a combination of soil fumigation and filtering techniques. Four different soil diversity treatments were planted with six different grass species either in monoculture or in polyculture to test how changes of general microbial functions, such as catabolic diversity and nutrient recycling efficiency would affect the performance of the plant communities. Relatively harsh soil treatments were necessary to elicit visible effects on major soil processes such as decomposition and nitrogen cycling due to the high redundancy and resilience of soil microbial communities. The strongest effects of soil diversity manipulations on plant growth occurred in polycultures where interspecific competition between plants was high. In polycultures, soil diversity reduction led to a gradual, linear decline in biomass production of one subordinate grass species (Bromus hordeaceus), which was compensated by increased growth of two intermediate competitors (Aegilops geniculata, B. madritensis). This negative covariance in growth of competing grass species smoothed the effects of soil diversity manipulations at the plant community level. As a result, total shoot biomass production remained constant. Apparently the effects of soil diversity manipulations were buffered because functional redundancy at both, the microbial and the plant community level complemented each other. The results further suggests that small trade-offs in plant fitness due to general functional shifts at the microbial level can be significant for the outcome of competition in plant communities and thus diversity at much larger scales.

  2. Construction and Evaluation of cDNA Libraries for Large-Scale Expressed Sequence Tag Sequencing in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, D.; Choi, D. W.; Wanamaker, S.; Fenton, R. D.; Chin, A.; Malatrasi, M.; Turuspekov, Y.; Walia, H.; Akhunov, E. D.; Kianian, P.; Otto, C.; Simons, K.; Deal, K. R.; Echenique, V.; Stamova, B.; Ross, K.; Butler, G. E.; Strader, L.; Verhey, S. D.; Johnson, R.; Altenbach, S.; Kothari, K.; Tanaka, C.; Shah, M. M.; Laudencia-Chingcuanco, D.; Han, P.; Miller, R. E.; Crossman, C. C.; Chao, S.; Lazo, G. R.; Klueva, N.; Gustafson, J. P.; Kianian, S. F.; Dubcovsky, J.; Walker-Simmons, M. K.; Gill, K. S.; Dvořák, J.; Anderson, O. D.; Sorrells, M. E.; McGuire, P. E.; Qualset, C. O.; Nguyen, H. T.; Close, T. J.

    2004-01-01

    A total of 37 original cDNA libraries and 9 derivative libraries enriched for rare sequences were produced from Chinese Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), five other hexaploid wheat genotypes (Cheyenne, Brevor, TAM W101, BH1146, Butte 86), tetraploid durum wheat (T. turgidum L.), diploid wheat (T. monococcum L.), and two other diploid members of the grass tribe Triticeae (Aegilops speltoides Tausch and Secale cereale L.). The emphasis in the choice of plant materials for library construction was reproductive development subjected to environmental factors that ultimately affect grain quality and yield, but roots and other tissues were also included. Partial cDNA expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were examined by various measures to assess the quality of these libraries. All ESTs were processed to remove cloning system sequences and contaminants and then assembled using CAP3. Following these processing steps, this assembly yielded 101,107 sequences derived from 89,043 clones, which defined 16,740 contigs and 33,213 singletons, a total of 49,953 “unigenes.” Analysis of the distribution of these unigenes among the libraries led to the conclusion that the enrichment methods were effective in reducing the most abundant unigenes and to the observation that the most diverse libraries were from tissues exposed to environmental stresses including heat, drought, salinity, or low temperature. PMID:15514038

  3. Spatial Pattern and Scale Influence Invader Demographic Response to Simulated Precipitation Change in an Annual Grassland Community

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    It is important to predict which invasive species will benefit from future changes in climate, and thereby identify those invaders that need particular attention and prioritization of management efforts. Because establishment, persistence, and spread determine invasion success, this prediction requires detailed demographic information. Explicit study of the impact of pattern on demographic response is particularly important for species that are naturally patchy, such as the invasive grass, Aegilops triuncialis. In the northern California Coast Range, where climate change may increase or decrease mean annual rainfall, we conducted a field experiment to understand the interaction of climate change and local-scale patterning on the demography of A. triuncialis. We manipulated precipitation (reduced, ambient, or augmented), seed density, and seeding pattern. Demographic and environmental data were collected for three years following initial seeding. Pattern and scale figure prominently in the demographic response of A. triuncialis to precipitation manipulation. Pattern interacts with precipitation and seeding density in its influence on per-plant seed output. Although per-plot seed production was highest when seeds were not aggregated, per-plant seed output was higher in aggregated patches. Results suggest aggregation of invasive A. triuncialis reduces the detrimental impact of interspecific competition in its invaded community, and that interspecific competition per se has a stronger impact than intraspecific competition. PMID:28046090

  4. Identifying variation in resistance to the take-all fungus, Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, between different ancestral and modern wheat species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ancestral wheat relatives are important sources of genetic diversity for the introduction of novel traits for the improvement of modern bread wheat. In this study the aim was to assess the susceptibility of 34 accessions of the diploid wheat Triticum monococcum (A genome) to Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt), the causal agent of take-all disease. The second aim was to explore the susceptibility of tetraploid wheat (T. durum) and the B genome progenitor species Aegilops speltoides to Ggt. Results Field trials, conducted over 5 years, identified seven T. monococcum accessions with a good level of resistance to take-all when exposed to natural inoculum under UK field conditions. All other accessions were highly susceptible or did not exhibit a consistent phenotype across years. DArT marker genotyping revealed that whole genome diversity was not closely related to resistance to take-all within T. monococcum, suggesting that multiple genetic sources of resistance may exist within the species. In contrast the tetraploid wheat cultivars and Ae. speltoides were all highly susceptible to the disease, including those with known elevated levels of benzoxazinoids. Conclusions The diploid wheat species T. monococcum may provide a genetic source of resistance to take-all disease that could be utilised to improve the performance of T. aestivum in high disease risk situations. This represents an extremely valuable resource to achieve economic and sustainable genetic control of this root disease. PMID:25084989

  5. Novel nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction in wheat (Triticum aestivum) induces vigorous plants.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Ali; Kumar, Ajay; Mergoum, Mohamed; Pirseyedi, Seyed Mostafa; Hegstad, Justin B; Mazaheri, Mona; Kianian, Shahryar F

    2016-03-01

    Interspecific hybridization can be considered an accelerator of evolution, otherwise a slow process, solely dependent on mutation and recombination. Upon interspecific hybridization, several novel interactions between nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes emerge which provide additional sources of diversity. The magnitude and essence of intergenomic interactions between nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes remain unknown due to the direction of many crosses. This study was conducted to address the role of nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions as a source of variation upon hybridization. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) alloplasmic lines carrying the cytoplasm of Aegilops mutica along with an integrated approach utilizing comparative quantitative trait locus (QTL) and epigenome analysis were used to dissect this interaction. The results indicate that cytoplasmic genomes can modify the magnitude of QTL controlling certain physiological traits such as dry matter weight. Furthermore, methylation profiling analysis detected eight polymorphic regions affected by the cytoplasm type. In general, these results indicate that novel nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions can potentially trigger an epigenetic modification cascade in nuclear genes which eventually change the genetic network controlling physiological traits. These modified genetic networks can serve as new sources of variation to accelerate the evolutionary process. Furthermore, this variation can synthetically be produced by breeders in their programs to develop epigenomic-segregating lines.

  6. PlantRGDB: A Database of Plant Retrocopied Genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    RNA-based gene duplication, known as retrocopy, plays important roles in gene origination and genome evolution. The genomes of many plants have been sequenced, offering an opportunity to annotate and mine the retrocopies in plant genomes. However, comprehensive and unified annotation of retrocopies in these plants is still lacking. In this study I constructed the PlantRGDB (Plant Retrocopied Gene DataBase), the first database of plant retrocopies, to provide a putatively complete centralized list of retrocopies in plant genomes. The database is freely accessible at http://probes.pw.usda.gov/plantrgdb or http://aegilops.wheat.ucdavis.edu/plantrgdb. It currently integrates 49 plant species and 38,997 retrocopies along with characterization information. PlantRGDB provides a user-friendly web interface for searching, browsing and downloading the retrocopies in the database. PlantRGDB also offers graphical viewer-integrated sequence information for displaying the structure of each retrocopy. The attributes of the retrocopies of each species are reported using a browse function. In addition, useful tools, such as an advanced search and BLAST, are available to search the database more conveniently. In conclusion, the database will provide a web platform for obtaining valuable insight into the generation of retrocopies and will supplement research on gene duplication and genome evolution in plants.

  7. Similarities and differences in the nuclear genome organization within Pooideae species revealed by comparative genomic in situ hybridization (GISH).

    PubMed

    Majka, Joanna; Majka, Maciej; Kwiatek, Michał; Wiśniewska, Halina

    2016-10-14

    In this paper, we highlight the affinity between the genomes of key representatives of the Pooideae subfamily, revealed at the chromosomal level by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). The analyses were conducted using labeled probes from each species to hybridize with chromosomes of every species used in this study based on a "round robin" rule. As a result, the whole chromosomes or chromosome regions were distinguished or variable types of signals were visualized to prove the different levels of the relationships between genomes used in this study. We observed the unexpected lack of signals in secondary constrictions of rye (RR) chromosomes probed by triticale (AABBRR) genomic DNA. We have also identified unlabeled chromosome regions, which point to species-specific sequences connected with disparate pathways of chromosome differentiation. Our results revealed a conservative character of coding sequence of 35S rDNA among selected species of the genera Aegilops, Brachypodium, Festuca, Hordeum, Lolium, Secale, and Triticum. In summary, we showed strong relationships in genomic DNA sequences between species which have been previously reported to be phylogenetically distant.

  8. AB-QTL analysis in winter wheat: II. Genetic analysis of seedling and field resistance against leaf rust in a wheat advanced backcross population.

    PubMed

    Naz, Ali Ahmad; Kunert, Antje; Lind, Volker; Pillen, Klaus; Léon, Jens

    2008-05-01

    The present study aimed to localize exotic quantitative trait locus (QTL) alleles for the improvement of leaf rust (P. triticina) resistance in an advanced backcross (AB) population, B22, which is derived from a cross between the winter wheat cultivar Batis (Triticum aestivum) and the synthetic wheat accession Syn022L. The latter was developed from hybridization of T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides and T. tauschii. Altogether, 250 BC2F3 lines of B22 were assessed for seedling resistance against the leaf rust isolate 77WxR under controlled conditions. In addition, field resistance against leaf rust was evaluated by assessing symptom severity under natural infestation across multiple environments. Simultaneously, population B22 was genotyped with a total of 97 SSR markers, distributed over the wheat A, B and D genomes. The phenotype and genotype data were subjected to QTL analysis by applying a 3-factorial mixed model analysis of variance including the marker genotype as a fixed effect and the environments, the lines and the marker by environment interactions as random effects. The QTL analysis revealed six putative QTLs for seedling resistance and seven for field resistance. For seedling resistance, the effects of exotic QTL alleles improved resistance at all detected loci. The maximum decrease of disease symptoms (-46.3%) was associated with marker locus Xbarc149 on chromosome 1D. For field resistance, two loci had stable main effects across environments and five loci exhibited marker by environment interaction effects. The strongest effects were detected at marker locus Xbarc149 on chromosome 1D, at which the exotic allele decreased seedling symptoms by 46.3% and field symptoms by 43.6%, respectively. Some of the detected QTLs co-localized with known resistance genes, while others appear to be as novel resistance loci. Our findings indicate, that the exotic wheat accession Syn022L may be useful for the improvement of leaf rust resistance in cultivated wheat.

  9. Comparative Genome Analysis between Agrostis stolonifera and Members of the Pooideae Subfamily, including Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jin-Joo; Chakraborty, Nanda; Curley, Joe; Chang, Taehyun; Inoue, Maiko; Warnke, Scott; Jung, Geunhwa

    2013-01-01

    Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera, allotetraploid 2n = 4x = 28) is one of the major cool-season turfgrasses. It is widely used on golf courses due to its tolerance to low mowing and aggressive growth habit. In this study, we investigated genome relationships of creeping bentgrass relative to the Triticeae (a consensus map of Triticum aestivum, T. tauschii, Hordeum vulgare, and H. spontaneum), oat, rice, and ryegrass maps using a common set of 229 EST-RFLP markers. The genome comparisons based on the RFLP markers revealed large-scale chromosomal rearrangements on different numbers of linkage groups (LGs) of creeping bentgrass relative to the Triticeae (3 LGs), oat (4 LGs), and rice (8 LGs). However, we detected no chromosomal rearrangement between creeping bentgrass and ryegrass, suggesting that these recently domesticated species might be closely related, despite their memberships to different Pooideae tribes. In addition, the genome of creeping bentgrass was compared with the complete genome sequence of Brachypodium distachyon in Pooideae subfamily using both sequences of the above-mentioned mapped EST-RFLP markers and sequences of 8,470 publicly available A. stolonifera ESTs (AgEST). We discovered large-scale chromosomal rearrangements on six LGs of creeping bentgrass relative to B. distachyon. Also, a total of 24 syntenic blocks based on 678 orthologus loci were identified between these two grass species. The EST orthologs can be utilized in further comparative mapping of Pooideae species. These results will be useful for genetic improvement of Agrostis species and will provide a better understanding of evolution within Pooideae species. PMID:24244501

  10. Comparative genome analysis between Agrostis stolonifera and members of the Pooideae subfamily, including Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Araneda, Loreto; Sim, Sung-Chur; Bae, Jin-Joo; Chakraborty, Nanda; Curley, Joe; Chang, Taehyun; Inoue, Maiko; Warnke, Scott; Jung, Geunhwa

    2013-01-01

    Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera, allotetraploid 2n = 4x = 28) is one of the major cool-season turfgrasses. It is widely used on golf courses due to its tolerance to low mowing and aggressive growth habit. In this study, we investigated genome relationships of creeping bentgrass relative to the Triticeae (a consensus map of Triticum aestivum, T. tauschii, Hordeum vulgare, and H. spontaneum), oat, rice, and ryegrass maps using a common set of 229 EST-RFLP markers. The genome comparisons based on the RFLP markers revealed large-scale chromosomal rearrangements on different numbers of linkage groups (LGs) of creeping bentgrass relative to the Triticeae (3 LGs), oat (4 LGs), and rice (8 LGs). However, we detected no chromosomal rearrangement between creeping bentgrass and ryegrass, suggesting that these recently domesticated species might be closely related, despite their memberships to different Pooideae tribes. In addition, the genome of creeping bentgrass was compared with the complete genome sequence of Brachypodium distachyon in Pooideae subfamily using both sequences of the above-mentioned mapped EST-RFLP markers and sequences of 8,470 publicly available A. stolonifera ESTs (AgEST). We discovered large-scale chromosomal rearrangements on six LGs of creeping bentgrass relative to B. distachyon. Also, a total of 24 syntenic blocks based on 678 orthologus loci were identified between these two grass species. The EST orthologs can be utilized in further comparative mapping of Pooideae species. These results will be useful for genetic improvement of Agrostis species and will provide a better understanding of evolution within Pooideae species.

  11. Genetic analysis of anther culture response in wheat carrying alien translocations.

    PubMed

    Sibikeeva, Y E; Sibikeev, S N

    1996-05-01

    A bread wheat cultivar, 'Saratovskaya 29', (S29), its nearly isogenic lines carrying alien translocations [Lr9 from Aegilops umbellulata (Eg29) and (Lr19) from Agropyron elongatum (Ps29)] and two F1 hybrids between three nearly isogenic lines of S29 that differed by the Lr19+Rht1,Pro1+Pro2 and Ppd1+Ppd2 gene complexes, namely the S29 (Lr19+Rht1)/S29 (Ppd1+Ppd2) F1 and the S29 (Pro1+Pro2)/S29 (Lr19+Rht1) F1 were studied for their culture response with the following results. (1) Translocations with Lr9 and Lr19 decreased embryo frequency and green plant regeneration. (2) Both F1 hybrids showed a decrease in embryo frequency. One of the F1 hybrids, S29 (Lr19+Rht1)/S29 (Ppd1+Ppd2) showed a decrease, with respect to S29 for green plant regeneration; the other F1 S29 (Pro1+Pro2)/S29 (Lr19+Rht1), equalled S29 for green plant regeneration. (3) The gene complex of the F1 hybrid S29 (Pro1+Pro2)/S29 (Lr19+Rht1) was better than that of the F1 hybrid S29 (Lr19+Rht1)/S29 (Ppd1+Ppd2) for embryo induction and green plant regeneration. This effect was possibly induced by interactions between the Pro1+Pro2 and Lr19+Rht1 genes or was the result of direct actions of the Pro1+Pro2 genes.

  12. orf260cra, a novel mitochondrial gene, is associated with the homeotic transformation of stamens into pistil-like structures (pistillody) in alloplasmic wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ye; Saraike, Tatsunori; Yamamoto, Yuko; Hagita, Hiroko; Takumi, Shigeo; Murai, Koji

    2008-11-01

    Homeotic transformation of stamens into pistil-like structures (pistillody) can occur in cytoplasmic substitution (alloplasmic) lines of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) that have the cytoplasm of the related species, Aegilops crassa. Previously we showed that pistillody results from altered patterns of expression of class B MADS-box genes mediated by mitochondrial gene(s) in the Ae. crassa cytoplasm. The wheat cultivar Chinese Spring does not show pistillody when Ae. crassa cytoplasm is introduced. The absence of an effect is due to a single dominant gene (designated Rfd1) located on the long arm of chromosome 7B. To identify the mitochondrial gene involved in pistillody induction, we performed a subtraction analysis using cDNAs derived from young spikes of a pistillody line and a normal line. We found that mitochondrial cDNA clone R04 was abundant in the young spikes of the pistillody line but was down-regulated in the normal line that carried nuclear Rfd1. Sequencing of the full-length cDNA corresponding to clone R04 showed that two genes were present, cox I (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I) and orf260(cra). orf260(cra) shows high sequence similarity to orf256, the T. timopheevii mitochondrial gene responsible for cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS). orf260(cra) was also present in the cytoplasms of Ae. juvenalis and Ae. vavilovii, which induce pistillody, but not in the cytoplasms of other species not associated with pistillody. Furthermore, Western blot analysis revealed that the ORF260cra protein was more abundant in the pistillody line than in the normal line. We suggest therefore that orf260(cra) is associated with pistillody induction.

  13. How the nucleus and mitochondria communicate in energy production during stress: nuclear MtATP6, an early-stress responsive gene, regulates the mitochondrial F₁F₀-ATP synthase complex.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Ali Asghar; Ebrahimie, Eemaeil; Taghavi, Seyed Mohsen; Niazi, Ali; Babgohari, Mahbobeh Zamani; Deihimi, Tahereh; Djavaheri, Mohammad; Ramezani, Amin

    2013-07-01

    A small number of stress-responsive genes, such as those of the mitochondrial F1F0-ATP synthase complex, are encoded by both the nucleus and mitochondria. The regulatory mechanism of these joint products is mysterious. The expression of 6-kDa subunit (MtATP6), a relatively uncharacterized nucleus-encoded subunit of F0 part, was measured during salinity stress in salt-tolerant and salt-sensitive cultivated wheat genotypes, as well as in the wild wheat genotypes, Triticum and Aegilops using qRT-PCR. The MtATP6 expression was suddenly induced 3 h after NaCl treatment in all genotypes, indicating an early inducible stress-responsive behavior. Promoter analysis showed that the MtATP6 promoter includes cis-acting elements such as ABRE, MYC, MYB, GTLs, and W-boxes, suggesting a role for this gene in abscisic acid-mediated signaling, energy metabolism, and stress response. It seems that 6-kDa subunit, as an early response gene and nuclear regulatory factor, translocates to mitochondria and completes the F1F0-ATP synthase complex to enhance ATP production and maintain ion homeostasis under stress conditions. These communications between nucleus and mitochondria are required for inducing mitochondrial responses to stress pathways. Dual targeting of 6-kDa subunit may comprise as a mean of inter-organelle communication and save energy for the cell. Interestingly, MtATP6 showed higher and longer expression in the salt-tolerant wheat and the wild genotypes compared to the salt-sensitive genotype. Apparently, salt-sensitive genotypes have lower ATP production efficiency and weaker energy management than wild genotypes; a stress tolerance mechanism that has not been transferred to cultivated genotypes.

  14. Nonhost resistance to rust pathogens – a continuation of continua

    PubMed Central

    Bettgenhaeuser, Jan; Gilbert, Brian; Ayliffe, Michael; Moscou, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    The rust fungi (order: Pucciniales) are a group of widely distributed fungal plant pathogens, which can infect representatives of all vascular plant groups. Rust diseases significantly impact several crop species and considerable research focuses on understanding the basis of host specificity and nonhost resistance. Like many pathogens, rust fungi vary considerably in the number of hosts they can infect, such as wheat leaf rust (Puccinia triticina), which can only infect species in the genera Triticum and Aegilops, whereas Asian soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi) is known to infect over 95 species from over 42 genera. A greater understanding of the genetic basis determining host range has the potential to identify sources of durable resistance for agronomically important crops. Delimiting the boundary between host and nonhost has been complicated by the quantitative nature of phenotypes in the transition between these two states. Plant–pathogen interactions in this intermediate state are characterized either by (1) the majority of accessions of a species being resistant to the rust or (2) the rust only being able to partially complete key components of its life cycle. This leads to a continuum of disease phenotypes in the interaction with different plant species, observed as a range from compatibility (host) to complete immunity within a species (nonhost). In this review we will highlight how the quantitative nature of disease resistance in these intermediate interactions is caused by a continuum of defense barriers, which a pathogen needs to overcome for successfully establishing itself in the host. To illustrate continua as this underlying principle, we will discuss the advances that have been made in studying nonhost resistance towards rust pathogens, particularly cereal rust pathogens. PMID:25566270

  15. Linking global-change induced shifts in soil nitrogen cycling with the abundance of key microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, C.; Eviner, V.; Beman, M.; Hart, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Since western colonization, the ecology of California has seen marked transformations. In particular, invasion of terrestrial ecosystems by exotic plants has altered plant community composition, disturbances, soil hydrologic regimes, and nutrient cycling. In addition, as a result of fertilization and combustion of fossil fuels, California experiences some of the highest nitrogen (N) deposition rates in the country. Land use has also changed with the introduction of domestic livestock grazing about 250 years ago. Currently, approximately 32% of land in California experiences grazing pressure. These ecological changes likely affect the ecosystems of California simultaneously. However, with multifactor global change experiments in their infancy, little is known about potential interactive effects on ecosystem structure and function. Our study measured the response of soil N dynamics to a unique combination of treatments: invasion by exotic plants (Aegilops triuncialis and Taeniatherum caput-medusae), elevated N additions, and simulated cattle grazing (aboveground vegetation removal). In addition, we quantified the abundance of key functional genes involved in nitrification (amoA) and denitrification (nirS/nirK) in order to gain a mechanistic insight into changes in ecosystem functioning. We found that, while responses of soil N pools and processes to global change factors tend to be dominated by main effects, interactions among factors can substantially alter the overall response of the ecosystem. For instance, N additions increased potential nitrification and pools of total inorganic N (TIN; NH4+ and NO3-); when N additions and grazing were combined, however, nitrification potentials and TIN decreased to those of ambient N (control) levels. Additionally, neither N additions nor simulated grazing independently affected soil microbial biomass of invaded plots; yet, when combined, the microbial biomass increased significantly. Our results help to provide a better

  16. What does the 5S rRNA multigene family tell us about the origin of the annual Triticeae (Poaceae)?

    PubMed

    Baum, B R; Edwards, T; Johnson, D A

    2013-05-01

    We have investigated the complex relationships among the annual genera within the tribe Triticeae through phylogenetic analyses of the 5S rRNA multigene family. Cloned sequences were assigned to groups of orthologous sequences, called unit classes, that were subjected to several analyses including BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) searches to assess possible ancestral relationships with perennial genera; phylogenetic analyses using parsimony (Pars), maximum likelihood (ML), and Bayesian methods; and minimum reticulation networks from the Pars, ML, and Bayesian trees. In this study, we included genera with both annual and perennial species, such as Dasypyrum, Hordeum, and Secale. BLAST pointed to Pseudoroegneria (carrier of the St genome) and possibly Thinopyrum (carrier of the J genome) as the potential next of kin. However, Thinopyrum and Pseudoroegneria have never fallen together on the individual trees with the former generally associated with Crithopsis, Aegilops, Triticum, and Dasypyrum, while the latter is usually associated with the rest of the genera within Triticeae. The "long" unit classes placed Dasypyrum breviaristatum together with Dasypyrum villosum, whereas the "short" unit classes put them far apart on the trees. None of the gene trees alone was able to summarize the complex relationships among the genera, in line with previous results in the Triticeae. However, the application of tools designed to display phylogenetic networks was able to depict the complex links among the genera based on the short and the long gene trees, including the close link between Thinopyrum and Pseudoroegneria suggested by the phylogenetic analyses. In addition, our analyses provide support for the hypothesis that at least some annual Triticeae taxa are derived from their perennial relatives.

  17. Production and identification of wheat - Agropyron cristatum (1.4P) alien translocation lines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Hua; Luan, Yang; Wang, Jing-Chang; Wang, Xiao-Guang; Su, Jun-Ji; Zhang, Jin-Peng; Yang, Xin-Ming; Gao, Ai-Nong; Li, Li-Hui

    2010-06-01

    The P genome of Agropyron Gaertn., a wild relative of wheat, contains an abundance of desirable genes that can be utilized as genetic resources to improve wheat. In this study, wheat - Aegilops cylindrica Host gametocidal chromosome 2C addition lines were crossed with wheat - Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. disomic addition line accession II-21 with alien recombinant chromosome (1.4)P. We successfully induced wheat - A. cristatum alien chromosomal translocations for the first time. The frequency of translocation in the progeny was 3.75%, which was detected by molecular markers and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). The translocation chromosomes were identified by dual-color GISH /fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The P genomic DNA was used as probe to detect the (1.4)P chromosome fragment, and pHvG39, pAs1, or pSc119.2 repeated sequences were used as probes to identify wheat translocated chromosomes. The results showed that six types of translocations were identified in the three wheat - A. cristatum alien translocation lines, including the whole arm or terminal portion of a (1.4)P chromosome. The (1.4)P chromosome fragments were translocated to wheat chromosomes 1B, 2B, 5B, and 3D. The breakpoints were located at the centromeres of 1B and 2B, the pericentric locations of 5BS, and the terminals of 5BL and 3DS. In addition, we obtained 12 addition-deletion lines that contained alien A. cristatum chromosome (1.4)P in wheat background. All of these wheat - A. cristatum alien translocation lines and addition-deletion lines would be valuable for identifying A. cristatum chromosome (1.4)P-related genes and providing genetic resources and new germplasm accessions for the genetic improvement of wheat. The specific molecular markers of A. cristatum (1.4)P chromosome have been developed and used to track the (1.4)P chromatin.

  18. Cytoplasmic effects on DNA methylation between male sterile lines and the maintainer in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Ba, Qingsong; Zhang, Gaisheng; Niu, Na; Ma, Shoucai; Wang, Junwei

    2014-10-01

    Male sterile cytoplasm plays an important role in hybrid wheat, and three-line system including male sterile (A line), its maintainer (B line) and restoring (R line) has played a major role in wheat hybrid production. It is well known that DNA methylation plays an important role in gene expression regulation during biological development in wheat. However, no reports are available on DNA methylation affected by different male sterile cytoplasms in hybrid wheat. We employed a methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism technique to characterize nuclear DNA methylation in three male sterile cytoplasms. A and B lines share the same nucleus, but have different cytoplasms which is male sterile for the A and fertile for the B. The results revealed a relationship of DNA methylation at these sites specifically with male sterile cytoplasms, as well as male sterility, since the only difference between the A lines and B line was the cytoplasm. The DNA methylation was markedly affected by male sterile cytoplasms. K-type cytoplasm affected the methylation to a much greater degree than T-type and S-type cytoplasms, as indicated by the ratio of methylated sites, ratio of fully methylated sites, and polymorphism between A lines and B line for these cytoplasms. The genetic distance between the cytoplasm and nucleus for the K-type is much greater than for the T- and S-types because the former is between Aegilops genus and Triticum genus and the latter is within Triticum genus between Triticum spelta and Triticum timopheevii species. Thus, this difference in genetic distance may be responsible for the variation in methylation that we observed.

  19. Genes encoding 4-Cys antimicrobial peptides in wheat Triticum kiharae Dorof. et Migush.: multimodular structural organization, instraspecific variability, distribution and role in defence.

    PubMed

    Utkina, Lyubov L; Andreev, Yaroslav A; Rogozhin, Eugene A; Korostyleva, Tatyana V; Slavokhotova, Anna A; Oparin, Peter B; Vassilevski, Alexander A; Grishin, Eugene V; Egorov, Tsezi A; Odintsova, Tatyana I

    2013-08-01

    A novel family of antifungal peptides was discovered in the wheat Triticum kiharae Dorof. et Migusch. Two members of the family, designated Tk-AMP-X1 and Tk-AMP-X2, were completely sequenced and shown to belong to the α-hairpinin structural family of plant peptides with a characteristic C1XXXC2-X(n)-C3XXXC4 motif. The peptides inhibit the spore germination of several fungal pathogens in vitro. cDNA and gene cloning disclosed unique structure of genes encoding Tk-AMP-X peptides. They code for precursor proteins of unusual multimodular structure, consisting of a signal peptide, several α-hairpinin (4-Cys) peptide domains with a characteristic cysteine pattern separated by linkers and a C-terminal prodomain. Three types of precursor proteins, with five, six or seven 4-Cys peptide modules, were found in wheat. Among the predicted family members, several peptides previously isolated from T. kiharae seeds were identified. Genes encoding Tk-AMP-X precursors have no introns in the protein-coding regions and are upregulated by fungal pathogens and abiotic stress, providing conclusive evidence for their role in stress response. A combined PCR-based and bioinformatics approach was used to search for related genes in the plant kingdom. Homologous genes differing in the number of peptide modules were discovered in phylogenetically-related Triticum and Aegilops species, including polyploid wheat genome donors. Association of the Tk-AMP-X genes with A, B/G or D genomes of hexaploid wheat was demonstrated. Furthermore, Tk-AMP-X-related sequences were shown to be widespread in the Poaceae family among economically important crops, such as barley, rice and maize. © 2013 FEBS.

  20. Exceptionally High Levels of Genetic Diversity in Wheat Curl Mite (Acari: Eriophyidae) Populations from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Szydło, W; Hein, G; Denizhan, E; Skoracka, A

    2015-08-01

    Recent research on the wheat curl mite species complex has revealed extensive genetic diversity that has distinguished several genetic lineages infesting bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and other cereals worldwide. Turkey is the historical region of wheat and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) domestication and diversification. The close relationship between these grasses and the wheat curl mite provoked the question of the genetic diversity of the wheat curl mite in this region. The scope of the study was to investigate genetic differentiation within the wheat curl mite species complex on grasses in Turkey. Twenty-one wheat curl mite populations from 16 grass species from nine genera (Agropyron sp., Aegilops sp., Bromus sp., Elymus sp., Eremopyrum sp., Hordeum sp., Poa sp., Secale sp., and Triticum sp.) were sampled in eastern and southeastern Turkey for genetic analyses. Two molecular markers were amplified: the cytochrome oxidase subunit I coding region of mtDNA (COI) and the D2 region of 28S rDNA. Phylogenetic analyses revealed high genetic variation of the wheat curl mite in Turkey, primarily on Bromus and Hordeum spp., and exceptionally high diversity of populations associated with bread wheat. Three wheat-infesting wheat curl mite lineages known to occur on other continents of the world, including North and South America, Australia and Europe, were found in Turkey, and at least two new genetic lineages were discovered. These regions of Turkey exhibit rich wheat curl mite diversity on native grass species. The possible implications for further studies on the wheat curl mite are discussed. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Genome-wide analysis of short interspersed nuclear elements SINES revealed high sequence conservation, gene association and retrotranspositional activity in wheat.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Smadar; Yaakov, Beery; Kashkush, Khalil

    2013-10-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are non-autonomous non-LTR retroelements that are present in most eukaryotic species. While SINEs have been intensively investigated in humans and other animal systems, they are poorly studied in plants, especially in wheat (Triticum aestivum). We used quantitative PCR of various wheat species to determine the copy number of a wheat SINE family, termed Au SINE, combined with computer-assisted analyses of the publicly available 454 pyrosequencing database of T. aestivum. In addition, we utilized site-specific PCR on 57 Au SINE insertions, transposon methylation display and transposon display on newly formed wheat polyploids to assess retrotranspositional activity, epigenetic status and genetic rearrangements in Au SINE, respectively. We retrieved 3706 different insertions of Au SINE from the 454 pyrosequencing database of T. aestivum, and found that most of the elements are inserted in A/T-rich regions, while approximately 38% of the insertions are associated with transcribed regions, including known wheat genes. We observed typical retrotransposition of Au SINE in the second generation of a newly formed wheat allohexaploid, and massive hypermethylation in CCGG sites surrounding Au SINE in the third generation. Finally, we observed huge differences in the copy numbers in diploid Triticum and Aegilops species, and a significant increase in the copy numbers in natural wheat polyploids, but no significant increase in the copy number of Au SINE in the first four generations for two of three newly formed allopolyploid species used in this study. Our data indicate that SINEs may play a prominent role in the genomic evolution of wheat through stress-induced activation. © 2013 Ben-Gurion University The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Genome-wide analysis of short interspersed nuclear elements SINES revealed high sequence conservation, gene association and retrotranspositional activity in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Ben-David, Smadar; Yaakov, Beery; Kashkush, Khalil

    2013-01-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are non-autonomous non-LTR retroelements that are present in most eukaryotic species. While SINEs have been intensively investigated in humans and other animal systems, they are poorly studied in plants, especially in wheat (Triticum aestivum). We used quantitative PCR of various wheat species to determine the copy number of a wheat SINE family, termed Au SINE, combined with computer-assisted analyses of the publicly available 454 pyrosequencing database of T. aestivum. In addition, we utilized site-specific PCR on 57 Au SINE insertions, transposon methylation display and transposon display on newly formed wheat polyploids to assess retrotranspositional activity, epigenetic status and genetic rearrangements in Au SINE, respectively. We retrieved 3706 different insertions of Au SINE from the 454 pyrosequencing database of T. aestivum, and found that most of the elements are inserted in A/T-rich regions, while approximately 38% of the insertions are associated with transcribed regions, including known wheat genes. We observed typical retrotransposition of Au SINE in the second generation of a newly formed wheat allohexaploid, and massive hypermethylation in CCGG sites surrounding Au SINE in the third generation. Finally, we observed huge differences in the copy numbers in diploid Triticum and Aegilops species, and a significant increase in the copy numbers in natural wheat polyploids, but no significant increase in the copy number of Au SINE in the first four generations for two of three newly formed allopolyploid species used in this study. Our data indicate that SINEs may play a prominent role in the genomic evolution of wheat through stress-induced activation. PMID:23855320

  3. Targeted Introgression of a Wheat Stem Rust Resistance Gene by DNA Marker-Assisted Chromosome Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Zhixia; Klindworth, Daryl L.; Friesen, Timothy L.; Chao, Shiaoman; Jin, Yue; Cai, Xiwen; Xu, Steven S.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome engineering is a useful strategy for transfer of alien genes from wild relatives into modern crops. However, this strategy has not been extensively used for alien gene introgression in most crops due to low efficiency of conventional cytogenetic techniques. Here, we report an improved scheme of chromosome engineering for efficient elimination of a large amount of goatgrass (Aegilops speltoides) chromatin surrounding Sr39, a gene that provides resistance to multiple stem rust races, including Ug99 (TTKSK) in wheat. The wheat ph1b mutation, which promotes meiotic pairing between homoeologous chromosomes, was employed to induce recombination between wheat chromosome 2B and goatgrass 2S chromatin using a backcross scheme favorable for inducing and detecting the homoeologous recombinants with small goatgrass chromosome segments. Forty recombinants with Sr39 with reduced surrounding goatgrass chromatin were quickly identified from 1048 backcross progenies through disease screening and molecular marker analysis. Four of the recombinants carrying Sr39 with a minimal amount of goatgrass chromatin (2.87–9.15% of the translocated chromosomes) were verified using genomic in situ hybridization. Approximately 97% of the goatgrass chromatin was eliminated in one of the recombinants, in which a tiny goatgrass chromosome segment containing Sr39 was retained in the wheat genome. Localization of the goatgrass chromatin in the recombinants led to rapid development of three molecular markers tightly linked to Sr39. The new wheat lines and markers provide useful resources for the ongoing global effort to combat Ug99. This study has demonstrated great potential of chromosome engineering in genome manipulation for plant improvement. PMID:21242535

  4. Prospective evaluation of cisplatin- and carboplatin-mediated ototoxicity in paediatric and adult soft tissue and osteosarcoma patients

    PubMed Central

    NITZ, ALEXANDRA; KONTOPANTELIS, EVANGELOS; BIELACK, STEFAN; KOSCIELNIAK, EWA; KLINGEBIEL, THOMAS; LANGER, THORSTEN; PAULIDES, MARIOS

    2013-01-01

    Platinum-compound chemotherapy is known to have ototoxic side-effects. However, there is a paucity of literature examining hearing function prospectively and longitudinally in cohorts containing paediatric and adult patients treated within the same cisplatin- or carboplatin-containing treatment trial protocols. In Germany, Austria and Switzerland, late effects of treatment for osteosarcoma and soft tissue sarcoma have been prospectively and longitudinally registered by the Late Effects Surveillance System since 1998. The aim of this study was to analyse cisplatin- and carboplatin-induced ototoxity in a group of 129 osteosarcoma and soft tissue sarcoma patients treated within the COSS-96, CWS-96 and CWS-2002P treatment trials. The cohort consisted of 112 children and 17 adults. The median age at diagnosis was 13.56 (IQR, 10.26–16.27) years. Follow-up was 6.97 (IQR, 0.87–15.63) months. Hearing function was examined by audiometry before and after platinum treatment. A total of 108 patients were treated with cisplatin with a median cumulative dose of 360 mg/m2. Thirteen patients received carboplatin with a median cumulative dose of 1500 mg/m2 and 8 patients were treated with both platinum compounds (median cisplatin dose, 240 mg/m2; IQR, 240–360 mg/m2 and median carboplatin dose: 1200 mg/m2; IQR, 600–3000 mg/m2). Following cessation of therapy, 47.3% of the patients demonstrated a hearing impairment, namely 55 children (49.1%) and 6 adults (42.1%). Out of thirteen children treated with carboplatin with a cumulative dose of 1500 mg/m2, six revealed a significant hearing impairment. Although ototoxicity caused by platinum compounds is considered irreversible, we identified hearing improvements over time in 11 children (9.8%) and 3 adults (17.6%). None of these patients received irradiation to the head. We conclude that hearing loss is frequent in children treated with protocols containing platinum compounds and recommend prospective testing via audiometry. PMID

  5. Ethnobotanical investigations on plants used in folk medicine in the regions of Constantine and Mila (North-East of Algeria).

    PubMed

    Ouelbani, Rayene; Bensari, Souheir; Mouas, Toma Nardjes; Khelifi, Douadi

    2016-12-24

    Constantine and Mila regions have been investigated in an ethnobotanical study for the first time. A total of 102 medicinal plants have been cited to treat human ailments. Twenty-eight new species of 31 common plants with 151 new therapeutic applications and 12 new cited species including one endemic specie Zygophyllum cornutum Coss were found as compared to other Algerian regions. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, 369 new medicinal uses of 75 known plants, were reported for the first time in the Mediterranean basin. This study is aimed at contributing to safeguard world cultural heritage and document ethnomedicinal uses of plants in Algeria and the Mediterranean basin; data on the national and global uses in the world were obtained to extract new potential species for further phytochemical and clinical investigations. The survey was carried out in two cities in the northeast of Algeria: Constantine and Mila. It was based on semi-structured interviews of 79 local informants. Data were analyzed using quantitative indices, namely, informant consensus factor, fidelity level (FL), use value (UV), and relative frequency citation (RFC), to evaluate the reliability and richness of herbal knowledge in the region. The interviewed persons used 102 plant species belonging to 90 genera and distributed among 53 families, represented mainly by Lamiaceae, Apiaceae, and Asteraceae (30%, 13%, and 10%, respectively), which were used to treat 14 ailment categories. The category of most frequent ailments (16%) was digestive disorders (diarrhea, constipation, and stomach bloating). The highest RFC was found for Origanum glandulosum Desf. With regard to the fidelity level, a higher FL was found for Tilia cordata Mill. (100%), followed by Artemisia herba alba Asso. with an FL of 95.74% and Punica granatum L. with an FL of 93.09%) to treat gastrointestinal system diseases, and Aloe sp. L. with an FL of 96.67% for skin diseases. The highest UV was found for Origanum glandulosum

  6. Écologie des soins de santé au Canada

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Moira; Ryan, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Présenter un profil populationnel pancanadien des besoins en soins de santé et de leur utilisation, facile d’accès et permettant des comparaisons entre les provinces et avec d’autres instances internationales. Conception Une comparaison des taux d’utilisation des soins de santé entre les provinces en utilisant des données d’enquêtes et des renseignements administratifs sur la santé. Contexte Les provinces du Canada. Principaux paramètres à l’étude Les taux canadiens et provinciaux de personnes en mauvaise santé (présence de problèmes chroniques) et d’utilisation des soins de santé (contacts avec des médecins de famille, avec d’autres médecins spécialistes, avec des infirmières et hospitalisations) sous forme de proportions mensuelles par 1000 habitants normalisées en fonction de l’âge et du genre. Résultats La proportion mensuelle par 1000 habitants de personnes souffrant d’au moins 1 problème chronique variait de 524 au Québec à 638 en Nouvelle-Écosse; les contacts avec un médecin de famille se situaient entre 158 au Québec et 295 en Colombie-Britannique; les contacts avec d’autres médecins spécialistes variaient entre 53 en Saskatchewan et 79 en Ontario; et le nombre de contacts avec des infirmières se situait entre 23 en Colombie-Britannique et 41 au Québec. Le nombre de séjours à l’hôpital variait entre 8 et 11 par 1000 habitants et les proportions étaient semblables d’une province à l’autre. Conclusion Il est essentiel de reconnaître les distinctions entre les provinces pour éclairer les politiques sur la santé dans l’ensemble du pays. Les différences persistaient lorsque les taux étaient normalisés en fonction de la composition démographique variable selon l’âge et le genre dans les provinces. Cet article présente une méthodologie simple à l’aide de données publiquement accessibles qui peut servir dans chaque province à examiner, à l’avenir, l

  7. Genome-wide characterization of JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN transcription repressors in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yukun; Qiao, Linyi; Bai, Jianfang; Wang, Peng; Duan, Wenjing; Yuan, Shaohua; Yuan, Guoliang; Zhang, Fengting; Zhang, Liping; Zhao, Changping

    2017-02-13

    The JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) repressor family proteins are jasmonate co-receptors and transcriptional repressor in jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway, and they play important roles in regulating the growth and development of plants. Recently, more and more researches on JAZ gene family are reported in many plants. Although the genome sequencing of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and its relatives is complete, our knowledge about this gene family remains vacant. Fourteen JAZ genes were identified in the wheat genome. Structural analysis revealed that the TaJAZ proteins in wheat were as conserved as those in other plants, but had structural characteristics. By phylogenetic analysis, all JAZ proteins from wheat and other plants were clustered into 11 sub-groups (G1-G11), and TaJAZ proteins shared a high degree of similarity with some JAZ proteins from Aegliops tauschii, Brachypodium distachyon and Oryza sativa. The Ka/Ks ratios of TaJAZ genes ranged from 0.0016 to 0.6973, suggesting that the TaJAZ family had undergone purifying selection in wheat. Gene expression patterns obtained by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed differential temporal and spatial regulation of TaJAZ genes under multifarious abiotic stress treatments of high salinity, drought, cold and phytohormone. Among these, TaJAZ7, 8 and 12 were specifically expressed in the anther tissues of the thermosensitive genic male sterile (TGMS) wheat line BS366 and normal control wheat line Jing411. Compared with the gene expression patterns in the normal wheat line Jing411, TaJAZ7, 8 and 12 had different expression patterns in abnormally dehiscent anthers of BS366 at the heading stage 6, suggesting that specific up- or down-regulation of these genes might be associated with the abnormal anther dehiscence in TGMS wheat line. This study analyzed the size and composition of the JAZ gene family in wheat, and investigated stress responsive and differential tissue-specific expression profiles of each

  8. SNP Discovery for mapping alien introgressions in wheat

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Monitoring alien introgressions in crop plants is difficult due to the lack of genetic and molecular mapping information on the wild crop relatives. The tertiary gene pool of wheat is a very important source of genetic variability for wheat improvement against biotic and abiotic stresses. By exploring the 5Mg short arm (5MgS) of Aegilops geniculata, we can apply chromosome genomics for the discovery of SNP markers and their use for monitoring alien introgressions in wheat (Triticum aestivum L). Results The short arm of chromosome 5Mg of Ae. geniculata Roth (syn. Ae. ovata L.; 2n = 4x = 28, UgUgMgMg) was flow-sorted from a wheat line in which it is maintained as a telocentric chromosome. DNA of the sorted arm was amplified and sequenced using an Illumina Hiseq 2000 with ~45x coverage. The sequence data was used for SNP discovery against wheat homoeologous group-5 assemblies. A total of 2,178 unique, 5MgS-specific SNPs were discovered. Randomly selected samples of 59 5MgS-specific SNPs were tested (44 by KASPar assay and 15 by Sanger sequencing) and 84% were validated. Of the selected SNPs, 97% mapped to a chromosome 5Mg addition to wheat (the source of t5MgS), and 94% to 5Mg introgressed from a different accession of Ae. geniculata substituting for chromosome 5D of wheat. The validated SNPs also identified chromosome segments of 5MgS origin in a set of T5D-5Mg translocation lines; eight SNPs (25%) mapped to TA5601 [T5DL · 5DS-5MgS(0.75)] and three (8%) to TA5602 [T5DL · 5DS-5MgS (0.95)]. SNPs (gsnp_5ms83 and gsnp_5ms94), tagging chromosome T5DL · 5DS-5MgS(0.95) with the smallest introgression carrying resistance to leaf rust (Lr57) and stripe rust (Yr40), were validated in two released germplasm lines with Lr57 and Yr40 genes. Conclusion This approach should be widely applicable for the identification of species/genome-specific SNPs. The development of a large number of SNP markers will facilitate the precise introgression and

  9. Cloning of a Conserved Receptor-Like Protein Kinase Gene and Its Use as a Functional Marker for Homoeologous Group-2 Chromosomes of the Triticeae Species

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Bi; Chen, Tingting; Cao, Aizhong; Wang, Haiyan; Xing, Liping; Ling, Hongqing; Wang, Daowen; Yu, Chunmei; Xiao, Jin; Ji, Jianhui; Chen, Xueluan; Chen, Peidu; Liu, Dajun; Wang, Xiue

    2012-01-01

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) play broad biological roles in plants. We report on a conserved receptor-like protein kinase (RPK) gene from wheat and other Triticeae species. The TaRPK1 was isolated from the Triticum aestivum cv. Prins - Triticum timopheevii introgression line IGVI-465 carrying the powdery mildew resistance gene Pm6. The TaRPK1 was mapped to homoeologous chromosomes 2A (TaRPK1-2A), 2D (TaRPK1-2D) and the Pm6-carrier chromosome 2G (TaRPK1-2G) of IGVI-465. Under the tested conditions, only the TaRPK1-2G allele was actively transcribed, producing two distinct transcripts via alternative splicing. The predicted 424-amino acid protein of TaRPK1-2G contained a signal peptide, a transmembrane domain and an intracellular serine/threonine kinase domain, but lacked a typical extracellular domain. The expression of TaRPK1-2G gene was up-regulated upon the infection by Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici (Bgt) and treatment with methyl jasmonate (MeJA), but down-regulated in response to treatments of SA and ABA. Over-expression of TaRPK1-2G in the powdery mildew susceptible wheat variety Prins by a transient expression assay showed that it slightly reduced the haustorium index of the infected Bgt. These data indicated that TaRPK1-2G participated in the defense response to Bgt infection and in the JA signaling pathway. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that TaRPK1-2G was highly conserved among plant species, and the amino acid sequence similarity of TaRPK1-2G among grass species was more than 86%. Based on its conservation, the RPK gene-based STS primers were designed, and used to amplify the RPK orthologs from the homoeologous group-2 chromosomes of all the tested Triticeae species, such as chromosome 2G of T. timopheevii, 2R of Secale cereale, 2H of Hordeum vulgare, 2S of Aegilops speltoides, 2Sl of Ae. longissima, 2Mg of Ae. geniculata, 2Sp and 2Up of Ae. peregrina. The developed STS markers serve as conserved functional markers for the identification of

  10. Comparative analysis of mitochondrial genomes between a wheat K-type cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) line and its maintainer line.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huitao; Cui, Peng; Zhan, Kehui; Lin, Qiang; Zhuo, Guoyin; Guo, Xiaoli; Ding, Feng; Yang, Wenlong; Liu, Dongcheng; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Aimin

    2011-03-29

    Plant mitochondria, semiautonomous organelles that function as manufacturers of cellular ATP, have their own genome that has a slow rate of evolution and rapid rearrangement. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), a common phenotype in higher plants, is closely associated with rearrangements in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and is widely used to produce F1 hybrid seeds in a variety of valuable crop species. Novel chimeric genes deduced from mtDNA rearrangements causing CMS have been identified in several plants, such as rice, sunflower, pepper, and rapeseed, but there are very few reports about mtDNA rearrangements in wheat. In the present work, we describe the mitochondrial genome of a wheat K-type CMS line and compare it with its maintainer line. The complete mtDNA sequence of a wheat K-type (with cytoplasm of Aegilops kotschyi) CMS line, Ks3, was assembled into a master circle (MC) molecule of 647,559 bp and found to harbor 34 known protein-coding genes, three rRNAs (18 S, 26 S, and 5 S rRNAs), and 16 different tRNAs. Compared to our previously published sequence of a K-type maintainer line, Km3, we detected Ks3-specific mtDNA (> 100 bp, 11.38%) and repeats (> 100 bp, 29 units) as well as genes that are unique to each line: rpl5 was missing in Ks3 and trnH was absent from Km3. We also defined 32 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 13 protein-coding, albeit functionally irrelevant, genes, and predicted 22 unique ORFs in Ks3, representing potential candidates for K-type CMS. All these sequence variations are candidates for involvement in CMS. A comparative analysis of the mtDNA of several angiosperms, including those from Ks3, Km3, rice, maize, Arabidopsis thaliana, and rapeseed, showed that non-coding sequences of higher plants had mostly divergent multiple reorganizations during the mtDNA evolution of higher plants. The complete mitochondrial genome of the wheat K-type CMS line Ks3 is very different from that of its maintainer line Km3, especially in non

  11. Multigenic phylogeny and analysis of tree incongruences in Triticeae (Poaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Introgressive events (e.g., hybridization, gene flow, horizontal gene transfer) and incomplete lineage sorting of ancestral polymorphisms are a challenge for phylogenetic analyses since different genes may exhibit conflicting genealogical histories. Grasses of the Triticeae tribe provide a particularly striking example of incongruence among gene trees. Previous phylogenies, mostly inferred with one gene, are in conflict for several taxon positions. Therefore, obtaining a resolved picture of relationships among genera and species of this tribe has been a challenging task. Here, we obtain the most comprehensive molecular dataset to date in Triticeae, including one chloroplastic and 26 nuclear genes. We aim to test whether it is possible to infer phylogenetic relationships in the face of (potentially) large-scale introgressive events and/or incomplete lineage sorting; to identify parts of the evolutionary history that have not evolved in a tree-like manner; and to decipher the biological causes of gene-tree conflicts in this tribe. Results We obtain resolved phylogenetic hypotheses using the supermatrix and Bayesian Concordance Factors (BCF) approaches despite numerous incongruences among gene trees. These phylogenies suggest the existence of 4-5 major clades within Triticeae, with Psathyrostachys and Hordeum being the deepest genera. In addition, we construct a multigenic network that highlights parts of the Triticeae history that have not evolved in a tree-like manner. Dasypyrum, Heteranthelium and genera of clade V, grouping Secale, Taeniatherum, Triticum and Aegilops, have evolved in a reticulated manner. Their relationships are thus better represented by the multigenic network than by the supermatrix or BCF trees. Noteworthy, we demonstrate that gene-tree incongruences increase with genetic distance and are greater in telomeric than centromeric genes. Together, our results suggest that recombination is the main factor decoupling gene trees from

  12. Structural analysis of chloroplast DNA in Prunus (Rosaceae): evolution, genetic diversity and unequal mutations.

    PubMed

    Katayama, H; Uematsu, C

    2005-11-01

    In order to understand the evolutionary aspects of the chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) structures in Rosaceous plants, a physical map of peach (Prunus persica cv. Hakuhou) cpDNA was constructed. Fourteen lambda phage clones which covered the entire sequence of the peach cpDNA were digested by restriction enzymes (SalI, XhoI, BamHI, SacI, and PstI) used singly or in combination. The molecular size of peach cpDNA was estimated to be about 152 kb. The gene order and contents were revealed to be equivalent to those of standard type of angiosperms by the localization of 31 genes on the physical map. Eighteen accessions from 14 Prunus species (P. persica, P. mira, P. davidiana, P. cerasis, P. cerasifera, P. domestica, P. insititia, P. spinosa, P. salicina, P. maritima, P. armeniaca, P. mume, P. tomentosa, P. zippeliana, and P. salicifolia) and one interspecific hybrid were used for the structural analysis of cpDNAs. Seventeen mutations (16 recognition site changes and one length mutation) were found in the cpDNA of these 18 accessions by RFLP analysis allowing a classification into 11 genome types. Although the base substitution rate in the recognition site (100p = 0.72) of cpDNA in Prunus was similar to that of other plants, i.e., Triticum-Aegilops, Brassica, and Pisum, it differed from Pyrus (100p = 0.15) in Rosaceae. Seven mutations including one length mutation were densely located within a region of about 9.1 kb which includes psbA and atpA in the left border of a large single-copy region of Prunus cpDNAs. The length mutation was detected only in P. persica and consisted of a 277 bp deletion which occurred in a spacer region between the trnS and trnG genes within the 9.1 kb region. Additional fragment length mutations (insertion/deletion), which were not detected by RFLP analysis, were revealed by PCR and sequence analyses in P. zippeliana and P. salicifolia. All of these length mutations occurred within the 9.1 kb region between psbA and atpA. This region could be an intra

  13. Multigenic phylogeny and analysis of tree incongruences in Triticeae (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Escobar, Juan S; Scornavacca, Céline; Cenci, Alberto; Guilhaumon, Claire; Santoni, Sylvain; Douzery, Emmanuel J P; Ranwez, Vincent; Glémin, Sylvain; David, Jacques

    2011-06-24

    Introgressive events (e.g., hybridization, gene flow, horizontal gene transfer) and incomplete lineage sorting of ancestral polymorphisms are a challenge for phylogenetic analyses since different genes may exhibit conflicting genealogical histories. Grasses of the Triticeae tribe provide a particularly striking example of incongruence among gene trees. Previous phylogenies, mostly inferred with one gene, are in conflict for several taxon positions. Therefore, obtaining a resolved picture of relationships among genera and species of this tribe has been a challenging task. Here, we obtain the most comprehensive molecular dataset to date in Triticeae, including one chloroplastic and 26 nuclear genes. We aim to test whether it is possible to infer phylogenetic relationships in the face of (potentially) large-scale introgressive events and/or incomplete lineage sorting; to identify parts of the evolutionary history that have not evolved in a tree-like manner; and to decipher the biological causes of gene-tree conflicts in this tribe. We obtain resolved phylogenetic hypotheses using the supermatrix and Bayesian Concordance Factors (BCF) approaches despite numerous incongruences among gene trees. These phylogenies suggest the existence of 4-5 major clades within Triticeae, with Psathyrostachys and Hordeum being the deepest genera. In addition, we construct a multigenic network that highlights parts of the Triticeae history that have not evolved in a tree-like manner. Dasypyrum, Heteranthelium and genera of clade V, grouping Secale, Taeniatherum, Triticum and Aegilops, have evolved in a reticulated manner. Their relationships are thus better represented by the multigenic network than by the supermatrix or BCF trees. Noteworthy, we demonstrate that gene-tree incongruences increase with genetic distance and are greater in telomeric than centromeric genes. Together, our results suggest that recombination is the main factor decoupling gene trees from multigenic trees. Our

  14. An Algorithm for Predicting Neonatal Mortality in Threatened Very Preterm Birth.

    PubMed

    Vincer, Michael J; Armson, B Anthony; Allen, Victoria M; Allen, Alexander C; Stinson, Dora A; Whyte, Robin; Dodds, Linda

    2015-11-01

    Objectif : Élaborer un modèle prédictif en ce qui concerne la mortalité néonatale au moyen de renseignements faciles à obtenir au cours de la période prénatale. Méthodes : Nous avons eu recours au modèle de régression logistique multiple d’une cohorte exhaustive, populationnelle et définie géographiquement de nouveau-nés très prématurés (âge gestationnel : de 23+0 à 30+6 semaines) pour identifier les facteurs prénataux permettant de prédire la mortalité au sein de cette population. Les nouveau-nés dont l’âge gestationnel était inférieur à 23 semaines et ceux qui présentaient des anomalies majeures ont été exclus. Résultats : Entre 1996 et 2012, 1 240 enfants nés vivants à moins de 31 semaines de gestation ont été issus de femmes résidant en Nouvelle-Écosse. La baisse de l’âge gestationnel constituait un facteur solide permettant de prédire une hausse du taux de mortalité. Parmi les autres facteurs contribuant de façon significative à la hausse du taux de mortalité, on trouvait l’hypotrophie fœtale, l’oligohydramnios, les troubles psychiatriques maternels, l’antibiothérapie prénatale et les jumeaux monozygotes. La baisse du taux de mortalité néonatale était associée à l’utilisation prénatale d’antihypertenseurs et à l’utilisation de corticostéroïdes (peu importe la durée du traitement) administrés au moins 24 heures avant l’accouchement. Nous avons élaboré un algorithme pour estimer le risque de mortalité sans avoir recours à une calculatrice. Conclusion : La prévision de la probabilité de la mortalité néonatale est influencée par des facteurs maternels et fœtaux. Le fait de disposer d’un algorithme pour estimer le risque de mortalité facilite le counseling et éclaire le processus décisionnel partagé en ce qui concerne la prise en charge obstétricale.

  15. Testing Carbon Monoxide Self-Shielding Model with Laboratory Experiment and Its Implications for the Early Solar System's Oxygen Isotope Evolution Planetary Major Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Qing-zhu

    We propose a laboratory experiment designed to test the carbon monoxide self-shielding (COSS) model to explain the oxygen isotope distribution in the early Solar System materials, arguably one of the most fundamental problems in cosmochemistry today (Wiens et al. 1999; Burnett et al., 2003; 2011; McKeegan and Leshin, 2001; Yin 2004; Young 2007; McKeegan et al. 2011; Marty et al. 2011). Specifically, we propose to experimentally verify if the carbon monoxide (CO) photodissociation at vacuum- ultraviolet (VUV) wavelengths (90-110 nm) would produce the expected mass independent oxygen isotope fractionation as predicted in the recently revived self- shielding model (Clayton 2002; Yurimoto and Kuramoto, 2004; Lyons and Young, 2005). This model has been invoked to explain the peculiar oxygen isotope distribution observed in early solar system materials and has a specific prediction for the Sun's oxygen isotope composition, a top science priority of NASA's GENESIS Discovery Mission (Burnett et al., 2003; 2011). We have developed an experimental set-up and procedures, namely an ultra high-resolution two VUV Laser Photodissociation Photoionization Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry (2VUV-LPP-TOF-MS), that would ensure the experimental conditions are reflective of the solar nebular photochemistry of CO. We describe our design concept and demonstrate our unique capability to perform this timely experiment on all major bands, with data obtained from the 105.17mn band (Band 31) as an example. The proposed experiment will be performed in VUV wavelength range (90-110 nm). An ultra-high resolution VUV laser will be sent across two separated molecular beams in sequence, the first one is for attenuation of light ("shielding") by CO absorption, and the second one is for fragmentation of CO by photodissociation. Following photodissociation of CO, all isotopic photo-fragments will be detected by another spatially overlapped but temporally slightly delayed photoionization VUV laser

  16. Testing Carbon Monoxide Self-Shielding Model with Laboratory Experiment and Its Implications for the Early Solar System's Oxygen Isotope Evolution - Planetary Major Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Qing-zhu

    We propose a laboratory experiment designed to test the carbon monoxide self-shielding (COSS) model to explain the oxygen isotope distribution in the early Solar System materials, arguably one of the most fundamental problems in cosmochemistry today (Wiens et al. 1999; Burnett et al., 2003; 2011; McKeegan and Leshin, 2001; Yin 2004; Young 2007; McKeegan et al. 2011; Marty et al. 2011). Specifically, we propose to experimentally verify if the carbon monoxide (CO) photodissociation at vacuum- ultraviolet (VUV) wavelengths (90-110 nm) would produce the expected mass independent oxygen isotope fractionation as predicted in the recently revived self- shielding model (Clayton 2002; Yurimoto and Kuramoto, 2004; Lyons and Young, 2005). This model has been invoked to explain the peculiar oxygen isotope distribution observed in early solar system materials and has a specific prediction for the Sun's oxygen isotope composition, a top science priority of NASA's GENESIS Discovery Mission (Burnett et al., 2003; 2011). We have developed an experimental set-up and procedures, namely an ultra high-resolution two VUV Laser Photodissociation Photoionization Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry (2VUV-LPP-TOF-MS), that would ensure the experimental conditions are reflective of the solar nebular photochemistry of CO. We describe our design concept and demonstrate our unique capability to perform this timely experiment on all major bands, with data obtained from the 105.17mn band (Band 31) as an example. The proposed experiment will be performed in VUV wavelength range (90-110 nm). An ultra-high resolution VUV laser will be sent across two separated molecular beams in sequence, the first one is for attenuation of light ("shielding") by CO absorption, and the second one is for fragmentation of CO by photodissociation. Following photodissociation of CO, all isotopic photo-fragments will be detected by another spatially overlapped but temporally slightly delayed photoionization VUV laser

  17. A Prospective Cohort Study Using e-Learning Modules as a Supplemental Teaching Resource for Obstetrics and Gynaecology Clerkship Students.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jason; Coolen, Jillian

    2015-09-01

    Objectif : L’accroissement du nombre des inscriptions aux facultés de médecine canadiennes a rendu nécessaire la mise sur pied de sites satellites d’apprentissage clinique pour offrir une expérience clinique adéquate. La faculté de médecine de l’Université Dalhousie compte des sites de stage clinique qui sont distribués d’un bout à l’autre de la Nouvelle-Écosse, du Nouveau-Brunswick et de l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard, lesquels offrent une diversité d’expositions pédagogiques. Cette étude avait pour but d’examiner l’influence des modules d’apprentissage en ligne (élaborés en vue de standardiser l’apprentissage d’un site de stage clinique à l’autre) sur l’acquisition des connaissances par les étudiants de médecine au cours de leur rotation en obstétrique-gynécologie. Méthodes : Les étudiants de troisième année de médecine ont été répartis en deux cohortes naturelles aux fins de cette étude. La rotation en obstétrique-gynécologie des étudiants du groupe 1 s’est déroulée entre septembre 2012 et mars 2013 (n = 54) et celle des étudiants du groupe 2 s’est déroulée entre avril et septembre 2013 (n = 60). Tous les étudiants se sont vu offrir l’occasion de passer un examen formatif en ligne avant leur examen sommatif à choix multiples; seuls les étudiants du groupe 2 ont eu accès à six modules d’apprentissage en ligne en obstétrique-gynécologie (sur lesquels l’examen formatif a été fondé). Résultats : Quarante-sept étudiants du groupe 1 (87 %) et 45 étudiants du groupe 2 (75 %) ont passé l’examen formatif (taux global de participation : 81 %). Aucune différence n’a été constatée en matière de scores médians entre le groupe 1 (score 9, écart interquartile de 8 à 10) et le groupe 2 (score 9, écart interquartile de 8 à 11, P = 0,08). Conclusion : L’accès à six modules d’apprentissage en ligne n’a pas donné lieu à une amélioration des scores des

  18. Antidiabetic, antioxidant and anti inflammatory properties of water and n-butanol soluble extracts from Saharian Anvillea radiata in high-fat-diet fed mice.

    PubMed

    Kandouli, Chouaib; Cassien, Mathieu; Mercier, Anne; Delehedde, Caroline; Ricquebourg, Emilie; Stocker, Pierre; Mekaouche, Mourad; Leulmi, Zineb; Mechakra, Aicha; Thétiot-Laurent, Sophie; Culcasi, Marcel; Pietri, Sylvia

    2017-07-31

    According to Saharian traditional medicine, Anvillea radiata Coss. & Dur. (Asteraceae) has been valued for treating a variety of ailments such as gastro-intestinal, liver and pulmonary diseases, and has gained awareness for its beneficial effect on postprandial hyperglycemia. However, to best of our knowledge, no detailed study of the antidiabetic curative effects of this plant has been conducted yet. To determine the hypoglycemic and antidiabetic effect of dietary supplementation with Anvillea radiata extracts on high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity and insulin resistance in C57BL/6J mice in relation with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, pancreatic beta-cells and skeletal muscle protection, and digestive enzyme inhibiting properties. Six extracts (water soluble and organic) from aerial parts of the plant were analyzed phytochemically (total phenolic and flavonoid content) and screened for in vitro superoxide (by chemiluminescence) and hydroxyl radical (by electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping) scavenging, antioxidant (DPPH, TRAP and ORAC assays), xanthine oxidase, metal chelating, α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory property, and protective effects on copper-induced lipoprotein oxidation. Then selected hydroalcoholic and aqueous extracts were assessed for toxicity in normal human lung fibroblasts and A549 cancer cells using FMCA and MTT assays. Two water-soluble extracts having the best overall properties were assessed for their (i) protective effect at 1-15µg/mL on metabolic activity of rat insulinoma-derived INS-1 cells exposed to hyperglycemic medium, and (ii) acute hypoglycemic effect on 16-weeks HFD-induced diabetic mice. Then diabetic mice were administered HFD supplemented by extracts (up to 150mg/kg/day) for 12 additional weeks using standard diet as control and the antidiabetic drug, metformin (150mg/kg), as positive control. Then the antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of extracts were determined. Of the highly efficient

  19. Molecular mapping of the grain iron and zinc concentration, protein content and thousand kernel weight in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Krishnappa, Gopalareddy; Chaudhary, Swati; Ahlawat, Arvind Kumar; Singh, Santosh Kumar; Shukla, Ram Bihari; Jaiswal, Jai Prakash; Singh, Gyanendra Pratap; Solanki, Ishwar Singh

    2017-01-01

    Genomic regions responsible for accumulation of grain iron concentration (Fe), grain zinc concentration (Zn), grain protein content (PC) and thousand kernel weight (TKW) were investigated in 286 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a cross between an old Indian wheat variety WH542 and a synthetic derivative (Triticum dicoccon PI94624/Aegilops squarrosa [409]//BCN). RILs were grown in six environments and evaluated for Fe, Zn, PC, and TKW. The population showed the continuous distribution for all the four traits, that for pooled Fe and PC was near normal, whereas, for pooled Zn, RILs exhibited positively skewed distribution. A genetic map spanning 2155.3cM was constructed using microsatellite markers covering the 21 chromosomes and used for QTL analysis. 16 quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified in this study. Four QTLs (QGFe.iari-2A, QGFe.iari-5A, QGFe.iari-7A and QGFe.iari-7B) for Fe, five QTLs (QGZn.iari-2A, QGZn.iari-4A, QGZn.iari-5A, QGZn.iari-7A and QGZn.iari-7B) for Zn, two QTLs (QGpc.iari-2A and QGpc.iari-3A) for PC, and five QTLs (QTkw.iari-1A, QTkw.iari-2A, QTkw.iari-2B, QTkw.iari-5B and QTkw.iari-7A) for TKW were identified. The QTLs together explained 20.0%, 32.0%, 24.1% and 32.3% phenotypic variation, respectively, for Fe, Zn, PC and TKW. QGpc.iari-2A was consistently expressed in all the six environments, whereas, QGFe.iari-7B and QGZn.iari-2A were identified in two environments each apart from pooled mean. QTkw.iari-2A and QTkw.iari-7A, respectively, were identified in four and three environments apart from pooled mean. A common region in the interval of Xgwm359-Xwmc407 on chromosome 2A was associated with Fe, Zn, and PC. One more QTL for TKW was identified on chromosome 2A but in a different chromosomal region (Xgwm382-Xgwm359). Two more regions on 5A (Xgwm126-Xgwm595) and 7A (Xbarc49-Xwmc525) were found to be associated with both Fe and Zn. A QTL for TKW was identified (Xwmc525-Xbarc222) in a different chromosomal region on the same

  20. 32nd International Austrian Winter Symposium : Zell am See, the Netherlands. 20-23 January 2016.

    PubMed

    Langsteger, W; Rezaee, A; Loidl, W; Geinitz, H S; Fitz, F; Steinmair, M; Broinger, G; Pallwien-Prettner, L; Beheshti, M; Imamovic, L; Beheshti, M; Rendl, G; Hackl, D; Tsybrovsky, O; Steinmair, M; Emmanuel, K; Moinfar, F; Pirich, C; Langsteger, W; Bytyqi, A; Karanikas, G; Mayerhöfer, M; Koperek, O; Niederle, B; Hartenbach, M; Beyer, T; Herrmann, K; Czernin, J; Rausch, I; Rust, P; DiFranco, M D; Lassen, M; Stadlbauer, A; Mayerhöfer, M E; Hartenbach, M; Hacker, M; Beyer, T; Binzel, K; Magnussen, R; Wei, W; Knopp, M U; Flanigan, D C; Kaeding, C; Knopp, M V; Leisser, A; Nejabat, M; Hartenbach, M; Kramer, G; Krainer, M; Hacker, M; Haug, A; Lehnert, Wencke; Schmidt, Karl; Kimiaei, Sharok; Bronzel, Marcus; Kluge, Andreas; Wright, C L; Binzel, K; Zhang, J; Wuthrick, Evan; Maniawski, Piotr; Knopp, M V; Blaickner, M; Rados, E; Huber, A; Dulovits, M; Kulkarni, H; Wiessalla, S; Schuchardt, C; Baum, R P; Knäusl, B; Georg, D; Bauer, M; Wulkersdorfer, B; Wadsak, W; Philippe, C; Haslacher, H; Zeitlinger, M; Langer, O; Bauer, M; Feldmann, M; Karch, R; Wadsak, W; Zeitlinger, M; Koepp, M J; Asselin, M-C; Pataraia, E; Langer, O; Zeilinger, M; Philippe, C; Dumanic, M; Pichler, F; Pilz, J; Hacker, M; Wadsak, W; Mitterhauser, M; Nics, L; Steiner, B; Hacker, M; Mitterhauser, M; Wadsak, W; Traxl, A; Wanek, Thomas; Kryeziu, Kushtrim; Mairinger, Severin; Stanek, Johann; Berger, Walter; Kuntner, Claudia; Langer, Oliver; Mairinger, S; Wanek, T; Traxl, A; Krohn, M; Stanek, J; Filip, T; Sauberer, M; Kuntner, C; Pahnke, J; Langer, O; Svatunek, D; Denk, C; Wilkovitsch, M; Wanek, T; Filip, T; Kuntner-Hannes, C; Fröhlich, J; Mikula, H; Denk, C; Svatunek, D; Wanek, T; Mairinger, S; Stanek, J; Filip, T; Fröhlich, J; Mikula, H; Kuntner-Hannes, C; Balber, T; Singer, J; Fazekas, J; Rami-Mark, C; Berroterán-Infante, N; Jensen-Jarolim, E; Wadsak, W; Hacker, M; Viernstein, H; Mitterhauser, M; Denk, C; Svatunek, D; Sohr, B; Mikula, H; Fröhlich, J; Wanek, T; Kuntner-Hannes, C; Filip, T; Pfaff, S; Philippe, C; Mitterhauser, M; Hartenbach, M; Hacker, M; Wadsak, W; Wanek, T; Halilbasic, E; Visentin, M; Mairinger, S; Stieger, B; Kuntner, C; Trauner, M; Langer, O; Lam, P; Aistleitner, M; Eichinger, R; Artner, C; Eidherr, H; Vraka, C; Haug, A; Mitterhauser, M; Nics, L; Hartenbach, M; Hacker, M; Wadsak, W; Kvaternik, H; Müller, R; Hausberger, D; Zink, C; Aigner, R M; Cossío, U; Asensio, M; Montes, A; Akhtar, S; Te Welscher, Y; van Nostrum, R; Gómez-Vallejo, V; Llop, J; VandeVyver, F; Barclay, T; Lippens, N; Troch, M; Hehenwarter, L; Egger, B; Holzmannhofer, J; Rodrigues-Radischat, M; Pirich, C; Pötsch, N; Rausch, I; Wilhelm, D; Weber, M; Furtner, J; Karanikas, G; Wöhrer, A; Mitterhauser, M; Hacker, M; Traub-Weidinger, T; Cassou-Mounat, T; Balogova, S; Nataf, V; Calzada, M; Huchet, V; Kerrou, K; Devaux, J-Y; Mohty, M; Garderet, L; Talbot, J-N; Stanzel, S; Pregartner, G; Schwarz, T; Bjelic-Radisic, V; Liegl-Atzwanger, B; Aigner, R; Stanzel, S; Quehenberger, F; Aigner, R M; Marković, A Koljević; Janković, Milica; Jerković, V Miler; Paskaš, M; Pupić, G; Džodić, R; Popović, D; Fornito, M C; Familiari, D; Koranda, P; Polzerová, H; Metelková, I; Henzlová, L; Formánek, R; Buriánková, E; Kamínek, M; Thomson, W H; Lewis, C; Thomson, W H; O'Brien, J; James, G; Notghi, A; Huber, H; Stelzmüller, I; Wunn, R; Mandl, M; Fellner, F; Lamprecht, B; Gabriel, M; Fornito, M C; Leonardi, G; Thomson, W H; O'Brien, J; James, G; Hudzietzová, J; Sabol, J; Fülöp, M

    2016-04-01

    -through reactorS Pfaff, C Philippe, M Mitterhauser, M Hartenbach, M Hacker, W WadsakA22 Influence of 24-nor-ursodeoxycholic acid on hepatic disposition of [18F]ciprofloxacin measured with positron emission tomographyT Wanek, E Halilbasic, M Visentin, S Mairinger, B Stieger, C Kuntner, M Trauner, O LangerA23 Automated 18F-flumazenil production using chemically resistant disposable cassettesP Lam, M Aistleitner, R Eichinger, C ArtnerA24 Similarities and differences in the synthesis and quality control of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE, 177Lu -HA-DOTA-TATE and 177Lu-DOTA-PSMA (PSMA-617)H Eidherr, C Vraka, A Haug, M Mitterhauser, L Nics, M Hartenbach, M Hacker, W WadsakA25 68Ga- and 177Lu-labelling of PSMA-617H Kvaternik, R Müller, D Hausberger, C Zink, RM AignerA26 Radiolabelling of liposomes with 67Ga and biodistribution studies after administration by an aerosol inhalation systemU Cossío, M Asensio, A Montes, S Akhtar, Y te Welscher, R van Nostrum, V Gómez-Vallejo, J LlopA27 Fully automated quantification of DaTscan SPECT: Integration of age and gender differencesF VandeVyver, T Barclay, N Lippens, M TrochA28 Lesion-to-background ratio in co-registered 18F-FET PET/MR imaging - is it a valuable tool to differentiate between low grade and high grade brain tumor?L Hehenwarter, B Egger, J Holzmannhofer, M Rodrigues-Radischat, C PirichA29 [11C]-methionine PET in gliomas - a retrospective data analysis of 166 patientsN Pötsch, I Rausch, D Wilhelm, M Weber, J Furtner, G Karanikas, A Wöhrer, M Mitterhauser, M Hacker, T Traub-WeidingerA30 18F-Fluorocholine versus 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose for PET/CT imaging in patients with relapsed or progressive multiple myeloma: a pilot studyT Cassou-Mounat, S Balogova, V Nataf, M Calzada, V Huchet, K Kerrou, J-Y Devaux, M Mohty, L Garderet, J-N TalbotA31 Prognostic benefit of additional SPECT/CT in sentinel lymph node mapping of breast cancer patientsS Stanzel, G Pregartner, T Schwarz, V Bjelic-Radisic, B Liegl-Atzwanger, R AignerA32 Evaluation of diagnostic value